Sample records for space group pc

  1. The Space Science Group

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1997-01-01

    The Space Science Group is part of the Division of Mathematics and Sciences at Northwestern State University in Natchitoches, La. The mission of The Space Science Group is to provide activities that encourage participation in math and science, build knowledge of basic concepts, teach basic science skill, and positively influence attitudes. The mission of The Space Science Group is to develop and implement programs which use aspects of the space program to motivate students to study mathematics and science. Many Space Science Group programs are described at the URL below.

  2. Space Group Symmetry

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this problem set, students are given space group symmetry diagrams for primitive (P) orthorhombic space groups. For each diagram they must write down the symmetry axis (either 2 or 21) that is parallel to each major axis, and give the symmetry plane (a, b, c, n, or m) that is normal (perpendicular)to each. They must also give the simplified Hermann-Mauguin symbol for the space group.

  3. International Space Exploration Coordination Group

    E-print Network

    International Space Exploration Coordination Group The Global Exploration Roadmap September 2011, and stimulating technical and commercial innovation. As more nations undertake space exploration activities agencies participating in the International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) are developing

  4. International Space Exploration Coordination Group

    E-print Network

    International Space Exploration Coordination Group The Global Exploration Roadmap September 2011 participating in the International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) are developing the Global. Agencies agree that human space exploration will be most successful as an international endeavor because

  5. The Drosophila Polycomb Group Protein Psc Contacts ph and Pc through Specific Conserved Domains

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MICHAEL KYBA; HUGH W. BROCK

    1998-01-01

    The Polycomb group proteins are transcriptional repressors that are thought to act through multimeric nuclear complexes. We show that ph and Psc coprecipitate with Pc from nuclear extracts. We have analyzed the domains required for the association of Psc with ph and Pc by using the yeast two-hybrid system and an in vitro protein-binding assay. Psc and ph interact through

  6. International Space Exploration Coordination Group

    E-print Network

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    International Space Exploration Coordination Group The Global Exploration Roadmap August 2013 #12 The Global Exploration Roadmap is being developed by space agencies participating in the International Space for collaborative space exploration missions beginning with the International Space Station (ISS) and continuing

  7. The Drosophila Polycomb Group Protein Psc Contacts ph and Pc through Specific Conserved Domains

    PubMed Central

    Kyba, Michael; Brock, Hugh W.

    1998-01-01

    The Polycomb group proteins are transcriptional repressors that are thought to act through multimeric nuclear complexes. We show that ph and Psc coprecipitate with Pc from nuclear extracts. We have analyzed the domains required for the association of Psc with ph and Pc by using the yeast two-hybrid system and an in vitro protein-binding assay. Psc and ph interact through regions of sequence conservation with mammalian homologs, i.e., the H1 domain of ph (amino acids 1297 to 1418) and the helix-turn-helix-containing region of Psc (amino acids 336 to 473). Psc contacts Pc primarily at the helix-turn-helix-containing region of Psc (amino acids 336 to 473), but also at the ring finger (amino acids 250 to 335). The Pc chromobox is not required for this interaction. We discuss the implication of these results for the nature of the complexes formed by Polycomb group proteins. PMID:9566890

  8. Coset spaces for quantum groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoda, Zoran

    Consideration of symmetries often simplifies problems in physics and geometry. Quantum groups are analogues of groups, and they can describe a novel kind of symmetry. We view them as objects of noncommutative geometry. They may act on algebras of noncommutative or quantum observables. We propose a theory of coset spaces for quantum groups in the language of coactions of Hopf algebras and analyse an example which should be thought as a quantum group analogue of the flag variety. In the classical case the flag variety is the coset space of the special linear group modulo its Borel subgroup of lower triangular matrices. We introduce and study a notion of localized coinvariants; the quantum group coset space is viewed as a system of algebras of localized coinvariants, equipped with a quantum version of the locally trivial principal bundle where the total space is described by the quantum special linear group and the base space is described by the system of algebras of localized coinvariants. We use quasideterminants, the commutation relations between the quantum minors and the noncommutative Gauss decomposition to formulate and prove the main results. We apply our axiomatization of quantum group fibre bundles to obtain a generalization of a concept of Perelomov coherent states to the Hopf algebra setting and obtain the corresponding resolution of unity formula.

  9. Symmetric spaces of exceptional groups

    SciTech Connect

    Boya, L. J., E-mail: luisjo@unizar.e [Universidad de Zaragoza, Departamento de Fisica Teorica (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    We address the problem of the reasons for the existence of 12 symmetric spaces with the exceptional Lie groups. The 1 + 2 cases for G{sub 2} and F{sub 4}, respectively, are easily explained from the octonionic nature of these groups. The 4 + 3 + 2 cases on the E{sub 6,7,8} series require the magic square of Freudenthal and, for the split case, an appeal to the supergravity chain in 5, 4, and 3 space-time dimensions.

  10. IDENTIFYING THE YOUNG LOW-MASS STARS WITHIN 25 pc. II. DISTANCES, KINEMATICS, AND GROUP MEMBERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 W. Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Anglada-Escude, Guillem [Institut fuer Astrophysik, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany); Liu, Michael C.; Bowler, Brendan P. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Weinberger, Alycia J.; Boss, Alan P. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution for Science, 5241 Broad Branch Road, NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Reid, I. Neill [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Tamura, Motohide, E-mail: shkolnik@lowell.edu [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-10-10

    We have conducted a kinematic study of 165 young M dwarfs with ages of {approx}<300 Myr. Our sample is composed of stars and brown dwarfs with spectral types ranging from K7 to L0, detected by ROSAT and with photometric distances of {approx}<25 pc assuming that the stars are single and on the main sequence. In order to find stars kinematically linked to known young moving groups (YMGs), we measured radial velocities for the complete sample with Keck and CFHT optical spectroscopy and trigonometric parallaxes for 75 of the M dwarfs with the CAPSCam instrument on the du Pont 2.5 m Telescope. Due to their youthful overluminosity and unresolved binarity, the original photometric distances for our sample underestimated the distances by 70% on average, excluding two extremely young ({approx}<3 Myr) objects found to have distances beyond a few hundred parsecs. We searched for kinematic matches to 14 reported YMGs and identified 10 new members of the AB Dor YMG and 2 of the Ursa Majoris group. Additional possible candidates include six Castor, four Ursa Majoris, two AB Dor members, and one member each of the Her-Lyr and {beta} Pic groups. Our sample also contains 27 young low-mass stars and 4 brown dwarfs with ages {approx}<150 Myr that are not associated with any known YMG. We identified an additional 15 stars that are kinematic matches to one of the YMGs, but the ages from spectroscopic diagnostics and/or the positions on the sky do not match. These warn against grouping stars together based only on kinematics and that a confluence of evidence is required to claim that a group of stars originated from the same star-forming event.

  11. Space complexity of Abelian groups

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Douglas Cenzer; Rodney G. Downey; Jeffrey B. Remmel; Zia Uddin

    2009-01-01

    We develop a theory of LOGSPACE structures and apply it to con- struct a number of examples of Abelian Groups which have LOGSPACE presentations. We show that all computable torsion Abelian groups have LOGSPACE presentations and we show that the groups Z, Z(p1), and the additive group of the rationals have LOGSPACE presentations over a standard universe such as the

  12. Group actions on geodesic Ptolemy spaces

    E-print Network

    Foertsch, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we study geodesic Ptolemy metric spaces $X$ which allow proper and cocompact isometric actions of crystallographic or, more generally, virtual polycyclic groups. We show that $X$ is equivariantly rough isometric to a Euclidean space.

  13. Aeritalia Space Systems Group, Turin, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donlan, Vincent

    1989-01-01

    Aeritalia has been involved in European space programs since the early 1960's. Space activities grew to the point that in 1984 Aeritalia established a separate Space Systems Group (SSG), located in Turin. Today, SSG is involved in dozens of projects, some of them jointly with NASA and U.S. aerospace companies. Here, several of the major projects, such as the Tethered Satellite system, HIPPARCOS, Columbus Pressurized Module, Italian Research Interim Stage, and others are briefly described.

  14. Quantum group gauge theory on quantum spaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomasz Brzezinski; Shahn Majid

    1993-01-01

    We construct quantum group-valued canonical connections on quantum homogeneous spaces, including aq-deformed Dirac monopole on the quantum sphere of Podles with quantum differential structure coming from the 3D calculus of Woronowicz onSUq(2). The construction is presented within the setting of a general theory of quantum principal bundles with quantum group (Hopf algebra) fibre, associated quantum vector bundles and connection one-forms.

  15. UK Space Exploration Working Group Report of the

    E-print Network

    Crowther, Paul

    UK Space Exploration Working Group Report of the UK Space Exploration Working Group 13 September 2007 #12;UK Space Exploration Working Group The UK Space Exploration Working Group Chair: Prof Frank committee to: · review current global plans for space exploration; · assess what opportunities and benefits

  16. DYNAMICS OF PLANETCROSSING ASTEROIDS Space Mechanics Group,

    E-print Network

    Milani, Andrea

    DYNAMICS OF PLANET­CROSSING ASTEROIDS A. MILANI Space Mechanics Group, Department of Mathematics, including Earth­crossing ones. The dynamics of planet­crossing asteroids/comets is strongly con­ trolled in a satisfactory way most of the dynamical behaviors found in the experiments. 1. THE ASTEROID COMPLEX, NEAR EARTH

  17. Optimal space-time constellations from groups

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian L. Hughes

    2003-01-01

    We consider the design of space-time constellations based on group codes for fading channels with multiple transmit and receive antennas. These codes can be viewed as multiantenna extensions of phase-shift keying (PSK), in the sense that all codewords have equal energy, all are rotations of a fixed codeword, and there is a simple differential transmission rule that allows data to

  18. PC software graphics tool for conceptual design of space/planetary electrical power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, L.V. [NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the Decision Support System (DSS), a personal computer software graphics tool for designing conceptual space and/or planetary electrical power systems. By using the DSS, users can obtain desirable system design and operating parameters, such as system weight, electrical distribution efficiency, and bus power. With this tool, a large-scale specific power system was designed in a matter of days. It is an excellent tool to help designers make tradeoffs between system components, hardware architectures, and operation parameters in the early stages of the design cycle. The DSS is a user-friendly, menu-driven tool with online help and a custom graphical user interface. An example design and results are illustrated for a typical space power system with multiple types of power sources, frequencies, energy storage systems, and loads.

  19. PC Software graphics tool for conceptual design of space/planetary electrical power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, Long V.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the Decision Support System (DSS), a personal computer software graphics tool for designing conceptual space and/or planetary electrical power systems. By using the DSS, users can obtain desirable system design and operating parameters, such as system weight, electrical distribution efficiency, and bus power. With this tool, a large-scale specific power system was designed in a matter of days. It is an excellent tool to help designers make tradeoffs between system components, hardware architectures, and operation parameters in the early stages of the design cycle. The DSS is a user-friendly, menu-driven tool with online help and a custom graphical user interface. An example design and results are illustrated for a typical space power system with multiple types of power sources, frequencies, energy storage systems, and loads.

  20. An IBM PC-based math model for space station solar array simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emanuel, E. M.

    1986-01-01

    This report discusses and documents the design, development, and verification of a microcomputer-based solar cell math model for simulating the Space Station's solar array Initial Operational Capability (IOC) reference configuration. The array model is developed utilizing a linear solar cell dc math model requiring only five input parameters: short circuit current, open circuit voltage, maximum power voltage, maximum power current, and orbit inclination. The accuracy of this model is investigated using actual solar array on orbit electrical data derived from the Solar Array Flight Experiment/Dynamic Augmentation Experiment (SAFE/DAE), conducted during the STS-41D mission. This simulator provides real-time simulated performance data during the steady state portion of the Space Station orbit (i.e., array fully exposed to sunlight). Eclipse to sunlight transients and shadowing effects are not included in the analysis, but are discussed briefly. Integrating the Solar Array Simulator (SAS) into the Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) subsystem is also discussed.

  1. The space shuttle payload planning working groups: Executive summaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings of a space shuttle payload planning group session are presented. The purpose of the workshop is: (1) to provide guidance for the design and development of the space shuttle and the spacelab and (2) to plan a space science and applications program for the 1980 time period. Individual groups were organized to cover the various space sciences, applications, technologies, and life sciences. Summaries of the reports submitted by the working groups are provided.

  2. Space station group activities habitability module study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, David

    1986-01-01

    This study explores and analyzes architectural design approaches for the interior of the Space Station Habitability Module (originally defined as Habitability Module 1 in Space Station Reference Configuration Decription, JSC-19989, August 1984). In the Research Phase, architectural program and habitability design guidelines are specified. In the Schematic Design Phase, a range of alternative concepts is described and illustrated with drawings, scale-model photographs and design analysis evaluations. Recommendations are presented on the internal architectural, configuration of the Space Station Habitability Module for such functions as the wardroom, galley, exercise facility, library and station control work station. The models show full design configurations for on-orbit performance.

  3. SPACES OF BOUNDED SPHERICAL FUNCTIONS ON HEISENBERG GROUPS: PART I

    E-print Network

    Benson, Chal

    SPACES OF BOUNDED SPHERICAL FUNCTIONS ON HEISENBERG GROUPS: PART I CHAL BENSON AND GAIL RATCLIFF hermitian vector space V . Letting K act on the associ- ated Heisenberg group HV = V Ã? R yields a Gelfand. Primary 43A90; Secondary 20G05, 43A75. 1 #12;2 C. BENSON AND G. RATCLIFF finite dimensional complex vector

  4. The International Space Life Sciences Strategic Planning Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Ronald J.; Rabin, Robert; Lujan, Barbara F.

    1993-01-01

    Throughout the 1980s, ESA and the space agencies of Canada, Germany, France, Japan, and the U.S. have pursued cooperative projects bilaterally and multilaterally to prepare for, and to respond to, opportunities in space life sciences research previously unapproachable in scale and sophistication. To cope effectively with likely future space research opportunities, broad, multilateral, coordinated strategic planning is required. Thus, life scientists from these agencies have allied to form the International Space Life Sciences Strategic Planning Working Group. This Group is formally organized under a charter that specifies the purpose of the Working Group as the development of an international strategic plan for the space life sciences, with periodic revisions as needed to keep the plan current. The plan will be policy-, not operations-oriented. The Working Group also may establish specific implementation teams to coordinate multilateral science policy in specific areas; such teams have been established for space station utilization, and for sharing of flight equipment.

  5. Automatic space group determination using precession electron diffraction patterns

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Oleynikov; S. Hovmöller; X. D. Zou

    A set of algorithms for automatic High Order Laue Zone (HOLZ) indexing and possible set of space groups extraction were developed\\u000a and implemented in the “Space Group Determinator” program. The symmetry analysis is performed using Morniroli-Steeds tables\\u000a [1 and 2]. The developed program becomes extremely useful for the analysis of precession electron diffraction patterns (PEDs,\\u000a see Fig. 1) [3]. “Space

  6. Semisimple actions of mapping class groups on CAT(0) spaces

    E-print Network

    Bridson, Martin

    1 Semisimple actions of mapping class groups on CAT(0) spaces Martin R. Bridson 1 Mathematical type and let Mod() be its mapping class group. We consider actions of Mod() by semisimple isometries-Petersson metric shows that there are interesting actions of this type. Whenever the mapping class group

  7. Drosophila O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) is encoded by the Polycomb group (PcG) gene, super sex combs (sxc)

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Donald A. R.; Syrzycka, Monika; Macauley, Matthew S.; Rastgardani, Tara; Komljenovic, Ivana; Vocadlo, David J.; Brock, Hugh W.; Honda, Barry M.

    2009-01-01

    O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT) reversibly modifies serine and threonine residues of many intracellular proteins with a single ?-O-linked N-acetylglucosamine residue (O-GlcNAc), and has been implicated in insulin signaling, neurodegenerative disease, cellular stress response, and other important processes in mammals. OGT also glycosylates RNA polymerase II and various transcription factors, which suggests that it might be directly involved in transcriptional regulation. We report here that the Drosophila OGT is encoded by the Polycomb group (PcG) gene, super sex combs (sxc). Furthermore, major sites of O-GlcNAc modification on polytene chromosomes correspond to PcG protein binding sites. Our results thus suggest a direct role for O-linked glycosylation by OGT in PcG-mediated epigenetic gene silencing, which is important in developmental regulation, stem cell maintenance, genomic imprinting, and cancer. In addition, we observe rescue of sxc lethality by a human Ogt cDNA transgene; thus Drosophila may provide an ideal model to study important functional roles of OGT in mammals. PMID:19666537

  8. Actuator Grouping Optimization on Flexible Space Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Jeffrey R.; Wang, K. W.; Fang, Houfei; Quijano, Ubaldo

    2011-01-01

    With the rapid advances in deployable membrane and mesh antenna technologies, the feasibility of developing large, lightweight reflectors has greatly improved. In order to achieve the required surface accuracy, precision surface control is needed on these lightweight reflectors. For this study, an analytical model is shown which combines a flexible Kapton reflector with Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) actuators for surface control. Surface errors are introduced that are similar to real world scenarios, and a least squares control algorithm is developed for surface control. Experimental results on a 2.4 meter reflector show that while the analytical reflector model is generally correct, due to idiosyncrasies in the reflector it cannot be used for online control. A new method called the En Mass Elimination algorithm is used to determine the optimal grouping of actuators when the number of actuators in the system exceeds the number of power supplies available.

  9. Group theoretical construction of planar noncommutative phase spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ngendakumana, Ancille, E-mail: nancille@yahoo.fr; Todjihoundé, Leonard, E-mail: leonardt@imsp.uac.org [Institut de Mathématiques et des Sciences Physiques (IMSP), Porto-Novo (Benin)] [Institut de Mathématiques et des Sciences Physiques (IMSP), Porto-Novo (Benin); Nzotungicimpaye, Joachim, E-mail: kimpaye@kie.ac.rw [Kigali Institute of Education (KIE), Kigali (Rwanda)] [Kigali Institute of Education (KIE), Kigali (Rwanda)

    2014-01-15

    Noncommutative phase spaces are generated and classified in the framework of centrally extended anisotropic planar kinematical Lie groups as well as in the framework of noncentrally abelian extended planar absolute time Lie groups. Through these constructions the coordinates of the phase spaces do not commute due to the presence of naturally introduced fields giving rise to minimal couplings. By symplectic realizations methods, physical interpretations of generators coming from the obtained structures are given.

  10. Linear spaces with flag-transitive automophism groups

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francis Buekenhout; Anne Delandtsheer; Jean Doyen; Peter B. Kleidman; Martin W. Liebeck; Jan Saxl

    1990-01-01

    Our purpose here is to announce a classification of the pairs (S, G), where S is a non-trivial finite linear space and (; is a group of automorphisms acting transitively on the flags of S. Here, by a linear space S we mean a finite incidence structure of points and lines such that any two points are incident with exactly

  11. SHELXT – Integrated space-group and crystal-structure determination

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldrick, George M., E-mail: gsheldr@shelx.uni-ac.gwdg.de [Georg-August Universität Göttingen, Tammannstrasse 4, Göttingen, 37077 (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    SHELXT automates routine small-molecule structure determination starting from single-crystal reflection data, the Laue group and a reasonable guess as to which elements might be present. The new computer program SHELXT employs a novel dual-space algorithm to solve the phase problem for single-crystal reflection data expanded to the space group P1. Missing data are taken into account and the resolution extended if necessary. All space groups in the specified Laue group are tested to find which are consistent with the P1 phases. After applying the resulting origin shifts and space-group symmetry, the solutions are subject to further dual-space recycling followed by a peak search and summation of the electron density around each peak. Elements are assigned to give the best fit to the integrated peak densities and if necessary additional elements are considered. An isotropic refinement is followed for non-centrosymmetric space groups by the calculation of a Flack parameter and, if appropriate, inversion of the structure. The structure is assembled to maximize its connectivity and centred optimally in the unit cell. SHELXT has already solved many thousand structures with a high success rate, and is optimized for multiprocessor computers. It is, however, unsuitable for severely disordered and twinned structures because it is based on the assumption that the structure consists of atoms.

  12. SHELXT - integrated space-group and crystal-structure determination.

    PubMed

    Sheldrick, George M

    2015-01-01

    The new computer program SHELXT employs a novel dual-space algorithm to solve the phase problem for single-crystal reflection data expanded to the space group P1. Missing data are taken into account and the resolution extended if necessary. All space groups in the specified Laue group are tested to find which are consistent with the P1 phases. After applying the resulting origin shifts and space-group symmetry, the solutions are subject to further dual-space recycling followed by a peak search and summation of the electron density around each peak. Elements are assigned to give the best fit to the integrated peak densities and if necessary additional elements are considered. An isotropic refinement is followed for non-centrosymmetric space groups by the calculation of a Flack parameter and, if appropriate, inversion of the structure. The structure is assembled to maximize its connectivity and centred optimally in the unit cell. SHELXT has already solved many thousand structures with a high success rate, and is optimized for multiprocessor computers. It is, however, unsuitable for severely disordered and twinned structures because it is based on the assumption that the structure consists of atoms. PMID:25537383

  13. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 10: Space technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings and recommendations of the Space Technology group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The elements of the space technology program are: (1) long duration exposure facility, (2) advanced technology laboratory, (3) physics and chemistry laboratory, (4) contamination experiments, and (5) laser information/data transmission technology. The space technology mission model is presented in tabular form. The proposed experiments to be conducted by each test facility are described. Recommended approaches for user community interfacing are included.

  14. Every finite group is the group of self homotopy equivalences of an elliptic space

    E-print Network

    Costoya, C

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we prove that every finite group $G$ can be realized as the group of self-homotopy equivalences of infinitely many (non homotopy equivalent) rational elliptic spaces $X$. Moreover, for every $k$ positive integer, $X$ can be chosen to be $k$-connected.

  15. Real-space renormalization group approach to driven diffusive systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Hanney; R. B. Stinchcombe

    2006-01-01

    We introduce a real-space renormalization group procedure for driven diffusive systems which predicts both steady state and dynamic properties. We apply the method to the boundary driven asymmetric simple exclusion process and recover exact results for the steady state phase diagram, as well as the crossovers in the relaxation dynamics for each phase.

  16. Representations of finite groups on Riemann-Roch spaces, II

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Joyner; Amy Ksir

    2003-01-01

    If G is a finite subgroup of the automorphism group of a projective curve X and D is a divisor on X stabilized by G, then under the assumption that D is nonspecial, we compute a simplified formula for the trace of the natural representation of G on Riemann-Roch space L(D).

  17. CONFIGURATION SPACES AND BRAID GROUPS ON GRAPHS IN ROBOTICS

    E-print Network

    Ghrist, Robert W.

    CONFIGURATION SPACES AND BRAID GROUPS ON GRAPHS IN ROBOTICS ROBERT GHRIST School of Mathematics control schemes for Automated Guided Vehicles (robots) in industrial settings. In this announcement, we filtered through the robotics community [Lat91, KR90]. Surprisingly, topologists have been generally

  18. The Lorentzian oscillator group as a geodesic orbit space

    SciTech Connect

    Batat, W. [Ecole Normale Superieure d'Enseignement Technologique d'Oran, Departement de Mathematiques et Informatique, B.P. 1523, El M'Naouar, Oran (Algeria); Gadea, P. M. [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Oubina, J. A. [Departamento de Xeometria e Topoloxia, Facultade de Matematicas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    We prove that the four-dimensional oscillator group Os, endowed with any of its usual left-invariant Lorentzian metrics, is a Lorentzian geodesic (so, in particular, null-geodesic) orbit space with some of its homogeneous descriptions corresponding to certain homogeneous Lorentzian structures. Each time that Os is endowed with a suitable metric and an appropriate homogeneous Lorentzian structure, it is a candidate for constructing solutions in d-dimensional supergravity with at least 24 of the 32 possible supersymmetries.

  19. Space station group activities habitability module study: A synopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, David; Glassman, Terry

    1987-01-01

    Space station habitability was studied by investigating crew activity routines, proximities, ergonomic envelopes, and group volumes. Ten alternative schematic interior designs were proposed. Preliminary conclusions include: (1) in-service interior modifications may be necessary and should be planned for; (2) design complexity will be increased if the module cluster is reduced from five to three; (3) the increased crew circulation attendant upon enhancement of space station activity may produce human traffic bottlenecks and should be planned for; (4) a single- or two-person quiet area may be desirable to provide crew members with needed solitude during waking hours; and (5) the decision to choose a two-shift or three-shift daily cycle will have a significant impact on the design configuration and operational efficiency of the human habitat.

  20. Introduction Surface actions and mapping class group Moduli space Elementary abelian actions References Elementary Abelian Group Actions on

    E-print Network

    Broughton, S. Allen

    Introduction Surface actions and mapping class group Moduli space Elementary abelian actions, 2007 #12;Introduction Surface actions and mapping class group Moduli space Elementary abelian actions and the mapping class group - background, some geometry in this part classification of elementary abelian actions

  1. Tall tales from de Sitter space; 1, Renormalization group flows

    E-print Network

    Leblond, F; Myers, R C; Leblond, Frederic; Marolf, Donald; Myers, Robert C.

    2002-01-01

    We study solutions of Einstein gravity coupled to a positive cosmological constant and matter, which are asymptotically de Sitter and homogeneous. Regarded as perturbations of de Sitter space, a theorem of Gao and Wald implies that generically these solutions are `tall,' meaning that the perturbed universe lives through enough conformal time for an entire spherical Cauchy surface to enter any observer's past light cone. Such observers will realize that their universe is spatially compact. An interesting fact, which we demonstrate with an explicit example, is that this Cauchy surface can have arbitrarily large volume for fixed asymptotically de Sitter behavior. Our main focus is on the implications of tall universes for the proposed dS/CFT correspondence. Particular attention is given to the associated renormalization group flows, leading to a more general de Sitter `c-theorem.' We find, as expected, that a contracting phase always represents a flow towards the infrared, while an expanding phase represents a `...

  2. Regularity Properties and Pathologies of PositionSpace RenormalizationGroup

    E-print Network

    Regularity Properties and Pathologies of Position­Space Renormalization­Group Transformations.EDU October 16, 1992 Short title: Renormalization­Group Pathologies KEY WORDS: Renormalization group; position­space renormalization; real­space renormalization; decimation transformation; majority­rule transformation; Kadanoff

  3. Report of the Working Group on Space/Lunar Tradeoffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The group discussed the advantages and disadvantages of five locations for an optical/infrared array: low-Earth orbit (LEO), Sun-synchronous Earth-orbit, geosynchronous orbit (GEO), Lagrangian points (L4 and L5), and the lunar surface. The factors affecting an array and our assessments of them are given and briefly discussed. In the discussions, two axioms are assumed: (1) Human expansion into space and to the Moon will occur; and (2) The Space Station will be constructed and operational. The major conclusion reached is that baselines of moderate size (greater than 300 m) are best done on the Moon and that large baselines (greater than 10 km) can be done only on the Moon. Three areas needing additional research were identified as follows. (1) Studies are needed on methods to steer long-baseline systems in orbit. This involves learning how to control free-flyers. It is not clear how the difficulty of control varies with orbital elevation. (2) More work is needed on the internal metrology of array systems, both orbital and lunar-surface systems.(3) We need to understand the radiation effects on detectors and electronics and learn how to mitigate them.

  4. Classification of Quaternionic Spaces with a Transitive Solvable Group of Motions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. V. Alekseevskii

    1975-01-01

    A complete classification of quaternionic Riemannian spaces (that is, spaces \\\\mathcal{V}^n with the holonomy group \\\\Gamma\\\\subset Sp(1)\\\\cdot Sp(m), n=4m) which admit a transitive solvable group of motions is given. It turns out that the rank of these spaces does not exceed four and that all spaces \\\\mathcal{V}^n whose rank is less than four are symmetric. The spaces \\\\mathcal{V}^n of rank

  5. Tall tales from de Sitter space I: Renormalization group flows

    E-print Network

    Frederic Leblond; Donald Marolf; Robert C. Myers

    2002-04-09

    We study solutions of Einstein gravity coupled to a positive cosmological constant and matter, which are asymptotically de Sitter and homogeneous. Regarded as perturbations of de Sitter space, a theorem of Gao and Wald implies that generically these solutions are `tall,' meaning that the perturbed universe lives through enough conformal time for an entire spherical Cauchy surface to enter any observer's past light cone. Such observers will realize that their universe is spatially compact. An interesting fact, which we demonstrate with an explicit example, is that this Cauchy surface can have arbitrarily large volume for fixed asymptotically de Sitter behavior. Our main focus is on the implications of tall universes for the proposed dS/CFT correspondence. Particular attention is given to the associated renormalization group flows, leading to a more general de Sitter `c-theorem.' We find, as expected, that a contracting phase always represents a flow towards the infrared, while an expanding phase represents a `reverse' flow towards the ultraviolet. We also discuss the conformal diagrams for various classes of homogeneous flows.

  6. Four-dimensional space groups for pedestrians: composite structures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Junliang; Lee, Stephen; Lin, Jianhua

    2007-10-01

    Higher-dimensional crystals have been studied for the last thirty years. However, most practicing chemists, materials scientists, and crystallographers continue to eschew the use of higher-dimensional crystallography in their work. Yet it has become increasingly clear in recent years that the number of higher-dimensional systems continues to grow from hundreds to as many as a thousand different compounds. Part of the problem has to do with the somewhat opaque language that has developed over the past decades to describe higher-dimensional systems. This language, while well-suited to the specialist, is too sophisticated for the neophyte wishing to enter the field, and as such can be an impediment. This Focus Review hopes to address this issue. The goal of this article is to show the regular chemist or materials scientist that knowledge of regular 3D crystallography is all that is really necessary to understand 4D crystal systems. To this end, we have couched higher-dimensional composite structures in the language of ordinary 3D crystals. In particular, we developed the principle of complementarity, which allows one to identify correctly 4D space groups solely from examination of the two 3D components that make up a typical 4D composite structure. PMID:17886829

  7. Future of the US Space Launch capability: A task group report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-11-01

    In July 1992, a special task group of the Space Policy Advisory Board reviewed the nation's Space Launch Strategy approved by the President in July 1991. The report contains the findings and recommendations of the Task Group. The Task Group has provided a set of recommendations from a 'national' perspective that will improve our nation's space launch capability, make us more competitive in the international marketplace, and reduce the cost of government space launch operations. The U.S. should start a single, completely new, 'Spacelifter' space launch vehicle program. The Spacelifter program would focus on the medium performance range, but be 'modular' in its performance capability. The task group also recommends a transition plan to phase out the older and expensive space launch vehicles, including the Space Shuttle. The task group further recommends that a centralized management structure be established to oversee Spacelifter and other space launch activities.

  8. ISECG ToR 6 November 2007 INTERNATIONAL SPACE EXPLORATION COORDINATION GROUP

    E-print Network

    ISECG ToR 6 November 2007 INTERNATIONAL SPACE EXPLORATION COORDINATION GROUP Terms of Reference In 2006, 14 space agencies1 began a series of discussions on global interests in space exploration, and developed a common set of key space exploration themes. This vision was articulated in `The Global

  9. PC-FACS.

    PubMed

    Zhukovsky, Donna S

    2015-07-01

    PC-FACS(FastArticleCriticalSummaries for Clinicians inPalliativeCare) provides hospice and palliative care clinicians with concise summaries of the most important findings from more than 100 medical and scientific journals. If you have colleagues who would benefit from receiving PC-FACS, please encourage them to join the AAHPM at aahpm.org. Comments from readers are welcomed at pc-facs@aahpm.org. PMID:26072324

  10. Differential geometry of the space of orbits of a Coxeter group

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Boris Dubrovin

    1993-01-01

    Differential-geometric structures on the space of orbits of a finite Coxeter group, determined by Groth\\\\'endieck residues, are calculated. This gives a construction of a 2D topological field theory for an arbitrary Coxeter group.

  11. Supplementary Text to accompany "Cell Groups Reveal Structure of Stimulus Space"

    E-print Network

    Logan, David

    Supplementary Text to accompany "Cell Groups Reveal Structure of Stimulus Space" Carina Curto coefficients There are many definitions of homology groups, and these can be shown to be equivalent for many

  12. Some Groups Having Only Elementary Actions on Metric Spaces with Hyperbolic Boundaries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anders Karlsson; Guennadi A. Noskov

    2004-01-01

    We study isometric actions of certain groups on metric spaces with hyperbolic-type bordifications. The class of groups considered includes SLn(Z), Artin braid groups and mapping class groups of surfaces (except the lower rank ones). We prove that in various ways such actions must be elementary. Most of our results hold for non-locally compact spaces and extend what is known for

  13. Group systems, groupoids, and moduli spaces of parabolic bundles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Guruprasad; J. Huebschmann; L. Jeffrey; A. Weinstein

    1995-01-01

    Let $G$ be a Lie group, with an invariant non-degenerate symmetric bilinear form on its Lie algebra, let $\\\\pi$ be the fundamental group of an orientable (real) surface $M$ with a finite number of punctures, and let $\\\\bold C$ be a family of conjugacy classes in $G$, one for each puncture. A finite-dimensional construction used earlier to obtain a symplectic

  14. Group Action Recognition Using Space-Time Interest Points

    E-print Network

    Ling, Haibin

    in computer vision due to the large complexity induced by multiple motion patterns. This paper aims the number of people in the group action. our purpose is to distinguish the group actions, just as basketball. In fact, the system has a linear time complexity, given previously extracted features. The rest

  15. Root filtration spaces from Lie algebras and abstract root groups 1

    E-print Network

    Cohen, Arjeh M.

    Root filtration spaces from Lie algebras and abstract root groups 1 Arjeh M. Cohen a, G subgroups and simple Lie algebras generated by extremal elements lead to root filtration spaces of buildings. Here we show how to obtain the root filtration space axioms from root subgroups and classical Lie

  16. An orientation for the SU(2) -representation space of knot groups

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Heusener; Blaise Pascal

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the SU(2)-representation spaces of knot groups. For a given a knot k?S3 we denote by R(k) the space of equivalence classes of irreducible representations of the knot group ?1(S3?k) in SU(2) and we denote by Reg(k)?R(k) the space of regular representations. It is well known that Reg(k)?R(k) is a real one-dimensional manifold.The

  17. The nature and space density of fossil groups of galaxies

    E-print Network

    L. R. Jones; T. J. Ponman; A. Horton; A. Babul; H. Ebeling; D. J. Burke

    2003-04-14

    We describe the properties of a sample of galaxy groups with very unusual distributions of galaxy luminosities. The most extreme example has an X-ray luminosity similar to that of the Virgo cluster but has a very low richness, with only one galaxy brighter than L*, compared with six in Virgo. That one galaxy, however, is optically more luminous than any galaxy in Virgo and has an optical luminosity as bright as many of the central cD galaxies in rich Abell clusters. The characteristic feature of the fossil groups we study is that most of the light arises from one dominant, central galaxy. We define a fossil system and, based on this definition, construct a small X-ray selected, flux-limited sample of fossil groups with well known selection criteria. We confirm that these systems are indeed groups of galaxies, but dominated by one central luminous giant elliptical galaxy and with few, or no, L* galaxies. We find that fossil systems represent 8%-20% of all systems of the same X-ray luminosity. Fossil groups are at least as numerous as all poor and rich clusters combined, and are thus a possible site for the formation of luminous central cluster galaxies before infall into clusters occurs. The fossil systems in our sample have significantly higher X-ray luminosities than normal groups of similar total optical luminosities (or similar X-ray temperature, where the latter can be measured). These enhanced X-ray luminosities may be due to relatively cool gas in the innermost regions or due to a low central gas entropy. We interpret fossil groups as old, undisturbed systems which have avoided infall into clusters, but where galaxy merging of most of the L* galaxies has occurred. An early formation epoch, before that of most groups, could explain low central gas entropies and high X-ray luminosities.

  18. Group calls for space policies to transcend politics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-06-01

    At a 22 May briefing, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) called on Congress to “establish space exploration policy goals which transcend partisan political differences.” AIAA president and former NASA administrator Michael Griffin said the “goal of establishing human capability to b e a space-faring species is not a short-term goal,” nor is it a goal that belongs to only one political party. “We will not reach long-term goals without a stable, coherent, sensible plan that transcends elections and leaders,” said Griffin, who has provided advice to Republican U.S. presidential candidate Mitt Romney. Griffin pointed to NASA's 2008 authorization as providing the kind of vision needed for NASA. The act called for human return to the Moon and preparation for the capability for permanent bases on the Moon, among other things, he said. “That's the kind of thing that we need. All of the goals espoused by the 2008 act were long-term, generational, strategic in scope,” Griffin said, adding that the act, which had bipartisan support, demonstrated “the kind of societal support, rather than political support, that I believe our space program deserves.”

  19. Marathons versus Spaced Groups: Skin Conductance and the Effects of Time Distribution on Encounter Group Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loomis, Thomas P.

    1988-01-01

    Randomly assigned 41 students to 2 twice-weekly groups, which met for 3 hours eight times; 2 marathons, which met continuously for 24 hours; and nontreatment control group. Treatment groups had significant positive changes on 14 of 15 measured personality variables between pre- and post-test, and positive change on all dependent measures between…

  20. PC-SPES (PDQ®)

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the use of PC-SPES as a treatment for prostate cancer. Note: The information in this summary is no longer being updated and is provided for reference purposes only.

  1. Castration Resistant PC (CRPC) With

    E-print Network

    Walter, Peter

    Legend Castration Resistant PC (CRPC) With Metastases Chemotherapy Metastatic Disease: Hormone Sensitive Prostate Cancer Rising PSA After Local Treatment Neoadjuvant Pre- Prostatectomy Castration Resistant PC (CRPC) With Metastases Post Chemotherapy Castration Resistant PC (CRPC) With Metastases

  2. SYMPLECTORMOPHISM GROUPS OF NON-COMPACT MANIFOLDS, ORBIFOLD BALLS, AND A SPACE OF

    E-print Network

    Hind, Richard

    the contact manifold is a Lens space L(n, 1) the compactly supported symplectomorphism group Sympc(sL(n, 1 RICHARD HIND, MARTIN PINSONNAULT, WEIWEI WU Abstract. We establish connections between contact isometry groups of cer- tain contact manifolds and compactly supported symplectomorphism groups

  3. Motions and pattern analysis: harmonic analysis on motion groups and their homogeneous spaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-Paul Gauthier; Guy Bornard; Martine Silbermann

    1991-01-01

    Fourier-like transforms that are defined on several groups of motions on the plane and on the plane itself (viewed as the homogeneous space of these motion groups) are presented. These transforms should have many applications in the area of pattern recognition, detection, and the representation of motions in pattern analysis. The method is based upon group-representation theory and abstract harmonic

  4. Polyimides Containing Pendent Phosphine Oxide Groups for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Watson, K. A.; Connell, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    As part of an ongoing materials development activity to produce high performance polymers that are durable to the space environment, phosphine oxide containing polyimides have been under investigation. A novel dianhydride was prepared from 2,5-dihydroxyphenyldiphenylphosphine oxide in good yield. The dianhydride was reacted with commercially available diamines, and a previously reported diamine was reacted with commercially available dianhydrides to prepare isomeric polyimides. The physical and mechanical properties, particularly thermal and optical properties, of the polymers were determined. One material exhibited a high glass transition temperature, high tensile properties, and low solar absorptivity. The chemistry, physical, and mechanical properties of these resins will be discussed.

  5. Distributed Space-Time Block Coded OFDM with Subcarrier Grouping

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nam H. Vien; Ha H. Nguyen; Tho Le-ngoc

    2008-01-01

    It has been shown that relaying systems can offer spatial and multipath diversity in amplify-and-forward (AF) relay-assisted transmission over frequency-selective fading channels when trellis coded modulation (TCM) is applied as an outer code. However, the price for such advantages is the high decoding complexity. To overcome this disadvantage, the technique of subcarrier grouping is applied for orthogonal frequency division multiplexing

  6. A MODULATED MULTIBAND Pc1 EVENT OBSERVED BY POLAR/EFI AROUND THE PLASMAPAUSE

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    in amplitude, corresponding to classical Pc1 pearls. The repetition period was the same on ground and in space. Moreover, the repetition period of Pc1 pearls coincided with the period of simultaneous Pc4 waves observed by POLAR and on ground. The observations suggest that Pc1 pearls (EMIC waves in general) are modulated

  7. Unitary Space-Time Constellations Based on Finite Reflection Group Codes

    E-print Network

    Nevins, Monica

    1 Unitary Space-Time Constellations Based on Finite Reflection Group Codes Terasan Niyomsataya, Ali diversity unitary space-time constellations for two transmitter antennas. Our proposed constellations unitary constellation designs in the literature. I. INTRODUCTION Consider a multiple-antenna system with M

  8. Outreach of Astronomy with emphasis to the Solar System by the Space group in Greece

    Microsoft Academic Search

    X. Moussas; K. Dialynas; G. Babasides; G. Fasoulopoulos; V. Dimitropoulou; D. Prassopoulos; S. Kouphos; E. Spandagos; J. Strikis

    2006-01-01

    We have a long tradition in Space and Solar System outreach at the University of Athens (Space Group). We have contributed with many popular science articles in encyclopaedias (a total of some 200000 words), magazines and newspapers, public lectures around Greece and radio and TV programmes. We contribute in exhibitions for the public on many occasions (e.g. The British Exploration

  9. Spacing pattern in a social group of stray cats: effects on male reproductive success

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ludovic Say; Dominique Pontier

    2004-01-01

    Reproductive consequences of male spacing patterns have received relatively little attention in nonterritorial mammals, in particular in group-living species, where most studies have focused on the relation between social rank and reproductive success. We investigated the effects of spacing pattern on male reproductive success within a social, nonterritorial, promiscuous population of stray cats, Felis catus. Male home ranges overlapped home

  10. The Chow group of the moduli space of marked cubic surfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elisabetta Colombo; Bert van Geemen

    2004-01-01

    Naruki gave an explicit construction of the moduli space of marked cubic surfaces, starting from a toric variety and proceeding with blow-ups and contractions. Using his result, we compute the Chow groups and the Chern classes of this moduli space. As an application we relate a recent result of Freitag on the Hilbert polynomial of a certain ring of modular

  11. Yang-Mills theory as Schroedinger quantum mechanics on the space of gauge-group orbits

    SciTech Connect

    Gawedzki, K.

    1982-12-15

    Recent proposals to study Yang-Mills theory on the space of gauge-group orbits are reconsidered. In particular, it is shown that the right formal Hamiltonian is not given by -h/sup 2//2 times the Laplace-Beltrami operator plus the standard ''magnetic field'' potential, as was suggested, but has an additional potential term proportional to h/sup 2/ and is expressible in terms of the geometry not only of the space of gauge-group orbits but also of the orbits themselves as embedded in the space of gauge fields. Formal discussion of the continuum fields is substantiated by a rigorous consideration of lattice gauge theory.

  12. PC Expo 2001

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    PC Expo 2001 wrapped up yesterday, and CNET offers a recap and its best of show awards at this site. Best of show categories include personal technology, emerging technology, enterprise product, business solution, and best overall. Each listing contains a brief description and a video segment. Also at the site are numerous short articles on various products and trends at the expo.

  13. The quaternionic affine group and related continuous wavelet transforms on complex and quaternionic Hilbert spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, S. Twareque; Thirulogasanthar, K.

    2014-06-01

    By analogy with the real and complex affine groups, whose unitary irreducible representations are used to define the one- and two-dimensional continuous wavelet transforms, we study here the quaternionic affine group and construct its unitary irreducible representations. These representations are constructed both on a complex and on a quaternionic Hilbert space. As in the real and complex cases, the representations for the quaternionic group also turn out to be square-integrable. Using these representations we construct quaternionic wavelets and continuous wavelet transforms on both the complex and quaternionic Hilbert spaces.

  14. The Quaternionic Affine Group and Related Continuous Wavelet Transforms on Complex and Quaternionic Hilbert Spaces

    E-print Network

    S. Twareque Ali; K. Thirulogasanthar

    2014-02-13

    By analogy with the real and complex affine groups, whose unitary irreducible representations are used to define the one and two-dimensional continuous wavelet transforms, we study here the quaternionic affine group and construct its unitary irreducible representations. These representations are constructed both on a complex and a quaternionic Hilbert space. As in the real and complex cases, the representations for the quaternionic group also turn out to be square-integrable. Using these representations we constrct quaternionic wavelets and continuous wavelet transforms on both the complex and quaternionic Hilbert spaces.

  15. The effect of in-line spacing of two cylinder groups on the Morison force coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.J.; Haritos, N. [Univ. of Melbourne (Australia). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes some results from an experimental study undertaken in the University of Melbourne`s Michell Laboratory which has investigated the interference effect associated with closely spaced cylinder groups on the in-line Morison force coefficients. Previous experimental studies undertaken at the University of Melbourne identified that the closely spaced cylinder range, (spacing to diameter ratio less than 3), is critical to the determination of the Morison force coefficients for tandem cylinders. The current research extends the previous work conducted in the department by investigating in more detail the closely spaced cylinder regime whilst extending results into the drag dominant regime (Keulegan-Carpenter number > 20). Results presented herein are limited to the exploration of the effect of varying the spacing of two cylinder groups oriented in-line to the direction of the uni-directional waves.

  16. Current Activities and Capabilities of the Terrestrial Environment Group at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry C.; Batts, Wade

    1997-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) designated Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) the center of excellence for space transportation. The Aerospace Environments and Effects (AEE) team of the Electromagnetics and Aerospace Environments Branch (EL23) in the Systems Analysis and Integration Laboratory at MSFC, supports the center of excellence designation by providing near-Earth space, deep space, planetary, and terrestrial environments expertise to projects as required. The Terrestrial Environment (TE) group within the AEE team maintains an extensive TE data base. Statistics and models derived from this data are applied to the design and development of new aerospace vehicles, as well as performance enhancement of operational vehicles such as the Space Shuttle. The TE is defined as the Earth's atmospheric environment extending from the surface to orbital insertion altitudes (approximately 90 km).

  17. Parametric Realization of the Lorentz Transformation Group in Pseudo-Euclidean Spaces

    E-print Network

    Abraham A. Ungar

    2015-05-09

    The Lorentz transformation group $SO(m,n)$ is a group of Lorentz transformations of order $(m,n)$, that is, a group of special linear transformations in a pseudo-Euclidean space of signature $(m,n)$ that leave the pseudo-Euclidean inner product invariant. A parametrization of $SO(m,n)$ is presented, giving rise to the composition law of Lorentz transformations of order $(m,n)$ in terms of parameter composition. The parameter composition, in turn, gives rise to a novel group-like structure called a bi-gyrogroup. Bi-gyrogroups form a natural generalization of gyrogroups where the latter form a natural generalization of groups. Like the abstract gyrogroup, the abstract bi-gyrogroup can play a universal computational role which extends far beyond the domain of pseudo-Euclidean spaces.

  18. PC Scene Generation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James A. Buford Jr.; David Cosby; Dennis H. Bunfield; Anthony J. Mayhall; Darian E. Trimble

    2007-01-01

    AMRDEC has successfully tested hardware and software for Real-Time Scene Generation for IR and SAL Sensors on COTS PC based hardware and video cards. AMRDEC personnel worked with nVidia and Concurrent Computer Corporation to develop a Scene Generation system capable of frame rates of at least 120Hz while frame locked to an external source (such as a missile seeker) with

  19. Johnson Space Center's Risk and Reliability Analysis Group 2008 Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentine, Mark; Boyer, Roger; Cross, Bob; Hamlin, Teri; Roelant, Henk; Stewart, Mike; Bigler, Mark; Winter, Scott; Reistle, Bruce; Heydorn,Dick

    2009-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) Safety & Mission Assurance (S&MA) Directorate s Risk and Reliability Analysis Group provides both mathematical and engineering analysis expertise in the areas of Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), Reliability and Maintainability (R&M) analysis, and data collection and analysis. The fundamental goal of this group is to provide National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) decisionmakers with the necessary information to make informed decisions when evaluating personnel, flight hardware, and public safety concerns associated with current operating systems as well as with any future systems. The Analysis Group includes a staff of statistical and reliability experts with valuable backgrounds in the statistical, reliability, and engineering fields. This group includes JSC S&MA Analysis Branch personnel as well as S&MA support services contractors, such as Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) and SoHaR. The Analysis Group s experience base includes nuclear power (both commercial and navy), manufacturing, Department of Defense, chemical, and shipping industries, as well as significant aerospace experience specifically in the Shuttle, International Space Station (ISS), and Constellation Programs. The Analysis Group partners with project and program offices, other NASA centers, NASA contractors, and universities to provide additional resources or information to the group when performing various analysis tasks. The JSC S&MA Analysis Group is recognized as a leader in risk and reliability analysis within the NASA community. Therefore, the Analysis Group is in high demand to help the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) continue to fly safely, assist in designing the next generation spacecraft for the Constellation Program (CxP), and promote advanced analytical techniques. The Analysis Section s tasks include teaching classes and instituting personnel qualification processes to enhance the professional abilities of our analysts as well as performing major probabilistic assessments used to support flight rationale and help establish program requirements. During 2008, the Analysis Group performed more than 70 assessments. Although all these assessments were important, some were instrumental in the decisionmaking processes for the Shuttle and Constellation Programs. Two of the more significant tasks were the Space Transportation System (STS)-122 Low Level Cutoff PRA for the SSP and the Orion Pad Abort One (PA-1) PRA for the CxP. These two activities, along with the numerous other tasks the Analysis Group performed in 2008, are summarized in this report. This report also highlights several ongoing and upcoming efforts to provide crucial statistical and probabilistic assessments, such as the Extravehicular Activity (EVA) PRA for the Hubble Space Telescope service mission and the first fully integrated PRAs for the CxP's Lunar Sortie and ISS missions.

  20. A Hilbert Space Operator Representation of Abelian Po-Groups of Bilinear Forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janda, Ji?í; Paseka, Jan

    2015-02-01

    The existence of a non-trivial singular positive bilinear form Simon (J. Funct. Analysis 28, 377-385 (1978)) yields that on an infinite-dimensional complex Hilbert space H the set of bilinear forms F(H) is richer than the set of linear operators {V}(H). We show that there exists an structure preserving embedding of partially ordered groups from the abelian po-group {S}D(H) of symmetric bilinear forms with a fixed domain D on a Hilbert space {H} into the po-group of linear symmetric operators on a dense linear subspace of an infinite dimensional complex Hilbert spacel 2(M). Moreover, if we restrict ourselves to the positive parts of the above mentioned po-groups, we can embed positive bilinear forms into corresponding positive linear operators.

  1. The Determination of the Orbit Spaces of Compact Coregular Linear Groups

    E-print Network

    Vittorino Talamini

    2015-03-26

    Some aspects of phase transitions can be more conveniently studied in the orbit space of the action of the symmetry group. After a brief review of the fundamental ideas of this approach, I shall concentrate on the mathematical aspect and more exactly on the determination of the equations defining the orbit space and its strata. I shall deal only with compact coregular linear groups. The method exposed has been worked out together with prof. G. Sartori and it is based on the solution of a matrix differential equation. Such equation is easily solved if an integrity basis of the group is known. If the integrity basis is unknown one may determine anyway for which degrees of the basic invariants there are solutions to the equation, and in all these cases also find out the explicit form of the solutions. The solutions determine completely the stratification of the orbit spaces. Such calculations have been carried out for 2, 3 and 4-dimensonal orbit spaces. The method is of general validity but the complexity of the calculations rises tremendously with the dimension $q$ of the orbit space. Some induction rules have been found as well. They allow to determine easily most of the solutions for the $(q+1)$-dimensional case once the solutions for the $q$-dimensional case are known. The method exposed is interesting because it allows to determine the orbit spaces without using any specific knowledge of group structure and integrity basis and evidences a certain hidden and yet unknown link with group theory and invariant theory.

  2. PC Scene Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buford, James A., Jr.; Cosby, David; Bunfield, Dennis H.; Mayhall, Anthony J.; Trimble, Darian E.

    2007-04-01

    AMRDEC has successfully tested hardware and software for Real-Time Scene Generation for IR and SAL Sensors on COTS PC based hardware and video cards. AMRDEC personnel worked with nVidia and Concurrent Computer Corporation to develop a Scene Generation system capable of frame rates of at least 120Hz while frame locked to an external source (such as a missile seeker) with no dropped frames. Latency measurements and image validation were performed using COTS and in-house developed hardware and software. Software for the Scene Generation system was developed using OpenSceneGraph.

  3. Roars of black howler monkeys (Alouatta caraya): evidence for a function in inter-group spacing

    E-print Network

    Roars of black howler monkeys (Alouatta caraya): evidence for a function in inter-group spacing) Summary Loud calls can be expected to play an important role in the lives of howler monkeys, given the specialised anatomy of howler vocal apparatus and the time and energy invested in call- ing. Here we present

  4. INFLUENCE OF SPAWNING GROUP SIZE AND SPACE ON REPRODUCTION BY SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS, CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cripe, G.M., R.L. Hemmer and L.R. Goodman. In press. Influence of Spawning Group Size and Space on Reproduction Variability of Sheepshead Minnows, Cyprinodon variegatus (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-18 November 2004, Portland, OR. 1 p. (ERL,GB...

  5. Automorphic Representations of Adele Groups We have defined the space A(G, ) of auto-

    E-print Network

    Gan, Wee Teck

    Automorphic Representations of Adele Groups We have defined the space A(G, ) of auto- morphic forms the theory of automor- phic forms using adelic language. The reasons, among others, are: · we want a theory theory, it is clean- est to use the adelic framework, as demon- strated in Tate's thesis. 2 #12;Adeles

  6. Real-space renormalization-group approach to the multigrid method

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, V. (Physics Department, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (US))

    1991-05-15

    We establish the connection between the multigrid algorithms and the real-space renormalization group. This is illustrated with the example of the two-dimensional Euclidean Klein-Gordon equation with random mass. The equation is then numerically solved using a two-level multigrid algorithm.

