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Sample records for southernmost scandinavian caledonides

  1. Kinematic stratification in the hinterland of the central Scandinavian Caledonides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilotti, J.A.; Hull, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    A transect through west-central Norway illustrates the changing geometry and kinematics of collision in the hinterland of the central Scandinavian Caledonides. A depth section through the crust is exposed on Fosen Peninsula, comprising three tectonic units separated by two shear zones. The lowest unit, exposed in the Roan window, is a modestly deformed, Caledonian granulite complex framed by a subhorizontal de??collement, with NW-SE oriented lineations and kinematic indicators showing top-to-the-northwest transport. The middle unit, the Vestranden gneiss complex, contains relict granulites, but was penetratively deformed at amphibolite facies to produce an orogen-parallel family of structures during translation on the de??collement. Shallow plunging lineations on steep schistosities are subparallel to fold axes of the dominant, upright, non-cylindrical folds. A small component of sinistral strike slip is also recorded. In contrast, southernmost Fosen Peninsula contains an abundance of cover rocks infolded with Proterozoic basement in a fold nappe, with shallow, E-dipping schistosities, down-dip lineations, and orogen-oblique, top-to-the-west shear sense indicators. A NE-striking, sinistral shear zone separates the gneisses from southern Fosen. Deformation in the Scandian hinterland was partitioned both in space and time, with orogen-parallel extension and shear at middle structural levels and orogen-oblique transport at shallower levels. ?? 1993.

  2. Possible types of rotations and translations in the Scandinavian Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamsen, Niels

    1985-06-01

    Folding, faulting and large scale translation nappe movements are well-known classical collision zone features, which are also found in the Scandinavian Caledonides where lateral movements of up to a few hundred kilometres have been suggested. In contrast to this, azimuthal rotations around vertical axes are rarely or never observed geologically. In a few cases, palaeomagnetic data, however, show abnormal directions of the remanent magnetic components, which may indicate vertical axes of rotations. Different types and scales of palaeomagnetic interpretations are classified and discussed in relation to 5 examples from the Scandinavian Caledonides (the Särv nappe, the Lönset dome, the Fongen gabbro, the Sulitjelma gabbro, and the Trollfjord-Komagelv fault), and various models to explain segmental rotations of the crust are suggested.

  3. ICDP Drilling in the Scandinavian Caledonides: the COSC Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhlin, C.; Gee, D. G.; Lorenz, H.; Pascal, C.; Pedersen, K.; Tsang, C.; Parrish, R. R.; Rosberg, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC) project is a multidisciplinary investigation of the Scandian mountain belt. Cenozoic uplift of the Scandes has exposed a lower- to middle-crustal level section through this Himalaya-type orogen, providing unique opportunities to better understand not only the Caledonides, but also on-going orogeny and the earthquake-prone environments of modern mountains belts. COSC will also contribute to our knowledge of mountain belt hydrology, provide the first information about deep thermal gradients for paleoclimate modeling and potential geothermal energy resources, contribute new information about the deep biosphere, and improve our understanding of the Cenozoic uplift history of the Scandes. The drilling program targets the far-traveled (> 400 km) allochthons of the Scandinavian Caledonides and their emplacement across the Baltoscandian foreland basin onto the platform of continent Baltica. Two 2.5 km deep holes are planned. COSC-1, with drilling to be started in the late Spring of 2014, will target the high-grade metamorphic complex of the Seve Nappes (SNC) and its contact to underlying allochthons. COSC-2 will start in the lower thrust sheets, pass through the basal décollement and investigate the character of the deformation in the underlying basement. An international science team, including expertise on Himalaya-Tibet and other young orogens, is running the science program. New high-resolution reflection seismic data provide excellent images of the upper crust, allowing the drilling to also test the origin of the upper crustal reflectivity in this area. The site of COSC-1 is based on a 3D geological model, constructed from surface geology, recent and vintage regional reflection seismic profiles, regional and local gravity data, and high-resolution aeromagnetics, acquired recently by the Geological Survey of Sweden. The drilling will be carried out utilizing the new Swedish scientific drilling

  4. ICDP drilling in the Scandinavian Caledonides: the SDDP-COSC project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Henning; Juhlin, Christopher; Gee, David; Pascal, Christophe; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Pedersen, Karsten; Rosberg, Jan-Erik

    2013-04-01

    The Swedish Deep Drilling Program (SDDP) Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC) project is a multidisciplinary investigation of the Scandian mountain belt. Cenozoic uplift of the Scandes has exposed a lower- to middle-crustal level section through this Himalaya-type orogen, providing unique opportunities to better understand not only the Caledonides, but also on-going orogeny and the earthquake-prone environments of modern mountains belts. COSC will also contribute to our knowledge of mountain belt hydrology, provide the first information about deep thermal gradients for paleoclimate modeling and potential geothermal energy resources, contribute new information about the deep biosphere, and improve our understanding of the Cenozoic uplift history of the Scandes. The drilling program targets the far-traveled (> 400 km) allochthons of the Scandinavian Caledonides and their emplacement across the Baltoscandian foreland basin onto the platform of continent Baltica. Two 2.5 km deep holes are planned. COSC-1, to be drilled in the summer of 2013, will target the high-grade metamorphic complex of the Seve Nappes (SNC) and its contact to underlying allochthons. COSC-2 will start in the lower thrust sheets, pass through the basal décollement and investigate the character of the deformation in the underlying basement. An international science team, including expertise on Himalaya-Tibet and other young orogens, is running the science program. New high-resolution reflection seismic data provide excellent images of the upper crust. Alternative interpretations of the reflectors' origin, particularly those in the basement, will be tested. The site of COSC-1 is based on a 3D geological model, constructed from surface geology, recent and vintage regional reflection seismic profiles, regional and local gravity data, and high-resolution aeromagnetics, acquired recently by the Geological Survey of Sweden. The drilling will be carried out utilising the new Swedish

  5. The uplift magnetisation record in the central scandinavian caledonides: results from basic igneous complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piper, J. D. A.; Poppleton, T. J.; Mason, R.; Griffiths, A. J.

    1990-11-01

    To identify the palaeomagnetic record acquired during slow post-orogenic uplift and cooling in the central part of the Scandinavian Caledonides we have investigated four separated synorogenic basic complexes in the Middle and Upper Allochthons. A shallow N-S axis of magnetisation is common to three of these bodies and therefore postdates all major tectonism. It is defined in the Møsjoen Gabbro ( D/I = 7°/3°, N = 23 samples, α 95 = 5.0° ), in the Sulitjelma Gabbro ( D/I=20°/-9°, N = 22 samples, α 95 = 6.6° )and the Råna norite ( D/I = 9°/-16°, N=19 samples, α 95 = 7.9° ). No vestige of this uplift remanence is recognised in the Lyngen Ophiolite, where a characteristic remanence of D/I = 65°/43° ( N = 19 samples, α 95 = 10.6° ) is recorded. The possibility that the N-S shallow axis of magnetisation is of mid-Carboniferous age, is considered and rejected. Instead it is attributed to the interval of post-tectonic cooling of the Caledonian nappe pile between synorogenic events dated ca.. 420 Ma and the uplift to surface levels defined by later Devonian events. It corresponds closely to an axis of magnetisation extensively represented within the metamorphic Caledonides and Scotland and believed to record a post-tectonic thermochemical event. Subordinate components record Mesozoic overprinting events and relict Caledonian magnetisations which have escaped replacement during this thermo-tectonic event. The latter collectively imply a rapid movement from high to low palaeolatitudes in Late Ordovician and Early Silurian times.

  6. The upper crust of the Scandinavian Caledonides as seen by Magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ping; Garcia Juanatey, Maria A.; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Juhlin, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    As part of the Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC) project, broadband magnetotelluric (MT) data were acquired along a 60 km long profile following recent seismic reflection surveys. In total, 78 MT sites were installed with an inter-site spacing varying between 600 and 1000 m. The aims of this study are to provide resistivity information on the upper crust of the mountain belt and, together with other geophysical investigations, to better delineate the structures of the orogen and the processes that shaped it. Additionally, the MT data are expected to help determine the location of a future borehole, COSC-2. COSC-2 is planned to drill through the décollement zone associated to the graphitic rich alum shales. Since these shales are highly conductive, they are an excellent target for the MT method. Besides the long MT profile, one short profile with 5 stations was acquired nearby the already existing COSC-1 drill site to increase areal coverage and better constrain 3D resistivity structures. The new 3D information improves the existing 3D geological model around the borehole, that has been interpreted from seismic reflection and potential field data. The impedance functions were calculated using a robust statistical procedure and the remote reference technique. MT data from Norway recorded at the same time in a field campaign by Oulu University were used for remote referencing. The data quality of the obtained transfer functions varies along the profile, being very good in remote areas, but quite noisy close to cities. Thus, a careful selection of the data set was necessary prior to analysis and modelling. 2D resistivity models of the 60 km long profile were estimated through inversion using the determinant of the impedance tensor, the TE mode, the TM mode, and the combination of TE and TM modes. The main features shared by the models are a resistor lying beneath COSC-1 extending down to about 2 km depth, a shallow resistor further to the east

  7. ICDP drilling in the Scandinavian Caledonides: Preliminary results from COSC-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhlin, Christopher; Lorenz, Henning; Almqvist, Bjarne; Gee, David; Pascal, Christophe; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Pedersen, Karsten; Roberts, Nick; Rosberg, Jan-Erik

    2015-04-01

    The Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC) project is a multidisciplinary investigation of the Scandian mountain belt. Cenozoic uplift of the Scandes has exposed a lower- to middle-crustal level section through this Himalaya-type orogen, providing unique opportunities to better understand not only the Caledonides, but also on-going orogeny and the earthquake-prone environments of modern mountains belts. COSC will also contribute to our knowledge of mountain belt hydrology, provide new data on deep thermal gradients for paleoclimate modeling and potential geothermal energy resources of the area, contribute new information about the deep biosphere, and improve our understanding of the geophysical response of the sub-surface. Two 2.5 km deep fully cored holes will help achieve these goals with the first one, COSC-1, completed in late August 2014. COSC-1 targeted the high-grade metamorphic complex of the Seve Nappes (SNC) and the contact with the underlying allochthon. Drilling was performed using an Atlas Copco CT20 diamond core-drilling rig, operated by Lund University, that resulted in nearly 100% core recovery to 2.5 km depth. A crew of 6 on-site researchers examined the core as it came up and performed on-site documentation of it; including photography, optical core scanning, physical property measurements and biological sampling. A number of geophysical logging suites were run during and after completion of drilling, including sonic, density, electric, temperature and acoustic televiewer logs. A near four week long seismic acquisition program followed in the Fall of 2014 with combined surface and borehole surveys in the vicinity of COSC-1. On-site core analysis indicates that the SNC is about 2 km thick (the lower boundary is not well defined), consisting mainly of gneisses and amphibolites. A zone of extensive shearing is found in the lowermost 500 m of the borehole. Metamorphosed sandstones intercalated with garnetiferous mylonites in this

  8. Online drilling mud gas monitoring and sampling during drilling the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersberg, Thomas; Almqvist, Bjarne; Klonowska, Iwona; Lorenz, Henning

    2015-04-01

    The COSC project (Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides) drilled a 2496 m deep hole in Åre (Sweden) to deliver insights into mid-Palaeozoic mountain building processes from continent-continent collision, to improve our understanding of the hydrogeological-hydrochemical state and geothermal gradient of the mountain belt and to study the deep biosphere in the metamorphic rocks and crystalline basement. COSC was the first slimhole drilling project where online gasmonitoring of drilling mud was conducted during continuous wireline coring. Gas was continuously extracted at the surface from the circulating drilling mud with a gas-water separator, pumped in a nearby laboratory container and analysed in real-time with a quadrupole mass spectrometer for argon, methane, helium, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, oxygen, hydrogen, and krypton. Gas samples were taken from the gas line for laboratory studies on chemical composition of hydrocarbons, noble gas isotopes and stable isotopes. Every drill core created a gas peak identified in the drilling mud ~20-30 min after core arrival at the surface. With known core depth and surface arrival time, these gas peaks could be attributed to depth. As a result, nearly complete gas depth profiles at three meter intervals were obtained from 662 m (installation of the gas-water separator) to 2490 m depth. Maximum concentrations of non-atmospheric gasses in drilling mud were ~200 ppmv helium, ~300 ppmv methane and ~2 vol-% hydrogen. Helium peaks between ~900 m and 1000 m and correlates with enhanced concentrations of methane. Methane and hydrogen exhibit maximum concentrations below 1630 m depth where helium concentrations remain low. Integration of the drilling mud gas monitoring dataset with data from geophysical downhole logging and core analysis is ongoing to help clarifying provenances and origin of gasses.

  9. Status and targets in the Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almqvist, Bjarne; Juhlin, Christopher; Lorenz, Henning; Gee, David; Pascal, Christophe; Tsang, Chin-fu; Pedersen, Karsten; Roberts, Nick; Rosberg, Jan-Erik

    2015-04-01

    The COSC project is a multidisciplinary international project with the aim to provide a deeper understanding of mountain belt dynamics in the Scandinavian Caledonides. Scientific investigations include a range of topics, from understanding the ancient orogeny to the present-day hydrological cycle. Six working groups comprise the project and include 1) tectonics, 2) geophysics, 3) geothermics, 4) hydrology, 5) microbiology and 6) drilling management and technology. This presentation provides an overview of the scientific goals of COSC and the first phase of drilling activities, which took place from April 28 until August 26, 2014 (COSC-1). COSC investigations and drilling activities are focused in central Scandinavia, near Åre (Sweden), where rocks from the mid to lower crust of the orogen are exposed. Rock units of interest include granulite facies migmatites (locally ultra-high pressure), gneisses and amphibolites in the middle allochthon (Seve nappe) that overlie greenschist facies metasedimentary rocks in the lower allochthons (Särv and Jämtlandian nappes). The base of the lower allochthon marks the contact with the autochthonos Precambrian basement. Scientific drilling is a central part of the COSC project, and is motivated from a tectonic viewpoint to obtain (i) better understanding of the exhumation and emplacement of the hot middle allochthon, which may enable comparison with exhumation processes in the Himalaya-Tibet orogen, (ii) a broad understanding of orogeny and deformation in the middle to deep crust and upper mantle of mountain belts, and (iii) constraints on the abundant geophysical data that has been collected in the area. Drilling is divided into two phases, firstly to drill through the high grade Seve nappe into the underlying allochthon. The second phase (COSC-2) will target the tectonostratigraphic units below COSC-1 including the Caledonian décollement and the autochthonos Precambrian basement, and investigate the involvement of the

  10. On protolith-, metamorphic overprint, microstructure and rheology of mineral assemblages in orogenic peridotites of the central Scandinavian Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilio, Mattia; Clos, Frediano; Van Roermund, Herman L. M.

    2013-04-01

    The Scandinavian Caledonides (SC) are a deeply eroded Alpine-type orogenic belt formed by closure of the Iapetus ocean and collision between Baltica and Laurentia (500-380 Ma). The SC consists of a stack of Nappe Complexes (from bottom to top called Lower, Middle, Upper and Uppermost Allochthons) thrusted to the east over the Baltic Shield (Brueckner and Van Roermund, 2004; Gee et al., 2008). Fossil lithospheric mantle fragments, called orogenic peridotites, have been found within the (upper part of) middle, upper and uppermost Allochthons, as well as in the reworked basement gneisses (a.o Western Gneiss Complex (WGC)) along the Norwegian west coast. They occur as isolated lenses that contain diverse mineral parageneses and/or bulk rock compositions. Crustal incorporation of orogenic peridotite is classically interpreted to be the result of plate collisional processes related to orogeny (Brueckner and Medaris, 2000). The WGC and parts of the upper part of the Middle Allochthon (a.o. Seve Nappe Complex (SNC) in N Jämtland/S Västerbotten, central Sweden), are well known for the occurrence of high (HP) and ultrahigh pressure (UHP) metamorphic terranes (of Caledonian age). The (U)HPM evidence clearly demonstrates the deep metamorphic origin of these rocks interpreted to be caused by continental subduction and/or collision. Other metamorphic rocks (of Caledonian age) exposed in allochthonous nappes are solely characterised by greenschist-, amphibolite- and/or MP granulite "facies" mineral assemblages that can be interpreted, in the absence of retrogression, to have formed in less deeply subducted (and/or metamorphic) environments. This duality in metamorphic "facies" allows for a discrimination (at least theoretically) between "deep" versus "shallow" rooted nappes (in central parts of the Scandinavian Caledonides). Conform this reasoning, this duality should also be present within the Caledonian mineral assemblages (= metamorphic overprint) of orogenic peridotites (in

  11. Prograde garnet-bearing ultramafic rocks from the Tromsø Nappe, northern Scandinavian Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravna, Erling J. K.; Kullerud, Kåre; Ellingsen, Edel

    2006-12-01

    Garnet-bearing peridotitic rocks closely associated with eclogite within the Tromsø Nappe of the northern Scandinavian Caledonides show good evidence for prograde metamorphism. Early stages are recognized as inclusions of hornblende and chlorite in the cores of large garnet poikiloblasts. Closer to the garnet rim, clinopyroxene and Cr-poor spinel appear as additional inclusion phases. Four suites of spinel inclusions can be distinguished based on optical properties and chemical composition. The innermost suite (suite 1) has the lowest Cr# and highest Mg#. Further rimward, the spinel inclusions gradually change in composition, with increasing Cr# and decreasing Mg#. Spinel is rare in the matrix, but locally chromitic spinel occurs as larger grains. Garnet poikiloblasts are rimmed by a kelyphite zone consisting of Hbl + Cr-poor Spl or Opx ± Cpx + Cr-poor Spl, and locally an inner zone of Na-rich Hbl + Chl. Matrix assemblage in the garnet-bearing peridotitic rocks is Hbl + Chl + Cpx + Ol ± Cr-rich spinel, defining a strong foliation wrapping around garnets and associated kelyphites. Thin layers of garnet-orthopyroxenite and garnet-hornblende-zoisite-chlorite rocks are presumably coeval with the matrix foliation of the peridotitic rocks. In dunitic to harzburgitic compositions large undulatory grains of Ol + Opx ± Chl + Spl apparently define the maximum- P conditions. This assemblage is succeeded by a recrystallized assemblage of Ol ± Tlc ± Mgs, which in turn is overgrown by strain-free poikiloblasts of orthopyroxene, indicating a temperature increase. This is postdated by Tlc + Ath ± Mgs, and finally serpentine. P- T estimates for the inclusion suites of clinopyroxene and spinel in garnet clearly indicate garnet growth and spinel consumption in a regime of increasing P. The inner suite (suite 1) apparently was in equilibrium with garnet, clinopyroxene and olivine at 1.40 GPa, 675 °C, whereas included spinel with maximum Cr# (suite 4) indicate 2.40 GPa at 740

  12. On protolith-, metamorphic overprint, microstructure and rheology of mineral assemblages in orogenic peridotites of the central Scandinavian Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilio, Mattia; Clos, Frediano; Van Roermund, Herman L. M.

    2013-04-01

    The Scandinavian Caledonides (SC) are a deeply eroded Alpine-type orogenic belt formed by closure of the Iapetus ocean and collision between Baltica and Laurentia (500-380 Ma). The SC consists of a stack of Nappe Complexes (from bottom to top called Lower, Middle, Upper and Uppermost Allochthons) thrusted to the east over the Baltic Shield (Brueckner and Van Roermund, 2004; Gee et al., 2008). Fossil lithospheric mantle fragments, called orogenic peridotites, have been found within the (upper part of) middle, upper and uppermost Allochthons, as well as in the reworked basement gneisses (a.o Western Gneiss Complex (WGC)) along the Norwegian west coast. They occur as isolated lenses that contain diverse mineral parageneses and/or bulk rock compositions. Crustal incorporation of orogenic peridotite is classically interpreted to be the result of plate collisional processes related to orogeny (Brueckner and Medaris, 2000). The WGC and parts of the upper part of the Middle Allochthon (a.o. Seve Nappe Complex (SNC) in N Jämtland/S Västerbotten, central Sweden), are well known for the occurrence of high (HP) and ultrahigh pressure (UHP) metamorphic terranes (of Caledonian age). The (U)HPM evidence clearly demonstrates the deep metamorphic origin of these rocks interpreted to be caused by continental subduction and/or collision. Other metamorphic rocks (of Caledonian age) exposed in allochthonous nappes are solely characterised by greenschist-, amphibolite- and/or MP granulite "facies" mineral assemblages that can be interpreted, in the absence of retrogression, to have formed in less deeply subducted (and/or metamorphic) environments. This duality in metamorphic "facies" allows for a discrimination (at least theoretically) between "deep" versus "shallow" rooted nappes (in central parts of the Scandinavian Caledonides). Conform this reasoning, this duality should also be present within the Caledonian mineral assemblages (= metamorphic overprint) of orogenic peridotites (in

  13. Hyperextension in the Caledonian margin of Baltica and its bearing on the structural and metamorphic evolution of Scandinavian Caledonides (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, T. B.

    2013-12-01

    transitional crust basin with mantle exhumed by hyperextension during the Caledonian Wilson cycle ';kick-off'. Islands formed by serpentinite and clastic serpentinites suggest that hydrated mantle diapirs rose above sea level in the Early Ordovician. A number of solitary peridotites and detrital serpentinites are also typical elements in Seve nappe complex in north-central Sweden and Norway. The Pre-Scandian events affecting the passive Baltican margin show a range of ages and characteristics, but most important are the eclogites of Ordovician age. The oldest (~482 Ma) occur in the northern part of the Seve (Nordbotn). UHP eclogites in Jämtland formed at 446 Ma, and both these occurrences in the Seve are associated with mantle peridotites. In SW Norway, 470-460 Ma eclogites are preserved in continental nappes immediately below the suture near Stavanger. Finally, a lower grade HP-LT Ordovician event (~450 Ma) also dated by unconformable Middle Silurian (Wenlock) sediments has been identified. These pre-Scandian events demonstrate that the margin of Baltica underwent a sequence of geographic and time-separated events in the Ordovician before the Iapetus closed in the Middle Silurian. In this presentation it is suggested that the extension and hyperextension geometry inherited from the Caledonian Wilson-cycle ';kick-off' controlled the sequence of short-lived and local HP-LT events in the Scandinavian Caledonides.

  14. The Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC) Project: Investigating Exposed Middle Crust Through Geological Mapping, Drilling and Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhlin, C.; Almqvist, B. S. G.; Lorenz, H.; Berthet, T.; Hedin, P.; Gee, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    The COSC project aims to provide a deeper understanding of mountain belt dynamics in the Scandinavian Caledonides. Scientific investigations include a range of topics, from understanding the ancient orogeny to the present-day hydrological cycle. Main objectives of the project, from a tectonic viewpoint, are to obtain (i) better understanding of the exhumation and emplacement of the hot middle allochthon, which may enable comparison with exhumation processes in the Himalaya-Tibet orogen, (ii) a broad understanding of orogeny and deformation in the middle to deep crust and upper mantle of mountain belts, and (iii) constraints on the abundant geophysical data that have been acquired in the area. COSC investigations and drilling activities are focused in central Scandinavia, near Åre (Sweden), where rocks from the mid to lower crust of the orogen are exposed. Rock units of interest include granulite facies migmatites (locally ultra-high pressure), gneisses and amphibolites in the middle allochthon (Seve nappe) that overlie greenschist facies metasedimentary rocks in the lower allochthons (Särv and Jämtlandian nappes). The base of the lower allochthon marks the contact with the autochthonous Precambrian basement. To investigate the high grade Seve nappe the COSC-1 borehole was drilled to 2496 m, with almost 100 % core recovery, during summer 2014. The top 1800 m consists mostly of sub-horizontal and shallowly dipping intermittent layers of gneiss and amphibolite, with lesser amounts of calc-silicates, metagabbro, marble and lenses of pegmatite. The first signs of increasing strain appear shortly below 1700 m in the form of narrow deformation bands and thin mylonites. Below c. 2100 m, mylonites dominate and garnets become common. A transition from gneiss into lower-grade metasedimentary rocks occurs between 2345 and 2360 m. The lower part of the drill core to TD is dominated by quartzites and metasandstones of unclear tectonostratigraphic position that are mylonitized

  15. Seismic imaging in the eastern Scandinavian Caledonides: siting the 2.5 km deep COSC-2 borehole, central Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhlin, Christopher; Hedin, Peter; Gee, David G.; Lorenz, Henning; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Yan, Ping

    2016-05-01

    The Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC) project, a contribution to the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP), aims to provide a deeper understanding of mountain belt dynamics. Scientific investigations include a range of topics, from subduction-related tectonics to the present-day hydrological cycle. COSC investigations and drilling activities are focused in central Scandinavia, where rocks from the middle to lower crust of the orogen are exposed near the Swedish-Norwegian border. Here, rock units of particular interest occur in the Seve Nappe Complex (SNC) of the so-called Middle Allochthon and include granulite facies migmatites (locally with evidence of ultra-high pressures) and amphibolite facies gneisses and mafic rocks. This complex overlies greenschist facies metasedimentary rocks of the dolerite-intruded Sarv Nappes and underlying, lower grade Jamtlandian Nappes (Lower Allochthon). Reflection seismic profiles have been an important component in the activities to image the subsurface structure in the area. Subhorizontal reflections in the upper 1-2 km are underlain and interlayered with strong west- to northwest-dipping reflections, suggesting significant east-vergent thrusting. Two 2.5 km deep fully cored boreholes are a major component of the project, which will improve our understanding of the subsurface structure and tectonic history of the area. Borehole COSC-1 (IGSN: http://hdl.handle.net/10273/ICDP5054EEW1001), drilled in the summer of 2014, targeted the subduction-related Seve Nappe Complex and the contact with the underlying allochthon. The COSC-2 borehole will be located further east and will investigate the lower grade, mainly Cambro-Silurian rocks of the Lower Allochthon, the Jamtlandian decollement, and penetrate into the crystalline basement rocks to identify the source of some of the northwest-dipping reflections. A series of high-resolution seismic profiles have been acquired along a composite ca

  16. Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC): Scientific objectives for the planned 2.5 km deep COSC-2 borehole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhlin, Christopher; Anderson, Mark; Dopson, Mark; Lorenz, Henning; Pascal, Christophe; Piazolo, Sandra; Roberts, Nick; Rosberg, Jan-Erik; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2016-04-01

    The Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC) scientific drilling project employs two fully cored boreholes for investigating mountain building processes at mid-crustal levels in a deeply eroded Paleozoic collisional orogen of Alpine-Himalayan size. The two COSC boreholes will provide a unique c. 5 km deep composite section from a hot allochthon through the underlying 'colder' nappes, the main décollement and into the basement of the collisional underriding plate. COSC's unprecedented wealth of geophysical field and borehole data combined with the petrology, geochronology and rock physics information obtained from the drill cores will develop into an integrated model for a major collisional mountain belt. This can be utilized as an analogue to better understand similar modern tectonic settings (Himalaya, Izu-Bonin-Mariana, amongst others) and, thus, advance our understanding of such complex systems and how they affect the (human) environment. COSC investigations and drilling activities are focused in the Åre-Mörsil area (Sweden) of central Scandinavia. The first drill hole, COSC-1, was completed in late August 2014 with near 100% core recovery down to 2.5 km. It targeted the high-grade metamorphic Seve Nappe Complex (SNC) and its contact with the underlying allochthon, investigating how this metasedimentary unit, that was initially deeply subducted during orogeny, was exhumed and then, still hot, emplaced as an allochthon onto the foreland of the underriding plate. COSC-2 will investigate the main Caledonian décollement, which is the major detachment that separates the Caledonian allochthons from the autochthonous basement of the Fennoscandian Shield, and the character of the deformation in the basement. Combined seismic, magnetotelluric (MT) and magnetic data provide control on the basement structure and the depth to the main décollement, believed to be hosted in the carbon-rich highly conductive Alum Shale. Key targets are to understand the

  17. Weakening and strain localization during metamorphic overprint: The example of Arnøya, Scandinavian Caledonides, Northern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Carly; Stünitz, Holger; Jeřábek, Petr

    2015-04-01

    Metamorphic processes such as new mineral growth, changes in mineral composition, and infiltration of water are thought to play an important role in rheological weakening and strain localization in the lower crust. However, the exact mechanisms and extent to which these processes have an effect, are not well understood. The Scandinavian Caledonides in northern Norway offer a unique field laboratory to study pervasively deformed and metamorphosed lower crustal nappes and allow for the comparison of deformation and metamorphic conditions between nappe cores, nappe boundaries, and the transition between the two. The island of Arnøya provides a 20 km-long cross section through the Vaddas, Kåfjord and Nordmannvik nappes, with metamorphic grade increasing upwards from amphibolite to granulite facies, respectively. The nappes display a pervasive foliation associated with a strong NW-SE lineation and top-to-SE shear sense consistent with Caledonian thrust deformation. Nappe boundaries occur as wide (10's of metres) ultramylonite-, mylonite- and schist-bearing shear zones, and have a different mineralogy to internal parts of the nappes. Metapelites and migmatites of the Nordmannvik nappe are kyanite-bearing (high T, high P), and the Kåfjord nappe is composed mainly of homogenous semi-pelite (medium T and P). The Vaddas nappe is more variable and contains interlayered metapsammites, amphibolites and local marbles. A comparison of metapelitic samples from the nappes and the two nappe boundary shear zones show that grain size decreases and degree of mixing of phases increases towards shear zone cores. Also grain size becomes homogeneous towards shear zone cores. All samples show evidence of high temperature dynamic recrystallization of quartz. Quartz within aggregates in nappe rocks have a crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO), while quartz in shear zone rocks shows no CPO, indicating deformation mainly by dislocation creep in the nappes and a switch to diffusion

  18. The Gaissa Nappe, Finnmark, North Norway: an example of a deeply eroded external imbricate zone within the Scandinavian Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, C.; Roberts, D.; Rice, A. H. N.; Gayer, R. A.

    The Lower Allochthon of the Caledonides of Finnmark, northern Norway, is represented solely by the Gaissa Nappe, which is composed of sub-greenschist facies sedimentary rocks of late Riphean to Tremadoc age. The lithostratigraphic sequence has been shortened by thrusting and folding in an ESE direction. Based on mapping and structural profiling east of Porsangerfjord, the Gaissa Nappe can be divided into four structural segments: the Børsely duplex, developed beneath the Kalak Nappe of the Middle Allochthon, is oblique to an imbricate fan, the Munkavarri imbricate zone, east of which is the Guiverassa duplex zone that is partly covered by the Vuonjalrassa thrust sheet. The sole thrust to the Gaissa Nappe is a flat planar surface which truncates the common N-S folds and associated cleavage in the rocks of the Gaissa Nappe. The Vuonjalrassa-Gaissa thrust cuts down section in the transport direction, possibly as a result of early tectonic downwarping. A balanced cross-section and a hanging-wall diagram have been partially restored, indicating that the metasediments of the trailing edge of the Munkavarri imbricate zone have been displaced by 104 km in their ESE translation direction. Taking the sequence west of Porsangerfjord into consideration, an overall contraction of more than 150 km is possible. In the east, it is argued that the basal Gaissa décollement, formerly thought to die out and pass laterally into an unconformity, extends to the northeast beyond the head of Tanafjord. Folds that occur in front of the sole thrust on the Varanger Peninsula imply the presence of a blind thrust. In an orogenic context, the Gaissa Nappe forms a series of imbricated thrust sheets in the external part to the collision belt, produced during the Finnmarkian orogenic event in late Cambrian to early Ordovician time.

  19. Burial and exhumation of high- and ultra high-pressure (U) HP rocks: some lessons on orogenic root-zone dynamics from the Scandinavian Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, T. B.

    2011-12-01

    The Caledonides of southern Norway have some of the best-exposed examples of (U) HP rocks in the world. A regional southeast to northwest metamorphic gradient in eclogite bearing rocks from ~550-600C; 1.8 GPa, to ~800C; >2.8-3GPa is documented in several studies. In addition there are several examples of diamond and majorite-bearing extreme UHP rocks indicating pressures up to 5.5 to 6 GPa (e.g. Van Roermund, 2009). The Proterozoic protoliths of the Western Gneiss Region (WGR) and trailing ends of Caledonian allochthons were deeply buried during the Scandian continental collision at 430-400 Ma. The initial response of the down-going Fennoscandian crust below the Caledonian floor-thrust was brittle failure and coseismic deformation as recorded by eclogite pseudotachylytes and localized high-strain zones (e.g. Austrheim & Boundy 1994). The co-facial brittle and ductile high-strain zones provide important lessons about the mechanism controlling deformation, particularly intermediate depth earthquakes in collision zones (e.g. Labrousse et al. 2010). Restorations of regional SE-NW cross-sections show that burial- and exhumation of coesite eclogites from 90-100 km can be reconciled with the observable structures. The exhumation can be explained by: 1) >50% pure shear vertical shortening at eclogite to amphibolite facies, 2) large-scale (>100 km) rotational deformation along extensional detachments at amphibolite to greenschist facies, 3) upper crustal normal faulting and 4) an average of 15 km erosion (e.g., Andersen et al. 1991). Preservation of the regional metamorphic gradient strongly suggests that the WGR was buried and exhumed as a mostly coherent unit. Within the coesite UHP-domains some occurrences of diamond, majorite and extreme-UHP opx-eclogites suggest pressure anomalies of up to 6 GPa, perturbing the regional metamorphic gradient by very local doubling of the regional P-max. Radiometric ages from the majorite-diamond UHP, coesite UHP and normal eclogites are

  20. Characterization of depositional age and structure of sedimentary successions by U-Pb TIMS and LA-ICP-MS dating of volcanic horizons and detrital zircons: an example from the western Trondheim Nappe Complex, Scandinavian Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasser, Deta; Grenne, Tor; Corfu, Fernando; Eivind Augland, Lars

    2016-04-01

    Revealing the absolute depositional age of non-fossiliferous sedimentary successions represents a long-lasting challenge in Earth Sciences. Lacking age control hampers the correct interpretation of the temporal evolution of depositional systems, and, if deformed, of the architecture of fold-and-thrust belts. Dating of detrital zircons within clastic sedimentary successions has over the past decades become a popular method to approximate the absolute depositional age and to characterize the source areas of such rocks. If combined with other geochronological information, such as dating of contemporaneous volcanic horizons, a much better resolution of the stratigraphy and structure of non-fossiliferous sedimentary successions can be achieved. The western Trondheim nappe complex in the central Scandinavian Caledonides is a classical area in this respect. On top of Late Cambrian to Early Ordovician ophiolitic fragments, various volcanic, volcano-clastic and clastic successions tell a complex story of island-arc formation, ocean closure and continent collision. Several famous fossil horizons indicate deposition during the Middle to Upper Ordovician (ca. 470-445 Ma), but large areas lack an absolute age control and several contrasting stratigraphic schemes and structural interpretations have been presented in the past. In this contribution we present the results of LA-ICP-MS detrital U-Pb zircon dating of clastic horizons as well as U-Pb TIMS zircon dating of volcanic horizons and magmatic clasts in conglomerates in order to characterize the depositional age and structure of the western Trondheim nappe complex in more detail. Together with field observations, including way up criteria, the zircon data enable significant revisions of existing stratigraphic and structural models. At least four (volcano-)sedimentary successions can be distinguished above the ca. 480-485 Ma greenstones: (1) ca. 470-463 Ma shales, limestones and andesitic porphyrites (Hølonda and Fanabekken

  1. Upper mantle and crustal structure of the East Greenland Caledonides: New geophysical evidence and geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffer, C.; Balling, N.; Jacobsen, B. H.; Hejrani, B.; Nielsen, S. B.

    2013-12-01

    The East Greenland and Scandinavian Caledonides once formed a major coherent mountain range, as a consequence of the collision of the continents of Laurentia and Baltica. The crustal and upper mantle structure was furthermore influenced by several geodynamic processes leading to the formation of the North Atlantic passive margins, including the gravitational collapse, extension, rifting and a possible influence by volcanism related to the Iceland hot spot. The landscape and topography were finally shaped by extensive erosion, finding its peak in the quaternary glaciations. Seismological data were acquired in the East Greenland Caledonides by the Ella-Ø-array for a period of two years (2009-2011). The array containing 11 broadband seismometers was situated at approximately 73 °N covering a distance of 270 km from the Greenland Ice Sheet to the Atlantic coast, north of the Iceland Ridge. A Receiver Function study based on an average of 36 events per station reveals a clear eastward dipping high-velocity structure underneath the study area. The geophysical character, supported by synthetic modelling, is consistent with a 10 km thick subducted slab of eclogitized oceanic crust. This might be the key for unravelling of a complex geodynamic setting and development leading to the formation of the Caledonides. The distinct preservation of structures in the upper mantle to depths of 100 km or more, limits the impact of subsequent collision and extension related deformation. In support of this interpretation, we present selected results from on-going detailed studies of the crustal and upper mantle, including a Receiver Function inversion, seismic P-wave travel time tomography and gravity modelling.

  2. Hyperextension in the northern Caledonides: the Gargia nappe in Finnmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corfu, Fernando; Andersen, Torgeir B.

    2015-04-01

    Hyperextension stretches the lithosphere to the breaking point leading to the exhumation of serpentinized upper mantle peridotites, and the development of sedimentary basins and tectonic melange. The products of such processes are well documented along recent passive margins and in the Alps. Melange defines also a prominent nappe units extending along the southern Scandinavian Caledonides, where it is interpreted as the product of extension during formation of Iapetus (Andersen et al. 2012). In western Finnmark, northern Norway, a melange-type assemblage with km-size serpentinite bodies embedded in various metasedimentary rocks, schists and mylonitic units occurs in the Gargia nappe. The nappe overlies an autochthonous basement suite of Early Paleoproterozoic basalts and associated sedimentary rocks and its Neoproterozic sedimentary cover, including a tillite horizon. The Gargia nappe is itself overlain by the Kalak Nappe Complex, which in this region is composed mainly of psammites, likely deposited around 1000 Ma. The Kalak Nappe Complex contains the record of a multistage tectonic evolution with several episodes of magmatism and metamorphism between 900 and 550 Ma that paleogeographically do not fit the Archean to Paleoproterozoic evolution of the underlying autochthon of the Baltic Shield. Because of this recent new information, the postulation, in past decades, of an origin of the Kalak Nappe Complex from the Baltic margin has been problematic. The presence of exhumed mantle serpentinite bodies in the underlying Gargia Nappe, however, provides evidence for a truly allochthonus nature of the overlying nappes. The serpentinite mega-boudins of the Gargia Nappe are embedded in mica schists, hornblende schists, rare marbles, and mylonitic gneisses. Preliminary U-Pb geochronology indicates that the protoliths of the mylonitic gneisses are about 2830 Ma and probably were derived from the deformed basement gneisses, likely of Archean age, in the nappe. The time of

  3. The Silurian to Permian history of a metamorphic core complex in Lofoten, northern Scandinavian Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steltenpohl, Mark G.; Hames, Willis E.; Andresen, Arild

    2004-02-01

    The Lofoten archipelago exposes Precambrian Baltic basement and Caledonian allochthonous sequences within a 1000 km long chain of gravity and magnetic highs and structural culminations along the extended, British and Norwegian continental shelf. Previous regional geophysical studies indicate that post-Caledonian extension and development of the northern Norwegian shelf occurred during broadly defined Carboniferous-Permian, Cretaceous-Jurassic, and early Tertiary events. Structures related to these events are known to young westward. We report field, structural, and 40Ar/39Ar thermochronologic data from rocks exposed in Lofoten that further define the history and style of post-Caledonian extension. The islands of southwest Lofoten also represent the most outboard exposures of Caledonian basement in northern Norway that presumably formed the middle to deep crustal core of the orogen. Metasedimentary rocks and penetratively deformed basement in Lofoten record high-grade Silurian-Devonian metamorphism and top-to-the-east (hereinafter tops-east) thrusting followed by episodes of Late Devonian to Early Carboniferous, tops-west, ductile extension which progressed into oblique left-slip movements. The structural style and timing of Silurian contraction in this area are remarkably similar to that determined for the more forelandward areas on the mainland, ˜120 km to the east, supporting the inference that distal parts of the Baltic continental margin that were once deeply subducted are presently exposed in Lofoten. The timings of post-Devonian structural events that affected rocks in Lofoten are partially constrained by the ages of unconformities and strata known to be preserved in graben flanking the Lofoten culmination. The radiometric age and structural data presented in this study, in combination with stratigraphic constraints, suggest a westward progression through time of extensional deformation over a protracted interval of Silurian to Permian time. The latest, Permian extension in Lofoten is largely characterized by brittle structures that formed at conditions substantially less than 300°C. Compared to the exhumation history of the southern Western Gneiss Region, the depth of Caledonian, continental (A-type) subduction and subsequent unroofing of Lofoten are of lesser magnitude, and the present erosional level remained in the middle crust for a much longer interval of time. The Permian 40Ar/39Ar mineral ages documented in this study are the youngest such ages yet identified in Scandinavia. These ages relate to episodes of deformation and cooling in response to extensional tectonic events that occurred roughly 100 m.y. after comparable effects identified on the Caledonian mainland. Our preferred explanation for the Carboniferous-Permian radiometric ages, structural evolution, and stratigraphic data for Lofoten is that they all developed in the context of a long-lived Cordilleran-style metamorphic core complex.

  4. Diachronous burial and exhumation of a single tectonic unit during collision orogenesis (Sulitjelma, central Scandinavian Caledonides)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Alan P.; Burton, Kevin W.; Westhead, R. Keith

    1994-11-01

    The Sulitjelma fold nappe represents part of a Caledonian marginal basin obducted during the closure of the Iapetus Ocean and collision between Laurentia and Baltica. Metamorphic pressure-temperature (P-T) paths indicate that various parts of the Sulitjelma fold nappe followed characteristic clockwise P-T paths involving prograde burial followed by prograde exhumation and then near-isothermal exhumation prior to cooling. Geochronological results indicate that foreland rocks followed this general P-T path before more hinterlandward rocks, such that foreland rocks underwent exhumation while hinterlandward rocks were still being buried. This is consistent with the fold nappe passing through a collisional orogen; burial and ultimately prograde metamorphism were terminated sequentially by exhumation as a given part of the fold nappe came into contact with the lower plate, basement ramp (Baltica) and was driven upward. Burial, heating, exhumation, and cooling were thus diachronous within a single tectonic unit.

  5. Structure and evolution of the crust beneath the Scandinavian mountain belt from geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, Richard; Ben Mansour, Walid; Ebbing, Jörg; Moorkamp, Max

    2015-04-01

    Geophysical data provides an image of the deep sub-subsurface velocity, density or conductivity structure of mountain belts at the present day. However, that present day structure is the result of the evolution of the mountain belt over a period of time and hence the geophysical image represents the cumulative effects of the development of the mountain belt. The Scandinavian mountain belt has a protracted history. While it is best known from studies of the surface geology for preserving the core of the Scandinavian Caledonides, the crust forming the root of that orogen was involved in earlier Fennoscandian and Sveco-Norwegian mountain building and has subsequently been involved in epeirogenic uplift which has led to the present topographic expression. We present the results of 3 onshore geophysical profiles across the south, central and northern parts of the Scandinavian mountains approximately orthogonal to the strike of the Caledonian orogen. Acquired to look for along strike variations in crustal structure that could be related to epeirogenesis and variations in present day topography, these profiles all show very similar features. Moving from East to West: crust between 42 and 45 km thick with a very high velocity (>7.2 km/s) lower crustal layer up to 10 km thick passes into a region beneath the current mountain range of crust of similar thickness but without the high velocity layer. There is no significant orogenic root preserved which could be associated with the Scandinavian Caledonides. A minor root is present to the east of the present topographic high. There is no evidence for the thrust nappes which dominate the near surface geology having a significant geophysical expression. This picture is consistent with the core of the Scandinavian Caledonides being preserved along the Norwegian coastline (which is broadly consistent with the classic Wilson Cycle model) and the bulk of the crust beneath Norway and Sweden being dominated by basement formed by

  6. COSC-1 - drilling of a subduction-related allochthon in the Palaeozoic Caledonide orogen of Scandinavia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, H.; Rosberg, J.-E.; Juhlin, C.; Bjelm, L.; Almqvist, B. S. G.; Berthet, T.; Conze, R.; Gee, D. G.; Klonowska, I.; Pascal, C.; Pedersen, K.; Roberts, N. M. W.; Tsang, C.-F.

    2015-05-01

    The Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC) scientific drilling project focuses on mountain building processes in a major mid-Palaeozoic orogen in western Scandinavia and its comparison with modern analogues. The project investigates the subduction-generated Seve Nape Complex. These in part under ultra-high-pressure conditions metamorphosed outer continental margin and continent-ocean transition zone assemblages were emplaced onto the Baltoscandian platform and there influenced the underlying allochthons and the basement. COSC-1 is the first of two ca. 2.5 km deep, fully cored drill holes located in the vicinity of the abandoned Fröå mine, close to the town of Åre in Jämtland, central Sweden. It sampled a thick section of the lower part of the Seve Complex and was planned to penetrate its basal thrust zone into the underlying lower-grade metamorphosed allochthon. The drill hole reached a depth of 2495.8 m and nearly 100 % core recovery was achieved. Although planning was based on existing geological mapping and new high-resolution seismic surveys, the drilling resulted in some surprises: the Lower Seve Nappe proved to be composed of rather homogenous gneisses, with only subordinate mafic bodies, and its basal thrust zone was unexpectedly thick (> 800 m). The drill hole did not penetrate the bottom of the thrust zone. However, lower-grade metasedimentary rocks were encountered in the lowermost part of the drill hole together with garnetiferous mylonites tens of metres thick. The tectonostratigraphic position is still unclear, and geological and geophysical interpretations are under revision. The compact gneisses host only eight fluid conducting zones of limited transmissivity between 300 m and total depth. Downhole measurements suggest an uncorrected average geothermal gradient of ~ 20 °C km-1. This paper summarizes the operations and preliminary results from COSC-1 (ICDP 5054-1-A), drilled from early May to late August 2014, and is

  7. A Sm-Nd eclogite and U-Pb detrital zircon study of a probable Baltic HP-UHP metamorphic terrane in the Greenland Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, S. M.; Brueckner, H. K.; Belousova, E. A.; Medaris, L. G., Jr.; Griffin, W. L.; Hartz, E. H.; Hemming, S. R.; Bubbico, R.

    2015-12-01

    Liverpool Land, at the southern tip of the Greenland Caledonides, exposes the small eclogite-facies, peridotite-bearing Tvaerdal complex tectonically juxtaposed against the mid-crustal, high-pressure granulite facies Jaettedal complex. Recent literature supports a Laurentian origin for the Jættedal complex, but the structurally lower Tværdal complex has been tentatively correlated with Baltica. Their juxtaposition raises the possibility of lower plate to upper plate terrane transfer during continental subduction. Pressure-temperature estimates from Tvaerdal eclogites indicate ultrahigh pressure (UHP) metamorphic conditions during recrystallization. Sm-Nd mineral isochrons from the eclogites indicate UHP recrystallization occured ≈400 millions years ago, the same time HP/UHP metamorphism occurred in the Western Gneiss Complex of the Scandinavian Caledonides. Almost half of detrital zircons collected from a modern stream channel within the Tvaerdal complex give LA-ICPMS U-Pb ages of 1.68 and 1.3-0.95 Ma ages, which are dates characteristic of both Baltic and Laurentia. However, none of the detrital zircons give the Archean or ≈1.8 Ga Proterozoic ages that are also characteristic of Laurentia. Most of the remaining detrital zircons from the Tvaerdal Complex give younger U-Pb ages that range between 411-375 Ma which contrast with the older 450-410 Ma ages obtained from the Jaettedal as well as from other gneiss terranes in the southern Greenland Caledonides. The different age patterns provide compelling evidence that the Tvaerdal Complex is indeed an orphaned Baltic Terrane. The Jaettedal complex took part in the lengthy evolution of a compressional continental arc complex along the eastern Laurentian margin during the closure of Iapetus while the Tvaerdal complex was a fragment of the approaching Baltic passive margin. Eclogite-facies metamorphism of the Tvaerdal Complex occurred when Iapetus closed and the edge of Baltica subducted to UHP mantle conditions

  8. A petrological and geochemical study of the Surna Nappe (Seve Nappe Complex?) in the Central Scandinavian Caledonides, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigand, Silvia; Hauzenberger, Christoph; Gasser, Deta

    2016-04-01

    The Seve Nappe Complex, mainly outcropping and investigated in Sweden, comprises relics of Ordovician HP and UHP metamorphic rocks, which were overprinted by upper amphibolite facies metamorphism and anataxis during the Silurian. In Norway, in the hinterland of the Caledonian orogen, rocks of the Surna and Blåhø nappes are generally correlated with the Seve Nappe Complex. However, no detailed metamorphic studies are available from these units to compare it with the Seve Nappe Complex. The Surna and Blåhø nappes are located between the oceanic-derived Støren nappe and the continentally-derived Sætra nappe. Due to a strong post-Caledonian extensional and transtensional overprint and a close proximity to the MTFC (Møre-Trøndelag Fault Complex, a prominent post-Caledonian strike-slip fault complex) investigations of the early metamorphic history of the Surna and Blåhø nappes are challenging. In this contribution we present the results of a petrological and geochemical study of the Surna Nappe, from a ca. 10 km wide transect across this nappe west of Trondheim in Norway. The nappe is lithologically very heterogenous, consisting of quartz-rich mica-schists, amphibole-garnet-mica-schists, amphibolites, calcsilicates as well as pegmatites. Geochemically, the whole rock compositions vary from ultrabasic to acidic, but a distinction between metavolcanic and metasedimentary origin of the lithologies is not always straightforward. Although there are metabasic rocks present they do not show a mineral assemblage with a relic eclogite facies. Garnet occurs in several lithologies and is used together with plagioclase and biotite for conventional geothermobarometry using the TWQ and PET software tools. Additionally, Zr-in-rutile and garnet-biotite thermometers were applied. PT calculations from 18 different samples reveal PT conditions of 600 to 700°C and pressures of 10 to 16 kbar. The elevated phengite content in muscovite (Si up to 3.28) in a few samples may indicate a high pressure evolution of these rocks. Garnet zoning patterns show an evolution of Xgrs from 0.2 in the cores to 0.35 at the rims, Xsps shows a typical bell shape, and all garnets are almandine rich (Xalm = ~0.6). The garnet zoning patterns and thermodynamic modeling results indicate a regional metamorphic prograde PT path reaching upper amphibolite to lower eclogite facies. Even though no classical eclogite facies assemblages in metabasic rocks are encountered in the Surna nappe, PT calculations from more intermediate and acidic lithologies indicate that they experienced elevated pressures of up to lower eclogite facies at some point, strengthening the possible correlation with rock of the less-overprinted Seve Nappe Complex in Sweden.

  9. Constraints on strain rates during large-scale mid-crustal shearing: An example from the basal Vaddas shear zone, northern Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasser, Deta; Stünitz, Holger; Nasipuri, Pritam; Menegon, Luca

    2013-04-01

    The Caledonian orogen in Scandinavia is characterized by large-scale crustal nappe stacks which were emplaced east-/southeast-wards onto the Baltica shield. Whereas original thrust relationships are generally obscured by syn- to post-collisional extensional deformation in the southern and central Scandinavian Caledonides, several large-scale thrust systems are well-preserved in the northern Scandinavian Caledonides in Troms and Finnmark. One example is the mid-crustal Vaddas shear zone, which emplaced the Vaddas nappe on top of the Kalak nappe complex. In this contribution we present a structural, petrological and geochronological analysis of the rocks under- and overlying the Vaddas shear zone in northern Troms, in order to estimate the strain rate associated with thrusting along this major shear zone. The Vaddas nappe above the investigated shear zone consists mainly of Upper Ordovician to Silurian metasediments, which were deposited in a marine environment and which were intruded by voluminous gabbroic intrusions, before they were sheared off from their substratum and transported on top of the Kalak nappe complex during the Caledonian orogeny. PT conditions from one of these gabbroic bodies indicate that the body intruded the metasediments at ~9 kbar (Getsinger et al., subm to G3), which corresponds to a depth of ~34 km. U-Pb SIMS dating of zircons from this gabbro indicate that intrusion occurred at 439±2 Ma. The Vaddas nappe is separated from the Kalak nappe by an at least ~150 m thick, amphibolite-facies shear zone with a subhorizontal fabric and top-to-the-SE shear sense. It has developed within the lowest part of the Vaddas nappe as well as the upper part of the Kalak nappe complex and PT calculations indicate that final shearing occurred at ~450° C and ~6 kbar (depth of ~23 km). U-Pb TIMS dating of titanites, which grow parallel to the shear fabric in the Kalak nappe complex, gives 206Pb/238U ages ranging from 442±1 to 429±1 Ma, indicating that

  10. The Wegener Memorial Expedition to the Greenland Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stüwe, Kurt; Piller, Werner

    2014-05-01

    2012 marked the 100 anniversary of the publication of Alfred Wegeners book: 'Die Entstehung der Kontinente' - which is often hailed as the discovery of continental drift theory in the advent of plate tectonics. Wegener was later appointed as professor for geophysics at the University of Graz in Austria - in part for this discovery. He held this position until his death in Greenland in 1930. In honor of the hundredth anniversary of the 1912 milestone publication, the University of Graz in Austria stages an expedition to Greenland in the spirit of Alfred Wegener, supported by the Austrian Academy of Sciences. The expedition aims predominantly to unravel secrets of the Caledonides of Northeastern Greenland using an extensive sampling program to some of the least explored corners of the orogenic belt. Particular emphasis will be placed on the Hager Bjerg allochthon and its relationship to the hanging wall and footwall units. The expedition will use the unparalleled flexibility of small aircraft that will be piloted by experienced Alaskan bush pilots and brought to Greenland from Alaska for this purpose.

  11. VIEW OF SOUTHERNMOST OF TWO HEAVY WATER STORAGE TANKS, LOCATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF SOUTHERN-MOST OF TWO HEAVY WATER STORAGE TANKS, LOCATED BEHIND SUPPORT COLUMN, WITH ADJACENT PIPING, LEVEL -27’, LOOKING WEST - Physics Assembly Laboratory, Area A/M, Savannah River Site, Aiken, Aiken County, SC

  12. 18. SOUTHERNMOST ARCH TOP AND BUTTRESS, AT TURNING POINT WHERE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. SOUTHERNMOST ARCH TOP AND BUTTRESS, AT TURNING POINT WHERE THE EARTHEN EMBANKMENT MEETS THE CONCRETE ARCH DAM. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Rock Creek Dam, East end of Rock Creek Road, Auburn, Placer County, CA

  13. 4. Front of isolated (southernmost) kiln. Visible through the doorway ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Front of isolated (southernmost) kiln. Visible through the doorway are temporary supports installed in 1986. - Warren King Charcoal Kilns, 5 miles west of Idaho Highway 28, Targhee National Forest, Leadore, Lemhi County, ID

  14. 11. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing northwest. Southernmost ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing northwest. Southernmost span. Plaque was originally located where striped traffic sign is posted. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  15. CONTEXT VIEW FROM SOUTHERNMOST HULETT, SHOWING UNLOADER AND CLEVELAND BULK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTEXT VIEW FROM SOUTHERN-MOST HULETT, SHOWING UNLOADER AND CLEVELAND BULK TERMINAL BUILDINGS IN ASSOCIATION. LOOKING SOUTH. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  16. Shifting Authenticities in Scandinavian Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyndahl, Petter; Nielsen, Siw Graabraek

    2014-01-01

    There has been an ongoing tendency, taking place in the Scandinavian countries from the late 1970s onwards, to expand the repertoires and resources of music as an educational matter, an academic field, as well as an area for support and funding from cultural authorities, organisations and institutions. Here, popular music, jazz, folk music and…

  17. 5. NHP, Water Turbine Section, southernmost steel standpipe base with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. NHP, Water Turbine Section, southern-most steel standpipe base with concrete curbing, constructed in 1908-1909, and turbine shaft entry portals in west wall of Powerhouse Section. View is to the Northeast. - Nunn Hydroelectric Plant, On Madison River, Ennis, Madison County, MT

  18. 6. Elevation view of east side of southernmost end of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Elevation view of east side of southernmost end of building. When joined with photo WA-116-A-7, these photos give a virtually complete elevation view of the east side of the 1896 south section of Building 59. Note that the steep angle of view gives the illusion of a flat roof. For a more accurate depiction of the roof slope, see previous photo's including WA-116-5. - Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Pattern Shop, Farragut Avenue, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  19. The formation processes and isotopic structure of continental crust of the Chingiz Range Caledonides (Eastern Kazakhstan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtyarev, K. E.; Shatagin, K. N.; Kovach, V. P.; Tretyakov, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    According to this paper, the juvenile crust of the Chingiz Range Caledonides (Eastern Kazakhstan) was formed due to suprasubduction magmatism within the Early Paleozoic island arcs developed on the oceanic crust during the Cambrian-Early Ordovician and on the transitional crust during the Middle-Late Ordovician, as well as to the attachment to the arcs of accretionary complexes composed of various oceanic structures. Nd isotopic compositions of the rocks in all island-arc complexes are very similar and primitive (ɛNd(t) from +4.0 to +7.0) and point to a short crustal prehistory. Further increase in the mass and thickness of the crust of the Chingiz Range Caledonides was mainly due to reworking of island-arc complexes in the basement of the Middle and Late Paleozoic volcanoplutonic belts expressed by the emplacement of abundant granitoids. All Middle and Late Paleozoic granitoids have high positive values of ɛNd(t) (at least +4), which are slightly different from Nd isotopic compositions of the rocks in the Lower Paleozoic island-arc complexes. Granitoids are characterized by uniform Nd isotopic compositions (<2-3 ɛ units for granites with a similar age), and thus we can consider the Chingiz Range as the region of the Caledonian isotope province with an isotopically uniform structure of the continental crust.

  20. A seismic tomography study of lithospheric structure under the Norwegian Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejrani, B.; Jacobsen, B. H.; Balling, N.; England, R. W.

    2012-04-01

    A deep lithospheric transition between southern Norway and southern Sweden has been revealed in papers by Medhus et al. (2009,) and Medhus (2010). This lithospheric transition is crossing various tectonic units including the Caledonides.. We address the question of whether this transition continues towards the north along the Caledonian Mountains or not? For this purpose we present new results of relative P-wave tomography for the northern SCANLIPS (SCANdinavia Lithosphere ProfileS) profile across the northern part of the Caledonides combined with data from permanent seismological stations in this area. These results are compared the upper mantle structure obtained by Medhus (2010) and Hejrani et al. (2011) for Caledonian and shield units to the south in southern Norway and Sweden, where the lithospheric transition follows the eastern margin of the Oslo Graben. Crooked line seismic tomography (Hejrani et al., 2011) (optimizes 2D ray coverage under a crooked profile) is used to resolve the details of the transition boundaries in lithosphere structure across the mountains and its relation to the geological surface settings.

  1. Early Eocene uplift of southernmost San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, S.A.; Cox, B.F.

    1989-04-01

    Stratigraphic studies in the southern San Joaquin basin and in the El Paso Mountains of the southwestern Great Basin corroborate a hypothesized early Eocene regional uplift event. Eocene uplift and erosion of the southernmost San Joaquin basin south of Bakersfield were recently proposed because an early Paleogene fluviodeltaic sequence in the El Paso Mountains (Goler Formation) apparently had no seaward counterpart to the southwest. New microfossil data (coccoliths) indicate that marine deposits near the top of the Goler Formation are uppermost Paleocene (nannofossil zone CP8) rather than lower Eocene, as reported previously. These data (1) confirm that the oldest known Tertiary strata south of Bakersfield (Eocene Tejon Formation) are younger than the uppermost Goler Formation and (2) seem to restrict uplift to the earliest Eocene. The authors propose that the uppermost Cretaceous and Paleocene deposits were eroded and the Mushrush trough was cut and filled mainly in response to earliest Eocene uplift. The uplift was transverse to the northwest-trending forearc basin. Thus, it was distinct from late early Eocene (pre-Comengine Formation) regional tilting and uplift, which produced northwest-trending structures. Early Eocene uplift probably played only a minor role in the southward termination of pre-Maastrichtian parts of the forearc basin, which they instead attribute to massive uplift of the southernmost Sierra Nevada during the early(.) Late Cretaceous.

  2. Infection control policies and guidelines--Scandinavian experience.

    PubMed

    Nyström, B

    1991-06-01

    In the Scandinavian countries few regulations govern hospital infection control. In Sweden a common procedure manual is used nationwide, consisting of guidelines covering a wide range of nursing and medical procedures performed by the nursing staff. It is revised every fifth year. A recent enquiry to over 150 wards in some 100 hospitals demonstrated that the manual is widely accepted and used. In the other Scandinavian countries, guidelines and policies on a variety of infection control topics have been published. PMID:1679772

  3. Population genomics of the inbred Scandinavian wolf.

    PubMed

    Hagenblad, Jenny; Olsson, Maria; Parker, Heidi G; Ostrander, Elaine A; Ellegren, Hans

    2009-04-01

    The Scandinavian wolf population represents one of the genetically most well-characterized examples of a severely bottlenecked natural population (with only two founders), and of how the addition of new genetic material (one immigrant) can at least temporarily provide a 'genetic rescue'. However, inbreeding depression has been observed in this population and in the absence of additional immigrants, its long-term viability is questioned. To study the effects of inbreeding and selection on genomic diversity, we performed a genomic scan with approximately 250 microsatellite markers distributed across all autosomes and the X chromosome. We found linkage disequilibrium (LD) that extended up to distances of 50 Mb, exceeding that of most outbreeding species studied thus far. LD was particularly pronounced on the X chromosome. Overall levels of observed genomic heterozygosity did not deviate significantly from simulations based on known population history, giving no support for a general selection for heterozygotes. However, we found evidence supporting balancing selection at a number of loci and also evidence suggesting directional selection at other loci. For markers on chromosome 23, the signal of selection was particularly strong, indicating that purifying selection against deleterious alleles may have occurred even in this very small population. These data suggest that population genomics allows the exploration of the effects of neutral and non-neutral evolution on a finer scale than what has previously been possible. PMID:19368642

  4. Scandinavian neuroscience during the Nazi era.

    PubMed

    Kondziella, Daniel; Hansen, Klaus; Zeidman, Lawrence A

    2013-07-01

    Although Scandinavian neuroscience has a proud history, its status during the Nazi era has been overlooked. In fact, prominent neuroscientists in German-occupied Denmark and Norway, as well as in neutral Sweden, were directly affected. Mogens Fog, Poul Thygesen (Denmark) and Haakon Sæthre (Norway) were resistance fighters, tortured by the Gestapo: Thygesen was imprisoned in concentration camps and Sæthre executed. Jan Jansen (Norway), another neuroscientist resistor, escaped to Sweden, returning under disguise to continue fighting. Fritz Buchthal (Denmark) was one of almost 8000 Jews escaping deportation by fleeing from Copenhagen to Sweden. In contrast, Carl Værnet (Denmark) became a collaborator, conducting inhuman experiments in Buchenwald concentration camp, and Herman Lundborg (Sweden) and Thorleif Østrem (Norway) advanced racial hygiene in order to maintain the "superior genetic pool of the Nordic race." Compared to other Nazi-occupied countries, there was a high ratio of resistance fighters to collaborators and victims among the neuroscientists in Scandinavia. PMID:23786731

  5. Supercontinent Breakup and Reassembly in the Appalachian-Caledonide System: Implications for the Wilson Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldron, J. W. F.; Schofield, D. I.; Reusch, D. N.; Murphy, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    The Appalachian-Caledonide orogen was the first to be interpreted as a zone of plate-tectonic collision. However, Wilson's original question 'Did the Atlantic close and then reopen?' addresses only part of the supercontinent cycle, spanning the transition from closing oceans, through supercontinent assembly, to breakup and ocean spreading. The transition from separation to convergence was not addressed by Wilson, but the initiation of subduction in new oceans remains a poorly understood part of the supercontinent cycle. In the Appalachian-Caledonide system, rifting apparently continued to at least ~550 Ma, producing an ocean with numerous hyperextended margins and microcontinental blocks. These include both peri-Laurentian and peri-Gondwanan terranes; the latter have been grouped into domains characterized by platformal Cambrian environments (east and west Avalonia) and deeper-water successions (Ganderia and Megumia). Isotopic work has shown that west Avalonia represents relatively juvenile continental crust, whereas Ganderia is more evolved; east Avalonia may represent continental basement of intermediate isotopic character. Arcs were present in the developing ocean by 505 Ma, as recorded in parts of the orogen from Maine and Newfoundland, through the British Isles to Scandinavia. Many show juvenile isotopic signatures suggesting that they did not originate on older margins. Some arcs underwent late Cambrian to Early Ordovician interaction with the Laurentian margin, while others were emplaced on peri-Gondwanan crust. Their subsequent histories were complex, involving the opening of back-arc basins within a closing ocean. Paleomagnetic data suggest substantial vertical-axis rotations during closure. These observations, and Wilson's original comparison with the Atlantic, suggest that spontaneous inversion of passive margins is unlikely to have initiated subduction. Instead arc systems entered the newly formed oceans formed by breakup of Rodinia and initiated ocean

  6. Latest Pleistocene and Holocene Glacier Fluctuations in southernmost Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menounos, B.; Maurer, M.; Clague, J. J.; osborn, G.; Ponce, F.; Davis, P. T.; Rabassa, J.; Coronato, A.; Marr, R.

    2011-12-01

    Neoglacial advances in western Canada. Taken together, these data: a) do not support the summer insolation hypothesis for Holocene glacier fluctuations in southernmost Patagonia; b) confirm paleobotanical evidence for a warm, dry early Holocene; and c) suggest that many Neoglacial advances in southernmost Patagonia and western North America were synchronous.

  7. The Ethical Dimensions of Curriculum Leadership in Scandinavian Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norberg, Katarina; Johansson, Olof

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Schooling is a significant tool for fostering future generations, which, in turn, implies that the curriculum is an ethical document. It mirrors the society's notion of what is valuable, useful and necessary from a societal and individual perspective. The purpose of this paper is to address the Scandinavian curricula's ethical framework,…

  8. Scandinavian forensic psychiatric practices--an overview and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Grøndahl, Pål

    2005-01-01

    The Scandinavian countries share a social-democratic and humanistic view in that mentally disturbed offenders should not be punished or sentenced to prison if they are considered unaccountable for their actions. The countries differ, however, for example regarding referrals for medico-legal examinations. This article gives: 1) an overview of the Scandinavian forensic psychiatric practices regarding organization, legislation, resources and use of methods, and 2) a study of forensic psychiatric assessment as they are done in the Scandinavian countries. From each country 20 forensic psychiatric court reports concerning male murderers were examined. Each report was scored in five sections: characteristics of the defendant, setting of the observation, acting professions, methods used and premises for the experts' conclusions. Data were summarized with descriptive measures. Danish and Swedish experts had a more frequent use of tests and instruments than Norwegian experts. Swedish experts used the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale (GAF), and they diagnosed the observant according to DSM-IV. The Scandinavian experts rarely referred to the tests they had applied nor did they refer to any kind of theory or literature as a basis for their conclusion. Only a few reports expressed doubt concerning the validity of the conclusion. Stating all the premises of the forensic psychiatric examination might improve the quality of the reports by doing them more explicit and verifiable. More use of standardized actuarial-based methods and more attention to knowledge about clinical judgmental processes is recommended. PMID:16195105

  9. The structure, stratigraphy, tectonostratigraphy, and evolution of the southernmost part of the Appalachian Orogen

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, M.W.; Atkins, R.L.; Crawford, T.J.; Crawford, R.F. III; Brooks, R.; Cook, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    The southernmost part of the Appalachian Orogen is composed of three stacks of folded thrust sheets, which preserve rocks formed in a variety of environments that virtually spanned the Iapetus Ocean. All of the metamorphism, deformation, and plutonism in the southernmost Appalachians can be related to the movement of the thrust sheets and stacks. Thrusting took place continuously from Early Ordovician through Carboniferous time. An account is given of the origins, assembly, transport, and arrival of the thrust sheets and stacks.

  10. Distribution of garnet grain sizes and morphologies across the Moine Supergroup, northern Scottish Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, Kyle T.; Thigpen, J. Ryan; Law, Richard D.

