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1

Abelianization of space groups  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tables of the abelianizations of all the n-dimensional space groups for n = 1, 2, 3 are provided. The exponent of the torsion subgroup of the abelianization of an arbitrary n-dimensional space group is shown to divide the order of its point group.

Ratcliffe, J. G.; Tschantz, S. T.

2009-01-01

2

International Space Exploration Coordination Group  

E-print Network

on Earth. This document presents the status of the space agency exploration road mapping activityInternational Space Exploration Coordination Group The Global Exploration Roadmap August 2013 #12 ankles. The water seems inviting. The ocean calls." --Dr. Carl Sagan #12;The Global Exploration Roadmap

Rathbun, Julie A.

3

POTENTIAL MEMBERS OF STELLAR KINEMATICAL GROUPS WITHIN 20 pc OF THE SUN  

SciTech Connect

We analyze the kinematical histories of stars within 20 pc of the Sun, for which three-dimensional spatial coordinates and three-dimensional velocity vectors are available. From this sample, we extract members of stellar kinematical groups (SKGs) in the following manner. First, in the three-dimensional velocity space centered on the local standard of rest, we consider a sphere with a radius of 8 km s{sup -1} centered on the mean velocity vector of a particular SKG. Around each SKG velocity center, we have found a significant excess of stars compared to background stars. For each candidate, in the three-dimensional spatial coordinate space, its trajectory is traced back in time by the age of the relevant SKG, to estimate the distance from the SKG center at the time of the SKG's birth by the epicycle approximation and vertical harmonic motion. It often happens that a star is a candidate member of multiple SKGs. Then we rank the candidacy to multiple SKGs based on the smallness of distance separations. In this manner, we have kinematically selected 74 candidate members of SKGs out of a sample of 383 stars. If we take into account stellar properties, the number is reduced to 68.

Nakajima, Tadashi; Morino, Jun-Ichi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Fukagawa, Misato, E-mail: tadashi.nakajima@nao.ac.j [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

2010-09-15

4

POTENTIAL MEMBERS OF STELLAR KINEMATIC GROUPS WITHIN 30 pc OF THE SUN  

SciTech Connect

We analyze the kinematic histories of stars within 30 pc of the Sun, for which three-dimensional spatial coordinates and three-dimensional velocity vectors are available. From this sample, we extract members of stellar kinematic groups (SKGs) in the following manner. First, we consider in the three-dimensional velocity space centered on the local standard of rest, a sphere with a radius of 8 km s{sup -1} centered on the mean velocity vector of a particular SKG. Around each SKG velocity center, we have found a significant excess of stars compared to background field stars. For each candidate, in the three-dimensional spatial coordinate space, its trajectory is traced back in time by the age of the relevant SKG to obtain the estimated distance from the SKG center at the time of the SKG's birth by the epicyclic approximation and harmonic vertical motion. It often happens that a star is a candidate member of multiple SKGs. Then we rank the candidacy to multiple SKGs based on the smallness of distance separations. In this manner, we have kinematically selected 238 candidates. We further impose at least one of the following qualitative criteria for being a member: spectral type A or B, variability, or EUV and X-ray emission. We have finally selected 137 candidate members of SKGs out of a sample of 966 stars.

Nakajima, Tadashi; Morino, Jun-Ichi, E-mail: tadashi.nakajima@nao.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2012-01-15

5

UCL DEPARTMENT OF SPACE & CLIMATE PHYSICS SPACE PLASMA PHYSICS GROUP  

E-print Network

UCL DEPARTMENT OF SPACE & CLIMATE PHYSICS SPACE PLASMA PHYSICS GROUP 18th September 2012 STFC 2012 #12;UCL DEPARTMENT OF SPACE & CLIMATE PHYSICS SPACE PLASMA PHYSICS GROUP 18th September 2012 STFC · Conclusion #12;UCL DEPARTMENT OF SPACE & CLIMATE PHYSICS SPACE PLASMA PHYSICS GROUP 18th September 2012 STFC

6

Renormalization group in internal space  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Renormalization group in the internal space consists of the gradual change of the coupling constants. Functional evolution equations corresponding to the change of the mass or the coupling constant are presented in the framework of a scalar model. The evolution in the mass which yields the functional generalization of the Callan-Symanzik equation for the one-particle irreducible effective action is given in its renormalized, cutoff-independent form. The evolution of the coupling constant generates an evolution equation for the two-particle irreducible effective action.

Polonyi, J.; Sailer, K.

2005-01-01

7

UCL DEPARTMENT OF SPACE & CLIMATE PHYSICS SPACE PLASMA PHYSICS GROUP  

E-print Network

UCL DEPARTMENT OF SPACE & CLIMATE PHYSICS SPACE PLASMA PHYSICS GROUP ESA Lunar Lander ­ L-DEPP C.J. Owen and D.O. Kataria UCL/MSSL #12;UCL DEPARTMENT OF SPACE & CLIMATE PHYSICS SPACE PLASMA PHYSICS GROUP PLASMA PHYSICS GROUP What is L-DEPP? · L-DEPP = Lunar Dust Environment and Plasma Package; · Investigate

Anand, Mahesh

8

Friendship, Group Size and Boundary Size: Small Group Spaces.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The results suggested group space boundaries increased with group size (from groups of one to two to four) if group members were strangers, but not if group members were friends. The only nonspatial variable found to correlate with boundary size was personal identity. (Author)

Edney, Julian J.; Grundmann, Michael J.

1979-01-01

9

FUNDAMENTAL GROUPS AND COVERING SPACES ETHAN JERZAK  

E-print Network

FUNDAMENTAL GROUPS AND COVERING SPACES ETHAN JERZAK Abstract. In this paper, I will briefly develop) Date: August 22, 2008. 1 #12;2 ETHAN JERZAK the structure of a group; the constant loop is the identity

May, J. Peter

10

Space Station concept development group studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA study activities in preparation for a Space Station began in the early 1970's. The early studies included many in-house NASA and contracted studies. A group of representatives from all the NASA Centers, titled the Space Station Concept Development Group (CDG) was involved in the studies which led to the initiation of the Space Station Program. The CDG studies were performed over a period of approximately one year and consisted of four phases. The initial phase had the objective to determine the functions required of the station as opposed to a configuration. The activities of the second phase were primarily concerned with a sizing of the facilities required for payloads and the resources necessary to support these mission payloads. The third phase of studies was designed to develop a philosophical approach to a number of areas related to autonomy, maintainability, operations and logistics, and verification. The fourth phase of the study was to be concerned with configuration assessment activities.

Powell, L. E.

1984-01-01

11

Guide to Space groups There are only 230 ways (space groups) to describe how identical objects can be  

E-print Network

Guide to Space groups There are only 230 ways (space groups) to describe how identical objects can but it gets better than that! If your structure contains a chrial center then any space group that has a mirror or an inversion operation can be rejected. Of the 230 space groups only 74 space groups

Meagher, Mary

12

GroupSpace 0.2.0  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Internet can serve as a communal gathering place, where like-minded community members can come together to discuss various pressing issues, share documents, take polls, and engage in the decision-making process as well. A recent project, GroupSpace, started at Stanford University as part of a research partnership with a local community organization, allows groups of individuals to do all of the above. As their mission statement suggests, the creation of the program is âto support the type of deliberation critical to the functioning of smaller, informal organizations in civil societyâ. It should be noted that this version of GroupSpace is a beta version.

13

Long-range repression by multiple polycomb group (PcG) proteins targeted by fusion to a defined DNA-binding domain in Drosophila.  

PubMed Central

A tethering assay was developed to study the effects of Polycomb group (PcG) proteins on gene expression in vivo. This system employed the Su(Hw) DNA-binding domain (ZnF) to direct PcG proteins to transposons that carried the white and yellow reporter genes. These reporters constituted naive sensors of PcG effects, as bona fide PcG response elements (PREs) were absent from the constructs. To assess the effects of different genomic environments, reporter transposons integrated at nearly 40 chromosomal sites were analyzed. Three PcG fusion proteins, ZnF-PC, ZnF-SCM, and ZnF-ESC, were studied, since biochemical analyses place these PcG proteins in distinct complexes. Tethered ZnF-PcG proteins repressed white and yellow expression at the majority of sites tested, with each fusion protein displaying a characteristic degree of silencing. Repression by ZnF-PC was stronger than ZnF-SCM, which was stronger than ZnF-ESC, as judged by the percentage of insertion lines affected and the magnitude of the conferred repression. ZnF-PcG repression was more effective at centric and telomeric reporter insertion sites, as compared to euchromatic sites. ZnF-PcG proteins tethered as far as 3.0 kb away from the target promoter produced silencing, indicating that these effects were long range. Repression by ZnF-SCM required a protein interaction domain, the SPM domain, which suggests that this domain is not primarily used to direct SCM to chromosomal loci. This targeting system is useful for studying protein domains and mechanisms involved in PcG repression in vivo. PMID:11333237

Roseman, R R; Morgan, K; Mallin, D R; Roberson, R; Parnell, T J; Bornemann, D J; Simon, J A; Geyer, P K

2001-01-01

14

UCLA IGPP Space Plasma Simulation Group  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the past 10 years the UCLA IGPP Space Plasma Simulation Group has pursued its theoretical effort to develop a Mission Oriented Theory (MOT) for the International Solar Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) program. This effort has been based on a combination of approaches: analytical theory, large scale kinetic (LSK) calculations, global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations and self-consistent plasma kinetic (SCK) simulations. These models have been used to formulate a global interpretation of local measurements made by the ISTP spacecraft. The regions of applications of the MOT cover most of the magnetosphere: the solar wind, the low- and high-latitude magnetospheric boundary, the near-Earth and distant magnetotail, and the auroral region. Most recent investigations include: plasma processes in the electron foreshock, response of the magnetospheric cusp, particle entry in the magnetosphere, sources of observed distribution functions in the magnetotail, transport of oxygen ions, self-consistent evolution of the magnetotail, substorm studies, effects of explosive reconnection, and auroral acceleration simulations.

1998-01-01

15

Actuator grouping optimization on flexible space reflectors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the rapid advances in deployable membrane and mesh antenna technologies, the feasibility of developing large, lightweight reflectors has greatly improved. In order to achieve the required accuracy, precision surface control is needed on these lightweight reflectors. While studies have shown that domain control of space reflectors via Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) actuators is promising, the challenge is to realistically control a large number of distributed actuators with limited number of power supplies. In this research, a new En Mass Elimination method is synthesized to determine the optimal grouping of actuators when the actuator number exceeds the number of power supplies available. An analytical model is developed and the methodology is demonstrated numerically through system simulation on the derived model.

Hill, Jeffrey R.; Wang, K. W.; Fang, Houfei; Quijano, Ubaldo

2011-03-01

16

The functional group on (E)-4,4'-disubstituted stilbenes influences toxicity and antioxidative activity in differentiated PC-12 cells.  

PubMed

This work probes the relationship between stilbene functional group and biological activity. The biological activity of synthesized stilbenes (E)-4,4'-dicyanostilbene, (E)-4,4'-diacetylstilbene, (E)-4,4'-diaminostilbene, a novel stilbene, 1,1'-(vinylenedi-p-phenylene)diethanol, and (E)-stilbene was assessed at biologically relevant nanomolar concentrations using the MTS cell viability assay in differentiated PC-12 cells under optimal culture conditions and conditions of oxidative stress. Under optimal culture conditions the synthesized stilbene derivatives were found to be non-toxic to cells at concentrations up to 10 ?g/ml. To mimic oxidative stress, the activity of these stilbene derivatives in the presence of 0.03% H2O2 was investigated. Stilbene derivatives with electron-withdrawing functional groups were 2-3 times more toxic than the H2O2 control, indicating that they may form toxic metabolites in the presence of H2O2. Fluorescence data supported that stilbene derivatives with electron-withdrawing functional groups, (E)-4,4'-dicyanostilbene and (E)-4,4'-diacetylstilbene, may react with H2O2. In contrast, the stilbene derivative with a strong electron-donating functional group, (E)-4,4'-diaminostilbene, rescued neurons from H2O2-induced toxicity. The DPPH assay confirmed that (E)-4,4'-diaminostilbene is able to scavenge free radicals. These data indicate that the Hammett value of the functional group correlates with the biological activity of (E)-4,4'-disubstituted stilbenes in differentiated PC-12 cells. PMID:24135726

Garcia, Genevieve X; Larsen, Sean W; Pye, Cameron; Galbreath, Michael; Isovitsch, Ralph; Fradinger, Erica A

2013-12-01

17

EXISTENTIALLY EQUIVALENT CYCLIC ULTRAMETRIC SPACES AND CYCLICALLY VALUED GROUPS.  

E-print Network

EXISTENTIALLY EQUIVALENT CYCLIC ULTRAMETRIC SPACES AND CYCLICALLY VALUED GROUPS. G. LELOUP Abstract we characterize existentially equivalence between cyclically ultrametric spaces, as well as existentially equivalence between generalized ultrametric spaces. We also describe classes of existentially

18

Group-to-Group Distance Collaboration: Examining the "Space Between"  

E-print Network

the constraints that exist when people communicate over media channels that limit social information. Access Grid technologies use interactive multi-media technologies with multicasting, showing multiple the challenges that group-to-group collaboration designers face in meeting requirements for supporting these new

Mark, Gloria

19

Space station group activities habitability module study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This study explores and analyzes architectural design approaches for the interior of the Space Station Habitability Module (originally defined as Habitability Module 1 in Space Station Reference Configuration Decription, JSC-19989, August 1984). In the Research Phase, architectural program and habitability design guidelines are specified. In the Schematic Design Phase, a range of alternative concepts is described and illustrated with drawings, scale-model photographs and design analysis evaluations. Recommendations are presented on the internal architectural, configuration of the Space Station Habitability Module for such functions as the wardroom, galley, exercise facility, library and station control work station. The models show full design configurations for on-orbit performance.

Nixon, David

1986-01-01

20

PC Software graphics tool for conceptual design of space/planetary electrical power systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes the Decision Support System (DSS), a personal computer software graphics tool for designing conceptual space and/or planetary electrical power systems. By using the DSS, users can obtain desirable system design and operating parameters, such as system weight, electrical distribution efficiency, and bus power. With this tool, a large-scale specific power system was designed in a matter of days. It is an excellent tool to help designers make tradeoffs between system components, hardware architectures, and operation parameters in the early stages of the design cycle. The DSS is a user-friendly, menu-driven tool with online help and a custom graphical user interface. An example design and results are illustrated for a typical space power system with multiple types of power sources, frequencies, energy storage systems, and loads.

Truong, Long V.

1995-01-01

21

An IBM PC-based math model for space station solar array simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report discusses and documents the design, development, and verification of a microcomputer-based solar cell math model for simulating the Space Station's solar array Initial Operational Capability (IOC) reference configuration. The array model is developed utilizing a linear solar cell dc math model requiring only five input parameters: short circuit current, open circuit voltage, maximum power voltage, maximum power current, and orbit inclination. The accuracy of this model is investigated using actual solar array on orbit electrical data derived from the Solar Array Flight Experiment/Dynamic Augmentation Experiment (SAFE/DAE), conducted during the STS-41D mission. This simulator provides real-time simulated performance data during the steady state portion of the Space Station orbit (i.e., array fully exposed to sunlight). Eclipse to sunlight transients and shadowing effects are not included in the analysis, but are discussed briefly. Integrating the Solar Array Simulator (SAS) into the Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) subsystem is also discussed.

Emanuel, E. M.

1986-01-01

22

Actuator grouping optimization on flexible space reflectors  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the rapid advances in deployable membrane and mesh antenna technologies, the feasibility of developing large, lightweight reflectors has greatly improved. In order to achieve the required accuracy, precision surface control is needed on these lightweight reflectors. While studies have shown that domain control of space reflectors via Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) actuators is promising, the challenge is to realistically control

Jeffrey R. Hill; K. W. Wang; Houfei Fang; Ubaldo Quijano

2011-01-01

23

SYMMETRIC SPACES OF THE NON-COMPACT TYPE : LIE GROUPS  

E-print Network

SYMMETRIC SPACES OF THE NON-COMPACT TYPE : LIE GROUPS by Paul-Emile PARADAN Abstract. -- In these notes, we give first a brief account to the theory of Lie groups. Then we consider the case of a smooth manifold with a Lie group of symmetries. When the Lie group acts transitively (e.g. the manifold

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

24

Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph Spectroscopy of the Central 14 pc OF NGC 3998: Evidence for an Inflow  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Prior imaging of the lenticular galaxy, NGC 3998, with the Hubble Space Telescope revealed a small, highly inclined, nuclear ionized gas disk, the kinematics of which indicate the presence of a 270 million solar mass black hole. Plausible kinematic models are used to constrain the size of the broad emission line region (BELR) in NGC 3998 by modeling the shape of the broad H?, H?, and H? emission line profiles. The analysis indicates that the BELR is large with an outer radius ~7 pc, regardless of whether the kinematic model is represented by an accretion disk or a spherically symmetric inflow. The electron temperature in the BELR is <= 28,800 K consistent with photoionization by the active galactic nucleus (AGN). Indeed, the AGN is able to sustain the ionization of the BELR, albeit with a high covering factor ranging between 20% and 100% depending on the spectral energy distribution adopted for the AGN. The high covering factor favors a spherical distribution for the gas as opposed to a thin disk. If the gas density is >=7 103 cm-3 as indicated by the broad forbidden [S II] emission line ratio, then interpreting the broad H? emission line in terms of a steady state spherically symmetric inflow leads to a rate <= 6.5 10-2 M sun yr-1 which exceeds the inflow requirement to explain the X-ray luminosity in terms of a radiatively inefficient inflow by a factor of <=18.

Devereux, Nick

2011-02-01

25

Actuator Grouping Optimization on Flexible Space Reflectors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With the rapid advances in deployable membrane and mesh antenna technologies, the feasibility of developing large, lightweight reflectors has greatly improved. In order to achieve the required surface accuracy, precision surface control is needed on these lightweight reflectors. For this study, an analytical model is shown which combines a flexible Kapton reflector with Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) actuators for surface control. Surface errors are introduced that are similar to real world scenarios, and a least squares control algorithm is developed for surface control. Experimental results on a 2.4 meter reflector show that while the analytical reflector model is generally correct, due to idiosyncrasies in the reflector it cannot be used for online control. A new method called the En Mass Elimination algorithm is used to determine the optimal grouping of actuators when the number of actuators in the system exceeds the number of power supplies available.

Hill, Jeffrey R.; Wang, K. W.; Fang, Houfei; Quijano, Ubaldo

2011-01-01

26

PC index as an indicator of solar wind energy that entered into the magnetosphere: basis for the space weather monitoring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The PC index has been introduced initially [Troshichev et al., 1988] as a characteristic of the polar cap magnetic activity related to the geoeffective interplanetary electric field EKL which was determined by formula of Kan and Lee [1979]. The recent studies showed that the PC index implication is more significant: the magnetospheric storms and substorms start only if the PC index reaches the definite threshold value (~ 2 mV/m for storms, and >1.5mV/m for substorms); the substorm growth phase duration and substorm intensity are determined by the PC growth rate and substorms are stopped as soon as PC index falls below 1-1.5 mV/m; the storm length is terminated by duration of period, when PC>2mV/m, the storm intensity being linearly related to the PC index averaged for the storm time interval; periodicity of saw-tooth substorms occurring under conditions of steadily high level of geoeffective interplanetary electric field is determined by duration of

Troshichev, O.; Janzhura, A.

2012-04-01

27

The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 2: Atmospheric and space physics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The findings of the Atmospheric and Space Physics working group of the space shuttle mission planning activity are presented. The principal objectives defined by the group are: (1) to investigate the detailed mechanisms which control the near-space environment of the earth, (2) to perform plasma physics investigations not feasible in ground-based laboratories, and (3) to conduct investigations which are important in understanding planetary and cometary phenomena. The core instrumentation and laboratory configurations for conducting the investigations are defined.

1973-01-01

28

The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 10: Space technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The findings and recommendations of the Space Technology group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The elements of the space technology program are: (1) long duration exposure facility, (2) advanced technology laboratory, (3) physics and chemistry laboratory, (4) contamination experiments, and (5) laser information/data transmission technology. The space technology mission model is presented in tabular form. The proposed experiments to be conducted by each test facility are described. Recommended approaches for user community interfacing are included.

1973-01-01

29

Environmental interactions in space exploration: Environmental interactions working group  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With the advent of the Space Exploration Initiative, the possibility of designing and using systems on scales heretofore unattempted presents exciting new challenges in systems design and space science. The environments addressed by the Space Exploration Initiative include the surfaces of the Moon and Mars, as well as the varied plasma and field environments which will be encountered by humans and cargo enroute to these destinations. Systems designers will need to understand environmental interactions and be able to model these mechanisms from the earliest conceptual design stages through design completion. To the end of understanding environmental interactions and establishing robotic precursor mission requirements, an Environmental Interactions Working Group was established as part of the Robotic Missions Working Group. The working group is described, and its current activities are updated.

Kolecki, Joseph C.; Hillard, G. Barry

1992-01-01

30

Entanglement renormalization in free bosonic systems: real-space versus momentum-space renormalization group transforms  

E-print Network

The ability of entanglement renormalization (ER) to generate a proper real-space renormalization group (RG) flow in extended quantum systems is analysed in the setting of harmonic lattice systems in D=1 and D=2 spatial dimensions. A conceptual overview of the steps involved in momentum-space RG is provided and contrasted against the equivalent steps in the real-space setting. The real-space RG flow, as generated by ER, is compared against the exact results from momentum-space RG, including an investigation of a critical fixed point and the effect of relevant and irrelevant perturbations.

G. Evenbly; G. Vidal

2008-01-16

31

Group Fourier transform and the phase space path integral for finite dimensional Lie groups  

E-print Network

We formulate a notion of group Fourier transform for a finite dimensional Lie group. The transform provides a unitary map from square integrable functions on the group to square integrable functions on a non-commutative dual space. We then derive the first order phase space path integral for quantum mechanics on the group by using a non-commutative dual space representation obtained through the transform. Possible advantages of the formalism include: (1) The transform provides an alternative to the spectral decomposition via representation theory of Lie groups and the use of special functions. (2) The non-commutative dual variables are physically more intuitive, since despite the non-commutativity they are analogous to the corresponding classical variables. The work is expected, among other possible applications, to allow for the metric representation of Lorentzian spin foam models in the context of quantum gravity.

Matti Raasakka

2011-11-28

32

JOUR."jAL I)P ALGEBRA 116, 227-242 (1988) Finite Group Actions on P"(C)  

E-print Network

, subgroups of U(Z), and the simple groups A,, A,, an PSL(F,). It turns out that these linear groups) the alternating group A, of order 60, (I) the alternating group A, or order 360, (I) the group PSL,([F,) or order

Hambleton, Ian

33

Contractor renormalization group technology and exact Hamiltonian real-space renormalization group transformations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The contractor renormalization group method, a new approach to solving Hamiltonian lattice systems, is presented. The method defines a systematic and nonperturbative means of implementing Kadanoff-Wilson real-space renormalization group transformations using cluster expansion and contraction techniques. We illustrate the approach and demonstrate its effectiveness using scalar field theory, the Heisenberg antiferromagnetic chain, and the anisotropic Ising chain. Future applications to

Colin J. Morningstar; M. Weinstein

1996-01-01

34

CONFIGURATION SPACES AND BRAID GROUPS ON GRAPHS IN ROBOTICS  

E-print Network

CONFIGURATION SPACES AND BRAID GROUPS ON GRAPHS IN ROBOTICS ROBERT GHRIST School of Mathematics control schemes for Automated Guided Vehicles (robots) in industrial settings. In this announcement, we filtered through the robotics community [Lat91, KR90]. Surprisingly, topologists have been generally

Ghrist, Robert W.

35

PC6 acupoint stimulation for the prevention of postcardiac surgery nausea and vomiting: a protocol for a two-group, parallel, superiority randomised clinical trial  

PubMed Central

Introduction Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) are frequent but unwanted complications for patients following anaesthesia and cardiac surgery, affecting at least a third of patients, despite pharmacological treatment. The primary aim of the proposed research is to test the efficacy of PC6 acupoint stimulation versus placebo for reducing PONV in cardiac surgery patients. In conjunction with this we aim to develop an understanding of intervention fidelity and factors that support, or impede, the use of PC6 acupoint stimulation, a knowledge translation approach. Methods and analysis 712 postcardiac surgery participants will be recruited to take part in a two-group, parallel, superiority, randomised controlled trial. Participants will be randomised to receive a wrist band on each wrist providing acupressure to PC six using acupoint stimulation or a placebo. Randomisation will be computer generated, use randomly varied block sizes, and be concealed prior to the enrolment of each patient. The wristbands will remain in place for 36?h. PONV will be evaluated by the assessment of both nausea and vomiting, use of rescue antiemetics, quality of recovery and cost. Patient satisfaction with PONV care will be measured and clinical staff interviewed about the clinical use, feasibility, acceptability and challenges of using acupressure wristbands for PONV. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval will be sought from appropriate Human Research Ethics Committee/s before start of the study. A systematic review of the use of wrist acupressure for PC6 acupoint stimulation reported minor side effects only. Study progress will be reviewed by a Data Safety Monitoring Committee (DSMC) for nausea and vomiting outcomes at n=350. Dissemination of results will include conference presentations at national and international scientific meetings and publications in peer-reviewed journals. Study participants will receive a one-page lay-summary of results. Trial registration number Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials RegistryACTRN12614000589684. PMID:25394818

Cooke, Marie; Rickard, Claire; Rapchuk, Ivan; Shekar, Kiran; Marshall, Andrea P; Comans, Tracy; Doi, Suhail; McDonald, John; Spooner, Amy

2014-01-01

36

The space shuttle payload planning working groups: Volume 9: Materials processing and space manufacturing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The findings and recommendations of the Materials Processing and Space Manufacturing group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The effects of weightlessness on the levitation processes, mixture stability, and control over heat and mass transport in fluids are considered for investigation. The research and development projects include: (1) metallurgical processes, (2) electronic materials, (3) biological applications, and (4)nonmetallic materials and processes. Additional recommendations are provided concerning the allocation of payload space, acceptance of experiments for flight, flight qualification, and private use of the space shuttle.

1973-01-01

37

Topological classification of crystalline insulators with space group symmetry  

SciTech Connect

We show that in crystalline insulators, space group symmetry alone gives rise to a topological classification based on the discretization of electric polarization. Using C3 rotational symmetry as an example, we first prove that the polarization is discretized into three distinct classes, i.e., it can only take three inequivalent values. We then prove that these classes are topologically distinct. Therefore, a Z3 topological classification exists, with polarization as a topological class index. A concrete tight-binding model is derived to demonstrate the Z3 topological phase transition. Using first-principles calculations, we identify graphene on a BN substrate as a possible candidate to realize these Z3 topological states. To complete our analysis, we extend the classification of band structures to all 17 two-dimensional space groups. This work will contribute to a complete theory of symmetry-conserved topological phases and also elucidate topological properties of graphenelike systems.

Jadaun, Priyamvada [University of Texas at Austin; Xiao, Di [Carnegie Mellon University (CMU); Niu, Q. [University of Texas at Austin; Banerjee, Sanjay K. [University of Texas at Austin

2013-01-01

38

Differential calculus on quantum spaces and quantum groups  

SciTech Connect

A review of recent developments in the quantum differential calculus. The quantum group GL{sub q}(n) is treated by considering it as a particular quantum space. Functions on SL{sub q} (n) are defined as a subclass of functions on GL{sub q}(n). The case of SO{sub q}(n) is also briefly considered. These notes cover part of a lecture given at the XIX International Conference on Group Theoretic Methods in Physics, Salamanca, Spain 1992.

Zumino, B.

1992-12-10

39

Differential calculus on quantum spaces and quantum groups  

SciTech Connect

A review of recent developments in the quantum differential calculus. The quantum group GL[sub q](n) is treated by considering it as a particular quantum space. Functions on SL[sub q] (n) are defined as a subclass of functions on GL[sub q](n). The case of SO[sub q](n) is also briefly considered. These notes cover part of a lecture given at the XIX International Conference on Group Theoretic Methods in Physics, Salamanca, Spain 1992.

Zumino, B.

1992-12-10

40

NGF Induces the Expression of Group IIA Secretory Phospholipase A2 in PC12 Cells: The Newly Synthesized Enzyme Is Addressed to Growing Neurites.  

PubMed

We proposed that group IIA secretory phospholipase A2 (GIIA) participates in neuritogenesis based on our observations that the enzyme migrates to growth cones and neurite tips when PC12 cells are induced to differentiate by nerve growth factor (NGF) (Ferrini et al., Neurochem Res 35:2168-2174, 2010). The involvement of other secretory PLA2 isoforms in neuronal development has been suggested by others but through different mechanisms. In the present study, we compared the subcellular distribution of GIIA and group X sPLA2 (GX) after stimulation of PC12 cells with NGF. We found that GIIA, but not GX, localized at the neuritic tips after treatment with NGF, as demonstrated by immunofluorescence analysis. We also found that NGF stimulated the expression and the activity of GIIA. In addition, NGF induced the expressed myc-tagged GIIA protein to migrate to neurite tips in its active form. We propose that GIIA expression, activity, and subcellular localization is regulated by NGF and that the enzyme may participate in neuritogenesis through intracellular mechanisms, most likely by facilitating the remodelling of glycerophospholipid molecular species by deacylation-reacylation reactions necessary for the incorporation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. PMID:24390571

Nardicchi, Vincenza; Ferrini, Monica; Pilolli, Francesca; Angeli, Emanuela Biagioni; Persichetti, Emanuele; Beccari, Tommaso; Mannucci, Roberta; Arcuri, Cataldo; Donato, Rosario; Dorman, Robert V; Goracci, Gianfrancesco

2014-08-01

41

Testing the Accuracy of Redshift Space Group Finding Algorithms  

E-print Network

Using simulated redshift surveys generated from a high resolution N-body cosmological structure simulation, we study algorithms used to identify groups of galaxies in redshift space. Two algorithms are investigated; both are friends-of-friends schemes with variable linking lengths in the radial and transverse dimensions. The chief difference between the algorithms is in the redshift linking length. The algorithm proposed by Huchra \\& Geller (1982) uses a generous linking length designed to find ``fingers of god'' while that of Nolthenius \\& White (1987) uses a smaller linking length to minimize contamination by projection. We find that neither of the algorithms studied is intrinsically superior to the other; rather, the ideal algorithm as well as the ideal algorithm parameters depend on the purpose for which groups are to be studied. The Huchra/Geller algorithm misses few real groups, at the cost of including some spurious groups and members, while the Nolthenius/White algorithm misses high velocity dispersion groups and members but is less likely to include interlopers in its group assignments. In a companion paper we investigate the accuracy of virial mass estimates and clustering properties of groups identified using these algorithms.

James J. Frederic

1994-09-07

42

Space station group activities habitability module study: A synopsis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Space station habitability was studied by investigating crew activity routines, proximities, ergonomic envelopes, and group volumes. Ten alternative schematic interior designs were proposed. Preliminary conclusions include: (1) in-service interior modifications may be necessary and should be planned for; (2) design complexity will be increased if the module cluster is reduced from five to three; (3) the increased crew circulation attendant upon enhancement of space station activity may produce human traffic bottlenecks and should be planned for; (4) a single- or two-person quiet area may be desirable to provide crew members with needed solitude during waking hours; and (5) the decision to choose a two-shift or three-shift daily cycle will have a significant impact on the design configuration and operational efficiency of the human habitat.

Nixon, David; Glassman, Terry

1987-01-01

43

Hardy spaces on Lie groups of polynomial growth A.F.M. ter Elst1  

E-print Network

Hardy spaces on Lie groups of polynomial growth A.F.M. ter Elst1 , Derek W. Robinson2 and Yueping-order, subelliptic operators on Lie groups with polynomial growth. August 2004 Keywords: Lie groups, Hardy spaces of Hardy spaces on Lie groups of polynomial growth. Let G be a connected Lie group with Lie algebra g. One

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

44

Contractor renormalization group technology and exact Hamiltonian real-space renormalization group transformations  

SciTech Connect

The contractor renormalization group method, a new approach to solving Hamiltonian lattice systems, is presented. The method defines a systematic and nonperturbative means of implementing Kadanoff-Wilson real-space renormalization group transformations using cluster expansion and contraction techniques. We illustrate the approach and demonstrate its effectiveness using scalar field theory, the Heisenberg antiferromagnetic chain, and the anisotropic Ising chain. Future applications to the Hubbard and {ital t}-{ital J} models and lattice gauge theory are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

Morningstar, C.J. [Department of Physics, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0319 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0319 (United States); Weinstein, M. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94309 (United States)] [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94309 (United States)

1996-09-01

45

Distributed interactive communication in simulated space-dwelling groups.  

PubMed

This report describes the development and preliminary application of an experimental test bed for modeling human behavior in the context of a computer generated environment to analyze the effects of variations in communication modalities, incentives and stressful conditions. In addition to detailing the methodological development of a simulated task environment that provides for electronic monitoring and recording of individual and group behavior, the initial substantive findings from an experimental analysis of distributed interactive communication in simulated space dwelling groups are described. Crews of three members each (male and female) participated in simulated "planetary missions" based upon a synthetic scenario task that required identification, collection, and analysis of geologic specimens with a range of grade values. The results of these preliminary studies showed clearly that cooperative and productive interactions were maintained between individually isolated and distributed individuals communicating and problem-solving effectively in a computer-generated "planetary" environment over extended time intervals without benefit of one another's physical presence. Studies on communication channel constraints confirmed the functional interchangeability between available modalities with the highest degree of interchangeability occurring between Audio and Text modes of communication. The effects of task-related incentives were determined by the conditions under which they were available with Positive Incentives effectively attenuating decrements in performance under stressful time pressure. PMID:14983895

Brady, Joseph V; Hienz, Robert D; Hursh, Steven R; Ragusa, Leonard C; Rouse, Charles O; Gasior, Eric D

2004-03-01

46

MOVING A MEDIA SPACE INTO THE REAL WORLD THROUGH GROUP-ROBOT INTERACTION  

E-print Network

MOVING A MEDIA SPACE INTO THE REAL WORLD THROUGH GROUP-ROBOT INTERACTION James E. Young, Gregor McEwan, Saul Greenberg, Ehud Sharlin1 Abstract New generation media spaces let group members see each other propose the AIBO Surrogate--a robotic interface for a media space group, allowing members to extend

47

MOVING A MEDIA SPACE INTO THE REAL WORLD THROUGH GROUP-ROBOT INTERACTION  

E-print Network

social entity, a surrogate of the media space group within the physical world, representing selectedMOVING A MEDIA SPACE INTO THE REAL WORLD THROUGH GROUP-ROBOT INTERACTION James E. Young, Gregor McEwan, Saul Greenberg, Ehud Sharlin1 Abstract New generation media spaces let group members see each other

Greenberg, Saul

48

On space-time code design with a conditional PIC group decoding  

Microsoft Academic Search

Space-time code designs based on a partial interference cancellation (PIC) group decoding has been recently proposed. The PIC group decoding complexity depends on the group size and is between the lowest linear receiver complexity and the highest ML decoding complexity. The symbol rate for a space-time code achieving full diversity with the PIC group decoding is also between those for

Tianyi Xu; Xiang-Gen Xia

2010-01-01

49

The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 1: Astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The space astronomy missions to be accomplished by the space shuttle are discussed. The principal instrument is the Large Space Telescope optimized for the ultraviolet and visible regions of the spectrum, but usable also in the infrared. Two infrared telescopes are also proposed and their characteristics are described. Other instruments considered for the astronomical observations are: (1) a very wide angle ultraviolet camera, (2) a grazing incidence telescope, (3) Explorer-class free flyers to measure the cosmic microwave background, and (4) rocket-class instruments which can fly frequently on a variety of missions. The stability requirements of the space shuttle for accomplishing the astronomy mission are defined.

1973-01-01

50

The hydrogenation reaction of [Ru 3(CO) 10(C 6F 5) 2P(CH 2) 2P(C 6F 5) 2]: Migration of a C 6F 5 group from a phosphorus to a ruthenium atom. X-ray crystal structures of [Ru 3(CO) 9(?-H){? 2-(C 6F 5)PCH 2CH 2P(C 6F 5) 2}], [Ru 3(CO) 7(?-H) 3(? 1-C 6F 5){? 3-PCH 2CH 2P(C 6F 5) 2}] and [Ru 3(CO) 8(?-H) 2{? 3-PCH 2CH 2P(C 6F 5) 2}  

Microsoft Academic Search

The reaction of [Ru3(CO)10{(C6F5)2P(CH2)2P(C6F5)2}] (1) with hydrogen in toluene produced four compounds. These compounds were characterized spectroscopically and structurally. Some experiments were carried out to determine the relationship between the different reaction products. The first two compounds (2 and 3) show ?-phosphide groups bridging metalmetal bonds, produced by the rupture of a PC6F5 bond; 2 also shows a C6F5 ring

Gloria Snchez-Cabrera; Marco A. Leyva; Francisco J. Zuno-Cruz; Mara G. Hernndez-Cruz; Maria J. Rosales-Hoz

2009-01-01

51

Scanning of magnetic space groups and the analysis of non-magnetic domain walls.  

PubMed

Similarly to atomic positions in a crystal being fixed, or at least constrained by the space group of that crystal, the displacements of atoms in a domain wall are determined or constrained by the symmetry of the wall given by the sectional layer group of the corresponding domain pair. The sectional layer group can be interpreted as comprised of operations that leave invariant a plane transecting two overlapping structures, the domain states of the two domains adhering to the domain wall. The procedure of determining the sectional layer groups for all orientations and positions of a transecting plane is called scanning of the space group. Scanning of non-magnetic space groups has been described and tabulated. It is shown here that the scanning of magnetic groups can be determined from that of non-magnetic groups. The information provided by scanning of magnetic space groups can be utilized in the symmetry analysis of domain walls in non-magnetic crystals since, for any dichromatic space group, which expresses the symmetry of overlapped structures of two non-magnetic domains, there exists an isomorphic magnetic space group. Consequently, a sectional layer group of a magnetic space group expresses the symmetry of a non-magnetic domain wall. Examples of this are given in the symmetry analysis of ferroelectric domain walls in non-magnetic perovskites. PMID:17703074

Janovec, V; Litvin, D B

2007-09-01

52

Complete derivation of space groups of magnetic symmetry of crystals by numerical construction  

SciTech Connect

The solution is given to the problem regarding the derivation of the so-called space groups of magnetic symmetry with crystallographic angles of rotation of the spin vector, which was formulated as far back as the early 1970s. The crystallographic P-symmetries that should be used in the generalization with the three-dimensional space Fedorov groups G{sub 3} are revealed. The space groups G{sub 3} are generalized with each of these P-symmetries.

Palistrant, A. F. [State University of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of)], E-mail: mepalistrant@yandex.ru

2007-11-15

53

Real-Space Renormalization-Group Approach to the Integer Quantum Hall Effect  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We review recent results based on an application of the real-space renormalization group (RG) approach to a network model for the integer quantum Hall (QH) transition. We demonstrate that this RG approach reproduces the critical distribution of the power transmission coefficients, i.e., two-terminal conductances, Pc(G), with very high accuracy. The RG flow of P(G) at energies away from the transition yields a value of the critical exponent ? that agrees with most accurate large-size lattice simulations. A description of how to obtain other relevant transport coefficients such as RL and RH is given. From the non-trivial fixed point of the RG flow we extract the critical level-spacing distribution (LSD). This distribution is close, but distinctively different from the earlier large-scale simulations. We find that the LSD obeys scaling behavior around the QH transition with ? = 2.370.02. Away from the transition it crosses over towards the Poisson distribution. We next investigate the plateau-to-insulator transition at strong magnetic fields. For a fully quantum coherent situation, we find a quantized Hall insulator with RH?h/e2 up to RL 20h/e2 when interpreting the results in terms of most probable value of the distribution function P(RH). Upon further increasing RL??, the Hall insulator with diverging Hall resistance R H? R L? is seen. The crossover between these two regimes depends on the precise nature of the averaging procedure for the distributions P(RL) and P(RH). We also study the effect of long-ranged inhomogeneities on the critical properties of the QH transition. Inhomogeneities are modeled by a smooth random potential with a correlator which falls off with distance as a power law r-?. Similar to the classical percolation, we observe an enhancement of ? with decreasing ?. These results exemplify the surprising fact that a small RG unit, containing only five nodes, accurately captures most of the correlations responsible for the localization-delocalization transition.

Cain, Philipp; Rmer, Rudolf A.

54

The NASA EEE parts assurance group (NEPAG) - An evolving approach to maximizing space parts assurance resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the activities of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Electrical, Electronic and Electromechanical (EEE) Parts Assurance Group (NEPAG) in its role as a resource sharing and coordinating force in EEE Parts assurance for space flight missions. NEPAG is a new organization, barely two years old. The EEE parts world for space applications faces a number of

M. J. Sampson

2002-01-01

55

The birth of an infant decreases group spacing in a zoo-housed lowland gorilla group (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).  

PubMed

Changes in group composition can alter the behavior of social animals such as gorillas. Although gorilla births are presumed to affect group spacing patterns, there is relatively little data about how these events affect gorilla group cohesion. We investigated how members of a western lowland gorilla group (n?=?6) at Lincoln Park Zoo (Chicago, IL, USA) spaced themselves prior to and after the birth of an infant, to investigate changes in group cohesion. Gorillas were housed in an indoor-outdoor enclosure in which access to the outdoors was permitted when temperatures exceeded 5C. We recorded spatial locations of each group member using 30-min group scans on tablet computers with an electronic map interface, as well as noting their access to outdoor areas. Data from the 4 months following the birth was compared to a control period corresponding to early pregnancy. We measured distances between all possible group dyads for each scan and subsequently calculated a mean distance between all group members. An ANOVA revealed that access to the outdoors had no effect on group spacing (F(1,56)?=?0.066, P?=?0.799). However, the presence of an infant resulted in a significant reduction in inter-individual distance (F(1,56)?=?23.988, P?=?0.000), decreasing inter-individual spacing by 12.5%. This information helps characterize the behavioral impact of a new birth on captive gorilla social structure and could potentially inform future management of breeding gorilla groups. Zoo Biol. 33:471-474, 2014. 2014 Wiley Periodicals Inc. PMID:25130595

Kurtycz, Laura M; Shender, Marisa A; Ross, Stephen R

2014-09-01

56

Iterative Spatial Sequence Estimator for Multi-Group Space Time Trellis Coded Systems  

E-print Network

Iterative Spatial Sequence Estimator for Multi-Group Space Time Trellis Coded Systems Samir Al fewer than what V-BLAST algorithm requires. By applying reduced state sequence estimation, complexity for decoding multi-group space time trellis coded systems. These systems consider a single user who transmits

Al-Ghadhban, Samir

57

Invariant-theoretic method for calculating Clebsch-Gordan coefficients for space groups  

SciTech Connect

A new invariant-theoretic method to directly calculate Clebsch-Gordan coefficients for space and point groups representations is proposed. The method is exemplified with the space groups O{sub h}{sup 5} and D{sub 6h}{sup 1}. 34 refs.

Aizenberg, A.Ya.; Gufan, Yu.M. [North Caucasus Research Center, Rostov-na-Donu (Russian Federation)

1995-03-01

58

Characterization of Shift-Invariant Spaces on a Class of Nilpotent Lie Groups with Applications  

E-print Network

Characterization of Shift-Invariant Spaces on a Class of Nilpotent Lie Groups with Applications Bradley Currey, Azita Mayeli , Vignon Oussa March 2, 2013 Abstract Given a simply connected nilpotent Lie-invariant spaces. Keywords: Nilpotent Lie groups; shift-invariant subspaces; frame and Reisz bases. 1 Introduction

Currey, Brad

59

On Full Diversity Space-Time Block Codes with Partial Interference Cancellation Group Decoding  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we propose a partial interference cancellati on (PIC) group decoding for linear disper- sive space-time block codes (STBC) and a design criterion for the codes to achieve full diversity when the PIC group decoding is used at the receiver. A PIC group decoding decodes the symbols embedded in an STBC by dividing them into several groups and

Xiaoyong Guo; Xiang-Gen Xia

2008-01-01

60

On full diversity space-time block codes with partial interference cancellation group decoding  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we propose a partial interference cancellation (PIC) group decoding strategy\\/scheme for linear dispersive space-time block codes (STBC) and a design criterion for the codes to achieve full diversity when the PIC group decoding is used at the receiver. A PIC group decoding decodes the symbols embedded in an STBC by dividing them into several groups and decoding

Xiaoyong Guo; Xiang-Gen Xia

2009-01-01

61

Polyimides Containing Pendent Phosphine Oxide Groups for Space Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As part of an ongoing materials development activity to produce high performance polymers that are durable to the space environment, phosphine oxide containing polyimides have been under investigation. A novel dianhydride was prepared from 2,5-dihydroxyphenyldiphenylphosphine oxide in good yield. The dianhydride was reacted with commercially available diamines, and a previously reported diamine was reacted with commercially available dianhydrides to prepare isomeric polyimides. The physical and mechanical properties, particularly thermal and optical properties, of the polymers were determined. One material exhibited a high glass transition temperature, high tensile properties, and low solar absorptivity. The chemistry, physical, and mechanical properties of these resins will be discussed.

Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Watson, K. A.; Connell, J. W.

2002-01-01

62

The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 6: Communications and navigation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The findings of the Communications and Navigation working group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The basic goals to be accomplished are to increase the use of space systems and to develop new space capabilities for providing communication and navigation services to the user community in the 1980 time period. Specific experiments to be conducted for improving space communication and navigation capabilities are defined. The characteristics of the experimental equipment required to accomplish the mission are discussed.

1973-01-01

63

Marathons versus Spaced Groups: Skin Conductance and the Effects of Time Distribution on Encounter Group Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Randomly assigned 41 students to 2 twice-weekly groups, which met for 3 hours eight times; 2 marathons, which met continuously for 24 hours; and nontreatment control group. Treatment groups had significant positive changes on 14 of 15 measured personality variables between pre- and post-test, and positive change on all dependent measures between

Loomis, Thomas P.

1988-01-01

64

Exploration of the Chemical Space of Group 4 Polymer Dielectrics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The current standards for capacitive energy storage applications are polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene (PE) which have large band gap and high breakdown strength, but a small dielectric constant. The envisaged next generation dielectric should provide high dielectric constant, while still preserving the insulating characteristics of PP and PE. To meet these growing needs, we use high throughput density functional theory (DFT) calculations in combination with machine learning (ML) methods to identify classes of polymers with large dielectric constant and band gap. In our work, we consider various possible local chemical modifications to polyethylene (PE). To be specific, we allow the -CH2- unit in the PE backbone segment to be replaced by -SiF2-, -SiCl2-, -GeF2-, -GeCl2-, -SnF2-, or -SnCl2- units in a systematic manner. High throughput methods were used first to accurately determine the dielectric constant and band gap of the chemically modified PE chains for a set of limited compositions and configurations. ML methods were then used to predict the properties of systems spanning a much larger part of the configurational and compositional space. A set of most promising PE modifications (with simultaneously large dielectric constant and band gap) is identified using this strategy.

Wang, Chenchen; Pilania, Ghanshyam; Ramprasad, Rampi

2013-03-01

65

MCMC-Particle-based group tracking of space objects within Bayesian framework  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the intense increase in space objects, especially space debris, it is necessary to efficiently track and catalog the extensive dense clusters of space objects. As the main instrument for low earth orbit (LEO) space surveillance, ground-based radar system is usually limited by its resolution while tracking small space debris with high density. Thus, the obtained measurement information could have been seriously missed, which makes the traditional tracking method inefficient. To address this issue, we conceived the concept of group tracking. For group tracking, the overall tendency of the group objects is expected to be revealed, and the trajectories of individual objects are simultaneously reconstructed explicitly. According to model the interaction between the group center and individual trajectories using the Markov random field (MRF) within Bayesian framework, the objects' number and individual trajectory can be estimated more accurately in the condition of high miss alarm probability. The Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC)-Particle algorithm was utilized for solving the Bayesian integral problem. Furthermore, we introduced the mechanism for describing the behaviors of groups merging and splitting, which can expand the single group tracking algorithm to track variable multiple groups. Finally, simulation of the group tracking of space objects was carried out to validate the efficiency of the proposed method.

Huang, Jian; Hu, Weidong

2014-01-01

66

Compound Poisson Processes and Lvy Processes in Groups and Symmetric Spaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

A sample path description of compound Poisson processes on groups is given and applied to represent Lvy processes on connected Lie groups as almost sure limits of sequences of Brownian motions with drift interlaced with random jumps. We obtain spherically symmetric Lvy processes in Riemannian symmetric spaces of the form M=G\\\\K, where G is a semisimple Lie group and K

David Applebaum

2000-01-01

67

Acyclicity of the groups of homeomorphisms of the Menger compact spaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Let k be the k-dimensional Menger compact space. We show that the group Homeo ( k) of homeomorphisms of k is acyclic. Introduction. The homology of groups of homeomorphisms, which has been studied by many authors, is strongly related to characteristic classes for various structures. A theorem of Mather (13) says that the group Homeoc (R n ) of homeomor-

VLAD SERGIESCU; TAKASHI TSUBOI

1996-01-01

68

Space group revsion of the triclinic polymorph of salicyl-aldehyde azine  

PubMed Central

The structure of the title compound, C14H12N2O2 {systematic name: 2,2?-[hydrazinediylidenebis(methanylylidene)]diphenol}, has already been determined in the triclinic space group P with Z = 4 [El-Medani, Aboaly, Abdalla & Ramadan (2004 ?). Spectrosc. Lett. 37, 619632]. However, the correct space group should be P21/c with Z = 4. This structure is a new polymorph of the already known monoclinic polymorph of salicyladehyde azine, which crystallizes in space group P21/n with Z = 2. The benzene rings form a dihedral angle of 46.12?(9). Two intramolucular OH?N hydrogen bonds occur. PMID:22346901

Saeed, Aamer; Bolte, Michael; Arshad, Muhammad

2012-01-01

69

Iterative Spatial Sequence Estimator for Multi-Group Space Time Trellis  

E-print Network

1 Iterative Spatial Sequence Estimator for Multi-Group Space Time Trellis Coded Systems Samir N. Al GK Multi-Group Space Time Trellis Decoder1x iNx 1x KNx B1 BK y1 y2 yM-1 yM 1B% KB% MIMO Fading STTE GK Multi-Group Space Time Trellis Decoder1x iNx 1x KNx B1 BK y1 y2 yM-1 yM 1B% KB% MIMO Fading

Al-Ghadhban, Samir

70

76 FR 1990 - Airworthiness Directives; Pilatus Aircraft Ltd. Models PC-6, PC-6-H1, PC-6-H2, PC-6/350, PC-6/350...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...airplanes, Fairchild Industries PC-6 airplanes, Fairchild Heli Porter PC-6 airplanes, or Fairchild-Hiller Corporation PC-6...airplanes, Fairchild Industries PC-6 airplanes, Fairchild Heli Porter PC-6 airplanes, or Fairchild- Hiller Corporation...

2011-01-12

71

Unusual space-group pseudo symmetry in crystals of human phosphopantothenoylcysteine decarboxylase  

SciTech Connect

Phosphopantothenoylcysteine (PPC) decarboxylase is an essential enzyme in the biosynthesis of coenzyme A and catalyzes the decarboxylation of PPC to phosphopantetheine. Human PPC decarboxylase has been expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The Laue class of the diffraction data appears to be {bar 3}m, suggesting space group R32 with two monomers per asymmetric unit. However, the crystals belong to the space group R3 and the asymmetric unit contains four monomers. The structure has been solved using molecular replacement and refined to a current R factor of 29%. The crystal packing can be considered as two interlaced lattices, each consistent with space group R32 and with the corresponding twofold axes parallel to each other but separated along the threefold axis. Thus, the true space group is R3 with four monomers per asymmetric unit.

Manoj, N.; Ealick, S.E. (Cornell)

2010-12-01

72

Photodynamic therapy potential of thiol-stabilized CdTe quantum dot-group 3A phthalocyanine conjugates (QD-Pc).  

PubMed

Thiol stabilized CdTe quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles were synthesized in aqueous phase and were used as energy donors to tetra-triethyleneoxythia substituted aluminum, gallium and indium phthalocyanines through fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Energy transfer occurred from the QDs to phthalocyanines upon photoexcitation of the QDs. An enhancement in efficiency of energy transfer with the nature of the carboxylic thiol stabilizer on the QDs was observed. As a result of the nanoparticle and the phthalocyanine mixing, the photoluminescence efficiency of the phthalocyanine moieties in the mixtures does not strictly follow the quantum yields of the bare phthalocyanines. The photochemistry study of phthalocyanines in the presence of the QDs revealed high singlet oxygen quantum yield, hence the possibility of using QDs in combination with phthalocyanines as photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy of cancer. The fluorescence of the CdTe quantum dots-phthalocyanine conjugates (QDs-Pc) were effectively quenched by addition of 1,4-benzoquinone. PMID:22484269

Tekda?, Duygu Ayd?n; Durmu?, Mahmut; Yan?k, Hlya; Ahsen, Vefa

2012-07-01

73

Pc-facs.  

PubMed

PC-FACS (Fast Article Critical Summaries for Clinicians in Palliative Care) provides hospice and palliative care clinicians with concise summaries of the most important findings from more than 100medical and scientific journals. If you have colleagues who would benefit from receiving PC-FACS, please encourage them to join the AAHPM at aahpm.org. Comments from readers are welcomed at pc-facs@aahpm.org. PMID:25150815

Zhukovsky, Donna S

2014-10-01

74

PC\\/370 virtual machine  

Microsoft Academic Search

PC\\/370 Virtual Machine is a software package containing an IBM 370 cross assembler, linkage editor, and 370 emulator for use by students and programmers on any MS-DOS compatible PC such as the IBM PC, XT, or AT with 128K of memory. The software was originally developed in 1981 for CP\\/M-80 Z80 systems with 64K. (1) The cross assembler translates standard

Donald S. Higgins

1985-01-01

75

Stable splittings, spaces of representations and almost commuting elements in Lie groups  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper the space of almost commuting elements in a Lie group is studied through a homotopical point of view. In particular a stable splitting after one suspension is derived for these spaces and their quotients under conjugation. A complete description for the stable factors appearing in this splitting is provided for compact connected Lie groups of rank one.By using symmetric products, the colimits $\\Rep(\\Z^n, SU)$, $\\Rep(\\Z^n,U)$ and $\\Rep(\\Z^n, Sp)$ are explicitly described as finite products of Eilenberg-MacLane spaces.

Adem, Alejandro; Cohen, Frederick R.; Gmez, Jos Manuel

2010-06-01

76

Constructions of E_{vc} and E_{fbc} for groups acting on CAT(0) spaces  

E-print Network

If G is a group acting properly by semisimple isometries on a proper CAT(0) space X, then we build models for the classifying spaces E_{vc} and E_{fbc} under the additional assumption that the action of G has a well-behaved collection of axes in X. (This hypothesis is described in the paper.) We conjecture that the latter hypothesis is satisfied in a large range of cases. Our classifying spaces resemble those created by Connolly, Fehrman, and Hartglass for crystallographic groups G.

Farley, Daniel

2009-01-01

77

Functional gene groups are concentrated within chromosomes, among chromosomes and in the nuclear space  

E-print Network

1 Functional gene groups are concentrated within chromosomes, among chromosomes and in the nuclear:+972-3-6405384 Keywords: chromosomes organization, gene function, chromosome conformation, spatial;2 Functional gene groups are concentrated within chromosomes, among chromosomes and in the nuclear space

Shamir, Ron

78

Challenges in Teaching Space Physics to Different Target Groups From Space Weather Forecasters to Heavy-weight Theorists  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Plasma physics as the backbone of space physics is difficult and thus the space physics students need to have strong foundations in general physics, in particular in classical electrodynamics and thermodynamics, and master the basic mathematical tools for physicists. In many universities the number of students specializing in space physics at Master's and Doctoral levels is rather small and the students may have quite different preferences ranging from experimental approach to hard-core space plasma theory. This poses challenges in building up a study program that has both the variety and depth needed to motivate the best students to choose this field. At the University of Helsinki we require all beginning space physics students, regardless whether they enter the field as Master's or Doctoral degree students, to take a one-semester package consisting of plasma physics and its space applications. However, some compromises are necessary. For example, it is not at all clear, how thoroughly Landau damping should be taught at the first run or how deeply should the intricacies of collisionless reconnection be discussed. In both cases we have left the details to an optional course in advanced space physics, even with the risk that the student's appreciation of, e.g., reconnection may remain at the level of a magic wand. For learning experimental work, data analysis or computer simulations we have actively pursued arrangements for the Master's degree students to get a summer employments in active research groups, which usually lead to the Master's theses. All doctoral students are members of research groups and participate in experimental work, data analysis, simulation studies or theory development, or any combination of these. We emphasize strongly "learning by doing" all the way from the weekly home exercises during the lecture courses to the PhD theses which in Finland consist typically of 4-6 peer-reviewed articles with a comprehensive introductory part.

Koskinen, H. E.

2008-12-01

79

The quaternionic affine group and related continuous wavelet transforms on complex and quaternionic Hilbert spaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

By analogy with the real and complex affine groups, whose unitary irreducible representations are used to define the one- and two-dimensional continuous wavelet transforms, we study here the quaternionic affine group and construct its unitary irreducible representations. These representations are constructed both on a complex and on a quaternionic Hilbert space. As in the real and complex cases, the representations for the quaternionic group also turn out to be square-integrable. Using these representations we construct quaternionic wavelets and continuous wavelet transforms on both the complex and quaternionic Hilbert spaces.

Ali, S. Twareque; Thirulogasanthar, K.

2014-06-01

80

Position and Orientation Distributions for Non-Reversal Random Walks using Space-Group Fourier Transforms.  

PubMed

This paper presents an efficient group-theoretic approach for computing the statistics of non-reversal random walks (NRRW) on lattices. These framed walks evolve on proper crystallographic space groups. In a previous paper we introduced a convolution method for computing the statistics of NRRWs in which the convolution product is defined relative to the space-group operation. Here we use the corresponding concept of the fast Fourier transform for functions on crystallographic space groups together with a non-Abelian version of the convolution theorem. We develop the theory behind this technique and present numerical results for two-dimensional and three-dimensional lattices (square, cubic and diamond). In order to verify our results, the statistics of the end-to-end distance and the probability of ring closure are calculated and compared with results obtained in the literature for the random walks for which closed-form expressions exist. PMID:21037950

Skliros, Aris; Park, Wooram; Chirikjian, Gregory S

2010-01-01

81

National facilities study. Volume 5: Space research and development facilities task group  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With the beginnings of the U.S. space program, there was a pressing need to develop facilities that could support the technology research and development, testing, and operations of evolving space systems. Redundancy in facilities that was once and advantage in providing flexibility and schedule accommodation is instead fast becoming a burden on scarce resources. As a result, there is a clear perception in many sectors that the U.S. has many space R&D facilities that are under-utilized and which are no longer cost-effective to maintain. At the same time, it is clear that the U.S. continues to possess many space R&D facilities which are the best -- or among the best -- in the world. In order to remain world class in key areas, careful assessment of current capabilities and planning for new facilities is needed. The National Facility Study (NFS) was initiated in 1992 to develop a comprehensive and integrated long-term plan for future aerospace facilities that meets current and projected government and commercial needs. In order to assess the nation's capability to support space research and development (R&D), a Space R&D Task Group was formed. The Task Group was co-chaired by NASA and DOD. The Task Group formed four major, technologically- and functionally- oriented working groups: Human and Machine Operations; Information and Communications; Propulsion and Power; and Materials, Structures, and Flight Dynamics. In addition to these groups, three supporting working groups were formed: Systems Engineering and Requirements; Strategy and Policy; and Costing Analysis. The Space R&D Task Group examined several hundred facilities against the template of a baseline mission and requirements model (developed in common with the Space Operations Task Group) and a set of excursions from the baseline. The model and excursions are described in Volume 3 of the NFS final report. In addition, as a part of the effort, the group examined key strategic issues associated with space R&D facilities planning for the U.S., and these are discussed in Section 4 of this volume.

1994-01-01

82

Constructions of E_{vc} and E_{fbc} for groups acting on CAT(0) spaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

If G is a group acting properly by semisimple isometries on a proper CAT(0) space X, then we build models for the classifying spaces E_{vc} and E_{fbc} under the additional assumption that the action of G has a well-behaved collection of axes in X. (This hypothesis is described in the paper.) We conjecture that the latter hypothesis is satisfied in

Daniel Farley

2009-01-01

83

Space group revsion of the triclinic polymorph of salicyl-aldehyde azine.  

PubMed

The structure of the title compound, C(14)H(12)N(2)O(2) {systematic name: 2,2'-[hydrazinediylidenebis(methanylyl-idene)]diphen-ol}, has already been determined in the triclinic space group P[Formula: see text] with Z = 4 [El-Medani, Aboaly, Abdalla & Ramadan (2004 ?). Spectrosc. Lett.37, 619-632]. However, the correct space group should be P2(1)/c with Z = 4. This structure is a new polymorph of the already known monoclinic polymorph of salicyladehyde azine, which crystallizes in space group P2(1)/n with Z = 2. The benzene rings form a dihedral angle of 46.12?(9). Two intramolucular O-H?N hydrogen bonds occur. PMID:22346901

Saeed, Aamer; Bolte, Michael; Arshad, Muhammad

2012-02-01

84

Active space decomposition with multiple sites: Density matrix renormalization group algorithm  

E-print Network

We extend the active space decomposition method, recently developed by us, to more than two active sites using the density matrix renormalization group algorithm. The fragment wave functions are described by complete or restricted active-space wave functions. Numerical results are shown on a benzene pentamer and a perylene diimide trimer. It is found that the truncation errors in our method decrease almost exponentially with respect to the number of renormalization states M, allowing for numerically exact calculations (to a few {\\mu}Eh or less) with M = 128 in both cases, which is in contrast to conventional ab initio density matrix renormalization group.

Parker, Shane M

2014-01-01

85

PowerPC News  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

PowerPC News: Full text of an independent electronic magazine published every two weeks for users and developers who want the latest news about the IBM/Motorola/Apple microprocessor family and the systems.

86

Status of the IAA study group on traffic management rules for space operations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The investigation of space traffic and its management has only recently become a point of wider discussion. In particular, the series of workshops organized by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and other international organizations on international cooperation highlighted the issue. It was discussed thoroughly at the workshops, which took place in 1999 and 2001, respectively. It was at the 2001 workshop, when the suggestion was made that an International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) Study on the subject of space traffic management should be prepared. This suggestion was taken up and a proposal was presented to the Board of Trustees of IAA, which, in late 2001, accepted this proposal. Following this, an interdisciplinary study group of around 20 persons was composed. One early milestone in the process of work was the conduct of an International Institute of Space Law (IISL)/European Center of Space Law (ECSL) Symposium alongside the 2002 session of the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UNCOPUOS) Legal Subcommittee. This symposium consisted of presentations of members of the IAA study group. Also, close coordination with other study projects of IAA, in particular with the one on space debris, is sought. This paper presents the status of work of the study group, in particular, the approach and the scope of the study as well as its preliminary findings. The study group intends to finalize its work in early 2004, in order to be able to put the study before IAA and launch its review process before the 2004 International Astronautical Congress. Following this review, the study will be published and may be expected to make an impact in fora like the UNCOPUOS. The authors of this paper act as the coordinators/the rapporteur to this study. The paper will be presented in the IAAas well as the IISLsession dealing with space traffic, by that bridging the two areas and seeking input from various sources.

Contant, Corinne; Lala, Petr; Schrogl, Kai-Uwe

2007-10-01

87

On Decoding and Performance Optimizing of Four-Group Decodable Space-Time Block Codes  

Microsoft Academic Search

A class of rate-one space-time block codes (STBC) allowing the decoding of transmitted symbols into four groups is recently proposed by Yuen, Guan and Tjhung. This code is called four-group decodable STBC (4Gp-STBC). In this paper, the equivalent channel of 4Gp-STBC is derived and a new method to decode 4Gp-STBC based on sphere decoders is proposed. Furthermore, the performance of

Dung Ngoc Dao; Chintha Tellambura; Chau Yuen; Tjeng Thiang Tjhung; Yong Liang Guan

88

On the Decoding and Optimizing Performance of Four-Group Decodable Space-Time Block Codes  

Microsoft Academic Search

A class of rate-one space-time block codes (STBC) allowing the decoding of transmitted symbols into four groups is recently proposed by Yuen, Guan and Tjhung. This code is called four-group decodable STBC (4Gp-STBC). In this paper, the equivalent channel of 4Gp-STBC is derived and a new method to decode 4Gp-STBC based on sphere decoders is presented. Furthermore, the performance of

Dung Ngoc Dao; C. Tellambura; Chau Yuen; Tjeng Thiang Tjhung; Yong Liang Guan

2006-01-01

89

Experiences of Young Bisexual Women in Lesbian\\/Bisexual Groups on MySpace  

Microsoft Academic Search

This exploratory study examined Topic threads in Lesbian\\/Bisexual Groups on MySpace to examine how young biwomen self-identify in online exchanges with other bisexuals and lesbians, as well as what attitudes and beliefs about bisexuality emerge from those exchanges. Four Topic threads from three Groups suggested that young biwomen use social networking sites to connect with others and create inclusive communities

M. Sue Crowley

2010-01-01

90

Groups of generalized flux transformations in the space of generalized connections  

E-print Network

We present a group of transformations in the space of generalized connections that contains the set of transformations generated by the flux variables of loop quantum gravity. This group is labelled by certain SU(2)-valued functions on the bundle of directions in the spatial manifold. A further generalization is obtained by considering functions that depend on germs of analytic curves, rather than just on directions.

J. M. Velhinho

2008-04-23

91

INFLUENCE OF SPAWNING GROUP SIZE AND SPACE ON REPRODUCTION BY SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS, CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS  

EPA Science Inventory

Cripe, G.M., R.L. Hemmer and L.R. Goodman. In press. Influence of Spawning Group Size and Space on Reproduction Variability of Sheepshead Minnows, Cyprinodon variegatus (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-18 November 2004, Portland, OR. 1 p. (ERL,GB...

92

Definition of spacecraft standard interfaces by the NASA Space Assembly and Servicing Working Group (SASWG)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of the NASA Space Assembly and Servicing Working Group (SASWG) is to study enabling technologies for on-orbit spacecraft maintenance and servicing. One key technology required for effective space logistics activity is the development of standard spacecraft interfaces, including the 'Basic Set' defined by NASA, the U.S. Space Command, and industry panelists to be the following: (1) navigation aids; (2) grasping, berthing, and docking; and (3) utility connections for power, data, and fluids. Draft standards have been prepared and referred to professional standards organizations, including the AIAA, EIA, and SAE space standards committee. The objective of the SASWG is to support these committees with the technical expertise required to prepare standards, guidelines, and recommended practices which will be accepted by the ANSI and international standards organizations, including the ISO, IEC, and PASC.

Radtke, Robert; Woolley, Charles; Arnold, Lana

1993-01-01

93

Environmental interactions in Space Exploration: Announcement of the formation of an Environmental Interactions Working Group  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With the advent of the Space Exploration Initiative, the possibility of designing and using systems on scales not heretofore attempted presents exciting new challenges in systems design and space science. The environments addressed by the Space Exploration Initiative include the surfaces of the Moon and Mars, as well as the varied plasma and field environments which will be encountered by humans and cargo enroute to these destinations. Systems designers will need to understand environmental interactions and be able to model these mechanisms from the earliest conceptual design stages through design completion. To the end of understanding environmental interactions and establishing robotic precursor mission requirements, an Environmental Interactions Working Group has been established as part of the Robotic Missions Working Group. The current paper describes the working group and gives an update of its current activities. Working group charter and operation are reviewed, background information on the environmental interactions and their characteristics is offered, and the current status of the group's activities is presented along with anticipations for the future.

Kolecki, Joseph C.; Hillard, G. Barry

1991-01-01

94

Kepler problem in deformed (quantum) four-dimensional space in non relativistic limit with Galilei group of motion  

E-print Network

It is shown that Kepler problem in deformed (quantum) four-dimensional space in non relativistic limit is integrable in quadratures. In non relativistic limit group of motion of quantum space coincide with Galilei one.

A. N. Leznov

2007-08-04

95

Phase-space shapes of clusters and rich groups of galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Context. Clusters and groups of galaxies are highly aspherical, with shapes approximated by nearly prolate ellipsoids of revolution. An equally fundamental property is the shape of these objects in velocity space which is the anisotropy of the global velocity dispersion tensor. Although many studies address the problem of the shape in position space, there has been no attempt to measure shapes in velocity space. Aims: Here we make use of kinematical data comprising ~600 nearby clusters and rich groups of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to place constraints on the phase-space shapes of these objects, i.e. their shapes in both position and velocity space. Methods: We show that the line of sight velocity dispersion normalised by a mass-dependent velocity scale correlates with the apparent elongation, with circular (elongated) clusters exhibiting an excessive (decremental) normalised velocity dispersion. This correlation holds for dynamically young or old clusters and, therefore, it originates from projecting their intrinsic phase-space shapes rather than from dynamical evolution. It signifies that clusters are preferentially prolate not only in position space, but also in velocity space. This property allows us to break the degeneracy between oblate and prolate models and thus to deproject the apparent elongations and the line of sight velocity dispersions obtaining constraints on the axial ratios of the ellipsoids approximating cluster shapes in 3D position or velocity space. Results: The distribution of the axial ratios in position space is found to be well approximated by a Gaussian with a mean, ? = 0.66 0.01, and a dispersion, ? = 0.07 0.008. The velocity ellipsoids representing the shapes in velocity space are more spherical, with a mean axial ratio of 0.78 0.03. Conclusions: The mean axial ratio of the velocity ellipsoids points to a highly anisotropic velocity distribution and, therefore, to a strong dependance of the observed velocity dispersions on the angle between the line of sight and the semi-principle axes of the clusters. This finding has important implications for mass measurements based on the line of sight velocity dispersion profiles in individual clusters. For typical axial ratios of the velocity ellipsoids in the analysed cluster sample, systematic errors on the mass estimates inferred from the line of sight velocity dispersions become comparable to statistical uncertainties for galaxy clusters with as few as 40 spectroscopic redshifts.

Wojtak, Rados?aw

2013-11-01

96

75 FR 62005 - Airworthiness Directives; Pilatus Aircraft Ltd. Models PC-6, PC-6-H1, PC-6-H2, PC-6/350, PC-6/350...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...B-H2, PC-6/B1-H2, PC-6/B2-H2, PC-6/B2-H4, PC-6/C-H2, and PC-6/C1-H2 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...FH or 12 calendar months, whichever occurs first, and to delete the related flight cycle...

2010-10-07

97

The NASA EEE parts assurance group (NEPAG) - An evolving approach to maximizing space parts assurance resources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes the activities of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Electrical, Electronic and Electromechanical (EEE) Parts Assurance Group (NEPAG) in its role as a resource sharing and coordinating force in EEE Parts assurance for space flight missions. NEPAG is a new organization, barely two years old. The EEE parts world for space applications faces a number of challenges as we enter the 21st Century but the most significant is clearly the economic incorporation of Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) parts without sacrificing reliability. NEPAG has collaborated in designing a NASA-funded evaluation plan to take a comprehensive look at COTS. A cost/benefit study has been performed to compare the cost of ownership of the US MIL parts NASA has traditionally used with COTS parts screened to an equivalent reliability level.

Sampson, M. J.

2002-12-01

98

Planning and managing future space facility projects. [management by objectives and group dynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To learn how ground-based personnel of a space project plan and organize their work and how such planning and organizing relate to work outcomes, longitudinal study of the management and execution of the Space Lab Mission Development Test 3 (SMD 3) was performed at NASA Ames Research Center. A view of the problems likely to arise in organizations and some methods of coping with these problems are presented as well as the conclusions and recommendations that pertain strictly to SMD 3 management. Emphasis is placed on the broader context of future space facility projects and additional problems that may be anticipated. A model of management that may be used to facilitate problem solving and communication - management by objectives (MBO) is presented. Some problems of communication and emotion management that MBO does not address directly are considered. Models for promoting mature, constructive and satisfying emotional relationships among group members are discussed.

Sieber, J. E.; Wilhelm, J. A.; Tanner, T. A.; Helmreich, R. L.; Burgenbauch, S. F.

1979-01-01

99

Exploiting space-group symmetry in fragment-based molecular crystal calculations.  

PubMed

Recent developments in fragment-based methods make it increasingly feasible to use high-level ab initio electronic structure techniques to molecular crystals. Such studies remain computationally demanding, however. Here, we describe a straightforward algorithm for exploiting space-group symmetry in fragment-based methods which often provides computational speed-ups of several fold or more. This algorithm does not require a priori specification of the space group or symmetry operators. Rather, the symmetrically equivalent fragments are identified automatically by aligning the individual fragments along their principle axes of inertia and testing for equivalence with other fragments. The symmetry operators relating equivalent fragments can then be worked out easily. Implementation of this algorithm for computing energies, nuclear gradients with respect to both atomic coordinates and lattice parameters, and the nuclear hessian is described. 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25270380

Heit, Yonaton; Beran, Gregory J O

2014-11-15

100

Real-space dynamic renormalization group. III. Calculation of correlation functions  

SciTech Connect

The real-space dynamic renormalization group method developed in previous papers is applied to the kinetic Ising model defined on a square lattice. In particular we extend the formalism to the calculation of space- and time-dependent equilibrium averaged correlation functions. We find that conventional methods for implementing the real-space renormalization group via cumulant expansions in terms of the intercell coupling lead to correlation functions which decay algebraically in space at large distances in the disordered phase in qualitative disagreement with the known exponential decay. We indicate how one can develop new perturbation theory expansion methods which lead to the proper exponential decay at large distances and also lead to good quantitative results for other observable quantities like the magnetization, susceptibility, and single spin time autocorrelation function. As the result of a first-order calculation we obtain excellent results for the static critical exponents and a value of z=1.79 for the dynamic critical exponent. The critical exponents obtained from the correlation functions calculated using this method satisfy the proper static and dynamic scaling relations.

Mazenko, G.F.; Hirsch, J.E.; Nolan, M.J.; Valls, O.T.

1981-02-01

101

Beware the PC Police.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Decries the prevalence of "racism,""sexual harassment," and "speciesism" labels applied to supposed violators of "political correctness" (PC). When freedom of speech on college campuses is held hostage to political correctness, K-12 education is bound to be affected. This new brand of McCarthyism cheapens the concept of discrimination and stifles

Cheney, Lynne V.

1992-01-01

102

Realization of vector fields for quantum groups as pseudodifferential operators on quantum spaces  

SciTech Connect

The vector fields of the quantum Lie algebra are described for the quantum groups GL{sub q}(n), SL{sub q}(N) and SO{sub q}(N) as pseudodifferential operators on the linear quantum spaces covariant under the corresponding quantum group. Their expressions are simple and compact. It is pointed out that these vector fields satisfy certain characteristic polynomial identities. The real forms SU{sub q}(N) and SO{sub q}(N,R) are discussed in detail.

Chu, Chong-Sun; Zumino, B.

1995-01-24

103

Localization of the Einstein group and a nonsingular cosmological model of space-time with torsion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We consider an Einstein-invariant gauge theory of gravitation (EGT), obtained by localizing the group of motions of a homogeneous static Einstein Universe. Taking into account the cosmological term, we find exact solutions of EGT are as nonsingular homogeneous Isotropic cosmological models with both the metric and the torsion regular. It is shown that EGT satisfies the principle of correspondence with Newton's theory of gravity and with the tetrad theory of gravity in the space of absolute parallelism.

Tunyak, V. N.

1986-10-01

104

A nice group structure on the orbit space of unimodular rows-II.  

E-print Network

We establish an Excision type theorem for niceness of group structure on the orbit space of unimodular rows of length $n$ modulo elementary action. This permits us to establish niceness for relative versions of results for the cases when $n = d+1$, $d$ being the dimension of the base algebra. We then study and establish niceness for the case when $n = d$, and also establish a relative version, when the base ring is a smooth affine algebra over an algebraically closed field.

Anjan Gupta; Anuradha Garge; Ravi A. Rao

105

Cohomologies of Configuration Spaces and Higher-Dimensional Polylogarithms in Renormalization Group Problems  

SciTech Connect

The deviation from commutativity of the renormalization and the action of all linear partial differential operators is the main source of the anomalies in quantum field theory, including the renormalization group action. This deviation is characterized by certain 'renormalization cocycles' that are related to cohomologies of the so called (ordered) configuration spaces. Cohomological differential equations that determine the renormalization cocycles up to the renormalization freedom are obtained. The solution of these equations requires introducing transcendental extensions related to higher-dimensional polylogarithms.

Nikolov, Nikolay M. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Tsarigradsko Chaussee 72, BG-1784 Sofia (Bulgaria)

2010-06-17

106

Report from the MPP Working Group to the NASA Associate Administrator for Space Science and Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) gave a select group of scientists the opportunity to test and implement their computational algorithms on the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) located at Goddard Space Flight Center, beginning in late 1985. One year later, the Working Group presented its report, which addressed the following: algorithms, programming languages, architecture, programming environments, the way theory relates, and performance measured. The findings point to a number of demonstrated computational techniques for which the MPP architecture is ideally suited. For example, besides executing much faster on the MPP than on conventional computers, systolic VLSI simulation (where distances are short), lattice simulation, neural network simulation, and image problems were found to be easier to program on the MPP's architecture than on a CYBER 205 or even a VAX. The report also makes technical recommendations covering all aspects of MPP use, and recommendations concerning the future of the MPP and machines based on similar architectures, expansion of the Working Group, and study of the role of future parallel processors for space station, EOS, and the Great Observatories era.

Fischer, James R.; Grosch, Chester; Mcanulty, Michael; Odonnell, John; Storey, Owen

1987-01-01

107

One dimensional zone center phonons in $O_{h}$ space group  

E-print Network

Motivated by experiments, we performed a systematic study on the one dimensional zone center phonons in $O_{h}$ space groups. All the one dimensional phonon modes for different Wyckoff positions are tabulated. We show that at least four (inequivalent) atoms (in one set of Wyckoff positions) are needed to carry a single one dimensional phonon. A general restriction rule on the number of atoms and the number of one dimensional phonons is obtained. The same restriction applies to phonons of all cubic crystal systems ($T$, $T_{h}$, $T_{d}$, $O$, $O_{h}$) and to magnons for crystals whose unitary symmetry elements are in ($T$, $T_{h}$, $T_{d}$, $O$, $O_{h}$). Crystals with $A15$ structure are found to satisfy experimental requirements (to have a $\\Gamma_{2}^{+}$ phonon) while most crystals of $O_{h}$ space groups do not. $A15$ is also used to demonstrate the rules we found regarding the phonon structure in $O_{h}$ space groups.

Jian Li; Jiufeng J. Tu; Joseph L. Birman

2014-03-04

108

Iterative Joint and Interference Nulling/ Cancellation Decoding Algorithms for Multi-Group Space Time Trellis Coded Systems  

E-print Network

for multi-group space time trellis coded (MGSTTC) systems. By considering a single user who transmits simultaneously through K parallel space time trellis encoders, the system can provide high spectral efficiencies is transmitting a space time trellis code. The transmitter will divide the information stream and transmits from

Al-Ghadhban, Samir

109

PC software overview  

SciTech Connect

The laptop PC is used by the Annunciator maintenance personnel to generate the site configuration and the sunrise/sunset times data files, to upload software files and data files to the host computer, to download the historical log file from the host, to maintain the historical log database, and to generate reports. This manual describes the organization and functionality of the software as well as generation mechanisms for development and target environments.

Fox, E.T.; Kissock, P.S. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-10-01

110

Higher-order calculations in the real space dynamic renormalization group: One dimension  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The application of real space dynamic renormalization group methods to the one-dimensional kinetic Ising model, discussed in an earlier paper, is extended to one order higher in perturbation theory than was done previously. It is shown that the treatment of short-range, local quantities is improved in going to higher order in the perturbation expansion, while that of the long-range properties remains largely unaffected. Arbitrariness in the real space mapping function and how it may be exploited to our advantage is duscussed. It is shown that the renormalized Hamiltonian continues to be characterized by one coupling through second order. We find that the single spin-flip kinetic Ising model generates at second-order new spin-flip mechanisms in the renormalized dynamical operator but that their effects are small (at most 2%) over the entire temperature range.

Luscombe, J.; Mazenko, Gene F.

1983-03-01

111

P-SPACE: a program for simulating spatial behavior in small groups.  

PubMed

P-SPACE is a computer program that simulates spatial behavior in a small group of individuals. The program describes how interpersonal distances change through time as a result of changes in microlevel features, such as the minimization of local dissatisfaction. Agents are located in a two-dimensional lattice and can move some discrete space units at each discrete time unit within their neighborhood. A nonsymmetrical matrix of ideal distances between agents must be specified. Agents move in order to minimize their dissatisfaction, defined as a function of the discrepancy between possible future distances and ideal distances between agents. At each iteration, agents will move to those cells in their neighborhoods for which the function is minimized. Depending on the specific values in the ideal-distance matrix, different kinds of social dynamics can be simulated. PMID:10758677

Quera, V; Solanas, A; Salafranca, L; Beltran, F S; Herrando, S

2000-02-01

112

A Fun and Effective Exercise for Understanding Lattices and Space Groups  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity uses figures from Francois Brisse as Esher drawings to teach students about 2-dimensional symmetry, especially involving translation. This exercise is based on discovery learning. Students need little introduction to lattices and space groups. They can figure things out for themselves. For example, they will figure out what a glide plane is, and if you tell them ahead of time it takes away from the learning experience. The last question, which asks them to make their own symmetrical drawings, is difficult but often leads to some spectacular results.

Perkins, Dexter

113

Real-space renormalization-group study of the Z(5) model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The phase diagram of the nearest-neighbor Z(5) model on the square and triangular lattices is investigated using techniques of the real-space renormalization group. We use the recently introduced technique of Nienhuis, Berker, Riedel, and Schick, which yields the expected first-order transition on the Potts subspace of the Z(5) model on the triangular lattice. For the general Z(5) model we obtain a line of first-order transitions which crosses over into a line of second-order transitions. The same technique when applied to the square lattice is found to show this crossover behavior only in combination with a Migdal procedure.

Mizrahi, Victor; Domany, Eytan

1981-10-01

114

Real-space renormalization group study of the anisotropic antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on a square lattice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work we apply two different real-space renormalization-group (RSRG) approaches to the anisotropic antiferromagnetic spin-1/2 Heisenberg model on the square lattice. Our calculations allow for an approximate evaluation of the T vs ? phase diagram: the results suggest the existence of a critical value of ?>0, at which the critical temperature goes to zero, and the presence of reentrant behavior on the critical line between the ordered and disordered phases. This whole critical line is found to belong to the same universality class as the Ising model. Our results are in accordance with previous RSRG approaches but not with numerical simulations and spin-wave calculations.

Branco, N. S.; Ricardo de Sousa, J.

2000-09-01

115

Hardy spaces on Lie groups of polynomial growth A.F.M. ter Elst 1 , Derek W. Robinson 2 and Yueping Zhu 3  

E-print Network

Hardy spaces on Lie groups of polynomial growth A.F.M. ter Elst 1 , Derek W. Robinson 2 and Yueping­order, subelliptic operators on Lie groups with polynomial growth. August 2004 Keywords: Lie groups, Hardy spaces of Hardy spaces on Lie groups of polynomial growth. Let G be a connected Lie group with Lie algebra g. One

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

116

Hubble Space Telescope Images of Stephan's Quintet: Star Cluster Formation in a Compact Group Environment  

E-print Network

Analysis of Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 images of Stephan's Quintet, Hickson Compact Group 92, yielded 115 candidate star clusters (with V-I < 1.5). Unlike in merger remants, the cluster candidates in Stephan's Quintet are not clustered in the inner regions of the galaxies; they are spread over the debris and surrounding area. Specifically, these sources are located in the long sweeping tail and spiral arms of NGC 7319, in the tidal debris of NGC 7318B/A, and in the intragroup starburst region north of these galaxies. Analysis of the colors of the clusters indicates several distinct epochs of star formation that appear to trace the complex history of dynamical interactions in this compact group.

S. C. Gallagher; J. C. Charlton; S. D. Hunsberger; D. Zaritsky; B. C. Whitmore

2001-03-31

117

PC Lube and Tune  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The objective of PC Lube and Tune "is to supply usable introductions, tutorials, and education on technical subjects to the large audience of computer users." For example, an article added January 20, 2003, looks at the history and evolution of the graphical user interface. The author demonstrates how computers interpret items such as the mouse, toolbars, and menus. Another article explains the basics of Web standards, such as HTML and XML, and how they are used to encode information. Not all of the articles are about computer technologies, though. For instance, one deals with the Microsoft's anti-trust case and its associated technical issues and implications.

1995-01-01

118

Electron precession microdiffraction as a useful tool for the identification of the space group.  

PubMed

The possible space groups of a crystal can be identified from a few zone axis microdiffraction patterns provided the position (and not the intensity) of the reflections on the patterns is taken into account. The method is based on the observation of the shifts and the periodicity differences between the reflections located in the first-order Laue zone (FOLZ) with respect to the ones located in the zero-order Laue zone (ZOLZ). Electron precession microdiffraction patterns display more reflections in the ZOLZ and in the FOLZ than in the conventional microdiffraction patterns and this number increases with the precession angle. It is shown, from the TiAl example given in the present study, that this interesting feature brings a strong beneficial effect for the identification of the possible space groups since it becomes very easy to identify unambiguously the FOLZ/ZOLZ shifts and periodicity differences. In addition, the diffracted intensity on the precession patterns is the integrated intensity and this intensity can also be used to identify the Laue class. PMID:17845710

Morniroli, J-P; Redjaimia, A

2007-08-01

119

Space group symmetry applied to SCF calculations with periodic boundary conditions and Gaussian orbitals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Space group symmetry is exploited and implemented in density functional calculations of extended systems with periodic boundary conditions. Our scheme for reducing the number of two-electron integrals employs the entire set of operations of the space group, including glide plains and screw axes. Speedups observed for the Fock matrix formation in simple 3D systems range from 2X to 9X for the near field Coulomb part and from 3X to 8X for the Hartree-Fock-type exchange, the slowest steps of the procedure, thus leading to a substantial reduction of the computational time. The relatively small speedup factors in special cases are attributed to the highly symmetric positions atoms occupy in crystals, including the ones tested here, as well as to the choice of the smallest possible unit cells. For quasi-1D systems with most atoms staying invariant only under identity, the speedup factors often exceed one order of magnitude reaching almost 70X (near-field Coulomb) and 57X (HFx) for the largest tested (16,7) single-walled nanotube with 278 symmetry operations.

Rusakov, Alexander A.; Frisch, Michael J.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

2013-09-01

120

Intraspecific variation in space use, group size, and mating systems of caviomorph rodents  

PubMed Central

Intraspecific variation in social systems is widely recognized across many taxa, and specific models, including polygamy potential, resource defense, and resource dispersion, have been developed to explain the relationship between ecological variation and social organization. Although mammals from temperate North America and Eurasia have provided many insights into this relationship, rodents from the Neotropics and temperate South America have largely been ignored. In this review we focus on reports documenting intraspecific variation in spacing systems, group size, and mating systems of caviomorphs. This large group of New World hystricognath rodents occupies a diverse array of habitats; thus, members of the same species potentially exhibit different social systems in response to different ecological conditions. Spatial patterns vary in response to a diverse array of factors, including predation, food availability, population density, and soil characteristics. Changes in group size typically correlate with changes in resource availability, particularly food. Mating systems generally reflect the ability of males to control access to females, which may depend on population density or food distribution. In general, social organization in caviomorphs fits predictions of resource-based models; however, most studies have been purely observational, involving small numbers of animals over short time periods and reporting qualitative rather than quantitative levels of ecological correlates. In future studies the use of molecular techniques and controlled, experimental manipulations can increase our understanding of intraspecific variation in caviomorph social systems. This understudied group of rodents offers excellent opportunities to provide insights into the influence of ecological conditions on behavior such as social systems. PMID:22328790

Maher, Christine R.; Burger, Joseph Robert

2012-01-01

121

Real-space renormalization group method for quantum 1/2 spins on the pyrochlore lattice.  