  7. Algorithms for deriving crystallographic space-group information. II: Treatment of special positions

    SciTech Connect

    Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Adams, Paul D.

    2001-10-05

    Algorithms for the treatment of special positions in 3-dimensional crystallographic space groups are presented. These include an algorithm for the determination of the site-symmetry group given the coordinates of a point, an algorithm for the determination of the exact location of the nearest special position, an algorithm for the assignment of a Wyckoff letter given the site-symmetry group, and an alternative algorithm for the assignment of a Wyckoff letter given the coordinates of a point directly. All algorithms are implemented in ISO C++ and are integrated into the Computational Crystallography Toolbox. The source code is freely available.

  8. Reaching the boundary between stellar kinematic groups and very wide binaries. II. alpha Lib + KU Lib: a common proper motion system in Castor separated by 1.0 pc

    E-print Network

    Caballero, Jose A

    2010-01-01

    AIMS. I investigate the gravitational binding of a nearby common proper motion system in the young Castor moving group (tau ~ 200 Ma), formed by the bright quadruple star alpha Lib (Zubenelgenubi) and the young solar analog KU Lib. The system has an exceptionally wide angular separation, of about 2.6 deg, which corresponds to a projected physical separation of about 1.0 pc. METHODS. I compile basic information of the system and compare its binding energy with those of other weakly bound systems in the field, and study the physical separations of resolved multiple systems in Castor. RESULTS. KU Lib has roughly the same proper motion, parallactic distance, radial velocity, and metallicity than the young hierarchical quadruple system alpha Lib. Besides, KU Lib also displays youth features. The resemblance between these basic parameters and the relatively large estimated binding energy point out that the five stars are gravitationally bound. KU Lib and alpha Lib constitute the widest known multiple system at all ...

  9. Environmental interactions in Space Exploration: Announcement of the formation of an Environmental Interactions Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolecki, Joseph C.; Hillard, G. Barry

    1991-01-01

    With the advent of the Space Exploration Initiative, the possibility of designing and using systems on scales not heretofore attempted presents exciting new challenges in systems design and space science. The environments addressed by the Space Exploration Initiative include the surfaces of the Moon and Mars, as well as the varied plasma and field environments which will be encountered by humans and cargo enroute to these destinations. Systems designers will need to understand environmental interactions and be able to model these mechanisms from the earliest conceptual design stages through design completion. To the end of understanding environmental interactions and establishing robotic precursor mission requirements, an Environmental Interactions Working Group has been established as part of the Robotic Missions Working Group. The current paper describes the working group and gives an update of its current activities. Working group charter and operation are reviewed, background information on the environmental interactions and their characteristics is offered, and the current status of the group's activities is presented along with anticipations for the future.

  10. Definition of spacecraft standard interfaces by the NASA Space Assembly and Servicing Working Group (SASWG)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radtke, Robert; Woolley, Charles; Arnold, Lana

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the NASA Space Assembly and Servicing Working Group (SASWG) is to study enabling technologies for on-orbit spacecraft maintenance and servicing. One key technology required for effective space logistics activity is the development of standard spacecraft interfaces, including the 'Basic Set' defined by NASA, the U.S. Space Command, and industry panelists to be the following: (1) navigation aids; (2) grasping, berthing, and docking; and (3) utility connections for power, data, and fluids. Draft standards have been prepared and referred to professional standards organizations, including the AIAA, EIA, and SAE space standards committee. The objective of the SASWG is to support these committees with the technical expertise required to prepare standards, guidelines, and recommended practices which will be accepted by the ANSI and international standards organizations, including the ISO, IEC, and PASC.

  11. Future In-Space Operations (FISO): A Working Group and Community Engagement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, Harley; Lester, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Long-duration human capabilities beyond low Earth orbit (LEO), either in support of or as an alternative to lunar surface operations, have been assessed at least since the late 1960s. Over the next few months, we will present short histories of concepts for long-duration, free-space human habitation beyond LEO from the end of the Apollo program to the Decadal Planning Team (DPT)/NASA Exploration Team (NExT), which was active in 1999 2000 (see Forging a vision: NASA s Decadal Planning Team and the origins of the Vision for Space Exploration , The Space Review, December 19, 2005). Here we summarize the brief existence of the Future In-Space Operations (FISO) working group in 2005 2006 and its successor, a telecon-based colloquium series, which we co-moderate.

  12. Phase-space shapes of clusters and rich groups of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtak, Rados?aw

    2013-11-01

    Context. Clusters and groups of galaxies are highly aspherical, with shapes approximated by nearly prolate ellipsoids of revolution. An equally fundamental property is the shape of these objects in velocity space which is the anisotropy of the global velocity dispersion tensor. Although many studies address the problem of the shape in position space, there has been no attempt to measure shapes in velocity space. Aims: Here we make use of kinematical data comprising ~600 nearby clusters and rich groups of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to place constraints on the phase-space shapes of these objects, i.e. their shapes in both position and velocity space. Methods: We show that the line of sight velocity dispersion normalised by a mass-dependent velocity scale correlates with the apparent elongation, with circular (elongated) clusters exhibiting an excessive (decremental) normalised velocity dispersion. This correlation holds for dynamically young or old clusters and, therefore, it originates from projecting their intrinsic phase-space shapes rather than from dynamical evolution. It signifies that clusters are preferentially prolate not only in position space, but also in velocity space. This property allows us to break the degeneracy between oblate and prolate models and thus to deproject the apparent elongations and the line of sight velocity dispersions obtaining constraints on the axial ratios of the ellipsoids approximating cluster shapes in 3D position or velocity space. Results: The distribution of the axial ratios in position space is found to be well approximated by a Gaussian with a mean, ? = 0.66 ± 0.01, and a dispersion, ? = 0.07 ± 0.008. The velocity ellipsoids representing the shapes in velocity space are more spherical, with a mean axial ratio of 0.78 ± 0.03. Conclusions: The mean axial ratio of the velocity ellipsoids points to a highly anisotropic velocity distribution and, therefore, to a strong dependance of the observed velocity dispersions on the angle between the line of sight and the semi-principle axes of the clusters. This finding has important implications for mass measurements based on the line of sight velocity dispersion profiles in individual clusters. For typical axial ratios of the velocity ellipsoids in the analysed cluster sample, systematic errors on the mass estimates inferred from the line of sight velocity dispersions become comparable to statistical uncertainties for galaxy clusters with as few as 40 spectroscopic redshifts.

  13. Equivalence of model space techniques and the renormalization group for a separable model problem

    E-print Network

    S. K. Bogner; T. T. S. Kuo

    2000-12-15

    Lee-Suzuki similarity transformations and Krencigowa-Kuo folded diagrams are two common methods used to derive energy independent model space effective interactions for nuclear many-body systems. We demonstrate that these methods are equivalent to a Renormalization Group (RG) analysis of a separable potential model. The effective low-momentum potentials V_{eff} are shown to give the same scaling equation that RG arguments predict. We find the new result that the different model space techniques considered in this paper yield a unique low-momentum V_{eff} when applied to the toy model problem.

  14. GFI - EASY PC GRAPHICS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R. B.

    1994-01-01

    Easy PC Graphics (GFI) is a graphical plot program that permits data to be easily and flexibly plotted. Data is input in a standard format which allows easy data entry and evaluation. Multiple dependent axes are also supported. The program may either be run in a stand alone mode or be embedded in the user's own software. Automatic scaling is built in for several logarithmic and decibel scales. New scales are easily incorporated into the code through the use of object-oriented programming techniques. For the autoscale routines and the actual plotting code, data is not retrieved directly from a file, but a "method" delivers the data, performing scaling as appropriate. Each object (variable) has state information which selects its own scaling. GFI is written in Turbo Pascal version 6.0 for IBM PC compatible computers running MS-DOS. The source code will only compile properly with the Turbo Pascal v. 6.0 or v. 7.0 compilers; however, an executable is provided on the distribution disk. This executable requires at least 64K of RAM and DOS 3.1 or higher, as well as an HP LaserJet printer to print output plots. The standard distribution medium for this program is one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. The contents of the diskette are compressed using the PKWARE archiving tools. The utility to unarchive the files, PKUNZIP.EXE, is included. An electronic copy of the documentation is provided on the distribution medium in ASCII format. GFI was developed in 1993.

  15. Space allowance and high fiber diet impact performance and behavior of group-kept gestating sows.

    PubMed

    DeDecker, A E; Hanson, A R; Walker, P M; Salak-Johnson, J L

    2014-04-01

    Identifying and optimizing housing and management systems that improve the well-being of the gestating sow is essential to sustaining animal agriculture. Therefore, the impact of 2 floor-space allowances and a high-fiber gestation diet on dry group-housed sows were evaluated using multiple measures of well-being. Groups of 10 multiparous sows/pen (n = 221) were assigned randomly to treatments in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement to either a corn-soybean meal diet (CTL) or corn-soybean meal diet supplemented with soybean hulls and wheat middlings (FBR), and floor-space allowance of either 1.7 or 2.3 m(2)/sow. Sow BW, backfat (BF), and body condition score (BCS) were all recorded on d 34, 65, 90, and 110 of gestation, whereas skin lesions were scored on d 34, every 2 d for the first 2-wk postmixing, and then biweekly throughout gestation. Blood sample was collected only on d 34 for cortisol (baseline), and samples were collected on d 90 of gestation for other measures including cortisol. Behavior was registered on multiple days throughout gestation. Sows fed FBR and kept at 1.7 m(2) produced heavier litter and weaning weights and greater number of piglets born alive, compared to sows fed FBR but kept at 2.3 m(2) of floor space (diet × floor space, P ? 0.04). Sows fed FBR and kept at 1.7 m(2) performed fewer oral-nasal-facial and sham-chew behaviors than sows fed CTL and kept at the same floor space (diet × floor space, P ? 0.044). Sows kept at 1.7 m(2) of floor space had a greater (P < 0.05) total lesion severity score than sows kept at 2.3 m(2)/sow, and vulva lesion scores were more (P < 0.02) severe among CTL-fed sows than FBR-fed sows. Parities 2 and 3 sows fed FBR and kept at 1.7 m(2) of floor space were heavier (P < 0.001) than sows fed the same diet but kept at 2.3 m(2). These results indicate that keeping small groups of pregnant sows at a minimum floor-space allowance of 1.7 m(2)/sow and floor feeding these sows a high-fiber diet can improve short-term sow well-being. PMID:24663162

  16. Fredholm and spectral properties of Toeplitz operators on H{sup p} spaces over ordered groups

    SciTech Connect

    Mirotin, Adolf R [Gomel State University, Gomel (Belarus)

    2011-05-31

    We consider Toeplitz operators on the spaces H{sup p}(G), 1< p<{infinity}, associated with a compact connected Abelian group G whose character group is ordered and, in the case of total order, prove a theorem on the Fredholm index for those operators which have continuous symbols which generalizes the classical Gohberg-Krein theorem. The results thus obtained are applied to the spectral theory of Toeplitz operators and examples where the index is evaluated explicitly are considered. Bibliography: 22 titles.

  17. Exploiting space-group symmetry in fragment-based molecular crystal calculations.

    PubMed

    Heit, Yonaton; Beran, Gregory J O

    2014-11-15

    Recent developments in fragment-based methods make it increasingly feasible to use high-level ab initio electronic structure techniques to molecular crystals. Such studies remain computationally demanding, however. Here, we describe a straightforward algorithm for exploiting space-group symmetry in fragment-based methods which often provides computational speed-ups of several fold or more. This algorithm does not require a priori specification of the space group or symmetry operators. Rather, the symmetrically equivalent fragments are identified automatically by aligning the individual fragments along their principle axes of inertia and testing for equivalence with other fragments. The symmetry operators relating equivalent fragments can then be worked out easily. Implementation of this algorithm for computing energies, nuclear gradients with respect to both atomic coordinates and lattice parameters, and the nuclear hessian is described. PMID:25270380

  18. Range Commanders Council Meteorology Group 88th Meeting: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Task Report, 2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry C.

    2004-01-01

    Supported Return-to-Flight activities by providing surface climate data from Kennedy Space Center used primarily for ice and dew formation studies, and upper air wind analysis primarily used for ascent loads analyses. The MSFC Environments Group's Terrestrial and Planetary Environments Team documented Space Shuttle day-of-launch support activities by publishing a document in support of SSP Return-to-Flight activities entitled "Space Shuttle Program Flight Operations Support". The team also formalized the Shuttle Natural Environments Technical Panel and chaired the first special session of the SSP Natural Environments Panel meeting at KSC, November 4-7,2003.58 participants from NASA, DOD and other government agencies from across the country attended the meeting.

  19. Planning and managing future space facility projects. [management by objectives and group dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sieber, J. E.; Wilhelm, J. A.; Tanner, T. A.; Helmreich, R. L.; Burgenbauch, S. F.

    1979-01-01

    To learn how ground-based personnel of a space project plan and organize their work and how such planning and organizing relate to work outcomes, longitudinal study of the management and execution of the Space Lab Mission Development Test 3 (SMD 3) was performed at NASA Ames Research Center. A view of the problems likely to arise in organizations and some methods of coping with these problems are presented as well as the conclusions and recommendations that pertain strictly to SMD 3 management. Emphasis is placed on the broader context of future space facility projects and additional problems that may be anticipated. A model of management that may be used to facilitate problem solving and communication - management by objectives (MBO) is presented. Some problems of communication and emotion management that MBO does not address directly are considered. Models for promoting mature, constructive and satisfying emotional relationships among group members are discussed.

  20. Report from the MPP Working Group to the NASA Associate Administrator for Space Science and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, James R.; Grosch, Chester; Mcanulty, Michael; Odonnell, John; Storey, Owen

    1987-01-01

    NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) gave a select group of scientists the opportunity to test and implement their computational algorithms on the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) located at Goddard Space Flight Center, beginning in late 1985. One year later, the Working Group presented its report, which addressed the following: algorithms, programming languages, architecture, programming environments, the way theory relates, and performance measured. The findings point to a number of demonstrated computational techniques for which the MPP architecture is ideally suited. For example, besides executing much faster on the MPP than on conventional computers, systolic VLSI simulation (where distances are short), lattice simulation, neural network simulation, and image problems were found to be easier to program on the MPP's architecture than on a CYBER 205 or even a VAX. The report also makes technical recommendations covering all aspects of MPP use, and recommendations concerning the future of the MPP and machines based on similar architectures, expansion of the Working Group, and study of the role of future parallel processors for space station, EOS, and the Great Observatories era.

  1. 76 FR 5467 - Airworthiness Directives; Pilatus Aircraft Ltd. Models PC-6, PC-6-H1, PC-6-H2, PC-6/350, PC-6/350...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-01

    ...901 Locust, Kansas City, Missouri 64106. For...301, ACE-112 Kansas City, Missouri 64106; telephone...PC-6 B2-H2 and B2-H4 models does not include a Chapter...models other than the Models PC-6/B2- H2 and PC-6...Locust, Room 301, Kansas City, Missouri 64106;...

  2. 75 FR 62002 - Airworthiness Directives; Pilatus Aircraft Ltd. Models PC-6, PC-6-H1, PC-6-H2, PC-6/350, PC-6/350...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ...for PC-6 B2-H2 and B2-H4 models. For PC-6 models other than B2-H2 and B2-H4...901 Locust, Room 301, Kansas City, Missouri 64106; telephone...of PC-6 B2-H2 and B2-H4 models does not include a Chapter 04...

  3. Effects of row spacing, seed rate and maturity group on late planted soybean under irrigated and dryland

    E-print Network

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Effects of row spacing, seed rate and maturity group on late planted soybean under irrigated, seeding rate, and maturity group (MG) for late planted soybean under irrigated and dryland conditions with three replications and three variables (MG, row spacing, and seeding rate). Table 1 shows all different

  4. The Scientific Capabilities of the James Webb Space Telescope Jonathan P. Gardner and the JWST Science Working Group

    E-print Network

    Sirianni, Marco

    The Scientific Capabilities of the James Webb Space Telescope Jonathan P. Gardner and the JWST.p.gardner@nasa.gov #12;The Scientific Capabilities of the James Webb Space Telescope Jonathan P. Gardner and the JWST Science Working Group 1. Introduction The James Webb Space Tele- scope (JWST; Figure 1) is a large (25 m2

  5. A summary of activities of the US\\/Soviet-Russian joint working group on space biology and medicine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles R. Doarn; Arnauld E. Nicogossian; Anatoly I. Grigoriev; Galina Tverskaya; Oleg I. Orlov; Eugene A. Ilyin; Kenneth A. Souza

    2010-01-01

    The very foundation of cooperation between the United States (US) and Russia (former Soviet Union) in space exploration is a direct result of the mutual desire for scientific understanding and the creation of a collaborative mechanism—the Joint Working Group (JWG) on Space Biology and Medicine. From the dawn of the space age, it has been the quest of humankind to

  6. A systematic method to identify the space group from PED and CBED patterns part II--practical examples.

    PubMed

    Jacob, D; Ji, G; Morniroli, J P

    2012-10-01

    Precession Electron Diffraction and Convergent-Beam Electron Diffraction are used in a complementary way to determine the space group of three known structures following the general method described in the first part of this paper. The selected structures concern a monoclinic example (coesite SiO(2) with space group C2/c) and two cubic examples (?-Al(4)Cu(9) with space group P43[combining overline]m and pyrite FeS(2) with space group Pa3[combining overline]). For each case, a minimum number of zone axis patterns are used to determine the space group without ambiguity, which illustrates the simplicity and reliability of the method. PMID:22749238

  7. Syzygy: Native PC Cluster VR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Benjamin Schaeffer; Camille Goudeseune

    2003-01-01

    The Syzygy software library consists of tools for programming VR applications on PC clusters. Since the PC cluster environment presents application development constraints, it is impossible to simultaneously optimize for efficiency, flexibility, and portability between the single-computer and cluster cases. Consequently Syzygy includes two application frameworks: a distributed scene graph framework for rendering a single application's graphics database on multiple

  8. Topological Entropy and Renormalization Group flow in 3-dimensional spherical spaces

    E-print Network

    M. Asorey; C. G. Beneventano; I. Cavero-Peláez; D. D'Ascanio; E. M. Santangelo

    2015-01-17

    We analyze the renormalization group (RG) flow of the temperature independent term of the entropy in the high temperature limit \\beta/atheory in 3-dimensional spherical spaces M_3 with constant curvature 6/a^2. For masses lower than 2\\pi/\\beta, this term can be identified with the free energy of the same theory on M_3 considered as a 3-dimensional Euclidean space-time. The non-extensive part of this free energy, S_hol, is generated by the holonomy of the spatial metric connection. We show that for homogeneous spherical spaces the holonomy entropy S_hol decreases monotonically when the RG scale flows to the infrared. At the conformal fixed points the values of the holonomy entropy do coincide with the genuine topological entropies recently introduced. The monotonic behavior of the RG flow leads to an inequality between the topological entropies of the conformal field theories connected by such flow, i.e. S_top^UV > S_top^IR. From a 3-dimensional viewpoint the same term arises in the 3-dimensional Euclidean effective action and has the same monotonic behavior under the RG group flow. We conjecture that such monotonic behavior is generic, which would give rise to a 3-dimensional generalization of the c-theorem, along the lines of the 2-dimensional c-theorem and the 4-dimensional a-theorem. The conjecture is related to recent formulations of the F-theorem. In particular, the holonomy entropy on lens spaces is directly related to the topological R\\'enyi entanglement entropy on disks of 2-dimensional flat spaces.

  9. Induced representations of the full holosymmetric double space groups based on the body-centred cubic bravais lattice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Kunert; M. Suffczynski

    1982-01-01

    We introduce a modified formula for the element matrices of the induced representations of any crystallographic space group. With the help of this formula we can obtain all the induced representations of any space group. The generating matrices of the induced representations for the groups Im3m (--- O9h) and Ia3d (--- O10h) have been calculated. In particular, we have considered

  10. Unfolding of electronic structure through induced representations of space groups: Application to Fe-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomi?, Milan; Jeschke, Harald O.; Valentí, Roser

    2014-11-01

    We revisit the problem that relevant parts of band structures for a given cell choice can reflect exact or approximate higher symmetries of subsystems in the cell and can therefore be significantly simplified by an unfolding procedure that recovers the higher symmetry. We show that band-structure unfolding can be understood as projection onto induced irreducible representations of a group obtained by extending the original group of translations with a number of additional symmetry operations. The resulting framework allows us to define a generalized unfolding procedure that includes the point group operations and can be applied to any quantity in the reciprocal space. The unfolding of the Brillouin zone follows naturally from the properties of the induced irreducible representations. In this context, we also introduce a procedure to derive tight-binding models of reduced dimensionality by making use of point group symmetries. Further, we show that careful consideration of unfolding has important consequences on the interpretation of angle-resolved photoemission experiments. Finally, we apply the unfolding procedure to various representative examples of Fe-based superconductor compounds and show that the one-iron picture arises as an irreducible representation of the glide-reflection group, and we comment on the consequences for the interpretation of one-iron versus two-iron Brillouin zone representations.

  11. Finite flat commutative group schemes over complete discrete valuation rings III: classification, tangent spaces, and semistable reduction of Abelian varieties

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. V. Bondarko

    2004-01-01

    We classify group schemes in terms of their Cartier modules. We also prove the equivalence of different definitions of the tangent space and the dimension for these group schemes; in particular, the minimal dimension of a formal group law that contains $S$ as a closed subgroup is equal to the minimal number of generators for the affine algebra of $S$.

  12. P.C. ROSSIN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE

    E-print Network

    Napier, Terrence

    , 2014 ASINGULAR MISSION AND SPACE THE MANY PERSPECTIVES OF HEALTH RESEARCH FIND COMMON GROUND IN A NEW to undermine pathogens Features 10 A SINGULAR MISSION AND SPACE An interdisciplinary hub for health research 16P.C. ROSSIN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE resolve SERENDIPITOUS SELF

  13. Real-space renormalization-group study of the Z(5) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizrahi, Victor; Domany, Eytan

    1981-10-01

    The phase diagram of the nearest-neighbor Z(5) model on the square and triangular lattices is investigated using techniques of the real-space renormalization group. We use the recently introduced technique of Nienhuis, Berker, Riedel, and Schick, which yields the expected first-order transition on the Potts subspace of the Z(5) model on the triangular lattice. For the general Z(5) model we obtain a line of first-order transitions which crosses over into a line of second-order transitions. The same technique when applied to the square lattice is found to show this crossover behavior only in combination with a Migdal procedure.

  14. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 4: Life sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings of the Life Sciences working group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The objectives of the Life Sciences investigations are: (1) to continue the research directed at understanding the origin of life and the search for extraterrestrial evidence of life, (2) biomedical research to understand mechanisms and provide criteria for support of manned flight, (3) technology development for life support, protective systems, and work aids for providing environmental control, and (4) to study basic biological functions at all levels or organization influenced by gravity, radiation, and circadian rhythms. Examples of candidate experimental schedules and the experimental package functional requirements are included.

  15. Pressure and equilibrium measures for actions of amenable groups on the space of configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Bufetov, Aleksei I [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Mechanics and Mathematics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-03-31

    The model of statistical physics on a countable amenable group G is considered. For the natural action of G on the space of configurations S{sup G}, |S|<{infinity}, and for any closed invariant set X subset of S{sup G} we prove that there exists pressure which corresponds to a potential with finite norm on X (in the sense of the limit with respect to any Foelner sequence of sets in G). The existence of an equilibrium measure is established. Bibliography: 8 titles.

  16. A Fun and Effective Exercise for Understanding Lattices and Space Groups

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dexter Perkins

    This activity uses figures from Francois Brisse as Esher drawings to teach students about 2-dimensional symmetry, especially involving translation. This exercise is based on discovery learning. Students need little introduction to lattices and space groups. They can figure things out for themselves. For example, they will figure out what a glide plane is, and if you tell them ahead of time it takes away from the learning experience. The last question, which asks them to make their own symmetrical drawings, is difficult but often leads to some spectacular results.

  17. Intraspecific variation in space use, group size, and mating systems of caviomorph rodents

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Christine R.; Burger, Joseph Robert

    2012-01-01

    Intraspecific variation in social systems is widely recognized across many taxa, and specific models, including polygamy potential, resource defense, and resource dispersion, have been developed to explain the relationship between ecological variation and social organization. Although mammals from temperate North America and Eurasia have provided many insights into this relationship, rodents from the Neotropics and temperate South America have largely been ignored. In this review we focus on reports documenting intraspecific variation in spacing systems, group size, and mating systems of caviomorphs. This large group of New World hystricognath rodents occupies a diverse array of habitats; thus, members of the same species potentially exhibit different social systems in response to different ecological conditions. Spatial patterns vary in response to a diverse array of factors, including predation, food availability, population density, and soil characteristics. Changes in group size typically correlate with changes in resource availability, particularly food. Mating systems generally reflect the ability of males to control access to females, which may depend on population density or food distribution. In general, social organization in caviomorphs fits predictions of resource-based models; however, most studies have been purely observational, involving small numbers of animals over short time periods and reporting qualitative rather than quantitative levels of ecological correlates. In future studies the use of molecular techniques and controlled, experimental manipulations can increase our understanding of intraspecific variation in caviomorph social systems. This understudied group of rodents offers excellent opportunities to provide insights into the influence of ecological conditions on behavior such as social systems. PMID:22328790

  18. Space group symmetry fractionalization in a family of exactly solvable models with Z2 topological order

    E-print Network

    Hao Song; Michael Hermele

    2015-02-05

    We study square lattice space group symmetry fractionalization in a family of exactly solvable models with $\\mathbb{Z}_2$ topological order in two dimensions. In particular, we have obtained a complete understanding of which distinct types of symmetry fractionalization (symmetry classes) can be realized within this class of models, which are generalizations of Kitaev's $\\mathbb{Z}_2$ toric code to arbitrary lattices. This question is motivated by earlier work of A. M. Essin and one of us (M. H.), where the idea of symmetry classification was laid out, and which, for square lattice symmetry, produces 2080 symmetry classes consistent with the fusion rules of $\\mathbb{Z}_2$ topological order. This approach does not produce a physical model for each symmetry class, and indeed there are reasons to believe that some symmetry classes may not be realizable in strictly two-dimensional systems, thus raising the question of which classes are in fact possible. While our understanding is limited to a restricted class of models, it is complete in the sense that for each of the 2080 possible symmetry classes, we either prove rigorously that the class cannot be realized in our family of models, or we give an explicit model realizing the class. We thus find that exactly 487 symmetry classes are realized in the family of models considered. With a more restrictive type of symmetry action, where space group operations act trivially in the internal Hilbert space of each spin degree of freedom, we find that exactly 82 symmetry classes are realized. In addition, we present a single model that realizes all $2^6 = 64$ types of symmetry fractionalization allowed for a single anyon species ($\\mathbb{Z}_2$ charge excitation), as the parameters in the Hamiltonian are varied. The paper concludes with a summary and a discussion of two results pertaining to more general bosonic models.

  19. The p-adic analytic space of pseudocharacters of a profinite group and pseudorepresentations over arbitrary rings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gaetan Chenevier

    2008-01-01

    Let G be a profinite group which is topologically finitely generated, p a prime number and d an integer. We show that the functor from rigid analytic spaces over Q_p to sets, which associates to a rigid space Y the set of continuous d-dimensional pseudocharacters G -> O(Y), is representable by a quasi-Stein rigid analytic space X, and we study

  20. Systematic prediction of new ferroelectrics in space group R3. I.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, S C

    2006-02-01

    Release 2005/1 of the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database contains 158 entries under the space group R3. The first 81 together with 15 related entries include 52 different structure types, 10 of which represent families that have two or more isostructural members. There are 18 types that satisfy the structural criteria for ferroelectricity with a confidence level that necessarily depends upon the reliability of each structural determination. Among them, (LiTaO3)9.Ta2O5 and the CsCd(NO2) family are known ferroelectrics. The remaining 16 include the high-intensity higher-order harmonic generator II-BaB2O4, not previously recognized as ferroelectric. The other predicted ferroelectrics are Te(OH)6.NaF, the MgSO3.6H2O family, Li3P3O9.3H2O, SeNbF9, Al2(H2PO4)3PO4.6H2O, [Cr(OCN2H4)6].[(Co(NH3)2(NO2)4]3.(H2O)(1.5)], NaZnBr3.5H2O, III-Ag3SI, Tl2S, the Ba3Yb4O9 family, the Fe(10.7)Ru(1.3)As5 family, Sr17Ta10S42, Pb8Sb3 and the Sc7I12C family. Six structures reported in the space group R3 most likely exhibit mirror symmetry, with three experimental confirmations. The other 19 structures are most likely nonpolar, with six experimental confirmations. The capacity for physical property prediction by the remaining ten structures is shown to be in doubt. Thus, 46% of the present 52 inorganic structure types initially determined in the space group R3 and 35% of those currently assigned to R3 more likely exhibit an additional inversion center, mirror or glide plane, strongly exceeding the recently reported error rate of approximately 11% in organic structures. PMID:16434790

  1. Melt crystallization of bisphenol A polycarbonate in PC/zinc sulfonated polystyrene ionomer blend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liang

    The effects of zinc sulfonated polystyrene ionomer (ZnSPS) on the melt crystallization of bisphenol A polycarbonate (PC) were investigated. Melt crystallization of pure PC is extremely slow due to its rigid chain. In the blend of PC and ZnSPS (PC-ZnSPS), the melt crystallization rate of PC can be enhanced. DSC was used to study the crystallization kinetics of PC in PC-ZnSPS blend. The crystallization of PC at 190°C increased in both partially miscible and miscible blends with ZnSPS. For PC-ZnSPS blend with same PC composition as 80%, the crystallization rate was affected by the sulfonation level of ZnSPS. The induction time of crystallization for a partially miscible blend PC-ZnSPS9.98 (80/20) was 40 minutes, and the crystallization reaches 27% crystallinity within 14 hrs. The induction time for pure PC with the same thermal history was more than 24 hrs. The crystal structure of PC crystal formed in PC-ZnSPS blend was studied by WAXD, which showed no difference from the reported WAXD pattern for pure PC. Molecular weight change of PC was found during the thermal annealing of PC-ZnSPS blend at 190°C, but molecular weight alone cannot explain the change of crystallization rate of PC in PC-ZnSPS blend. Discussion was made to address the mechanisms that are responsible for the crystallization rate enhancement of PC in PC-ZnSPS blend. In order to understand and elucidate the reason for the molecular weight change of PC in PC-ZnSPS blend and its effect on the crystallization of PC, TG, GPC and GC-MS were used to investigate the stability of PC-ZnSPS blend and mixtures of PC with sodium tosylate (NaTS), zinc tosylate (ZnTS) and sodium benzoate (NaBZ). ZnSPS, NaTS and ZnTS undergo desulfonation of the sulfonate group at temperatures above 350°C. The desulfonation process can destabilize PC and lower the maximum mass loss rate temperature of PC for more than 70°C. NaTS, ZnTS and NaBZ have quite different effect on the thermal stability of PC at temperatures below 250°C. NaBZ can significantly degrade PC both at 190°C and 250°C. PC does not show any molecular weight (M w) change in the presence of NaTS at 250°C and 190°C for up to 1hr and 16 hrs respectively. ZnTS can also cause Mw change of PC at 250°C and 190°C, but the changing of Mw of PC in the presence of ZnTS is less than that in the presence of NaBZ. The reason for the molecular weight change of PC in PC-ZnSPS blend can be explained based on Davis's ionic ester exchange reaction mechanism.

  2. Nuclear safety policy working group recommendations on nuclear propulsion safety for the space exploration initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Albert C.; Lee, James H.; Mcculloch, William H.; Sawyer, J. Charles, Jr.; Bari, Robert A.; Cullingford, Hatice S.; Hardy, Alva C.; Niederauer, George F.; Remp, Kerry; Rice, John W.

    1993-01-01

    An interagency Nuclear Safety Working Group (NSPWG) was chartered to recommend nuclear safety policy, requirements, and guidelines for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) nuclear propulsion program. These recommendations, which are contained in this report, should facilitate the implementation of mission planning and conceptual design studies. The NSPWG has recommended a top-level policy to provide the guiding principles for the development and implementation of the SEI nuclear propulsion safety program. In addition, the NSPWG has reviewed safety issues for nuclear propulsion and recommended top-level safety requirements and guidelines to address these issues. These recommendations should be useful for the development of the program's top-level requirements for safety functions (referred to as Safety Functional Requirements). The safety requirements and guidelines address the following topics: reactor start-up, inadvertent criticality, radiological release and exposure, disposal, entry, safeguards, risk/reliability, operational safety, ground testing, and other considerations.

  3. Mathematical aspects of molecular replacement. III. Properties of space groups preferred by proteins in the Protein Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Chirikjian, G; Sajjadi, S; Toptygin, D; Yan, Y

    2015-03-01

    The main goal of molecular replacement in macromolecular crystallography is to find the appropriate rigid-body transformations that situate identical copies of model proteins in the crystallographic unit cell. The search for such transformations can be thought of as taking place in the coset space ?\\G where ? is the Sohncke group of the macromolecular crystal and G is the continuous group of rigid-body motions in Euclidean space. This paper, the third in a series, is concerned with viewing nonsymmorphic ? in a new way. These space groups, rather than symmorphic ones, are the most common ones for protein crystals. Moreover, their properties impact the structure of the space ?\\G. In particular, nonsymmorphic space groups contain both Bieberbach subgroups and symmorphic subgroups. A number of new theorems focusing on these subgroups are proven, and it is shown that these concepts are related to the preferences that proteins have for crystallizing in different space groups, as observed in the Protein Data Bank. PMID:25727867

  4. On the Reflection Type Decomposition of the Adjoint Reduced Phase Space of a Compact Semisimple Lie group

    E-print Network

    Martin Hofmann; Gerd Rudolph; Matthias Schmidt

    2013-02-25

    We consider a system with symmetries whose configuration space is a compact Lie group, acted upon by inner automorphisms. The classical reduced phase space of this system decomposes into connected components of orbit type subsets. To investigate hypothetical quantum effects of this decomposition one has to construct the associated costratification of the Hilbert space of the quantum system in the sense of Huebschmann. In the present paper, instead of the decomposition by orbit types, we consider the related decomposition by reflection types (conjugacy classes of reflection subgroups). These two decompositions turn out to coincide e.g. for the classical groups SU(n) and Sp(n). We derive defining relations for reflection type subsets in terms of irreducible characters and discuss how to obtain from that the corresponding costratification of the Hilbert space of the system. To illustrate the method, we give explicit results for some low rank classical groups.

  5. A New Nearby Candidate Star Cluster in Ophiuchus at d = 170 pc

    E-print Network

    Eric E. Mamajek

    2006-09-04

    The recent discoveries of nearby star clusters and associations within a few hundred pc of the Sun, as well as the order of magnitude difference in the formation rates of the embedded and open cluster populations, suggests that additional poor stellar groups are likely to be found at surprisingly close distances to the Sun. Here I describe a new nearby stellar aggregate found by virtue of the parallel proper motions, similar trigonometric parallaxes, and consistent color-magnitude distribution of its early-type members. The 120 Myr-old group lies in Ophiuchus at $d$ $\\simeq$ 170 pc, with its most massive member being the 4th-magnitude post-MS B8II-III star $\\mu$ Oph. The group may have escaped previous notice due to its non-negligible extinction ($A_V$ $\\simeq$ 0.9 mag). If the group was born with a normal initial mass function, and the nine B- and A-type systems represent a complete system of intermediate-mass stars, then the original population was probably of order $\\sim$200 systems. The age and space motion of the new cluster are very similar to those of the Pleiades, $\\alpha$ Per cluster, and AB Dor Moving Group, suggesting that these aggregates may have formed in the same star-forming complex some $\\sim10^8$ yr ago.

  6. Quantum groups, roots of unity and particles on quantized Anti-de Sitter space

    SciTech Connect

    Steinacker, H [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-05-23

    Quantum groups in general and the quantum Anti-de Sitter group U{sub q}(so(2,3)) in particular are studied from the point of view of quantum field theory. The author shows that if q is a suitable root of unity, there exist finite-dimensional, unitary representations corresponding to essentially all the classical one-particle representations with (half) integer spin, with the same structure at low energies as in the classical case. In the massless case for spin {ge} 1, {open_quotes}naive{close_quotes} representations are unitarizable only after factoring out a subspace of {open_quotes}pure gauges{close_quotes}, as classically. Unitary many-particle representations are defined, with the correct classical limit. Furthermore, the author identifies a remarkable element Q in the center of U{sub q}(g), which plays the role of a BRST operator in the case of U{sub q}(so(2,3)) at roots of unity, for any spin {ge} 1. The associated ghosts are an intrinsic part of the indecomposable representations. The author shows how to define an involution on algebras of creation and anihilation operators at roots of unity, in an example corresponding to non-identical particles. It is shown how nonabelian gauge fields appear naturally in this framework, without having to define connections on fiber bundles. Integration on Quantum Euclidean space and sphere and on Anti-de Sitter space is studied as well. The author gives a conjecture how Q can be used in general to analyze the structure of indecomposable representations, and to define a new, completely reducible associative (tensor) product of representations at roots of unity, which generalizes the standard {open_quotes}truncated{close_quotes} tensor product as well as many-particle representations.

  7. [Study on fluorescence labeling and determination of polypeptide (PC2~PC6) by high performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing-xi; Gao, Li-jie; Cao, Wei; Zheng, Li; Chen, Jun-hui; Xu, Xiu-li; Wang, Xiao-ru

    2014-12-01

    This study was based on the thiol groups (-SH) of PC2~PC6, which could be reacted with the Monobromobimane (mBBr), in order to get polypeptide derivatives with fluorescent signal. A new method was developed for measuring the Polypeptides by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detector, then the chromatographic conditions of HPLC was optimized; meawhile the reaction proportion of PCs and mBBr was identified by Trap-MS. The results showed that, the reaction proportion of PCs and mBBr was 1:1, the polypeptide derivatives had good stability; the five compounds separation was better, and the peak time focused on the 16.6~22.0 min; the linear correlation coefficient of PC2, PC3, PC4, PC5 and PC6 was >0.9991, and the limits of quantification were 0.3, 0.05, 0.3, 0.5 and 0.8 mg · L(-1) respectively, the recovery rate was 83.0%-102.0%; the method was reproducible, RSD<2%, this method for measuring the peptide compounds was rapid and accurate. PMID:25881428

  8. International Space Station Air Quality Assessed According to Toxicologically-Grouped Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.; Limero, Tom; DeVera, Vanessa; Cheng, Patti; Hand, Jennifer; Macatangay, Ariel; Beck, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Scores of compounds are found in the International Space Station (ISS) atmospheric samples that are returned to the Johnson Space Center Toxicology Laboratory for analysis. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs) are set with the view that each compound is present as if there were no other compounds present. In order to apply SMACs to the interpretation of the analytical data, the toxicologist must employ some method of combining the potential effects of the aggregate of compounds found in the atmospheric samples. The simplest approach is to assume that each quantifiable compound has the potential for some effect in proportion to the applicable SMAC, and then add all the proportions. This simple paradigm disregards the fact that most compounds have potential to adversely affect only a few physiological systems, and their effects would be independent rather than additive. An improved approach to dealing with exposure to mixtures is to add the proportions only for compounds that adversely affect the same physiological system. For example, toxicants that cause respiratory irritation are separated from those that cause neurotoxicity or cardio-toxicity. Herein we analyze ISS air quality data according to toxicological groups with a view that this could be used for understanding any crew symptoms occurring at the time of the sample. In addition, this approach could be useful in post-flight longitudinal surveys where the flight surgeon may need to identify post-flight, follow-up medical studies because of on-orbit exposures that target specific physiological systems.

  9. International Space Station Air Quality Assessed According to Toxicologically-Grouped Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.; Limero, Thomas F.; Beck, Steve; Cheng, Patti F.; deVera, Vanessa J.; Hand, Jennifer; Macatangay, Ariel

    2010-01-01

    Scores of compounds are found in the International Space Station (ISS) atmospheric samples that are returned to the Johnson Space Center Toxicology Laboratory for analysis. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs) are set with the view that each compound is present as if there were no other compounds present. In order to apply SMACs to the interpretation of the analytical data, the toxicologist must employ some method of combining the potential effects of the aggregate of compounds found in the atmospheric samples. The simplest approach is to assume that each quantifiable compound has the potential for some effect in proportion to the applicable SMAC, and then add all the proportions. This simple paradigm disregards the fact that most compounds have potential to adversely affect only a few physiological systems, and their effects would be independent rather than additive. An improved approach to dealing with exposure to mixtures is to add the proportions only for compounds that adversely affect the same physiological system. For example, toxicants that cause respiratory irritation are separated from those that cause neurotoxicity or cardio-toxicity. Herein we analyze ISS air quality data according to toxicological groups with a view that this could be used for understanding any crew symptoms occurring at the time of the sample acquisition. In addition, this approach could be useful in post-flight longitudinal surveys where the flight surgeon may need to identify post-flight, follow-up medical studies because of on-orbit exposures that target specific physiological systems.

  10. Fractal space-times under the microscope: A Renormalization Group view on Monte Carlo data

    E-print Network

    Martin Reuter; Frank Saueressig

    2011-10-24

    The emergence of fractal features in the microscopic structure of space-time is a common theme in many approaches to quantum gravity. In this work we carry out a detailed renormalization group study of the spectral dimension $d_s$ and walk dimension $d_w$ associated with the effective space-times of asymptotically safe Quantum Einstein Gravity (QEG). We discover three scaling regimes where these generalized dimensions are approximately constant for an extended range of length scales: a classical regime where $d_s = d, d_w = 2$, a semi-classical regime where $d_s = 2d/(2+d), d_w = 2+d$, and the UV-fixed point regime where $d_s = d/2, d_w = 4$. On the length scales covered by three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations, the resulting spectral dimension is shown to be in very good agreement with the data. This comparison also provides a natural explanation for the apparent puzzle between the short distance behavior of the spectral dimension reported from Causal Dynamical Triangulations (CDT), Euclidean Dynamical Triangulations (EDT), and Asymptotic Safety.

  11. PC\\/104 Embedded IOCs at Jefferson Lab

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jianxun Yan; Trent Allison; Sue Witherspoon; Anthony Cuffe

    2009-01-01

    Jefferson Lab has developed embedded IOCs based on PC\\/104 single board computers (SBC) for low level control systems. The PC\\/104 IOCs run EPICS on top of the RTEMS operating system. Two types of control system configurations are used in different applications, PC\\/104 SBC with commercial PC\\/104 I\\/O cards and PC\\/104 SBC with custom designed FPGA-based boards. RTEMS was built with

  12. Hsp70 binds to PrPC in the process of PrPC release via exosomes from THP-1 monocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gui-Hua; Zhou, Xiang-Mei; Bai, Yu; Yin, Xiao-Min; Yang, Li-Feng; Zhao, Deming

    2011-06-01

    PrPC (cellular prion protein) is a GPI (glycophosphatidylinositol)-anchored protein present on the surface of a number of peripheral blood cells. PrPC must be present for the generation and propagation of pathogenic conformer [PrPSc (scrapie prion protein)], which is a conformational conversion form of PrPC and has a central role in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. It is important to determine the transportation mechanism of normal PrPC between cells. Exosomes are membrane vesicles released into the extracellular space upon fusion of multivesicular endosomes with the plasma membrane. We have identified that THP-1 monocytes can secrete exosomes to culture medium, and the secreted exosomes can bear PrPC. We also found that Hsp70 interacts with PrPC not only in intracellular environment, but in the secreted exosomes. However, the specific markers of exosomes, Tsg101 and flotillin-1, were found with no interaction with PrPC. Our results demonstrated that PrPC can be released from THP-1 monocytes via secreted exosomes, and in this process, Hsp70 binds to PrPC, which suggests that Hsp70 may play a potential functional role in the release of PrPC. PMID:20964628

  13. Differentiation of PC12 Cells

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Elizabeth Adler (AAAS; )

    2006-09-05

    This 3-week-long series of collaborative laboratory exercises explores how to use a cultured cell system (PC12 cells) to study signaling pathways involved in cellular differentiation. The background and details for performing the lab are provided along with suggestions for assessing student performance and understanding.

  14. Differentiation of PC12 Cells

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Elizabeth M. Adler (American Association for the Advancement of Science; Associate Editor of Science's STKE REV)

    2006-09-05

    This 3-week-long series of collaborative laboratory exercises explores how to use a cultured cell system (PC12 cells) to study signaling pathways involved in cellular differentiation. The laboratory would be useful in a neurobiology or cell biology course for advanced undergraduate students. The background and details for performing the lab are provided along with suggestions for assessing student performance and understanding.

  15. Space station needs, attributes and architectural options study commercialization working group briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The benefits for each of the following commercial areas was investigated: communications, remote sensing, materials processing in space, low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite assembly, testing, and servicing, and space tourism. In each case, where economic benefits are derived, the costs for accomplishing tasks with the Space Station are compared with the cost with the Space Transportation System only.

  16. Group Dynamics as a Critical Component of Successful Space Exploration: Conceptual Theory and Insights from the Biosphere 2 Closure Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Mark; Allen, John P.

    As space exploration and eventually habitation achieves longer durations, successfully managing group dynamics of small, physically isolated groups will become vital. The paper summarizes important underlying research and conceptual theory and how these manifested in a well-documented example: the closure experiments of Biosphere 2. Key research breakthroughs in discerning the operation of small human groups comes from the pioneering work of W.R. Bion. He discovered two competing modalities of behavior. The first is the “task-oriented” or work group governed by shared acceptance of goals, reality-thinking in relation to time, resources and rational, and intelligent management of challenges presented. The opposing, usually unconscious, modality is what Bion called the “basic-assumption” group and alternates between three “group animal” groups: dependency/kill the leader; fight/flight and pairing. If not dealt with, these dynamics work to undermine and defeat the conscious task group’s goal achievement. The paper discusses crew training and selection, various approaches to structuring the work and hierarchy of the group, the importance of contact with a larger population through electronic communication and dealing with the “us-them” syndrome frequently observed between crew and Mission Control. The experience of the first two year closure of Biosphere 2 is drawn on in new ways to illustrate vicissitudes and management of group dynamics especially as both the inside team of biospherians and key members of Mission Control had training in working with group dynamics. Insights from that experience may help mission planning so that future groups in space cope successfully with inherent group dynamics challenges that arise.

  17. Bilateral deep neck space infection in the paediatric age group: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Songu, M; Demiray, U; Adibelli, Z H; Adibelli, H

    2011-06-01

    Deep neck space infections can occur at any age but require more intimate management in the paediatric age group because of their rapidly progressive nature. Concurrent abscess in distinct neck spaces has rarely been reported in healthy children. Herewith, a rare case of bilateral neck abscess is reported in a 16-month-old female and the clinical presentation and management are discussed with a review of the literature. PMID:22058596

  18. Extreme Covariant Quantum Observables in the Case of an Abelian Symmetry Group and a Transitive Value Space

    E-print Network

    Erkka Haapasalo; Juha-Pekka Pellonpää

    2011-05-05

    We represent quantum observables as POVMs (normalized positive operator valued measures) and consider convex sets of observables which are covariant with respect to a unitary representation of a locally compact Abelian symmetry group $G$. The value space of such observables is a transitive $G$-space. We characterize the extreme points of covariant observables and also determine the covariant extreme points of the larger set of all quantum observables. The results are applied to position, position difference and time observables.

  19. Transformation of Air Quality Monitor Data from the International Space Station into Toxicological Effect Groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.; Zalesak, Selina M.

    2011-01-01

    The primary reason for monitoring air quality aboard the International Space Station (ISS) is to determine whether air pollutants have collectively reached a concentration where the crew could experience adverse health effects. These effects could be near-real-time (e.g. headache, respiratory irritation) or occur late in the mission or even years later (e.g. cancer, liver toxicity). Secondary purposes for monitoring include discovery that a potentially harmful compound has leaked into the atmosphere or that air revitalization system performance has diminished. Typical ISS atmospheric trace pollutants consist of alcohols, aldehydes, aromatic compounds, halo-carbons, siloxanes, and silanols. Rarely, sulfur-containing compounds and alkanes are found at trace levels. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs) have been set in cooperation with a subcommittee of the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology. For each compound and time of exposure, the limiting adverse effect(s) has been identified. By factoring the analytical data from the Air Quality Monitor (AQM), which is in use as a prototype instrument aboard the ISS, through the array of compounds and SMACs, the risk of 16 specific adverse effects can be estimated. Within each adverse-effect group, we have used an additive model proportioned to each applicable 180-day SMAC to estimate risk. In the recent past this conversion has been performed using archival data, which can be delayed for months after an air sample is taken because it must be returned to earth for analysis. But with the AQM gathering in situ data each week, NASA is in a position to follow toxic-effect groups and correlate these with any reported crew symptoms. The AQM data are supplemented with data from real-time CO2 instruments aboard the ISS and from archival measurements of formaldehyde, which the AQM cannot detect.

  20. Canonical Groups for Quantization on the Two-Dimensional Sphere and One-Dimensional Complex Projective Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A, Sumadi A. H.; H, Zainuddin

    2014-11-01

    Using Isham's group-theoretic quantization scheme, we construct the canonical groups of the systems on the two-dimensional sphere and one-dimensional complex projective space, which are homeomorphic. In the first case, we take SO(3) as the natural canonical Lie group of rotations of the two-sphere and find all the possible Hamiltonian vector fields, and followed by verifying the commutator and Poisson bracket algebra correspondences with the Lie algebra of the group. In the second case, the same technique is resumed to define the Lie group, in this case SU (2), of CP'.We show that one can simply use a coordinate transformation from S2 to CP1 to obtain all the Hamiltonian vector fields of CP1. We explicitly show that the Lie algebra structures of both canonical groups are locally homomorphic. On the other hand, globally their corresponding canonical groups are acting on different geometries, the latter of which is almost complex. Thus the canonical group for CP1 is the double-covering group of SO(3), namely SU(2). The relevance of the proposed formalism is to understand the idea of CP1 as a space of where the qubit lives which is known as a Bloch sphere.

  1. Charge Conjugation from Space-Time Inversion in Qed:. Discrete and Continuous Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, B. Carballo; Socolovsky, M.

    We show that the CPT groups of QED emerge naturally from the {PT} and {P} (or {T}) subgroups of the Lorentz group. We also find relationships between these discrete groups and continuous groups, like the connected Lorentz and Poincaré groups and their universal coverings.

  2. LDEF meteoroid and debris special investigation group investigations and activities at the Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    See, Thomas H.; Warren, Jack L.; Zolensky, Michael E.; Sapp, Clyde A.; Bernhard, Ronald P.; Dardano, Claire B.

    1995-01-01

    Since the return of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) in January, 1990, members of the Meteoroid and Debris Special Investigation Group (M&D SIG) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas have been examining LDEF hardware in an effort to expand the knowledge base regarding the low-Earth orbit (LEO) particulate environment. In addition to the various investigative activities, JSC is also the location of the general Meteoroid & Debris database. This publicly accessible database contains information obtained from the various M&D SIG investigations, as well as limited data obtained by individual LDEF Principal Investigators. LDEF exposed approximately 130 m(exp 2) of surface area to the LEO particulate environment, approximately 15.4 m(exp 2) of which was occupied by structural frame components (i.e., longerons and intercoastals) of the spacecraft. The data reported here was obtained as a result of detailed scans of LDEF intercoastals, 68 of which reside at JSC. The limited amount of data presently available on the A0178 thermal control blankets was reported last year and will not be reiterated here. The data presented here are limited to measurements of crater diameters and their frequency of occurrence (i.e., flux).

  3. A systematic method to identify the space group from PED and CBED patterns part I--theory.

    PubMed

    Morniroli, J P; Ji, G; Jacob, D

    2012-10-01

    This systematic method allows the unambiguous identification of the extinction and diffraction symbols of a crystal by comparison of a few experimental Precession Electron Diffraction (PED) patterns with theoretical patterns drawn for all the extinction and diffraction symbols. The method requires the detection of the Laue class, of the kinematically forbidden reflections and of the shift and periodicity differences between the reflections located in the First-Order Laue Zone (FOLZ) with respect to the ones located in the Zero-Order Laue Zone (ZOLZ). The actual space group can be selected, among the possible space groups connected with each extinction symbol or diffraction symbol, from the identification of the point group. This point group is available from observation of the 2D symmetry of the ZOLZ on Convergent-Beam Electron Diffraction (CBED) patterns. PMID:22770661

  4. Creating Social Spaces to Tackle AIDS-Related Stigma: Reviewing the Role of Church Groups in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Campbell; M. Skovdal; A. Gibbs

    2011-01-01

    An expanding body of literature explores the role of African church groups in facilitating or hindering the support of people\\u000a living with AIDS and challenging or contributing to HIV\\/AIDS-related stigma. Treating church groups as social spaces in which\\u000a HIV\\/AIDS-related stigma may potentially be challenged, we systematically review this literature, identifying five themes that\\u000a highlight the complex and contradictory role of

  5. X:\\Capital Development Group\\Documents & Forms & Guidelines\\Policies Procedures and Guidelines\\REF-FM-025 Space Management Guidelines V4

    E-print Network

    Li, Jiuyong "John"

    X:\\Capital Development Group\\Documents & Forms & Guidelines\\Policies Procedures and Guidelines Group member. #12;X:\\Capital Development Group\\Documents & Forms & Guidelines\\Policies Procedures\\REF-FM-025 Space Management Guidelines V4 260308.doc Page 1 of 7 REF-FM-025 REFERENCE DOCUMENT: Space

  6. PRE AND POST BREAKUP MOVEMENTS AND SPACE USE OF BLACK BEAR FAMILY GROUPS IN CHEROKEE NATIONAL FOREST, TENNESSEE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ANTHONY P. CLEVENGER; MICHAEL R. PELTON

    The movements and space use of 7 yearling black bears (Ursus americanus) (3 males, 4 females) from 3 family groups were intensively monitored concurrently with 13 adults (6 males, 7 females) in the Cherokee National Forest, Tennessee from February 1983 until December 1983. The timing of family breakup occurred in 2 families between 29 May-5 June, and 22-25 June, respectively.