    2016-04-01

    Garnet is used in a wide range of geologic studies due to its important physical and chemical characteristics. While the mineral is useful for thermobarometry and geochronology constraints and can often be correlated to deformation and fabric development, difficulties remain in making meaningful interpretations of such data. In this study, we characterize garnet grain sizes and crystal morphologies from 141 garnet-bearing metasedimentary rock samples collected from the northern part of the Moine Supergroup in the Scottish Caledonides. Larger, euhedral crystals are indicative of prograde metamorphic growth and are typically associated with the most recent phase of orogenesis (Scandian, ˜430 Ma). Small, rounded ("pin-head") garnets are interpreted as detrital in origin. A subhedral classification is more subjective and is used when garnets contains portions of straight boundaries but have rounded edges or rims that have been altered through retrograde metamorphic reactions. From our collection, 88 samples contain anhedral garnets (maximum measured grain size d = 0.46 ± 0.21 mm), 34 bear subhedral garnets (d = 2.0 ± 1.0 mm), and the remaining 19 samples contain garnets with euhedral grains (d = 4.4 ± 2.6 mm). Plotting the distribution of garnets relative to the mapped thrust contacts reveals an abrupt change in morphology and grain size when traced from the Moine thrust sheet across the Ben Hope and Sgurr Beag thrusts into the higher-grade, more hinterland-positioned thrust sheets. The dominance of anhedral garnets in the Moine thrust sheet suggests that these grains should not be used for peak P ‑ T estimation associated with relatively low temperature (<500 ° C) Scandian metamorphism, as they are likely detrital in origin and contain protolith chemical signatures that would not have been reset due to sluggish diffusivities at greenschist facies temperatures. However, chemical and isotopic data from these grains may provide information into the provenance of

  11. Is the Liverpool Land Eclogite Terrane, Eastern Greenland Caledonides, Baltican, Laurentian, or Both?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brueckner, H. K.; Johnston, S. M.; Belousova, E. A.; Griffin, W. L.; Hartz, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Liverpool land Eclogite Terrane (LLET) is a small (≈200 km2) high pressure metamorphic terrane at the southern tip of the Eastern Greenland Caledonides. Recent publications propose the LLET is a subducted Baltic terrane that underplated the Eastern Greenland Caledonides during the ca. 400 Ma Scandian Orogeny and was stranded in Greenland (Laurentia) during the opening of the Atlantic. However Johnston et al. (2011) proposed the LLET is actually a composite terrane comprised of a mid-crustal, high-pressure (granulite facies) terrane, the Jaettedal Complex, tectonically juxtaposed during the Scandian orogeny against a higher pressure (eclogite-facies), peridotite-bearing, metamorphic terrane, the Tvaerdal complex. The composite Tvaerdal/Jaettedal Terrane (now the LLET) was subsequently exhumed from beneath a Laurentian plutonic continental arc terrane, the Hurry Inlet Complex. U-Pb Precambrian ages from the Tvaerdal Complex obtained by LA-ICPMS from detrital zircons (this study) as well as published zircon dates do not distinctly match the published Proterozoic zircon age patterns of basins and crystalline complexes from either Laurentia or Baltica, therefore not resolving the provenance of the Tvaerdal Complex. However, Paleozoic zircon U-Pb dates (this study and the literature) demonstrate the Tvaerdal Complex underwent relatively short-lived high pressure/ultrahigh pressure metamorphism and subsequent anatectic melting between 415-385 Ma while recent work by Johnston et al. (2014) indicates the Jaettedal Complex underwent an earlier, much longer evolution between 460-412 Ma. The older ages from the Jaettedal coincide with ages obtained from the overlying Hurry Inlet Complex as well as other Greenland igneous terranes suggesting the Jaettedal Complex is a Laurentian terrane involved in the lengthy evolution of a continental arc complex along the eastern Greenland margin during the closure of Iapetus. The paucity of concordant 460-412 ages from the Tvaerdal

  12. Tertiary and Quaternary tectonic faulting in southernmost Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, W.J.; Denny, F.B.; Devera, J.A.; Follmer, L.R.; Masters, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Tertiary and/or Quaternary tectonic faulting is documented in three areas of southernmost Illinois: the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex (FAFC) in Pope and Massac Counties, the Ste. Genevieve Fault Zone (SGFZ) in Alexander and Union Counties, and the Commerce Fault Zone (CFZ) in Alexander County. In the FAFC, faults that strike NE and NNE displace Mounds Gravel (late Miocene to early Pleistocene) and, locally, the Metropolis terrace gravel (Pleistocene; pre-Woodfordian). No Woodfordian or younger deposits are deformed. Faults typically outline narrow, linear grabens that formed under tension with a component of strike slip. North-south to NW-trending vertical faults near the southeast end of the SGFZ displace Eocene sediments. Again, faults outline narrow grabens and show indications of strike slip. Deformed Quaternary sediments have not been observed. The CFZ, which trends northeast, displaces Mounds Gravel in Illinois and units as young as Peoria Silt (Woodfordian) in Missouri. Quaternary movement has been interpreted as right-lateral strike-slip. The CFZ coincides with a subtle gravity and magnetic lineament and seems to reflect a major feature in the basement. Surface expression in Illinois is subtle, but mafic and ultramafic intrusions, hydrothermal alteration and small faults align with the Commerce geophysical lineament. Earthquake foci in Missouri and Illinois lie on or close to the CFZ; some focal mechanisms fit the fault trend. Among these structures, only the CFZ exhibits slip that conforms to the current stress field (principal compressive stress axis E-W to ENE-WSW). Possibly, the stress field changed during Neogene time. Alternatively, high fluid pressures or local stress concentrations may have induced slip on less favorably oriented fractures. Tighter constraints are needed on timing, magnitude, and direction of Neogene displacement. ?? 1997 Elsevier Science B.V.

  13. Tephrochronology of the southernmost Andean Southern Volcanic Zone, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, D. J.; Miranda, C. G.; Moreno, P. I.; Villa-Martínez, R.; Stern, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    Correlations among and identification of the source volcanoes for over 60 Late Glacial and Holocene tephras preserved in eight lacustrine sediment cores taken from small lakes near Coyhaique, Chile (46° S), were made based on the stratigraphic position of the tephra in the cores, lithostratigraphic data (tephra layer thickness and grain size), and tephra petrochemistry (glass color and morphology, phenocryst phases, and bulk-tephra trace element contents determined by ICP-MS). The cores preserve a record of explosive eruptions, since ˜17,800 calibrated years before present (cal years BP), of the volcanoes of the southernmost Andean Southern Volcanic Zone (SSVZ). The suggested source volcanoes for 55 of these tephras include Hudson (32 events), Mentolat (10 events), and either Macá or Cay or some of the many minor monogenetic eruptive centers (MECs; 13 events) in the area. Only four of these eruptions had been previously identified in tephra outcrops in the region, indicating the value of lake cores for identifying smaller eruptions in tephrochronologic studies. The tephra records preserved in these lake cores, combined with those in marine cores, which extend these records back to 20,000 cal years BP, prior to the Last Glacial Maximum, suggest that no significant temporal change in the frequency of explosive eruptions was associated with deglaciation. Over this time period, Hudson volcano, one of the largest and longest lived volcanoes in the Southern Andes, has had >55 eruptions (four of them were very large) and has produced >45 km3 of pyroclastic material, making it also one of the most active volcanoes in the SVZ in terms of both frequency and volume of explosive eruptions.

  14. Where the Caledonides crosses the Grenville: The Grenvillian Glenelg Inlier as an allochthonous pip within a fold-nappe complex in the Scottish Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbendam, M.; Ramsay, J. G.; Leslie, A. G.; Tanner, P. W. G.; Dietrich, D.; Goodenough, K. M.

    2012-04-01

    The Grenvillian (1100 - 990 Ma) and Caledonian (470-420 Ma) orogenies represent pivotal tectonic events in the evolution of Laurentia and Baltica. Significantly, these two orogenic belts lie at a high angle to one another, with an inferred intersection in NW Scotland. This relationship is most readily examined at the Glenelg Inlier of NW Scotland, a basement gneiss inlier within the Scottish Caledonides nappe pile. This inlier contains a Western Glenelg Inlier, composed of orthogneiss with no record of Grenville metamorphism, and a separate Eastern Glenelg Inlier, comprising both ortho-and paragneisses that experienced Grenvillian eclogite-facies metamorphism. The two components of the Glenelg Inlier are interleaved and/or infolded with locally unconformable, basal Moine Supergroup metasediments, deposited (just) after Grenvillian orogenesis. The inlier and the metasediments are now located in the hanging wall of the well-studied Caledonian Moine Thrust. Despite decades of research and classical structural studies, the overall geometry and structural evolution of the Glenelg Inlier and the surrounding Moine metasediments remain elusive. The synthesis presented here is based upon both new, and hitherto unpublished, mapping. The Glenelg Inlier and enclosing Moine were deformed by three generations of major ductile fold structures (F1-F3). In areas of medium strain, away from the basement inliers, F2 and F3 large-scale structures face and verge towards the west, and record coaxial interference patterns. In areas of higher strain, F2 fold axes were rotated into parallelism with the (westerly) transport direction. Subsequent refolding of these F2 folds by west-vergent (N-S trending) F3 folds led in some areas to high-angle, non-coaxial fold interference patterns, including dome-and-basin structures. On structural grounds, both F2 and F3 are thought to be of Caledonian age. An approximate restoration of the F2 and F3 folds reveals the pre-F2 basement-cover architecture

  15. Whole grain foods and health - a Scandinavian perspective.

    PubMed

    Frølich, Wenche; Aman, Per; Tetens, Inge

    2013-01-01

    The food-based dietary guidelines in the Scandinavian countries that recommend an intake of minimum 75 g whole grain per 10 MJ (2,388 kcal) per day are mainly derived from prospective cohort studies where quantitative but little qualitative details are available on whole grain products. The objective of the current paper is to clarify possible differences in nutritional and health effects of the types of whole grain grown and consumed in the Scandinavian countries. A further objective is to substantiate how processing may influence the nutritional value and potential health effects of different whole grains and whole grain foods. The most commonly consumed whole grain cereals in the Scandinavian countries are wheat, rye, and oats with a considerable inter-country variation in the consumption patterns and with barley constituting only a minor role. The chemical composition of these different whole grains and thus the whole grain products consumed vary considerably with regard to the content of macro- and micronutrients and bioactive components. A considerable amount of scientific substantiation shows that processing methods of the whole grains are important for the physiological and health effects of the final whole grain products. Future research should consider the specific properties of each cereal and its processing methods to further identify the uniqueness and health potentials of whole grain products. This would enable the authorities to provide more specific food-based dietary guidelines in relation to whole grain to the benefit of both the food industry and the consumer. PMID:23411562

  16. Whole grain foods and health – a Scandinavian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Frølich, Wenche; Åman, Per; Tetens, Inge

    2013-01-01

    The food-based dietary guidelines in the Scandinavian countries that recommend an intake of minimum 75 g whole grain per 10 MJ (2,388 kcal) per day are mainly derived from prospective cohort studies where quantitative but little qualitative details are available on whole grain products. The objective of the current paper is to clarify possible differences in nutritional and health effects of the types of whole grain grown and consumed in the Scandinavian countries. A further objective is to substantiate how processing may influence the nutritional value and potential health effects of different whole grains and whole grain foods. The most commonly consumed whole grain cereals in the Scandinavian countries are wheat, rye, and oats with a considerable inter-country variation in the consumption patterns and with barley constituting only a minor role. The chemical composition of these different whole grains and thus the whole grain products consumed vary considerably with regard to the content of macro- and micronutrients and bioactive components. A considerable amount of scientific substantiation shows that processing methods of the whole grains are important for the physiological and health effects of the final whole grain products. Future research should consider the specific properties of each cereal and its processing methods to further identify the uniqueness and health potentials of whole grain products. This would enable the authorities to provide more specific food-based dietary guidelines in relation to whole grain to the benefit of both the food industry and the consumer. PMID:23411562

  17. Metamorphism and gold mineralization in the Blue Ridge, Southernmost Appalachians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stowell, H.H.; Lesher, C.M.; Green, N.L.; Sha, P.; Guthrie, G.M.; Sinha, A.K.

    1996-01-01

    Lode gold mineralization in the Blue Ridge of the southernmost Appalachians is hosted by metavolcanic rocks (e.g., Anna Howe mine, AL; Royal Vindicator mine, GA), metaplutonic rocks (e.g., Hog Mountain mine, AL), and metasedimentary rocks (e.g., Lowe, Tallapoosa, and Jones Vein mines, AL). Most gold occurs in synkinematic quartz ?? plagioclase ?? pyrite ?? pyrrhotite ?? chlorite veins localized along polydeformational faults that juxtapose rocks with significantly different peak metamorphic mineral assemblages. Mineralogy, chemistry, and O and H isotope studies suggest that the three types of host rocks have undergone differing amounts and types of alteration during mineralization. Limited wall-rock alteration in metavolcanic- and metasediment-hosted deposits, and relatively extensive wall-rock alteration in granitoid-hosted deposits, suggests that most deposits formed from fluids that were close to equilibrium with metavolcanic and metasedimentary rocks. Stable isotope compositions of the fluids calculated from vein minerals and vein selvages are consistent with a predominantly metasedimentary fluid source, but vary from deposit to deposit (-22 to -47??? ??D, 4-5??? ??18O, and 5-7??? ??34S at Anna Howe and Royal Vindicator; -48 to -50??? ??D, 9-13??? ??18O, and ca. 19??? ??34S at Lowe and Jones Vein; and -22 to -23??? ??D, 8-11??? ??18O, 9-10??? ??34S, and -6 ??13C at Hog Mountain). Silicate mineral thermobarometry of vein, vein selvage, and wall-rock mineral assemblages indicate that mineralization and regional metamorphism occured at greenschist to amphibolite facies (480?? ?? 75??C at Anna Howe, 535?? ?? 50??C at 6.4 ?? 1 kbars at Lowe, 530?? ?? 50??C at 6.9 ?? 1 kbars at Tallapoosa, and 460?? ?? 50??C at 5.5 ?? 1 kbars at Hog Mountain). Oxygen isotope fractionation between vein minerals and selvage minerals consistently records equilibration temperatures that are similar to or slightly lower than those estimated from silicate thermometry. Auriferous veins

  18. Glacial trinity: Neoproterozoic Earth history within the British-Irish Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCay, G. A.; Prave, A. R.; Alsop, G. I.; Fallick, A. E.

    2006-11-01

    Two distinct Neoproterozoic glacial episodes are known for the Dalradian Supergroup in the British-Irish Caledonides, the Port Askaig Formation and the Inishowen Loch na Cille ice-rafted debris (IRD) beds. Here we describe a third, intermediate between those two, the Stralinchy-Reelan formations, composed of diamictite and IRD. Developed directly above these rocks is the Cranford Limestone, which consists of a basal, 1 6-m-thick, tan-gray dolostone overlain by a variably developed, but as much as 340-m-thick, sequence of thin-bedded limestone and dolostone. This unit exhibits a C isotopic trend that begins negative in the basal dolostone, reaches a nadir of -7‰, and then rises to 0‰ 2‰. These characteristics match strikingly those of Marinoan-style cap carbonates. Consequently, we interpret the Port Askaig Formation, the Stralinchy-Reelan units, and the Inishowan Loch na Cille beds as equivalents of the ca. 700 Ma Sturtian, the 635 Ma Marinoan, and the ca. 580 Ma Gaskiers glacials, respectively. Two additional observations are noteworthy. Carbonate rocks below the Port Askaig Formation record a δ13C decline to -6‰ that implies that such downturns may occur in both pre-Sturtian and pre-Marinoan strata. In addition, the Bonahaven Dolomite is not a cap carbonate to the Port Askaig Formation, but exhibits a δ13C rise to 12‰, which we correlate with the inferred global Keele peak. These data further document the utility of Neoproterozoic glacial cap carbonate sequences in global correlations and denote the base of the Cranford Linestone as the Cryogenian-Ediacaran boundary.

  19. Neoproterozoic-Early Paleozoic tectonic evolution of the western part of the Kyrgyz Ridge (Northern Tian Shan) caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtyarev, K. E.; Ryazantsev, A. V.; Tretyakov, A. A.; Tolmacheva, T. Yu.; Yakubchuk, A. S.; Kotov, A. B.; Salnikova, E. B.; Kovach, V. P.

    2013-11-01

    The conducted comprehensive study of the western part of Kyrgyz Ridge provided new data on the structure, composition and age of Precambrian and Early Paleozoic stratified and igneous complexes. The main achievements of these studies are: (1) the establishment of a wide age spectrum, embracing the interval from the Neoproterozoic to the end of the Early Ordovician, for the clastic-carbonate units composing the cover of the Northern Tian Shan sialic massif; (2) the reconstruction and dating of Early and Late Cambrian ophiolite complexes formed in suprasubduction settings;(3) the discovery and dating of the Early-Middle Ordovician volcano-sedimentary complex of island-arc affinity; and (4) proof of the wide occurrence of Late Ordovician granitoids, some of which bear Cu-Au-Mo ores. The intricate thrust-and-fold structure of the western part of the Kyrgyz Ridge, formed in several stages from the Middle Cambrian (?) until the end of the Middle Ordovician, was scrutinized; the importance of the Early Ordovician stage was demonstrated. The intrusion of large batholiths in the early Late Ordovician accomplished the caledonide structural evolution. Formation of Neoproterozoic and Early Paleozoic caledonide complexes, which were possibly related to the protracted and entangled evolution of the active continental margin, ceased by the Late Ordovician.

  20. A Student's Guide to Scandinavian American Genealogy. Oryx American Family Tree Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paddock, Lisa Olson; Rollyson, Carl Sokolnicki

    This book is designed to help the novice in understanding how to conduct genealogical research for Scandinavian ancestors. A brief introduction to each chapter offers ideas on topics for research and resources to consult. Chapters include: (1) "Tracing Your Roots"; (2) "Scandinavia, Scandinavians, and the History of Immigration"; (3) "Beginning…

  1. "Folkbildning" through Hip-Hop: How the Ideals of Three Rappers Parallel a Scandinavian Educational Tradition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soderman, Johan

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to show how the rappers' talk about hip-hop and its connection to pedagogy and social activism parallel the Scandinavian tradition of folkbildning. Scandinavian folkbildning can be seen as a movement to provide voluntary education for the general population. It can also be the name of the process of learning in which…

  2. Whole grain intake and survival among Scandinavian colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Skeie, Guri; Braaten, Tonje; Olsen, Anja; Kyrø, Cecilie; Tjønneland, Anne; Nilsson, Lena Maria; Landberg, Rikard; Lund, Eiliv

    2014-01-01

    To our knowledge, no studies of associations between intake of whole grain (WHG) and survival of colorectal cancer have been published, despite evidence that dietary fiber, and to some extent WHG, are associated with lower risk of colorectal cancer. Scandinavia is an area where the WHG consumption traditionally is high. We performed a case-only (N = 1119) study in the Scandinavian HELGA cohort of pre-diagnosis WHG intake (total WHG, WHG wheat, WHG rye, and WHG oats) and survival of colorectal cancer. Cox regression analyses were used to study the associations, both in categorical and continuous models, stratified by location (proximal, distal, rectum) and country. No evidence of an association was found, neither for total WHG intake (hazard ratio = 1.32, 95% confidence interval: 0.88-1.97 lowest vs. highest tertile, adjusted for age at diagnosis, metastasis status, smoking, folate, margarine, and energy), nor for specific grains. Prediagnosis consumption of WHG does not seem to improve survival of colorectal cancer in subjects diagnosed within this prospective population-based Scandinavian cohort. PMID:24274588

  3. Garnet and clinopyroxene pseudomorphs: example of local mass balance in the Caledonides of western Norway.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centrella, Stephen; Austrheim, Håkon; Putnis, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    The Precambrian granulite facies rocks of Lindås Nappe, Bergen Arcs, Caledonides of W.Norway are partially hydrated at amphibolites and eclogite facies conditions. The Lindås Nappe outcrop over an area of ca 1000 km2 where relict granulite facies lenses make up only ca 10%. At Hillandsvatnet, garnetite displays sharp hydration fronts across which the granulite facies assemblage composed of garnet (70%) and clinopyroxene (30%) is replaced by an amphibolite facies mineralogy defined by chlorite, epidote and amphibole. This setting allows us to assess the mechanism of fluid transport through an initially low permeability rock and how this induces changes of texture and element transport. The replacement of garnet and clinopyroxene is pseudomorphic so that the grain shapes of the garnet and clinopyroxene are preserved even if when they are completely replaced. This requires that the reactive fluids must pass through the solid crystal grains and this can be achieved by an interface coupled dissolution-precipitation mechanism. Porosity generation is a key feature of this mechanism (Putnis and Austrheim 2012). The porosity is not only a consequence of reduction in solid molar volume but depends on the relative solubilities of parent and product phases in the reactive fluid. Putnis et al. 2007 and Xia et al. 2009 have shown that even in pseudomorphic reactions where the molar volume increases, porosity may still be generated by the reaction. This is fundamental in understanding the element mobility and the mass transfer in a low permeability rock even more when the bulk rock composition of these two rocks stay unchanged; except a gain in water during amphibolitisation. The textural evolution during the replacement of garnet by pargasite, epidote and chlorite and pyroxene by hornblende and quartz in our rock sample conforms to that expected by a coupled dissolution-precipitation mechanism. SEM and Microprobe analysis coupled with the software XMapTools V 1.06.1 .(Lanari

  4. Strike-slip faults in the southernmost Andes and the development of the Patagonian orocline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, W. Dickson

    1993-02-01

    The Patagonian orocline is the 90° bend in the southernmost Andes between 50°S and 56°S. Paleomagnetic and structural data indicate that the orocline is, at least in part, the product of tectonic rotation. Recent field work in the Beagle Channel region of southernmost Chile provides evidence for widespread left-lateral strike-slip faulting in the internal zones of the mountain belt. Both arms of the Beagle Channel are interpreted to be left-lateral strike-slip faults based on detailed study of mesoscale strike-slip faults (Riedel shears) observed in coastal outcrops. Although much of the evidence indicates Cenozoic brittle strike-slip faulting, other fabric data, including vertical foliation zones containing horizontal quartz stretching lineations and ductile left-lateral kinematic indicators, suggest that Mesozoic ductile strike-slip or oblique-slip shearing also occurred. The implication is that the mid-Cretaceous Andean orogeny involved the transpressional inversion of the Rocas Verdes marginal basin and that transpression has been the dominant deformational regime in the region for the last 120 Ma. Regional left-lateral strike-slip faults are now recognized in all lithotectonic provinces of the southernmost Andes. A statistical study of regional lineament trends using aerial photographs and satellite imagery suggests that many unstudied lineaments are also strike-slip faults. A new model is proposed that integrates the development of strike-slip faulting and the structural evolution and uplift of the southernmost Andes with the rotational development of the orocline. The Patagonian orocline appears to be the product of broad interplate shearing accommodated by strike-slip faulting, block rotation, and contraction and is probably continuing to evolve today.

  5. Scandinavian NATO policy: The next five years. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, J.

    1990-05-01

    Based on reports from the Foreign Broadcast Information Service, this Note assesses the future of Danish and Norwegian security policies and the probable internal and external factors that will influence them. In the next five years, Danish politics will be marked by instability as rapid disarmament and tension reduction are pursued. The somewhat more stable Norwegian political environment is also entering a period of uncertainty. However, the weakening of centrism in Norwegian politics should not undermine a traditional concern for arms control and reduced tensions in Europe. While neither Scandinavian nation is expected to take a leading role in the NATO policy debate, they will make clear their opposition to the modernization or expansion of nuclear forces. Although both Norway and Denmark may turn their attention increasingly toward regional or Nordic solutions, the importance of their sea-lanes to U.S. maritime interests will ensure a continued U.S. commitment to maintaining some form of security relationship with them.

  6. Complexity Matters: On Gender Agreement in Heritage Scandinavian

    PubMed Central

    Johannessen, Janne Bondi; Larsson, Ida

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates aspects of the noun phrase from a Scandinavian heritage language perspective, with an emphasis on noun phrase-internal gender agreement and noun declension. Our results are somewhat surprising compared with earlier research: We find that noun phrase-internal agreement for the most part is rather stable. To the extent that we find attrition, it affects agreement in the noun phrase, but not the declension of the noun. We discuss whether this means that gender is lost and has been reduced to a pure declension class, or whether gender is retained. We argue that gender is actually retained in these heritage speakers. One argument for this is that the speakers who lack agreement in complex noun phrases, have agreement intact in simpler phrases. We have thus found that the complexity of the noun phrase is crucial for some speakers. However, among the heritage speakers we also find considerable inter-individual variation, and different speakers can have partly different systems. PMID:26733114

  7. Transcript of Audio Narrative Portion of: Scandinavian Heritage. A Set of Five Audio-Visual Film Strip/Cassette Presentations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Gerald D.; Olson, David B.

    The document presents the transcript of the audio narrative portion of approximately 100 interviews with first and second generation Scandinavian immigrants to the United States. The document is intended for use by secondary school classroom teachers as they develop and implement educational programs related to the Scandinavian heritage in…

  8. Late Triassic climate in southernmost Parana Basin (Brazil): evidence from dendrochronological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbrin Pires, Etiene; Guerra Sommer, Margot; Marlon dos Santos Scherer, Claiton

    2005-01-01

    Dendrochronological methods were used to study a fossil wood assemblage identified as Sommerxylon spiralosus Pires et Guerra-Sommer from outcropping sandstone fluvial sequences (Late Triassic of southernmost Parana Basin, Brazil). The climate signal from fossil woods, supported by sedimentary evidence, indicates a seasonal climate. Analysis of preserved growth rings has yielded information about the peridiodicity of growth related to seasonal cycles. The growth phase in each cycle developed at a slow rate, and the growing period was relatively uniform; in contrast, the periodic phases of growth restriction were not very extensive. These seasonal cycles were interrupted by occasional droughts during the growth season, reflected by the presence of false growth rings. These data match recent global climate patterns from the Late Triassic.

  9. Simple shear detachment fault system and marginal grabens in the southernmost Red Sea rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesfaye, Samson; Ghebreab, Woldai

    2013-11-01

    The NNW-SSE oriented Red Sea rift, which separates the African and Arabian plates, bifurcates southwards into two parallel branches, southeastern and southern, collectively referred to as the southernmost Red Sea rift. The southern branch forms the magmatically and seismo-tectonically active Afar rift, while the less active southeastern branch connects the Red Sea to the Gulf of Aden through the strait of Bab el Mandeb. The Afar rift is characterized by lateral heterogeneities in crustal thickness, and along-strike variation in extension. The Danakil horst, a counterclockwise rotating, narrow sliver of coherent continental relic, stands between the two rift branches. The western margin of the Afar rift is marked by a series of N-S aligned right-lateral-stepping and seismo-tectonically active marginal grabens. The tectonic configuration of the parallel rift branches, the alignment of the marginal grabens, and the Danakil horst are linked to the initial mode of stretching of the continental crust and its progressive deformation that led to the breakup of the once contiguous African-Arabian plates. We attribute the initial stretching of the continental crust to a simple shear ramp-flat detachment fault geometry where the marginal grabens mark the breakaway zone. The rift basins represent the ramps and the Danakil horst corresponds to the flat in the detachment fault system. As extension progressed, pure shear deformation dominated and overprinted the initial low-angle detachment fault system. Magmatic activity continues to play an integral part in extensional deformation in the southernmost Red Sea rift.

  10. Late Cenozoic volcanism in the Lassen area, southernmost Cascade Range, California

    SciTech Connect

    Clynne, M.A.; Muffler, L.J.P.; Dalrymple, G.B. )

    1993-04-01

    Volcanism in the southernmost Cascade Range can be characterized on two scales. Regional volcanism is predominantly basaltic to andesitic, and hundreds of coalescing volcanoes of small volume (10[sup [minus]3] to 10[sup 1] km[sup 3]) with short lifetimes have built a broad platform. Superimposed on the regional volcanism are a few long-lived ([approximately]10[sup 6] years) much larger (>10 [sup 2] km[sup 3]) volcanic centers. Each of these larger centers consists of a basaltic-andesite to andesite composite cone and flanking silicic domes and flows. The evolution of these volcanic centers conforms to a generalized three-stage model during which a conspicuous edifice is constructed. Stages 1 and 2 comprise a dominantly andesitic composite cone; Stage 3 marks a change to dominantly silicic volcanism and is accompanied by development of a hydrothermal system in the permeable core of the andesitic composite cone. Subsequent fluvial and glacial erosion produces a caldera-like depression with a topographically high resistant rim of Stage 2 lavas surrounding the deeply eroded, hydrothermally altered core of the composite cone. Two types of basalt are recognized in the southernmost Cascades; medium-K calc-alkaline (CAB) and low-K olivine tholeiite (LKOT). CAB exhibits considerable geochemical diversity and is the parent magma for the volcanic-center lavas and the majority of the evolved regional lavas. LKOT is chemically homogeneous, and outcrops sporadically in association with extensional tectonics of the Basin and Range Province, and is related to Pleistocene encroachment of Basin-and-Range tectonics on the subduction-related volcanism of the Cascade Range.

  11. Bed bugs are back and also arriving is the southernmost record of Cimex lectularius (Heteroptera: Cimicidae) in South America.

    PubMed

    Faúndez, Eduardo I; Carvajal, Máriom A

    2014-09-01

    The arrival and establishment of the bed bug Cimex lectularius L., 1755 in Magallanes Region (Chile) is reported. The present record is the southernmost for this species in America. The circumstances that provided for the species reaching this southern locality are discussed. PMID:25276939

  12. EDITORIAL: The 2nd Scandinavian NeutrinO Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-10-01

    The first Scandinavian NeutrinO Workshop (SNOW) was held in Uppsala, Sweden, in February 2001. About five years passed until the next SNOW took place—this time in Stockholm, Sweden between 2 May 2006 and 6 May 2006. The aim of the workshop was to cover a variety of topics in neutrino physics with leading researchers in the field as speakers. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (KVA) awarded SNOW 2006 a grant for inviting such speakers. The workshop was mainly directed towards phenomenology and theory with connections to experiments and gave an opportunity for theorists and experimentalists to work together, discuss the latest results, and combine the different branches of neutrino physics. The different topics discussed were: solar and atmospheric neutrinos, reactor and accelerator neutrinos, neutrinos in astrophysics and cosmology, phenomenology of neutrino data, neutrino oscillations, theory and model building, fundamental properties of neutrinos, neutrinoless double beta decay, and flavor physics. Around 70 scientists (spanning from graduate students to world-leading researchers) in the field of neutrino physics participated in SNOW 2006 and 44 talks were presented in plenary sessions. Out of the 44 talks, 37 have been contributed to these proceedings. The talks of SNOW 2006 took place in the Oskar Klein Auditorium at the AlbaNova University Center in Stockholm. The AlbaNova University Center is a joint endeavour between the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) and Stockholm University. The social program included a welcome reception at KVA, an excursion to the Royal Armoury at the Royal Palace in Stockholm as well as a boat trip in the archipelago of Stockholm, a reception at the City Hall of Stockholm arranged by the city, and finally, a workshop dinner at Häringe Castle south of Stockholm. T Ohlsson and M Blennow Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden B Badelek Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden J Edsjö Stockholm University, Stockholm

  13. Democratic Experience and the Democratic Challenge: A Historical and Comparative Citizenship Education Study of Scandinavian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberkind, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    In Scandinavian schools, there is a significant tradition for creating a democratic context of experience; this tradition is gradually being challenged by new political and economic movements and increasing focus on tests, assessments, knowledge, and skills. The purpose of this study is to analyze and discuss the status of the current context of…

  14. Modernisation--A Challenge to Early Childhood Education: Scandinavian Experiences and Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dencik, Lars

    1998-01-01

    Discusses how modernization processes (rationalization, secularization, and individuation) produce continuous change in children's life conditions in the Scandinavian welfare states. Argues that scientific knowledge about early childhood fails because it abstracts children from their particular contexts. Proposes that "childhood" is the particular…

  15. Mobbing in the Schools. Scandinavian Initiatives in the Prevention and Reduction of Group Violence among Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juul, Kristen D.

    The paper defines the concept of mobbing and notes alternate terms such as bullying, scapegoating, and group violence or aggression. Scandinavian research and literature on mobbing is analyzed, especially as it relates to the incidence of mobbing and characteristics of aggressor and victim. Intervention efforts are described, such as individual…

  16. Constraining heat production rates in Ireland's basement rocks: measurements of exposed basement and correlations from across the Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmot Noller, Nicola; Daly, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    are subjacent to the Mid/Late Palaeozoic sedimentary basin between the ISZ and their outcrop in SE Ireland. In addition, Newfoundland Appalachians are interpreted as part of the relict collision zone from the Caledonian orogenic event, separated from the Irish Caledonides by rifting as the Atlantic opened. This region offers extensive exposure of Precambrian, Lower Palaeozoic supracrustal and plutonic rocks many of which can be regarded as equivalent to those in Ireland. The Canadian geochemical dataset thus provides an opportunity to test the validity of assigning to Ireland's basement, heat production rates obtained from otherwise limited exposures.

  17. U-Pb SHRIMP geochronology and trace-element geochemistry of coesite-bearing zircons, North-East Greenland Caledonides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McClelland, W.C.; Power, S.E.; Gilotti, J.A.; Mazdab, F.K.; Wopenka, B.

    2006-01-01

    Obtaining reliable estimates for the timing of eclogite-facies metamorphism is critical to establishing models for the formation and exhumation of high-pressure and ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphic terranes in collisional orogens. The presence of pressure-dependent phases, such as coesite, included in metamorphic zircon is generally regarded as evidence that zircon growth occurred at UHP conditions and, ifdated, should provide the necessary timing information. We report U-Pb sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) ages and trace-element SHRIMP data from coesite-bearing zircon suites formed during UHP metamorphism in the North- East Greenland Caledonides. Kyanite eclogite and quartzofeldspathic host gneiss samples from an island in J??kelbugt (78??00'N, 18??04'W) contained subspherical zircons with well-defined domains in cathodoluminescence (CL) images. The presence of coesite is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy in six zircons from four samples. Additional components of the eclogite-facies inclusion suite include kyanite, omphacite, garnet, and rutile. The trace-element signatures in core domains reflect modification of igneous protolith zircon. Rim signatures show flat heavy rare earth element (HREE) patterns that are characteristic of eclogite-facies zircon. The kyanite eclogites generally lack a Eu anomaly, whereas a negative Eu anomaly persists in all domains of the host gneiss. The 207Pb- corrected 206Pb/238U ages range from 330 to 390 Ma for the host gneiss and 330-370 Ma for the kyanite eclogite. Weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages for coesite-bearing domains vary from 364 ?? 8 Ma for the host gneiss to 350 ?? 4 Ma for kyanite eclogite. The combined U-Pb and REE data interpreted in conjunction with observed CL domains and inclusion suites suggest that (1) Caledonian metamorphic zircon formed by both new zircon growth and recrystallization, (2) UHP metamorphism occurred near the end of the Caledonian collision, and (3) the 30-50m.y. span of ages

  18. Cirque-driven erosion of the Scandinavian mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, John D.; Codilean, Alexandru T.; Egholm, David L.; Knudsen, Mads F.; Korup, Oliver; Stroeven, Arjen; Goodfellow, Bradley; Andersen, Jane L.; Ugelvig, Sofie V.; Klein, Josefin

    2015-04-01

    Climatic versus tectonic explanations for Scandinavian topography have sustained a century-long dispute. Here, at high-latitudes, the more recent question of whether Late-Cenozoic cooling has influenced mountain erosion rates is especially apt because glaciations commenced earlier: >10 Myr and possibly ~34 Myr according to marine palaeorecords. Although selective glacial incision along valley troughs is well recognised in Scandinavia, the legacy of glacial cirque erosion has yet to be fully investigated. We examine the topographic legacy of mountain glaciation in seven massifs of the Caledonian Scandes (western Scandinavia ~61-70° N): Lyngen, Kebnekaise, Sarek, Saltfjellet, Dovrefjell, Jostedalsbreen, and Jotunheimen. Glacial cirques are the product of discrete alpine glaciers and so the elevation of ice-free cirques provides a guide to past fluctuations in regional equilibrium line altitude (ELA). The Scandes currently hosts >3400 mountain glaciers and the distribution of >10,000 ice-free cirques indicates that glaciers have extended much lower and farther in the past. Previous workers argue that alpine glaciations focus erosion selectively at and above a zone of cirques, which approximates the long-term average 'palaeo-ELA'. First, we set out to examine the topographic relationships between mountain peak elevation, ELA, cirque-floor elevations, and the distribution of low-slope (<10°) terrain. To estimate the regional ELA for each massif, inclined planar trend-surfaces (first-order polynomial) were fitted to median elevations of existing glaciers. A total of ~4000 ice-free cirques were mapped and plotted relative to the ELA surfaces. For all seven massifs, cirque-floors cluster within a discrete elevational range: 240-490 m (25-75th percentiles) below ELA, suggesting a well-defined 'palaeo-ELA'. Hypsometric analyses show that this 'palaeo-ELA' closely matches the maximum frequency of low-slope terrain. Consistent with studies elsewhere, terrain surface area

  19. Petrochemistry and hydrothermal alteration within the Tyrone Igneous Complex, Northern Ireland: implications for VMS mineralization in the British and Irish Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollis, Steven P.; Roberts, Stephen; Earls, Garth; Herrington, Richard; Cooper, Mark R.; Piercey, Stephen J.; Archibald, Sandy M.; Moloney, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Although volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits can form within a wide variety of rift-related tectonic environments, most are preserved within suprasubduction affinity crust related to ocean closure. In stark contrast to the VMS-rich Appalachian sector of the Grampian-Taconic orogeny, VMS mineralization is rare in the peri-Laurentian British and Irish Caledonides. Economic peri-Gondwanan affinity deposits are limited to Avoca and Parys Mountain. The Tyrone Igneous Complex of Northern Ireland represents a ca. 484-464 Ma peri-Laurentian affinity arc-ophiolite complex and a possible broad correlative of the Buchans-Robert's Arm belt of Newfoundland, host to some of the most metal-rich VMS deposits globally. Stratigraphic horizons prospective for VMS mineralization in the Tyrone Igneous Complex are associated with rift-related magmatism, hydrothermal alteration, synvolcanic faults, and high-level subvolcanic intrusions (gabbro, diorite, and/or tonalite). Locally intense hydrothermal alteration is characterized by Na-depletion, elevated SiO2, MgO, Ba/Sr, Bi, Sb, chlorite-carbonate-pyrite alteration index (CCPI) and Hashimoto alteration index (AI) values. Rift-related mafic lavas typically occur in the hanging wall sequences to base and precious metal mineralization, closely associated with ironstones and/or argillaceous sedimentary rocks representing low temperature hydrothermal venting and volcanic quiescence. In the ca. 475 Ma pre-collisional, calc-alkaline lower Tyrone Volcanic Group rift-related magmatism is characterized by abundant non-arc type Fe-Ti-rich eMORB, island-arc tholeiite, and low-Zr tholeiitic rhyolite breccias. These petrochemical characteristics are typical of units associated with VMS mineralization in bimodal mafic, primitive post-Archean arc terranes. Following arc-accretion at ca. 470 Ma, late rifting in the ensialic upper Tyrone Volcanic Group is dominated by OIB-like, subalkaline to alkali basalt and A-type, high-Zr rhyolites. These units

  20. Carinina ochracea (Palaeonemertea: Tubulanidae) Reaches Its Southernmost Distribution: New Morphological and Molecular Data.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Álvarez, Fernando Ángel; García-Jiménez, Ricardo; Machordom, Annie

    2015-12-01

    New data for Carinina ochracea Sundberg et al., 2009 are provided for the Iberian Peninsula, establishing the southernmost limit of its known distribution. This species was previously known from only two localities: the type locality in Tjärnö (Sweden) and Pouldohan (Brittany, France). The material examined here was obtained during a faunal survey in the Villaviciosa Estuary (Asturias, northern Iberian Peninsula). The identity of the new specimen was confirmed both by DNA barcoding and anatomical examination. The molecular divergence of all available sequences of this species for four molecular markers, cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI), 16S, 18S and 28S rDNA, is discussed. For COI, four polymorphic sites were found, indicating: 1) a nuclear pseudogene; 2) heteroplasmy; or 3) gene duplication of a region of the mitochondrial genome. Two previously overlooked morphological characters were found: the presence of a colour ring and a postfixation staining band (pigmented band), which is histologically characterized. This species is the 12th palaeonemertean and the 75th nemertean reported from Iberian waters. PMID:26654042

  1. Tectonic evolution of Early Paleozoic island-arc systems and continental crust formation in the Caledonides of Kazakhstan and the North Tien Shan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtyarev, K. E.

    2011-01-01

    The extended Saryarka and Shyngyz-North Tien Shan volcanic belts that underwent secondary deformation are traced in the Caledonides of Kazakhstan and the North Tien Shan. These belts are composed of igneous rocks pertaining to Early Paleozoic island-arc systems of various types and the conjugated basins with oceanic crust. The Saryarka volcanic belt has a complex fold-nappe structure formed in the middle Arenigian-middle Llanvirnian as a result of the tectonic juxtaposition of Early-Middle Cambrian and Late Cambrian-Early Ordovician complexes of ensimatic island arcs and basins with oceanic crust. The Shyngyz-North Tien Shan volcanic belt is characterized by a rather simple fold structure and consists of Middle-Late Ordovician volcanic and plutonic associations of ensialic island arcs developing on heterogeneous basement, which is composed of complexes belonging to the Saryarka belt and Precambrian sialic massifs. The structure and isotopic composition of the Paleozoic igneous complexes provide evidence for the heterogeneous structure of the continental crust in various segments of the Kazakh Caledonides. The upper crust of the Shyngyz segment consists of Early Paleozoic island-arc complexes and basins with oceanic crust related to the Saryarka and Shyngyz-North Tien Shan volcanic belts in combination with Middle and Late Paleozoic continental igneous rocks. The deep crustal units of this segment are dominated by mafic rocks of Early Paleozoic suprasubduction complexes. The upper continental crust of the Stepnyak segment is composed of Middle-Late Ordovician island-arc complexes of the Shyngyz-North Tien Shan volcanic belt and Early Ordovician rift-related volcanics. The middle crustal units are composed of Riphean, Paleoproterozoic, and probably Archean sialic rocks, whereas the lower crustal units are composed of Neoproterozoic mafic rocks.

  2. Petrogenesis of the Neoproterozoic West Highland Granitic Gneiss, Scottish Caledonides: Cryptic mantle input to S-type granites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, M.; Millar, I. L.; Strachan, R. A.; Fallick, A. E.

    2013-05-01

    The Neoproterozoic (c. 870 Ma) West Highland Granitic Gneiss, exposed in the Northern Highlands Terrane of Scotland, has elemental characteristics that are strikingly similar to those of the host Moine metasediments, which are thus consistent with an origin involving major Moine melting. Most of the constituent bodies have compositions significantly removed from minimum melts of pelites, and trace element constraints suggest variable but significant restite entrainment leading to less silicic bulk compositions with enhanced REE, Zr and Y. However, initial Nd and Hf isotope ratios are not coincident with contemporary Moine and imply a significant juvenile contribution. Close association with a regional suite of metabasites prompts consideration of mafic magma input, for which binary mixing models offer qualitative support. Quantitative difficulties with typical Moine metasediments are eased with radiogenic pelites or by partial melting of the mafic component. A possible alternative is currently unexposed Grenvillian felsic crust. Subsequent interaction of the granitic gneisses with meteoric water has significantly perturbed the oxygen and Sr isotope systems, the timing of which is equivocal but probably occurred during Caledonian events. The elemental characteristics of the West Highland Granitic Gneiss show many similarities with Scandinavian (rift-related?) granites of the same age, but since their geochemistry is largely inherited from the protolith it would be unwise to pursue palaeotectonic attribution on this basis. However, the probable incorporation of significant mantle-derived mafic magma of MORB-like affinity is consistent with an extensional setting.

  3. Organized medicine and Scandinavian professional unionism: hospital policies and exit options in Denmark and Sweden.

    PubMed

    Heidenheimer, A J; Johansen, L N

    1985-01-01

    Strikes by junior hospital doctors over the issue of on-call remuneration in Denmark and Sweden in 1981 are analyzed to clarify the impact of public-sector cost-control policies on intra- and interprofessional solidarity within the Scandinavian professional peak associations. The junior doctors' grievances could find expression either through increased "voice" within the medical negotiating machinery, or by pursuing the exit option in having the medical associations quit the peak associations. The article explains why the "exit" option was selected in Denmark, while in Sweden the granting of additional voice helped persuade the medical association to withdraw its exit threat and to remain within the peak association. The two cases are interpreted as presaging a divergence in the paths being taken by the various Scandinavian welfare states. PMID:4045171

  4. The mantle and crustal evolution of two garnet peridotite suites from the Western Gneiss Region, Norwegian Caledonides: An isotopic investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brueckner, H. K.; Carswell, D. A.; Griffin, W. L.; Medaris, L. G., Jr.; Van Roermund, H. L. M.; Cuthbert, S. J.

    2010-06-01

    A compilation of published and unpublished geochronological and isotopic data from garnet-bearing orogenic peridotites in the HP/UHP Western Gneiss Region (WGR) of the Norwegian Caledonides indicate a common origin for all WGR peridotites, followed by different, though related, Proterozoic and Phanerozoic histories for those in the northwestern WGR (NW peridotites) compared to those in the central and western WGR (CW peridotites). All peridotites are refractory fragments of the subcontinental lithosphere generated by Archean melt extraction, which produced strongly depleted dunites and harzburgites with relict orthopyroxene and majoritic garnet megacrysts (M 1NW) within the NW peridotites. The Archean history is preserved by Re-Os sulfide and whole-rock ages from several WGR bodies and by Sm-Nd ages from the M 1NW megacrysts. Subsequently the CW peridotites were re-fertilized within the lithospheric mantle by mid-Proterozoic or older silicate melts that generated M 2CW garnet pyroxenites and adjacent garnet peridotites. Clinopyroxenes from these bodies show large variation in 143Nd/ 144Nd, but nearly constant 87Sr/ 86Sr, suggesting autometasomatism of depleted mantle by LREE-enriched, Rb-poor melts derived from equally depleted mantle. NW peridotites lack mid-Proterozoic garnet pyroxenite intrusions, but M 2NW garnet-rich assemblages that exsolved from relict M 1 megacrysts may have equilibrated at the same time as the M 2CW refertilization. Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf mineral apparent isochron ages from both suites range from 1.75 to ca. 0.87 Ga. The age spectrum suggests continuous diffusion among M 2 minerals that formed ≥ 1.75 Ga ago punctuated by partial re-equilibration during a 1.0 Ga thermal event. Much later the NW peridotites were transferred from the mantle wedge into the crust as the WGR was subducted into the mantle during the ca 400 Ma Scandian Orogeny. Further subduction heterogeneously metasomatized and recrystallized the NW peridotites to form M 3NW garnet

  5. Late Paleozoic paleofjord in the southernmost Parana Basin (Brazil): Geomorphology and sedimentary fill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedesco, Julia; Cagliari, Joice; Coitinho, Julia dos Reis; da Cunha Lopes, Ricardo; Lavina, Ernesto Luiz Correa

    2016-09-01

    In the southernmost part of the Parana Basin, records of the late Paleozoic glaciation occur in a discontinuous form preserved in paleovalley systems excavated in the crystalline basement. This paper addresses one of these paleovalleys, the Mariana Pimentel, which extends over 60 km with NW-SE valley direction and a constant width of 2.5 km. With the objective of demonstrating that the paleovalley worked as a fjord during the glaciation period, its origin as well as sedimentary fill and morphology were analyzed. The paleovalley morphology was obtained through electrical resistivity (electrical sounding and lateral mapping) and mathematical modeling in four transverse sections. The morphology of the paleovalley documented by the U-shape, steady width, and high depth reaching up to 400 m are typical features of modern glacial valleys. The sedimentary facies that fill the base of the paleovalley, such as rhythmites and dropstones with thickness up to 70 m and diamictites with faceted pebbles (up to 5 m thick) are signs of its glacial origin. During the glaciation period, the paleovalley had a connection to the epicontinental sea located to the northwest, extended toward Namibia, and was excavated by glaciers from the highlands of this region. Thus, the evidence attests that the Mariana Pimentel paleovalley was a fjord during the late Paleozoic glaciation. The duration of the late Paleozoic glaciation (which is longer than the Quaternary glaciation), the apatite fission track that suggests erosion up to 4 km thick in the study area, and the lack of preserved hanging valleys in the Mariana Pimentel indicate that the paleovalley once featured a higher dimension. Furthermore, the existence of paleofjords excavated in the border of the basement corroborates the idea of small ice centers controlled by topography during the late Paleozoic glaciation.

  6. Extensive MIS 3 glaciation in southernmost Patagonia revealed by cosmogenic nuclide dating of outwash sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvill, Christopher M.; Bentley, Michael J.; Stokes, Chris R.; Hein, Andrew S.; Rodés, Ángel

    2015-11-01

    The timing and extent of former glacial advances can demonstrate leads and lags during periods of climatic change and their forcing, but this requires robust glacial chronologies. In parts of southernmost Patagonia, dating pre-global Last Glacial Maximum (gLGM) ice limits has proven difficult due to post-deposition processes affecting the build-up of cosmogenic nuclides in moraine boulders. Here we provide ages for the Río Cullen and San Sebastián glacial limits of the former Bahía Inútil-San Sebastián (BI-SSb) ice lobe on Tierra del Fuego (53-54°S), previously hypothesised to represent advances during Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 12 and 10, respectively. Our approach uses cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al exposure dating, but targets glacial outwash associated with these limits and uses depth-profiles and surface cobble samples, thereby accounting for surface deflation and inheritance. The data reveal that the limits formed more recently than previously thought, giving ages of 45.6 ka (+139.9/-14.3) for the Río Cullen, and 30.1 ka (+45.6/-23.1) for the San Sebastián limits. These dates indicate extensive glaciation in southern Patagonia during MIS 3, prior to the well-constrained, but much less extensive MIS 2 (gLGM) limit. This suggests the pattern of ice advances in the region was different to northern Patagonia, with the terrestrial limits relating to the last glacial cycle, rather than progressively less extensive glaciations over hundreds of thousands of years. However, the dates are consistent with MIS 3 glaciation elsewhere in the southern mid-latitudes, and the combination of cooler summers and warmer winters with increased precipitation, may have caused extensive glaciation prior to the gLGM.

  7. Improved Timing of Deglaciation of the Southwestern Scandinavian Ice Sheet Using 10Be Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gump, D.; Briner, J. P.; Svendsen, J. I.; Mangerud, J.

    2015-12-01

    We present 28 new 10Be ages from glacial erratic boulders to constrain Scandinavian Ice Sheet deglaciation along the major fjord system of Boknafjorden in southwest Norway. Results indicate ages in the range 20-14 ka and complement our previous findings that the Norwegian Channel Ice Stream (NCIS) had retreated some 400 km as early as ~20 ka (Svendsen et al., 2015) and further corroborate that this was followed by a second pulse of deglaciation at ~16 ka. After the immediate coast was rendered an ice-free corridor at ~20 ka, our new suite of ages identifies ~16 ka as a period of a possible culmination of re-advance, and almost certainly the onset of a subsequent period of retreat. These findings are promising for the possibility of long lake sediment archives from areas around the mouth of Boknafjorden. Additionally, by coupling our new 10Be ages of erratic boulders from sea level and from summits bordering Boknafjorden with topographic profiles and rudimentary ice-sheet profile calculations (Benn and Hulton, 2010), we are able to estimate spatial and temporal Scandinavian Ice Sheet history along both vertical and horizontal transects. Our results not only fill chronological gaps and add to a growing database of ages of deglaciation from the southwest Norway, but also provide new constraints for a three-dimensional reconstruction of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet during deglaciation.

  8. Unravelling the Late Pleistocene habitat of the southernmost woolly mammoths in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Alix, A.; Delgado Huertas, A.; Martín Suárez, E.

    2012-01-01

    The southernmost record of woolly mammoths ( Mammuthus primigenius) in Europe has been found in Late Pleistocene sediments from 'El Padul' peat-bog, in the Granada Basin (southern Spain). In this paper we discuss a plausible habitat based on stable isotopic analyses of these specimens, dated ˜40-30 cal ky BP, probably corresponding with the beginning of Heinrich Stadial 4 (HS4) and the end of Heinrich Stadial 3 (HS3). Woolly mammoth remains preserve an accurate isotopic register of past climatic conditions because they needed to ingest large amount of resources daily (water and fresh food), whose isotopic signature, influenced by the environmental conditions, was recorded in their tissues. The δ18O w values of the past meteoric waters (-5.4‰ to -6.7‰ vs V-SMOW), calculated from the isotopic composition of teeth enamel, suggest moderate temperatures in comparison with those of similar age recovered in central and northern Europe. Due to its geographic position in southern Europe, our samples recorded the highest δ 18O w values of past meteoric waters deduced from mammoth remains in Europe. The difference between these values and those of δ 18O w of current mean annual precipitation are minimal, contrasting with those of higher latitudes during the end of the last glaciation (˜50 to ˜20 cal ky BP). The isotopic values of nitrogen (10.1‰ to 13.2‰ vs AIR) and carbon (-20.7 to -21.8‰ vs V-PDB) of collagen show a dry habitat, which occasionally could have been extreme. Taken as a whole, the isotopic results suggest that the studied specimens lived in a very dry steppic area, with moderately cold conditions, contrasting with the wet environment of 'El Padul' peat-bog, and its colder temperatures, due to the influence of glacial conditions of the Sierra Nevada, the highest peninsular mountain range. The described habitat may be sited in a more westerly position than the 'El Padul' peat-bog, and it was warmer and drier than those of contemporaneous European

  9. Recognition and characterisation of high-grade ignimbrites from the Neoproterozoic rhyolitic volcanism in southernmost Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Carlos Augusto; Lima, Evandro Fernandes; Machado, Adriane; Rossetti, Lucas de Magalhães May; Pierosan, Ronaldo

    2013-11-01

    Neoproterozoic magmatism in southern Brazil is associated with translithospheric shear belts and strike-slip basins in a post-collisional setting related to the last stages of the Brasilian-Pan African Orogenic Cycle. It evolved from an association of high-K calc-alkaline, leucocratic-peraluminous and continental tholeiitic magmas, to an association with shoshonitic magmas and, eventually, to an association with magmas of the sodic mildly alkaline series. This magmatism varies from metaluminous to peralkaline and exhibits alkaline sodic affinity. A large volcanism is related to this alkaline sodic magmatism and is named the Acampamento Velho Formation. This unit was coeval with subaerial siliciclastic sedimentation in post-collisional basins preserved in the region. The Acampamento Velho Formation consists of pyroclastic and effusive volcanic deposits, which are mainly silicic, emplaced under subaerial conditions. The best exposures of this volcanism occur on the Ramada and Taquarembó plateaus, located southwest of Rio Grande do Sul in southernmost Brazil. The pyroclastic flow deposits are composed mainly of juvenile fragments such as pumices, shards and crystal fragments. Welding is very effective in these units. High-grade ignimbrites occur at the base and intermediate portions of the deposits and rheoignimbrites are observed at the top. The pre-eruptive temperature calculations, which were obtained at the saturation of zircon, revealed values between 870 °C and 978 °C for Taquarembó Plateau and 850 °C-946 °C for Ramada Plateau. The calculated viscosity values vary from 6.946 to 8.453 log η (Pas) for the rheoignimbrites and 7.818 to 10.588 log η (Pas) for the ignimbrites. Zr contents increase toward the top of the pyroclastic sequence, which indicates an increase in peralkalinity and determines the reduction in viscosity for clasts at the upper portions of the flows. The patterns of the structures of the ignimbrites and rheoignimbrites in the Taquaremb

  10. Latest Pleistocene and Holocene glacier fluctuations in southernmost Tierra del Fuego, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menounos, Brian; Clague, John J.; Osborn, Gerald; Davis, P. Thompson; Ponce, Federico; Goehring, Brent; Maurer, Malyssa; Rabassa, Jorge; Coronato, Andrea; Marr, Rob

    2013-10-01

    Some researchers propose that summer insolation controls long-term changes in glacier extent during the Holocene. If this hypothesis is correct, the record of glacier fluctuations at high latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere should differ from that in the Northern Hemisphere. Although the chronology of Holocene glacier fluctuations in the Northern Hemisphere is well established, much uncertainty remains in the ages of Holocene glacier fluctuations in the Southern Hemisphere, especially South America. Here we report on latest Pleistocene and Holocene glacier fluctuations at the southern end of the Andes north and west of Ushuaia, Argentina. Surface exposure ages (10Be) from glaciated bedrock beyond cirque moraines indicate that alpine areas were free of ice by ca 16.9 ka. One, and in some cases two, closely spaced moraines extend up to 2 km beyond Little Ice Age moraines within many of the cirques in the region. The mean age of five 10Be ages from two pre-Little Ice Age moraines is 14.27-12.67 ka, whereas a minimum limiting radiocarbon age for a smaller, recessional moraine in one cirque is 12.38-12.01 ka. Our ages imply that, following glacier retreat beginning about 18.52-17.17 ka, cirque glaciers first advanced during the Antarctic Cold Reversal (14.5-12.9 ka) and may have later advanced or stabilized in the Younger Dryas Chronozone (12.9-11.7 ka). Based on the distribution of thick, geochemically distinct, and well-dated Hudson tephra, no Holocene moraines appear to be older than 7.96-7.34 ka. At some sites, there is evidence for one or more advances of glaciers sometime between 7.96-7.34 ka and 5.29-5.05 ka to limits only tens of meters beyond Little Ice Age maximum positions. Taken together, the data: 1) do not support the summer insolation hypothesis to explain Holocene glacier fluctuations in southernmost Patagonia; 2) confirm paleobotanical evidence for a warm, dry early Holocene; and 3) suggest that some glaciers in the region reached extents comparable to

  11. Initiation of the Magallanes foreland basin: Timing of the southernmost Patagonian Andes orogeny revised by detrital zircon provenance analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fildani, A.; Cope, T.D.; Graham, S.A.; Wooden, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    New sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe-reverse geometry U-Pb detrital zircon data establish the timing of onset of foreland basin subsidence in the Magallanes basin and the age of the Patagonian Andes in southernmost Chile. Initiation of the Magallanes foreland basin is signaled by the abrupt occurrence of sandstone of the Punta Barrosa Formation, loosely dated as upper Albian-Cenomanian from biofacies assemblages. Detrital zircon analyses demonstrate that the Punta Barrosa Formation is not older than 92 ?? 1 Ma and that the linked Andean belt started forming in the Turonian.

  12. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of post-collisional ultrapotassic syenites and granites from southernmost Brazil: the Piquiri Syenite Massif.

    PubMed

    Nardi, Lauro V S; Plá-Cid, Jorge; Bitencourt, Maria de Fátima; Stabel, Larissa Z

    2008-06-01

    The Piquiri Syenite Massif, southernmost Brazil, is part of the post-collisional magmatism related to the Neoproterozoic Brasiliano-Pan-African Orogenic Cycle. The massif is about 12 km in diameter and is composed of syenites, granites, monzonitic rocks and lamprophyres. Diopside-phlogopite, diopside-biotite-augite-calcic-amphibole, are the main ferro-magnesian paragenesis in the syenitic rocks. Syenitic and granitic rocks are co-magmatic and related to an ultrapotassic, silica-saturated magmatism. Their trace element patterns indicate a probable mantle source modified by previous, subduction-related metasomatism. The ultrapotassic granites of this massif were produced by fractional crystallization of syenitic magmas, and may be considered as a particular group of hypersolvus and subsolvus A-type granites. Based upon textural, structural and geochemical data most of the syenitic rocks, particularly the fine-grained types, are considered as crystallized liquids, in spite of the abundance of cumulatic layers, schlieren, and compositional banding. Most of the studied samples are metaluminous, with K2O/Na2O ratios higher than 2. The ultrapotassic syenitic and lamprophyric rocks in the Piquiri massif are interpreted to have been produced from enriched mantle sources, OIB-type, like most of the post-collisional shoshonitic, sodic alkaline and high-K tholeiitic magmatism in southernmost Brazil. The source of the ultrapotassic and lamprophyric magmas is probably the same veined mantle, with abundant phlogopite + apatite + amphibole that reflects a previous subduction-related metasomatism. PMID:18506262

  13. An Early Cretaceous volcanic arc/marginal basin transition zone, Peninsula hardy, southernmost Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher A.; Barton, Michael; Hanson, Richard E.; Fleming, Thomas H.

    1994-10-01

    The Hardy Formation represents a latest Jurassic-Early Cretaceous volcanic arc that was located along the Pacific margin of southern South America. It was separated from the continent by a marginal basin floored by portions of an ophiolite sequence (the Rocas Verdes ophiolites). The transition between the arc and marginal basin occurs on Peninsula Hardy, southernmost Chile, where there is a lateral facies transition from arc deposits of the Hardy Formation into proximal marginal basin fill of the Yahgan Formation. Interfingering of arc and marginal basin sequences demonstrates that subduction-related arc magmatism was concurrent with marginal basin formation. The lateral facies transition is reflected in the geochemistry of volcanic rocks from the Hardy and Yahgan formations. Basalts, andesites and dacites of the arc sequence follow a calc-alkaline differentiation trend whereas basalts from the marginal basin follow a tholeiitic differentiation trend. Estimates of temperature and oxygen fugacity for crystallization of the arc andesites are similar to values reported for other calc-alkaline andesites. It is suggested that water activity influenced the early or late crystallization of Ti-magnetite and this controlled the style of differentiation of the magmas erupted on Peninsula Hardy. Magmas with high water contents evolved along the calc-alkaline differentiation trend whereas those with low water contents evolved along the tholeiitic differentiation trend. Some rhyolites are differentiated from the calc-alkaline andesites and dacites, but most appear to be the products of crustal anatexis on the basis of trace-element evidence. The arc basalts and some marginal basin basalts show relative enrichment in LILE, relative depletion in HFSE, and enrichment in LREE. Other marginal basin basalts are LREE depleted and show small relative depletions in HFSE. Basalts with both calc-alkaline and tholeiitic affinities can also be recognized in the Rocas Verdes ophiolites

  14. Existing data sources for clinical epidemiology: Scandinavian Cohort for osteonecrosis of the jaw – work in progress and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Schiodt, Morten; Larsson Wexell, Cecilia; Herlofson, Bente Brokstad; Giltvedt, Karen Marie; Norholt, Sven Erik; Ehrenstein, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) is a severe side effect associated with antiresorptive treatment. Monitoring of ONJ using routine databases in Scandinavian countries is a challenge owing to lack of valid algorithms and to heterogeneous referral practices. The aim of this paper is to describe the process of establishing a Scandinavian ONJ Cohort enrolling all ONJ cases related to antiresorptive treatment arising in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden between 2011 and 2019. The initial purpose of the cohort is to support an ongoing pharmacovigilance study of denosumab and zoledronic acid in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. The three countries, with their 199 clinics, departments, and units of oral and maxillofacial surgery, both hospital-based and freestanding, differ somewhat in referral practices of the ONJ patients. By directly contacting all providers of care to ONJ patients in the three countries, we established a network for reporting incident cases to each country’s research database directly or through a member of the Scandinavian ONJ task force as a liaison. The task force includes a Scandinavian coordinator and three national coordinators collaborating directly with the clinics. A uniform ONJ registration form has been developed, and the relevant medical community has been informed either directly or through presentations at professional meetings. A website with study information is published in each country, and data entry is ongoing. This large-scale systematic uniform registration of ONJ cases in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden, with an underlying total population of more than 20 million people, merged into the Scandinavian ONJ Cohort, will contribute to better knowledge and understanding of this challenging group of patients, and ultimately, help improve patient care. The Scandinavian ONJ Cohort as a whole and its component national ONJ research databases may offer the potential for large-scale multinational intervention and safety studies in the future. PMID:25657594

  15. Trichinella in arctic, subarctic and temperate regions: Greenland, the Scandinavian countries and the Baltic States.

    PubMed

    Kapel, C M

    1997-01-01

    The transmission and occurrence of Trichinella spp according to the zoogeography of different climatic conditions, socioeconomy and human activity are discussed. Comparing arctic, subarctic and temperate regions, it appears that the species of Trichinella present, the composition of the fauna and the human activity are all very important interacting factors affecting epidemiology. In Greenland, where only sylvatic trichinellosis is present, the high prevalence in wildlife appears closely connected with polar bear hunting. In the Scandinavian countries, the prevalence of both sylvatic and domestic trichinellosis differ widely. Denmark is regarded as Trichinella-free in the case of domestic trichinellosis and sylvatic trichinellosis is very rare. In Sweden and Norway, Trichinella is found in wildlife but domestic trichinellosis is rare. In Finland, both domestic and sylvatic trichinellosis have increased dramatically during the last decade. Among the Scandinavian countries, Finland also has the largest populations of carnivorous mammals. In the Baltic states, Trichinella is frequently found in wildlife and domestic trichinellosis is increasingly diagnosed. The high prevalence in the widespread wildlife populations may have epidemiological importance in relation to the recent changes in production and infrastructure in these former Soviet states. PMID:9656341

  16. Prescribed journeys through life: Cultural differences in mental time travel between Middle Easterners and Scandinavians.

    PubMed

    Ottsen, Christina Lundsgaard; Berntsen, Dorthe

    2015-12-01

    Mental time travel is the ability to remember past events and imagine future events. Here, 124 Middle Easterners and 128 Scandinavians generated important past and future events. These different societies present a unique opportunity to examine effects of culture. Findings indicate stronger influence of normative schemas and greater use of mental time travel to teach, inform and direct behaviour in the Middle East compared with Scandinavia. The Middle Easterners generated more events that corresponded to their cultural life script and that contained religious words, whereas the Scandinavians reported events with a more positive mood impact. Effects of gender were mainly found in the Middle East. Main effects of time orientation largely replicated recent findings showing that simulation of future and past events are not necessarily parallel processes. In accordance with the notion that future simulations rely on schema-based construction, important future events showed a higher overlap with life script events than past events in both cultures. In general, cross-cultural discrepancies were larger in future compared with past events. Notably, the high focus in the Middle East on sharing future events to give cultural guidance is consistent with the increased adherence to normative scripts found in this culture. PMID:26432189

  17. Evidence of a giant helmeted frog (Australobatrachia, Calyptocephalellidae) from Eocene levels of the Magallanes Basin, southernmost Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, Rodrigo A.; Jimenez-Huidobro, Paulina; Soto-Acuña, Sergio; Yury-Yáñez, Roberto E.

    2014-11-01

    The fossil record of frogs from South America has improved dramatically in recent years. Here we describe a distal fragment of a large-sized humerus recovered from the middle-to-upper Eocene of southernmost Chile. The large distally located ventral condyle, and the presence of two epicondyles (radial and ulnar) confirm its identity as an anuran humerus. Comparisons with humeri from extant and fossil South American neobatrachians suggest a phylogentic affinity to calyptocephalellids (Australobatrachia). If correct, the new fossil represents the first occurrence of this family in high latitudes of South America and the first amphibian recovered from the Magallanes (=Austral) Basin. The humerus also represents evidence for one of the largest frogs known to date from anywhere in the world. Such exceptional body size may reflect an unusually hot and damp palaeoenvironment.

  18. Structure and tectonic evolution of the Fuegian Andes (southernmost South America) in the framework of the Scotia Arc development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres Carbonell, Pablo J.; Dimieri, Luis V.; Olivero, Eduardo B.; Bohoyo, Fernando; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús

    2014-12-01

    The major structural and tectonic features of the Fuegian Andes provide an outstanding onshore geological framework that aids in the understanding of the tectonic evolution of the Scotia Arc, mainly known from offshore studies. The orogenic history of the Fuegian Andes (Late Cretaceous-Miocene) is thus compared and integrated with the tectonic history of the Scotia Sea. Late Cretaceous-Paleocene structures in the Fuegian Andes suggest a N-directed contraction consistent with an oroclinal bending of the southernmost South America-Antarctic Peninsula continental bridge. This N-directed contraction in the Fuegian Andes continued during the spreading of the West Scotia Ridge, between 40-50 and 10 Ma ago. The onset of major strike-slip faulting in Tierra del Fuego is considered here to be not older than the late Miocene, consistent with the recent history of the North Scotia Ridge; thus forming part of a tectonic regime superposed to the prior contraction in the Fuegian Andes.

  19. The UHP metamorphic Seve Nappe Complex of the Swedish Caledonides - a new occurrence of the microdiamond-bearing gneisses and their exhumation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klonowska, Iwona; Janák, Marian; Majka, Jarosław; ‎ Froitzheim, Nikolaus; Gee, David G.

    2015-04-01

    The ultra-high pressure metamorphism (UHPM) in the Seve Nappe Complex of the Swedish Caledonides has been recently recognized within several lithologies including gneisses, eclogites and garnet pyroxenites (e.g. Janák et al. 2013, Klonowska et al. 2014a, Majka et al. 2014). Thermodynamic modelling and thermobarometric calculations indicate peak pressure conditions of >3GPa at c. 800-900°C (reaching the diamond stability field) for eclogites and garnet pyroxenites from northern Jämtland (e.g. Klonowska et al. 2014b). In addition to this, the first microdiamonds were found in paragneisses from the Snasahögarna Mt. in central Jämtland (Majka et al. 2014). Here we report a new discovery of microdiamond together with moissanite (SiC) from one of the world's most famous localities for thrusting, Mount Åreskutan, where long transport distances were recognized already in the 19th century (Törnebohm 1888). Garnet porphyroblasts in gneisses from the Åreskutan Mt. contain abundant mineral inclusions, mainly graphite, carbonates and quartz, together with fluid inclusions of CO2 concentrated in swarms. Among these inclusions three microdiamonds were found in two gneiss samples. In one of the samples moissanite was also discovered. Both minerals were identified by micro-Raman spectroscopy. In addition to these 'swarm' inclusions, biotite, kyanite, rutile, feldspars, zircon, monazite, ±phengite, ±muscovite, ±spinel, ±ilmenite, ±apatite occur in garnets. Phase equilibrium modelling for the phengite-bearing gneiss confirms its UHP history at temperatures of c. 800°C. Recent discoveries of UHP metamorphism within the Seve Nappe Complex derived from the Baltican outer margin (part of the Middle Allochthon) challenged us to present a new tectonic model incorporating exhumation of the deeply subducted continental rocks together with mantle lithosphere peridotites. Majka et al. (2014) introduced a new "under-pressure"-driven exhumation mechanism of rocks buried in

  20. Kyanite-garnet gneisses of the Kåfjord Nappe - North Norwegian Caledonides: P-T conditions and monazite Th-U-Pb dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemniak, Grzegorz; Kośmińska, Karolina; Majka, Jarosław; Janák, Marian; Manecki, Maciej

    2016-04-01

    The Kåfjord Nappe is the part of the Skibotn Nappe Complex traditionally ascribed to the Upper Allochthon of the North Norwegian Caledonides. Pressure-temperature (P-T) conditions and metamorphic age of the Kåfjord Nappe are not well constrained, geochronological data are limited to a single Rb-Sr age of c. 440 Ma (Dangla et al. 1978). Metamorphic evolution of kyanite-garnet gneisses of the Kåfjord Nappe is presented here. The kyanite-garnet gneisses are associated with a few meters thick amphibolite lenses. The gneisses mainly consist of quartz, plagioclase, biotite, muscovite, garnet, kyanite, and rutile. Retrograde minerals are represented by sillimanite and chlorite. Garnet occurs as two textural types. Garnet-I forms euhedral porphyroblasts with multiple small inclusions. Profiles through garnet-I show chemical zonation in all components. The composition varies from Alm64-68Prp11-16Grs13-18Sps2-8 in the core to Alm68-70Prp17-18Grs10-13Sps1-3 in the rim. Garnet-II is subhedral to anhedral, its core is inclusion-rich, whereas rim contains only single inclusions. Chemical composition of garnet-II is similar to that of the garnet-I rim. P-T conditions have been estimated using the garnet-biotite-muscovite-plagioclase (GBPM) geothermobarometer (Holdaway, 2001; Wu, 2014). Calculated peak P-T metamorphic conditions are 610-625 °C and 7.6-8.2 kbar corresponding to the amphibolite facies conditions. Phase equilibrium modelling in the NCKFMMnASH system yields peak metamorphic conditions of c. 620 °C at 8 kbar. Growth conditions of garnet-I core modelled in the NCKFMMnASH system are c. 570 °C at 9.7 kbar. Chemical Th-U-total Pb monazite dating has been performed. Preliminary dating results from the kyanite-garnet gneiss of the Kåfjord Nappe yield an array of dates from 468 Ma to 404 Ma. There is a correlation between an increase of yttrium content and decrease of monazite single dates. Compositional maps confirm an increase of yttrium towards the rim of the

  1. Chewing lice Trichodectes pinguis pinguis in Scandinavian brown bears (Ursus arctos).

    PubMed

    Esteruelas, Núria Fandos; Malmsten, Jonas; Bröjer, Caroline; Grandi, Giulio; Lindström, Anders; Brown, Paul; Swenson, Jon E; Evans, Alina L; Arnemo, Jon M

    2016-08-01

    In April 2014 and 2015, we noted localized alopecia (neck, forelimbs, and chest) and hyperpigmentation on two adult brown bears (Ursus arctos) captured in central-south Sweden for ecological studies under the Scandinavian Brown Bear Research Project. In spring 2015, a brown bear was shot because of human-wildlife conflict in the same region. This bear also had extensive alopecia and hyperpigmentation. Ectoparasites were collected from the affected skin areas in all three individuals and preserved in ethanol for identification. Based on morphological characteristics, the lice were identified as Trichodectes spp. and Trichodectes pinguis pinguis. To our knowledge, these are the first reported cases of chewing lice in free-ranging brown bears in Scandinavia. PMID:27330984

  2. The dental X-ray file of crew members in the Scandinavian Airlines System (SAS).

    PubMed

    Keiser-Nielsen, S; Johanson, G; Solheim, T

    1981-11-01

    In 1977, the Scandinavian Airlines System (SAS) established a dental X-ray file of all crew members. Its aim was to have immediately available an adequate set of physical antemortem data useful for identification in case of a fatal crash. Recently, an investigation into the quality and suitability of this material was carried out. The radiographs of 100 Danish, 100 Norwegian, and 100 Swedish pilots were picked at random and evaluated for formal deficiences, technical deficiencies, treatment pattern as useful for identification purposes, and the presence of pathology. The major results of the investigation were that a number of formal and technical deficiencies were disclosed, that the treatment pattern would seem adequate for identification purposes, and that a number of pathological findings were made, several of which had to be considered possible safety risks in the form of barodontalgia. PMID:7305798

  3. Glacial and periglacial landforms in Denmark: Scandinavian analogs for Martian features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossbacher, L. A.