PubMed

A simple phenomenological real-space renormalization group method for quantum Heisenberg spins with nearest and next nearest neighbour interactions on a pyrochlore lattice is presented. Assuming a scaling law for the order parameter of two clusters of different sizes, a set of coupled equations that gives the fixed points of the renormalization group transformation and, thus, the critical temperatures and ordered phases of the system is found. The particular case of spins 1/2 is studied in detail. Furthermore, to simplify the mathematical details, from all the possible phases arising from the renormalization group transformation, only those phases in which the magnetic lattice is commensurate with a subdivision of the crystal lattice into four interlocked face-centred cubic sublattices are considered. These correspond to a quantum spin liquid, ferromagnetic order, or non-collinear order in which the total magnetic moment of a tetrahedral unit is zero. The corresponding phase diagram is constructed and the differences with respect to the classical model are analysed. It is found that this method reproduces fairly well the phase diagram of the pyrochlore lattice under the aforementioned constraints. PMID:24625859

Garcia-Adeva, Angel J

2014-04-01

122

Systematic prediction of new ferroelectrics in space group R3. I.  

PubMed

Release 2005/1 of the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database contains 158 entries under the space group R3. The first 81 together with 15 related entries include 52 different structure types, 10 of which represent families that have two or more isostructural members. There are 18 types that satisfy the structural criteria for ferroelectricity with a confidence level that necessarily depends upon the reliability of each structural determination. Among them, (LiTaO3)9.Ta2O5 and the CsCd(NO2) family are known ferroelectrics. The remaining 16 include the high-intensity higher-order harmonic generator II-BaB2O4, not previously recognized as ferroelectric. The other predicted ferroelectrics are Te(OH)6.NaF, the MgSO3.6H2O family, Li3P3O9.3H2O, SeNbF9, Al2(H2PO4)3PO4.6H2O, [Cr(OCN2H4)6].[(Co(NH3)2(NO2)4]3.(H2O)(1.5)], NaZnBr3.5H2O, III-Ag3SI, Tl2S, the Ba3Yb4O9 family, the Fe(10.7)Ru(1.3)As5 family, Sr17Ta10S42, Pb8Sb3 and the Sc7I12C family. Six structures reported in the space group R3 most likely exhibit mirror symmetry, with three experimental confirmations. The other 19 structures are most likely nonpolar, with six experimental confirmations. The capacity for physical property prediction by the remaining ten structures is shown to be in doubt. Thus, 46% of the present 52 inorganic structure types initially determined in the space group R3 and 35% of those currently assigned to R3 more likely exhibit an additional inversion center, mirror or glide plane, strongly exceeding the recently reported error rate of approximately 11% in organic structures. PMID:16434790

Abrahams, S C

2006-02-01

123

Nuclear safety policy working group recommendations on nuclear propulsion safety for the space exploration initiative  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An interagency Nuclear Safety Working Group (NSPWG) was chartered to recommend nuclear safety policy, requirements, and guidelines for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) nuclear propulsion program. These recommendations, which are contained in this report, should facilitate the implementation of mission planning and conceptual design studies. The NSPWG has recommended a top-level policy to provide the guiding principles for the development and implementation of the SEI nuclear propulsion safety program. In addition, the NSPWG has reviewed safety issues for nuclear propulsion and recommended top-level safety requirements and guidelines to address these issues. These recommendations should be useful for the development of the program's top-level requirements for safety functions (referred to as Safety Functional Requirements). The safety requirements and guidelines address the following topics: reactor start-up, inadvertent criticality, radiological release and exposure, disposal, entry, safeguards, risk/reliability, operational safety, ground testing, and other considerations.

Marshall, Albert C.; Lee, James H.; Mcculloch, William H.; Sawyer, J. Charles, Jr.; Bari, Robert A.; Cullingford, Hatice S.; Hardy, Alva C.; Niederauer, George F.; Remp, Kerry; Rice, John W.

1993-01-01

124

International Space Station Air Quality Assessed According to Toxicologically-Grouped Compounds  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Scores of compounds are found in the International Space Station (ISS) atmospheric samples that are returned to the Johnson Space Center Toxicology Laboratory for analysis. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs) are set with the view that each compound is present as if there were no other compounds present. In order to apply SMACs to the interpretation of the analytical data, the toxicologist must employ some method of combining the potential effects of the aggregate of compounds found in the atmospheric samples. The simplest approach is to assume that each quantifiable compound has the potential for some effect in proportion to the applicable SMAC, and then add all the proportions. This simple paradigm disregards the fact that most compounds have potential to adversely affect only a few physiological systems, and their effects would be independent rather than additive. An improved approach to dealing with exposure to mixtures is to add the proportions only for compounds that adversely affect the same physiological system. For example, toxicants that cause respiratory irritation are separated from those that cause neurotoxicity or cardio-toxicity. Herein we analyze ISS air quality data according to toxicological groups with a view that this could be used for understanding any crew symptoms occurring at the time of the sample acquisition. In addition, this approach could be useful in post-flight longitudinal surveys where the flight surgeon may need to identify post-flight, follow-up medical studies because of on-orbit exposures that target specific physiological systems.

James, John T.; Limero, Thomas F.; Beck, Steve; Cheng, Patti F.; deVera, Vanessa J.; Hand, Jennifer; Macatangay, Ariel

2010-01-01

125

Outreach of Astronomy with emphasis to the Solar System by the Space group in Greece  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have a long tradition in Space and Solar System outreach at the University of Athens (Space Group). We have contributed with many popular science articles in encyclopaedias (a total of some 200000 words), magazines and newspapers, public lectures around Greece and radio and TV programmes. We contribute in exhibitions for the public on many occasions (e.g. The British Exploration of the Planets, an exhibition organized by the British Council, at Eugenides Foundation and The Planetarium, where I prepared some 15 posters). We are preparing an outreach site of Astrophysics with sections for the planets, the exploration of the solar system and solar terrestrial relations. I am preparing several posters for the planets. We organize with the Hellenic Physical Union a series of Astrophysics Lectures at the University of Athens. Together with the Hellenic Physical Union we are planning to produce a theatrical play and CD or DVD concerning the planets. We have excellent collaboration with the amateur astronomers allover Greece and Cyprus. We organize, together with Physics or mathematics teachers in high schools several events related to astronomical observations (e.g. Venus transit, solar eclipe, astronomy nights). 1 We also organize popular science programmes in TV channels. I brief we consider Astronomy and especially the planetary system as a "Great Attractor" of pupil and the general public to science and we use it on every occasion for the benefit of the pupil and science. 2

Moussas, X.; Dialynas, K.; Babasides, G.; Fasoulopoulos, G.; Dimitropoulou, V.; Prassopoulos, D.; Kouphos, S.; Spandagos, E.; Strikis, J.

126

Fractal space-times under the microscope: A Renormalization Group view on Monte Carlo data  

E-print Network

The emergence of fractal features in the microscopic structure of space-time is a common theme in many approaches to quantum gravity. In this work we carry out a detailed renormalization group study of the spectral dimension $d_s$ and walk dimension $d_w$ associated with the effective space-times of asymptotically safe Quantum Einstein Gravity (QEG). We discover three scaling regimes where these generalized dimensions are approximately constant for an extended range of length scales: a classical regime where $d_s = d, d_w = 2$, a semi-classical regime where $d_s = 2d/(2+d), d_w = 2+d$, and the UV-fixed point regime where $d_s = d/2, d_w = 4$. On the length scales covered by three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations, the resulting spectral dimension is shown to be in very good agreement with the data. This comparison also provides a natural explanation for the apparent puzzle between the short distance behavior of the spectral dimension reported from Causal Dynamical Triangulations (CDT), Euclidean Dynamical Triangulations (EDT), and Asymptotic Safety.

Martin Reuter; Frank Saueressig

2011-10-24

127

Quantum groups, roots of unity and particles on quantized Anti-de Sitter space  

SciTech Connect

Quantum groups in general and the quantum Anti-de Sitter group U{sub q}(so(2,3)) in particular are studied from the point of view of quantum field theory. The author shows that if q is a suitable root of unity, there exist finite-dimensional, unitary representations corresponding to essentially all the classical one-particle representations with (half) integer spin, with the same structure at low energies as in the classical case. In the massless case for spin {ge} 1, {open_quotes}naive{close_quotes} representations are unitarizable only after factoring out a subspace of {open_quotes}pure gauges{close_quotes}, as classically. Unitary many-particle representations are defined, with the correct classical limit. Furthermore, the author identifies a remarkable element Q in the center of U{sub q}(g), which plays the role of a BRST operator in the case of U{sub q}(so(2,3)) at roots of unity, for any spin {ge} 1. The associated ghosts are an intrinsic part of the indecomposable representations. The author shows how to define an involution on algebras of creation and anihilation operators at roots of unity, in an example corresponding to non-identical particles. It is shown how nonabelian gauge fields appear naturally in this framework, without having to define connections on fiber bundles. Integration on Quantum Euclidean space and sphere and on Anti-de Sitter space is studied as well. The author gives a conjecture how Q can be used in general to analyze the structure of indecomposable representations, and to define a new, completely reducible associative (tensor) product of representations at roots of unity, which generalizes the standard {open_quotes}truncated{close_quotes} tensor product as well as many-particle representations.

Steinacker, H. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1997-05-23

128

Space station needs, attributes and architectural options study commercialization working group briefing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The benefits for each of the following commercial areas was investigated: communications, remote sensing, materials processing in space, low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite assembly, testing, and servicing, and space tourism. In each case, where economic benefits are derived, the costs for accomplishing tasks with the Space Station are compared with the cost with the Space Transportation System only.

1983-01-01

129

On the reflection type decomposition of the adjoint reduced phase space of a compact semisimple Lie group  

SciTech Connect

We consider a system with symmetries whose configuration space is a compact Lie group, acted upon by inner automorphisms. The classical reduced phase space of this system decomposes into connected components of orbit type subsets. To investigate hypothetical quantum effects of this decomposition one has to construct the associated costratification of the Hilbert space of the quantum system in the sense of Huebschmann. In the present paper, instead of the decomposition by orbit types, we consider the related decomposition by reflection types (conjugacy classes of reflection subgroups). These two decompositions turn out to coincide, e.g., for the classical groups SU(n) and Sp(n). We derive defining relations for reflection type subsets in terms of irreducible characters and discuss how to obtain from that the corresponding costratification of the Hilbert space of the system. To illustrate the method, we give explicit results for some low rank classical groups.

Hofmann, M. [Naturwissenschaftlich-Technische Fakultt, Universitt Siegen, Walter-Flex-Str. 3, 57068 Siegen (Germany)] [Naturwissenschaftlich-Technische Fakultt, Universitt Siegen, Walter-Flex-Str. 3, 57068 Siegen (Germany); Rudolph, G.; Schmidt, M. [Institut fr Theoretische Physik, Universitt Leipzig, Augustusplatz 10/11, 04109 Leipzig (Germany)] [Institut fr Theoretische Physik, Universitt Leipzig, Augustusplatz 10/11, 04109 Leipzig (Germany)

2013-08-15

130

Tangent spaces to motivic cohomology groups-on $CH^{\\bullet}(X,1)$ and $CH^{\\bullet}(X,2)$.  

E-print Network

Using higher K-theory and tensor triangular geometry, we propose K-theoretic higher Chow groups, at position 1 and 2, of derived categories of noetherian schemes and their Milnoe variants for regular schemes and infinitesimal thickenings. We discuss fuctoriality ans show that these new higher Chow groups agree with the classical ones for regular schemes. As an application, we define tangent spaces to these new higher Chow groups as usually and identify them with cohomology groups of absolute differentials. Moreover, combing our results with Green-Griffiths' work on tangent spaces to algebraic cycles, we put a geometric meaning to the tangent space to $CH^{2}(X,1)$, where X is a smooth projective surface over a field k, chark=0.

Sen Yang

131

Gas and dust in the beta Pictoris moving group as seen by the Herschel Space Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Context. Debris discs are thought to be formed through the collisional grinding of planetesimals, and then can be considered as the outcome of planet formation. Understanding the properties of gas and dust in debris discs can help us comprehend the architecture of extrasolar planetary systems. Herschel Space Observatory far-infrared (IR) photometry and spectroscopy have provided a valuable dataset for the study of debris discs gas and dust composition. This paper is part of a series of papers devoted to the study of Herschel-PACS observations of young stellar associations. Aims: This work aims at studying the properties of discs in the beta Pictoris moving group (BPMG) through far-IR PACS observations of dust and gas. Methods: We obtained Herschel-PACS far-IR photometric observations at 70, 100, and 160 ?m of 19 BPMG members, together with spectroscopic observations for four of them. These observations were centred at 63.18 ?m and 157 ?m, aiming to detect [OI] and [CII] emission. We incorporated the new far-IR observations in the SED of BPMG members and fitted modified blackbody models to better characterise the dust content. Results: We have detected far-IR excess emission towards nine BPMG members, including the first detection of an IR excess towards HD 29391.The star HD 172555, shows [OI] emission, while HD 181296 shows [CII] emission, expanding the short list of debris discs with a gas detection. No debris disc in BPMG is detected in both [OI] and [CII]. The discs show dust temperatures in the range 55-264 K, with low dust masses (<6.6 10-5 M? to 0.2 M?) and radii from blackbody models in the range 3 to ~82 AU. All the objects with a gas detection are early spectral type stars with a hot dust component. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Barrado, D.; Montesinos, B.; Duchne, G.; Bouy, H.; Pinte, C.; Menard, F.; Donaldson, J.; Eiroa, C.; Krivov, A. V.; Kamp, I.; Mendiguta, I.; Dent, W. R. F.; Lillo-Box, J.

2014-05-01

132

A PC based fault diagnosis expert system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Integrated Status Assessment (ISA) prototype expert system performs system level fault diagnosis using rules and models created by the user. The ISA evolved from concepts to a stand-alone demonstration prototype using OPS5 on a LISP Machine. The LISP based prototype was rewritten in C and the C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) to run on a Personal Computer (PC) and a graphics workstation. The ISA prototype has been used to demonstrate fault diagnosis functions of Space Station Freedom's Operation Management System (OMS). This paper describes the development of the ISA prototype from early concepts to the current PC/workstation version used today and describes future areas of development for the prototype.

Marsh, Christopher A.

1990-01-01

133

Alveolar Gas - PC Version  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Alveolar Gas is a computer program that lets you study some of the physiological factors that affect the composition of alveolar and expired gases. Such factors include dead space, tidal volume, the frequency of breathing, and the rates of oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production. A worksheet is included.

1998-07-01

134

Gas and dust in the Beta Pictoris Moving Group as seen by the Herschel Space Observatory  

E-print Network

Context. Debris discs are thought to be formed through the collisional grinding of planetesimals, and can be considered as the outcome of planet formation. Understanding the properties of gas and dust in debris discs can help us to comprehend the architecture of extrasolar planetary systems. Herschel Space Observatory far-infrared (IR) photometry and spectroscopy have provided a valuable dataset for the study of debris discs gas and dust composition. This paper is part of a series of papers devoted to the study of Herschel PACS observations of young stellar associations. Aims. This work aims at studying the properties of discs in the Beta Pictoris Moving Group (BPMG) through far-IR PACS observations of dust and gas. Methods. We obtained Herschel-PACS far-IR photometric observations at 70, 100 and 160 microns of 19 BPMG members, together with spectroscopic observations of four of them. Spectroscopic observations were centred at 63.18 microns and 157 microns, aiming to detect [OI] and [CII] emission. We incorpo...

Riviere-Marichalar, P; Montesinos, B; Duchne, G; Bouy, H; Pinte, C; Menard, F; Donaldson, J; Eiroa, C; Krivov, A V; Kamp, I; Mendiguta, I; Dent, W R F; Lillo-Box, J

2014-01-01

135

LDEF meteoroid and debris special investigation group investigations and activities at the Johnson Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since the return of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) in January, 1990, members of the Meteoroid and Debris Special Investigation Group (M&D SIG) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas have been examining LDEF hardware in an effort to expand the knowledge base regarding the low-Earth orbit (LEO) particulate environment. In addition to the various investigative activities, JSC is also the location of the general Meteoroid & Debris database. This publicly accessible database contains information obtained from the various M&D SIG investigations, as well as limited data obtained by individual LDEF Principal Investigators. LDEF exposed approximately 130 m(exp 2) of surface area to the LEO particulate environment, approximately 15.4 m(exp 2) of which was occupied by structural frame components (i.e., longerons and intercoastals) of the spacecraft. The data reported here was obtained as a result of detailed scans of LDEF intercoastals, 68 of which reside at JSC. The limited amount of data presently available on the A0178 thermal control blankets was reported last year and will not be reiterated here. The data presented here are limited to measurements of crater diameters and their frequency of occurrence (i.e., flux).

See, Thomas H.; Warren, Jack L.; Zolensky, Michael E.; Sapp, Clyde A.; Bernhard, Ronald P.; Dardano, Claire B.

1995-01-01

136

Effects of incentives on psychosocial performances in simulated space-dwelling groups  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Prior research with individually isolated 3-person crews in a distributed, interactive, planetary exploration simulation examined the effects of communication constraints and crew configuration changes on crew performance and psychosocial self-report measures. The present report extends these findings to a model of performance maintenance that operationalizes conditions under which disruptive affective responses by crew participants might be anticipated to emerge. Experiments evaluated the effects of changes in incentive conditions on crew performance and self-report measures in simulated space-dwelling groups. Crews participated in a simulated planetary exploration mission that required identification, collection, and analysis of geologic samples. Results showed that crew performance effectiveness was unaffected by either positive or negative incentive conditions, while self-report measures were differentially affectednegative incentive conditions produced pronounced increases in negative self-report ratings and decreases in positive self-report ratings, while positive incentive conditions produced increased positive self-report ratings only. Thus, incentive conditions associated with simulated spaceflight missions can significantly affect psychosocial adaptation without compromising task performance effectiveness in trained and experienced crews.

Hienz, Robert D.; Brady, Joseph V.; Hursh, Steven R.; Gasior, Eric D.; Spence, Kevin R.; Emurian, Henry H.

137

Overview of the Space Propulsion Synergy Group (SPSG) strategic planning support efforts for earth to orbit transportation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An essential requirement of a successful space program is the assurance of a safe affordable routine access to space. In view of this, a national organization known as the Space Propulsion Synergy Group (SPSG) has been directed for the past two years toward supporting strategic planning for earth-to-orbit space transportation and propulsion systems. This paper presents a short description of the approach the SPSG followed in their space transportation and propulsion systems strategic planning support activities. The SPSG study emphasized the identification of the transportation systems users/customers and the characteristics of attributes most valued by them in earth-to-LEO payload transportation services. The study initiated the process known as Quality Function Deployment to ensure that the customer/user real requirements and needs are properly addressed and that the transportation system concepts advocated had the greatest probability of satisfying the custosmer's requirements and desired attributes.

Dankhoff, Walter F.; Hope, William P., Jr.

1993-06-01

138

Personal Computer (PC) thermal analyzer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rome Air Development Center (RADC) has developed an expert system based design verification tool to increase the efficiency of calculating device junction temperatures on printed circuit boards (PCBs). This tool, the Personal Computer (PC) Thermal Analyzer, was developed for reliability and electronic design engineers for use during the computer-aided design (CAD) phase. The PC Thermal Analyzer was developed through the combination of two technical areas, thermal analysis and expert systems. This intelligent analyzer is a more effective verification tool because traditional tools require much time and knowledge of thermal analysis, while the PC Thermal Analyzer is quick, requires no expertise in thermal analysis, and provides useful results during the CAD phase.

Vaccaro, James M.; Holzhauer, Douglas J.; Yaworsky, Paul S.

1990-03-01

139

Group Dynamics as a Critical Component of Successful Space Exploration: Conceptual Theory and Insights from the Biosphere 2 Closure Experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As space exploration and eventually habitation achieves longer durations, successfully managing group dynamics of small, physically isolated groups will become vital. The paper summarizes important underlying research and conceptual theory and how these manifested in a well-documented example: the closure experiments of Biosphere 2. Key research breakthroughs in discerning the operation of small human groups comes from the pioneering work of W.R. Bion. He discovered two competing modalities of behavior. The first is the task-oriented or work group governed by shared acceptance of goals, reality-thinking in relation to time, resources and rational, and intelligent management of challenges presented. The opposing, usually unconscious, modality is what Bion called the basic-assumption group and alternates between three group animal groups: dependency/kill the leader; fight/flight and pairing. If not dealt with, these dynamics work to undermine and defeat the conscious task groups goal achievement. The paper discusses crew training and selection, various approaches to structuring the work and hierarchy of the group, the importance of contact with a larger population through electronic communication and dealing with the us-them syndrome frequently observed between crew and Mission Control. The experience of the first two year closure of Biosphere 2 is drawn on in new ways to illustrate vicissitudes and management of group dynamics especially as both the inside team of biospherians and key members of Mission Control had training in working with group dynamics. Insights from that experience may help mission planning so that future groups in space cope successfully with inherent group dynamics challenges that arise.

Nelson, Mark; Allen, John P.

140

Origin and evolution of moving groups I. Characterization in the observational kinematic-age-metallicity space  

E-print Network

Context. Recent studies have suggested that moving groups have a dynamic or "resonant" origin. Under this hypothesis, these kinematic structures become a powerful tool for studying the large-scale structure and dynamics of the Milky Way. Aims. We aim to characterize these structures in the U-V-age-[Fe/H] space and establish observational constraints that will allow us to study their origin and evolution. Methods. We apply multiscale techniques -wavelet denoising (WD)- to an extensive compendium of more than 24000 stars in the solar neighbourhood with the best available astrometric, photometric and spectroscopic data. Results. We confirm that the dominant structures in the U-V plane are the branches of Sirius, Coma Berenices, Hyades-Pleiades and Hercules, which are nearly equidistant in this kinematic plane and show a negative slope. The abrupt drops in the velocity distribution are characterized. We find a certain dependence of these kinematic structures on Galactic position with a significant change of contrast among substructures inside the branches. A large spread of ages is observed for all branches. The Hercules branch is detected in all subsamples with ages older than ~ 2 Gyr and the set of the other three branches is well established for stars > 400 Myr. The age-metallicity relation of each branch is examined and the relation between kinematics and metallicity is studied. Conclusions. Not all of these observational constraints are successfully explained by the recent models proposed for the formation of such kinematic structures. Simulations incorporating stellar ages and metallicities are essential for future studies. The comparison of the observed and simulated distributions obtained by WD will provide a physical interpretation of the existence of the branches in terms of local or large-scale dynamics. [Abridged

T. Antoja; F. Figueras; D. Fernandez; J. Torra

2008-09-02

141

Creating Social Spaces to Tackle AIDS-Related Stigma: Reviewing the Role of Church Groups in Sub-Saharan Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

An expanding body of literature explores the role of African church groups in facilitating or hindering the support of people\\u000a living with AIDS and challenging or contributing to HIV\\/AIDS-related stigma. Treating church groups as social spaces in which\\u000a HIV\\/AIDS-related stigma may potentially be challenged, we systematically review this literature, identifying five themes that\\u000a highlight the complex and contradictory role of

C. Campbell; M. Skovdal; A. Gibbs

2011-01-01

142

Smart Cards and PC Cards.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document introduces both smart cards and PC cards and covers some of their relevant applications to information security. This includes their use in access control, as portable secure storage for cryptographic keys and for computing cryptographic fun...

M. Henderson

1999-01-01

143

Grouping  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive Flash applet models the measurement interpretation of division. A child or teacher chooses a total number of objects and a divisor representing the size of equal groups. The applet allows the user to move the objects into equal groups and links the process to jumps on a number line. The applet can be used to introduce children to remainders and to reinforce the language and notation of division. It works well on an interactive white board or projector. A teacher's guide to this collection of applets is cataloged separately.

2006-01-01

144

Effects of row spacing, seed rate and maturity group on late planted soybean under irrigated and dryland  

E-print Network

Effects of row spacing, seed rate and maturity group on late planted soybean under irrigated Oklahoma State University SUMMARY POINTS: For Irrigated Soybean a plant population of 180,000 resulted at the dryland location. Introduction Soybean Production has increased significantly in Oklahoma the past few

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

145

PRE AND POST BREAKUP MOVEMENTS AND SPACE USE OF BLACK BEAR FAMILY GROUPS IN CHEROKEE NATIONAL FOREST, TENNESSEE  

Microsoft Academic Search

The movements and space use of 7 yearling black bears (Ursus americanus) (3 males, 4 females) from 3 family groups were intensively monitored concurrently with 13 adults (6 males, 7 females) in the Cherokee National Forest, Tennessee from February 1983 until December 1983. The timing of family breakup occurred in 2 families between 29 May-5 June, and 22-25 June, respectively.

ANTHONY P. CLEVENGER; MICHAEL R. PELTON

146

PC index as an indicator of the magnetospheric substorm and magnetic storm development  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The PC index as a characteristic of the solar wind energy that entered into the magnetosphere is used to monitor and nowcast the magnetospheric substorm development. It is shown that the PC index always begins to grow ahead the substorm sudden onset. Length of substorm growth phase is determined by the PC growth rate: the higher the rate, the shorter is growth phase duration. The substorms start when the PC index exceeds the definite threshold level (from ~ 1.5 mV/m to >3 mV/m under different conditions). The substorm intensity, expressed by the auroral AL index, is determined by difference between the initial PC value in moment of the growth phase beginning and final PC value in moment of the substorm onset: the larger the PC gradient during the growth phase, the more powerful is magnetospheric substorm. Under condition of high PC index (PC > 3 mV/m) the substorm intensifications can occur in any time. It means that energy available in the magnetosphere in these cases occurs to be enough for the substorm intensifications irrespective of the PC behavior. Substorms are stopped as soon as PC index falls below 1 mV/m. The magnetic storms, identified by the world geomagnetic field depression (Dst index), start to develop when the PC value persistently exceeds the threshold level ~ 2mV/m. The storm intensity is linearly related to the greatest PC value preceding (~1 hour) the maximal depression. The storm recovery phase is observed when the PC index persistently declines below the threshold level. The statistically justified relationships between the PC index and AL and Dst indices were derived for various trends of the PC index behavior and under the quite different conditions. The obtained relationships were testified while examining the concrete storm and substorm events. The checking results demonstrate that the PC index provides the reliable basis for the space weather monitoring and nowcasting.

Troshichev, Oleg; Janzhura, Alexander; Sormakov, Dmitry; Podorozhkina, Nataly

2013-04-01

147

A summary of activities of the US/Soviet-Russian joint working group on space biology and medicine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The very foundation of cooperation between the United States (US) and Russia (former Soviet Union) in space exploration is a direct result of the mutual desire for scientific understanding and the creation of a collaborative mechanismthe Joint Working Group (JWG) on Space Biology and Medicine. From the dawn of the space age, it has been the quest of humankind to understand its place in the universe. While nations can and do solve problems independently, it takes nations, working together, to accomplish great things. The formation of the JWG provided an opportunity for the opening of a series of productive relationships between the superpowers, the US and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR); and served as a justification for continued relationship for medical assistance in spaceflight, and to showcase Earth benefits from space medicine research. This relationship has been played out on an international scale with the construction and operation of the International Space Station. The fundamental reason for this successful endeavor is a direct result of the spirit and perseverance of the men and women who have worked diligently side-by-side to promote science and move our understanding of space forward. This manuscript provides a historical perspective of the JWG; how it came about; its evolution; what it accomplished; and what impact it has had and continues to have in the 21st century with regard to human spaceflight and space life sciences research. It captures the spirit of this group, which has been in continuous existence for over 40 years, and provides a never before reported summary of its activities.

Doarn, Charles R.; Nicogossian, Arnauld E.; Grigoriev, Anatoly I.; Tverskaya, Galina; Orlov, Oleg I.; Ilyin, Eugene A.; Souza, Kenneth A.

2010-10-01

148

Melt crystallization of bisphenol A polycarbonate in PC/zinc sulfonated polystyrene ionomer blend  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effects of zinc sulfonated polystyrene ionomer (ZnSPS) on the melt crystallization of bisphenol A polycarbonate (PC) were investigated. Melt crystallization of pure PC is extremely slow due to its rigid chain. In the blend of PC and ZnSPS (PC-ZnSPS), the melt crystallization rate of PC can be enhanced. DSC was used to study the crystallization kinetics of PC in PC-ZnSPS blend. The crystallization of PC at 190C increased in both partially miscible and miscible blends with ZnSPS. For PC-ZnSPS blend with same PC composition as 80%, the crystallization rate was affected by the sulfonation level of ZnSPS. The induction time of crystallization for a partially miscible blend PC-ZnSPS9.98 (80/20) was 40 minutes, and the crystallization reaches 27% crystallinity within 14 hrs. The induction time for pure PC with the same thermal history was more than 24 hrs. The crystal structure of PC crystal formed in PC-ZnSPS blend was studied by WAXD, which showed no difference from the reported WAXD pattern for pure PC. Molecular weight change of PC was found during the thermal annealing of PC-ZnSPS blend at 190C, but molecular weight alone cannot explain the change of crystallization rate of PC in PC-ZnSPS blend. Discussion was made to address the mechanisms that are responsible for the crystallization rate enhancement of PC in PC-ZnSPS blend. In order to understand and elucidate the reason for the molecular weight change of PC in PC-ZnSPS blend and its effect on the crystallization of PC, TG, GPC and GC-MS were used to investigate the stability of PC-ZnSPS blend and mixtures of PC with sodium tosylate (NaTS), zinc tosylate (ZnTS) and sodium benzoate (NaBZ). ZnSPS, NaTS and ZnTS undergo desulfonation of the sulfonate group at temperatures above 350C. The desulfonation process can destabilize PC and lower the maximum mass loss rate temperature of PC for more than 70C. NaTS, ZnTS and NaBZ have quite different effect on the thermal stability of PC at temperatures below 250C. NaBZ can significantly degrade PC both at 190C and 250C. PC does not show any molecular weight (M w) change in the presence of NaTS at 250C and 190C for up to 1hr and 16 hrs respectively. ZnTS can also cause Mw change of PC at 250C and 190C, but the changing of Mw of PC in the presence of ZnTS is less than that in the presence of NaBZ. The reason for the molecular weight change of PC in PC-ZnSPS blend can be explained based on Davis's ionic ester exchange reaction mechanism.

Xu, Liang

149

Space station needs attributes and architectural options study costing working group briefing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Individuals in the United States who understand the promise of materials processing in space and who also are senior technical personnel associated with commercial firms that process materials: (1) endorsed the concept of a space station as a desirable national asset; (2) stated that a commercial MPS research program is mandatory to extend commericalization of space for materials processing; and (3) described in general terms a national research laboratory and free flying facilities that are needed. Participants agreed that industry R&D is motivated largely by market pull rather than by technology push, that initial interest is low-g materials research; and that to farther, commercial market assurance (a salable product) is a must.

1983-01-01

150

Japanese projects development under activity of working group 4 (space environment natural and artificial)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since the beginning of 90's, space environment international standards have been developed within the scope of ISO/TC20/SC14/WG 4(space environment natural and artificial) activities. Japanese WG4 members have developed and proposed 5 projects under WG4 activity. These 5 projects are (1) Observed proton fluences over long duration at GEO and guideline for selection of confidence level in statistical model of solar proton fluences (TS12208), (2) Process-Based Implementation of Meteoroid and Debris Environmental Models ( Orbital Altitudes Below GEO+2000km)(FDIS14200), (3)Methods for estimation of future geomagnetic activity(DIS16698), (4) Realtime solar activity and space environment information for spacecraft operation(CD16709), (5) Procedure for obtaining worst case and confidence level of fluence using the quasi-dynamic radiation belts model(NWIP). This report presents the first published TS12208 (2011-09-15) in the above 5 projects in detail.

Goka, Tateo; Kitazawa, Yukihito

2012-07-01

151

Evaluating a Safe Space Training for School Counselors and Trainees Using a Randomized Control Group Design  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

School counselors need to advocate and act as an ally for all students. Safe Space, a training designed to facilitate competency for working with and serving LGBTQ youth (i.e., LGBTQ competency), has received increased attention in the field of school counseling. However, limited empirical support exists for training interventions such as Safe

Byrd, Rebekah; Hays, Danica G.

2014-01-01

152

Group therapy for women problem gamblers: A space of their own  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents the results of a grounded theory analysis produced from in-depth interviews with 14 women participating in group counselling for problem gambling. Themes emerged from this analysis that provided insights into effective counselling practices for women problem gamblers. The results explore the impact of a group therapy approach in addressing the needs of these women. Participants indicated that

Nolla Piquette-Tomei; Erika Norman; Sonya Corbin Dwyer; Evelyn McCaslin

2008-01-01

153

ON THE CLASSIFYING SPACE FOR THE FAMILY OF VIRTUALLY CYCLIC SUBGROUPS FOR ELEMENTARY AMENABLE GROUPS  

E-print Network

that has a bound on the orders of its finite subgroups admits a finite dimensional model for EG with finite isotropy [19­21]. Finiteness conditions for EG for elementary amenable groups are very well under] it was conjectured that the only groups admitting a finite type model for EG are virtually cyclic

Sheldon, Nathan D.

154

D-side: A facility and workforce planning group multi-criteria decision support system for Johnson Space Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract To understand and protect our home planet, to explore the universe and search for life, and to inspire the next generation of explorers is NASAs mission. The Systems Management,Office at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is searching for methods,to effectively manage,the Centers resources to meet NASAs mission. D-Side is a group multi-criteria decision support system (GMDSS) developed to support facility

Madjid Tavana; James W. Smither; Ralph V. Anderson

2007-01-01

155

Creating Social Spaces to Tackle AIDS-Related Stigma: Reviewing the Role of Church Groups in Sub-Saharan Africa  

PubMed Central

An expanding body of literature explores the role of African church groups in facilitating or hindering the support of people living with AIDS and challenging or contributing to HIV/AIDS-related stigma. Treating church groups as social spaces in which HIV/AIDS-related stigma may potentially be challenged, we systematically review this literature, identifying five themes that highlight the complex and contradictory role of the church as a potential agent of health-enhancing social change. In many ways the church perpetuates HIV/AIDS-related stigma through (i) moralistic attitudes and (ii) its reinforcement of conservative gender ideologies. However some churches have managed move towards action that makes a more positive contribution to HIV/AIDS management through (iii) promoting various forms of social control for HIV prevention, (iv) contributing to the care and support of the AIDS-affected and (v) providing social spaces for challenging stigmatising ideas and practices. We conclude that church groups, including church leadership, can play a key role in facilitating or hindering the creation of supportive social spaces to challenge stigma. Much work remains to be done in developing deeper understandings of the multi-layered factors that enable some churches, but not others, to respond effectively to HIV/AIDS. PMID:20668927

Skovdal, M.; Gibbs, A.

2012-01-01

156

Rheological Properties, Morphology, and Thermal Performance of E?MA?GMA\\/PC Blend  

Microsoft Academic Search

Blends of ethylenemethyl acrylateglycidyl methacrylate terpolymer (E?MA?GMA, a random terpolymer) and polycarbonate (PC) were prepared in a Haake torque rheometer and the rheological properties, phase morphology, and thermal behavior were investigated. The graft reactions of PC terminal hydroxyl groups with the epoxy groups of E?MA?GMA and the in situ formation of the E?MA?GMA?g?PC copolymers at the interface were illustrated by

Bo Yin; Wei Yang; Yin Zhao

2007-01-01

157

Computer (PC/Network) Coordinator.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication contains 22 subjects appropriate for use in a competency list for the occupation of computer (PC/network) coordinator, 1 of 12 occupations within the business/computer technologies cluster. Each unit consists of a number of competencies; a list of competency builders is provided for each competency. Titles of the 22 units are as

Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

158

D2PC sensitivity analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Chemical Hazard Prediction Model (D2PC) developed by the US Army will play a critical role in the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program by predicting chemical agent transport and dispersion through the atmosphere after an accidental release. To aid in the analysis of the output calculated by D2PC, this sensitivity analysis was conducted to provide information on model response to a variety of input parameters. The sensitivity analysis focused on six accidental release scenarios involving chemical agents VX, GB, and HD (sulfur mustard). Two categories, corresponding to conservative most likely and worst case meteorological conditions, provided the reference for standard input values. D2PC displayed a wide variety of sensitivity to the various input parameters. The model displayed the greatest overall sensitivity to wind speed, mixing height, and breathing rate. For other input parameters, sensitivity was mixed but generally lower. Sensitivity varied not only with parameter, but also over the range of values input for a single parameter. This information on model response can provide useful data for interpreting D2PC output.

Lombardi, D.P.

1992-08-01

159

Creating Spaces for Critical Transformative Dialogues: Legitimising Discussion Groups as Professional Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Focussed dialogue (as lived and living practices) can have a powerful role in renewing professional practice, advancing its sustainability and development as administrative and political systems colonise the practices of teachers and teacher educators. However, participating in discussion groups for many teachers, including those in academia, is

Edwards-Groves, Christine J.

2013-01-01

160

Tribenzotriquinacenes bearing three peripheral or bridgehead urea groups stretched into the 3-D space  

PubMed Central

Summary The syntheses of tribenzotriquinacenes (TBTQ) bearing three phenylurea groupings at either the arene periphery or at the benzhydrylic bridgeheads of the rigid, convexconcave, C 3 v-symmetrical molecular framework are reported. 1H NMR data point to supramolecular aggregation of these TBTQ derivatives in low-polarity solvents. PMID:21512595

Tellenbroker, Jorg

2011-01-01

161

Deep neck space abscesses of dental origin: the impact of Streptococcus group Milleri.  

PubMed

In recent years, there has been rising interest in Streptococcus group Milleri (SM) because high mortality rates have been related to it. In case of deep neck infections (DNI), whatever the origin, mortality rates as high as 26% were reported. But there are no data available for DNI with SM of purely dental origin. The aim of our article was to describe and analyse DNI of purely dental origin involving on one hand SM and on the other hand infections without presence of SM. We compared these two groups and statistically investigated if there were differences in clinical presentation (age, mouth opening, length of hospital stay, laboratory parameters) or clinical behaviour (re-operation, re-hospitalisation, secondary osteomyelitis, stay at intensive care, length of antibiotic treatment, presence of resistances against antibiotics, incapacity to work). For this, we retrospectively searched medical records of our institution for all purulent DNI treated from 2004 till 2012. We found 81 patients meeting all inclusion criteria. Thirty-four patients had involvement of SM, 47 did not. The only statistically significant difference between the SM group and the non-SM group was the length of incapacity to work. All other parameters were non-significant. Furthermore, there were no fatalities. In conclusion, the clinical importance of this article is that patients with deep neck abscesses of purely dental origin involving SM do not need more or different care when compared to all other DNI of dental origin. PMID:24241360

Terzic, Andrej; Scolozzi, Paolo

2014-10-01

162

Assessment of various natural orbitals as the basis of large active space density-matrix renormalization group calculations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is well-known that not only the orbital ordering but also the choice of the orbitals itself as the basis may significantly influence the computational efficiency of density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) calculations. In this study, for assessing the efficiency of using various natural orbitals (NOs) as the DMRG basis, we performed benchmark DMRG calculations with different bases, which included the NOs obtained by various traditional electron correlation methods, as well as NOs acquired from preliminary moderate DMRG calculations (e.g., preserved states less than 500). The tested systems included N2, transition metal Cr2 systems, as well as 1D hydrogen polyradical chain systems under equilibrium and dissociation conditions and 2D hydrogen aggregates. The results indicate that a good compromise between the requirement for low computational costs of acquiring NOs and the demand for high efficiency of NOs as the basis of DMRG calculations may be very dependent on the studied systems' diverse electron correlation characteristics and the size of the active space. It is also shown that a DMRG-complete active space configuration interaction (DMRG-CASCI) calculation in a basis of carefully chosen NOs can provide a less expensive alternative to the standard DMRG-complete active space self-consistent field (DMRG-CASSCF) calculation and avoid the convergence difficulties of orbital optimization for large active spaces. The effect of different NO ordering schemes on DMRG-CASCI calculations is also discussed.

Ma, Yingjin; Ma, Haibo

2013-06-01

163

Space  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This unit begins by introducing students to the historical motivation for space exploration. They learn about the International Space Station, including current and futuristic ideas that engineers are designing to propel space research. Then they learn about the physical properties of the Moon, and think about what types of products engineers would need to design in order for humans to live on the Moon. Lastly, students learn some descriptive facts about asteroids, such as their sizes and how that relates to the potential danger of an asteroid colliding with the Earth.

Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

164

Application of the real space dynamic renormalization group method to the one-dimensional kinetic ising model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We apply the recently developed real space dynamic renormalization group method to the one-dimensional kinetic Ising model. We show how one can develop block spin methods that lead to recursion relations for the space and time dependent correlation functions that correspond to the observables for this system. We point out the importance of carefully choosing the appropriate parameters governing the behavior of individual blocks of spins and the necessity of worrying about the high temperature properties of the temperature recursion relations if one is to obtain the proper exponential decay of correlation functions at large distances away from the critical point at zero temperature. We systematically investigate the accuracy of our approximate recursion relations for various correlation functions by checking them against the known exact results. Our simple methods work surprisingly well over a wide range of temperatures, wavenumbers and frequencies.

Mazenko, Gene F.; Luscombe, J.

1981-03-01

165

Using space-time visual analytic methods for exploring the dynamics of ethnic groups' residential patterns  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, we present a methodological framework, based on georeferenced house-level socio-demographic and infrastructure data, for investigating minority (or ethnic) group residential pattern dynamics in cities. This methodology, which uses visual analytical tools, is meant to help researchers examine how local land-use configurations shape minorities' residential dynamics and, thereby, affect the level of minoritymajority segregation. This methodology responds to

Itzhak Omer; Peter Bak; Tobias Schreck

2010-01-01

166

Tablet PC and Computing Curriculum Initiative Evaluation of Tablet PC Supported Pedagogy  

E-print Network

Tablet PC and Computing Curriculum Initiative 2006 Evaluation of Tablet PC Supported Pedagogy http holders react to the technology? Does the student submissions pedagogy increase engagement? Which types

Anderson, Richard

167

An HI survey of the Centaurus and Sculptor Groups - Constraints on the space density of low mass galaxies  

E-print Network

We present results of two 21-cm HI surveys performed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array in the nearby Centaurus A and Sculptor galaxy groups. These surveys are sensitive to compact HI clouds and galaxies with HI masses as low as 3E+06 Msun, and are therefore among the most sensitive extragalactic HI surveys to date. The surveys consist of sparsely spaced pointings that sample approximately 2% of the groups' area on the sky. We detected previously known group members, but we found no new HI clouds or galaxies down to the sensitivity limit of the surveys. If the HI mass function had a faint end slope of alpha = 1.5 below M_{HI} = 10^{7.5} Msun in these groups, we would have expected ~3 new objects. Cold dark matter theories of galaxy formation predict the existence of a large number low mass DM sub-halos that might appear as tiny satellites in galaxy groups. Our results support and extend similar conclusions derived from previous HI surveys that a HI rich population of these satellites does not exist.

W. J. G. de Blok; M. A. Zwaan; M. Dijkstra; F. H. Briggs; K. C. Freeman

2001-11-13

168

On the renormalisation group for the boundary truncated conformal space approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we continue the study of the truncated conformal space approach to perturbed boundary conformal field theories. This approach to perturbation theory suffers from a renormalisation of the coupling constant and a multiplicative renormalisation of the Hamiltonian. We show how these two effects can be predicted by both physical and mathematical arguments and prove that they are correct to leading order for all states in the TCSA system. We check these results using the TCSA applied to the tri-critical Ising model and the Yang-Lee model. We also study the TCSA of an irrelevant (non-renormalisable) perturbation and find that, while the convergence of the coupling constant and energy scales are problematic, the renormalised and rescaled spectrum remain a very good fit to the exact result, and we find a numerical relationship between the IR and UV couplings describing a particular flow. Finally we study the large coupling behaviour of TCSA and show that it accurately encompasses several different fixed points.

Watts, Grard M. T.

2012-06-01

169

The Exploration Atmospheres Working Group's Report on Space Radiation Shielding Materials  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This part of Exploration Atmospheres Working Group analyses focuses on the potential use of nonmetallic composites as the interior walls and structural elements exposed to the atmosphere of the spacecraft or habitat. The primary drive to consider nonmetallic, polymer-based composites as an alternative to aluminum structure is due to their superior radiation shielding properties. But as is shown in this analysis, these composites can also be made to combine superior mechanical properties with superior shielding properties. In addition, these composites can be made safe; i.e., with regard to flammability and toxicity, as well as "smart"; i.e., embedded with sensors for the continuous monitoring of material health and conditions. The analysis main conclusions are that (1) smart polymer-based composites are an enabling technology for safe and reliable exploration missions, and (2) an adaptive, synergetic systems approach is required to meet the missions requirements from structure, properties, and processes to crew health and protection for exploration missions.