  7. Encoding Curved Tetrahedra in Face Holonomies: a Phase Space of Shapes from Group-Valued Moment Maps

    E-print Network

    Haggard, Hal M; Riello, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    We present a generalization of Minkowski's classic theorem on the reconstruction of tetrahedra from algebraic data to homogeneously curved spaces. Euclidean notions such as the normal vector to a face are replaced by Levi-Civita holonomies around each of the tetrahedron's faces. This allows the reconstruction of both spherical and hyperbolic tetrahedra within a unified framework. A new type of hyperbolic simplex is introduced in order for all the sectors encoded in the algebraic data to be covered. Generalizing the phase space of shapes associated to flat tetrahedra leads to group valued moment maps and quasi-Poisson spaces. These discrete geometries provide a natural arena for considering the quantization of gravity including a cosmological constant. A concrete realization of this is provided by the relation with the spin-network states of loop quantum gravity. This work therefore provides a bottom-up justification for the emergence of deformed gauge symmetries and quantum groups in 3+1 dimensional covariant...

  8. Phase-space formulation of quantum mechanics and quantum state reconstruction for physical systems with Lie-group symmetries

    E-print Network

    C. Brif; A. Mann

    1998-09-17

    We present a detailed discussion of a general theory of phase-space distributions, introduced recently by the authors [J. Phys. A {\\bf 31}, L9 (1998)]. This theory provides a unified phase-space formulation of quantum mechanics for physical systems possessing Lie-group symmetries. The concept of generalized coherent states and the method of harmonic analysis are used to construct explicitly a family of phase-space functions which are postulated to satisfy the Stratonovich-Weyl correspondence with a generalized traciality condition. The symbol calculus for the phase-space functions is given by means of the generalized twisted product. The phase-space formalism is used to study the problem of the reconstruction of quantum states. In particular, we consider the reconstruction method based on measurements of displaced projectors, which comprises a number of recently proposed quantum-optical schemes and is also related to the standard methods of signal processing. A general group-theoretic description of this method is developed using the technique of harmonic expansions on the phase space.

  9. Regularity Properties and Pathologies of Position-Space Renormalization-Group Transformations

    E-print Network

    A. C. D. van Enter; R. Fernandez; A. D. Sokal

    1992-10-22

    We reconsider the conceptual foundations of the renormalization-group (RG) formalism, and prove some rigorous theorems on the regularity properties and possible pathologies of the RG map. Regarding regularity, we show that the RG map, defined on a suitable space of interactions (= formal Hamiltonians), is always single-valued and Lipschitz continuous on its domain of definition. This rules out a recently proposed scenario for the RG description of first-order phase transitions. On the pathological side, we make rigorous some arguments of Griffiths, Pearce and Israel, and prove in several cases that the renormalized measure is not a Gibbs measure for any reasonable interaction. This means that the RG map is ill-defined, and that the conventional RG description of first-order phase transitions is not universally valid. For decimation or Kadanoff transformations applied to the Ising model in dimension $d \\ge 3$, these pathologies occur in a full neighborhood $\\{ \\beta > \\beta_0 ,\\, |h| < \\epsilon(\\beta) \\}$ of the low-temperature part of the first-order phase-transition surface. For block-averaging transformations applied to the Ising model in dimension $d \\ge 2$, the pathologies occur at low temperatures for arbitrary magnetic-field strength. Pathologies may also occur in the critical region for Ising models in dimension $d \\ge 4$. We discuss in detail the distinction between Gibbsian and non-Gibbsian measures, and give a rather complete catalogue of the known examples. Finally, we discuss the heuristic and numerical evidence on RG pathologies in the light of our rigorous theorems.

  10. The Carina-Near Moving Group

    E-print Network

    B. Zuckerman; M. S. Bessell; Inseok Song; S. Kim

    2006-09-01

    We identify a group of ~20 co-moving, mostly southern hemisphere, ~200 Myr old stars near Earth. Of the stars likely to be members of this Carina-Near Moving Group, in either its nucleus (~30 pc from Earth) or surrounding stream, all but 3 are plausible members of a multiple star system. The nucleus is (coincidentally) located quite close to the nucleus of the AB Doradus moving group notwithstanding that the two groups have substantially different ages and Galactic space motions, UVW.

  11. TEACHING WITH TABLET PC'S Kenrick Mock

    E-print Network

    Mock, Kenrick

    powerful desktop machines. An "official" Tablet PC, as designated by Microsoft, is essentially an x86-based or recognized as text. As a Windows XP machine, the Tablet PC has the benefit that it can directly execute anyTEACHING WITH TABLET PC'S Kenrick Mock University of Alaska Anchorage Anchorage, AK 99508 kenrick

  12. Space station needs, attributes and architectural options study costing working group briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The interface between tasks and the sequence of information flow are charted. The mission model and the requirements of each mission. These requirements along with the mission model schedule resulted in a further definition of the mission payloads, the Space Station architecture and the STS requirements was developed in task 2. The information was used to estimate the cost parameters necessary to generate cost estimates for the system with the aid of cost models for the Missions, Space Station and Space Transportation.

  13. Proceedings of the Space Shuttle Sortie Workshop. Volume 2: Working group reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Details are presented on the mission planning progress in each of the working paper reports. The general topics covered are the following: space technology; materials processing and space manufacturing; communications and navigation; earth and ocean physics; oceanography; earth resources and surface environmental quality; meteorology and atmospheric environmental quality; life sciences; atmospheric and space physics; solar physics; high energy cosmic rays; X-ray and gamma ray astronomy; ultraviolet-optical astronomy; planetary astronomy; and infrared astronomy.

  14. REQUEST FOR LEASED SPACE 3. FROM: (REQUESTING DIVISION) 4. FOR: (USER GROUP)

    E-print Network

    . FT. SUBTOTAL 13. SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS AND SERVICES (See Attached) ATTACHMENTS A. PRIMARY OFFICE AREA Spaces (Government Vehicles) BUDGET NO. PRINT NAME AND TITLE PHONE NO. DATE 15. SIGNATURE (BUSINESS MANAGER) DATE 16. SIGNATURE (SPACE ALLOCATION MANAGER) DATE 17. FOR REAL ESTATE USE ONLY RECOMMENDED

  15. Group classification of the Sachs equations for a radiating axisymmetric, non-rotating, vacuum space-time

    E-print Network

    Nail H. Ibragimov; Ewald J. H. Wessels; George F. R. Ellis

    2006-11-21

    We carry out a Lie group analysis of the Sachs equations for a time-dependent axisymmetric non-rotating space-time in which the Ricci tensor vanishes. These equations, which are the first two members of the set of Newman-Penrose equations, define the characteristic initial-value problem for the space-time. We find a particular form for the initial data such that these equations admit a Lie symmetry, and so defines a geometrically special class of such spacetimes. These should additionally be of particular physical interest because of this special geometric feature.

  16. SI PC104 Performance Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    Montelongo, S

    2005-12-16

    The Spectral Instruments (SI) PC104 systems associated with the SI-1000 CCD camera exhibited intermittent power problems during setup, test and operations which called for further evaluation and testing. The SI PC104 System is the interface between the SI-1000 CCD camera and its associated Diagnostic Controller (DC). As such, the SI PC104 must be a reliable, robust system capable of providing consistent performance in various configurations and operating conditions. This SI PC104 system consists of a stackable set of modules designed to meet the PC104+ Industry Standard. The SI PC104 System consists of a CPU module, SI Camera card, Media converter card, Video card and a I/O module. The root cause of power problems was identified as failing solder joints at the LEMO power connector attached to the SI Camera Card. The recommended solution was to provide power to the PC104 system via a PC104+ power supply module configured into the PC104 stack instead of thru the LEMO power connector. Test plans (2) were developed to test SI PC104 performance and identify any outstanding issues noted during extended operations. Test Plan 1 included performance and image acquisition tests. Test Plan 2 verified performance after implementing recommendations. Test Plan 2 also included verifying integrity of system files and driver installation after bootup. Each test plan was implemented to fully test against each set of problems noted. Test Plan presentations and Test Plan results are attached as appendices. Anticipated test results will show successful operation and reliable performance of the SI PC104 system receiving its power via a PC104 power supply module. A SI PC104 Usage Recommendation Memo will be sent out to the SI PC104 User Community. Recommendation memo(s) are attached as appendices.

  17. Pathway Controlled Penetration (PcP)

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Earl E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rougier, Esteban [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zubelewicz, Aleksander [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-29

    The technical approach employs advanced computational simulation tools to demonstrate how current assets can destroy RWK-RFI-12-0001's HDBT, a tunnel complex with two portals built into the base of a granite mountain. The granite over layer is assumed to be 60 meters thick over both portals and 80 meters over the facility's mission space. Key S&T is the completed development of a highly innovative viscoplastic fracture material model, 3D parallel gas-fracture capabilities into FDEM, and a stochastic handling of the material properties. Phase I - Develop and validate code simulation tools: (1) develop, incorporate and validate AZ-Frac material model for granite; and (2) Develop and incorporate gas-driven-fracture modeling into LANL's FDEM MUNROU code; (3) Develop and incorporate stochastic features into FDEM modeling. Phase II - Conduct PcP analysis on above HDBT: (1) Acquire HDBT design data, develop simulation model; and (2) Evaluate and select most promising defeat alternative. Phase III - Deliver code, train Service target analysts, and conduct simulations against real world HDBTs. PcP uses advanced computer simulations to enhance HDBT functional defeat efforts. Newly developed material models that account for fractural energy coupled with the finite discrete element methodology (FDEM) will provide targeting packages that will create penetration avenues for current or future lethality options. This novel computational approach requires full 3D geologic and structure characterization as well as significant high performance computing capabilities. The goal is to distinctively alter the targeting paradigm by leveraging critical DoD assets along with insitu geologic strata. In other words, assets will utilize underground rock structure to their benefit by creating rubbilization zones that will allow pathway controlled penetration.

  18. Magneto-transport study in single crystals of Cd3 As2 with different space group symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shih-Ting; Sankar, Raman; Chien, Yung-Yu; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Guo, G. Y.; Chou, F. C.; Lee, Wei-Li; Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taiwan Collaboration; Center of condensed matter sciences, National Taiwan University, Taiwan Collaboration; Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taiwan Collaboration; Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    The 3-D Dirac semi-metal Cd3As2 is known as a potential parent compound for several unique topological phases such as Weyl semi-metal, topological superconductor, and axion insulator. Its 3D Dirac band has recently been demonstrated by ARPES experiments. In this report, we conduct magneto-transport measurements on single crystals of Cd3As2 with three different space group symmetries of I41cd, I41/acd, and P42/nmc, which was characterized by X-ray diffraction. Large anisotropy magnetoresistance and splitting of SdH frequency were observed in all Cd3As2crystals under investigation regardless of the type of space group symmetry suggesting that defects may play an important role. Detailed magneto-transport data at various field orientations will be presented and discussed..

  19. Position-space renormalization-group approach for driven diffusive systems applied to the asymmetric exclusion model.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, Ivan T; McKay, Susan R

    2003-05-01

    This paper introduces a position-space renormalization-group approach for nonequilibrium systems and applies the method to a driven stochastic one-dimensional gas with open boundaries. The dynamics are characterized by three parameters: the probability alpha that a particle will flow into the chain to the leftmost site, the probability beta that a particle will flow out from the rightmost site, and the probability p that a particle will jump to the right if the site to the right is empty. The renormalization-group procedure is conducted within the space of these transition probabilities, which are relevant to the system's dynamics. The method yields a critical point at alpha(c)=beta(c)=1/2, in agreement with the exact values, and the critical exponent nu=2.71, as compared with the exact value nu=2.00. PMID:12786216

  20. PC/104 Embedded IOCs at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Jianxun Yan, Trent Allison, Sue Witherspoon, Anthony Cuffe

    2009-10-01

    Jefferson Lab has developed embedded IOCs based on PC/104 single board computers (SBC) for low level control systems. The PC/104 IOCs run EPICS on top of the RTEMS operating system. Two types of control system configurations are used in different applications, PC/104 SBC with commercial PC/104 I/O cards and PC/104 SBC with custom designed FPGA-based boards. RTEMS was built with CEXP shell to run on the PC/104 SBC. CEXP shell provides the function of dynamic object loading, which is similar to the widely used VxWorks operating system. Standard software configurations were setup for PC/104 IOC application development to provide a familiar format for new projects as well as ease the conversion of applications from VME based IOCs to PC/104 IOCs. Many new projects at Jefferson Lab are going to employ PC/104 SBCs as IOCs and some applications have already been running them for accelerator operations. The PC/104 - RTEMS IOC provides a free open source Real-Time Operating System (RTOS), low cost/maintenance, easily installed/ configured, flexible, and reliable solution for accelerator control and 12GeV Upgrade projects.

  1. Group dynamics in a long-term blind endeavor on Earth: An analog for space missions (Lewis & Clark Expedition group dynamic analysis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allner, M.; Rygalov, V.

    2008-12-01

    In 1803, President Thomas Jefferson set fourth a military expedition led by Captains M. Lewis and W. Clark (Lewis and Clark Expedition) on an exploration that would become an everlasting part of US national history and pride. Looking back at the events of this exploration, there are many similarities to the experiences future human space explorers will face as we look to colonize the Moon and travel to Mars and beyond (NASA Vision for Space Exploration, 2004): The Lewis and Clark Expedition lasted almost three years and involved a crew of 43 men traveling up the Missouri River to explore the unknown lands and a possible water route to the Pacific Ocean; The Expedition took place far away from customary comfortable environments known to European settlers in the early 18th century; The Expedition involved a remotely confined high-perceived risk environment with high levels of uncertainty providing stresses and every day challenges for the crew; Supplies brought on the mission were limited (mainly a mass/weight issue rather than cost), therefore the discovery and use of environmental resources (In-Situ Resource Utilization approach, including info-resources to mitigate uncertainty) was necessary for crew survival. The environments astronauts will encounter in space and on the Moon and Mars due to high risk and uncertainty will be in many aspects similar to what Lewis and Clark's crew experienced, as environments will be hostile and unforgiving if problems arise and aren't resolved quickly. The analysis provided in this research paper is relevant because the Lewis and Clark Expedition needed to move extensively and with minimal supplies. Polar remote settings, which were analyzed extensively, were different from this expedition due to the fact that these missions did not encompass extensive movement of crew facilities and supplies and were more like space missions orbiting the Earth. Using past space station results of performance on orbit in correlation with a suggested distinguishable mission phase model, the Lewis and Clark Expedition will be analyzed for similarities to these space findings. Factors of consideration in support of this analysis involve an understanding of the leadership qualities of Lewis and Clark (and relations established and maintained with one another), the selection and diversity of their crew, and the group dynamics that were developed and maintained so carefully during the expedition. With this knowledge and understanding one can gain enormous insights useful in the planning and preparation for future long-duration space exploratory missions with high level of autonomy, mobility, minimal primary life support supply and high dependence on material re-circulation and In-Situ Resource Utilization approach.

  2. Position-space renormalization-group approach for driven diffusive systems applied to the asymmetric exclusion model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ivan T. Georgiev; Susan R. McKay

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces a position-space renormalization-group approach for\\u000anonequilibrium systems and applies the method to a driven stochastic\\u000aone-dimensional gas with open boundaries. The dynamics are characterized by\\u000athree parameters: the probability $\\\\alpha$ that a particle will flow into the\\u000achain to the leftmost site, the probability $\\\\beta$ that a particle will flow\\u000aout from the rightmost site, and the

  3. Position-space renormalization-group approach for driven diffusive systems applied to the asymmetric exclusion model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ivan T. Georgiev; Susan R. McKay

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces a position-space renormalization-group approach for nonequilibrium systems and applies the method to a driven stochastic one-dimensional gas with open boundaries. The dynamics are characterized by three parameters: the probability alpha that a particle will flow into the chain to the leftmost site, the probability beta that a particle will flow out from the rightmost site, and the

  4. Space station needs attributes and architectural options study costing working group briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Individuals in the United States who understand the promise of materials processing in space and who also are senior technical personnel associated with commercial firms that process materials: (1) endorsed the concept of a space station as a desirable national asset; (2) stated that a commercial MPS research program is mandatory to extend commericalization of space for materials processing; and (3) described in general terms a national research laboratory and free flying facilities that are needed. Participants agreed that industry R&D is motivated largely by market pull rather than by technology push, that initial interest is low-g materials research; and that to farther, commercial market assurance (a salable product) is a must.

  5. Distinct Mechanisms Account for ?-Amyloid Toxicity in PC12 and Differentiated PC12 Neuronal Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yen-Jen Sung; Chia-Io Cheng; Chaio-Sung Chen; Hsien-Bin Huang; Fong-Lee Huang; Pei-Chun Wu; Ming-Shi Shiao; Huey-Jen Tsay

    2003-01-01

    Whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate ?-amyloid (A?) neurotoxicity remains controversial. Naive PC12 cells (PC12) and nerve growth factor-differentiated PC12 cells (dPC12) were used to study the role of ROS in cell death induced by A?25–35. The viability of PC12 and dPC12 cells decreased by 30–40% after a 48-hour exposure to 20 ?M A?25–35. Microscopic examination showed that A?25–35 induced

  6. Distinct mechanisms account for ?-amyloid toxicity in PC12 and differentiated PC12 neuronal cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yen-Jen Sung; Chia-lo Cheng; Chaio-Sung Chen; Hsien-Bin Huang; Fong-Lee Huang; Pei-Chun Wu; Ming-Shi Shiao; Huey-Jen Tsay

    2003-01-01

    Whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate ?-amyloid (A?) neurotoxicity remains controversial. Naive PC12 cells (PC12) and nerve growth factor-differentiated PC12 cells (dPC12) were used to study the role of ROS in cell death induced by A?25–35. The viability of PC12 and dPC12 cells decreased by 30–40% after a 48-hour exposure to 20 µM A?25–35. Microscopic examination showed that A?25–35 induced

  7. REQUEST FOR LEASED SPACE 3. FROM: (REQUESTING DIVISION) 4. FOR: (USER GROUP)

    E-print Network

    ORNL-669 (Formerly OR-F-4300.16) (10-2005) Exception Print Form Oct-17-2005 Asset Management Real. FT. SUBTOTAL 13. SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS AND SERVICES (See Attached) ATTACHMENTS A. PRIMARY OFFICE AREA Spaces (Government Vehicles) BUDGET NO. PRINT NAME AND TITLE PHONE NO. DATE 15. SIGNATURE (BUSINESS

  8. Peptide biosynthetic processing: distinguishing prohormone convertases PC1 and PC2

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luc Paquet; An Zhou; Edwin Y. Chang; Richard E. Mains

    1996-01-01

    To determine whether manipulation of time, temperature and intragranular pH could be used to distinguish the actions of two subtilisin-related endoproteases, PC1 and PC2, in peptide biosynthesis, the biosynthetic processing of proneuropeptide Y (proNPY) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) was examined in pituitary cell lines. AtT-20 cells express PC1 and POMC endogenously; stably transfected AtT-20 lines expressing NPY or PC2 were studied.

  9. Banach frames in coorbit spaces consisting of elements which are invariant under symmetry groups

    E-print Network

    Feichtinger, Hans Georg

    the continuous transform. As examples, the continuous wavelet transform and the short time Fourier transform function on the positive halfline R+ and it turned out in [18] that the continuous wavelet transform representation theory of locally compact groups. In this abstract setting the theory for the continuous transform

  10. Finding a Space for Professional Development: Creating Thirdspace through After-School Writing Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooke, Robert; Coyle, Deborah; Walden, Anne; Healey, Conniem; Larson, Kim; Laughridge, Virginia; Ridder, Kim; Williams, Molly; Williams, Shawn

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a teacher study group focusing on After School Writing Circles for elementary students as a site of Thirdspace professional development. Borrowing the concept of Thirdspace from postmodern geographer Edward Soja, the authors argue that professional development works best when teachers engage in the dual work of imagining and…

  11. Learning in Large Learning Spaces: The Academic Engagement of a Diverse Group of Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Clive

    2012-01-01

    Teaching larger groups of students is a growing phenomenon in HE and this brings with it its own challenges, not least for the students themselves but also for their lecturers. Demographic factors as well as the experiences that characterise us as individuals will impact upon our ability to learn. The pilot study reported here considered the…

  12. Limit points in the space of left orderings of a group University of British Columbia

    E-print Network

    Harizanov, Valentina S.

    for isolated points in LO(G); those positive cones P satisfying {P} = n i=1 Ugi , for some finite family, for a given group G, we look for isolated points in LO(G); those positive cones P satisfying {P} = n i=1 Ugi

  13. Communication constraints, indexical countermeasures, and crew configuration effects in simulated space-dwelling groups

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert D. Hienz; Joseph V. Brady; Steven R. Hursh; Michele J. Banner; Eric D. Gasior; Kevin R. Spence

    2007-01-01

    Previous research with groups of individually isolated crews communicating and problem-solving in a distributed interactive simulation environment has shown that the functional interchangeability of available communication channels can serve as an effective countermeasure to communication constraints. The present report extends these findings by investigating crew performance effects and psychosocial adaptation following: (1) the loss of all communication channels, and (2)

  14. Localization of the Einstein group and a nonsingular cosmological model of space-time with torsion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. N. Tunyak

    1986-01-01

    We consider an Einstein-invariant gauge theory of gravitation (EGT), obtained by localizing the group of motions of a homogeneous static Einstein Universe. Taking into account the cosmological term, we find exact solutions of EGT are as nonsingular homogeneous Isotropic cosmological models with both the metric and the torsion regular. It is shown that EGT satisfies the principle of correspondence with

  15. Localization of the Einstein group and a nonsingular cosmological model of space-time with torsion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tunyak

    1987-01-01

    The authors consider an Einstein-invariant gauge theory of gravitation (EGT), obtained by localizing the group of motions of a homogeneous static Einstein Universe. Taking into account the cosmological term, they find exact solutions of EGT are as nonsingular homogeneous isotropic cosmological models with both the metric and the torsion regular. It is shown that EGT satisfies the principle of correspondence

  16. PC application remote control via mobile phone

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Haeil Hyun; Jonghyun Park; Yunchan Cho; Jae Wook Jeon

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a PC application remote control system via mobile phones. Recently, mobile phones have been used to remotely control systems such as home automation systems. However, users are inconvenienced when using remote control systems because existing remote control systems require specific devices and software. Thus, in this paper, we propose a PC application remote control system

  17. Real-space renormalization-group investigation of the randomly dilute q-state Potts model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Bakchich; A. Benyoussef; T. Biaz; L. Laanait

    1988-01-01

    The randomly bond-diluted two-dimensional nearest-neighbor q-state Potts ferromagnet and antiferromagnet on the square lattice is studied by renormalization-group methods based on the Migdal-Kadanoff approximate recursion relations. In the bond-diluted ferromagnet Potts model, differential recursion relations yield a phase diagram which is in quantitative agreement with all known results for q<=4. In the bond-diluted antiferromagnet Potts model, the phase diagram obtained

  18. Polar space group and complex magnetism in Ni11?(HPO3)8(OH)6: towards a new multiferroic material?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poienar, M.; Maignan, A.; Sfirloaga, P.; Malo, S.; Vlazan, P.; Guesdon, A.; Lainé, F.; Rouquette, J.; Martin, C.

    2015-01-01

    The Ni11?(HPO3)8(OH)6 phosphite was prepared using a hydrothermal method. Depending on the pressure used during the synthesis, different hierarchical superstructures were encountered, including a new original cross-shaped star. The as-obtained products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and magnetization. In agreement with the presence of transition metal dimers in the structure, a complex magnetic behavior is observed at low temperature. This magnetic ground-state, combined with the non-centrosymmetry of the space group, creates new opportunities for applications in this class of open framework inorganic materials.

  19. Group dynamics during the EXEMSI isolation study. Experimental Campaign for the European Manned Space Infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Cazes, C; Rosnet, E; Bachelard, C; Le Scanff, C; Rivolier, J

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the social behavior, interrelations, cohesion, efficiency and team formation of the crew during 60 days of isolation and confinement, to make a critical comparison of a variety of test methods used for this purpose and to formulate recommendations for their applications in selection, training and support for future studies of this kind. The study consisted of three phases: (1) the pre-isolation period, in which initial individual and group assessment were made to understand the motivation, characteristics, and styles of the crew members, the state of the crew, and to make a prognosis for the behavior of the group and its members, (2) the isolation period, with tests and observations to follow and analyze behavior and group dynamics of the crew, and to detect manifestations of stress, and (3) the post-isolation period with final assessment and debriefing. During these three periods individual and group tests were carried out. Direct methods, questionnaires and tests, as well as indirect methods, observations of behavior, were used. These had cognitive, affective-emotional and social components; they were quantitative, qualitative or a combination. Before isolation the crew members expressed strong confidence in the team and in their own personal capability. The leadership of the Commander seemed uncontested. Crew functioning during this period was conflict-free, but was structured in a rather rigid and defensive way (isolation of affects, denial of anxiety). Apparently, the members strongly needed to present a good image image of themselves. The relatively short period of the experiment, and the absence of real risk suggested that the crew would be able to maintain their cohesion, but in a real spaceflight situation this behavior could be inadequate and even dangerous. The pre-isolation prognosis for crew behavior during isolation was validated to a large extent. During isolation there were no clear manifestations of stress. Nevertheless, the confinement and isolation were experienced as the major stress factors. The crew members described themselves as a heterogeneous but harmonious group that was successful in their mission. In fact, the team maintained its cohesion by opposing external authority, using management as a scapegoat. Occasionally, in times of crisis, they also criticized ground crew. The Commander supported this attitude. Strongly differences in personality and behavior were noted. Analysis of the sociometric data showed that the asserted harmony was more apparent than real. It is questionable whether the group cohesion would have persisted in a life threatening crisis or even in a prolongation of the experiment. The most reliable instruments for this type of survey seem to be: group methods, non-obstructive tests, indirect instruments, and qualitative tools. The least reliable are: strictly quantitative methods, self-evaluations, standard debriefing techniques, since these reinforced in most cases subjects' defenses in an unconscious avoidance of criticism. Several recommendations were made for the organization, definition of objectives, experiment selection, crew selection, roles of external management and personnel. In particular, it is felt to be necessary to explain the aims of the mission to the subjects, to give clear and complete information, to establish confident and cooperative relations with the crew. It is essential to allow dialogue, to take opinions and suggestions of the crew seriously, and to establish clear rules of confidentiality. PMID:8814802

  20. Prediction of molecular crystal structures by a crystallographic QM/MM model with full space-group symmetry.

    PubMed

    Mörschel, Philipp; Schmidt, Martin U

    2015-01-01

    A crystallographic quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical model (c-QM/MM model) with full space-group symmetry has been developed for molecular crystals. The lattice energy was calculated by quantum-mechanical methods for short-range interactions and force-field methods for long-range interactions. The quantum-mechanical calculations covered the interactions within the molecule and the interactions of a reference molecule with each of the surrounding 12-15 molecules. The interactions with all other molecules were treated by force-field methods. In each optimization step the energies in the QM and MM shells were calculated separately as single-point energies; after adding both energy contributions, the crystal structure (including the lattice parameters) was optimized accordingly. The space-group symmetry was maintained throughout. Crystal structures with more than one molecule per asymmetric unit, e.g. structures with Z' = 2, hydrates and solvates, have been optimized as well. Test calculations with different quantum-mechanical methods on nine small organic molecules revealed that the density functional theory methods with dispersion correction using the B97-D functional with 6-31G* basis set in combination with the DREIDING force field reproduced the experimental crystal structures with good accuracy. Subsequently the c-QM/MM method was applied to nine compounds from the CCDC blind tests resulting in good energy rankings and excellent geometric accuracies. PMID:25537386

  1. My Time, My Space (an arts-based group for women with postnatal depression): a project report.

    PubMed

    Morton, Alison; Forsey, Philippa

    2013-05-01

    This paper will describe an innovative method of treatment for women with postnatal depression that has been used in the south west of England since 2004 and has now been successfully piloted in other areas of the UK. My Time My Space is an arts-based group for women with postnatal depression that aims to improve mood by reducing social isolation and using creativity to improve self-esteem. Results of the programme will be shared, in addition to the ways in which the project has been implemented using collaborative working with children's centres and building community capacity by engaging local charities. The qualitative results have been collected from participants (n = 30) over the last two years using post-course evaluation forms with open questions to elicit participants' views. The quantitative results of a small pilot study (n = 8) based on pre- and post-group Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale scores (EPDS) are also reported. The findings suggest My Time My Space has a positive effect on women's mood and perceived social support, and provides an effective alternative or additional method of treatment for postnatal depression. PMID:23724760

  2. The Exploration Atmospheres Working Group's Report on Space Radiation Shielding Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, A. F.; Thibeault, S. A.

    2006-01-01

    This part of Exploration Atmospheres Working Group analyses focuses on the potential use of nonmetallic composites as the interior walls and structural elements exposed to the atmosphere of the spacecraft or habitat. The primary drive to consider nonmetallic, polymer-based composites as an alternative to aluminum structure is due to their superior radiation shielding properties. But as is shown in this analysis, these composites can also be made to combine superior mechanical properties with superior shielding properties. In addition, these composites can be made safe; i.e., with regard to flammability and toxicity, as well as "smart"; i.e., embedded with sensors for the continuous monitoring of material health and conditions. The analysis main conclusions are that (1) smart polymer-based composites are an enabling technology for safe and reliable exploration missions, and (2) an adaptive, synergetic systems approach is required to meet the missions requirements from structure, properties, and processes to crew health and protection for exploration missions.

  3. The classification of maps between the classifying spaces of Lie groups

    E-print Network

    Mahmud, Zafer

    1974-08-01

    this informally as "H'~ (BG,R) is the subring of Weyl group invariants in H:~ (BT ,R) " • Section 1 G2 0 From [11, page 84J we find that we can choose a maximal torus T C G2 with H*(BT,Z) ~ Z[t(1),t(2),t(3)J/I where dim t(i) = 2 and I is the ideal generated... on . ~-.~ ' r, cm, Ti<:NTS . CH 'I.PTER_l1. G 2 r-md F 4 • CHAPTER 2 : fi'lap s BSp ( 1 ) .~ BH. 47 CHAPTER 3: I'jaD s BG -+ BH . J . CHAP'r ,'B·-1: The c onje c ture A ' . Refe r enc es . In t r oduc ti C2.!}, ._ Let C be . the ca t a g or y of p a irs...

  4. Scale-PC shielding analysis sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, S.M.

    1996-05-01

    The SCALE computational system is a modular code system for analyses of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. With the release of SCALE-PC Version 4.3, the radiation shielding analysis community now has the capability to execute the SCALE shielding analysis sequences contained in the control modules SAS1, SAS2, SAS3, and SAS4 on a MS- DOS personal computer (PC). In addition, SCALE-PC includes two new sequences, QADS and ORIGEN-ARP. The capabilities of each sequence are presented, along with example applications.

  5. Dispersive Pc1 bursts observed by Freja

    SciTech Connect

    Mursula, K.; Braeysy, T.; Rasinkangas, R.; Tanskanen, P. [Univ. of Oulu (Finland)] [Univ. of Oulu (Finland); Blomberg, L.G.; Lindqvist, P.A.; Marklund, G.T. [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)] [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1994-08-15

    The authors report on observation of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves (Pc1 pulsations) by the Freja satellite on November 18, 1992. These observations are coincident with ground based observation of such pearl like Pc1 pulsations extending over a 12 hour period. This is the first observation by a satellite above the ionosphere of such phenomena. The wave pulsations were observed to come in 10 to 25 second pulses, and to be clearly dispersive in nature. Two spectral bands were observed in all Pc1 pearls. In the longer bursts, the authors observed time differences between the two distinct spectral bands.

  6. GOMER: a PC-based expert system

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrell, G.D.

    1986-04-01

    The algorithm for a PC-based expert system for interpretation of seismic data from remote sensors is described. The original expert system was written on a Symbolics computer using Zeta LISP. The PC version is written in Pascal and runs on the IBM PC or on any IBM-compatible computer. The Pascal source code is included with this report. To date the software has been used only on simulated sensor data but will be modified to accept data from fielded sensors. Extensive field testing will be required to refine the program's knowledge base. 8 figs.

  7. Incorporating Space Science Content Into the Undergraduate Curriculum by the NASA Education Forums' Higher Education Working Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, N. A.; Buxner, S.; Cobabe-Ammann, E. A.; Fraknoi, A.; Moldwin, M.; Peticolas, L. M.; Low, R.; Schultz, G. R.

    2013-12-01

    As part of the NASA Education Forums, the Higher Education Working Group (HEWG) strives to support undergraduate science education through a variety of activities. These activities include: providing resource that incorporate space science topics into the existing undergraduate curriculum, understanding the role that community colleges play in STEM education and preparing STEM teachers, and identifying issues in diversity related to STEM education. To assess the best way of including space science into the undergraduate curriculum, the HEWG held a series of workshops and conducted surveys of undergraduate faculty who are conducting research in space science. During this engagement, the faculty expressed a need for a centralized repository of materials that can be used as part of already existing undergraduate courses in astronomy, physics, and earth science. Such a repository has since been developed, the 'EarthSpace Higher Education Clearing House (http://www.lpi.usra.edu/earthspace/) and it is still growing. Additional community tools, such as a newsletter, are provided through this website. To better understand the role and needs of community colleges, the HEWG undertook and extensive survey of community college STEM faculty. 187 faculty responded to the survey and the results show the extensive teaching load these faculty have, as well as the diverse demographics and the extent to which STEM teachers begin their preparation at 2 year institutions. Finally, the HEWG has begun to work on understanding the issues faced in increasing the diversity of the STEM work force. Progress and results of all this work will be summarized in this presentation.

  8. A New Hubble Space Telescope Distance to NGC 1569: Starburst Properties and IC 342 Group Membership

    E-print Network

    Aaron J. Grocholski; Alessandra Aloisi; Roeland P. van der Marel; Jennifer Mack; Francesca Annibali; Luca Angeretti; Laura Greggio; Enrico V. Held; Donatella Romano; Marco Sirianni; Monica Tosi

    2008-08-01

    We present deep HST ACS/WFC photometry of the dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 1569, one of the closest and strongest nearby starburst galaxies. These data allow us, for the first time, to unequivocally detect the tip of the red giant branch and thereby determine the distance to NGC 1569. We find that this galaxy is 3.36 +/- 0.20 Mpc away, considerably farther away than the typically assumed distance of 2.2 +/- 0.6 Mpc. Previously thought to be an isolated galaxy due to its shorter distance, our new distance firmly establishes NGC 1569 as a member of the IC 342 group of galaxies. The higher density environment may help explain the starburst nature of NGC 1569, since starbursts are often triggered by galaxy interactions. On the other hand, the longer distance implies that NGC 1569 is an even more extreme starburst galaxy than previously believed. Previous estimates of the rate of star formation for stars younger than ~ 1 Gyr become stronger by more than a factor of 2. Stars older than this were not constrained by previous studies. The dynamical masses of NGC 1569's three super star clusters, which are already known as some of the most massive ever discovered, increase by ~53% to 6-7x10^5 solar masses.

  9. Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Web Feet K-8, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This annotated subject guide to Web sites and additional resources focuses on space and astronomy. Specifies age levels for resources that include Web sites, CD-ROMS and software, videos, books, audios, and magazines; offers professional resources; and presents a relevant class activity. (LRW)

  10. PC-SPES–for health professionals (PDQ®)

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the use of PC-SPES as a treatment for prostate cancer. Note: The information in this summary is no longer being updated and is provided for reference purposes only.

  11. E-Books and the Tablet PC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin-Jones, Bob

    2003-01-01

    Highlights the emerging technologies of e-books, electronic versions of texts, and the Tablet PC, a new hybrid laptop computer and personal digital assistant that features a writing tablet and stylus-based input/navigation. (Author/VWL)

  12. DimmPC Backplane PCB Chris J Cannell

    E-print Network

    Virginia Tech

    DimmPC Backplane PCB Chris J Cannell 22 September 2004 Description The DimmPC Backplane contains on the ASCL website. Printed Circuit Board Figure 5: DimmPC Backplane PCB (Top-right, Bottom-left) #12;

  13. PC-183B Standoff Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredrickson, Henry J.

    1984-12-01

    Itek has recently completed a program to supply long range oblique photography (LOROP) cameras for a nose installation in an F-104 aircraft. The camera, designated PC-183B, is a derivative of a configuration presented at the June 1980, SPIE show and is described in Volume 242. The PC-183B camera features reflective optics, internal two-axis stabilization, and a unique air capstan.

  14. Coordination of Advanced Solar Observatory (ASO) Science Working Group (SWG) for the study of instrument accommodation and operational requirements on space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    1989-01-01

    The objectives are to coordinate the activities of the Science Working Group (SWG) of the Advanced Solar Observatory (ASO) for the study of instruments accommodation and operation requirements on board space station. In order to facilitate the progress of the objective, two conferences were organized, together with two small group discussions.

  15. Structure of Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase R2 in space group P6[subscript 1]22

    SciTech Connect

    Sommerhalter, Monika; Saleh, Lana; Bollinger Jr., J. Martin; Rosenzweig, Amy C. (NWU); (Penn)

    2010-07-20

    A new crystal form of wild-type ribonucleotide reductase R2 from Escherichia coli was obtained. Crystals grow in space group P6{sub 1}22 with one R2 monomer in the asymmetric unit. A twofold crystallographic symmetry axis generates the physiological dimeric form of R2. Co-crystallization with CoCl{sub 2} or MnCl{sub 2} results in full occupancy of the dinuclear metal site. The structure of the Mn{sup II}-loaded form was determined to 2.6 {angstrom} resolution by molecular replacement. The crystallization conditions, backbone conformation, crystal-packing interactions and metal centers are compared with those of previously determined crystal forms.

  16. The Star Formation Histories of Local Group Dwarf Galaxies. I. Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Skillman, Evan D.; Holtzman, Jon; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.

    2014-07-01

    We present uniformly measured star formation histories (SFHs) of 40 Local Group (LG) dwarf galaxies based on color-magnitude diagram (CMD) analysis from archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging. We demonstrate that accurate SFHs can be recovered from CMDs that do not reach the oldest main sequence turn-off (MSTO), but emphasize that the oldest MSTO is critical for precisely constraining the earliest epochs of star formation. We find that: (1) the average lifetime SFHs of dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) can be approximated by an exponentially declining SFH with ? ~ 5 Gyr (2) lower luminosity dSphs are less likely to have extended SFHs than more luminous dSphs; (3) the average SFHs of dwarf irregulars (dIrrs), transition dwarfs, and dwarf ellipticals can be approximated by the combination of an exponentially declining SFH (? ~ 3-4 Gyr) for lookback ages >10-12 Gyr ago and a constant SFH thereafter; (4) the observed fraction of stellar mass formed prior to z = 2 ranges considerably (80% for galaxies with M < 105 M ? to 30% for galaxies with M > 107 M ?) and is largely explained by environment; (5) the distinction between "ultra-faint" and "classical" dSphs is arbitrary; (6) LG dIrrs formed a significantly higher fraction of stellar mass prior to z = 2 than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies from Leitner and the SFHs from the abundance matching models of Behroozi et al. This may indicate higher than expected star formation efficiencies at early times in low mass galaxies. Finally, we provide all the SFHs in tabulated electronic format for use by the community. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  17. PC-based PCM (Pulse Code Modulation) telemetry data reduction system hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-02-01

    The Solar Energy Research Institute's (SERI) Wind Research Program is using pulse code modulation (PCM) telemetry systems to study horizontal-axis wind turbines. SERI has developed a low-cost PC-based PCM data acquisition system to facilitate quick PCM data analysis in the field. The SERI PC-PCM system consists of AT-compatible hardware boards for decoding and combining PCM data streams and DOS software for control and management of data acquisition. Up to four boards can be installed in a single PC, providing the capability to combine data from four PCM streams direct to disk or memory. The SERI PC-PCM system hardware is described focusing on the practicality of PC-based PCM data reduction. A related paper highlights the comprehensive PCM data management software program which can be used in conjunction with this hardware to provide full quick-look data processing and display. The PC-PCM hardware boards support a subset of the Inter-Range Instrumentation Group (IRIG) PCM standard, designed to synchronize and decommutate NRZ or Bi-Phase L PCM streams in the range of 1 to 800 Kbits/sec at 8 to 12 bits per word and 2 to 64 words per frame. Multiple PCM streams (at various rates) can be combined and interleaved into a contiguous digital time series. Maximum data throughput depends on characteristics of the PC hardware, such as CPU rate and disk access speed.

  18. Emissions tracking system (ETS-PC) software

    SciTech Connect

    Weatherbee, J. Jr.; Kress, T. [Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The U.S. EPA Acid Rain Division developed and is maintaining the Emissions Tracking System (ETS) to receive, store and analyze data from continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) submitted by utilities affected by the 1990 Clean Air Act. This paper will describe ETS-PC, a PC application developed by EPA to assist utilities in analyzing and submitting emission data files each quarter. ETS-PC includes quality assurance software which helps utilities identify possible errors in their quarterly data files (QDFs) prior to submission. It also includes communications software which allows utilities to transfer QDFs via modem directly to the EPA mainframe computer located in Research Triangle Park, NC. After a file is transferred, users are provided with immediate feedback from the mainframe in the form of a file transfer receipt and summary.

  19. Possible effects of ionospheric beating for the formation of Pc1 pearl structures based on 6-year ground observations in Canada, Russia and Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, C. W.; Shiokawa, K.; Connors, M. G.; Schofield, I.; Poddelsky, I.; Shevtsov, B.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate pearl structures (amplitude modulation) of Pc1 pulsations simultaneously observed at Athabasca (ATH, 54.7N, 246.7E, L=4.3) in Canada, Magadan (MGD, 60.1N, 150.7E, L=2.6) in Russia, and Moshiri (MOS, 44.4N, 142.3E, L=1.5) in Japan. From a 6-year period of ground observations, from 2008 to 2013, we selected 150 events at longitudinally separated stations (ATH and MGD, group 1), 782 at latitudinally separated stations (MGD and MOS, group 2), all with high coherence of Pc1 waveforms (r > 0.5). As a result, we found that the peak occurrence rates of simultaneous Pc1 events were at 12-18 UT in group1, when ATH was in the morning sector and MGD in the midnight sector. In group 2, the peak was at 18-21 UT, with MGD and MOS in the morning sector. Using cross-correlation analysis, we confirmed the similarity of Pc1 pearl structures at different stations during Pc1 event timing. 82 % of Pc1 events in group 1 were less than 40 % of similarity of Pc1 pearl structures. In addition, 18 % of Pc1 events in group 1, which are over than 40 % of similarity of Pc1 pearl structures, were concentrated at 10-18 UT. According to polarization angle distribution in group 1, 57 % of Pc1 events occurred between ATH and MGD. Most of those events had high similarity of Pc1 amplitude envelopes. We investigated the relationship between the similarity of Pc1 pearl structures and geomagnetic activities (AE and SYM-H indices). The AE index seemed suddenly to start decreasing before the Pc1 onset and increasing after 80 min. The variation of SYM-H index was increasing 2 hours before Pc1 onset. From our statistical analysis, we suggest that the beating process in the ionosphere could be the dominant generation mechanism of Pc1 pearl structures in the ionosphere. It seems that the ionospheric duct in dawn sector of the ionosphere is well-defined during Pc1 pulsation propagating from ionospheric sources to stations. In order to understand the beating process in the ionosphere more clearly, we are going to take into account the possible effects such as distributed ionospheric source, attenuation effect in the ionosphere, dispersive propagation in the ionosphere and Pc1 source amplitude. Using the same procedure, we will also investigate Pc1 pearl structures simultaneously observed at latitudinally separated ground stations (MGD and MOS).

  20. Fabrication of ZnPc/protein nanohorns for double photodynamic and hyperthermic cancer phototherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Minfang; Murakami, Tatsuya; Ajima, Kumiko; Tsuchida, Kunihiro; Sandanayaka, Atula S. D.; Ito, Osamu; Iijima, Sumio; Yudasaka, Masako

    2008-01-01

    Multifunctionalization of carbon nanotubules is easily achieved by attaching functional molecules that provide specific advantages for microscopic applications. We fabricated a double photodynamic therapy (PDT) and photohyperthermia (PHT) cancer phototherapy system that uses a single laser. Zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) was loaded onto single-wall carbon nanohorns with holes opened (SWNHox), and the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) was attached to the carboxyl groups of SWNHox. In this system, ZnPc was the PDT agent, SWNHox was the PHT agent, and BSA enhanced biocompatibility. The double phototherapy effect was confirmed in vitro and in vivo. When ZnPc-SWNHox-BSA was injected into tumors that were subcutaneously transplanted into mice, the tumors almost disappeared upon 670-nm laser irradiation. In contrast, the tumors continued to grow when only ZnPc or SWNHox-BSA was injected. We conclude that carbon nanotubules may be a valuable new tool for use in cancer phototherapy. PMID:18815374

  1. Young Stars near Earth: The Octans-Near Association and Castor Moving Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckerman, B.; Vican, Laura; Song, Inseok; Schneider, Adam

    2013-11-01

    All cataloged stellar moving groups and associations with ages <=100 Myr and within 100 pc of Earth have Galactic space motions (UVW) situated in a "good box" with dimensions ~20 km s-1 on a side. Torres et al. defined the Octans Association as a group of 15 stars with age "20 Myr?" and located ~140 pc from Earth, but with average V space velocity -3.6 km s-1 that is well outside of the good box. We present a list of 14 Hipparcos star systems within 100 pc of Earth that we call "Octans-Near"; these systems have UVW similar to those of the much more distant Octans Association. The Octans-Near stars have apparent ages between about 30 and 100 Myr and their relationship to the Octans Association stars is unclear. Six additional star systems have UVW similar to those of Octans-Near stars and likely ages <=200 Myr. These six systems include the late-type binary star EQ Peg—6.2 pc from Earth with likely age <=100 Myr and thus likely to be the nearest known pre-main sequence star system. The UVW of stars in a previously proposed ~200 Myr old Castor moving group are not too dissimilar from the UVW of Octans-Near stars. However, stars in the Castor group—if it exists at all—are mostly substantially older than 200 Myr and thus generally can readily be distinguished from the much younger Octans-Near stars.

  2. Electroacupuncture at PC6 or ST36 Influences the Effect of Tacrine on the Motility of Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chi; Chen, Xin; Xie, Peng-Yan

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the mechanisms of gastrointestinal side effects of tacrine, and find treatment methods with electroacupuncture (EA). Methods. Twenty-five healthy cats were randomly divided into 5 groups: gastric-distention group (model group), tacrine group (cholinesterase inhibitor), tacrine + sham acupoint group (control group), tacrine + PC6 (neiguan) group, and tacrine + ST36 (zusanli) group, with 5 cats in each group. Saline 2?mL i.p. was given 30?min before gastric distention in model group. Tacrine 5.6?mg/kg i.p. was given 30 minutes before gastric distention in the other groups. Tacrine + sham acupoint group (control group), tacrine + PC6 group, and tacrine + ST36 group received EA at corresponding acupoints during gastric distention. The frequency of TLESRs and LESP were recorded by using a perfused sleeve assembly. Results. Compared with the model group, tacrine significantly increased the frequency of gastric distention-induced TLESR (P < 0.05) but did not influence the rate of common cavity during TLESR. Tacrine significantly increased the LESP, which could not remain during gastric distention. EA at PC6 could decrease the frequency of TLESR and maintain the increase of LESP, but EA at ST36 did not have these effects. Conclusion. Tacrine can significantly increase the gastric distention-induced transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs). Electroacupuncture (EA) at PC6 may reverse the above side effect. PMID:24808917

  3. First-principles study for the adsorption of segments of BPA-PC on ?-Al2O3(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomqvist, Janne; Salo, Petri

    2011-10-01

    We have studied the adsorption of bisphenol-A-polycarbonate (BPA-PC) on the ?-Al2O3(0001) surface using density functional theory (DFT) with van der Waals (vdW) corrections. The BPA-PC polymer can be divided into its chemical fragments, which are phenylene, carbonate, and isopropylidene groups. We have calculated the adsorption energy and geometry of the BPA-PC segments that consist of two to three adjacent groups of the polymer. Our DFT results show that the adsorption is dominated by the vdW interaction. It is also important to include the interaction of nearest-neighbor groups in order to provide a realistic environment for the adsorption of the polymer onto the surface. Our results also show that the BPA-PC molecule attaches to the alumina surface via the carbonate group located in the middle of the molecule chain.

  4. Parallel Computing on a PC Cluster

    E-print Network

    X. Q. Luo; E. B. Gregory; J. C. Yang; Y. L. Wang; D. Chang; Y. Lin

    2001-09-04

    The tremendous advance in computer technology in the past decade has made it possible to achieve the performance of a supercomputer on a very small budget. We have built a multi-CPU cluster of Pentium PC capable of parallel computations using the Message Passing Interface (MPI). We will discuss the configuration, performance, and application of the cluster to our work in physics.

  5. Dielectric behaviour of LLDPE\\/PC blends

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Schifani; G. Spadaro; F. Cassata; A. Valenza

    1995-01-01

    Dielectric characterization of blends of linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) with bisphenol-A polycarbonate (PC) is presented. The obtained results show that these measurements are a useful tool to obtain information about the structure of incompatible systems. In particular the experimental data are discussed in relation to the prediction of a statistical mixture type equation and specific rheological, thermal and morphological

  6. Stretch Your PC Dollars--Buy Clones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    True, John

    1986-01-01

    Relates how the story of how San Francisco State University evaluated IBM PC look-alikes, considered some of the risks involved, and decided to purchase over 100 of them. Questions of compatibility, vendor longevity, support, and other risk management issues are discussed. (Author/MLW)

  7. A PC-based platform for MATE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. G. Allred; M. J. Cain; L. V. Kirkland

    1992-01-01

    In terms of cost and overall performance, the personal computer has considerably more to offer than the traditional 1750A modular automatic testing equipment (MATE) standard computer. The proof of concept was performed by replacing the 1750A MATE computer with a PC and running the tester's current repertoire of test program sets (TPSs) for a variety of test platforms including the

  8. Mathematics Instruction and the Tablet PC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fister, K. Renee; McCarthy, Maeve L.

    2008-01-01

    The use of tablet PCs in teaching is a relatively new phenomenon. A cross between a notebook computer and a personal digital assistant (PDA), the tablet PC has all of the features of a notebook with the additional capability that the screen can also be used for input. Tablet PCs are usually equipped with a stylus that allows the user to write on…

  9. Experience using EPICS on PC platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.O. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kasemire, K.U. [Univ. Osnabruck (Germany). Fachbereich Physik

    1998-03-01

    The Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) has been widely adopted in the accelerator community. Although EPICS is available on many platforms, the majority of implementations have used UNIX workstations as clients, and VME- or VXI-based processors for distributed input output controllers. Recently, a significant portion of EPICS has been ported to personal computer (PC) hardware platforms running Microsoft`s operating systems, and also Wind River System`s real time vxWorks operating system. This development should significantly reduce the cost of deploying EPICS systems, and the prospect of using EPICS together with the many high quality commercial components available for PC platforms is also encouraging. A hybrid system using both PC and traditional platforms is currently being implemented at LANL for LEDA, the low energy demonstration accelerator under construction as part of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project. To illustrate these developments the authors compare their recent experience deploying a PC-based EPICS system with experience deploying similar systems based on traditional (UNIX-hosted) EPICS hardware and software platforms.

  10. GUI for PC auto-shutdown

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohd. Liakot Ali; Rafiqul Islam; A. Siti Anom; M. Y. Nurul Amziah

    2008-01-01

    Computer is a part and parcel of our daily life. It is being widely used at homes, offices, schools and industries. It is now an important issue to save user program and data as well as hardware and software of the personal computer (PC) itself from damage and corruption due to sudden power failure. This paper presents the solution of

  11. A Graphical User Interface for PC GAMESS

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    GAMESS is a set of computational chemistry tools available free for several computing platforms. Using the set of tools described here along with the pcgRun tool provided allows these tools to be used on the ubiquitous Windows PC with a graphic interface preferred by many of us over the command line.