    1984-01-01

    The geomorphology of Denmark is dominated by glacial deposits, including both end moraines and ground moraines. Many of these features have morphologies similar to features observed on Mars. A characteristic landscape complex in Denmark is a series of irregular mounds or parallel curvilinear ridges that outline the former ice margin. Many of these resemble curviliner features on Mars, and the Danish landforms occur at a similar scale. Another distinctive landform in Denmark is the hummocky moraine landscape found in parts of Sjaelland. Although their size is smaller, these areas resemble the hummocky terrain associated with some of the curvilinear features in the northern plains of Mars. The hummocky Danish terrain is probably caused by the melting of masses of dead ice left during glacial retreat. Similar landscapes observed developing during retreat of smaller glaciers were ice caps in Scandinavian mountains and in Greenland.

  4. Viking and Early Middle Ages Northern Scandinavian Textiles Proven to be made with Hemp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoglund, G.; Nockert, M.; Holst, B.

    2013-10-01

    Nowadays most plant textiles used for clothing and household are made of cotton and viscose. Before the 19th century however, plant textiles were mainly made from locally available raw materials, in Scandinavia these were: nettle, hemp and flax. It is generally believed that in Viking and early Middle Ages Scandinavia hemp was used only for coarse textiles (i.e. rope and sailcloth). Here we present an investigation of 10 Scandinavian plant fibre textiles from the Viking and Early Middle Ages, believed to be locally produced. Up till now they were all believed to be made of flax. We show that 4 textiles, including two pieces of the famous Överhogdal Viking wall-hanging are in fact made with hemp (in three cases hemp and flax are mixed). This indicates that hemp was important, not only for coarse but also for fine textile production in Viking and Early Middle Ages in Scandinavia.

  5. Viking and early Middle Ages northern Scandinavian textiles proven to be made with hemp.

    PubMed

    Skoglund, G; Nockert, M; Holst, B

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays most plant textiles used for clothing and household are made of cotton and viscose. Before the 19th century however, plant textiles were mainly made from locally available raw materials, in Scandinavia these were: nettle, hemp and flax. It is generally believed that in Viking and early Middle Ages Scandinavia hemp was used only for coarse textiles (i.e. rope and sailcloth). Here we present an investigation of 10 Scandinavian plant fibre textiles from the Viking and Early Middle Ages, believed to be locally produced. Up till now they were all believed to be made of flax. We show that 4 textiles, including two pieces of the famous Överhogdal Viking wall-hanging are in fact made with hemp (in three cases hemp and flax are mixed). This indicates that hemp was important, not only for coarse but also for fine textile production in Viking and Early Middle Ages in Scandinavia. PMID:24135914

  6. Geomorphological evidence of channelized subglacial meltwater drainage under the Scandinavian Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, Aleksander; Wysota, Wojciech; Sobiech, Marcin; Piotrowski, Jan A.

    2016-04-01

    The impact of subglacial meltwater erosion on shaping glacial landscapes is contentious and often difficult to constrain due to the lack of unequivocal diagnostic criteria. The same holds for the role of subglacial meltwater in glacier movement processes and sediment transport and deposition. Here we present new evidence of widespread channelized erosion under the southern, soft-bedded fringe of the last Scandinavian Ice Sheet (SIS) based on high-resolution terrain analysis with LiDAR imagery. We identify several tens of sites with "glacial curvilineation" landscapes first recognized by Lesemann et al. (2010, 2014) and considered as evidence of erosion by turbulent meltwater flows at the ice/bed interface. The "glacial curvilineation" landscapes mapped here consist of sets of parallel, winding ridges typically several metres high and up to several kilometres long occupying glacial overdeepenings and tunnel valleys. The ridges are aligned approximately perpendicular to the past ice sheet margins and they are composed of various deposits often pre-dating the last ice advance. We interpret them as erosional remnants of older landscapes dissected by high-energy subglacial meltwater flows. These findings suggest that the palaeoglaciological significance of meltwater drainage under the southern portion of SIS may have been grossly underestimated. References Lesemann, J.-E., Piotrowski, J.A. and Wysota, W., 2010. „Glacial curvilineations": New glacial landforms produced by longitudinal vortices in subglacial meltwater flows. Geomorphology 120, 153-161. Lesemann, J.-E., Piotrowski, J.A. and Wysota, W., 2014. Genesis of the "glacial curvilineation" landscape by meltwater processes under the former Scandinavian Ice Sheet, Poland. Sedimentary Geology 312, 1-18.

  7. Pioneering early Intensive Care Medicine by the 'Scandinavian Method' of treatment for severe acute barbiturate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Trubuhovich, R V

    2015-07-01

    Between the 1920s and the mid-1950s, barbiturates were the sedative-hypnotic agents most used in clinical practice. Their ready availability and narrow therapeutic margin accounted for disturbingly high rates of acute poisoning, whether suicidal or accidental. Until the late 1940s, medical treatment was relatively ineffective, with mortality subsequently high - not only from the effects of coma, respiratory depression and cardiovascular shock with renal impairment, but also from complications of the heavy use in the 1930s and 1940s of analeptic stimulating agents. Incidence of barbiturate intoxication increased substantially following World War II and this paper details development of what became known as the 'Scandinavian Method' of treatment, which contributed substantially to the earliest establishment of intensive care units and to the practice and methods of intensive care medicine. Three names stand out for the pioneering of this treatment. Successively, psychiatrist, Aage Kirkegaard, for introducing effective anti-shock fluid therapy; anaesthetist, Eric Nilsson, for introducing anaesthesiologic principles, including manual intermittent positive pressure ventilation into management; and, psychiatrist, Carl Clemmesen, for introducing centralisation of seriously poisoned patients in a dedicated unit. Clemmesen's Intoxication Unit opened at the Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, on 1 October 1949. ICU pioneer Bjørn Ibsen suggested it was the initial ICU, while noting that it supplied Intensive Therapy for one type of disorder only (as had HCA Lassen's Blegdam Hospital unit for Denmark's 1952 to 1953 polio epidemic). Treatment for barbiturate poisoning during the 1950s in some other Scandinavian hospitals will also be considered briefly. PMID:26126074

  8. Complete spectrum of PAH mutations in Tataria: presence of Slavic, Turkic and Scandinavian mutations.

    PubMed

    Kuzmin, A I; Eisensmith, R C; Goltsov, A A; Sergeeva, N A; Schwartz, E I; Woo, S L

    1995-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder associated with a deficiency of hepatic phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). Although the molecular lesions present in the PAH genes of PKU patients have previously been determined in several Slavic populations, little is known regarding the molecular basis of PKU in the non-Slavic populations of the former Soviet Union. Guthrie card samples from twenty-one classical PKU patients residing in the Tatarian Republic were examined by a combination of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and direct sequence analysis. Twelve patients were of Tatarian ancestry, five were of Russian ancestry, and four were of mixed Tatarian and Russian ancestry. Two of the Tatarian patients were related, sharing one mutant allele. The single major allele identified in this study was R408W/RFLP haplotype 2/VNTR 3, which was present on 11/14 or 78.6% of all mutant chromosomes of Slavic origin, but on only 10/27 or 37.0% of mutant chromosomes of Tatarian origin. This result suggests that this allele was introduced into central Asian populations during the eastward expansion of Slavs across the Eurasian landmass. A significant influence of Turkic peoples on Tatars can be inferred from the presence of R261Q. IVS10nt546g --> a, L48S, IVS2nt5g --> c and P281L, all of which are relatively common among Turks or have been observed in Mediterranean populations. Together, these alleles are present on 11/27 or 40.7% of all mutant chromosomes in ethnic Tatars. Surprisingly, the common Scandinavian mutation IVS12ntlg --> a was also present in Tataria, as was the delta agE221D222fs mutation found previously only in Denmark. Thus, some direct or indirect gene flow from Scandinavian into Tataria seems evident. Finally, the complete absence of PAH mutations previously observed in Oriental populations suggests that there was little gene flow into Tataria from Eastern Asia. PMID:8528673

  9. Spatio-temporal variability of NDVI-precipitation over southernmost South America: possible linkages between climate signals and epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourre, Y. M.; Jarlan, L.; Lacaux, J.-P.; Rotela, C. H.; Lafaye, M.

    2008-10-01

    Climate-environment variability affects the rates of incidence of vector-borne and zoonotic diseases and is possibly associated with epidemics outbreaks. Over southernmost South America the joint spatio-temporal evolution of climate-environment is analyzed for the 1982-2004 period. Detailed mapping of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and rainfall variability are then compared to zones with preliminary epidemiological reports. A significant quasi-biennial signal (2.2- to 2.4-year periods, or QB) for joint NDVI-rainfall variability is revealed. From rotated EOFs, dominant NDVI patterns are partitioned according to their lead frequencies: (1) the 'QB group' (2.1-to 3-year periods) includes six modes over southern Brazil, Uruguay, northern-central Argentina (two modes), the southern Paraguay-northern Argentina border, and the Santa Cruz Province; (2) the QB1 (2.4- to 3-year periods) + quasi-quadrennial (QQ) mode over the Misiones Province; and (3) the QB2 (2.1- to 2.5-year periods) + QQ + inter-annual (IA) (3- to 7-year periods) two modes over south-eastern Argentina. Modes within the 'QB group' are positively correlated with global climate signals and SST. The Uruguayan mode is correlated with global ENSO (8-month lag) whilst the southern Entre-Rios/northern Buenos Aires provinces are correlated with central equatorial Pacific SSTs (3-month lag). The Santa Cruz (Patagonia) Province is most correlated with the Pacific South America (PSA) index and SST patterns (3-month lag) along the Antarctica circumpolar current. The spatial distribution of lead NDVI modes includes the Formosa, Misiones, Chaco and Buenos Aires provinces among others, known for being prone to vector-borne epidemics such as dengue fever, malaria, leishmaniasis (American cutaneous leishmaniasis or ACL), hantivirus, chagas and Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF). Some provinces also correspond to regions where lead NDVI PCs' modes are associated with high-frequency climate signals such as the

  10. India-Asia collision was at 24°N and 50 Ma: palaeomagnetic proof from southernmost Asia.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jun; Wang, Chengshan; Zhao, Xixi; Coe, Rob; Li, Yalin; Finn, David

    2012-01-01

    How and when India collided with Asia is crucial for global climate and continental dynamics. We present new palaeomagnetic data showing that the Xigaze forearc basin of southern Tibet was located at 24.2 ± 5.9°N during 54-57 Ma, providing a direct constraint on the position of the southernmost margin of Asia at this crucial stage. Our study suggests 1) the age and locus of the initial India-Asia collision are at ~50 Ma and ~24°N, respectively; 2) Tibet resisted India's northward push during the first ~16 Ma of initial impact from the collision and experienced little latitudinal displacement; and 3) Sometime a little after 34 Ma, Greater India was consumed and thicker Indian Craton subsequently made contact with Asia, resulting in ~6° northward drift of Asia. Our model has implications for the process by which the high proto-Tibetan plateau formed and for the two slowdowns of India's convergence rate with Asia. PMID:23226592

  11. India-Asia collision was at 24°N and 50 Ma: palaeomagnetic proof from southernmost Asia

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jun; Wang, Chengshan; Zhao, Xixi; Coe, Rob; Li, Yalin; Finn, David

    2012-01-01

    How and when India collided with Asia is crucial for global climate and continental dynamics. We present new palaeomagnetic data showing that the Xigaze forearc basin of southern Tibet was located at 24.2±5.9°N during 54–57 Ma, providing a direct constraint on the position of the southernmost margin of Asia at this crucial stage. Our study suggests 1) the age and locus of the initial India-Asia collision are at ~50 Ma and ~24°N, respectively; 2) Tibet resisted India's northward push during the first ~16 Ma of initial impact from the collision and experienced little latitudinal displacement; and 3) Sometime a little after 34 Ma, Greater India was consumed and thicker Indian Craton subsequently made contact with Asia, resulting in ~6° northward drift of Asia. Our model has implications for the process by which the high proto-Tibetan plateau formed and for the two slowdowns of India's convergence rate with Asia. PMID:23226592

  12. U/Pb ages of ophiolites and arc-related plutons of the Norwegian Caledonides: implications for the development of Iapetus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunning, G. R.; Pedersen, R. B.

    1988-01-01

    U/Pb zircon ages are reported for four ophiolites and three crosscutting arc-related plutons from the Norwegian Caledonides. Plagiogranite differentiated from gabbro of the Karmøy ophiolite is dated at 493+7/-4 Ma whereas arc-related trondhjemite cutting this ophiolite crystallized at 485+/-2 Ma. A crosscutting clinopyroxene-phyric gabbro intrusion is dated at 470+9/-5 Ma by near concordant magmatic titanite (sphene) and discordant U-rich (2903 6677 ppm) zircon. Lower intercepts of 247+/-68 and 191+/-70 Ma defined by the plagiogranite and clinopyroxene-phyric gabbro best-fit lines may reflect a real low-T alteration/rift-related event. A plagiogranite differentiate of the Gullfjellet ophiolite complex is dated at 489+/-3 Ma and a crosscutting arc-related tonalite is 482+6/-4 Ma. Both of these ages overlap with those of the correlative rocks at Karmøy suggesting that they are parts of one ophiolitic terrane with a common history. Trondhjemite associated with the Leka ophiolite is dated at 497+/-2 Ma, indicating that supra-subduction zone magmatism there may be coeval with spreading which formed the Karmøy axis sequence. The U/Pb zircon ages of Norwegian ophiolites reported here, combined with ages of other Appalachian-Caledonian ophiolite complexes in Britain and Canada, indicate a narrow age range for the generation of at least two marginal basins in the Tremadoc-Arenig. Two spreading episodes documented at Karmøy are separated in time by intrusion of arc-related trondhjemite magmas at 485+/-2 Ma and may correlate with two separate spreading events documented in other ophiolites. The Solund/Stavfjorden ophiolite, at 443+/-3 Ma, is the only late Ordovician ophiolite yet documented in the entire Appalachian-Caledonian Orogen and it probably represents a small, short-lived marginal basin late in the history of the Iapetus Ocean. It is correlative with Caradocian ensialic marginal basin magmatism in Wales and the Trondheim region, and with tholeiitic gabbro

  13. Ediacaran-Devonian opening and closing of the complex Iapetus Ocean and the formation of an accretionary orogen in the northern Appalachians and British Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Staal, Cees; Zagorevski, Alexandre

    2013-04-01

    Prior to the formation of Pangea, the Northern Appalachians-British Caledonides accretionary orogen formed over ca. 150 my by piecemeal accretion of outboard terranes to a progressively growing composite Laurentian margin. The accreted material originated either in seaways and marginal basins in the peri-Gondwanan or peri-Laurentian realms and comprises micro-continental ribbons with arc supra-structure and, to a lesser extent, supra-subduction zone oceanic slivers. The preponderance of micro-continental ribbons in Iapetus necessitates detailed knowledge of the opening history in order to understand the closure. The final opening of Iapetus took place between 550 and 540 Ma following a ca. 70 my period of rifting and formation of extensive hyper-extended, non volcanic segments with adjacent seaways partially underlain by exhumed lithospheric mantle along the Laurentian margin. The conjugate margin to Laurentia likely was represented by Arequipa-Antofalla, which was left behind when Amazonia departed earlier during the Ediacaran. Subduction in Iapetus initiated at ca. 515 Ma at opposite margins, probably as a result of a major plate reorganization following the terminal amalgamation of Gondwana. Shortly thereafter Ganderia and Avalonia diachronously rifted-off Gondwana and drifted towards Laurentia, opening the Rheic Ocean in their wake. Meguma could have travelled with Avalonia or as a separate microcontinent. Closure of the main tract of the Iapetus Ocean took place during the Late Ordovician following arc-arc collision. Iapetus' main closure did not lead to widespread orogenesis; most collisional damage took place as a result of arrival of continental ribbons at the composite Laurentian margin following closure of narrow oceanic, Iapetus-related seaways or marginal basins The resultant deformation is grouped into Cambro-Ordovician Taconic-Grampian, Silurian Salinic-Scandian and Devonian Acadian orogenies; however, these orogenies are all composite and involve

  14. Basement-cover relationships in the Grampian Caledonides of Scotland - extensional strain preceding continental rupture and generation of the Laurentian ocean-continent transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, Graham; Smith, Martin; Gillespie, Martin; Thomas, Christopher; Krabbendam, Maarten

    2010-05-01

    Ancient rift and passive margin basins can frequently only be studied in outcrop after uplift following orogenesis. Such basins are thus deformed, metamorphosed and partially eroded as a consequence of closure of the oceanic system in which the passive margin was originally established. As a result there are significant challenges in restoration and interpretation of the original basin geometries and lithostratigraphical relationships. The mid-Neoproterozoic to Cambrian Dalradian Supergroup of Scotland and Ireland was intensively deformed and metamorphosed by mid-Ordovician arc-accretion (c. 460 Ma) during the Caledonian Orogeny. Nevertheless, we can determine a history of stretching and break-up associated with rupture of the Neoproterozoic supercontinent of Rodinia and opening of Iapetus. Continental fragments apparently separated from the passive margin during rift-drift transition. The extensional structures bounding the various fragments subsequently exerted control on the collisional geometry and acted as nuclei for deformation structures during Caledonian orogenesis. Reading the record of Neoproterozoic extension in the Scottish Caledonides is further complicated by the need to unravel the structural record at the boundary between the Dalradian Supergroup and underlying early-Neoproterozoic metamorphic basement. The depositional age of the Dalradian succession is not well constrained but the oldest strata could pre-date 800 Ma. If such should be the case, then the thick siliciclastic deposits characteristic of the lower Dalradian Grampian Group succession accumulated before 800 Ma during an early stretching phase (distributed high angle faulting) that led to crustal thinning (low-angle shearing). A major low-angle, regional-scale ductile shear zone in the upper levels of the underlying basement is arranged sub-parallel to the present structural base of the Dalradian. The high-temperature regional metamorphism in basement is c. 830 Ma old while the ductile

  15. Extension, disruption and translation of an orogenic wedge by exhumation of large ultrahigh pressure terranes: Two examples from the Norwegian Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brueckner, H. K.; Cuthbert, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    We propose the thrust-dominated accretion of an orogenic wedge during continental subduction can be succeeded by stretching, disruption and passive transport of the frontal part of the wedge on top of an exhuming high pressure/ultrahigh pressure (HP/UHP) metamorphic terrane. Initial thrusting occurs when cratons collide and one subducts beneath the other into the mantle. The subducted craton undergoes HP/UHP metamorphism while an accretionary orogenic wedge develops at its junction with the overlying craton. The subsequent exhumation of the HP/UHP terrane either by true extension and/or buoyancy-driven extrusion reverses the shear traction along its upper boundary from its earlier foreland-directed thrust motion to hinterland-directed normal displacement. This normal-sense shear stretches the orogenic wedge and can potentially detach a fragment of its frontal part away from the rearward part, allowing it to be carried passively towards the foreland on the exhuming plate with the length of displacement a function of the amount of exhumation of the HP/UHP terrane. The Jotun and Trondheim Basin Nappe Complexes of the Caledonide orogenic wedge in southern and central Scandinavia were thrust (sensu stricto) E/SE onto the Baltic Shield during the Scandian Orogeny when the western edge of Baltica subducted into the mantle beneath Laurentia to form the HP/UHP Western Gneiss Complex (WGC). Kinematic indicators along the basal décollements of orogenic wedge allochthons indicate a change in shear sense from top-E/SE to top-W/NW at the same time (≈415 Ma) radiometric ages indicate the WGC began exhumation from the mantle. The shear traction along the top of the exhuming WGC stretched the Jotun and Trondheim Basin allochthons, then broke them into segments, and finally separated the frontal part of some of the allochthons away from the main body, causing them to be carried passively E/SE as the WGC continued to exhume out of the mantle. The lack of fragmentation and absence

  16. The petrogenesis of felsic calc-alkaline magmas from the southernmost Cascades, California: origin by partial melting of basaltic lower crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borg, L.E.; Clynne, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    The majority offelsic rocks from composite centers in teh southernmost Cascades have geochemical and Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic ratios that suggest derivation by partial melting of lower crust that is compositionally similar to cale-alkaline basalts observed in the region. Only a few felsic rocks have ???18O and Pb isotopic compositions that indicate interaction with the upper crust. Mineralogical and geochemical differences among the felsic magmas results primarily from melting under variable f(H2O) and lower temperature conditions leaves an amphibole-rich residuum, and produced magmas that have amphibole ?? biotite phenocrysts, relatively high silica contents, and pronounced middle rare earch element depletions. These conclusions are consistent with published thermal models that suggest that reasonable volumes of basaltic magma emplaced beneath large composite centers in the southernmost Cascades can serve as the eat source for melting of the lower crust. Melting of the lower crust under varible f(H2O contents of these basaltic magmas.

  17. Hornblende-rich, high grade metamorphic terranes in the southernmost Sierra Nevada, California, and implications for crustal depths and batholith roots

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, Donald Clarence

    1983-01-01

    The southernmost Sierra Nevaaa widely exposes hornblende-rich, gneissic to granoblastic, amphibolite- to granulite-grade, metamorphic rocks and associated magmatic rocks, all of mid-Cretaceous age. Locally, red garnet, in part in euhedral crystals as large as 10 cm, as well as strongly pleochroic hyperstnene, characterize these rocks. These hornblende-rich rocks dominate the north slopes of the southern tail of the Sierra Nevada, but are also present as inclusion masses of various sizes in the dominantly granitic terrane to She northeast. The mafic, hornblende-rich rocks reflect a deeper crustal level than the dominantly granitic terrane to the northeast based on: 1) 'index' minerals (presence of hypersthene, coarse garnet, and brown hornblende; 2) textures (considerable ambivalence of whether individual samples are metamorphic or magmatic, 3) metamorphic grade (at least local granulite facies); and 4) the presence of migmatite, and the eviaence of local melting and mobilization. These rocks may be exposures of the upper part of the root zone and metamorphic substrate of the Sierra Nevada batholith. Xenoliths of gneiss, amphibolite, and granulite from sub-batholithic levels, that have been transported upward and preserved in volcanic rocks in the central Sierra Nevada, are similar to some exposed rocks of the southernmost Sierra Nevada. Hypersthene-bearing granulite and tonalite, as well as distinctive granofels of mid-Cretaceous age, are exposed in the western part of the Santa Lucia Range (some 300 km to the northwest across the San Andreas fault). These rocks have much in common with some of the metamorphic and magmatic rocks in the southernmost Sierra Nevada, suggesting that the two areas record similar metamorphic conditions and crustal depth. Mid-Cretaceous hypersthene granulite is rare, which makes correlation of the Santa Lucia Range and the southernmost Sierra Nevada seem attractive. Nevertheless, possibly significant petrographic anm rock distribution

  18. Direct precipitation on demand at large Scandinavian WWTPs reduces the effluent phosphorus load.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Ann; Nivert, Glen; Heinonen, Mari

    2012-01-01

    On demand use of direct precipitation of wastewater has been successfully implemented at several large Scandinavian wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) as a cost-efficient method of treating wastewater bypassing secondary treatment. During wet weather situations or when the capacity of secondary treatment is reduced excess wastewater can be treated through efficient direct precipitation. This increases the total capacity of the WWTP to remove phosphorus during these periods. This treatment strategy allows the WWTPs to meet stringent effluent phosphorus limits without extending secondary treatment of the main plant, despite high wet weather flows. The gain in terms of reduced phosphorus emissions varies depending on local conditions such as climate, collection system and secondary treatment capacity. It also varies from year to year depending on the weather and reductions of capacity due to planned refurbishing or unplanned breakdown of equipment. Operating chemical precipitation on demand has proved to contain challenges to operation and organisation of the WWTP. These challenges include logistics of start-up, training of staff and maintaining the system between occasions of operation. Sufficient up-stream storage capacity, reliable weather forecasts and good contracts with suppliers of chemicals are keys of success. PMID:22643403

  19. The drainage of the Baltic Ice Lake and a new Scandinavian reference 10Be production rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroeven, Arjen P.; Heyman, Jakob; Fabel, Derek; Björck, Svante; Caffee, Marc W.; Fredin, Ola; Harbor, Jonathan M.

    2015-04-01

    An important constraint on the reliability of cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating is the derivation of tightly controlled production rates. We present a new dataset for 10Be production rate calibration from Mount Billingen, southern Sweden, the site of the final drainage of the Baltic Ice Lake, an event dated to 11,620 ± 100 cal yr BP. Nine samples of flood-scoured bedrock surfaces and depositional boulders and cobbles unambiguously connected to the drainage event yield a reference 10Be production rate of 4.09 ± 0.22 atoms g-1 yr-1 for the CRONUS Lm scaling and 3.93 ± 0.21 atoms g-1 yr-1 for the LSD general spallation scaling. We also recalibrate the reference 10Be production rates for four sites in Norway and combine these with the Billingen results to derive a tightly clustered Scandinavian reference 10Be production rate of 4.12 ± 0.10 (4.12 ± 0.25 for altitude scaling) atoms g-1 yr-1 for the Lm scaling scheme and 3.96 ± 0.10 (3.96 ± 0.24 for altitude scaling) atoms g-1 yr-1 for the LSD scaling scheme.

  20. The Impact of Geothermal Heat on the Scandinavian Ice Sheet's LGM Extent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szuman, Izabela; Ewertowski, Marek W.; Kalita, Jakub Z.

    2016-04-01

    The last Scandinavian ice sheet attained its most southern extent over Poland and Germany, protruding c. 200 km south of the main ice sheet mass. There are number of factors that may control ice sheet dynamics and extent. One of the less recognised is geothermal heat, which is heat that is supplied to the base of the ice sheet. A heat at the ice/bed interface plays a crucial role in controlling ice sheet stability, as well as impacting basal temperatures, melting, and ice flow velocities. However, the influence of geothermal heat is still virtually neglected in reconstructions and modelling of paleo-ice sheets behaviour. Only in a few papers is geothermal heat recalled though often in the context of past climatic conditions. Thus, the major question is if and how spatial differences in geothermal heat had influenced paleo-ice sheet dynamics and in consequence their extent. Here, we assumed that the configuration of the ice sheet along its southern margin was moderately to strongly correlated with geothermal heat for Poland and non or negatively correlated for Germany.

  1. River runoff and regional climate of a small glaciated catchment area in the Andes in southernmost Patagonia, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, C.; Moritz, M.; Kilian, R.

    2003-04-01

    The river runoff from a small partly glaciated catchment area in southernmost Patagonian Andes in Chile is measured to analyse the influence of regional precipitation and climate dependent glacier ablation on runoff. The first data from March to September 2002 were compared to climate data recorded at an automatic weather station in the area. The poster presents the first detailed hydrometeorological investigation from this part of the Andes. The investigation area is located at 53°S in southernmost South America exactly east of the main divide of the mountain range of the Andes at 72.5°W. The catchment area of about 15 km2 comprises parts of the Gran Campo Nevado Ice Cap reaching up to 1500 m asl, and the outlet glacier Glaciar Lengua which ends at a proglacial lake at 100 m asl. The Gran Campo Nevado Ice Cap is the major ice mass between the Southern Patagonian Ice field in the north and the Strait of Magallan to the South. Climate in the area is characterised by whole-year round cool and super-humid conditions with a mean annual air temperature of 5,6°C at sea level and an annual precipitation sum of approximately 7,000 mm. The Río Lengua itself meets approximately 3.5 km downstreams from the proglacial lake into the fjord system of Canal Garjado which is a branch of Seno Skyring. A continuous hourly record of water levels in the river was obtained from two digital water depth sensors. Runoff was calibrated against river level by measuring runoff at different times with the tracer method of salt dilution and with velocity measurements employing a hydrometric vane. Mean runoff was computed to about 3 m3/s with peak flows exceeding 10 m3/s. Ablation on the glacier was estimated using the degree-day method with a degree-day factor that has been calibrated previously using data from a temporal energy balance weather station on Glacíar Lengua. The correlation between runoff and air temperature and precipitation returned significant correlation coefficients of rt

  2. Inheritance of diapause in crosses between the northernmost and the southernmost strains of the Asian corn borer Ostrinia furnacalis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shu; Chen, Chao; Xiao, Liang; He, Haimin; Xue, Fangsen

    2015-01-01

    The northernmost Harbin strain (N strain) of the Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis enters facultative diapause as fully grown larvae in response to short daylengths; whereas the southernmost Ledong strain (S strain) exhibits almost no diapause under the same light conditions. In the present study, we examined the inheritance of diapause induction and termination by crossing the two strains under a range of environmental conditions. The N strain showed a typical long-day response with a critical daylength of approximately15.88 h at 22°C, 15.72 h at 25°C and 15.14 h at 28°C, whereas the S strain showed a weak photoperiodic response at 22°C. The F1 progeny also showed a long-day response at 22, 25 and 28°C. However, the critical daylengths in S ♀ × N ♂ crosses were significantly longer than those in N ♀ × S ♂ crosses, indicating a sex linkage in the inheritance of diapause induction, with the male parent having more influence on the following F1 progeny. The incidence of diapause in S ♀ × N ♂ crosses was the same as in the N strain under short daylengths of 11-13 h, indicating that diapause trait is completely dominant over the non-diapause trait. The critical daylength in backcross to N was significantly longer than it was in backcross to S, showing a grandfather gene effect. Whether the inheritance of diapause fits an additive hypothesis or not was dependent on the rearing photoperiod, and the capacity for diapause was transmitted genetically in the manner of incomplete dominance. The duration of diapause for the reciprocal crosses under different diapause-terminating conditions showed different patterns of inheritance. The results in this study reveal that genetic and genetic-environmental interactions are involved in diapause induction and termination in O. furnacalis. PMID:25706525

  3. Regional Extinctions and Quaternary Shifts in the Geographic Range of Lestodelphys halli, the Southernmost Living Marsupial: Clues for Its Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Formoso, Anahí E.; Martin, Gabriel M.; Teta, Pablo; Carbajo, Aníbal E.; Sauthier, Daniel E. Udrizar; Pardiñas, Ulyses F. J.

    2015-01-01

    The Patagonian opossum (Lestodelphys halli), the southernmost living marsupial, inhabits dry and open environments, mainly in the Patagonian steppe (between ~32°S and ~49°S). Its rich fossil record shows its occurrence further north in Central Argentina during the Quaternary. The paleoenvironmental meaning of the past distribution of L. halli has been mostly addressed in a subjective framework without an explicit connection with the climatic “space” currently occupied by this animal. Here, we assessed the potential distribution of this species and the changes occurred in its geographic range during late Pleistocene-Holocene times and linked the results obtained with conservation issues. To this end, we generated three potential distribution models with fossil records and three with current ones, using MaxEnt software. These models showed a decrease in the suitable habitat conditions for the species, highlighting a range shift from Central-Eastern to South-Western Argentina. Our results support that the presence of L. halli in the Pampean region during the Pleistocene-Holocene can be related to precipitation and temperature variables and that its current presence in Patagonia is more related to temperature and dominant soils. The models obtained suggest that the species has been experiencing a reduction in its geographic range since the middle Holocene, a process that is in accordance with a general increase in moisture and temperature in Central Argentina. Considering the findings of our work and the future scenario of global warming projected for Patagonia, we might expect a harsh impact on the distribution range of this opossum in the near future. PMID:26203650

  4. High Macroalgal Cover and Low Coral Recruitment Undermines the Potential Resilience of the World's Southernmost Coral Reef Assemblages

    PubMed Central

    Hoey, Andrew S.; Pratchett, Morgan S.; Cvitanovic, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Coral reefs are under increasing pressure from anthropogenic and climate-induced stressors. The ability of reefs to reassemble and regenerate after disturbances (i.e., resilience) is largely dependent on the capacity of herbivores to prevent macroalgal expansion, and the replenishment of coral populations through larval recruitment. Currently there is a paucity of this information for higher latitude, subtropical reefs. To assess the potential resilience of the benthic reef assemblages of Lord Howe Island (31°32′S, 159°04′E), the worlds' southernmost coral reef, we quantified the benthic composition, densities of juvenile corals (as a proxy for coral recruitment), and herbivorous fish communities. Despite some variation among habitats and sites, benthic communities were dominated by live scleractinian corals (mean cover 37.4%) and fleshy macroalgae (20.9%). Live coral cover was higher than in most other subtropical reefs and directly comparable to lower latitude tropical reefs. Juvenile coral densities (0.8 ind.m−2), however, were 5–200 times lower than those reported for tropical reefs. Overall, macroalgal cover was negatively related to the cover of live coral and the density of juvenile corals, but displayed no relationship with herbivorous fish biomass. The biomass of herbivorous fishes was relatively low (204 kg.ha−1), and in marked contrast to tropical reefs was dominated by macroalgal browsing species (84.1%) with relatively few grazing species. Despite their extremely low biomass, grazing fishes were positively related to both the density of juvenile corals and the cover of bare substrata, suggesting that they may enhance the recruitment of corals through the provision of suitable settlement sites. Although Lord Howe Islands' reefs are currently coral-dominated, the high macroalgal cover, coupled with limited coral recruitment and low coral growth rates suggest these reefs may be extremely susceptible to future disturbances. PMID:21991366

  5. Regional Extinctions and Quaternary Shifts in the Geographic Range of Lestodelphys halli, the Southernmost Living Marsupial: Clues for Its Conservation.

    PubMed

    Formoso, Anahí E; Martin, Gabriel M; Teta, Pablo; Carbajo, Aníbal E; Sauthier, Daniel E Udrizar; Pardiñas, Ulyses F J

    2015-01-01

    The Patagonian opossum (Lestodelphys halli), the southernmost living marsupial, inhabits dry and open environments, mainly in the Patagonian steppe (between ~32 °S and ~49 °S). Its rich fossil record shows its occurrence further north in Central Argentina during the Quaternary. The paleoenvironmental meaning of the past distribution of L. halli has been mostly addressed in a subjective framework without an explicit connection with the climatic "space" currently occupied by this animal. Here, we assessed the potential distribution of this species and the changes occurred in its geographic range during late Pleistocene-Holocene times and linked the results obtained with conservation issues. To this end, we generated three potential distribution models with fossil records and three with current ones, using MaxEnt software. These models showed a decrease in the suitable habitat conditions for the species, highlighting a range shift from Central-Eastern to South-Western Argentina. Our results support that the presence of L. halli in the Pampean region during the Pleistocene-Holocene can be related to precipitation and temperature variables and that its current presence in Patagonia is more related to temperature and dominant soils. The models obtained suggest that the species has been experiencing a reduction in its geographic range since the middle Holocene, a process that is in accordance with a general increase in moisture and temperature in Central Argentina. Considering the findings of our work and the future scenario of global warming projected for Patagonia, we might expect a harsh impact on the distribution range of this opossum in the near future. PMID:26203650

  6. The Friningen Garnet Peridotite (central Swedish Caledonides). A good example of the characteristic PTt path of a cold mantle wedge garnet peridotite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilio, Mattia; Clos, Frediano; van Roermund, Herman L. M.

    2015-08-01

    -bearing subduction zone fluids. The well-defined PTt-deformation path of the FGP resembles that of a mantle wedge garnet peridotite. The M1 assemblage originates from the base of a cold, old and thick subcontinental lithospheric mantle that is inferred to extend asymmetrically leading to extreme exhumation of FGP down to lithospheric conditions around 1.5 GPa and 850-900 °C. After that the FGP became incorporated into the subducting continental crust of the SNC during "early-Caledonian" subduction (M2) down to UHPM conditions (800 °C/3.0 GPa), subsequently followed by eduction back to sub-crustal levels. As such, FGP is the first locality in the Swedish Caledonides from which two UHP metamorphic events are described, the first event can be related to the formation of an ancient (> 1.0 Ga) lithosphere underneath a craton (Rodinia) and the second is of early-Caledonian age.

  7. Refinement of the MHC Risk Map in a Scandinavian Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Population

    PubMed Central

    Næss, Sigrid; Lie, Benedicte A.; Melum, Espen; Olsson, Marita; Hov, Johannes R.; Croucher, Peter J. P.; Hampe, Jochen; Thorsby, Erik; Bergquist, Annika; Traherne, James A.; Schrumpf, Erik; Boberg, Kirsten Muri; Schreiber, Stefan; Franke, Andre; Karlsen, Tom H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic variants within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) represent the strongest genetic susceptibility factors for primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Identifying the causal variants within this genetic complex represents a major challenge due to strong linkage disequilibrium and an overall high physical density of candidate variants. We aimed to refine the MHC association in a geographically restricted PSC patient panel. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 365 PSC cases and 368 healthy controls of Scandinavian ancestry were included in the study. We incorporated data from HLA typing (HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB3, -DRB1, -DQB1) and single nucleotide polymorphisms across the MHC (n = 18,644; genotyped and imputed) alongside previously suggested PSC risk determinants in the MHC, i.e. amino acid variation of DRβ, a MICA microsatellite polymorphism and HLA-C and HLA-B according to their ligand properties for killer immunoglobulin-like receptors. Breakdowns of the association signal by unconditional and conditional logistic regression analyses demarcated multiple PSC associated MHC haplotypes, and for eight of these classical HLA class I and II alleles represented the strongest association. A novel independent risk locus was detected near NOTCH4 in the HLA class III region, tagged by rs116212904 (odds ratio [95% confidence interval] = 2.32 [1.80, 3.00], P = 1.35×10−11). Conclusions/Significance Our study shows that classical HLA class I and II alleles, predominantly at HLA-B and HLA-DRB1, are the main risk factors for PSC in the MHC. In addition, the present assessments demonstrated for the first time an association near NOTCH4 in the HLA class III region. PMID:25521205

  8. Normative values for mandibular mobility in Scandinavian individuals 4-17 years of age.

    PubMed

    Stoustrup, P; Kristensen, K D; Küseler, A; Herlin, T; Pedersen, T K

    2016-08-01

    Assessment of mandibular mobility is an important part of the clinical oro-facial examination of paediatric and adolescent patients. The aims of the present cross-sectional study were to establish age-related normative values for mandibular mobility in a Scandinavian paediatric and adolescent cohort and to assess the validity of universal cut-off values for lower 'normal' mandibular ranges of motion. A total of 1114 Danish individuals between 4-17 years of age were included. Maximal mouth opening capacity and laterotrusion capacity were assessed, in each individual, according to a standardised measurement protocol. The mean maximal mouth opening capacity gradually increased from 38 mm (SD 6·1 mm) at age 4 to 54·5 mm (SD 6·8 mm) at age 17. No inter-gender difference in maximal mouth opening capacity was observed (P > 0·15). The mean maximal laterotrusion capacity gradually increased from 7·4 mm (SD. 1·1 mm) at age four to 10·1 mm (SD 1·9 mm) at age 17. A statistical significant inter-gender difference of 0·8 mm (SD 0·4 mm) was observed in relation to the total laterotrusion capacity; however, the clinical relevance of this significant difference is questionable. Normative values of mandibular function was established in individuals 4-17 years of age. Our findings oppose the use of a single universal cut-off value for 'normal' range of motion in paediatric and adolescent patients. Instead, we recommend to use the age-related normative values of mandibular range of motion as basis for the assessment of the development of oro-facial function. PMID:27145166

  9. Orogenesis at the southern tip of the Americas: the structural evolution of the Cordillera Darwin metamorphic complex, southernmost Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, W. Dickson

    1995-04-01

    New, detailed lithologic and structural data are presented from three separately mapped areas along the southern boundary of the Cordillera Darwin metamorphic complex of southernmost Chile. Cordillera Darwin is a unique uplift because it exposes the highest grade rocks in the Andes south of Peru and averages 1 km higher in elevation than adjacent areas. The structural data indicate that Cordillera Darwin experienced mid-Late Cretaceous trans-pressional deformation with a partitioned strike-slip component localized along the Beagle Channel that forms the southern boundary to the range. Foliation, lineation and fold axis trends indicate NE-SW-directed contraction and NW-SE strike-slip shearing (present directions) during progressive {D1}/{D2} Andean deformation. D2 deformation is marked by outcrop-to 10 km-scale south-southwest-vergent folds. Late Cretaceous-Tertiary brittle-ductile and brittle left-lateral strike-slip faults and shear zones crosscut all {D1}/{D2} structures. Although limited structural evidence for extensional tectonics was documented in this study, apparent normal offsets across both arms of the Beagle Channel and previously documented field evidence for extension from other areas in Cordillera Darwin suggest that transtensional displacements also may have occurred in southern Cordillera Darwin during the Late Cretaceous-Early Tertiary. Cordillera Darwin's position within the evolving Patagonian Orocline adjacent to an evolving Mesozoic-Cenozoic left-lateral transform boundary between the South American and Antarctic plates, and later the South American and Scotia plates, necessitates consideration of the possible effects of regional counterclockwise rotation on development of structures. Regional counterclockwise rotation of Cordillera Darwin may have controlled the temporal and spatial transition of deformational regimes within Cordillera Darwin. Exhumation of the metamorphic core of Cordillera Darwin during the Late Cretaceous-Early Tertiary is

  10. Radial patterns of bitumen dykes around Quaternary volcanoes, provinces of northern Neuquén and southernmost Mendoza, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobbold, Peter R.; Ruffet, Gilles; Leith, Leslie; Loseth, Helge; Rodrigues, Nuno; Leanza, Hector A.; Zanella, Alain

    2014-12-01

    Where the Neuquén Basin of Argentina abuts the Andes, hundreds of veins of solid hydrocarbon (bitumen) are visible at the surface. Many of these veins became mines, especially in the last century. By consensus, the bitumen has resulted from maturation of organic-rich shales, especially the Vaca Muerta Fm of Late Jurassic age, but also the Agrio Fm of Early Cretaceous age. To account for their maturation, recent authors have invoked regional subsidence, whereas early geologists invoked magmatic activity. During 12 field seasons (since 1998), we have tracked down the bitumen localities, mapped the veins and host rocks, sampled them, studied their compositions, and dated some of them. In the provinces of northern Neuquén and southernmost Mendoza, the bitumen veins are mostly sub-vertical dykes. They tend to be straight and continuous, crosscutting regional structures and strata of all ages, from Jurassic to Palaeocene. Most of the localities lie within 70 km of Tromen volcano, although four are along the Rio Colorado fault zone and another two are at the base of Auca Mahuida volcano. On both volcanic edifices, lavas are of late Pliocene to Pleistocene age. Although regionally many of the bitumen dykes tend to track the current direction of maximum horizontal tectonic stress (ENE), others do not. However, most of the dykes radiate outward from the volcanoes, especially Tromen. Thicknesses of dykes tend to be greatest close to Tromen and where the host rocks are the most resistant to fracturing. Many of the dykes occur in the exhumed hanging walls of deep thrusts, especially at the foot of Tromen. Here the bitumen is in places of high grade (impsonite), whereas further out it tends to be of medium grade (grahamite). A few bitumen dykes contain fragments of Vaca Muerta shale, so that we infer forceful expulsion of source rock. At Curacó Mine, some shale fragments contain bedding-parallel veins of fibrous calcite (beef) and these contain some bitumen, which is

  11. Crustal properties in the continuum Baltic Shield-Scandinavian Mountains from seismic ambient noise and magnetotelluric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Mansour, Walid; England, Richard W.; Fishwick, Stewart; Köhler, Andreas; Moorkamp, Max; Ottemøller, Lars; Smirnov, Maxim

    2016-04-01

    The Scandinavian passive margin is a good example of a region where a Precambrian shield is directly in contact with a younger mountain belt. Located along the Atlantic coast, the Scandinavian mountains, formed 440 Ma ago, show high peaks (> 1 km from the sea level) due to an uplift event 12 Ma ago. This topography contrasts strongly with the low topography of the Baltic shield (around 500 m from the sea level). If the mountain shows high topography compared to the shield, P-receiver functions analysis indicates that the Moho is deeper beneath the shield than beneath the orogenic belt. This result is surprising, as simple crustal isostasy would produce the opposite result. It is therefore likely that there is further variation in crustal and lithospheric properties between the shield and the mountain belt. In this perspective, several geophysical experiments (SCANLIPS2, POLENET-LAPNET, SCANLIPS3D, Norwegian National Seismic Network) have been deployed in the region in order to better understand the lateral variation in the crustal properties. From these different seismic arrays, we used the technique of ambient noise cross correlation in order to reconstruct the Rayleigh wave Green's function (R-R and Z-Z components) and produced a new Vs model of the upper crust in the transition between the Scandinavian mountains and Baltic Shield. In addition of this study, a magnetotelluric survey was done in the framework of MaSCa (MAgnetotellurics in the SCandes) project between 2011 and 2013 in the same area of broadband seismic network (Northern Scandinavia Mountains and the Baltic Shield). This project shows higher resistivity in the crust beneath the Baltic shield than beneath the orogenic belt. The results of this study are used in a joint inversion with seismic ambient noise in order to improve existing models. We used the multi objective genetic algorithms (GA) to inverse in the same time seismological data (receiver functions and dispersion curves from seismic ambient

  12. Triassic deformation of Permian Early Triassic arc-related sediments in the Beishan (NW China): Last pulse of the accretionary orogenesis in the southernmost Altaids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhonghua; Xiao, Wenjiao; Sun, Jimin; Windley, Brian F.; Glen, Richard; Han, Chunming; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Ji'en; Wan, Bo; Ao, Songjian; Song, Dongfang

    2015-11-01

    The Beishan orogenic collage (BOC) in the southernmost Altaids provides evidence of the final stage of evolution of the Paleo-Asian Ocean. However, the closure time of the Paleo-Asian Ocean in the BOC is controversial. From field mapping, and structural analysis of mesoscale, superposed folds in Early Triassic sediments in the Hongyanjing Basin in the central BOC, we define at least two phases of deformation, which we can bracket in age as end-Permian to Early-Late Triassic. The sandstones in the basin are poorly sorted with angular clasts, which indicates immaturity characteristic of proximal and rapid deposition. Geochemical data indicate that the Hongyanjing Basin probably developed in an arc-related setting near an active continental margin or mature island arc. Combined with published regional geological data, we interpret the Hongyanjing Basin as a Permian-Early Triassic inter-arc basin between the Carboniferous Mazongshan arc to the north and the Ordovician to Permian Huaniushan-Dundunshan arc to the south. In addition, the age distribution of our sediments shows that the active continental margin or continental arc on which the Hongyanjing arc-related basin sat was somehow independently distributed in the Paleo-Asian Ocean without any major contribution of provenance from the Tarim Craton and Dunhuang Block to the south and Southern Mongolia accretionary system to the north. Deformation of the superposed folds began in the end-Permian, continued in the Early Triassic, and ended before the middle Late Triassic (219 Ma). Therefore the accretionary orogenesis in the Beishan part of the southernmost Altaids was still ongoing in the early to middle Triassic, and it finished in the Late Triassic, which might have been the last pulse of the accretionary orogenesis in the southernmost Altaids. We correlate this terminal event with tectonic developments in the Kunlun and Qinling orogens in the Tethyan domain.

  13. Dynamics of the Zemgale Lobe of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet reconstructed from the subglacial landform record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamsters, Kristaps; Zelčs, Vitālijs

    2015-04-01

    Deglacial ice dynamics were inferred from the distribution, morphometry and sedimentology of subglacial bedforms such as drumlins, mega-flutes, mega-scale glacial lineations (MSGL), ribbed moraines, from meltwater features such as subglacial channels and eskers, and ice-marginal landforms, which were identified and mapped from the topographical maps and digital elevation models. The Zemgale Lobe operated in the area of the Central Latvian and Lithuanian Lowlands, and it was characterized by the fast ice flow that was sustained by a combination of subglacial deformation and basal sliding. The mosaic ice-bed deformation model is favoured due to observed sediment structures indicating ice/bed coupling and decoupling episodes. The landform record indicates on two major reactivations of the Zemgale Lobe during the overall deglaciation of the Late Weichselian Scandinavian Ice Sheet and may imply surge-type behaviour. The coexistence of subglacial bedform assemblage and overlapping of their morphometry demonstrates subglacial bedform continuum. A significant number of prominent esker chains are distinguished proximally from the marginal ridges of the North Lithuanian deglacial phase with an average spacing of 10 - 15 km. Some of eskers are found within subglacial channels recording change in meltwater discharge. The cores of the many eskers consist of coarse deposits - gravels, cobbles and boulders indicating episodes of high-energy and hyper-concentrated flow conditions. Ribbed moraines are superimposed on streamlined subglacial features, thereby indicating a shift of subglacial conditions, which promoted the shutdown of the SE part of the Zemgale Lobe. The presence of ribbed moraines on the Zemgale Lobe bed proves that they are distributed not only at the central parts of ice sheets but also outside the core areas. The structure or ribbed moraines is glaciotectonically deformed, and comprises multiple units of diamicton and sorted sediments, which formed by repeated

  14. The Ponto-Caspian basin as a final trap for southeastern Scandinavian Ice-Sheet meltwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudryn, Alina; Leroy, Suzanne A. G.; Toucanne, Samuel; Gibert-Brunet, Elisabeth; Tucholka, Piotr; Lavrushin, Yuri A.; Dufaure, Olivier; Miska, Serge; Bayon, Germain

    2016-09-01

    This paper provides new data on the evolution of the Caspian Sea and Black Sea from the Last Glacial Maximum until ca. 12 cal kyr BP. We present new analyses (clay mineralogy, grain-size, Nd isotopes and pollen) applied to sediments from the river terraces in the lower Volga, from the middle Caspian Sea and from the western part of the Black Sea. The results show that during the last deglaciation, the Ponto-Caspian basin collected meltwater and fine-grained sediment from the southern margin of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet (SIS) via the Dniepr and Volga Rivers. It induced the deposition of characteristic red-brownish/chocolate-coloured illite-rich sediments (Red Layers in the Black Sea and Chocolate Clays in the Caspian Sea) that originated from the Baltic Shield area according to Nd data. This general evolution, common to both seas was nevertheless differentiated over time due to the specificities of their catchment areas and due to the movement of the southern margin of the SIS. Our results indicate that in the eastern part of the East European Plain, the meltwater from the SIS margin supplied the Caspian Sea during the deglaciation until ∼13.8 cal kyr BP, and possibly from the LGM. That led to the Early Khvalynian transgressive stage(s) and Chocolate Clays deposition in the now-emerged northern flat part of the Caspian Sea (river terraces in the modern lower Volga) and in its middle basin. In the western part of the East European Plain, our results confirm the release of meltwater from the SIS margin into the Black Sea that occurred between 17.2 and 15.7 cal kyr BP, as previously proposed. Indeed, recent findings concerning the evolution of the southern margin of the SIS and the Black Sea, show that during the last deglaciation, occurred a westward release of meltwater into the North Atlantic (between ca. 20 and 16.7 cal kyr BP), and a southward one into the Black Sea (between 17.2 and 15.7 cal kyr BP). After the Red Layers/Chocolate Clays deposition in both seas

  15. Tree and forest water use under elevated CO2 and temperature in Scandinavian boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg Hasper, Thomas; Wallin, Göran; Lamba, Shubhangi; Sigurdsson, Bjarni D.; Laudon, Hjalmar; Medhurst, Jane L.; Räntfors, Mats; Linder, Sune; Uddling, Johan

    2014-05-01

    predictions of boreal atmosphere-biosphere interactions, indicating that tree responses to precipitation and temperature are more important than responses to elevated [CO2] in determining the future forest water-use and hydrology of Scandinavian boreal ecosystems.

  16. Den Entry Behavior in Scandinavian Brown Bears: Implications for Preventing Human Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Sahlén, Veronica; Friebe, Andrea; Sæbø, Solve; Swenson, Jon E; Støen, Ole-Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Encounters between Scandinavian brown bears (Ursus arctos) and humans that result in human injuries and fatalities typically coincide with den entry in October and November, and commonly occur near a den. Our aim was to determine when bears arrive at their dens, identify potential predictors of this event, document behavior and activity associated with this period, and attempt to explain the increased risk of bear-caused human injuries in this period. We analyzed global positioning system (GPS) location and activity data from brown bears in south-central Sweden, using generalized linear mixed models, statistical process control, and activity analyses. Bears arrived at their den sites between 6 October and 1 December. Timing varied by reproductive category, bear age, and year. Half of all bears significantly reduced their activity before arriving at the den area: on average 2,169 m away from the den and 1.8 days before arrival. The other half reduced their activity after arriving at the den area. The latter bears took longer time to reach hibernation activity levels, but we did not find a difference in the start date of hibernation between the 2 groups. Bears also appeared to be sensitive to disturbance in this period, with higher den abandonment rates than later in winter, particularly for males and for bears that had not visited their den sites previously. Den entry occurred from October to December, with high variability and poor predictability of its timing. Therefore, restricting hunting or other recreation activities to reduce risk of injury by bears and disturbing bears probably would be both impractical and ineffective. Our findings can be used to educate hunters about bear behavior at this time of year. Many people associate dens with an increased risk of a bear responding aggressively to disturbance to defend its den, but our results indicate that other behavioral, and possibly physiological, changes in this period also may be involved. © 2014 The

  17. 10Be dating of the Narsarsuaq moraine in southernmost Greenland: evidence for a late-Holocene ice advance exceeding the Little Ice Age maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsor, K.; Carlson, A. E.; Rood, D. H.

    2014-08-01

    In southernmost Greenland near Narsarsuaq, the terminal Narsarsuaq moraine was deposited well outside of a historical Little Ice Age (LIA) moraine adjacent to the modern ice margin. Using 10Be surface exposure dating, we determine Narsarsuaq moraine abandonment at 1.51 ± 0.11 ka. A second set of 10Be ages from a more ice-proximal position shows that ice has been within or at its historical (i.e., LIA) extent since 1.34 ± 0.15 ka. Notably, Narsarsuaq moraine abandonment was coincident with climate amelioration in southern Greenland. Southern Greenland warming at ˜1.5 ka was also concurrent with the end of the Roman Warm Period as climate along the northern North Atlantic sector of Europe cooled into the Dark Ages. The warming of southern Greenland and retreat of ice from the Narsarsuaq moraine is consistent with studies suggesting possible anti-phase centennial-scale climate variability between northwestern Europe and southern Greenland. Other southernmost Greenland ice-margin records do not preclude a pre-LIA ice-margin maximum, potentially concurrent with a Narsarsuaq advance prior to ˜1.51 ka, but also lack sufficient ice-margin control to confirm such a correlation. We conclude that there is a clear need to further determine whether a late-Holocene pre-LIA maximum was a local phenomenon or a regional southern Greenland ice maximum, and if this advance and retreat reflects a regional fluctuation in climate.

  18. Peace Education Books. A Selective Bibliography with a Focus on Materials in English, German, and the Scandinavian Languages. Peace Education Miniprints No. 73.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjerstedt, Ake

    This document lists 30 pages of monographs and collections of papers explicitly dealing with peace education. The major focus is on materials in English, German or the Scandinavian languages from later years. For those who are not familiar at all with this area, an asterisk (*) has been used to mark publications valuable for introduction and…

  19. Scandinavian Emigration to Australia and New Zealand Project. Proceedings of a Symposium (Turku, Finland, February 17-19, 1982). Migration Studies C7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koivukangas, Olavi, Ed.

    These proceedings of a 1982 symposium on Scandinavian emigration in Australia include presentations on three general topics: field work conducted in Australia and New Zealand in 1980-82; research progress; and Australian immigration policy. The presentors and their papers are: (1) Hans Norman, "The Emigration to America from the Nordic countries";…

  20. Sixth Anglo-Scandinavian Public Library Conference on Public Libraries as Cultural Centres, Koli, Finland, 19th - 23rd August, 1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rautalin, Marja-Leena, Ed.

    The developing role of the library as a center for cultural activity was the principal subject of discussion at the sixth Anglo-Scandinavian Library Conference. Aspects of this growing function which were treated in participants' papers included: the spectrum of activities which is encompassed by the word "cultural"; the library's role in…

  1. Efficiency of preventive actions for landslides and flooding - evaluation of Scandinavian practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, R.; Andersson-sköld, Y. B.; Nyberg, L.; Johansson, M.; Persson, E.

    2011-12-01

    Author: Ramona Bergman, Yvonne Andersson-Sköld, Lars Nyberg, Magnus Johansson, Erik Persson Preventive actions can be, and are frequently, taken to reduce accidents and their consequences in different ways. The MSB funded research programme "Effects of Society's Security actions" (ESS, 2009-2013) aims to study the relationship between such actions and their effects. The program is divided into three subgroups: Frequent accidents Natural hazards (such as flooding, erosion and landslide) Chemical and landfill accidents The results presented here covers natural hazards with focus on land slides and flooding. The results are based on Swedish/Scandinavian contexts. Natural events such as erosion, flooding and land slides are common, but the number of accidents (events causing severe negative impact) is rare. Therefore, in such analysis there is limited data and other information available which can be used for example in statistical analysis of actions and their effects. Instead, the analysis must be based on other information. Therefore, the analysis may have to include aspects that only can be assessed by scenario and "what-if" analyses. In this project the main method has been interviews with officials in Swedish municipalities and national agencies in Sweden and Norway. The two levels are chosen since policies are taken on national (or international) level, while the key actions and actors are on the municipal level. The interviews cover experiences and potential scenarios. In all municipalities, one politician and officials working with planning and rescue service have been interviewed. The study covers hazard and risk mapping, follow up of such maps, physical planning and lessons learned from previous events and activities. The final outcome of the research will be a review of what is found to be well functioning, identification of weak points and recommendations for the management of landslides, erosion and flooding. The present results indicate that hazard

  2. OSL ages in central Norway support a MIS 2 interstadial (25-20 ka) and a dynamic Scandinavian ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsen, Timothy F.; Olsen, Lars; Murray, Andrew

    2012-06-01

    Recent work has suggested that the Scandinavian ice sheet was much more dynamic than previously believed, and its western marine-based margin can provide an analogue to the rapid-paced fluctuations and deglaciation observed at the margins of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets. In this study we used a complimentary dating technique, OSL (Optically Stimulated Luminescence dating), to support the existence of the Trofors interstadial in central Norway; an ice-free period that existed from ˜25 to 20 ka recorded at multiple sites throughout Norway (cf. Andøya interstadial) and that divides the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) into two stadials. OSL signal component analysis was used to optimize data analysis, and internal (methodological) tests show the results to be of good quality. Both large and small aliquots gave consistent OSL ages (22.3 ± 1.7 ka, n = 7) for sub-till glaciofluvial/fluvial sediments at the Langsmoen stratigraphic site, and an apparent old age (˜100 ka) for a poorly-bleached sample of glaciolacustrine sediment at the nearby stratigraphically-related Flora site. Eight radiocarbon ages of sediment from the Flora site gave consistent ages (20.9 ± 1.6 cal ka BP) that overlap within 1σ with OSL ages from the nearby Langsmoen site. The similarity in age within and between these stratigraphically-related sites and using different geochronological techniques strongly suggests that this area was ice-free around ˜21 or 22 ka. The existence of the Trofors interstadial along with other interstadials during the Middle and Late Weichselian (MIS 3 and MIS 2) indicates that not only the western margin, but the whole western part of the Scandinavian ice sheet, from the ice divide to the ice margin was very dynamic. These large changes in the ice margin and accompanying drawdown of the ice surface would have affected the eastern part of the ice sheet as well.

  3. Uplifted ophiolitic rocks on Isla Gordon, southernmost Chile: implications for the closure history of the Rocas Verdes marginal basin and the tectonic evolution of the Beagle Channel region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, W. D.

    1994-04-01

    A succession of mafic rocks that includes gabbro, sheeted dikes and deformed pillow basalts has been mapped in detail on Isla Gordon, southernmost Chile and is identified as an upper ophiolitic complex representing the uplifted floor of the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Rocas Verdes marginal basin. The complex was uplifted, deformed, and regionally metamorphosed prior to the intrusion of an undeformed 90 Ma granodiorite that cuts the complex. The complex appears para-autochthonous, is gently tilted to the northeast and is internally sheared by near-vertical foliation zones. No evidence for obduction was observed although the base of the complex is not exposed. The ophiolitic rocks have been regionally metamorphosed to mid-upper greenschist levels. Isla Gordon is bounded by the northwest and southwest arms of the Beagle Channel, two important structural boundaries in the southernmost Andes that are interpreted to have accommodated north-side-up and left-lateral displacements. Directly north of Isla Gordon is the Cordillera Darwin metamorphic complex that exposes the highest grade metamorphic rocks in the Andes south of Peru. On the north coast of Isla Gordon a volcaniclastic turbidite sequence that is interpreted to have been deposited above the mafic floor is metamorphosed to lower greenschist levels in strong metamorphic contrast to amphibolite-grade othogneisses exposed in Cordillera Darwin only 2 km away across the northwest arm of the Beagle Channel. The profound metamorphic break across the northwest arm of the Beagle Channel and the regional northeast tilt of the ophiolitic complex are consistent with the previously proposed hypothesis that Isla Gordon represents the upper plate to an extensional fault that accommodated tectonic unroofing of Cordillera Darwin. However, limited structural evidence for extension was identified in this study to support the model and further work is needed to determine the relative importance of contractional, extensional and

  4. Orbital and millennial-scale variability in the southernmost reaches of the South American summer monsoon during the last 50 ka BP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiessi, C. M.; Govin, A.; Mulitza, S.; Campos, M. D.

    2013-05-01

    The South American summer monsoon (SASM) and its related features (e.g., the South Atlantic Convergence Zone) deliver most of the precipitation for the Amazon and La Plata basins, the two largest drainage systems in South America. Marine, cave and lake records mainly from equatorial and tropical South America show that the strength of the SASM fluctuated on orbital and millennial time-scales, with a strong SASM during periods of high austral summer insolation. On millennial time-scales, precipitation in tropical South America to the south of the equator was increased during periods of a weak Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. Nevertheless, there is an almost complete lack of information about changes in precipitation in the subtropics and mid-latitudes of South America. This area comprises the transition from the southernmost reaches of the SASM to the semi-arid northern Patagonia, and is highly sensitive to changes in precipitation because: (i) it mainly receives precipitation during austral summer (related to the SASM); and (ii) it shows a steep gradient in total annual precipitation (going from ca. 1000 mm/yr around 30oS to ca. 200 mm/yr around 40oS). Here we present recently acquired data from the terrigenous fraction of marine sediment core GeoB6308-3 (39.30oS / 53.97oW / 3620 m water depth / 793 cm long) collected off southeastern South America. Our age model is based on 18 14C AMS ages while information about changes in continental climate comes from bulk sediment major element (i.e., Ca, Fe, Al, Si, Ti, K) proportions and Nd isotopes. The core recorded the last ca. 50 ka BP and its terrigenous sediment fraction shows a typical Central-West Argentinean / Patagonian isotopic signature. Through X-ray fluorescence scanning we were able to produce a record with mean temporal resolution of 35 yr. In our presentation, we will discuss changes in the southernmost reaches of the SASM and compare it to other records from South and Central America with the

  5. New insights into the last deglaciation of the south-eastern flank of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitinas, Albertas

    2012-06-01

    The existing glaciodynamic paradigm used to explain the dynamics, morphogenesis, and deglaciation of the last Scandinavian Ice Sheet (SIS) does not satisfactorily reflect all the nuances of ice sheet dynamics, formation of particular forms of glacial relief, and details of deglaciation. Significant problems are to be found in the explanations proposed for the processes of deglaciation. Therefore a new theory for the deglaciation of the last SIS, based on new geochronological, geological, and geomorphological data has been developed and is presented here. It is suggested that along the south-eastern perimeter of the SIS, with the exception of the Salpausselkä moraine ridges, there is no evidence anywhere for re-advances of the SIS during deglaciation. Apart from the Salpausselkä moraine ridges the evidence for so-called 'stadial' or 'phasial' recessional events is interpreted as the result of SIS surges that occurred at different times and positions along the ice sheet margin. This new theory also proposes that deglaciation of the south-eastern flank of the SIS was dominated by surface thinning rather than marginal retreat. Characteristic landforms such as kame terraces located on the distal slopes of recessional marginal ridges and plateau-like glaciolacustrine kames, were developed during deglaciation probably due to the interaction of active ice lobes (surges) and masses of dead ice that persisting beyond the ice margin.

  6. A temporal analysis shows major histocompatibility complex loci in the Scandinavian wolf population are consistent with neutral evolution.

    PubMed

    Seddon, J M; Ellegren, H

    2004-11-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) has an integral role in the immune system, and hence diversity at its genes may be of particular importance for the health of populations. In large populations, balancing selection maintains diversity in MHC genes, but theoretical expectations indicate that this form of selection is absent or inefficient in small populations. We examine the level of diversity at three MHC class II loci in the wolf population of Scandinavia, a population naturally recolonized with a genetic contribution from as few as three founders, and in four neighbouring wolf populations. In the Scandinavian wolf population, two alleles were found for each locus and the distribution of alleles is compatible with their linkage into two haplotypes. Changes in the level of heterozygosity over time since recolonization demonstrate the effects of the proposed arrival of an immigrant wolf. The maintenance of diversity is shown to be compatible with a neutral, random allocation of alleles, in conjunction with crossing between packs. A total of 15 DRB1, seven DQA and 10 DQB1 alleles are found in four neighbouring wolf populations, with substantial sharing across populations. Even in these larger populations, bottlenecks and fragmentation with consequent genetic drift are likely to have resulted in few indicators for balancing selection and significant differentiation of populations. PMID:15539354

  7. Taxonomy and bathymetric distribution of the outer neritic/upper bathyal ostracodes (Crustacea: Ostracoda) from the southernmost Brazilian continental margin.

    PubMed

    Bergue, Cristianini Trescastro; Coimbra, João Carlos; Ramos, Maria Inês Feijó

    2016-01-01

    Sixty-five ostracode species belonging to 41 genera and 17 families were recorded in the outer shelf and upper slope off Rio Grande do Sul and Santa Catarina states, southernmost Brazil, between 100 and 586 m water depth interval. The ostracode occurrences are hypothesized to be influenced by both, the coastal waters and the Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW). The taxonomy of some species of Bradleya Hornibrook, 1952, Legitimocythere Coles & Whatley, 1989 and Henryhowella Puri, 1957 previously described in the same study area is revised. Bradleya gaucha sp. nov., Legitimocythere megapotamica sp. nov., Apatihowella acelos sp. nov., Apatihowella capitulum sp. nov., Apatihowella besnardi sp. nov., Apatihowella convexa sp. nov., and Aversovalva tomcronini sp. nov. are herein proposed. Trachyleberis aorata Bergue & Coimbra, 2008 is reassigned to the genus Legitimocythere and Bradleya pseudonormani Ramos et al., 2009 has its diagnosis emended. Bythocypris praerenis Brandão, 2008 is considered a junior synonym of Bythocypris kyamos Whatley et al., 1998a. Apatihowella Jellinek & Swanson, 2003 and Legitimocythere species have well-defined bathymetric distributions and are potential paleoceanographic markers for the Quaternary in the Southern Brazilian Margin. PMID:27395992

  8. The evolution of Neoproterozoic magmatism in Southernmost Brazil: shoshonitic, high-K tholeiitic and silica-saturated, sodic alkaline volcanism in post-collisional basins.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Carlos A; Lima, Evandro F; Nardi, Lauro V S; Liz, Joaquim D; Waichel, Breno L

    2006-09-01

    The Neoproterozoic shoshonitic and mildly alkaline bimodal volcanism of Southernmost Brazil is represented by rock assemblages associated to sedimentary successions, deposited in strike-slip basins formed at the post-collisional stages of the Brasilian/Pan-African orogenic cycle. The best-preserved volcano sedimentary associations occur in the Camaquã and Campo Alegre Basins, respectively in the Sul-riograndense and Catarinense Shields and are outside the main shear belts or overlying the unaffected basement areas. These basins are characterized by alternation of volcanic cycles and siliciclastic sedimentation developed dominantly on a continental setting under subaerial conditions. This volcanism and the coeval plutonism evolved from high-K tholeiitic and calc-alkaline to shoshonitic and ended with a silica-saturated sodic alkaline magmatism, and its evolution were developed during at least 60 Ma. The compositional variation and evolution of post-collisional magmatism in southern Brazil are interpreted as the result mainly of melting of a heterogeneous mantle source, which includes garnet-phlogopite-bearing peridotites, veined-peridotites with abundant hydrated phases, such as amphibole, apatite and phlogopite, and eventually with the addition of an asthenospheric component. The subduction-related metasomatic character of post-collisional magmatism mantle sources in southern Brazil is put in evidence by Nb-negative anomalies and isotope features typical of EM1 sources. PMID:16936944

  9. An Early Permian fusuline fauna from southernmost Peninsular Thailand: Discovery of Early Permian warming spikes in the peri-Gondwanan Sibumasu Block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Katsumi; Arita, Michiko; Meno, Satomi; Sardsud, Apsorn; Saesaengseerung, Doungrutai

    2015-05-01

    An Early Permian fusuline fauna is reported from the Tarn To Formation of the Yala area in southernmost Peninsular Thailand, which geotectonically belongs to the peri-Gondwanan Sibumasu Block. The fauna consists of Pseudofusulina and Praeskinnerella? species, including forms closely resembling Tethyan and Panthalassan Pseudofusulina fusiformis and Pseudofusulina ex gr. kraffti. A Yakhtashian-Bolorian age is estimated for this fauna. In Sibumasu, shallow-marine biotas showing similar Tethyan affinities, such as the fusulines Misellina and alatoconchid bivalves, also occur in the Early Permian succession of the Kinta Valley area in western Peninsular Malaysia. These unusual Tethyan faunas within Early Permian peri-Gondwanan fossil records suggest episodic influences from paleo-tropical Tethyan biotas. They are here interpreted as showing short-term warming spikes during the late Yakhtashian-Bolorian transgression, which would facilitate sporadic migration and temporal inhabitation of warm-water dwellers into the eastern Cimmerian areas. The Yala and Kinta Valley fusuline and other invertebrate faunas would give us a new insight for the Permian geohistory and environmental change of the peri-Gondwanan Sibumasu Block.