Barghouty, A. F.; Thibeault, S. A.

2006-01-01

170

Communication constraints, indexical countermeasures, and crew configuration effects in simulated space-dwelling groups  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Previous research with groups of individually isolated crews communicating and problem-solving in a distributed interactive simulation environment has shown that the functional interchangeability of available communication channels can serve as an effective countermeasure to communication constraints. The present report extends these findings by investigating crew performance effects and psychosocial adaptation following: (1) the loss of all communication channels, and (2) changes in crew configuration. Three-person crews participated in a simulated planetary exploration mission that required identification, collection, and analysis of geologic samples. Results showed that crews developed and employed discrete navigation system operations that served as functionally effective communication signals (i.e., indexical or deictic cues) in generating appropriate crewmember responses and maintaining performance effectiveness in the absence of normal communication channels. Additionally, changes in crew configuration impacted both performance effectiveness and psychosocial adaptation.

Hienz, Robert D.; Brady, Joseph V.; Hursh, Steven R.; Banner, Michele J.; Gasior, Eric D.; Spence, Kevin R.

2007-02-01

171

Behavioral and biological effects of autonomous versus scheduled mission management in simulated space-dwelling groups  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Logistical constraints during long-duration space expeditions will limit the ability of Earth-based mission control personnel to manage their astronaut crews and will thus increase the prevalence of autonomous operations. Despite this inevitability, little research exists regarding crew performance and psychosocial adaptation under such autonomous conditions. To this end, a newly-initiated study on crew management systems was conducted to assess crew performance effectiveness under rigid schedule-based management of crew activities by Mission Control versus more flexible, autonomous management of activities by the crews themselves. Nine volunteers formed three long-term crews and were extensively trained in a simulated planetary geological exploration task over the course of several months. Each crew then embarked on two separate 3-4 h missions in a counterbalanced sequence: Scheduled, in which the crews were directed by Mission Control according to a strict topographic and temporal region-searching sequence, and Autonomous, in which the well-trained crews received equivalent baseline support from Mission Control but were free to explore the planetary surface as they saw fit. Under the autonomous missions, performance in all three crews improved (more high-valued geologic samples were retrieved), subjective self-reports of negative emotional states decreased, unstructured debriefing logs contained fewer references to negative emotions and greater use of socially-referent language, and salivary cortisol output across the missions was attenuated. The present study provides evidence that crew autonomy may improve performance and help sustain if not enhance psychosocial adaptation and biobehavioral health. These controlled experimental data contribute to an emerging empirical database on crew autonomy which the international astronautics community may build upon for future research and ultimately draw upon when designing and managing missions.

Roma, Peter G.; Hursh, Steven R.; Hienz, Robert D.; Emurian, Henry H.; Gasior, Eric D.; Brinson, Zabecca S.; Brady, Joseph V.

2011-05-01

172

Incorporating Space Science Content Into the Undergraduate Curriculum by the NASA Education Forums' Higher Education Working Group  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As part of the NASA Education Forums, the Higher Education Working Group (HEWG) strives to support undergraduate science education through a variety of activities. These activities include: providing resource that incorporate space science topics into the existing undergraduate curriculum, understanding the role that community colleges play in STEM education and preparing STEM teachers, and identifying issues in diversity related to STEM education. To assess the best way of including space science into the undergraduate curriculum, the HEWG held a series of workshops and conducted surveys of undergraduate faculty who are conducting research in space science. During this engagement, the faculty expressed a need for a centralized repository of materials that can be used as part of already existing undergraduate courses in astronomy, physics, and earth science. Such a repository has since been developed, the 'EarthSpace Higher Education Clearing House (http://www.lpi.usra.edu/earthspace/) and it is still growing. Additional community tools, such as a newsletter, are provided through this website. To better understand the role and needs of community colleges, the HEWG undertook and extensive survey of community college STEM faculty. 187 faculty responded to the survey and the results show the extensive teaching load these faculty have, as well as the diverse demographics and the extent to which STEM teachers begin their preparation at 2 year institutions. Finally, the HEWG has begun to work on understanding the issues faced in increasing the diversity of the STEM work force. Progress and results of all this work will be summarized in this presentation.

Gross, N. A.; Buxner, S.; Cobabe-Ammann, E. A.; Fraknoi, A.; Moldwin, M.; Peticolas, L. M.; Low, R.; Schultz, G. R.

2013-12-01

173

PC PE PS PI SPM GangChol  

E-print Network

PC PE PS PI SPM GangChol TM1 TM2GPI Acyl Raft 1 Raft 2 Lipid rafts are localized regions invaginations that are coated with the cholesterol-binding protein caveolin, are a subset of lipid rafts. The acyl groups of the phospholipids present in lipid rafts and caveolae are more highly saturated than

Pike, Linda J.

174

Clonal nature of the immune response to phosphorylcholine (PC). V. Cross-idiotypic specificity among heavy chains of murine anti-PC antibodies and PC-binding myeloma proteins  

PubMed Central

Seven mouse myeloma proteins with specificity for phosphorylcholine (PC) were found to share a common antigenic determinant. This group of proteins contained members which differed in genetic origin, heavy chain class, kappa-chain subgroup, individual antigenic determinants and specificity for choline analogues. The cross-idiotypic determinant, VH-PC, was antigenically similar in each of the proteins and was associated with the variable portion of the heavy chain in the region of the antibody combining site. Further studies showed that an indistinguishable determinant was present on IgM anti-PC antibodies isolated from all strains of mice tested regardless of histocompatibility or heavy chain allotype. In view of the finding that this cross-idiotypic determinant was not found on antibodies or myeloma proteins which lacked specificity for PC, the data strongly suggest that a particular heavy chain variable region has been preserved in all mouse antibodies with specificity for PC. PMID:47894

1975-01-01

175

An application of the renormalization group to the calculation of the vacuum decay rate in flat and curved space-time  

E-print Network

I show that an application of renormalization group arguments may lead to significant corrections to the vacuum decay rate for phase transitions in flat and curved space-time. It can also give some information regarding its dependence on the parameters of the theory, including the cosmological constant in the case of decay in curved space-time.

D. Metaxas

2004-12-14

176

Pathway Controlled Penetration (PcP)  

SciTech Connect

The technical approach employs advanced computational simulation tools to demonstrate how current assets can destroy RWK-RFI-12-0001's HDBT, a tunnel complex with two portals built into the base of a granite mountain. The granite over layer is assumed to be 60 meters thick over both portals and 80 meters over the facility's mission space. Key S&T is the completed development of a highly innovative viscoplastic fracture material model, 3D parallel gas-fracture capabilities into FDEM, and a stochastic handling of the material properties. Phase I - Develop and validate code simulation tools: (1) develop, incorporate and validate AZ-Frac material model for granite; and (2) Develop and incorporate gas-driven-fracture modeling into LANL's FDEM MUNROU code; (3) Develop and incorporate stochastic features into FDEM modeling. Phase II - Conduct PcP analysis on above HDBT: (1) Acquire HDBT design data, develop simulation model; and (2) Evaluate and select most promising defeat alternative. Phase III - Deliver code, train Service target analysts, and conduct simulations against real world HDBTs. PcP uses advanced computer simulations to enhance HDBT functional defeat efforts. Newly developed material models that account for fractural energy coupled with the finite discrete element methodology (FDEM) will provide targeting packages that will create penetration avenues for current or future lethality options. This novel computational approach requires full 3D geologic and structure characterization as well as significant high performance computing capabilities. The goal is to distinctively alter the targeting paradigm by leveraging critical DoD assets along with insitu geologic strata. In other words, assets will utilize underground rock structure to their benefit by creating rubbilization zones that will allow pathway controlled penetration.

Knight, Earl E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rougier, Esteban [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zubelewicz, Aleksander [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-29

177

Structure of N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GlmU) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a cubic space group.  

PubMed

GlmU is a bifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the final two steps in the biosynthesis of UDP-GlcNAc. Crystals of GlmU from Mycobacterium tuberculosis obtained using ammonium sulfate as a precipitant diffracted poorly (to 3.4 A resolution) and displayed an unusually high solvent content (>80%) with sparse crystal packing that resulted in large solvent channels. With one molecule per asymmetric unit, the monomers from three neighbouring asymmetric units related by the crystal threefold formed a biological trimer. Although this is the first report of the structure of GlmU determined in a cubic crystal form, the trimeric arrangement here is similar to that observed for other GlmU structures determined in hexagonal (H3, H32, P6(3)22) space groups. PMID:19407371

Verma, Sunil Kumar; Jaiswal, Mamta; Kumar, Neeraj; Parikh, Amit; Nandicoori, Vinay Kumar; Prakash, Balaji

2009-05-01

178

Calculating field emission currents in nanodiodes - a multi-group formalism with space charge and exchange-correlation effects  

E-print Network

Inclusion of electron-electron interaction is essential in nano-diodes to understand the underlying physical phenomenon and tailor devices accordingly. However, both space charge and exchange-correlation interactions involve electrons at different energies and hence a self-consistent multi-energy-group solution of the Schr\\{o}dinger-Poisson system is required. It is shown here that the existence of a limiting density-dependent potential at low applied voltages allows calculation of the field emission current. Despite additional interactions, a Fowler-Nordheim behaviour is observed. It is also found that the exchange-correlation potential dominates at these voltages in nanogaps and possibly leads to a higher turn-on voltage.

Debabrata Biswas; Raghwendra Kumar

2013-10-10

179

Structure of Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase R2 in space group P6[subscript 1]22  

SciTech Connect

A new crystal form of wild-type ribonucleotide reductase R2 from Escherichia coli was obtained. Crystals grow in space group P6{sub 1}22 with one R2 monomer in the asymmetric unit. A twofold crystallographic symmetry axis generates the physiological dimeric form of R2. Co-crystallization with CoCl{sub 2} or MnCl{sub 2} results in full occupancy of the dinuclear metal site. The structure of the Mn{sup II}-loaded form was determined to 2.6 {angstrom} resolution by molecular replacement. The crystallization conditions, backbone conformation, crystal-packing interactions and metal centers are compared with those of previously determined crystal forms.

Sommerhalter, Monika; Saleh, Lana; Bollinger Jr., J. Martin; Rosenzweig, Amy C. (NWU); (Penn)

2010-07-20

180

PC-ATOMIC Final Report 1 Joseph D. Touch1  

E-print Network

PC-ATOMIC Final Report 1 PC-ATOMIC Joseph D. Touch1 USC / Information Sciences Institute touch@isi.edu ABSTRACT: PC-ATOMIC is a PC interface for the ATOMIC LAN. PC- ATOMIC is implemented as a VL-Bus (VESA. This document describes the PC-ATOMIC interface, its design, capabilities, and performance. The board design

Touch, Joe

181

PC1: Approximate solution techniques in solid mechanics  

E-print Network

- sphere - r=R2 : imposed displacement - r=R1= given pression (p)p Model problem Galerkin approach FinitePC1: Approximate solution techniques in solid mechanics - « Standard » PC : PC1 (20/09), PC2 (27 slides - PC slides - Exams #12;PC 1 : Example of the sphere Differents form : strong, weak, variational

Frangi, Attilio

182

Requirements for space-based observations in fire management: a report by the Wildland Fire Hazard Team, Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) Disaster Management Support Group (DMSG)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Wildland Fire Hazard Team reviewed potential requirements for space-based observations in fire management. The team produced a report, developed under the auspices of the Disaster Management Support Group (DMSG) of the G-7 Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS). The document was prepared by an international working group, with experience in the field of remote sensing as applied to wildland

T. J. Lynham; C. W. Dull; A. Singh

2002-01-01

183

Coordination of Advanced Solar Observatory (ASO) Science Working Group (SWG) for the study of instrument accommodation and operational requirements on space station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objectives are to coordinate the activities of the Science Working Group (SWG) of the Advanced Solar Observatory (ASO) for the study of instruments accommodation and operation requirements on board space station. In order to facilitate the progress of the objective, two conferences were organized, together with two small group discussions.

Wu, S. T.

1989-01-01

184

AMPS/PC - AUTOMATIC MANUFACTURING PROGRAMMING SYSTEM  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The AMPS/PC system is a simulation tool designed to aid the user in defining the specifications of a manufacturing environment and then automatically writing code for the target simulation language, GPSS/PC. The domain of problems that AMPS/PC can simulate are manufacturing assembly lines with subassembly lines and manufacturing cells. The user defines the problem domain by responding to the questions from the interface program. Based on the responses, the interface program creates an internal problem specification file. This file includes the manufacturing process network flow and the attributes for all stations, cells, and stock points. AMPS then uses the problem specification file as input for the automatic code generator program to produce a simulation program in the target language GPSS. The output of the generator program is the source code of the corresponding GPSS/PC simulation program. The system runs entirely on an IBM PC running PC DOS Version 2.0 or higher and is written in Turbo Pascal Version 4 requiring 640K memory and one 360K disk drive. To execute the GPSS program, the PC must have resident the GPSS/PC System Version 2.0 from Minuteman Software. The AMPS/PC program was developed in 1988.

Schroer, B. J.

1994-01-01

185

Building Neo-Riemannian Groups of Musical Transformations as Extensions  

E-print Network

Chords in musical harmony can be viewed as objects having shapes (major/minor/etc.) grafted on base spaces (pc-sets). The base space and the shape space are usually given the structure of a group, more particularly a cyclic group. In a more general setting, any object could be defined by its position on a base space and by its internal shape or state. The goal of this paper is to determine the structure of simply transitive groups of transformations acting on such sets of objects with internal symmetries. In the main proposition, we state that, under simple assumptions, these groups can be built as group extensions of the group associated to the base space by the group associated to the shape space, or the other way. By doing so, complex groups of transformations are obtained, including the traditional ones such as the dihedral groups. The knowledge of the group structure and product allows to explicitly build group actions on the objects. In particular we differentiate between left and right group actions an...

Popoff, Alexandre

2011-01-01

186

An analysis of Pc3 and Pc4 pulsations at Terra Nova Bay (Antarctica)  

E-print Network

An analysis of Pc3 and Pc4 pulsations at Terra Nova Bay (Antarctica) U. Villante, M. Vellante, G) detected, during the austral summer 1994±95, at Terra Nova Bay (Antarctica, corrected latitude 80.0°S

Boyer, Edmond

187

LE BULLETIN DE L'EPI N 56 COMMUNICATION PC/MINITEL COMMUNICATION PC/MINITEL  

E-print Network

programmes fonctionneront directement sur le minitel. Pour reprendre la main sur le PC, tapez sur le minitel229 LE BULLETIN DE L'EPI N° 56 COMMUNICATION PC/MINITEL COMMUNICATION PC/MINITEL Michel HILLENWECK normalisation sérieuse sur la sortie série d'un PC amène à des dysfonctionnements imprévisibles, suivant l

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

188

AIPS Memo 98 AIPSTerminal for Linux PC's  

E-print Network

AIPS Memo 98 AIPSTerminal for Linux PC's Robert L. Millner and Patrick P. Murphy National Radio in accessing AIPS on a home Linux PC. Many home machines lack the resources to run AIPS well and people may Linux which contains a minimal subset of AIPS to run the TV, Message and Tek servers. With this package

Groppi, Christopher

189

PC6 : Numerical elastoplasticity Local aspects  

E-print Network

-== ++= = e Plane strain 033 = - Linear isotropic hardening: )( 0+= phpR µ3 1 + = + h f p elas n n #12;PC6 - A simple example - A Von Mises type model with nonlinear isotropic hardening #12;PC6: Numerical To be precised : - Elasticity law (A) - Yield function (f) - Hardening (isotropic, kinematic) Yield function

Frangi, Attilio

190

The Star Formation Histories of Local Group Dwarf Galaxies I. Hubble Space Telescope / Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 Observations  

E-print Network

We present uniformly measured star formation histories (SFHs) of 40 Local Group dwarf galaxies based on color-magnitude diagram (CMD) analysis from archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging. We demonstrate that accurate SFHs can be recovered from CMDs that do not reach the oldest main sequence turn-off (MSTO), but emphasize that the oldest MSTO is critical for precisely constraining the earliest epochs of star formation. We find that: (1) the average lifetime SFHs of dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) can be approximated by an exponentially declining SFH with $\\tau$ $\\sim$ 5 Gyr; (2) lower luminosity dSphs are less likely to have extended SFHs than more luminous dSphs; (3) the average SFHs of dwarf irregulars (dIrrs), transition dwarfs (dTrans), and dwarf ellipticals (dEs) can be approximated by the combination of an exponentially declining SFH ($\\tau$ $\\sim$ 3-4 Gyr) for lookback ages $>$ 10-12 Gyr ago and a constant SFH thereafter; (4) the observed fraction of stellar mass formed prior to z=2 ranges considerably (80\\%...

Weisz, Daniel R; Skillman, Evan D; Holtzman, Jon; Gilbert, Karoline M; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Williams, Benjamin F

2014-01-01

191

Corrosion of PC boards in contaminated industrial environments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Corrosion on the copper surface of a PC board is investigated. The corrosion materials were identified using SEM/EDX, XRD and SIMS to consist mainly of Cu 2O along with a small amount of Cu 2S and other components for the PC board exposed to the manufacturing environment. The chemical vapor in the manufacturing environment was found to accelerate the H 2S corrosion process by lowering the H 2S corrosion threshold from 0.5 to 0.3 ppm. Experiments were also conducted to test the effectiveness of vapor phase corrosion prevention. It was observed that 0.01 g of dicyclohexyl-ammonium nitrite (DHN) powder was observed to provide good protection against H 2S corrosion up to 1 ppm H 2S in an enclosed space. The efficiency of DHN vapor phase corrosion prevention appears to increase linearly with the amount of DHN powder provided.

Lin, S. H.; Chuang, T. S.

1994-04-01

192

PC Lube and Tune: PC and Internet Hardware and Software Tutorials  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

PC Lube and Tune, provided by Howard Gilbert, a Senior Research Programmer for Yale University's Computer and Information Systems, is a no-nonsense set of tutorials pertaining to PC computing. Internet tutorials of interest include "Distributed Applications and the Web," "Learning Java," "Introduction to TCP/IP," and "The Warp Internet Connection." There is also much useful information about the PC and networking world in general. There are tutorials on operating systems, considerations when changing operating systems, and PC hardware, among others. Many of the tutorials are illustrated. The power of this site is that even for those who don't get "under the hood" very often, it explains concepts in clear, concise language. And for those contemplating buying a PC, but for whom PC-features language might as well be Sumerian, the first tutorial, "An introduction to PC Hardware," is essential.

193

Induction of cytoprotective autophagy in PC-12 cells by cadmium  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Cadmium can promote early upregulation of autophagy in PC-12 cells. Autophagy precedes apoptosis in cadmium-treated PC-12 cells. Cadmium-induced autophagy is cytoprotective in PC-12 cells. Class III PI3K/beclin-1/Bcl-2 signaling pathway plays a positive role in cadmium-triggered autophagy. -- Abstract: Laboratory data have demonstrated that cadmium (Cd) may induce neuronal apoptosis. However, little is known about the role of autophagy in neurons. In this study, cell viability decreased in a dose- and time-dependent manner after treatment with Cd in PC-12 cells. As cells were exposed to Cd, the levels of LC3-II proteins became elevated, specific punctate distribution of endogenous LC3-II increased, and numerous autophagosomes appeared, which suggest that Cd induced a high level of autophagy. In the late stages of autophagy, an increase in the apoptosis ratio was observed. Likewise, pre-treatment with chloroquine (an autophagic inhibitor) and rapamycin (an autophagic inducer) resulted in an increased and decreased percentage of apoptosis in contrast to other Cd-treated groups, respectively. The results indicate that autophagy delayed apoptosis in Cd-treated PC-12 cells. Furthermore, co-treatment of cells with chloroquine reduced autophagy and cell activity. However, rapamycin had an opposite effect on autophagy and cell activity. Moreover, class III PI3 K/beclin-1/Bcl-2 signaling pathways served a function in Cd-induced autophagy. The findings suggest that Cd can induce cytoprotective autophagy by activating class III PI3 K/beclin-1/Bcl-2 signaling pathways. In sum, this study strongly suggests that autophagy may serve a positive function in the reduction of Cd-induced cytotoxicity.

Wang, Qiwen [College of Veterinary Medicine, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China) [College of Veterinary Medicine, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Jiangsu Co-innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Diseases and Zoonoses, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Bijie Pilot Area Research Institute of Bijie University, Bijie 551700 (China); Zhu, Jiaqiao; Zhang, Kangbao; Jiang, Chenyang; Wang, Yi; Yuan, Yan; Bian, Jianchun; Liu, Xuezhong; Gu, Jianhong [College of Veterinary Medicine, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China) [College of Veterinary Medicine, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Jiangsu Co-innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Diseases and Zoonoses, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Liu, Zongping, E-mail: liuzongping@yzu.edu.cn [College of Veterinary Medicine, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China) [College of Veterinary Medicine, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Jiangsu Co-innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Diseases and Zoonoses, Yangzhou 225009 (China)

2013-08-16

194

Scale-PC shielding analysis sequences  

SciTech Connect

The SCALE computational system is a modular code system for analyses of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. With the release of SCALE-PC Version 4.3, the radiation shielding analysis community now has the capability to execute the SCALE shielding analysis sequences contained in the control modules SAS1, SAS2, SAS3, and SAS4 on a MS- DOS personal computer (PC). In addition, SCALE-PC includes two new sequences, QADS and ORIGEN-ARP. The capabilities of each sequence are presented, along with example applications.

Bowman, S.M.

1996-05-01

195

The behavioural and physiological reactions of farmed red deer to transport: effects of sex, group size, space allowance and vehicular motion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sixty yearling red deer (30 males, 30 females), comprising eight single-sex groups of either 5 or 10 animals, were loaded onto a livestock transporter for 3 h, during which they were either transported or remained stationary, at one of two space allowances (males: 0.5 m2 or 1 m2\\/deer, females: 0.4 m2 or 0.8 m2\\/deer). One group was tested each day,

P. N Grigor; P. J Goddard; C. A Littlewood

1998-01-01

196

Patterns of space use common to widely different types of social groupings of a coral reef fish  

Microsoft Academic Search

Synopsis The protogynous, Indo-Pacific serranid fish Anthias squamipinnis forms three types of social groupings, often within the same population: discrete groups, continuous masses, and intermediate groupings. In an intermediate grouping on Aldabra Island, Indian Ocean, females had larger home ranges than males and moved over the home range of several males. The movement rate of females into and out of

Douglas Y. Shapiro

1987-01-01

197

36 CFR 1280.85 - What space in the National Archives at College Park is available for use by non-NARA groups and...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

36 ? Parks, Forests, and Public Property ? 3 ? 2010-07-01 ? 2010-07-01 ? false ? What space in the National Archives at College Park is available for use by non-NARA groups and organizations? ? 1280.85 ? Section 1280.85 ? Parks, Forests, and Public Property ? NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND...

2010-07-01

198

39 CFR 501.16 - PC postage payment methodology.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false PC postage payment methodology. 501.16 Section...DISTRIBUTE POSTAGE EVIDENCING SYSTEMS 501.16 PC postage payment methodology. (a) The PC Postage customer is permitted to make...

2011-07-01

199

39 CFR 501.16 - PC postage payment methodology.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false PC postage payment methodology. 501.16 Section...DISTRIBUTE POSTAGE EVIDENCING SYSTEMS 501.16 PC postage payment methodology. (a) The PC Postage customer is permitted to make...

2010-07-01

200

PC-based programmable process rate controller  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development of an extension card for the IBM PC I\\/O interface card for establishing a programmable process rate controller with the PC is reported. The process rate controlling involves maintaining the process variable with reference to a variable reference input. The reference input for the process variable has a definite function of time, constituting the follow-up of several piece-wise

Ziya G. ALTUN; Karuppanan BALASUBRAMANIAN; Kamil GUVEN

1994-01-01

201

PC-183B Standoff Imaging System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Itek has recently completed a program to supply long range oblique photography (LOROP) cameras for a nose installation in an F-104 aircraft. The camera, designated PC-183B, is a derivative of a configuration presented at the June 1980, SPIE show and is described in Volume 242. The PC-183B camera features reflective optics, internal two-axis stabilization, and a unique air capstan.

Fredrickson, Henry J.

1984-12-01

202

AUTOPLAN - A PC-based automated mission planning tool  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A PC-based automated mission and resource planning tool, AUTOPLAN, is described, with application to small-scale planning and scheduling systems in the Space Station program. The input is a proposed mission profile, including mission duration, number of allowable slip periods, and requirement profiles for one or more resources as a function of time. A corresponding availability profile is also entered for each resource over the whole time interval under study. AUTOPLAN determines all integrated schedules which do not require more than the available resources.

Paterra, Frank C.; Allen, Marc S.; Lawrence, George F.

1987-01-01

203

Epitaxial growth and electronic properties of well ordered phthalocyanine heterojunctions MnPc/F??CoPc.  

PubMed

We have prepared phthalocyanine heterojunctions out of MnPc and F16CoPc, which were studied by means of X-ray absorption spectroscopy. This heterojunction is characterized by a charge transfer at the interface, resulting in charged MnPc(? +) and F16CoPc(? -) species. Our data reveal that the molecules are well ordered and oriented parallel to the substrate surface. Furthermore, we demonstrate the filling of the Co 3d(z(2)) orbital due to the charge transfer, which supports the explanation of the density functional theory, that the charge transfer is local and affects the metal centers only. PMID:25194385

Lindner, Susi; Mahns, Benjamin; Treske, Uwe; Vilkov, Oleg; Haidu, Francisc; Fronk, Michael; Zahn, Dietrich R T; Knupfer, Martin

2014-09-01

204

Fire retardancy mechanisms of arylphosphates in polycarbonate (PC) and PC\\/acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene  

Microsoft Academic Search

The pyrolysis of polycarbonate (PC) and PC\\/acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (PC\\/ABS) with and without arylphosphates (triphenylphosphate\\u000a TPP, resorcinol-bis(diphenyl phosphate) RDP and bisphenol A bis(diphenyl phosphate) BDP) is investigated by thermal analysis\\u000a as key to understanding the flame retardancy mechanisms and corresponding structureproperty relationships. The correspondence\\u000a between the decomposition temperature range of arylphosphates and PC is pointed out as prerequisite for the occurrence of

Birgit Perret; Kristin H. Pawlowski; Bernhard Schartel

2009-01-01

205

The moduli space and monodromies of the N=2 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory with any Lie gauge groups  

E-print Network

We propose a unified scheme for finding the hyperelliptic curve of N=2 SUSY YM theory with any Lie gauge groups. Our general scheme gives the well known results for classical gauge groups and exceptional G_2 group. In particular, we present the curve for the exceptional gauge groups F_4, E_{6,7,8} and check consistency condition for them. The exact monodromies and the dyon spectrum of these theories are determined. We note that for any Lie gauge groups, the exact monodromies could be obtained only from the Cartan matrix.

Abolhasani, M R; Ghezelbash, A M; Abolhasani, Mohammad Reza; Alishahiha, Mohsen; Ghezelbash, Amir Masoud

1996-01-01

206

Effect of magnetic storm intensity on Pc1 activity at high and mid-latitudes  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the properties of structured and unstructured Pc1 pulsations at a high-latitude station (Sodankyl; L=5.1) and a mid-latitude station (Nurmijrvi; L=3.3) during 18 storms occurring in low solar activity years. The storms were divided into two groups according to their intensity as measured by the minimum value of the Dst index. Pc1 activity was studied from the day of

R. Kerttula; K. Mursula; T. Pikkarainen; J. Kangas

2001-01-01

207

Activity budget, diet, and use of space by two groups of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) in eastern Amazonia.  

PubMed

Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri spp.) are widely distributed in the Amazon basin. This study describes the ecological and behavioral patterns of two social groups of S. sciureus in forests adjacent to the Tucuru hydroelectric reservoir in eastern Amazonia, including range size, activity budgets, and composition of the diet. The groups were monitored at Base 4 (group B4) and Germoplasma Island (group GI). Quantitative behavioral data were collected using instantaneous scan sampling to record behavior, substrate use, and height. Home ranges were delimited using a GPS to determine group position after each 50 m of movement. Home ranges were 75.0 ha for group B4 (39 members) and 77.5 ha for group GI (32 members). The use of vertical strata was well defined, with a marked preference for the middle and lower levels of the canopy. The activity budgets of both groups were typical of those of other squirrel monkeys and were dominated by foraging (B4 = 48.7 %; GI = 49.6 %), moving (both groups 28.9 %), and feeding (B4 = 14.6 %; GI = 12.4 %). Resting was rare (B4 = 3.5 %; GI = 2.6 %) and less common than social behavior (B4 = 4.3 %; GI = 6.4 %). The diet of both groups was dominated by plant material (B4 = 70.7 % of feeding records; GI = 71.4 %), which is in contrast with the more insectivorous diets recorded for Saimiri at other sites. Group GI spent more time foraging during the dry season, whereas group B4 spent more time in the rainy season when the consumption of fruit increased (significantly, in the case of group GI). The less insectivorous diet of these groups may be due to a number of factors, including the unique habitat configuration at the site and reduced hydrological stress due to the proximity of the reservoir. PMID:23546826

Pinheiro, Tatyana; Ferrari, Stephen F; Lopes, Maria Aparecida

2013-07-01

208

Relationship between PC index and interplanetary electric field EKL under actual conditions of varying solar wind  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The PC index was introduced as an indicator of magnetic activity in the polar caps generated by the geoeffective interplanetary electric field E _{KL} determined in accordance with Kan and Lee [1979]. The PC index is calculated basing on magnetic data (?F) from near-pole stations Thule and Vostok with use of the statistically justified coefficients of regression ? and ? linking the polar cap magnetic disturbance vectors ?F with the electric field E _{KL}. As a result, the PC index is defined as a value of the polar cap magnetic disturbance standardized with the intensity of the interplanetary electric field EKL regardless of season, UT and hemisphere. Statistically the appropriate values PC and E _{KL} well correlate, however in concrete situations PC and E _{KL} may be quite differ, because E _{KL} characterizes the state of the solar wind far upstream of the magnetosphere, whereas PC characterizes the energy that entered into magnetosphere, Analysis of consistencies and discrepancies between PC and E _{KL} under conditions of different solar wind parameters was carried for all events with magnetic substorms (N=1798) and magnetic storms (N=203) observed in epoch of maximal solar activity (1998-2001). Thus, the solar wind geoefficiency was estimated by independent indicators, such as AL and Dst indices characterizing magnetic activity within the magnetosphere. The essential attention was given also to geoefficiency of sudden pulses of the solar wind dynamic pressure. The results of the analysis were applied to derive the method to nowcast the magnetosphere state, including estimation of the model PC, AL and Dst indices calculated by actual measurement of E _{KL} in the point L1 under conditions of varying solar wind. It is demonstrated that the PC index can be successfully used to monitor space weather and the readiness of the magnetosphere to producing substorm or storm.

Troshichev, Oleg; Smirnov, Michael

209

PC-based PCM (Pulse Code Modulation) telemetry data reduction system hardware  

SciTech Connect

The Solar Energy Research Institute's (SERI) Wind Research Program is using pulse code modulation (PCM) telemetry systems to study horizontal-axis wind turbines. SERI has developed a low-cost PC-based PCM data acquisition system to facilitate quick PCM data analysis in the field. The SERI PC-PCM system consists of AT-compatible hardware boards for decoding and combining PCM data streams and DOS software for control and management of data acquisition. Up to four boards can be installed in a single PC, providing the capability to combine data from four PCM streams direct to disk or memory. This paper describes the SERI PC-PCM system hardware, focusing on the practicality of PC-based PCM data reduction. A related paper highlights our comprehensive PCM data management software program which can be used in conjunction with this hardware to provide full quick-look'' data processing and display. The PC-PCM hardware boards support a subset of the Inter-Range Instrumentation Group (IRIG) PCM standard, designed to synchronize and decommutate NRZ or Bi-Phase L PCM streams in the range of 1 to 800 Kbits/sec at 8 to 12 bits per word and 2 to 64 words per frame. Multiple PCM streams (at various rates) can be combined and interleaved into a contiguous digital time series. Maximum data throughput depends on characteristics of the PC hardware, such as CPU rate and disk access speed. 7 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

Simms, D.A.; Butterfield, C.P.

1990-02-01

210

Space, time and the pattern of individual associations in a group-living species: Sanderlings have no friends  

Microsoft Academic Search

The persistence of flock membership through time and space was examined for wintering sanderlings Calidris alba at Bodega Bay, California from October 1978 to March 1981. Observed patterns of association were then compared with those expected from a null model: that the set of birds within a given flock represent a random sample from the local population.

J. P. Myers

1983-01-01

211

Talk in Blended-Space Speech Communities: An Exploration of Discursive Practices of a Professional Development Group  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study is an exploration of alternative teacher professional development. While using symbolic interactionism for a research lens, it characterizes the discursive practices commonly found in formal, informal, and blended-space speech communities based on the talk within a leadership-development program comprised of five female, church-based

Garvin, Tabitha Ann

2011-01-01

212

Effects of group reflection variations in project-based learning integrated in a Web 2.0 learning space  

Microsoft Academic Search

A Web 2.0 environment that is coupled with emerging multimodal interaction tools can have considerable influence on team learning outcomes. Today, technologies supporting social networking, collective intelligence, emotional interaction, and virtual communication are introducing new forms of collaboration that are profoundly impacting education. In this study, an empirical analysis was conducted on a Web 2.0 learning space designed to promote

Paul Kim; Ji-Seong Hong; Curtis Bonk; Gloria Lim

2011-01-01

213

Enveloping algebra-valued gauge transformations for non-abelian gauge groups on non-commutative spaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

. An enveloping algebra-valued gauge field is constructed, its components are functions of the Lie algebra-valued gauge field\\u000a and can be constructed with the Seiberg-Witten map. This allows the formulation of a dynamics for a finite number of gauge\\u000a field components on non-commutative spaces.

B. Jurco; Stefan Schraml; Peter Schupp; Julius Wess

2000-01-01

214

The Space Density of Primordial Gas Clouds near Galaxies and Groups and their Relation to Galactic High-Velocity Clouds.  

PubMed

The Arecibo H i Strip Survey probed the halos of approximately 300 cataloged galaxies and the environments of approximately 14 groups with sensitivity to neutral hydrogen masses >/=107 M middle dot in circle. The survey detected no objects with properties resembling the high-velocity clouds (HVCs) associated with the Milky Way or Local Group. If the HVCs were typically MHi=107.5 M middle dot in circle objects distributed throughout groups and galaxy halos at distances of approximately 1 Mpc, the survey should have made approximately 70 HVC detections in groups and approximately 250 detections around galaxies. The null detection implies that HVCs are deployed at typical distances of group barycenters. If the clouds are in virial equilibrium, their average dark matter fraction must be 98% or higher. PMID:10655165

Zwaan; Briggs

2000-02-20

215

Emissions tracking system (ETS-PC) software  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. EPA Acid Rain Division developed and is maintaining the Emissions Tracking System (ETS) to receive, store and analyze data from continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) submitted by utilities affected by the 1990 Clean Air Act. This paper will describe ETS-PC, a PC application developed by EPA to assist utilities in analyzing and submitting emission data files each quarter. ETS-PC includes quality assurance software which helps utilities identify possible errors in their quarterly data files (QDFs) prior to submission. It also includes communications software which allows utilities to transfer QDFs via modem directly to the EPA mainframe computer located in Research Triangle Park, NC. After a file is transferred, users are provided with immediate feedback from the mainframe in the form of a file transfer receipt and summary.

Weatherbee, J. Jr.; Kress, T. [Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (United States)

1997-12-31

216

[Construction of VEGF recombinant plasmid pcDNA/V and its expression in model rats with acute myocardial ischemia].  

PubMed

The cDNA encoding human Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor 165 (VEGF165) was amplified using RT-PCR from human tonsil tissue and cloned into eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1 (+). The recombinant plasmid pcDNA/V was transferred into 293 cells mediated by liposome and the cells stably expressing VEGF were selected under the pressure of G418. ELISA and Western blotting demonstrated that the eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA/V was successfully constructed and its corresponding protein could be expressed efficiently in vitro. Chick Charioallantoic Membrane (CAM) bioassay showed that recombinant protein has biological activity of hVEGF. Model rats with acute myocardial ischemia were used to further study the expression of VEGFin vivo. The model rats were divided randomly into three groups: control group, pcDNA3.1 (+) group and pcDNA/V group. 50microL naked plasmid DNA or saline was intramyocardially injected at three sites into the border zone of infarction. The hearts of rats were excised and fixed histologically, then the infarction sizes were studied by immunohistochemical staining and electron microscope after four weeks. Immunohistochemical staining for VEGF appeared to be negative in control and pcDNA3.1 (+) groups. In pcDNA/V group, myocardial cells in infarction border zone showed positive staining for VEGF in cytoplasm. Ultrastructural anaylsis showed that there were visible hyperplasia of vascular endothilium in pcDNA/V group. The control and pcDNA3.1 (+) groups showed less capillary hyperplasia. In this study, VEGF165 gene was successfully cloned and its protein expressed in vitro and in vivo was of bioactivity, which provides a basis for the further study of biological functions of human VEGF. PMID:16607947

Wang, Ya-Mei; Liu, Bing; Sun, Li-Cui; Yan, Yu-Dong; Si, Yang; Qi, Ya-Hui

2006-03-01

217

Themed Space  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a classroom activity that introduces students to the concept of themed space. Students learn to think critically about the spaces they encounter on a regular basis by analyzing existing spaces and by working in groups to create their own themed space. This exercise gives students the chance to see the relevance of critical

Lynch, Christopher O.

2010-01-01

218

Report from the MPP Working Group to the NASA Associate Administrator for Space Science and Applications. Technical memorandum report, 1 October 1985-30 September 1986  

SciTech Connect

NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) gave a select group of scientists the opportunity to test and implement their computational algorithms on the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) located at Goddard Space Flight Center, beginning in late 1985. One year later, the Working Group presented its report, which addressed the following: algorithms, programming languages, architecture, programming environments, the way theory relates, and performance measured. The findings point to a number of demonstrated computational techniques for which the MPP architecture is ideally suited. For example, besides executing much faster on the MPP than on conventional computers, systolic VLSI simulation (where distances are short), lattice simulation, neural network simulation, and image problems were found to be easier to program on the MPP's architecture than on a CYBER 205 or even a VAX. The report also makes technical recommendations covering all aspects of MPP use, and recommendations concerning the future of the MPP and machines based on similar architectures, expansion of the Working Group, and study of the role of future parallel processors for space station, EOS, and the Great Observatories era.

Fischer, J.R.; Grosch, C.; Mcanulty, M.; Odonnell, J.; Storey, O.

1987-11-01

219

CRYSTALLOGRAPHIC POINT AND SPACE  

E-print Network

CRYSTALLOGRAPHIC POINT AND SPACE GROUPS Andy Elvin June 10, 2013 #12;Contents Point and Space no reflection axes #12;Cube and Octahedron are dual Symmetries under Oh #12;Space Groups Subgroups of E(3) Point Group + Translation { R | 0 }{ E | t }a = { R | t }a = Ra + t 230 Space Groups 73 symmorphic space

California at Santa Cruz, University of

220

Conjectures of Graffiti.pc Ermelinda DeLaVia  

E-print Network

G.pc Conjectures of Graffiti.pc Ermelinda DeLaViña University of Houston-Downtown Houston, TX 77002 SIAM Discrete Math, Halifax, Canada, 2012 #12;G.pc Outline of talk Overview of Graffiti.pc Sample of conjectures settled for t, 2, and 2 Sample of conjectures still open for t, 2, and 2 #12;G.pc Graffiti

Gera, Ralucca

221

LE BULLETIN DE L'EPI N 55 LOGICIELS NANORSEAU SUR PC PASSAGE DES LOGICIELS NANORSEAU SUR PC  

E-print Network

trois parties : 1 - un émulateur de MO5 sur PC, 2 - un ensemble d'outils de traitement des programmes sur PC Ce programme de quelques 5 000 lignes de C propose une trentaine de fonctions parmi lesquelles202 LE BULLETIN DE L'EPI N° 55 LOGICIELS NANOR?SEAU SUR PC PASSAGE DES LOGICIELS NANOR?SEAU SUR PC

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

222

Combating adverse selection in secondary PC markets.  

PubMed

Adverse selection is a significant contributor to market failure in secondary personal computer (PC) markets. Signaling can act as a potential solution to adverse selection and facilitate superior remarketing of second-hand PCs. Signaling is a means whereby usage information can be utilized to enhance consumer perception of both value and utility of used PCs and, therefore, promote lifetime extension for these systems. This can help mitigate a large portion of the environmental impact associated with PC system manufacture. In this paper, the computer buying and selling behavior of consumers is characterized via a survey of 270 Irish residential users. Results confirm the existence of adverse selection in the Irish market with 76% of potential buyers being unwilling to purchase and 45% of potential vendors being unwilling to sell a used PC. The so-called "closet affect" is also apparent with 78% of users storing their PC after use has ceased. Results also indicate that consumers place a higher emphasis on specifications when considering a second-hand purchase. This contradicts their application needs which are predominantly Internet and word-processing/spreadsheet/presentation applications, 88% and 60% respectively. Finally, a market solution utilizing self monitoring and reporting technology (SMART) sensors for the purpose of real time usage monitoring is proposed, that can change consumer attitudes with regard to second-hand computer equipment. PMID:18497164

Hickey, Stewart W; Fitzpatrick, Colin

2008-04-15

223

A Graphical User Interface for PC GAMESS  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

GAMESS is a set of computational chemistry tools available free for several computing platforms. Using the set of tools described here along with the pcgRun tool provided allows these tools to be used on the ubiquitous Windows PC with a graphic interface preferred by many of us over the command line.

224

Measuring Bullet Velocity with a PC Soundcard  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes a simple method for using a PC soundcard to accurately measure bullet velocity. The method involves placing the microphone within a foot of the muzzle and firing at a steel target between 50 and 100 yards away. The time of flight for the bullet is simply the recorded time between muzzle blast and sound of the bullet

Michael Courtney; Brian Edwards

2006-01-01

225

Mathematics Instruction and the Tablet PC  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of tablet PCs in teaching is a relatively new phenomenon. A cross between a notebook computer and a personal digital assistant (PDA), the tablet PC has all of the features of a notebook with the additional capability that the screen can also be used for input. Tablet PCs are usually equipped with a stylus that allows the user to write on

Fister, K. Renee; McCarthy, Maeve L.

2008-01-01

226

Deproletarianizing Agriculture Lemmens, P.C.  

E-print Network

Deproletarianizing Agriculture Lemmens, P.C. ISDA 2010, Montpellier, June 28-30, 2010 1 DEPROLETARIANIZING AGRICULTURE RECOVERING AGRICULTURE FROM AGRIBUSINESS AND THE NEED FOR A COMMONS-BASED, OPEN SOURCE AGRICULTURE Dr. Pieter LEMMENS Wageningen University Centre for Methodical Ethics and Technology Assessment

Boyer, Edmond

227

PC DAQ, a Windows based DAQ system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary form only given. PC DAQ is a Windows NT based general DAQ\\/Analysis\\/Monte Carlo shell developed as part of the Proton Radiography project at LANL (Los Alamos National Laboratory). It has been adopted by experiments outside of the Proton Radiography project at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and at LANL. The program provides DAQ, Monte Carlo, and replay (disk file input)

G. E. Hogan

1999-01-01

228

Tablet PC Enhanced Curricula University of Washington  

E-print Network

Tablet PC Enhanced Curricula University of Washington Richard Anderson http://www.cs.washington Classroom Presenter is free for educational and non-commercial use. It is available from: www.cs.washington University of Washington anderson@cs.washington.edu 1. Instructor displays a slide with an exercise

Anderson, Richard

229

Simulation, Optimierung mit SIMLER-PC  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Zu diesem Kapitel ist im Abschnitt 10.5 vergleichbare Literatur und Software angegeben (siehe auch \\/47\\/, \\/59\\/, \\/60\\/). Alle\\u000a Formelzeichen wurden so gewhlt, wie sie auch im Programm SIMLER-PC auf dem Bildschirm erscheinen.