  12. The MHTS PC Package REFERENCE MANUAL

    E-print Network

    McLeod, Ian

    system. The MHTS package component programs are provided for running under Windows NT and 2000i The MHTS PC Package REFERENCE MANUAL c 2002, A.I. McLeod & K.W. Hipel Reference Manual Version: 1.6 #12;1 INTRODUCTION #12;2 Introduction Prologue The McLeod-Hipel Time Series (MTS) Package provides

  13. Parallel Agent Based Simulation on PC Cluster

    E-print Network

    Haridi, Seif

    1 Parallel Agent Based Simulation on PC Cluster Seif Haridi Konstantin Popov Mahmoud Rafea Fredrik · Participate in "local" social networks · Maintain a portfolio of frequently visited sites · Have memory about from his portfolio. · Surf along the links of the already visited sites. · Replace a site

  14. An ISDN interface for the PC compatible

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Broderick; M. R. Inggs

    1992-01-01

    Low bit rate ISDN (2B+D) connections are becoming available especially within a PABX. An interface card is described that allows IBM TM PC compatible computers to connect to the ISDN. The design is innovative in that the interface operates as a COMx port obeying the HAYESTM command set, as a memory mapped interface for customized applications and finally as a

  15. Deproletarianizing Agriculture Lemmens, P.C.

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Deproletarianizing Agriculture Lemmens, P.C. ISDA 2010, Montpellier, June 28-30, 2010 1 DEPROLETARIANIZING AGRICULTURE RECOVERING AGRICULTURE FROM AGRIBUSINESS AND THE NEED FOR A COMMONS-BASED, OPEN SOURCE AGRICULTURE Dr. Pieter LEMMENS Wageningen University Centre for Methodical Ethics and Technology Assessment

  16. Effects of oridonin nanosuspension on cell proliferation and apoptosis of human prostatic carcinoma PC-3 cell line

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Xiumei; Xue, Wei; YangYang, Yuna; Xu, Derong; Zhao, Yunxue; Lou, Haiyan

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the inhibitory effects of oridonin nanosuspension on human prostatic carcinoma PC-3 cell line in vitro. The PC-3 cells were incubated with increasing concentrations of oridonin solution and nanosuspensions for 12 hours, 24 hours, and 36 hours. MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay was performed to measure cellular viability and investigate the effect of oridonin on cell growth of PC-3. Annexin V-FITC/PI staining method was used to determine the effect of oridonin by fluorescence microscope and flow cytometry, respectively. Nanosuspension on early apoptosis of PC-3 cells was also evaluated. Oridonin significantly inhibited the growth of PC-3 cells after 12 hours, 24 hours, and 36 hours of treatment in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05). Compared with the same concentration of oridonin solution, oridonin nanosuspension enhanced the inhibition ratio of proliferation. The observation of propidium iodide fluorescence staining confirmed the MTT assay results. The cell proportion of PC-3 at the G2/M phase in the nanosuspension treatment group was upregulated compared with that of the control and oridonin solution groups. Both oridonin solution and nanosuspension promoted the early apoptosis of PC-3 cells. Furthermore, while improving the ratio of early apoptosis, oridonin nanosuspensions also enhanced growth suppression, and induced apoptosis of PC-3 cells. This shows great potential in the treatment of androgen-independent carcinoma of prostate by oridonin nanosuspensions. PMID:21042419

  17. ISO-PC Version 1.98: User`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Rittmann, P.D.

    1995-05-02

    This document describes how to use Version 1.98 of the shielding program named ISO-PC. Version 1.98 corrects all known errors in ISOSHLD-II. In addition, a few numeric problems have been eliminated. There are three new namelist variables, 25 additional shielding materials, and 5 more energy groups. The two major differences with the original ISOSHLD-II are the removal of RIBD(radioisotope buildup and decay) source generator, and the removal of the non-uniform source distribution parameter, SSV1. This version of ISO-PC works with photon energies from 10 KeV to 10 MeV using 30 energy groups.

  18. PC1 and PC2 are Proprotein Convertases Capable of Cleaving Proopiomelanocortin at Distinct Pairs of Basic Residues

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Benjannet; N. Rondeau; R. Day; M. Chretien; N. G. Seidah

    1991-01-01

    A recombinant vaccinia virus vector was used to coexpress the two candidate mouse prohormone convertases, PC1 and PC2, together with mouse proopiomelanocortin (POMC) in the constitutively secreting cell line BSC-40 and in the endocrine tissue-derived cell lines PC12 and AtT-20, which exhibit regulated secretion. Monitoring of POMC processing demonstrated the distinct cleavage specificities of PC1 and PC2, since in the

  19. Drift resonant generation of peaked relativistic electron distributions by Pc 5 ULF waves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. W. Degeling; L. G. Ozeke; R. Rankin; I. R. Mann; K. Kabin

    2008-01-01

    The adiabatic drift-resonant interaction between relativistic, equatorially mirroring electrons and narrowband, Pc 5 ultra low frequency (ULF) waves in the magnetosphere is investigated using a time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave model. Attention is focused on the effect of a ULF wave packet with finite duration on the equatorially mirroring, relativistic electron phase space density (PSD) profile. It is demonstrated that a

  20. Spaced seed design on profile HMMs for precise HTS read-mapping e cient sliding window product on the matrix semi-group

    E-print Network

    Noé, Laurent

    product on the matrix semi-group Laurent No´e August 27, 2013 Abstract We propose a new method and itsDRAFT Spaced seed design on profile HMMs for precise HTS read-mapping e cient sliding window with a matrix product problem. Interestingly, it brings to light an interval product problem considered more

  1. Spaces of Kleinian Groups Cambridge University Press Lond. Math. Soc. Lec. Notes 329, 301336 Y. Minsky, M. Sakuma & C. Series (Eds.)

    E-print Network

    Wright, David J.

    . Minsky, M. Sakuma & C. Series (Eds.) © D. Wright, 2005 Searching for the cusp David J. Wright¡ Abstract-¢¡ Mullen's theorem [McM91] that the maximal cusp groups are dense in the boundary¢¢ #12;302 David J. Wright will explain how maximal cusps on the ¢ boundary of the Schottky space of genus g may be described

  2. The inner ? 40 pc radial distribution of the star formation rate for a nearby Seyfert 2 galaxy M51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Li-Ling; Jiang, Xiao-Lei; He, Zhi-Cheng; Bian, Wei-Hao

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the spatially resolved specific star formation rate (SSFR) in the inner ?40 pc for a nearby Seyfert 2 galaxy, M51 (NGC 5194) by analyzing spectra obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). We present 24 radial spectra measured along the STIS long slit in M51, extending ? 1? from the nucleus (i.e., ?41.5 pc to 39.4 pc). By simple stellar population synthesis, the stellar contributions in these radial optical spectra are modeled. It is found that the mean flux fraction of young stellar populations (younger than 24.5 Myr) is about 9%. Excluding some regions with zero young flux fraction near the center (from ?6 pc to 2 pc), the mean mass fraction is about 0.09%. The young stellar populations are not required in the center inner ?8 pc in M51, suggesting a possible SSFR suppression in the circumnuclear region (? 10 pc) from the feedback of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The radial distribution of SSFR in M51 is not symmetrical with respect to the long slit in STIS. This unsymmetrical SSFR distribution is possibly due to the unsymmetrical AGN feedback in M51, which is related to its jet. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  3. D-Side: A Facility and Workforce Planning Group Multi-criteria Decision Support System for Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavana, Madjid

    2005-01-01

    "To understand and protect our home planet, to explore the universe and search for life, and to inspire the next generation of explorers" is NASA's mission. The Systems Management Office at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is searching for methods to effectively manage the Center's resources to meet NASA's mission. D-Side is a group multi-criteria decision support system (GMDSS) developed to support facility decisions at JSC. D-Side uses a series of sequential and structured processes to plot facilities in a three-dimensional (3-D) graph on the basis of each facility alignment with NASA's mission and goals, the extent to which other facilities are dependent on the facility, and the dollar value of capital investments that have been postponed at the facility relative to the facility replacement value. A similarity factor rank orders facilities based on their Euclidean distance from Ideal and Nadir points. These similarity factors are then used to allocate capital improvement resources across facilities. We also present a parallel model that can be used to support decisions concerning allocation of human resources investments across workforce units. Finally, we present results from a pilot study where 12 experienced facility managers from NASA used D-Side and the organization's current approach to rank order and allocate funds for capital improvement across 20 facilities. Users evaluated D-Side favorably in terms of ease of use, the quality of the decision-making process, decision quality, and overall value-added. Their evaluations of D-Side were significantly more favorable than their evaluations of the current approach. Keywords: NASA, Multi-Criteria Decision Making, Decision Support System, AHP, Euclidean Distance, 3-D Modeling, Facility Planning, Workforce Planning.

  4. Group dynamics in a long-term blind endeavor on Earth: An analog for space missions (Lewis & Clark Expedition group dynamic analysis)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Allner; V. Rygalov

    2008-01-01

    In 1803, President Thomas Jefferson set fourth a military expedition led by Captains M. Lewis and W. Clark (Lewis and Clark Expedition) on an exploration that would become an everlasting part of US national history and pride. Looking back at the events of this exploration, there are many similarities to the experiences future human space explorers will face as we

  5. IBM PC enhances the world's future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Jozelle

    1988-01-01

    Although the purpose of this research is to illustrate the importance of computers to the public, particularly the IBM PC, present examinations will include computers developed before the IBM PC was brought into use. IBM, as well as other computing facilities, began serving the public years ago, and is continuing to find ways to enhance the existence of man. With new developments in supercomputers like the Cray-2, and the recent advances in artificial intelligence programming, the human race is gaining knowledge at a rapid pace. All have benefited from the development of computers in the world; not only have they brought new assets to life, but have made life more and more of a challenge everyday.

  6. PC Wizard 2009 1.90

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    With so many free options for system utilities, it can be hard to separate the wheat from the chaff. PC Wizard 2009 1.90 is a most worthy option, and visitors can use the program to not only detect hardware performance, but it will also look at hard disk performance, and display a graph to note how various elements in a given category perform. This version is compatible with computers running Windows 95 and newer.

  7. ZDNet Special Report: PC Expo 2000

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2000-01-01

    PC Expo 2000 is over, but readers can still get the lowdown on the gadgets and gizmos unveiled at the Jacob Javits Center in 2000. ZDNet's special coverage includes breaking and archived news, product previews and first impressions, commentary, and press releases. CNET offers pieces on new products, top trends of the coming year, and Best of Show awards. At the official site, users will find a list of exhibitors and speakers, and information on keynote programs.

  8. Virtual Reality at the PC Level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, John

    1998-01-01

    The main objective of my research has been to incorporate virtual reality at the desktop level; i.e., create virtual reality software that can be run fairly inexpensively on standard PC's. The standard language used for virtual reality on PC's is VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language). It is a new language so it is still undergoing a lot of changes. VRML 1.0 came out only a couple years ago and VRML 2.0 came out around last September. VRML is an interpreted language that is run by a web browser plug-in. It is fairly flexible in terms of allowing you to create different shapes and animations. Before this summer, I knew very little about virtual reality and I did not know VRML at all. I learned the VRML language by reading two books and experimenting on a PC. The following topics are presented: CAD to VRML, VRML 1.0 to VRML 2.0, VRML authoring tools, VRML browsers, finding virtual reality applications, the AXAF project, the VRML generator program, web communities and future plans.

  9. Pc-based car license plate reading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Katsuyoshi; Marubayashi, Eisaku; Kawashima, Harumi; Nakanishi, Tadashi; Shio, Akio

    1994-03-01

    A PC-based car license plate recognition system has been developed. The system recognizes Chinese characters and Japanese phonetic hiragana characters as well as six digits on Japanese license plates. The system consists of a CCD camera, vehicle sensors, a strobe unit, a monitoring center, and an i486-based PC. The PC includes in its extension slots: a vehicle detector board, a strobe emitter board, and an image grabber board. When a passing vehicle is detected by the vehicle sensors, the strobe emits a pulse of light. The light pulse is synchronized with the time the vehicle image is frozen on an image grabber board. The recognition process is composed of three steps: image thresholding, character region extraction, and matching-based character recognition. The recognition software can handle obscured characters. Experimental results for hundreds of outdoor images showed high recognition performance within relatively short performance times. The results confirmed that the system is applicable to a wide variety of applications such as automatic vehicle identification and travel time measurement.

  10. Estimation of the radial diffusion coefficient using REE-associated ground Pc 5 pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, A.; Yumoto, K.

    2010-12-01

    Pc 5 pulsations with frequencies between 1.67 and 6.67 mHz are believed to contribute to the REE in the outer radiation belt during magnetic storms, by means of the observations [Baker et al., 1998; Rostoker et al., 1998; Mathie and Mann, 2000; O'Brien et al., 2001, 2003] and several theoretical studies. The latter studies are roughly categorized into two themes: in-situ acceleration at L lower than 6.6 by wave-particle interactions [Liu et al., 199 9; Summers et al., 1999; Summers and Ma, 2000] and acceleration by radial diffusion from the outer to the inner magnetosphere [Elkington et al., 1999, 2003; Hudson et al., 2000; Kim et al., 2001]. One possible acceleration mechanism is the resonant interaction with Pc 5 toroidal and poloidal pulsations, referred as the radial diffusion mechanism. One of unsolved problems is where and which Pc 5 pulsation mode (toroidal and/or poloidal) play effective role in the radial diffusion process. In order to verify Pc 5 pulsation as the major roles for REEs, we have to examine the time variation of electron phase space density (cf. Green et al., 2004). Electron phase space density is not directly measured, but we can estimate radial diffusion coefficients which determine the electron transportation efficiency, using ground-based magnetic field data. We estimated the radial diffusion coefficient of ground Pc 5 pulsations associated with the Relativistic Electron Enhancement (REE) in the geosynchronous orbit. In order to estimate the radial diffusion coefficient D_LL, we need the value of in-situ Pc 5 electric field power spectral density. In this paper, however, we estimated the equatorial electric field mapped from Pc 5 pulsations power spectral density on the ground. Reciprocal of radial diffusion coefficient describes the timescale T_LL for an electron to diffuse 1 Re. Applying a superposed epoch analysis about timescales T_LL of the radial diffusion for 12 REE events in 2008, we found that when the relativistic electron enhancements occur, T_LL at higher latitude (L larger than 5) is predominantly diffusional, whereas T_LL at lower latitude (L less than 4) is mainly convectional. We concluded that higher-latitude Pc 5 pulsations play more effective roles than lower latitude Pc 5 pulsations in the radial diffusion process.

  11. Remote facility sharing with ATM networks [PC based ATM Link Delay Simulator (LDS)]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, H. T.

    2001-06-01

    The ATM Link Delay Simulator (LDS) adds propagation delay to the ATM link on which it is installed, to allow control of link propagation delay in network protocol experiments simulating an adjustable piece of optical fiber. Our LDS simulates a delay of between 1.5 and 500 milliseconds and is built with commodity PC hardware, only the ATM network interface card is not generally available. Our implementation is special in that it preserves the exact spacing of ATM data cells a feature that requires sustained high performance. Our implementation shows that applications demanding sustained high performance are possible on commodity PC hardware. This illustrates the promise that PC hardware has for adaptability to demanding specialized testing of high speed network.

  12. The USL NASA PC R and D development environment standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (editor); Moreau, Dennis R.

    1984-01-01

    The development environment standards which have been established in order to control usage of the IBM PC/XT development systems and to prevent interference between projects being currently developed on the PC's are discussed. The standards address the following areas: scheduling PC resources; login/logout procedures; training; file naming conventions; hard disk organization; diskette care; backup procedures; and copying policies.

  13. Wf/pc Cycle 1 Calibration: Photometric Calibration Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenty, John

    1990-12-01

    THIS PROGRAM MONITORS THE QE OF THE WFC AND PC. Exposures in six wide filters in both the WF and PC are taken of a UV flux standard star. The program is repeated every 4 weeks. NOTE!!! Fine lock is default for PC and requested for WFC but COARSE TRACK IS ACCEPTABLE IF FINE LOCK GUIDE STARS ARE NOT AVAILABLE.

  14. The PC Dairy Windows Project P.H. Robinson1

    E-print Network

    Delany, Mary E.

    article The PC Dairy Windows Project P.H. Robinson1 and A. Ahmadi2 1 Cooperative Extension of dairy cattle nutrition. However the popularity of Windows operating systems caused a conversion of the DOS version of PC Dairy-2 to a Windows compatible version in 2005. To date, we have sold copies of PC

  15. TEC variations during geomagnetic storm/substorm with Pc5/PI2 pulsation signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, A. M.; Mahrous, A. M.; Fathy, I.; Ghamry, E.; Groves, K.; Yumoto, K.

    2015-06-01

    The electron density integral along the paths between a GPS satellite and receiver is known as Total Electron Content (TEC), and this parameter is used in studying the ionosphere behaviors. TEC can be obtained by means of many methods. A space-based radio navigation system, such as Global Positioning System (GPS), offers good opportunities for studying the ionosphere. The TEC is calculated from the group path delay and phase advance in GPS satellite signals along the slant paths connecting GPS receivers and satellites at 22,000 km. Locally, a dual frequency GPS receiver was installed in Helwan, Egypt (29.86°N, 31.32°E) in November 2009. Here, GPS data were analyzed to establish a daily observation of Vertical TEC in a region located near to the northern crest of the ionospheric equatorial anomaly. During a moderate geomagnetic storm, observed on 02-05 May 2010, a number of ionospheric/magnetic phenomena were observed. Also, observations for Pc5/Pi2 pulsations were recorded during the geomagnetic storm phases. These geomagnetic observations are taken from MAGDAS-magnetometer station, located at Aswan (23.59°N, 32.51°E). More than 10 TECU increase in the ionospheric TEC values were recorded during the daytime of 02 May, followed by a large reduction during 03 May, reference to the pre-storm conditions. This confirms the enhancement in the geomagnetic H-component peak during the storm's initial phase and its reduction during the main phase.

  16. Finding Galaxy Groups In Photometric Redshift Space: the Probability Friends-of-Friends (pFoF) Algorithm

    E-print Network

    I-hui Li; Howard K. C. Yee

    2008-01-16

    We present a structure finding algorithm designed to identify galaxy groups in photometric redshift data sets: the probability friends-of-friends (pFoF) algorithm. This algorithm is derived by combining the friends-of-friends algorithm in the transverse direction and the photometric redshift probability densities in the radial dimension. The innovative characteristic of our group-finding algorithm is the improvement of redshift estimation via the constraints given by the transversely connected galaxies in a group, based on the assumption that all galaxies in a group have the same redshift. Tests using the Virgo Consortium Millennium Simulation mock catalogs allow us to show that the recovery rate of the pFoF algorithm is larger than 80% for mock groups of at least $2\\times10^{13}M_{\\sun}$, while the false detection rate is about 10% for pFoF groups containing at least $\\sim8$ net members. Applying the algorithm to the CNOC2 group catalogs gives results which are consistent with the mock catalog tests. From all these results, we conclude that our group-finding algorithm offers an effective yet simple way to identify galaxy groups in photometric redshift catalogs.

  17. Amerindians show no association of PC-1 gene Gln121 allele and obesity: a thrifty gene population genetics.

    PubMed

    Rey, Diego; Fernandez-Honrado, Mercedes; Areces, Cristina; Algora, Manuel; Abd-El-Fatah-Khalil, Sedeka; Enriquez-de-Salamanca, Mercedes; Coca, Carmen; Arribas, Ignacio; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2012-07-01

    PC-1 Gln121 gene is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, obesity and insulin resistance in European/American Caucasoids and Orientals. We have aimed to correlate for the first time this gene in Amerindians with obesity and their corresponding individuals genotypes with obesity in order to establish preventive medicine programs for this population and also studying the evolution of gene frequencies in world populations. Central obesity was diagnosed by waist circumference perimeter and food intake independent HDL-cholesterol plasma levels were measured. HLA genes were determined in order to more objectively ascertain participants Amerindians origin. 321 Amerindian blood donors who were healthy according to the blood doning parameters were studied. No association was found between PC-1 Gln121 variant and obesity. Significant HDL-cholesterol lower values were found in the PC-1 Lys121 bearing gene individuals versus PC-1 Gln121 bearing gene ones (45.1 ± 12.7 vs. 48.7 ± 15.2 mg/dl, p < 0.05). Population analyses showed a world geographical gradient in the PC-1 Gln121 allele frequency: around 9% in Orientals, 15% in European Caucasoids and 76% in Negroids. The conclusions are: (1) No association of PC-1 Gln121 gene is found with obesity in Amerindians when association is well established in Europeans. (2) PC-1 Gln121 gene is associated to higher levels of HDL-cholesterol than the alternative PC-1 Lys121 allele. This may be specific for Amerindians. (3) Amerindians have an intermediate frequency of this possible PC-1 Gln121 thrifty gene when compared with Negroid African Americans (78.5%) or Han Chinese (7.5%, p < 0.0001). Historical details of African and other groups may support the hypothesis that PC-1 Gln121 is indeed a thrifty gene. PMID:22327785

  18. A PC based thin film dosimeter system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Arne; Hargittai, Peter; Kovacs, Andras

    2000-03-01

    A dosimeter system based on the Risø B3 dosimeter film, an office scanner for use with PC and the associated software is presented. The scanned image is analyzed either with standard software (Paint Shop Pro 5 or Excel) functions or with the computer code "Scanalizer" that allows presentation of two-dimensional dose maps. Stability and traceability of the dosimeter system is ensured through simultaneous measurement of reference dosimeters. In the dose range from 10 to 70 kGy reproducibility is approximately ±2% at 1 ?.

  19. A Position-Space Renormalization-Group Approach for Driven Diffusive Systems Applied to the One-Dimensional Driven Asymmetric Chain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ivan T. Georgiev; Susan R. McKay

    2001-01-01

    We present a position-space renormalization-group method for nonequilibrium systems, and illustrate its application using the one-dimensional driven asymmetric chain. The dynamics in this case are characterized by three parameters: the probability alpha that a particle will enter the chain from the left boundary, the probability beta that a particle will exit the chain at the right boundary, and the probability

  20. Ellipsometric study of the optical transitions of PC60BM and PC70BM thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencheikh Aboura, Fatima; Duché, D.; Simon, J. J.; Escoubas, L.

    2015-04-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry is used to determine the optical properties and to extract electronic transitions of PC60BM and PC70BM thin films in the UV-Visible range. By means of a sum of Gaussian oscillators, the imaginary parts of dielectric functions of both materials are modeled. The physical meaning of each model is checked by comparing the energy position of the oscillators with known optical transitions of the C60 and C70 molecules as revealed in literature by others techniques. It is shown that spectroscopic ellipsometry is a powerful technique to investigate the electronic structure of pi-conjugated molecules.

  1. Terrestrial Effects of a 30 pc Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, B. C.; Melott, A. L.; Hogan, D. P.

    2005-12-01

    It has been suggested by several authors (e.g. Ruderman 1974; Reid et al. 1978; Ellis & Schramm 1995) that a relatively nearby supernova (SN) explosion could have significant effects on life on the Earth. A primary terrestrial effect of such an encounter would be depletion of the ozone layer, thereby increasing the flux of solar UVB radiation at the Earth's surface. At least one quantitative study of the effects on ozone by SN at various distances has been conducted (Gehrels et al. 2003). There is direct geochemical evidence for at least one SN event at a distance of around 40 pc at about 2.8 Myr ago (Fields 2004; Knie et al. 1999, 2004; Benitez et al. 2002). In this work we examine a suite of effects of such a SN at a distance of 30pc. We investigate ozone depletion, the subsequent increase of solar UVB reaching the Earth's surface, and the biological impact of this increased UVB. We find maximum localized ozone column density depletion of about 10% lasting a few months, an increase of around 1% in UVB irradiance in certain locations, and about 5% increase in relative DNA damage. While this level of effect is unlikely to be responsible for a large scale die-off, increases in the mutation rate are likely, possibly with interesting evolutionary or ecological implications. This work is supported in part by NASA Astrobiology grant NNG04GM41G.

  2. Evaluating security systems using SNAP-PC

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, C.D.; Gregg, M.L.; Erdbruegger, M.R.

    1986-08-01

    SNAP-PC (Safeguards Network Analysis Procedure for the Personal Computer) is a user-friendly version of SNAP designed for IBM XT or AT compatible microcomputers. SNAP is a simulation-based analysis technique supporting the evaluation of fixed-site security systems to prevent theft or sabotage of a specified target. Through SNAP the user is able to define the facility, the sensor system, the guard operating policies and response tactics, and the adversary's attack plan. SNAP uses the system definition to analyze its effectiveness in defending against specific threats. The system performance statistics measured by SNAP include: Adversary mission success probability, guard and adversary casualties, duration of engagements, outcome of engagements, duration of scenario by outcome (adversary success/fail), and adversary duration by facility location. The SNAP-PC package provides a compact analysis tool that can be used to analyze a wide variety of security systems. It places SNAP, a proven evaluation technique, in the hands of on-site personnel, not just computer analysts. The support programs eliminate the labor intensive tedious task of organizing and sorting through reams of output reports and greatly reduce the time previously required to analyze a security system.

  3. ICAN - INTEGRATED COMPOSITE ANALYZER (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Integrated Composite Analyzer (ICAN) is a computer program designed to carry out a comprehensive linear analysis of multilayered fiber composites. The analysis contains the essential features required to effectively design structural components made from fiber composites. ICAN includes the micromechanical design features of the Intraply Hybrid Composite Design (INHYD) program to predict ply level hygral, thermal, and mechanical properties. The laminate analysis features of the Multilayered Filamentary Composite Analysis (MFCA) program are included to account for interply layer effects. ICAN integrates these and additional features to provide a comprehensive analysis capability for composite structures. Additional features unique to ICAN include the following: 1) ply stress-strain influence coefficients, 2) microstresses and microstrain influence coefficients, 3) concentration factors around a circular hole, 4) calculation of probable delamination locations around a circular hole, 5) Poisson's ratio mismatch details near a straight edge, 6) free-edge stresses, 7) material card input for finite element analysis using NASTRAN (available separately from COSMIC) or MARC, 8) failure loads based on maximum stress criterion, and laminate failure stresses based on first-ply failures and fiber breakage criteria, 9) transverse shear stresses, normal and interlaminar stresses, and 10) durability/fatigue type analyses for thermal as well as mechanical cyclic loads. The code can currently assess degradation due to mechanical and thermal cyclic loads with or without a defect. ICAN includes a dedicated data bank of constituent material properties, and allows the user to build a database of material properties of commonly used fibers and matrices so the user need only specify code names for constituents. Input to ICAN includes constituent material properties (or code names), factors reflecting the fabrication process, and composite geometry. ICAN performs micromechanics, macromechanics, and laminate analysis including the hygrothermal response of fiber composites. ICAN output includes the various ply and composite properties, composite structural response, and composite stress analysis results with details of failure. Output can be tailored to specific needs by choosing the appropriate options. Two machine versions of ICAN are available. The IBM 370 series version (LEW-14468) is written in FORTRAN IV for the IBM 370 series computers running OS/TSS. The IBM PC version (LEW-15592) is written in FORTRAN 77 for use on the IBM PC series computers running MS-DOS and Microsoft FORTRAN 5.1. The IBM 370 version requires 3.5Mb of memory for execution. No sample executable is provided. For the IBM PC version, a sample executable, along with sample input and output data, is included on the distribution medium. Although the included executable requires a math coprocessor, the ICAN source can be recompiled into an executable which does not require a math coprocessor. The standard distribution medium for the IBM 370 version of ICAN is a 9-track 1600 BPI magnetic tape in EBCDIC CARD IMAGE format. The standard distribution medium for the IBM PC version is one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. The contents of the diskette are compressed using the PKWARE archiving tools. The utility to unarchive the files, PKUNZIP.EXE, is included. ICAN was developed in 1986 and the IBM PC version was released in 1992.

  4. Remote estimation of phycocyanin (PC) for inland waters coupled with YSI PC fluorescence probe.

    PubMed

    Song, Kaishan; Li, Lin; Tedesco, Lenore; Clercin, Nicole; Hall, Bob; Li, Shuai; Shi, Kun; Liu, Dawei; Sun, Ying

    2013-08-01

    Nuisance cyanobacterial blooms degrade water resources through accelerated eutrophication, odor generation, and production of toxins that cause adverse effects on human health. Quick and effective methods for detecting cyanobacterial abundance in drinking water supplies are urgently needed to compliment conventional laboratory methods, which are costly and time consuming. Hyperspectral remote sensing can be an effective approach for rapid assessment of cyanobacterial blooms. Samples (n=250) were collected from five drinking water sources in central Indiana (CIN), USA, and South Australia (SA), which experience nuisance cyanobacterial blooms. In situ hyperspectral data were used to develop models by relating spectral signal with handheld fluorescence probe (YSI 6600 XLM-SV) measured phycocyanin (PC in cell/ml), a proxy pigment unique for indicating the presence of cyanobacteria. Three-band model (TBM), which is effective for chlorophyll-a estimates, was tuned to quantify cyanobacteria coupled with the PC probe measured cyanobacteria. As a comparison, two band model proposed by Simis et al. (Limnol Oceanogr, 50(11): 237-245, 2005; denoted as SM05) was paralleled to evaluate TBM model performance. Our observation revealed a high correlation between measured and estimated PC for SA dataset (R (2)?=0.96; range: 534-20,200 cell/ml) and CIN dataset (R (2)?=0.88; range: 1,300-44,500 cell/ml). The potential of this modeling approach for imagery data were assessed by simulated ESA/Centinel3/OLCI spectra, which also resulted in satisfactory performance with the TBM for both SA dataset (RMSE %?=26.12) and CIN dataset (RMSE %?=34.49). Close relationship between probe-measured PC and laboratory measured cyanobacteria biovolume was observed (R (2)?=0.93, p<0.0001) for the CIN dataset, indicating a stable performance for PC probe. Based on our observation, field spectroscopic measurement coupled with PC probe measurements can provide quantitative cyanobacterial bloom information from both relatively static and flowing inland waters. Hence, it has promising implications for water resource managers to obtain information for early warning detection of cyanobacterial blooms through the close association between probe measured PC values and cyanobacterial biovolume via remote sensing modeling. PMID:23397212

  5. Using Innovative Outliers to Detect Discrete Shifts in Dynamics in Group-Based State-Space Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, Sy-Miin; Hamaker, Ellen L.; Allaire, Jason C.

    2009-01-01

    Outliers are typically regarded as data anomalies that should be discarded. However, dynamic or "innovative" outliers can be appropriately utilized to capture unusual but substantively meaningful shifts in a system's dynamics. We extend De Jong and Penzer's 1998 approach for representing outliers in single-subject state-space models to a…

  6. A study of space station needs, attributes and architectural options. Final briefing: Cost working group discussion session

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The economic factors involved in the design and utilization of the space station are investigated. Topics include the economic benefits associated with research and production, the orbit transfer vehicle, and satellite servicing. Program costs and design options are examined. The possibilities of financing from the private sector are discussed.

  7. The PcG protein hPc2 interacts with the N-terminus of histone demethylase JARID1B and acts as a transcriptional co-repressor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wu; Chen, Haixiang; Zhang, Lihuang

    2009-03-31

    JARID1B (jumonji AT rich interactive domain 1B) is a large nuclear protein that is highly expressed in breast cancers and is proposed to function as a repressor of gene expression. In this paper, a phage display screen using the N-terminus of JARID1B as bait identified one of the JARID1B interacting proteins, namely PcG protein (Polycomb group) hPc2. We demonstrated that the C-terminal region, including the COOH box, was required for the interaction with the N-terminus of JARID1B. In a reporter assay system, co-expression of JARID1B with hPc2 significantly enhanced the transcriptional repression. These results support a role for hPc2 acting as a transcriptional co-repressor. PMID:19336002

  8. A scientific program for infrared, submillimeter and radio astronomy from space: A report by the Management Operations Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Important and fundamental scientific progress can be attained through space observations in the wavelengths longward of 1 micron. The formation of galaxies, stars, and planets, the origin of quasars and the nature of active galactic nuclei, the large scale structure of the Universe, and the problem of the missing mass, are among the major scientific issues that can be addressed by these observations. Significant advances in many areas of astrophysics can be made over the next 20 years by implementing the outlined program. This program combines large observatories with smaller projects to create an overall scheme that emphasized complementarity and synergy, advanced technology, community support and development, and the training of the next generation of scientists. Key aspects of the program include: the Space Infrared Telescope Facility; the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy; a robust program of small missions; and the creation of the technology base for future major observatories.

  9. A Lisp-Based PC Vision Workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiber, Michael; Skrzypek, Josef

    1987-06-01

    Progress in the field of image understanding is partly hindered by the gap between numerical and symbolic processing, both of which are required. Image processing algorithms are best expressed by procedural programming languages, such as C or FORTRAN, while "understanding" is perhaps better addressed by functional languages, such as LISP. Image understanding involves both processing and analysis of images, thus including numeric and symbolic computation. Hence the need for both programming paradigms. This paper describes the development of a new vision workstation - a tool that combines numeric (in C) and symbolic (in LISP) programs in one package. The system described is based on an IBM Personal Computer AT. It provides a low-cost solution to computer vision educational needs. A more powerful implementation, based on an IBM RT/PC, is currently under development.

  10. Using seismic array-processing to enhance observations of PcP waves to constrain lowermost mantle structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventosa, S.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    The topography of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) and the structure and composition of the D" region are essential to understand the interaction between the earth's mantle and core. A variety of seismic data-processing techniques have been used to detect and measure travel-times and amplitudes of weak short-period teleseismic body-waves phases that interact with CMB and D", which is crucial to constrain properties of the lowermost mantle at short wavelengths. Major challenges in enhancing these observations are: (1) increasing signal-to-noise ratio of target phases and (2) isolating them from unwanted neighboring phases. Seismic array-processing can address these problems by combining signals from groups of seismometers and exploiting information that allows to separate the coherent signals from the noise. Here, we focus on the study of the Pacific large-low shear-velocity province (LLSVP) and surrounding areas using differential travel-times and amplitude ratios of the P and PcP phases, and their depth phases. We particularly design scale-dependent slowness filters that do not compromise time-space resolution. This is a local delay-and-sum (i.e. slant-stack) approach implemented in the time-scale domain using the wavelet transform to enhance time-space resolution (i.e. reduce array aperture). We group stations from USArray and other nearby networks, and from Hi-Net and F-net in Japan, to define many overlapping local arrays. The aperture of each array varies mainly according (1) to the space resolution target and (2) to the slowness resolution required to isolate the target phases at each period. Once the target phases are well separated, we measure their differential travel-times and amplitude ratios, and we project these to the CMB. In this process, we carefully analyze and, when possible and significant, correct for the main sources of bias, i.e., mantle heterogeneities, earthquake mislocation and intrinsic attenuation. We illustrate our approach in a series of regional studies of the CMB and D" using P and PcP observations with unprecedented resolution, for events with magnitude Mw>5.4 and distances up to 80 degrees. Regions sampled span Alaska and the north of Canada, inside and outside of the northwest border of the Pacific LLSVP, and up to its eastern border from central America.

  11. PcG-Mediated Higher-Order Chromatin Structures Modulate Replication Programs at the Drosophila BX-C

    PubMed Central

    Comoglio, Federico; De Bardi, Marco; Paro, Renato; Orlando, Valerio

    2013-01-01

    Polycomb group proteins (PcG) exert conserved epigenetic functions that convey maintenance of repressed transcriptional states, via post-translational histone modifications and high order structure formation. During S-phase, in order to preserve cell identity, in addition to DNA information, PcG-chromatin-mediated epigenetic signatures need to be duplicated requiring a tight coordination between PcG proteins and replication programs. However, the interconnection between replication timing control and PcG functions remains unknown. Using Drosophila embryonic cell lines, we find that, while presence of specific PcG complexes and underlying transcription state are not the sole determinants of cellular replication timing, PcG-mediated higher-order structures appear to dictate the timing of replication and maintenance of the silenced state. Using published datasets we show that PRC1, PRC2, and PhoRC complexes differently correlate with replication timing of their targets. In the fully repressed BX-C, loss of function experiments revealed a synergistic role for PcG proteins in the maintenance of replication programs through the mediation of higher-order structures. Accordingly, replication timing analysis performed on two Drosophila cell lines differing for BX-C gene expression states, PcG distribution, and chromatin domain conformation revealed a cell-type-specific replication program that mirrors lineage-specific BX-C higher-order structures. Our work suggests that PcG complexes, by regulating higher-order chromatin structure at their target sites, contribute to the definition and the maintenance of genomic structural domains where genes showing the same epigenetic state replicate at the same time. PMID:23437006

  12. Dual mode bioreactions on polymer nanoparticles covered with phosphorylcholine group

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tomomi Ito; Junji Watanabe; Madoka Takai; Tomohiro Konno; Yasuhiko Iwasaki; Kazuhiko Ishihara

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the preparation of polymer nanoparticles covered with phosphorylcholine (PC) groups and the immobilization of proteins in order to observe dual mode bioreactions on the nanoparticles. For the surface modification on the nanoparticles, a water-soluble amphiphilic phospholipid polymer with PC groups as a hydrophilic moiety was synthesized. In this polymer, an active ester group, which can immobilize proteins, was

  13. On algebras and groups of formal series over a groupoïd and application to some spaces of cobordism

    E-print Network

    Jean-Pierre Magnot

    2015-07-03

    We develop here a concept of deformed algebras and their related groups through two examples. Deformed algebras are obtained from a fixed algebra by deformation along a family of indexes, through formal series. We show how the example of deformed algebra used in \\cite{Ma2013} is only an example among others, and how they often give rise to regular Fr\\"olicher Lie groups, and sometimes to Fr\\'echet Lie groups, that are regular. The first example, indexed by $\\N,$ is obtained by deformations of the gourp of bounded classical pseudo-differential operators $Cl^{0,*}$ by algebras of (maybe unbounded) classical pseudo-differential operators. In the second one, the set of indexes is a $\\N-$graded groupo\\"id, which is made of manifolds with boundary that are understood as morphisms of cobordisms. Here again, we get regular Lie groups, and we show how this setting applies to a class of examples that are derived of so-called stochastic cosurfaces.

  14. Summary Report of the NASA Management Study Group: Recommendations to the Administrator, National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Samuel C.

    1986-01-01

    The NASA Management Study Group (NMSG) was established under the auspices of the National Acedamy of Public Administration at the request of the Administrator of NASA to assess NASA's management practices and to evaluate the effectiveness of the NASA organization. This report summarizes the conclusions and recommendations of the NMSG on the overall management and organization of NASA.

  15. Pearl structures of Pc1 geomagnetic pulsations observed at multipoint ground stations at Russia, Japan and Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, C.; Shiokawa, K.; Connors, M. G.; Schofield, I.; Poddelsky, I.; Shevtsov, B.

    2013-12-01

    Pc1 geomagnetic pulsations propagate from high to low latitudes through the ionospheric wave duct. A few papers had shown longitudinal propagation of Pc1 pulsations [e.g., Kawamura et al. 1981; Sakaguchi et al.2012]. Despite these previous researches, diurnal variations of longitudinally-distributed Pc1 pulsations and the pearl structures at different stations have not been investigated yet. In order to understand generation and propagation processes of Pc1 pulsations in the magnetosphere and the ionosphere, it is necessary to investigate spatial distribution of Pc1 pulsations using magnetometers at longitudinally and latitudinally separated ground stations. We have investigated spatial distributions of the Pc1 pulsations observed by induction magnetometers at three ground stations at Moshiri (MOS) in Japan, Magadan (MGD) in far-eastern Russia and Athabasca (ATH) in central Canada from January 2009 to December 2011. Simultaneous Pc1 events observed at MGD and ATH occurred in the morning and afternoon sectors. This result is consistent with the global distribution of EMIC waves observed in space [Min et al. 2012]. The simultaneous Pc1 events with high coherence (> 0.5) observed at ATH and MGD concentrates in the afternoon to pre-midnight sector. The Pc1 frequencies of the simultaneous Pc1 events at ATH and MGD in the afternoon to pre-midnight sector were higher than those in the post-midnight to morning sector. Most of the simultaneous Pc1 events with high coherence observed at ATH and MGD have different pearl structures. This result indicates that the pearl structures should be not caused in the magnetosphere, and rather made during the propagation in the ionospheric duct. Simultaneous Pc1 events observed at MGD and MOS at subauroral and middle latitudes, respectively, were most frequently observed at night suggesting that propagation in the ionospheric duct suffers less attenuation at night. In the presentation we discuss these results in combination with the EMIC wave distribution in the magnetosphere and their propagation to the ionosphere and in the ionospheric duct.

  16. Invariant conformal vectors in space-times admitting a group of G/sub 3/ of motions acting on spacelike orbits S/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Bona, C.

    1988-11-01

    The paper deals with four-dimensional space-times admitting locally a three-dimensional group of motions G/sub 3/ acting on two-dimensional spacelike orbits S/sub 2/. The local existence problem for conformal vectors invariant under G/sub 3/ is shown to be equivalent to the local existence problem for Killing vectors of a given two-dimensional pseudo-Riemannian metric g. This problem is explicitly solved in terms of the Gaussian curvature R of g and two of its scalar differential concomitants. The results are applied to the case of dust-filled space-times, where an exhaustive list of metrics has been obtained by using the algebraic computing language Sm-smcapsp-smcaps.-smcaps The metrics are either homogeneous, self-similar, or Friedmann models.

  17. TKN Telecommunication Networks Group

    E-print Network

    Wichmann, Felix

    Multiplexing PA Power Amplifier PC Personal Computer PCI Peripheral Component Interconnect PCMCIA Personal over Ethernet PSE Power Sourcing Equipment RF Radio Frequency RMS Root Mean Square TCP Transmission consumption data (Section 3), a brief overview of the related work is given. Analyzed material is grouped

  18. First-principles study for the adsorption of segments of BPA-PC on alpha-Al2O3(0001)

    E-print Network

    Blomqvist, Janne; 10.1103/PhysRevB.84.153410

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the adsorption of bisphenol-A-polycarbonate (BPA-PC) on the alpha-Al2O3(0001) surface using density-functional theory (DFT) with van der Waals (vdW) corrections. The BPA-PC polymer can be divided into its chemical fragments which are phenylene, carbonate and isopropylidene groups. We have calculated the adsorption energy and geometry of the BPA-PC segments that consist of two to three adjacent groups of the polymer. Our DFT results show that the adsorption is dominated by the vdW interaction. It is also important to include the interaction of nearest-neighbor groups in order to provide a realistic environment for the adsorption of the polymer onto the surface. Our results also show that the BPA-PC molecule attaches to the alumina surface via the carbonate group located in the middle of the molecule chain.

  19. Real-space renormalization-group study of the two-dimensional Blume-Capel model with a random crystal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branco, N. S.; Boechat, Beatriz M.

    1997-11-01

    The phase diagram of the two-dimensional Blume-Capel model with a random crystal field is investigated within the framework of a real-space renormalization-group approximation. Our results suggest that, for any amount of randomness, the model exhibits a line of Ising-like continuous transitions, as in the pure model, but no first-order transition. At zero temperature the transition is also continuous, but not in the same universality class as the Ising model. In this limit, the attractor (in the renormalization-group sense) is the percolation fixed point of the site diluted spin-1/2 Ising model. The results we found are in qualitative agreement with general predictions made by Berker and Hui on the critical behavior of random models.

  20. Vitamin D2 interacts with Human PrPc (90–231) and breaks PrPc oligomerization in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Suenaga, Midori; Hiramoto, Yusuke; Matsunaga, Yoichi

    2013-01-01

    PrPsc, the pathogenic isoform of PrPc, can convert PrPc into PrPsc through direct interactions. PrPc oligomerization is a required processing step before PrPsc formation, and soluble oligomers appear to be the toxic species in amyloid-related disorders. In the current study, direct interactions between vitamin D2 and human recombinant PrPc (90–231) were observed by Biacore assay, and 3F4 antibody, specific for amino acid fragment 109–112 of PrPc, inhibited this interaction. An ELISA study using3F4 antibody showed that PrPc (101–130), corresponding sequence to human PrP, was affected by vitamin D2, supporting the results of Biacore studies and suggesting that the PrPc sequence around the 3F4 epitope was responsible for the interaction with vitamin D2. Furthermore, the effects of vitamin D2 on disruption of PrPc (90–231) oligomerization were elucidated by dot blot analysis and differential protease k susceptibilities. While many chemical compounds have been proposed as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of scrapie, most of these are toxic. However, given the safety and blood brain barrier permeability of vitamin D2, we propose that vitamin D2 may be a suitable agent to target PrPc in the brain and therefore is a potential therapeutic candidate for prion disease. PMID:23857314

  1. Pc-Based Floating Point Imaging Workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzak, Chris J.; Pier, Richard M.; Chinn, Patty; Kim, Yongmin

    1989-07-01

    The medical, military, scientific and industrial communities have come to rely on imaging and computer graphics for solutions to many types of problems. Systems based on imaging technology are used to acquire and process images, and analyze and extract data from images that would otherwise be of little use. Images can be transformed and enhanced to reveal detail and meaning that would go undetected without imaging techniques. The success of imaging has increased the demand for faster and less expensive imaging systems and as these systems become available, more and more applications are discovered and more demands are made. From the designer's perspective the challenge to meet these demands forces him to attack the problem of imaging from a different perspective. The computing demands of imaging algorithms must be balanced against the desire for affordability and flexibility. Systems must be flexible and easy to use, ready for current applications but at the same time anticipating new, unthought of uses. Here at the University of Washington Image Processing Systems Lab (IPSL) we are focusing our attention on imaging and graphics systems that implement imaging algorithms for use in an interactive environment. We have developed a PC-based imaging workstation with the goal to provide powerful and flexible, floating point processing capabilities, along with graphics functions in an affordable package suitable for diverse environments and many applications.

  2. Determination of the crystal system and space group of BaBiO3 by convergent-beam electron diffraction and x-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Takuya; Tsuda, Kenji; Shiono, Junichiro; Mizusaki, Junichiro; Tanaka, Michiyoshi

    2001-12-01

    The crystal system and space group of BaBiO3 with a distorted perovskite structure were investigated by convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED), selected area electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. Since all the observed CBED patterns showed a symmetry of 1, and the +/-G dark-field disk of CBED patterns indicated the absence of an inversion center in BaBiO3, the crystal symmetry of BaBiO3 was concluded to be triclinic with a space group of P1 (No. 1). The diffraction angles of the x-ray-diffraction peaks of BaBiO3, obtained using synchrotron radiation, could apparently be explained by assuming a monoclinic symmetry. However, a larger full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the 440 peak, indexed assuming a monoclinic symmetry other than that of each peak of 008, 404¯, 404, and 044 could not be explained. The large FWHM of the 440 peak could be attributed to an overlapping of the 4¯40 and 440 peaks of triclinic symmetry, showing agreement with the result of CBED.

  3. MCS -Data Recorder PC Assembly and Operating System Installation

    E-print Network

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    MCS - Data Recorder PC Assembly and Operating System Installation Christopher Wolfe , Steve. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 3 #12;1 Purpose This document will describe the parts and required assembly of an MCS selection. 2 Hardware Specification The MCS-DR PC consists of a stock Dell Precision T1500, a Myricom 10

  4. Wf/pc Cycle 2 Calibration: Photometric Calibration Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenty, John

    1991-07-01

    THIS PROGRAM MONITORS THE QE OF THE WFC AND PC. Exposures in six wide filters in both the WF and PC are taken of a UV flux standard star. The program is repeated every 4 weeks. NOTE COARSE TRACK IS ACCEPTABLE IF FINE LOCK GUIDE STARS ARE NOT AVAILABLE.

  5. Wf/pc Cycle 1 Calib: QE Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenty, John

    1990-12-01

    THIS PROGRAM CALIBRATES THE QE OF THE WFC AND PC. Exposures in six wide filters in both the WF and PC are taken of a UV flux standard star. The program is repeated every 4 weeks. NOTE COARSE TRACK IS ACCEPTABLE IF FINE LOCK GUIDE STARS ARE NOT AVAILABLE.

  6. Wf/pc Cycle 3 Calibration: Photometric Calibration Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenty, John

    1992-06-01

    THIS PROGRAM MONITORS THE QE OF THE WFC AND PC. Exposures in six wide filters in both the WF and PC are taken of a UV flux standard star. The program is repeated every 4 weeks. NOTE COARSE TRACK IS ACCEPTABLE IF FINE LOCK GUIDE STARS ARE NOT AVAILABLE.

  7. The redshift-space cluster-galaxy cross-correlation function - I. Modelling galaxy infall on to Millennium simulation clusters and SDSS groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Ying; Weinberg, David H.

    2013-06-01

    The large-scale infall of galaxies around massive clusters provides a potentially powerful diagnostic of structure growth, dark energy and cosmological deviations from General Relativity. We develop and test a method to recover galaxy infall kinematics (GIK) from measurements of the redshift-space cluster-galaxy cross-correlation function ? s_cg(r_p,r_? ). Using galaxy and halo samples from the Millennium simulation, we calibrate an analytic model of the galaxy kinematic profiles comprising a virialized component with an isotropic Gaussian velocity distribution and an infall component described by a skewed 2D t-distribution with a characteristic infall velocity vr, c and separate radial and tangential dispersions. We show that convolving the real-space cross-correlation function with this velocity distribution accurately predicts the redshift-space ? s_cg, and we show that measurements of ? s_cg can be inverted to recover the four distinct elements of the GIK profiles. These in turn provide diagnostics of cluster mass profiles, and we expect the characteristic infall velocity vr, c(r) in particular to be insensitive to galaxy formation physics that can affect velocity dispersions within haloes. As a proof of concept we measure ? s_cg for rich galaxy groups in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and recover GIK profiles for groups in two bins of central galaxy stellar mass. The higher mass bin has a vr, c(r) curve very similar to that of 1014 h-1 M? haloes in the Millennium simulation, and the recovered kinematics follow the expected trends with mass. GIK modelling of cluster-galaxy cross-correlations can be a valuable complement to stacked weak lensing analyses, allowing novel tests of modified gravity theories that seek to explain cosmic acceleration.

  8. Ongoing Analysis of Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engines by the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph; Holt, James B.; Canabal, Francisco

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the status of analyses on three Rocket Based Combined Cycle configurations underway in the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group (TD64). TD64 is performing computational fluid dynamics analysis on a Penn State RBCC test rig, the proposed Draco axisymmetric RBCC engine and the Trailblazer engine. The intent of the analysis on the Penn State test rig is to benchmark the Finite Difference Navier Stokes code for ejector mode fluid dynamics. The Draco engine analysis is a trade study to determine the ejector mode performance as a function of three engine design variables. The Trailblazer analysis is to evaluate the nozzle performance in scramjet mode. Results to date of each analysis are presented.

  9. Ongoing Analyses of Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engines by the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph H.; Holt, James B.; Canabal, Francisco

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the status of analyses on three Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) configurations underway in the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group (TD64). TD64 is performing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis on a Penn State RBCC test rig, the proposed Draco axisymmetric RBCC engine and the Trailblazer engine. The intent of the analysis on the Penn State test rig is to benchmark the Finite Difference Navier Stokes (FDNS) code for ejector mode fluid dynamics. The Draco analysis was a trade study to determine the ejector mode performance as a function of three engine design variables. The Trailblazer analysis is to evaluate the nozzle performance in scramjet mode. Results to date of each analysis are presented.

  10. The Polycomb Group Protein EED Interacts with YY1, and Both Proteins Induce Neural Tissue in Xenopus Embryos

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DAVID P. E. SATIJN; KARIEN M. HAMER; JAN DEN BLAAUWEN; ARIE P. OTTE

    2001-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins form multimeric protein complexes which are involved in the heritable stable repression of genes. Previously, we identified two distinct human PcG protein complexes. The EED-EZH protein complex contains the EED and EZH2 PcG proteins, and the HPC-HPH PcG complex contains the HPC, HPH, BMI1, and RING1 PcG proteins. Here we show that YY1, a homolog of

  11. Combined treatment of PC-3 cells with ultrasound and microbubbles suppresses invasion and migration

    PubMed Central

    WEI, CONG; BAI, WEN-KUN; WANG, YU; HU, BING

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether ultrasound treatment combined with microbubbles inhibits cell invasion and migration in androgen-independent prostate cancer (PCa) cells and to identify the probable mechanism. Ultrasound was used in continuous wave mode at a frequency of 21 kHz and with a spatial-average temporal-average intensity of 46 mW/cm2. Ultrasound combined with microbubbles (200 ?l; SonoVue) was administered to androgen-independent human PCa PC-3 cells for 30 sec. The PC-3 cells were divided into three groups: The control group, the ultrasound group (US) and the ultrasound combined with microbubbles group (US + MB). Following treatment for 12, 24, 48 and 72 h, cell counting kit-8 was used to assess cell viability. Cell invasion and migration was measured 12 h after treatment using Transwell migration assays. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were used to evaluate the expression of the migration-associated proteins, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9. Cell reproduction levels in the US and US + MB groups were significantly suppressed when compared with the control group (P<0.01) following 24 h of treatment and this suppression was significantly higher in the US + MB group than in the US group (P<0.01). However, no significant differences in cell reproduction levels between the three groups were identified at 12 h (P>0.05). Ultrasound combined with microbubbles significantly suppressed the level of invasion and migration in the PC-3 cells compared with the control group (190.83±14.63 vs. 509.67±18.62, P<0.01; and 86.67±10.60 vs. 271.33±65.14; P<0.01, respectively). Furthermore, combined treatment with ultrasound and microbubbles suppressed the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9. In conclusion, it was found that ultrasound combined with microbubbles suppressed invasion and migration in human PCa PC-3 cells via downregulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9. PMID:25120726

  12. Electric and magnetic field observations of Pc4 and Pc5 pulsations in the inner magnetosphere: A statistical study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Liu; T. E. Sarris; X. Li; S. R. Elkington; R. Ergun; V. Angelopoulos; J. Bonnell; K. H. Glassmeier

    2009-01-01

    Ultralow frequency (ULF) waves in the Pc4 and Pc5 bands are ubiquitous in the inner magnetosphere and have significant influence on energetic particle transport. Investigating the source and characteristics of ULF waves also helps us better understand the interaction processes between the solar wind and the magnetosphere. However, owing to the limitation in instrumentation and spatial coverage, the distribution of

  13. Make sure wireless card in pc / laptop is installed and active. Make sure your PC / laptop is set for DHCP.

    E-print Network

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    to the location of the Wireless Access Point. · The SSID should start with SDSU_Wireless and have the Building to the SDSU_Wireless network in any building on campus that has TNS installed Access Points, simply repeatStep 1. · Make sure wireless card in pc / laptop is installed and active. · Make sure your PC

  14. PC viruses: How do they do that

    SciTech Connect

    Pichnarczyk, K.