  10. Geomorphology and weathering characteristics of erratic boulder trains on Tierra del Fuego, southernmost South America: Implications for dating of glacial deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvill, Christopher M.; Bentley, Michael J.; Stokes, Chris R.

    2015-01-01

    Erratic boulder trains (EBTs) are a useful glacial geomorphological feature because they reveal former ice flow trajectories and can be targeted for cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating. However, understanding how they are transported and deposited is important because this has implications for palaeoglaciological reconstructions and the pre-exposure and/or erosion of the boulders. In this study, we review previous work on EBTs, which indicates that they may form subglacially or supraglacially but that large angular boulders transported long distances generally reflect supraglacial transport. We then report detailed observations of EBTs from Tierra del Fuego, southernmost South America, where their characteristics provide a useful framework for the interpretation of previously published cosmogenic nuclide exposure dates. We present the first comprehensive map of the EBTs and analyse their spatial distribution, size, and physical appearance. Results suggest that they were produced by one or more supraglacial rock avalanches in the Cordillera Darwin and were then transported supraglacially for 100 s of kilometres before being deposited. Rock surface weathering analysis shows no significant difference in the weathering characteristics of a sequence of EBTs, previously hypothesized to be of significantly different age (i.e., different glacial cycles). We interpret this to indicate that the EBTs are much closer in age than previous work has implied. This emphasises the importance of understanding EBT formation when using them for cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating.

  11. Olivine and chromian spinel in primitive calc-alkaline and tholeiitic lavas from the southernmost cascade range, California: A reflection of relative fertility of the source

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clynne, M.A.; Borg, L.E.

    1997-01-01

    Chromian spinel and coexisting olivine phenocrysts from a geochemically diverse suite of primitive tholeiitic and calc-alkaline basalts and magnesian andesites from the Lassen region, in the southernmost Cascade Range, in California, show that the sub-arc mantle is zoned. Depleted calc-alkaline basalts and magnesian andesites erupt in the forearc region, and calc-alkaline basalts contain increasing abundances of incompatible elements toward the backarc. High-alumina olivine tholeiites erupt from the arc and backarc areas. Olivine from all these lavas displays a limited compositional range, from Fo86 to Fo91, and crystallized at high temperature, generally 1225-1275??C. Chromian spinel trapped in the olivine phenocrysts displays a large range of composition: Cr# values span the range 9-76. Excess Al in the spinel relative to that in 1-atm spinel suggests that it crystallized at elevated pressure. The phenocrysts in these lavas are in equilibrium with their host liquids. The full range of Cr# of the spinel compositions cannot be explained by differentiation or variable pressure, variations in f(O2), subsolidus equilibration or variations in degree of partial melting of a single peridotitic source. Rather, the systematic compositional differences among phenocrysts in these primitive lavas result from bulk chemical variability in their mantle sources. Correlations between spinel and host-rock compositions support the assertion that the geochemical diversity of Lassen basalts reflects the relative fertility of their mantle sources.

  12. Final deglaciation of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet and implications for the Holocene global sea-level budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzone, Joshua K.; Clark, Peter U.; Carlson, Anders E.; Ullman, David J.; Rinterknecht, Vincent R.; Milne, Glenn A.; Lunkka, Juha-Pekka; Wohlfarth, Barbara; Marcott, Shaun A.; Caffee, Marc

    2016-08-01

    The last deglaciation of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet (SIS) from ∼ 21, 000 to 13,000 yr ago is well-constrained by several hundred 10Be and 14C ages. The subsequent retreat history, however, is established primarily from minimum-limiting 14C ages and incomplete Baltic-Sea varve records, leaving a substantial fraction of final SIS retreat history poorly constrained. Here we develop a high-resolution chronology for the final deglaciation of the SIS based on 79 10Be cosmogenic exposure dates sampled along three transects spanning southern to northern Sweden and Finland. Combining this new chronology with existing 10Be ages on deglaciation since the Last Glacial Maximum shows that rates of SIS margin retreat were strongly influenced by deglacial millennial-scale climate variability and its effect on surface mass balance, with regional modulation of retreat associated with dynamical controls. Ice-volume estimates constrained by our new chronology suggest that the SIS contributed ∼ 8 m sea-level equivalent to global sea-level rise between ∼14.5 ka and 10 ka. Final deglaciation was largely complete by ∼10.5 ka, with highest rates of sea-level rise occurring during the Bølling-Allerød, a 50% decrease during the Younger Dryas, and a rapid increase during the early Holocene. Combining our SIS volume estimates with estimated contributions from other remaining Northern Hemisphere ice sheets suggests that the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) contributed 14.4 ± 5.9 m to global sea-level rise since ∼13 ka. This new constraint supports those studies that indicate that an ice volume of 15 m or more of equivalent sea-level rise was lost from the AIS during the last deglaciation.

  13. The 1.90-1.88 Ga magmatism in the southernmost Guyana Shield, Amazonas, Brazil: Geology, geochemistry, zircon geochronology, and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valério, Cristóvão da Silva; Souza, Valmir da Silva; Macambira, Moacir José Buenano

    The southernmost Guyana Shield-Uatumã subdomain, northeastern Amazonas State, Brazil is dominantly formed by granitoid and volcanic rocks from the Água Branca Suite (ABS), undivided Granite Stocks (GS) and São Gabriel volcano-plutonic system (SGS). The ABS is characterized by a granite series that exhibits comparatively low Fe/(Fe + Mg) ratio, low (Nb/Zr) N, high Sr values and high Rb/Zr ratio. Its rocks display metaluminous to weakly peraluminous (A/CNK 0.94-1.06), high-K calc-alkaline, I normal-type character and have moderately to strongly fractionated rare earth elements (REE) pattern. The SG granites and SGS effusive-ignimbrite-granite association is metaluminous to weakly peraluminous (A/CNK 0.84-1.18), high-K calc-alkaline, has moderately to weakly fractionated REE trend, higher Fe/(Fe + Mg) ratio, lower Sr content and lower Rb/Zr ratio. The ABS geochemical signature is consistent with formation from volcanic arc rocks and small participation of collisional setting rocks, whereas the SG and SGS have post-collisional tectonic rocks-related geochemical signature. This model is in harmony with a post-collisional extensional regime, started with the 1.90-1.89 Ga Água Branca magmatism, and culminated with the 1.89-1.88 Ga São Gabriel system at an early stage of intracratonic reactivation, which included intrusion of mafic dikes. The Uatumã subdomain was related to mantle underplating with continental uplift and its origin involved contributions of 2.3-2.44 Ga Archean-contaminated Trans-Amazonian, 2.13-2.21 Ga Trans-Amazonian, 1.93-1.94/2.0 Ga Tapajós-Parima. Foliation styles point out that part of the Água Branca granitoids recorded later deformational effects, likely related to the Rio Negro Province formation.

  14. Subducting oceanic high causes compressional faulting in southernmost Ryukyu forearc as revealed by hypocentral determinations of earthquakes and reflection/refraction seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font, Yvonne; Lallemand, Serge

    2009-03-01

    Absolute earthquake hypocenter locations have been determined in the area offshore eastern Taiwan, at the Southernmost Ryukyu subduction zone. Location process is run within a 3D velocity model by combining the Taiwanese and neighboring Japanese networks and using the 3D MAXI technique. The study focuses on the most active seismic cluster in the Taiwan region that occurs in the forearc domain offshore eastern Taiwan. Earthquakes distribute mainly along 2 active planes. The first one aligns along the subduction interface and the second one, shallower affects the overriding margin. Focal mechanisms within the shallow group indicate that nodal planes are either compatible with high-angle back-thrusts or low-angle thrusts. The active seismic deformation exclusively indicates reverse faulting revealing that the forearc basement undergoes trench-perpendicular strong compression. By integrating the seismological image into the regional context, we favor the hypothesis in which the dense seismicity occurring offshore marks the activity of en-échelon high-angle reverse faults accommodating the uplift of a broken piece of Ryukyu Arc basement, called Hoping Basement Rise. The uplift is inferred to be caused by the subduction of an oceanic relief, either exotic block, seamount or oceanic crust sliver. Our favored solution satisfies the narrowness of epicenter's cluster along the Hoping Canyon, and the observation of high-angle active faults on seismic lines crossing the area. Furthermore, this solution is compatible with the active uplift of the Hoping Rise demonstrated from morphological and sedimentological data. We do not exclude the branching of the high-angle reverse faults system onto a splay fault connected with the subduction interface but further investigations are needed to map precisely the 3D distribution of active faults that break the margin.

  15. Scandinavian systems monitoring the oral health in children and adolescents; an evaluation of their quality and utility in the light of modern perspectives of caries management

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recording reliable oral health data is a challenge. The aims were a) to outline different Scandinavian systems of oral health monitoring, b) to evaluate the quality and utility of the collected data in the light of modern concepts of disease management and to suggest improvements. Material and methods The information for in this study was related to (a) children and adolescents, (b) oral health data and (c) routines for monitoring such data. This meant information available in the official web sites of the “KOSTRA-data” (Municipality-State-Report) in Norway, the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare (“Socialstyrelsen”) and Oral Health Register (the SCOR system, National Board of Health) in Denmark. Results A potential for increasing the reliability and validity of the data existed. Routines for monitoring other oral diseases than caries were limited. Compared with the other Scandinavian countries, the data collection system in Denmark appeared more functional and had adopted more modern concepts of disease management than other systems. In the light of modern concepts of caries management, data collected elsewhere had limited utility. Conclusions The Scandinavian systems of health reporting had much in common, but some essential differences existed. If the quality of epidemiological data were enhanced, it would be possible to use the data for planning oral health care. Routines and procedures should be improved and updated in accordance with the modern ideas about caries prevention and therapy. For appropriate oral health planning in an organised dental service, reporting of enamel caries is essential. PMID:24885243

  16. Southernmost Andes and South Georgia Island, North Scotia Ridge: Zircon U-Pb and muscovite {40Ar }/{39Ar } age constraints on tectonic evolution of Southwestern Gondwanaland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukasa, Samuel B.; Dalziel, Ian W. D.

    1996-11-01

    Zircon U-Pb and muscovite {40Ar }/{39Ar } isotopic ages have been determined on rocks from the southernmost Andes and South Georgia Island, North Scotia Ridge, to provide absolute time constraints on the kinematic evolution of southwestern Gondwanaland, until now known mainly from stratigraphic relations. The U-Pb systematics of four zircon fractions from one sample show that proto-marginal basin magmatism in the northern Scotia arc, creating the peraluminous Darwin granite suite and submarine rhyolite sequences of the Tobifera Formation, had begun by the Middle Jurassic (164.1 ± 1.7 Ma). Seven zircon fractions from two other Darwin granites are discordant with non-linear patterns, suggesting a complex history of inheritances and Pb loss. Reference lines drawn through these points on concordia diagrams give upper intercept ages of ca. 1500 Ma, interpreted as a minimum age for the inherited zircon component. This component is believed to have been derived from sedimentary rocks in the Gondwanaland margin accretionary wedge that forms the basement of the region, or else directly from the cratonic "back stop" of that wedge. Ophiolitic remnants of the Rocas Verdes marginal basin preserved in the Larsen Harbour complex on South Georgia yield the first clear evidence that Gondwanaland fragmentation had resulted in the formation of oceanic crust in the Weddell Sea region by the Late Jurassic (150 ± 1 Ma). The geographic pattern in the observed age range of 8 to 13 million years in these ophiolitic materials, while not definitive, is in keeping with propagation of the marginal basin floor northwestward from South Georgia Island to the Sarmiento Complex in southern Chile. Rocks of the Beagle granite suite, emplaced post-tectonically within the uplifted marginal basin floor, have complex zircon U-Pb systematics with gross discordances dominated by inheritances in some samples and Pb loss in others. Of eleven samples processed, only two had sufficient amounts of zircon for

  17. The variable role of slab-derived fluids in the generation of a suite of primitive calc-alkaline lavas from the Southernmost Cascades, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borg, L.E.; Clynne, M.A.; Bullen, T.D.

    1997-01-01

    The compositional continuum observed in primitive calc-alkaline lavas erupted from small volcanoes across the southernmost Cascade arc is produced by the introduction of a variable proportion of slab-derived fluid into the superjacent peridotite layer of the mantle wedge. Magmas derived from fluid-rich sources are erupted primarily in the forearc and are characterized by Sr and Pb enrichment (primitive mantle-normalized Sr/P > 5.5), depletions of Ta and Nb, low incompatible-element abundances, and MORB-like Sr and Pb isotopic ratios. Magmas derived from fluid-poor sources are erupted primarily in the arc axis and behind the arc, and are characterized by weak enrichment in Sr [1.0 < (Sr/P)N < 1.3], weak depletions in Ta and Nb, higher incompatible-element abundances, and OIB-like Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic ratios. Fluxing the mantle wedge above the subducting slab with H2O-rich fluid stabilizes amphibole and enriches the wedge peridotites in incompatible elements, particularly unradiogenic Sr and Pb. The hydrated amphibole-bearing portion of the mantle wedge is downdragged beneath the forearc, where its solidus is exceeded, yielding melts that are enriched in Sr and Pb, and depleted in Ta and Nb (reflecting both high Sr and Pb relative to Ta and Nb in the fluid, and the greater compatibility of Ta and Nb in amphibole compared to other silicate phases in the wedge). A steady decrease of the fluid-contributed geochemical signature away from the trench is produced by the progressive dehydration of the downdragged portion of the mantle wedge with depth, resulting from melt extraction and increased temperature at the slab-wedge interface. Inverse correlation between incompatible-element abundances and the size of the fluid-contributed geochemical signature is generated by melting of more depleted peridotites, rather than by significant differences in the degree of melting. High-(Sr/P)N lavas of the forearc are generated by melting of a MORB-source-like peridotite that has

  18. Effects of Scandinavian hydro power on storage needs in a fully renewable European power system for various transmission capacity scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kies, Alexander; Nag, Kabitri; von Bremen, Lueder; Lorenz, Elke; Heinemann, Detlev

    2015-04-01

    can reduce storage needs by up to 50% with respect to stored energy. This requires however large transmission capacities between the major hydro power producers in Scandinavia and the largest consumers of electrical energy in Western Europe. We show how Scandinavian hydro power can reduce storage needs in dependency of the transmission grid for two fully renewable scenarios: The first one has its wind and pv generation capacities distributed according to an empirically derived approach. The second scenario has an optimal spatial distribution to minimize storage needs distribution of wind and pv generation capacities across Europe. We show that in both cases hydro power together with a well developed transmission grid has the potential to contribute a large share to the solution of the generation-consumption mismatch problem. The work is part of the RESTORE 2050 project (BMBF) that investigates the requirements for cross-country grid extensions, usage of storage technologies and capacities and the development of new balancing technologies.

  19. Two types of ore-bearing mafic complexes of the Early Proterozoic East-Scandinavian LIP and their ore potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofanov, Felix; Zhirov, Dmitry; Bayanova, Tamara; Korchagin, Alexey; Chaschin, Victor

    2015-04-01

    Two types of the ore-bearing mafic complexes are allotted in the East-Scandinavian large igneous province (LIP). They differ in geodynamic setting, structure, isotope geochemistry, petrology and mineralogy. The PGE-bearing mafic-ultramafic layered intrusions are associated with the first complex. They have been formed at an initial (pre-rift) stage of LIP. Features of origin of this complex are: 1) large-scale, protracted, and multiple episodes of deep mantle plume or asthenosphere upwelling; 2) the vast non-subduction-type basaltic magma in an intraplate continental setting; 3) low-sulfide Pt-Pd (with Ni, Cu, Au, Co and Rh) mineralization in different geological setting (reef- and contact type etc.); 4) anomalously high concentrations of PGEs in the bulk sulfides, inferred platinum distribution coefficient between silicate and sulfide melts of >100000. Deep mantle magma source is enriched in ore components (fertile source) and lithophile elements. It is reflected in the isotope indicators such as ɛNd(T) from -1 to -3, ISr(87Sr/86Sr) from 0.702 to 0.704, 3Не/4Не = (10 ^-5 ÷ 10 ^-6). Magma and ore sources differ from those of Mid-Ocean Ridge basalts (MORB), subduction-related magma but are similar to EM-I. Ore-bearing mafic complexes formed during a long period of time and by different episodes (2490±10 Ma; 2470±10 Ma; 2450±10 Ma; 2400±10 Ma), and by mixing between the boninitic an anorthositic magmas. It is known about 10 deposits and occurrences in Kola region with total reserves and resources about 2000 tons in palladium equivalent (with an average content ≥2-3 ppm). Intrusions with the rich sulfide Ni-Cu ore (with Co and poor PGE) are associated with the second mafic complex. Ore-controlling mafic-ultramafic intrusions are formed at a final stage of the intracontinental rifting of the Transitional period (2200-1980 Ma). Initial magma is depleted and similar to the MORB in terms of rare earths distribution. Enriched ferropicritic Fe-Ti derivatives of

  20. Geochronological data from TTG-type rock associations of the Arroio dos Ratos Complex and implications for crustal evolution of southernmost Brazil in Paleoproterozoic times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Tiago Rafael; Bitencourt, Maria de Fátima; Nardi, Lauro Valentim Stoll; Florisbal, Luana Moreira; Chemale, Farid, Jr.

    2015-01-01

    U-Pb isotope analyses by LA-MC-ICPMS (Laser Ablation - Multi Collector - Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry) in zircon crystals from metatonalites, tonalites and granodiorite gneiss from the Arroio dos Ratos Complex (ARC) early magmatism in southernmost Brazil are presented. The ARC is located in the eastern portion of the Sul-rio-grandense Shield, occurring as septa and roof pendants on granitoids emplaced along the Southern Brazilian Shear Belt (SBSB). The SBSB corresponds to a translithospheric structure composed of several anastomosed shear zones of dominantly transcurrent kinematics whose syntectonic magmatism, of Neoproterozoic age, is characteristic of post-collisional environments. The studied rocks comprise TTG-type associations with coeval mafic magmatism, deformed and metamorphosed within a ductile shear zone. Zircon crystals obtained from six samples are interpreted as igneous given that the crystals are subhedral to euhedral, bipyramidal, with concentric zonation, have ratios Th/U between 0.13 and 0.81 and have restricted evidence of overgrowth. The oldest Association 1 (A1) has structures compatible with recrystallization under conditions of high temperature and an igneous age of 2148 ± 33 Ma, obtained in a metatonalite. The rocks of Association 2 (A2) have similar compositions, although with a more significant coeval mafic fraction. They are intrusive into A1 and also show high-temperature recrystallization features. However, they are less deformed and partly preserve their primary, igneous fabric. The igneous ages obtained from two A2 tonalites are 2150 ± 28 Ma and 2136 ± 27 Ma. Association 3 (A3) is represented by tonalitic to granodioritic gneisses whose structure, composition and metamorphic features are similar to those of A1 rocks, except for the absence of coeval mafic magmas in the former. Local features resulting from partial melting are present in A3 rocks. Three samples from A3 were dated. A tonalitic gneiss gives igneous age

  1. Arc-arc Collision Structure in the Southernmost Part of the Kuril Trench Region -Results from Integrated Analyses of the 1998-2000 Hokkaido Transect Seismic Data-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Takaya; Tsumura, Noriko; Ito, Tanio; Sato, Hiroshi; Kurashimo, Eiji; Hirata, Naoshi; Arita, Kazunori; Noda, Katsuya; Fujiwara, Akira; Abe, Susumu; Kikkuchi, Shunsuke; Suzuki, Kazuko

    2015-04-01

    The Hokkaido Island, located in the southernmost part of the Kuril trench region, has been under a unique tectonic environment of arc-arc collision. Due to the oblique subduction of the Pacific (PAC) plate, the Kuril forearc sliver started to collide against Northeast (NE) Japan arc from the east at the time of middle Miocene to form complicated structures in the Hidaka collision zone (HCZ), as characterized by the westward obduction of the crustal rocks of the Kuril arc (the Hidaka metamorphic belt (HMB)) along the Hidaka main thrust (HMT) and a thick foreland fold-and-thrust belt. In and around the HCZ, a series of seismic reflection/refraction experiments were undertaken from 1994 to 2000, which provided important structural features including crustal delamination in the southern HCZ and a thick fold-and-thrust belt with velocity reversals (low velocity layers) in the northern HCZ. Reprocessing/reinterpretation for these data sets, which started in 2012, is aimed to construct a more detailed collision model through new processing and interpretation techniques. A multi-disciplinary project of the 1998-2000 Hokkaido Transect, crossing the northern part of the HCZ in EW direction, collected high-quality seismic data on a 227-km seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profile and three seismic reflection lines. Our reanalyses revealed interesting collision structure ongoing in the northern part of the HCZ. The westward obduction of the Kuril arc crust was clearly imaged along the HMT. This obduction occurs at a depth of 27-30 km, much deeper than in the southern HCZ (23-25 km). The CRS/MDRS processing to the reflection data firstly succeeded in imaging clear reflection events at a 30-45 km depth below the obducted Kuril arc crust. These events show an eastward dip, probably corresponding to the lower crust/Moho within the NE Japan arc descending down to the east under the collision zone. Gently eastward dipping structures above these events (in a depth range of 5

  2. Fault History and Architecture of the Southernmost San Andreas Fault and Brawley Seismic Zone: New Constraints from CHIRP Data Acquired in the Salton Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brothers, D.; Seitz, G.; Williams, P.; Driscoll, N.; Kent, G.

    2006-12-01

    offshore CHIRP with the five most recent lake episodes observed at the excavation site. Predicted sedimentation rates from the CHIRP data, based on this assumption, are consistent with rates determined from nearby URS borings in the Salton Sea. The incremental, down-section increase in offset shown in CHIRP profiles is consistent with three to four events over the last four lake cycles, which is nearly equivalent to the timing and number of events observed at the Salt Creek paleoseismic site. If our interpretations are correct, the onshore excavation and offshore CHIRP data suggest that faults in the BSZ rupture in concert with the southern SAF. Furthermore, based on the limited imaging offshore, we suggest that the BSZ consists of a series of relatively short en-echelon normal- dominated faults. Such onshore-offshore studies can potentially answer important questions regarding linkage and slip partitioning between the southernmost San Andreas Fault, Brawley Seismic Zone, Superstition Hills Fault and cross faults such as the Elmore Ranch Fault, and will strengthen interpretations of the individual data sets.

  3. Long-term feeding ecology and habitat use in harbour porpoises Phocoena phocoena from Scandinavian waters inferred from trace elements and stable isotopes

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Michaël C; Tolley, Krystal A; Siebert, Ursula; Gobert, Sylvie; Lepoint, Gilles; Bouquegneau, Jean-Marie; Das, Krishna

    2007-01-01

    Background We investigated the feeding ecology and habitat use of 32 harbour porpoises by-caught in 4 localities along the Scandinavian coast from the North Sea to the Barents Sea using time-integrative markers: stable isotopes (δ13C, δ15N) and trace elements (Zn, Cu, Fe, Se, total Hg and Cd), in relation to habitat characteristics (bathymetry) and geographic position (latitude). Results Among the trace elements analysed, only Cd, with an oceanic specific food origin, was found to be useful as an ecological tracer. All other trace elements studied were not useful, most likely because of physiological regulation and/or few specific sources in the food web. The δ13C, δ15N signatures and Cd levels were highly correlated with each other, as well as with local bathymetry and geographic position (latitude). Variation in the isotopic ratios indicated a shift in harbour porpoise's feeding habits from pelagic prey species in deep northern waters to more coastal and/or demersal prey in the relatively shallow North Sea and Skagerrak waters. This result is consistent with stomach content analyses found in the literature. This shift was associated with a northward Cd-enrichment which provides further support to the Cd 'anomaly' previously reported in polar waters and suggests that porpoises in deep northern waters include Cd-contaminated prey in their diet, such as oceanic cephalopods. Conclusion As stable isotopes and Cd provide information in the medium and the long term respectively, the spatial variation found, shows that harbour porpoises experience different ecological regimes during the year along the Scandinavian coasts, adapting their feeding habits to local oceanographic conditions, without performing extensive migration. PMID:17229317

  4. Timing, petrogenesis and tectonic setting of the Late Paleozoic gabbro-granodiorite-granite intrusions in the Shalazhashan of northern Alxa: Constraints on the southernmost boundary of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xingjun; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Lei; Castro, Antonio; Xiao, XuChang; Tong, Ying; Zhang, Jianjun; Guo, Lei; Yang, Qidi

    2014-11-01

    The Late Paleozoic tectonic setting and location of the southernmost boundary of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) with respect to the Alxa Block or Alxa-North China Craton (ANCC) are debated. This paper presents new geochronological, petrological, geochemical and zircon Hf isotopic data of the Late Paleozoic intrusions from the Shalazhashan in northern Alxa and discusses the tectonic setting and boundary between the CAOB and ANCC. Using zircon U-Pb dating, intrusions can be broadly grouped as Late Carboniferous granodiorites (~ 301 Ma), Middle Permian gabbros (~ 264 Ma) and granites (~ 266 Ma) and Late Permian granodiorites, monzogranites and quartz monzodiorites (254-250 Ma). The Late Carboniferous granodiorites are slightly peraluminous and calcic. The remarkably high zircon Hf isotopes (εHf(t) = + 6-+ 10) and characteristics of high silica adakites suggest that these granodiorites were mainly derived from "hot" basaltic slab-melts of the subducted oceanic crust. The Middle Permian gabbros exhibited typical cumulate textures and were derived from the partial melting of depleted mantle. The Middle Permian granites are slightly peraluminous with high-K calc-alkaline and low εHf(t) values from - 0.9 to + 2.9. These granites were most likely derived from juvenile materials mixed with old crustal materials. The Late Permian granodiorites, monzogranites and quartz monzodiorites are characterized as metaluminous to slightly peraluminous, with variable Peacock alkali-lime index values from calc-alkalic to alkali-calcic. These rocks were mainly derived from juvenile crustal materials, as evidenced by their high εHf(t) values (+ 3.3 to + 8.9). The juvenile sources of the above intrusions in the Shalazhashan are similar to those of the granitoids from the CAOB but distinct from the granitoids within the Alxa Block. These findings suggest that the Shalazhashan Zone belongs to the CAOB rather than the Alxa Block and that its boundary with the Alxa block can be

  5. Short communication: Presence of Lactococcus and lactococcal exopolysaccharide operons on the leaves of Pinguicula vulgaris supports the traditional source of bacteria present in Scandinavian ropy fermented milk.

    PubMed

    Porcellato, Davide; Tranvåg, Malena; Narvhus, Judith

    2016-09-01

    Some traditional Scandinavian fermented milk products have a pronounced ropy consistency due to the presence of exopolysaccharide-producing strains of Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris. Norwegian food folklore describes how leaves from the carnivorous plant Pinguicula vulgaris (common butterwort) may be added to milk to initiate the fermentation of the traditional fermented milk product tettemelk. However, scientific confirmation of the link between the plant and the milk product has not been previously published. In the present study, the microbiome on 20 samples of P. vulgaris leaves collected from 5 different rural geographical locations in Norway and from 4 samples of commercial tettemelk was analyzed using high-throughput sequencing methods. The leaf microbiota of P. vulgaris was dominated by Proteobacteria and Firmicutes and the genus Lactococcus was demonstrated in all leaf samples. In addition, DNA extracted from the leaf microbiome contained genes identical to those responsible for exopolysaccharide production in Lactococcus. These results confirm the traditional use of P. vulgaris as a source of bacteria for the Norwegian ropy fermented milk product tettemelk and indicate that P. vulgaris microbiomes can be a potential source of lactic acid bacteria with interesting dairy technological features. PMID:27423953

  6. Till formation under a soft-bedded palaeo-ice stream of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet, constrained using qualitative and quantitative microstructural analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narloch, Włodzimierz; Piotrowski, Jan A.; Wysota, Wojciech; Tylmann, Karol

    2015-08-01

    This study combines micro- and macroscale studies, laboratory experiments and quantitative analyses to decipher processes of till formation under a palaeo-ice stream and the nature of subglacial sediment deformation. Till micromorphology (grain lineations, grain stacks, turbate structures, crushed grains, intraclasts and domains), grain-size and till fabric data are used to investigate a basal till generated by the Vistula Ice Stream of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet during the last glaciation in north-central Poland. A comparison of microstructures from the in situ basal till and laboratory-sheared till experiments show statistical relationships between the number of grain lineations and grain stacks; and between the number of grain lineations and turbate structures. Microstructures in the in situ till document both brittle and ductile styles of deformation, possibly due to fluctuating basal water pressures beneath the ice stream. No systematic vertical and lateral trends are detected in the parameters investigated in the in situ till, which suggests a subglacial mosaic of relatively stable and unstable areas. This situation can be explained by an unscaled space-transgressive model of subglacial till formation whereby at any given point in time different processes operated in different places under the ice sheet, possibly related to the distance from the ice margin and water pressure at the ice-bed interface. A new quantitative measure reflecting the relationship between the number of grain lineations and grain stacks may be helpful in discriminating between pervasive and non-pervasive deformation and constraining the degree of stress heterogeneity within a deformed bed. Independent strain magnitude estimations revealed by a quantitative analysis of micro- and macro-particle data show low cumulative strain in the ice-stream till in the order of 10-102.

  7. Sedimentary record of a Scandinavian Ice Sheet drainage system and till deposition over subglacial obstacles promoting basal sliding (an example from southern Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamon, Tomasz

    2015-12-01

    Subglacial obstacles occurring in the path of advancing ice sheets generally generate higher longitudinal compression and higher frictional drag than a flat substrate. However, in the case of a soft sediment substratum, they can have a very different effect on ice sheet behaviour. This study concerns a substrate composed of very fine-grained sediments with low permeability. The relationship between subglacial obstacles and the overriding Scandinavian Ice Sheet was studied in an area of southern Poland where a small intervalley Neogene clay ridge (40 m high) was present. Based on sedimentological and structural analysis of subglacial till and gravelly-sandy sediments, the basal depositional processes and subglacial conditions and their influence on ice sheet behaviour were analysed. The till and related deposits within the ridge reflecting high water pressure conditions and lack of glacitectonic deformations indicate that the clay ridge did not generate much resistance against the advancing ice sheet, but instead favoured basal slip: the impermeable substratum weakened the ice/bed coupling and promoted ice detachment from the substratum. Gravelly sandy inclusions at the till/clay contact indicate that during the first stage of ice sheet overriding, a canal drainage system developed at the ice/substrate interface. Varied geometry, size and location of inclusions of sorted sediments suggest periodic instability of the canal system, which could lead to its transformation from initially uniform to being composed of conduits of different sizes. During later stages of ice sheet overriding, a traction till was deposited and occasional drainage through a water film was sufficient to evacuate basal meltwater. The resulting change in the character of subglacial drainage was probably related to variations in water pressure gradient during progressive ice sheet advance.

  8. Radiotherapy to Improve Local Control Regardless of Surgical Margin and Malignancy Grade in Extremity and Trunk Wall Soft Tissue Sarcoma: A Scandinavian Sarcoma Group Study

    SciTech Connect

    Jebsen, Nina L. Trovik, Clement S.; Bauer, Henrik C.F.; Rydholm, Anders; Monge, Odd R.; Hall, Kirsten Sundby; Alvegard, Thor; Bruland, Oyvind S.

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy has during the past decades become increasingly used in the treatment of localized soft tissue sarcoma. We evaluated the effect of radiotherapy (RT) on local recurrence rates (LRRs) in Scandinavia between 1986 and 2005. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,093 adult patients with extremity or trunk wall soft tissue sarcoma treated at four Scandinavian sarcoma centers were stratified according to the treatment period (1986-1991, 1992-1997, and 1998-2005). The use of adjuvant RT, quality of the surgical margin, interval between surgery and RT, and LRR were analyzed. The median follow-up was 5 years. Results: The use of RT (77% treated postoperatively) increased from 28% to 53%, and the 5-year LRR decreased from 27% to 15%. The rate of wide surgical margins did not increase. The risk factors for local recurrence were histologic high-grade malignancy (hazard ratio [HR], 5), an intralesional (HR, 6) or marginal (HR, 3) surgical margin, and no RT (HR, 3). The effect of RT on the LRR was also significant after a wide margin resection and in low-grade malignant tumors. The LRR was the same after preoperative and postoperative RT. The median interval from surgery to the start of RT was 7 weeks, and 98% started RT within 4 months. The LRR was the same in patients who started treatment before and after 7 weeks. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that adjuvant RT effectively prevents local recurrence in soft tissue sarcoma, irrespective of the tumor depth, malignancy grade, and surgical margin status. The effect was most pronounced in deep-seated, high-grade tumors, even when removed with a wide surgical margin.

  9. Survival, lifetime production, and profitability of Normande × Holstein, Montbéliarde × Holstein, and Scandinavian Red × Holstein crossbreds versus pure Holsteins.

    PubMed

    Heins, B J; Hansen, L B; De Vries, A

    2012-02-01

    Pure Holstein (HO) cows (n=416) were compared with Normande (NO) × HO (n=251), Montbéliarde (MO) × HO (n=503), and Scandinavian Red (SR) × HO (n=321) crossbred cows for survival, lifetime production, and profitability in 6 commercial herds in California. The SR crossbred cows were sired by both Swedish Red and Norwegian Red bulls. Cows calved from June 2002 to January 2009. For analysis of survival to subsequent calvings, lifetime production, and profitability, data were restricted to 3 of 6 herds because they had at least 20 cows in each of the breed groups. All cows had the opportunity to calve at least 4 times. Best prediction, which is used by USDA for national genetic evaluations in the United States, was used to determine lifetime production to 4 yr (1,461 d) in the herd after first calving from test-day observations. Production and survival were estimated after 4 yr to calculate lifetime profit. A profit function was defined to include revenues and expenses for milk, fat, protein, and other solids production; somatic cell count; reproduction; feed intake; calf value; salvage value; dead cow disposal; and fixed cost. The NO × HO (1.2%), MO × HO (2.0%), and SR × HO cows (1.6%) had significantly fewer deaths than did pure HO cows (5.3%) during the first 305 d of first lactation. All crossbred groups had significantly more cows that calved a second, third, and fourth time, and had mean survival that was 300 to 400 d longer than did pure HO cows. The NO × HO, MO × HO, and SR × HO cows had significantly higher lifetime fat plus protein production than did pure HO cows up to 1,461 d after first calving. For profitability (ignoring possible differences in health costs), NO × HO cows had 26% greater projected lifetime profit per cow, but 6.7% less profit per cow-day, than did pure HO cows. On the other hand, MO × HO and SR × HO cows had 50 to 44%, respectively, more projected lifetime profit per cow and 5.3 to 3.6%, respectively, more projected profit

  10. Hendra Virus Infection Dynamics in the Grey-Headed Flying Fox (Pteropus poliocephalus) at the Southern-Most Extent of Its Range: Further Evidence This Species Does Not Readily Transmit the Virus to Horses

    PubMed Central

    Burroughs, A. L.; Durr, P. A.; Boyd, V.; Graham, K.; White, J. R.; Todd, S.; Barr, J.; Smith, I.; Baverstock, G.; Meers, J.; Crameri, G.; Wang, L-F

    2016-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) is an important emergent virus in Australia known to infect horses and humans in certain regions of the east coast. Whilst pteropid bats (“flying foxes”) are considered the natural reservoir of HeV, which of the four mainland species is the principal reservoir has been a source of ongoing debate, particularly as shared roosting is common. To help resolve this, we sampled a colony consisting of just one of these species, the grey-headed flying fox, (Pteropus poliocephalus), at the southernmost extent of its range. Using the pooled urine sampling technique at approximately weekly intervals over a two year period, we determined the prevalence of HeV and related paramyxoviruses using a novel multiplex (Luminex) platform. Whilst all the pooled urine samples were negative for HeV nucleic acid, we successfully identified four other paramyxoviruses, including Cedar virus; a henipavirus closely related to HeV. Collection of serum from individually caught bats from the colony showed that antibodies to HeV, as estimated by a serological Luminex assay, were present in between 14.6% and 44.5% of animals. The wide range of the estimate reflects uncertainties in interpreting intermediate results. Interpreting the study in the context of HeV studies from states to the north, we add support for an arising consensus that it is the black flying fox and not the grey-headed flying fox that is the principal source of HeV in spillover events to horses. PMID:27304985

  11. Hendra Virus Infection Dynamics in the Grey-Headed Flying Fox (Pteropus poliocephalus) at the Southern-Most Extent of Its Range: Further Evidence This Species Does Not Readily Transmit the Virus to Horses.

    PubMed

    Burroughs, A L; Durr, P A; Boyd, V; Graham, K; White, J R; Todd, S; Barr, J; Smith, I; Baverstock, G; Meers, J; Crameri, G; Wang, L-F

    2016-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) is an important emergent virus in Australia known to infect horses and humans in certain regions of the east coast. Whilst pteropid bats ("flying foxes") are considered the natural reservoir of HeV, which of the four mainland species is the principal reservoir has been a source of ongoing debate, particularly as shared roosting is common. To help resolve this, we sampled a colony consisting of just one of these species, the grey-headed flying fox, (Pteropus poliocephalus), at the southernmost extent of its range. Using the pooled urine sampling technique at approximately weekly intervals over a two year period, we determined the prevalence of HeV and related paramyxoviruses using a novel multiplex (Luminex) platform. Whilst all the pooled urine samples were negative for HeV nucleic acid, we successfully identified four other paramyxoviruses, including Cedar virus; a henipavirus closely related to HeV. Collection of serum from individually caught bats from the colony showed that antibodies to HeV, as estimated by a serological Luminex assay, were present in between 14.6% and 44.5% of animals. The wide range of the estimate reflects uncertainties in interpreting intermediate results. Interpreting the study in the context of HeV studies from states to the north, we add support for an arising consensus that it is the black flying fox and not the grey-headed flying fox that is the principal source of HeV in spillover events to horses. PMID:27304985

  12. Rocas Verdes Ophiolite Complexes in the Southernmost Andes: Remnants of the Mafic Igneous Floor of a Back-arc Basin that Rifted the South American Continental Crust in the Late Jurrassic and Early Cretaceous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, C. R.

    2001-12-01

    The Rocas Verdes are an en echelon group of late Jurassic and early Cretaceous igneous complexes in the southernmost Andes. They consist of mafic pillow lavas, dikes and gabbros interpreted as the upper portions of ophiolite complexes formed along mid-ocean-ridge-type spreading centers. When secondary metamorphic affects are accounted for, the geochemistry of mafic Rocas Verdes rocks are similar to ocean-ridge basalts (MORB). The spreading centers that generated the Rocas Verdes rifted the southwestern margin of the Gondwana continental crust, during the start of break-up in the southern Atlantic, to form the igneous floor of a back-arc basin behind a contemporaneous convergent plate boundary magmatic arc. Late Jurassic and early Cretaceous sediments from both the magmatic arc on the southwest and the continental platform on the northeast of the basin were deposited in the Rocas Verdes basin, and these sediments are interbedded with mafic pillow lavas along the margins of the Rocas Verdes mafic complexes. Also, mafic dikes and gabbros intrude older pre-Andean and Andean lithologies along both flanks of the Rocas Verdes, and leucocratic country rocks are engulfed in the Rocas Verdes mafic complexes. These relations indicate that the Rocas Verdes complexes formed in place and are autochthonous, having been uplifted but not obducted, which may explain the lack of exposure of the deeper ultramafic units. Zircon U/Pb ages of 150+/-1 Ma for the Larsen Harbour Formation, a southern extension of the Rocas Verdes belt on South Georgia Island, and 138+/-2 Ma for the Sarmiento complex, the northernmost in the Rocas Verdes belt, indicate that this basin may have formed by "unzipping" from the south to the north, with the southern portion beginning to form earlier and developing more extensively than the northern portion of the basin. Paleomagnetic data suggest that the Rocas Verdes basin developed in conjunction with the displacement of the Antarctic Peninsula and opening of

  13. Whole-grain products and whole-grain types are associated with lower all-cause and cause-specific mortality in the Scandinavian HELGA cohort.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Nina F; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Christensen, Jane; Skeie, Guri; Lund, Eiliv; Landberg, Rikard; Johansson, Ingegerd; Nilsson, Lena M; Halkjær, Jytte; Olsen, Anja; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne

    2015-08-28

    No study has yet investigated the intake of different types of whole grain (WG) in relation to all-cause and cause-specific mortality in a healthy population. The aim of the present study was to investigate the intake of WG products and WG types in relation to all-cause and cause-specific mortality in a large Scandinavian HELGA cohort that, in 1992-8, included 120 010 cohort members aged 30-64 years from the Norwegian Women and Cancer Study, the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study, and the Danish Diet Cancer and Health Study. Participants filled in a FFQ from which data on the intake of WG products were extracted. The estimation of daily intake of WG cereal types was based on country-specific products and recipes. Mortality rate ratios (MRR) and 95 % CI were estimated using the Cox proportional hazards model. A total of 3658 women and 4181 men died during the follow-up (end of follow-up was 15 April 2008 in the Danish sub-cohort, 15 December 2009 in the Norwegian sub-cohort and 15 February 2009 in the Swedish sub-cohort). In the analyses of continuous WG variables, we found lower all-cause mortality with higher intake of total WG products (women: MRR 0·89 (95 % CI 0·86, 0·91); men: MRR 0·89 (95 % CI 0·86, 0·91) for a doubling of intake). In particular, intake of breakfast cereals and non-white bread was associated with lower mortality. We also found lower all-cause mortality with total intake of different WG types (women: MRR 0·88 (95 % CI 0·86, 0·92); men: MRR 0·88 (95 % CI 0·86, 0·91) for a doubling of intake). In particular, WG oat, rye and wheat were associated with lower mortality. The associations were found in both women and men and for different causes of deaths. In the analyses of quartiles of WG intake in relation to all-cause mortality, we found lower mortality in the highest quartile compared with the lowest for breakfast cereals, non-white bread, total WG products, oat, rye (only men), wheat and total WG types. The MRR for highest v

  14. Metamorphism of basic and pelitic rocks at Sulitjelma, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Alan P.

    1986-06-01

    The Sulitjelma area of the Scandinavian Caledonides consists of a variety of metasedimantary units with small basic intrusions, and a large ophiolitic complex of predominantly basic composition. All units underwent prograde greenschist facies to amphibolite facies regional metamorphism during the Scandinavian phase of the Caledonian orogeny. The resultant mineral assemblages and relationships are consistent with the presence of a miscibility gap in the actinolite-hornblende series under greenschist facies conditions; a garnet forming reaction in pelites involving the consumption of carbonate in order to produe the observed grossular content; some conflict between low-baric and medium-baric pressure estimates from equilibria involving Ca amphibole bearing assemblages in metabasites.

  15. After melt down of the Scandinavian icecap sea-level change rates of the Kattegat Sea shifted many times between -3.1 and +3.7 mm a-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morten Hansen, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Short-term sea-level change rates of the late Holocene are generally underestimated because SL-proxies of lowstands normally have a much lower preservation potential than SL-proxies of highstands. However, continuous series of numerous sea-level proxies from both highstands and lowstands are preserved on an island in the middle of the Kattegat Sea between Denmark and Sweden. The island (Læsø, 118 km2) emerged c. 4900 years BP and thereafter the island evolved around 4000 km of still visible, successive shorelines. Due to constantly retreating shores and - not least - a constantly high supply of sediment from a 90 km2 shallow abrasion platform around most of the island, the isostatically raised beaches provide a unique setting for preservation of both highstand and lowstand proxies, while lowstand proxies in most other Scandinavian settings have been eroded by subsequent highstands, thus forming plains of laterally stacked highstand berms. Consequently, the island supplies with many lowstand proxies not previously reported from Scandinavia, and which are essential for understanding magnitudes of relatively short-term (200 - 300 years) sea-level oscillations during the late Holocene. By means of a high resolution LiDAR model of the island, levels and formation chronology of the island's previous shorelines have been identified with high confidence, and by means of 108 absolute datings (14C, OSL and tree-ring datings) the shorelines' absolute ages have been modelled, presently based on 551 RSL/age index points. By means of ground penetrating radar (GPR) the swash heights of any type of paleo-beach have been identified with good precision. By compensation for regional isostatic rates (GIA) and other types of more local terrain-level changes, which can be depicted from the LiDAR-mapping, the RSL-levels have been transformed to a detailed absolute sea-level (ASL) curve. Calculated as a 200 year running mean of the level/age index points the 'eustatic' ASL-curve shows

  16. Evolution of enlarged body size of coal tits Parus ater in geographic isolation from two larger competitors, the crested tit Parus cristatus and the willow tit Parus montanus, on six Scandinavian islands.

    PubMed

    Norberg, R Åke; Lindhe Norberg, Ulla M

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report that on six widely separated Scandinavian islands, the coal tit Parus ater has evolved morphologically in the direction of two absent competitors, the crested tit P. cristatus and the willow tit P. montanus, to the effect that it is up to 10% larger in linear dimensions than conspecifics on the adjacent Swedish mainland, where all three species coexist. The large size is genetically determined, as ascertained by clutch exchange experiments between island and mainland nests. We conclude that the increased size of P. ater in places where it is geographically isolated from its larger congeners is the result of evolutionary adaptation, due ultimately to relaxed interspecific competition. On the islands, P. ater has evolved into a medium-sized generalist, with selection pressures likely governed by the following causal relationships. When competitors are lacking, P. ater takes over the foraging space of the absentees. The enlarged food base allows higher population densities, which intensifies intraspecific interference competition. This, in turn, selects for increased body size. When P. ater coexists with its larger congeners, it occupies peripheral foraging sites in trees, which requires excellent manoeuvrability and energy-expensive locomotion modes. Reduction of body size increases locomotor capacity for mechanical and aerodynamic reasons and lowers energy consumption, so small size is favoured in sympatry. But in geographic isolation, P. ater exploits the tree periphery less and the inner tree regions more, and it also adopts the easier locomotion modes of the absent species. Therefore, selection for manoeuvrability and a small body size is relaxed. The new selection regime shifts the balance between opposing selection forces towards a larger body size. We were able to test 11 alternative hypotheses and available evidence conclusively eliminates them all. As a result, here, evolution could be predicted regarding both direction and amount of change

  17. Design and methods for a Scandinavian pharmacovigilance study of osteonecrosis of the jaw and serious infections among cancer patients treated with antiresorptive agents for the prevention of skeletal-related events

    PubMed Central

    Acquavella, John; Ehrenstein, Vera; Schiødt, Morten; Heide-Jørgensen, Uffe; Kjellman, Anders; Hansen, Svein; Larsson Wexell, Cecilia; Herlofson, Bente Brokstad; Noerholt, Sven Erik; Ma, Haijun; Öhrling, Katarina; Hernandez, Rohini K; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2016-01-01

    Objective Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) is a recognized complication of potent antiresorptive therapies, especially at the doses indicated to prevent skeletal complications for cancer patients with bone metastases. This paper describes the rationale and methods for a prospective, post-authorization safety study of cancer patients treated with antiresorptive therapies. Methods As part of a comprehensive pharmacovigilance plan, developed with regulators’ input, the study will estimate incidence of ONJ and of serious infections among adult cancer patients with bone metastases treated with denosumab (120 mg subcutaneously) or zoledronic acid (4 mg intravenously, adjusted for renal function). Patients will be identified using routinely collected data combined with medical chart review in Denmark, Sweden, and Norway. Followup will extend from the first administration of antiresorptive treatment to the earliest of death, loss-to-follow-up, or 5 years after therapy initiation. Results will be reported for three treatment cohorts: denosumab-naïve patients, zoledronic acid-naïve patients, and patients who switch from bisphosphonate treatment to denosumab. ONJ cases will be identified in three newly established national ONJ databases and adjudicated by the committee that functioned during the XGEVA® clinical trials program. Conclusion This study will provide a real world counterpart to the clinical trial-estimated risks for ONJ and serious infections for cancer patients initiating denosumab or zoledronic acid. The establishment of ONJ databases in the three Scandinavian countries will have potential benefits outside this study for the elucidation of ONJ risk factors and the evaluation of ONJ treatment strategies. PMID:27499646

  18. Evolution of enlarged body size of coal tits Parus ater in geographic isolation from two larger competitors, the crested tit Parus cristatus and the willow tit Parus montanus, on six Scandinavian islands

    PubMed Central

    Norberg, R. Åke; Lindhe Norberg, Ulla M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report that on six widely separated Scandinavian islands, the coal tit Parus ater has evolved morphologically in the direction of two absent competitors, the crested tit P. cristatus and the willow tit P. montanus, to the effect that it is up to 10% larger in linear dimensions than conspecifics on the adjacent Swedish mainland, where all three species coexist. The large size is genetically determined, as ascertained by clutch exchange experiments between island and mainland nests. We conclude that the increased size of P. ater in places where it is geographically isolated from its larger congeners is the result of evolutionary adaptation, due ultimately to relaxed interspecific competition. On the islands, P. ater has evolved into a medium-sized generalist, with selection pressures likely governed by the following causal relationships. When competitors are lacking, P. ater takes over the foraging space of the absentees. The enlarged food base allows higher population densities, which intensifies intraspecific interference competition. This, in turn, selects for increased body size. When P. ater coexists with its larger congeners, it occupies peripheral foraging sites in trees, which requires excellent manoeuvrability and energy-expensive locomotion modes. Reduction of body size increases locomotor capacity for mechanical and aerodynamic reasons and lowers energy consumption, so small size is favoured in sympatry. But in geographic isolation, P. ater exploits the tree periphery less and the inner tree regions more, and it also adopts the easier locomotion modes of the absent species. Therefore, selection for manoeuvrability and a small body size is relaxed. The new selection regime shifts the balance between opposing selection forces towards a larger body size. We were able to test 11 alternative hypotheses and available evidence conclusively eliminates them all. As a result, here, evolution could be predicted regarding both direction and amount of

  19. Scandinavian Treelines are Impacted by Herbivory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairns, D. M.; Granberg, T. C.; Lafon, C. W.; Young, A. B.; Moen, J.

    2011-12-01

    Forest tundra boundaries occur world wide in both Arctic and alpine locations and respond to changes in climate over both short and long time spans. The treeline environments of Fennoscandia are particularly sensitive indicators of climate change. Trees at these treelines are subject to herbivory by a variety of large and small animals, and recent studies have shown that herbivores may be limiting the ability of treeline to migrate upslope in response to climate change. However, the data are typically for small areas. In this paper, we present the results of a dendroecological study of mountain birch (Betula pubescens ssp. czerepanovii) that encompasses a large portion of the Swedish Scandes in northern Sweden. Results are based on data from more than 4700 stems gathered at 65 sites in Norrbotten and Vasterbotten counties. Stems from small trees reveal the historical establishment of new individuals at the treeline, and data from large trees are used to detect outbreaks of the autumnal moth. These data indicate that historic autumnal moth outbreaks can be identified and that the effects of reindeer herbivory are equivocal. Data from mountain birch seedlings and saplings indicate that pulses in mountain birch establishment are influenced by both climate and herbivory. These results indicate that the response of both the pattern and location of the treeline should be interpreted as a complex interaction of both climate and herbivory.

  20. [Scandinavian eugenics: Nordic historians provide new approaches].

    PubMed

    Zylberman, Patrick

    2004-10-01

    Late disclosure of the large scale of sterilization practices in the Nordic countries created an outburst of scandal: did these policies rely on coercion? To what extent? Who in the end was responsible? Sterilization practices targeted underpriviledged people first. The mentally retarded and women were their first victims. Operations were very frequently determined by other people's manipulative or coercive influences. Should the blame be put on the Social-Democrats in power throughout the period (except in Finland and Estonia)? Apart from Denmark, perhaps, local physicians and local services, more than governments, seemed to have strongly supported sterilization practices. Teetotalers and feminists shared responsibilities. How can one explain that eugenics finally declined? Based on a sound application of the Hardy-Weinberg law, the science of the eugenicists was correct. Was it politics? But uncovering of the Nazi crimes had only a very small impact on eugenics. Some authors underline the fact that the Nordic scientific institutions were particularly suited to liberal values. Others point to the devastating effect on eugenics once hereditarist psychiatry fell from favour in the middle of the sixties. PMID:15461971

  1. An American physician's foray into Scandinavian healthcare.

    PubMed

    Gendler, Robert

    2016-05-01

    The article describes the experience of the author, an American Physician, seeking care for an uncommon orthopedic condition. Unable to find adequate treatment in the United States, the author traveled to Finland for surgical treatment. PMID:26879080

  2. Homicide by firearms in two Scandinavian capitals.

    PubMed

    Hougen, H P; Rogde, S; Poulsen, K

    2000-09-01

    In the Oslo and Copenhagen areas, 83 homicides by firearms were registered in the 10-year period 1985 to 1994, accounting for 19.3% of all homicides in that period. The majority of the victims were between 20 and 50 years old, and 58% were male, 42% female. The yearly number of firearm homicides varied between 4 and 15, with neither an increase nor decrease throughout the period. Most of the victims had no detectable blood alcohol at autopsy. Female victims were typically shot in their own domicile with a shotgun by their spouse, mostly because of jealousy or in a family argument, whereas male victims were shot on different locations, predominantly with a handgun, for many different reasons. Most victims were shot in the head, and few had entrance wounds in more than one anatomic region. PMID:10990294

  3. Reply to comment by D. Nývlt on "Development of the topography-controlled Upper Odra ice lobe (Scandinavian Ice Sheet) in the fore-mountain area of southern Poland during the Saalian glaciation"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamon, Tomasz

    2016-02-01

    D. Nyvlt's comment provides an opportunity to re-discuss the problem of the maximum extent of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet during the Saalian glaciation in the area of the Moravian Gate, which has been a subject of debate for many years (Lewandowski, 1988; Badura and Przybylski, 1998). The controversies arise from different conclusions derived from studies in neighbouring areas of Poland and Czech Republic (Fig. 1a). In Poland, a generally accepted view is that the ice sheet reached its maximum extent during the Elsterian glaciation (Marks, 2004; Mojski, 2005), when it advanced up to the foothills of the Carpathian Mountains. During the Saalian glaciation it did not over-pass the Middle Polish Upland belt, but only through the Silesian Lowland slipped further southward, but not as far as the Czech authors suggest. They propose that the ice sheet advanced deeply into the Moravian Gate, crossed the main European water divide and its maximum extent was even larger than during Elsterian glaciation (Nývlt et al., 2011; Tyráček, 2011). A less extensive Saalian ice sheet was proposed by Lewandowski (1988), who claimed that the concept of deep penetration of the Moravian Gate by the ice lobe is in contradiction to data obtained from the area to the north of the Ostrava Basin, and especially from the Oświęcim Basin and the Rybnik Plateau (Fig. 1a). If the ice-sheet reached as far as the Czech authors claim, the mentioned areas should also have been glaciated (at least partially), however there is no evidence for this. Only a single (Elsterian) horizon of till is known from the Oświęcim Basin and the Rybnik Plateau (Karaś-Brzozowska, 1963; Klimek, 1972; Lewandowski, 1988; Haisig and Wilanowski, 2003). Sediments of Saalian age have been identified there, but these are only proglacial sands and silts (e.g. Lewandowski, 1988; Salamon, 2009). There is no evidence of the Saalian glaciation at the immediate foreland of the Beskidy Mountains to the east of the Ostrava Basin

  4. Occurrence of bovine dermatophilosis in the southernmost islands of Japan.

    PubMed

    Kinjo, E; Motonaga, H; Matayoshi, E; Kudo, S; Watanabe, K; Hara, M; Tabuchi, K; Momotani, E; Azuma, R

    1981-01-01

    Such cutaneous symptoms as characteristic incrustation and alopecia were noticed in 25 calves of the indigenous Japanese Black breed grazing on subtropical islands in Japan over a period of April, 1978 to February, 1980. These islands were Ishigaki, Kuro, Yonaguni and Tarama belonging to the Sakishima Islands. Microbiological and pathological examination on three of these calves revealed that the calves were affected with dermatophilosis caused by Dermatophilus congolensis. The disease in these calves seemed to be the same as that reported previously in other countries, since it attacked young calves in a humid district with an abundant rainfall. It broke out first on Ishigaki Island and subsequently on the other islands in 3 years. Discussion was made on factors inducing these outbreaks. PMID:7341992

  5. Modeling the exhumation path of partially melted ultrahigh-pressure metapelites, North-East Greenland Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Helen M.; Gilotti, Jane A.

    2015-06-01

    Pseudosection modeling constrains the pressure-temperature (P-T) exhumation path of partially melted ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metapelites exposed in the North-East Greenland UHP terrane. A robust peak P and T estimate of 3.6 GPa and 970 °C based on mineral assemblages in nearby kyanite eclogites is the starting point for the P-T path. Although the peak assemblage for the metapelite is not preserved, the calculated modeled peak assemblage contained substantial clinopyroxene, garnet, phengite, K-feldspar and coesite with minor kyanite and rutile. Combining the pseudosection and observed textures, the decompression path crosses the coesite-quartz transition before reaching the dry phengite dehydration melting reaction where phengite is abruptly consumed. In the range of 2.5 to 2.2 GPa, clinopyroxene is completely consumed and garnet grows to its maximum volume and grossular content, matching the high grossular rims of relict megacrysts. Plagioclase joins the assemblage and the pseudosection predicts up to 12-13 vol.% melt in the supersolidus assemblage, which contained garnet, liquid, K-feldspar, plagioclase, kyanite, quartz and rutile. At this stage, the steep decompression path flattened out and became nearly isobaric. The melt crystallization assemblage that formed when the path crossed the solidus with decreasing temperature contains phengite, garnet, biotite, 2 feldspars, kyanite, quartz and rutile. Therefore, the path must have intersected the solidus at approximately 1.2 GPa, 825 °C. The pseudosection predicts that garnet is consumed on the cooling path, but little evidence of late garnet consumption or other retrograde effects is observed. This may be due to partial melt loss from the rock. Isochemical PT-n and PT-X sections calculated along the P-T path display changes in mineral assemblage and composition that are consistent with preserved assemblages.

  6. Partial eclogitization of the Ambolten gabbro-norite, north-east Greenland Caledonides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilotti, J.A.; Elvevold, S.

    1998-01-01

    Partially eclogitized igneous bodies composed of gabbro, leucogabbro, anorthosite and cross-cutting diabase dikes are well represented in the North-East Greenland Eclogite Province. A 200 x 100 meter intrusive body on Ambolten Island (78?? 20' N, 19?? 15' W) records a prograde transition from gabbro-norite to eclogite facies coronitic metagabro-norite surrounded by hydrated margins of undeformed to strongly foliated amphibolite. Igneous plagioclase + olivine + enstatite + augite + oxides convert to eclogite facies assemblages consisting of garnet, omphacite, diopside, enstatite, kyanite, zoisite, rutile and pargasitic amphibole through several coronitic reactions. Relict cumulus plagioclase laths are replaced by an outer corona of garnet, an inner corona of omphacite and an internal region of sodic plagioclase, garnet, kyanite, omphacite and zoisite. Olivine and intercumulus pyroxene are partly replaced by metamorphic pyroxenes and amphibole. The corona structures, zoning patterns, diversity of mineral compositions in a single thin section, and preservation of metastable asemblages are characteristic of diffusion-controlled metamorphism. The most extreme disequilibrium is found in static amphibolites, where igneous pyroxenes, plagioclase domains with eclogite facies, assemblages, and matrix amphibole coexist. Complete eclogitization was not attained at Ambolten due to a lack of fluids needed to drive diffusion during prograde and retrograde metamorphism. The P-T conditions of the high-pressure metamorphism are estimated at ??? 750??C and > 18 kbar. Well-equilibrated, foliated amphibolites from the margin of the gabbro-norite supports our contention that the entire North-East Greenland Eclogite Province experienced Caledonian high-pressure metamorphism, even though no eclogite facies assemblages have been found in the quartzofeldspathic host gneisses to date.

  7. Exotic metamorphic terranes in the Caledonides: Tectonic history of the Dalradian block, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluck, B. J.; Dempster, T. J.

    1991-11-01

    The Dalradian block, a part of the Precambrian metamorphic basement of Scotland, is thought to be exotic to Laurentia, having a provenance in Gondwana. In contrast to the rest of the Laurentian margin, which from ca. 700 to 530 Ma was undergoing extension, the Dalradian block was undergoing severe compression ca. 590 Ma. At the time of splitting of the Late Proterozoic supercontinent, both Gondwana and Laurentia shared a common history of extension; however, at ca. 670 Ma Gondwana converted to a destructive margin and underwent compression, whereas Laurentia remained in extension and passive to 500-510 Ma. The Dalradian block had two major phases of metamorphism and deformation, one in Gondwana, and the other in Laurentia. The second phase of classical Barrovian metamorphism may have been produced by thickening due to emplacement of ophiolitic and other nappes, rather than the earlier internal nappe structures. Late-stage ductile folding in the Moine basement to the north may be related to the final emplacement of the Dalradian block onto Laurentia.

  8. Geological Constraints, Structural Evolution, and Deep Geology of the Northwest Scottish Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, R. W. H.; Coward, M. P.

    1984-06-01

    The front of the Caledonian orogenic belt in NW Scotland is marked by a zone of foreland thrusting which contains imbricates of Lewisian basement, Proterozoic cover and Cambrian shelf sediments. Faults within this Moine thrust belt, in most localities, propagated in a foreland directed sequence. Therefore the earliest of these thrusts was the Moine thrust, which carried a basement assemblage of Moine and Lewisian rocks over the Cambrian shelf. The development of large duplex and imbricate structures in the footwall postadted movement on this thrust. Hence a restoration of these imbricates provides a minimum estimate of the eastern extent of the Cambrian shelf. No synsedimentary or prethrust extensional features are recognised within the Cambrian succession which displays a remarkable stratigraphic and thickness consistency. This implies a corresponding consistency in crustal structure beneath these cover rocks immediately prior to Caledonian thrusting. A balanced cross section constructed across the northern part of the Moine thrust belt has given a restored width for the Cambrian shelf of 54 km. Geophysical data suggest that the present foreland crustal thickness is 28 km. If this is taken to be the crustal thickness beneath the Cambrian shelf during Caledonian thrusting, a minimum cross sectional area of 1512 km² of Lewisian rocks must remain beneath the present outcrop of the Moine thrust sheet. This foreland basement wedge may have been imbricated subsequent to the development of the Cambrian imbricates. Caledonian structures within the Moine thrust sheet are interpreted as forming an imbricate stack with the Moine thrust acting as a floor thrust. The ductile imbricate thrusts possibly roofed into the Naver slide. Late open folds, which warp foliation, slides, and metamorphic isograds within the Moine sheet, may represent culminations in the foreland Lewisian imbricates beneath the Moine thrust. These postulated culminations may have been sufficient to initiate gravity-driven structures. This may explain late movements on high-level faults within the Moine thrust belt.

  9. Cataclasites-ultracataclasites in a major thrust zone: Gaissa Thrust, N. Norwegian Caledonides.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, A. Hugh N.; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    Narrow fault zones of intense deformation imply strain localisation. This is superbly shown by the ~horizontal Caledonian basal décollement in N. Norway, where ~127 km of top E-to-ESE thrust displacement is concentrated in a ~3 cm thick principle slip zone within lower strain hanging wall and footwall cataclasites less than a few centimetres thick. A scan of a transport-direction parallel 8.5x11.5cm thin-section of the fault is enlarged to 0.7x1.0m in the poster. The Caledonian external imbricate zone here places anchizone pre-Marinoan quartzite/shales onto diagenetic-zone post-Gaskiers red/green shales, silts and fine sandstones. Carbonates are absent. The displacement was estimated from balanced cross-sections and branch-line restorations. In the hangingwall cataclastic zone, a coarse qtz-rich/clay-rich cataclastic compositional layering dips at <30° towards the hinterland. Sedimentary features are nowhere seen in this pervasively, cyclically fractured rock. A cataclastic foliation is locally present parallel to the compositional layering. Close to the principle slip zone, an irregular fabric develops parallel to the detachment. The hangingwall cataclasites are cut by foreland-dipping (<70°) fractures at all scales, with offsets of up to a few mm, rarely with a reverse shear-sense, creating lozenge shaped clasts of earlier cataclasites. Fractures concentrate darker material, indicating pressure solution; similar layers lie parallel to the compositional layering. The principle slip zone has at least 11 distinct bands, although these contain microstructural variations; not all persist across the sample. Three types of band can be distinguished, separated generally by principle slip surfaces. (1) layers containing abundant angular fragments of earlier cataclasite. A variably oriented cataclastic foliation is irregularly developed, dipping towards both foreland and hinterland and wrapping larger clasts. Some elongate clasts have an (oblique) earlier internal cataclastic foliation. (2) layers with a fine, essentially planar ultracataclastic foliation (0.05 mm thick layers visible on poster) parallel to the core-zone boundary. Clasts of cataclasite are rare but typically rounded. (3) ultracataclasite layers with no, or relatively coarse, banding and more abundant rounded clasts of cataclasite. These layers may be only 0.15 mm thick (seen in the enlarged thin-section), separating type 1 layers. Boundaries between the three types are generally sharp (principle slip surfaces). The excision of some layers and one markedly irregular boundary between type 2 and 3 layers indicates late movement oblique to the regional transport direction. No evidence of pseudotachylite has been seen. The footwall cataclastic zone is more disturbed than in the hanging wall. Variations in cataclasites define an irregular, poor compositional layering. No sedimentary features are preserved. Foreland dipping fractures (<20° to detachment) cut the cataclasites with offsets of <1cm. High angle (conjugate) thin fractures, some with very minor offsets, cut across the whole fault. Thicker, irregular detachment parallel fractures also occur in the principle slip zone. These very late fractures, as well as minor voids in the principle slip zone, are filled with carbonate. Further work is in progress on the age, chemistry and textural evolution of the fault.

  10. Crustal Decoupling in Collisional Orogenesis: Examples from the East Greenland Caledonides and Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, K. V.

    2016-06-01

    Mature orogenic systems built by continent-continent collision feature orogenic plateaus flanked by accretionary wedges. Thermal-mechanical models of these systems predict the development of a thermally weakened orogenic infrastructure that is capable of lateral flow toward the orogenic foreland. Such flow, if it occurs, strongly influences the evolutionary pathway of a wedge. Although the architecture of a wedge features numerous large-displacement faults, three are preeminent in mature orogens: one that marks the base of the wedge and two others that mark the base and top, respectively, of the weakened infrastructure. These structures represent major decoupling horizons separating domains with distinctive deformational and thermal histories. Reviews of the geology of orogenic wedges in two mature orogenic systems—the Cenozoic Himalaya and the Paleozoic East Greenland Caledonides—show how this simple conceptual model provides a valuable context for studies of how collisional orogenic systems develop and how they interact with the surrounding lithosphere.

  11. Open-System Alkaline Magmatism in the Caledonides of North-Central Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, C. G.; Prestvik, T.; Barnes, M. A.

    2002-12-01

    The Caledonian-age Hortavaer intrusion is exposed on small islands and skerries off the coast of north-central Norway. It was emplaced into a range of host rocks that includes calcitic and dolomitic marble to migmatitic gneiss to quartz-rich meta-arenite. The intrusion is unusual relative to Caledonian plutons on the mainland because of its alkaline nature and its possible circa 460-470 Ma age (based on imprecise Sr and Nd isochrones). The intrusion is broadly zoned, with central diorite and outer syenite. Dike-like bodies of monzonite and syenite are also present and are elongate in a NNE-SSW direction. Each lithologic unit is characterized by evidence for magma mingling, particularly by synplutonic dikes and enclaves. In the syenitic zone, mingled magmas ranged from monzonitic (syenitic) to dioritic. In the diorite zone, mingling was dominated by diorite-in-diorite, but composite diorite-syenite dikes are present. The contact between the syenite and diorite units is marked by an approximately 500-m-wide zone of sheeted diorite/syenite dikes that are mutually intrusive. In addition to magma mingling, the complex shows a variety of types of interaction with screens of its host rocks, which are typically subparallel to foliation in the pluton. Some screens were apparently unreactive with the surrounding magma, whereas others resulted in intense reaction and formation of garnet melasyenite, pyroxene-rich monzodiorite, and rare nepheline-bearing rocks. A trend toward Fe enrichment among the dioritic rocks, the low Mg/(Mg+Fe) and Sr contents of the evolved syenites, and curvilinear composition trends for many elements in the suite suggest fractional crystallization was a major control on magma evolution. However, low epsilon Nd (465 Ma) (-3 to -10), moderate initial 87Sr/86Sr (0.705 to 0.710), and high delta18O (+8.3 to +14.0 %) suggest either a crustal source or intense contamination. The presence of primary calcite with delta13C typical of host carbonate rocks suggests that assimilation was important in the pluton, and was perhaps promoted by evolution of mixed CO2-H2O fluid during assimilation of carbonate rich metasedimentary rocks.

  12. A N-S receiver function profile across the Variscides and Caledonides in SW Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landes, Michael; Ritter, J. R. R.; O'Reilly, B. M.; Readman, P. W.; Do, V. C.

    2006-08-01

    Teleseismic receiver functions have been calculated from data of a temporary seismological network of broad-band three-component stations to investigate the lithospheric and asthenospheric structure across the Late Caledonian Iapetus Suture Zone (ISZ) in southern Ireland. The stations were deployed during the Irish Seismological Lithospheric Experiment (ISLE 2002/3) and straddle the Killarney-Mallow Fault Zone, a remnant of the Variscan orogeny, and the ISZ, the inferred boundary between the Laurentia and Eastern Avalonia plates fused together during the Caledonian orogeny. Receiver functions from the western part of the network were projected onto the N-S VARNET 1996 seismic refraction profile, extending from the Old Head of Kinsale to Galway Bay in SW Ireland. Laterally continuous P to S conversions from the Moho at delay times of about 3.8-4.1 s are clearly observed, and correspond to Moho depths of about 29-32 km. The Moho has a transitional character to the south of the ISZ. Synthetic receiver functions, calculated from a 2-D velocity model of the previous VARNET experiment, show Moho conversions and multiple crustal phases compatible to those observed in the ISLE data. Furthermore, P to S conversions from the 660 km discontinuity (66-68 s delay time) are well determined at the stations. In comparison, the conversion from the 410 km discontinuity at about 43-45 s delay time is considerably weaker. Delay times of stacked receiver functions from the mantle transition zone are in agreement with the standard iasp91 earth model and thus no structural changes are observed across the ISZ at this depth interval.