Peter F. Orlowski

230

Prototyping on the PC with Programmable Hardware  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes how to design and use a framework of hardware and software for flexible interfacing and prototyping on the PC. The hardware comprises a card with programmable hardware provided by FPGAs, with an interface including DMA block transfer and interrupts. A library of hardware macros is described. Software routines are provided to enable the FPGAs to be programmed

Jamaludin Omar; James M. Noras

1997-01-01

231

Monte Carlo correction programme for PC  

Microsoft Academic Search

A Monte Carlo correction program for quantitative microanalysis on PC computer is introduced in this paper. The elastic scattering is described by the screened Rutherford cross section. Instead of computing the energy loss according to the actual path between two scatterings we have defined the Bethe inelastic cross section determined by the Bethe-slowing-down approximation. It is assumed that it causes

Ondrej Gedeon; Vaclav Hulinsky

1994-01-01

232

PC Based Drawing Simulation Using Wiimote  

Microsoft Academic Search

The primary controller of Nintendo's Wii console is Wii Remote. It has the motion sensor that can recognize user's motion as three dimensional coordinate. Also, it can be used as wireless pointing device on personal computer through Bluetooth. In this study, we suggested PC based drawing system using the motion sensor and the IR sensor via Bluetooth communication.

EunByeol Oh; SeungTaek Ryoo

2010-01-01

233

TEACHING WITH TABLET PC'S Kenrick Mock  

E-print Network

with add-ons to support pen-based input. Digital ink that is input by pen can be stored directly as ink@acm.org ABSTRACT Tablet PC's are traditional notebook computers with the ability to process digital ink by writing whiteboard by connecting it to a data projector. The lecture material was archived and accessed

Mock, Kenrick

234

The MHTS PC Package REFERENCE MANUAL  

E-print Network

i The MHTS PC Package REFERENCE MANUAL c 2002, A.I. McLeod & K.W. Hipel Reference Manual Version: 1.6 #12;1 INTRODUCTION #12;2 Introduction Prologue The McLeod-Hipel Time Series (MTS) Package provides series modelling and anal- ysis. Many of the methods discussed in the textbook by Hipel and McLeod (1994

McLeod, Ian

235

First-principles study for the adsorption of segments of BPA-PC on ?-Al2O3(0001)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have studied the adsorption of bisphenol-A-polycarbonate (BPA-PC) on the ?-Al2O3(0001) surface using density functional theory (DFT) with van der Waals (vdW) corrections. The BPA-PC polymer can be divided into its chemical fragments, which are phenylene, carbonate, and isopropylidene groups. We have calculated the adsorption energy and geometry of the BPA-PC segments that consist of two to three adjacent groups of the polymer. Our DFT results show that the adsorption is dominated by the vdW interaction. It is also important to include the interaction of nearest-neighbor groups in order to provide a realistic environment for the adsorption of the polymer onto the surface. Our results also show that the BPA-PC molecule attaches to the alumina surface via the carbonate group located in the middle of the molecule chain.

Blomqvist, Janne; Salo, Petri

2011-10-01

236

Regulation of PrPC signaling and processing by dimerization  

PubMed Central

The cellular prion protein (PrPC) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein present at the cell surface. PrPC N-terminal moiety is intrinsically disordered and is able to interact with a variety of ligands. Physiological ligands have neurotrophic activity, whilst others, including protein toxic oligomers, have neurotoxic functions. These two opposite activities involve different interacting partners and result from different PrPC-activated signaling pathways. Remarkably, PrPC may be inactivated either by physiological endoproteolysis and release of the N-terminal domain, or by ectodomain shedding. Ligand-induced PrPC dimerization or enforced dimerization of PrPC indicate that PrPC dimerization represents an important molecular switch for both intracellular signaling and inactivation by the release of PrPC N-terminal domain or shedding. In this review, we summarize evidence that cell surface receptor activity of PrPC is finely regulated by dimerization. PMID:25364762

Roucou, Xavier

2014-01-01

237

Synchronization of heart rate indices of human and Pc5 pulsations in the geomagnetic quiet conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Geomagnetic pulsations with duration of the period over 150 seconds (Pc5-6) are present in the magnetosphere almost constantly. Unlike other types of geomagnetic pulsations, they are characterized by high amplitudes reaching in auroral latitudes 30-100 nT, and even 300 - 600 nT in time of significant geomagnetic disturbances [1]. To date, it is generally accepted that the classic morning and afternoon Pc5 pulsations in the magnetosphere are toroidal Alfven resonance vibrations of the geomagnetic field lines [2, 3]. It was revealed that the basic oscillation periods, presented in heart rate variability of healthy subjects, in conditions of rest, at each time point substantially coincide with the periods of oscillation of the X-vector components of the geomagnetic field in the frequency range of Pc5-6 pulsations. Synchronization effect was observed in approximately 60% of cases [4]. The above statement is based on the results of more than 100 experiments (recording time from 60 to 200 min), conducted in the period 2011-2013 in various research groups [4]. In total, 37 volunteers in the age range 18-65 yrs took part in the experiments. Experiments were performed in Pushchino and Khimki (Moscow region), Arkhangelsk, Tomsk, Sofia (Bulgaria), as well as at the station Starorusskaya (Leningrad region). The geomagnetic data were obtained from INTERMAGNET network (http://ottawa.intermagnet.org/Welcom_e.php). From a biophysical point of view, the observed effects of timing fluctuations of heart rate of healthy subjects with the oscillations of the magnetic induction vector of the GMF could be an effective tool for solving one of the most actual problems in heliobiophysics, namely the identification of specific physiological mechanisms of biosystems response to low-intensity variations external factors. 1. Pilipenko V.A., Kleimenova N.G., Kozyreva O.V., Yumoto K., Bitterly G. Geomagnetism and aeronomy, 1997, V. 37, ?.3, P. 64-76 2. Chen L. and Hasegawa A. J.Geophys. Res. 1974. Vol.79,P.1024-1032 3. Southwood D.J. Planet. Space Sci. 1974. Vol.22, P.483-491. 4.Zenchenko T.A., Medvedeva A.A., Khorseva N.I., Breus T.K. // Geophysical Processes and Biosphere. 2013. V. 12. ? 4. P. 73-84

Zenchenko, Tatiana

238

PC1/3, PC2 and PC5/6A are targeted to dense core secretory granules by a common mechanism.  

PubMed

There are seven members of the proprotein convertase (PC) family of secreted serine proteases that cleave their substrates at basic amino acids, thereby activating a variety of hormones, growth factors, and viruses. PC1/3, PC2 and PC5/6A are the only members of the PC family that are targeted to dense core secretory granules, where they carry out the processing of proteins that are secreted from the cell in a regulated manner. Previous studies have identified alpha-helices in the C-termini of the PC1/3 and PC2 proteases that are required for this subcellular targeting. In the current study, we demonstrate that a predicted alpha-helix in the C-terminus of PC5/6A is also critical for the ability of this domain to target a heterologous protein to the regulated secretory pathway of mouse endocrine AtT-20 cells. Analysis of the subcellular distribution of fusion proteins containing the C-terminal domains of PC1/3, PC2 and PC5/6A confirmed that all three domains have the capacity to redirect a constitutively secreted protein to the granule-containing cytoplasmic extensions. Analysis of the predicted structures formed by these three granule-sorting helices shows a correlation between their granule-sorting efficiency and the clustering of hydrophobic amino acids in their granule-targeting helices. PMID:17645548

Dikeakos, Jimmy D; Mercure, Chantal; Lacombe, Marie-Jose; Seidah, Nabil G; Reudelhuber, Timothy L

2007-08-01

239

Theory of electronic and structural properties of materials: Novel group-IV materials and real space methods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This dissertation consists of two parts. The first part employs existing computational techniques to study the electronic, and structural properties of novel group-IV and related materials, namely, carbon nanotubes, boron nitride nanotubes, and crystalline group-IV alloys. In the second part, we develop a new electronic structure calculation technique based on finite element methods with multigrid acceleration. The computation time of our new technique scales quadratically with the number of atoms in the system i.e., O( N2), as opposed to the unfavorable cubic scaling ( O(N3)) for most existing ab initio methods. Chapter 1 gives an overview of theoretical methods involved in this dissertation. Chapter 2 focuses on the structural properties of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes. First, a new nucleation model for carbon nanotubes is proposed. Second, plastic deformation of carbon nanotube under high tensile stress is studied using a tight-binding total energy model. The elastic limits of carbon nanotubes are found to be higher than any other known materials and very sensitive to the so-called wrapping angle of nanotubes. Chapter 3 is devoted to the electronic and structural properties of novel group-IV alloys formed from CVD precursor. Group-IV alloys have attracted considerable research interest recently. Using the newly developed UltraHigh Vacuum Chemical Vapor Deposition (UHV CVD) technique, group-IV alloys such as Si4C and Ge4C, which contain 20 atomic % carbon, have been realized. The computational time of traditional ab initio techniques such as pseudopotential planewave methods scales at least as O( N3), where N is the number of atoms in the system. This unfavorable scaling limits the number of atoms one can study using these methods to several hundreds, even with the most powerful supercomputers available today. In chapter 4, we develop an O( N2) ab initio electronic structure calculation technique based on the finite element methods with multigrid acceleration. O(N2) scaling is achieved by avoiding explicit re-orthogonalization between eigenvectors, which is made possible by a multigrid algorithm. With these new techniques, we can perform ab initio calculations for systems containing more than 32 atoms on a single workstation (Compaq alpha DS10). (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

Zhang, Peihong

240

Identifying New Members of Nearby Moving Groups  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Our group has assembled a sample of 14,000 stars of spectral types B9-M9 with measured UVW Galactic space velocities and lying within 125 pc of Earth. We have identified candidate members of three nearby young (less than 100 Myr) moving groups. For stars of spectral types G5 and later, we have used the Kast spectrometer on the Shane 3m telescope at Lick Observatory to measure lithium abundance in order to determine stellar ages. With the data we have obtained from this run, we will be able to establish whether our candidates are bona fide members of the moving groups in question. I will be presenting the preliminary results from this survey, including spectra of the ~50 stars observed thus far. These nearby young stars will make excellent targets for direct imaging followup surveys, since any giant planets around young stars will still be warm, and will therefore be bright enough to detect with instruments like GPI.

Holmbeck, Erika; Vican, Laura

2014-06-01

241

PC12 polarity on biopolymer nanogratings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cell differentiation properties are strongly entangled with the morphology and physical properties of the extracellular environment. A complete understanding of this interaction needs artificial scaffolds with controlled nano-/micro-topography. We induced specific topographies by nanoimprint lithography (NIL) on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) dishes substrates and, using light microscopy and high-magnification scanning-electron-microscopy, quantitatively compared the changes in PC12 differentiation phenotype induced by the periodicity of the nanopatterns. This analysis revealed that nanogratings reduce the number of neurites produced by PC12 cells upon treatment with NGF and that neuronal bipolarity correlated with an increased stretching of the cell body and a reduced length of the cell neuronal protrusions.

Cecchini, M.; Ferrari, A.; Beltram, F.

2008-03-01

242

PC12 differentiation on biopolymer nanostructures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The study of nervous system regeneration and axonal outgrowth control are relevant in several research areas, like neurophysiology or biomedical engineering. Among the elements that control neuron dynamics, the host substrate topography is a key parameter in determining cell differentiation. We present time-lapse experiments to analyze the differentiation dynamics of PC12 cells on nanopatterned biocompatible substrates. 200 nm depth gratings were fabricated on tissue-culture polystyrene substrates by nanoimprint lithography; different linewidths and pitches were compared down to 500 nm and 1000 nm, respectively. PC12 cells were cultured on these substrates and, following NGF administration to the medium, body morphology, cell movement and neuritogenesis were monitored at different time periods. In addition to demonstrating guided differentiation, our studies show complex time variations in body morphology and axon length, and guided cell movement. We show unstable synaptic connections and cell-body polarization, and the competition between topographical guidance and cell-cell interactions.

Cecchini, Marco; Bumma, Giorgia; Serresi, Michela; Beltram, Fabio

2007-12-01

243

ZDNet Special Report: PC Expo 2000  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

PC Expo 2000 is over, but readers can still get the lowdown on the gadgets and gizmos unveiled at the Jacob Javits Center in 2000. ZDNet's special coverage includes breaking and archived news, product previews and first impressions, commentary, and press releases. CNET offers pieces on new products, top trends of the coming year, and Best of Show awards. At the official site, users will find a list of exhibitors and speakers, and information on keynote programs.

2000-01-01

244

Direct solution of renormalization group equations of QCD in x-space: NLO implementations at leading twist  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We illustrate the implementation of a method based on the use of recursion relations in (Bjorken) x-space for the solution of the evolution equations of QCD for all the leading twist distributions. The algorithm has the advantage of being very fast. The implementation that we release is written in C and is performed to next-to-leading order in ?s. Program summaryTitle of program:evolution.c Catalogue identifier: ADUB Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADUB Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer: Athlon 1800 plus Operating system under which the program has been tested: Linux Programming language used: C Peripherals used: Laser printer No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4559 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1048 Distribution format: gzip file Nature of physical problem: The program provided here solves the DGLAP evolution equations to next-to-leading order ?s, for unpolarized, longitudinally polarized and transversely polarized parton distributions. Method of solution: We use a recursive method based on an expansion of the solution in powers of log( ?s( Q)/ ?s( Q0)). Typical running time: About 1 minute and 30 seconds for the unpolarized and longitudinally polarized cases and 1 minute for the transversely polarized case.

Cafarella, Alessandro; Corian, Claudio

2004-07-01

245

Virtual Reality at the PC Level  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The main objective of my research has been to incorporate virtual reality at the desktop level; i.e., create virtual reality software that can be run fairly inexpensively on standard PC's. The standard language used for virtual reality on PC's is VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language). It is a new language so it is still undergoing a lot of changes. VRML 1.0 came out only a couple years ago and VRML 2.0 came out around last September. VRML is an interpreted language that is run by a web browser plug-in. It is fairly flexible in terms of allowing you to create different shapes and animations. Before this summer, I knew very little about virtual reality and I did not know VRML at all. I learned the VRML language by reading two books and experimenting on a PC. The following topics are presented: CAD to VRML, VRML 1.0 to VRML 2.0, VRML authoring tools, VRML browsers, finding virtual reality applications, the AXAF project, the VRML generator program, web communities and future plans.