    1992-07-01

    The topic of PC Viruses has been an issue for a number of years now. They've been reported in every major newspaper, tabloids, television and radio. People from all fields get viruses: government, private sector businesses, home computers, schools, computer software suppliers. A definition is proposed to introduce the virus phenomenon. Virus authors come from a variety of communities. Motives and ideologies of authors are discussed, and examples of viruses are offered. Also mentioned is the growing number of viruses developed, isolated, and never distributed to the public at large, but kept within the antivirus research community. Virus examples are offered as well. Viruses are distributed not only through bulletin boards and shareware, but also from areas previously assumed to be safe, including the threat of receiving a virus through a standard in-house function, such as an in-house hardware maintenance shop. Three categories of viruses are presented: File Infecter viruses, Boot Sector Infecters, and the new category of Directory Entry Infecter virus. Also discussed are crossover viruses, that is, viruses which utilize a variety of techniques to ensure survival. An explanation of what is occurring within every stage of various viruses is given. Replication strategies common to all three types is noted, mainly the two different replication strategies of memory resident infecters and active selection infecters. A detailed definition, description and application of a stealth virus is presented. Detection strategies are discussed as each topic in this section is completed; a high level schemata of the operation of various virus detection programs ispresented. Since most eradication today is done using virus detection/eradication software, this paper attempts to reveal the techniques used by these packages.Included in the paper is the topic of manual eradication.

  15. PC viruses: How do they do that?

    SciTech Connect

    Pichnarczyk, K.

    1992-07-01

    The topic of PC Viruses has been an issue for a number of years now. They`ve been reported in every major newspaper, tabloids, television and radio. People from all fields get viruses: government, private sector businesses, home computers, schools, computer software suppliers. A definition is proposed to introduce the virus phenomenon. Virus authors come from a variety of communities. Motives and ideologies of authors are discussed, and examples of viruses are offered. Also mentioned is the growing number of viruses developed, isolated, and never distributed to the public at large, but kept within the antivirus research community. Virus examples are offered as well. Viruses are distributed not only through bulletin boards and shareware, but also from areas previously assumed to be safe, including the threat of receiving a virus through a standard in-house function, such as an in-house hardware maintenance shop. Three categories of viruses are presented: File Infecter viruses, Boot Sector Infecters, and the new category of Directory Entry Infecter virus. Also discussed are crossover viruses, that is, viruses which utilize a variety of techniques to ensure survival. An explanation of what is occurring within every stage of various viruses is given. Replication strategies common to all three types is noted, mainly the two different replication strategies of memory resident infecters and active selection infecters. A detailed definition, description and application of a stealth virus is presented. Detection strategies are discussed as each topic in this section is completed; a high level schemata of the operation of various virus detection programs ispresented. Since most eradication today is done using virus detection/eradication software, this paper attempts to reveal the techniques used by these packages.Included in the paper is the topic of manual eradication.

  16. Run-09 pC polarimeter analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, I.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoyan, G.; Bazilevsky, A.; Gill, R.; Huang, H.; Lee, S.; Li, X.; Makdisi, Y.; Morozov, B.; Nakagawa, I.; Svirida, D.; Zelenski, A.

    2010-08-01

    Analysis of PC polarimeter data at {radical}s = 200 and 500 GeV from Run9 is presented. Final polarization results, fill-by-fill, for blue and yellow beams, as to be used by RHIC experiments (in collisions) are released and collected in http://www4.rcf.bnl.gov/cnipol/pubdocs/Run09Offline/. Global relative systematic uncertainties {delta}P/P (to be considered as correlated from fill to fill) are 4.7% for 100 GeV beams, and 8.3% (12.1%) for blue (yellow) 250 GeV beams. For a product of two beam polarizations P{sub B} {center_dot} P{sub Y} (used in double spin asymmetry measurements) the relative uncertainty {delta}(P{sub B} {center_dot} P{sub Y})/(P{sub B} {center_dot} P{sub Y}) 8.8% for 100 GeV beams and 18.5% for 250 GeV beams. For the average between two beam polarization (P{sub B} + P{sub Y})/2 (used in single spin asymmetry measurements, when data from two polarized beams are combined) the relative uncertainty is 4.4% for 100 GeV beams and 9.2% for 250 GeV beams. Larger uncertainties for 250 GeV beams relate to significant rate related systematic effects experienced in the first part of Run9 (due to thicker targets used and smaller trans. beam size at higher beam energy).

  17. An automatic wave detection algorithm applied to Pc1 pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortnik, J.; Cutler, J. W.; Dunson, C.; Bleier, T. E.

    2007-04-01

    A new technique designed to automatically identify and characterize waves in three-axis data is presented, which can be applied in a variety of settings, including triaxial ground-magnetometer data or satellite wave data (particularly when transformed to a field-aligned coordinate system). This technique is demonstrated on a single Pc1 event recorded on a triaxial search coil magnetometer in Parkfield, California (35.945°,-120.542°), and then applied to a 6-month period between 1 June 2003 and 31 December 2003. The technique begins with the creation of a standard dynamic spectrogram and consists of three steps: (1) for every column of the spectrogram (which represents the spectral content of a short period in the time series), spectral peaks are identified whose power content significantly exceeds the ambient noise; (2) the series of spectral peaks from step 1 are grouped into continuous blocks representing discrete wave events using a "spectral-overlap" criterion; and (3) for each identified event, wave parameters (e.g., wave normal angles, polarization ratio) are calculated which can be used to check the continuity of individual identified wave events or to further filter wave events (e.g., by polarization ratio).

  18. The Hubble Space Telescope Extragalactic Distance Scale Key Project. VII. The Discovery of Cepheids in the Leo I Group Galaxy NGC 3351

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, John A.; Phelps, Randy L.; Freedman, Wendy L.; Saha, Abhijit; Ferrarese, Laura; Stetson, Peter B.; Madore, Barry F.; Silbermann, N. A.; Sakai, Shoko; Kennicutt, Robert C.; Harding, Paul; Bresolin, Fabio; Turner, Anne; Mould, Jeremy R.; Rawson, Daya M.; Ford, Holland C.; Hoessel, John G.; Han, Mingsheng; Huchra, John P.; Macri, Lucas M.; Hughes, Shaun M.; Illingworth, Garth D.; Kelson, Daniel D.

    1997-03-01

    We report of the discovery and properties of Cepheid variable stars in the barred spiral galaxy NGC 3351 which is a member of the Leo I group of galaxies. NGC 3351 is one of 18 galaxies being observed as part of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale which aims to determine the Hubble constant to 10% accuracy. Our analysis is based on observations made with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 during 1994 and early 1995. The Leo I group contains several bright galaxies of diverse types and is very suitable for linking together a number of secondary calibrators which can be employed at much greater distances than the Cepheid variables. We identify 49 probable Cepheids within NGC 3351 in the period range 10-43 days which have been observed at 12 epochs with the F555W filter and 4 epochs using the F814W filter. The HST F555W and F814W data have been transformed to the Johnson V and Cousins I magnitude systems, respectively. Photometry has principally been carried out using the DAOPHOT/ALLFRAME package. Reference is made to parallel measurements being made with the DoPHOT package. Apparent period-luminosity functions for V and I have been constructed assuming values of ?0 = 18.50 +/- 0.10 mag and E(B - V) = 0.10 mag for the distance modulus and reddening of the Large Magellanic Cloud. A true distance modulus of 30.01 +/- 0.19 mag is derived corresponding to a distance of 10.05 +/- 0.88 Mpc with a reddening E(V - I) = 0.15 mag. A comparison is made with distances estimated for other galaxies in the Leo I group using various distance indicators. There is good agreement with the surface brightness fluctuation and planetary nebula luminosity function methods as calibrated by the Cepheids in M31. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, operated by AURA, Inc. under NASA contract No. NAS5-26555.

  19. Proton-gated channels in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xiang-Ping; Miesch, Jennifer; Johnson, Martha; Root, Leslie; Zhu, Xiao-Man; Chen, Dexi; Simon, Roger P; Xiong, Zhi-Gang

    2002-05-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are expressed in various sensory and central neurons. The functional role of these channels remains elusive. Complex subunit combinations and lack of specific blockers for native receptors are likely to contribute to the difficulty of resolving the function of ASICs. Finding a neuronal cell line, which expresses a single population of ASICs, should prove to be useful in delineating the function of individual ASICs. Using patch-clamp, Ca(2+)-imaging, and RT-PCR techniques, we have explored the existence of ASICs in PC12 cells, a clonal neuronal cell line. Fast drops of extracellular pH activated transient inward currents in PC12 cells with pH(0.5) at 6.0-6.2. The ASICs in PC12 cells were selective for Na(+) with significant Ca(2+) permeability. Currents in PC12 cells were blocked by the nonselective ASIC blocker amiloride. PcTX1, a specific homomeric ASIC1a blocker, also blocked the ASIC currents with an IC(50) of approximately 1.5 nM. RT-PCR demonstrated the existence of ASIC1a transcript in both undifferentiated and nerve growth factor-differentiated PC12 cells. Our data suggest that PC12 cells likely contain a single population of functional proton-gated channel-homomeric ASIC1a. It might be an ideal neuronal cell line for the study of physiological and potential pathological roles of this key subunit of ASICs. PMID:11976391

  20. Oleanolic Acid Enhances the Beneficial Effects of Preconditioning on PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Willie M. U.; Mabandla, Musa V.

    2014-01-01

    Preconditioning triggers endogenous protection against subsequent exposure to higher concentrations of a neurotoxin. In this study, we investigated whether exposure to oleanolic acid (OA) enhances the protective effects of preconditioning on PC12 cells exposed to 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). A concentration response curve was constructed using 6-OHDA (50, 150, 300, and 600??M). The experiment consisted of 6 groups: untreated, OA only, Group 1: cells treated with 6-OHDA (50??M) for 1 hour, Group 2: cells treated with 6-OHDA (150??M) for 1 hour, Group 3: cells treated with 6-OHDA (50??M) for 30 minutes followed 6 hours later by treatment with 6-OHDA (150??M) for 30 minutes, and Group 4: cells treated as in group 3 but also received OA immediately after the second 6-OHDA treatment. Cell viability and apoptotic ratio were assessed using the MTT and Annexin V staining tests, respectively. In preconditioned cells, we found that cell viability remained high following exposure to 6-OHDA (150??M). OA treatment enhanced the protective effects of preconditioning. Similarly, with the annexin V apoptosis test, preconditioning protected the cell and this was enhanced by OA. Therefore, preexposure of PC12 cells to low 6-OHDA concentration can protect against subsequent toxic insults of 6-OHDA and OA enhances this protection. PMID:25478286

  1. ISTUM PC: industrial sector technology use model for the IBM-PC

    SciTech Connect

    Roop, J.M.; Kaplan, D.T.

    1984-09-01

    A project to improve and enhance the Industrial Sector Technology Use Model (ISTUM) was originated in the summer of 1983. The project had dix identifiable objectives: update the data base; improve run-time efficiency; revise the reference base case; conduct case studies; provide technical and promotional seminars; and organize a service bureau. This interim report describes which of these objectives have been met and which tasks remain to be completed. The most dramatic achievement has been in the area of run-time efficiency. From a model that required a large proportion of the total resources of a mainframe computer and a great deal of effort to operate, the current version of the model (ISTUM-PC) runs on an IBM Personal Computer. The reorganization required for the model to run on a PC has additional advantages: the modular programs are somewhat easier to understand and the data base is more accessible and easier to use. A simple description of the logic of the model is given in this report. To generate the necessary funds for completion of the model, a multiclient project is proposed. This project will extend the industry coverage to all the industrial sectors, including the construction of process flow models for chemicals and petroleum refining. The project will also calibrate this model to historical data and construct a base case and alternative scenarios. The model will be delivered to clients and training provided. 2 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  2. PC Farms for Offline Event Reconstruction at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Beretvas, A.

    1997-03-01

    Fermilab is investigating the use of PC`s for HEP computing. As a first step we have built a full offline environment under Linux on a set of Pentium (P5) and Pentium Pro (P6) machines (the ``PC Farm``). The Pythia simulation has been ported to run serially and in parallel (using CPS) on the PC Farm. Fermilab software products and CDF offline packages have also been ported to Linux. Run 1 CDF data has been analyzed on both Linux and SGI (Irix) with essentially identical results. The performance of the system is compared to results with commercial UNIX systems.

  3. The Australian experience with the PC-EVN recorder

    E-print Network

    R. Dodson; S. Tingay; C. West; C. Phillips; A. Tzioumis; J. Ritakari; F. Briggs

    2004-12-30

    We report on our experiences using the Metsahovi Radio Observatory's (MRO) VLBI Standard Interface (VSI, Whitney 2002) recorder in a number of astronomical applications. The PC-EVN device is a direct memory access (DMA) interface which allows 512 megabit per second (Mbps) or better recording to "off the shelf" PC components. We have used this setup to record at 640 Mbps for a pulsar coherent dispersion system and at 256 Mpbs for a global VLBI session. We have also demonstrated recording at 512 Mbps and will shortly form cross correlations between the CPSR-II and the PC-EVN systems.

  4. Molecular layers of ZnPc and FePc on Au(111) surface: Charge transfer and chemical interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Sareh; Shariati, M. Nina; Yu, Shun; Göthelid, Mats

    2012-08-01

    We have studied zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) and iron phthalocyanine (FePc) thick films and monolayers on Au(111) using photoelectron spectroscopy and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Both molecules are adsorbed flat on the surface at monolayer. ZnPc keeps this orientation in all investigated coverages, whereas FePc molecules stand up in the thick film. The stronger inter-molecular interaction of FePc molecules leads to change of orientation, as well as higher conductivity in FePc layer in comparison with ZnPc, which is reflected in thickness-dependent differences in core-level shifts. Work function changes indicate that both molecules donate charge to Au; through the ?-system. However, the Fe3d derived lowest unoccupied molecular orbital receives charge from the substrate when forming an interface state at the Fermi level. Thus, the central atom plays an important role in mediating the charge, but the charge transfer as a whole is a balance between the two different charge transfer channels; ?-system and the central atom.

  5. Near-equatorial Pi2 and Pc3 waves observed by CHAMP and on SAMBA/MAGDAS stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuturrufo, F.; Pilipenko, V.; Heilig, B.; Stepanova, M.; Lühr, H.; Vega, P.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2015-02-01

    We have examined simultaneous ULF activity in the Pi2 and Pc3 bands at the near-equatorial magnetic stations in South America from SAMBA and MAGDAS arrays and low-orbiting CHAMP satellite during its passage over this meridional network. At the nighttime, both Pi2 and Pc3 waves in the upper ionosphere and on the ground are nearly of the same magnitude and in-phase. At the same time, the daytime Pc3 pulsations on the ground and in space are nearly out-of-phase. Comparison of observational results with the theoretical notions on the MHD wave interaction with the system ionosphere-atmosphere-ground suggests that nighttime low-latitude Pi2 and Pc3 wave signatures are produced by magnetospheric fast compressional mode. The daytime near-equatorial Pc3 waves still resist a quantative interpretation. These waves may be produced by a combination of two mechanisms: compressional mode leakage through the ionosphere, and by oscillatory ionospheric current spreading towards equatorial latitudes.

  6. Electric and magnetic field observations of Pc4 and Pc5 pulsations in the inner magnetosphere: A statistical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Sarris, T. E.; Li, X.; Elkington, S. R.; Ergun, R.; Angelopoulos, V.; Bonnell, J.; Glassmeier, K. H.

    2009-12-01

    Ultralow frequency (ULF) waves in the Pc4 and Pc5 bands are ubiquitous in the inner magnetosphere and have significant influence on energetic particle transport. Investigating the source and characteristics of ULF waves also helps us better understand the interaction processes between the solar wind and the magnetosphere. However, owing to the limitation in instrumentation and spatial coverage, the distribution of ULF waves in local time and L shell in the inner magnetosphere has not been completely studied. The recent Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions During Substorms (THEMIS) mission provides unique opportunities to investigate the spatial distribution of ULF pulsations across different L shells with full local time coverage in the inner magnetosphere during solar minimum, with both electric and magnetic field measurements. Pc4 and Pc5 pulsations in the electric field observations are identified throughout 13 months of measurements, covering 24 h in local time. The pulsations are characterized as either toroidal or poloidal (including compressional) mode, depending on the polarization of the electric field. Subsequently, the pulsations' occurrence rate and wave power distributions in radial distance and local time are recorded. While the distributions of both Pc4 and Pc5 events vary greatly with radial distance and local time, Pc4 events are more frequently observed in the inner region around 5-6 RE and Pc5 events are more frequently observed in the outer region around 7-9 RE, which suggests that the field line resonance is an important source of the ULF waves. In the flank regions, the wave power is dominated by the toroidal mode, likely associated with the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability. In the noon sector, the Pc5 ULF wave power is dominated by the poloidal mode, likely associated with the solar wind dynamic pressure disturbance. The KH instability plays an important role, suggested by our observations, during the solar minimum when the solar wind dynamic pressure is relatively weak. We also find that the contributions to the Pc5 ULF wave power from the external sources are larger than the contributions from the internal sources. These statistical results are important in characterizing Pc4 and Pc5 waves and also important for any efforts to model the transport of energetic particles in the magnetosphere.

  7. Polar's Observations of Pc Pulsations in Near-Earth Tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Y. S.; Russell, C. T.

    2005-12-01

    When the Polar spacecraft passes the magnetospheric equator at 9 RE in the tail, very monochromatic continuous pulsations (Pc pulsations) are seen. The frequencies of the pulsations observed varies from 4 to 17 mHz which are within Pc 4 and Pc 5 pulsation frequency band. While most events are Pc 4 pulsations and waves are transverse, one event of frequency 4 mHz has a larger compressional component than transverse. The IMF during these waves is mostly radial and northward. The pulsations appear to occur during the quiet times of tail following disturbed times. Cold plasma data from TIDE on Polar has been also examined. Clear correlation between cold plasma pressure and magnetic pressure is seen in all events within the central plasma sheet, while the plasma pressure is anti-correlated with magnetic pressure when the wave is close to the boundary of the plasma sheet.

  8. PC-Scheme/Geneva 4.02 log

    E-print Network

    1999-06-01

    Jun 1, 1999 ... This program is based, and includes source code, of Texas Instrument's PC- ... to act interactively on the graphic screen without scrolling up what you've drawn. ... A set of macro designed for Scheme objects manipulation from.

  9. 21 CFR 868.2480 - Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO 2) monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 false Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO 2) monitor. 868...Monitoring Devices § 868.2480 Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO 2 ) monitor. (a) Identification. A cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2 ) monitor...

  10. 21 CFR 868.2480 - Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO 2) monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 false Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO 2) monitor. 868...Monitoring Devices § 868.2480 Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO 2 ) monitor. (a) Identification. A cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2 ) monitor...

  11. Simultaneous ground-satellite observations of structured Pc 1 pulsations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. E. Erlandson; K. Mursula; T. Bösinger

    1996-01-01

    Structured Pc 1 pulsations are investigated using simultaneous multipoint ground-satellite observations recorded on September 10, 1986, during Viking orbit 1103. The multipoint Pc 1 observations were acquired using the Viking magnetic field experiment at 13,550 km altitude from L=5.1 to 5.5 and three Finnish ground stations at Rovaniemi, Ivalo, and Kilpisjärvi. These stations are all located within 30 min magnetic

  12. Accelerating an embedded RTOS in a SoPC platform

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timothy F. Oliver; Siraj Mohammed; Nataraj Muthu Krishna; Douglas L. Maskell

    2004-01-01

    SoPC platforms are becoming more prevalent as a solution for the implementation of embedded computing systems. This is due to their ease of implementation and highly customisable nature. We demonstrate a simple yet effective technique for accelerating an embedded RTOS running on a soft-core CPU in an SoPC platform. Custom instructions are developed to accelerate the task scheduling. We show

  13. Information Retrieval on an SCI-Based PC Cluster

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sang-Hwa Chung; Hyuk-Chul Kwon; Kwang Ryel Ryu; Yoojin Chung; Hankook Jang; Cham-Ah Choi

    2001-01-01

    This article presents an efficient parallel information retrieval (IR) system which provides fast information service for the Internet users on low-cost high-performance PC-NOW environment. The IR system is implemented on a PC cluster based on the scalable coherent interface (SCI), a powerful interconnecting mechanism for both shared memory models and message-passing models. In the IR system, the inverted-index file (IIF)

  14. [Protective effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell-derived microvesicles on glutamate injured PC12 cells].

    PubMed

    Lin, Shan-Shan; Zhu, Bo; Guo, Zi-Kuan; Huang, Guo-Zhi

    2014-08-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the protective effect of bone mesenchymal stem cell-derived microvesicles (BMMSC-MV) on glutamate injured PC12 cells so as to elucidate the mechanism of the neural damage repair. BMMSC were isolated and purified with density-gradient centrifugation method, BMMSC-MV were harvested from the supernatants of BMMSC by hypothermal ultracentrifugation method. The surface markers of BMMSC reacted against different antibodies were detected by flow cytometry. The morphology features of MV were observed under an electron microscope. Experiment was divided into three groups, one was a control group, and the other two were glutamate-injured group and co-culture group of BMMSC-MV and glutamate-damaged cells respectively. MTT test was used to evaluate the proliferative status of PC12 cells and the AnnexinV-FITC detecting kit and Hoechst33342 were used to detect the apoptosis of PC12 cells in different groups. The results showed that BMMSC isolated from rat bone marrow were highly positive for CD29, CD44 and negative for CD31, CD34 and CD45. The morphology of MV was round and the vesicles were homogenous in size. BMMSC-MV exhibited a protective effect on the excitotoxicity-injured PC12 cells, displaying increase of cell viability, decrease of Annexin-V/PI staining positive and nuclear condensed cells. It is concluded that BMMSC-MV can protect PC12 cells from glutamate-induced apoptosis, suggesting that BMMSC-MV may be a potential candidate for treatment of neurological diseases.This study provides the preliminary experimental and theoretical evidence for use of BMMSC-MV in treatment of neural excited damage. PMID:25130832

  15. ULF Pc 3-4 Pulsations: Observations, Processing, and Characterization in the California Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunson, J. C.; Doering, J.; Bleier, T.; Cutler, J.; Bortnik, J.

    2006-12-01

    Pulsations are known to occur in the 0.005 - 0.1 Hz (period = 10 sec-150 sec) portion of the geomagnetic spectrum as a strong signal. They have been designated as Pc 3 &4, and prior work has sought to determine the structure of the magnetospheric standing waves for use in estimating density of the plasmasphere, etc. (Russell, et al. [1998]). Pc 3-4 characteristics also have held long interest for seismologists, as they are a form of interference when using digital seismometers to attempt measurements of long-period motion. Another recent source of interest in these pulsations stems from the announcement that some researchers have seen fluctuations in the geomagnetic signal associated with earthquakes. Reports of these anomalies have spanned frequencies in the range of 0.01 Hz, thus long term monitoring of Pc3-4 activity over California may be critical in defining the normal, background signal levels when looking for potential earthquake-related ULF signals. The deployment of high-resolution search coils in Quakefinder's CalMagNet in 2005, have allowed a much higher resolution and wider geographic distribution of measurements to study these complex signals. The analytical techniques of multi- channel coherence, wave analysis, and signal space separation provide unique characterizations of these signals, including latitude dependency. Progress in studying the geomagnetic signal using these techniques is presented, the signal estimator's design is shown, and future directions are discussed.

  16. Effect of Processing Method on Morphological and Rheological Properties of PC\\/CaCO3 Nanocomposites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chao-Lu Yin; Zheng-Ying Liu; Wei Yang; Jian-Min Feng; Ming-Bo Yang

    2009-01-01

    The focus of this work is to investigate the effect of different manufacturing methods on nanoparticles dispersion and rheological properties of polycarbonate (PC) filled nano-calcium carbonate (CaCO3) nanocomposites. Two methods were used to prepare the PC\\/CaCO3 nanocomposites through twin-screw extruder: one was compounding PC with CaCO3 nano-powder, named PC-CP; another was compounding PC with CaCO3 aqueous suspension, named PC-CAS. The

  17. Structural and morphological modifications in double layer heterostructures containing H2Pc, perylene-3, 4, 9, 10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride and Alq3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heutz, S.; Jones, T. S.

    2002-09-01

    The morphological, structural and spectroscopic properties of molecular double layers grown by organic molecular beam deposition have been investigated using atomic force microscopy, Nomarski microscopy, powder x-ray diffraction and electronic absorption spectroscopy. The structures, based on metal-free phthalocyanine (H2)Pc, perylene-3, 4, 9, 10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) and aluminum-tris-quinolate (Alq3), were deposited on glass substrates, with individual layer thicknesses ranging from 7 to 380 nm. Alq3 has no influence on the subsequent growth of either H2Pc or PTCDA, and its properties are not affected by a first molecular layer. By contrast, significant structural modifications are observed in double layers based on the two crystalline materials H2Pc and PTCDA. H2Pc deposited onto a PTCDA first layer departs from its herringbone structure, and adopts a layered structure with an interplanar spacing of 3.33 A and an intermolecular shift of 1.7 A. The structure of a PTCDA film deposited onto a alpha-H2Pc layer is completely disrupted. When PTCDA is deposited onto a beta-H2Pc first layer, a morphological templating is observed and this annihilates any structural disruption. This is consistent with the growth of a microcrystalline PTCDA film on top of a alpha-H2Pc first layer.

  18. CoPc and CoPcF16 on gold: Site-specific charge-transfer processes

    PubMed Central

    Petraki, Fotini; Uihlein, Johannes; Aygül, Umut; Chassé, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Summary Interface properties of cobalt(II) phthalocyanine (CoPc) and cobalt(II) hexadecafluoro-phthalocyanine (CoPcF16) to gold are investigated by photo-excited electron spectroscopies (X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) and X-ray excited Auger electron spectroscopy (XAES)). It is shown that a bidirectional charge transfer determines the interface energetics for CoPc and CoPcF16 on Au. Combined XPS and XAES measurements allow for the separation of chemical shifts based on different local charges at the considered atom caused by polarization effects. This facilitates a detailed discussion of energetic shifts of core level spectra. The data allow the discussion of site-specific charge-transfer processes. PMID:24991487

  19. Role of Polycomb -group genes in sustaining activities of normal and malignant stem cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoshihiro Takihara

    2008-01-01

    Polycomb-group genes (PcG), identified by Drosophila genetics, are believed to maintain positional information by constituting a cellular memory system. Recently this system\\u000a has been proved to be supported by epigenetic transcription regulation. PcG products comprise two distinct complexes, PcG\\u000a complex 1 and 2. First PcG complex 2 silences chromatin and encodes a histone code by methylating histone H3 at lysine

  20. Pc1–Pc2 waves and energetic particle precipitation during and after magnetic storms: Superposed epoch analysis and case studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Engebretson; M. R. Lessard; J. Bortnik; J. C. Green; R. B. Horne; D. L. Detrick; A. T. Weatherwax; J. Manninen; N. J. Petit; J. L. Posch; M. C. Rose

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic pulsations in the Pc1–Pc2 frequency range (0.1–5 Hz) are often observed on the ground and in the Earth's magnetosphere during the aftermath of geomagnetic storms. Numerous studies have suggested that they may play a role in reducing the fluxes of energetic ions in the ring current; more recent studies suggest they may interact parasitically with radiation belt electrons as

  1. PC Tutor. Bericht uber ein PC-gestutzes Tutorensystem = PC Tutor. Report on a Tutoring System with Personal Computer. ZIFF Papiere 75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritsch, Helmut

    A project was conducted to increase as well as to professionalize communication between tutors and learners in a West German university's distance education program by the use of personal computers. Two tutors worked on the systematic development of a PC-based correcting system. The goal, apart from developing general language skills in English,…

  2. Morphine treatment selectively regulates expression of rat pituitary POMC and the prohormone convertases PC1/3 and PC2

    PubMed Central

    Anghel, Adrian; Paez Espinosa, Enma V.; Stuart, Ronald C.; Lutfy, Kabirullah; Nillni, Eduardo A.; Friedman, Theodore C.

    2013-01-01

    The prohormone convertases, PC1/3 and PC2 are thought to be responsible for the activation of many prohormones through processing including the endogenous opioid peptides. We propose that maintenance of hormonal homeostasis can be achieved, in part, via alterations in levels of these enzymes that control the ratio of active hormone to prohormone. In order to test the hypothesis that exogenous opioids regulate the endogenous opioid system and the enzymes responsible for their biosynthesis, we studied the effect of short-term morphine or naltrexone treatment on pituitary PC1/3 and PC2 as well as on the level of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), the precursor gene for the biosynthesis of the endogenous opioid peptide, beta-endorphin. Using ribonuclease protection assays, we observed that morphine down-regulated and naltrexone up-regulated rat pituitary PC1/3 and PC2 mRNA. Immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis confirmed that the protein levels changed in parallel with the changes in mRNA levels and were accompanied by changes in the levels of phosphorylated cyclic-AMP response element binding protein. We propose that the alterations of the prohormone processing system may be a compensatory mechanism in response to an exogenous opioid ligand whereby the organism tries to restore its homeostatic hormonal milieu following exposure to the opioid, possibly by regulating the levels of multiple endogenous opioid peptides and other neuropeptides in concert. PMID:23891651

  3. Histone trimethylation and the maintenance of transcriptional ONand OFF states by trxG and PcG proteins

    PubMed Central

    Papp, Bernadett; Müller, Jürg

    2006-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) and trithorax group (trxG) proteins act as antagonistic regulators to maintain transcriptional OFF and ON states of HOX and other target genes. To study the molecular basis of PcG/trxG control, we analyzed the chromatin of the HOX gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx) in UbxOFFand UbxONcells purified from developing Drosophila. We find that PcG protein complexes PhoRC, PRC1, and PRC2 and the Trx protein are all constitutively bound to Polycomb response elements (PREs) in the OFF and ON state. In contrast, the trxG protein Ash1 is only bound in the ON state; not at PREs but downstream of the transcription start site. In the OFF state, we find extensive trimethylation at H3-K27, H3-K9, and H4-K20 across the entire Ubx gene; i.e., throughout the upstream control, promoter, and coding region. In the ON state, the upstream control region is also trimethylated at H3-K27, H3-K9, and H4-K20, but all three modifications are absent in the promoter and 5? coding region. Our analyses of mutants that lack the PcG histone methyltransferase (HMTase) E(z) or the trxG HMTase Ash1 provide strong evidence that differential histone lysine trimethylation at the promoter and in the coding region confers transcriptional ON and OFF states of Ubx. In particular, our results suggest that PRE-tethered PcG protein complexes act over long distances to generate Pc-repressed chromatin that is trimethylated at H3-K27, H3-K9, and H4-K20, but that the trxG HMTase Ash1 selectively prevents this trimethylation in the promoter and coding region in the ON state. PMID:16882982

  4. NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION

    E-print Network

    NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION Earth Science Data Systems Working Group Standards-identified practices. #12;NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION The Standards Process Group (SPG) · History #12;NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION Insights (why the SPG?) · Interoperability does

  5. An unusal case of facile non-degenerate P-C bond making and breaking.

    PubMed

    Nesterov, Vitaly; Özbolat-Schön, Aysel; Schnakenburg, Gregor; Shi, Lili; Cangönül, Asli; van Gastel, Maurice; Neese, Frank; Streubel, Rainer

    2012-06-01

    Oxidation of Li/X phosphinidenoid complex 2, obtained via selective deprotonation from the P-H precursor 1, with [Ph(3)C]BF(4) led to the formation of two P-F substituted diorganophosphane complexes 6,7; the latter tautomer 7 formed via H-shift from 6. In contrast, oxidation of 2 with [(p-Tol)(3)C]BF(4) led to three major and one minor intermediates at low temperature, which we tentatively assign to two pairs of P-C atropisomers 10?a,a' and 10?c,c' and which differ by the relative orientations of their CH(SiMe(3))(2) and W(CO)(5) groups. Conversion of all isomers led finally to complex 11 having a ligand with a long P-C bond to the central trityl* carbon atom, firmly established by single-crystal X-ray analysis. DFT calculations at the B3LYP/def2-TZVPP//BP86/def2-TZVP level of theory on real molecular entities revealed the structures of the in situ formed combined singlet diradicals (4+5 and 5+9) and the nature of intermediates on the way to the final product, complex 11. Remarkable is that all isomers of 11 possess relative energies in the narrow energy regime of about 20?kcal ?mol(-1). A preliminary study revealed that complex 11 undergoes selective P-C bond cleavage at 75?°C in toluene solution. PMID:22488865

  6. A clue towards improving the European Society of Medical Oncology risk group classification in apparent early stage endometrial cancer? Impact of lymphovascular space invasion

    PubMed Central

    Bendifallah, S; Canlorbe, G; Raimond, E; Hudry, D; Coutant, C; Graesslin, O; Touboul, C; Huguet, F; Cortez, A; Daraï, E; Ballester, M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI) is one of the most important predictors of nodal involvement and recurrence in early stage endometrial cancer (EC). Despite its demonstrated prognostic value, LVSI has not been incorporated into the European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) classification. The aim of this prospective multicentre database study is to investigate whether it may improve the accuracy of the ESMO classification in predicting the recurrence risk. Methods: Data of 496 patients with apparent early-stage EC who received primary surgical treatment between January 2001 and December 2012 were abstracted from prospective multicentre database. A modified ESMO classification including six risk groups was created after inclusion of the LVSI status in the ESMO classification. The primary end point was the recurrence accuracy comparison between the ESMO and the modified ESMO classifications with respect to the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results: The recurrence rate in the whole population was 16.1%. The median follow-up and recurrence time were 31 (range: 1–152) and 27 (range: 1–134) months, respectively. Considering the ESMO modified classification, the recurrence rates were 8.2% (8 out of 98), 23.1% (15 out of 65), 25.9% (15 out of 58), and 45.1% (28 out of 62) for intermediate risk/LVSI?, intermediate risk/LVSI+, high risk/LVSI?, and high risk/LVSI+, respectively (P<0.001). In the low risk group, LVSI status was not discriminant as only 7.0% (14 out of 213) had LVSI+. The staging accuracy according to AUC criteria for ESMO and ESMO modified classifications were of 0.71 (95% CI: 0.68–0.74) and 0.74 (95% CI: 0.71–0.77), respectively. Conclusions: The current modified classification could be helpful to better define indications for nodal staging and adjuvant therapy, especially for patients with intermediate risk EC. PMID:24809776

  7. Dependence of radiation belt enhancements on the radial extent of Pc5 waves and the plasmapause location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, M.; Daglis, I. A.; Zesta, E.; Balasis, G.; Katsavrias, C.; Mann, I. R.; Tsinganos, K.

    2014-12-01

    Low-energy electrons are accelerated to relativistic energies through different mechanisms, transporting them across their drift shells to the outer radiation belt. Among the different acceleration mechanisms, radial diffusion describes the result of ULF magnetic field pulsations resonantly interacting with radiation belt electrons. In this paper, the radial positioning of the relativistic electron population during 39 intense and moderate magnetic storms is examined against that of ULF Pc5 wave power and the plasmapause location. The relativistic electron population of the outer radiation belt appeared enhanced in the 2 - 6 MeV electron flux data from SAMPEX and in > 2 MeV electron flux data from the geosynchronous GOES satellites following 27 of the magnetic storms. We compared relativistic electrons observations with concurrent radial distribution of wave power enhancements at Pc5 frequencies as detected by the IMAGE and CARISMA magnetometer arrays, as well as by additional magnetic stations collaborating in SuperMAG. We discuss the growth and decay characteristics of Pc5 waves in association with the plasmapause location, determined from IMAGE EUV observations, as the controlling factor for wave power penetration deep into the magnetosphere. We show that, during magnetic storms characterized by increased post-storm fluxes, Pc5 wave power penetrates to L shells of 4 and lower. On the other hand, magnetic storms which were characterised by loss of electrons were related to low Pc5 wave activity, which was not intensified at low L shells. These observations provide support for the hypothesis that enhanced Pc5 wave activity deep into the magnetosphere during the main and recovery phase can discriminate between storms that result in increases of electron fluxes from those that do not. The work leading to this paper has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7-SPACE-2011-1) under grant agreement no. 284520 for the MAARBLE (Monitoring, Analyzing and Assessing Radiation Belt Energization and Loss) collaborative research project.

  8. PC-based PCM telemetry data reduction system software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simms, D. A.

    1990-02-01

    The Solar Energy Research Institute's (SERI) Wind Research Program is using pulse code modulation (PCM) telemetry systems to study horizontal-axis wind turbines. SERI has developed a low-cost PC-based PCM data-acquisition system to facilitate quick PCM data analysis in the field. The SERI PC-PCM system consists of AT-compatible hardware boards for decoding and combining PCM data streams and DOS software for control and management of data acquisition. Up to four boards can be installed in a single PC, providing the capability to combine data from four PCM streams direct to disk or memory. This paper describes the SERI Quick-Look Data Management Program, which is a comprehensive software package used to organize, acquire, process, and display information from PCM data streams. The software was designed for use in conjunction with SERI's PC-PCM hardware described in a related paper. Features of the Quick-Look program are highlighted, including those which make it useful in an experiment test environment to quickly examine and verify incoming data. Also discussed are problems and techniques associated with PC-based PCM data acquisition, processing, and real-time display.

  9. In vitro effects of fetal rat cerebrospinal fluid on viability and neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fetal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contains many neurotrophic and growth factors and has been shown to be capable of supporting viability, proliferation and differentiation of primary cortical progenitor cells. Rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells have been widely used as an in vitro model of neuronal differentiation since they differentiate into sympathetic neuron-like cells in response to growth factors. This study aimed to establish whether PC12 cells were responsive to fetal CSF and therefore whether they might be used to investigate CSF physiology in a stable cell line lacking the time-specific response patterns of primary cells previously described. Methods In vitro assays of viability, proliferation and differentiation were carried out after incubation of PC12 cells in media with and without addition of fetal rat CSF. An MTT tetrazolium assay was used to assess cell viability and/or cell proliferation. Expression of neural differentiation markers (MAP-2 and ?-III tubulin) was determined by immunocytochemistry. Formation and growth of neurites was measured by image analysis. Results PC12 cells differentiate into neuronal cell types when exposed to bFGF. Viability and cell proliferation of PC12 cells cultured in CSF-supplemented medium from E18 rat fetuses were significantly elevated relative to the control group. Neuronal-like outgrowths from cells appeared following the application of bFGF or CSF from E17 and E19 fetuses but not E18 or E20 CSF. Beta-III tubulin was expressed in PC12 cells cultured in any media except that supplemented with E18 CSF. MAP-2 expression was found in control cultures and in those with E17 and E19 CSF. MAP2 was located in neurites except in E17 CSF when the whole cell was positive. Conclusions Fetal rat CSF supports viability and stimulates proliferation and neurogenic differentiation of PC12 cells in an age-dependent way, suggesting that CSF composition changes with age. This feature may be important in vivo for the promotion of normal brain development. There were significant differences in the effects on PC12 cells compared to primary cortical cells. This suggests there is an interaction in vivo between developmental stage of cells and the composition of CSF. The data presented here support an important, perhaps driving role for CSF composition, specifically neurotrophic factors, in neuronal survival, proliferation and differentiation. The effects of CSF on PC12 cells can thus be used to further investigate the role of CSF in driving development without the confounding issues of using primary cells. PMID:22494846

  10. A New Position-Space Renormalization-Group Approach for Non-Equilibrium Systems and its Application to the Three-State Driven Lattice Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Ivan T.; McKay, Susan R.

    2004-03-01

    We have introduced a general position-space renormalization-group approach for non-equilibrium systems developed from the microscopic master equation. The method is based upon a closed form representation of the parameters of the system in terms of the steady state probability distribution of small clusters. From the master equation in terms of these small clusters, we build recursion relations linking parameters affecting transition rates on various length scales and determine the flow topology. Results for the three-state driven lattice gas show many of the expected features associated with the phase diagrams previously reported for this system, (G. Korniss, B. Schmittmann, and R.K.P. Zia, Non-Equilibrium Phase Transitions in a Simple Three-State Lattice Gas, J. Stat. Phys. 86, 721 (1997).)in excellent agreement with simulations. The flow diagrams also exhibit added complexities, suggesting multiple regions within the ordered phase for some values of parameters and the presence of an extra "source" fixed point. (I.T. Georgiev, U. of Maine Ph.D. Thesis (2003); I.T. Georgiev and S.R. McKay, in preparation.)

  11. A geospatially enabled, PC-based, software to fuse and interactively visualize large 4D\\/5D data sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Andres; M. Davis; K. Fujiwara; J. C. Anderson; Tie Fang; M. Nedbal

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the development and main operational capabilities of a PC-based, geospatial enabled software that can fuse and visualize large, multi-variable data sets that change in space (x, y, z) and time (t). The new software has the ability to simultaneously visualize imagery, bathymetry\\/terrain, and true volumetric (voxel) data in a fully interactive geo-referenced mode. In addition to providing

  12. METHANE de-NOX FOR UTILITY PC BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Rabovitser; Bruce Bryan; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo

    2003-04-01

    During the current quarter, pilot scale testing was continued with the modified combustor and modified channel burner using the new PRB coal delivered in late December. Testing included benchmark testing to determine whether the system performance was comparable to that with the previous batch of PRB coal, baseline testing to characterize performance of the PC Burner without coal preheating, and parametric testing to evaluate the effect of various preheat combustor and PC burner operating variables, including reduced gas usage in the preheat combustor. A second version of the PC burner in which the secondary air channels were closed and replaced with six air nozzles was then tested with PRB coal. Plans were developed with RPI for the next phase of testing at the 100 million Btu/h scale using RPI's Coal Burner Test Facility (CBTF). A cost estimate for preparation of the CBTF and preheat burner system design, installation and testing was then prepared by RPI.

  13. Fine structure of the "PcG body" in human U-2 OS cells established by correlative light-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Smigová, Jana; Juda, Pavel; Cmarko, Dušan; Raška, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins of the Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) are found to be diffusely distributed in nuclei of cells from various species. However they can also be localized in intensely fluorescent foci, whether imaged using GFP fusions to proteins of PRC1 complex, or by conventional immunofluorescence microscopy. Such foci are termed PcG bodies, and are believed to be situated in the nuclear intechromatin compartment. However, an ultrastructural description of the PcG body has not been reported to date. To establish the ultrastructure of PcG bodies in human U-2 OS cells stably expressing recombinant polycomb BMI1-GFP protein, we used correlative light-electron microscopy (CLEM) implemented with high-pressure freezing, cryosubstitution and on-section labeling of BMI1 protein with immunogold. This approach allowed us to clearly identify fluorescent PcG bodies, not as distinct nuclear bodies, but as nuclear domains enriched in separated heterochromatin fascicles. Importantly, high-pressure freezing and cryosubstitution allowed for a high and clear-cut immunogold BMI1 labeling of heterochromatin structures throughout the nucleus. The density of immunogold labeled BMI1 in the heterochromatin fascicles corresponding to fluorescent "PcG bodies" did not differ from the density of labeling of heterochromatin fascicles outside of the "PcG bodies". Accordingly, an appearance of the fluorescent "PcG bodies" seems to reflect a local accumulation of the labeled heterochromatin structures in the investigated cells. The results of this study should allow expansion of the knowledge about the biological relevance of the "PcG bodies" in human cells. PMID:21818415

  14. METHANE de-NOX for Utility PC Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Bryan; Joseph Rabovitser; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo

    2005-06-30

    Large-scale combustion tests with caking bituminous coal has stopped. This stoppage has come about due to limitations in current funding available to continue large scale research and development activities at Riley's Commercial Burner Test Facility (CBTF) of the PC Preheat technology. The CBTF was secured and decommissioned in the previous quarter; work this quarter has focused on disposition of PC Preheat experimental equipment at the CBTF as well as methods for disposal of about 100 tons of residual PRB test coal in storage. GTI was granted a no-cost time extension through September 2005; a final report is due in December 2005.

  15. PC proliferation: Minimizing corporate risk through planning for application maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, L.I.

    1987-01-01

    The rapid proliferation of personal computers, offering tremendous productivity gains for the knowledge worker, often creates new application maintenance tasks. Specific concerns include security, data integrity, and access authorization. Distributed networks require security and communication systems. Distributed data entry requires file servers, network support personnel, and synchronization methods to preserve the integrity of corporate data. Much PC software which must be maintained will be developed outside of standard-imposing environments and without benefit of formal training. A recommended method for limiting future maintenance problems is the formation of a staff possessing skills specific to problem solving in the areas mentioned and functioning as PC consultants for the area of the knowledge worker.

  16. Processing and intracellular localization of rice stripe virus Pc2 protein in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuling; Zhang, Gaozhan; Dai, Xuejuan; Hou, Yanling; Li, Min; Liang, Jiansheng; Liang, Changyong

    2012-08-01

    Rice stripe virus (RSV) belongs to the genus Tenuivirus and its genome consists of four single-stranded RNAs encoding seven proteins. Here, we have analyzed the processing and membrane association of Pc2 encoded by vcRNA2 in insect cells. The enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) was fused to the Pc2 and used for the detection of Pc2 fusion proteins. The results showed that Pc2 was cleaved to produce two proteins named Pc2-N and Pc2-C. When expressed alone, either Pc2-N or Pc2-C could transport to the Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes independently. Further mutagenesis studies revealed that Pc2 contained three ER-targeting domains. The results led us to propose a model for the topology of the Pc2 in which an internal signal peptide immediately followed a cleavage site, and two transmembrane regions are contained. PMID:22575054

  17. Processing and intracellular localization of rice stripe virus Pc2 protein in insect cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Shuling; Zhang, Gaozhan; Dai, Xuejuan; Hou, Yanling; Li, Min [College of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China)] [College of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Liang, Jiansheng, E-mail: jsliang@yzu.edu.cn [College of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China)] [College of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Liang, Changyong, E-mail: cyliang@yzu.edu.cn [College of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China)] [College of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China)

    2012-08-01

    Rice stripe virus (RSV) belongs to the genus Tenuivirus and its genome consists of four single-stranded RNAs encoding seven proteins. Here, we have analyzed the processing and membrane association of Pc2 encoded by vcRNA2 in insect cells. The enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) was fused to the Pc2 and used for the detection of Pc2 fusion proteins. The results showed that Pc2 was cleaved to produce two proteins named Pc2-N and Pc2-C. When expressed alone, either Pc2-N or Pc2-C could transport to the Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes independently. Further mutagenesis studies revealed that Pc2 contained three ER-targeting domains. The results led us to propose a model for the topology of the Pc2 in which an internal signal peptide immediately followed a cleavage site, and two transmembrane regions are contained.

  18. Sex comb on midleg (Scm) is a functional link between PcG-repressive complexes in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyuckjoon; McElroy, Kyle A; Jung, Youngsook Lucy; Alekseyenko, Artyom A; Zee, Barry M; Park, Peter J; Kuroda, Mitzi I

    2015-06-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are key regulators of development in Drosophila and are strongly implicated in human health and disease. How PcG complexes form repressive chromatin domains remains unclear. Using cross-linked affinity purifications of BioTAP-Polycomb (Pc) or BioTAP-Enhancer of zeste [E(z)], we captured all PcG-repressive complex 1 (PRC1) or PRC2 core components and Sex comb on midleg (Scm) as the only protein strongly enriched with both complexes. Although previously not linked to PRC2, we confirmed direct binding of Scm and PRC2 using recombinant protein expression and colocalization of Scm with PRC1, PRC2, and H3K27me3 in embryos and cultured cells using ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation [ChIP] combined with deep sequencing). Furthermore, we found that RNAi knockdown of Scm and overexpression of the dominant-negative Scm-SAM (sterile ? motif) domain both affected the binding pattern of E(z) on polytene chromosomes. Aberrant localization of the Scm-SAM domain in long contiguous regions on polytene chromosomes revealed its independent ability to spread on chromatin, consistent with its previously described ability to oligomerize in vitro. Pull-downs of BioTAP-Scm captured PRC1 and PRC2 and additional repressive complexes, including PhoRC, LINT, and CtBP. We propose that Scm is a key mediator connecting PRC1, PRC2, and transcriptional silencing. Combined with previous structural and genetic analyses, our results strongly suggest that Scm coordinates PcG complexes and polymerizes to produce broad domains of PcG silencing. PMID:26063573

  19. Polycomb group protein bodybuilding: working out the routines.

    PubMed

    Sievers, Cem; Paro, Renato

    2013-09-30

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins regulate gene expression by modifying chemical and structural properties of chromatin. Isono et al. (2013) now report in Developmental Cell a polymerization-dependent mechanism used by PcG proteins to form higher-order chromatin structures, referred to as Polycomb bodies, and demonstrate its necessity for gene silencing. PMID:24091008

  20. Architectural and Functional Diversity of Polycomb Group Response Elements in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. Lesley; Kassis, Judith A.

    2013-01-01

    Polycomb group response elements (PREs) play an essential role in gene regulation by the Polycomb group (PcG) repressor proteins in Drosophila. PREs are required for the recruitment and maintenance of repression by the PcG proteins. PREs are made up of binding sites for multiple DNA-binding proteins, but it is still unclear what combination(s) of binding sites is required for PRE activity. Here we compare the binding sites and activities of two closely linked yet separable PREs of the Drosophila engrailed (en) gene, PRE1 and PRE2. Both PRE1 and PRE2 contain binding sites for multiple PRE–DNA-binding proteins, but the number, arrangement, and spacing of the sites differs between the two PREs. These differences have functional consequences. Both PRE1 and PRE2 mediate pairing-sensitive silencing of mini-white, a functional assay for PcG repression; however, PRE1 requires two binding sites for Pleiohomeotic (Pho), whereas PRE2 requires only one Pho-binding site for this activity. Furthermore, for full pairing-sensitive silencing activity, PRE1 requires an AT-rich region not found in PRE2. These two PREs behave differently in a PRE embryonic and larval reporter construct inserted at an identical location in the genome. Our data illustrate the diversity of architecture and function of PREs. PMID:23934890

  1. COBOL on a PC: a new perspective on a language and its performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul J. Jalics

    1987-01-01

    A comparison of Cobol performance on the PC AT Enhanced versus an IBM 370 mainframe suggests that high-quality PC compiler implementations—combined with the new language features of the Cobol 85 Standard—are improving the PC environment for Cobol to the point where serious applications can now be developed and debugged on the PC, either to be run on the PC itself,

  2. The effect of a proline residue on the rate of growth and the space group of alpha-spectrin SH3-domain crystals.

    PubMed

    Cámara-Artigas, Ana; Andújar-Sánchez, Monserrat; Ortiz-Salmerón, Emilia; Cuadri, Celia; Casares, Salvador

    2009-12-01

    alpha-Spectrin SH3-domain (Spc-SH3) crystallization is characterized by very fast growth of the crystals in the presence of ammonium sulfate as a precipitant agent. The origin of this behaviour can be attributed to the presence of a proline residue that participates in a crystal contact mimicking the binding of proline-rich sequences to SH3 domains. This residue, Pro20, is located in the RT loop and is the main contact in one of the interfaces present in the orthorhombic Spc-SH3 crystal structures. In order to understand the molecular interactions that are responsible for the very fast crystal growth of the wild-type (WT) Spc-SH3 crystals, the crystal structure of a triple mutant in which the residues Ser19-Pro20-Arg21 in the RT loop have been replaced by Gly19-Asp20-Ser21 (GDS Spc-SH3 mutant) has been solved. The removal of the critical proline residue results in slower nucleation of the Spc-SH3 crystals and a different arrangement of the protein molecules in the unit cell, leading to a crystal that belongs to the tetragonal space group P4(1)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 42.231, c = 93.655 A, and that diffracts to 1.45 A resolution. For both WT Spc-SH3 and the GDS mutant, light-scattering experiments showed that a dimer was formed in solution within a few minutes of the addition of 2 M ammonium sulfate at pH 6.5 and allowed the proposal of a mechanism for the nucleation and crystal growth of Spc-SH3 in which the Pro20 residue plays a key role in the rate of crystal growth. PMID:19966410

  3. Examples of Data Analysis with SPSS/PC+ Studentware.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacFarland, Thomas W.

    Intended for classroom use only, these unpublished notes contain computer lessons on descriptive statistics with files previously created in WordPerfect 4.2 and Lotus 1-2-3 Version 1.A for the IBM PC+. The statistical measures covered include Student's t-test with two independent samples; Student's t-test with a paired sample; Chi-square analysis;…

  4. Travelling Waves and Resonances: Pc3 Sources at High Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menk, F. W.; Howard, T. A.

    2009-12-01

    It is generally accepted that some of the main sources of coherent ULF waves at high (polar) latitudes are from either compressional waves entering the magnetosphere from the solar wind, or from boundary instabilities such as the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability or over-reflection modes. While these sources may couple energy to field line resonances in the Pc5 range, the origin of higher frequency Pc3 signals, which are frequently seen at the ground, is not clear. We performed a detailed study of the properties and propagation characteristics of Pc3-4 events seen at local daytime with high coherence across 56-76 deg magnetic latitude. Most of these events seem to originate from waves generated in the upstream solar wind but appeared to propagate across the ground poleward and westward. About 24-30% of the events are higher harmonics of field line resonances. The observations suggest the a mechanism involving mode coupling and field-guided propagation, in which fast mode waves in the Pc3-4 range entering near the subsolar point propagate Earthward along the Tamao minimum travel time path, and due to the inhomogeneity of the magnetosphere couple to the field-guided Alfven mode. At certain latitudes, standing oscillations are established at harmonics of the local resonant frequency, while at other latitudes travelling waves convey energy to low altitudes. The expected L dependence of wave power and travel time agree well with observed amplitude and phase profiles.