  13. A Scandinavian View on the Aesthetics as a Learning Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austring, Bennye D.; Sorensen, Merete

    2012-01-01

    As the aesthetic learning process is always relational and developed in interaction with the surrounding culture, the participants in the aesthetic activities can develop cultural identity and social skills. Add to this that the individual can share its inner world with others through aesthetic activities in the potential space and in this way…

  14. Open Dialogue Approach - about the phenomenon of Scandinavian Psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Kłapciński, Michał M; Rymaszewska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    After twenty years of transformation of Finnish mental health care, in the late 80s and early 90s of the last century, incidence of schizophrenia in Western Lapland dropped from 35/100,000 to 7/100,000. This phenomenon is linked with Yrjo O. Alanen et al. who investigated schizophrenia treatment outcomes and psychosocial rehabilitation of people with schizophrenia. Investigators focused on an individually tailored psychotherapeutic recovery plan during patient's hospitalization, including care for patients' families. Within the "Finnish National Schizophrenia Project" the principles of the Need-Adapted Treatment were created and 50% of Finland's country gained access to mobile crisis intervention teams. Further studies were continued within "Acute PsychosisIntegrated Treatment Project" (1992-1993) which locally, in Western Lapland, proceeded into "Open Dialogue in Acute Psychosis Project" (ODAP) (1994-1997). In this approach, all important decisions regarding the patient, including hospitalization or pharmacotherapy, are discussed not only with the entire therapeutic team, but also with the patient and his family members. Two - and five-year follow-ups demonstrated high treatment efficacy as well as important cost reduction in mental health care spending. First two"Open Dialogue Method" training courses for representatives of the medical, psychological, nursing and social care have been completed in Poland in October 2014. Studies evaluating the therapeutic effectiveness of the described approach are being planned. PMID:26909395

  15. Scandinavian Mass Communication Research: Publications in English, French and German.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordic Documentation Center for Mass Communication Research, Aarhus (Denmark).

    This update to the bibliographies from Nordicom edited in 1975 and 1976 lists publications on mass communications research from Denmark, Finland, and Norway, that have appeared in one or more of the three languages--English, French, or German. Materials are listed for each country separately, arranged by author (or title if there is no author),…

  16. Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis: molecular characterization of two Scandinavian sisters.

    PubMed

    Rystedt, E; Olin, M; Seyama, Y; Buchmann, M; Berstad, A; Eggertsen, G; Björkhem, I

    2002-09-01

    Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) is a hereditary disorder, which is inherited as an autosomally recessive disease, causing production of cholesterol and cholestanol xanthomas and mental retardation. The disease is caused by mutations in the gene for sterol 27-hydroxylase (CYP27A1). The only CTX patients diagnosed in Scandinavia are two Norwegian sisters from a consanguineous marriage. Here we have characterized the mutation and its functional consequences for the enzyme. Analysis of genomic DNA from cultured fibroblasts identified a base exchange C > T in position 1441, causing arginine at amino acid position 441 to be replaced by tryptophan. The same mutation was introduced by mutagenesis in the complimentary DNA (cDNA) for CYP27, ligated into the expression vector pcDNA4/HisMax and transfected into HEK293 cells. The mutated enzyme had less than 5% of the enzyme activity compared with the native enzyme. No abnormal catalytic products could be identified in the cell culture medium. Probably the mutation affects the haem binding within the holoenzyme. The mutation has also previously been reported in a Japanese family. This is the second example of a CTX-causing mutation that has been recognized in more than one population. PMID:12270007

  17. Educational Evaluation in Scandinavian Countries: Converging or Diverging Practices?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Hanne Foss

    2009-01-01

    Current educational evaluation is institutionalized as an element in national educational policy in Sweden, Denmark, and Norway. This article analyses how higher education and primary and lower secondary education have adopted and institutionalized educational evaluation. The analysis shows similarities and differences in organizing and practicing…

  18. Concentrating on CO2: the Scandinavian and Arctic measurements.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Maria

    2011-01-01

    This article concerns atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements made in Scandinavia and in the Arctic region before measurements started at Mauna Loa, Hawaii, in 1958. The CO2 hypothesis of climate change was one reason to measure atmospheric CO2 in the mid-1950s. The earlier history of CO2 measurements--for instance, the work of the chemist Kurt Buch--was also influential in this period. It is unclear when the CO2 hypothesis of climate change began to provide sufficient motivation for measurements, and the measurements may relate in a nonlinear way to the growth in popularity of the hypothesis. Discussions between meteorologist Carl-Gustaf Rossby at Stockholm Högskola and scientists in America reveal how different kinds of CO2 studies varied with regard to precision. PMID:21936192

  19. Ethnographic Investigations of Issues of Race in Scandinavian Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beach, Dennis; Lunneblad, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    In this article we aim to present an overview of some of the ways in which issues of race and ethnicity are represented and researched in educational ethnography in Scandinavia. Several things are suggested. Amongst them is that educational ethnographers in Scandinavia rarely use the concept of race. The term (im)migrant(s) is used instead and the…

  20. Temporal and spatial variation of hematozoans in Scandinavian willow warblers.

    PubMed

    Bensch, Staffan; Akesson, Susanne

    2003-04-01

    We examined temporal and geographical distribution of Haemoproteus sp. and Plasmodium sp. parasites in Swedish willow warblers, Phylloscopus trochilus. Parasite lineages were detected with molecular methods in 556 birds from 41 sites distributed at distances up to 1,500 km. Two mitochondrial lineages of Haemoproteus sp. were detected, WW1 in 56 birds and WW2 in 75 birds, that differed by 5.2% sequence divergence. We discuss the reasons behind the observed pattern of variation and identify 3 possible causes: (1) variation in the geographic distribution of the vector species, (2) the degree of parasite sharing with other bird species coexisting with the willow warbler, and (3) timing of transmission. Our results support a fundamental and rarely tested assumption of the now classical Hamilton-Zuk hypothesis of sexual selection, namely, that these parasites vary in both time and space. Such fluctuations of parasites and the selection pressure they supposedly impose on the host population are likely to maintain variation in immune system genes in the host population. PMID:12760661

  1. ADHD in Finland and Types of Scandinavian Cooperation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapper, Marie-Louise; Michelsson, Katarina

    This paper reviews the history and current status of services to children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in Finland. It notes the availability of free or almost free health services in Finland and the resulting very low infant mortality rate. The history of attention deficit hyperactivity disorders (ADHD), termed "minimal brain…

  2. Palaeomagnetism of the Loch Doon Granite Complex, Southern Uplands of Scotland: The Late Caledonian palaeomagnetic record and an Early Devonian episode of True Polar Wander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piper, J. D. A.

    2007-03-01

    The Southern Uplands terrane is an Ordovician-Silurian back-arc/foreland basin emplaced at the northern margin of the Iapetus Ocean and intruded by granite complexes including Loch Doon (408.3 ± 1.5 Ma) during Early Devonian times. Protracted cooling of this 130 km 3 intrusion recorded magnetic remanence comprising a predominant ('A') magnetisation linked to initial cooling with dual polarity and mean direction D / I = 237 / 64° ( α95 = 4°, palaeopole at 316°E, 21°N). Subsidiary magnetisations include Mesozoic remanence correlating with extensional tectonism in the adjoining Irish Sea Basin ('B', D / I = 234/- 59°) and minority populations ('C', D / I = 106/- 2° and 'D', D / I = 199/1°) recording emplacement of younger (˜ 395 Ma) granites in adjoining terranes and the Variscan orogenic event. The 'A' directions have an arcuate distribution identifying anticlockwise rotation during cooling. A comparable rotation is identified in the Orthotectonic Caledonides to the north and the Paratectonic Caledonides to the south following closure of Iapetus. Continental motion from midsoutherly latitudes (˜ 40°S) at 408 Ma to equatorial palaeolatitudes by ˜ 395 Ma is identified and implies minimum rates of continental movement between 430 and 390 Ma of 30-70 cm/year, more than double maximum rates induced by plate forces and interpreted as a signature of true polar wander. Silurian-Devonian palaeomagnetic data from the British-Scandinavian Caledonides define a 430-385 Ma closed loop comparable to the distributed contemporaneous palaeomagnetic poles from Gondwana. They reconcile pre-430 Ma and post-380 Ma APW from this supercontinent and show that Laurentia-Baltica-Avalonia lay to the west of South America with a relict Rheic Ocean opening to the north which closed to produce Variscan orogeny by a combination of pivotal closure and right lateral transpression.

  3. Geochemistry of Ordovician Keli Group basalts associated with Besshi-type Cu-Zn deposits from the southern Trondheim and Sulitjelma mining districts of Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. D.; Farquhar, J. S.; Smith, P.

    1990-01-01

    Besshi-type volcanogenic Cu-Zn deposits in the Scandinavian Caledonides are hosted by Ordovician metabasalts and clastic sediments of the Storen, Fundsjo and Sulitjelma groups. The basalts are transitional between T-MORB and marginal basin tholeiites in composition and are characterised by Nd and Pb isotopic compositions which overlap the more radiogenic values of Lower Palaeozoic MORB. These features, along with the intercalation of the basalts with tuffs and continentally derived sediments, indicate an epicontinental rift or marginal basin origin, possibly analogous to the present Red Sea and Gulf of Aden rifts. This implies the development of a restricted ocean basin in the north of Iapetus between the Laurentian and Baltoscandian microcontinents during the Cambrian and Early Ordovician.

  4. Elastic anisotropy and borehole stress estimation in the Seve Nappe Complex from the COSC-1 well, Åre, Sweden.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenning, Quinn; Almquist, Bjarne; Ask, Maria; Schmitt, Douglas R.; Zappone, Alba

    2015-04-01

    The Caledonian orogeny, preserved in Scandinavia and Greenland, began with the closure of the Iapetus Ocean and culminated in the collision of Baltica and Laurentia cratons during the middle Paleozoic. The COSC scientific drilling project aims at understanding the crustal structure and composition of the Scandinavian Caledonides. The first well of the dual phase drilling program, completed in Summer of 2014, drilled through ~2.5 km of the Seve Nappe Complex near the town of Åre, Sweden. Newly acquired drill core and borehole logs provide fresh core material for physical rock property measurements and in-situ stress determination. This contribution presents preliminary data on compressional and shear wave ultrasonic velocities (Vp, Vs) determined from laboratory measurements on drill cores, together with in-situ stress orientation analysis using image logs from the first borehole of the Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides project (COSC-1). An hydrostatically oil pressurized apparatus is used to test the ultrasonic Vp and Vs on three orthogonally cut samples of amphibolite, calcium bearing and felsic gneiss, meta-gabbro, and mylonitic schist from drill core. We measure directional anisotropy variability for each lithology using one sample cut perpendicular to the foliation and two additional plugs cut parallel to the foliation with one parallel to the lineation and the other perpendicular. Measurements are performed using the pulse transmission technique on samples subjected to hydrostatic pressure from 1-350 MPa at dry conditions. We present preliminary results relating Vp and Vs anisotropy to geologic units and degree of deformation. Additionally, we use acoustic borehole televiewer logs to estimate the horizontal stress orientation making use of well developed techniques for observed borehole breakouts (compressive failure) and drilling induced fractures (tensile failure). Preliminary observations show that very few drilling-induced tensile

  5. Geologic map and map database of western Sonoma, northernmost Marin, and southernmost Mendocino counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blake, M.C., Jr.; Graymer, R.W.; Stamski, R.E.

    2002-01-01

    This digital map database, compiled from previously published and unpublished data, and new mapping by the authors, represents the general distribution of bedrock and surficial deposits in the mapped area. Together with the accompanying text file (wsomf.ps, wsomf.pdf, wsomf.txt), it provides current information on the geologic structure and stratigraphy of the area covered. The database delineates map units that are identified by general age and lithology following the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U.S. Geological Survey. The scale of the source maps limits the spatial resolution (scale) of the database to 1:62,500 or smaller.

  6. Petrochemistry and tectonic significance of Lower Cretaceous Barros Arana Formation basalts, southernmost Chilean Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, C. R.; Mohseni, P. P.; Fuenzalida, P. R.

    The Lower Cretaceous Barros Arana Formation (Albian, hornblende KAr age of 104 Ma), in the Magallanes region of Chile, consists of a sequence of spilitized clinopyroxene- and amphibole-bearing mafic dikes and lavas, and volcaniclastic breccias, occurring within the sedimentary infill of the Rocas Verdes marginal basin and its eastward extension onto the Cretaceous continental platform. Although the original alkali and alkaline earth element concentrations of the basaltic lavas and dikes have been altered by spilitization, the presence of relict pargasitic amphibole phenocrysts, the absence of orthopyroxene, and high LREE contents and LREE/HREE ratios imply mildly alkaline affinities for these basalts. Their low TiO 2 and HFSE (Zr, Nb, Ta, and Hf) contents and high LREE/HFSE ratios suggest affinities with convergent plate boundary arc magmas. The Barros Arana basalts are interpreted as mafic members of the mildly alkaline shoshonitic rock suite of subduction-related arcs. They may have formed as subduction geometry began to undergo the changes (flattening) that ultimately led to the initiation of the closure, deformation, and uplift of the Rocas Verdes basin by the late or post-Albian. The low initial 87Sr/ 86Sr (0.7031) and high initial 143Nd/ 144Nd (0.51277) of the basalts indicate that a generally extensional tectonic regime east of the main calc-alkaline arc allowed eruption of these mafic shoshonites without interaction with continental crust (in contrast to the contemporaneous plutons of the Patagonian batholith).

  7. Seismic Study of the Southernmost Andes. The Contact Between Scotia and South American Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassone, A.; Cominguez, A. H.; Yagupsky, D.; Alvarado, P.; Lodolo, E.; Menichetti, M.

    2003-12-01

    The relationships between the sinistral Magallanes-Fagnano continental transform fault (MFS), a major segment of the boundary between Scotia-South American plates, and the northern flank of the western Scotia Sea, characterized mostly by compressional structures, have not been yet clearly identified. From data processing, depth seismic-migration modeling and interpretation of 800 km of seismic reflection profiles, this study presents one morpho-structural analysis of these two main tectonic elements. In the offshore part of the Malvinas fold-and-thrust belt, five main seismic units have been recognized. Steeply dipping (mainly to the south) reverse faults cut through the folds. Some of these faults represent old extensional faults of the Middle-Mesozoic Rocas Verdes marginal basin rifting, which have been subsequently inverted by compressional stress fields. A noticeable fault system is recognized in the seismic profile, which involves both the sedimentary cover and the acoustic basement. This fault is interpreted as the result of shear stresses produced along the transcurrent South American-Scotia plate boundary. In the SW border of Malvinas Basin, four major discontinuities were recognized. Each discontinuity represents important changes in the regional geodynamic evolution: Early-Late Jurassic rift; Thermal subsidence (Late Jurassic-Late Cretaceous); Transitional stage, to Foreland basin (Late Cretaceous-Eocene) and Foreland (since Eocene).

  8. Integrated evaluation of the geology, aerogammaspectrometry and aeromagnetometry of the Sul-Riograndense Shield, southernmost Brazil.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Léo A; Lopes, William R; Savian, Jairo F

    2016-03-01

    An integrated evaluation of geology, aerogammaspectrometry and aeromagnetometry of the Sul-Riogran-dense Shield is permitted by the advanced stage of understanding of the geology and geochronology of the southern Brazilian Shield and a 2010 airborne geophysical survey. Gamma rays are registered from the rocks near the surface and thus describe the distribution of major units in the shield, such as the Pelotas batholith, the juvenile São Gabriel terrane, the granulite-amphibolite facies Taquarembó terrane and the numerous granite intrusions in the foreland. Major structures are also observed, e.g., the Dorsal de Canguçu shear. Magnetic signals register near surface crustal compositions (analytic signal) and total crust composition (total magnetic signal), so their variation as measured indicates either shallow or whole crustal structures. The Caçapava shear is outstanding on the images as is the magnetic low along the N-S central portion of the shield. These integrated observations lead to the deepening of the understanding of the largest and even detailed structures of the Sul-Riograndense Shield, some to be correlated to field geology in future studies. Most significant is the presence of different provinces and their limits depending on the method used for data acquisition - geology, aerogammaspectrometry or aeromagnetometry. PMID:26840006

  9. Temporal variations of atmospheric carbon dioxide in the southernmost part of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xia; Nakazawa, Takakiyo; Ishizawa, Misa; Aoki, Shuji; Nakaoka, Shin-Ichiro; Sugawara, Satoshi; Maksyutov, Shamil; Saeki, Tazu; Hayasaka, Tadahiro

    2007-09-01

    We present analysis of the temporal variation of atmospheric CO2 in the subtropical region of East Asia, obtained aboard a ferry between Ishigaki Island and Hateruma Island, Japan for the period June 1993-April 2005. The annual mean CO2 concentration increases from 360.1 ppmv in 1994 to 378.4 ppmv in 2004, showing an average growth rate of 1.8 ppmv yr-1. The growth rate shows interannual variations with high values during ENSO events. The average seasonal CO2 cycle reaches the maximum in early April and the minimum in mid-September, with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 8.5 ppmv. Numerical simulations using a three-dimensional atmospheric transport model show interannual variations of the CO2 growth rate similar to the observation, but the amplitude of the seasonal cycle is larger, with maximum concentration appearing earlier than the observation by 1 month. Low CO2 values observed during the spring of 1998 are likely associated with the 1997/1998 ENSO event. A backward trajectory analysis suggests that they were due to changes in atmospheric transport whereby maritime air masses from the Pacific Ocean dominated over polluted air masses from the Asian Continent. Extreme values (either high or low) of CO2 are also occasionally observed. A comparison of backward trajectories of air parcels with CO2 concentration fields calculated using the atmospheric transport model shows that these unusual CO2 concentrations result from the transport of air affected not only by anthropogenic CO2 emissions but also by terrestrial biospheric activities mainly in China.

  10. Quaternary grabens in southernmost Illinois: Deformation near an active intraplate seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, W.J.; Denny, F.B.; Follmer, L.R.; Masters, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Narrow grabens displace Quaternary sediments near the northern edge of the Mississippi Embayment in extreme southern Illinois, east-central United States. Grabens are part of the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex (FAFC), which has been recurrently active throughout Phanerozoic time. The FAFC strikes directly toward the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ), scene of some of the largest intra-plate earthquakes in history. The NMSZ and FAFC share origin in a failed Cambrian rift (Reelfoot Rift). Every major fault zone of the FAFC in Illinois exhibits Quaternary displacement. The structures appear to be strike-slip pull-apart grabens, but the magnitude and direction of horizontal slip and their relationship to the current stress field are unknown. Upper Tertiary strata are vertically displaced more than 100 m, Illinoian and older Pleistocene strata 10 to 30 m, and Wisconsinan deposits 1 m or less. No Holocene deformation has been observed. Average vertical slip rates are estimated at 0.01 to 0.03 mm/year, and recurrence intervals for earthquakes of magnitude 6 to 7 are on the order of 10,000s of years for any given fault. Previous authors remarked that the small amount of surface deformation in the New Madrid area implies that the NMSZ is a young feature. Our findings show that tectonic activity has shifted around throughout the Quaternary in the central Mississippi Valley. In addition to the NMSZ and southern Illinois, the Wabash Valley (Illinois-Indiana), Benton Hills (Missouri), Crowley's Ridge (Arkansas-Missouri), and possibly other sites have experienced Quaternary tectonism. The NMSZ may be only the latest manifestation of seismicity in an intensely fractured intra-plate region.

  11. Crustal structure of the southernmost Chilean margin from seismic and gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio, E.; Torné, M.; Vera, E.; Díaz, A.

    2000-08-01

    The southern Chilean convergent margin south of the Strait of Magellan, between 52 and 57°S, is undergoing a style of subduction where obliquity plays a significant role. Seismic reflection and gravity data collected during 1988 by LDEO (RC2902) across the study area image crustal structures from oceanic crust (seaward of the trench) to the continental shelf. Pre-stack and post-stack depth migration have been applied to MCS profile RC2902-790, from which we have obtained a depth section, with true geometries and an associated accurate velocity model. Additional velocity information from sonobuoys has been used to further constrain the depth-converted section. 2D gravity modelling has supported the deduced crustal structure. Four main domains are imaged, which, from SW to NE, are: (1) the oceanic domain, where the Chilean trench is buried with a clastic sedimentary wedge reaching maximum thickness of 4 km, lying on a 7-8-km-thick crystalline oceanic crust that gently dips landward (3-4°); (2) the accretionary prism domain, about 40 km wide, of highly deformed sediments with a clear Bottom Simulating Reflector (BSR); (3) the forearc basin domain, a 25-km-wide basin (nearly undeformed) with a maximum sediment thickness of 4.5 km, which is bordered along its seaward edge by a zone of outer-arc structural highs and the accretionary prism forming the so-called 'Fuegian terrace'; and (4) the continental domain which consists of an 8° dip continental slope and the continental shelf. Seismic reflection data along the continental shelf reveal that between 5 and 8 s twt, there is package of reflections that could mark the presence of a high reflective lower crust. Results from the corresponding sonobuoy are not conclusive enough to confirm such a hypothesis, but the brightness of these reflectors suggests the presence of a 10-km-thick reflective lower crust between 14 and 24 km depth. At greater depths (between 11 and 14 s twt), there is a thin package of bright landward-dipping reflectors, which may indicate the top of the subducting slab as deduced from gravity data. Furthermore, gravity modelling shows that the slab subducts at a very low angle of about 7-8°. In spite of the lack of seismicity, our results favour the conclusion that subduction still occurs in this region of the Chilean margin or has recently ceased.

  12. Heavy metals monitoring in the southernmost mussel farm of the world (Beagle Channel, Argentina).

    PubMed

    Giarratano, Erica; Amin, Oscar A

    2010-09-01

    Water quality surrounding the mussel farm of Mytilus edulis chilensis at Brown Bay (Beagle Channel) was evaluated. The levels of five heavy metals in sediment and in gill and digestive gland of mussels were examined to consider potential risks to human health. Cd showed the highest enrichment factor in relation to its level in Earth crust (3.85-21.58), which could be related to an upwelling phenomenon. A seasonal trend was found regarding metal bioaccumulation, being higher in winter than in summer. The bioaccumulation pattern in gill was Zn>Fe>Cu>Cd, meanwhile in digestive gland was Fe>Zn>Cu>Cd. Despite Pb was measured in sediment (15.59-23.91 microg/g dw), it was not available for being incorporated by mussels. In all cases it was below the detection limit (2.37 microg/g dw). With regard to human consumption of mussels from Brown Bay, none of the elements analyzed should cause concern for consumers. Values measured in tissue mussels were below the limit of 10 microg/g dw for Cd and Pb established by SENASA for molluscs. Considering that studied mussels are for human consumption and the relatively high levels of metals in sediment may vary their availability if physical parameters changes, periodical monitoring must be carried out to avoid human risks and to produce food in a responsible manner that complies with the food safety standards. PMID:20638724

  13. Tectonic Evolution of the Patagonian Orocline: New Insights from a Paleomagnetic Study in Southernmost America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roperch, P. J.; Poblete, F.; Arriagada, C.; Herve, F.; Ramirez de Arellano, C.

    2015-12-01

    One of the most noteworthy features of the Southern Andes is its bend, where the orogenic trend and main tectonic provinces change from Andean N-S oriented structures to W-E orientations in Tierra del Fuego. Few paleomagnetic studies have been carried out, and whether the bending is a primary curvature or a true orocline is still matter of controversy; also the mechanism of its formation. We have conducted a paleomagnetic study between 50°S to ~56°S, where 146 sites were drilled. Paleomagnetic data were obtained in 44 sites. Results in Early Cretaceous sediments and volcanics rocks confirm a remagnetization event during the mid-Cretaceous and record ~90° of counterclockwise rotation. Paleomagnetic results in mid-Cretaceous intrusives rocks record large counterclockwise rotation (>90°) while Late Cretaceous-Early Eocene intrusive rocks only record ~45° to ~30°. The paleomagnetic results reveal a systematic pattern of rotation—the Fueguian rotation pattern—suggesting that the curvature of Patagonia would have occurred in two stages: the first stage during the collapse and obduction of the Rocas Verdes basin in the mid-Cretaceous and a second stage between the Late Cretaceous and the Paleocene, concomitant with exhumation of Cordillera Darwin and propagation of the fold and thrust belt into the Magallanes foreland. Integrating this result in plate reconstructions shows the Antarctic Peninsula as a prolongation of Patagonia and would have acted as a non-rotational rigid block, facilitating the development of the Patagonia Bend. This land bridge could be a dispersal mechanism for fauna between Australia and South America and would have restricted deep ocean water circulation.

  14. Alleghanian development of the Goat Rock fault zone, southernmost Appalachians: Temporal compatibility with the master decollement

    SciTech Connect

    Steltenpohl, M.G. ); Goldberg, S.A. ); Hanley, T.B. ); Kunk, M.J. )

    1992-09-01

    The Goat Rock and associated Bartletts Ferry fault zones, which mark the eastern margin of the Pine Mountain Grenville basement massif, are controversial due to the suggestion that they are rare exposed segments of the late Paleozoic southern Appalachian master decollement. The controversy in part stems from reported middle Paleozoic (Acadian) radiometric dates postulated as the time of movement along these fault zones. Ultramylonite samples from the type area at Goat Rock Dam yield a 287 [plus minus] 15 Ma Rb-Sr isochron interpreted as the time of Sr isotopic rehomgenization during mylonitization. This date is corroborated by Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar mineral ages on hornblende (297-288 Ma) and muscovite (285-278 Ma) from neomineralized and dynamically recrystallized rocks within and straddling the fault zone. These Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian dates indicate the time of right-slip movement (Alleghenian) along the Goat Rock fault zone, which is compatible with the timing suggested by COCORP for thrusting along the southern Appalachian master decollement.

  15. Perfluoroalkyl substances detected in the world's southernmost marine mammal, the Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii).

    PubMed

    Routti, Heli; Krafft, Bjørn A; Herzke, Dorte; Eisert, Regina; Oftedal, Olav

    2015-02-01

    This study investigates concentrations of 18 perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in blood plasma of adult lactating Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) (n = 10) from McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. Perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnDA) was detected in all samples at concentrations ranging from 0.08 to 0.23 ng/ml. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorohexanoate (PFHxA) and perfluorotridecanoate (PFTriDA) were sporadically detected, while the remaining compounds were below the limit of detection. This is the first report of detectible concentrations of PFASs in an endemic Antarctic marine mammal species. We suggest that the pollutants have been subjected to long range atmospheric transportation and/or derive from a local source. A review of these and published data indicate that perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs) dominate in biotic PFAS patterns in species feeding south of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), whereas PFOS was the major PFAS detected in species feeding predominantly north of the current. PMID:25497307

  16. Geological investigations of pre-late Jurassic terranes in the southernmost Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsythe, R. D.

    Pre-Late Jurassic terranes of the Patagonian Archipelago were investigated. Their regional stratigraphic and structural characteristics were surveyed. Their significance in the late Paleozoic to early Mesozoic evolution of South America were determined. Pre-Late Jurassic rocks within the archipelago are distributed in two belts. Within the outer belt the Madre de Dios Archipielago was studied in detail. Pre-Late Jurassic rocks of this area are divisible into three mappable units. These three units are interpreted to be part of a late Paleozoic to early Mesozoic accretionary prism that was located along the ancestral Pacific margin of the South American sector of Gondwana. Within the inner belt, the region of Peninsula Staines was studied in detail. In this region greenschist facies metamorphism and pervasive deformation fabrics prevent stratigraphic subdivision of the terrane. However the lithologies present are correlative with the outer belt suggesting that they also were part of the late Paleozoic to early Mesozoic accretionary prism.

  17. Geology of the southernmost Piedmont from Columbus to Junction City, GA

    SciTech Connect

    Hanley, T.B. . Dept. of Chemistry and Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Mapping in the Piedmont from the Chattahoochee River to Junction City, GA, is critical to understanding contacts with Southern Appalachian outboard terranes, relationships to the Piedmont allochthon, strike slip displacements along major faults and late Paleozoic and post Paleozoic tectonic activity. Three major map units defining a large synform are recognized in western Muscogee County: the North Columbus Migmatite Complex, the Moffitts Mill Schist (MMS), and the Phenix City gneiss. The distinctive but poorly exposed fine grained feldspar augen MMS, which extends at least as far east as Geneva, contains small enclaves of amphibolite and calcsilicate and large enclaves of lineated granitoid gneiss. Protomylonites and mylonitic gneiss with a N-S to N45E strike are exposed from Geneva to Junction City. Three brecciated quartz dikes transect the area in eastern Muscogee Co. and Talbot Co., converging on Talbotton from the southwest. The northern dike strikes ENE and is associated with an augen schist; the middle dike strikes NE and projects to the southwest deep into Muscogee County as a silicified fracture zone with minor associated granite. The southern dike has a NNE strike and is parallel to and locally silicifies the mylonitic foliation that dominates gneisses to the east. Deflections of the magnetic anomaly patterns to the northeast in the Geneva - Junction City area are parallel to quartz dikes and mylonitic foliations.

  18. Behavior of the southernmost San Andreas fault during the past 300 years

    SciTech Connect

    Sieh, K.E.; Williams, P.L. )

    1990-05-10

    Surficial creep occurs at low rates along the Coachella Valley segment of the San Andreas fault, which has not produced a large earthquake during the period of historical record. Geodetic data indicate, however, that the crust adjacent to this segment of the San Andreas fault is accumulating strain at a high rate. Furthermore, neotectonic and paleoseismic data indicate that the fault does produce very large earthquakes every two to three centuries. In view of its long-term behavior, the occurrence of creep along the surficial trace of the fault in the Coachella Valley is of particular interest. Along two short reaches of the San Andreas fault in the Coachella Valley, measurements of offset geological deposits and man-made structures and from alignment arrays and creep meters show that slip rates of 2-4 mm/yr near Indio and near the Salton Sea have persisted for the past three centuries. This slow aseismic surficial creep is not a transient precursor to seismic failure of this segment of the fault. The authors suggest that the Coachella Valley segment of the San Andreas fault creeps in its upper few kilometers. This behavior may be due to tectonically induced high pore pressures in the coarse sediments that abut the fault.

  19. Geochemistry, petrogenesis, and tectonic setting of amphibolites from the southernmost exposure of the Appalachian Piedmont

    SciTech Connect

    Chalokwu, C.I. ); Hanley, T.B. )

    1990-09-01

    The Uchee belt of the southern Appalachian Piedmont consists of a sequence of amphibolite, amphibolitic gneiss, and gneissic calc-silicate surrounded by highly strained mylonitic rocks associated with motion along the Bartletts Ferry-Goat Rock fault system. Amphibolites from three major localities within the belt, the Hudson Mill Rapids, Davis Mill, and Lindsey Creek localities, have been analyzed for their major- and trace element chemistry. The mafic amphibolites are concluded to have been derived from intrinsically basaltic protoliths, as determined by the presence of patchy zoning in relict igneous plagioclase, normative mineralogy, Niggli trends, and a variety of diagnostic geochemical criteria. Davis Mill amphibolites are characterized by high REE abundances and flat REE pattern ((La/Yb){sub n} = 1.3 to 2.3), similar to volcanic rocks from Pacific-type island arcs. Geochemical parameters such as high La/Nb and V/Ni ratios, low Ti/V and Ti/Zr ratios, and discriminant trace element diagrams based on elements generally considered immobile during metamorphism, indicate an island-arc and back-arc basin affinity for the amphibolites. Hudson Mill Rapids amphibolites, characterized by a wide range of REE concentrations and strongly negative Ce anomaly are interpreted as having been derived from parental basalts produced in a back-arc basin by melting of a descending slab plus mantle wedge. The chemical diversity of the amphibolites and the presence of thrusts, strike-slip faults, and highly strained rocks are consistent with the premise that the western Uchee belt is a deformed composite part of an extensive arc system.

  20. Pressure tide gauge records from the Atlantic shelf off Tierra del Fuego, southernmost South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Andreas; Mendoza, Luciano; Perdomo, Raúl; Hormaechea, José Luis; Savcenko, Roman; Bosch, Wolfgang; Dietrich, Reinhard

    2012-07-01

    Based on pressure tide gauge observations at three sites off the Atlantic coast of Tierra del Fuego main island, time series spanning one to seven months of bottom pressure and sea-level variations are derived and analysed to reveal the major driving mechanisms. Ocean tides account for 99.5% of the total energy of the sea-level variations. The amplitudes and phases of a comprehensive set of tidal constituents resulting from a harmonic tidal analysis are presented. Exceptionally large shallow-water tides are identified. The second largest contribution is due to the local inverse barometer model accounting for up to 65% of the variance of the tide residual sea-level variations. Close to the shore a significant topographic modulation of the sea-level variations is revealed. The in situ observations are compared with six recent global ocean tide models, official tide tables, and sea-surface heights derived from satellite altimetry data. The amplitudes and phases predicted by the ocean tide models for the semidiurnal and diurnal constituents agree with those derived from our tide gauge records on average within 2 cm and 5°, respectively. In the time domain the tidal signal represented by the models deviates typically by a few decimetres from that extracted from our records. Absolute altimeter biases were determined for the Jason-2, Jason-1 extended mission, and Envisat satellite altimeters. Relative sea-level variations are represented by the altimetry data with an accuracy of the order of 5 cm.

  1. Simultaneous normal faulting and extensional flexuring during rifting: an example from the southernmost Upper Rhine Graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustaszewski, Kamil; Schumacher, Markus E.; Schmid, Stefan M.

    2005-09-01

    The southern end of the Upper Rhine Graben (URG) is formed by a major continental transfer zone, which was localised by the reactivation of ENE-oriented basement faults of Late Palaeozoic origin. A combination of subcrop data (derived from exploration wells and reflection seismic lines) and palaeostress analysis provided new constraints on the timing and kinematics of interacting basement faults. Rifting in the southern URG began in the Upper Priabonian under regional WNW ESE-directed extension, oriented roughly perpendicular to the graben axis. In the study area, this led to the formation of NNE-trending half-grabens. Simultaneously, ENE-trending basement faults, situated in the area of the future Rhine-Bresse Transfer Zone (RBTZ), were reactivated in a sinistrally transtensive mode. In the sedimentary cover the strike-slip component was accommodated by the development of en-échelon aligned extensional flexures. Flexuring and interference between the differently oriented basement faults imposed additional, but locally confined extension in the sedimentary cover, which deviated by as much as 90° from the regional WNW ESE extension. The interference of regional and local stresses led to a regime approaching radial extension at the intersection between the URG and RBTZ.

  2. Forest biomass variation in Southernmost Brazil: the impact of Araucaria trees.

    PubMed

    Rosenfield, Milena Fermina; Souza, Alexandre F

    2014-03-01

    A variety of environmental and biotic factors determine vegetation growth and affect plant biomass accumulation. From temperature to species composition, aboveground biomass storage in forest ecosystems is influenced by a number of variables and usually presents a high spatial variability. With this focus, the aim of the study was to evaluate the variables affecting live aboveground forest biomass (AGB) in Subtropical Moist Forests of Southern Brazil, and to analyze the spatial distribution of biomass estimates. Data from a forest inventory performed in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Southern Brazil, was used in the present study. Thirty-eight 1-ha plots were sampled and all trees with DBH > or = 9.5cm were included for biomass estimation. Values for aboveground biomass were obtained using published allometric equations. Environmental and biotic variables (elevation, rainfall, temperature, soils, stem density and species diversity) were obtained from the literature or calculated from the dataset. For the total dataset, mean AGB was 195.2 Mg/ha. Estimates differed between Broadleaf and Mixed Coniferous-Broadleaf forests: mean AGB was lower in Broadleaf Forests (AGB(BF)=118.9 Mg/ha) when compared to Mixed Forests (AGB(MF)=250.3 Mg/ha). There was a high spatial and local variability in our dataset, even within forest types. This condition is normal in tropical forests and is usually attributed to the presence of large trees. The explanatory multiple regressions were influenced mainly by elevation and explained 50.7% of the variation in AGB. Stem density, diversity and organic matter also influenced biomass variation. The results from our study showed a positive relationship between aboveground biomass and elevation. Therefore, higher values of AGB are located at higher elevations and subjected to cooler temperatures and wetter climate. There seems to be an important contribution of the coniferous species Araucaria angustifolia in Mixed Forest plots, as it presented significantly higher biomass than angiosperm species. In Brazil, this endangered species is part of a high diversity forest (Araucaria Forest) and has the potential for biomass storage. The results of the present study show the spatial and local variability in aboveground biomass in subtropical forests and highlight the importance of these ecosystems in global carbon stock, stimulating the improvement of future biomass estimates. PMID:24912365

  3. Occurrence of aphidborne viruses in southernmost South American populations of Fragaria chiloensis ssp. chiloensis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wild and cultivated Fragaria chiloensis ssp. chiloensis (Fcc) plants were collected at different locations in southern Chile in order to determine the current viral status of this native strawberry. The following aphidborne viruses (ABVs): Strawberry mild yellow edge virus (SMYEV), Strawberry mottle...

  4. Structure and tectonic history of the foreland basins of southernmost South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiglione, Matías C.; Quinteros, Javier; Yagupsky, Daniel; Bonillo-Martínez, Pedro; Hlebszevtich, Julio; Ramos, Victor A.; Vergani, Gustavo; Figueroa, Daniel; Quesada, Santiago; Zapata, y. Tomás

    2010-03-01

    The common elements and differences of the neighboring Austral (Magallanes), Malvinas and South Malvinas (South Falkland) sedimentary basins are described and analyzed. The tectonic history of these basins involves Triassic to Jurassic crustal stretching, an ensuing Early Cretaceous thermal subsidence in the retroarc, followed by a Late Cretaceous-Paleogene compressional phase, and a Neogene to present-day deactivation of the fold-thrust belt dominated by wrench deformation. A concomitant Late Cretaceous onset of the foreland phase in the three basins and an integrated history during the Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic are proposed. The main lower Paleocene-lower Eocene initial foredeep depocenters were bounding the basement domain and are now deformed into the thin-skinned fold-thrust belts. A few extensional depocenters developed in the Austral and Malvinas basins during late Paleocene-early Eocene times due to a temporary extensional regime resulting from an acceleration in the separation rate between South America and Antarctica preceding the initial opening of the Drake Passage. These extensional depocenters were superimposed to the previous distal foredeep depocenter, postdating the initiation of the foredeep phase and the onset of compressional deformation. Another pervasive set of normal faults of Paleocene to Recent age that can be recognized throughout the basins are interpreted to be a consequence of flexural bending of the lithosphere, in agreement with a previous study from South Malvinas basin. Contractional deformation was replaced by transpressive kinematics during the Oligocene due to a major tectonic plate reorganization. Presently, while the South Malvinas basin is dominated by the transpressive uplift of its active margin with minor sediment supply, the westward basins undergo localized development of pull-apart depocenters and transpressional uplift of previous structures. The effective elastic thickness of the lithosphere for different sections of each basin is calculated using a dynamic finite element numerical model that simulates the lithospheric response to advancing tectonic load with active sedimentation.

  5. Lamniform Shark Teeth from the Late Cretaceous of Southernmost South America (Santa Cruz Province, Argentina)

    PubMed Central

    Schroeter, Elena R.; Egerton, Victoria M.; Ibiricu, Lucio M.; Lacovara, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Here we report multiple lamniform shark teeth recovered from fluvial sediments in the (Campanian-Maastrichtian) Cerro Fortaleza Formation, Santa Cruz Province, Argentina. This small tooth assemblage is compared to various lamniform sharks possessing similar dental morphologies, including Archaeolamna, Cretalamna, Dwardius, Dallasiella, and Cretodus. Although the teeth share numerous morphological features with the genus Archaeolamna, including a developed neck that maintains a relatively consistent width along the base of the crown, the small sample size and incomplete nature of these specimens precludes definitive taxonomic assignment. Regardless, the discovery of selachian teeth unique from those previously described for the region broadens the known diversity of Late Cretaceous South American sharks. Additionally, the discovery of the teeth in fluvial sandstone may indicate a euryhaline paleobiology in the lamniform taxon or taxa represented by this tooth assemblage. PMID:25141301

  6. Remnants of a hyperextended passive margin in a Caledonian mélange unit below the Jotun nappe, B\\overdalen, Central-south Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsaif, Manar; Jakob, Johannes; Andersen, Torgeir; Corfu, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    The Scandinavian Caledonides have been long studied, yet their ever unfolding complexity renders them far from being fully understood. It has been recognized that the Caledonian Allochthons have neither a linear nor straightforward along-strike relationship (Corfu et al. 2014). A mélange unit has been recently identified as a separate tectonic unit (Andersen et al. 2012). This unit is structurally positioned below crystalline nappes previously assigned to the Middle Allochthon. The mélange comprises meta-sediments and minor meta-basalt/gabbro, but most intriguingly, numerous solitary meta-peridotites. These occur as 'Alpine type' meta-peridotites, serpentinites, soapstones and detrital serpentinites. We present results of a field study of the mélange in the B\\overdalen area, structurally below the Jotun nappe, and suggest that this provides further evidence that the regional mélange unit was formed in a hyperextended passive margin. The meta-peridotites represent exhumed serpentinized mantle and are intimately associated with meta-sediments. The sediments are garnetiferous chlorite-muscovite schists, graphitic schists, phyllites, amphibolites, meta-sandstones as well as quartzite-pebble dominated conglomerates. It is suggested that this highly heterogeneous unit formed during the early stages of rifting and hyperextension along the Baltican passive margin. Characteristics of the detrital peridotites suggests that serpentinite-talc protrusions may have formed islands. The processes involved are observed on modern margins where the best-studied example is the Iberia-Newfoundland passive margin. Work in present-day margins (mostly seismic reflection data) elucidate the large-scale structure of hyperextended margins, while studies of ancient exposed examples in mountain belts provide insight into the lithology, geochemistry and details of these margins. The widespread distribution of hyperextended margins in modern margins and the increasing number of recognizable

  7. Using Paleomagnetic, Geochemical and Structural Data to Recognize Post-metamorphic Tectonic Events in the Caledonide Terranes of Western Svalbard.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalski, K.; Manby, G.; Nejbert, K.; Domańska Siuda, J.; Burzyński, M.

    2015-12-01

    A total of 170 oriented palaeomagnetic samples of Proterozoic-Lower Palaeozoic metacarbonates and metabasites from 28 sites in Hornsund and Oscar II Land, Western Spitsbergen (Fig. 1A) were investigated at the Polish Academy of Sciences Institute of Geophysics . Petrographic and rock-magnetic analyses revealed that the ferromagnetic carriers are dominated by metamorphic pyrrhotite and Low-Ti magnetite. Simultaneous in situ laser ablation 40Ar/39Ar age determination of the samples indicate that a 426-380 Ma Caledonian sensu lato thermal overprint was followed by younger events in the 377-326 Ma and ca. 300 Ma intervals (Fig. 1B). The latter two ages appear to coincide with recently published seismic data indicating that Late Devonian - Carboniferous rifting was followed by similar crustal extension in the SW Barents shelf area in Late Carboniferous time. Published in situ palaeomagnetic directions from Hornsund area in SW Svalbard fit the Silurian sector of the Baltica reference path suggesting that the geometry of the sampled Caledonian Sofekammen Syncline was not modified during following Svalbardian or Eurekan deformation events (Fig. 1C). In contrast, palaeomagnetic directions obtained from Oscar II Land are distant from Caledonian sector of Baltica reference path (Fig. 1C). It is suggested here, that the most significant mechanism responsible for the rotation of the palaeomagnetic directions and modification of geometry of Caledonian tectonic structures of Oscar II Land was listric normal faulting related to the opening of the North Atlantic -Arctic Ocean Basins. Late Cretaceous- Early Tertiary Eurekan folding and thrust faulting appear to have had minor influence on the palaeomagnetic directions obtained. This study is part of the Polish National Science Centre - DEC 2011/03/D/ST10/05193 PALMAG 2012-2016 funded project . Fig. 1. A. Geological sketch map of Western Spitsbergen. B. Probability diagrams derived from insitu 40Ar/39Ar laser ablation age determinations for Oscar II/Haakon VII Land. C. The most stable palaeomagnetic components from Hornsund (squares) and Oscar II Land (ovals) against the reference path for the Batica paleomagnetic directions recalculated for the area of Western Spitsbergen; equal area; open/ full symbols -upper/lower hemisphere.

  8. Detrital U-Pb zircon dating of lower Ordovician syn-arc-continent collision conglomerates in the Irish Caledonides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clift, P.D.; Carter, A.; Draut, A.E.; Long, H.V.; Chew, D.M.; Schouten, H.A.

    2009-01-01

    The Early Ordovician Grampian Orogeny in the British Isles represents a classic example of collision between an oceanic island arc and a passive continental margin, starting around 480??Ma. The South Mayo Trough in western Ireland preserves a complete and well-dated sedimentary record of arc collision. We sampled sandstones and conglomerates from the Rosroe, Maumtrasna and Derryveeny Formations in order to assess erosion rates and patterns during and after arc collision. U-Pb dating of zircons reveals a provenance dominated by erosion from the upper levels of the Dalradian Supergroup (Southern Highland and Argyll Groups), with up to 20% influx from the colliding arc into the Rosroe Formation, but only 6% in the Maumtrasna Formation (~ 465??Ma). The dominant source regions lay to the northeast (e.g. in the vicinity of the Ox Mountains, 50??km distant, along strike). The older portions of the North Mayo Dalradian and its depositional basement (the Annagh Gneiss Complex) do not appear to have been important sources, while the Connemara Dalradian only plays a part after 460??Ma, when it supplies the Derryveeny Formation. By this time all erosion from the arc had effectively ceased and exhumation rates had slowed greatly. The Irish Grampian Orogeny parallels the modern Taiwan collision in showing little role for the colliding arc in the production of sediment. Negligible volumes of arc crust are lost because of erosion during accretion to the continental margin. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  9. The tectonic significance of pre-Scandian 40Ar/39Ar phengite cooling ages in the Caledonides of western Norway

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andersen, T.B.; Berry, H.N., IV; Lux, D.R.; Andresen, A.

    1998-01-01

    Pre-Silurian continental-margin deposits in western Norway, non-conformably overlying allochthonous continental orthogneisses retain Ordovician 40Ar/39Ar cooling ages for phengites, implying either rapid cooling immediately after a Late Ordovician orogenic event, or less likely, a slow cooling following an Early Ordovician or older orogeny. The Dalsfjord Suite-H??yvik Group basement-cover pair are probably a lateral equivalent to Late Proterozoic sandstones ('sparagmites') covering the Jotun Nappe gneisses of the Middle Allochthon in central-south Norway. The H??yvik Group underwent polyphase deformation, greenschist-facies metamorphism (Tmax <450??C) and exhumation prior to deposition of the unconformably overlying Wenlockian continental-margin deposits of the Herland Group. The H??yvik Group was only weakly metamorphosed during obduction of the Solund-Stavfjord Ophiolite and the Scandian continental collision between Baltica and Laurentia. Phengitic white micas from the H??yvik Group yield cooling ages of 446.1 ?? 3.0, 449.1 ?? 2.2 and 447.5 ?? 4.0 Ma, respectively, identical within experimental error. One sample gives a plateau over 72% of the gas analysed, whereas the other samples were slightly disturbed after initial cooling, as indicated by systematically lower apparent ages at low experimental extraction temperatures. Minor 40Ar loss probably occurred during subsequent Scandian deformation and late to post-orogenic extension. The H??yvik Group rocks were unroofed before the Wenlock time (423-428 Ma) and cooled through the temperature for argon retention in phengite at c. 447 ?? 4 Ma, indicating a maximum cooling rate between 14 and 22??C/Ma-1 through Ashgill and Llandovery times before being subjected to low-grade metamorphism during the Scandian orogeny. Rapid pre-Scandian cooling, combined with peak metamorphic conditions of 450??C or less, may indicate that the Dalsfjord-H??yvik basement-cover pair were affected by an orogenic event during the Late Ordovician (Caradoc) time. The data also suggest that the Caledonian margin of Baltica may have experienced a more protracted tectonism during the Caledonian cycle than previously models focusing on Early Caledonian and Tremadoc (or older) ophiolite obduction and the Scandian continental collision between Baltica and Laurentia.

  10. The ICE hypothesis stands: How the dogma of late Cenozoic tectonic uplift can no longer be sustained in the light of data and physical laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S. B.; Clausen, O. R.; Jacobsen, B. H.; Thomsen, E.; Huuse, M.; Gallagher, K.; Balling, N.; Egholm, D.

    2010-08-01

    In this reply, we address the issues raised by the comment of Chalmers et al. (2010) regarding our ICE hypothesis for the evolution of western Scandinavia. We reject their conjectures as based, uncritically and without consideration of physical mechanisms, on the long-standing dogma of late Cenozoic tectonic uplift. Our hypothesis, in contrast, honours well-documented physical laws and the present wealth of actual data constraints (as opposed to dogma-biased inferences). After careful consideration of the points raised by Chalmers et al. (2010) we maintain our simple explanation for the evolution of Scandinavian topography, as it honours well-documented actual data constraints, such as crustal structure (including its spatio-temporal variability), thermal history in the eastern North Sea, global and regional climatic change (including eustacy) and sedimentation in the adjacent basins. The inevitable conclusion is that, although more data constraints are desirable, the current best fit hypothesis, is that the Scandinavian topography is of Caledonide origin, and has been shaped by fluvial and glacial buzzsaw and periglacial processes, and most recently (last few Myr) been re-invigorated by extensive glacial erosion in the fjords and on the shelf.

  11. Magma-poor and magma-rich segments along the hyperextended, pre-Caledonian passive margin of Baltica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Torgeir B.; Alsaif, Manar; Corfu, Fernando; Jakob, Johannes; Planke, Sverre; Tegner, Christian

    2015-04-01

    The Scandinavian Caledonides constitute a more than 1850 km long 'Himalayan-type' orogen, formed by collision between Baltica-Avalonia and Laurentia. Subduction-related magmatism in the Iapetus ended at ~430 Ma and continental convergence continued for ~30 Myr until ~400 Ma. The collision produced a thick orogenic wedge comprising the stacked remnants of the rifted to hyperextended passive Baltican margin (Andersen et al. 2012), as well as suspect, composite and outboard terranes, which were successively emplaced as large-scale nappe complexes onto Baltica during the Scandian collision (see Corfu et al. 2014 for a recent review). Large parts (~800 km) of the mountain-belt in central Scandinavia, particularly in the Särv and Seve Nappes and their counterparts in Troms, are characterised by spectacular dyke complexes emplaced into continental sediments (e.g. Svenningsen 2001, Hollocher et al. 2007). These constitute a magma-rich segment formed along the margin of Baltica or within hyperextended continental slivers outboard of Baltica. The intensity of the pre-Caledonian magmatism is comparable to that of the present NE-Atlantic and other volcanic passive margins. The volumes and available U-Pb ages of 610-597 Ma (Baird et al. 2014 and refs therein) suggest that the magmatism was short lived, intense and therefore compatible with a large igneous province (LIP). By analogy with present-day margins this LIP may have been associated with continental break-up and onset of sea-floor spreading. The remnants of the passive margin both north and south of the magma-rich segment have different architectures, and are almost devoid of rift/drift related magmatic rocks. Instead, these magma-poor segments are dominated by heterogeneous sediment-filled basins characterised by the abundant presence of solitary bodies of variably altered mantle peridotites, also commonly present as detrital serpentinites. These basins are interpreted to have formed by hyperextension. We suggest that

  12. Borehole seismic in crystalline environment at the COSC-project in Central Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauß, Felix; Hedin, Peter; Almqvist, Bjarne; Simon, Helge; Giese, Rüdiger; Buske, Stefan; Juhlin, Christopher; Lorenz, Henning

    2016-04-01

    As support for the COSC drilling project (Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides), an extensive seismic survey took place during September and October 2014 in and around the newly drilled 2.5 km deep COSC-1 borehole. The main aim of the COSC project is to better understand orogenic processes in past and recently active mountain belts. For this, the Scandinavian Caledonides provide a well preserved case of Paleozoic collision of the Laurentia and Baltica continental plates. Surface geology and geophysical data provide knowledge about the geometry of the Caledonian structure. The reflectivity geometry of the upper crust was imaged by regional seismic data and the resistivity structure by magnetotelluric methods. The crustal model was refined by seismic pre-site surveys in 2010 and 2011 to define the exact position of the first borehole, COSC-1. The completely cored COSC-1 borehole was drilled in Central Sweden through the Seve Nappe Complex, a part of the Middle Allochthon of the Scandinavian Caledonides that comprises units originating from the outer margin of Baltica. The upper 2350 m consist of alternating layers of highly strained felsic and calc-silicate gneisses and amphibolites. Below 1710 m the mylonite content increases successively and indicates a high strain zone of at least 800 m thickness. At ca. 2350 m, the borehole leaves the Seve Nappe Complex and enters underlying mylonitised lower grade metasedimentary units of unknown tectonostratigraphic position. The seismic survey consisted of three parts: a limited 3D-survey, a high resolution zero-offset VSP (vertical seismic profile) and a multi-azimuthal walkaway VSP (MSP) experiment with sources and receivers along three surface profiles and receivers at seven different depth levels of the borehole. For the zero-offset VSP (ZVSP) a hydraulic hammer source was used and activated over a period of 20 s as a sequence of impacts with increasing hit frequency. The wave field was recorded with 3

  13. Electrical conductivity of the Fennoscandian Shield margin from recent magnetotelluric profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, M. Yu.; Korja, T.; Pedersen, L. B.

    2009-04-01

    During the last decade several magnetotelluric profiles extending from Proterozoic East European Craton into younger domains have been measured. Magnetotelluric TOR profile crosses the Sorgenfrei-Tornquist-Zone (STZ) in the southwestern part of the Fennoscandian Shield. The STZ marks the border between the intact shield in Sweden to the north and the reactivated Danish basin and the Ringkobing-Fyn High (RFH) to the south. The STZ manifests itself electrically very clearly in the lower crust and upper lithospheric mantle as a narrow zone of high conductivity. The thickness of the electric lithosphere decreases across the STZ from about 300 km in the Fennoscandian Shield to about 100 km in the Danish basin. Jämtland-Trondelag magnetotelluric profile crosses the Central Scandinavian Caledonides from Baltic to Norwegian Sea. The results of the data analysis reveal the following main features: (1) An electrically highly conducting layer beneath the Caledonides images alum shales, the autochthonous Cambrian carbon-bearing black shales on top of the Precambrian basement. (2) Beneath the eastern part of the profile in the Fennoscandian Shield, proper, the first upper mantle conductor is detected at the depth of more than 250-300 km. A region of enhanced conductivity is identified at the depth of c.100- 150 km under the Caledonides in the central part of the profile. Further to the west, however, the lithosphere seems to thicken to 150-200 km. A large-scale international electromagnetic experiment has been carried out in northwest Poland and northeast Germany across the Trans European Suture Zone (TESZ), which is the most prominent tectonic boundary in Europe and which constitutes a complex transition between the European Paleozoic Platform towards the southeast and the Precambrian Craton towards the northeast. The results show the presence of highly conductive Cenozoic-Mesozoic sedimentary cover reaching depths up to 3 km. The significant conductivity anomaly in the

  14. Zero-Offset VSP in the COSC-1 borehole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauß, Felix; Simon, Helge; Giese, Rüdiger; Buske, Stefan; Hedin, Peter; Juhlin, Christopher; Lorenz, Henning

    2015-04-01

    As support for the COSC drilling project (Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides), an extensive seismic survey took place during September and October 2014 in and around the newly drilled borehole COSC-1. The main aim of the COSC project is to better understand orogenic processes in past and recently active mountain belts. For this an approx. 2.5 km deep borehole, with nearly 100% core recovery, was drilled in the Scandinavian Caledonides, close to the town of Åre in western Jämtland/Sweden. The seismic survey consisted of a high resolution zero-offset VSP (vertical seismic profiling) and a multi-azimuthal walkaway VSP experiment with receivers at the surface and in the borehole. For the zero-offset VSP (ZVSP) a hydraulic hammer source (VIBSIST 3000) was used and activated over a period of 20 seconds as a sequence of impacts with increasing hit frequency. For each source point, 25 seconds of data were recorded. The wavefield was recorded in the borehole by 15 three-component receivers using a Sercel Slimwave geophone chain with an inter-tool spacing of 10 meters. The ZVSP was designed to result in a geophone spacing of 2 meters over the whole borehole length. The source was about 30 meters away from the borehole and thus, provides a poor geometry to rotate 3C-data in greater depths. For this reason, a check shot position was defined in about 1.9 km distance to the borehole. With this offset shots, it is possible to rotate the components of the 3C receivers and to concentrate the S-wave energy on one component and thus, increase the signal-to-noise ratio of S-wave events. This offset source point was activated periodically for certain depth positions of the geophone chain. The stacked ZVSP-data show a high signal-to-noise ratio and good data quality. Frequencies up to 150 Hz were recorded. On the vertical component, clear direct P-wave arrivals are visible. Several P-wave reflections occur below 1600 meters depth. After rotating the components

  15. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar evidence for delayed post-Acadian cooling in the southernmost Connecticut Valley Synclinorium

    SciTech Connect

    Moecher, D.P. . Dept. of Geological Science); Cosca, M.A. )

    1992-01-01

    Available Ar-40/Ar-39 data for the Connecticut Valley Synclinorium (CVS) of the New England segment of the Appalachian Orogen indicate rapid post-Acadian cooling. However, new data indicate this pattern does not extend the entire length of the CVS. Ar-40/Ar-39 ages obtained from hornblende and muscovite in The Straits Schist indicate delayed cooling and a more complex post-Acadian thermal history. Data for the Seymour area are consistent with the studies above for the vicinity of the Waterbury Dome. The data farther south indicate one or more of the following: (1) slow (2--3C/Ma) post-Acadian cooling and uplift through the Permian; (2) post-Acadian cooling through Hbl closure in the Mississippian with a subsequent Alleghanian metamorphism that did not exceed 500 C; or (3) post-Acadian cooling with subsequent metamorphism that approached 500 C or involved ductile recrystallization, partly resetting hornblende and totally resetting muscovite south of Derby. Petrologic evidence supporting (2) or (3) consists of widespread but not pervasive greenschist facies retrogression of Hbl + Pl + Sph assemblages in amphibolites to Act + Ep, and Grt + Ky + St assemblages in metapelites to Chl + Bt + Qz. The present data cannot resolve between (2) or (3). However, both are consistent with results of a study in the Bridgeport Synform that yield (1) a U-Pb monazite age of 296 [+-] 2 Ma from the Ansonia Leucogranite, implying the occurrence of an Alleghanian thermal event that promoted monazite growth; and, (2) a U-Pb cooling age of 360 Ma from sphene in the Pumpkin Ground Granodiorite, indicating that Alleghanian events did not exceed ca. 550 C.

  16. Melting features along the western Ryukyu slab edge (northeast Taiwan) and Ryukyu slab tear (southernmost Okinawa Trough): Seismic evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Hsu, S.; Sibuet, J.

    2003-12-01

    Behind the sedimentary Ryukyu arc lies the Okinawa Trough whose termination is located at the tip of the Ilan plain (northern Taiwan), just above the Ryukyu slab edge. The present-day active volcanic front, located 80-100 km above the Ryukyu slab, extends from Japan to Kueishantao Island, an islet situated 10-km offshore the Ilan plain. 3370 earthquakes recorded in northern Taiwan by 65 seismic land stations between December 1990 and May 1999 were used to determine the 3-D Vp and Vs velocity structures and Vp/Vs ratios. A low Vp, low Vs and high Vp/Vs sausage like body, about 20 km in diameter, lies within the Eurasian mantle wedge, on top of the western Ryukyu slab extremity, from depths ranging between 20 km and 100 km. We suggest that the friction of the Ryukyu slab edge against the Eurasian lithosphere and/or the upwelling of the underlying Philippine Sea plate lithospheric mantle around the slab edge would cause an abnormal heating resulting in the formation of partial melt. Part of this melt feeds obliquely the Kueishantao andesitic Island. An abnormal amount of volcanism occurs within the Okinawa Trough, east of a slab tear located 140 km from the Ryukyu slab edge. The power spectrum analysis of magnetic data shows the presence of a thick crust located above the slab tear, suggesting that a similar pattern to the one identified above of the Ryukyu slab edge might exist in the slab tear region, feeding obliquely this area of abnormal volcanism.

  17. The late Paleozoic palynological diversity in southernmost Paraná (Uruguay), Claromecó and Paganzo basins (Argentina), Western Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beri, Ángeles; Gutiérrez, Pedro R.; Balarino, M. Lucía

    2015-12-01

    This study explores the changes in palynoflora diversity of the late Paleozoic in boreholes DI.NA.MI.GE. 254 (26 samples) and DI.NA.MI.GE. 221 (14 samples) of the Paraná Basin in Uruguay and in 18 surface samples of the La Deheza Formation (Paganzo Basin) and 10 samples of borehole UTAL.CMM1.La Estrella.x-1 (Claromecó Basin) in Argentina. Possible relationships among biostratigraphic zones, diversity levels, facies and climatic evolution patterns in Western Gondwana are studied. Diversity curves of boreholes 221 and 254 and the La Deheza Formation outcrop exhibit similar diversity evolution patterns, i.e., an increase in lower strata diversity and a decrease in upper strata diversity. The disappearance events are determined to be more prominent in biozones of the Cisuralian to the Guadalupian age and less prominent in biozones of the early Cisuralian age. The number of genera raises from the glaciomarine facies, through the deltaic and the marine facies, up to the shallow marine or lagoon facies, in which the disappearance rates become more prominent. . The diversity of the lower part of the La Estrella borehole is lesser than that of the other sequences These diversity, disappearance and appearance behaviors may reflect post-glacial climatic amelioration patterns and the beginning of an arid phase.

  18. The southernmost Andean Mountain soils: a toposequence from Nothofagus Forest to Sub Antarctic Tundra at Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firme Sá, Mariana M.; Schaefer, Carlos E.; Loureiro, Diego C.; Simas, Felipe N.; Francelino, Marcio R.; Senra, Eduardo O.

    2015-04-01

    Located at the southern tip of the Fuegian Andes Cordilhera, the Martial glacier witnessed a rapid process of retreat in the last century. Up to now little is known about the development and genesis of soils of this region. A toposequence of six soils, ranging from 430-925 m a.s.l, was investigated, with emphasis on genesis, chemical and mineralogical properties. The highest, youngest soil is located just below the Martial Glacier Martial Sur sector, and the lowest soils occur on sloping moraines under Nothofagus pumilio forests. Based on chemical, physical and mineralogical characteristics, the soils were classified according to the Soil taxonomy, being keyed out as Inceptisols and Entisols. Soil parent material of the soil is basically moraines, in which the predominant lithic components dominated by metamorphic rocks, with allochthonous contributions of wind-blown materials (very small fragments of volcanic glass) observed by hand lens in all horizons, except the highest profile under Tundra. In Nothofagus Deciduous Forests at the lowest part of the toposequence, poorly developed Inceptisols occur with Folistic horizons, with mixed "andic" and "spodic" characters, but with a predominance of andosolization (Andic Drystrocryepts). Under Tundra vegetation, Inceptisols are formed under hydromorphism and andosolization processes (Oxiaquic Dystrocrepts and Typic Dystrocrepts). On highland periglacial environments, soils without B horizon with strong evidence of cryoturbation and cryogenesis occur, without present-day permafrost down to 2 meters (Typic Cryorthents and Lithic Haploturbels). The mountain soils of Martial glacier generalize young, stony and rich in organic matter, with the exception of barely vegetated Tundra soils at higher altitudes. The forest soils are more acidic and have higher Al3+activity. All soils are dystrophic, except for the highest profile of the local periglacial environment. The organic carbon amounts are higher in forest soils and decrease with altitude. Clay content is low and varies little along the topossequence, indicating an overall low chemical weathering. The clay mineralogy indicates predominance of primary minerals and high proportion of low crystalline Fe and Al minerals, bound to organic matter.

  19. The Olmsted fault zone, southernmost Illinois: A key to understanding seismic hazard in the northern new Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bexfield, C.E.; McBride, J.H.; Pugin, Andre J.M.; Nelson, W.J.; Larson, T.H.; Sargent, S.L.

    2005-01-01

    Geological deformation in the northern New Madrid seismic zone, near Olmsted, Illinois (USA), is analyzed using integrated compressional-wave (P) and horizontally polarized-wave (SH) seismic reflection and regional and dedicated borehole information. Seismic hazards are of special concern because of strategic facilities (e.g., lock and dam sites and chemical plants on the Ohio River near its confluence with the Mississippi River) and because of alluvial soils subject to high amplification of earthquake shock. We use an integrated approach starting with lower resolution, but deeper penetration, P-wave reflection profiles to identify displacement of Paleozoic bedrock. Higher resolution, but shallower penetration, SH-wave images show deformation that has propagated upward from bedrock faults into Pleistocene loess. We have mapped an intricate zone more than 8 km wide of high-angle faults in Mississippi embayment sediments localized over Paleozoic bedrock faults that trend north to northeast, parallel to the Ohio River. These faults align with the pattern of epicenters in the New Madrid seismic zone. Normal and reverse offsets along with positive flower structures imply a component of strike-slip; the current stress regime favors right-lateral slip on northeast-trending faults. The largest fault, the Olmsted fault, underwent principal displacement near the end of the Cretaceous Period 65 to 70 million years ago. Strata of this age (dated via fossil pollen) thicken greatly on the downthrown side of the Olmsted fault into a locally subsiding basin. Small offsets of Tertiary and Quaternary strata are evident on high-resolution SH-wave seismic profiles. Our results imply recent reactivation and possible future seismic activity in a critical area of the New Madrid seismic zone. This integrated approach provides a strategy for evaluating shallow seismic hazard-related targets for engineering concerns. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Biochronostratigraphy and paleoenvironment analysis of Neogene deposits from the Pelotas Basin (well 2-TG-96-RS), Southernmost Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Wagner G; Zerfass, Geise S A; Souza, Paulo A; Helenes, Javier

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the integration of micropaleontological (palynology and foraminifera) and isotopic (87Sr/86Sr) analysis of a selected interval from the well 2-TG-96-RS, drilled on the onshore portion of the Pelotas Basin, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. A total of eight samples of the section between 140.20 and 73.50 m in depth was selected for palynological analysis, revealing diversified and abundant palynomorph associations. Species of spores, pollen grains and dinoflagellate cysts are the most common palynomorphs found. Planktic and benthic calcareous foraminifera were recovered from the lowest two levels of the section (140.20 and 134.30 m). Based on the stratigraphic range of the species of dinoflagellate cysts and sporomorphs, a span age from Late Miocene to Early Pliocene is assigned. The relative age obtained from the 87Sr/86Sr ratio in shells of calcareous foraminifers indicates a Late Miocene (Messinian) correspondence, corroborating the biostratigraphic positioning performed with palynomorphs. Paleoenvironmental interpretations based on the quantitative distribution of organic components (palynomorphs, phytoclasts and amorphous organic matter) throughout the section and on foraminiferal associations indicate a shallow marine depositional environment for the section. Two palynologicals intervals were recognized based on palynofacies analysis, related to middle to outer shelf (140.20 to 128.90 m) and inner shelf (115.75 to 73.50 m) conditions. PMID:26312424

  1. Widespread Lake Highstands in the Southernmost Andean Altiplano during Heinrich Event 1: Implications for the South American Summer Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. Y.; McGee, D.; Quade, J.

    2014-12-01

    Speleothem-based oxygen isotope records provide strong evidence of anti-phased behavior of the northern and southern hemisphere summer monsoons during Heinrich events, but we lack rigorous constraints on the amount of wetting or drying occurring in monsoon regions. Studies centered on shoreline deposits of closed-basin lakes are well suited for establishing such quantitative controls on water balance changes by providing unequivocal evidence of lake volume variations. Here we present new dating constraints on the highstands of several high-altitude (3800-4350 m) paleolakes in the southern Andean Altiplano, an outlying arid region of the Atacama Desert stretching across the Chilean-Bolivian-Argentinian border east of the Andes (20-25°S). These lakes once occupied the closed basins where only phreatic playas, dry salars, and shallow ponds exist today. Initial U-Th dating of massive shoreline tufas reveals that these deposits are dateable to within ±150 to 300 yrs due to high U concentrations and low initial Th content (as indicated by high 230Th/232Th). Our U-Th and 14C dates show that lake highstands predominantly occur between 18.5 and 14.5 kyrs BP, coinciding with Heinrich Event 1 (HE1) and the expansion of other nearby lakes, such as Lake Titicaca. Because of their (1) location at the modern-day southwestern edge of the summer monsoon, (2) intact shoreline preservation, and (3) precise age control, these lakes may uniquely enable us to reconstruct the evolution of water balance (P-E) changes associated with HE1. Hydrologic modeling constrained by temperature estimates provided by local glacial records is used to provide bounds for past precipitation changes. We also examine North Atlantic cooling as the mechanism for these changes by comparing a compilation of S. American lake level records with various hosing experiments and transient climate simulations at HE1. Our results lend us confidence in expanding our U-Th work to other shoreline tufas in the surrounding region to produce a more detailed, spatiotemporal record of water balance changes in S. America.

  2. Multiple, discrete inversion episodes revealed by apatite fission track analysis along the southernmost Atlantic margin of South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildman, M.; Brown, R. W.; Persano, C.; Stuart, F. M.