Dean, John

1998-01-01

246

Pc1-2 auroral pulsations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Abstract<p label="1">By observations at Lovozero station (64.3 N, 114.3 E CGM coordinates), we have investigated two events of auroral pulsations of <span class="hlt">Pc</span>1-2 type with periods in the range 2.5-7 s accompanied by similar geomagnetic pulsations. Luminous variations in different parts of the sky were found by photometric measurements of the frames of all-sky camera, which was operated at the rate of one frame per second. The pulsations under study are associated with the diffuse aurora. For the event with 7 s period, a phase relationship between auroral and magnetic pulsations is as follows: the luminosity bursts are coincident with positive half periods in the Z component and negative ones in the D component, while positive peaks in the H component lag behind the luminous peaks by about ?/2. For the event with 2.5 s period, this relationship appears different. Within one of 10-min intervals, <span class="hlt">Pc</span>2 pulsations observed in both magnetic field and aurora were superposed by regular <span class="hlt">Pc</span>4 pulsations of 1-min period. For these, the luminosity bursts corresponded to negative half periods in the Z component. A connection between auroral and magnetic pulsations is discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Roldugin, V. C.; Roldugin, A. V.; Pilgaev, S. V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">247</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020050408&hterms=rocket+nozzle+design&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Drocket%2Bnozzle%2Bdesign"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ongoing Analyses of Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engines by the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis <span class="hlt">Group</span> at Marshall <span class="hlt">Space</span> Flight Center</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents the status of analyses on three Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) configurations underway in the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis <span class="hlt">Group</span> (TD64). TD64 is performing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis on a Penn State RBCC test rig, the proposed Draco axisymmetric RBCC engine and the Trailblazer engine. The intent of the analysis on the Penn State test rig is to benchmark the Finite Difference Navier Stokes (FDNS) code for ejector mode fluid dynamics. The Draco analysis was a trade study to determine the ejector mode performance as a function of three engine design variables. The Trailblazer analysis is to evaluate the nozzle performance in scramjet mode. Results to date of each analysis are presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ruf, Joseph H.; Holt, James B.; Canabal, Francisco</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">248</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19990105699&hterms=rocket+nozzle+design&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Drocket%2Bnozzle%2Bdesign"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ongoing Analysis of Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engines by the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis <span class="hlt">Group</span> at Marshall <span class="hlt">Space</span> Flight Center</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents the status of analyses on three Rocket Based Combined Cycle configurations underway in the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis <span class="hlt">Group</span> (TD64). TD64 is performing computational fluid dynamics analysis on a Penn State RBCC test rig, the proposed Draco axisymmetric RBCC engine and the Trailblazer engine. The intent of the analysis on the Penn State test rig is to benchmark the Finite Difference Navier Stokes code for ejector mode fluid dynamics. The Draco engine analysis is a trade study to determine the ejector mode performance as a function of three engine design variables. The Trailblazer analysis is to evaluate the nozzle performance in scramjet mode. Results to date of each analysis are presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ruf, Joseph; Holt, James B.; Canabal, Francisco</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">249</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26398123"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">PC</span> based analysis of alpha-particle spectra</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recently developed personal computer (<span class="hlt">PC</span>) software performs analysis of alpha-particle spectra. The spectra are collected using a commercially available multichannel analyzer board in the <span class="hlt">PC</span>, interfaced with up to eight (8) alpha-particle detectors. The <span class="hlt">PC</span> is a IBM <span class="hlt">PC</span>-AT computer with a 20 Mbyte Bernoulli Box removable cartridge disk, a math co-processor, and a printer. Once saved on disk, the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T CHAPMAN</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">250</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3038206"> <span id="translatedtitle">POLYCOMB <span class="hlt">GROUP</span> COMPLEXES - MANY COMBINATIONS, MANY FUNCTIONS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Polycomb <span class="hlt">Group</span> (<span class="hlt">Pc</span>G) proteins are transcription regulatory proteins that control the expression of a variety of genes from early embryogenesis through birth to adulthood. <span class="hlt">Pc</span>G proteins form several complexes that are thought to collaborate to repress gene transcription. Individual <span class="hlt">Pc</span>G proteins have unique characteristics and mutations in genes encoding different <span class="hlt">Pc</span>G proteins cause distinct phenotypes. Histone modifications have important roles in some <span class="hlt">Pc</span>G protein functions, but they are not universally required. The mechanisms of gene-specific recruitment, transcription repression, and selective derepression of genes by vertebrate <span class="hlt">Pc</span>G proteins are incompletely understood. Future studies of this enigmatic <span class="hlt">group</span> of developmental regulators are certain to produce unanticipated discoveries. PMID:19889541</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kerppola, Tom K</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">251</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890005604&hterms=Disk+Scheduling&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3DDisk%2BScheduling"> <span id="translatedtitle">The USL NASA <span class="hlt">PC</span> R and D development environment standards</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The development environment standards which have been established in order to control usage of the IBM <span class="hlt">PC</span>/XT development systems and to prevent interference between projects being currently developed on the <span class="hlt">PC</span>'s are discussed. The standards address the following areas: scheduling <span class="hlt">PC</span> resources; login/logout procedures; training; file naming conventions; hard disk organization; diskette care; backup procedures; and copying policies.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dominick, Wayne D. (editor); Moreau, Dennis R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">252</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title41-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title41-vol3-sec128-1-5002-8.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">41 CFR 128-1.5002-8 - Property custodian (<span class="hlt">PC</span>).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...2011-01-01 false Property custodian (<span class="hlt">PC</span>). 128-1.5002-8 Section 128-1...128-1.5002-8 Property custodian (<span class="hlt">PC</span>). An individual responsible for...within his jurisdiction. The designation as <span class="hlt">PC</span> may or may not correspond to the...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">253</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title41-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title41-vol3-sec128-1-5002-8.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">41 CFR 128-1.5002-8 - Property custodian (<span class="hlt">PC</span>).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...2010-07-01 false Property custodian (<span class="hlt">PC</span>). 128-1.5002-8 Section 128-1...128-1.5002-8 Property custodian (<span class="hlt">PC</span>). An individual responsible for...within his jurisdiction. The designation as <span class="hlt">PC</span> may or may not correspond to the...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">254</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27055095"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">PC</span> Versus CNC-Which Do You Choose?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent advances in programmable controller technology, particularly in the area of motion control, have redefined the distinctions between programmable controllers (<span class="hlt">PC</span>'s) and computer numerical controls (CNC's). Advanced <span class="hlt">PC</span>'s now offer new features, such as coordinated motion control of multiple axes. The benefits of new <span class="hlt">PC</span>'s that make them the preferred choice over CNC's in many machine control applications are discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lee E. Schmitt</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">255</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.math.uiuc.edu/~west/pubs/totdom.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Some conjectures of Graffiti.<span class="hlt">pc</span> on total domination</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Some conjectures of Graffiti.<span class="hlt">pc</span> on total domination Ermelinda DeLaViña , Qi Liu , Ryan Pepper domination number of a graph that originated as conjectures of Graffiti.<span class="hlt">pc</span>. Keywords: chromatic number, clique number, connected domination number, domination number, girth, Graffiti.<span class="hlt">pc</span>, local independence</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">West, Douglas B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">256</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.7042B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Using OLCI/Sentinel-3 and Sentinel-5-P data synergistically for retrieving different phytoplankton <span class="hlt">groups</span> from <span class="hlt">space</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We are proposing the development of an algorithm, using the combination of data from OCLI (Sentinel-3) and Sentinel-5P sensors, which derives globally pyhtoplankton <span class="hlt">groups</span> (phytoplankton functional types) biomass. The information of the total biomass will be achieved by standard processing of the Chlorophyll-a (chl-a) concentration using satellite data from multispectral imaging instruments (firstly SeaWiFS, MODIS and MERIS merged within the GlobColour data set, later OLCI data). The percentage of the main phytoplankton types on the total biomass will be retrieved by the analysis of characteristic absorption features in hyperspectral satellite measurements (firstly SCIAMACHY, later Sentinel-5-P) using the PhytoDOAS method by Bracher et al. (2009) and improved by Sadeghi et al. (2011). Thus, a synergistic product from information of multi- and hyperspectral satellite instruments which complements one another will be developed. The two instruments of the Sentinel mission will enable a data product of weekly to monthly temporal and 7 km by 7 km spatial resolution. On the the SCIAMACHY/Globcolour product (starting in 2002 until today) will be limited to a monthly and 0.5 degree resolution. The application of the algorithm is for assessing the spatial and temporal variability of specific phytoplankton types' biomass on longer time scale (10 to 20 and more years) with global coverage. This will engross the understanding of the role of different phytoplankton types in the world ocean's ecosystem and improve estimates on the contribution of different phytoplankton types to the global carbon cycle. The concept of the algorithm development, including its uncertainity determined via validaton with in-situ phytoplankton data and sensitivity studies using the coupled atmospheric-oceanic radiative transfer model SCIATRAN (Rozanov et al. 2002, Blum et al. in press) and examples for its application are given in the presentation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bracher, A.; Dinter, T.; Altenburg Soppa, M.; Taylor, B.; Rozanov, V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">257</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.kyoto-u.ac.jp/kr/k_issue/documents/hand/2013/p33.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">www.kansai-airport.or.jp/index.asp www.kate.co.jp/<span class="hlt">pc</span>/index.html</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">10 33 201279 20044 URL www.kansai-airport.or.jp/index.asp URL www.kate.co.jp/<span class="hlt">pc</span>/index.html MK URL www.mk-<span class="hlt">group</span>.co.jp/ URL www.yasaka.jp/taxi/shuttle/service.html JASSO JASSO JASSO URL www.jasso.go.jp/exchange/follow.html :0120000530 0570000247</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Takada, Shoji</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">258</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.kyoto-u.ac.jp/kr/k_issue/documents/hand/p32.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">www.kansai-airport.or.jp/index.asp www.kate.co.jp/<span class="hlt">pc</span>/index.html</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">10 31 20044 URL www.kansai-airport.or.jp/index.asp URL www.kate.co.jp/<span class="hlt">pc</span>/index.html MK URL www.mk-<span class="hlt">group</span>.co.jp/ URL www.yasaka.jp/taxi/shuttle/service.html JASSO JASSO JASSO URL , . ()· . . ( ) () , . , ( ) . , 2004 4 , (:, , ) . . · , . , , . (·) URL www</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Takada, Shoji</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">259</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26666876"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">PC</span>-based instrument for harmonics and interharmonics measurement in power supply systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Growing interest on power quality has led international working <span class="hlt">groups</span> to define new standards for testing and measurement techniques to apply to power systems. Special attention has been paid to harmonic and interharmonic measurements. Here, the authors introduce a <span class="hlt">PC</span>-based instrument capable of synchronising sampling frequency with fundamental frequency in order to perform on-line voltage or current distortion analysis. The</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Massimo Aiello; Antonio Cataliotti; Salvatore Nuccio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">260</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://edutice.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/03/08/00/PDF/b69p233.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">LE BULLETIN DE L'EPI N 69 AFFICHER DES IMAGES SUR <span class="hlt">PC</span> AFFICHER DES IMAGES SUR COMPATIBLE <span class="hlt">PC</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">233 LE BULLETIN DE L'EPI N° 69 AFFICHER DES IMAGES SUR <span class="hlt">PC</span> AFFICHER DES IMAGES SUR COMPATIBLE <span class="hlt">PC</span> programme de pilotage IMAGEPCX.EXE et les *BGI [EGAVGA.BGI ou EGA.BGI..] lancer IMAGEPCX et se laisser L'EPI AFFICHER DES IMAGES SUR <span class="hlt">PC</span> VI. OBTENTION DE CE PROGICIEL Ce produit est donné gratuitement en</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paris-Sud XI, Université de</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return 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class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">261</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890005615&hterms=pc+28&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dpc%2B28"> <span id="translatedtitle">IBM <span class="hlt">PC</span>/IX operating system evaluation plan</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An evaluation plan for the IBM <span class="hlt">PC</span>/IX Operating System designed for IBM <span class="hlt">PC</span>/XT computers is discussed. The evaluation plan covers the areas of performance measurement and evaluation, software facilities available, man-machine interface considerations, networking, and the suitability of <span class="hlt">PC</span>/IX as a development environment within the University of Southwestern Louisiana NASA <span class="hlt">PC</span> Research and Development project. In order to compare and evaluate the <span class="hlt">PC</span>/IX system, comparisons with other available UNIX-based systems are also included.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dominick, Wayne D. (editor); Granier, Martin; Hall, Philip P.; Triantafyllopoulos, Spiros</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">262</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1989CG.....15...43P"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">PC</span>-interactive stereonet plotting program</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The computer program here described allows the structural geologist to rotate and revolve structural data interactively (strike dip: trend plunge). These actions can remove the effects of dip and plunge. Once a final screen plot is obtained, it may be printed on an associated graphics printer. This program requires an IBM <span class="hlt">PC</span>/XT AT or compatible equipped with the color graphics (CGA) card. It also works satisfactorily on compatible PCs such as the COMPAQ or AT&T 6300 (which use a combination mono CGA screen). The addition of a math coprocessor (8087 or 80287) greatly speeds up the response time but is not required.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pilant, Walter L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">263</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pcmag.com/category2/0,2806,415483,00.asp"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">PC</span> Magazine: The Future of Technology</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This section of <span class="hlt">PC</span> Magazine's Web site highlights some of the most fascinating and potentially revolutionary technologies that could be on the verge of large scale development. Of the nineteen main technologies that are featured, some have been widely publicized, such as hydrogen fuel cells and grid computing. Others are not as well known. For example, the article on e-bombs, or "high-power microwave (HPM) weapons," touches on a US Department of Defense effort that until recently has been shrouded in secrecy. A prototype gallery is also available on this site, showing images and brief descriptions of other remarkable technologies.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">264</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24742965"> <span id="translatedtitle">S-<span class="hlt">PC</span>: an e-treatment application for management of smoke-quitting patients.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The main objective of this paper is to present a new program that facilitates the management of people who want to quit smoking, implemented through an e-treatment software called S-<span class="hlt">PC</span> (Smoker Patient Control). S-<span class="hlt">PC</span> is a web-based application that manages <span class="hlt">groups</span> of patients, provides a bidirectional communication through mobile text messages and e-mails between patients and clinicians and offers advice and control to keep track of the patients and their status. A total of 229 patients were enrolled in the study, randomly divided into two <span class="hlt">groups</span>, although some variables were tested to ensure that there were no significant differences between the <span class="hlt">groups</span> that could have an impact on the outcome of the treatment. There were no significant differences between the two <span class="hlt">groups</span> regarding the ratio/number of males/females, tobacco dependence, co-oximetry, average cigarette consumption, current age and age when smoking started. The first <span class="hlt">group</span> was made up of 104 patients (45.4% of the total) and followed a treatment that incorporated the S-<span class="hlt">PC</span> tool, while the second one had 125 patients without the S-<span class="hlt">PC</span> tool. S-<span class="hlt">PC</span> was evaluated for its effectiveness at assisting the patients to give up smoking, and its effect on clinician time management. 74% of the S-<span class="hlt">PC</span> <span class="hlt">group</span> completed the treatment without relapses and remained abstinent three months after the completion of the treatment, understanding abstinence as being continuous (with no relapses allowed and co-oximetry below 1 ppm) from the day of stopping. In contrast only 45.6% of the No S-<span class="hlt">PC</span> <span class="hlt">group</span> completed the treatment without relapses and remained abstinent three months after completion of the treatment. The rate of admittance to the program has doubled in one year and patients went from having to wait for 3 months to be immediately admitted into the program. This therapeutic e-health program aims at maximizing the number of patients that a professional can effectively help to quit smoking. In addition, the system also detects patients who are not progressing appropriately, allowing the professional to improve their treatment parameters dynamically. PMID:24742965</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vilaplana, Jordi; Solsona, Francesc; Abella, Francesc; Cuadrado, Josep; Alves, Rui; Mateo, Jordi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">265</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19720033787&hterms=thermal+plasma&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dthermal%2Bplasma"> <span id="translatedtitle">Irregular structure of thermal ion plasma near the plasmapause observed from Ogo 3 and <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 1 measurements.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Independent measurements of the plasmapause and associated thermal plasma structure from Ogo 3 are compared with ground-based <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 1 observations from the period 1966-67. Substantial agreement between the plasmapause crossing identified on the satellite and the <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 1 occurrence positions observed on the ground at midlatitudes during the nighttime (including dawn and dusk) indicates that these nighttime <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 1 events are closely associated with the plasmapause. A correlation of selected closely <span class="hlt">spaced</span> events obtained in the nighttime under quiet to moderate activity provides good agreement in the proton concentrations near the plasmapause boundary. Preliminary results indicate <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 1 excitation is associated with plasma irregularities near the plasmapause and is particularly favorable in the region of 'post-storm recovery' and in the region of diurnal 'plasma bulge' in the afternoon-dusk sector.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kikuchi, H.; Taylor, H. A., Jr.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1972-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">266</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7147234"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluating security systems using SNAP-<span class="hlt">PC</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">SNAP-<span class="hlt">PC</span> (Safeguards Network Analysis Procedure for the Personal Computer) is a user-friendly version of SNAP designed for IBM XT or AT compatible microcomputers. SNAP is a simulation-based analysis technique supporting the evaluation of fixed-site security systems to prevent theft or sabotage of a specified target. Through SNAP the user is able to define the facility, the sensor system, the guard operating policies and response tactics, and the adversary's attack plan. SNAP uses the system definition to analyze its effectiveness in defending against specific threats. The system performance statistics measured by SNAP include: Adversary mission success probability, guard and adversary casualties, duration of engagements, outcome of engagements, duration of scenario by outcome (adversary success/fail), and adversary duration by facility location. The SNAP-<span class="hlt">PC</span> package provides a compact analysis tool that can be used to analyze a wide variety of security systems. It places SNAP, a proven evaluation technique, in the hands of on-site personnel, not just computer analysts. The support programs eliminate the labor intensive tedious task of organizing and sorting through reams of output reports and greatly reduce the time previously required to analyze a security system.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tobin, C.D.; Gregg, M.L.; Erdbruegger, M.R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">267</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AIPC.1349..495L"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">PC</span> Based Pulsed Field Hysteresis Loop Tracer</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The present paper describes the design and setting up of a <span class="hlt">PC</span> based hysteresis loop tracer that enables quick characterization of magnetic materials at room temperature. A high magnetic field is generated in a solenoid by passing a pulse current of sinusoidal shape at an interval slow enough to produce minimum heating in the solenoid. A pickup coil system is kept in the solenoid to detect field and magnetization signal of a sample placed in the pickup coil. These transitory analog signals are converted into digital signals by a micro-controller integrated circuit. These digital signals are sent to a computer through a serial port. A software has been developed to interface the system to the <span class="hlt">PC</span> and processing the data to calculate hysteresis parameters like saturation magnetization Ms, coercivity Hc and remanence Mr followed by plotting of the hysteresis loop. The data and graphs can be printed or stored as files. The sample holder is designed for samples in powder or pellet form. The data acquired for some standard magnetic samples are presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Likhite, S. D.; Likhite, Prachi; Radha, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">268</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003APS..SES.BB006H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Motor Proteins at Work in <span class="hlt">PC</span>12</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Motor proteins such as kinesin and dynein drive vesicle transport within cells by converting the chemical energy of ATP into mechanical work. As vesicles are transported in <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 neurites, they travel at constant velocity for long intervals before changing to a different constant velocity. When scaled by the minimum observed velocity of a vesicles, the changes in velocity occur in quantizes intervals of +/- 1, 2, 3 etc. These changes in velocity are caused by a change in the number of motor proteins actively transporting the vesicle. The viscoelastic modulus and viscosity appropriate for large vesicles (0.25 - 0.5 micron radius) in <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 was determined by measuring the Brownian motion of vesicles within the distal expansions of neurites. The corresponding Stokes' drag on the vesicles was 4.2 +/- 0.6 pN per motor. Assuming that kinesin hydrolyzes 1 ATP per 8 nm step (consistent with in-vitro measurements), the motor's efficiency is 33apply forces in magnetic beeds in the hopes of mimicking vesicle motion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hill, David; Holzwarth, George; Superfine, Richard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">269</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993nps..reptQQ...M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Design and implementation of a prototype <span class="hlt">PC</span> based graphical and interactive MILSATCOM requirements database system</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This thesis develops a prototype <span class="hlt">PC</span> based Military Satellite Communications (MILSATCOM) Requirements Database (MRDB) application for U.S. <span class="hlt">Space</span> Command, using Microsoft's Access relational database management system (DBMS) for Windows. It demonstrates the advantages of using the proposed database system over the existing one and shows how U.S. <span class="hlt">Space</span> Command can save both time and money by using a <span class="hlt">PC</span> based interactive, graphical, and user friendly database system. A rapid prototyping approach in concert with a six phase database design process was used to develop the prototype. The first two chapters of the thesis provide a background of the application and describe database management systems in general and Microsoft Access in particular. The applications of Access - tables, queries, forms, reports, macros, and modules - to the design of the MRDB are then discussed in the succeeding five chapters. The conclusions describe the advantages and benefits of using the prototype MRDB database system and make recommendations for future improvements.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Major, William M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">270</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890005617&hterms=pc+28&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dpc%2B28"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">PC</span>-based Multiple Information System Interface (<span class="hlt">PC</span>/MISI) detailed design and implementation plan</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The design plan for the personal computer multiple information system interface (<span class="hlt">PC</span>/MISI) project is discussed. The document is intended to be used as a blueprint for the implementation of the system. Each component is described in the detail necessary to allow programmers to implement the system. A description of the system data flow and system file structures is given.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dominick, Wayne D. (editor); Hall, Philip P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">271</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23397212"> <span id="translatedtitle">Remote estimation of phycocyanin (<span class="hlt">PC</span>) for inland waters coupled with YSI <span class="hlt">PC</span> fluorescence probe.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nuisance cyanobacterial blooms degrade water resources through accelerated eutrophication, odor generation, and production of toxins that cause adverse effects on human health. Quick and effective methods for detecting cyanobacterial abundance in drinking water supplies are urgently needed to compliment conventional laboratory methods, which are costly and time consuming. Hyperspectral remote sensing can be an effective approach for rapid assessment of cyanobacterial blooms. Samples (n=250) were collected from five drinking water sources in central Indiana (CIN), USA, and South Australia (SA), which experience nuisance cyanobacterial blooms. In situ hyperspectral data were used to develop models by relating spectral signal with handheld fluorescence probe (YSI 6600 XLM-SV) measured phycocyanin (<span class="hlt">PC</span> in cell/ml), a proxy pigment unique for indicating the presence of cyanobacteria. Three-band model (TBM), which is effective for chlorophyll-a estimates, was tuned to quantify cyanobacteria coupled with the <span class="hlt">PC</span> probe measured cyanobacteria. As a comparison, two band model proposed by Simis et al. (Limnol Oceanogr, 50(11): 237-245, 2005; denoted as SM05) was paralleled to evaluate TBM model performance. Our observation revealed a high correlation between measured and estimated <span class="hlt">PC</span> for SA dataset (R (2)?=0.96; range: 534-20,200 cell/ml) and CIN dataset (R (2)?=0.88; range: 1,300-44,500 cell/ml). The potential of this modeling approach for imagery data were assessed by simulated ESA/Centinel3/OLCI spectra, which also resulted in satisfactory performance with the TBM for both SA dataset (RMSE %?=26.12) and CIN dataset (RMSE %?=34.49). Close relationship between probe-measured <span class="hlt">PC</span> and laboratory measured cyanobacteria biovolume was observed (R (2)?=0.93, p<0.0001) for the CIN dataset, indicating a stable performance for <span class="hlt">PC</span> probe. Based on our observation, field spectroscopic measurement coupled with <span class="hlt">PC</span> probe measurements can provide quantitative cyanobacterial bloom information from both relatively static and flowing inland waters. Hence, it has promising implications for water resource managers to obtain information for early warning detection of cyanobacterial blooms through the close association between probe measured <span class="hlt">PC</span> values and cyanobacterial biovolume via remote sensing modeling. PMID:23397212</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Song, Kaishan; Li, Lin; Tedesco, Lenore; Clercin, Nicole; Hall, Bob; Li, Shuai; Shi, Kun; Liu, Dawei; Sun, Ying</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">272</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/591066main_GER_2011_for_release.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">International <span class="hlt">Space</span> Exploration Coordination <span class="hlt">Group</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">surface of the Earth is the shore of the cosmic ocean. From it we have learned most of what we know will strengthen and enrich humanity's future, bringing nations together in a common cause, revealing new knowledge in strong partnerships that have brought discoveries, innovations, and inspiration to all mankind</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">273</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20100025855&hterms=international+investment&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dinternational%2Binvestment"> <span id="translatedtitle">An International Strategy for Human Exploration of the Moon: The International <span class="hlt">Space</span> Exploration Coordination <span class="hlt">Group</span> (ISECG) Reference Architecture for Human Lunar Exploration</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The International <span class="hlt">Space</span> Exploration Coordination <span class="hlt">Group</span> (ISECG) was established in response to The Global Exploration Strategy: The Framework for Coordination developed by fourteen <span class="hlt">space</span> agencies and released in May 2007. Several ISECG participating <span class="hlt">space</span> agencies have been studying concepts for human exploration of the moon that allow individual and collective goals and objectives to be met. This 18 month study activity culminated with the development of the ISECG Reference Architecture for Human Lunar Exploration. The reference architecture is a series of elements delivered over time in a flexible and evolvable campaign. This paper will describe the reference architecture and how it will inform near-term and long-term programmatic planning within interested agencies. The reference architecture is intended to serve as a global point of departure conceptual architecture that enables individual agency investments in technology development and demonstration, International <span class="hlt">Space</span> Station research and technology demonstration, terrestrial analog studies, and robotic precursor missions to contribute towards the eventual implementation of a human lunar exploration scenario which reflects the concepts and priorities established to date. It also serves to create opportunities for partnerships that will support evolution of this concept and its eventual realization. The ISECG Reference Architecture for Human Lunar Exploration (commonly referred to as the lunar gPoD) reflects the agency commitments to finding an effective balance between conducting important scientific investigations of and from the moon, as well as demonstrating and mastering the technologies and capabilities to send humans farther into the Solar System. The lunar gPoD begins with a robust robotic precursor phase that demonstrates technologies and capabilities considered important for the success of the campaign. Robotic missions will inform the human missions and buy down risks. Human exploration will start with a thorough scientific investigation of the polar region while allowing the ability to demonstrate and validate the systems needed to take humans on more ambitious lunar exploration excursions. The ISECG Reference Architecture for Human Lunar Exploration serves as a model for future cooperation and is documented in a summary report and a comprehensive document that also describes the collaborative international process that led to its development. ISECG plans to continue with architecture studies such as this to examine an open transportation architecture and other destinations, with expanded participation from ISECG agencies, as it works to inform international partnerships and advance the Global Exploration Strategy.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Laurini, Kathleen C.; Hufenbach, Bernhard; Junichiro, Kawaguchi; Piedboeuf, Jean-Claude; Schade, Britta; Lorenzoni, Andrea; Curtis, Jeremy; Hae-Dong, Kim</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">274</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3353548"> <span id="translatedtitle">Clinical Trial: comparison of Ibuprofen-<span class="hlt">PC</span> and ibuprofen on the GI safety and analgesic efficacy in osteoarthritic patients</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">SUMMARY Background Chronic use of NSAIDs is associated with GI toxicity that increases with age. Aims The GI safety and therapeutic efficacy of Ibuprofen chemically associated with phosphatidylcholine (<span class="hlt">PC</span>) was evaluated in osteoarthritic (OA) patients. Methods A randomized, double-blind trial of 125 patients was performed. A dose of 2400 mg/day of ibuprofen or an equivalent dose of Ibuprofen-<span class="hlt">PC</span> was administered for 6 weeks. GI safety was assessed by endoscopy. Efficacy was assessed by scores of analgesia and anti-inflammatory activity. Bioavailability of ibuprofen was pharmacokinetically assessed. Results Ibuprofen-<span class="hlt">PC</span> and ibuprofen provided similar bioavailability/therapeutic efficacy. In the evaluable subjects a trend for improved GI safety in the Ibuprofen-<span class="hlt">PC</span> <span class="hlt">group</span> compared with ibuprofen was observed, that did not reach statistical significance. However, in patients >55 years of age, a statistically significant advantage for Ibuprofen-<span class="hlt">PC</span> treatment vs ibuprofen in the prevention of NSAID-induced gut injury was observed with increases in both mean Lanza scores and the risk of developing > 2 erosions or an ulcer. Ibuprofen-<span class="hlt">PC</span> was well tolerated with no major adverse events observed. Conclusions Ibuprofen-<span class="hlt">PC</span> is an effective osteoarthritic agent with an improved GI safety profile compared to ibuprofen in older OA patients, who are most susceptible to NSAID-induced gastroduodenal injury. PMID:18549459</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">LANZA, F. L.; MARATHI, U. K.; ANAND, B. S.; LICHTENBERGER, L. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">275</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/physics/research/src/online_version_SRC_brochure_2012.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Space</span> Research Centre <span class="hlt">Space</span> Research Centre</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Space</span> Research Centre <span class="hlt">Space</span> Research Centre www.src.le.ac.uk #12;2 University of Leicester � DeLivering over five DecaDes of <span class="hlt">space</span> science anD instrUmentation expertise... Welcome to the SRC The <span class="hlt">Space</span> Research Centre's (SRC) programme has two main foci: the <span class="hlt">Space</span> Science and Instrumentation (SSI) <span class="hlt">Group</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hinton, Jim</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">276</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992CG.....18..627A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interactive local earthquake location on a <span class="hlt">PC</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two small and fast programs for interactive location of local earthquakes are presented; one considers the medium as a homogeneous halfspace, the other works with velocity models representing laterally (and for some special situations, radially) homogeneous media. Both programs feature automatic (least-squares damped iterative residual minimization in the distance domain) location; however, their main feature is the graphic interactive <span class="hlt">PC</span> version of the old map and compass location method, which lets the user apply his/her expertise and easily incorporate supplementary data or information to the location process, and gives a clear picture of the goodness of the locations and their possible errors. Because both station and arrival times (phase) files can be created or modified directly from the programs, data checking and error correction can be carried out interactively.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alejandro Nava, F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">277</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMSM43A2269J"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pearl structures of <span class="hlt">Pc</span>1 geomagnetic pulsations observed at multipoint ground stations at Russia, Japan and Canada</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Pc</span>1 geomagnetic pulsations propagate from high to low latitudes through the ionospheric wave duct. A few papers had shown longitudinal propagation of <span class="hlt">Pc</span>1 pulsations [e.g., Kawamura et al. 1981; Sakaguchi et al.2012]. Despite these previous researches, diurnal variations of longitudinally-distributed <span class="hlt">Pc</span>1 pulsations and the pearl structures at different stations have not been investigated yet. In order to understand generation and propagation processes of <span class="hlt">Pc</span>1 pulsations in the magnetosphere and the ionosphere, it is necessary to investigate spatial distribution of <span class="hlt">Pc</span>1 pulsations using magnetometers at longitudinally and latitudinally separated ground stations. We have investigated spatial distributions of the <span class="hlt">Pc</span>1 pulsations observed by induction magnetometers at three ground stations at Moshiri (MOS) in Japan, Magadan (MGD) in far-eastern Russia and Athabasca (ATH) in central Canada from January 2009 to December 2011. Simultaneous <span class="hlt">Pc</span>1 events observed at MGD and ATH occurred in the morning and afternoon sectors. This result is consistent with the global distribution of EMIC waves observed in <span class="hlt">space</span> [Min et al. 2012]. The simultaneous <span class="hlt">Pc</span>1 events with high coherence (> 0.5) observed at ATH and MGD concentrates in the afternoon to pre-midnight sector. The <span class="hlt">Pc</span>1 frequencies of the simultaneous <span class="hlt">Pc</span>1 events at ATH and MGD in the afternoon to pre-midnight sector were higher than those in the post-midnight to morning sector. Most of the simultaneous <span class="hlt">Pc</span>1 events with high coherence observed at ATH and MGD have different pearl structures. This result indicates that the pearl structures should be not caused in the magnetosphere, and rather made during the propagation in the ionospheric duct. Simultaneous <span class="hlt">Pc</span>1 events observed at MGD and MOS at subauroral and middle latitudes, respectively, were most frequently observed at night suggesting that propagation in the ionospheric duct suffers less attenuation at night. In the presentation we discuss these results in combination with the EMIC wave distribution in the magnetosphere and their propagation to the ionosphere and in the ionospheric duct.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jun, C.; Shiokawa, K.; Connors, M. G.; Schofield, I.; Poddelsky, I.; Shevtsov, B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">278</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/622132"> <span id="translatedtitle">Embedded Linux Outlook in the Post<span class="hlt">PC</span> Industry</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents an analysis of the future of Embedded Linux in the Post<span class="hlt">PC</span> industry. This analysis is carried out by first examining the current forces at work in the Post<span class="hlt">PC</span> market and how they effect Linux. Next, we look at the future trends in the Post<span class="hlt">PC</span> market for the many types of devices we see in the market now</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Seongsoo Hong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">279</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17363079"> <span id="translatedtitle">Polycomb <span class="hlt">group</span> and trithorax <span class="hlt">group</span> proteins in Arabidopsis.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Polycomb <span class="hlt">group</span> (<span class="hlt">Pc</span>G) and trithorax <span class="hlt">group</span> (trxG) proteins form molecular modules of a cellular memory mechanism that maintains gene expression states established by other regulators. In general, <span class="hlt">Pc</span>G proteins are responsible for maintaining a repressed expression state, whereas trxG proteins act in opposition to maintain an active expression state. This mechanism, first discovered in Drosophila and subsequently in mammals, has more recently been studied in plants. The characterization of several Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) components in Arabidopsis thaliana constituted a first breakthrough, revealing key roles of <span class="hlt">Pc</span>G proteins in the control of crucial plant developmental processes. Interestingly, the recent identification of plant homologues of the Drosophila trithorax protein suggests a conservation of both the <span class="hlt">Pc</span>G and trxG gene regulatory system in plants. Here, we review the current evidence for the role of <span class="hlt">Pc</span>G and trxG proteins in the control of plant development, their biochemical functions, their interplay in maintaining stable expression states of their target genes, and point out future directions which may help our understanding of <span class="hlt">Pc</span>G and trxG function in plants. PMID:17363079</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pien, Stphane; Grossniklaus, Ueli</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">280</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3683082"> <span id="translatedtitle">Inferring functional connectivity in MRI using Bayesian network structure learning with a modified <span class="hlt">PC</span> algorithm</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Resting state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI) is a popular technique used to gauge the functional relatedness between regions in the brain for typical and special populations. Most of the work to date determines this relationship by using Pearson's correlation on BOLD fMRI timeseries. However, it has been recognized that there are at least two key limitations to this method. First, it is not possible to resolve the direct and indirect connections/influences. Second, the direction of information flow between the regions cannot be differentiated. In the current paper, we follow-up on recent work by Smith et al (2011), and apply a Bayesian approach called the <span class="hlt">PC</span> algorithm to both simulated data and empirical data to determine whether these two factors can be discerned with <span class="hlt">group</span> average, as opposed to single subject, functional connectivity data. When applied on simulated individual subjects, the algorithm performs well determining indirect and direct connection but fails in determining directionality. However, when applied at <span class="hlt">group</span> level, <span class="hlt">PC</span> algorithm gives strong results for both indirect and direct connections and the direction of information flow. Applying the algorithm on empirical data, using a diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) structural connectivity matrix as the baseline, the <span class="hlt">PC</span> algorithm outperformed the direct correlations. We conclude that, under certain conditions, the <span class="hlt">PC</span> algorithm leads to an improved estimate of brain network structure compared to the traditional connectivity analysis based on correlations. PMID:23501054</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Iyer, Swathi; Shafran, Izhak; Grayson, David; Gates, Kathleen; Nigg, Joel; Fair, Damien</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">281</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oregonstate.edu/~bogleyw/research/og.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">OMEGA-<span class="hlt">GROUPS</span> <span class="hlt">Group</span> Theory For Wild Topology</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">OMEGA-<span class="hlt">GROUPS</span> <span class="hlt">Group</span> Theory For Wild Topology Allan J. Sieradski The algebraic topology of locally. But for wild <span class="hlt">spaces</span>, by which we mean metric <span class="hlt">spaces</span> with arbitrarily small essential fea- tures, new <span class="hlt">group</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">282</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3297197"> <span id="translatedtitle">ncRNA- and <span class="hlt">Pc</span>2 Methylation-Dependent Gene Relocation between Nuclear Structures Mediates Gene Activation Programs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Summary Although eukaryotic nuclei contain distinct architectural structures associated with noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), their potential relationship to regulated transcriptional programs remains poorly understood. Here, we report that methylation/demethylation of Polycomb 2 protein (<span class="hlt">Pc</span>2) controls relocation of growth control genes between Polycomb bodies (<span class="hlt">Pc</span>Gs) and interchromatin granules (ICGs) in response to growth signals. This movement is the consequence of binding of methylated and unmethylated <span class="hlt">Pc</span>2 to the ncRNAs, TUG1 and MALAT1/NEAT2, located in <span class="hlt">Pc</span>Gs and ICGs, respectively. These ncRNAs mediate assembly of multiple co-repressors/co-activators, and can alter the histone marks read by <span class="hlt">Pc</span>2 in vitro. Additionally, binding of NEAT2 to unmethylated <span class="hlt">Pc</span>2 promotes E2F1 SUMOylation, leading to activation of the growth control gene program. These observations delineate a molecular pathway linking the actions of subnuclear structure-specific ncRNAs and non-histone protein methylation to relocation of transcription units in the three-dimensional <span class="hlt">space</span> of the nucleus, thus achieving coordinated gene expression programs. PMID:22078878</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yang, Liuqing; Lin, Chunru; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Jie; Ohgi, Kenneth A.; Grinstein, Jonathan D.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Rosenfeld, Michael G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">283</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53299935"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pile-of-<span class="hlt">PC</span> (Po<span class="hlt">PC</span>) signature predictions in support of HWIL simulation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Signature predictions for full-scale vehicles at Ka-band frequencies can require weeks or months of CPU time for completion; consequently, high performance computers are required in order for prediction codes to be useful in simulation support. Recent advances in Commodity-off-the-Shelf (COTS) personal computer (<span class="hlt">PC</span>) hardware along with open-source operating systems such as Linux allow for a cost-effective solution to computational requirements</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. S. McFarlin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">284</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23807700"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electronic properties of Cu<span class="hlt">Pc</span> and H2<span class="hlt">Pc</span>: an experimental and theoretical study.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Phthalocyanine (H2<span class="hlt">Pc</span>) and its open-shell copper complex (Cu<span class="hlt">Pc</span>) deposited on amorphous gold films have been studied by combining the outcomes of several synchrotron based spectroscopic tools (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV photoelectron spectroscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure, NEXAFS, spectroscopy) with those of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The assignment of experimental evidence has been guided by the results of DFT numerical experiments carried out on isolated molecules. With specific reference to Cu<span class="hlt">Pc</span> NEXAFS data collected at the N K-edge, they have been assigned by using the open-shell time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) in the framework of the zeroth order regular approximation (ZORA) scalar relativistic approach. The agreement between theory and experiment has been found to be satisfactory, thus indicating that the open-shell TDDFT (F. Wang and T. Ziegler, Mol. Phys., 2004, 102, 2585) may be used with some confidence to look into the X-ray absorption spectroscopy results pertinent to transition metal complexes. As far as the metal-ligand interaction is concerned, the combined use of NEXAFS spectroscopy and DFT outcomes ultimately testified the significant ionic contribution characterizing the bonding between the metal centre and the nitrogen atoms of the phthalocyanine coordinative pocket. PMID:23807700</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nardi, Marco Vittorio; Detto, Francesca; Aversa, Lucrezia; Verucchi, Roberto; Salviati, Giancarlo; Iannotta, Salvatore; Casarin, Maurizio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">285</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://edutice.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/03/07/80/PDF/b62p231.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">LE BULLETIN DE L'EPI N 62 LES BASICS POUR <span class="hlt">PC</span> : QUE CHOISIR ? LES BASICS POUR <span class="hlt">PC</span> : QUE CHOISIR ?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">231 LE BULLETIN DE L'EPI N° 62 LES BASICS POUR <span class="hlt">PC</span> : QUE CHOISIR ? LES BASICS POUR <span class="hlt">PC</span> : QUE CHOISIR transformer un <span class="hlt">PC</span> en MAC pour naviguer dans l'hypertexte. Il s'agit, tout simplement, et en attendant que donc l'avoir sous la main pour exécuter un programme. #12;232 Jean-Louis MALANDAIN LE BULLETIN DE L</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paris-Sud XI, Université de</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">286</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22270538"> <span id="translatedtitle">YOUNG STARS NEAR EARTH: THE OCTANS-NEAR ASSOCIATION AND CASTOR MOVING <span class="hlt">GROUP</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">All cataloged stellar moving <span class="hlt">groups</span> and associations with ages ?100 Myr and within 100 <span class="hlt">pc</span> of Earth have Galactic <span class="hlt">space</span> motions (UVW) situated in a 'good box' with dimensions ?20 km s{sup 1} on a side. Torres et al. defined the Octans Association as a <span class="hlt">group</span> of 15 stars with age '20 Myr?' and located ?140 <span class="hlt">pc</span> from Earth, but with average V <span class="hlt">space</span> velocity 3.6 km s{sup 1} that is well outside of the good box. We present a list of 14 Hipparcos star systems within 100 <span class="hlt">pc</span> of Earth that we call {sup O}ctans-Near{sup ;} these systems have UVW similar to those of the much more distant Octans Association. The Octans-Near stars have apparent ages between about 30 and 100 Myr and their relationship to the Octans Association stars is unclear. Six additional star systems have UVW similar to those of Octans-Near stars and likely ages ?200 Myr. These six systems include the late-type binary star EQ Peg6.2 <span class="hlt">pc</span> from Earth with likely age ?100 Myr and thus likely to be the nearest known pre-main sequence star system. The UVW of stars in a previously proposed ?200 Myr old Castor moving <span class="hlt">group</span> are not too dissimilar from the UVW of Octans-Near stars. However, stars in the Castor <span class="hlt">group</span>if it exists at allare mostly substantially older than 200 Myr and thus generally can readily be distinguished from the much younger Octans-Near stars.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zuckerman, B.; Vican, Laura [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Song, Inseok [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2451 (United States); Schneider, Adam, E-mail: ben@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: lvican@ucla.edu, E-mail: song@uga.edu, E-mail: Adam.Schneider@Utoledo.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-11-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">287</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PThPh.128..301F"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Practical Method of Solving Cutoff Coulomb Problems in Momentum <span class="hlt">Space</span> --- Application to the Lippmann-Schwinger Resonating-<span class="hlt">Group</span> Method and the pd Elastic Scattering ---</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A practical method of solving cutoff Coulomb problems of two-cluster systems in momentum <span class="hlt">space</span> is given. When a sharply cut-off Coulomb force with a cutoff radius ? is introduced at the level of constituent particles, the two-cluster direct potential of the Coulomb force becomes in general a local screened Coulomb potential. The asymptotic Hamiltonian yields two types of asymptotic waves; one is an approximate Coulomb wave with ? in the middle-range region, and the other a free (no-Coulomb) wave in the longest-range region. The constant Wronskians of this Hamiltonian can be calculated in either region. We can evaluate the Coulomb-modified nuclear phase shifts for the screened Coulomb problem using the matching condition proposed by Vincent and Phatak for the sharply cut-off Coulomb problem. We apply this method first to an exactly solvable model of the ? ? scattering with the Ali-Bodmer potential and confirm that a complete solution is obtained with a finite ?. The stability of nuclear phase shifts with respect to the change in ? within some appropriate range is demonstrated in the ? ? resonating-<span class="hlt">group</span> method (RGM) calculation using the Minnesota three-range force. An application to the pd elastic scattering is also discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fujiwara, Y.; Fukukawa, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">288</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1394081"> <span id="translatedtitle">First-principles study for the adsorption of segments of BPA-<span class="hlt">PC</span> on alpha-Al2O3(0001)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have studied the adsorption of bisphenol-A-polycarbonate (BPA-<span class="hlt">PC</span>) on the alpha-Al2O3(0001) surface using density-functional theory (DFT) with van der Waals (vdW) corrections. The BPA-<span class="hlt">PC</span> polymer can be divided into its chemical fragments which are phenylene, carbonate and isopropylidene <span class="hlt">groups</span>. We have calculated the adsorption energy and geometry of the BPA-<span class="hlt">PC</span> segments that consist of two to three adjacent <span class="hlt">groups</span> of the polymer. Our DFT results show that the adsorption is dominated by the vdW interaction. It is also important to include the interaction of nearest-neighbor <span class="hlt">groups</span> in order to provide a realistic environment for the adsorption of the polymer onto the surface. Our results also show that the BPA-<span class="hlt">PC</span> molecule attaches to the alumina surface via the carbonate <span class="hlt">group</span> located in the middle of the molecule chain.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Blomqvist, Janne; 10.1103/PhysRevB.84.153410</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">289</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4207012"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pr<span class="hlt">PC</span> from stem cells to cancer</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The cellular prion protein Pr<span class="hlt">PC</span> was initially discovered as the normal counterpart of the pathological scrapie prion protein PrPSc, the main component of the infectious agent of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies. While clues as to the physiological function of this ubiquitous protein were greatly anticipated from the development of knockout animals, PrP-null mice turned out to be viable and to develop without major phenotypic abnormalities. Notwithstanding, the discovery that hematopoietic stem cells from PrP-null mice have impaired long-term repopulating potential has set the stage for investigating into the role of Pr<span class="hlt">PC</span> in stem cell biology. A wealth of data have now exemplified that Pr<span class="hlt">PC</span> is expressed in distinct types of stem cells and regulates their self-renewal as well as their differentiation potential. A role for Pr<span class="hlt">PC</span> in the fate restriction of embryonic stem cells has further been proposed. Paralleling these observations, an overexpression of Pr<span class="hlt">PC</span> has been documented in various types of tumors. In line with the contribution of Pr<span class="hlt">PC</span> to stemness and to the proliferation of cancer cells, Pr<span class="hlt">PC</span> was recently found to be enriched in subpopulations of tumor-initiating cells. In the present review, we summarize the current knowledge of the role played by Pr<span class="hlt">PC</span> in stem cell biology and discuss how the subversion of its function may contribute to cancer progression. PMID:25364760</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Martin-Lanneree, Severine; Hirsch, Theo Z.; Hernandez-Rapp, Julia; Halliez, Sophie; Vilotte, Jean-Luc; Launay, Jean-Marie; Mouillet-Richard, Sophie</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">290</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27423071"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modelling of carbonation of <span class="hlt">PC</span> and blended cement concrete</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Presented herein is a numerical model to predict the carbonation depth of Portland cement (<span class="hlt">PC</span>) and blended cement concrete under a wide range of environmental conditions. The improved model for hydration of <span class="hlt">PC</span> and activity of blended cement is proposed and used in this carbonation model. This carbonation model can be used for concrete made of silica fume, fly ash</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sabet Divsholi Bahador; Jong Herman Cahyadi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">291</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://animalscience.ucdavis.edu/faculty/robinson/Projects/pdf/pcdairy.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">PC</span> Dairy Windows Project P.H. Robinson1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">article The <span class="hlt">PC</span> Dairy Windows Project P.H. Robinson1 and A. Ahmadi2 1 Cooperative Extension Dairy is a software package designed to formulate rations for dairy cows on a least cost basis primarily using National Research Council equations. <span class="hlt">PC</span> Dairy was largely developed by Dr. Don Bath of UC Davis</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Delany, Mary E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">292</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.uct.ac.za/downloads/uct.ac.za/about/policies/supervisors_doc_candidates.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">PC</span> 02 2004 (Item 2) UNIVERSITY OF CAPE TOWN</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Approved: <span class="hlt">PC</span> 02 2004 (Item 2) UNIVERSITY OF CAPE TOWN DOCTORAL DEGREES BOARD GUIDELINES demarcated at the outset of the research programme and the candidate must be fully informed about or interest. #12;Approved: <span class="hlt">PC</span> 02 2004 (Item 2) 7. The supervisor must recognise that accepting a research</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jarrett, Thomas H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">293</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://physics.ucsd.edu/neurophysics/Manuals/Sutter%20Instruments/Sutter%20Instrument%20Company%20Model%20P-80%20PC%20Flaming-Brown%20Micropipette%20Puller.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">MODEL P-80/<span class="hlt">PC</span> FLAMING/BROWN MICROPIPETTE PULLER</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">MODEL P-80/<span class="hlt">PC</span> FLAMING/BROWN MICROPIPETTE PULLER a SUTTER INSTRUMENT COMPANY ·^. k 1 P.O. BOX 3592 SAN RAFAEL, CA 94912 (415) 459-7327 #12;INTRODUCTION The Model P-80/<span class="hlt">PC</span> Brown-Flaming Micropipette Puller combines a proven pulling technol- ogy with programmability to produce a very versatile instrument</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kleinfeld, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">294</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4393606"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Design and Performance of a Bare <span class="hlt">PC</span> Web Server</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">There is an increasing need for new Web server architectures that are application-centric, simple, small, and pervasive in nature. In this pap er, we present a novel architecture for a bare <span class="hlt">PC</span> Web server that meets most of these requirements. A bare <span class="hlt">PC</span> Web server runs on any Intel 386 (or above) based architecture with no operating system in the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Long He; Ramesh K. Karne; Alexander L. Wijesinha</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">295</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=cars&pg=3&id=EJ936355"> <span id="translatedtitle">Transforming <span class="hlt">PC</span> Power Supplies into Smart Car Battery Conditioners</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper describes a laboratory project consisting of a <span class="hlt">PC</span> power supply modification into an intelligent car-battery conditioner with both wireless and wired networking capabilities. Adding a microcontroller to an average <span class="hlt">PC</span> power supply transforms it into a flexible, intelligent device that can be configured and that is suitable to keep car</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rodriguez-Ascariz, J. M.; Boquete-Vazquez, L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">296</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1410179"> <span id="translatedtitle">Management of Data Replication for <span class="hlt">PC</span> Cluster-based Cloud Storage System</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Storage systems are essential building blocks for cloud computing infrastructures. Although high performance storage servers are the ultimate solution for cloud storage, the implementation of inexpensive storage system remains an open issue. To address this problem, the efficient cloud storage system is implemented with inexpensive and commodity computer nodes that are organized into <span class="hlt">PC</span> cluster based datacenter. Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS) is an open source cloud based storage platform and designed to be deployed in low-cost hardware. <span class="hlt">PC</span> Cluster based Cloud Storage System is implemented with HDFS by enhancing replication management scheme. Data objects are distributed and replicated in a cluster of commodity nodes located in the cloud. This system provides optimum replica number as well as weighting and balancing among the storage server nodes. The experimental results show that storage can be balanced depending on the available disk <span class="hlt">space</span>, expected availability and failure probability of each node ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Myint, Julia</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">297</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4010272"> <span id="translatedtitle">Huperzine A derivative M3 protects <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cells against sodium nitroprusside-induced apoptosis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aim: To investigate the effects of M3, a derivative of huperzine A, on the apoptosis induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cells. Methods: Cell viability was detected using MTT method. Apoptosis was examined with annexin V/prodium iodide (PI) stain. The levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured using fluorophotometric quantitation. The amount of malonaldehyde (MDA) was determined with MDA detection kits. The expression of caspase-3 and Hsp70 were analyzed using Western blotting. Results: Exposure of <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cells to SNP (200?mol/L) for 24 h decreased the cell viability to 69.0% of that in the control <span class="hlt">group</span>. Pretreatment with M3 (10?mol/L) or huperzine A (10?mol/L) significantly protected the cells against SNP-induced injury and apoptosis; the ratio of apoptotic bodies in <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cells was decreased from 27.3% to 15.0%. Pretreatment with M3 (10?mol/L) significantly decreased ROS and MDA levels, and increased the expression of Hsp70 in the cells. Quercetin (10?mol/L) blocked the protective effect of M3, while did not influence on that of huperzine A. Conclusion: M3 protects <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cells against SNP-induced apoptosis, possible due to ROS scavenging and Hsp70 induction. PMID:22120967</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ning, Na; Hu, Jin-feng; Yuan, Yu-he; Zhang, Xin-yuan; Dai, Jun-gui; Chen, Nai-hong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">298</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23247194"> <span id="translatedtitle">Biosafety of the plasmid <span class="hlt">pc</span>DNA3-1E of Eimeria acervulina in chicken.