  5. A gPC-based approach to uncertain transonic aerodynamics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Simon; P. Guillen; P. Sagaut; D. Lucor

    2010-01-01

    The present paper focus on the stochastic response of a two-dimensional transonic airfoil to parametric uncertainties. Both the freestream Mach number and the angle of attack are considered as random parameters and the generalized Polynomial Chaos (gPC) theory is coupled with standard deterministic numerical simulations through a spectral collocation projection methodology. The results allow for a better understanding of the

  6. WiMAX integrated PC for emerging markets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Modali; P. Adiraju; A. Biswas

    2009-01-01

    India is making rapid progress in GDP growth resulting in the growth of numbers and income of the middle class. However, PC and broadband penetration are approximately 3% and 2% respectively. Desirability & affordability are becoming the most influencing consumption factors for the growing middle class. Bringing technology to large and upcoming middle class consumers requires localization efforts that define

  7. A PC based coherent sonar workstation for experimental underwater acoustics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Kraeutner; J. Bird

    1993-01-01

    Apart from water, the most important component in an experimental underwater acoustics program is a versatile sonar system for transmitting, receiving, and recording acoustic waveforms. At the Underwater Research Lab (URL) at Simon Fraser University a simple yet fully coherent sonar workstation has been developed by making use of ZBM compatible personal computer (PC) technology, commercially available digital signal processing

  8. What's Under Your PC's 'Hood': A Primer for Today's Machines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Li; Mills, Joyce White

    2002-01-01

    Explains how to decide what type of computer to buy for a small academic library, based on software requirements, staff and patron use, and PC technology. Topics include the central processing unit; types of memory; storage devices; ports; multimedia capabilities; modems; operating systems; and monitors. (LRW)

  9. Performance characteristics of the Cooper PC9 centrifugal compressor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. E. Foster; R. F. Neely

    1988-01-01

    Mathematical performance modeling of the PC-9 centrifugal compressor has been completed. Performance characteristics curves have never been obtained for them in test loops with the same degree of accuracy as for the uprated axial compressors and, consequently, computer modeling of the top cascade and purge cascades has been very difficult and of limited value. This compressor modeling work has been

  10. Tablet PC Technology for the Enhancement of Synchronous Distributed Education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elliot Moore II; Tristan T. Utschig; Kevin A. Haas; Benjamin Klein; P. D. Yoder; Ying Zhang; Monson H. Hayes

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we describe how tablet PCs are being used at Georgia Tech Savannah (GTS) to improve student learning in a distributed classroom environment. The Tablet PC is an attractive technology for use in synchronous distributed learning environments because of its mobility, and its ability to not only serve as an effective note taking device but also as a

  11. Distributed PC Based Routers: Bottleneck Analysis and Architecture Proposal

    E-print Network

    Distributed PC Based Routers: Bottleneck Analysis and Architecture Proposal A. J. Khan lIT Bombay R Abstract-Recent research in the different functional areas of modern routers have made proposals that can the advances made by researchers. We therefore examine the ability of a personal computer to act as a router

  12. Flexible Control of Parallelism in a Multiprocessor PC Router

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Benjie Chen; Robert Morris

    2001-01-01

    SMP Click is a software router that provides both flexibility and high performance on stock multiprocessor PC hardware. It achieves high performance using device, buffer, and queue management techniques optimized for multiprocessor rout- ing. It allows vendors or network administrators to configur e the router in a way that indicates parallelizable packet pro - cessing tasks, and adaptively load-balances those

  13. User Guide for Radiological Assessments PC Version 1.1

    E-print Network

    User Guide for Radiological Assessments PC Version 1.1 for the Food Standards Agency CEFAS Contract RB101 Environment Report RL6/04 #12;Environment Report RL 6/04 User Guide for Radiological for open coastlines, and the single compartment model for estuarine systems. ADO - to calculate the doses

  14. Mechanical shock testing and modeling of PC motherboards

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James Pitarresi; Brian Roggeman; Satish Chaparala; Phil Geng

    2004-01-01

    Due to a variety of manufacturing, environmental, shipping, and end-use conditions, personal computer (PC) motherboards and other circuit boards may be subjected to potentially damaging mechanical shock loads. As these loads can lead to product failure, an understanding of the response of circuit boards subjected to suddenly applied loads is necessary. A first step in this direction is to develop

  15. Audio Podcasting in a Tablet PC-Enhanced Biochemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyles, Heather; Robertson, Brian; Mangino, Michael; Cox, James R.

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the effects of making audio podcasts of all lectures in a large, basic biochemistry course promptly available to students. The audio podcasts complement a previously described approach in which a tablet PC is used to annotate PowerPoint slides with digital ink to produce electronic notes that can be archived. The fundamentals…

  16. tchen@engr.smu.edu Phishing to Steal Your PC,

    E-print Network

    Chen, Thomas M.

    Tom Chen SMU tchen@engr.smu.edu Phishing to Steal Your PC, Money, and Identity #12;TC/Londonmet/12-8-04 SMU Engineering p. 2 · What is Phishing? · Threats · Defenses (Research?) Outline #12;TC/Londonmet/12-8-04 SMU Engineering p. 3 What is Phishing? · A social engineering attack: - Email message (type of spam

  17. Falling PC Solitaire Cards: An Open-Inquiry Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Espada, Wilson J.

    2012-01-01

    Many of us have played the PC Solitaire game that comes as standard software in many computers. Although I am not a great player, occasionally I win a game or two. The game celebrates my accomplishment by pushing the cards forward, one at a time, falling gracefully in what appears to look like a parabolic path in a drag-free environment. One day,…

  18. The Tablet PC classroom: Erasing borders, stimulating activity, enhancing communication

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Judy Sneller

    2007-01-01

    In fall 2006, South Dakota School of Mines & Technology launched a mandatory Tablet PC program for incoming students. As I prepared to teach my first all- tablet class, my reaction was mixed. Although the idea was exciting, facing a sea of computers on each student desk meant leaving my comfort zone and testing new classroom methods. Would this new

  19. A Multithreaded Soft Processor for SoPC Area Reduction

    E-print Network

    Brown, Stephen Dean

    ,davor,zvonko,brown}@eecg.toronto.edu ABSTRACT The growth in size and performance of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) has compelled System-on-a- Programmable-Chip (SoPC) designers to use soft proces- sors for controlling systems with large numbers of intellec- tual property (IP) blocks. Soft processors control IP blocks, which are accessed by the processor

  20. Book Layout on the PC Instructions for Authors and Editors

    E-print Network

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    Book Layout on the PC Instructions for Authors and Editors Springer #12;#12;Dear Author, We want summarized for you (and/or your col- leagues) the most important rules for the layout of your book these instructions carefully. The organization, layout, and typography shown here exactly corresponds

  1. PC-CUBE: A personal computer based hypercube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Alex; Fox, Geoffrey; Walker, David; Snyder, Scott; Chang, Douglas; Chen, Stanley; Breaden, Matt; Cole, Terry

    1988-01-01

    PC-CUBE is an ensemble of IBM PCs or close compatibles connected in the hypercube topology with ordinary computer cables. Communication occurs at the rate of 115.2 K-band via the RS-232 serial links. Available for PC-CUBE is the Crystalline Operating System III (CrOS III), Mercury Operating System, CUBIX and PLOTIX which are parallel I/O and graphics libraries. A CrOS performance monitor was developed to facilitate the measurement of communication and computation time of a program and their effects on performance. Also available are CXLISP, a parallel version of the XLISP interpreter; GRAFIX, some graphics routines for the EGA and CGA; and a general execution profiler for determining execution time spent by program subroutines. PC-CUBE provides a programming environment similar to all hypercube systems running CrOS III, Mercury and CUBIX. In addition, every node (personal computer) has its own graphics display monitor and storage devices. These allow data to be displayed or stored at every processor, which has much instructional value and enables easier debugging of applications. Some application programs which are taken from the book Solving Problems on Concurrent Processors (Fox 88) were implemented with graphics enhancement on PC-CUBE. The applications range from solving the Mandelbrot set, Laplace equation, wave equation, long range force interaction, to WaTor, an ecological simulation.

  2. Deciding when It's Time to Buy a New PC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsborough, Reid

    2004-01-01

    How to best decide when it's time to replace your PC, whether at home or at work, is always tricky. Spending on computers can make you more productive, but it's money you otherwise cannot spend, invest or save, and faster systems always await you in the future. What is clear is that the computer industry really wants you to buy, and the computer…

  3. OAST Space Theme Workshop. Volume 3: Working group summary. 6: Power (P-2). A. Statement. B. Technology needs (form 1). C. Priority assessment (form 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Power requirements for the multipurpose space power platform, for space industrialization, SETI, the solar system exploration facility, and for global services are assessed for various launch dates. Priorities and initiatives for the development of elements of space power systems are described for systems using light power input (solar energy source) or thermal power input, (solar, chemical, nuclear, radioisotopes, reactors). Systems for power conversion, power processing, distribution and control are likewise examined.

  4. Combustion Group Group members

    E-print Network

    Wang, Wei

    Combustion Group Group members: Thierry Poinsot, Emilien Courtine, Luc Vervisch, Benjamin Farcy 2014 #12;Combustion Group Combustion Physics and Modeling Pollutants, Emissions, and Soot Formation Thermoacoustics and Combustion Dynamics Research focus § Examine mechanisms responsible for flame stabilization

  5. Effect of lysosomal and ubiquitin-proteasome system dysfunction on the abnormal aggregation of ?-synuclein in PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    WANG, RUNQING; ZHAO, JIE; ZHANG, JIEWEN; LIU, WEI; ZHAO, MEIYING; LI, JIANGTAO; LV, JUAN; LI, YANAN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of lysosomal and ubiquitin-proteasome system dysfunction on the abnormal aggregation of ?-synuclein, and to analyze its role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). PC12 cells subjected to nerve growth factor-induced differentiation were used as the cell model to study the dopaminergic neurons, and the lysosomal and proteasomal inhibitors trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido-(4-guanidino) butane (E64) and, respectively, were used exclusively and in combination to treat the PC12 cells. The viability and metabolic state of the cells was assessed using the MTT assay; flow cytometry was used to measure the rate of cell apoptosis; and the double immunofluorescence method was applied to observe the formation of thioflavin S- and ?-synuclein protein-positive aggregates and inclusion bodies in the PC12 cells. In addition, the Hoechst 33258 staining method was used to observe the apoptosis of the ?-synuclein protein and thioflavin-S double-labeled cells. Following the administration of the lysosomal and proteasomal pathway inhibitors, the cell viability decreased in a concentration-dependent manner and the cell apoptosis rate increased. The proportion of PC12 cells with ?-synuclein protein-positive aggregates and inclusion bodies in the E64 group was 7.94%, compared with 20.33 and 36.77% in the lactacystin and combination treatment groups, respectively. Statistical analysis indicated that the number of inclusion body-positive cells in the treatment groups was significantly higher than that in the control group (3.78%) (P<0.05). Apoptosis was evident in the double-positive cells with ?-synuclein protein-positive inclusion bodies (17.29±1.54%). In conclusion, lysosomal and proteasomal dysfunction may play an important role in the pathogenesis of PD through the induction of abnormal ?-synuclein protein aggregation in dopaminergic neurons.

  6. Preparation and characterization of PC\\/SBR heterogeneous cation exchange membrane filled with carbon nano-tubes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. M. Hosseini; S. S. Madaeni; A. R. Khodabakhshi

    2010-01-01

    Polycarbonate (PC)\\/styrene–butadiene–rubber (SBR) blend heterogeneous cation exchange membranes were prepared by solution casting technique using tetrahydrofuran as solvent and cation exchange resin powder as functional groups agent. Multi-walled carbon nano-tube (MWCNT) was selected as inorganic filler additive. The effect of additive loading on properties of prepared membranes was studied. Sonication was used to help in appropriate dispersion of particles in

  7. The comparison of CAP88-PC version 2.0 versus CAP88-PC version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Yakubovich, B.A.; Klee, K.O.; Palmer, C.R.; Spotts, P.B.

    1997-12-01

    40 CFR Part 61 (Subpart H of the NESHAP) requires DOE facilities to use approved sampling procedures, computer models, or other approved procedures when calculating Effective Dose Equivalent (EDE) values to members of the public. Currently version 1.0 of the approved computer model CAP88-PC is used to calculate EDE values. The DOE has upgraded the CAP88-PC software to version 2.0. This version provides simplified data entry, better printing characteristics, the use of a mouse, and other features. The DOE has developed and released version 2.0 for testing and comment. This new software is a WINDOWS based application that offers a new graphical user interface with new utilities for preparing and managing population and weather data, and several new decay chains. The program also allows the user to view results before printing. This document describes a test that confirmed CAP88-PC version 2.0 generates results comparable to the original version of the CAP88-PC program.

  8. Chromosomal assignment of the genes for proprotein convertases PC4, PC5, and PACE 4 in mouse and human

    SciTech Connect

    Mbikay, M.; Seidah, N.G.; Chretien, M. [Univ. of Montreal, Quebec (Canada)] [and others] [Univ. of Montreal, Quebec (Canada); and others

    1995-03-01

    The genes for three subtilisin/kexin-like proprotein convertases, PC4, PC5, and PACE4, were mapped in the mouse by RFLP analysis of a DNA panel from a (C57BL/6JEi x SPRET/Ei) F{sub 1} x SPRET/Ei backcross. The chromosomal locations of the human homologs were determined by Southern blot analysis of a DNA panel from human-rodent somatic cell hybrids, most of which contained a single human chromosome each. The gene for PC4 (Pcsk4 locus) mapped to mouse chromosome 10, close to the Adn (adipsin, a serine protease) locus and near the Amh (anti-Mullerian hormone) locus; in a human, the gene was localized to chromosome 19. The gene for PC5 (Pcsk5 locus) mapped to mouse chromosome 19 close to the Lpc1 (lipoacortin-1) locus and, in human, was localized to chromosome 9. The gene for PACE4 (Pcsk6 locus) mapped to mouse chromosome 7, at a distance of 13 cM from the Pcsk3 locus, which specifies furin, another member of this family of enzymes previoulsy mapped to this chromosome. This is in concordance with the known close proximity of these two loci in the homologous region on human chromosome 15q25-qter. Pcsk3 and Pcsk6 mapped to a region of mouse chromosome 7 that has been associated cytogenetically with postnatal lethality in maternal disomy, suggesting that these genes might be candidates for imprinting. 43 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Astaxanthin Suppresses MPP+-Induced Oxidative Damage in PC12 Cells through a Sp1/NR1 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qinyong; Zhang, Xiaodong; Huang, Bixia; Zhu, Yuangui; Chen, Xiaochun

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate astaxanthin (ATX) neuroprotection, and its mechanism, on a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridine ion (MPP+)-induced cell model of Parkinson’s disease. Methods: Mature, differentiated PC12 cells treated with MPP+ were used as an in vitro cell model. The MTT assay was used to investigate cell viability after ATX treatment, and western blot analysis was used to observe Sp1 (activated transcription factor 1) and NR1 (NMDA receptor subunit 1) protein expression, real-time PCR was used to monitor Sp1 and NR1 mRNA, and cell immunofluorescence was used to determine the location of Sp1 and NR1 protein and the nuclear translocation of Sp1. Results: PC12 cell viability was significantly reduced by MPP+ treatment. The expression of Sp1 and NR1 mRNA and protein were increased compared with the control (p < 0.01). Following co-treatment with ATX and MPP+, cell viability was significantly increased, and Sp1 and NR1 mRNA and protein were decreased, compared with the MPP+ groups (p < 0.01). In addition, mithracycin A protected PC12 cells from oxidative stress caused by MPP+ by specifically inhibiting the expression of Sp1. Moreover, cell immunofluorescence revealed that ATX could suppress Sp1 nuclear transfer. Conclusion: ATX inhibited oxidative stress induced by MPP+ in PC12 cells, via the SP1/NR1 signaling pathway. PMID:23538867

  10. Electrochemical evidence of intramolecular electronic communication in Zr and Hf phthalocyanines bearing ferrocene-containing ?-diketonato axial ligands: structure of [PcHf(FcCOCHCOC6H5)2].

    PubMed

    Buitendach, Blenerhassitt E; G?gor, Anna; Swarts, Jannie C

    2013-09-16

    The series of zirconium(IV) and hafnium(IV) phthalocyanine complexes [PcM(FcCOCHCOR)2] (Pc = phthalocyaninato; M = Zr; R = CF3 (1), CH3 (2), C6H5 (3), Fc ((C5H5)Fe(C5H4), 4), as well as M = Hf ; R = CF3 (5), CH3 (6), C6H5 (7), and Fc (8)) were synthesized. A single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of the structure of [PcHf(FcCOCHCOC6H5)2], 7 (Z = 2, space group P1), showed the two axial ?-diketonato ligands were orientated in such a way that the ferrocenyl groups were positioned diagonally opposite each other. From the structural determination of 7 it was clear that these complexes have a distorted D4h symmetry at the coordination site of the metal centers, which explains a splitting of the UV-vis Q band into Qx and Qy components with 3 ? ??(max,Q) ? 10 nm. Cyclic and square wave voltammetric studies in CH2Cl2/[N((n)Bu)4][B(C6F5)4] allowed observation of at least three phthalocyaninato macrocycle-based redox couples as well as all (i.e., two or four) well-resolved ferrocenyl couples in 1-8. For M = Zr and R = Fc, formal reduction potentials of the four ferrocenyl groups were found to be E°' = 296, 386, 538, and 687 mV versus free ferrocene. Spectroelectrochemical evidence, UV-vis Q-band maximum wavelengths, and HOMO-LUMO energy gaps as expressed by ?E°'I-III = ?E°'wave I - ?E°'wave III were mutually consistent, indicating that the first phthalocyaninato ring-based oxidation occurs before ferrocenyl oxidations take place. The potential for each redox process was found to be dependent on the sum of ?-diketonato R-group group electronegativities, ??R. Mathematical relationships for the dependency of E°' on ??R for all four observed ring-based redox processes as well as for the ferrocenyl-based redox processes were determined. This allowed prediction of potentials for redox processes that fall outside the workable potential window of the solvent. No significant differences were found between the corresponding redox potentials of zirconium and hafnium analogues bearing the same axial ligands. PMID:23971994

  11. Columbia returning to Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Space shuttle orbiter Columbia returns to the shuttle landing facility atop NASA 905, a modified 747, following a cross country flight from the Dryden Flight Research Facility. The Kennedy Space Center alternative photo number is 108-KSC-82PC-1328.

  12. METHANE de-NOX for Utility PC Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Bryan; Serguei Nester; Joseph Rabovitser; Stan Wohadlo

    2005-09-30

    The overall project objective is the development and validation of an innovative combustion system, based on a novel coal preheating concept prior to combustion, that can reduce NO{sub x} emissions to 0.15 lb/million Btu or less on utility pulverized coal (PC) boilers. This NO{sub x} reduction should be achieved without loss of boiler efficiency or operating stability, and at more than 25% lower levelized cost than state-of-the-art SCR technology. A further objective is to ready technology for full-scale commercial deployment to meet the market demand for NO{sub x} reduction technologies. Over half of the electric power generated in the U.S. is produced by coal combustion, and more than 80% of these units utilize PC combustion technology. Conventional measures for NOx reduction in PC combustion processes rely on combustion and post-combustion modifications. A variety of combustion-based NO{sub x} reduction technologies are in use today, including low-NO{sub x} burners (LNBs), flue gas recirculation (FGR), air staging, and natural gas or other fuel reburning. Selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) are post-combustion techniques. NO{sub x} reduction effectiveness from these technologies ranges from 30 to 60% and up to 90-93% for SCR. Typically, older wall-fired PC burner units produce NO{sub x} emissions in the range of 0.8-1.6 lb/million Btu. Low-NO{sub x} burner systems, using combinations of fuel staging within the burner and air staging by introduction of overfire air in the boiler, can reduce NO{sub x} emissions by 50-60%. This approach alone is not sufficient to meet the desired 0.15 lb/million Btu NO{sub x} standard with a range of coals and boiler loads. Furthermore, the heavy reliance on overfire air can lead to increased slagging and corrosion in furnaces, particularly with higher-sulfur coals, when LNBs are operated at sub-stoichiometric conditions to reduce fuel-derived NOx in the flame. Therefore, it is desirable to minimize the need for overfire air by maximizing NO{sub x} reduction in the burner. The proposed combustion concept aims to greatly reduce NO{sub x} emissions by incorporating a novel modification to conventional or low-NO{sub x} PC burners using gas-fired coal preheating to destroy NO{sub x} precursors and prevent NO{sub x} formation. A concentrated PC stream enters the burner, where flue gas from natural gas combustion is used to heat the PC up to about 1500 F prior to coal combustion. Secondary fuel consumption for preheating is estimated to be 3 to 5% of the boiler heat input. This thermal pretreatment releases coal volatiles, including fuel-bound nitrogen compounds into oxygen-deficient atmosphere, which converts the coal-derived nitrogen compounds to molecular N{sub 2} rather than NO. Design, installation, shakedown, and testing on Powder River Basin (PRB) coal at a 3-million Btu/h pilot system at RPI's (Riley Power, Inc.) pilot-scale combustion facility (PSCF) in Worcester, MA demonstrated that the PC PREHEAT process has a significant effect on final O{sub x} formation in the coal burner. Modifications to both the pilot system gas-fired combustor and the PC burner led to NO{sub x} reduction with PRB coal to levels below 0.15 lb/million Btu with CO in the range of 35-112 ppmv without any furnace air staging.

  13. CARES/PC - CERAMICS ANALYSIS AND RELIABILITY EVALUATION OF STRUCTURES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szatmary, S. A.

    1994-01-01

    The beneficial properties of structural ceramics include their high-temperature strength, light weight, hardness, and corrosion and oxidation resistance. For advanced heat engines, ceramics have demonstrated functional abilities at temperatures well beyond the operational limits of metals. This is offset by the fact that ceramic materials tend to be brittle. When a load is applied, their lack of significant plastic deformation causes the material to crack at microscopic flaws, destroying the component. CARES/PC performs statistical analysis of data obtained from the fracture of simple, uniaxial tensile or flexural specimens and estimates the Weibull and Batdorf material parameters from this data. CARES/PC is a subset of the program CARES (COSMIC program number LEW-15168) which calculates the fast-fracture reliability or failure probability of ceramic components utilizing the Batdorf and Weibull models to describe the effects of multi-axial stress states on material strength. CARES additionally requires that the ceramic structure be modeled by a finite element program such as MSC/NASTRAN or ANSYS. The more limited CARES/PC does not perform fast-fracture reliability estimation of components. CARES/PC estimates ceramic material properties from uniaxial tensile or from three- and four-point bend bar data. In general, the parameters are obtained from the fracture stresses of many specimens (30 or more are recommended) whose geometry and loading configurations are held constant. Parameter estimation can be performed for single or multiple failure modes by using the least-squares analysis or the maximum likelihood method. Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Anderson-Darling goodness-of-fit tests measure the accuracy of the hypothesis that the fracture data comes from a population with a distribution specified by the estimated Weibull parameters. Ninety-percent confidence intervals on the Weibull parameters and the unbiased value of the shape parameter for complete samples are provided when the maximum likelihood technique is used. CARES/PC is written and compiled with the Microsoft FORTRAN v5.0 compiler using the VAX FORTRAN extensions and dynamic array allocation supported by this compiler for the IBM/MS-DOS or OS/2 operating systems. The dynamic array allocation routines allow the user to match the number of fracture sets and test specimens to the memory available. Machine requirements include IBM PC compatibles with optional math coprocessor. Program output is designed to fit 80-column format printers. Executables for both DOS and OS/2 are provided. CARES/PC is distributed on one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette in compressed format. The expansion tool PKUNZIP.EXE is supplied on the diskette. CARES/PC was developed in 1990. IBM PC and OS/2 are trademarks of International Business Machines. MS-DOS and MS OS/2 are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. VAX is a trademark of Digital Equipment Corporation.

  14. The Carina-Near Moving Group

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Zuckerman; M. S. Bessell; Inseok Song; S. Kim

    2006-01-01

    We identify a group of ~20 comoving, mostly southern hemisphere, ~200 Myr old stars near Earth. Of the stars likely to be members of this Carina-Near moving group, in either its nucleus (~30 pc from Earth) or its surrounding stream, all but three are plausible members of a multiple star system. The nucleus is (coincidentally) located quite close to the

  15. METHANE de-NOX for Utility PC Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Rabovitser; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo

    2005-09-30

    Large-scale combustion tests with caking bituminous coal has stopped. This stoppage has come about due to limitations in current funding available to continue large scale research and development activities at Riley Power's Commercial Burner Test Facility (CBTF) of the PC Preheat technology. The CBTF was secured and decommissioned in the previous quarter; work this quarter work completed the securing the proper disposition of all PC Preheat experimental equipment at the PSCF and CBTF and completing negotiations with AES Westover (a power plant in Johnson City, New York) to accept 130 tons of residual PRB test coal in storage. The coal transport to Westover occurred at the end of August. GTI was granted a no-cost time extension through September 2005; immediate efforts are focused on completing a draft final report, which is due in October 31, 2005 and the final report in December.

  16. Local Group(s)

    E-print Network

    Eva K. Grebel

    2006-05-22

    The properties of the galaxies of the Local Group are reviewed, followed by a brief discussion of nearby groups. The galaxy groups in our vicinity - the M81 group, the Cen A group, and the IC 342/Maffei group - are in many respects Local Group analogs: Their luminosity functions, galaxy content, fractional galaxy type distribution, crossing times, masses, and zero-velocity surface radii are similar to those of the Local Group. Also, the nearby groups usually consist of two subgroups, some of which approach each other and may ultimately merge to form a fossil group. These poor groups contrast with the less evolved, loose and extended galaxy ``clouds'' such as the Scl group and the CVn I cloud. These are characterized by long crossing times, are dominated by gas-rich, late-type galaxies, and lack gas-deficient, low luminosity early-type dwarfs. These clouds may be groups still in formation. The local Hubble flow derived from the clouds and groups is very cold.

  17. Polycomb Group Proteins Set the Stage for Early Lineage Commitment

    E-print Network

    Surface, Lauren Elizabeth

    Precise control of gene expression patterns is critical for the specification of cellular diversity during metazoan development. Polycomb group (PcG) proteins comprise a class of transcriptional modifiers that have dynamic ...

  18. The Photodynamic Antibacterial Effects of Silicon Phthalocyanine (Pc) 4

    PubMed Central

    Dimaano, Matthew L.; Rozario, Chantal; Nerandzic, Michelle M.; Donskey, Curtis J.; Lam, Minh; Baron, Elma D.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains in facultative anaerobic Gram-positive coccal bacteria, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), is a global health issue. Typically, MRSA strains are found associated with institutions like hospitals but recent data suggest that they are becoming more prevalent in community-acquired infections. It is thought that the incidence and prevalence of bacterial infections will continue to increase as (a) more frequent use of broad-spectrum antibiotics and immunosuppressive medications; (b) increased number of invasive medical procedures; and (c) higher incidence of neutropenia and HIV infections. Therefore, more optimal treatments, such as photodynamic therapy (PDT), are warranted. PDT requires the interaction of light, a photosensitizing agent, and molecular oxygen to induce cytotoxic effects. In this study, we investigated the efficacy and characterized the mechanism of cytotoxicity induced by photodynamic therapy sensitized by silicon phthalocyanine (Pc) 4 on (a) methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) (ATCC 25923); (b) community acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) (ATCC 43300); and (c) hospital acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA) (PFGE type 300). Our data include confocal image analysis, which confirmed that Pc 4 is taken up by all S. aureus strains, and viable cell recovery assay, which showed that concentrations as low as 1.0 ?M Pc 4 incubated for 3 h at 37 °C followed by light at 2.0 J/cm2 can reduce cell survival by 2–5 logs. These results are encouraging, but before PDT can be utilized as an alternative treatment for eradicating resistant strains, we must first characterize the mechanism of cell death that Pc 4-based PDT employs in eliminating these pathogens. PMID:25856680

  19. The photodynamic antibacterial effects of silicon phthalocyanine (Pc) 4.

    PubMed

    Dimaano, Matthew L; Rozario, Chantal; Nerandzic, Michelle M; Donskey, Curtis J; Lam, Minh; Baron, Elma D

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains in facultative anaerobic Gram-positive coccal bacteria, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), is a global health issue. Typically, MRSA strains are found associated with institutions like hospitals but recent data suggest that they are becoming more prevalent in community-acquired infections. It is thought that the incidence and prevalence of bacterial infections will continue to increase as (a) more frequent use of broad-spectrum antibiotics and immunosuppressive medications; (b) increased number of invasive medical procedures; and (c) higher incidence of neutropenia and HIV infections. Therefore, more optimal treatments, such as photodynamic therapy (PDT), are warranted. PDT requires the interaction of light, a photosensitizing agent, and molecular oxygen to induce cytotoxic effects. In this study, we investigated the efficacy and characterized the mechanism of cytotoxicity induced by photodynamic therapy sensitized by silicon phthalocyanine (Pc) 4 on (a) methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) (ATCC 25923); (b) community acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) (ATCC 43300); and (c) hospital acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA) (PFGE type 300). Our data include confocal image analysis, which confirmed that Pc 4 is taken up by all S. aureus strains, and viable cell recovery assay, which showed that concentrations as low as 1.0 ?M Pc 4 incubated for 3 h at 37 °C followed by light at 2.0 J/cm2 can reduce cell survival by 2-5 logs. These results are encouraging, but before PDT can be utilized as an alternative treatment for eradicating resistant strains, we must first characterize the mechanism of cell death that Pc 4-based PDT employs in eliminating these pathogens. PMID:25856680

  20. Fast vesicle transport in PC12 neurites: velocities and forces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. B. Hill; M. J. Plaza; K. Bonin; G. Holzwarth

    2004-01-01

    Although the mechanical behavior of single-motor protein molecules such as kinesin has been carefully studied in buffer, the mechanical behavior of motor-driven vesicles in cells is much less understood. We have tracked single vesicles in neurites of PC12 cells with a spatial precision of ±30 nm and a time resolution of 120 ms. Because the neurites are thin, long, straight, and attached

  1. PC-Based Interface Circuit For Communication Of Telemetric Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flatley, Thomas P.

    1993-01-01

    PCIO card in input/output interface-circuit card enabling computer based on ISA bus to transmit and receive high-speed, synchronous serial data and clock signals. Designed specifically to plug into IBM PC-AT or compatible computer and to handle input and output of data in packet formats like those of telemetric data streams used throughout NASA and aerospace industry. Reduces amount of auxiliary equipment needed.

  2. PC-Based IO Controllers from a VME Perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. O. Hill

    The Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) has been widely adopted in the accelerator community. Although EPICS is available on many platforms, the majority of sites have deployed VME- or VXI-based input output controllers running the vxWorks real time operating system. Recently, a hybrid approach using vxWorks on both PC and traditional platforms is being implemented at LANL. To

  3. Endoplasmic oleoyl-PC desaturase references the second double bond

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer L Schwartzbeck; Sook Jung; Albert G Abbott; Erin Mosley; Shahed Lewis; Gina L Pries; Gary L Powell

    2001-01-01

    The regiospecificity for the gene product of fad2,11We will employ the convention of using fad2 for the gene and oleoyl-PC desaturase or FAD2 for the gene product. This permits us to avoid describing the enzyme as a ?12 desaturase, or an ?-6 desaturase. The latter designations involve an assertion about the substrate specificity no longer tenable based on this work.

  4. Bioequivalence of over-the-counter (OTC) progesterone cream (PC)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. C. Hermann; A. N. Nafziger; J. Victory; M. L. Rocci; R. Kulawy; J. S. Bertino

    2004-01-01

    Progesterone cream is an OTC (non-prescription) product that contains USP Progesterone (P). The exposure (E) of progesterone cream (PC) was compared to an FDA approved oral micronized form of P. Twelve healthy postmenopausal (as determined by elevated FSH and menstrual cycle history) Caucasian females, mean age of 54.6+7.0 yr and mean weight of 77.2+16.6 kg were enrolled. The trial consisted

  5. 36 CFR 1280.74 - What spaces in the National Archives Building are available for use by non-NARA groups and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... false What spaces in the National Archives Building are available for use by non-NARA...Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NARA FACILITIES...the Washington, DC, Area? National Archives Building, Washington, Dc §...

  6. 36 CFR 1280.74 - What spaces in the National Archives Building are available for use by non-NARA groups and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... false What spaces in the National Archives Building are available for use by non-NARA...Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NARA FACILITIES...the Washington, DC, Area? National Archives Building, Washington, Dc §...

  7. 36 CFR 1280.85 - What space in the National Archives at College Park is available for use by non-NARA groups and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... false What space in the National Archives at College Park is available for use...Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NARA FACILITIES...the Washington, DC, Area? National Archives at College Park, Md § 1280.85...

  8. 36 CFR 1280.74 - What spaces in the National Archives Building are available for use by non-NARA groups and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... false What spaces in the National Archives Building are available for use by non-NARA...Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NARA FACILITIES...the Washington, DC, Area? National Archives Building, Washington, Dc §...

  9. 36 CFR 1280.85 - What space in the National Archives at College Park is available for use by non-NARA groups and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... false What space in the National Archives at College Park is available for use...Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NARA FACILITIES...the Washington, DC, Area? National Archives at College Park, Md § 1280.85...

  10. 36 CFR 1280.74 - What spaces in the National Archives Building are available for use by non-NARA groups and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... false What spaces in the National Archives Building are available for use by non-NARA...Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NARA FACILITIES...the Washington, DC, Area? National Archives Building, Washington, Dc §...

  11. 36 CFR 1280.85 - What space in the National Archives at College Park is available for use by non-NARA groups and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... false What space in the National Archives at College Park is available for use...Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NARA FACILITIES...the Washington, DC, Area? National Archives at College Park, Md § 1280.85...

  12. 36 CFR 1280.85 - What space in the National Archives at College Park is available for use by non-NARA groups and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... false What space in the National Archives at College Park is available for use...Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NARA FACILITIES...the Washington, DC, Area? National Archives at College Park, Md § 1280.85...

  13. 36 CFR 1280.74 - What spaces in the National Archives Building are available for use by non-NARA groups and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... true What spaces in the National Archives Building are available for use by non-NARA...Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NARA FACILITIES...the Washington, DC, Area? National Archives Building, Washington, Dc §...

  14. LysoPC acyltransferase/PC transacylase activities in plant plasma membrane and plasma membrane-associated endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Karin E; Kjellberg, J Magnus; Tjellström, Henrik; Sandelius, Anna Stina

    2007-01-01

    Background The phospholipids of the plant plasma membrane are synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The majority of these lipids reach the plasma membrane independently of the secretory vesicular pathway. Phospholipid delivery to the mitochondria and chloroplasts of plant cells also bypasses the secretory pathway and here it has been proposed that lysophospholipids are transported at contact sites between specific regions of the ER and the respective organelle, followed by lysophospholipid acylation in the target organelle. To test the hypothesis that a corresponding mechanism operates to transport phospholipids to the plasma membrane outside the secretory pathway, we investigated whether lysolipid acylation occurs also in the plant plasma membrane and whether this membrane, like the chloroplasts and mitochondria, is in close contact with the ER. Results The plant plasma membrane readily incorporated the acyl chain of acyl-CoA into phospholipids. Oleic acid was preferred over palmitic acid as substrate and acyl incorporation occurred predominantly into phosphatidylcholine (PC). Phospholipase A2 stimulated the reaction, as did exogenous lysoPC when administered in above critical micellar concentrations. AgNO3 was inhibitory. The lysophospholipid acylation reaction was higher in a membrane fraction that could be washed off the isolated plasma membranes after repeated freezing and thawing cycles in a medium with lowered pH. This fraction exhibited several ER-like characteristics. When plasma membranes isolated from transgenic Arabidopsis expressing green fluorescent protein in the ER lumen were observed by confocal microscopy, membranes of ER origin were associated with the isolated plasma membranes. Conclusion We conclude that a lysoPC acylation activity is associated with plant plasma membranes and cannot exclude a PC transacylase activity. It is highly plausible that the enzyme(s) resides in a fraction of the ER, closely associated with the plasma membrane, or in both. We suggest that this fraction might be the equivalent of the mitochondria associated membrane of ER origin that delivers phospholipids to the mitochondria, and to the recently isolated ER-derived membrane fraction that is in close contact with chloroplasts. The in situ function of the lysoPC acylation/PC transacylase activity is unknown, but involvement in lipid delivery from the ER to the plasma membrane is suggested. PMID:18045483

  15. Tablet PC interaction with digital micromirror device (DMD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refai, Hakki H.; Dahshan, Mostafa H.; Sluss, James J., Jr.

    2007-02-01

    Digital light processing (DLP) is an innovative display technology that uses an optical switch array, known as a digital micromirror device (DMD), which allows digital control of light. To date, DMDs have been used primarily as high-speed spatial light modulators for projector applications. A tablet PC is a notebook or slate-shaped mobile PC. Its touch screen or digitizing tablet technology allows the user to operate the notebook with a stylus or digital pen instead of using a keyboard or mouse. In this paper, we describe an interface solution that translates any sketch on the tablet PC screen to an identical mirror-copy over the cross-section of the DMD micromirrors such that the image of the sketch can be projected onto a special screen. An algorithm has been created to control each single micromirror of the hundreds of thousands of micromirrors that cover the DMD surface. We demonstrate the successful application of a DMD to a high-speed two-dimensional (2D) scanning environment, acquiring the data from the tablet screen and launching its contents to the projection screen; with very high accuracy up to 13.68 ?m x 13.68 ?m of mirror pitch.

  16. Combustion Group Group members

    E-print Network

    Wang, Wei

    Combustion Group Group members: Thierry Poinsot, Emilien Courtine, Luc Vervisch, Benjamin Farcy § New combustion and energy-conversion concepts #12;Introduction Combustion research thrusts Combustion Dynamics and Flame-Stabilization Research objectives § Obtain fundamental understanding of combustion

  17. [Functional disorders of vision and their prophylaxis in professionals using PC].

    PubMed

    Bol'shakova, V A

    2004-01-01

    With ophthalmologic examination of professionals using PC, the author specified functional disorders of vision. A syndrome diagnosed could be assigned to asthenopia. Complex of preventive measures could decrease frequency of asthenopic signs among PC operators and managing staffers. PMID:15581088

  18. CD151 promotes proliferation and migration of PC3 cells via the formation of CD151-integrin ?3/?6 complex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wuxiao; Li, Pengcheng; Lin, Jingyang; Zuo, Houjuan; Zuo, Ping; Zou, Yuanlin; Liu, Zhengxiang

    2012-06-01

    Over-expression of CD151 was found to be associated with metastasis and poor prognosis of prostatic carcinoma. This study was designed to examine the mechanism by which CD151 promotes the proliferation and migration of prostatic cancer cells. The pAAV-CD151, pAAV-GFP and pAAV-CD151-AAA mutant plasmids were constructed and used to transiently transfect PC3 cells (a prostatic carcinoma 3 cell line) by the mediation of Fugene HD. Then, the cells were assigned to control group, pAAV-GFP group, pAAV-CD151 group, and pAAV-CD151-AAA group respectively. Cell proliferation was evaluated by using the 3-[4,5-dimet-hylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5, diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) method. Cell migration assay was performed by using Boyden chambers. The formation of CD151-integrin ?3/?6 complex was determined by the method of co-immunoprecipitation. The protein expression levels of CD151 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) were measured by Western blotting. The results showed that transfection of pAAV-CD151 or pAAV-CD151-AAA mutant increased the expression of CD151 protein in PC3 cells. Co-immunoprecipitation showed that more CD151-integrin ?3/?6 complex was formed in the pAAV-CD151 group than in the control group, the pAAV-GFP group and the pAAV-CD151-AAA mutant group. Furthermore, the proliferative and migrating capacity of PC3 cells was substantially increased in the pAAV-CD151 group but inhibited in the pAAV-CD151-AAA mutant group. CD151 transfection increased the expression of phospho-ERK. Taken together, it was concluded that CD151 promotes the proliferation and migration of PC3 cells through the formation of CD151-integrin complex and the activation of phosphorylated ERK. PMID:22684562

  19. Listen to Me: Four Web-Based CSCL Students' Perspectives and Experiences in Group Collaboration and Knowledge Construction in Cyber Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, C. Y. Janey

    The main purpose of this Naturalistic inquiry study is to explore four ethically diverse Web-based Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) students' perceptions of and experiences in knowledge construction and group collaboration. Findings suggest that individual and group successes are interconnected and rely on successful negotiation…

  20. Effects of composition and transesterification catalysts on the physico-chemical and dynamic properties of PC\\/PET blends rich in PC

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Al-Jabareen; S. Illescas; M. L. I. Maspoch; O. O. Santana

    2010-01-01

    Melt blending of polycarbonate (PC)\\/poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) rich in PC at absence\\/present of different type of\\u000a tranesterification catalysts was carried out by using reactive extrusion method. The thermal, dynamic, and morphological properties\\u000a were studied. It was found that all blends are formed by a PC matrix and a semicrystalline (12–20% of crystallinity) of PET\\u000a dispersed phase. The addition of a

  1. Recent Developments on PC+PLC based Control Systems for Beer Brewery Process Automation Applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Ogawa; Y. Henmi

    2006-01-01

    Manufacturers are continuing to do their best efforts for cost effective production systems in order to contribute consumers' requirement. Such environment carries plant operations using quite flexible control systems such as PC (personal computer) - PLC (programmable logic controller) combination control systems called PC+PLC based control system. However, almost PC+PLC based control systems has been applied for small to medium

  2. Integrating a Single Tablet PC in Chemistry, Engineering, and Physics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, James W.; Cox, James R.

    2008-01-01

    A tablet PC is a versatile computer that combines the computing power of a notebook with the pen functionality of a PDA (Cox and Rogers 2005b). The authors adopted tablet PC technology in order to improve the process and product of the lecture format in their chemistry, engineering, and physics courses. In this high-tech model, a single tablet PC

  3. An impedimetric biosensor based on PC 12 cells for the monitoring of exogenous agents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gymama E. Slaughter; Rosalyn Hobson

    2009-01-01

    The effect of exogenous agents on the complex impedance of PC 12 cells that were cultured to confluency on 250-?m gold microdot electrodes fabricated within 8-well cell culture biochips was studied. Surface attachment of PC 12 cells to gold microelectrodes was accomplished using cysteamine SAMs covalently derivatized with laminin. The impedimetric response of PC 12 cells that undergo calcium exocytosis

  4. OAST Space Theme Workshop. Volume 3: Working group summary. 2: Data handling, communications (E-2). A. Statement. B. Technology needs (form 1). C. Priority assessment (form 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Technologies required to support the stated OAST thrust to increase information return by X1000, while reducing costs by a factor of 10 are identified. The most significant driver is the need for an overall end-to-end data system management technology. Maximum use of LSI component technology and trade-offs between hardware and software are manifest in most all considerations of technology needs. By far, the greatest need for data handling technology was identified for the space Exploration and Global Services themes. Major advances are needed in NASA's ability to provide cost effective mass reduction of space data, and automated assessment of earth looking imagery, with a concomitant reduction in cost per useful bit. A combined approach embodying end-to-end system analysis, with onboard data set selection, onboard data processing, highly parallel image processing (both ground and space), low cost, high capacity memories, and low cost user data distribution systems would be necessary.

  5. Benefits Stemming from Space Exploration

    E-print Network

    Waliser, Duane E.

    Benefits Stemming from Space Exploration September 2013 International Space Exploration Coordination Group #12; This page is intentionally left blank #12;ISECG ­ Benefits Stemming from Space Exploration Table of Content Executive Summary

  6. NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION

    E-print Network

    Christian, Eric

    NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION 1 NASA Earth Science Data Systems Software Reuse #12;NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION ESDS Reuse Working Group 2 Award Background: http://www.esdswg.com/softwarereuse/Resources/awards/ #12;NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION

  7. Space smarts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, Frank

    1991-02-01

    A review is presented of design and development work in space data processors at the Honeywell Space Systems Group in Florida. Space computers, some hardened for the first time against radiation from both man-made nuclear events and the natural space environment, are described. A specific illustration of this is the Space Shuttle main engine control which monitors some 120 engine parameters 50 times per second and operates the actuators that control the liquid-fueled engine through its eight minute burn. It is further pointed out that Space Station processors will be tied together by three different data buses, each with its own protocol, while the backbone of the data management system will be an optical fiber distributed data interface handling up to 100 Mbits/sec. Radiation hardening without heavy shielding can be accomplished in several ways, i.e., at the materials level, by insulating substrates which can limit the photo-currents generated by a nuclear event, and at the topological level, by spacing transistors so that photocurrents cannot concentrate at any particular node.

  8. Abelian groups 

    E-print Network

    Bolen, James Cordell

    1956-01-01

    groups. In order to d. o this, we will need the aid. of some vector space theorys D~ef ~tp 4s10 A vector ~sac 7 over the field. P is an abelian group which admits mult1plicatlon by elements of t' he field. such that, for a, b e P and. x, y s V& (l) a(x... (antisymmetry), (c) x & y, y & z implies that x & z (transitivity). Let S be a partially ordered set and T a subset. Defin1tion 4s2 The element x is an ~u er bound. of T if x & y for every y in T. The element x may or may not be in T. Definition 4...

  9. OAST Space Theme Workshop. Volume 3: Working group summary. 9: Aerothermodynamics (M-3). A: Statement. B: Technology needs (form 1). C. Priority assessment (form 2). D. Additional assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Twelve aerothermodynamic space technology needs were identified to reduce the design uncertainties in aerodynamic heating and forces experienced by heavy lift launch vehicles, orbit transfer vehicles, and advanced single stage to orbit vehicles for the space transportation system, and for probes, planetary surface landers, and sample return vehicles for solar system exploration vehicles. Research and technology needs identified include: (1) increasing the fluid dynamics capability by at least two orders of magnitude by developing an advanced computer processor for the solution of fluid dynamic problems with improved software; (2) predicting multi-engine base flow fields for launch vehicles; and (3) developing methods to conserve energy in aerothermodynamic ground test facilities.

  10. OAST Space Theme Workshop. Volume 3: Working group summary. 7: Material (M-1). A. Statement. B. Technology needs (form 1). C. Priority assessment (form 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The approach of matching technology areas with various themes needs was not effective for the materials and thermal control discipline because of the diversity of requirements for each. Top priorities were evolved from the advanced space transportation system and the space power platform because these are essential building blocks in fulfilling some of the other themes. Important needs identified include life long-life cryogenic cooling systems for sensors, masers, and other devices and the needs for lightweight nuclear shielding materials for nuclear electric propulsion.

  11. Minocycline attenuates both OGD-induced HMGB1 release and HMGB1-induced cell death in ischemic neuronal injury in PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, Kiyoshi [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan) [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Department of Neurosurgery, Omuta City General Hospital, 2-19-1 Takarazaka, Omuta-City, Fukuoka 836-8567 (Japan); Kawahara, Ko-ichi; Biswas, Kamal Krishna; Ito, Takashi [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan)] [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Tancharoen, Salunya [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Dentistry, Mahidol University, 6 Yothe Rd., Rajthevee Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)] [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Dentistry, Mahidol University, 6 Yothe Rd., Rajthevee Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Morimoto, Yoko [Department of Periodontology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)] [Department of Periodontology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Matsuda, Fumiyo [Division of Physical Therapy, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8560 (Japan)] [Division of Physical Therapy, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8560 (Japan); Oyama, Yoko; Takenouchi, Kazunori [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan)] [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Miura, Naoki [Laboratory of Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Arimura, Noboru; Nawa, Yuko; Meng, Xiaojie; Shrestha, Binita; Arimura, Shinichiro [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan)] [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); and others

    2009-07-24

    High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), a non-histone DNA-binding protein, is massively released into the extracellular space from neuronal cells after ischemic insult and exacerbates brain tissue damage in rats. Minocycline is a semisynthetic second-generation tetracycline antibiotic which has recently been shown to be a promising neuroprotective agent. In this study, we found that minocycline inhibited HMGB1 release in oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-treated PC12 cells and triggered the activation of p38mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2). The ERK kinase (MEK)1/2 inhibitor U-0126 and p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580 blocked HMGB1 release in response to OGD. Furthermore, HMGB1 triggered cell death in a dose-dependent fashion. Minocycline significantly rescued HMGB1-induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. In light of recent observations as well as the good safety profile of minocycline in humans, we propose that minocycline might play a potent neuroprotective role through the inhibition of HMGB1-induced neuronal cell death in cerebral infarction.

  12. Molecular species of PC and PE formed during castor oil biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiann-Tsyh; Chen, Jennifer M; Chen, Pei; Liao, Lucy P; McKeon, Thomas A

    2002-10-01

    As part of a program to elucidate castor oil biosynthesis, we have identified 36 molecular species of PC and 35 molecular species of PE isolated from castor microsomes after incubations with [14C]-labeled FA. The six [14C]FA studied were ricinoleate, stearate, oleate, linoleate, linolenate, and palmitate, which were the only FA identified in castor microsomal incubations. The incorporation of each of the six FA into PC was better than that into PE. The [14C]FA were incorporated almost exclusively into the sn-2 position of both PC and PE. The incorporation of [14C]stearate and [14C]palmitate into 2-acyl-PC was slower compared to the other four [14C]FA. The incorporation does not show any selectivity for the various lysoPC molecular species. The level of incorporation of [14C]FA in PC was in the order of: oleate > linolenate > palmitate > linoleate > stearate > ricinoleate, and in PE: linoleate > linolenate > oleate > palmitate > stearate > ricinoleate. In general, at the sn-1 position of both PC and PE, linoleate was the most abundant FA, palmitate was the next, and oleate, linolenate, stearate, and ricinoleate were minor FA. The activities of oleoyl-12-hydroxylase, oleoyl-12-desaturase seem unaffected by the FA at the sn-1 position of 2-oleoyl-PC. The FA in the sn-1 position of PC does not significantly affect the activity of phospholipase A2, whereas ricinoleate is preferentially removed from the sn-2 position of PC. The results show that (i) [14C]oleate is most actively incorporated to form 2-oleoyl-PC, the immediate substrate of oleoyl-12-hydroxylase; (ii) 2-ricinoleoyl-PC is formed mostly by the hydroxylation of 2-oleoyl-PC, not from the incorporation of ricinoleate into 2-ricinoleoyl-PC; and (iii) 2-oleoyl-PE is less actively formed than 2-oleoyl-PC. PMID:12530559

  13. Conformal Carroll groups

    E-print Network

    C. Duval; G. W. Gibbons; P. A. Horvathy

    2014-07-02

    Conformal extensions of Levy-Leblond's Carroll group, based on geometric properties analogous to those of Newton-Cartan space-time are proposed. The extensions are labelled by an integer $k$. This framework includes and extends our recent study of the Bondi-Metzner-Sachs (BMS) and Newman-Unti (NU) groups. The relation to Conformal Galilei groups is clarified. Conformal Carroll symmetry is illustrated by "Carrollian photons". Motion both in the Newton-Cartan and Carroll spaces may be related to that of strings in the Bargmann space.

  14. Conformal Carroll groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duval, C.; Gibbons, G. W.; Horvathy, P. A.

    2014-08-01

    Conformal extensions of Lévy-Leblond's Carroll group, based on geometric properties analogous to those of Newton-Cartan space-time are proposed. The extensions are labeled by an integer k. This framework includes and extends our recent study of the Bondi-Metzner-Sachs (BMS) and Newman-Unti (NU) groups. The relation to conformal Galilei groups is clarified. Conformal Carroll symmetry is illustrated by ‘Carrollian photons’. Motion both in the Newton-Cartan and Carroll spaces may be related to that of strings in the Bargmann space.

  15. 36 CFR 1280.85 - What space in the National Archives at College Park is available for use by non-NARA groups and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 true What space in the National Archives at College Park is available for use...Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NARA FACILITIES...the Washington, DC, Area? National Archives at College Park, Md § 1280.85...

  16. Ionospheric signatures of cusp latitude Pc 3 pulsations

    SciTech Connect

    Engebretson, M.J.; Anderson, B.J. (Augsburg Coll., Minneapolis, MN (United States)); Cahill, L.J. Jr. (Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States)); Arnoldy, R.L. (Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham (United States)); Rosenberg, T.J. (Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States)); Carpenter, D.L. (Stanford Univ., Palo Alto, CA (United States)); Gail, W.B. (Aerospace Corp., Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Eather, R.H. (Boston Coll., Chestnut Hill, MA (United States))

    1990-03-01

    The authors have compared search coil magnetometer, riometer, photometer, and ELF-VLF receiver data obtained at South Pole Station and McMurdo, Antarctica, during selected days in March and April 1986. Narrow-band magnetic pulsations in the Pc 3 period range are observed simultaneously at both stations in the dayside sector during times of low interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) cone angle, but are considerably stronger at South Pole, which is located at a latitude near the nominal foot point of the daysie cusp/cleft region. Pulsations in auroral light a 427.8 nm wavelength are often observed with magnetic pulsations at South Pole, but such optical pulsations are not observed at McMurdo. When Pc 3 pulsations are present, they exhibit nearly identical frequencies, proportional to the magnitude of the IMF, in magnetometer, photometer, and ELF-VLF receiver signals at South Pole Station and in magnetometer signals at McMurdo. Singals from the 30-MHz riometer at South Pole are modulated in concert with the magnetic and optical variations during periods of broadband pulsation activity, but no riometer variations are noted during periods of narrow-band activity. Because riometers are sensitive to electrons of auroral energies (several keV and above), while the 427.8-nm photometer is sensitive to precipitation with much lower energies, they interpret these observatons as showing that precipitating magnetosheathlike electrons (with energies {le} 1 keV) at nominal dayside cleft latitudes are at times modulated with frequencies similar to those of upstream waves. They suggest that these particles may play an important role, via modification of ionospheric currents and conductivities, in the transmission of upstream wave signals into the magnetosphere and in the generation of dayside high-latitude Pc 3 pulsations.