    2013-12-01

    The morpho-tectonic history of the western South African continental margin and interior plateau remains enigmatic. Recent investigations of offshore sediment accumulation and interpretations of onshore structural and geomorphological observations have highlighted the complex geological evolution of South Africa throughout the Mesozoic and Cenozoic. Moreover, advances in geodynamic modelling approaches have explored the crustal response to varying styles of rifting and the influence of mantle upwelling beneath the African plate. These geological observations and models, however, require validation from quantitative constraints on the surface response (i.e. uplift and erosion) to syn- and post rift thermal and tectonic processes Over the last two decades, low temperature thermochronometry, particularly apatite fission track analysis (AFTA) and apatite (U-Th)/He, have been effective tools in providing these constraints by tracking the time-temperature history of rocks through c. 60 - 110°C and 80 - 40°C, respectively. The unique ability of AFTA to constrain both the timing and nature of sample cooling rests largely on the sensitivity of fission track annealing to temperature. Here, we present new AFT data from a suite of samples across the entire western continental margin of South Africa which contributes to a now extensive AFT dataset spanning the entire sub-continent. This dataset broadly invokes at least two discrete episodes of cooling driven by km scale denudation at c. 130 Ma, following rifting and break up of West Gondwana, and 90 Ma as a response to renewed tectonic uplift. However, the apparent lack of correlation of AFT age with elevation or with distance from the coast highlight the spatial and temporal variability of post-rift cooling that may be related to Mid-Cretaceous structural reactivation along the margin. We also present thermal history modelling using the Bayesian transdimensional inverse modelling approach of QTQt (Gallagher, 2012). Modelling was performed for several outcrop samples, including a 604 m vertical profile, and two borehole profiles from the interior plateau with bottom depths of 2.5 (QU 1/65) and 6.2 km (KC 1/70). The results of this novel modelling approach are interpreted alongside independent on and offshore geological observations to lend additional support to the occurrence of multiple, discrete episodes of denudation driven cooling at c. 150 - 130 and 90 Ma, and possibly a later Cretaceous episode of cooling at c. 70 Ma. The existence of a Late Cretaceous or younger period of enhanced denudation is being further explored through ongoing work combining new AFT data with apatite (U-Th)/He data to generate more robust thermal history information and provide new insights into the timing and magnitude of the major periods of uplift and erosion that have formed the first order topography of South Africa. Gallagher, K., 2012, Transdimensional inverse thermal history modeling for quantitative thermochronology: Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth, v. 117(B2).

  3. Seasonal variations of 25 hydroxyvitamin D and parathyroid hormone in Ushuaia (Argentina), the southernmost city of the world.

    PubMed

    Oliveri, M B; Ladizesky, M; Mautalen, C A; Alonso, A; Martinez, L

    1993-01-01

    Serum levels of calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, 250HD, 1.25(OH)2D and PTH were studied in a group of 42 children aged 8.5 +/- 1.8 years (X +/- SD) from the city of Ushuaia (latitude 55 degrees S), at both the end of the winter and the end of summer. Calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase and 1.25(OH)2D serum levels were not different in summer and winter. The levels of serum 25OHD were significantly higher in summer (18.4 +/- 7.3 ng/ml) than in winter (9.8 +/- 3.8 ng/ml P < 0.001). The levels of 25OHD in children with fair or dark skin were similar in winter but were significantly higher in children with fair skin in summer (20.0 +/- 7.2 ng/l vs 15.3 +/- 5.1 ng/ml (P < 0.05). Serum levels of PTH were higher in winter (58.2 +/- 30.5 pg/ml) than in summer (47.9 +/- 28.3 pg/ml) (P < 0.03). The results demonstrate the existence of a population with low serum levels of 25OHD in winter. The higher levels of PTH in winter when serum 25OHD levels are lower could be the cause of the lack of seasonal variation in serum calcium and 1.25(OH)2D levels. Further studies are needed to establish whether these changes besides increasing the incidence of rickets, could also affect the mineral density of the skeleton in the population of this vitamin-D-deficient area. PMID:8453326

  4. Assessment of land influence on a high-latitude marine coastal system: Tierra del Fuego, southernmost Argentina.

    PubMed

    Amin, Oscar; Comoglio, Laura; Spetter, Carla; Duarte, Claudia; Asteasuain, Raúl; Freije, Rubén Hugo; Marcovecchio, Jorge

    2011-04-01

    The study deals with the determination of physico-chemical parameters, inorganic nutrients, particulate organic matter, and photosynthetic pigments on a monthly basis during an annual cycle from nine sampling sites of the coastal zone of a high-latitude ecosystem (Tierra del Fuego, Argentina). Nitrites and phosphates concentrations were similar to other systems of the south Atlantic coast (median, 0.30 and 1.02 μM, respectively), while nitrates were higher in all sampling periods (median, 45.37 μM), and silicates were significantly smaller (median, 7.76 μM). Chlorophyll a and phaeopigments have shown median values of 0.38 and 0.85 mg m(-3), respectively, while saturated values of dissolved oxygen were recorded throughout the study. The analysis reflected that nutrient enrichment seems to be linked to an anthropogenic source, the presence of peatlands areas, and a sink of Nothofagus pumilio woods. The area could be characterized in three zones related to (1) high urban influence, (2) natural inputs of freshwater, and (3) mixed inputs coming from moderate urban impacts. PMID:20473562

  5. Neoselachians and Chimaeriformes (Chondrichthyes) from the latest Cretaceous-Paleogene of Sierra Baguales, southernmost Chile. Chronostratigraphic, paleobiogeographic and paleoenvironmental implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, Rodrigo A.; Oyarzún, José Luis; Soto-Acuña, Sergio; Yury-Yáñez, Roberto E.; Gutierrez, Nestor M.; Le Roux, Jacobus P.; Torres, Teresa; Hervé, Francisco

    2013-12-01

    This paper discusses a well-represented fossil record of cartilaginous fishes (Chondrichthyes) from southern South America. The recovered samples allow the recognition of three assemblages with chronostratigraphic and paleogeographic value: i) typical Maastrichtian sharks and rays with affinities to eastern Pacific fauna, including the taxa Ischyrhiza chilensis, Serratolamna serrata, Centrophoroides sp. associated to Carcharias sp., and Dasyatidae indet.; ii) a scarce reworked assemblage of Paleocene-Early Eocene age including the taxa Otodus obliquus and Megascyliorhinus cooperi; iii) a rich assemblage with reworked taxa of Early to Middle Eocene age, together with autochthonous deposited Middle to Late Eocene taxa with close affinities to paleoichthyofaunas recovered from the North Atlantic, represented by Carcharias 'hopei', Odontaspis winkleri, Carcharoides catticus, Macrorhizodus praecursor, Carcharocles auriculatus, Striatolamia sp., Striatolamia macrota, Hexanchus agassizi, Notorhynchus sp., Myliobatis sp., Abdounia sp., Pristiophorus sp., Squatina sp., cf. Rhizoprionodon sp., Ischyodus sp., and one new species, Jaekelotodus bagualensis sp. nov. The studied samples include for the first time taxa with well established chronostratigraphic resolutions as well as taphonomic information that help clarifying the age of the fossil-bearing units. In addition, they provide relevant information about the evolution of the Magallanes (=Austral) Basin from the Upper Cretaceous to the Paleogene, suggesting a probable connection with the Quiriquina Basin of south-central Chile during the latest Cretaceous. Finally, the studied assemblages indicate a latitudinal pattern of distribution that provides valuable data on the environmental evolution and temperature of southern South America during the Paleogene.

  6. Multistage evolution of UHT granulites from the southernmost part of the Gföhl Nappe, Bohemian Massif, Lower Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schantl, Philip; Hauzenberger, Christoph; Linner, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    A detailed petrological investigation has been undertaken in leucocratic kyanite-garnet bearing and mesocratic orthopyroxene bearing granulites from the Dunkelsteiner Wald, Pöchlarn-Wieselburg and Zöbing granulite bodies from the Moldanubian Zone in the Bohemian Massif (Austria). A combination of textural observations, conventional geothermobarometry, phase equilibrium modelling as well as major and trace element analyses in garnet enables us to confirm a multistage Variscan metamorphic history. Chemically homogenous garnet cores with near constant grossular-rich plateaus are considered to reflect garnet growth during an early HP/UHP metamorphic evolution. Crystallographically oriented rutile exsolutions restricted to those grossular-rich garnet cores point to a subsequent isothermal decompression of the HP/UHP rocks. Overgrowing garnet rims show a pronounced zonation and are interpreted as the result of dehydration melting reactions during an isobaric heating phase which could have taken place near the base of an overthickened continental crust, where the previously deeply subducted rocks were exhumed to. For this HP granulite facies event maximum PT conditions of ~1050 °C and 1.6 GPa have been estimated from leucocratic granulites comprising the peak mineral assemblage quartz, ternary feldspar, garnet, kyanite and rutile. The pronounced zoning of garnet rims indicates that the HP granulite facies event must have been short lived since diffusion in this temperature region is usually sufficient fast to homogenize a zoning pattern in garnet. A retrogressive metamorphic stage is documented in these rocks by the replacement of kyanite to sillimanite and the growth of biotite. This retrograde event took place within the granulite facies but at significantly lower pressures and temperatures with ~0.8 GPa and ~760 °C. This final stage of re-equilibration is thought to be linked with a second exhumation phase into middle crustal levels accompanied by intensive mylonitization. Keywords: Bohemian Massif; Moldanubian; granulite; HP/UHP, HP granulite facies, LP granulite facies overprint; Andes type geodynamic model.

  7. Phanerozoic burial and exhumation history of southernmost Norway estimated from apatite fission-track analysis data and geological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Japsen, Peter; Green, Paul F.; Bonow, Johan M.; Chalmers, James A.; Rasmussen, Erik S.

    2016-04-01

    We present new apatite fission-track analysis (AFTA) data from 27 basement samples from Norway south of ~60°N. The data define three events of cooling and exhumation that overlap in time with events defined from AFTA in southern Sweden (Japsen et al. 2015). The samples cooled below palaeotemperatures of >100°C in a major episode of Triassic cooling as also reported by previous studies (Rohrman et al. 1995). Our study area is just south of the Hardangervidda where Cambrian sediments and Caledonian nappes are present. We thus infer that these palaeotemperatures reflect heating below a cover that accumulated during the Palaeozoic and Triassic. By Late Triassic, this cover had been removed from the Utsira High, off SW Norway, resulting in deep weathering of a granitic landscape (Fredin et al. 2014). Our samples were therefore at or close to the surface at this time. Palaeotemperatures reached ~80°C prior to a second phase of cooling and exhumation in the Jurassic, following a phase of Late Triassic - Jurassic burial. Upper Jurassic sandstones rest on basement near Bergen, NW of our study area (Fossen et al. 1997), and we infer that the Jurassic event led to complete removal of any remaining Phanerozoic cover in the region adjacent to the evolving rift system prior to Late Jurassic subsidence and burial. The data reveal a third phase of cooling in the early Miocene when samples that are now near sea level cooled below palaeotemperatures of ~60°C. For likely values of the palaeogeothermal gradient, such palaeotemperatures correspond to burial below rock columns that reach well above the present-day landscape where elevations rarely exceed 1 km above sea level. This implies that the present-day landscape was shaped by Neogene erosion. This is in agreement with the suggestion of Lidmar-Bergström et al. (2013) that the near-horizontal Palaeic surfaces of southern Norway are the result of Cenozoic erosion to sea level followed by uplift to their present elevations in a fourth event that is not detected by the AFTA data. Fossen, Mangerud, Hesthammer, Bugge, Gabrielsen 1997: The Bjorøy Formation: a newly discovered occurrence of Jurassic sediments in the Bergen Arc System. Norsk Geologisk Tidsskrift 77. Fredin, Zwingmann, Knies, Sørlie, Gandal, Lie, Müller, Vogt, 2014: Saprolites on- and offshore Norway: New constraints on formation processes and age. Nordic Geological Winter Meeting, Lund, Sweden. Japsen, Green, Bonow, Erlström 2015: Episodic burial and exhumation of the southern Baltic Shield: Epeirogenic uplifts during and after break-up of Pangea. Gondwana Research, in press. Lidmar-Bergström, Bonow, Japsen 2013: Stratigraphic landscape analysis and geomorphological paradigms: Scandinavia as an example of Phanerozoic uplift and subsidence. Global and Planetary Change 100. Rohrman, van der Beek, Andriessen, Cloetingh 1995: Meso-Cenozoic morphotectonic evolution of southern Norway: Neogene domal uplift inferred from apatite fission track thermochronology. Tectonics 14.

  8. The southernmost margin of the Tethys realm during the Mesozoic and Cenozoic: Initial geometry and timing of the inversion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frizon de Lamotte, Dominique; Raulin, Camille; Mouchot, Nicolas; Wrobel-Daveau, Jean-Christophe; Blanpied, Christian; Ringenbach, Jean-Claude

    2011-06-01

    Along the northern border of Africa, Pangea breakup has been diachronic. During the Jurassic, the Alpine Tethys propagated northeastward from the Atlantic to the Alps. During the Permian, the Neo-Tethys propagated westward from Oman to northwestern Arabia. Then a secondary and late branch of Neo-Tethys gave birth to the East Mediterranean basin. Finally the two oceans connected at end of Jurassic times, achieving the development of Africa northern plate boundary. By the Late Cretaceous, convergence between Africa and Eurasia led to the progressive closure of the Tethys realm. The continental collision is not completely achieved, and the different segments of the confrontation zone (Maghreb, central and East Mediterranean, Zagros, and Oman) expose different stages of the process. However, we emphasize the existence of synchronous geodynamic events from one end of the system to the other, although they do not have the same meaning. Two of them are particularly important. The Campanian-Santonian (C-S) event corresponds to (1) obduction and exhumation of high-pressure-low-temperature metamorphic rocks around the Arabian promontory, (2) inversion along the margins of the East Mediterranean basins, and (3) lithosphere buckling in the Atlas system (Maghreb) and adjacent Sahara platform. The middle-late Eocene (MLE) event corresponds to (1) the onset of collision at the northern corner of Arabia, (2) the onset of slab retreat in the Mediterranean, and (3) inversion along the margin of the East Mediterranean as well as in the Atlas. The C-S event coincides with a change in plate kinematics resulting in an abrupt increase of convergence velocity. The MLE event coincides with a period of strong coupling between the Africa and Eurasia plates and an abrupt decrease of convergence velocity. In the middle of the system, the central Mediterranean seems to escape to the effects of convergence and is the site of quite permanent extensional movements since the Triassic.

  9. De Novo SNP Discovery in the Scandinavian Brown Bear (Ursus arctos)

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Anita J.; Street, Nathaniel R.; Spong, Göran

    2013-01-01

    Information about relatedness between individuals in wild populations is advantageous when studying evolutionary, behavioural and ecological processes. Genomic data can be used to determine relatedness between individuals either when no prior knowledge exists or to confirm suspected relatedness. Here we present a set of 96 SNPs suitable for inferring relatedness for brown bears (Ursus arctos) within Scandinavia. We sequenced reduced representation libraries from nine individuals throughout the geographic range. With consensus reads containing putative SNPs, we applied strict filtering criteria with the aim of finding only high-quality, highly-informative SNPs. We tested 150 putative SNPs of which 96% were validated on a panel of 68 individuals. Ninety-six of the validated SNPs with the highest minor allele frequency were selected. The final SNP panel includes four mitochondrial markers, two monomorphic Y-chromosome sex-determination markers, three X-chromosome SNPs and 87 autosomal SNPs. From our validation sample panel, we identified two previously known parent-offspring dyads with reasonable accuracy. This panel of SNPs is a promising tool for inferring relatedness in the brown bear population in Scandinavia. PMID:24260529

  10. [Great Scandinavian Jahre Prize 1993. Studies of cartilage and bone yields new knowledge of tissue homeostasis].

    PubMed

    Heinegård, D

    1994-01-01

    Increased knowledge of connective tissue, such as cartilage and bone, has improved our understanding of tissue replenishment under normal and pathological conditions. Although developments in this field are still at an early stage, it is already possible to discern avenues for future development leading to new diagnostic and therapeutic methods in connective tissue diseases. In this article, Dick Heinegård, the second recipient of the Jahre Prize for 1993, gives an account of his research. PMID:8121785

  11. Timescales of methane seepage on the Norwegian margin following collapse of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crémière, Antoine; Lepland, Aivo; Chand, Shyam; Sahy, Diana; Condon, Daniel J.; Noble, Stephen R.; Martma, Tõnu; Thorsnes, Terje; Sauer, Simone; Brunstad, Harald

    2016-05-01

    Gas hydrates stored on continental shelves are susceptible to dissociation triggered by environmental changes. Knowledge of the timescales of gas hydrate dissociation and subsequent methane release are critical in understanding the impact of marine gas hydrates on the ocean-atmosphere system. Here we report a methane efflux chronology from five sites, at depths of 220-400 m, in the southwest Barents and Norwegian seas where grounded ice sheets led to thickening of the gas hydrate stability zone during the last glaciation. The onset of methane release was coincident with deglaciation-induced pressure release and thinning of the hydrate stability zone. Methane efflux continued for 7-10 kyr, tracking hydrate stability changes controlled by relative sea-level rise, bottom water warming and fluid pathway evolution in response to changing stress fields. The protracted nature of seafloor methane emissions probably attenuated the impact of hydrate dissociation on the climate system.

  12. The risk/benefit ratio of depot neuroleptics: a Scandinavian perspective.

    PubMed

    Dencker, S J

    1984-05-01

    The three developmental phases in the acceptance and use of depot neuroleptics are described. The practical advantages of these drugs are considered, as well as the extrapyramidal side effects that may result from oral or depot administration. Local (injection site) and other side effects of depot neuroleptics are discussed. Typical plasma drug concentration curves and receptor responses of depot neuroleptics are illustrated. Alternative use of oral drugs and strategies to increase the effectiveness of depot forms are presented. The depot neuroleptics used in Scandinavia today are discussed, and predictions are made regarding their use in the future. PMID:6143744

  13. Timescales of methane seepage on the Norwegian margin following collapse of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Crémière, Antoine; Lepland, Aivo; Chand, Shyam; Sahy, Diana; Condon, Daniel J.; Noble, Stephen R.; Martma, Tõnu; Thorsnes, Terje; Sauer, Simone; Brunstad, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Gas hydrates stored on continental shelves are susceptible to dissociation triggered by environmental changes. Knowledge of the timescales of gas hydrate dissociation and subsequent methane release are critical in understanding the impact of marine gas hydrates on the ocean–atmosphere system. Here we report a methane efflux chronology from five sites, at depths of 220–400 m, in the southwest Barents and Norwegian seas where grounded ice sheets led to thickening of the gas hydrate stability zone during the last glaciation. The onset of methane release was coincident with deglaciation-induced pressure release and thinning of the hydrate stability zone. Methane efflux continued for 7–10 kyr, tracking hydrate stability changes controlled by relative sea-level rise, bottom water warming and fluid pathway evolution in response to changing stress fields. The protracted nature of seafloor methane emissions probably attenuated the impact of hydrate dissociation on the climate system. PMID:27167635

  14. The doers of good. Scandinavian historians revise the social history of eugenics(1997-2001).

    PubMed

    Zylberman, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Late disclosure of the large scale of sterilization practices in the Nordic countries created an outburst of scandal: did these policies rely on coercion? To what extent? Who in the end was responsible? Sterilization practices targeted underprivileged people first. The mentally retarded and women were their first victims. Operations were very frequently determined by other people's manipulative or coercive influences. Should the blame be put on the Social-Democrats in power throughout the period (except in Finland and Estonia)? Apart from Denmark, perhaps, local physicians and local services, more than governments, seemed to have strongly supported sterilization practices. Teetotalers and feminists shared responsibilities. How can one explain that eugenics finally declined? Based on a sound application of the Hardy-Weinberg law, the science of the eugenicists was correct. Was it politics? But uncovering of the Nazi crimes had only a very small impact on eugenics. Some authors underline the fact that the Nordic scientific institutions were particularly suited to liberal values. Others point to the devastating effect on eugenics once hereditarist psychiatry fell from favor in the middle of the sixties. PMID:19848224

  15. The Problems of "Competence" and Alternatives from the Scandinavian Perspective of "Bildung"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willbergh, Ilmi

    2015-01-01

    The paper aims to show how competence as an educational concept for the 21st century is struggling with theoretical problems for which the concept of "Bildung" in the European tradition can offer alternatives, and to discuss the possibility of developing a sustainable educational concept from the perspectives of competence and…

  16. Timescales of methane seepage on the Norwegian margin following collapse of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet.

    PubMed

    Crémière, Antoine; Lepland, Aivo; Chand, Shyam; Sahy, Diana; Condon, Daniel J; Noble, Stephen R; Martma, Tõnu; Thorsnes, Terje; Sauer, Simone; Brunstad, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Gas hydrates stored on continental shelves are susceptible to dissociation triggered by environmental changes. Knowledge of the timescales of gas hydrate dissociation and subsequent methane release are critical in understanding the impact of marine gas hydrates on the ocean-atmosphere system. Here we report a methane efflux chronology from five sites, at depths of 220-400 m, in the southwest Barents and Norwegian seas where grounded ice sheets led to thickening of the gas hydrate stability zone during the last glaciation. The onset of methane release was coincident with deglaciation-induced pressure release and thinning of the hydrate stability zone. Methane efflux continued for 7-10 kyr, tracking hydrate stability changes controlled by relative sea-level rise, bottom water warming and fluid pathway evolution in response to changing stress fields. The protracted nature of seafloor methane emissions probably attenuated the impact of hydrate dissociation on the climate system. PMID:27167635

  17. Wetland methane modelling over the Scandinavian Arctic: Performance of current land-surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayman, Garry; Quiquet, Aurélien; Gedney, Nicola; Clark, Douglas; Friend, Andrew; George, Charles; Prigent, Catherine

    2014-05-01

    Wetlands are generally accepted as being the largest, but least well quantified, single natural source of CH4, with global emission estimates ranging from 100-231 Tg yr-1 [1] and for which the Boreal and Arctic regions make a significant contribution [2, 3]. The recent review by Melton et al. [4] has provided a summary of the current state of knowledge on the modelling of wetlands and the outcome of the WETCHIMP model intercomparison exercise. Melton et al. found a large variation in the wetland areas and associated methane emissions from the participating models and varying responses to climate change. In this paper, we report results from offline runs of two land surface models over Scandinavia (JULES, the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator [5, 6] and HYBRID8 [7]), using the same driving meteorological dataset (CRU-NCEP) for the period from January 1980 to December 2010. Although the two land surface models are very different, both models have used a TOPMODEL approach to derive the wetland area and have similar parameterisations of the methane wetland emissions. We find that both models give broadly similar results. They underestimate the wetland areas over Northern Scandinavia, compared to remote sensing and map-based datasets of wetlands [8]. This leads to lower predicted methane emissions compared to those observed on the ground and from aircraft [9]. We will present these findings and identify possible reasons for the underprediction. We will show the sensitivity to using the observed wetland areas to improve the methane emission estimates. References [1] Denman, K., et al.,: Couplings Between Changes in the Climate System and Biogeochemistry, In Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis, Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Cambridge University Press, United Kingdom, 2007; [2] Smith, L. C., et al.: Siberian peatlands a net carbon sink and global methane source since the early Holocene, Science, 303, 353-356, doi:10.1126/science.1090553, 2004; [3] Zhuang, Q., et al.: CO2 and CH4 exchanges between land ecosystems and the atmosphere in northern high latitudes over the 21st century, Geophysical Research Letters, 33, doi:10.1029/2006gl026972, 2006; [4] Melton, J.R., et al.: Present state of global wetland extent and wetland methane modelling: conclusions from a model inter-comparison project (WETCHIMP), Biogeosciences, 10, 753-788, doi:10.5194/bg-10-753-2013, 2013; [5] Best, M. J., et al.: The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES), model description - Part 1: Energy and water fluxes, Geoscientific Model Development, 4, 677-699, doi:10.5194/gmd-4-677-2011, 2011; [6] Clark, D.B., et al.: The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES), Model description - Part 2: Carbon fluxes and vegetation. Geoscientific Model Development, 4, 701-722, doi:10.5194/gmd-4-701-2011, 2011; [7] Friend, A.D., and N.Y. Kiang: Land surface model development for the GISS GCM: Effects of improved canopy physiology on simulated climate. J. Climate, 18, 2883-2902, doi:10.1175/JCLI3425.1, 2005; [8] Prigent, C., et al.: Changes in land surface water dynamics since the 1990s and relation to population pressure, Geophys. Res. Lett., 39, L08403, doi:10.1029/2012GL051276, 2012; [9] O'Shea, S., et al.: Methane and carbon dioxide fluxes from the European Arctic wetlands during the MAMM project, paper in preparation.

  18. High Prevalence and Putative Lineage Maintenance of Avian Coronaviruses in Scandinavian Waterfowl.

    PubMed

    Wille, Michelle; Muradrasoli, Shaman; Nilsson, Anna; Järhult, Josef D

    2016-01-01

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) are found in a wide variety of wild and domestic animals, and constitute a risk for zoonotic and emerging infectious disease. In poultry, the genetic diversity, evolution, distribution and taxonomy of some coronaviruses have been well described, but little is known about the features of CoVs in wild birds. In this study we screened 764 samples from 22 avian species of the orders Anseriformes and Charadriiformes in Sweden collected in 2006/2007 for CoV, with an overall CoV prevalence of 18.7%, which is higher than many other wild bird surveys. The highest prevalence was found in the diving ducks--mainly Greater Scaup (Aythya marila; 51.5%)--and the dabbling duck Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos; 19.2%). Sequences from two of the Greater Scaup CoV fell into an infrequently detected lineage, shared only with a Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula) CoV. Coronavirus sequences from Mallards in this study were highly similar to CoV sequences from the sample species and location in 2011, suggesting long-term maintenance in this population. A single Black-headed Gull represented the only positive sample from the order Charadriiformes. Globally, Anas species represent the largest fraction of avian CoV sequences, and there seems to be no host species, geographical or temporal structure. To better understand the eitiology, epidemiology and ecology of these viruses more systematic surveillance of wild birds and subsequent sequencing of detected CoV is imperative. PMID:26938459

  19. Scandinavian postglacial faults and their physical connection to present day seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvidsson, R.

    2015-12-01

    In Scandinavia large earthquakes up to M~8.2 occurred 9500 yBP due to rapid deglaciation leaving fault scarps with lengths up to 160km and vertical offsets of at least 10 m. Today a lion share of local earthquakes are located to the vicinity of the faults. I show here from Coulomb failure stress modeling a physical connection between clustering of recent earthquakes and high Coulomb failure stresses around the faults. This can be interpreted In such a fashion that the location of the current earthquakes resembles locations of aftershock sequences. The explanation is that when these faults where formed it was due to state of stress in the crust at time of deglaciation, different from today's conditions. The crust was heavily depressed at deglaciation about 250 m in the region and due of the receding icesheet the crust was subjected to high stresses resulting in fault motion. This fault motion occurred in order to minimize state of stress at deglaciation. However, this state of stress has since changed with the regional postglacial uplift and thus today these faults remain as perturbations in the crust with concentrations of high stresses. I elaborate on this mechanism. I also advocate that this correlation between high stressed fault areas and locations of earthquakes indicates that seismicity within stable continental regions like Scandinavia might be caused by previous crustal disturbances that show local perturbations of the stress field. Therefore if faults are favorably oriented in the present stress field they can be released by brittle earthquake faulting . Thus past transient tectonic events can explain part of the stable continental region's seismicity. This may be of large importance to assessment of seismic hazard within stable continental regions particularly for critical structures like e.g., nuclear waste deposits and hydroelectric dams.

  20. Folkehøjskole: A Scandinavian Model Can Help Our Students Succeed in College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Sara M.

    2016-01-01

    Citizens need to be college prepared in higher numbers and with greater urgency than in the past. This growing need for a college-prepared workforce places increased demand on schools to create college-ready students. The Career and College Readiness Standards for much of public education foster the skills and dispositions for academic excellence,…

  1. Motivations, concerns, and expectations of Scandinavian health professionals volunteering for humanitarian assignments.

    PubMed

    Bjerneld, Magdalena; Lindmark, Gunilla; McSpadden, Lucia Ann; Garrett, Martha J

    2006-01-01

    International nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) involved in humanitarian assistance employ millions of volunteers. One of the major challenges for the organizations is the high turnover rate among their personnel. Another is recruiting the right persons. As part of a series of studies investigating factors that affect the recruitment process and the success of assignment, this qualitative study examined health professionals' motivations for volunteering, their various concerns, and their expectations about themselves and the organizations for which they would work. The findings from focus group interviews with potential humanitarian volunteers were considered within the framework of Hertzberg's theory of motivations and Maslow's hierarchy of needs. The study has significant implications for personnel policy and practice in the humanitarian sector. Recruitment officers should have the self-actualized person, as described by Maslow, in mind when interviewing candidates. This perspective would make it easier for them to understand the candidates' thoughts and concerns and would lead to more effective interventions. Program officers should have satisfiers and dissatisfiers, as identified by Herzberg, in mind when planning programs. The probability that personnel will leave humanitarian work is lower if they perceive working conditions as good. PMID:16580984

  2. Scandinavian consumer preference for beef steaks packed with or without oxygen.

    PubMed

    Aaslyng, M D; Tørngren, M A; Madsen, N T

    2010-07-01

    Beef steaks retail-packed with (80% O(2), 20% CO(2)) or without oxygen (either skin-packed or gas-packed (69.6% N(2), 30% CO(2), 0.04% CO or 70% N(2), 30% CO(2))) were compared by consumers in Denmark (n=382), Norway (n=316) and Sweden (n=374). Two pairs of two steaks - one steak packed in a high oxygen atmosphere and one packed without oxygen - were given to the consumers. They were instructed to prepare the steaks at home on two consecutive days, and two persons had to taste each steak. In Denmark, the oxygen-free packing was either gas packing with CO (69.6% N(2), 30% CO(2), 0.04% CO) or without CO (70% N(2), 30% CO(2)), in Norway it was either gas packing with CO (69.6% N(2), 30% CO(2), 0.04% CO) or skin packing, and in Sweden it was either skin packing or gas packing without CO (70% N(2), 30% CO(2)). The meat represented animals that were between 17 and 80 months old (Denmark) and young bulls (Norway and Sweden). Consumers in all three countries clearly preferred steaks packed without oxygen, in terms of overall liking, willingness to pay and their preferred choice of one steak. Furthermore, they preferred the oxygen-free steaks in terms of both overall liking and liking of tenderness, juiciness and flavour. In Sweden, many consumers would pay more than usual for the skin-packed steak, and it was more often chosen as the preferred steak out of the four compared with gas-packed without oxygen. No difference was seen between the two oxygen-free packing methods in Denmark and Norway. PMID:20416824

  3. The Relationship between Ethical Positions and Methodological Approaches: A Scandinavian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beach, Dennis; Eriksson, Anita

    2010-01-01

    In this article, based on reading ethnographic theses, books and articles and conversations with nine key informants, we have tried to describe how research ethics are approached and written about in educational ethnography in Scandinavia. The article confirms findings from previous research that there are different methodological forms of…

  4. Scandinavian, Siberian, and Arctic Ocean Glaciation: Effect of Holocene Atmospheric CO2 Variations.

    PubMed

    Lindstrom, D R; Macayeal, D R

    1989-08-11

    A computer model of coupled ice sheet-ice shelf behavior was used to evaluate whether observed changes in atmospheric CO(2) concentration could have caused the advance and retreat of Pleistocene ice sheets in the Eurasian Arctic. For CO(2) concentrations below a threshold of approximately 250 parts per million, an extensive marine-based ice sheet covering Scandinavia, the Barents, Kara, and East Siberian seas, and parts of the Arctic Ocean developed in the model simulations. In the simulations, climatic warming associated with the Holocene rise of atmospheric CO(2) was sufficient to collapse this widespread glaciation and restore present-day ice conditions. PMID:17837618

  5. High Prevalence and Putative Lineage Maintenance of Avian Coronaviruses in Scandinavian Waterfowl

    PubMed Central

    Wille, Michelle; Muradrasoli, Shaman; Nilsson, Anna; Järhult, Josef D.

    2016-01-01

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) are found in a wide variety of wild and domestic animals, and constitute a risk for zoonotic and emerging infectious disease. In poultry, the genetic diversity, evolution, distribution and taxonomy of some coronaviruses have been well described, but little is known about the features of CoVs in wild birds. In this study we screened 764 samples from 22 avian species of the orders Anseriformes and Charadriiformes in Sweden collected in 2006/2007 for CoV, with an overall CoV prevalence of 18.7%, which is higher than many other wild bird surveys. The highest prevalence was found in the diving ducks—mainly Greater Scaup (Aythya marila; 51.5%)—and the dabbling duck Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos; 19.2%). Sequences from two of the Greater Scaup CoV fell into an infrequently detected lineage, shared only with a Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula) CoV. Coronavirus sequences from Mallards in this study were highly similar to CoV sequences from the sample species and location in 2011, suggesting long-term maintenance in this population. A single Black-headed Gull represented the only positive sample from the order Charadriiformes. Globally, Anas species represent the largest fraction of avian CoV sequences, and there seems to be no host species, geographical or temporal structure. To better understand the eitiology, epidemiology and ecology of these viruses more systematic surveillance of wild birds and subsequent sequencing of detected CoV is imperative. PMID:26938459

  6. Land-Bridge Calibration of Molecular Clocks and the Post-Glacial Colonization of Scandinavia by the Eurasian Field Vole Microtus agrestis

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Jeremy S.; McDevitt, Allan D.; Kawałko, Agata; Jaarola, Maarit; Wójcik, Jan M.; Searle, Jeremy B.

    2014-01-01

    Phylogeography interprets molecular genetic variation in a spatial and temporal context. Molecular clocks are frequently used to calibrate phylogeographic analyses, however there is mounting evidence that molecular rates decay over the relevant timescales. It is therefore essential that an appropriate rate is determined, consistent with the temporal scale of the specific analysis. This can be achieved by using temporally spaced data such as ancient DNA or by relating the divergence of lineages directly to contemporaneous external events of known time. Here we calibrate a Eurasian field vole (Microtus agrestis) mitochondrial genealogy from the well-established series of post-glacial geophysical changes that led to the formation of the Baltic Sea and the separation of the Scandinavian peninsula from the central European mainland. The field vole exhibits the common phylogeographic pattern of Scandinavian colonization from both the north and the south, however the southernmost of the two relevant lineages appears to have originated in situ on the Scandinavian peninsula, or possibly in the adjacent island of Zealand, around the close of the Younger Dryas. The mitochondrial substitution rate and the timescale for the genealogy are closely consistent with those obtained with a previous calibration, based on the separation of the British Isles from mainland Europe. However the result here is arguably more certain, given the level of confidence that can be placed in one of the central assumptions of the calibration, that field voles could not survive the last glaciation of the southern part of the Scandinavian peninsula. Furthermore, the similarity between the molecular clock rate estimated here and those obtained by sampling heterochronous (ancient) DNA (including that of a congeneric species) suggest that there is little disparity between the measured genetic divergence and the population divergence that is implicit in our land-bridge calibration. PMID:25111840

  7. Land-bridge calibration of molecular clocks and the post-glacial Colonization of Scandinavia by the Eurasian field vole Microtus agrestis.

    PubMed

    Herman, Jeremy S; McDevitt, Allan D; Kawałko, Agata; Jaarola, Maarit; Wójcik, Jan M; Searle, Jeremy B

    2014-01-01

    Phylogeography interprets molecular genetic variation in a spatial and temporal context. Molecular clocks are frequently used to calibrate phylogeographic analyses, however there is mounting evidence that molecular rates decay over the relevant timescales. It is therefore essential that an appropriate rate is determined, consistent with the temporal scale of the specific analysis. This can be achieved by using temporally spaced data such as ancient DNA or by relating the divergence of lineages directly to contemporaneous external events of known time. Here we calibrate a Eurasian field vole (Microtus agrestis) mitochondrial genealogy from the well-established series of post-glacial geophysical changes that led to the formation of the Baltic Sea and the separation of the Scandinavian peninsula from the central European mainland. The field vole exhibits the common phylogeographic pattern of Scandinavian colonization from both the north and the south, however the southernmost of the two relevant lineages appears to have originated in situ on the Scandinavian peninsula, or possibly in the adjacent island of Zealand, around the close of the Younger Dryas. The mitochondrial substitution rate and the timescale for the genealogy are closely consistent with those obtained with a previous calibration, based on the separation of the British Isles from mainland Europe. However the result here is arguably more certain, given the level of confidence that can be placed in one of the central assumptions of the calibration, that field voles could not survive the last glaciation of the southern part of the Scandinavian peninsula. Furthermore, the similarity between the molecular clock rate estimated here and those obtained by sampling heterochronous (ancient) DNA (including that of a congeneric species) suggest that there is little disparity between the measured genetic divergence and the population divergence that is implicit in our land-bridge calibration. PMID:25111840

  8. Baltican versus Laurentian Crust in the Norwegian Caledonides between Latitudes 67° and 69° N: Implications for Mountains across oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steltenpohl, Mark G.; Yaw Nana Yaw, Nana; Andresen, Arild; Verellen, Devon

    2015-04-01

    Field and geochronological data (U-Pb ID-TIMS, SHRIMP, and LA ICPMS) on granitoids and their metasedimentary hosts are reported for rocks of the Bodø and Ofoten regions of north-central Norway documenting the distribution of Baltican versus Laurentian crust and allowing for tectonostratigraphic correlations across the EW-trending Tysfjord basement culmination. In the Bodø region, large areas previously interpreted as domes cored by Baltic basement (ca. 1.8 Ga; e.g., Heggmovatn and Landegode domes) are in fact Caledonian thrust sheets belonging to the exotic (Laurentian) Uppermost Allochthon. The Bratten orthogneiss, the Landegode augen gneiss, and the batholithic Tårnvika augen gneiss each has a ca. 950 Ma age of crystallization, and are together called the Rørstad complex. Orthogneisses that intrude metasedimentary units of the Heggmo allochthon (formerly the Heggmovatn dome) are dated to ca. 930 Ma, and these are intruded by 430 Ma leucogranites; U-Pb analysis of detrital zircons from metasiliciclastic rocks constrain the age of deposition to between 1100-930 Ma. We lithologically correlate the metasedimentary rocks between the Heggmo and Rørstad complexes. The Rørstad complex was migmatized at ca. 450 Ma and then was intruded by 430 Ma granitoids. Ordovician migmatites have not been documented in the Heggmo unit but such relics might have been masked by intense Scandian magmatic and metamorphic activity. The Rørstad and Heggmo units have straightforward age correlations to Mesoproterozoic to Neoproterozoic rock complexes in southern East Greenland and in other parts of the North Atlantic realm (i.e., Krummedal sequence and Eleonore Bay Supergroup). Laurentian Grenville-continental crust preserved in the Uppermost Allochthon of the Bodø region, therefore, records tectonic events that took place on the northeastern Laurentian continental margin prior to its Scandian continent-continent collision with Baltica. In Ofoten, ~150 km north of Bodø, the basal units of the Uppermost Allochthon comprise a thick sequence of platformal marbles (Evenes Group) that overlie a fragmented ophiolite complex dated at ca. 474 Ma. Multiple suites of felsic intrusions occur within the overlying Bogen and Niingen nappes and in the underlying Narvik nappe (Upper Allochthon) but none are found in the Evenes Group. A geochemically distinct (A-type) suite of ca. 470 Ma granites (Snaufjell granite) intrudes the Bogen Group and implies correlation to parts of the Uppermost Allochthon in the Helgeland nappe far to the south of Bodø; lithologically correlative units also occur directly south of Tysfjord in the Engeløy synform, the southern counterpart to the Ofoten synform. Ordovician magmatism and metamorphism and Grenville detrital zircon age populations within rocks of Lofoten-Vesterålen imply slivers of the Uppermost Allochthon exist far to the west of exposed Baltic basement. Although we have not identified Tonian-aged plutonic rocks north of Tysfjord, U-Pb detrital zircon age populations in quartzites from Lofoten-Vesterålen (Leknes and Gullesfjord), and the Evenes, Bogen, and Niingen groups indicate that they too likely have Laurentian origins. We speculate on potential Laurentian source areas and possible interactions between the two conjugate continental sides of the orogen that could have resulted in the Scandian amalgamation of these orphaned terranes.

  9. Small scale metasomatism of mafic schist in the Norwegian Caledonides associated with brine infiltration - Fluid inclusions, SEM-CL and mineralogical record of the fluid infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drivenes, K.; Sorensen, B. E.; Larsen, R. B.

    2012-12-01

    The uppermost stratigraphic layer of a 250 meter thick sequence of metasediments in the Bjellaatinden area, Northern Norway, consists of a hornblende-biotite schist. The schist is cross cut by sub vertical, slightly arched, 2 - 10 cm thick quartz veins with an alteration halo up to 5 cm into the unaltered gneiss. The zoned alteration assemblage includes sericite, chlorite, calcite and muscovite. Hornblende is gradually altered to biotite, and plagioclase is increasingly sericitized towards the vein. Biotite is completely replaced by chlorite near the vein. Muscovite and calcite dominate closest to the quartz vein. The Fe/Fe+Mg ratio increases in biotite when partly altered to chlorite, and increases slightly in chlorite (0,55) compared to biotite (0,50) in the unaltered zones. Titanite is the main Ti-mineral in the unaltered gneiss, while ilmenite + rutile dominate in the alteration zone. An earlier hydrothermal mineral assembly consisting of scapolite (Me55-60) and biotite is also recognized Three types of fluid inclusions in quartz are described: Saline (ca. 40 wt% NaCl equiv.) water rich, gas rich, and low saline water rich. Multiple generations of fluids are indicated by several trails consisting of separate gas rich, saline water rich and low saline water rich inclusions. In some areas all three types occur together and are indicative of co-existence of different fluids in an immiscible fluid system. SEM-CL reveals three different types of quartz: Low lumicent, with a broad peak from 420 - 650 nm, hosting late, gas rich inclusions, higher lumicent, with a peak around 500 nm, hosting the saline fluid inclusions, and high lumicent with a peak around 500 nm scarce of fluid inclusions. Low saline, water rich fluids are mostly found in high lumicent quartz with a peak around 400 nm inside the alteration zone. Separate CO2 and H2O inclusions are found in scapolite and vein quartz related to scapolite. Microthermometry of the saline fluid inclusions revealed a bimodal distribution of total homogenization temperatures (Th), but with stabile salinity measured by halite melting at ca. 300 °C and Th (liquid + vapour -> liquid) ranging from ca. 450 °C to ca. 250 °C. Semi quantitative EPMA analysis of decrepitated fluid inclusions showed major Na, Ca and Fe, and minor K and Mn. The increased K level in the alteration zone is probably related to these fluids. CO2 and water inclusions related to scapolite homogenize at 21 °C and 325 °C respectively, and their isochores intersect at ca. 600 °C and 2.4 kbar. Hornblende-plagioclase geothermometry measured in the schist between the quartz veins indicate that a isothermal pressure drop from ca 6.5 to 5.5 kbar at ca 700 °C occurred prior to fluid infiltration

  10. A combined surface and borehole seismic survey at the COSC-1 borehole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Helge; Krauß, Felix; Hedin, Peter; Buske, Stefan; Giese, Rüdiger; Juhlin, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    The ICDP project COSC (Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides) focuses on the mid Paleozoic Caledonide Orogen in Scandinavia in order to better understand orogenic processes, from the past and in recent active mountain belts. The Scandinavian Caledonides provide a well preserved example of a Paleozoic continent-continent collision. Surface geology in combination with geophysical data provide control of the geometry of the Caledonian structure, including the allochthon and the underlying autochthon, as well as the shallow W-dipping décollement surface that separates the two and consist of a thin skin of Cambrian black shales. During spring/summer 2014 the COSC-1 borehole was drilled to approx. 2.5 km depth near the town of Åre (western Jämtland/Sweden) with nearly 100 % of core recovery and cores in best quality. After the drilling was finished, a major seismic survey was conducted in and around the COSC-1 borehole which comprised both seismic reflection and transmission experiments. Besides a high resolution zero-offset VSP (Vertical Seismic Profiling) experiment also a multi-azimuthal walkaway VSP survey took place. For the latter the source points were distributed along three profile lines centered radially around the borehole. For the central part up to 2.5 km away from the borehole, a hydraulic hammer source was used, which hits the ground for about 20 s with an linear increasing hit rate. For the far offset shots up to 5 km, explosive sources were used. The wavefield of both source types was recorded in the borehole using an array of 15 three-component receivers with a geophone spacing of 10 m. This array was deployed at 7 different depth levels during the survey. At the same time the wavefield was also recorded at the surface by 180 standalone three-component receivers placed along each of the three up to 10 km long lines, as well as with a 3D array of single-component receivers in the central part of the survey area around the borehole. Here

  11. LEUKOCYTE COPING CAPACITY AS A TOOL TO ASSESS CAPTURE- AND HANDLING-INDUCED STRESS IN SCANDINAVIAN BROWN BEARS (URSUS ARCTOS).

    PubMed

    Esteruelas, Núria Fandos; Huber, Nikolaus; Evans, Alina L; Zedrosser, Andreas; Cattet, Marc; Palomares, Francisco; Angel, Martine; Swenson, Jon E; Arnemo, Jon M

    2016-04-01

    Brown bears (Ursus arctos) are often captured and handled for research and management purposes. Although the techniques used are potentially stressful for the animals and might have detrimental and long-lasting consequences, it is difficult to assess their physiological impact. Here we report the use of the leukocyte coping capacity (LCC) technique to quantify the acute stress of capture and handling in brown bears in Scandinavia. In April and May 2012 and 2013, we collected venous blood samples and recorded a range of physiological variables to evaluate the effects of capture and the added impact of surgical implantation or removal of transmitters and sensors. We studied 24 brown bears, including 19 that had abdominal surgery. We found 1) LCC values following capture were lower in solitary bears than in bears in family groups suggesting capture caused relatively more stress in solitary bears, 2) ability to cope with handling stress was better (greater LCC values) in bears with good body condition, and 3) LCC values did not appear to be influenced by surgery. Although further evaluation of this technique is required, our preliminary results support the use of the LCC technique as a quantitative measure of stress. PMID:26845299

  12. PANS - A Detailed Study of the Patients, Their Symptoms, Biomarkers and Treatment Offered in a Scandinavian Cohort

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-04

    Obsessive-compulsive Disorder With Acute Onset; PANDAS; Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated With Streptococcal Infections; Pediatric Acute-onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome (PANS); Childhood Acute Neuropsychiatric Symptoms (CANS); Obsessive-compulsive Disorder

  13. Association Mapping in Scandinavian Winter Wheat for Yield, Plant Height, and Traits Important for Second-Generation Bioethanol Production.

    PubMed

    Bellucci, Andrea; Torp, Anna Maria; Bruun, Sander; Magid, Jakob; Andersen, Sven B; Rasmussen, Søren K

    2015-01-01

    A collection of 100 wheat varieties representing more than 100 years of wheat-breeding history in Scandinavia was established in order to identify marker-trait associations for plant height (PH), grain yield (GY), and biomass potential for bioethanol production. The field-grown material showed variations in PH from 54 to 122 cm and in GY from 2 to 6.61 t ha(-1). The release of monomeric sugars was determined by high-throughput enzymatic treatment of ligno-cellulosic material and varied between 0.169 and 0.312 g/g dm for glucose (GLU) and 0.146 and 0.283 g/g dm for xylose (XYL). As expected, PH and GY showed to be highly influenced by genetic factors with repeatability (R) equal to 0.75 and 0.53, respectively, while this was reduced for GLU and XYL (R = 0.09 for both). The study of trait correlations showed how old, low-yielding, tall varieties released higher amounts of monomeric sugars after straw enzymatic hydrolysis, showing reduced recalcitrance to bioconversion compared to modern varieties. Ninety-three lines from the collection were genotyped with the DArTseq(®) genotypic platform and 5525 markers were used for genome-wide association mapping. Six quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for GY, PH, and GLU released from straw were mapped. One QTL for PH was previously reported, while the remaining QTLs constituted new genomic regions linked to trait variation. This paper is one of the first studies in wheat to identify QTLs that are important for bioethanol production based on a genome-wide association approach. PMID:26635859

  14. Sorption, degradation and leaching of the fungicide iprodione in a golf green under Scandinavian conditions: measurements, modelling and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Strömqvist, Johan; Jarvis, Nicholas

    2005-12-01

    In cold climates, fungicides are used on golf greens to prevent snow mould causing serious damage to the turf. However, fungicide residues have been detected in runoff from golf courses, which may lead to restrictions on use. There is therefore an urgent need to improve understanding of the processes affecting leaching of fungicides from turfgrass systems to allow identification of green construction and management practices that minimize environmental impacts. In this study we monitored the leaching of the fungicide iprodione in a putting green. Sorption and degradation of iprodione was measured in batch and incubation experiments, and the simulation model MACRO was used as a risk assessment tool. Degradation of iprodione was bi-phasic, with a rapid initial phase (half-life 17 h) caused by enhanced biodegradation. Degradation rates slowed considerably after 5 days, with half-lives of up to 38 days. Sorption of iprodione was linear, with a K(oc) value of ca 400 cm(3) g(-1). MACRO reasonably accurately matched measured drainflows and concentrations of iprodione in soil and drainflow. However, peak concentrations in drainage were underestimated, which was attributed to preferential finger flow due to water repellency. The results also showed the importance of the organic matter content in the green root zone in reducing leaching. It was concluded that, with 'reasonable worst-case' use, losses of iprodione from greens can occur at concentrations exceeding water quality limits for aquatic ecosystems. Snow mould problems should be tackled by adopting green root zone mixes that minimize leaching and 'best management practices' that would avoid the need for intensive prophylactic use of fungicides. PMID:16082718

  15. Behavioural Differences between Single Scandinavian Brown Bears (Ursus arctos) and Females with Dependent Young When Experimentally Approached by Humans

    PubMed Central

    Sahlén, Veronica; Ordiz, Andrés; Swenson, Jon E.; Støen, Ole Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Carnivore-human encounters that result in human injury present a conservation and management challenge and it is therefore important to understand under what conditions such incidents occur. Females with cubs are often involved when humans are injured by brown bears Ursus arctos. In Scandinavia, this is particularly true for unarmed recreational forest users. Our aim was to document behavioural differences between single bears and females with cubs in order to develop recommendations to minimize the risk of injuries to recreational forest users. We documented the reactions of GPS-collared females with cubs and single brown bears to experimental approaches by humans to 50 m from the bear on 42 and 108 occasions, respectively. The majority of females with cubs (95%) and single bears (89%) left when approached. Bears that left were passed at shorter distances and were in more open areas than those that stayed. Both groups had similar flight initiation distances, which were longer for bears that were active at the time of the disturbance. Females with cubs selected more open habitat than single bears, also for the new site they selected following disturbance. Females with cubs, particularly active females with cubs of the year, moved greater distances and spent more time active following the approach. Females with cubs and single bears were seen or heard in 26% and 14% of the approaches, respectively. None of the bears displayed any aggressive behaviour during the approaches. Females with cubs selected more open habitat, perhaps predisposing them to encountering people that are not involved in hunting activities, which might be the primary explanation why females with cubs are most frequently involved when unarmed people are injured by bears in Scandinavia. To mitigate injury risks, one must consider factors that bring bears closer to human activity in the first place. PMID:25830333

  16. Predicting Reading and Spelling Difficulties in Transparent and Opaque Orthographies: A Comparison between Scandinavian and US/Australian Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furnes, Bjarte; Samuelsson, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    In this study, predictors of reading and spelling difficulties among children learning more transparent (Norwegian/Swedish) and less transparent (English) orthographies were examined longitudinally from preschool through Grade 2 using parallel versions of tests. A series of logistic regression analysis indicated three main findings. First,…

  17. Present status, actions taken and future considerations due to the findings of E. multilocularis in two Scandinavian countries.

    PubMed

    Wahlström, Helene; Enemark, Heidi L; Davidson, Rebecca K; Oksanen, Antti

    2015-10-30

    When Echinococcus (E.) multilocularis was first detected in mainland Scandinavia in Denmark in 2000, surveillance was initiated/intensified in Sweden, mainland Norway and Finland. After 10 years of surveillance these countries all fulfilled the requirements of freedom from E. multilocularis as defined by the EU, i.e. a prevalence in final hosts <1% with 95% confidence level. However, in 2011 E. multilocularis was detected in Sweden for the first time and surveillance was increased in all four countries. Finland and mainland Norway are currently considered free from E. multilocularis, whereas the prevalence in foxes in Sweden and Denmark is approximately 0.1% and 1.0%, respectively. E. multilocularis has been found in foxes from three different areas in Denmark: Copenhagen (2000), Højer (2012-14) and Grindsted (2014). Unlike Sweden, Norway and Finland, human alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is not notifiable in Denmark, and the number of human cases is therefore unknown. In Sweden, E. multilocularis has been found in foxes in four counties, Västra Götaland, Södermanland, Dalarna (2011) and Småland (2014). E. multilocularis has also been found in an intermediate host in Södermanland (2014). Two cases of AE have been reported in humans (2012), both infected abroad. No cases of E. multilocularis or AE have been reported in Finland and Norway. Recommendations and future considerations are discussed further. PMID:26362495

  18. Association Mapping in Scandinavian Winter Wheat for Yield, Plant Height, and Traits Important for Second-Generation Bioethanol Production

    PubMed Central

    Bellucci, Andrea; Torp, Anna Maria; Bruun, Sander; Magid, Jakob; Andersen, Sven B.; Rasmussen, Søren K.

    2015-01-01

    A collection of 100 wheat varieties representing more than 100 years of wheat-breeding history in Scandinavia was established in order to identify marker-trait associations for plant height (PH), grain yield (GY), and biomass potential for bioethanol production. The field-grown material showed variations in PH from 54 to 122 cm and in GY from 2 to 6.61 t ha-1. The release of monomeric sugars was determined by high-throughput enzymatic treatment of ligno-cellulosic material and varied between 0.169 and 0.312 g/g dm for glucose (GLU) and 0.146 and 0.283 g/g dm for xylose (XYL). As expected, PH and GY showed to be highly influenced by genetic factors with repeatability (R) equal to 0.75 and 0.53, respectively, while this was reduced for GLU and XYL (R = 0.09 for both). The study of trait correlations showed how old, low-yielding, tall varieties released higher amounts of monomeric sugars after straw enzymatic hydrolysis, showing reduced recalcitrance to bioconversion compared to modern varieties. Ninety-three lines from the collection were genotyped with the DArTseq® genotypic platform and 5525 markers were used for genome-wide association mapping. Six quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for GY, PH, and GLU released from straw were mapped. One QTL for PH was previously reported, while the remaining QTLs constituted new genomic regions linked to trait variation. This paper is one of the first studies in wheat to identify QTLs that are important for bioethanol production based on a genome-wide association approach. PMID:26635859

  19. A meditation on the use of hands. Previously published in Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy 1995; 2: 153-166.

    PubMed

    Kielhofner, G

    2014-01-01

    The theme of mind-body unity is fundamental to occupational therapy. Nonetheless, the field continues to embrace a dualism of mind and body. This dualism persists because the field views the body only as an object, ignoring how the body is lived. Drawing upon phenomenological discussions of bodily experience, this paper illustrates how the lived body is a locus of intelligence, intentionality, adaptiveness, and experience. It also considers the bodily ground of motivation and thought and discusses how the body constitutes and incorporates its world. Finally, the paper considers implications of the lived body for therapy. PMID:25116744

  20. Deglaciation chronology of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet from the Lake Onega Basin to the Salpausselkä End Moraines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saarnisto, Matti; Saarinen, Timo

    2001-11-01

    Several long sediment cores (max. 12 m) from various parts (up to 150 km apart) of Lake Onega, Russian Karelia, have been studied for lithology, varve chronology and palaeomagnetism. The two longest varve records from the central basin contain 1300 varves. These indicate the length of the deglaciation period from these localities to the north of Lake Onega, where the drainage of glacial meltwaters was directed towards the White Sea and the deposition of varves in the Onega basin terminated. An estimate of the duration of deglaciation of the whole Onega basin is 1500 years. Natural remanent magnetization (NRM) is strong and stable in these sediments and accurately records changes in the Earth's magnetic field. A distinct change in the magnetic field, when the declination shifted from east to west by at least 60° in 350 varve years, is clearly identifiable in all cores. This palaeomagnetic feature was used for core to core correlation together with other variations in magnetic parameters and widely distributed lithological marker horizons. On the basis of the correlations between the cores and calibration of AMS radiocarbon dates from varves obtained from the northern archipelago of Lake Onega, the age of the westerly declination peak is dated to 13 090 cal. BP and accordingly the deglaciation of the Onega basin took place between 14 250 and 12 750±100 cal. BP. The westerly declination peak was also recognized earlier by Bakhmutov and Zagniy in the Helylä varved clay sequence near Sortavala on the northern shore of Lake Ladoga. Helylä is situated outside the Salpausselkä end moraines and the accumulation of varved clays continued there 1500 years after the declination peak, up until the drainage of the Baltic Ice Lake, which more or less coincides with the ice margin retreat from Salpausselkä II end moraine and the termination of the Younger Dryas event. The date thus arrived at for this event is 11 590±100 cal. BP, close to the recent results from Greenland ice cores and from varved lake sediments and tree rings from Central Europe. It is further suggested that the formation of the major Younger Dryas end moraines, the Finnish Salpausselkä I and Salpausselkä II and their correlatives in Russian Karelia, took place between 12 250 and 11 590 calendar years ago, clearly earlier than earlier estimated through correlation with the Swedish varve chronology.

  1. Constructing Scandinavian-American Identity through a Chaos of Darkness: Maj Lindman's "Snipp, Snapp, Snurr and the Gingerbread"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lybeck, Rick

    2015-01-01

    Popular among young American readers since the early 1930s, Maj Lindman's two series of children's books--"Snipp, Snapp, Snurr and Flicka, Ricka, Dicka"--continue their long publishing histories in the U.S. These nostalgia-filled adventures about the Swedish triplet boys and girls construct positive values of childhood independence and…

  2. Noble gas and halogen evidence for the origin of Scandinavian sandstone-hosted Pb-Zn deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, M. A.; Burgess, R.; Harrison, D.; Bjørlykke, A.

    2005-01-01

    Fluid origins in the sandstone-hosted Pb-Zn class of ore deposit have been investigated in three deposits from Scandinavia; Laisvall, Vassbo and Osen. The deposits studied are hosted by autochthonous Cambrian sandstones that preserve a near original structural relationship to the underlying Precambrian basement, enabling the role of basement interaction to be assessed. Mineral samples have been collected from across the paragenetic sequence: sphalerite, galena, pyrite, fluorite and barite, of impregnation and related joint-hosted mineralization. Fluid-inclusion halogen (Cl, Br and I) and noble gas isotope ( 40Ar, 36Ar, 84Kr) compositions were determined simultaneously by noble gas mass spectrometry of irradiated sample splits. Complementary He isotope analyses are obtained from nonirradiated splits of the same samples. 3He/ 4He values at Laisvall and Osen are highly radiogenic, 0.02 Ra, and the 4He/ 40Ar* ratio extends to values greater than the crustal production value of 5, characteristic of low-temperature crustal fluids. At Vassbo, a slightly elevated 3He/ 4He ratio of 0.1-0.3 Ra is compatible with a very minor mantle component (1%-4%) suggesting a distal source for the basinal brine-dominated fluid. Br/Cl molar ratios 3.2-8.2 × 10 -3 are greater than the present seawater value of 1.54 × 10 -3 and correspond with I/Cl molar ratios in the range 64-1600 × 10 -6. The upper limits of both the I/Cl and Br/Cl values are amongst the highest measured in crustal fluids. Together, the data indicate acquisition of salinity by the evaporation of seawater beyond the point of halite saturation and subsequent fluid interaction with I-rich organic matter in the subsurface. The data are compatible with the independent transport of sulfate and sulfide and indicate that fluids responsible for joint-hosted mineralization were distinct to those responsible for impregnation mineralization. All three deposits preserve fluids with 40Ar/ 36Ar in the range of 6,000-10,000 and fluid inclusion 40Ar* concentrations of >0.02-0.05 cm 3cm -3. Fluid-inclusion 4He concentrations are also extremely elevated with maximum values of ˜0.1 cm 3cm -3 in Laisvall fluorite and sphalerite. The high 40Ar/ 36Ar values, together with the high 4He and 40Ar* concentrations, result from a very long premineralization crustal residence time on the order of 100-200 Ma. Together, the noble gas and halogen data are compatible with a Caledonian mineralization event (˜425 Ma) caused by mixing of two or more, long-lived, hydrothermal basinal brines and pore fluids at the sites of mineralization. The data suggest negligible recharge of the basinal brines by meteoric water and indicate extensive fluid-basement interaction before mineralization. The similar noble gas composition of each deposit, suggests that similar processes operated at all three deposits and favors a single-pass fluid-flow model for mineralization.

  3. Tectonic models for the Patagonian orogenic curve (southernmost Andes): An appraisal based on analog experiments from the Fuegian thrust-fold belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres Carbonell, Pablo J.; Guzmán, Cecilia; Yagupsky, Daniel; Dimieri, Luis V.

    2016-03-01

    Tectonic models for the evolution of the Patagonian orogenic curve were evaluated using analog experiments that considered either a rotational or a non-rotational orogenic backstop, combined with a basement promontory on the foreland cratonic margin. Five different kinematic configurations were used, aiming to evaluate the influence of the Río Chico Arc as a rigid obstacle on the evolution of the Fuegian thrust-fold belt. Rotations, strains and displacement fields obtained from each analog experiment were compared with the structural geology known from the Fuegian thrust-fold belt, in order to appraise the tectonic models that are more consistent with the natural structure. The push of a counterclockwise rotational backstop, combined with the buttressing effect of a foreland promontory, seem of major importance in controlling the final structure and map-view shape of the thrust wedge.

  4. High-resolution stratigraphy and depositional model of wind- and water-laid deposits in the ordovician Guaritas rift (Southernmost Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paim, Paulo S. G.; Scherer, Claiton M. S.

    2007-12-01

    The upper portion of the Pedra Pintada Alloformation includes about 100 m of mostly eolian deposits. This paper emphasizes the vertical succession and lateral association of sedimentary facies, based on analysis of outcrop data and aerial photographs, as well as the hierarchy and origin of bounding surfaces. It aims to propose a high-resolution stratigraphic and depositional model that may be useful to exploitation of eolian reservoirs. The succession has been preserved due to basin subsidence, and is described in terms of four facies associations that constitute three dominantly eolian units. These units are sharply bounded by major flooding surfaces (super surfaces) that, in turn, are overlain by 1 to 2 m thick, dominantly water-laid facies (lacustrine, fluvial, deltaic and eolian). Both their internal organization and boundaries were controlled by changes in the base level rise rate. The basal Eolian Unit is composed of crescentic eolian dunes and damp interdune deposits ascribed to a wet eolian system. On the other hand, eolian units II and III, also characterized by crescentic eolian dunes (simple and compound) deposits, were related to dry eolian systems, since they comprise dry (eventually wet) interdune facies. Eolian Unit III is truncated by basinwide unconformity, which is then overlain by the ephemeral fluvial deposits (Varzinha Alloformation). This second type of super surface is related to climate-induced wind erosion (deflation) down to the water table level (regional Stokes surface) followed by fluvial incision linked to tectonic activity.

  5. Calc-alkaline rear-arc magmatism in the Fuegian Andes: Implications for the mid-cretaceous tectonomagmatic evolution of southernmost South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, Mauricio González; Escayola, Mónica; Acevedo, Rogelio

    2011-02-01

    The magmatic arc of the Fuegian Andes is composed mostly of Upper Mesozoic to Cenozoic calc-alkaline plutons and subordinated lavas. To the rear arc, however, isolated mid-Cretaceous monzonitic plutons and small calc-alkaline dykes and sills crop out. This calc-alkaline unit (the Ushuaia Peninsula Andesites, UPA) includes hornblende-rich, porphyritic quartz meladiorites, granodiorites, andesites, dacites and lamprophyres. Radiometric dating and cross-cutting relationships indicate that UPA is younger than the monzonitic suite. The geochemistry of UPA is medium to high K, with high LILE (Ba 500-2000 ppm, Sr 800-1400 ppm), HFSE (Th 7-23 ppm, Nb 7-13 ppm, Ta 0.5-1.1 ppm) and LREE (La 16-51 ppm) contents, along with relatively low HREE (Yb 1.7-1.3 ppm) and Y (9-19 ppm). The similar mineralogy and geochemistry of all UPA rocks suggest they evolved from a common parental magma, by low pressure crystal fractionation, without significant crustal assimilation. A pure Rayleigh fractionation model indicates that 60-65% of crystal fractionation of 60% hornblende + 34% plagioclase + 4% clinopyroxene + 1% Fe-Ti oxide, apatite and sphene (a paragenesis similar of UPA mafic rocks) can explain evolution from lamprophyres to dacites. The UPA has higher LILE, HFSE and LREE, and lower HREE and Y than the calc-alkaline plutons and lavas of the volcanic front. The HREE and Y are lower than in the potassic plutons as well. High concentrations of Th, Nb, Ta, Zr, Hf, LREE and Ce/Pb, and low U/Th, Ba/Th ratios in UPA, even in the least differentiated samples, suggest contributions from subducted sediments to the mantle source. On the other hand, relatively low HREE and Y, high LREE/HREE (La/Yb 11-38) ratios and Nb-Ta contents can be interpreted as mantle metasomatism by partial melts of either subducted garnetiferous oceanic sediment or basalt as well. Additionally, high LILE content in UPA, similar to the potassic plutons, suggests also a mantle wedge previously metasomatized by potassic parental magmas in their route to crustal levels. Therefore, UPA represents a unique suite in the Fuegian arc generated in a multiple hybridized source. UPA generation is related to a transition from normal to flat subduction which additionally caused the widening and landward migration of the magmatic arc, as well as crustal deformation. Rear-arc magmatism endured ca. 22 m.y.; afterwards, calc-alkaline magmatism remained at the volcanic front.

  6. New Patagonian species of Liolaemus (Iguania: Liolaemidae) and novelty in the lepidosis of the southernmost lizard of the world: Liolaemus magellanicus.

    PubMed

    Abdala, Cristian Simón; Procopio, Diego Esteban; Stellatelli, Oscar Aníbal; Travaini, Alejandro; Monachesi, Mario Ricardo Ruiz

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new species within the genus Liolaemus from southeast Argentine Patagonia. This new taxon, Liolaemus yatel sp. nov., presents anatomical traits shared with the Liolaemus lineomaculatus section within the Liolaemus lineomaculatus group, especially the absence of precloacal pores in both sexes. However, Liolaemus yatel sp. nov. does not exhibit trifid dorsal scales, which is a diagnostic character of the L. lineomaculatus group. Moreover, this new species differs from other taxa of the L. lineomaculatus group in that dorsal and nuchal scales either completely lack keels or are slightly keeled. We also report, for the first time, the presence of trifid scales in Liolaemus magellanicus, another species included in the L. lineomaculatus section but constituting an independent lineage regarding the L. lineomaculatus group. The phenotypic traits of L. yatel sp. nov. and the presence of trifid scales in L. magellanicus provide additional information for the study of evolutionary relationships among the species of the L. lineomaculatus section, especially the establishment of their diagnostic character states. PMID:25283673

  7. High-Sr Volcanic Domes from the Lassen Volcanic Region, Southernmost Cascade Arc, Northern California: Implications for Andesite and Dacite Magma Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stout, C.; DeBari, S. M.; Clynne, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Onion Butte (OB) and Barkley Mountain (BM) groups comprise two linear arrays of volcanic domes at a high angle to the Cascade arc axis (40 km SW of Lassen Volcanic Center). These groups have atypical petrographic and geochemical characteristics compared to other lithologies in the Lassen area. Petrographically, both groups are sparsely phyric containing hornblende and pyroxene, but lacking plagioclase; disequilibrium textures are not observed. The OB group is composed of dacite (64.0-65.2wt. % SiO2) characterized by high Sr (> 1000ppm), with low 87Sr/86Sr (<0.7040), high (Sr/P)N (2.8-3.5), no Eu anomaly, and moderate (La/Yb)N (11-23). The BM group is composed of basaltic andesite to andesite (53.6-62.3wt. % SiO2) characterized by lower Sr (354-611ppm), but higher 87Sr/86Sr (>0.7040), low (Sr/P)N (1.1-2.1), no Eu anomaly, and moderate (La/Yb)N (4.6-11.8). The distinctive characteristics of these two groups mirror those of the two end members of calc-alkaline primitive basalts recognized in the Lassen region (high Sr/P vs. low Sr/P). We invoke different sources and processes to explain the origin and evolution of these groups. The BM basaltic andesites are likely derived from fractionation of low Sr/P basalts and the BM andesites are successfully modeled by fractional crystallization of BM basaltic andesites with a fractionating assemblage that contains <10% plagioclase. In contrast, the OB dacites share geochemical characteristics with some adakites, suggesting an origin by partial melting of the subducting slab. However, partial melting models of the subducting Gorda plate at eclogite facies conditions failed to reproduce the observed trends of the OB dacites. Partial melting of an amphibolitic lower arc crust with a source composition similar to high Sr/P calc-alkaline basalts successfully reproduces observed trends. Geochemical characteristics and results from modeling suggest Sr concentrations may be a useful source indicator in the Lassen region.

  8. Three-thrust fault system at the plate suture of arc-continent collision in the southernmost Longitudinal Valley, eastern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Chen, H.; Hsu, Y.; Yu, S.

    2013-12-01

    Active faults developed into a rather complex three-thrust fault system at the southern end of the narrow Longitudinal Valley in eastern Taiwan, a present-day on-land plate suture between the Philippine Sea plate and Eurasia. Based on more than ten years long geodetic data (including GPS and levelling), field geological investigation, seismological data, and regional tomography, this paper aims at elucidating the architecture of this three-thrust system and the associated surface deformation, as well as providing insights on fault kinematics, slip behaviors and implications of regional tectonics. Combining the results of interseismic (secular) horizontal and vertical velocities, we are able to map the surface traces of the three active faults in the Taitung area. The west-verging Longitudinal Valley Fault (LVF), along which the Coastal Range of the northern Luzon arc is thrusting over the Central Range of the Chinese continental margin, braches into two active strands bounding both sides of an uplifted, folded Quaternary fluvial deposits (Peinanshan massif) within the valley: the Lichi fault to the east and the Luyeh fault to the west. Both faults are creeping, to some extent, in the shallow surface level. However, while the Luyeh fault shows nearly pure thrust type, the Lichi fault reveals transpression regime in the north and transtension in the south end of the LVF in the Taitung plain. The results suggest that the deformation in the southern end of the Longitudinal Valley corresponds to a transition zone from present arc-collision to pre-collision zone in the offshore SE Taiwan. Concerning the Central Range, the third major fault in the area, the secular velocities indicate that the fault is mostly locked during the interseismic period and the accumulated strain would be able to produce a moderate earthquake, such as the example of the 2006 M6.1 Peinan earthquake, expressed by an oblique thrust (verging toward east) with significant left-lateral strike slip component. Taking into account of the recent study on the regional seismic Vp tomography, it shows a high velocity zone with steep east-dipping angle fills the gap under the Longitudinal Valley between the opposing verging LVF and the Central Range fault, implying a possible rolled-back forearc basement under the Coastal Range.