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">To evaluate the biosafety of the plasmid <span class="hlt">pc</span>DNA3-1E of Eimeria acervulina in chicken, two-week-old chickens were injected intramuscularly with the plasmid <span class="hlt">pc</span>DNA3-1E at dose of 50 ?g/chicken. At the 15 days post-injection, the tissue samples were collected, the total DNA was extracted, and the 3-1E gene was amplified by PCR. Genomic DNA was first purified away from free plasmid using gel electrophoresis, and then assayed for integrated plasmid using PCR amplification of the 3-1E gene. Simultaneously, the environmental dejection samples were collected, the total bacterial DNA was extracted and then transfer of the <span class="hlt">pc</span>DNA3-1E gene was detected by PCR amplification of the 3-1E gene. Two-week-old chickens were injected intramuscularly with the plasmid <span class="hlt">pc</span>DNA3-1E with three dosage <span class="hlt">groups</span> of 100 ?g, 500 ?g and 2500 ?g/chicken for 14 days respectively, and with physiological saline at dose of 2500 ?L/chicken as control <span class="hlt">group</span> for acute toxicity test. A target band of 583 bp was obtained by PCR with chicken genomic DNA as template. If the chicken genomic DNA was purified, no target band could be obtained. It showed that the recombinant plasmid <span class="hlt">pc</span>DNA3-1E existed in tissues, and no genomic integration of DNA plasmid was detected in the immunized chickens. No target band was found by PCR with environmental dejection bacteria genomic DNA as template. It showed that integration and transfer phenomenon did not exist in environment. The acute toxicity results showed the typical clinical symptoms did not occur in the inoculated chickens, the blood biochemical indices and viscera configuration were not affected significantly in the inoculated <span class="hlt">group</span> and control <span class="hlt">group</span> (P>0.05). The results showed that the plasmid <span class="hlt">pc</span>DNA3-1E was safe and suitable for chicken clinical trials. PMID:23247194</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhao, Yuelan; Bao, Yongzhan; Zhang, Lijuan; Chang, Liyun; Jiang, Lufeng; Liu, Yiwei; Zhang, Lei; Qin, Jianhua</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">299</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10176730"> <span id="translatedtitle">HOTSPOT Health Physics codes for the <span class="hlt">PC</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The HOTSPOT Health Physics codes were created to provide Health Physics personnel with a fast, field-portable calculation tool for evaluating accidents involving radioactive materials. HOTSPOT codes are a first-order approximation of the radiation effects associated with the atmospheric release of radioactive materials. HOTSPOT programs are reasonably accurate for a timely initial assessment. More importantly, HOTSPOT codes produce a consistent output for the same input assumptions and minimize the probability of errors associated with reading a graph incorrectly or scaling a universal nomogram during an emergency. The HOTSPOT codes are designed for short-term (less than 24 hours) release durations. Users requiring radiological release consequences for release scenarios over a longer time period, e.g., annual windrose data, are directed to such long-term models as CAPP88-<span class="hlt">PC</span> (Parks, 1992). Users requiring more sophisticated modeling capabilities, e.g., complex terrain; multi-location real-time wind field data; etc., are directed to such capabilities as the Department of Energy`s ARAC computer codes (Sullivan, 1993). Four general programs -- Plume, Explosion, Fire, and Resuspension -- calculate a downwind assessment following the release of radioactive material resulting from a continuous or puff release, explosive release, fuel fire, or an area contamination event. Other programs deal with the release of plutonium, uranium, and tritium to expedite an initial assessment of accidents involving nuclear weapons. Additional programs estimate the dose commitment from the inhalation of any one of the radionuclides listed in the database of radionuclides; calibrate a radiation survey instrument for ground-survey measurements; and screen plutonium uptake in the lung (see FIDLER Calibration and LUNG Screening sections).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Homann, S.G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">300</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.kyoto-u.ac.jp/cn/c_issue/documents/hand/p32.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">www.kansai-airport.or.jp/index.asp www.kate.co.jp/<span class="hlt">pc</span>/index.html</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">10 31 20044 URL www.kansai-airport.or.jp/index.asp URL www.kate.co.jp/<span class="hlt">pc</span>/index.html MK URL www.mk-<span class="hlt">group</span>.co.jp/ URL www.yasaka.jp/taxi/shuttle/service.html JASSO JASSO JASSO URL-20-8762 9:00 ­ 15:00 9:00 ­ 16:00 #12;10 32 10 () 20044 URL www</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Takada, Shoji</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' 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onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">301</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=350566"> <span id="translatedtitle">General Transcriptional Coactivator <span class="hlt">PC</span>4 Activates p53 Function</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The function of p53 is modulated by several transcriptional coactivators that regulate its tumor suppressor activity. Here we report that human transcriptional coactivator <span class="hlt">PC</span>4 enhances the DNA binding of p53 to its cognate site in vitro and directly interacts with p53 in vivo. In vitro interaction studies demonstrated that the C-terminal 30 amino acids (364 to 393) of p53 strongly interact with <span class="hlt">PC</span>4. Surprisingly, <span class="hlt">PC</span>4 also stimulates the sequence-specific DNA binding of p53 with the C-terminal 30 amino acids deleted (p53?30), suggesting that <span class="hlt">PC</span>4 mediates enhancement of p53 DNA binding by a unique mechanism. We also demonstrated that <span class="hlt">PC</span>4 can stimulate p53- and p53?30-mediated transactivation from a p53-responsive promoter. Furthermore, <span class="hlt">PC</span>4 enhances p53- and p53?30-dependent apoptosis by inducing bax (a p53-targeted proapoptotic gene) gene expression. These results establish the first physiological role of <span class="hlt">PC</span>4 as a transcriptional coactivator. PMID:14966284</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Banerjee, Sourav; Kumar, B. R. Prashanth; Kundu, Tapas K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">302</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2128784"> <span id="translatedtitle">Photodynamic Therapy with the Phthalocyanine Photosensitizer <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 4</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is emerging as a promising non-invasive treatment for cancers. PDT involves either local or systemic administration of a photosensitizing drug, which preferentially localizes within the tumor, followed by illumination of the involved organ with light, usually from a laser source. Here, we provide a selective overview of our experience with PDT at Case Western Reserve University, specifically with the silicon phthalocyanine photosensitizer <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 4. We first review our in-vitro studies evaluating the mechanism of cell killing by <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 4-PDT. Then we briefly describe our clinical experience in a Phase I trial of <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 4-PDT and our preliminary translational studies evaluating the mechanisms behind tumor responses. Preclinical work identified (a) cardiolipin and the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL as targets of <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 4-PDT, (b) the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, with the key participation of caspase-3, as a central response of many human cancer cells to <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 4-PDT, (c) signaling pathways that could modify apoptosis, and (d) a formulation by which <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 4 could be applied topically to human skin and penetrate at least through the basal layer of the epidermis. Clinical-translational studies enabled us to develop an immunohistochemical assay for caspase-3 activation, using biopsies from patients treated with topical <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 4 in a Phase I PDT trial for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Results suggest that this assay may be used as an early biomarker of clinical response. PMID:17397888</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Miller, Janine D.; Baron, Elma D.; Scull, Heather; Hsia, Andrew; Berlin, Jeffrey C.; McCormick, Thomas; Colussi, Valdir; Kenney, Malcolm E.; Cooper, Kevin D.; Oleinick, Nancy L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">303</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=49566"> <span id="translatedtitle">Conservation of the prohormone convertase gene family in metazoa: analysis of cDNAs encoding a <span class="hlt">PC</span>3-like protein from hydra.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A subclass of proteolytic enzymes that correctly cleave precursor proteins at paired basic residues and are structurally related to the bacterial subtilisins has recently been identified. In yeast, a single membrane-bound proteolytic processing enzyme encoded by the kex2 gene has been found, whereas in higher vertebrates cDNAs encoding four distinct enzymes (<span class="hlt">PC</span>2, <span class="hlt">PC</span>3, furin, and PACE 4) have been identified. Like kex2, furin (also known as PACE) contains a hydrophobic transmembrane domain, but <span class="hlt">PC</span>2, <span class="hlt">PC</span>3, and PACE 4 lack this feature. All five enzymes exhibit striking similarities in their catalytic domains, and this suggests that they have arisen from a common ancestral subtilisin-like gene. We report here the identification of cDNAs encoding a protein that is similar in structure to <span class="hlt">PC</span>3 from a simple metazoan, Hydra vulgaris (formerly Hydra attenuata). cDNAs encoding two isoforms of this <span class="hlt">PC</span>3-like enzyme were obtained that differ only in their carboxyl-terminal sequences, probably due to alternative splicing of a common pre-mRNA. Neither form contains a transmembrane domain. Predicted amino acid sequence comparisons revealed that the hydra <span class="hlt">PC</span>3-like enzyme is 55.4% and 56.7% identical in the catalytic domain to mouse <span class="hlt">PC</span>3 and human furin, respectively. RNA blot analyses revealed that the <span class="hlt">PC</span>3-like RNA is expressed predominantly in the hydra body column and not in the head region, although the hydra head contains a high density of nerve cells, which synthesize a variety of neuropeptides. For this reason, we suspect that another proprotein cleavage enzyme isoform may be expressed in head nerve cells. The isolation of a <span class="hlt">PC</span>3-like cDNA from hydra is consistent with the presence of neuroendocrine cells and indicates that the <span class="hlt">PC</span>/furin gene family has been well conserved in all metazoa. A simplified nomenclature for the <span class="hlt">group</span> of mammalian processing proteases is proposed. Images PMID:1495957</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chan, S J; Oliva, A A; LaMendola, J; Grens, A; Bode, H; Steiner, D F</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">304</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6791153"> <span id="translatedtitle">ISTUM <span class="hlt">PC</span>: industrial sector technology use model for the IBM-<span class="hlt">PC</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A project to improve and enhance the Industrial Sector Technology Use Model (ISTUM) was originated in the summer of 1983. The project had dix identifiable objectives: update the data base; improve run-time efficiency; revise the reference base case; conduct case studies; provide technical and promotional seminars; and organize a service bureau. This interim report describes which of these objectives have been met and which tasks remain to be completed. The most dramatic achievement has been in the area of run-time efficiency. From a model that required a large proportion of the total resources of a mainframe computer and a great deal of effort to operate, the current version of the model (ISTUM-<span class="hlt">PC</span>) runs on an IBM Personal Computer. The reorganization required for the model to run on a <span class="hlt">PC</span> has additional advantages: the modular programs are somewhat easier to understand and the data base is more accessible and easier to use. A simple description of the logic of the model is given in this report. To generate the necessary funds for completion of the model, a multiclient project is proposed. This project will extend the industry coverage to all the industrial sectors, including the construction of process flow models for chemicals and petroleum refining. The project will also calibrate this model to historical data and construct a base case and alternative scenarios. The model will be delivered to clients and training provided. 2 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Roop, J.M.; Kaplan, D.T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">305</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title36-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title36-vol3-sec1280-74.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">36 CFR 1280.74 - What <span class="hlt">spaces</span> in the National Archives Building are available for use by non-NARA <span class="hlt">groups</span> and...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href=""></a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What <span class="hlt">spaces</span> in the National Archives Building are available for use by...National Archives Building, Washington, Dc 1280.74 What <span class="hlt">spaces</span> in the National Archives Building are available for use...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">306</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title36-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title36-vol3-sec1280-85.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">36 CFR 1280.85 - What <span class="hlt">space</span> in the National Archives at College Park is available for use by non-NARA <span class="hlt">groups</span> and...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href=""></a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What <span class="hlt">space</span> in the National Archives at College Park is available for use... National Archives at College Park, Md 1280.85 What <span class="hlt">space</span> in the National Archives at College Park is available for...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">307</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21997066"> <span id="translatedtitle">Directional free-<span class="hlt">space</span> coupling from photonic crystal waveguides.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a general approach for coupling a specific mode in a planar photonic crystal (<span class="hlt">PC</span>) waveguide to a desired free-<span class="hlt">space</span> mode. We apply this approach to a W1 <span class="hlt">PC</span> waveguide by introducing small index perturbations to selectively couple a particular transverse mode to an approximately Gaussian, slowly diverging free <span class="hlt">space</span> mode. This "perturbative photonic crystal waveguide coupler" (PPCWC) enables efficient interconversion between selectable propagating photonic crystal and free <span class="hlt">space</span> modes with minimal design perturbations. PMID:21997066</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tsai, Cheng-Chia; Mower, Jacob; Englund, Dirk</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">308</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25159695"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of extremely low frequency magnetic fields on NGF induced neuronal differentiation of <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cells.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MFs) affect various cellular processes and systems, such as cell proliferation, differentiation and metabolic pathways. The present study investigated ELF-MFs effect on nerve growth factor (NGF) induced neuronal differentiation of <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cells using proteomic applications to understand its role in the enhancement of neuronal differentiation. After 50?Hz, 1?mT ELF-MFs 5-day exposure on NGF induced <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cells, it was observed to increase neurite length as well as an increase in the number of neurite bearing cells. It was also discovered that there was a decrease in proliferation activity, which is associated with an increase in differentiated cells. Neuronal differentiation related mRNA levels and protein levels were increased in NGF induced <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cells. Compared with NGF induced <span class="hlt">group</span>, ELF-MFs stimulated <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cells had different protein expression as measured with two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) gels. Consequently six differentially expressed spots were detected between the 2-DE maps, which were identified by electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-Q-TOF LC/MS/MS) as: peripherin, neurosecretory protein nerve growth factor inducible (VGF8a) precursor, dnaK-type molecular chaperone sp72-ps1 (HSP72-psI), low molecular weight (Mr) phosphotyrosine protein phosphatase isoenzyme AcP1 (LMW-PTP/ACP1), Tubulin alpha-1A (TUBA1A) chain, outcome predictor in acute leukemia 1 homolog (OPA1L). The identification of these proteins provides clues to the mechanism of ELF-MFs stimulation on NGF induced <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cells that occur during neuronal differentiation and may contribute to the development novel treatments for neurodegenerative diseases. Bioelectromagnetics 35:459-469, 2014. 2014 The Authors. Bioelectromagnetics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25159695</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jung, In-Soo; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Noh, Ran; Kim, Soo-Chan; Kim, Chan-Wha</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">309</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006SPIE.6347E..2YG"> <span id="translatedtitle">Implementation of WWW server in So<span class="hlt">PC</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper implementation of WWW server in So<span class="hlt">PC</span> (System-on-Programmable-Chip) is described. Reasons for implementing a WWW server in So<span class="hlt">PC</span> are explained. Moreover, the basis architecture of So<span class="hlt">PC</span> will be mentioned. The proposed system is divided into two parts. First part is software implemented for microprocessor, which consists of operating system, web server and additional functionalities. Second part is a control process that is implemented in FPGA structure. The software solution is based on the Nut/OS operating system and web server implemented in it. The dynamic reconfiguration is also discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Grobelny, Micha?; W?grzyn, Marek</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">310</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20080004540&hterms=pc+28&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dpc%2B28"> <span id="translatedtitle">Method of mounting a <span class="hlt">PC</span> board to a hybrid</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A system for mounting a hybrid electronic component to a <span class="hlt">PC</span> board is disclosed. The system includes a set of brackets for mutually engaging a first surface of the <span class="hlt">PC</span> board and a cover surface of the hybrid electronic component, wherein the cover surface has an arcuate shape when in a vacuum environment. The brackets are designed with legs having lengths and thicknesses for providing clearance between the cover surface of the hybrid and the first surface of the <span class="hlt">PC</span> board for use when the hybrid electronic component is in a vacuum environment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">O'Coin, James R. (Inventor)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">311</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.7854D"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the long-term evolution of the <span class="hlt">PC</span> index</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A number of geomagnetic indices have been designed to describe the evolution of various current systems developing in the magnetosphere and ionosphere as a consequence of the interaction of the solar wind and heliospheric magnetic field. The Polar Cap (<span class="hlt">PC</span>) index, a proxy for the electric field and convection in the polar ionosphere, has been only recently introduced (1980). We attempt here to reconstruct the <span class="hlt">PC</span> index back to 1870, based on a correlation comparison of several geomagnetic indices (aa, AE, Dst, <span class="hlt">PC</span>) that show common long-term behaviour, characterised by solar activity signature at Hale and Gleissberg cycles time scales.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Demetrescu, C.; Dobrica, V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">312</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://repository.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1956-THESIS-B688"> <span id="translatedtitle">Abelian <span class="hlt">groups</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">of G . Therefore x is the sum of elements in the G 's, pi p To finish our proof we wish to show this expression is unique. Suppose x ~ yl + y 2 + ~ ~ ~ + yg and m zl + s2 + ~ ~ ~ + s~o Then yl + y 2 + ~ ~ ~ + yy sl + $2 + ~ ~ ~ + zygo so that s... <span class="hlt">groups</span>. In order to d. o this, we will need the aid. of some vector <span class="hlt">space</span> theorys D~ef ~tp 4s10 A vector ~sac 7 over the field. P is an abelian <span class="hlt">group</span> which admits mult1plicatlon by elements of t' he field. such that, for a, b e P and. x, y s V& (l) a...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bolen, James Cordell</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">313</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23715786"> <span id="translatedtitle">Active extracts of black tea (Camellia Sinensis) induce apoptosis of <span class="hlt">PC</span>-3 prostate cancer cells via mitochondrial dysfunction.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cancer of the prostate gland is the most common invasive malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in human males. Many studies have shown that black tea reduces the risk of several types of cancer. We studied the effects of active extracts of black tea and the black tea polyphenols theaflavins (TFs), on the cellular proliferation and mitochondria of the human prostate cancer cell line <span class="hlt">PC</span>-3. Our studies revealed that Yinghong black tea extracts (YBT), Assam black tea extracts (ABT) and TFs inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. We also showed that TFs, YBT and ABT affected the morphology of <span class="hlt">PC</span>-3 cells and induced apoptosis or even necrosis in <span class="hlt">PC</span>-3 cells. In addition, it was observed that the samples significantly caused loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochromec from the intermembrane <span class="hlt">space</span> into the cytosol, decrease of the ATP content and activation of caspase-3 compared with the control. Taken together, these findings suggest that black tea could act as an effective anti-proliferative agent in <span class="hlt">PC</span>-3 cells, and TFs, YBT and ABT induced apoptosis of <span class="hlt">PC</span>-3 cells through mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:23715786</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sun, Shili; Pan, Shunshun; Miao, Aiqing; Ling, Caijin; Pang, Shi; Tang, Jinchi; Chen, Dong; Zhao, Chaoyi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">314</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1310616"> <span id="translatedtitle">Abnormal expression and processing of the proprotein convertases <span class="hlt">PC</span>1 and <span class="hlt">PC</span>2 in human colorectal liver metastases</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background The family of proprotein convertases has been recently implicated in tumorigenesis and metastasis in animal models. However, these studies have not yet been completely corroborated in human tumors. Methods Using RT PCR, immunoblot and immunohistochemistry we assessed the presence and the processing patterns of the convertases <span class="hlt">PC</span>1 and <span class="hlt">PC</span>2 as well as the <span class="hlt">PC</span>2 specific chaperone 7B2 in human liver metastases originating from colorectal cancer and compared them to unaffected and normal liver. Furthermore, we assessed the presence and processing profiles of <span class="hlt">PC</span>1, <span class="hlt">PC</span>2 and 7B2 in primary colon cancers. Results mRNA, protein expression, and protein cleavage profiles of proprotein convertases 1 and 2 are altered in liver colorectal metastasis, compared to unaffected and normal liver. Active <span class="hlt">PC</span>1 protein is overexpressed in tumor, correlating with its mRNA profile. Moreover, the enhanced <span class="hlt">PC</span>2 processing pattern in tumor correlates with the overexpression of its specific binding protein 7B2. These results were corroborated by immunohistochemistry. The specific and uniform convertase pattern observed in the metastases was present only in a fraction of primary colon cancers. Conclusion The uniformly altered proprotein convertase profile in liver metastases is observed only in a fraction of primary colon cancers, suggesting possible selection processes involving PCs during metastasis as well as an active role of PCs in liver metastasis. In addition, the exclusive presence of 7B2 in metastatic tumors may represent a new target for early diagnosis, prognosis and/or treatment. PMID:16293189</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tzimas, George N; Chevet, Eric; Jenna, Sarah; Nguyen, Duc Thang; Khatib, Abdel M; Marcus, Victoria; Zhang, Yi; Chretien, Michel; Seidah, Nabil; Metrakos, Peter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">315</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/223716"> <span id="translatedtitle">Synthesis, structure, and characterization of uranium(IV) phenyl phosphonate, U(O{sub 3}<span class="hlt">PC</span>{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}, and uranium(IV) pyro phosphate, UP{sub 2}O{sub 7}</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two tetravalent uranium compounds have been characterized. The structure of a new uranium(IV) phosphonate, U(O{sub 3}<span class="hlt">PC</span>{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}, has been solved from laboratory X-ray powder diffraction data by using ab initio methodology, U(O{sub 3}<span class="hlt">PC</span>{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2} crystallizes in the <span class="hlt">space</span> <span class="hlt">group</span> Cw/m with a = 9.4559(7) {Angstrom}, b = 5.6769(5) {Angstrom}, c = 14.9687(12) {Angstrom}, {Beta} = 96.539(5) {Angstrom}, V = 798.3(1) {Angstrom}{sup 3}, Z=2. The reliability factors were R{sub WP} = 8.0%, R{sub p} = 6.04%, and R{sub F} = 3.0%. The structure is lamellar, and the framework of the U(O{sub 3}P){sub 2} layers is similar to that of the {alpha}-Zr(HOP{sub 4}){sub 2} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O and the phosphonate <span class="hlt">group</span> in Zr(O{sub 3}<span class="hlt">PC</span>{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}. The phenyl <span class="hlt">groups</span> are located in the interlamellar <span class="hlt">space</span>, being inclined 10{degrees} to the c-axis. The phenyl rings are tilted out 53{degrees} from the ac plane, and they are disordered. The authors have also characterized this compound by UV-VIS-IR spectroscopies and thermal analysis. The thermal decomposition product is uranium(IV) pyro phosphate. This compound was identified through its X-ray powder diffraction pattern. UP{sub 2}O{sub 7} crystallizes in the Pa3 <span class="hlt">space</span> <span class="hlt">group</span> (a = 8.6311(2) {Angstrom}, V = 642.99(4) {Angstrom}{sup 3},Z=4). The structure belongs to the cubic ZrP{sub 2}O{sub 7-}type structure. The reliability factors were R{sub WP} = 11.7%, R{sub p} = 8.6%, and R{sub F} = 10.4%. Disorder has been found in the oxygen that bridges the pyrophosphate <span class="hlt">groups</span>, leading to an angular P-O-P arrangement. The VIS-near-IR adsorption spectra revealed the uranium(IV) presence and the oxygen environment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cabeza, A.; Aranda, M.A.G.; Cantero, F.M. [Universidade de Malaga (Spain)] [and others] [Universidade de Malaga (Spain); and others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-05</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">316</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JGRA..11412206L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electric and magnetic field observations of <span class="hlt">Pc</span>4 and <span class="hlt">Pc</span>5 pulsations in the inner magnetosphere: A statistical study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ultralow frequency (ULF) waves in the <span class="hlt">Pc</span>4 and <span class="hlt">Pc</span>5 bands are ubiquitous in the inner magnetosphere and have significant influence on energetic particle transport. Investigating the source and characteristics of ULF waves also helps us better understand the interaction processes between the solar wind and the magnetosphere. However, owing to the limitation in instrumentation and spatial coverage, the distribution of ULF waves in local time and L shell in the inner magnetosphere has not been completely studied. The recent Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions During Substorms (THEMIS) mission provides unique opportunities to investigate the spatial distribution of ULF pulsations across different L shells with full local time coverage in the inner magnetosphere during solar minimum, with both electric and magnetic field measurements. <span class="hlt">Pc</span>4 and <span class="hlt">Pc</span>5 pulsations in the electric field observations are identified throughout 13 months of measurements, covering 24 h in local time. The pulsations are characterized as either toroidal or poloidal (including compressional) mode, depending on the polarization of the electric field. Subsequently, the pulsations' occurrence rate and wave power distributions in radial distance and local time are recorded. While the distributions of both <span class="hlt">Pc</span>4 and <span class="hlt">Pc</span>5 events vary greatly with radial distance and local time, <span class="hlt">Pc</span>4 events are more frequently observed in the inner region around 5-6 RE and <span class="hlt">Pc</span>5 events are more frequently observed in the outer region around 7-9 RE, which suggests that the field line resonance is an important source of the ULF waves. In the flank regions, the wave power is dominated by the toroidal mode, likely associated with the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability. In the noon sector, the <span class="hlt">Pc</span>5 ULF wave power is dominated by the poloidal mode, likely associated with the solar wind dynamic pressure disturbance. The KH instability plays an important role, suggested by our observations, during the solar minimum when the solar wind dynamic pressure is relatively weak. We also find that the contributions to the <span class="hlt">Pc</span>5 ULF wave power from the external sources are larger than the contributions from the internal sources. These statistical results are important in characterizing <span class="hlt">Pc</span>4 and <span class="hlt">Pc</span>5 waves and also important for any efforts to model the transport of energetic particles in the magnetosphere.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liu, W.; Sarris, T. E.; Li, X.; Elkington, S. R.; Ergun, R.; Angelopoulos, V.; Bonnell, J.; Glassmeier, K. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">317</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060029795&hterms=microprocessor&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dmicroprocessor"> <span id="translatedtitle">Single-event upset in advanced Power<span class="hlt">PC</span> microprocessors</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Proton and heavy-ion single-event upset susceptibility has been measured for the MotorolaPower<span class="hlt">PC</span>7400. The results show that this advanced device has low upset susceptibility, despite the scaling and design advances.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Irom, F.; Swift, G. M.; Farmanesh, F.; Millward, D. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">318</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5915919"> <span id="translatedtitle">Global wiring strategy for IC and <span class="hlt">PC</span> routing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A global (topological) router is presented which can be used for both custom IC routing and <span class="hlt">PC</span> (gate array) routing. It is based on a graph theoretical model and effectively models both wire length and area figures of merit.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wisniewski, J.A.; Hudson, J.A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">319</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title41-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title41-vol3-sec128-1-5002-8.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">41 CFR 128-1.5002-8 - Property custodian (<span class="hlt">PC</span>).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...50-Authorities and Responsibilities for Personal Property Management 128-1.5002-8 Property custodian (<span class="hlt">PC</span>). An individual responsible for the immediate physical custody of all personal property under his control and for...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">320</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title41-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title41-vol3-sec128-1-5002-8.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">41 CFR 128-1.5002-8 - Property custodian (<span class="hlt">PC</span>).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...50-Authorities and Responsibilities for Personal Property Management 128-1.5002-8 Property custodian (<span class="hlt">PC</span>). An individual responsible for the immediate physical custody of all personal property under his control and for...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' 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showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">321</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=49910"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">PC</span> BEEPOP - AN ECTOXICOLOGICAL SIMULATION MODEL FOR HONEY BEE POPULATIONS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">PC</span> BEEPOP is a computer model that simulates honey bee colony population dynamics. he model consists of a feedback system of interdependent elements, including colony condition, environmental variability, and contaminant exposures. t includes a mortality module (BEEKILL) and a ch...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">322</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=45892"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">PC</span> BEEPOP - A PERSONAL COMPUTER HONEY BEE POPULATION DYNAMICS MODEL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">PC</span> BEEPOP is a computer model that simulates honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) colony population dynamics. he model consists of a system of interdependent elements, including colony condition, environmental variability, colony energetics, and contaminant exposure. t includes a mortal...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">323</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25135729"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of electro-acupuncture stimulation of Ximen (<span class="hlt">PC</span>4) and Neiguan (<span class="hlt">PC</span>6) on remifentanil-induced breakthrough pain following thoracal esophagectomy.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The clinical analgesic effect of electro-acupuncture (EA) stimulation (EAS) on breakthrough pain induced by remifentanil in patients undergoing radical thoracic esophagectomy, and the mechanisms were assessed. Sixty patients (ASAIII) scheduled for elective radical esophagectomy were randomized into three <span class="hlt">groups</span>: <span class="hlt">group</span> A (control) receiving a general anesthesia only; <span class="hlt">group</span> B (sham) given EA needles at <span class="hlt">PC</span>4 (Ximen) and <span class="hlt">PC</span>6 (Neiguan) but no stimulation; and <span class="hlt">group</span> C (EAS) electrically given EAS of the ipsilateral <span class="hlt">PC</span>4 and <span class="hlt">PC</span>6 throughout the surgery. The EAS consisting of a disperse-dense wave with a low frequency of 2 Hz and a high frequency of 20 Hz, was performed 30 min prior to induction of general anesthesia and continued through the surgery. At the emergence, sufentanil infusion was given for postoperative analgesia with loading dose of 7.5 ?g, followed by a continuous infusion of 2.25 ?g/h. The patient self-administration of sufentanil was 0.75 ?g with a lockout of 15 min as needed. Additional breakthrough pain was treated with dezocine (5 mg) intravenously at the patient's request. Blood samples were collected before (T1), 2 h (T2), 24 h (T3), and 48 h (T4) after operation to measure the plasma ?-EP, PGE2, and 5-HT. The operative time, the total dose of sufentanil and the dose of self-administration, and the rescue doses of dezocine were recorded. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scores at 2, 12, 24 and 48 h postoperatively and the incidence of apnea and severe hypotension were recorded. The results showed that the gender, age, weight, operative time and remifentanil consumption were comparable among 3 <span class="hlt">groups</span>. Patients in EAS <span class="hlt">group</span> had the lowest VAS scores postoperatively among the three <span class="hlt">groups</span> (P<0.05). The total dose of sufentanil was 1156.0 ?g in EAS <span class="hlt">group</span>, significantly lower than that in control (134.35.9 ?g) and sham (133.57.0 ?g) <span class="hlt">groups</span>. Similarly, the rescue dose of dezocine was the least in EAS <span class="hlt">group</span> (P<0.05) among the three <span class="hlt">groups</span>. Plasma ?-EP levels in EAS <span class="hlt">group</span> at T3 (176.9045.73) and T4 (162.9635.00 pg/mL) were significantly higher than those in control (132.3336.75 and 128.7941.24 pg/mL) and sham (136.5645.80 and 129.8536.14 pg/mL) <span class="hlt">groups</span>, P<0.05 for all. EAS could decrease the release of PGE2. Plasma PGE2 levels in EAS <span class="hlt">group</span> at T2 and T3 (415 and 405 pg/mL respectively) were significantly lower than those in control (645 and 627 pg/mL) and sham (666 and 626 pg/mL) <span class="hlt">groups</span>. Plasma 5-HT levels in EAS <span class="hlt">group</span> at T2 (133.6640.85) and T3 (154.6652.49 ng/mL) were significantly lower than those in control (168.3356.94 and 225.2882.03) and sham (164.5447.53 and 217.7476.45 ng/mL) <span class="hlt">groups</span>. For intra-<span class="hlt">group</span> comparison, plasma 5-HT and PGE2 levels in control and sham <span class="hlt">groups</span> at T2 and T3, and ?-EP in EAS <span class="hlt">group</span> at T3 and T4 were significantly higher than those at T1 (P<0.05); PGE2 and 5-HT levels in EAS <span class="hlt">group</span> showed no significant difference among the different time points (P>0.05). No apnea or severe hypotension was observed in any <span class="hlt">group</span>. It was concluded that intraoperative ipsilateral EAS at <span class="hlt">PC</span>4 and <span class="hlt">PC</span>6 provides effective postoperative analgesia for patients undergoing radical esophagectomy with remifentanil anesthesia and significantly decrease requirement for parental narcotics. The underlying mechanism may be related to stimulation of the release of endogenous ?-EP and inhibition of inflammatory mediators (5-HT and PGE2). PMID:25135729</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xie, Yan-hu; Chai, Xiao-qing; Wang, Yue-lan; Gao, Yan-chun; Ma, Jun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">324</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-10-29/pdf/2010-27214.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 66655 - Airworthiness Directives; PILATUS Aircraft Ltd. Model <span class="hlt">PC</span>-7 Airplanes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Directives; PILATUS Aircraft Ltd. Model <span class="hlt">PC</span>-7 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation...applies to PILATUS Aircraft Ltd. Model <span class="hlt">PC</span>-7 airplanes, manufacturer serial numbers...paragraph 3.A. of Pilatus Aircraft Ltd. <span class="hlt">PC</span>-7 Service Bulletin No. 57-015,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-10-29</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">325</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-07-06/pdf/2011-16820.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 39473 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 1120-<span class="hlt">PC</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Collection; Comment Request for Form 1120-<span class="hlt">PC</span> AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS...soliciting comments concerning Form 1120-<span class="hlt">PC</span>, U.S. Property and Casualty Insurance...1545-1027. Form Number: Form 1120-<span class="hlt">PC</span>. Abstract: Property and casualty...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-06</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">326</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/ja/ja0304/2002JA009600/2002JA009600.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Pc</span>5 micropulsation power at conjugate high-latitude locations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The micropulsation power, integrated over the <span class="hlt">Pc</span>5 frequency range, has been calculated for the horizontal component of the geomagnetic field at two high-latitude conjugate locations: Dumont D'Urville (corrected geomagnetic coordinates: 80.61S, 235.76E) and Mould Bay (corrected geomagnetic coordinates: 80.85N, 272.65E). Because of the different distances between the geographic and the geomagnetic poles in each hemisphere, the comparison between the <span class="hlt">Pc</span>5</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paola Ballatore</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">327</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53409523"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">PC</span>-based observation control of balloon-borne telescope</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The operations involved during observations, using the TIFR 100-cm balloon-borne far-infrared telescope, have been semi-automated using an IBM-<span class="hlt">PC</span>. A hardware interface has been developed for this <span class="hlt">PC</span>, which interacts with the two-way radio communication links (telemetry and telecommand) between the ground station and the telescope system. In addition, software has been developed to improve the accuracy of the telescope aspect</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. Das; S. K. Ghosh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">328</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005SPIE.5775..359Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">FPGA and embedded <span class="hlt">PC</span> based module for research and education</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents a versatile experimental and educational module, which can be used both for prototyping of embedded <span class="hlt">PC</span> based electronic devices, and for teaching of computer engineering. The FPGA chip may be used to implement or to emulate wide range of hardware devices, while the embedded <span class="hlt">PC</span>, able to run the Linux OS, provides an efficient environment for controlling this hardware using different techniques.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zabolotny, Wojciech M.; Husejko, Michal; Zaworski, Wojciech</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">329</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50460039"> <span id="translatedtitle">The development of Bio-based Polymers for Notebook <span class="hlt">PC</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The article discusses the life cycle of personal computer (<span class="hlt">PC</span>) housings made from plant resin and analyzed their environmental burden by considering carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and various inputs such as energy and resources during the life cycle. We compared the levels of CO2 emission from <span class="hlt">PC</span> housings made from bio- and fossil-fuel-based polymers throughout their life cycles. There were</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Koichi Kimura; Y. Horikoshi; T. Hashitani; K. Nihsii</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">330</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.isoi.in/Journal/BackIssues/33(2).pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">VIRTUAL INSTRUMENT BASED <span class="hlt">PC</span> PARALLEL LPT PORT COMPATIBLE TEMPERATURE CONTROLLER</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A low-cost user-friendly programmable temperature controller compatible with the PCs LPT port has been designed based on a Virtual Instrument (VI) program with minimum hardware and maximum support of software written in LabVIEW 6.0. This design consists of a MAXIM 12-bit serial ADC, thermocouple read-out circuit, fabricated in a miniature PCB. The <span class="hlt">PC</span>'s LPT port is used for <span class="hlt">PC</span> bus</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. Jayapandian; Usharani Ravi; R. Mallika; O. K. Sheela; B. Purniah</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">331</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005Icar..173..409S"> <span id="translatedtitle">A closer look at main belt asteroids 1: WF/<span class="hlt">PC</span> images</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present new reconstructions of images of main belt Asteroids 9 Metis, 18 Melpomene, 19 Fortuna, 216 Kleopatra, and 624 Hektor, made with the uncorrected Wide-Field/Planetary Camera (WF/<span class="hlt">PC</span>) on the Hubble <span class="hlt">Space</span> Telescope (HST). Deconvolution with the MISTRAL algorithm demonstrates that these asteroids are clearly resolved. We determine diameters, albedos, and lower limits to axial ratios for these bodies. We also review the process used to restore the aberrated images. No surface features or companions are found, but the rotation of 216 Kleopatra is clearly seen. The asteroidal albedos are similar to those determined by other procedures.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Storrs, A. D.; Dunne, C.; Conan, J.-M.; Mugnier, L.; Weiss, B. P.; Zellner, B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">332</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.cps.org.tw/docs/51(3)%20167-177,%202008.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of Acupuncture at Neiguan (<span class="hlt">PC</span> 6) of the Pericardial Meridian on Blood Pressure and Heart Rate Variability</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The aims of this study were to investigate (i) if and when the blood pressure would rise or fall and (ii) the associated changes of human heart rate variability (HRV) by manual stimulation of the Neiguan (<span class="hlt">PC</span> 6) acupuncture site. In this paper, two <span class="hlt">groups</span> of six healthy male volunteers with ranges of ages 20- 56 and 20-55 and with</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shyang Chang; Meng-Ju Chiang; Shiun-Jeng Li; Yu-Tsung Lu; Chia-Mei Ma; Hsiu-Yao Cheng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">333</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFMSM23A1583F"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Pc</span> 5 Spectral Density at ULTIMA stataions and its Radial Diffusion Coefficients for REE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Pc</span> 5 magnetic pulsations with frequencies between 1.67 and 6.67 mHz, are believed to contribute to the Relativistic Electron Enhancement (REE) in the outer radiation belt during magnetic storms. Ground-based observations suggested that high-speed solar wind and large-amplitude <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 5 waves with a long duration during the storm recovery phase are closely associated with the production of relativistic electrons [Baker et al., 1998; Rostoker et al., 1998; Mathie and Mann, 2000; OBrien et al., 2001, 2003]. On the other hand, many relativistic electron acceleration mechanisms have been proposed theoretically. They are separated roughly into two themes: in situ acceleration at L lower than 6.6 by wave particle interactions (as internal source acceleration mechanisms) [Liu et al., 1999; Summers et al., 1999; Summers and Ma, 2000] and acceleration by radial diffusion to transport and accelerate a source population of electrons from the outer to the inner magnetosphere (as external source acceleration mechanisms) [Elkington et al., 1999, 2003; Hudson et al., 2000; Kim et al., 2001]. One possible external source acceleration mechanism is the resonant interaction with ULF toroidal and poloidal waves. In order to verify which of the two mechanisms is more effective for the REE, we have to examine the time variation of electron phase <span class="hlt">space</span> density. Electron phase <span class="hlt">space</span> density is not directly measured, but we can estimate radial diffusion coefficients using observational electric and magnetic data. The goal of this paper is to get more reliable radial diffusion coefficient from ground-based observational magnetic field and to show reasonability of it for radial diffusion model. We use the global magnetometer data obtained from ULTIMA (Ultra Large Terrestrial International Magnetic Array, see http://www.serc.kyushu-u.ac.jp/ultima/ultima.html) stations, to precisely define the radial diffusion timescales. The ULTIMA includes McMAC, CARISAM, 210MM and MAGDAS/CPMN magnetometer arrays. The radial diffusion coefficient can be given from the magnetic field power spectral density as a function of L, frequency (f) and m-number (m) in the <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 5 frequency range during the REE related magnetic storms [see Brautigam et al., 2005]. We can fit <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 5 power spectral density (L, f, m) using the ULTIMA data. The m-number of global <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 5 pulsation on the ground is found to be almost less than 5. This is consistent with m-number required in the radial diffusion theory by Elkington et al. [1999, 2003]. We will compare the observationally estimated diffusion coefficient with theoretical diffusion coefficient [e.g. Elkington et al., 2006], and discuss adequacy of our diffusion coefficient.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fujimoto, A.; Tokunaga, T.; Abe, S.; Uozumi, T.; Yoshikawa, A.; Mann, I. R.; Chi, P. J.; Engebretson, M. J.; Yumoto, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">334</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4077293"> <span id="translatedtitle">Co<span class="hlt">Pc</span> and Co<span class="hlt">Pc</span>F16 on gold: Site-specific charge-transfer processes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Summary Interface properties of cobalt(II) phthalocyanine (Co<span class="hlt">Pc</span>) and cobalt(II) hexadecafluoro-phthalocyanine (Co<span class="hlt">Pc</span>F16) to gold are investigated by photo-excited electron spectroscopies (X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) and X-ray excited Auger electron spectroscopy (XAES)). It is shown that a bidirectional charge transfer determines the interface energetics for Co<span class="hlt">Pc</span> and Co<span class="hlt">Pc</span>F16 on Au. Combined XPS and XAES measurements allow for the separation of chemical shifts based on different local charges at the considered atom caused by polarization effects. This facilitates a detailed discussion of energetic shifts of core level spectra. The data allow the discussion of site-specific charge-transfer processes. PMID:24991487</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Petraki, Fotini; Uihlein, Johannes; Aygul, Umut; Chasse, Thomas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">335</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/5307407"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Pc</span>1<span class="hlt">Pc</span>2 waves and energetic particle precipitation during and after magnetic storms: Superposed epoch analysis and case studies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Magnetic pulsations in the <span class="hlt">Pc</span>1-<span class="hlt">Pc</span>2 frequency range (0.1-5 Hz) are often observed on the ground and in the Earth's magnetosphere during the aftermath of geomagnetic storms. Numerous studies have suggested that they may play a role in reducing the fluxes of energetic ions in the ring current; more recent studies suggest they may interact parasitically with radiation belt electrons as</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. J. Engebretson; M. R. Lessard; J. Bortnik; J. C. Green; R. B. Horne; D. L. Detrick; A. T. Weatherwax; J. Manninen; N. J. Petit; J. L. Posch; M. C. Rose</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">336</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48898998"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Pc</span>1<span class="hlt">Pc</span>2 waves and energetic particle precipitation during and after magnetic storms: Superposed epoch analysis and case studies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Magnetic pulsations in the <span class="hlt">Pc</span>1<span class="hlt">Pc</span>2 frequency range (0.15 Hz) are often observed on the ground and in the Earth's magnetosphere during the aftermath of geomagnetic storms. Numerous studies have suggested that they may play a role in reducing the fluxes of energetic ions in the ring current; more recent studies suggest they may interact parasitically with radiation belt electrons as</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. J. Engebretson; M. R. Lessard; J. Bortnik; J. C. Green; R. B. Horne; D. L. Detrick; A. T. Weatherwax; J. Manninen; N. J. Petit; J. L. Posch; M. C. Rose</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">337</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19790006950&hterms=nasal+high+flow&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dnasal%2Bhigh%2Bflow"> <span id="translatedtitle">OAST <span class="hlt">Space</span> Theme Workshop. Volume 3: Working <span class="hlt">group</span> summary. 2: Data handling, communications (E-2). A. Statement. B. Technology needs (form 1). C. Priority assessment (form 2)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Technologies required to support the stated OAST thrust to increase information return by X1000, while reducing costs by a factor of 10 are identified. The most significant driver is the need for an overall end-to-end data system management technology. Maximum use of LSI component technology and trade-offs between hardware and software are manifest in most all considerations of technology needs. By far, the greatest need for data handling technology was identified for the <span class="hlt">space</span> Exploration and Global Services themes. Major advances are needed in NASA's ability to provide cost effective mass reduction of <span class="hlt">space</span> data, and automated assessment of earth looking imagery, with a concomitant reduction in cost per useful bit. A combined approach embodying end-to-end system analysis, with onboard data set selection, onboard data processing, highly parallel image processing (both ground and <span class="hlt">space</span>), low cost, high capacity memories, and low cost user data distribution systems would be necessary.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">338</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0605564v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Local <span class="hlt">Group(s</span>)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The properties of the galaxies of the Local <span class="hlt">Group</span> are reviewed, followed by a brief discussion of nearby <span class="hlt">groups</span>. The galaxy <span class="hlt">groups</span> in our vicinity - the M81 <span class="hlt">group</span>, the Cen A <span class="hlt">group</span>, and the IC 342/Maffei <span class="hlt">group</span> - are in many respects Local <span class="hlt">Group</span> analogs: Their luminosity functions, galaxy content, fractional galaxy type distribution, crossing times, masses, and zero-velocity surface radii are similar to those of the Local <span class="hlt">Group</span>. Also, the nearby <span class="hlt">groups</span> usually consist of two subgroups, some of which approach each other and may ultimately merge to form a fossil <span class="hlt">group</span>. These poor <span class="hlt">groups</span> contrast with the less evolved, loose and extended galaxy ``clouds'' such as the Scl <span class="hlt">group</span> and the CVn I cloud. These are characterized by long crossing times, are dominated by gas-rich, late-type galaxies, and lack gas-deficient, low luminosity early-type dwarfs. These clouds may be <span class="hlt">groups</span> still in formation. The local Hubble flow derived from the clouds and <span class="hlt">groups</span> is very cold.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eva K. Grebel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-05-22</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">339</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19790006955&hterms=radioactive+material+packaging&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dradioactive%2Bmaterial%2Bpackaging"> <span id="translatedtitle">OAST <span class="hlt">Space</span> Theme Workshop. Volume 3: Working <span class="hlt">group</span> summary. 7: Material (M-1). A. Statement. B. Technology needs (form 1). C. Priority assessment (form 2)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The approach of matching technology areas with various themes needs was not effective for the materials and thermal control discipline because of the diversity of requirements for each. Top priorities were evolved from the advanced <span class="hlt">space</span> transportation system and the <span class="hlt">space</span> power platform because these are essential building blocks in fulfilling some of the other themes. Important needs identified include life long-life cryogenic cooling systems for sensors, masers, and other devices and the needs for lightweight nuclear shielding materials for nuclear electric propulsion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">340</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/834746"> <span id="translatedtitle">METHANE de-NOX FOR UTILITY <span class="hlt">PC</span> BOILERS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The project seeks to develop and validate a new pulverized coal combustion system to reduce utility <span class="hlt">PC</span> boiler NOx emissions to 0.15 lb per million Btu or less without post-combustion flue gas cleaning. Work during previous reporting periods completed the design, installation, shakedown and initial PRB coal testing of a 3-million Btu/h pilot system at BBP's Pilot-Scale Combustion Facility (PSCF) in Worcester, MA. Based on these results, modifications to the gas-fired preheat combustor and <span class="hlt">PC</span> burner were defined, along with a modified testing plan and schedule. A revised subcontract was executed with BBP to reflect changes in the pilot testing program. Modeling activities were continued to develop and verify revised design approaches for both the Preheat gas combustor and <span class="hlt">PC</span> burner. Reactivation of the pilot test system was then begun with BBP personnel. During the previous reporting period, reactivation of the pilot test system was completed with the modified Preheat gas combustor. Following shakedown of the modified gas combustor alone, a series of successful tests of the new combustor with PRB coal using the original <span class="hlt">PC</span> burner were completed. NOx at the furnace exit was reduced significantly with the modified gas combustor, to as low as 150 ppm with only 36 ppm CO (both corrected to 3% O2). Concurrent with testing, GTI and BBP collaborated on development of two modified designs for the <span class="hlt">PC</span> burner optimized to fire preheated char and pyrolysis products from the Preheat gas combustor. During the current reporting period, one of the two modified <span class="hlt">PC</span> burner designs was fabricated and installed in the pilot test facility. Testing of the modified pilot system (modified gas combustor and modified <span class="hlt">PC</span> burner) during the quarter included 38 tests with PRB coal. NOx reduction was significantly improved to levels as low as 60-100 ppmv with CO in the range of 35-112 ppmv without any furnace air staging.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Joseph Rabovitser; Bruce Bryan; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span 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</span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">341</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23564771"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of pyridine analogs of curcumin on growth, apoptosis and NF-?B activity in prostate cancer <span class="hlt">PC</span>-3 cells.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Twelve pyridine analogs of curcumin were studied for their effects on growth and apoptosis in human prostate cancer <span class="hlt">PC</span>-3 cells. The ability of these compounds to inhibit the transcriptional activity of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) and the level of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (phospho-ERK1/2) in <span class="hlt">PC</span>-3 cells was also determined. Treatment of <span class="hlt">PC</span>-3 cells with the pyridine analogs of curcumin resulted in concentration-dependent growth inhibition and apoptosis stimulation. Only pyridine analogs of curcumin with a tetrahydrothiopyrane-4-one linker (FN compounds) exhibited a strong inhibitory effect on growth and a strong stimulatory effect on apoptosis at low concentrations (? 1 ?M). Mechanistic studies showed that NF-?B transcriptional activity in <span class="hlt">PC</span>-3 cells was strongly inhibited by treatment with <span class="hlt">group</span> FN compounds. Treatment of <span class="hlt">PC</span>-3 cells with 1 ?M FN1 resulted in a decrease of activated ERK1/2. Results from the present study indicate that FN compounds warrant further in vivo studies using suitable animal models of prostate cancer. PMID:23564771</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wei, Xingchuan; Zhou, Daiying; Wang, Huaqian; Ding, Ning; Cui, Xiao-Xing; Wang, Hong; Verano, Michael; Zhang, Kun; Conney, Allan H; Zheng, Xi; DU, Zhi-Yun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">342</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://fye.osu.edu/PDF/FirstGenSmallGroupActivityNotes.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">In the <span class="hlt">space</span> provided below, work with your <span class="hlt">group</span> members to develop support strategies/tips for supporting traditional and non-traditional first generation college students.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">for supporting traditional and non-traditional first generation college students. Traditional first generation generation students · Place to study/meet with <span class="hlt">group</span> Focusing on the First Year Conference, 2014 <span class="hlt">Group</span> OSU to high-income first generation college students. Low-income first generation students · FAFSA completion</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">343</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003JGRA..108.1146B"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Pc</span>5 micropulsation power at conjugate high-latitude locations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The micropulsation power, integrated over the <span class="hlt">Pc</span>5 frequency range, has been calculated for the horizontal component of the geomagnetic field at two high-latitude conjugate locations: Dumont D'Urville (corrected geomagnetic coordinates: 80.61S, 235.76E) and Mould Bay (corrected geomagnetic coordinates: 80.85N, 272.65E). Because of the different distances between the geographic and the geomagnetic poles in each hemisphere, the comparison between the <span class="hlt">Pc</span>5 power observed at Dumont D'Urville and at Mould Bay shows the relative importance of geomagnetic and solar illumination effects in driving low-frequency micropulsation activity. In particular, similarities observed at the two sites can be explained in terms of their common geomagnetic characteristics, while differences can be attributed to the different sunlight or solar zenith angle configurations. Results show that the local summer <span class="hlt">Pc</span>5 power is statistically higher in the northern hemisphere than in the southern one. This hemispherical difference is smaller for the local equinoxes, and it is only very slight or absent for local winters. These findings are interpreted in terms of the proportionality between the <span class="hlt">Pc</span>5 power and the ionospheric conductance, which is higher at Mould Bay owing to more permanent and direct sunlight conditions during local summers and equinoxes. Thus the different geographic coordinates affect the <span class="hlt">Pc</span>5 power at the two considered sites so much so that their effect is visible regardless of the geomagnetic similarities. However, the influence of the geomagnetic activity on <span class="hlt">Pc</span>5 power is found to be more significant than these geographical effects or than the seasonal effects. In fact, for Kp < 2 the difference in simultaneous observations at Mould Bay and at Dumont D'Urville is <?10? nT2 with an occurrence >70%. The magnetic local time modulation of <span class="hlt">Pc</span>5 power is similar in both hemispheres, since it is determined by the equivalent geomagnetic characteristics and regardless of possible geographical differences. In particular, the occurrence of higher <span class="hlt">Pc</span>5 power observed at Mould Bay than at Dumont D'Urville is not localized in one specific magnetic local time sector. The present observations are compared with previous results regarding solar illumination effects on geomagnetic activity and on auroral brightness. Finally, no solar cycle effect is observed on either the <span class="hlt">Pc</span>5 power level, on its hemispherical dependence, or on its daily modulation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ballatore, Paola</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">344</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880007038&hterms=metonymy&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dmetonymy"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Space</span> languages</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Applications of linguistic principles to potential problems of human and machine communication in <span class="hlt">space</span> settings are discussed. Variations in language among speakers of different backgrounds and change in language forms resulting from new experiences or reduced contact with other <span class="hlt">groups</span> need to be considered in the design of intelligent machine systems.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hays, Dan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">345</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25179994"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coronin 1A inhibits neurite outgrowth in <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cells.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Regenerative response to central nervous system damage in mammals is limited because of inhibitor signals which consist of myelin associated inhibitor proteins and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans. Inhibitor signals mainly affect cytoskeleton elements which are important for axonal sprouting and neurite outgrowth. Coronin 1A is an actin cytoskeleton associated protein. Coronin 1A shows its effect on actin cytoskeleton through binding to the Arp2/3 complex which is a key nucleator of actin polymerization and regulates its activation on actin cytoskeleton. Coronin 1A-Arp2/3 interaction is regulated by phosphorylation of Coronin 1A from the C and N terminal region. Thus, Coronin 1A-Arp2/3 complex is one of the targets of inhibitory signaling cascades. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Coronin 1A on neurite outgrowth in <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cells in vitro. The results showed that Coronin 1A is expressed in differentiated <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cells and localized along axonal sprouting region of the neurites. Other results showed that overexpression of Coronin 1A in <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cells effects neurite outgrowth. Neurite lengths of the Coronin 1A overexpressing <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cells were lower than the untransfected (p<0.001) and control transfected (p=0.002) <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cells. These results indicate that Coronin 1A has an inhibitory effect on neurite outgrowth in vitro. PMID:25179994</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Terzi, Yunus Kasim; Kocaefe, Yusuf Cetin; Ayter, Sukriye</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-17</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">346</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMSM33A2140P"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Pc</span>1 Waves Observed by the Van Allen Probes and at Halley, Antarctica</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Waves in the <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 1 frequency range (0.2 to 5 Hz) generated in Earth's magnetosphere serve as diagnostics of instabilities that are understood to thermalize energetic plasma populations, including ions in the ring current and possibly electrons in the radiation belts. We have compared observations of <span class="hlt">Pc</span>1 waves detected by the EFW double probe electric field experiment and EMFISIS fluxgate magnetometer on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft and by a search coil magnetometer at Halley, Antarctica (L = 4.6). Transverse EMIC waves observed in <span class="hlt">space</span> were observed at Halley during many intervals when the spacecraft were located within two hours of local time of Halley and within 1 L shell. Some of these conjunction events were observed as the spacecraft passed through regions of rapidly varying plasma density (i.e., the plasmapause or plume-like structures). Waves up to 4 Hz have occasionally been observed at Halley, but no conjunction events have yet been observed above 1.5 Hz. Purely compressional waves (with no evident transverse power) with frequencies above 2 Hz, and purely electrostatic waves (with no evident power in the magnetic field) with frequencies typically above 2 Hz, have also been observed in <span class="hlt">space</span>, but not on the ground.