  17. PC based controller for utility interconnected photovoltaic power conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, S.S.; Palanichamy, S. [PSG Coll. of Technology, Coimbatore (India). Dept. of Electrical and Electronics Engineering

    1995-12-31

    Utility interfaced photovoltaic power conditioning systems have come into vogue recently. In majority of the reported works, grid connections have been achieved through line commutated inverters with analog control. The poor performance of these schemes points to the need for developing a more efficient and reliable grid interface for generating utility grade AC, with fairly low levels of harmonics generated. In this paper, a DC to AC static power converter with a PC-based controller employing pulse width modulation technique have been developed and tested, and the results of experimental investigations are also reported.

  18. Search for a J/sup PC/ exotic hybid meson

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.U.; Fernow, R.; Kirk, H.; Protopopescu, S.D.; Willutzki, H.; Crittenden, R.; Dzierba, A.; Marshall, T.; Zieminska, D.; Bonner, B.E.

    1988-12-01

    This paper describes an experiment that will search for J/sup PC/ hybrid mesons at the Brookhaven MPS-II facility. Such explicitly exotic states are allowed in QCD, and are predicted to be in an accessible mass region by several models. The experiment will investigate the production of exotics in the reaction ..pi../sup /minus//p ..-->.. ..pi../sup /minus//f/sub 1/p. Expected rates and experimental sensitivity to possible hybrid states are discussed. 3 refs. 3 figs.

  19. The Milky Way nuclear star cluster beyond 1 pc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmeier, A.; Neumayer, N.; Seth, A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Schödel, R.; Lützgendorf, N.; Kissler-Patig, M.; Nishiyama, S.; Walcher, C. J.

    2014-05-01

    Within the central 10 pc of our Galaxy lies a dense cluster of stars, the nuclear star cluster, forming a distinct component of our Galaxy. Nuclear star clusters are common objects and are detected in ˜75% of nearby galaxies. It is, however, not fully understood how nuclear clusters form. Because the Milky Way nuclear star cluster is at a distance of only 8 kpc, we can spatially resolve its stellar populations and kinematics much better than in external galaxies. This makes the Milky Way nuclear star cluster a reference object for understanding the structure and assembly history of all nuclear star clusters.

  20. AKPLOT: A plotter routine for IBM PC, XT and AT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil

    1987-01-01

    The AKPLOT software for the IBM PC, XT, and AT is an efficient and versatile tool that allows X-Y plotting of quantitative information. Features include IBM four-color graphics, which combined with 10 different symbols allows 40 different curves on the same grid, shrink or expansion of the graph size, any combination of log and linear X and Y axes, selective plotting from multiple curves of a previous run, interpolation and polynomial least-squares fit with any degree polynomial, and a 90-degree tilt of the entire graph. These options are independent, and can be invoked individually.

  1. Nasal Associated Lymphoid Tissue of the Syrian Golden Hamster Expresses High Levels of PrPC

    PubMed Central

    Clouse, Melissa D.; Shikiya, Ronald A.; Bartz, Jason C.; Kincaid, Anthony E.

    2015-01-01

    The key event in the pathogenesis of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies is a template-dependent misfolding event where an infectious isoform of the prion protein (PrPSc) comes into contact with native prion protein (PrPC) and changes its conformation to PrPSc. In many extraneurally inoculated models of prion disease this PrPC misfolding event occurs in lymphoid tissues prior to neuroinvasion. The primary objective of this study was to compare levels of total PrPC in hamster lymphoid tissues involved in the early pathogenesis of prion disease. Lymphoid tissues were collected from golden Syrian hamsters and Western blot analysis was performed to quantify PrPC levels. PrPC immunohistochemistry (IHC) of paraffin embedded tissue sections was performed to identify PrPC distribution in tissues of the lymphoreticular system. Nasal associated lymphoid tissue contained the highest amount of total PrPC followed by Peyer’s patches, mesenteric and submandibular lymph nodes, and spleen. The relative levels of PrPC expression in IHC processed tissue correlated strongly with the Western blot data, with high levels of PrPC corresponding with a higher percentage of PrPC positive B cell follicles. High levels of PrPC in lymphoid tissues closely associated with the nasal cavity could contribute to the relative increased efficiency of the nasal route of entry of prions, compared to other routes of infection. PMID:25642714

  2. [PC-1 enhances c-myc gene expression in prostate cancer cells].

    PubMed

    Yu, Lan; Shi, Qing-Guo; Qian, Xiao-Long; Li, Shan-Hu; Wang, Hong-Tao; Wang, Le-Le; Zhou, Jian-Guang

    2010-04-01

    PC-1(Prostate and colon gene 1) gene belongs to TPD52 (Tumor Protein D52) gene family. The expression of PC-1 is found to promote androgen-independent progression. This study was conducted to assess the mechnism of promotion of androgen-independent progression in PC-1 gene. The c-myc gene expression was tested by RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses in the LNCaP-pc-1 and LNCaP-zero cell line. After separation of cytoplasm and nulear proteins of the LNCaP-pc-1 and LNCaP-zero cell line, the beta-catenin protein was detected by Western blotting. C4-2 cell line was used to examine the effects of 10058-F4 on the PC-1 gene expression. The results of RT-PCR and Western blotting indicated that PC-1 enhanced c-myc gene expression in prostate cancer cells, PC-1 was also found to enhance beta-catenin expression in nuclear. Furthermore, a small-molecule c-Myc inhibitor, 10058-F4 represses PC-1 gene expression in C4-2 cell line. Our findings suggest that PC-1 enhances c-myc gene expression in prostate cancer cells through the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway. Meanwhile, c-myc plays a feed-forward role in enhancing PC-1 driven c-myc gene expression, and promotes prostate an-drogen-independent progression. PMID:20423888

  3. Effects of curcumin analogues for inhibiting human prostate cancer cells and the growth of human PC-3 prostate xenografts in immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dai-Ying; Ding, Ning; Van Doren, Jeremiah; Wei, Xing-Chuan; Du, Zhi-Yun; Conney, Allan H; Zhang, Kun; Zheng, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Four curcumin analogues ((2E,6E)-2,6-bis(thiophen-3-methylene) cyclohexanone (AS), (2E,5E)-2,5-bis(thiophen-3-methylene) cyclopentanone (BS), (3E,5E)-3,5-bis(thiophen-3-methylene)-tetrahydropyran-4-one (ES) and (3E,5E)-3,5-bis(thiophen-3-methylene)-tetrahydrothiopyran-4-one (FS) as shown in Fig. 1) with different linker groups were investigated for their effects in human prostate cancer CWR-22Rv1 and PC-3 cells. Compounds FS and ES had stronger inhibitory effects than curcumin, AS and BS on the growth of cultured CWR-22Rv1 and PC-3 cells, as well as on the androgen receptor (AR) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-?B) activity. The strong activities of ES and FS may be correlated with a heteroatom linker. In animal studies, severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice were injected subcutaneously (s.c.) with PC-3 cells in Matrigel. After 4 to 6 weeks, mice with PC-3 tumors (about 0.6?cm wide and 0.6?cm long) received daily intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of vehicle, ES and FS (10?µg/g body weight) for 31?d. FS had a potent effect in inhibiting the growth and progression of PC-3 tumors. Our results indicate that FS may be useful for inhibiting human prostate tumors growth. PMID:24647337

  4. Inhibition of Hypoxia Inducible Factor Alpha and Astrocyte-Elevated Gene-1 Mediates Cryptotanshinone Exerted Antitumor Activity in Hypoxic PC-3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Jung, Deok-Beom; Sohn, Eun Jung; Kim, Hanna Hyun; Park, Moon Nyeo; Lew, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Seok Geun; Kim, Bonglee; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2012-01-01

    Although cryptotanshinone (CT) was known to exert antitumor activity in several cancers, its molecular mechanism under hypoxia still remains unclear. Here, the roles of AEG-1 and HIF-1? in CT-induced antitumor activity were investigated in hypoxic PC-3 cells. CT exerted cytotoxicity against prostate cancer cells and suppressed HIF-1? accumulation and AEG-1 expression in hypoxic PC-3 cells. Also, AEG-1 was overexpressed in prostate cancer cells. Interestingly, HIF-1? siRNA transfection enhanced the cleavages of caspase-9,3, and PAPR and decreased expression of Bcl-2 and AEG1 induced by CT in hypoxic PC-3 cells. Of note, DMOG enhanced the stability of AEG-1 and HIF-1? during hypoxia. Additionally, CT significantly reduced cellular level of VEGF in PC-3 cells and disturbed tube formation of HUVECs. Consistently, ChIP assay revealed that CT inhibited the binding of HIF-1? to VEGF promoter. Furthermore, CT at 10?mg/kg suppressed the growth of PC-3 cells in BALB/c athymic nude mice by 46.4% compared to untreated control. Consistently, immunohistochemistry revealed decreased expression of Ki-67, CD34, VEGF, carbonic anhydrase IX, and AEG-1 indices in CT-treated group compared to untreated control. Overall, our findings suggest that CT exerts antitumor activity via inhibition of HIF-1?, AEG1, and VEGF as a potent chemotherapeutic agent. PMID:23243443

  5. Neuritogenic Monoglyceride Derived from the Constituent of a Marine Fish for Activating the PI3K/ERK/CREB Signalling Pathways in PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Luo, Yan; Tang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Hui; Ye, Ying; Xiang, Lan; Qi, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    A neuritogenic monoglyceride, 1-O-(myristoyl) glycerol (MG), was isolated from the head of Ilisha elongate using a PC12 cell bioassay system, and its chemical structure was elucidated using spectroscopic methods. MG significantly induced 42% of the neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells at a concentration of 10 ?M. To study the structure-activity relationships of MG, a series of monoglycerides was designed and synthesised. Bioassay results indicated that the alkyl chain length plays a key role in the neuritogenic activity of the monoglycerides. The groups that link the propane-1,2-diol and alkyl chain were also investigated. An ester linkage, rather than an amido one, was found to be optimal for neuritogenic activity. Therefore, 1-O-(stearoyl) glycerol (SG), which induces 57% of the neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells at 10 ?M, was determined to be a lead compound for neuritogenic activity. We then investigated the mechanism of action of neurite outgrowth induced by SG on PC12 cells using protein specific inhibitors and Western blot analysis. The mitogen-activated kinase/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor U0126 and the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 significantly decreased neurite outgrowth. At the same time, SG increased phosphorylation of CREB in protein level. Thus, SG-induced neuritogenic activity depends on the activation of the extracellular-regulated protein kinase (ERK), cAMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB) and PI3K signalling pathways in PC12 cells. PMID:24351811

  6. Extraction of weak PcP phases using the slant-stacklet transform - I: method and examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventosa, Sergi; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    In order to study fine scale structure of the Earth's deep interior, it is necessary to extract generally weak body wave phases from seismograms that interact with various discontinuities and heterogeneities. The recent deployment of large-scale dense arrays providing high-quality data, in combination with efficient seismic data processing techniques, may provide important and accurate observations over large portions of the globe poorly sampled until now. Major challenges are low signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and interference with unwanted neighbouring phases. We address these problems by introducing scale-dependent slowness filters that preserve time-space resolution. We combine complex wavelet and slant-stack transforms to obtain the slant-stacklet transform. This is a redundant high-resolution directional wavelet transform with a direction (here slowness) resolution that can be adapted to the signal requirements. To illustrate this approach, we use this expansion to design coherence-driven filters that allow us to obtain clean PcP observations (a weak phase often hidden in the coda of the P wave), for events with magnitude Mw > 5.4 and distances up to 80°. In this context, we then minimize a linear misfit between P and PcP waveforms to improve the quality of PcP-P traveltime measurements as compared to a standard cross-correlation method. This significantly increases both the quantity and the quality of PcP-P differential traveltime measurements available for the modelling of structure near the core-mantle boundary. The accuracy of our measurements is limited mainly by the highest frequencies of the signals used and the level of noise. We apply this methodology to two examples of high-quality data from dense arrays located in north America. While focusing here on body-wave separation, the tools we propose are more general and may contribute to enhancing seismic signal observations in global seismology in situations of low SNR and high signal interference.

  7. Group Dynamics in Long -term blind endeavors on Earth as an analog for Remote Space Missions (Lewis & Clark Expedition, 1803 - 1806, Dynamic Analysis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allner, M.; Rygalov, V.; Reilly, J.

    In 1803 President Thomas Jefferson set fourth a military expedition led by Captains newline M Lewis and W Clark L C Expedition on an exploration to learn more about the large territory of land the U S had just purchased from France Cavan 1991 Their mission was to find a direct water route to the Pacific Ocean for the purpose of commerce and further industrial development Edwards 1999 Looking back at the events of this exploration there are many similarities to the experiences future human space explorers will face as we look to colonize the Moon and travel to Mars and beyond NASA Vision for Space Exploration 2004 - The L C Expedition lasted almost three years and involved a crew of 43 men traveling up the Missouri River to explore the unknown lands and a possible water route to the Pacific Ocean newline - The expedition took place far away from customary comfortable environments known to European settlers in early 18th century newline - The expedition involved a remotely confined high-perceived risk environment with high levels of uncertainty providing stresses and every day challenges for the crew newline - Supplies brought on the mission were limited mainly a mass weight issue rather than cost therefore the discovery and use of environmental resources In-Situ Resource Utilization approach including info-resources to mitigate uncertainty was necessary for crew survival The environments astronauts will encounter in space and on the Moon and Mars due to high risk and uncertainty will be in many aspects similar

  8. Enhanced photodynamic efficacy towards melanoma cells by encapsulation of Pc4 in silica nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Baozhong [Laboratory of Pharmacology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Yin Junjie [Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, Food and Drug Administration, College Park, MD (United States); Bilski, Piotr J.; Chignell, Colin F. [Laboratory of Pharmacology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Roberts, Joan E. [Fordham University, Department of Natural Sciences, Lincoln Center, NY (United States); He Yuying, E-mail: yyhe@medicine.bsd.uchicago.ed [Section of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Nanoparticles have been explored recently as an efficient means of delivering photosensitizers for cancer diagnosis and photodynamic therapy (PDT). Silicon phthalocyanine 4 (Pc4) is currently being clinically tested as a photosensitizer for PDT. Unfortunately, Pc4 aggregates in aqueous solutions, which dramatically reduces its PDT efficacy and therefore limits its clinical application. We have encapsulated Pc4 using silica nanoparticles (Pc4SNP), which not only improved the aqueous solubility, stability, and delivery of the photodynamic drug but also increased its photodynamic efficacy compared to free Pc4 molecules. Pc4SNP generated photo-induced singlet oxygen more efficiently than free Pc4 as measured by chemical probe and EPR trapping techniques. Transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering measurements showed that the size of the particles is in the range of 25-30 nm. Cell viability measurements demonstrated that Pc4SNP was more phototoxic to A375 or B16-F10 melanoma cells than free Pc4. Pc4SNP photodamaged melanoma cells primarily through apoptosis. Irradiation of A375 cells in the presence of Pc4SNP resulted in a significant increase in intracellular protein-derived peroxides, suggesting a Type II (singlet oxygen) mechanism for phototoxicity. More Pc4SNP than free Pc4 was localized in the mitochondria and lysosomes. Our results show that these stable, monodispersed silica nanoparticles may be an effective new formulation for Pc4 in its preclinical and clinical studies. We expect that modifying the surface of silicon nanoparticles encapsulating the photosensitizers with antibodies specific to melanoma cells will lead to even better early diagnosis and targeted treatment of melanoma in the future.

  9. On the PC Interface for Hearing-Impaired

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Mitsuhiro; Akiyama, Kouichi; Hama, Hiromitsu

    2002-12-01

    A human being takes in the outer world information by using the five senses, and lives. So he is forced very inconvenient life even when one sense is missing. Among others, it is said that the sense of hearing has importance next to the sight, but it is one of the organs which surely become weak with aging, and "hearing defect" is particularly the problem which all people face someday. But, technically and socially, the system which the person whose physical function is poor can entry into and contribute to the society is very important. In this research, the way of making up for a lost function by the medium change to the sense of touch information from the auditory information is examined, as a help that hearing-impaired gets "safety", "independence", "the tranquility of the heart" from the technical side. In this paper, as a concrete system, it paid attention to the mouse of the PC interface, and a vibration mouse was used under the environment which a PC was being used for, and thought about building of the system which can acquire the sound information of the life environment in real time.

  10. CAP88-PC Version 4, an updated radionuclide NESHAPS model.

    PubMed

    Wood, Raymond; Stuenkel, David; Rosnick, Reid

    2013-08-01

    The latest version of the CAP88-PC computer model, Version 4, has many changes and improvements from previous versions. The most significant of these changes from a user perspective are the incorporation of age-dependent radionuclide dose and risk factors for ingestion and inhalation, the increase in the number of included radionuclides, and a change in the file management system used by the program. Other changes less visible to the user include new code architecture, incorporation of numerical solvers for the calculation of radioactive decay chains, including the ingrowth of decay products during air transport and ground surface deposition, enhanced error messages, updated on-line help, and a utility for migrating Version 3 datasets, wind files, and population files to Version 4. The modifications have produced a significant improvement in speed and stability for Version 4 relative to Version 3 and eliminated the solution approximations used in Version 3. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has implemented an extensive testing and documentation program for CAP88-PC Version 4 to address user concerns with past versions, resulting in enhanced documentation supporting compatibility with user software quality assurance programs. PMID:23803671

  11. Commodity clusters: Performance comparison between PC`s and workstations

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, R.; Laroco, J.; Armstrong, R.

    1996-03-01

    Workstation clusters were originally developed as a way to leverage the better cost basis of UNIX workstations to perform computations previously handled only by relatively more expensive supercomputers. Commodity workstation clusters take this evolutionary process one step further by replacing equivalent proprietary workstation functionality with less expensive PC technology. As PC technology encroaches on proprietary UNIX workstation vendor markets, these vendors will see a declining share of the overall market. As technology advances continue, the ability to upgrade a workstations performance plays a large role in cost analysis. For example, a major upgrade to a typical UNIX workstation means replacing the whole machine. As major revisions to the UNIX vendor`s product line come out, brand new systems are introduced. IBM compatibles, however, are modular by design, and nothing need to be replaced except the components that are truly improved. The DAISy cluster, for example, is about to undergo a major upgrade from 90MHz Pentiums to 200MHz Pentium Pros. All of the memory -- the system`s largest expense -- and disks, power supply, etc., can be reused. As a result, commodity workstation clusters ought to gain an increasingly large share of the distributed computing market.

  12. Nuclear data retrieval for PC applications, PCNuDat

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsey, R.R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). National Nuclear Data Center

    1996-11-01

    The PCNuDat program for IBM-PC compatibles is similar to the NuDat program available through the NNDC Online Nuclear Data Service. They provide a user with access to nuclear data in a convenient and menu driven system. This data is useful in both basic and applied research. The nuclear base used by NuDat is extracted from several data bases maintained at the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC). The program is an extended DOS program which uses 32 bit addressing. It can run in a DOS window on all the current Windows operating systems. The program and its data base are currently available on both a CD-ROM or electronically over the Internet. Electronic access can be made through the NNDC`s Web home page. The files may also be FTP`d from the public area under the [pc{_}prog] directory on bnlnd2.dne.bnl.gov. The CD-ROM version also contains the Nuclear Science References (NSR) data base and its retrieval program, Papyrus NSR.

  13. GROUP ACTIONS AND HOMOGENEOUS

    E-print Network

    Korbas, Julius

    ;Zostavili/Edited by: J´ulius Korbas, Masaharu Morimoto, Krzysztof Pawalowski N´azov/Title: Group Actions and Homogeneous Spaces Podn´azov/Subtitle: Proceedings of the International Conference Bratislava Topology

  14. OPEN COMPUTING FACILITY Group Account Application Form 1. Pick an account name. It must consist of between three and eight lowercase letters (no spaces, numbers, underscores,

    E-print Network

    Walker, Matthew P.

    of other users, re- spect the integrity of the systems and related physical resources, and observe all to protect the integrity of computer systems. For exam- ple, system administrators may access or examineOPEN COMPUTING FACILITY Group Account Application Form 1. Pick an account name. It must consist

  15. -Search-Register Submit News Blogs Protocols Forum Groups Shop All Health Bioscience Physical Science Environment Space Tech Life Origins Misc

    E-print Network

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    -Search- Register Submit News Blogs Protocols Forum Groups Shop All Health Bioscience Physical Blog articles Vladimir R BaruchChani Ahmed Michal Labspaces.net on Facebook 1,238 people like Labspaces.net. Like Facebook social plugin Email Forgot password? Not a member?News Blogs Featured Blogs 3-dimensional

  16. Noninvasive assessment of tissue distribution and tumor pharmacokinetics of Pc 181, a silicon phthalocyanine analogue, in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Lihua; Guo, Jianxia; Clausen, Dana M.; Eiseman, Julie L.

    2010-02-01

    Objective: In in vitro photodynamic therapy, the LD50 of Pc 181 has been reported to be 7 to 8 times less than that of silicon phthalocyanine 4 (Pc 4). The Optical Pharmacokinetic System (OPS) can measure photosensitizer concentrations in accessible tissues non-invasively. We used OPS to evaluate the tumor pharmacokinetics of Pc 181 and Pc 4 and the tissue drug distribution in SCID mice bearing either human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 or human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma SCC-15 xenografts. Methods: Following iv administration of 2.5 mg/kg Pc 181 or 2 mg/kg Pc 4 to SCID mice, OPS measurements were taken on tumor and normal tissues between 5 and 4320 min in vivo or in situ. Results: Large variations in tumor Pc 181 concentrations were observed among mice. In MDA-MB-231 tumors, the Pc 181 concentration peaked at 240 min, and was retained in the tumor. Tumor Pc 181 concentrations were much less than the tumor Pc 4 concentrations at an equimolar dose. Pc 181 concentrations were the highest in liver, followed by spleen, and kidney. In mice bearing SCC-15 xenografts, skin and underlying tissue Pc 181 concentrations were higher than tumor concentrations at all time points examined. Conclusions: This first Pc 181 pharmacokinetics study described a tissue Pc 181 distribution similar to that of Pc 4. However, tumor Pc 181 concentrations were lower than those of Pc 4 at equimolar doses.

  17. Space Weather Now

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Space Environment Center

    The Space Weather Now page is intended to give the non-technical user a "plain language" look at space weather. It includes information about relevant events and announcements, data from and about different instruments and satellites watching various aspects of space weather, alerts and advisories, daily themes of products and services, and links appropriate for the various groups of users.

  18. The SAND domain protein ULTRAPETALA1 acts as a trithorax group factor to regulate cell fate in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During development, trithorax group (trxG) chromatin remodeling complexes counteract repression by Polycomb group (PcG) complexes to sustain active expression of key regulatory genes. Although PcG complexes are well characterized in plants, little is known about trxG activities. Here we demonstrate ...

  19. Studies of social group dynamics under isolated conditions. Objective summary of the literature as it relates to potential problems of long duration space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinograd, S. P.

    1974-01-01

    Scientific literature which deals with the study of human behavior and crew interaction in situations simulating long term space flight is summarized and organized. A bibliography of all the pertinent U.S. literature available is included, along with definitions of the behavioral characteristics terms employed. The summarized studies are analyzed according to behavioral factors and environmental conditions. The analysis consist of two matrices. (1) The matrix of factors studied correlates each research study area and individual study with the behavioral factors that were investigated in the study. (2) The matrix of conclusions identifies those studies whose investigators appeared to draw specific conclusions concerning questions of importance to NASA.

  20. Effect of oridonin-mediated hallmark changes on inflammatory pathways in human pancreatic cancer (BxPC-3) cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ru-Yi; Xu, Bin; Chen, Su-Feng; Chen, Si-Si; Zhang, Ting; Ren, Jun; Xu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of oridonin on nuclear transcription factors and to study the relationship between biological behavior and inflammatory factors in human pancreatic cancer (BxPC-3) cells. METHODS: BxPC-3 cells were treated with various concentrations of oridonin, and viability curves were generated to test for inhibitory effects of the drug on cells. The expression of cytokines such as interleukin-1? (IL-1?), IL-6, or IL-33 was detected in BxPC-3 cell supernatants using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the protein expression of nuclear transcription factors including nuclear factor ?B, activating protein-1, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, bone morphogenetic protein 2, transforming growth factor ?1 and sma and mad homologues in BxPC-3 cells was detected using Western blot. Carcinoma hallmark-related proteins such as survivin, vascular endothelial growth factor, and matrix metallopeptidase 2 were also detected using immunoblotting, and intra-nuclear IL-33 expression was detected using immunofluorescent staining. RESULTS: Treatment with oridonin reduced the viability of BxPC-3 cells in a dose dependent manner. The cells exhibited reduced growth following treatment with 8 ?g/mL oridonin (13.05% ± 3.21%, P < 0.01), and the highest inhibitory ratio was 90.64% ± 0.70%, which was achieved with oridonin at a dose of 32 ?g/mL. The IC50 value of oridonin in BxPC-3 cells was 19.32 ?g/mL. ELISA analysis revealed that oridonin down-regulated the inflammatory factors IL-1?, IL-6, and IL-33 in a dose-dependent manner. IL-1? expression was significantly reduced in the 16 and 32 ?g/mL treatment groups compared to the control group (12.97 ± 0.45 pg/mL, 11.17 ± 0.63 pg/mL vs 14.40 ± 0.38 pg/mL, P < 0.01). Similar trends were observed for IL-6 expression, which was significantly reduced in the 16 and 32 ?g/mL treatment groups compared to the control group (4.05 ± 0.14 pg/mL vs 4.45 ± 0.43 pg/mL, P < 0.05; 3.95 ± 0.13 pg/mL vs 4.45 ± 0.43 pg/mL, P < 0.01). IL-33 expression was significantly reduced in the 8, 16, and 32 ?g/mL treatment groups compared to the control group (911.05 ± 14.18 pg/mL vs 945.25 ± 12.09 pg/mL, P < 0.05; 802.70 ± 11.88 pg/mL, 768.54 ± 10.98 pg/mL vs 945.25 ± 12.09 pg/mL, P < 0.01). Western blot and immunofluorescent staining analyses suggested that oridonin changed the hallmarks and regulated the expression of various nuclear transcription factors. CONCLUSION: The results obtained suggest that oridonin alters the hallmarks of pancreatic cancer cells through the regulation of nuclear transcription factors. PMID:25356049

  1. Abundance of Jackfruit ( Artocarpus heterophyllus) Affects Group Characteristics and Use of Space by Golden-Headed Lion Tamarins ( Leontopithecus chrysomelas) in Cabruca Agroforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Leonardo C.; Neves, Leonardo G.; Raboy, Becky E.; Dietz, James M.

    2011-08-01

    Cabruca is an agroforest of cacao trees shaded by native forest trees. It is the predominant vegetation type throughout eastern part of the range of the golden-headed lion tamarins, Leontopithecus chrysomelas, an endangered primate endemic to Atlantic Forest. Understanding how lion tamarins use this agroforest is a conservation priority. To address this question, we documented the diet, home range size, group sizes and composition, density, number of litters and body condition of lion tamarins living in cabruca, and other habitats. Jackfruit, Artocarpus heterophyllus, was the most used species used by lion tamarins in cabruca and was widely available and used throughout the year. In cabruca, home range size was the smallest (22-28 ha) and density of lion tamarins was the highest (1.7 ind/ha) reported for the species. Group size averaged 7.4 individuals and was not significantly different among the vegetation types. In cabruca, groups produced one or two litters a year, and all litters were twins. Adult males in cabruca were significantly heavier than males in primary forest. Our study is the first to demonstrate that breeding groups of golden-headed lion tamarins can survive and reproduce entirely within cabruca agroforest. Jackfruit proved to be a keystone resource for lion tamarins in cabruca, and bromeliads were important as an animal prey foraging microhabitat. In cases where cabruca contains concentrated resources, such as jackfruit and bromeliads, lion tamarins may not only survive and reproduce but may fare better than in other forest types, at least for body condition and reproduction.

  2. The structures of marialite (Me[subscript 6]) and meionite (Me[subscript 93]) in space groups P4[subscript 2]\\/n and I4\\/m, and the absence of phase transitions in the scapolite series

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sytle M. Antao; Ishmael Hassan

    2011-01-01

    The crystal structures of marialite (Me) from Badakhshan, Afghanistan and meionite (Me) from Mt. Vesuvius, Italy were obtained using synchrotron high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction (HRPXRD) data and Rietveld structure refinements. Their structures were refined in space groups I4\\/m and P42\\/n, and similar results were obtained. The Me sample has a formula Ca{sub 0.24}Na{sub 3.37}K{sub 0.24}[Al{sub 3.16}Si{sub 8.84}O]Cl{sub 0.84}(CO){sub 0.15}, and

  3. PC-based calculation of activation energy using linear regression

    SciTech Connect

    Bornt, F W

    1989-01-01

    During a severe accident, various plant locations will be subjected to harsh environments: high temperature, high humidity, high radiation, etc. Equipment required for accident mitigation located in these areas must be capable of withstanding these conditions, i.e., environmentally qualified. Qualification is normally accomplished by type-testing. The equipment undergoes accelerated aging to achieve a condition equivalent to the end-of-life condition. This aging consists of accelerated thermal aging and radiation aging. The aged equipment is then subjected to simulated seismic vibration and other vibration. After a radiation exposure simulating some maximum accident exposure, the equipment is then mounted in a test chamber and operated during a simulated design basis event (DBE) environment (high temperature, pressure, humidity, and possible submergence) and post-accident conditions. This paper describes two PC-based methods of applying the linear regression method to the thermal aging data to obtain an activation energy. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Implementation of PC and PNDT Act in Gulbarga region.

    PubMed

    Mudda, Vandana; Uzair, Syed H

    2014-01-01

    Denial to a girl child of her right to live is one of the heinous violations of the right to life committed by the society. Gender bias and deep rooted prejudice and discrimination against girl child and preference of male child have led to large scale female foeticide in the last decade. The declining sex ratio is a major concern for all. The census 2001 data indicates that female ratio is declining at an alarming rate and needs immediate action. In order to check the female foeticide, the Prenatal Diagnostic Techniques (regulation and prevention of misuse) Act 1994 was enacted and became operational from January, 1996. This article is an attempt to throw light on the successful implementatuion of PC and PNDT Act in the Gulbarga region and active participation of various organisations and people in proper implementation of the act. PMID:25935949

  5. Power-cable-carrier control (PC/sup 3/) system

    SciTech Connect

    Alvis, R.L.; Wally, K.; Rosborough, J.R.

    1981-04-01

    A control system has been developed that uses a carrier signal imposed on an existing ac power circuit to transmit commands. This system was specifically developed to control an entire solar collector field by sending sun-tracking information to the trough collectors or by commanding them to assume safe positions (STOW) if out-of-limit conditions were encountered. Objectives were to develop a control system that operates reliably and has enough functions to control an entire collector field, yet do it at less cost than for conventional approaches. Development, design, operating characteristics, and field testing and results of the new system, the Power Cable Carrier Control (PC/sup 3/) System are described.

  6. A PC-Based Free Text DSS for Health Care

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grams, Ralph R.; Buchanan, Paul; Massey, James K.; Jin, Ming

    1987-01-01

    A free Decision Support System(DST) has been constructed for health care professional that allows the analysis of complex medical cases and the creation of diagnostic list of potential diseases for clinical evaluation.The system uses a PC-based text management system specifically designed for desktop operation. The texts employed in the decision support package include the Merck Manual (published by Merck Sharpe & Dohme) and Control of Communicable Diseas in Man (published by the American Public Health Association). The background and design of the database are discussed along with a structured analysis procedure for handling free text DSS system. A case study is presented to show the application of this technology and conclusions are drawn in the summary that point to expanded areas of professional intention and new frontiers yet to be explored in this rapidly progressing field.

  7. Creating security system models using SNAP-PC

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, C.D.; Gregg, M.L.; Erdbruegger, M.R.

    1986-08-01

    SNAP-PC (Safeguards Network Analysis Procedure for the Personal Computer) is a user-friendly version of SNAP designed for IBM XT or AT compatible microcomputers. SNAP is a simulation-based analysis technique supporting the evaluation of fixed-site security systems to prevent theft or sabotage of a specified target. Through SNAP the user is able to define the facility, the sensor system, the guard operating policies and response tactics, and the adversary's attack plan. SNAP uses the system definition to analyze its effectiveness in defending against specific threats. The system performance statistics measured by SNAP include: adversary mission success probability, guard and adversary casualties, duration of engagements, outcome of engagements, duration of scenario by outcome (adversary success/fail), and adversary duration by facility location. The development of SNAP began in the late 1970's for use on a mainframe computer.

  8. METHANE DE-NOX FOR UTILITY PC BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Bryan; Joseph Rabovitser; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo

    2003-07-30

    During the current quarter, pilot-scale testing with the modified air nozzle version of the PC burner was completed with PRB coal at the Riley Power Inc. (RPI) test facility. A total of 8 different burner configurations were tested utilizing various burner air nozzle arrangements in place of the burner air channels. It was found that with the arrangements tested, a stable flame could not be maintained at coal feed rates above 100 lb/h. While it is felt that the air nozzle approach can ultimately be used effectively, in the interest of holding to the current project schedule it was decided to proceed with the balance of the project using the air channel design. The pilot-scale PC burner was therefore restored to the air-channel configuration and benchmark testing with PRB coal to confirmed previous operating results. A series of tests was then conducted with PRB and West Virginia caking coal to evaluate modifications to the gas combustor configuration and operation for improved performance with caking coal. Continuous operation was achieved with caking coal up to 50 lb/h vs. the full load target of 150 lb/h. Impingement and deposition of partially devolatilized coal occurred at various points within the combustor when the caking coal feed was increased above 50 lb/h. The 100 MMBtu/h commercial-scale prototype design was started with coal burner design input from both RPI and VTI. Based on typical burner installation layout considerations, it was that the preheat combustor should be oriented horizontally on the axial centerline of the coal burner. Accordingly, work was begun to relocate the pilot gas combustor to this orientation so that the pilot results with caking coal will be directly applicable to the preferred 100 MMBtu design. Inspection and repair of the 100 MMBtu/h Coal Burner Test Facility (CBTF) was initiated by RPI and as of 6/30, this activity was 70% complete.

  9. Space Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Mary Fae (Editor); McKay, David S. (Editor); Duke, Michael S. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Space resources must be used to support life on the Moon and exploration of Mars. Just as the pioneers applied the tools they brought with them to resources they found along the way rather than trying to haul all their needs over a long supply line, so too must space travelers apply their high technology tools to local resources. The pioneers refilled their water barrels at each river they forded; moonbase inhabitants may use chemical reactors to combine hydrogen brought from Earth with oxygen found in lunar soil to make their water. The pioneers sought temporary shelter under trees or in the lee of a cliff and built sod houses as their first homes on the new land; settlers of the Moon may seek out lava tubes for their shelter or cover space station modules with lunar regolith for radiation protection. The pioneers moved further west from their first settlements, using wagons they had built from local wood and pack animals they had raised; space explorers may use propellant made at a lunar base to take them on to Mars. The concept for this report was developed at a NASA-sponsored summer study in 1984. The program was held on the Scripps campus of the University of California at San Diego (UCSD), under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). It was jointly managed under the California Space Inst. and the NASA Johnson Space Center, under the direction of the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) at NASA Headquarters. The study participants (listed in the addendum) included a group of 18 university teachers and researchers (faculty fellows) who were present for the entire 10-week period and a larger group of attendees from universities, Government, and industry who came for a series of four 1-week workshops. The organization of this report follows that of the summer study. Space Resources consists of a brief overview and four detailed technical volumes: (1) Scenarios; (2) Energy, Power, and Transport; (3) Materials; (4) Social Concerns. Although many of the included papers got their impetus from workshop discussions, most have been written since then, thus allowing the authors to base new applications on established information and tested technology. All these papers have been updated to include the authors' current work. This overview, drafted by faculty fellow Jim Burke, describes the findings of the summer study, as participants explored the use of space resources in the development of future space activities and defined the necessary research and development that must precede the practical utilization of these resources. Space resources considered included lunar soil, oxygen derived from lunar soil, material retrieved from near-Earth asteroids, abundant sunlight, low gravity, and high vacuum. The study participants analyzed the direct use of these resources, the potential demand for products from them, the techniques for retrieving and processing space resources, the necessary infrastructure, and the economic tradeoffs. This is certainly not the first report to urge the utilization of space resources in the development of space activities. In fact, Space Resources may be seen as the third of a trilogy of NASA Special Publications reporting such ideas arising from similar studies. It has been preceded by Space Settlements: A Design Study (NASA SP-413) and Space Resources and Space Settlements (NASA SP-428). And other, contemporaneous reports have responded to the same themes. The National Commission on Space, led by Thomas Paine, in Pioneering the Space Frontier, and the NASA task force led by astronaut Sally Ride, in Leadership and America's Future in Space, also emphasize expansion of the space Infrastructure; more detailed exploration of the Moon, Mars, and asteroids; an early start on the development of the technology necessary for using space resources; and systematic development of the skills necessary for long-term human presence in space. Our report does not represent any Government-authorized view or official NASA policy. NASA's official response to these challenging op

  10. Distinct Spacing Between Anionic Groups: An Essential Chemical Determinant for Achieving Thiophene-Based Ligands to Distinguish ?-Amyloid or Tau Polymorphic Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Klingstedt, Therése; Shirani, Hamid; Mahler, Jasmin; Wegenast-Braun, Bettina M; Nyström, Sofie; Goedert, Michel; Jucker, Mathias; Nilsson, K Peter R

    2015-06-15

    The accumulation of protein aggregates is associated with many devastating neurodegenerative diseases and the existence of distinct aggregated morphotypes has been suggested to explain the heterogeneous phenotype reported for these diseases. Thus, the development of molecular probes able to distinguish such morphotypes is essential. We report an anionic tetrameric oligothiophene compound that can be utilized for spectral assignment of different morphotypes of ?-amyloid or tau aggregates present in transgenic mice at distinct ages. The ability of the ligand to spectrally distinguish between the aggregated morphotypes was reduced when the spacing between the anionic substituents along the conjugated thiophene backbone was altered, which verified that specific molecular interactions between the ligand and the protein aggregate are necessary to detect aggregate polymorphism. Our findings provide the structural and functional basis for the development of new fluorescent ligands that can distinguish between different morphotypes of protein aggregates. PMID:26013403

  11. The muon component in extensive air showers and new p+C data in fixed target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Meurer, C.; Bluemer, J.; Engel, R.; Haungs, A.; Roth, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2007-03-19

    One of the most promising approaches to determine the energy spectrum and composition of the cosmic rays with energies above 1015 eV is the measurement of the number of electrons and muons produced in extensive air showers (EAS). Therefore simulation of air showers using electromagnetic and hadronic interaction models are necessary. These simulations show uncertainties which come mainly from hadronic interaction models. One aim of this work is to specify the low energy hadronic interactions which are important for the muon production in EAS. Therefore we simulate extensive air showers with a modified version of the simulation package CORSIKA. In particular we investigate in detail the energy and the phase space regions of secondary particle production, which are most important for muon production. This phase space region is covered by fixed target experiments at CERN. In the second part of this work we present preliminary momentum spectra of secondary {pi}+ and {pi}- in p+C collisions at 12 GeV/c measured with the HARP spectrometer at the PS accelerator at CERN. In addition we use the new p+C NA49 data at 158 GeV/c to check the reliability of hadronic interaction models for muon production in EAS. Finally, possibilities to measure relevant quantities of hadron production in existing and planned accelerator experiments are discussed.

  12. Adsorption properties of CoPc molecule on epitaxial graphene/Ru(0 0 0 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yiliang; Zhang, Hanjie; Song, Junjie; Zhang, Yuxi; Bao, Shining; He, Pimo

    2015-02-01

    Combining the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT), the adsorption properties of cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) on monolayer graphene/Ru(0 0 0 1) [MG/Ru(0 0 0 1)] have been investigated. At monolayer coverage, CoPc forms an ordered Kagome lattice, and a slight deformation for one lobe of CoPc and charge transfer from CoPc to Ru(0 0 0 1) substrate take place. The existence of the defect (vacancy) in graphene on Ru(0 0 0 1) increases the coupling between the Ru substrate and the epitaxial graphene. Such an increase of the coupling brings about an overall CoPc molecular energy level shift toward the low binding energy, which subsequently results in a central topographical contrast between the CoPc molecules on the intact and defective MG/Ru(0 0 0 1).

  13. Reduction of PrPC in human cerebrospinal fluid after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Carnini, Anna; Casha, Steve; Yong, V. Wee; Hurlbert, R. John

    2010-01-01

    It has been estimated that cerebrospinal fluid (CS F) contains approximately 80 proteins that significantly increase or decrease in response to various clinical conditions. Here we have evaluated the CS F protein PrPC (cellular prion protein) for possible increases or decreases following spinal cord injury. The physiological function of PrPC is not yet completely understood; however, recent findings suggest that PrPC may have neuroprotective properties. Our results show that CS F PrPC is decreased in spinal cord injured patients 12 h following injury and is absent at 7 days. Given that normal PrPC has been proposed to be neuroprotective, we speculate that the decrease in CS F PrPC levels may influence neuronal cell survival following spinal cord injury. PMID:20418657

  14. A Domain Shared by the Polycomb Group Proteins Scm and ph Mediates Heterotypic and Homotypic Interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    AIDAN J. PETERSON; MICHAEL KYBA; DOUGLAS BORNEMANN; KELLY MORGAN; HUGH W. BROCK; JEFFREY SIMON

    1997-01-01

    The Sex comb on midleg (Scm) and polyhomeotic (ph) proteins are members of the Polycomb group (PcG) of transcriptional repressors. PcG proteins maintain differential patterns of homeotic gene expression during development in Drosophila flies. The Scm and ph proteins share a homology domain with 38% identity over a length of 65 amino acids, termed the SPM domain, that is located

  15. Ice in Space

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is a detailed lesson about space and how Earth fits in it. Learners will consider the essential question, "What is space?" Activities include small group miming, speaking, drawing, and/or writing about space and the evidence for ice in space. Included are detailed games and dialogue. Native stories are shared. This is lesson 9 of 12 in the unit, Exploring Ice in the Solar System.

  16. Local structure characterization of CuPc\\/TiO2 nanocomposites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Saributr; W. Mekprasat; P. Thanangam; W. Pacharapa

    2010-01-01

    This work is the structural characterization of the copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)\\/TiO2 nanocomposites. The nanocomposite were prepared by mixing TiO2 nanoparticle and TiO2 nanotube with CuPc suspension. The nanocomposites structure properties were evaluated by means of Raman spectra and EXAFS. From the results show that CuPc can be hosted at the surface of TiO2 and resulted to the bond lengths of

  17. Organic photovoltaic cells using hexadecafluorophthalocyaninatocopper (F 16CuPc) as electron acceptor material

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaoxia Jiang; Jiguang Dai; Haibo Wang; Yanhou Geng; DongHang Yan

    2007-01-01

    We fabricated organic photovoltaic cells by using hexadecafluorophthalocyaninatocopper (F16CuPc) as electron acceptor material and para-sexiphenyl (p-6P) as electron donor material. F16CuPc has wide absorption spectrum from 550nm to 850nm, which covers the maximum of solar photo flux. The measurement of their external quantum efficiency (EQE) demonstrated that the photocurrent comes from the excitons created in F16CuPc, which were separated into

  18. Improving efficiency of organic photovoltaic cells with pentacene-doped CuPc layer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wei-Bing Chen; Hai-Feng Xiang; Zong-Xiang Xu; Bei-Ping Yan; V. A. L. Roy; Chi-Ming Che; Pui-To Lai

    2007-01-01

    We have fabricated efficient heterojunction organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells based on pentacene-doped copper(II) phthalocyanine (CuPc) layer as donor and fullerene (C60) layer as acceptor. The power conversion efficiency of 4% pentacene-doped CuPc\\/C60 OPV cell (3.06%) is increased by 77% compared with that of the standard CuPc\\/C60 OPV cell (1.73%). The efficiency improvement can be attributed to the higher carrier mobility

  19. Jurgen A. Doornik Work Page for Ox, GiveWin, PcGive and PcFiml

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jurgen A. Doornik of Nuffield College, Oxford (UK) has made Ox, an object oriented matrix programming language similar to Gauss and S-plus, available at this site. Ox is available on several platforms including Windows (PC and Alpha), MS-DOS, Linux, SunOS, Solaris, HP-UX, Unix (DEC-Alpha), Irix (SGI) and RS6000 (AIX). The console version of Ox is free for educational and research use. OxEdit, a text editor with "support for syntax highlighting, and running external tools" developed to write Ox programs is offered at this site. Note that OxEdit works only under Windows 95 and NT. The site also contains Introduction to Ox (postscript format), a hands-on guide to the Ox language. The guide contains many examples, exercises, and 30 tutorial programs for interactive learning. There are also software reviews comparing Ox to various other econometric packages such as Gauss and S-Plus.

  20. Effect of K doping on CuPc: C{sub 60} heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chiu-Ping; Chen, Wen-Yen [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiayi University, Chiayi 60004, Taiwan (China); Wei, Ching-Hsuan; Pi, Tun-Wen [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China)

    2011-12-01

    Here, the electronic properties of K-doped copper phthalocyanine (CuPc): C{sub 60} heterojunctions are studied via synchrotron-radiation photoemission. The K-doped heterointerfaces were obtained by means of C{sub 60} on K{sub 1.5}CuPc and CuPc on K{sub 3}C{sub 60}. The photoelectron spectra show that the potassium prefers to combine with C{sub 60}. At the C{sub 60}/K{sub 1.5}CuPc interface, the K diffuses and transfers negative charge into the C{sub 60} overlayer, while no strong chemical reaction could be found at the CuPc/K{sub 3}C{sub 60} interface. A significant shift of the vacuum level was observed in both cases, which was caused by the charge transfer for the C{sub 60}/K{sub 1.5}CuPc and by the induced density of interface states (IDIS) dipole for the CuPc/K{sub 3}C{sub 60}. The energy level diagrams show that using C{sub 60} adsorption on a K-doped CuPc film is good for the improvement of photovoltaic devices. However, the inverse process, that of CuPc on a K-doped C{sub 60}, is unfavorable for the photovoltaic effect.

  1. Substitution of tryptophan 89 with tyrosine switches the DNA binding mode of PC4

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinguang; Zhao, Yanxiang; Liu, Huaian; Huang, Dan; Cheng, Xiankun; Zhao, Wensheng; Taylor, Ian A.; Liu, Junfeng; Peng, You-Liang

    2015-01-01

    PC4, a well-known general transcription cofactor, has multiple functions in transcription and DNA repair. Residue W89, is engaged in stacking interactions with DNA in PC4, but substituted by tyrosine in some PC4 orthologous proteins. In order to understand the consequences and reveal the molecular details of this substitution we have determined the crystal structures of the PC4 orthologue MoSub1 and a PC4 W89Y mutant in complex with DNA. In the structure of MoSub1-DNA complex, Y74 interacts directly with a single nucleotide of oligo DNA. By comparison, the equivalent residue, W89 in wild type PC4 interacts with two nucleotides and the base of the second nucleotide has distinct orientation relative to that of the first one. A hydrophobic patch around W89 that favours interaction with two nucleotides is not formed in the PC4 W89Y mutant. Therefore, the change of the surface hydrophobicity around residue 89 results in a difference between the modes of DNA interaction. These results indicate that the conserved Y74 in MoSub1 or W89 in PC4, are not only key residues in making specific interactions with DNA but also required to determine the DNA binding mode of PC4 proteins. PMID:25739870

  2. Multitone Photoconductive Sensors for Free-Space Optics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    X. Jin; J. F. Holzman

    2010-01-01

    A multitone frequency-biasing technique is applied to an integrated photoconductive (PC) sensor for application to free-space optical (FSO) communication systems. The introduced technique and integrated device provide the required optical transmission, detection, and retroreflection capabilities for both passive uplink and active downlink operations. The physical structure incorporates three triangular PC switches, with 450- ?m GaAs gaps, assembled in a corner-cube

  3. Copper hexadecafluorophthalocyanine (F 16CuPc) as an electron accepting material in bilayer small molecule organic photovoltaic cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. L. Yang; S. Schumann; R. A. Hatton; T. S. Jones

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that the molecular semiconductor, copper hexadecafluorophthalocyanine (F16CuPc), can be used as an electron accepting layer in bilayer small molecule organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells using boron subphthalocyanine chloride (SubPc) as the electron donor. The F16CuPc\\/SubPc cells show good overall performance and stability, with a power conversion efficiency of 0.56% obtained for optimised F16CuPc layer thickness and only 10% degradation

  4. NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION

    E-print Network

    Christian, Eric

    NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION 1 Reuse Working Group Co-chairs: Robert Wolfe, NASA, PA October 21­23, 2008 #12;NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION ESDS Reuse Working Group 2 on the Mailing List #12;NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION 4 Background #12;NATIONAL AERONAUTICS

  5. NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION

    E-print Network

    Christian, Eric

    NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION 1 Reuse Working Group ­ Report Back Co-chairs: Robert Philadelphia, PA October 21­23, 2008 #12;NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION ESDS Reuse Working Group system ­ Future reuse (persistent use) is important #12;NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION

  6. Space Station Human Factors Research Review. Volume 3: Space Station Habitability and Function: Architectural Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Marc M. (editor); Eichold, Alice (editor); Heers, Susan (editor)

    1987-01-01

    Articles are presented on a space station architectural elements model study, space station group activities habitability module study, full-scale architectural simulation techniques for space stations, and social factors in space station interiors.

  7. METHANE de-NOX for Utility PC Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Bryan; Joseph Rabovitser; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo

    2003-09-30

    During the current quarter, pilot-scale testing with the modified air nozzle version of the PC burner was completed with PRB coal at the Riley Power Inc. (RPI) test facility. A total of 8 different burner configurations were tested utilizing various burner air nozzle arrangements in place of the burner air channels. It was found that with the arrangements tested, a stable flame could not be maintained at coal feed rates above 100 lb/h. While it is felt that the air nozzle approach can ultimately be used effectively, in the interest of holding to the current project schedule it was decided to proceed with the balance of the project using the air channel design. The pilot-scale PC burner was therefore restored to the air-channel configuration and benchmark testing with PRB coal to confirmed previous operating results. A series of tests was then conducted with PRB and West Virginia caking coal to evaluate modifications to the gas combustor configuration and operation for improved performance with caking coal. Continuous operation was achieved with caking coal up to 50 lb/h vs. the full load target of 150 lb/h. Impingement and deposition of partially devolatilized coal occurred at various points within the combustor when the caking coal feed was increased above 50 lb/h. The 100 MMBtu/h commercial-scale prototype design was continued with coal burner design input from both RPI and VTI. Based on typical burner installation layout considerations, it was decided that the preheat combustor should be oriented horizontally on the axial centerline of the coal burner. Accordingly, the pilot gas combustor was changed to this orientation so that the pilot results with caking coal will be directly applicable to the preferred 100 MMBtu design. Testing with caking coal in the horizontal pilot combustor achieved feed rates up to 126 lb/h, although some deposition and LOI issues remain. Several promising approaches to further improve operation with caking coal were identified. NOx results with caking coal are promising, with NOx as low as 150 ppmv at exit oxygen levels of 4% and higher. The 100 MMBtu/h commercial-scale prototype design is nearing completion. Design of the caking coal version of the unit continues with additional pilot testing in support of this design expected. GTI and RPI are expediting the fabrication of the 100 MMBtu/h PRB unit in order to start testing in early- to mid-December. Inspection and repair of the 100 MMBtu/h Coal Burner Test Facility (CBTF) is nearing completion. As of mid-September, this activity was 95% complete.

  8. 78 FR 14401 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Public Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ...Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee...DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee...Systems Working Group of the Commercial Space Transportation Advisory...

  9. Modification of HSP proteins and Ca2+ are responsible for the NO-derived peroxynitrite mediated neurological damage in PC12 cell

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jun; Li, Hua; Zhang, Yudan; Li, Xia; Liu, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Peroxynitrite as one crucial metabolite of NO-derived agents has been well multi-investigated to inspect its potential role and sought to define its concrete mechanism underlying the memory loss and impaired cognition involved in pathological processes. In this investigation, the cell viability was assessed by the MTT assay. The neurotoxicity of peroxynitrite was analyzed by using immunohistochemical measurements in cultured PC12 cells to explore the underlying mechanisms. The generation of ROS was evaluated by a fluorometry assay by a fluorometry assay. Apoptosis was assayed by annexin V-FITC and PI staining with flow cytometry. [Ca2+]i was examined by using the microspectrofluorometer. Hsp70 was detected by western blot assay. The results revealed that PC12 cells were inhibited by peroxynitrite both in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. The level of ROS in PC12 cells exposed to SIN-1 was increased in a dose-dependent manner. The result indicated that the SIN-1 induced apoptosis of PC12 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Quercetin inhibited the viability of PC12 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. [Ca2+]i was increased gradually when cells treated with quercetin alone and also increased with treatment of dantrolene-containing. Hsp70 was significantly decreased in SIN-1-treated group compared with that of control group (P<0.01). In conclusion, Ca2+ homeostasis and chaperone Hsp70 were critically involved in peroxynitrite induced nitrosative stress as protective. Peroxynitrite acts as the pathological agent in learning and memory defects in CNS disorders associated with challenge. PMID:26191139

  10. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing the Drosophila Polycomb (Pc) chromodomain show developmental alterations: possible role of Pc chromodomain proteins in chromatin-mediated gene regulation in plants.