  9. Stable isotope and mineralogical investigation of the genesis of amethyst geodes in the Los Catalanes gemological district, Uruguay, southernmost Paraná volcanic province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Lauren C.; Hartmann, Leo A.; Ronchi, Luiz H.; Berner, Zsolt; Theye, Thomas; Massonne, Hans J.

    2011-03-01

    Stable isotopes (C, O, S) and mineralogical studies of the world-class amethyst-geode deposits of the Los Catalanes gemological district, Uruguay, constrain processes operative during mineral deposition. The mineralized basaltic andesites from the Cretaceous Paraná volcanic province are intensely altered to zeolites (clinoptilolite) and clay minerals. Variations in the δ18O values of silica minerals in geodes (chalcedony, quartz, and amethyst) are much larger and the values generally somewhat lower (21.2-31.5‰) in the Uruguayan deposits than in the Ametista do Sul area of southern Brazil. The range of δ34S values (-15.0 to -0.3‰) of altered basaltic rocks requires (in addition to sulfur of magmatic origin) the involvement of 34S-depleted sedimentary sulfur from bacterial sulfate reduction. The results delimit the mineralizing processes to a post-eruption environment characterized by low temperature and strong interaction of the lava flows with meteoric water.

  10. Erratic boulder trains and cosmogenic exposure dating of former glacial limits: A case-study from Tierra del Fuego, southernmost South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvill, Christopher; Stokes, Chris; Bentley, Mike

    2014-05-01

    Erratic Boulder Trains (EBTs) are a spectacular yet poorly-understood glacial geomorphological feature. These linear clusters of glacial erratic boulders help to illustrate the flow-lines of former glaciers by pin-pointing the parent rock from which they have originated and are often used as targets for cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating. Consequently, there is a need to understand their geomorphological significance to improve ice-sheet reconstructions and provide important contextual information for dating studies. The EBTs in Tierra del Fuego are some of the finest examples of this feature in the world, and this paper presents the first comprehensive mapping and physical assessment of four boulder trains. Unlike most other examples, they were deposited laterally rather than medially and are tightly clustered, presenting linear features only a few kilometres long that contain hundreds to thousands of huge boulders (often >8 m in diameter). The size and angularity of the boulders strongly supports the hypothesis that they were deposited as a supraglacial rock avalanche. The boulders have been the subject of previous cosmogenic dating, which have yielded anomalously young ages from deposits thought to be hundreds of thousands of years old. Analysis of weathering proxies shows little difference between boulder trains thought to be of radically different ages, with important implications for the timing of glaciations and potentially contradicting previous age constraints on glacial limits in the region.

  11. Effects of a rainstorm high in sea-salts on labile inorganic aluminium in drainage from the acidified catchments of Lake Terjevann, southernmost Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, D. O.; Seip, H. M.

    1999-10-01

    The acidification of many streams and lakes that has occurred in southern Norway during several decades is to a large extent caused by acid deposition. However, in coastal areas deposition events with high loading of sea-salts may result in increased acidity and aluminium concentration in the discharge. Since such episodes are difficult to predict and usually of short duration, the aluminium chemistry during such episodes has so far not been evaluated in detail. In January 1993, during monitoring of streams in the Lake Terjevann catchment, the area was exposed to an extraordinary high sea-salt loading. The Cl - concentration in the stream water more than doubled (reaching about 900 μeq/l), the labile inorganic aluminium (Al i) concentration almost quadrupled (reaching about 33 and 18 μM in the two streams), and the relative increase in the Al 3+ concentration was even higher. It took 3-4 months until the Al i concentration and almost a year until the Cl - concentration returned to pre-event levels. Simple equilibria with minerals such as gibbsite, jurbanite, kaolinite/halloysite or imogolite do not control aluminium concentration in the discharge from these catchments. Retention of Na + more than compensated for the desorption of Al 3+. The results strongly indicate that cation exchange in the organic soil layers was essential in controlling the aluminium chemistry in the stream waters especially during high flow. Similar, but less pronounced, effects of the sea-salt episode were seen at the Birkenes catchment about 37 km inland from Lake Terjevann.

  12. Palaeoproterozoic tectonic evolution of the Alto Tererê Group, southernmost Amazonian Craton, based on field mapping, zircon dating and rock geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacerda Filho, J. V.; Fuck, R. A.; Ruiz, A. S.; Dantas, E. L.; Scandolara, J. E.; Rodrigues, J. B.; Nascimento, N. D. C.

    2016-01-01

    New geochemical and geochronological U-Pb and Sm-Nd data from amphibolites of the Alto Tererê Group, which are of Palaeoproterozoic age, are presented. The amphibolites are exposed in the central-eastern portion of the Rio Apa Block, southern Amazonian Craton, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, and are composed of hornblende, plagioclase, quartz, biotite, cummingtonite and epidote. The amphibolites are subdivided into three lithofacies: (i) thinly banded amphibolites (metabasalts), (ii) coarse- and medium-grained amphibolites with relic subophitic texture (metagabbros), and (iii) amphibolites with relic cumulate texture (metapyroxenites). Chemical data also suggest the subdivision of the amphibolites into three different types. These rocks yield a U-Pb zircon age of 1768 ± 6 Ma and are therefore older than rocks of part of the Rio Apa Complex. Their Sm-Nd model ages range between 2.89 and 1.88 Ga, and their ɛNd (T) values range between -3.40 and + 3.74. Chemical analyses of these rocks indicate SiO2 concentrations between 45.23 and 50.65 wt.%, MgO concentrations between 4.34 and 8.01 wt.%, TiO2 concentrations between 0.91 and 1.74 wt.%, weakly fractionated rare-earth element (REE) patterns with mild depletion in heavy REEs, enrichment in large-ion lithophile elements (LILEs) and high-field-strength element (HFSEs), negative Nb, Ta and Co anomalies, positive Ba and Pb anomalies, low Ce concentrations, high Rb/Y ratios and low Th/La and Hf/Sm ratios. These features reflect metasomatism of the mantle wedge produced by sediments from the subducted plate. Various degrees of melting mark the evolution of the parent basic magmas, although subordinate crustal contamination may also have occurred. The geochemical signature of the amphibolites corresponds to that of tholeiitic basalts generated in an extensional back-arc-basin environment. The deposition in the basin apparently ceased during the first episode of compression and deformation at approximately 1.68 Ga, and the main deformation was most likely related to the San Ignácio Orogeny, which dates to approximately 1.3 Ga.

  13. Diverse, discrete, mantle-derived batches of basalt erupted along a short normal fault zone: The Poison Lake chain, southernmost Cascades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muffler, L.J.P.; Clynne, M.A.; Calvert, A.T.; Champion, D.E.

    2011-01-01

    The Poison Lake chain consists of small, monogenetic, calc-alkaline basaltic volcanoes located east of the Cascade arc axis, 30 km ENE of Lassen Peak in northeastern California. This chain consists of 39 distinguishable units in a 14-km-long and 2-kmwide zone trending NNW, parallel to nearby Quaternary normal faults. The 39 units fall into nine coherent groups based on stratigraphy, field characteristics, petrography, and major-element compositions. Petrographic differences among groups are expressed by different amounts and proportions of phenocrysts. MgO-SiO 2, K 2O-SiO 2, and TiO 2-SiO 2 variation diagrams illustrate clear differences in compatible and incompatible elements among the groups. Variation of K 2O/ TiO 2 and K 2O/P 2O 5 with MgO indicates that most of the basalts of the Poison Lake chain cannot be related by crystal fractionation at different pressures and that compositions have not been affected significantly by incorporation of low-degree silicic crustal melt or interaction with sialic crust. Limited traceelement and whole-rock isotopic data also suggest little if any incorporation of uppercrustal material, and that compositional variation among groups primarily reflects source compositional differences. Precise 40Ar/ 39Ar determinations show that the lavas were erupted between 100 and 110 ka. The migration of paleomagnetic remanent directions over 30?? suggests that the entire Poison Lake chain could represent three short-lived episodes of volcanism within a period as brief as 500 yr. The diverse geologic, petrographic, chemical, paleomagnetic, and age data indicate that each of the nine groups represents a small, discrete magma batch generated in the mantle and stored briefly in the lower crust. A NNW normal fault zone provided episodic conduits that allowed rapid ascent of these batches to the surface, where they erupted as distinct volcanic groups, each aligned along a segment of the Poison Lake chain. Compositional diversity of these primitive magmas argues against widespread, long-lived ponding of uniform basalt magma at the base of the crust in this region and against interaction with a zone of melting, assimilation, storage, and homogenization (MASH) in the lower crust. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  14. Investigations on the geothermal state of the ICDP COSC-1 well bore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwe, Richard; Pascal, Christophe; Renner, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    In 2014 the first well of the Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC) ICDP project was drilled near Åre in west central Sweden. The well penetrates the Seve Nappe complex, a result of subduction/exhumation processes during the collision of Baltica and Laurentia ~ 400 Myrs ago (Gee et al. 2010). To gain a more detailed understanding of the geothermal state of fossil mountain belts and cratonic areas, it is necessary to study present-day heat transfer in the earth's crust in appropriate deep boreholes. Constraining the heat transfer requires temperature measurements in boreholes and determination of thermal properties of the rocks present. The specific object of our study is to derive a local thermal model providing the pristine thermal state and quantifying transient effects, i.e. paleoclimatic and convective effects, on the local geotherm. The outstanding core recovery (~ 100%) of the 2495.8 m (MD) deep well in combination with extensive wireline logging campaigns provide an exceptional basis for a broad range of core measurements and well log correlations. A total of 105 core samples, representing all major lithologies, were carefully selected for laboratory investigations, such as determining heat capacity, thermal conductivity, and thermal diffusivity. Density and thermal conductivity were determined for each of the 105 core samples under ambient pressure and unsaturated conditions. The thermal conductivity was measured using the optical scanning method (Popov et al. 1985) providing a first-order estimate of thermal properties along the cores' surfaces. Based on these preliminary measurements, a thermal conductivity profile was constructed, showing a steep increase towards the lower section of the well. For the first ~ 2000 m the average thermal conductivity amounts to 2.5±0.6 W/(m.K) and increases to 4.1±1 W/(m.K) in the lower section of the well. In addition, spectral gamma ray logs were used to determine the amount of radiogenic heat

  15. Wilson-cycle "kick-off": Constraining the influence of a Large Igneous Province during the Neoproterozoic evolution of the pre-Caledonian margin of Baltica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgen Kjøll, Hans; Andersen, Torgeir B.; Tegner, Christian; Corfu, Fernando; Planke, Sverre

    2016-04-01

    The supercontinent Rodinia broke up in the late Neoproterozoic to form the oceans and margins separating paleocontinents such as Baltica, Avalonia and Laurentia, which in turn later collided to form the Caledonian - Appalachian mountain belts. Some of the geological products of the complex evolution from passive-margin- to break-up are presently found in nappe complexes within the Scandinavian Caledonides. As described by P-G. Andreasson and co-workers in several papers from the 1990's, the break-up was associated with emplacement of major dolerite dike-complexes of Ediacaran age (c. 600 Ma), probably constituting a pre-Caledonian Large Igneous Province (pCLIP). The dominantly dolerite-dike swarms intruded a thinned continental crust comprising both crystalline basement and marine sediments deposited in pre- to early syn-rift basins. During peak rifting a sheeted dike complex defining the ocean-continent transition (OCT) evolved. More than 100 Myr later, during early stages of plate convergence, distal parts of the margin and the OCT experienced high to ultra-high pressure metamorphism, before the remnants of the dike swarms and the OCT were finally thrusted onto Baltica as the Seve and Särv Nappe Complexes. This occurred during the Scandian phase of the Caledonian orogeny at c. 425 Ma. Parts of the ancient magma-rich rifted margin are now exposed in the Scandinavian Caledonides. The best-preserved parts provide a remarkable analogue to present day OCTs and adjacent areas that generally only is observable in seismic sections. In order to understand the dynamics of the continental break-up, we will investigate the exposed areas to better constrain the active mechanisms that eventually produced oceanic crust. Also, with an improved understanding of magma-rich segments, a better comprehension may be achieved for magma-poor segments, which in the present study area occur both to the south and north of the pCLIP-segment in central Scandinavia. This presentation reports

  16. Relations between heat flow, topography and Moho depth for Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, Marcin; Majorowicz, Jacek; Grad, Marek

    2013-04-01

    The relation between heat flow, topography and Moho depth for recent maps of Europe is presented. New heat flow map of Europe (Majorowicz and Wybraniec, 2010) is based on updated database of uncorrected heat flow values to which paleoclimatic correction is applied across the continental Europe. Correction is depth dependent due to a diffusive thermal transfer of the surface temperature forcing of which glacial-interglacial history has the largest impact. This explains some very low uncorrected heat flow values 20-30 mW/m2 in the shields, shallow basin areas of the cratons, and in other areas including orogenic belts were heat flow was likely underestimated. New integrated map of the European Moho depth (Grad et al., 2009) is the first high resolution digital map for European plate understand as an area from Ural Mountains in the east to mid-Atlantic ridge in the west, and Mediterranean Sea in the south to Spitsbergen and Barents Sea in Arctic in the north. For correlation we used: onshore heat flow density data with palaeoclimatic correction (5318 locations), topography map (30 x 30 arc seconds; Danielson and Gesch, 2011) and Moho map (longitude, latitude and Moho depth, each 0.1 degree). Analysis was done in areas where data from all three datasets were available. Continental Europe area could be divided into two large domains related with Precambrian East European craton and Palaeozoic Platform. Next two smaller areas correspond to Scandinavian Caledonides and Anatolia. Presented results show different correlations between Moho depth, elevation and heat flow for all discussed regions. For each region more detailed analysis of these relation in different elevation ranges is presented. In general it is observed that Moho depth is more significant to HF then elevation. Depending on region and elevation range HF value in mW/m2 is up to two times larger than Moho depth in km, while HF relation to elevation varies much more.

  17. H2O-fluid-saturated melting of subducted continental crust facilitates exhumation of ultrahigh-pressure rocks in continental subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrousse, L.; Duretz, T.; Gerya, T.

    2015-10-01

    We present two-dimensional numerical models of plate subduction and collision inspired by the Scandinavian Caledonian orogeny to investigate the possible impact of continental crust partial melting on the exhumation of ultra-high pressure metamorphic rocks. Three possible reactions were tested: low temperature solidus representing H2O-fluid-saturated partial melting, and two end-member reaction curves for dehydration melting. Thermo-mechanical effects of partial melting were implemented as (1) a viscosity decrease as a determined rheologically critical melt percentage was reached (here 0.1), (2) a change in effective heat capacity and adiabatic heating/cooling accounting for a latent heat term in the heat equation. Among the 3 tested reactions, only H2O-fluid-saturated partial melting drastically modifies the collision dynamics from the non-melting reference model holding all other parameters constant. A substantially low general viscosity truncation (here 1017 Pa s) is needed to properly resolve the effect of partial melting on deep collision processes. Low temperature melting indeed induces the development of a low viscosity buoyant plume prior to slab detachment, where migmatites exhume from UHP conditions at rates and with pressure-temperature paths similar to the natural values acknowledged for the Norwegian Caledonides. High temperature melting has no drastic influence on early collision dynamics. While positive buoyancy remains the first order driver for the exhumation of buried continental rocks, exhumation initiates in these cases with eduction subsequent to slab detachment. Melting and formation of a migmatite plume can later occur along decompression path while continental crust undergoes thermal reequilibration at temperatures above 900 °C. Some of the partially molten material can also relaminate in the overriding plate rather than exhume within the collision zone. Even if minor in terms of amount of magma produced, H2O-fluid-saturated partial melting

  18. Magnetotelluric array data analysis from north-west Fennoscandia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherevatova, M.; Smirnov, M. Yu.; Jones, A. G.; Pedersen, L. B.; Becken, M.; Biolik, M.; Cherevatova, M.; Ebbing, J.; Gradmann, S.; Gurk, M.; Hübert, J.; Jones, A. G.; Junge, A.; Kamm, J.; Korja, T.; Lahti, I.; Löwer, A.; Nittinger, C.; Pedersen, L. B.; Savvaidis, A.; Smirnov, M.

    2015-06-01

    New magnetotelluric (MT) data in north-west Fennoscandia were acquired within the framework of the project "Magnetotellurics in the Scandes" (MaSca). The project focuses on the investigation of the crustal and upper mantle lithospheric structure in the transition zone from stable Precambrian cratonic interior to passive continental margin beneath the Caledonian orogen and the Scandinavian Mountains in western Fennoscandia. An array of 59 synchronous long period and 220 broad-band MT sites was occupied in the summers of 2011 to 2013. We estimated MT transfer functions in the period range from 0.003 to 105 s. The Q-function multi-site multi-frequency analysis and the phase tensor were used to estimate strike and dimensionality of MT data. Dimensionality and strike analyses indicate generally 2-D behaviour of the data with 3-D effects at some sites and period bands. In this paper we present 2-D inversion of the data, 3-D inversion models are shown in the parallel paper. We choose to invert the determinant of the impedance tensor to mitigate 3-D effects in the data on our 2-D models. Seven crustal-scale and four lithospheric-scale 2-D models are presented. The resistive regions are images of the Archaean and Proterozoic basement in the east and thin Caledonian nappes in the west. The middle and lower crust of the Svecofennian province is conductive. The southern end of the Kittilä Greenstone Belt is seen in the models as a strong upper to middle crustal conductor. In the Caledonides, the highly conductive alum shales are observed along the Caledonian Thrust Front. The thickest lithosphere is in the Palaeoproterozioc Svecofennian Domain, not in the Archaean. The thickness of the lithosphere is around 200 km in the north and 300 km in the south-west.

  19. Peak metamorphic temperatures from Raman Spectroscopy on Carbonaceous Matter (RSCM) and δ18O and δ13C (carb) isotope composition of a major mélange zone in the South Norwegian Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, Johannes; Beyssac, Olivier; Boulvais, Philippe; Andersen, Torgeir B.

    2016-04-01

    A mélange in southern Norway comprises a matrix of garnet, mica- and black carbonaceous schists and phyllites of abyssal origin, interlayered with originally coarser grained siliciclastic metasediments, serpentinite conglomerates and sandstones, solitary metaperidotites and thin slivers of gneisses. Several models for the formation of the mélange have been suggested, including formation as a) an ophiolitic mélange formed during ophiolite obduction, b) an unconformable post-obduction transgressive sequence or c) a mélange formed during hyperextension along the pre-Caledonian margin of Baltica. In the past, the mélange has therefore not been treated as one single tectonic unit, but has been assigned to various tectonic positions with both outboard Iapetus and inboard Baltican origins. In this study we argue that the mélange occupies a tectonostratigraphic position below major Baltican basement nappe-complexes previously assigned to the Middle Allochthon. Furthermore, we present new consistent results on the peak metamorphic temperatures (T ˜ 500° C), based on RSCM, and a characteristic δ18Ocarb isotope composition (11-15.5 ‰ SMOW), both consistent for more than 250 km along strike of the mélange. δ13Ccarb values fall within three clusters around 1, ‑ 2 , and ‑ 7 ‰ (PDB), respectively. The stable isotope investigation presented here was carried out in order to explore if pre-Caledonian isotope signatures in various generations of carbonate veins and the early Ordovician fossils at Otta, could have been preserved through a later Caledonian metamorphic overprint. The results presented here however, suggest that re-equilibration of the carbonates took place in the Silurian, most likely coeval with peak metamorphism of ˜ 500° C at ˜ 420 Ma, and the main fabric development close to the base of the nappe-stack. Re-equilibration of the carbonates was assisted by the presence a pervasive static fluid, allowing for oxygen isotope exchange with the surrounding schists and resulting in an mélange-wide uniform δ18Ocarb signature. The carbon isotope composition was re-equilibrated only within each lithological body and notably not beyond lithological boundaries.

  20. The main features of the interaction of mantle magmas with granulite complexes of the lower crust and their relationship with granitic melts (exemplified by the Early Caledonides of the West Baikal Region, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, Alexandr; Khromykh, Sergei; Mekhonoshin, Alexei; Volkova, Nina; Travin, Alexei; Mikheev, Evgeny; Vladimirova, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Granulite complexes occurring in the Early Caledonian southern folded framing of the Siberian Craton are deeply eroded fragments of the Vendian-Early Paleozoic accretionary prism, which is an indicator of the early stages of the Paleo-Asian Ocean (Gladkochub et al., 2010). The main feature of the granulite complexes is a wide development of gabbro-pyroxenites composing tectonic plates, synmetamorphic intrusive bodies, and numerous disintegrated fragments (boudins and enclaves), immersed in a metamorphic matrix. The volume of basites reaches 5-10 %, which allows us to consider mantle magmatism as a heat source for the granulite metamorphism. The most studied polygon is Chernorud granulite zone, which is a part of the Olkhon metamorphic terrane, West Baikal Region. Just this polygon was used for considering the problems of interaction of mantle magmas with lower crust granulite complexes and their relationship with granitic melts. The Chernorud Zone is a typical example of the accretionary prism with a predominance of metabasalts (70-80 %), subordinate amounts of marbles, quartzites and metapelites that have been subjected to granulite facies metamorphism and viscoelastic flow of rock masses. Study of two-pyroxene granulites (metabasalts) and garnet-sillimanite gneisses (metapelites) allows us to estimate P-T metamorphic conditions (P = 7.7-8.6 kbar, T = 770-820°C) and their U-Pb metamorphic age (530-500 Ma). Metabasalts correspond in their geochemistry to the island-arc tholeiitic series (Volkova et al., 2010; Gladkochub et al., 2010). Sin-metamorphic gabbro-pyroxenites formed in two stages: 1) Chernorud complex - tectonic slices and body's exhumed from deep earth crust levels (10-12 kb) and composed of arc tholeiitic series rocks (age T ≥ 500 Ma); 2) Ulan-Khargana complex - supply magmatic canals and fragmented tabular intrusions. This rocks composition corresponds to subalkaline petrochemical series (OIB) and U/Pb age is equal to 485±10 Ma (Travin et al., 2009). Intrusion of basic magma at granulitic facies level promote to deep anatexis and formation of sin-metamorphic hypersthenes plagiogranite (age 500-490 Ma, U/Pb data). Chernorud granulitic zone is characterized by intense shear viscoplastic and brittle-ductile deformations accompanying metamorphic processes and processes of intrusion and formation of gabbro. It leads to fragmentation of basic chambers and formation of special class of tectonic structures - metamorphic magma-mingling. All tectonic and magmatic structures have been "sealed" by K-Na granites at regressive stage at amphibolites facies conditions at 470-460 Ma (U/Pb, 40Ar/39Ar data). Research has been supported by RNF grant № 15-17-10010. References: Travin A.V., Yudin D.S., Vladimirov A.G., Khromykh S.V., Volkova N.I., Mekhonoshin A.S., Kolotilina T.B., 2009. Thermochronology of the Chernorud granulite zone, Ol'khon Region, Western Baikal area. Geochemistry International 47 (11): 1107-1124. Volkova N.I., Vladimirov A.G., Travin A.V., Mekhonoshin A.S., Khromykh S.V., Yudin D.S., Rudnev S.N., 2010. U-Pb isotopic dating of zircons (SHRIMP-II) from granulites of the Ol'khon region of Western Baikal area. Doklady Earth Sciences 432 (2): 821-824. Gladkochub D.P., Donskaya T.V., Fedorovsky V.S., Mazukabzov A.M., Larionov A.N., Sergeev S.A., 2010. The Olkhon metamorphic terrane in the Baikal Region: an Early Paleozoic collage of Neoproterozoic active margin fragments. Russian Geology and Geophysics 51 (5): 447-460.

  1. Timing of the Late Vistulian (Weichselian) glacial phases in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Leszek

    2012-06-01

    The Lower Vistula Region in northern Poland is a stratotype area for the Vistulian (Weichselian) glaciation and during Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) the southernmost extension of the Scandinavian ice sheet occurred in western Poland and in eastern Germany. Reinterpretation of the available geochronological data (radiocarbon, 36Cl and 10Be ages), supplied with new field geological evidence, mostly for the Late Vistulian ice sheet limits and movement directions, was focused in three key regions in Poland. During the late Middle Vistulian there was one or two ice sheet advances in the Lower Vistula region. The Late Vistulian maximum ice sheet limit in Poland was time-transgressive and occurred at 24-19 kyrs BP (generally, the younger to the east). Ice sheet limits during the Leszno Phase occurred at 24 cal/10Be/36Cl kyrs, the Poznań Phase ice sheet limit was dated to 19 10Be/36Cl kyrs and the Pomeranian Phase ice sheet limit about 16-17 10Be/36Cl kyrs. Every Late Vistulian glacial phase in Poland was preceded by an ice sheet retreat.

  2. 14C chronology of the oldest Scandinavian church in use. An AMS/PIXE study of lime lump carbonate in the mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindroos, Alf; Ranta, Heikki; Heinemeier, Jan; Lill, Jan-Olof

    2014-07-01

    Mortar dating was applied to newly revealed, original mortar in the church of Dalby in Scania, southern Sweden which is considered to be the oldest still standing church in Scandinavia. Small white lime lumps were sampled by chipping from the supporting pillars in the interior of the church. Special emphasis was in sampling lime lumps because the church is situated in the Scania limestone area and aggregate limestone contamination was anticipated in the bulk mortars. Earlier studies have, however, shown that lime lumps do not contain aggregate material but only possible limestone rests from incomplete calcination. The sampled material was prepared for radiocarbon AMS dating. The carbonate in the lime lumps was hydrolyzed according to the sequential leaching technique developed for the Århus 14C laboratory in Denmark. Prior to the hydrolysis the lime lumps were examined for dead-carbon contamination using a stereo microscope and cathodoluminescence. The lime lumps displayed heterogeneous carbonate luminescence. This is, however, common and it was not considered a problem because carbonate growth in changing pH/Eh conditions often leads to changing luminescence colors. Two lumps had little dead carbon contamination and an early second millennium 14C signature. One lump, however, seemed to be heavily contaminated with dead carbon. Since the sample passed the microscopic screening, the leftovers of the lump was subjected to PIXE analysis and compared with the other two lumps. The well-defined, early 2nd millennium 14C age of the lime lumps of this particular church is an important contribution to the discussion on stone church chronology in Scandinavia.

  3. Environmental factors influencing human viral pathogens and their potential indicator organisms in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis: the first Scandinavian report.

    PubMed

    Hernroth, Bodil E; Conden-Hansson, Ann-Christine; Rehnstam-Holm, Ann-Sofi; Girones, Rosina; Allard, Annika K

    2002-09-01

    This study was carried out in order to investigate human enteric virus contaminants in mussels from three sites on the west coast of Sweden, representing a gradient of anthropogenic influence. Mussels were sampled monthly during the period from February 2000 to July 2001 and analyzed for adeno-, entero-, Norwalk-like, and hepatitis A viruses as well as the potential viral indicator organisms somatic coliphages, F-specific RNA bacteriophages, bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides fragilis, and Escherichia coli. The influence of environmental factors such as water temperature, salinity, and land runoff on the occurrence of these microbes was also included in this study. Enteric viruses were found in 50 to 60% of the mussel samples, and there were no pronounced differences between the samples from the three sites. E. coli counts exceeded the limit for category A for shellfish sanitary safety in 40% of the samples from the sites situated in fjords. However, at the site in the outer archipelago, this limit was exceeded only once, in March 2001, when extremely high levels of atypical indole-negative strains of E. coli were registered at all three sites. The environmental factors influenced the occurrence of viruses and phages differently, and therefore, it was hard to find a coexistence between them. This study shows that, for risk assessment, separate modeling should be done for every specific area, with special emphasis on environmental factors such as temperature and land runoff. The present standard for human fecal contamination, E. coli, seems to be an acceptable indicator of only local sanitary contamination; it is not a reliable indicator of viral contaminants in mussels. To protect consumers and get verification of "clean" mussels, it seems necessary to analyze for viruses as well. The use of a molecular index of the human contamination of Swedish shellfish underscores the need for reference laboratories with high-technology facilities. PMID:12200309

  4. Changing Social Imaginaries, Multiplicities and "One Sole World": Reading Scandinavian Environmental and Sustainability Education Research Papers with Badiou and Taylor at Hand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotz-Sisitka, Heila

    2010-01-01

    Badiou's ontological work draws attention to multiplicities--the oneness of ontology, which he explains can only become ontologically differentiated into events or sites through political, artistic or amorous practices that philosophies can think and invent from. He also draws attention to the fusion of events and sites, and he explains that…

  5. Curriculum Change and Social Inclusion: Perspectives from the Baltic and Scandinavian Countries. Final Report of the Regional Seminar (Vilnius, Lithuania, December 5-8, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tawil, Sobhi, Ed.

    The main objectives of a Vilnius, Lithuania, seminar were to share experiences in curriculum reform to promote life skills for social inclusion. This was to be achieved through an exchange on principles, approaches and methodologies that inform processes of curriculum reform in life skills education. Most of the participants were senior education…

  6. Environmental Factors Influencing Human Viral Pathogens and Their Potential Indicator Organisms in the Blue Mussel, Mytilus edulis: the First Scandinavian Report

    PubMed Central

    Hernroth, Bodil E.; Conden-Hansson, Ann-Christine; Rehnstam-Holm, Ann-Sofi; Girones, Rosina; Allard, Annika K.

    2002-01-01

    This study was carried out in order to investigate human enteric virus contaminants in mussels from three sites on the west coast of Sweden, representing a gradient of anthropogenic influence. Mussels were sampled monthly during the period from February 2000 to July 2001 and analyzed for adeno-, entero-, Norwalk-like, and hepatitis A viruses as well as the potential viral indicator organisms somatic coliphages, F-specific RNA bacteriophages, bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides fragilis, and Escherichia coli. The influence of environmental factors such as water temperature, salinity, and land runoff on the occurrence of these microbes was also included in this study. Enteric viruses were found in 50 to 60% of the mussel samples, and there were no pronounced differences between the samples from the three sites. E. coli counts exceeded the limit for category A for shellfish sanitary safety in 40% of the samples from the sites situated in fjords. However, at the site in the outer archipelago, this limit was exceeded only once, in March 2001, when extremely high levels of atypical indole-negative strains of E. coli were registered at all three sites. The environmental factors influenced the occurrence of viruses and phages differently, and therefore, it was hard to find a coexistence between them. This study shows that, for risk assessment, separate modeling should be done for every specific area, with special emphasis on environmental factors such as temperature and land runoff. The present standard for human fecal contamination, E. coli, seems to be an acceptable indicator of only local sanitary contamination; it is not a reliable indicator of viral contaminants in mussels. To protect consumers and get verification of “clean” mussels, it seems necessary to analyze for viruses as well. The use of a molecular index of the human contamination of Swedish shellfish underscores the need for reference laboratories with high-technology facilities. PMID:12200309

  7. The significance of chemical, isotopic, and detrital components in three coeval stalagmites from the superhumid southernmost Andes (53°S) as high-resolution palaeo-climate proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimpf, Daniel; Kilian, Rolf; Kronz, Andreas; Simon, Klaus; Spötl, Christoph; Wörner, Gerhard; Deininger, Michael; Mangini, Augusto

    2011-02-01

    Stalagmites are important palaeo-climatic archives since their chemical and isotopic signatures have the potential to record high-resolution changes in temperature and precipitation over thousands of years. We present three U/Th-dated records of stalagmites (MA1-MA3) in the superhumid southern Andes, Chile (53°S). They grew simultaneously during the last five thousand years (ka BP) in a cave that developed in schist and granodiorite. Major and trace elements as well as the C and O isotope compositions of the stalagmites were analysed at high spatial and temporal resolution as proxies for palaeo-temperature and palaeo-precipitation. Calibrations are based on data from five years of monitoring the climate and hydrology inside and outside the cave and on data from 100 years of regional weather station records. Water-insoluble elements such as Y and HREE in the stalagmites indicate the amount of incorporated siliciclastic detritus. Monitoring shows that the quantity of detritus is controlled by the drip water rate once a threshold level has been exceeded. In general, drip rate variations of the stalagmites depend on the amount of rainfall. However, different drip-water pathways above each drip location gave rise to individual drip rate levels. Only one of the three stalagmites (MA1) had sufficiently high drip rates to record detrital proxies over its complete length. Carbonate-compatible element contents (e.g. U, Sr, Mg), which were measured up to sub-annual resolution, document changes in meteoric precipitation and related drip-water dilution. In addition, these soluble elements are controlled by leaching during weathering of the host rock and soils depending on the pH of acidic pore waters in the peaty soils of the cave's catchment area. In general, higher rainfall resulted in a lower concentration of these elements and vice versa. The Mg/Ca record of stalagmite MA1 was calibrated against meteoric precipitation records for the last 100 years from two regional weather stations. Carbonate-compatible soluble elements show similar patterns in the three stalagmites with generally high values when drip rates and detrital tracers were low and vice versa. δ 13C and δ 18O values are highly correlated in each stalagmite suggesting a predominantly drip rate dependent kinetic control by evaporation and/or outgassing. Only C and O isotopes from stalagmite MA1 that received the highest drip rates show a good correlation between detrital proxy elements and carbonate-compatible elements. A temperature-related change in rainwater isotope values modified the MA1 record during the Little Ice Age (˜0.7-0.1 ka BP) that was ˜1.5 °C colder than today. The isotopic composition of the stalagmites MA2 and MA3 that formed at lower drip rates shows a poor correlation with stalagmite MA1 and all other chemical proxies of MA1. 'Hendy tests' indicate that the degassing-controlled isotope fractionation of MA2 and MA3 had already started at the cave roof, especially when drip rates were low. Changing pathways and residence times of the seepage water caused a non-climatically controlled isotope fractionation, which may be generally important in ventilated caves during phases of low drip rates. Our proxies indicate that the Neoglacial cold phases from ˜3.5 to 2.5 and from ˜0.7 to 0.1 ka BP were characterised by 30% lower precipitation compared with the Medieval Warm Period from 1.2 to 0.8 ka BP, which was extremely humid in this region.

  8. Along-strike variability of back-arc basin collapse and the initiation of sedimentation in the Magallanes foreland basin, southernmost Andes (53-54.5°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAtamney, Janelle; Klepeis, Keith; Mehrtens, Charlotte; Thomson, Stuart; Betka, Paul; Rojas, Lisandro; Snyder, Shane

    2011-10-01

    The Patagonian Andes record the Cretaceous demise of the quasi-oceanic Rocas Verdes back-arc basin and formation of the Magallanes foreland basin. For >500 km along the strike of the mountains, this tectonic transition is marked by a sandstone-mudstone package that records the beginning of turbiditic sand deposition and fan growth. Sandstone modal analyses and U-Pb detrital zircon spectra show changes in rock composition and provenance across the transition on a basin-wide scale, indicating it has tectonic significance and is related to orogenic uplift and the progressive evolution of the Andean fold-thrust belt. Spatial variations in transition zone characteristics indicate the foreland basin's central and southern sectors were fed by different sources and probably record separate fans. At Bahía Brookes, on Tierra del Fuego, foreland basin sedimentation began at least after 88-89 Ma, and possibly after ˜85 Ma, several million years after it did ˜700 km away at the northern end of the basin. This event coincided with increased arc volcanism and the partial obduction of the basaltic Rocas Verdes basin floor onto continental crust. By 81-80 Ma, conglomerate deposition and increased compositional and provenance complexity, including the abundance of metamorphic lithic fragments, indicate that the obducted basaltic floor first became emergent and was eroding. The results suggest that the beginning of turbidite sedimentation in the Magallanes foreland basin and the progressive incorporation and exhumation of deeply buried rocks in the Andean fold-thrust belt, occurred later in southern Patagonia than in the north by a few million years.

  9. Relicts of a forested past: Southernmost distribution of the hairy frog genus Trichobatrachus Boulenger, 1900 (Anura: Arthroleptidae) in the Serra do Pingano region of Angola with comments on its taxonomic status.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Raffael; Nienguesso, Alvaro Bruno Toto; Lautenschläger, Thea; Barej, Michael F; Schmitz, Andreas; Scmitz, Andreas; Hölting, Monique

    2014-01-01

    The monotypic genus Trichobatrachus, with its sole representative, the hairy frog, Trichobatrachus robustus Boulenger, 1900, could be considered one of the most well-known frogs of Africa. Despite its broad recognition and the fact that it is considered wide-spread and locally common (Amiet & Burger 2004), surprisingly little is known about the actual distribution and the specific occurrence patterns of the species. It was originally described by Boulenger (1900) from the Benito River, previously erroneously stated to be located in Gabon. However, Lötters et al. (2001) clarified that the type locality was actually situated in Equatorial Guinea, then part of French Congo, and subsequently provided the first confirmed country record for Gabon. Hairy frogs were previously included in the herpetofaunal lists of Cameroon (Parker 1936; Perret & Mertens 1957), the Democratic Republic of Congo (Laurent 1956), and Nigeria (Schiøtz 1963). More recently published accounts list them for Cameroon (Euskirchen et al. 1999; Herrmann et al. 2005; Gonwouo & Rödel 2008), Equatorial Guinea (De la Riva 1994; Lasso et al. 2002), Gabon (Lötters et al. 2001; Rödel & Pauwels 2003; Burger et al. 2004; Pauwels & Rödel 2007; Bell et al. 2011), and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC, Fretey et al. 2011), and speculate about their potential occurrence in Congo and the Cabinda enclave of Angola (Amiet & Burger 2004). The DRC record so far represented the most southerly distribution, while the most northerly account comes from the Adamaoua Province of northern Cameroon (Tadpole voucher MHNG-AMP/ERPI-1035.006 from Bénoué source, Northern cliff Ngaoundéré, Adamaoua, Cameroon/Adamaoua Province, cf. Perret 1966). Specimens stored in the collection at the Royal Museum of Central Africa, Tervuren (RMCA) under collection numbers RMCA B 90060.0004-11 confirm the occurrence of the species in Congo. To our knowledge, these specimens represent yet unpublished first country records. PMID:24871726

  10. Borehole logging at the COSC-1 drill hole: a new dataset of in-situ geophysical properties through the lower Seve Nappe Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthet, Théo; Alm, Per-Gunnar; Wenning, Quinn; Almqvist, Bjarne; Kück, Jochem; Hedin, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC) drilling project supported by the International Continental Drilling Program was designed to study mountain building processes in a deeply eroded Paleozoic orogen. The first half of this project, COSC-1, targeted the lower part of the high grade Seve Nappe Complex and its basal thrust zone near Åre in the Jämtland county, Sweden. From May to August 2014, the COSC drilling crew drilled to a depth of 2496 m from the surface with an almost fully recovered core sample. During this drilling period, four borehole-logging runs have been conducted by Lund University with a low impact on drilling schedule and two supplementary ones once the drilling was completed. Three-Arm Caliper, Electrical Logging, Sidewall Density, Flowing Fluid Electric Conductivity, High Resolution Acoustic Televiewer and Full Waveform Sonic sondes have been used to investigate in-situ physical properties of the borehole. In addition, the ICDP operational support group has conducted two continuous borehole-logging runs from the surface to the bottom of the COSC-1 borehole in September and October. Due to technical problems, some of the planned logging have not been completed, however natural gamma, rock resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, K/Th/U concentration, temperature and fluid conductivity have been measured all along the borehole. We used the continuous natural gamma log from the ICDP logging group as the depth reference to depth-match and stack the composite borehole logging done during the drilling. These borehole logging operations result in reliable continuous data of resistivity, density, velocity, magnetic susceptibility, K/Th/U concentration, temperature, fluid conductivity, pressure, diameter as well as an image (amplitude and travel time of reflected ultrasounds) of the borehole till its bottom. Only the density, velocity and image datasets stop at 1600 m depth due to instrumentation limits. Preliminary conclusions from

  11. Revisiting the Wilson Cycle in the North Atlantic: The role of inheritance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenin, Pauline; Manatschal, Gianreto; Müntener, Othmar; Picazo, Suzanne; Erratt, Duncan; Karner, Garry; Johnson, Christopher; Ulrich, Marc

    2016-04-01

    According to the Wilson Cycle, oceans open and close approximately parallel to ancient suture zones, suggesting a major control of inheritance in the extension and convergent process. While this paradigm is well illustrated in the northern North Atlantic where the rift follows largely the Iapetus suture between Norway and Greenland, this is not the case for the southern North Atlantic, where neither the westward, nor the northward propagating branch of the Central Atlantic rift, affected the Variscan sutures of Western Europe. These observations suggest that inheritance is not necessarily reactivated during subsequent rifting events and begs the question about what may truly control the localization and details of rift systems. One possible cause for the differing behavior of the North Atlantic rift with respect to the Caledonian and Variscan orogens may be their contrasting paleo-geographic settings. Indeed, the Scandinavian Caledonides resulted from the closure of one wide ocean between two cratonic shields, whereas the Variscides were built from the accretion of several terranes/micro-continents following the closure of a series of narrow oceans. The variability in the initial architecture of the intervening rift systems and in their subduction processes may have significantly controlled the subsequent orogenies. The aim of this presentation is twofold: first we investigate how the first-order structural and lithological characteristics of narrow/embryonic versus wide/mature oceans, as well as the processes associated with their subduction and collision, characterize orogens. Second, we study how this variable orogenic inheritance may impact subsequent rifting. Our results suggest that: (1) the margins from narrow/embryonic and wide/mature oceans are comparable, therefore the major difference between these end-members is the existence of a significant amount of normal oceanic crust; (2) subduction-induced processes significantly impact both the thermal state and

  12. Hyperextension, micro-continents, magma-poor and magma-rich segments in the pre-Caledonian margin of Baltica: research in progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Torgeir B.; Jakob, Johannes; Jørgen Kjøll, Hans; Corfu, Fernando; Tegner, Christian; Alsaif, Manar; Enger, Ander S.; Kjeldberg, Øystein

    2016-04-01

    rocks in the magma-poor melange basin will be discussed further at this meeting (see abstracts 1 and 2 by Jakob et al.). The remnants of the pre-Caledonian passive margin complexes of Baltica are presently structurally positioned in lower and middle nappe units in the Scandinavian Caledonides. Large parts of these units were also affected by early Caledonian deformation and metamorphic events before their final emplacement as composite NCs during the Siluro-Devonian Scandian orogeny. This protracted orogenic history strongly contributed to the complexity of these units; nevertheless some parts are remarkably well preserved and can be used, as field analogues to further understand processes associated with passive margin evolution.

  13. Geothermal research on the 2.5 km deep COSC-1 drillhole, Central Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Christophe; Beltrami, Hugo; Daly, Stephen; Juhlin, Christopher; Kukkonen, Ilmo; Long, Mike; Rath, Volker; Renner, Joerg; Schwarz, Gerhard; Sundberg, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The scientific drilling project "Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides" (COSC), supported by ICDP and the Swedish Research Council, involves the drilling of two boreholes through carefully selected sections of the Paleozoic Caledonian orogen in Central Sweden. COSC-1, the first of the two planned boreholes, was drilled and fully cored down to 2.5 km depth during spring and summer 2014 near the town of Åre. The COSC working group is organised around six thematic teams including us, the geothermal team. The major objectives of the COSC geothermal team are: a) to contribute to basic knowledge about the thermal regime of Palaeozoic orogenic belts, ancient shield areas and high heat-producing plutons; b) to refine knowledge on climate change at high latitudes (i.e. Scandinavia), including historical global changes, recent palaeoclimate development (since last ice age) and expected future trends; c) to determine the vertical variation of the geothermal gradient, heat flow and thermal properties down to 2.5 km, and to determine the required corrections for shallow (< 1 km) heat flow data; d) to explore the geothermal potential of the Åre-Järpen area; e) to explore to what degree the conductive heat transfer is affected by groundwater flow in the uppermost crust and f) to evaluate the heat generation input and impact from the basement and the alum shales. To reach these targets the following tasks were carried out or are planned: 1) heat flow predictions from shallow boreholes; 2) geophysical logging; 3) analyses of logs and well tests; (3) determination of rock thermal properties on core samples; 4) determination of heat generation rates from radiometric and geochemical studies; 5) fracture characterisation for permeability and convective heat flow estimations; 6) analysis of convective signals; 7) analysis of paleoclimatic signals; 8) heat flow modelling and evaluation of geothermal potential and 9) Fennoscandia heat flow map compilation. The purpose of

  14. Is the West Karmøy complex igneous or metasedimentary?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, John

    1994-03-01

    The island of Karmøy in southwestern Norway is famous among geologists for the Ophiolite, one of the first ophiolites to be recognized and described in the Scandinavian Caledonides. Much of the island is underlain by the West Karmøy Complex, presently interpreted as an igneous complex that intrudes the Karmøy Ophiolite. There is a striking resemblance of some rocks of the Complex with the Sykesville "granite" of Maryland, which was shown by Cloos and by Hopson (1964) to be a metadiamictite. After local examination of the rocks and after comparison with the 1980 report of Ledru, the conclusion was drawn that — except for the Risdal granodiorite, pegmatite and aplite dikes — the Complex is a metasedimentary, compositionally variable succession of meta-arkose (the "quartz-augen gneiss"—Ledru's Diorite quartzique et Granodiorite du nord) and metadiamictite (his various inclusion-rich "granite" units). Both units were derived by erosion from advancing thrust sheets, including the Karmøy Ophiolite, which then overrode the sedimentary succession. The high modal quartz and normative corundum contents of the "granitic" rocks resemble those of the Sykesville and favor a metasedimentary origin; the chemistry is also similar and rather far from a granite minimum melt, though certain mixtures of quartz-sandy matrix and mafic blocks may have melted locally while being overridden by the Ophiolite. Reports that quartz diorite of the West Karmøy Complex intrudes metagabbro of the Karmøy Ophiolite could not be confirmed, although trondhjemite dikes belonging to the Ophiolite do intrude the metagabbro; the contact of the Ophiolite with the Complex was faulted wherever observed. As recognized by almost all observers, both Ophiolite and Complex are overlain unconformably by Upper Ordovician sediments of the Skudeneset Group, which was later deformed and metamorphosed in the greenschist facies; at least a great part of the fault separating the Karmøy Ophiolite and the West

  15. Tectonic structure of the Arctic shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, N.; Khain, V.

    2003-04-01

    The Arctic shelf of Eurasia occupies over half (51 percent) of the Arctic Ocean area. The Shelf is in general shallow-water except its western part (the Barents Sea). The sea depth within the shelf rarely reaches 200 m. In fact, everywhere, it is separated from structures of the ocean central part by a high-angle continental escarpment with depth differences over 1000 m. In the west up to the New Siberian Islands, major tectonic elements of the shelf floor structure are N-S oriented, i.e. are found nearly at a right angle to the shelf margin. East of the New Siberian Islands, just like in passive margins of oceans, structures of the floor are parallel to the shoreline and shelf margin. The analysis of the geological evolution of the Arctic shelf in Eurasia indicates that modern structures are stipulated by the geodynamics of its formation. In the west within the Barents Sea, the Arctic shelf was formed after the closing of the Yapetus Ocean, displacement of Scandinavian sheets, and intrusion of Lower Devonian collisional granitoids. In that epoch, the Svalbard microplate with its Grenville basement joined the East-European craton, in addition to roots of Scandinavian Caledonides. On the east in the Pechora Sea region, the Timan-Pechora microplate had joined the craton still earlier, in the Vendian. In the Lower Devonian, the boundary of the East European plate was traced in the shelf along the axis of the East Barents trough. Bordering the latter on the east the Novaya Zemlya-Pai Hoi belt, just like the Uralian, isolates the East European plate from a complicated collage of blocks and microplates, tha makes up the base of the West Siberian basin. They are inherited by Triassic troughs, which were filled in the Jurassic and Cretaceous with sand-shale oil-bearing sedimentary sequences. The northern continuation of the Siberian plate is Taymyr with its folded and collisional belts and with the Kara plate with Grenville basement, confined to the plate from the north

  16. Papers from the Scandinavian-German Symposium on the Language of Immigrant Workers and Their Children (1st, Roskilde, Denmark, March 19-23, 1978). ROLIG-papir 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittmar, Norbert, Ed.; And Others

    Papers included in this volume are: "The Muted Voice of Immigrant Workers;""The Situation of Foreign Workers in Sweden"; "Situation of Foreign Workers in the Federal Republic of Germany"; "Teaching German to Immigrant Children"; "Using Language Typology in Contrastive Studies"; "On Determining Developmental Stages in Natural Second Language…

  17. Comment on "Development of the topography-controlled Upper Odra ice lobe (Scandinavian ice sheet) in the fore-mountain area of southern Poland during the Saalian glaciation" by T. Salamon [Quat. Sci. Rev. 123 (2015) 1-15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nývlt, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Salamon (2015) presented a glaciodynamic model of the evolution of the Upper Odra ice lobe of the Northern European Ice Sheet during the Saalian (Drenthe) glaciation. This is timely and welcomed paper, as it brings a dynamic conceptual model and emphasizes the topographic control of the ice sheet behaviour, which was very important for Middle Pleistocene ice sheet advances in Central European sector (e.g.; Nývlt, 2008; Nývlt et al., 2011).

  18. Early deglaciation (18.1 ka BP) of the southwest Scandinavian Ice Sheet and Late Glacial sea-level change reconstructed from isolation basins on Karmøy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasskog, Kristian; Svendsen, John-Inge; Mangerud, Jan; Svean, Arve; Lunnan, Eva Marie; Briner, Jason

    2016-04-01

    A series of cosmogenic exposure dates (10Be) suggest that the island Utsira off the SW coast of Norway became ice free as early as 20 ka years ago. Here we present a preliminary sea level curve that has been constructed for the island of Karmøy, which is situated at the mouth of Boknafjorden just a few km inside Utsira, based on coring and analyses of sediment sequences from isolation basins. A deglaciation age of 18.1±0.1 ka BP has been established for southern Karmøy based on radiocarbon dating of foraminifera from basal marine sediments in two basins; lake Grødheimsvatnet (15.5 m above present sea level) and the bog Kringlemyr (12.0 m above present sea level). Lithostratigraphic and microfossil analyses show that Grødheimsvatnet became isolated from the sea at 17.8±0.1 ka BP, while Kringlemyr emerged at 17.0±0.2 ka BP. The results from these basins give a mean rate of emergence of about 4.4 mm/yr during the first millennium after the area became ice-free. Relative sea level on Karmøy then fell more rapidly at the transition to the Bølling interstadial before levelling out some 3-4 m below present day sea level around 14 ka BP. Following this period of stillstand the sea level started to rise during the Allerød culminating at 6-7 m above present towards the end of Younger Dryas, after which another, more rapid regression phase started. We have combined the curve from Karmøy with far-field sea-level data in order to quantify the contributing factors (i.e. glacial isostatic adjustment and geoid changes) in the reconstructed shoreline displacement.

  19. Five-Year Results From a Scandinavian Sarcoma Group Study (SSG XIII) of Adjuvant Chemotherapy Combined With Accelerated Radiotherapy in High-Risk Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremities and Trunk Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Jebsen, Nina L.; Bruland, Oyvind S.; Eriksson, Mikael; Engellau, Jacob; Turesson, Ingela; Folin, Annika; Trovik, Clement S.; Hall, Kirsten Sundby

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate adjuvant chemotherapy and interpolated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) for adult patients with high-risk soft tissue sarcoma in the extremities or trunk wall. Methods and Materials: High-risk soft tissue sarcoma was defined as high-grade malignancy and at least two of the following criteria: size {>=}8 cm, vascular invasion, or necrosis. Six cycles of doxorubicin and ifosfamide were prescribed for all patients. RT to a total dose of 36 Gy (1.8 Gy twice daily) was inserted between two chemotherapy cycles after marginal margin resection regardless of tumor depth or after wide-margin resection for deep-seated tumors. RT was boosted to 45 Gy in a split-course design in the case of intralesional margin resection. Results: A total of 119 patients were eligible, with a median follow-up of 5 years. The 5-year estimate of the local recurrence, metastasis-free survival, and overall survival rate was 12%, 59%, and 68%, respectively. The group receiving RT to 36 Gy had a local recurrence rate of 10%. In contrast, the local recurrence rate was 29% in the group treated with RT to 45 Gy. The presence of vascular invasion and low chemotherapy dose intensity had a negative effect on metastasis-free and overall survival. Toxicity was moderate after both the chemotherapy and the RT. Conclusions: Accelerated RT interposed between chemotherapy cycles in a selected population of patients with high-risk soft tissue sarcoma resulted in good local and distant disease control, with acceptable treatment-related morbidity. The greater radiation dose administered after intralesional surgery was not sufficient to compensate for the poorer surgical margin. Vascular invasion was the most important prognostic factor for metastasis-free and overall survival.

  20. Continental break-up and collision in the Neoproterozoic and Palaeozoic — A tale of Baltica and Laurentia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torsvik, T. H.; Smethurst, M. A.; Meert, J. G.; Van der Voo, R.; McKerrow, W. S.; Brasier, M. D.; Sturt, B. A.; Walderhaug, H. J.

    1996-06-01

    a short and rapid excursion to lower latitudes in the Late Vendian, remained mostly in intermediate to high southerly latitudes and closer to the Gondwana margin until Early Ordovician times. In Early Ordovician times, Arenig-Llanvirn platform trilobites show a broad distinction between the continents of Laurentia/Siberia/North China Block (Bathyurid), Baltica (Ptychopygine/ Megalaspid) and the areas of NW Gondwana/Avalonia/Armorica (Calymenacean-Dalmanitacean). During the Ordovician, Baltica rotated and moved northward, approaching close enough to Laurentia by the late Caradoc for trilobite and brachiopod spat to cross the intervening Iapetus Ocean. Docking appears to have been irregular both in time and manner: the collision between Scotland/Greenland and western Norway resulted in the early Scandian Orogeny in the Silurian (c. 425 Ma), but further south, there is evidence of late Silurian impingement with subduction of Avalonian continental crust (in England and Ireland) below the eastern edge of Laurentia until the Emsian. In the northern Appalachians the main time of collision appears to have been during the Emsian/Eifellian Acadian Orogeny. Recent analyses invalidates the traditional concept of a sustained orthogonal relationship between Baltica and Laurentia across a single Iapetus Ocean throughout the Caledonide evolution. The active margin of Baltica (Scandinavian Caledonides) faced Siberia during the Late Cambrian and Early Ordovician with oceanic separation between these landmasses in the order of 1200-1500 km. This may explain the local occureences of Siberia-Laurentian type Bathyarid tribobite faunas in Central Norwegian Caledonian nappes, earlier interpreted as Laurentia-Baltica trilobite mixing. Subsequent counterclockwise rotation of Baltica transferred the Caledonian margin in the direction of Laurentia by Silurian times, when the two continents once again started to collide to form Euramerica. This rotation, along with the strongly asymmetric

  1. The COSC-1 drill core - a geological sample through a hot allochthon and the underlying thrust zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Henning; Almqvist, Bjarne; Berthet, Théo; Klonowska, Iwona

    2015-04-01

    The ICDP (International Continental Scientific Drilling Program) supported Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC) scientific drilling project has the aim to study mountain building processes in a major Paleozoic orogen. COSC-1, drilled in 2014 near Åre (Sweden), was planned to sample a section from the hot allochthon of the Lower Seve Nappe through the thrust zone and into the underlying less metamorphic rocks of the Särv and/or Jämtlandian nappes. Diamond core drilling operations resulted in 2396.0 m of drill core with only about 2.5 m documented core loss (technical failure of the core catcher). Down to about 1800 m, the COSC-1 drill hole penetrated a succession that is dominated by gneisses of varying compositions (felsic, amphibole, calc-silicate gneisses, and more), often garnet and diopside bearing. Meta-gabbros and amphibolites are common and apparently correlate well with seismic reflectors between 500 and 1000 m depth. Also marbles, pegmatite dykes and minor mylonites occur. These rocks are highly strained. Small scale structures (e.g. isoclinal folding) are occasionally discernible in the narrow section provided by the drill cores. (Young) Fractures are sparse. Only a set of very steep fractures results in fluid conduction zones at several levels throughout the drill hole. At 175 m and between 1200 and 1300 m, this results in the dissolution of calcite-rich bands in the gneisses to form "micro-karst". First signs of the thrust zone below the Seve Nappe appear just below 1700 m in form of narrow deformation bands and thin mylonites. The mylonites increase in thickness and reach a thickness of around 1 m between 1900 and 2000 m. Below c. 2100 m, mylonites are dominating and garnets become common (but are not present in all mylonites). The deepest rock of mafic origin (possibly amphibolite in the Seve Nappe) was identified at 2314 m, a transition from gneiss into lower grade metasedimentary rocks occurs between 2345 and 2360 m. The

  2. The pre-Caledonian Large Igneous Province and the North Atlantic Wilson Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegner, Christian; Andersen, Torgeir B.; Corfu, Fernando; Planke, Sverre; Jørgen Kjøll, Hans; Torsvik, Trond H.

    2016-04-01

    Magmatism of the first known rifting phase of the North Atlantic Wilson Cycle is surprisingly well preserved in the Caledonian nappes of central Scandinavia. The Särv and Seve Nappes are characterised by spectacular dyke complexes originally emplaced into continental sediments along the rifted margin of Iapetus. The intensity and structure of the pre-Caledonian Dyke Complex is comparable to that of the present passive margins of the North Atlantic large igneous province (NALIP) and U-Pb ages of 610-590 Ma suggest magmatism was short-lived. It can be described as a pre-Caledonian large igneous province (CLIP). To constrain the origin of CLIP magmatism we: (1) re-visited the dyke complexes of the Sarek, Kebnekaise and Tornetrask mountains of North Sweden; (2) compiled new and published geochemical data for the more than 950 km long, magma-rich segment of the Scandinavian Caledonides; and (3) extended reconstructions of the paleo-position of Baltica back to 600 Ma. Although the appearance of the dykes ranges from garnet amphibolite gneiss to pristine magmatic intrusions, all bulk rock compositions largely reflect the original magmatic rock. The compiled dataset includes 584 analyses that essentially forms a coherent suite of tholeiitic ferrobasalt (2-12 wt% MgO, 45-54 wt% SiO2; 6-16 wt% FeOtot; 0.7-4.0 wt% TiO2) akin to LIP basalts such as those of NALIP (61-54 Ma). A few samples (<20) are significantly contaminated with crust, but most are largely uncontaminated. The delta Nb value is a proxy for geochemical enrichment based on Nb-Zr-Y systematics and was defined for the present-day North Atlantic system to distinguish enriched Iceland basalts (positive delta Nb) from normal MORB basalts (negative delta Nb). The CLIP dykes are dominantly enriched with positive delta Nb (-0.07 to +0.9) in the central and southern portion, but stretching to more negative values (-0.6 to +0.5) in the northern portion (Sarek, Kebnekaise, Tornetrask). The few available rare earth element

  3. Joint laboratory investigations of the physical and mechanical properties of the COSC-1 drill core, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almqvist, Bjarne S. G.; Schmitt, Douglas R.; Lebedev, Maxim; Ask, Maria; Wenning, Quinn; Zappone, Alba; Berthet, Théo; Malehmir, Alireza

    2015-04-01

    The Caledonian orogen is an early to middle Paleozoic mountain chain with size dimension similar to the Alpine-Himalayan orogen. Parts of the Caledonian orogen have been deeply eroded and provide excellent exposure of rocks that were emplaced into the middle and lower crust during orogenesis. These exposed rock units therefore provide the possibility to study processes of mountain building that are often inaccessible in more modern orogens, and represent the targets for the Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides deep drilling project (COSC-1). The main target of COSC-1 was the high grade Seve nappe complex. Temperature estimates indicate granulite facies conditions at the top of this nappe, grading to lower amphibolitic conditions downwards through the nappe. Discovery of micro-diamond included in garnets from the nearby Åreskutan mountain hints at an ultra-high pressure origin in parts of the Seve nappe complex. The COSC-1 deep drilling project presents a unique opportunity to study the laboratory physical properties of a 2.5 km drill core, which can be correlated to downhole logging measurements and for the interpretation of surface geophysical experiments. In a joint effort that comprises five laboratories, the physical properties the COSC drill core are investigated. Measurement schemes and preliminary results from this cooperative effort are presented. The physical properties suite of measurements on the core includes (i) density, (ii) porosity, (iii) ultrasonic wave velocity and anisotropy at elevated confining pressure, (iv) seismic attenuation and (v) permeability (and anisotropy of permeability). Mechanical properties include uniaxial and triaxial compressive strength at different confining pressures, and subsequent calculation of internal and residual friction angles. The joint investigations will also serve to cross-validate and calibrate different laboratory techniques that are used to measure physical properties. The rock units

  4. Fragments of deeper parts of the hanging wall mantle preserved as orogenic peridotites in the central belt of the Seve Nappe Complex, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clos, Frediano; Gilio, Mattia; van Roermund, Herman L. M.

    2014-04-01

    levels around 8-48 MPa. In contrast the M3 olivine "mortar" microstructure formed at 550-600 °C/0.45-0.6 GPa and represents deformation after the subducted slab had returned to shallow crustal levels. It is proposed here that the presence of a penetrative olivine M2 "foam" microstructure can be used as an easy tool in the field to discriminate between mantle wedge (i.e. sub-continental affinity), ophiolite (i.e. sub-oceanic affinity), and/or hyper-extensional peridotite in the Scandinavian Caledonides. The latter two peridotite subtypes may have similar M2 microstructures, but exclusively restricted to the structural base of the bodies. Alternatively in basal parts of ophiolites, M3 microstructures directly overprint coarser grained proto-granular olivine microstructures.

  5. The Swedish Deep Drilling Program - an emerging scientific drilling program and new infrastructure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Henning; Juhlin, Christopher

    2010-05-01

    Scientific drilling projects imply numerous aspects that are difficult to handle for individual research groups. Therefore, about three years ago a joint effort was launched in the Swedish geoscientific community to establish a national program for scientific drilling, the Swedish Deep Drilling Program (SDDP). Soon afterwards, several working groups established drilling proposals with Nordic and, also, international participation. With this serious interest in scientific drilling SDDP was able to successfully promote the Swedish membership in ICDP which commenced in 2008. Two SDDP projects achieved workshop grants from the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) in 2009. In the same year the Swedish Research Council decided to support an application for a truck-mounted drill rig - a big success for the SDDP working group. Scientific Drilling infrastructure: SDDP envisages a mobile platform that is capable of core drilling to at least 2500 m depth. The procurement will be made during 2010 and first operations are planned for 2011. This drill rig is primarily intended for use in the SDDP drilling projects, but will be rented out to other scientific drilling projects or even commercial enterprises in the remaining time to cover maintenance and future upgrade costs. SDDP's drill rig will be unique in Europe and complementary to the deep drilling InnovaRig of the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences. Until now, drilling to 2000 - 3000 m implied the use of a full-sized drill rig like the InnovaRig or the mobilization of a core drill rig from another continent. This gap will now be filled by Sweden's upcoming scientific drilling infrastructure. Drilling projects and proposals: Presently, SDDP serves six projects: "Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides" (COSC; ICDP workshop spring 2010), the "Postglacial Fault Drilling Project" (PFDP; ICDP workshop autumn 2010), a "Deep Rock Laboratory" (DRL), "Palaeoproterozoic Mineralized Volcanic

  6. The Continent-Ocean Transition in the Mid-Norwegian Margin: Insight From Seismic Data and the Onshore Caledonian Analogue in the Seve Nappe Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmalak, Mansour M.; Planke, Sverre; Andersen, Torgeir B.; Faleide, Jan Inge; Corfu, Fernando; Tegner, Christian; Myklebust, Reidun

    2015-04-01

    The continental breakup and initial seafloor spreading in the NE Atlantic was accompanied by widespread intrusive and extrusive magmatism and the formation of conjugate volcanic passive margins. These margins are characterized by the presence of seaward dipping reflectors (SDR), an intense network of mafic sheet intrusions of the continental crust and adjacent sedimentary basins and a high-velocity lower crustal body. Nevertheless many issues remain unclear regarding the structure of volcanic passive margins; in particular the transitional crust located beneath the SDR.New and reprocessed seismic reflection data on the Mid-Norwegian margin allow a better sub-basalt imaging of the transitional crust located beneath the SDR. Different high-amplitude reflections with abrupt termination and saucer shaped geometries are identified and interpreted as sill intrusions. Other near vertical and inclined reflections are interpreted as dykes or dyke swarms. We have mapped the extent of the dyke reflections along the volcanic margin. The mapping suggests that the dykes represent the main feeder system for the SDR. The identification of saucer shaped sills implies the presence of sediments in the transitional zone beneath the volcanic sequences. Onshore exposures of Precambrian basement of the eroded volcanic margin in East Greenland show that, locally, the transitional crust is highly intruded by dykes and intrusive complexes with an increasing intensity of the plumbing and dilatation of the continental crust ocean-ward. Another well exposed analogue for a continent-ocean transitional crust is located within the Seve Nappe Complex (SNC) of the Scandinavian Caledonides. The best-preserved parts of SNC in the Pårte, Sarek, Kebnekaise, Abisko, and Indre Troms mountains are composed mainly of meta-sandstones and shales (now hornfelses) truncated typically by mafic dykes. At Sarek and Pårte, the dykes intrude the sedimentary rocks of the Favoritkammen Group, with a dyke density up

  7. Utilizing the International GeoSample Number Concept during ICDP Expedition COSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conze, Ronald; Lorenz, Henning; Ulbricht, Damian; Gorgas, Thomas; Elger, Kirsten

    2016-04-01

    The concept of the International GeoSample Number (IGSN) was introduced to uniquely identify and register geo-related sample material, and make it retrievable via electronic media (e.g., SESAR - http://www.geosamples.org/igsnabout). The general aim of the IGSN concept is to improve accessing stored sample material worldwide, enable the exact identification, its origin and provenance, and also the exact and complete citation of acquired samples throughout the literature. The ICDP expedition COSC (Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides, http://cosc.icdp-online.org) prompted for the first time in ICDP's history to assign and register IGSNs during an ongoing drilling campaign. ICDP drilling expeditions are using commonly the Drilling Information System DIS (http://doi.org/10.2204/iodp.sd.4.07.2007) for the inventory of recovered sample material. During COSC IGSNs were assigned to every drill hole, core run, core section, and sample taken from core material. The original IGSN specification has been extended to achieve the required uniqueness of IGSNs with our offline-procedure. The ICDP name space indicator and the Expedition ID (5054) are forming an extended prefix (ICDP5054). For every type of sample material, an encoded sequence of characters follows. This sequence is derived from the DIS naming convention which is unique from the beginning. Thereby every ICDP expedition has an unlimited name space for IGSN assignments. This direct derivation of IGSNs from the DIS database context ensures the distinct parent-child hierarchy of the IGSNs among each other. In the case of COSC this method of inventory-keeping of all drill cores was done routinely using the ExpeditionDIS during field work and subsequent sampling party. After completing the field campaign, all sample material was transferred to the "Nationales Bohrkernlager" in Berlin-Spandau, Germany. Corresponding data was subsequently imported into the CurationDIS used at the aforementioned core storage

  8. Geometry of the Iapetus Baltoscandian continental margin; evidence for basement highs from the external imbricate zone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, A. Hugh N.

    2015-04-01

    The geometry of the Iapetus Baltoscandian continental margin prior to Scandinavian Caledonian collision is important, since only with a detailed initial input can synthetic palaeogeographic and deformation models be correctly applied. The Scandes comprise ~SE-directed nappes pierced by tectonic windows exposing basement with condensed, post-Gaskiers-glaciation (582-580Ma) cover sequences. Here, evidence, largely from the Lower Allochthon (external imbricate zone), for major displacement of these basement rocks ('Window Allochthon'), is summarized; palaeogeographically they formed a topographic-high along the Baltoscandian continental margin. In the Oslo Graben and East Finnmark areas (southernmost/northernmost Scandinavia), the transition from (par)-autochthon to allochthon is preserved (Osen-Roa Nappe Complex/Gaissa Thrust Belt; ORNC/GTB). These areas give reliable templates for other parts of the orogen, where the orogen leading edge has been extensively eroded. In the ORNC and GTB, bulk shortening was ~50%, with values rising towards the hinterland; metamorphic grades also increase towards the hinterland. Balanced-sections restore the trailing-edges of the ORNC and GTB to Norwegian coastal areas. In Finnmark, restoration places pre-Marinoan (pre~650 Ma) GTB anchizone-grade rocks above epizone-grade post-Gaskiers rocks lying unconformably on basement in the Komagfjord tectonic window. In southern Norway, restored pre-Gaskiers ORNC rocks overlie Cambro-Ordovician sediments unconformable on basement in the Atnsjøen/Spekedalen windows and WGR. Caledonian Middle Allochthon deformation in Finnmark was SE-directed and in the GTB E- to ESE-directed. In the Komagfjord window basement, Caledonian imbrication was SE-directed, but the overlying basal Middle Allochthon mylonites have an out-of-sequence E-ESE overprint. Thus the Komagfjord basement/cover lies structurally between the Middle and Lower Allochthons. In the Atnsjøen/Spekedalen windows, SE-directed Caledonian

  9. Some Common and Unique Features of Special Education in the Nordic Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juul, Kristen D.

    1989-01-01

    Similarities in special education services in the five Scandinavian countries include their normalization philosophy and cooperative policy development. Among unique Scandinavian innovations are camp schools, folk high schools, toy libraries (lekoteks), therapeutic communities or collectives for young substance abuses, and measures to combat…

  10. Physical Education in Scandinavia with a Focus on Sweden: A Comparative Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annerstedt, Claes

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate meanings attached to physical education in the Scandinavian countries through (1) the different national syllabi; and (2) interpretations and conclusions researchers make in their studies of Scandinavian physical education and how these findings look like compared with other researchers'…

  11. The Nordic Council and Immigrant Education Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kristi Planck

    Cooperation among Scandinavian nations (Norway, Denmark, Finland, and Sweden) is important in order to develop an effective policy regarding the education of immigrants and refugees. Each of the Scandinavian countries has a definitive education policy for refugees and immigrants. However, cooperative efforts among the nations through the Nordic…

  12. The Conducivity Model and Pragmatic Work-Change Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hvid, Helge

    2004-01-01

    The Scandinavian working-life tradition is founded on ideas and values similar to the model of conductivity. However, although the Scandinavian working-life tradition is pragmatic and consensus seeking the model of conductivity is stringent following its principles. The pragmatic approach, here represented by the Danish program of "the…

  13. 46 CFR 7.60 - Cape Fear, NC to Sullivans Island, SC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cape Fear, NC to Sullivans Island, SC. 7.60 Section 7.60... Atlantic Coast § 7.60 Cape Fear, NC to Sullivans Island, SC. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost... Buoy “2CF”); thence to Oak Island Light. (b) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of...

  14. 46 CFR 7.60 - Cape Fear, NC to Sullivans Island, SC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cape Fear, NC to Sullivans Island, SC. 7.60 Section 7.60... Atlantic Coast § 7.60 Cape Fear, NC to Sullivans Island, SC. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost... Buoy “2CF”); thence to Oak Island Light. (b) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of...