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, R; Charrier, B; Scollan, C; Meyer, P

    1999-01-01

    The chromodomain of the Drosophila Polycomb (Pc) protein has been introduced into tobacco nuclei to determine its location in the nucleus and its effect on plant development. Pc is a repressor of homeotic Drosophila genes that shares a well-conserved, although not identical, chromodomain with a structural heterochromatin component, Heterochromatin Protein 1. The chromodomains might therefore play a common role in chromatin repression. An analysis of transgenic plants expressing the Pc chromodomain, which was linked to the green fluorescent protein, suggested that the Pc chromodomain has distinct target regions in the plant genome. Transgenic plants expressing the Pc chromodomain had phenotypic abnormalities in their leaves and flowers, indicating a disruption in development. In axillary shoot buds of plants displaying altered leaf phenotypes, enhanced expression of a homeodomain gene, which is downregulated in wild-type leaves, was found. In Drosophila, Pc has been shown to possess distinct chromosome binding activity and to be involved in the regulation of development-specific genes. Our results support the assumptions that the heterologous chromodomain affects related functions in Drosophila and in plants, and that chromatin modification mechanisms are involved in the regulation of certain plant genes, in a manner similar to chromatin-mediated gene regulation in Drosophila. PMID:10368176

  11. Bacillus anthracis-Like Bacteria and Other B. cereus Group Members in a Microbial Community Within the International Space Station: A Challenge for Rapid and Easy Molecular Detection of Virulent B. anthracis

    PubMed Central

    van Tongeren, Sandra P.; Roest, Hendrik I. J.; Degener, John E.; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.

    2014-01-01

    For some microbial species, such as Bacillus anthracis, the etiologic agent of the disease anthrax, correct detection and identification by molecular methods can be problematic. The detection of virulent B. anthracis is challenging due to multiple virulence markers that need to be present in order for B. anthracis to be virulent and its close relationship to Bacillus cereus and other members of the B. cereus group. This is especially the case in environments where build-up of Bacillus spores can occur and several representatives of the B. cereus group may be present, which increases the chance for false-positives. In this study we show the presence of B. anthracis-like bacteria and other members of the B. cereus group in a microbial community within the human environment of the International Space Station and their preliminary identification by using conventional culturing as well as molecular techniques including 16S rDNA sequencing, PCR and real-time PCR. Our study shows that when monitoring the microbial hygiene in a given human environment, health risk assessment is troublesome in the case of virulent B. anthracis, especially if this should be done with rapid, easy to apply and on-site molecular methods. PMID:24945323

  12. Bacillus anthracis-like bacteria and other B. cereus group members in a microbial community within the International Space Station: a challenge for rapid and easy molecular detection of virulent B. anthracis.

    PubMed

    van Tongeren, Sandra P; Roest, Hendrik I J; Degener, John E; Harmsen, Hermie J M

    2014-01-01

    For some microbial species, such as Bacillus anthracis, the etiologic agent of the disease anthrax, correct detection and identification by molecular methods can be problematic. The detection of virulent B. anthracis is challenging due to multiple virulence markers that need to be present in order for B. anthracis to be virulent and its close relationship to Bacillus cereus and other members of the B. cereus group. This is especially the case in environments where build-up of Bacillus spores can occur and several representatives of the B. cereus group may be present, which increases the chance for false-positives. In this study we show the presence of B. anthracis-like bacteria and other members of the B. cereus group in a microbial community within the human environment of the International Space Station and their preliminary identification by using conventional culturing as well as molecular techniques including 16S rDNA sequencing, PCR and real-time PCR. Our study shows that when monitoring the microbial hygiene in a given human environment, health risk assessment is troublesome in the case of virulent B. anthracis, especially if this should be done with rapid, easy to apply and on-site molecular methods. PMID:24945323

  13. Using Gnu C to develop PC-based vision systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, John W. V.; Shridhar, Malayappan; Shabestari, Behrouz N.

    1995-10-01

    The Gnu project has provided a substantial quantity of free high-quality software tools for UNIX-based machines including the Gnu C compiler which is used on a wide variety of hardware systems including IBM PC-compatible machines using 80386 or newer (32-bit) processors. While this compiler was developed for UNIX applications, it has been successfully ported to DOS and offers substantial benefits over traditional DOS-based 16-bit compilers for machine vision applications. One of the most significant advantages with Gnu C is the removal of the 640 K limit since addressing is performed with 32-bit pointers. Hence, all physical memory can be used directly to store and retrieve images, lookup tables, databases, etc. Execution speed is generally faster also since 32-bit code usually executes faster and there are no far pointers. Protected-mode operation provides other benefits since errant pointers often cause segmentation errors and the source of such errors can be readily identified using special tools provided with the compiler. Examples of vision applications using Gnu C include automatic hand-written address block recognition, counting of shattered-glass particles, and dimensional analysis.

  14. NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION

    E-print Network

    Christian, Eric

    NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION 1 Reuse Working Group Breakout #4 ­ Reuse Readiness;NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION 2 Overview of RRLs #12;NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE in a laboratory; for example, an application tested with simulated inputs. #12;NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE

  15. High Speed PC Based Data Acquisition and Instrumentation for Measurement of Simulated Low Earth Orbit Thermally Induced Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sills, Joel W., Jr.; Griffin, Thomas J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Disturbance Verification Test (DVT) was conducted to characterize responses of the Observatory's new set of rigid solar array's (SA3) to thermally induced 'creak' or stiction releases. The data acquired in the DVT were used in verification of the HST Pointing Control System on-orbit performance, post-Servicing Mission 3B (SM3B). The test simulated the on-orbit environment on a deployed SA3 flight wing. Instrumentation for this test required pretest simulations in order to select the correct sensitivities. Vacuum compatible, highly accurate accelerometers and force gages were used for this test. The complexity of the test, as well as a short planning schedule, required a data acquisition system that was easy to configure, highly flexible, and extremely robust. A PC Windows oriented data acquisition system meets these requirements, allowing the test engineers to minimize the time required to plan and perform complex environmental test. The SA3 DVT provided a direct practical and complex demonstration of the versatility that PC based data acquisition systems provide. Two PC based data acquisition systems were assembled to acquire, process, distribute, and provide real time processing for several types of transducers used in the SA3 DVT. A high sample rate digital tape recorder was used to archive the sensor signals. The two systems provided multi-channel hardware and software architecture and were selected based on the test requirements. How these systems acquire and processes multiple data rates from different transducer types is discussed, along with the system hardware and software architecture.

  16. Do's and Don'ts for e-Lab Notebooks Fish & Richardson, P.C.

    E-print Network

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Do's and Don'ts for e-Lab Notebooks Fish & Richardson, P.C. Laboratory notebooks provide important-up copy in a safe place free from magnetic fields or other corruptive conditions. Print computer generated the system, and review the reports for any unauthorized persons. © Copyright 2000 Fish & Richardson P.C. All

  17. State identification and tunable Kondo effect of MnPc on Ag(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kügel, Jens; Karolak, Michael; Krönlein, Andreas; Senkpiel, Jacob; Hsu, Pin-Jui; Sangiovanni, Giorgio; Bode, Matthias

    2015-06-01

    We present a detailed investigation of spectroscopic features located at the central metal ion of MnPc (where Pc represents phthalocyanine) on Ag(001) by means of scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and first-principles theory. STS data taken close to the Fermi level reveal an asymmetric feature that cannot be fitted with a single Fano function representing a one-channel Kondo effect. Instead, our data indicate the existence of a second superimposed feature. Two potential physical origins, a second Kondo channel related to the dx z /y z orbitals, and a spectral feature of the dz2 orbital itself, are discussed. A systematic experimental and theoretical comparison of MnPc with CoPc and FePc indicates that the second feature observed on MnPc is caused by the dz2 orbital. This conclusion is corroborated by STM-induced dehydrogenation experiments on FePc and MnPc which in both cases result in a gradual shift towards more positive binding energies and a narrowing of the Kondo resonance. Theoretical analysis reveals that the latter is caused by the reduced hybridization between the d orbital and the substrate. Spatially resolved differential conductivity maps taken close to the respective peak positions show that the intensity of both features is highest over the central Mn ion, thereby providing further evidence against a second Kondo channel originating from the dx z /y z orbital of the central Mn ion.

  18. The isoforms of proprotein convertase PC5 are sorted to different subcellular compartments

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The proprotein convertase PC5 is encoded by multiple mRNAs, two of which give rise to the COOH-terminal variant isoforms PC5-A (915 amino acids [aa]) and PC5-B (1877 aa). To investigate the differences in biosynthesis and sorting between these two proteins, we generated stably transfected AtT-20 cell lines expressing each enzyme individually and examined their respective processing pattern and subcellular localization. Biosynthetic analyses coupled to immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that the shorter and soluble PC5-A is sorted to regulated secretory granules. In contrast, the COOH- terminally extended and membrane-bound PC5-B is located in the Golgi. The presence of a sorting signal in the COOH-terminal 38 amino acids unique to PC5-A was demonstrated by the inefficient entry into the regulated secretory pathway of a mutant lacking this segment. EM of pancreatic cells established the presence of immunoreactive PC5 in glucagon-containing granules, demonstrating the sorting of this protein to dense core secretory granules in endocrine cells. Thus, a single PC5 gene generates COOH-terminally modified isoforms with different sorting signals directing these proteins to distinct subcellular localization, thereby allowing them to process their appropriate substrates. PMID:8947550

  19. Rheological Properties of PET\\/PC Immiscible Polymer Blends: Effect of Catalysts and Stabilizers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mbarek Souad; Carrot Christian; Jaziri Mohamed; Chalamet Yvan; Elleuch Boubaker

    2008-01-01

    The rheology of PET\\/PC blends obtained by melt reactive blending using various transesterification catalysts has been measured in the melt at 260 °C in dynamic oscillatory shear flow. The thermal stability in the melt of PET\\/PC blends is a key limitation of the measurement time especially in presence of transesterification catalysts. For long residence time, a noticeable decrease of the

  20. Thesis Defense Large-Scale Graph Computation on Just a PC

    E-print Network

    Gordon, Geoffrey J.

    This thesis Machine Learning / Data Mining Graph analysis and mining External=ons Research contribu=ons 2 #12;Why Graphs? Large-Scale Graph Computation on Just a PC 3 #12;BigData-Scale Graph Computation on Just a PC 9 #12;Big Graphs != Big Data 10 Data size: 140 billion

  1. USL/DBMS NASA/PC R and D project C programming standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (editor); Moreau, Dennis R.

    1984-01-01

    A set of programming standards intended to promote reliability, readability, and portability of C programs written for PC research and development projects is established. These standards must be adhered to except where reasons for deviation are clearly identified and approved by the PC team. Any approved deviation from these standards must also be clearly documented in the pertinent source code.

  2. PC based data acquisition system for measurement of switched reluctance motor (SRM)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. N. Walivadekar; S. K. Pillai; S. S. Sadistap; R. Bhandhari

    1996-01-01

    The paper proposes a PC-based scheme for the measurement of the inductance profile of a switched reluctance motor (SRM) under conditions closer to normal operation. Different methods for inductance measurement appropriate to SRMs are briefly described. Specifications of the data acquisition system (DAS) for PC-based measurement systems for SRMs are derived by considering the operational features and instrumentation requirements of

  3. A Large LinuxPC Farm for Online Event Reconstruction and Data Management at HERAB

    E-print Network

    A Large Linux­PC Farm for Online Event Reconstruction and Data Management at HERA­B #3; A. Gellrich to data rates and volumes in HEP pointing towards the LHC era. The experiment exploits a Linux­PC farm of the Farm and the data handling in HERA­B as well as installation and running experiences after 6 months

  4. Phase structure of Pc3 waves observed by Cluster and ground stations near the cusp

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. H. Liu; B. J. Fraser; S. T. Ables; M. W. Dunlop; B. C. Zhang; R. Y. Liu; Q. G. Zong

    2008-01-01

    Ground observations of Pc3 ULF waves at high latitude show enhanced pulsation activity near the cusp. To investigate this, typical Pc3 pulsation events from 0920 to 1010 UT on 1 April 2004 have been selected that are simultaneously observed by the Cluster satellites and Zhongshan, Davis, and Mawson magnetometers, Antarctica. When Cluster was located on closed field lines equatorward of

  5. USER'S GUIDE TO THE PERSONAL COMPUTER VERSION OF THE BIOGENIC EMISSIONS INVENTORY SYSTEM (PC-BEIS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Personal Computer Version of the Biogenic Emissions Inventory System (PC-BEIS) has been developed to allow users to estimate hourly emissions of biogenic non-methane hydrocarbon emissions for any county in the contiguous United States. PC-BEIS has been compiled using Microsof...

  6. Pathology of US Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Strain PC21A in Gnotobiotic Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kwonil; Scheuer, Kelly A.; Lu, Zhongyan; Zhang, Yan; Saif, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    To understand the progression of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus infection, we inoculated gnotobiotic pigs with a newly emerged US strain, PC21A, of the virus. At 24–48 hours postinoculation, the pigs exhibited severe diarrhea and vomiting, fecal shedding, viremia, and severe atrophic enteritis. These findings confirm that strain PC21A is highly enteropathogenic. PMID:24795932

  7. Induction of cellular prion protein (PrPc) under hypoxia inhibits apoptosis caused by TRAIL treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju-Hee; Moon, Ji-Hong; Kim, Sung-Wook; Lee, You-Jin; Park, Sang-Youel

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia decreases cytotoxic responses to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) protein. Cellular prion protein (PrPc) is regulated by HIF-1? in neurons. We hypothesized that PrPc is involved in hypoxia-mediated resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. We found that hypoxia induced PrPc protein and inhibited TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Thus silencing of PrPc increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis under hypoxia. Overexpression of PrPc protein using an adenoviral vector inhibited TRAIL-induced apoptosis. In xenograft model in vivo, shPrPc transfected cells were more sensitive to TRAIL-induced apoptosis than in shMock transfected cells. Molecular chemo-therapy approaches based on the regulation of PrPc expression need to address anti-tumor function of TRAIL under hypoxia. Molecular chemo-therapy approaches based on the regulation of PrPc expression need to address anti-tumor function of TRAIL under hypoxia. PMID:25742790

  8. Using a Tablet PC in the German Classroom to Enliven Teacher Input

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Orden, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Providing students with lively, authentic comprehensible input is one of the most important tasks of introductory German teachers. Using a Tablet PC can enable teachers to improve the quality of the comprehensible input they provide their students. This article describes how integrating a Tablet PC into daily teaching processes allows classroom…

  9. k=10 GS PC TPDA GES Average SHD Results -Child -Sample Size 500

    E-print Network

    Brown, Laura E.

    TPDA GES Structural Hamming Distance Average SHD Results - Child - Sample Size 500 Error Bars = +/- Std GS PC TPDA GES Structural Hamming Distance Average SHD Results - Child3 - Sample Size 500 Error Bars k=10 GS PC TPDA GES Structural Hamming Distance Average SHD Results - Child5 - Sample Size 500 Error

  10. Efficacy of oleylphosphocholine (OlPC) in vitro and in a mouse model of invasive aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Paulussen, Caroline; Boulet, Gaëlle; Bosschaerts, Tom; Cos, Paul; Fortin, Anny; Maes, Louis

    2015-03-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) has become increasingly common and is characterised by high morbidity and mortality. Upcoming resistance threatens treatment with azoles and highlights the continuous need for novel therapeutics. This laboratory study investigated the in vitro and in vivo potential of the alkylphospholipid oleylphosphocholine (OlPC) against Aspergillus. In vitro activities of OlPC, miltefosine, posaconazole and voriconazole were determined for Aspergillus fumigatus, A. niger, A. terreus and A. flavus. In vivo efficacy of OlPC was evaluated in a systemic A. fumigatus mouse model, adopting a short-term and long-term oral or intraperitoneal dosing regimen. OlPC showed good in vitro activity against A. fumigatus (IC50 = 1.04 ?mol l(-1)). Intraperitoneal administration of 50 mg kg(-1) day(-1) OlPC significantly reduced the fungal organ burdens at 4 days post-infection (dpi). Although 5- and 10-day OlPC treatment improved survival, organ burdens were not affected at 10 and 15 dpi. While this study showed excellent in vitro activity of OlPC against Aspergillus spp., its therapeutic efficacy in an acute mouse model for IA was less convincing. Given the limited therapeutic options in the current antifungal market for invasive infections, OlPC activity should be assessed in a less stringent in vivo model, potentially in combination treatment with other already marketed antifungal drugs. PMID:25590577

  11. A N-dimensional Stochastic Control Algorithm for Electricity Asset Management on PC cluster

    E-print Network

    Vialle, Stéphane

    A N-dimensional Stochastic Control Algorithm for Electricity Asset Management on PC cluster of stocks (N) and a big number of uncertainty factors. This paper introduces a distribution of a N-dimension stochastic dynamic programming application, on PC clusters and IBM Blue Gene/L super- computer. It has needed

  12. Programmed Cell Death during Regression of PC82 Human Prostate Cancer following Androgen Ablation1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Natasha Kyprianou; Hugh F. English; John T. Isaacs

    To study the mechanism of regression of human prostatic cancer followingandrogen ablation, the androgen-responsive PC-82 human pros tatic adenocarcinoma xenograft was used as a model system. Castration of male nude mice bearing PC-82 xenografts results in a 50' i tumor regression by 2 wk following androgen ablation. This regression is due to a sequence of biochemical and morphological events that

  13. Pc Images of Eta CAR Outer Condensations Augmentation, Cycle 3, High Priority

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dennis Ebbets

    1993-01-01

    This proposal defines a set of PC images of the outer condensations of Eta Carinae which should be made during cycle 3, shortly before the first HST service mission. These images should be made with the first generation PC. This proposal uses the balance of the GTO Augmentation time granted to the Eta Carinae project.

  14. Alkynide and acetonitrile activation by strained AlPC2 heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Roters, Steffi; Hepp, Alexander; Slootweg, J Chris; Lammertsma, Koop; Uhl, Werner

    2012-10-01

    Bicyclic compounds with annulated four- (AlPC(2)) and five-membered (P(2)C(3)) rings activate and capture Al-alkynides and acetonitrile at room temperature to afford bicyclic compounds with unique six-membered Al(2)PC(3) and AlNPC(3) heterocycles. PMID:22911118

  15. A High Speed Digital Ultrasonic Flaw Detector Based on PC and USB

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ziqiang Song; Qiang Wang; Xiuli Du; Yan Wang

    2007-01-01

    In order to meet the need of high speed data transfer in ultrasonic inspection nowadays, a PC and USB based high speed digital ultrasonic flaw detector is introduce. The technology of USB (universal serial bus), especially USB2.0 facilitates the connection of PC to peripheral, and accelerates data transfer. By using the USB interface the speed of data transfer is significantly

  16. Statistical Study of Low Latitude Pc3 Geomagnetic Pulsations: Diurnal and Seasonal Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, I. A.

    2006-05-01

    Using an array of four low latitude induction coil magnetometers, geomagnetic pulsations in the Pc3 period range were recorded simultaneously in southeast Australia. The data recording stations were situated at Woomera, Broken Hill, Newcastle and Launceston over a latitudinal range of 100 and a longitudinal range of 170 at L=1.8 to 2.7. Geomagnetic data for a period of about six months were digitized and analysis was carried out employing digital sonagram technique. The Pc3 occurrence was found to be evenly distributed with magnetic activity over the Kp = 2 - 5 range. Launceston, however, showed lower occurrences at low Kp values (Kp <2+) than the other three stations. The Pc3 occurrence probability normalized with respect to Kp occurrence was maximum for Kp = 4+ at all the four stations. It is also worth noting that Pc3 in winter was observed during intense magnetic activity when 5 < Kp <9. Finally, a gradual increase in the Pc3 average, lower and upper frequencies limit with Kp was observed during the local winter months for Kp <5. Key words - Pc3 geomagnetic pulsations, digital sonagram, diurnal variation of Pc3 occurrence, seasonal variation of Pc3 occurrence, Kp dependence.

  17. SoPC implementation of autofocus for infrared imaging apparatus based on retinal vision mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Kun; Liu, Na; Sun, Chengzhi; Ni, Guoqiang

    2009-07-01

    The center problem of common autofocus method by using image processing is to determine the position of best focus of an objective lens through the system output video. The general image processing autofocus algorithms require a focusing window with a suitable size, but this size is difficult to determine. An innovative solution is proposed here according to the retinal vision information-processing function. Un-uniform sampling is introduced by using the retinal space-variant resolution vision mechanism as reference in order to get higher resolution in central part of image and wider view field, making sure that the object located in the fovea region is protruded and the negative effect of the background image is restricted. The sharpness evaluation parameters are further studied for better performance. All the logic circuit above is realized in one FPGA chip of Cyclone II EP2C20 and the SoPC (System-on-a-Programmable-Chip) architecture is adopted to ensure the computing and response speed of the image autofocus. The experimental results indicate that the validity of autofocus algorithm.

  18. Interference with the expression of a novel human polycomb protein, hPc2, results in cellular transformation and apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Satijn, D P; Olson, D J; van der Vlag, J; Hamer, K M; Lambrechts, C; Masselink, H; Gunster, M J; Sewalt, R G; van Driel, R; Otte, A P

    1997-01-01

    Polycomb (Pc) is involved in the stable and heritable repression of homeotic gene activity during Drosophila development. Here, we report the identification of a novel human Pc homolog, hPc2. This gene is more closely related to a Xenopus Pc homolog, XPc, than to a previously described human Pc homolog, CBX2 (hPc1). However, the hPc2 and CBX2/hPc1 proteins colocalize in interphase nuclei of human U-2 OS osteosarcoma cells, suggesting that the proteins are part of a common protein complex. To study the functions of the novel human Pc homolog, we generated a mutant protein, delta hPc2, which lacks an evolutionarily conserved C-terminal domain. This C-terminal domain is important for hPc2 function, since the delta hPc2 mutant protein which lacks the C-terminal domain is unable to repress gene activity. Expression of the delta hPc2 protein, but not of the wild-type hPc2 protein, results in cellular transformation of mammalian cell lines as judged by phenotypic changes, altered marker gene expression, and anchorage-independent growth. Specifically in delta hPc2-transformed cells, the expression of the c-myc proto-oncogene is strongly enhanced and serum deprivation results in apoptosis. In contrast, overexpression of the wild-type hPc2 protein results in decreased c-myc expression. Our data suggest that hPc2 is a repressor of proto-oncogene activity and that interference with hPc2 function can lead to derepression of proto-oncogene transcription and subsequently to cellular transformation. PMID:9315667

  19. The structures of marialite (Me[subscript 6]) and meionite (Me[subscript 93]) in space groups P4[subscript 2]/n and I4/m, and the absence of phase transitions in the scapolite series

    SciTech Connect

    Antao, Sytle M.; Hassan, Ishmael (West Indies) [West Indies; (Calgary)

    2014-05-28

    The crystal structures of marialite (Me{sub 6}) from Badakhshan, Afghanistan and meionite (Me{sub 93}) from Mt. Vesuvius, Italy were obtained using synchrotron high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction (HRPXRD) data and Rietveld structure refinements. Their structures were refined in space groups I4/m and P42/n, and similar results were obtained. The Me{sub 6} sample has a formula Ca{sub 0.24}Na{sub 3.37}K{sub 0.24}[Al{sub 3.16}Si{sub 8.84}O{sub 24}]Cl{sub 0.84}(CO{sub 3}){sub 0.15}, and its unit-cell parameters are a = 12.047555(7), c = 7.563210(6) {angstrom}, and V = 1097.751(1) {angstrom}{sup 3}. The average (T1-O) distances are 1.599(1) {angstrom} in I4/m and 1.600(2) {angstrom} in P4{sub 2}/n, indicating that the T1 site contains only Si atoms. In P4{sub 2}/n, the average distances of (T2-O) = 1.655(2) and (T3-O) = 1.664(2) {angstrom} are distinct and are not equal to each other. However, the mean (T2,3-O) = 1.659(2) {angstrom} in P4{sub 2}/n and is identical to the (T2-O) = 1.659(1) {angstrom} in I4/m. The (M-O) [7] = 2.754(1) {angstrom} (M site is coordinated to seven framework O atoms) and M-A = 2.914(1) {angstrom}; these distances are identical in both space groups. The Me{sub 93} sample has a formula of Na{sub 0.29}Ca{sub 3.76}[Al{sub 5.54}Si{sub 6.46}O{sub 24}]Cl{sub 0.05}(SO{sub 4}){sub 0.02}(CO{sub 3}){sub 0.93}, and its unit-cell parameters are a = 12.19882(1), c = 7.576954(8) {angstrom}, and V = 1127.535(2) {angstrom}{sup 3}. A similar examination of the Me{sub 93} sample also shows that both space groups give similar results; however, the C-O distance is more reasonable in P4{sub 2}/n than in I4/m. Refining the scapolite structure near Me{sub 0} or Me{sub 100} in I4/m forces the T2 and T3 sites (both with multiplicity 8 in P4{sub 2}/n) to be equivalent and form the T2' site (with multiplicity 16 in I4/m), but (T2-O) is not equal to (T3-O) in P4{sub 2}/n. Using different space groups for different regions across the series implies phase transitions, which do not occur in the scapolite series.

  20. Physiological regulation, xenobiotic induction, and heterologous expression of P450 monooxygenase gene pc-3 (CYP63A3), a new member of the CYP63 gene cluster in the white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Subramanian, Venkataramanan; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2005-06-01

    In order to characterize the functional diversity in CYP63 cluster of tandemly linked P450 genes (pc-1, pc-2, and pc-3) in Phanerochaete chrysosporium, here we report the functional characterization of pc-3 (CYP63A3), a newly cloned member of this group. pc-3 expression was favored in nutrient-limited versus nutrient-rich media in 3-6-day-old cultures and was upregulated by starch as a carbon source or by oxygenation of cultures. pc-3 was induced by various xenobiotics in defined nutrient-limited (3-9-fold) and nutrient-rich (2-5-fold) cultures. Particularly, a range of unsubstituted and substituted aliphatic hydrocarbons (alkanes and fatty acids) induced the expression under the two nutrient conditions albeit in a differential manner. Interestingly, pc-3 was also inducible by certain oxygenated mono aromatics (nitrophenol, benzoate, and resorcinol), lower molecular weight (2 to 4 ring size) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and alkali-treated lignin derivatives in nutrient-rich malt extract cultures. The study further establishes that the three CYP63 genes (CYP63A1, A2, and A3) are independently regulated despite being members of the tandem gene cluster with high gene structural similarity (13-14 introns) and protein sequence homology (59-85%). The pc-3 cDNA (1,812 bp) was expressed in E. coli as a His-tagged protein (approximately 74 kDa). This constitutes the first report on heterologous expression of a P450 monooxygenase enzyme from this model white-rot fungus. PMID:15968506

  1. THE SOLAR NEIGHBORHOOD. XXVI. AP Col: THE CLOSEST (8.4 pc) PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Riedel, Adric R.; Henry, Todd J.; Jao, Wei-Chun [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30302-4106 (United States); Murphy, Simon J. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Melis, Carl [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, CA 92093-0424 (United States); Subasavage, John P., E-mail: riedel@chara.gsu.edu, E-mail: thenry@chara.gsu.edu, E-mail: jao@chara.gsu.edu, E-mail: murphysj@mso.anu.edu.au, E-mail: cmelis@ucsd.edu, E-mail: jsubasavage@ctio.noao.edu [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, La Serena (Chile)

    2011-10-15

    We present the results of a multi-technique investigation of the M4.5Ve flare star AP Col, which we discover to be the nearest pre-main-sequence star. These include astrometric data from the CTIO 0.9 m, from which we derive a proper motion of 342.0 {+-} 0.5 mas yr{sup -1}, a trigonometric parallax of 119.21 {+-} 0.98 mas (8.39 {+-} 0.07 pc), and photometry and photometric variability at optical wavelengths. We also provide spectroscopic data, including radial velocity (22.4 {+-} 0.3 km s{sup -1}), lithium equivalent width (EW) (0.28 {+-} 0.02 A), H{alpha} EW (-6.0 to -35 A), vsin i (11 {+-} 1 km s{sup -1}), and gravity indicators from the Siding Spring 2.3 m WiFeS, Lick 3 m Hamilton echelle, and Keck-I HIRES echelle spectrographs. The combined observations demonstrate that AP Col is the closer of only two known systems within 10 pc of the Sun younger than 100 Myr. Given its space motion and apparent age of 12-50 Myr, AP Col is likely a member of the recently proposed {approx}40 Myr old Argus/IC 2391 Association.

  2. Groups32

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    A group theory calculator. Groups32 computes information about groups of orders 1-32; has a permutation group package; and provides a search for groups with given generators and relations. Site includes documentation as well as course handouts in PDF format.

  3. Proactive Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galassi, John P., Ed.

    Several authors describe group counseling programs provided by a university counseling center to meet student needs for developing interpersonal communication skills and self-assertion behavior. In response to these needs, the counseling center provided personal growth groups, a proactive black group, a women's group, a marriage growth group, and…

  4. METHANE DE-NOX FOR UTILITY PC BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Bryan; Joseph Rabovitser; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo

    2004-02-06

    The primary focus for the project continues to be on developing a PC PREHEAT system design suitable for use with caking coals and readying the 100 MMBtu/h CBTF for testing with noncaking PRB coal. During the current quarter, twenty-two pilot tests were conducted with Central Appalachian (CA) caking coal. The objective for these tests was to achieve continuous operation of the pilot system at its design coal feed rate of 156 lb/h, without plugging or agglomeration in the combustor. One combustor air distribution method tested achieved continuous operation at 110 lb/hr, and inspection of the combustor afterward indicated that this method has potential to solve the caking problem. The NOx results from the pilot caking coal runs indicate that even greater NOx reduction is possible with CA coal than with the PRB coal tested, to levels near 100 ppmv or lower at 4-6% exit oxygen. It was therefore decided to conduct additional pilot tests of the air distribution method to determine how to incorporate this into a workable CA combustor design. Based on current weather and manpower restrictions at the site, this pilot testing is expected to be started in February. The design for the 100 MMBtu/h unit for PRB testing in the CBTF was completed and fabrication and installation started during the quarter. While significant progress has been made in the installation of the unit, weather and combustor fabrication delays are expected to move the start of large-scale testing with PRB coal into February, which will push the project completion date beyond the current 3/30/04 end date. GTI is in the process of developing a revised project schedule and estimated cost to complete.

  5. AKPLOT- A PLOTTER ROUTINE FOR THE IBM PC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, A. V.

    1994-01-01

    The AKPLOT routine was designed for engineers and scientists who use graphs as an integral part of their documentation. AKPLOT allows the user to generate a graph and edit its appearance on a CRT. This graph may undergo many interactive alterations before it is finally screen dumped to a printer for a hard copy plot. The finished AKPLOT graph may be stored in a file for future use. Features available in AKPLOT include: multiple curves on a single plot; combinations of linear and logarithmic scale axes; Lagrange interpolation of selected curves; shrink, expand, zoom, and tilt; ten different symbols and four different colors for curves; and three different grid types. AKPLOT enables the user to perform least squares fitting of all or selected curves with polynomials of up to 99 degrees and examine the least squares coefficients. The user must provide the data points to be plotted by one of two methods: 1) supplying an external file of X-Y values for all curves, or 2) computing the X-Y vectors by either placing BASIC code describing the relation in a designated section of the AKPLOT code or dynamically entering a one line function. Using either technique, the X-Y values are input to the computer only once, as the iterative graph edit loop bypasses the data input step for faster execution. AKPLOT is written in BASIC for interactive execution and has been implemented on an IBM PC series computer operating under DOS. AKPLOT requires a graphics board and a color monitor. This program was originally developed in 1986 and later revised in 1987.

  6. Silver Impairs Neurodevelopment: Studies in PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Christina M.; Wrench, Nicola; Ryde, Ian T.; Smith, Amanda M.; Seidler, Frederic J.; Slotkin, Theodore A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Exposure to silver is increasing because of silver nanoparticles in consumer products. Objectives and methods Many biological effects of silver entail actions of Ag+ (monovalent silver ions), so we used neuronotypic PC12 cells to evaluate the potential for silver to act as a developmental neurotoxicant, using chlorpyrifos (CPF), a pesticide known to evoke developmental neurotoxicity, as a positive control for comparison. Results In undifferentiated cells, a 1-hr exposure to 10 ?M Ag+ inhibited DNA synthesis more potently than did 50 ?M CPF; it also impaired protein synthesis but to a lesser extent than its effect on DNA synthesis, indicating a preferential effect on cell replication. Longer exposures led to oxidative stress, loss of viability, and reduced numbers of cells. With the onset of cell differentiation, exposure to 10 ?M Ag+ evoked even greater inhibition of DNA synthesis and more oxidative stress, selectively impaired neurite formation without suppressing overall cell growth, and preferentially suppressed development into the acetylcholine phenotype in favor of the dopamine phenotype. Lowering the exposure to 1 ?M Ag+ reduced the net effect on undifferentiated cells. However, in differentiating cells, the lower concentration produced an entirely different pattern, enhancing cell numbers by suppressing ongoing cell death and impairing differentiation in parallel for both neurotransmitter phenotypes. Conclusions Our results show that silver has the potential to evoke developmental neurotoxicity even more potently than known neurotoxicants, such as CPF, and that the spectrum of effects is likely to be substantially different at lower exposures that do not show signs of outright toxicity. PMID:20056586

  7. CathSim: an intravascular catheterization simulator on a PC.

    PubMed

    Ursino, M; Tasto, J L; Nguyen, B H; Cunningham, R; Merril, G L

    1999-01-01

    The development of a medical simulator that incorporates substantial training value and realism into an affordable product has been a huge challenge for the simulation community. A large hurdle to making an inexpensive simulator has been the high cost of the computers needed for adequate realism. We have met this challenge by developing CathSim, a low-cost medical simulator that integrates force feedback, multimedia, and 3D graphics simulation technology on an industry standard PC. This product is commercially available and is currently being used by numerous training institutions and hospitals. The CathSim system includes software and a force feedback interface device. The platform and device can be used to train health care providers to perform needle-stick medical procedures. Our first module teaches users the techniques of peripheral intravenous (i.v.) catheterization. Other training modules that will be added to the CathSim platform include central venous catheter (CVC) insertion and peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) placement. This paper discusses the challenges of this project and the trade-offs and solutions that we developed to overcome them. We describe our process of analyzing and prioritizing the medical tasks necessary to correctly perform peripheral intravenous catheterization. This analysis and prioritization was used to decide which tasks would be included in the simulator and how the included tasks would be replicated. We discuss the method by which we obtained the needed realism in the 3D graphics rendering and in the tactile feedback of the input device. We illustrate how we blended together simulation and multimedia technology to ensure adequate immersion and training efficacy, while keeping the system cost to a minimum. PMID:10538388

  8. Conceptual Design of Oxygen-Based PC Boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Seltzer; Zhen Fan

    2005-09-01

    Coal is presently the world's primary fuel for generating electrical power and, being more abundant and less expensive than oil or natural gas, is expected to continue its dominance into the future. Coal, however, is more carbon intensive than natural gas and oil and consequently coal-fired power plants are large point source emitters of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Since CO{sub 2} is a greenhouse gas, which may have an adverse impact on the world's climate/weather patterns, studies have been conducted to determine the feasibility and economic impact of capturing power plant CO{sub 2} emissions for pipeline transport to a sequestration/storage site. The stack gas that exhausts from a modern coal-fired power plant typically contains about 15% CO{sub 2} on a dry volume basis. Although there are numerous processes available for removing CO{sub 2} from gas streams, gas scrubbing with amine solvent is best suited for this application because of the large gas volumes and low CO{sub 2} concentrations involved. Unfortunately the energy required to regenerate the solvent for continued use as a capturing agent is large and imposes a severe energy penalty on the plant. In addition this ''back end'' or post combustion cleanup requires the addition of large vessels, which, in retrofit applications, are difficult to accommodate. As an alternative to post combustion scrubbing, Foster Wheeler (FW) has proposed that the combustion process be accomplished with oxygen rather than air. With all air nitrogen eliminated, a CO{sub 2}-water vapor rich flue gas will be generated. After condensation of the water vapor, a portion of the flue gas will be recirculated back to the boiler to control the combustion temperature and the balance of the CO{sub 2} will be processed for pipeline transport. This proposed oxygen-carbon dioxide (O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}) combustion process eliminates the need for CO{sub 2} removal/separation and reduces the cost of supplying a CO{sub 2} rich stream for sequestration. FW has developed a conceptual design of an O{sub 2} fired boiler to determine overall plant performance and economics. Five subtasks were conducted: (1) a literature review, (2) a system design and analysis, (3) a low NOx burner design and analysis, (4) a furnace and heat recovery area design analysis, and (5) an economic analysis. The objective of the literature search is to locate any data/information relevant to the Oxygen-Based PC Boiler conceptual design. The objective of the system design and analysis task is to optimize the PC boiler plant by maximizing system efficiency within practical considerations. Simulations of the oxygen-fired plant with CO{sub 2} sequestration were conducted using Aspen Plus and were compared to a reference air-fired 460 MW plant. Flue gas recycle is used in the O{sub 2}-fired PC to control the flame temperature. Parametric runs were made to determine the effect of flame temperature on system efficiency and required waterwall material and thickness. The degree of improvement on system efficiency of various modifications including hot gas recycle, purge gas recycle, flue gas feedwater recuperation, and recycle purge gas expansion were investigated. The selected O{sub 2}-fired design case has a system efficiency of 30.6% compared to the air-fired system efficiency of 36.7%. The design O{sub 2}-fired case requires T91 waterwall material and has a waterwall surface area of only 65% of the air-fired reference case. The objective of the low NOx burner design and analysis task is to optimize the burner design to ensure stable ignition, to provide safe operation, and to minimize pollutant formation. The burners were designed and analyzed using the Fluent CFD computer program. Four burner designs were developed: (1) with no OFG and 65% flue gas recycle, (2) with 20% OFG and 65% flue gas recycle, (3) with no OFG and 56% flue gas recycle and (4) with 20% OFG and 56% flue gas recycle. A 3-D Fluent simulation was made of a single wall-fired burner and horizontal portion of the furnace from the wall to the center. Without primary gas sw

  9. Combination of Quercetin and 2-Methoxyestradiol Enhances Inhibition of Human Prostate Cancer LNCaP and PC-3 Cells Xenograft Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feiya; Song, Liming; Wang, Huiping; Wang, Jun; Xu, Zhiqing; Xing, Nianzeng

    2015-01-01

    Quercetin and 2-Methoxyestradiol (2-ME) are promising anti-cancer substances. Our previous in vitro study showed that quercetin synergized with 2-Methoxyestradiol exhibiting increased antiproliferative and proapoptotic activity in both androgen-dependent LNCaP and androgen-independent PC-3 human prostate cancer cell lines. In the present study, we determined whether their combination could inhibit LNCaP and PC-3 xenograft tumor growth in vivo and explored the underlying mechanism. Human prostate cancer LNCaP and PC-3 cells were inoculated subcutaneously in male BALB/c nude mice. When xenograft tumors reached about 100 mm3, mice were randomly allocated to vehicle control, quercetin or 2-Methoxyestradiol singly treated and combination treatment groups. After therapeutic intervention for 4 weeks, combination treatment of quercetin and 2-ME i) significantly inhibited prostate cancer xenograft tumor growth by 46.8% for LNCaP and 51.3% for PC-3 as compared to vehicle control group, more effective than quercetin (28.4% for LNCaP, 24.8% for PC3) or 2-ME (32.1% for LNCaP, 28.9% for PC3) alone; ii) was well tolerated by BALB/c mice and no obvious toxic reactions were observed; iii) led to higher Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, cleaved caspase-3 protein expression and apoptosis rate; and iv) resulted in lower phosphorylated AKT (pAKT) protein level, vascular endothelial growth factor protein and mRNA expression, microvascular density and proliferation rate than single drug treatment. These effects were more remarkable compared to vehicle group. Therefore, combination of quercetin and 2-ME can serve as a novel clinical treatment regimen owning the potential of enhancing antitumor effect on prostate cancer in vivo and lessening the dose and side effects of either quercetin or 2-ME alone. These in vivo results will lay a further solid basis for subsequent researches on this novel therapeutic regimen in human prostate cancer. PMID:26011145

  10. Combination of Quercetin and 2-Methoxyestradiol Enhances Inhibition of Human Prostate Cancer LNCaP and PC-3 Cells Xenograft Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feiya; Song, Liming; Wang, Huiping; Wang, Jun; Xu, Zhiqing; Xing, Nianzeng

    2015-01-01

    Quercetin and 2-Methoxyestradiol (2-ME) are promising anti-cancer substances. Our previous in vitro study showed that quercetin synergized with 2-Methoxyestradiol exhibiting increased antiproliferative and proapoptotic activity in both androgen-dependent LNCaP and androgen-independent PC-3 human prostate cancer cell lines. In the present study, we determined whether their combination could inhibit LNCaP and PC-3 xenograft tumor growth in vivo and explored the underlying mechanism. Human prostate cancer LNCaP and PC-3 cells were inoculated subcutaneously in male BALB/c nude mice. When xenograft tumors reached about 100 mm3, mice were randomly allocated to vehicle control, quercetin or 2-Methoxyestradiol singly treated and combination treatment groups. After therapeutic intervention for 4 weeks, combination treatment of quercetin and 2-ME i) significantly inhibited prostate cancer xenograft tumor growth by 46.8% for LNCaP and 51.3% for PC-3 as compared to vehicle control group, more effective than quercetin (28.4% for LNCaP, 24.8% for PC3) or 2-ME (32.1% for LNCaP, 28.9% for PC3) alone; ii) was well tolerated by BALB/c mice and no obvious toxic reactions were observed; iii) led to higher Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, cleaved caspase-3 protein expression and apoptosis rate; and iv) resulted in lower phosphorylated AKT (pAKT) protein level, vascular endothelial growth factor protein and mRNA expression, microvascular density and proliferation rate than single drug treatment. These effects were more remarkable compared to vehicle group. Therefore, combination of quercetin and 2-ME can serve as a novel clinical treatment regimen owning the potential of enhancing antitumor effect on prostate cancer in vivo and lessening the dose and side effects of either quercetin or 2-ME alone. These in vivo results will lay a further solid basis for subsequent researches on this novel therapeutic regimen in human prostate cancer. PMID:26011145

  11. Thermodynamic modeling of ionic liquid systems: development and detailed overview of novel methodology based on the PC-SAFT.

    PubMed

    Paduszy?ski, Kamil; Doma?ska, Urszula

    2012-04-26

    We present the results of an extensive study on a novel approach of modeling ionic liquids (ILs) and their mixtures with molecular compounds, incorporating perturbed-chain statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT). PC-SAFT was used to calculate the thermodynamic properties of different homologous series of ILs based on the bis(trifluormethylsulfonyl)imide anion ([NTf2]). First, pure fluid parameters were obtained for each IL by means of fitting the model predictions to experimental liquid densities over a broad range of temperature and pressure. The reliability and physical significance of the parameters as well as the employed molecular scheme were tested by calculation of density, vapor pressure, and other properties of pure ILs (e.g., critical properties, normal boiling point). Additionally, the surface tension of pure ILs was calculated by coupling the PC-SAFT equation of state with density gradient theory (DGT). All correlated/predicted results were compared with literature experimental or simulation data. Afterward, we attempted to model various thermodynamic properties of some binary systems composed of IL and organic solvent or water. The properties under study were the binary vapor-liquid, liquid-liquid, and solid-liquid equilibria and the excess enthalpies of mixing. To calculate cross-interaction energies we used the standard combining rules of Lorentz-Berthelot, Kleiner-Sadowski, and Wolbach-Sandler. It was shown that incorporation of temperature-dependent binary corrections was required to obtain much more accurate results than in the case of conventional predictions. Binary corrections were adjusted to infinite dilution activity coefficients of a particular solute in a given IL determined experimentally or predicted by means of the modified UNIFAC (Dortmund) group contribution method. We concluded that the latter method allows accurate and reliable calculations of bulk-phase properties in a totally predictive manner. PMID:22469027

  12. EFFECT OF D609 ON PHOSPHOLIPID METABOLISM AND CELL DEATH DURING OXYGEN-GLUCOSE DEPRIVATION IN PC12 CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, E. C.; Hatcher, J. F.; Adibhatla, Rao Muralikrishna

    2007-01-01

    Alterations in lipid metabolism play an integral role in neuronal death in cerebral ischemia. Here we used an in vitro model, oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) of PC12 cells, and analyzed changes in phosphatidylcholine (PC) and sphingomyelin (SM) metabolism. OGD (4–8-h) of PC12 cells triggered a dramatic reduction in PC and SM levels, and a significant increase in ceramide. OGD also caused increases in PC-phospholipase C (PC-PLC) and phospholipase D (PLD) activities and PLD2 protein expression, and reduction in cytidine triphosphate:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase-? (CCT?, the rate-limiting enzyme in PC synthesis) protein expression and activity. Phospholipase A2 activity and expression were unaltered during OGD. Increased neutral sphingomyelinase activity during OGD could account for SM loss and increased ceramide. Surprisingly, treatment with PC-PLC inhibitor D609 aggravated cell death in PC12 during OGD. D609 was cytotoxic only during OGD; cell death could be prevented by inclusion of sera, glucose or oxygen. During OGD, D609 caused further loss of PC and SM, depletion of 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG), increase in ceramide and free fatty acids (FFA), cytochrome c release from mitochondria, increases in intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), PARP cleavage and phosphatidylserine externalization, indicative of apoptotic cell death. Exogenous PC during OGD in PC12 cells with D609 attenuated PC, SM loss, restored DAG, attenuated ceramide levels, decreased cytochrome c release, PARP cleavage, annexin V binding, attenuated the increase in [Ca2+]i, FFA release, and significantly increased cell viability. Exogenous PC may have elicited these effects by restoring membrane PC levels. A tentative scheme depicting the mechanism of action of D609 (inhibiting PC-PLC, SM synthase, PC synthesis at the CDP-choline-DAG phosphocholine transferase (CPT) step and causing mitochondrial dysfunction) has been proposed based on our observations and literature. PMID:17434680

  13. Polish topometric groups

    E-print Network

    Yaacov, Itaï Ben; Melleray, Julien

    2010-01-01

    We define and study the notion of \\emph{ample metric generics} for a Polish topological group, which is a weakening of the notion of ample generics introduced by Kechris and Rosendal in \\cite{Kechris-Rosendal}. Our work is based on the concept of a \\emph{Polish topometric group}, defined in this article. Using Kechris and Rosendal's work as a guide, we explore consequences of ample metric generics (or, more generally, ample generics for Polish topometric groups). Then we provide examples of Polish groups with ample metric generics, such as the isometry group $\\text{Iso}(\\U_1)$ of the bounded Urysohn space, the unitary group ${\\mathcal U}(\\ell_2)$ of a separable Hilbert space, and the automorphism group $\\text{Aut}([0,1],\\lambda)$ of the Lebesgue measure algebra on $[0,1]$. We deduce from this and earlier work of Kittrell and Tsankov that this last group has the automatic continuity property, i.e any morphism from $\\text{Aut}([0,1],\\lambda)$ into a separable topological group is continuous.

  14. Semiannual Variation of Pc-Index for North and South Polar Caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Tamara

    Though the semiannual variation of geomagnetic activity with peaks near equinoxes has long been established, its cause is open for discussion. We have suggested earlier a new mechanism for the variation to explain (Adv. Space Res, v. 47, 2011). Phase of the semiannual variation is determined by the annual variation of the geomagnetic moment component My (GSE) caused by sinusoidal oscillations of the moment M at the yz interaction plane during annual motion: extrema at equinoxes (My<0 for the first half of year, My>0 for the second one) and My=0 at the solstices. Amplitude of the annual variation is modulated by the solar wind electric field Ez=VBy. By the other words, annual variation of the My makes extrema at equinoxes that produces maxima of the dawn-dusk component Emv=VByMy at the yz plane at spring equinox for toward polarity of the IMF (By<0, Bx>0) and at fall equinox for away one (By>0, Bx<0). It is logically to search for the semiannual variation of PC-index for north and south polar caps. As is known, the PC index is a measure of the strength of the solar wind electric field derived from magnetic variations measured at a single station near a magnetic pole. We use PC index of south cap Ps, which we could get from the AARS www-page for years 1995, 1998, and Danish north cap Pn for 1975-2012 (Thule. We also use data of the IMF B and wind velocity V measured at 1 a.u. near ecliptic plane for the same years. We show that mean value of E=1 mV/m and mean IMF described by Parker's spiral lies at ecliptic plane. The semiannual variations of both Pn and Ps does not differ from ones of the other indexes (Kp, AA, Dst): smoothed maxima near equinoxes and minima near solstices. As for the other indexes, the spring equinox peak is higher than the fall equinox one. We also obtained annual variations of Ps and Pn for various signs of By. We show that the semiannual variation of both Pn and Ps is determined by the By component. Both Pn and Ps has peak in February-May during the first half of year for By<0, the peak in August-October during the second half one for By>0. The same phase of the statistical semiannual variations of all the indexes is explained by the semiannual variation of the effective dawn-dusk Emv component, which does not depend from ionosphere conductivity and terrestrial induction effects. This Emv variation in turn is caused by the variation of mutual orientation of large-scale electric field E=[VxB] and magnetic moment M in the interaction plane during annual motion of the Earth.

  15. WINDOW 4. 0: Program description. A PC program for analyzing the thermal performance of fenestration products

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    WINDOW 4.0 is a publicly available IBM PC compatible computer program developed by the Windows and Daylighting Group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for calculating total window thermal performance indices (e.g. U-values, solar heat gain coefficients, shading coefficients, and visible transmittances). WINDOW 4.0 provides a versatile heat transfer analysis method consistent with the rating procedure developed by the National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC). The program can be used to design and develop new products, to rate and compare performance characteristics of all types of window products, to assist educators in teaching heat transfer through windows, and to help public officials in developing building energy codes. WINDOW 4.0 is a major revision to WINDOW 3.1 and we strongly urge all users to read this manual before using the program. Users who need professional assistance with the WINDOW 4.0 program or other window performance simulation issues are encouraged to contact one or more of the NFRC-accredited Simulation Laboratories. A list of these accredited simulation professionals is available from the NFRC.

  16. Commercialization of space

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. T. Rose; B. A. Stone

    1988-01-01

    Space-commercialization activities are grouped into five categories: private sector development from existing technology for private sector use; pure privatization; private sector development for US government use; private sector development from novel technology for private sector use; and, finally, full commercialization. The authors define the commercialization of space categories and highlight the key issues in each. A description of key NASA

  17. A search space \\

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Cosmin Porumbel; Jin-Kao Hao; Pascale Kuntz

    2010-01-01

    We present a search space analysis and its application in improving local search algorithms for the graph coloring problem. Using a classical distance measure be- tween colorings, we introduce the following clustering hypothesis: the high quality solutions are not randomly scattered in the search space, but rather grouped in clusters within spheres of specific diameter. We first provide intuitive evidence

  18. Aging and space travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohler, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    The matter of aging and its relation to space vehicle crewmembers undertaking prolonged space missions is addressed. The capabilities of the older space traveler to recover from bone demineralization and muscle atrophy are discussed. Certain advantages of the older person are noted, for example, a greater tolerance of monotony and repetitious activities. Additional parameters are delineated including the cardiovascular system, the reproductive system, ionizing radiation, performance, and group dynamics.

  19. Global Pc5 pulsations during strong magnetic storms: excitation mechanisms and equatorward expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, J. A.; Pilipenko, V.; Vega, P.; Zesta, E.; Stepanova, M. V.; Uozumi, T.

    2012-12-01

    The spatial structure of Pc5 waves during the recovery phases of strong magnetic storms is important not only for the identification of possible physical mechanisms of its excitation, but as an important parameter of the ULF driver of relativistic electrons. The dynamics of global Pc5 waves during the magnetic storms on October 29-31, 2003 and May 15, 2005 is studied, using the data from the trans-American network of magnetometers comprising SAMBA, MAGDAS, CARISMA, and MACCS arrays. We study the behavior of Pc5 wave properties and spectral characteristics with respect to latitude. One of the accepted sources of Pc5 wave activity is Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the flanks of the magnetosphere. In our study we examine whether the KH instability is sufficient as an excitation mechanism for the observed waves? More specifically, we attempt to determine, what is the Pc5 wave generation type: self-excitation, resonant response, trigger? While the KH instability generation takes place at the outer flanks of the magnetosphere, Pc5 waves are observed at all latitudes. We determine how deep into the magnetosphere these Pc5 waves activity can extend and what is the wave energy transmission mechanism: surface mode, cavity mode, Alfven field-line resonance, magnetospheric MHD waveguide?

  20. Inhibitory Effects of PC-SPESII Herbal Extract on Human Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiu-Feng; Du, Jia; Zhang, Tian-Ling; Zhou, Qian-Mei; Lu, Yi-Yu; Zhang, Hui; Su, Shi-Bing

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis is refractory to most forms of chemotherapy. Conventional and alternative drugs, such as Chinese herbal remedies, have been developed to target metastatic cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of PC-SPESII, an herbal formulation, on the migration, invasion, and metastasis of an experimental human breast cancer cell line in vivo and in vitro. PC-SPESII suppressed pulmonary metastasis and tumor growth of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts without affecting body weight, liver function, and kidney function. PC-SPESII also inhibited MDA-MB-231 cell migration and invasion in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Based on ELISA analysis, secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9, proteins associated with extracellular matrix degradation, was reduced in response to PC-SPESII treatment. Western blot analysis of whole-cell extracts revealed that the levels of proteolytic proteins associated with matrix and base membrane degradation (MMP-2, MMP-9, and uPA) were decreased and the levels of their endogenous inhibitors (TIMP1 and TIMP2) were increased. Moreover, the p38MAPK and SAPK/JNK signaling pathway, which stimulates proteolytic enzymes and matrix degradation, was inhibited by PC-PSESII. Remarkably, cotreatment with PC-PSESII and p38MAPK or SAPK/JNK inhibitors magnified the antimetastatic phenotype. Our results indicate that PC-PSESII impairs human breast cancer metastasis by regulating proteolytic enzymes and matrix dynamics through the p38MAPK and SAPK/JNK pathway. PMID:23878609