  15. 46 CFR 7.60 - Cape Fear, NC to Sullivans Island, SC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cape Fear, NC to Sullivans Island, SC. 7.60 Section 7.60... Atlantic Coast § 7.60 Cape Fear, NC to Sullivans Island, SC. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost... Buoy “2CF”); thence to Oak Island Light. (b) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of...

  16. 46 CFR 7.60 - Cape Fear, NC to Sullivans Island, SC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cape Fear, NC to Sullivans Island, SC. 7.60 Section 7.60... Atlantic Coast § 7.60 Cape Fear, NC to Sullivans Island, SC. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost... Buoy “2CF”); thence to Oak Island Light. (b) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of...

  17. 33 CFR 161.12 - Vessel operating requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CFR 80.148(b), a very high frequency watch on Channel 16 (156.800 MHz) is not required on vessels... southernmost tip of Possession Point on Whidbey Island to the shoreline. Seattle Traffic—003669957 156.250 MHz... north of a line drawn due east from the southernmost tip of Possession Point on Whidbey Island to...

  18. 33 CFR 161.12 - Vessel operating requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR 80.148(b), a very high frequency watch on Channel 16 (156.800 MHz) is not required on vessels... from the southernmost tip of Possession Point on Whidbey Island to the shoreline. Seattle Traffic... Whidbey Island North of a line drawn due east from the southernmost tip of Possession Point on...

  19. Tectonically reset Rb-Sr system during Late Ordovician terrane assembly in lapetus, western Ireland

    SciTech Connect

    Kennan, P.S.; Murphy, F.C.

    1987-12-01

    The uncertainty of a ca. 460 Ma age of mylonitization of acid igneous rocks in the western Irish Caledonides required reevaluation of the published Rb-Sr whole-rock data. The authors found that the data support an alternative ca. 426 +/- 10 Ma age of mylonitic resetting. This time of deformation relates to the assembly of suspect terranes during Late Ordovician closure of the Iapetus ocean.

  20. A review of Ruffe (Gymnocephalus cernuus) life history in its native versus non-native range

    EPA Science Inventory

    Invasive Ruffe (Gymnocephalus cernuus) have caused or have the potential to cause negative economic and ecological impacts in North America (particularly the Laurentian Great Lakes), the European Union, Scandinavian countries, and the United Kingdom. To better predict potential f...

  1. Reviewer acknowledgement 2012

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Contributing reviewers The Editors of Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine (SJTREM) would like to thank all our reviewers who have contributed to the journal in Volume 20 (2012).

  2. Thorium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickleder, Mathias S.; Fourest, Blandine; Dorhout, Peter K.

    In 1815 Berzelius analyzed a rare mineral from the Falun district. He assumed that the mineral contained a new element, which he named thorium after the ancient Scandinavian god of thunder and weather, Thor (Weeks and Leicester, 1968).

  3. Reviewer acknowledgement

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Contributing reviewers The Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine—which received its first Impact Factor in 2013—is extremely grateful for the time, hard work and support of its highly-qualified peer reviewers. The editors of the Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, the Norwegian Air Ambulance Foundation and BioMed Central would like to show our appreciation by thanking the following people for their assistance reviewing manuscripts for the journal in 2013.

  4. Facility 596, detail of ramp from below, with replacement sheetpile ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Facility 596, detail of ramp from below, with replacement sheet-pile dolphin on right and southernmost dolphins in background. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ferry Landing Type, Halawa Landing on Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. 33 CFR 3.25-1 - Fifth district.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... south of the Shrewsbury River), thence westward to 40°18′ N. latitude, 74°30.5′ W. longitude, thence... of the Shrewsbury River) to the southernmost point in the First Coast Guard District (a point...

  6. 50 CFR 229.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... equal to 1.030, and, for groundlines only, does not float at any point in the water column. Small mesh....S. border southward to a line extending eastward from the southernmost tip of Florida on the...

  7. 50 CFR 229.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... equal to 1.030, and, for groundlines only, does not float at any point in the water column. Small mesh....S. border southward to a line extending eastward from the southernmost tip of Florida on the...

  8. 36 CFR 13.1180 - Closed waters, motor vessels and seaplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., then along the south shore of Lester Island to its western end, then to the southernmost point of Young Island, then north along the west shore and east along the north shore of Young Island to...

  9. 36 CFR 13.1180 - Closed waters, motor vessels and seaplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., then along the south shore of Lester Island to its western end, then to the southernmost point of Young Island, then north along the west shore and east along the north shore of Young Island to...

  10. 36 CFR 13.1180 - Closed waters, motor vessels and seaplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., then along the south shore of Lester Island to its western end, then to the southernmost point of Young Island, then north along the west shore and east along the north shore of Young Island to...

  11. 36 CFR 13.1180 - Closed waters, motor vessels and seaplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., then along the south shore of Lester Island to its western end, then to the southernmost point of Young Island, then north along the west shore and east along the north shore of Young Island to...

  12. 46 CFR 7.80 - Tybee Island, GA to St. Simons Island, GA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... southernmost extremity of Savannah Beach on Tybee Island 255° true across Tybee Inlet to the shore of Little... extremity of Little Tybee Island at Beach Hammock to the easternmost extremity of Wassaw Island. (c) A...

  13. 46 CFR 7.70 - Folly Island, SC to Hilton Head Island, SC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... southernmost extremity of Folly Island to latitude 32°35′ N. longitude 79°58.2′ W. (Stono Inlet Lighted Whistle... southernmost extremity of Kiawah Island to latitude 32°31′ N. longitude 80°07.8′ W. (North Edisto River...′ N. longitude 80°12.7′ W. (c) A line drawn from the microwave antenna tower on Edisto Beach...

  14. 46 CFR 7.70 - Folly Island, SC to Hilton Head Island, SC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... southernmost extremity of Folly Island to latitude 32°35′ N. longitude 79°58.2′ W. (Stono Inlet Lighted Whistle... southernmost extremity of Kiawah Island to latitude 32°31′ N. longitude 80°07.8′ W. (North Edisto River...′ N. longitude 80°12.7′ W. (c) A line drawn from the microwave antenna tower on Edisto Beach...

  15. 46 CFR 7.70 - Folly Island, SC to Hilton Head Island, SC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... southernmost extremity of Folly Island to latitude 32°35′ N. longitude 79°58.2′ W. (Stono Inlet Lighted Whistle... southernmost extremity of Kiawah Island to latitude 32°31′ N. longitude 80°07.8′ W. (North Edisto River...′ N. longitude 80°12.7′ W. (c) A line drawn from the microwave antenna tower on Edisto Beach...

  16. 46 CFR 7.70 - Folly Island, SC to Hilton Head Island, SC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... southernmost extremity of Folly Island to latitude 32°35′ N. longitude 79°58.2′ W. (Stono Inlet Lighted Whistle... southernmost extremity of Kiawah Island to latitude 32°31′ N. longitude 80°07.8′ W. (North Edisto River...′ N. longitude 80°12.7′ W. (c) A line drawn from the microwave antenna tower on Edisto Beach...

  17. Scale and timing of movements on the Great Glen fault, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. I.; Watson, Janet

    1983-09-01

    The Great Glen fault, for which a strike-slip displacement of about 2,000 km is proposed from paleomagnetic data by Van der Voo and Scotese, transects the metamorphic Caledonides of Scotland. Comparisons of pre-Caledonian basement complexes, folded cover successions, and late Caledonian intrusive suites occurring in the Northern and Grampian Highlands on either side of the fault reveal a close stage-by-stage correspondence in the geologic histories of these terrains. It is argued that these correspondences are incompatible with displacements of more than about 200 km on the Great Glen fault.

  18. Genetic diversity and differentiation of the Ryukyu endemic frog Babina holsti as revealed by mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Atsushi; Matsui, Masafumi; Nakata, Katsushi

    2014-02-01

    We surveyed the genetic diversity and genetic differentiation of an endangered frog, Babina holsti, endemic to Okinawajima and Tokashikijima Islands of the Ryukyus, to elucidate its divergence history and obtain basic data for its conservation. Genetic differentiation between the two island lineages is moderate (3.1% p-distance in the cyt b gene). This result suggests that the two island lineages have been isolated between the late Pliocene and the middle Pleistocene and have never migrated between the current northern part of Okinawajima and Tokashikijima Islands, which were once connected in the late Pleistocene glacial age. On Okinawajima Island, the southernmost sample was constituted by a unique haplotype, without considerable genetic distance from haplotypes detected from northern samples. This unique haplotype composition in the southernmost sample would have resulted from the restricted gene flow between the southernmost population and the other populations in Okinawajima Island. Furthermore, the absence of genetic diversity within the southernmost sample indicates that this population has recently experienced population size reduction, possibly by predation pressure from an introduced mongoose, which is more abundant in the southern part than in the northern part of the island. Lower genetic diversity in the Tokashikijima sample implies a small effective population size for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in B. holsti on the island. Immediate conservation measures should be taken for the populations from the southernmost range in Okinawajima and Tokashikijima. PMID:24521314

  19. Uranium mineralization in response to regional metamorphism at Lilljuthatten, Sweden.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuckless, J.S.; Troeng, B.

    1984-01-01

    Uranium deposits occur in the Olden granite of approx 1650 m.y. in age. This granite outcrops in the northern and eastern segments of the Precambrian Olden window of the central Swedish Caledonides. The Olden granite is a 'highly evolved' biotite granite, with SiO2 >70%. The granite was rich in U (and other incompatible trace elements) and much of the U was located in labile sites. During the Caledonian orogeny 420 m.y. ago, the granite was metamorphosed to greenschist facies, clastically deformed, hydrothermally altered in turn, and mineralized along fractures with quartz, fluorite, calcite and galena. Pitchblende and coffinite were locally deposited as fracture fillings, in particular association with biotitic alteration, whose relation to hydrothermal alteration is obscure; biotite is concentrated along fractures. The U deposits are partly and 'recently' oxidized. The Pb-U, Pb-Pb, and Sr-Rb isotopic systems of most samples were strongly to completely reset by the Caledonian orogeny. The source and host of the Lilljuthatten uranium ore was a special type of granite. The granite fractured, U was mobilized by metamorphism, and deposited in the fractures, and the deposit was preserved from weathering. Similar U deposits in high U granites, common in the Swedish Caledonides, should occur elsewhere.-G.J.N.

  20. Tracing the origin of Geodynamics: The Alfred Wegener Memorial Expedition 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stüwe, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    2012 marked the 100st anniversary of the seminal publications on Continental Drift Theory by Alfred Wegener. These publications (and Wegener's book "On the origin of the continents", published three years later) are widely accepted to be the fundamental breakthrough that opened the path to the Theory of Plate Tectoncis and ultimately the path to modern Geodynamics some 50 years later. In the same historic year of the 1912 publications, Alfred Wegener set off for what was to become the most dramatic of his three Greenland expeditions. On this expedition Wegener and Koch crossed the entire northern icecap of Greenland. In honour of the hundreds anniversary of Wegener's publications, the Austrian Academy of Sciences funded an expedition to trace the footsteps of the 1912 expedition in the spirit of Alfred Wegener, while also conducting modern Earth Science. This expedition that was conducted in summer 2014. For the expedition, a 1952 Cessna180 was acquired in Alaska, adapted with bush wheels, wing extensions and extra tanks and was flown by the author and one of the worlds most renown bush pilots from Alaska in a 10 day effort to Greenland. There, the entire NE Greenland Caledonides were covered and photographed. Field work for a masters projects was conducted and samples were collected from a series of some of the most remote locations in the Caledonides ever visited. Most spectacularly, the original sled of Wegeners 1912 expedition was found some 30 kilometers from its expected location in the Dove Bugt Region of northeastern Greenland.

  1. Design for All in Scandinavia - a strong concept.

    PubMed

    Bendixen, Karin; Benktzon, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Design for All is more than an appealing point of view. It is a concept that offers a set of challenges capable of generating innovation and giving design added value and weight. In the Scandinavian tradition, the concept has developed from a purely social dimension to a design topic that is discussed both in terms of its business potential and in relation to Corporate Social Responsibility, CSR. This article gives a State of the Art of the development of Design for All in the Scandinavian countries: Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Finland during the past 15 years, beginning with a common review and joint Scandinavian projects, followed by an overall review country by country which include selected case studies over the past 15 years. PMID:23755993

  2. Can Canada afford a truly pan-Canadian approach to elder care?

    PubMed

    Gibson, Diana

    2011-01-01

    This commentary is about Canada's ability to afford a comprehensive pan-Canadian approach to elder care. In redefining the universal public system, a broad and more comprehensive definition of universal public care is needed for those whose physical or mental abilities are impaired. The Scandinavian model affirms that this is both effective and affordable. Comparisons of Canada with other nations in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development on taxation and spending levels reveal that there is room for Canada to increase taxation to fund a Scandinavian model while still having competitive tax and spending rates. PMID:21593614

  3. Interprétation hydrogéologique de l'aquifère des bassins sud-rifains (Maroc) : apport de la sismique réflexionHydrogeological interpretation of the southern Rifean basins aquifer (Morocco): seismic reflexion contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zouhri, Lahcen; Gorini, Christian; Lamouroux, Christian; Vachard, Daniel; Dakki, Mohammed

    2003-03-01

    The aquifer of the Rharb Basin is constituted by heterogeneous material. The seismic reflexion interpretation carried out in this area, highlighted a permeable device compartmentalized in raised and subsided blocks. Depressions identified in the northern and southernmost zones are characterized by Plio-Quaternary fillings that are favourable to the hydrogeological exploitation. Two mechanisms contribute to structure the Plio-Quaternary aquifer: the Hercynian reactivation in the southernmost part, and the gravitational mechanism of the Pre-Rifean nappe. The groundwater flow and the aquifer thickening are controlled by this reactivation.

  4. Day Care in Scandinavia: Denmark, Sweden and Norway.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esbensen, Steen B.

    Day care programs in the Scandinavian countries have been viewed as exemplary models to transfer to Canada and the United States. This publication, which provides an overview of day care in Denmark, Sweden and Norway, discusses conditions, facts, and programs contributing to the widespread acclaim. It is pointed out that day care in Denmark is an…

  5. Communication Based on Receptive Multilingualism: Advantages and Disadvantages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braunmüller, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    This paper tries to give answers for successful receptive multilingualism (RM) but also for its failure. It is mainly based on the results of two projects, one on inter-dialectal communication in the Baltic area during the era of the Hanseatic League and the other analyses inter-Scandinavian communication today. The main purpose of this survey is…

  6. Discovering the Local Landscape: Pioneer Log Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Bob; And Others

    Building structures made from logs appeared in the eastern United States during the late 17th century, and immigrants from Sweden, Finland, and Germany are credited with their construction. There were two types of structures: the horizontal design introduced by the Scandinavians and the German or Pennsylvania Dutch model that was used by the…

  7. Students' Attitudes towards Craft and Technology in Iceland and Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorsteinsson, Gísli; Ólafsson, Brynjar; Autio, Ossi

    2012-01-01

    Craft education in both Finland and Iceland originated over 140 years ago and was influenced by the Scandinavian Sloyd pedagogy. Since then, the subject has moved away from craft and towards technology, with the aim being to increase students' technological abilities. In the beginning, the subject largely focused on the students copying artefacts,…

  8. Peace Education Books: A Selective Bibliography. Reprints and Miniprints No. 810.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjerstedt, Ake

    The bibliography lists examples of monographs and collections of papers explicitly dealing with peace education. Some special issues of journals devoted to the area of peace education also have been included. The major focus is on materials in English, German, and the Scandinavian languages from recent years. For those unfamiliar with the area,…

  9. Technology in the School Curriculum: The Moral Dimension of Making Things.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, John

    1997-01-01

    Criticizes the compartmentalization of educational practices into a hierarchy of general, vocational, and social. Argues for a more holistic integration of technology, vocation, and education reflecting a vision of lifelong learning and meaningful work. Discusses examples of this including the Scandinavian tradition of "Sloyd" (unification of…

  10. Questioning a Discourse of Information Literacy Practice in Web-Based Tutorials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreiber, Trine

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: A number of Scandinavian Web-based tutorials on information seeking mediate a kind of discourse of information literacy practice by combining the two themes, written academic assignment and information seeking. The aim of the paper is first to examine students' experience of the pragmatic value of two of these Web-based…

  11. Mental Health Systems in Scandinavia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vail, David J.

    The guidebook is introduced by general observations on the Scandinavian countries concerning history, social policy, medicine, mental health, and psychiatric diagnosis. Discussed individually for Norway, Sweden, and Denmark are the following areas: mental health programs and statistics; mental illness programs, regional, hospital, aftercare,…

  12. Synthesis of Research Related to Policy for Education in Rural America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edington, Everett D.

    Until recently other countries (Australia, Great Britain, the Scandinavian countries) have been well ahead of the United States in development of rural education policy, In 1969 and again in 1977 the U.S. Office of Education (USOE) produced task force reports with recommendations for rural education. The 1969 recommendations were very specific and…

  13. Sex Differences in Left-Handedness Are Also Evident in Scandinavia and in Twins: Comment on Papadatou-Pastou, Martin, Munafo, and Jones (2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vuoksimaa, Eero; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2010-01-01

    The lack of sex difference in left-handedness in Scandinavian countries reported by Papadatou-Pastou, Martin, Munafo, and Jones (2008) is questioned. We investigated the sex difference in left-handedness in two Finnish, one Norwegian, and one Swedish population-based sample not included in the Papadatou-Pastou et al. (2008) meta-analysis. The…

  14. Heritage of Struggle. A History of American Working People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Howard

    The materials in this pamphlet describe the difficulties encountered by various racial and ethnic groups as they attempted to become assimilated into the American labor force. The experiences and problems faced by blacks, Jews, and immigrants from England, Ireland, the Scandinavian countries, China, Italy, and Puerto Rico are described in an…

  15. In a tight spin.

    PubMed

    Malone, Jasmine

    A major report on the impact of the financial crisis on nurses and nursing in Europe has highlighted job losses and deep salary cuts in the worst-affected areas. Nurses in northern and Scandinavian countries are generally faring better than nurses in the south and east. PMID:22876425

  16. Attitudes towards Study Effort Response to Higher Grading Standards: Do Gender and Personality Distinctions Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallan, Lars; Opstad, Leiv

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore how gender and personality preferences affect student attitudes towards effort response to higher grading standards. Data collected from 150 economics and business students at a Scandinavian business school reveals that higher grading standards enhance effort and time devoted to learning to a higher degree…

  17. The development of pediatric anesthesia and intensive care in Scandinavia.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Krister; Ekström-Jodal, Barbro; Meretoja, Olli; Valentin, Niels; Wagner, Kari

    2015-05-01

    The initiation and development of pediatric anesthesia and intensive care have much in common in the Scandinavian countries. The five countries had to initiate close relations and cooperation in all medical disciplines. The pediatric anesthesia subspecialty took its first steps after the Second World War. Relations for training and exchange of experiences between Scandinavian countries with centers in Europe and the USA were a prerequisite for development. Specialized pediatric practice was not a full-time position until during the 1950s, when the first pediatric anesthesia positions were created. Scandinavian anesthesia developed slowly. In contrast, Scandinavia pioneered both adult and certainly pediatric intensive care. The pioneers were heavily involved in the teaching and training of anesthetists and nurses. This was necessary to manage the rapidly increasing work. The polio epidemics during the 1950s initiated a combination of clinical development and technical innovations. Blood gas analyses technology and interpretation in combination with improved positive pressure ventilators were developed in Scandinavia contributing to general and pediatric anesthesia and intensive care practice. Scandinavian specialist training and accreditation includes both anesthesia and intensive care. Although pediatric anesthesia/intensive care is not a separate specialty, an 'informal accreditation' for a specialist position is obtained after training. The pleasure of working in a relatively small group of devoted colleagues and staff has persisted from the pioneering years. It is still one of the most inspiring and pleasant gifts for those working in this demanding specialty. PMID:25641001

  18. Atmospheric transport of persistent pollutants governs uptake by holarctic terrestrial biota

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, P.; Okla, L.; Woin, Per )

    1990-10-01

    The atmospheric deposition of PCBs, DDT, and lindane, governed uptake in terrestrial biota in the Scandinavian peninsula. Mammalian herbivores and predators as well as predatory insects contained higher levels of pollutants at locations where the fallout load was high than at stations where atmospheric deposition was lower, and the two variables were significantly correlated.

  19. Annotated Bibliography of Multi-Ethnic Curriculum Materials, Sixth Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midwest Center for Equal Educational Opportunity, Columbia, MO.

    This annotated bibliography cites 132 multiethnic curriculum materials for grades K through 12. It is designed to be used by students, teachers, and administrators. Some of the materials focus on specific groups, such as Blacks, American Indians, Puerto Ricans, Italian Americans, Chinese Americans, Slavs, Scandinavians, and women. Other materials…

  20. Abandonment of mandatory jail for impaired drivers in Norway and Sweden.

    PubMed

    Ross, H L; Klette, H

    1995-04-01

    In 1988 and 1990, respectively, Norway and Sweden adopted legal reforms including abandonment of mandatory jail sentences for persons driving with BACs above specific limits. Interrupted time-series analysis finds that in both countries traffic deaths diminished simultaneously with the reforms, consistent with the understanding that Scandinavian success in reducing impaired driving does not depend upon mandatory jail. PMID:7786382

  1. A review of Ruffe (Gymnocephalus cernuus) life history in its native versus non-native range (journal article)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ruffe (Gymnocephalus cernuus) have caused and have the potential to cause great ecological damage as invasive species in North America, parts of the European Union, Scandinavian countries, and the United Kingdom. The objectives of this review are to define the Ruffe's native and ...

  2. Adult and Child Development in the Zone of Proximal Development: Socratic Dialogue in a Playworld

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferholt, Beth; Lecusay, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This article analyses adult and child development in the zone of proximal development in an educational practice based in Vygotsky's theories of play: the playworld educational practice. The playworld educational practice is a central component of a Scandinavian play pedagogy that promotes shared responsibility amongst adults and children for…

  3. When Friendship Is Used as a Weapon: Using Life Space Crisis Intervention Skills to Confront Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitson, Signe

    2012-01-01

    Bullying has received international attention since the pioneering research over thirty years ago by Scandinavian psychologist Dan Olweus (1978). While prevention programs have proliferated, this article charts new ground by applying Life Space Crisis Intervention (LSCI) to bullying in an example involving young girls. The author describes how…

  4. Are American Children and Youth Fit? Some International Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Neil; Koenig-McIntyre, Constance

    1992-01-01

    Youth fitness levels in the United Kingdom are discussed, including a comparative analysis of Scandinavian children vs American youth concerning fitness levels. Two recommendations are offered: (1) increase the number and types of physical activities in earlier school years; and (2) do not decrease standards, but expect higher fitness performance.…

  5. Forest School: Reclaiming It from Scandinavia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Polly

    2010-01-01

    "Forest schools" are an increasingly well-known feature of the educational landscape, having been adopted by many local authorities across the United Kingdom in an effort to build children's confidence and self-esteem through learning outdoors in a woodland setting. Their origins are usually described as deriving from a Scandinavian (particularly…

  6. Architecture as a Quality in the Learning and Teaching Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cold, Birgit

    Using an outline format accompanied by numerous photographs and sketches, this brochure explores the relationship of "school" to people's conceptions, actions, and physical surroundings, highlighting changes over the past 20 years in Scandinavian school design. Two major conceptual changes are decentralized administration and teaching and learning…

  7. Experiences and Challenges of International Students in Technology-Rich Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habib, Laurence; Johannesen, Monica; Øgrim, Leikny

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a study of international students and their use of technology in a Scandinavian institution of Higher Education. A special emphasis is placed on patterns of use of a virtual learning environment (VLE) that is available to all the study programmes at the institution. Actor-Network Theory (ANT) is used as a theoretical approach…

  8. Overview of genomic selection in dairy cattle populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic selection is most successful for traits recorded over many years in large populations. Holstein breeders have reference populations >10,000 proven bulls via cooperation among major countries, and countries with smaller Holstein populations can contribute additional bulls. Scandinavian red da...

  9. University and Society. Essays on the Social Role of Research and Higher Education. Higher Education Policy Series 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trow, Martin A.; Nybom, Thorsten

    This volume contains 14 essays on the role of research and higher education in society today and in historical perspective. The essays' titles and authors are as follows: "Vagabonds, Specialists or the Voice of the People: Scandinavian Students and the Rise of the Modern Research University in the 19th Century" (Nils Runeby); "Knowledge and Power:…

  10. Neo-Liberalism and Universal State Education: The Cases of Denmark, Norway and Sweden 1980-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiborg, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates neo-liberal policy on education in Denmark, Norway and Sweden. Traditionally, the edifice of the education system in these Scandinavian countries has been built on egalitarian values, but over the last 20 years they have increasingly adopted market-led reforms of education. The extent of neo-liberal policy varies between…

  11. The Ordinary and the Fabulous: An Introduction to Myths, Legends and Fairy Tales. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Elizabeth

    Written for teachers, for students who intend to be teachers or librarians, and for storytellers in general, this book interprets the familiar legends and tales (Greek, Scandinavian, German, and Celtic myths and legends; Arthurian romances; the Old Testament; and fairy tales) and describes how they can best be told to children. Parallel accounts…

  12. The Significance of "Participation" as an Educational Ideal in Education for Sustainable Development and Health Education in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreasen Lysgaard, Jonas; Simovska, Venka

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the significance of the concept of participation for teacher meaning-making processes in education for sustainable development and health education. In Scandinavian public schools, education for sustainable development and health education focus on a wide palette of societal problems rather than on narrow curricula. Drawing…

  13. "Friluftsliv": A Contribution to Equity and Democracy in Swedish Physical Education? An Analysis of Codes in Swedish Physical Education Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backman, Erik

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, expanding research investigating the school subject Physical Education (PE) indicates a promotion of inequalities regarding which children benefit from PE teaching. Outdoor education and its Scandinavian equivalent "friluftsliv," is a part of the PE curriculum in many countries, and these practices have been claimed to have…

  14. Values at Stake in Late Modernity Relationships between Maternal Educational Background, Childrearing Views, Sanctions and Children's Temperament

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommer, Dion

    2005-01-01

    Some perspectives on society, family and childhood leave us with the impression that contemporary children are growing up in a post-traditional society that has decisively broken away from previous values. Based on a representative study of specific maternal childrearing values in a Scandinavian welfare society (Denmark) this article will present…

  15. Scottish Kindergarten, Part 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeler, Rusty

    2012-01-01

    One of the author's favorite things in the whole world is a forest school--a nature kindergarten. People have probably heard the rumors: preschoolers outdoors all day long, in all kinds of weather. And it's not just for Scandinavian kids anymore. It is yet another children and nature global movement. More than just adding nature to a playground,…

  16. Using MOOCs at Learning Centers in Northern Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norberg, Anders; Händel, Åsa; Ödling, Per

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the use of globally accessible Massive Open Online Courses, MOOCs, for addressing the needs of learners at community learning centers in Northern Sweden. The Scandinavian "study circle" concept is used to facilitate the studying of MOOCs, thereby forming "blended" or "glonacal" courses. Although…

  17. The Danish People's High School Including a General Account of the Educational System of Denmark. Bulletin, 1915, No. 45

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegland, Martin

    1915-01-01

    The folk high schools of Denmark and other Scandinavian countries are so unique and contain so much of interest to all who are concerned in the preparation of young men and women for higher and better living and for more efficient citizenship that, although two or three former bulletins of this bureau have been devoted to a description of these…

  18. The Place of Didactics in Curriculum in Scandinavia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gundem, Bjorg B.

    In its examination of the place of didactics in Scandinavian curricula, this paper discusses didactics as theory and prescription, at different levels of abstraction, and as scientific discipline. It focuses on the process of curriculum planning and selection in two areas: (1) preparing curriculum programs for teaching and learning nationally and…

  19. The Role of Didactics in Curriculum in Scandinavia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gundem, Bjorg B.

    1995-01-01

    Didactics, an entity associated with different Scandinavian institutions and educational settings, comprises the theory and prescriptive elements for reflection, deliberation, and action in pedagogical planning. This article discusses the processes of selection and planning involved with preparing national programs for teaching and learning and…

  20. Social Science Libraries Section. Special Libraries Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Three papers on the nonconventional literature and social science libraries were presented at the 1983 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference. In "Grey Material: A Scandinavian View," Birgitta Bergdahl (Sweden) outlines the etymology and meaning of the concept of "grey literature" (which can include reports, theses,…

  1. EQUIP: A European Survey of Quality Criteria for the Evaluation of Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, T. D.

    1998-01-01

    Reports on two stages of an investigation into the perceived quality of online databases. Presents data from 989 questionnaires from 600 database users in 12 European and Scandinavian countries and results of a test of the SERVQUAL methodology for identifying user expectations about database services. Lists statements used in the SERVQUAL survey.…

  2. Synthetic Speech and Computer Aided Reading for Reading Disabled Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olofsson, Ake

    1992-01-01

    Investigates the effectiveness of a computer program that pronounces words for Scandinavian students with word decoding problems. Finds that second-grade children did not perform better on a reading comprehension test when using computer-aided reading and that older students benefited more than younger students. Discusses reasons for letting the…

  3. Lectures for Program on Technology and Social Change in Foreign Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westermarck, Nils C.

    The book contains eight lectures on technological progress and social change in Europe. The lecture titles are: Social and Economic Aspects on European Technological Progress; Migration Between Poor and Rich Countries in Europe: The Exceptional Case of Finland; The Scandinavian Countries Faced with the Third World's Problems; Policy Measures to…

  4. On education and pedagogic development at NHV.

    PubMed

    Hermansen, Mads

    2015-08-01

    The role and development of the Nordic School of Public Health (NHV) during its 60 year existence with special emphasis on the pedagogical basis (Scandinavian pedagogy) of courses, the student population, cross-borders incorporation of staff and professional and institution identity-creation through storytelling. PMID:26311793

  5. Conditions for Collaborative Learning and Constructive Competition in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Pia; Sheridan, Sonja

    2010-01-01

    Background: Teacher-organised group work, in which pupils work together in groups or pairs, is one of many learning situations pupils may encounter at school. Research (Williams, P. and Sheridan, S., Collaboration as one aspect of quality: a perspective of collaboration and pedagogical quality in educational settings. "Scandinavian Journal of…

  6. The scale and nature of Viking settlement in Ireland from Y-chromosome admixture analysis.

    PubMed

    McEvoy, Brian; Brady, Claire; Moore, Laoise T; Bradley, Daniel G

    2006-12-01

    The Vikings (or Norse) played a prominent role in Irish history but, despite this, their genetic legacy in Ireland, which may provide insights into the nature and scale of their immigration, is largely unexplored. Irish surnames, some of which are thought to have Norse roots, are paternally inherited in a similar manner to Y-chromosomes. The correspondence of Scandinavian patrilineal ancestry in a cohort of Irish men bearing surnames of putative Norse origin was examined using both slow mutating unique event polymorphisms and relatively rapidly changing short tandem repeat Y-chromosome markers. Irish and Scandinavian admixture proportions were explored for both systems using six different admixture estimators, allowing a parallel investigation of the impact of method and marker type in Y-chromosome admixture analysis. Admixture proportion estimates in the putative Norse surname group were highly consistent and detected little trace of Scandinavian ancestry. In addition, there is scant evidence of Scandinavian Y-chromosome introgression in a general Irish population sample. Although conclusions are largely dependent on the accurate identification of Norse surnames, the findings are consistent with a relatively small number of Norse settlers (and descendents) migrating to Ireland during the Viking period (ca. AD 800-1200) suggesting that Norse colonial settlements might have been largely composed of indigenous Irish. This observation adds to previous genetic studies that point to a flexible Viking settlement approach across North Atlantic Europe. PMID:16957681

  7. Out with the Old

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rydeen, James E.; Stofferahn, Terry; Lange, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Displacement ventilation (DV) units use the natural buoyancy of warm air to improve ventilation and comfort. Although relatively new to the United States, DV has been used in Scandinavian countries since the 1970s. Two types of DV can be used in a classroom: (1) Conventional displacement ventilation (CDV) units which are situated on an interior…

  8. Outside the Box: The Danish Folkehojskole as Educational Innovator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, John

    2013-01-01

    Travelling between various Scandinavian adult educational institutions in 1978, the author, John Collins, picked up a couple of hitchhikers--Danish students returning to their school after a short vacation period. As they neared the Funen Island harbour village, which was their destination, the students invited Collins to visit their school. What…

  9. Geographical Locational Knowledge as an Indicator of Children's Views of the World: Research from Sweden and Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Ruth; Vinterek, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Children's locational knowledge is often used to clarify underlying conceptual understandings of the world in which they live. Although there has been some exploration of how European children view their world there is little recent research on Scandinavian children's knowledge and associated perceptions of the wider world, or about Australian…

  10. The Rural School Building in North Central and Northwestern North Dakota: A Brief Description. Country School Legacy: Humanities on the Frontier.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Mary C.

    The time period and the pioneer conditions that existed when north central and northwestern North Dakota were settled determined the type of rural schools that were established there. Those areas were settled between 1885 and 1910. Most of the settlers in that area of the state were of Scandinavian (particularly Norwegian) extraction. The vast…

  11. State, Governmentality and Education--the Nordic Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kivinen, Osmo; Rinne, Risto

    1998-01-01

    Interrogates the prevailing concept of the state as a regulative idea. Introduces Michel Foucault's notion of "governmentality" and investigates how it has historically been linked to education and to the Scandinavian "Caring State." Explores changing tasks of education and the nature of social contracts that could correspond to the new social…

  12. Drinking and Driving: Alcohol Association with Traffic Accidents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacey, Barrie G.

    1985-01-01

    Presents an analysis of drink-driving research methods and findings with reference to traffic accidents. Challenges some conclusions about drinking and driving in Australia and New Zealand. Evaluates the growing acceptance of Scandinavian-type laws. Rejects the demand to "criminalize" drink-driving offenses. Presents the reduction of death as the…

  13. Strategies for Internationalization of Higher Education. A Case Study--the Nordic Centre at Fudan University, Shanghai, China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holtermann, Sigrid

    1996-01-01

    The Nordic Centre at Fudan University (China) links it with Norwegian universities, and has resulted in: a new Norwegian School of Management program; a Chinese-Norwegian dictionary; short credit courses on Scandinavian affairs for Chinese students; language courses and examinations for Norwegian students of Chinese; establishment of a library on…

  14. The Democratization of Higher Education in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden: A Cross-National Study of Post-War Reforms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumberg, Melanie J.

    The extent of democratization of Scandinavian higher education is evaluated. Democratization is considered to include: (1) the subordination of university decision-making to parliamentary democracy and, in Sweden, to corporate representative bodies; (2) the decentralization of higher education regionally, important particularly in Finland, Norway,…

  15. The Role of Radio and TV in the Lives of Pre-School Children. Summary. No. 52-75/76.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filipson, Leni

    This 2-part report investigates the role of mass media in the lives of pre-school Scandinavian children. The first part presents a portrait of one child, giving a personal picture of the child's family life and her relationships to various forms of media. Part II continues the discussion of the role of media in children's lives, based on the…

  16. Dyscalculia ? Maths Difficulties. An Analysis of Conflicting Positions at a Time That Calls for Inclusive Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Maria Christina Secher

    2016-01-01

    Using Bourdieu's notion of field, the Scandinavian field of maths pedagogy occurs at a time characterised by increasing inclusion efforts in primary school. Various stakeholders in maths pedagogy are arguing about what should be done about pupils who perform poorly in mathematics and what causes their difficulties. Four analytical positions are…

  17. Extended geographical distribution and host range of the cactus moth Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera Pyralidae)in Argentina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A field exploration was conducted to confirm the southernmost distribution of Cactoblastis cactorum in Argentina. The distribution of the moth was extended to the south (40° 10´S) and west (66° 56´W). The native Opuntia penicilligera was recorded as a host for the first time. These findings should ...

  18. 33 CFR 110.127c - Trinidad Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Trinidad Bay, Calif. 110.127c... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.127c Trinidad Bay, Calif. The waters of Trinidad Bay, beginning at the southernmost point of Trinidad Head at latitude 41°03′04″ N., longitude 124°08′56″...

  19. Language and Politics in Guam and Micronesia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kehoe, Monika

    There is presently little world-wide interest in Micronesia. Attitudes toward the U.S. administration vary from the pro-American bid for Commonwealth status by the Marianas to the movement for independence in the Marshalls. The polarization of these attitudes from the northernmost to southernmost reaches of the territory seems to be in direct…

  20. Sweet drinks are made of this: Conservation genetics of an endemic palm species from the Dominican Republic

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudophoenix ekmanii is a threatened palm species restricted to the Parque Nacional of Jaragua in the southernmost region of Hispaniola. Sap from individual trees is commonly extracted to make a local drink; once they are tapped the plant usually dies. Additionally, adult plants are harvested for...

  1. 33 CFR 80.707 - Cape Romain, SC to Sullivans Island, SC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Island, SC. 80.707 Section 80.707 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... to Sullivans Island, SC. (a) A line drawn from the western extremity of Cape Romain 292° true to... southernmost extremity of Bull Island to the easternmost extremity of Capers Island. (d) A line formed by...

  2. 46 CFR 7.170 - Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. 7.170... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.170 Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Cape Kumlium to the westernmost extremity of Nakchamik Island; thence to...

  3. 33 CFR 80.723 - Amelia Island, FL to Cape Canaveral, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Amelia Island, FL to Cape... SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Seventh District § 80.723 Amelia Island, FL to Cape Canaveral, FL. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Amelia Island to...

  4. 46 CFR 7.80 - Tybee Island, GA to St. Simons Island, GA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tybee Island, GA to St. Simons Island, GA. 7.80 Section... BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.80 Tybee Island, GA to St. Simons Island, GA. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Savannah Beach on Tybee Island 255° true across Tybee Inlet to the shore of...

  5. 33 CFR 80.707 - Cape Romain, SC to Sullivans Island, SC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Island, SC. 80.707 Section 80.707 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... to Sullivans Island, SC. (a) A line drawn from the westernmost point on Cape Romain to the... northernmost extremity of Northeast Point. (c) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Bull Island...

  6. 33 CFR 80.707 - Cape Romain, SC to Sullivans Island, SC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Island, SC. 80.707 Section 80.707 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... to Sullivans Island, SC. (a) A line drawn from the western extremity of Cape Romain 292° true to... southernmost extremity of Bull Island to the easternmost extremity of Capers Island. (d) A line formed by...

  7. 46 CFR 7.170 - Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. 7.170... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.170 Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Cape Kumlium to the westernmost extremity of Nakchamik Island; thence to...

  8. 46 CFR 7.165 - Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. 7.165 Section... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.165 Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Kenai Peninsula at longitude 151°44.0′ W. to East Amatuli Island Light; thence to...

  9. 46 CFR 7.165 - Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. 7.165 Section... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.165 Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Kenai Peninsula at longitude 151°44.0′ W. to East Amatuli Island Light; thence to...

  10. 33 CFR 80.707 - Cape Romain, SC to Sullivans Island, SC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Island, SC. 80.707 Section 80.707 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... to Sullivans Island, SC. (a) A line drawn from the westernmost point on Cape Romain to the... northernmost extremity of Northeast Point. (c) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Bull Island...

  11. 46 CFR 7.165 - Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. 7.165 Section... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.165 Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Kenai Peninsula at longitude 151°44.0′ W. to East Amatuli Island Light; thence to...

  12. 46 CFR 7.170 - Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. 7.170... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.170 Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Cape Kumlium to the westernmost extremity of Nakchamik Island; thence to...

  13. 46 CFR 7.170 - Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. 7.170... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.170 Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Cape Kumlium to the westernmost extremity of Nakchamik Island; thence to...

  14. 46 CFR 7.170 - Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. 7.170... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.170 Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Cape Kumlium to the westernmost extremity of Nakchamik Island; thence to...

  15. 33 CFR 80.707 - Cape Romain, SC to Sullivans Island, SC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Island, SC. 80.707 Section 80.707 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... to Sullivans Island, SC. (a) A line drawn from the western extremity of Cape Romain 292° true to... southernmost extremity of Bull Island to the easternmost extremity of Capers Island. (d) A line formed by...

  16. 46 CFR 7.165 - Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. 7.165 Section... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.165 Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Kenai Peninsula at longitude 151°44.0′ W. to East Amatuli Island Light; thence to...

  17. 33 CFR 80.723 - Amelia Island, FL to Cape Canaveral, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Amelia Island, FL to Cape... SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Seventh District § 80.723 Amelia Island, FL to Cape Canaveral, FL. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Amelia Island to...

  18. 33 CFR 80.723 - Amelia Island, FL to Cape Canaveral, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Amelia Island, FL to Cape... SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Seventh District § 80.723 Amelia Island, FL to Cape Canaveral, FL. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Amelia Island to...

  19. 46 CFR 7.165 - Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. 7.165 Section... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.165 Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Kenai Peninsula at longitude 151°44.0′ W. to East Amatuli Island Light; thence to...

  20. 33 CFR 80.723 - Amelia Island, FL to Cape Canaveral, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amelia Island, FL to Cape... SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Seventh District § 80.723 Amelia Island, FL to Cape Canaveral, FL. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Amelia Island to...

  1. 33 CFR 80.723 - Amelia Island, FL to Cape Canaveral, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Amelia Island, FL to Cape... SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Seventh District § 80.723 Amelia Island, FL to Cape Canaveral, FL. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Amelia Island to...

  2. Do Caste and Class Define Inequality? Revisiting Education in a Kerala Village

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scaria, Suma

    2014-01-01

    Is there a strong correlation between caste and class in access to education, especially higher education? This is the broader question addressed by the study in the context of Kerala, the southernmost state in India, with impressive conventional indicators in education. Micro-level insights based on the study of a village in Kerala show that old…

  3. Aspects of the earthquake geology and seismotectonics of the southern San Andreas and related faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Patrick Lee

    Aspects of the mechanics and movement history of the southernmost San Andreas or related faults are addressed. The seismotectonic context of the southernmost San Andreas fault is investigated. Microstratigraphic and geomorphological investigations of the fault's segmentation, slip potential and latest seismogenic slip history are presented. Measurements of geological deposits, man-made structures, alignment arrays and creepmeters offset across the southernmost San Andreas fault are presented. These measure the fault's aseismic slip rate during the past three hundred years. Observations of triggered aseismic slippage along the southernmost 100 km of the San Andreas fault soon after the North Palm Springs earthquake are described. Dextral surficial slip ranging from less than or equal to 9 mm and occurred on three sections of the San Andreas fault that lie between 44 and 86 km from the epicenter near North Palm Springs. Data complied and interpretations gleaned from repeated measurements of surface slip at dozens of site along the Superstition Hills fault during the period of two hours to one year after the Superstition Hills earthquake are presented. The common result of these five investigations is increased understanding of phenomena associated with fault motion along the highly active border between the Pacific and North American plates.

  4. American Influence on Okinawan Culture before 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trafton, Terry

    The Ryukyu Islands form a chain stretching from the southernmost point of mainland Japan to the northern tip of Taiwan. The largest and most important of these islands is Okinawa. This paper documents the influence of other nations and cultures upon the Okinawan culture, and focuses upon U.S. cultural influence. In the mid-nineteenth century,…

  5. Halley's Comet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Tom

    1985-01-01

    Provides tips for viewing Comet Halley in the Northeast including best viewing dates from November 1985-January 1986. Discusses going south to view the comet in March-April 1986 and gives specific information about accommodations for the Halley Rally in Everglades National Park, southernmost site in the contiguous 48 states. (JHZ)

  6. 76 FR 78891 - Listing Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on Petitions To List the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ... any species of vertebrate fish and wildlife'' (61 FR 4722). The joint DPS policy describes two... climate change to specific impacts on thorny skate. One possibility is that global warming could cause a... represent the southernmost population of the species in the world. They state that, as global...

  7. Transmission of Babesia caballi by Dermacentor nitens (Acari: Ixodidae) Is Restricted to One Generation in the Absense of Alimentary Reinfection on a Susceptible Equine Host

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The tropical horse tick, Dermacentor nitens, is the natural vector of Babesia caballi in the Americas; the distribution of this tick in the United States is limited to the southernmost parts of Florida and Texas. Babesia caballi, one of the etiologic agents of equine babesiosis, occurs widely throug...

  8. IMPLICATION OF LAKE WATER RESIDENCE TIME ON THE CLASSIFICATION OF NORWEGIAN SURFACE WATER SITES INTO PROGRESSIVE STAGES OF NITROGEN SATURATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seasonal behaviour of NO3- in surface water is often used as an indicator on a catchment's ability to retain N from atmospheric deposition. In this paper, we classify 12 pristine sites (five streams and seven lakes) in southernmost Norway according to the N saturation stage conce...

  9. 33 CFR 80.712 - Morris Island, SC to Hilton Head Island, SC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., SC to Hilton Head Island, SC. (a) A line drawn from the easternmost tip of Folley Island to the... 10 across Stono River to the shoreline of Sandy Point. (c) A line drawn from the southernmost... Island. (f) A line drawn from the westernmost extremity of Bull Point on Capers Island to Port...

  10. 36 CFR 242.27 - Subsistence taking of fish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... latitude of the westernmost tip of Point Hope and the latitude of the westernmost tip of Cape Prince of... westernmost tip of Point Hope and west of 141° West longitude, including those waters draining into the Arctic... latitude of the westernmost point of Naskonat Peninsula and the latitude of the southernmost tip of...

  11. 33 CFR 80.712 - Morris Island, SC to Hilton Head Island, SC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., SC to Hilton Head Island, SC. (a) A line drawn from the easternmost tip of Folley Island to the... 10 across Stono River to the shoreline of Sandy Point. (c) A line drawn from the southernmost... Island. (f) A line drawn from the westernmost extremity of Bull Point on Capers Island to Port...

  12. 33 CFR 80.712 - Morris Island, SC to Hilton Head Island, SC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., SC to Hilton Head Island, SC. (a) A line drawn from the easternmost tip of Folley Island to the... 10 across Stono River to the shoreline of Sandy Point. (c) A line drawn from the southernmost... Island. (f) A line drawn from the westernmost extremity of Bull Point on Capers Island to Port...

  13. 50 CFR 100.26 - Subsistence taking of wildlife.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) including all drainages into northwestern Seymour Canal between Staunch Point and the southernmost tip of... center line of Clarence Strait from Dixon Entrance to Caamano Point, and all islands in Stephens Passage... Lemesurier Point including all drainages into Behm Canal, excluding all drainages of Ernest Sound. (ii)...

  14. Survey of Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus Forster, 1781)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) breed on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of the southernmost parts of South America and migrate northwards up to Peru and Brazil. Serum samples (n = 100) from Magellanic penguins from 3 zoos and 2 rehabilitation centres in Brazil were assayed for the pre...

  15. Oblique view of Bonita Ridge Access Road Retaining Wall, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of Bonita Ridge Access Road Retaining Wall, showing southernmost portion of intact wall and portion of concrete drainage ditch from Signal Corps Radar 296 Station 5 Transmitter Building foundation above, camera facing west-north - Fort Barry, Bonita Ridge Access Road, Retaining Wall, Point Bonita, Marin Headlands, Sausalito, Marin County, CA

  16. Panoramic view from bluff south of Grand Coulee Dam; this ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Panoramic view from bluff south of Grand Coulee Dam; this segment of the panorama shows the terminus of the concrete-lined feeder canal and entrance to Banks Lake at the head of the Grand Coulee. The southernmost limits of the town of Grand Coulee are seen in the middle. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  17. Resilience of Higher Educational Students, the Human Spirit among Thai and Muslim Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prinyaphol, Penprapa; Chongruksa, Doungmani

    2008-01-01

    (Purpose) The present study sought to enhance the understanding of 1148 Thai and Muslims college students' resilience during the time of insurgent terrorism in the southernmost province of Thailand, Pattani. (Methodology) Resilience scale based on Grotberg three features of "I HAVE," "I AM" and "I CAN" was developed in Thai as an instrument.…

  18. Llano Grande Center's Oral History Project Sparks Cultural and Economic Renewal in Texas's Rio Grande Valley. Rural Trust Featured Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Null, Elizabeth Higgins

    The Llano Grande Center for Research and Development started as an oral history experiment in two of Texas's poorest school districts. Since the 1920s, when this arid region in the southernmost tip of Texas was first transformed into the orchards and farmlands of the "Magic Valley," workers of Mexican descent have worked the land. Over time,…

  19. 33 CFR 80.160 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Beach, NY. 80.160 Section 80.160 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from the Shinnecock Inlet East Breakwater Light to Shinnecock... southernmost extremity of the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

  20. 33 CFR 80.160 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Beach, NY. 80.160 Section 80.160 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from the Shinnecock Inlet East Breakwater Light to Shinnecock... southernmost extremity of the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

  1. 33 CFR 80.160 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Beach, NY. 80.160 Section 80.160 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from the Shinnecock Inlet East Breakwater Light to Shinnecock... southernmost extremity of the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

  2. 33 CFR 80.160 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Beach, NY. 80.160 Section 80.160 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from the Shinnecock Inlet East Breakwater Light to Shinnecock... southernmost extremity of the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

  3. 33 CFR 80.160 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Beach, NY. 80.160 Section 80.160 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from the Shinnecock Inlet East Breakwater Light to Shinnecock... southernmost extremity of the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

  4. 60. DETAIL VIEW OF TWO STEEL STRUCTURAL COLUMNS THAT REPLACED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. DETAIL VIEW OF TWO STEEL STRUCTURAL COLUMNS THAT REPLACED THE ORIGINAL BRICK SUPPORTS FOR THE SOUTHERNMOST ARCH ON THE BUILDING'S W WALL WHEN THE S SECTION OF THE BUILDING WAS 'OPENED-UP' DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR; LOOKING NW. (Ceronie) - Watervliet Arsenal, Building No. 110, Hagner Road between Schull & Whittemore Roads, Watervliet, Albany County, NY

  5. Library Networks in Less-Developed Countries: Two Argentine Cases and Some Observations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Donna Taxco

    As an American Library Association/USIA International Library Fellow in Argentina from March to September 1989, the author worked with the Argentine National Protective Commission for People's Libraries. Included in her assignment was a charge "to assist in the development of a popular libraries network in Patagonia," the southernmost region of…

  6. 5. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing east. Bridge ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing east. Bridge from south shore of Clark Fork River-southernmost span. 1900-era Northern Pacific Railway Bridge in background. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  7. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - American Samoa; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of American Samoa, the southernmost territory of the United States. American Samoa’s residential electricity rates are approximately $0.29 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), more than twice the average U.S. residential rate of $0.13 USD/kWh.

  8. Modeling streamflow from snowmelt in the upper Rio Grande

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Annual snowpack in the high elevation snowsheds of the Upper Rio Grande (URG) Basin is a vital source of surface water for irrigated agriculture in New Mexico. Maximum streamflow from the annual snowpack usually occurs in early May for the southernmost snowsheds (e.g., Ojo Caliente) and at the end o...

  9. Student Retention--The Tasmanian Situation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milbourne, Sally

    2005-01-01

    Tasmania is the southernmost state of Australia. Separated from mainland Australia by a 240 km stretch of water, Bass Strait, it has a population of almost 500,000 people. The state Department of Education provides compulsory education through the delivery of educational services to almost 70,000 students in 218 schools and colleges across the…

  10. 46 CFR 7.130 - Point Conception, CA to Point Sur, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Point Conception, CA to Point Sur, CA. 7.130 Section 7... LINES Pacific Coast § 7.130 Point Conception, CA to Point Sur, CA. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Fossil Point at longitude 120°43.5′ W. to the seaward extremity of Whaler...

  11. 46 CFR 7.130 - Point Conception, CA to Point Sur, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Point Conception, CA to Point Sur, CA. 7.130 Section 7... LINES Pacific Coast § 7.130 Point Conception, CA to Point Sur, CA. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Fossil Point at longitude 120°43.5′ W. to the seaward extremity of Whaler...

  12. Correlation of stratigraphy, structure, metamorphism and intrusion in the Caledonian allochthons of East Greenland and Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, David G.

    2014-05-01

    There are two main hypotheses for the relationships between the Greenland and Svalbard Caledonides. The one regards the Svalbard "terranes" to be a natural, along-strike (via the continental shelves) continuation of the northeast Greenland allochthons, with a minor component in southwest Spitsbergen of rock units with affinities to the Ellesmerian Orogen and Pearya. The other hypothesis regards Svalbard as an assembly of lithospheric fragments that have been moved thousands of kilometres along the axis of the Caledonide Orogen from more southerly latitudes. It has long been accepted that the Neoproterozoic to Early Paleozoic successions in the Caledonides of northeastern Greenland and on Nordaustlandet, eastern Svalbard, are closely comparable in stratigraphy, depositional environment and structure and are unambiguous parts of the Laurentian continental margin.Their close correlation provides the foundation for the interpretation that they were deposited adjacent to each other and subsequently separated by vast (1000 km plus) displacements on orogen-parallel sinistral transcurrent faults. Studies of their underlying metamorphic complexes (the Renlandian Orogen in the Hager Berg Allochthon of northeast Greenland and the Nordaustlandet Orogen of northeastern Svalbard), demonstrated that they had very similar histories: latest Mesoproterozoic to earliest Neoproterozoic siliciclastic deposition, followed by mid Tonian deformation, HT/LP metamorphism, migmatization and syn- to post-tectonic granite intrusion (c. 950-930 Ma). On Nordaustlandet, major unconformities and some calc-alkaline volcanics, separate this late Grenvillian "basement" complex from the overlying Cryogenian succession; in northeast Greenland, unconformity is inferred, but has yet to be demonstrated. Another aspect of the geological history of these two "terranes" is that their Caledonian tectonothermal histories are also remarkably similar, with early to mid Silurian HT/LP metamorphism and

  13. An explicit kinematic scenario for the Iapetus and Rheic Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domeier, Mat; Torsvik, Trond

    2015-04-01

    The opening of the Rheic Ocean by the rifting of Avalonia, and the subsequent closure of the Iapetus Ocean by means of the three-way continental collision between Laurentia, Baltica and Avalonia, together constitute the most dramatic, defining and well-studied tectonic events of the early Paleozoic. Despite this, modern kinematic models of those interrelated events are still schematic and/or spatiotemporally disjointed. This is in large part due to the fact that: 1.) many of the available models were originally built to explain a specific region (i.e. Northern Appalachians, Northern Ireland and Scotland, Norwegian Caledonides, etc.) and have only been expanded to neighboring regions as a speculative note, and 2.) the models were not constructed upon a rigorous plate tectonic framework, wherein plate boundaries are specified and the kinematics of the entire lithosphere within the domain are explicitly defined through time. Although the lithosphere of the Iapetus and Rheic Oceans was long ago destroyed, the kinematics of those basins can still be surmised through the careful consideration of paleomagnetic data from the continents and terranes formerly flanking those oceans, and from geological observables along their margins. It is thus possible to explore the tectonic evolution of those basins with kinematic models that strictly conform to plate tectonic rules, both in space and time. Such an approach can plainly identify existing kinematic concepts that are tectonically untenable and those that work only in isolation. Here we briefly elaborate on this approach and present the results of a developing full-plate model of the Iapetus and Rheic Oceans for Late Cambrian to end-Silurian time, with a particular focus on the development of the Caledonide margins.

  14. [An answer to an inquiry on diffuse panbronchiolitis. Now it has found its way here!].

    PubMed

    Naalsund, A; Foerster, A; Aasebø, U; Kearney, M; Boe, J

    1995-08-30

    Diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB) is a disease characterised by chronic inflammation in the region of respiratory bronchioles. The condition has mainly been observed in Japanese patients, though isolated cases have been reported from other countries. In a review published in Läkartidningen (37/94), the question was raised of why this disease had not been seen in Scandinavia, and whether this might be the result of missed diagnosis. The diagnostic criteria were listed, and the question was posed of whether (Scandinavian) physicians existed who had encountered patients with chronic sinusitis, persistent cough and inexplicable nodular changes in lung x-rays. As a direct result of this enquiry, the present article reports what may well be the first Scandinavian patient to fulfil all the diagnostic criteria of DPB. The patient responded with improved lung function and normalised blood gases to a combined treatment regimen comprising immunosuppression (cyclophosphamide and prednisolone) and nebulised antibiotics (gentamicin). PMID:7658766

  15. Northern Islands, human error, and environmental degradation: A view of social and ecological change in the medieval North Atlantic

    SciTech Connect

    McGovern, T.H.; Bigelow, G.; Amorosi, T.; Russell, D. )

    1988-09-01

    Between ca. 790 and 1,000 AD, Scandinavian settlers occupied the islands of the North Atlantic: Shetland, the Orkneys, the Hebrides, the Faroes, Iceland, and Greenland. These offshore islands initially supported stands of willow, alder, and birch, and a range of non-arboreal species suitable for pasture for the imported Norse domestic animals. Overstocking of domestic animals, fuel collection, ironworking, and construction activity seems to have rapidly depleted the dwarf trees, and several scholars argue that soil erosion and other forms of environmental degradation also resulted from Norse land-use practices in the region. Such degradation of pasture communities may have played a significant role in changing social relationships and late medieval economic decline in the western tier colonies of Iceland and Greenland. This paper presents simple quantified models for Scandinavian environmental impact in the region, and suggests some sociopolitical causes for ultimately maladaptive floral degradation.

  16. Lower-class sexuality: Some emotional and social aspects in West German males and females.

    PubMed

    Sigusch, V; Schmidt, G

    1971-03-01

    Emotional and social aspects of lower-class sexuality in West Germany are examined on the basis of results of interviews with 150 male and 150 female, single, 20-21-year-old, unskilled or semi-skilled workers from six large cities. Particular attention was given to the relation between sexuality and love, the significance of fidelity and virginity, partner mobility, mutuality of sexual relations, attitudes to marriage and family, double standards and gender roles, emotional reactions to coitus, as well as the experience of orgasm in the female. A comparison between American and Scandinavian patterns of lower-class sexuality shows that the West German pattern is largely congruent with the Scandinavian pattern. PMID:24179046

  17. The introduction of ether anaesthesia in the Nordic countries.

    PubMed

    Secher, O

    1985-01-01

    The way in which the news about ether anaesthesia went from U.S.A. to Europe is briefly described. The first information about ether anaesthesia came to the Scandinavian countries in 1847 through newspapers, which had their information from newspapers in England, France and Germany. The professional news came to the respective countries from doctors who were studying medical progress in Paris or from French medical journals. The first Scandinavian Society to be informed was the Swedish, and the first ether anaesthesia was given in Stockholm about 6 February. Denmark was next, and the first anaesthesia was given about 20 February in Copenhagen. In Norway, ether was used on 4 March in Christiania (Oslo), and in Finland on 8 March in Helsingfors (Helsinki). Anaesthesia in Iceland cannot be traced any earlier than 1856. A table shows when the first anaesthetics were given in different places in Europe and the world. PMID:3883682

  18. Characterization of the heartworm Acanthocheilonema spirocauda (Leidy, 1858) Anderson, 1992 (Nematoda: Onchocercidae) in Scandinavia.

    PubMed

    Leidenberger, Sonja; Boström, Sven

    2008-12-01

    The heartworm Acanthocheilonema spirocauda (Leidy, Proc Acad Nat Sci Philadelphia 10:110-112, 1858) Anderson, 1992 is described from material collected from harbour seals in Scandinavia and compared with types and other specimens described by Anderson (Can J Zool 37:481-493, 1959) from harbour seals in eastern USA. Most morphometric characters of the material from USA fall within the ranges established for the Scandinavian one. Some intraspecific variability in the organisation of papillae on the male tail was detected among the Scandinavian specimens. Differences between the specimens from Scandinavia and Eastern USA are also found in the organisation of papillae on the tail of males and females. An excretory pore was not discernible, but a clearly hemizonid-like structure is described. For the first time, scanning electron micrographs present external morphological structures of the species. PMID:18762981

  19. Crustal structure beneath southern Norway imaged by magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherevatova, M.; Smirnov, M.; Korja, T.; Kaikkonen, P.; Pedersen, L. B.; Hübert, J.; Kamm, J.; Kalscheuer, T.

    2014-07-01

    We use data from two magnetotelluric profiles, ToSca10 and ToSca'09, over the Scandinavian Mountains to study the crustal structure in southern Norway. The profiles cross the major tectonic structures of the Caledonian orogen as well as the western margin of the Precambrian Baltica. Dimensionality and strike analyses indicate generally 3-D behavior of the data. However, the majority of the used data distinguishes a preferable strike direction, which is supported by the geology of the region. Hence, we employ 2-D inversion and choose to invert the determinant of the impedance tensor to mitigate 3-D effects in the data on our 2-D models. Magnetotelluric data from both profiles are inverted using a damped least squares solution based on a singular value decomposition. We improved the solution by defining the inverse model covariance matrix through gradient or Laplacian smoothing operators. The two-dimensional inversion models of the ToSca'09 and ToSca'10 field data from southern Norway derived from the damped least squares scheme with the Laplacian inverse model covariance matrix are presented. Resistive rocks, extending to the surface, image the autochthonous Southwest Scandinavian Domain and the allochthonous Western Gneiss Region. Near-surface conductors, which are located between the resistive Caledonian nappes and Precambrian basement, delineate highly conductive shallow-sea sediments, so called alum shales. They exhibit a decollement along which the Caledonian nappes were overthrust. A deeper, upper to mid-crustal conducting layer in the Southwest Scandinavian Domain may depict the remnants of closed ocean basins formed during the accretions and collisions of various Sveconorwegian terranes. In ToSca'10, the Caledonian nappes, the conducting alum shales and the deeper conductor are terminated in the west by the Faltungsgraben shear complex which represents a crustal scale boundary between the Western Gneiss Region in the west and the Southwest Scandinavian

  20. Wood products trade and foreign markets, August 1994. Annual production, consumption, and trade issue. Foreign agriculture circular

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    Trade Highlights: US Loses CVD Case; USDA Issues Import EIS; USDOC Signs MOU With Russian Federation; US to Cosponsor Sustainable Management Conference--International delegation to focus on temperate and boreal forest management issues in September; Scandinavians Get Ready For EU Accession Vote--Finland to vote October 16, Sweden-November 13, Norway-November 27-28; Japan Announced Deregulation Plan For Construction Sector--Goal to make home ownership more affordable for Japanese consumer.

  1. Chromate sensitization and elicitation from cement with iron sulfate.

    PubMed

    Bruze, M; Gruvberger, B; Hradil, E

    1990-01-01

    For some years, iron sulfate has been added to cement manufactured in the Scandinavian countries to prevent sensitization to and elicitation from chromate in cement. Allergic contact dermatitis from chromate is reported here in 3 workers with hand dermatitis and exposure to cement containing iron sulfate. Although iron sulfate had been added to the cement, high chromate concentrations were found in many samples of cement to which these workers were exposed. PMID:1969204

  2. Fourth Annual International Acquisitions Workshop: Access to Multiple Media Worldwide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Topics discussed during the workshop include: (1) Multinational-Multiple media collections and activities spanning many countries; (2) Multiple media in North American trade and commerce; (3) African spotlight; (4) Europe-Multiple media in national libraries and services; (5) Scandinavian spotlight; (6) Internet update; (7) Multiple media in US federal agencies; (8) Open-source multiple media in US federal agencies; and (9) Multiple media at US federal technical agencies-NIST and NOAA.

  3. Ichthyosis prematurity syndrome: a case report and review of known mutations.

    PubMed

    Kiely, Clare; Devaney, Deirdre; Fischer, Judith; Lenane, Patricia; Irvine, Alan D

    2014-01-01

    Ichthyosis prematurity syndrome (IPS; Mendelian Inheritance in Man 608649) is classified as a syndromic autosomal recessive ichthyosis. Here we describe two siblings with IPS and report a recurrent homozygous mutation (c.1430T>A) that is predicted to lead to a p.Val477Asp substitution in fatty acid transport protein 4. This mutation has arisen for the second time in an entirely distinct population from the Scandinavian population where it was first described. PMID:24889544

  4. Mineral resource of the month: vanadium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Magyar, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Vanadium, the name of which comes from Vanadis, a goddess in Scandinavian mythology, is one of the most important ferrous metals. Vanadium has many uses, but the metal’s metallurgical applications, such as an alloying element in iron and steel, account for more than 85 percent of U.S. consumption. The dominant nonmetallurgical use of the metal is as a catalyst for the production of maleic anhydride and sulfuric acid, ceramics, vanadium chemicals and electronics.

  5. The cranial base and calvaria index methods applied to Australian aborigine skulls.

    PubMed

    Göthlin, J H; Gadeholt, G

    1988-11-01

    Cranial base and calvaria indices were calculated on lateral skull radiographs of Australian aborigines, and compared with the values of one mummy, 4 prehistoric (fossil), and modern Scandinavian skulls. The aborigines had thicker calvarian bone and a lower forehead profile than the mummy and the modern skulls, but a higher frontal calvarium than the fossils. The aborigines may developmentally represent a link between prehistoric and modern man (including the mummy). PMID:3234401

  6. Isoelectric focusing of superoxide dismutase: report of the unique SOD A*2 allele in a US white population.

    PubMed

    DeCroo, S; Kamboh, M I; Leppert, M; Ferrell, R E

    1988-01-01

    An isoelectric focusing procedure in an ultranarrow pH range (5.0-5.5) polyacrylamide gel is described for the determination of superoxide dismutase (SOD) phenotypes. The occurrence of the rare SOD A*2 allele in the Caucasian population of Utah is also reported at a polymorphic frequency (0.011). The presence of the SOD A 2 unique allele in the Mormons of Utah is compatible with their historical affinity with Scandinavians. PMID:3350528

  7. Holocene Paleoglacier History of Glaciar Dalla Vedova, Cordillera DARWIN, Tierra del Fuego, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynhout, S.

    2015-12-01

    Southernmost South America is unique in its position immediately north of the present-day Antarctic Convergence, making it ideally suited for the evaluation of Antarctic influences on terrestrial paleoclimate. Here we present a glacial geomorphic interpretation of the paleoglacial history of Glaciar Dalla Vedova in Bahía Blanca, Cordillera Darwin, Chile (53°S). This interpretation is further constrained by radiocarbon dating, cosmogenic dating, dendrochronology, and historical photogrammetry. Preliminary field work suggests that Holocene glacier fluctuations have been constrained to within 3 km of the present glacier boundary, punctuated by rapid recent glacier retreat over the past century. By comparing the observed chronology with the record contained further north in Patagonia, we will evaluate possible mechanisms of regional climate variability over the Holocene across southernmost South America.

  8. Excavating past population structures by surname-based sampling: the genetic legacy of the Vikings in northwest England.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Georgina R; Balaresque, Patricia; King, Turi E; Hansen, Ziff; Lee, Andrew C; Pergl-Wilson, Giles; Hurley, Emma; Roberts, Stephen J; Waite, Patrick; Jesch, Judith; Jones, Abigail L; Thomas, Mark G; Harding, Stephen E; Jobling, Mark A

    2008-02-01

    The genetic structures of past human populations are obscured by recent migrations and expansions and have been observed only indirectly by inference from modern samples. However, the unique link between a heritable cultural marker, the patrilineal surname, and a genetic marker, the Y chromosome, provides a means to target sets of modern individuals that might resemble populations at the time of surname establishment. As a test case, we studied samples from the Wirral Peninsula and West Lancashire, in northwest England. Place-names and archaeology show clear evidence of a past Viking presence, but heavy immigration and population growth since the industrial revolution are likely to have weakened the genetic signal of a 1,000-year-old Scandinavian contribution. Samples ascertained on the basis of 2 generations of residence were compared with independent samples based on known ancestry in the region plus the possession of a surname known from historical records to have been present there in medieval times. The Y-chromosomal haplotypes of these 2 sets of samples are significantly different, and in admixture analyses, the surname-ascertained samples show markedly greater Scandinavian ancestry proportions, supporting the idea that northwest England was once heavily populated by Scandinavian settlers. The method of historical surname-based ascertainment promises to allow investigation of the influence of migration and drift over the last few centuries in changing the population structure of Britain and will have general utility in other regions where surnames are patrilineal and suitable historical records survive. PMID:18032405

  9. 76 FR 35379 - Archers Creek, Ribbon Creek, and Broad River; U.S. Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, SC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-17

    ...: Commencing from the shoreline at the southernmost portion of the area, at latitude 32 19'59'' N, longitude 80 42'54'' W, thence to a point at latitude 32 20'05'' N, longitude 80 43'16'' W, thence to a point at latitude 32 21'40'' N, longitude 80 44'54'' W, thence to a point at latitude 32 22'20'' N, longitude 80...

  10. 46 CFR 7.70 - Folly Island, SC to Hilton Head Island, SC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Folly Island, SC to Hilton Head Island, SC. 7.70 Section... BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.70 Folly Island, SC to Hilton Head Island, SC. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Folly Island to latitude 32°35′ N. longitude 79°58.2′ W. (Stono Inlet Lighted...

  11. 46 CFR 7.85 - St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL. 7.85... BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.85 St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL. (a) A line drawn... Island Light. (b) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Amelia Island to latitude 30°29.4′...

  12. 46 CFR 7.85 - St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL. 7.85... BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.85 St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL. (a) A line drawn... Island Light. (b) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Amelia Island to latitude 30°29.4′...

  13. 46 CFR 7.85 - St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL. 7.85... BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.85 St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL. (a) A line drawn... Island Light. (b) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Amelia Island to latitude 30°29.4′...

  14. 46 CFR 7.85 - St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL. 7.85... BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.85 St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL. (a) A line drawn... Island Light. (b) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Amelia Island to latitude 30°29.4′...

  15. 46 CFR 7.85 - St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL. 7.85... BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.85 St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL. (a) A line drawn... Island Light. (b) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Amelia Island to latitude 30°29.4′...

  16. Education in Chile. Bulletin, 1945, No. 10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebaugh, Cameron D.

    1945-01-01

    Chile is a republic 2,630 miles long, extending along the western coast of South America from Peru to the southernmost tip of the continent. In width it averages about 110 miles, with snow-capped, volcano-studded Andes in the East, a low coastal range along the Pacific and a string of valleys and plains in between. It is estimated that 5,000…

  17. 46 CFR 7.25 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 7.25 Section 7... LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.25 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from Shinnecock... Light 348° true to the southernmost extremity of the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d)...

  18. 46 CFR 7.25 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 7.25 Section 7... LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.25 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from Shinnecock... Light 348° true to the southernmost extremity of the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d)...

  19. 46 CFR 7.25 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 7.25 Section 7... LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.25 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from Shinnecock... Light 348° true to the southernmost extremity of the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d)...

  20. 46 CFR 7.25 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 7.25 Section 7... LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.25 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from Shinnecock... Light 348° true to the southernmost extremity of the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d)...