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Posch, J. L.; Engebretson, M. J.; Roisen, N. D.; Perrin, J. B.; Breneman, A. W.; Kersten, K.; Wygant, J. R.; Kletzing, C.; Lessard, M.; Argall, M. R.; Smith, C. W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">347</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3904316"> <span id="translatedtitle">Binding of bovine T194A Pr<span class="hlt">PC</span> by PrPSc-specific antibodies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal neurodegenerative diseases that are based on the misfolding of a cellular prion protein (Pr<span class="hlt">PC</span>) into an infectious, pathological conformation (PrPSc). There is proof-of-principle evidence that a prion vaccine is possible but this is tempered with concerns of the potential dangers associated with induction of immune responses to a widely-expressed self-protein. By targeting epitopes that are specifically exposed upon protein misfolding, our <span class="hlt">group</span> developed a vaccine that induces PrPSc-specific antibody responses. Here we consider the ability of this polyclonal antibody (SN6b) to bind to a mutant of Pr<span class="hlt">PC</span> associated with spontaneous prion disease. Polyclonal antibodies were selected to mimic the vaccination outcome and also explore all possible protein conformations of the recombinant bovine prion protein with mutation T194A [bPrP(T194A)]. This mutant is a homolog of the human T183A mutation of Pr<span class="hlt">PC</span> that is associated with early onset of familial dementia. With nanopore analysis, under non-denaturing conditions, we observed binding of the SN6b antibody to bPrP(T194A). This interaction was confirmed through ELISAs as well as immunoprecipitation of the recombinant and cellularly expressed forms of bPrP(T194A). This interaction did not promote formation of a protease resistant conformation of PrP in vitro. Collectively, these findings support the disease-specific approach for immunotherapy of prion diseases but also suggest that the concept of conformation-specific immunotherapy may be complicated in individuals who are genetically predisposed to Pr<span class="hlt">PC</span> misfolding. PMID:23787697</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Madampage, Claudia A; Maattanen, Pekka; Marciniuk, Kristen; Brownlie, Robert; Andrievskaia, Olga; Potter, Andrew; Cashman, Neil R; Lee, Jeremy S; Napper, Scott</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">348</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56610900"> <span id="translatedtitle">Trithorax <span class="hlt">group</span> proteins: switching genes on and keeping them active</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cellular memory is provided by two counteracting <span class="hlt">groups</span> of chromatin proteins termed Trithorax <span class="hlt">group</span> (TrxG) and Polycomb <span class="hlt">group</span> (<span class="hlt">Pc</span>G) proteins. TrxG proteins activate transcription and are perhaps best known because of the involvement of the TrxG protein MLL in leukaemia. However, in terms of molecular analysis, they have lived in the shadow of their more famous counterparts, the <span class="hlt">Pc</span>G proteins.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bernd Schuettengruber; Anne-Marie Martinez; Nicola Iovino; Giacomo Cavalli</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">349</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/860867"> <span id="translatedtitle">Demonstration of a <span class="hlt">PC</span> 25 Fuel Cell in Russia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This project involved the installation of a 200kW <span class="hlt">PC</span>25C{trademark} phosphoric-acid fuel cell power plant at Orgenergogaz, a Gazprom industrial site in Russia. In April 1997, a <span class="hlt">PC</span>25C{trademark} was sold by ONSI Corporation to Orgenergogaz, a subsidiary of the Russian company ''Gazprom''. Due to instabilities in the Russian financial markets, at that time, the unit was never installed and started by Orgenergogaz. In October of 2001 International Fuel Cells (IFC), now known as UTC Fuel Cells (UTCFC), received a financial assistance award from the United States Department of Energy (DOE) entitled ''Demonstration of <span class="hlt">PC</span> 25 Fuel Cell in Russia''. Three major tasks were part of this award: the inspection of the proposed site and system, start-up assistance, and installation and operation of the powerplant.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John C. Trocciola; Thomas N. Pompa; Linda S. Boyd</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">350</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/821271"> <span id="translatedtitle">METHANE de-NOX FOR UTILITY <span class="hlt">PC</span> BOILERS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the current quarter, pilot scale testing was continued with the modified combustor and modified channel burner using the new PRB coal delivered in late December. Testing included benchmark testing to determine whether the system performance was comparable to that with the previous batch of PRB coal, baseline testing to characterize performance of the <span class="hlt">PC</span> Burner without coal preheating, and parametric testing to evaluate the effect of various preheat combustor and <span class="hlt">PC</span> burner operating variables, including reduced gas usage in the preheat combustor. A second version of the <span class="hlt">PC</span> burner in which the secondary air channels were closed and replaced with six air nozzles was then tested with PRB coal. Plans were developed with RPI for the next phase of testing at the 100 million Btu/h scale using RPI's Coal Burner Test Facility (CBTF). A cost estimate for preparation of the CBTF and preheat burner system design, installation and testing was then prepared by RPI.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Joseph Rabovitser; Bruce Bryan; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">351</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/834747"> <span id="translatedtitle">METHANE de-NOX FOR UTILITY <span class="hlt">PC</span> BOILERS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The project seeks to develop and validate a new pulverized coal combustion system to reduce utility <span class="hlt">PC</span> boiler NOx emissions to 0.15 lb/million Btu or less without post-combustion flue gas cleaning. Work during previous reporting periods completed the design, installation, shakedown and initial PRB coal testing of a 3-million Btu/h pilot system at BBP's Pilot-Scale Combustion Facility (PSCF) in Worcester, MA. Based on these results, modifications to the gas-fired preheat combustor and <span class="hlt">PC</span> burner were defined, along with a modified testing plan and schedule. During the current reporting period, BBP's subcontract was modified to reflect changes in the pilot testing program, and the modifications to the gas-fired preheat combustor were completed. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling approach was defined for the combined <span class="hlt">PC</span> burner and 3-million Btu/h pilot system. Modeling of the modified gas-fired preheat combustor was also started.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Joseph Rabovitser; Bruce Bryan; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-04-29</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">352</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/957467"> <span id="translatedtitle">Run-08 <span class="hlt">pC</span> polarization analysis - October 16, 2008</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this note we will discuss the analysis of RHIC run 08 <span class="hlt">pC</span> data that were collected during February 14 - March 10, 2008. An analysis method that is similar to Run 05 and Run 06 was adopted for Run 08 analysis (except few minor changes, which are described below). A detailed analysis note and a NIM article that describe the <span class="hlt">pC</span> analysis procedure (for run 05 and run 06) can be found elsewhere. In brief, the analysis consists of calibrating the detectors, determining energy corrections ('dead layers'), determining good runs and extracting the polarization from data.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dharmawardane,V.; Bazilevsky,A.; Bunce, G.; Gill, R.; Huang, H.; Makdisi, Y.; Nakagawa, I.; Morozov, B.; Okada, H.; Sivertz, M.; Zelenski, A.; Alekseev, I.; Svirida, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">353</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16494054"> <span id="translatedtitle">[A skin cell segregating control system based on <span class="hlt">PC</span>].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A skin cell segregating control system based on <span class="hlt">PC</span> (personal computer) is presented in this paper. Its front controller is a single-chip microcomputer which enables the manipulation for 6 patients simultaneously, and thus provides a great convenience for clinical treatments for vitiligo. With the use of serial port communication technology, it's possible to monitor and control the front controller in a <span class="hlt">PC</span> terminal. And the application of computer image acquisition technology realizes the synchronous acquisition of pathologic shin cell images pre/after the operation and a case history. Clinical tests prove its conformity with national standards and the pre-set technological requirements. PMID:16494054</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liu, Wen-zhong; Zhou, Ming; Zhang, Hong-bing</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">354</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/793993"> <span id="translatedtitle">METHANE DE-NOX FOR UTILITY <span class="hlt">PC</span> BOILERS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The project seeks to develop and validate a new pulverized coal combustion system to reduce utility <span class="hlt">PC</span> boiler NO{sub x} emissions to 0.15 lb/million Btu or less without post-combustion flue gas cleaning. Work during the quarter included completion of the equipment fabrication and installation efforts for the 3-million Btu/h pilot system at BBP's Pilot-Scale Combustion Facility (PSCF) in Worcester, MA. Selection and procurement of the first two test coals and preliminary selection of the final two test coals were completed. Shakedown and commissioning activities were finished and <span class="hlt">PC</span> Preheat pilot scale tests commenced with PRB coal.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Joseph Rabovitser; Bruce Bryan; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">355</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6650059"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">PC</span> proliferation: Minimizing corporate risk through planning for application maintenance</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The rapid proliferation of personal computers, offering tremendous productivity gains for the knowledge worker, often creates new application maintenance tasks. Specific concerns include security, data integrity, and access authorization. Distributed networks require security and communication systems. Distributed data entry requires file servers, network support personnel, and synchronization methods to preserve the integrity of corporate data. Much <span class="hlt">PC</span> software which must be maintained will be developed outside of standard-imposing environments and without benefit of formal training. A recommended method for limiting future maintenance problems is the formation of a staff possessing skills specific to problem solving in the areas mentioned and functioning as <span class="hlt">PC</span> consultants for the area of the knowledge worker.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shafer, L.I.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">356</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://earthdata.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/field/document/ESDSWG7ReusePeerAwards.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND <span class="hlt">SPACE</span> ADMINISTRATION</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND <span class="hlt">SPACE</span> ADMINISTRATION 1 NASA Earth Science Data Systems Software Reuse #12;NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND <span class="hlt">SPACE</span> ADMINISTRATION ESDS Reuse Working <span class="hlt">Group</span> 2 Award Background: http://www.esdswg.com/softwarereuse/Resources/awards/ #12;NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND <span class="hlt">SPACE</span> ADMINISTRATION</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Christian, Eric</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">357</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51136491"> <span id="translatedtitle">Implementation of Transparent Network Subsystem for <span class="hlt">PC</span> Manageability</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">By adding a subsystem that provides continuous network service to a host system such as a <span class="hlt">PC</span> (Personal Computer), even while the host system is sleeping, it is possible to achieve efficient use of the system and energy reduction. Remote management is a typical example. Recently, to maintain network service anytime and anywhere, WWAN (Wireless Wide Area Network) technology such</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kazuaki Nimura; Hidenobu Ito; Yousuke Nakamura; Zhaogong Guo; Kouich Yasaki; Takafumi Miura</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">358</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=computer+AND+usage&pg=4&id=EJ750493"> <span id="translatedtitle">Installing and Managing <span class="hlt">PC</span> Time-Control Software</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Employees of a West Virginia library system were tired of intervening in frequent patron fights over the public access PCs. In this article, the author discusses how the implementation of time-control software for an automated session reservation/management service reduced the conflict. A team was assigned to investigate <span class="hlt">PC</span> management software.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dawson, Jennifer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">359</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060035772&hterms=montanari&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dmontanari"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">PC</span>-based Workstation for Robotic Discectomy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ths paper describes a <span class="hlt">PC</span>-based controller for robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery. The development is motivated by the need of reducing the exposure of operating room personnel to X-rays during surgical procedures such as percutanrous discectomy.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Casadei, C.; Fiorini, P.; Martelli, S.; Montanari, M.; Morri, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">360</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://pdos.csail.mit.edu/papers/click:usenix01/usenix01.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Flexible Control of Parallelism in a Multiprocessor <span class="hlt">PC</span> Router</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">SMP Click is a software router that provides both flexibility and high performance on stock multiprocessor <span class="hlt">PC</span> hardware. It achieves high performance using device, buffer, and queue management techniques optimized for multiprocessor rout- ing. It allows vendors or network administrators to configur e the router in a way that indicates parallelizable packet pro - cessing tasks, and adaptively load-balances those</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Benjie Chen; Robert Morris</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span 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id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">361</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990hst..prop.4004M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wf/<span class="hlt">pc</span> Cycle 1 Calib: 4-CHIP UV Calibration</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">THIS PROGRAM CALIBRATES THE QE OF THE WFC AND <span class="hlt">PC</span> IN THE ULTRAVIOLET (F194W, F230W, AND F284W). This calibration is done for each CCD detector using exposures of a UV flux standard star. This program is intended for use only during a UV campaign.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">MacKenty, John</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">362</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991hst..prop.4739M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wf/<span class="hlt">pc</span> Cycle 2 Calib: Single Chip UV Calibration</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">THIS PROGRAM CALIBRATES THE QE OF THE WFC AND <span class="hlt">PC</span> IN THE ULTRAVIOLET (F194W, F230W, AND F284W). This calibration is done using exposures of a UV flux standard star. This program is intended for use only following a UV decontamination.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">MacKenty, John</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">363</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=computer+AND+programmers&pg=3&id=EJ984089"> <span id="translatedtitle">Falling <span class="hlt">PC</span> Solitaire Cards: An Open-Inquiry Approach</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Many of us have played the <span class="hlt">PC</span> Solitaire game that comes as standard software in many computers. Although I am not a great player, occasionally I win a game or two. The game celebrates my accomplishment by pushing the cards forward, one at a time, falling gracefully in what appears to look like a parabolic path in a drag-free environment. One day,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gonzalez-Espada, Wilson J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">364</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60221234"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">PC</span> program calculates gas well BHP from tubing pressure</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Basic program described was designed for an IBM <span class="hlt">PC</span> computer. The program converts tubing pressures to bottom hole conditions and uses a simplified solution that is as accurate as the more sophisticated methods available. It works for either dry gas or gas condensate wells. Input variables include: well depth; gas gravity; condensate API gravity and yield; tubing diameter; absolute</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Santos; E. Dismuke</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">365</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=electronic+AND+packaging&pg=2&id=ED376373"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">PC</span> Board Layout and Electronic Drafting with CAD. Teacher Edition.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This teacher's guide contains 11 units of instruction for a course on computer electronics and computer-assisted drafting (CAD) using a personal computer (<span class="hlt">PC</span>). The course covers the following topics: introduction to electronic drafting with CAD; CAD system and software; basic electronic theory; component identification; basic integrated circuit</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bryson, Jimmy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">366</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.kfupm.edu.sa/dad/deanship/events/forums/material/dfmar2002/paper/rahman.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">PC</span>-Based Teaching Tools for Fluid Mechanics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this work an interactive teaching tool in the form of virtual fluid mechanics laboratory has been developed. This lab consists of four experiments dealing with losses in piping systems, flow meters, packed and fluidized beds. The labs can be run on any <span class="hlt">PC</span> running a 32-bit operating system and could be made available through Internet. With the ability to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. U. Rahman; N. M. Tukur; I. A. Khan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">367</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://web.engr.oregonstate.edu/~wildensd/CMWR2008.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">LATTICE-BOLTZMANN SIMULATIONS OF THE <span class="hlt">Pc</span> -S -anw RELATIONSHIP</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">July 9, 2008 2 / 9 #12;Introduction <span class="hlt">Pc</span> - S - anw relationship [Hassanizadeh and Gray, WRR, 1993]. Air-water [Hassanizadeh and Gray, WRR, 1993]. Air-water experiments [Culligan et al., WRR, 2004]. Shan & Chen multi [Hassanizadeh and Gray, WRR, 1993]. Air-water experiments [Culligan et al., WRR, 2004]. Shan & Chen multi</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wildenschild, Dorthe</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">368</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/582414"> <span id="translatedtitle">Motorola Power<span class="hlt">PC</span> Migration Tools - Emulation and Translation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper describes the Motorola Power<span class="hlt">PC</span> Migration Tools project. The development methodology emphasizes code reuse. Emulation and translation methods are described and characterized. Emulation is applied to ROM-based environments. Translation achieves higher performance by having access to source code</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tariq Afzal; Mauricio Breternitz Jr.; M. Kacher; S. Menyhert; M. Ommerman; W. Su</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">369</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50429636"> <span id="translatedtitle">Design of <span class="hlt">PC</span>-programmable digital hearing-testing device</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The design of <span class="hlt">PC</span> programmable digital hearing-testing device is described in this paper targeting the testing of hearing impairedness in a laboratory environment. It is used to measure the response of each ear at different frequencies and at different sound pressure level (SPL). The device input is the serial 12-bit data and 7-bit control signal from USB connection while the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jasbir N. Patel; Z. Abid</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">370</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.kineticorp.com/publications/2009-01-0822-pc-crash-dolly-rollover-analysis.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of a Dolly Rollover with <span class="hlt">PC</span>-Crash</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper evaluates the use of <span class="hlt">PC</span>-Crash simulation software for modeling the dynamics of a dolly rollover crash test. The specific test used for this research utilized a Ford sport utility vehicle and was run in accordance with SAE J2114. Scratches, gouges, tire marks and paint deposited on the test surface by the test vehicle were documented photographically and by</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nathan A. Rose; Gray Beauchamp</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">371</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4782756"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tablet <span class="hlt">PC</span> Technology for the Enhancement of Synchronous Distributed Education</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, we describe how tablet PCs are being used at Georgia Tech Savannah (GTS) to improve student learning in a distributed classroom environment. The Tablet <span class="hlt">PC</span> is an attractive technology for use in synchronous distributed learning environments because of its mobility, and its ability to not only serve as an effective note taking device but also as a</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Elliot Moore II; Tristan T. Utschig; Kevin A. Haas; Benjamin Klein; P. D. Yoder; Ying Zhang; Monson H. Hayes</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">372</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890002023&hterms=ER&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DER"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">PC</span>-CUBE: A personal computer based hypercube</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">PC</span>-CUBE is an ensemble of IBM PCs or close compatibles connected in the hypercube topology with ordinary computer cables. Communication occurs at the rate of 115.2 K-band via the RS-232 serial links. Available for <span class="hlt">PC</span>-CUBE is the Crystalline Operating System III (CrOS III), Mercury Operating System, CUBIX and PLOTIX which are parallel I/O and graphics libraries. A CrOS performance monitor was developed to facilitate the measurement of communication and computation time of a program and their effects on performance. Also available are CXLISP, a parallel version of the XLISP interpreter; GRAFIX, some graphics routines for the EGA and CGA; and a general execution profiler for determining execution time spent by program subroutines. <span class="hlt">PC</span>-CUBE provides a programming environment similar to all hypercube systems running CrOS III, Mercury and CUBIX. In addition, every node (personal computer) has its own graphics display monitor and storage devices. These allow data to be displayed or stored at every processor, which has much instructional value and enables easier debugging of applications. Some application programs which are taken from the book Solving Problems on Concurrent Processors (Fox 88) were implemented with graphics enhancement on <span class="hlt">PC</span>-CUBE. The applications range from solving the Mandelbrot set, Laplace equation, wave equation, long range force interaction, to WaTor, an ecological simulation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ho, Alex; Fox, Geoffrey; Walker, David; Snyder, Scott; Chang, Douglas; Chen, Stanley; Breaden, Matt; Cole, Terry</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">373</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=customized+AND+software&pg=4&id=ED301186"> <span id="translatedtitle">SEF.ASSISTANT: Shell for Authoring Language SEF.<span class="hlt">PC</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper describes SEF.ASSISTANT, a special software shell for authoring languages to be used in the development of courseware serving computer based education (CBE). The capabilities of SEF.ASSISTANT are identified: (1) it will generate programs written in the IBM SEF.<span class="hlt">PC</span> authoring language; (2) it is compatible with external standard software</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Masturzi, Elio R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">374</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/6026692"> <span id="translatedtitle">OrganicPad: a tablet <span class="hlt">PC</span> based chemistry tool</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper describes a software tool that provides a natural user interface through the use of a Tablet <span class="hlt">PC</span> for organic chemistry. The use of Tablet PCs is spreading throughout the computer world. Proof of this is from increased submission count at ACM SIGCSE and IEEE FIE and new conferences such as WIPTE 2007 (Workshop on the Impact of Pen</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sam Bryfczynski</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">375</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/36246595"> <span id="translatedtitle">Heterogeneity of Catecholamine-Containing Vesicles in <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 Cells</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Vesicular catecholamine release has been measured amperometrically from undifferentiated rat <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cells using carbon fiber microelectrodes. During superfusion with high K+ saline, vesicular release was detected from ?50% of 200 cells investigated. On repeated stimulation the releasable pool of vesicles is rapidly depleted, while vesicle contents remains constant. Vesicular catecholamine release is not restored within 1 h after depletion of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Remco H. S. Westerink; Aart de Groot; Henk P. M. Vijverberg</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">376</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JPhA...47G5204D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Conformal Carroll <span class="hlt">groups</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Conformal extensions of Lvy-Leblond's Carroll <span class="hlt">group</span>, based on geometric properties analogous to those of Newton-Cartan <span class="hlt">space</span>-time are proposed. The extensions are labeled by an integer k. This framework includes and extends our recent study of the Bondi-Metzner-Sachs (BMS) and Newman-Unti (NU) <span class="hlt">groups</span>. The relation to conformal Galilei <span class="hlt">groups</span> is clarified. Conformal Carroll symmetry is illustrated by Carrollian photons. Motion both in the Newton-Cartan and Carroll <span class="hlt">spaces</span> may be related to that of strings in the Bargmann <span class="hlt">space</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Duval, C.; Gibbons, G. W.; Horvathy, P. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">377</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21970412"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of nanoscale Sub<span class="hlt">Pc</span> interfacial layer on the performance of inverted polymer solar cells based on P3HT/<span class="hlt">PC</span>71BM.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The effect of a nanoscale boron subphthalocyanine chloride (Sub<span class="hlt">Pc</span>) interfacial layer on the performance of inverted polymer solar cells based on poly (3-hexyl thiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C(71)-butyric acid methyl ester (<span class="hlt">PC</span>(71)BM) was studied. When a 1 nm Sub<span class="hlt">Pc</span> layer was introduced between the active layer (P3HT:<span class="hlt">PC</span>(71)BM) and MoO(x) in the device with ITO/ZnO/P3HT:<span class="hlt">PC</span>(71)BM/Sub<span class="hlt">Pc</span>/MoO(x)/Al configuration, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) was increased from 3.42 (without Sub<span class="hlt">Pc</span>) to 3.59%. This improvement is mainly attributed to the enhanced open-circuit voltage from 0.62 to 0.64 V. When the Flory-Huggins interaction parameters were estimated from the solubility parameters through the contact angle measurement, it revealed that the interaction between Sub<span class="hlt">Pc</span> and <span class="hlt">PC</span>(71)BM is more attractive than that between Sub<span class="hlt">Pc</span> and P3HT at the interface of P3HT:<span class="hlt">PC</span>(71)BM/Sub<span class="hlt">Pc</span>, through which charges are well transported from the active layer to the anode. This is supported by a decrease of the contact resistance from 5.49 (Sub<span class="hlt">Pc</span> 0 nm) to 0.94 M? cm (Sub<span class="hlt">Pc</span> 1 nm). The photoelectron spectra provide another evidence for the enhanced PCE, exhibiting that the 1 nm thick Sub<span class="hlt">Pc</span> layer extracts more photoelectrons from the active layer than other thicknesses. PMID:21970412</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, Jung Yong; Noh, Seunguk; Nam, Young Min; Kim, Jun Young; Roh, Jeongkyun; Park, Myeongjin; Amsden, Jason J; Yoon, Do Y; Lee, Changhee; Jo, Won Ho</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">378</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.9601J"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">PC</span> index: method of calculation and physical sense</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">PC</span> index has been introduced [Troshichev and Andrezen, 1985; Troshichev et al., 1988] to characterize magnetic activity in the polar caps generated by the solar wind coupling with the magnetosphere. The concept of the antisunward convection within the polar cap, controlled by the interplanetary electric field EKL determined by Kan and Lee (1979), served as a basis for the method of the index calculation. Value of disturbances in the polar cap geomagnetic H and D (or X and Y) components form the basis for derivation of the <span class="hlt">PC</span> index. The technique of <span class="hlt">PC</span> index derivation consists of two separate procedures: (1) derivation of the statistically justified regression coefficients determining relationship between the coupling function EKL and vector of polar cap magnetic disturbance ?F, and (2) calculation of <span class="hlt">PC</span> indices by data on current ?F values with use of the regression coefficients established in course of the first procedure. To exclude from examination the geomagnetic field changes unrelated to the solar wind variations the value of geomagnetic disturbance is calculated in reference to the quiet daily variation. The regression coefficients ? (slope) and ? (intersection) describing a linear link between values ?F and EKL are calculated in combination with the optimal angle ? providing the highest correlation between ?F and EKL. Parameters ?, ? and ? are derived based on the statistically justified sets of data. As a result the <span class="hlt">PC</span> index corresponding to the value of coupling function EKL, irrespective of UT time, season and point of observation is determined. Validation of the <span class="hlt">PC</span> proper derivation has been testified by the following requirements imposed on the calculated PCN and PCS indices: PCN and PCS indices should be consistent with the interplanetary electric field EKL; PCN and PCS indices should be in close agreement with each other irrespective of season and UT time; indices should not demonstrate seasonal variation; indices should not demonstrate regular daily variation (i.e. dependence on UT-time). By its derivation, the <span class="hlt">PC</span> index is regarded as a proxy of the interplanetary electric field EKL affecting the magnetosphere in course of constant solar wind - magnetosphere coupling.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Janzhura, A.; Troshichev, O.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">379</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/811945"> <span id="translatedtitle">METHANE de-NOX FOR UTILITY <span class="hlt">PC</span> BOILERS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The project seeks to develop and validate a new pulverized coal combustion system to reduce utility <span class="hlt">PC</span> boiler NO{sub x} emissions to 0.15 lb per million Btu or less without post-combustion flue gas cleaning. Work during previous reporting periods completed the design, installation, shakedown and initial PRB coal testing of a 3-million Btu/h pilot system at BBP's Pilot-Scale Combustion Facility (PSCF) in Worcester, MA. Based on these results, modifications to the gas-fired preheat combustor and <span class="hlt">PC</span> burner were defined, along with a modified testing plan and schedule. A revised subcontract was executed with BBP to reflect changes in the pilot testing program. Modeling activities were continued to develop and verify revised design approaches for both the Preheat gas combustor and <span class="hlt">PC</span> burner. Reactivation of the pilot test system was then begun with BBP personnel. During the current reporting period, reactivation of the pilot test system was completed with the modified Preheat gas combustor. Following shakedown of the modified gas combustor alone, a series of successful tests of the new combustor with PRB coal using the original <span class="hlt">PC</span> burner were completed. NO{sub x} at the furnace exit was reduced significantly with the modified gas combustor, to as low as 150 ppm with only 36 ppm CO (both corrected to 3% O{sub 2}). Concurrent with testing, GTI and BBP collaborated on development of two modified designs for the <span class="hlt">PC</span> burner optimized to fire preheated char and pyrolysis products from the Preheat gas combustor.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Joseph Rabovitser; Bruce Bryan; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-10-29</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">380</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMSA51D1974I"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ground-satellite observation of <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 4 pulsations by MAGDAS/CPMN and ETS-VIII geosynchronous orbit satellite</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Electromagnetic pulsations in ULF range have been studied extensively using ground and satellite observations. However, how <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 4 pulsations (6.7-22.2 mHz) propagate from the magnetosphere to the ground is not fully understand. Especially the propagation to low latitudes is unclear. We examined data obtained by the ETS-VIII satellite at the geosynchronous orbit (G.M.Lat. -12 degree, G.G.Lon. 146.0 degree) (Koga et al., 2010). We also analyzed ground data of MAGDAS/CPMN (Yumoto and the MAGDAS <span class="hlt">Group</span>, 2006). The ground data were obtained at high-latitude CHD station (G.M.Lat. 64.9 degree, G.M.Lon. 212.7 degree) and at low-latitude KUJ station (G.M.Lat. 26.1 degree, G.M.Lon. 203.0 degree). The magnetic longitudes of these ground stations are almost same as that of the ETS-VIII. <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 4 events at ETS-VIII were selected by an automated routine using FFT method which was developed by Takahashi and Ukhorskiy (2007). These <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 4 events were classified into 2 types. One type is a poloidal <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 4, in which Hp (northward) component is dominant. Another type is a toroidal mode, in which Hn (eastward) component is dominant. About 10 % of the poloidal/toroidal <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 4 pulsations, the peak frequency is identical with that of ground <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 4 pulsations, and the coherence between pulsations observed aboard ETS-VII and on the ground stations is high at the peak frequencies. Thus, about 10 % of the poloidal/toroidal <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 4 in the magnetosphere can be concluded to transmit to high-latitude ground stations as well as low-latitude stations. For such <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 4 events, H (horizontal northward) and D (horizontal eastward) components at CHD showed higher amplitude (delta(H)/delta(Hn) = 6.8, delta(H)/delta(Hp) = 10.8, delta(D)/delta(Hn) = 6.8, delta(D)/delta(Hp) = 7.4) than that at the geosynchronous orbit. On the other hand, H and D components at KUJ was attenuated considerably (delta(H)/delta(Hn) = 0.66, delta(H)/delta(Hp) = 0.89, delta(D)/delta(Hn) = 0.35, delta(D)/delta(Hp) = 0.37).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ikeda, A.; Yumoto, K.; Koga, K.; Obara, T.; Baishev, D. G.; Shevtsov, B. M.; Uozumi, T.; Abe, S.; Shishime, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a 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href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">381</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/645468"> <span id="translatedtitle">The comparison of CAP88-<span class="hlt">PC</span> version 2.0 versus CAP88-<span class="hlt">PC</span> version 1.0</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">40 CFR Part 61 (Subpart H of the NESHAP) requires DOE facilities to use approved sampling procedures, computer models, or other approved procedures when calculating Effective Dose Equivalent (EDE) values to members of the public. Currently version 1.0 of the approved computer model CAP88-<span class="hlt">PC</span> is used to calculate EDE values. The DOE has upgraded the CAP88-<span class="hlt">PC</span> software to version 2.0. This version provides simplified data entry, better printing characteristics, the use of a mouse, and other features. The DOE has developed and released version 2.0 for testing and comment. This new software is a WINDOWS based application that offers a new graphical user interface with new utilities for preparing and managing population and weather data, and several new decay chains. The program also allows the user to view results before printing. This document describes a test that confirmed CAP88-<span class="hlt">PC</span> version 2.0 generates results comparable to the original version of the CAP88-<span class="hlt">PC</span> program.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yakubovich, B.A.; Klee, K.O.; Palmer, C.R.; Spotts, P.B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">382</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/84679"> <span id="translatedtitle">Polycomb <span class="hlt">Group</span> Proteins Set the Stage for Early Lineage Commitment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Precise control of gene expression patterns is critical for the specification of cellular diversity during metazoan development. Polycomb <span class="hlt">group</span> (<span class="hlt">Pc</span>G) proteins comprise a class of transcriptional modifiers that have dynamic ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Surface, Lauren Elizabeth</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">383</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/895024"> <span id="translatedtitle">METHANE de-NOX for Utility <span class="hlt">PC</span> Boilers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The overall project objective is the development and validation of an innovative combustion system, based on a novel coal preheating concept prior to combustion, that can reduce NO{sub x} emissions to 0.15 lb/million Btu or less on utility pulverized coal (<span class="hlt">PC</span>) boilers. This NO{sub x} reduction should be achieved without loss of boiler efficiency or operating stability, and at more than 25% lower levelized cost than state-of-the-art SCR technology. A further objective is to ready technology for full-scale commercial deployment to meet the market demand for NO{sub x} reduction technologies. Over half of the electric power generated in the U.S. is produced by coal combustion, and more than 80% of these units utilize <span class="hlt">PC</span> combustion technology. Conventional measures for NOx reduction in <span class="hlt">PC</span> combustion processes rely on combustion and post-combustion modifications. A variety of combustion-based NO{sub x} reduction technologies are in use today, including low-NO{sub x} burners (LNBs), flue gas recirculation (FGR), air staging, and natural gas or other fuel reburning. Selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) are post-combustion techniques. NO{sub x} reduction effectiveness from these technologies ranges from 30 to 60% and up to 90-93% for SCR. Typically, older wall-fired <span class="hlt">PC</span> burner units produce NO{sub x} emissions in the range of 0.8-1.6 lb/million Btu. Low-NO{sub x} burner systems, using combinations of fuel staging within the burner and air staging by introduction of overfire air in the boiler, can reduce NO{sub x} emissions by 50-60%. This approach alone is not sufficient to meet the desired 0.15 lb/million Btu NO{sub x} standard with a range of coals and boiler loads. Furthermore, the heavy reliance on overfire air can lead to increased slagging and corrosion in furnaces, particularly with higher-sulfur coals, when LNBs are operated at sub-stoichiometric conditions to reduce fuel-derived NOx in the flame. Therefore, it is desirable to minimize the need for overfire air by maximizing NO{sub x} reduction in the burner. The proposed combustion concept aims to greatly reduce NO{sub x} emissions by incorporating a novel modification to conventional or low-NO{sub x} <span class="hlt">PC</span> burners using gas-fired coal preheating to destroy NO{sub x} precursors and prevent NO{sub x} formation. A concentrated <span class="hlt">PC</span> stream enters the burner, where flue gas from natural gas combustion is used to heat the <span class="hlt">PC</span> up to about 1500 F prior to coal combustion. Secondary fuel consumption for preheating is estimated to be 3 to 5% of the boiler heat input. This thermal pretreatment releases coal volatiles, including fuel-bound nitrogen compounds into oxygen-deficient atmosphere, which converts the coal-derived nitrogen compounds to molecular N{sub 2} rather than NO. Design, installation, shakedown, and testing on Powder River Basin (PRB) coal at a 3-million Btu/h pilot system at RPI's (Riley Power, Inc.) pilot-scale combustion facility (PSCF) in Worcester, MA demonstrated that the <span class="hlt">PC</span> PREHEAT process has a significant effect on final O{sub x} formation in the coal burner. Modifications to both the pilot system gas-fired combustor and the <span class="hlt">PC</span> burner led to NO{sub x} reduction with PRB coal to levels below 0.15 lb/million Btu with CO in the range of 35-112 ppmv without any furnace air staging.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bruce Bryan; Serguei Nester; Joseph Rabovitser; Stan Wohadlo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-09-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">384</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=MSFC-9607423&hterms=fornax&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dfornax"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hubble <span class="hlt">Space</span> Telescope Image</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This color image from the Hubble <span class="hlt">Space</span> Telescope (HST) shows a region in NGC 1365, a barred spiral galaxy located in a cluster of galaxies called Fornax. A barred spiral galaxy is characterized by a bar of stars, dust, and gas across its center. The black and white photograph from a ground-based telescope shows the entire galaxy, which is visible from the Southern Hemisphere. The galaxy is estimated to be 60-million light-years from Earth. This image was taken by the HST Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 (WF/<span class="hlt">PC</span>-2).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">385</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020086598&hterms=The+Relation+between+the+Sociocultural+Attitudes+towards+Appearance+the+Lifestyle+Self-Esteem+of+Adolescents&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3D%2528%2528%2528%2528%2528%2528%2528%2528%2528%2528%2528%2528The%2BRelation%2529%2Bbetween%2529%2Bthe%2529%2BSociocultural%2529%2BAttitudes%2529%2Btowards%2529%2BAppearance%2529%2Bthe%2529%2BLifestyle%2529%2BSelf-Esteem%2529%2Bof%2529%2BAdolescents%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Space</span> Resources</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Space</span> resources must be used to support life on the Moon and exploration of Mars. Just as the pioneers applied the tools they brought with them to resources they found along the way rather than trying to haul all their needs over a long supply line, so too must <span class="hlt">space</span> travelers apply their high technology tools to local resources. The pioneers refilled their water barrels at each river they forded; moonbase inhabitants may use chemical reactors to combine hydrogen brought from Earth with oxygen found in lunar soil to make their water. The pioneers sought temporary shelter under trees or in the lee of a cliff and built sod houses as their first homes on the new land; settlers of the Moon may seek out lava tubes for their shelter or cover <span class="hlt">space</span> station modules with lunar regolith for radiation protection. The pioneers moved further west from their first settlements, using wagons they had built from local wood and pack animals they had raised; <span class="hlt">space</span> explorers may use propellant made at a lunar base to take them on to Mars. The concept for this report was developed at a NASA-sponsored summer study in 1984. The program was held on the Scripps campus of the University of California at San Diego (UCSD), under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). It was jointly managed under the California <span class="hlt">Space</span> Inst. and the NASA Johnson <span class="hlt">Space</span> Center, under the direction of the Office of Aeronautics and <span class="hlt">Space</span> Technology (OAST) at NASA Headquarters. The study participants (listed in the addendum) included a <span class="hlt">group</span> of 18 university teachers and researchers (faculty fellows) who were present for the entire 10-week period and a larger <span class="hlt">group</span> of attendees from universities, Government, and industry who came for a series of four 1-week workshops. The organization of this report follows that of the summer study. <span class="hlt">Space</span> Resources consists of a brief overview and four detailed technical volumes: (1) Scenarios; (2) Energy, Power, and Transport; (3) Materials; (4) Social Concerns. Although many of the included papers got their impetus from workshop discussions, most have been written since then, thus allowing the authors to base new applications on established information and tested technology. All these papers have been updated to include the authors' current work. This overview, drafted by faculty fellow Jim Burke, describes the findings of the summer study, as participants explored the use of <span class="hlt">space</span> resources in the development of future <span class="hlt">space</span> activities and defined the necessary research and development that must precede the practical utilization of these resources. <span class="hlt">Space</span> resources considered included lunar soil, oxygen derived from lunar soil, material retrieved from near-Earth asteroids, abundant sunlight, low gravity, and high vacuum. The study participants analyzed the direct use of these resources, the potential demand for products from them, the techniques for retrieving and processing <span class="hlt">space</span> resources, the necessary infrastructure, and the economic tradeoffs. This is certainly not the first report to urge the utilization of <span class="hlt">space</span> resources in the development of <span class="hlt">space</span> activities. In fact, <span class="hlt">Space</span> Resources may be seen as the third of a trilogy of NASA Special Publications reporting such ideas arising from similar studies. It has been preceded by <span class="hlt">Space</span> Settlements: A Design Study (NASA SP-413) and <span class="hlt">Space</span> Resources and <span class="hlt">Space</span> Settlements (NASA SP-428). And other, contemporaneous reports have responded to the same themes. The National Commission on <span class="hlt">Space</span>, led by Thomas Paine, in Pioneering the <span class="hlt">Space</span> Frontier, and the NASA task force led by astronaut Sally Ride, in Leadership and America's Future in <span class="hlt">Space</span>, also emphasize expansion of the <span class="hlt">space</span> Infrastructure; more detailed exploration of the Moon, Mars, and asteroids; an early start on the development of the technology necessary for using <span class="hlt">space</span> resources; and systematic development of the skills necessary for long-term human presence in <span class="hlt">space</span>. Our report does not represent any Government-authorized view or official NASA policy. NASA's official response to these challenging op</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McKay, Mary Fae (Editor); McKay, David S. (Editor); Duke, Michael S. (Editor)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">386</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2475600"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mutations in the Glucose-6-Phosphatase-? (G6<span class="hlt">PC</span>) Gene that Cause Type Ia Glycogen Storage Disease</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Glucose-6-phosphatase-? (G6<span class="hlt">PC</span>) is a key enzyme in glucose homeostasis that catalyzes the hydrolysis of glucose-6-phosphate to glucose and phosphate in the terminal step of gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis. Mutations in the G6<span class="hlt">PC</span> gene, located on chromosome 17q21, result in glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia), an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder. GSD-Ia patients manifest a disturbed glucose homeostasis, characterized by fasting hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, nephromegaly, hyperlipidemia, hyperuricemia, lactic acidemia, and growth retardation. G6<span class="hlt">PC</span> is a highly hydrophobic glycoprotein, anchored in the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum with the active center facing into the lumen. To date, 54 missense, 10 nonsense, 17 insertion/deletion, and 3 splicing mutations in the G6<span class="hlt">PC</span> gene have been identified in more than 550 patients. Of these, 50 missense, 2 nonsense, and 2 insertion/deletion mutations have been functionally characterized for their effects on enzymatic activity and stability. While GSD-Ia is not more prevalent in any ethnic <span class="hlt">group</span>, mutations unique to Caucasian, oriental, and Jewish populations have been described. Despite this, GSD-Ia patients exhibit phenotypic heterogeneity and a stringent genotype-phenotype relationship does not exist. PMID:18449899</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chou, Janice Y.; Mansfield, Brian C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">387</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3705385"> <span id="translatedtitle">Astaxanthin Suppresses MPP+-Induced Oxidative Damage in <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 Cells through a Sp1/NR1 Signaling Pathway</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objective: To investigate astaxanthin (ATX) neuroprotection, and its mechanism, on a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridine ion (MPP+)-induced cell model of Parkinsons disease. Methods: Mature, differentiated <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cells treated with MPP+ were used as an in vitro cell model. The MTT assay was used to investigate cell viability after ATX treatment, and western blot analysis was used to observe Sp1 (activated transcription factor 1) and NR1 (NMDA receptor subunit 1) protein expression, real-time PCR was used to monitor Sp1 and NR1 mRNA, and cell immunofluorescence was used to determine the location of Sp1 and NR1 protein and the nuclear translocation of Sp1. Results: <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cell viability was significantly reduced by MPP+ treatment. The expression of Sp1 and NR1 mRNA and protein were increased compared with the control (p < 0.01). Following co-treatment with ATX and MPP+, cell viability was significantly increased, and Sp1 and NR1 mRNA and protein were decreased, compared with the MPP+ <span class="hlt">groups</span> (p < 0.01). In addition, mithracycin A protected <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cells from oxidative stress caused by MPP+ by specifically inhibiting the expression of Sp1. Moreover, cell immunofluorescence revealed that ATX could suppress Sp1 nuclear transfer. Conclusion: ATX inhibited oxidative stress induced by MPP+ in <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cells, via the SP1/NR1 signaling pathway. PMID:23538867</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ye, Qinyong; Zhang, Xiaodong; Huang, Bixia; Zhu, Yuangui; Chen, Xiaochun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">388</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.sec.noaa.gov/SWN/index.html"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Space</span> Weather Now</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Space</span> Weather Now page is intended to give the non-technical user a "plain language" look at <span class="hlt">space</span> weather. It includes information about relevant events and announcements, data from and about different instruments and satellites watching various aspects of <span class="hlt">space</span> weather, alerts and advisories, daily themes of products and services, and links appropriate for the various <span class="hlt">groups</span> of users.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Center, Space E.; Service, National O.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">389</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www2.hawaii.edu/~ruizhang/ee205/Group/GroupAssignment-1.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Group</span> Assignment-1 <span class="hlt">Group</span> A <span class="hlt">Group</span> B <span class="hlt">Group</span> C</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Group</span> Assignment-1 <span class="hlt">Group</span> A <span class="hlt">Group</span> B <span class="hlt">Group</span> C Shirkhodai, Arta ( artashir ) Kurozumi, Dean ( kurozumi ) Trang, Derrick ( trangd ) Yim, Gilbert ( gyim ) Marchant, Richard ( rmarchan) Young, Garrett ( garrettz</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, Rui</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">390</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www2.hawaii.edu/~ruizhang/ee205/Group/GroupAssignment-2.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Group</span> Assignment-2 <span class="hlt">Group</span> A <span class="hlt">Group</span> B <span class="hlt">Group</span> C</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Group</span> Assignment-2 <span class="hlt">Group</span> A <span class="hlt">Group</span> B <span class="hlt">Group</span> C Shirkhodai, Arta ( artashir ) Kurozumi, Dean ( kurozumi ( cobatake ) Shultz, Allen ( shultzam ) Yamakawa, Kelsie ( kayama ) Young, Garrett ( garrettz ) Walser, Ryan</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, Rui</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">391</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20110020356&hterms=std&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dstd"> <span id="translatedtitle">Four-Channel <span class="hlt">PC</span>/104 MIL-STD-1553 Circuit Board</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The mini bus interface card (miniBIC) is the first four-channel electronic circuit board that conforms to MIL-STD-1553 and to the electrical-footprint portion of <span class="hlt">PC</span>/104. [MIL-STD-1553 is a military standard that encompasses a method of communication and electrical- interface requirements for digital electronic subsystems connected to a data bus. <span class="hlt">PC</span>/104 is an industry standard for compact, stackable modules that are fully compatible (in architecture, hardware, and software) with personal-computer data- and power-bus circuitry.] Prior to the development of the miniBIC, only one- and two-channel <span class="hlt">PC</span>/104 MIL-STD-1553 boards were available. To obtain four channels, it was necessary to include at least two boards in a <span class="hlt">PC</span>/104 stack. In comparison with such a two-board stack, the miniBIC takes up less <span class="hlt">space</span>, consumes less power, and is more reliable. In addition, the miniBIC includes 32 digital input/output channels. The miniBIC (see figure) contains four MIL-STD-1553B hybrid integrated circuits (ICs), four transformers, a field-programmable gate array (FPGA), and an Industry Standard Architecture (ISA) interface. Each hybrid IC includes a MILSTD-1553 dual transceiver, memory-management circuitry, processor interface logic circuitry, and 64Kx16 bits of shared static random access memory. The memory is used to configure message and data blocks. In addition, 23 16-bit registers are available for (1) configuring the hybrid IC for, and starting it in, various modes of operation; (2) reading the status of the functionality of the hybrid IC; and (3) resetting the hybrid IC to a known state. The miniBIC can operate as a remote terminal, bus controller, or bus monitor. The FPGA provides the chip-select and data-strobe signals needed for operation of the hybrid ICs. The FPGA also receives interruption signals and forwards them to the ISA bus. The ISA interface connects the address, data, and control interfaces of the hybrid ICs to the ISA backplane. Each channel is, in effect, a MIL-STD-1553 interface that can operate either independently of the others or else as a redundant version of one of the others. The transformer in each channel provides electrical isolation between the rest of the miniBIC circuitry and the bus to which that channel is connected.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cox, Gary L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">392</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMSM31B2298M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coordinated satellite and ground observations of global monochromatic <span class="hlt">Pc</span>5 oscillations on the morning side</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Strong <span class="hlt">Pc</span>5 activity on the morning side was observed by the CARISMA ground magnetometer array on 7 December 2002, for several hours under moderately high solar wind speed (~580 km/s). In this study, we focus on the 30-min time interval from 1245 to 1315 UT, when a narrow-band <span class="hlt">Pc</span>5 oscillation (~4.0 mHz) was clearly visible near 6 MLT over a wide range of L, 4-11. During this interval, the Cluster spacecraft was crossing L shells in the MLT sector covered by the CARISMA array. On the ground the X component of the magnetic field indicated the classical field line resonance signatures, latitudinal localization in amplitude (peaking at 300 nT at the Gillam station, L=6.6) and 180-degree phase shift. The ground <span class="hlt">Pc</span>5 propagated tailward at a low azimuthal number of 3~5, suggesting that the ground <span class="hlt">Pc</span>5 was caused by an external source. In the magnetosphere there were toroidal oscillations, which had a constant (i.e., global) frequency of ~4.0 mHz over the L shells 3.8-6.2 covered by the Custer spacecraft. Consistent with the ground observations, the toroidal wave amplitude in <span class="hlt">space</span> was large at Cluster 3, which was moving from L= 6.2 to L= 4.8, and small at the other three Cluster spacecraft located at L= 4.0-4.5. The toroidal magnetic and electric field components at each Cluster spacecraft were approximately 90 degrees out of phase, as expected for a standing Alfven wave. In addition, the toroidal oscillations at the Cluster were accompanied by a significant compressional component with the same frequency, and by periodic modulations in oxygen ions of 1-38 keV and energetic electrons of 30-120 keV. We discuss possible mechanisms for the excitation of the global 4 mHz oscillations and for the modulation of such particle fluxes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Motoba, T.; Takahashi, K.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Ohtani, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">393</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFMSM33A1745F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Global nature of <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 5 magnetic pulsation during the WHI observation campaign</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In conjunction with the activities of IHY(International Heliophysical Year), an international observation campaign was planned and carried out from March 20 to April 16 of 2008. The name of this campaign is Whole Heliosphere Interval (WHI). During WHI, the nations of the world worked together to collect relevant scientific data. As a result, there now exists an exceptionally good data set of multi-point ground-based and satellite magnetometer data for this time frame. There were no clear and outstanding geomagnetic storms during WHI, but there were some moderate geomagnetically active moments. For example, on March 26, Dst index decreased from 25 nT to -41 nT for 10 hours(1000 -1900 UT). The amplitude of <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 5 pulsation in the frequency band between 1.67 and 6.67 mHz at the MAGDAS stations increased for few days after March 26. Using magnetometer data obtained globally from ULTIMA(Ultra Large Terrestrial International Magnetic Array) stations, we will investigate the occurrence and wave characteristics(amplitude, period and phase) of <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 5 pulsations. Particularly high-latitude <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 5 observed at THEMIS (the Time History of Events and Macroscopic Interactions during Substorms), CARISMA(Canadian Array for Realtime Investigations of Magnetic Activity) and McMaC (Mid-continent Magnetoseismic Chain) stations will be compared with equatorial-latitude <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 5 observed at MAGDAS stations(TIR, DAV, YAP, ANC, EUS, ILR, and UT=LT+5h, +8h, +9h, -5h, -2h and 0h, respectively). Acknowledgment: MAGDAS data used in this paper were obtained in mutual collaborations with the following representatives of various organizations; Prof. Archana Bhattacharya(Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, TIR), Fr. Daniel McNamara(Manila Observatory, DAV), Dr. David Aranug(Weather Service Office YAP, YAP), Dr. Ronald Woodman Pollitt(Instituto Geofisico del Peru, ANC), Dr. Severino L. G. Dutra(Brazilian National <span class="hlt">Space</span> Research Institute (INPE), EUS), Dr. A. Babatunde Rabiu(Federal University of Technology, ILR).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fujimoto, A.; Tokunaga, T.; Abe, S.; Uozumi, T.; Yoshikawa, A.; Yumoto, K.; Group, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">394</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008lgpg.book.....G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lie <span class="hlt">Groups</span>, Physics, and Geometry</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">1. Introduction; 2. Lie <span class="hlt">groups</span>; 2. Matrix <span class="hlt">groups</span>; 4. Lie algebras; 5. Matrix algebras; 6. Operator algebras; 7. Exponentiation; 8. Structure theory for Lie algebras; 9. Structure theory for simple Lie algebras; 10. Root <span class="hlt">spaces</span> and Dykin diagrams; 11. Real forms; 12. Riemannian symmetric <span class="hlt">spaces</span>; 13. Contraction; 14. Hydrogenic atoms; 15. Maxwell's equations; 16. Lie <span class="hlt">groups</span> and differential equations; References; Index.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gilmore, Robert</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">395</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/23197385"> <span id="translatedtitle">Preparation and characterization of <span class="hlt">PC</span>\\/SBR heterogeneous cation exchange membrane filled with carbon nano-tubes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Polycarbonate (<span class="hlt">PC</span>)\\/styrenebutadienerubber (SBR) blend heterogeneous cation exchange membranes were prepared by solution casting technique using tetrahydrofuran as solvent and cation exchange resin powder as functional <span class="hlt">groups</span> agent. Multi-walled carbon nano-tube (MWCNT) was selected as inorganic filler additive. The effect of additive loading on properties of prepared membranes was studied. Sonication was used to help in appropriate dispersion of particles in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. M. Hosseini; S. S. Madaeni; A. R. Khodabakhshi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">396</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ieor.berkeley.edu/~oren/pubs/III.B.1.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Els UK Job: CDI Ch01-I047172 30-10-2007 9:17a.m. Page:25 Trim:165240MM Float:Top/Bot TS: Integra, India Fonts: Palatino & Helvetica 9/11 Margins:Top:4<span class="hlt">PC</span> Gutter:5<span class="hlt">PC</span> T. W:30<span class="hlt">PC</span> open recto 1 Color 49 Lines</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">, India Fonts: Palatino & Helvetica 9/11 Margins:Top:4<span class="hlt">PC</span> Gutter:5<span class="hlt">PC</span> T. W:30<span class="hlt">PC</span> open recto 1 Color 49 Lines?240MM Float:Top/Bot TS: Integra, India Fonts: Palatino & Helvetica 9/11 Margins:Top:4<span class="hlt">PC</span> Gutter:5<span class="hlt">PC</span> T. W:165?240MM Float:Top/Bot TS: Integra, India Fonts: Palatino & Helvetica 9/11 Margins:Top:4<span class="hlt">PC</span> Gutter:5<span class="hlt">PC</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Oren, Shmuel S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">397</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3897264"> <span id="translatedtitle">Calibration Tools for <span class="hlt">PC</span>-Based Vision Assessment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper details the research and development of the <span class="hlt">PC</span> Vision system, a unique calibration and monitoring subsystem that will enable use of personal computers as accurately calibrated and controlled vision test instruments. The need for such a system is evident. Display intensity and chromaticity, test distance, room illumination, and a number of other variables must be controlled to avoid unexplained discrepancies in test outcomes, within and between individuals and test locations. Modern displays (CRT-, LCD-, or projector-based) have sufficient resolution, gamut, and stability to allow high-quality stimulus presentation. The <span class="hlt">PC</span> Vision system consists of two categorical functions one to calibrate screen properties, the other to monitor room and test setup conditions packaged into a fully integrated hardware prototype. PMID:19964242</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rolkosky, David J.; Dagnelie, Gislin; Kramer, Kevin; Havey, Gary; Seifert, Gregory J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">398</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19960014066&hterms=green+concrete&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dgreen%2Bconcrete"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnetospheric filter effect for <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 3 Alfven mode waves</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a ray-tracing study of the propagation of <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 3 Alfven mode waves originating at the dayside magnetopause. This study reveals interesting features of magnetospheric filter effect for these waves. <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 3 Alfven mode waves cannot penetrate to low Earth altitudes unless the wave frequency is below approximately 30 mHz. Configurations of the dispersion curves and the refractive index show that the gyroresonance and pseudo-cutoff introduced by the heavy ion O(+) block the waves. When the O(+) concentration is removed from the plasma composition, the barriers caused by the O(+) no longer exist, and waves with much higher frequencies than 30 mHz can penetrate to low altitudes. The result that the 30 mHz or lower frequency Alfven waves can be guided to low altitudes agrees with ground-based power spectrum observation at high altitudes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, X.; Comfort, R. H.; Gallagher, D. L.; Green, J. L.; Musielak, Z. E.; Moore, T. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">399</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19960003151&hterms=green+concrete&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dgreen%2Bconcrete"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnetospheric filter effect for <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 3 Alfven mode waves</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a ray-tracing study of the propagation of <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 3 Alfven mode waves originating at the dayside magnetopause. This study reveals interesting features of a magnetospheric filter effect for these waves. <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 3 Alfven mode waves cannot penetrate to low Earth altitudes unless the wave frequency is below approximately 30 mHz. Configurations of the dispersion curves and the refractive index show that the gyroresonance and pseudo-cutoff introduced by the heavy ion O(+) block the waves. When the O(+) concentration is removed from the plasma composition, the barriers caused by the O(+) no longer exist, and waves with much higher frequencies than 30 mHz can penetrate to low altitudes. The result that the 30 mHz or lower frequency Alfven waves can be guided to low altitudes agrees with ground-based power spectrum observations at high latitudes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, X.; Comfort, R. H.; Gallagher, D. L.; Green, J. L.; Musielak, Z. E.; Moore, T. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">400</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/1285498"> <span id="translatedtitle">Power<span class="hlt">PC</span> 603, A Microprocessor for Portable Computers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Power<span class="hlt">PC</span> 603 incorporates a variety of features to reduce power dissipation: dynamic idle-time shutdown of separate execution units, low-power cache design, and power considerations for standard cells, data-path elements, and clocking. System-level features include three software-programmable static power management modes and a hardware-programmable phase-lock loop. Operating at 80 MHz, the 603 typically dissipates 2.2 W, while achieving an estimated</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sonya Gary; Pete Ippolito; Gianfranco Gerosa; Carl Dietz; Jim Eno; Hector Sanchez</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> 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showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">401</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60792064"> <span id="translatedtitle">METHANE de-NOX for Utility <span class="hlt">PC</span> Boilers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The project seeks to develop and validate a new pulverized coal combustion system to reduce utility <span class="hlt">PC</span> boiler NO emissions to 0.15 lb\\/million Btu or less without post-combustion flue gas cleaning. Work during the quarter included continuation of the equipment fabrication effort for pilot system components. Successful proof-of-performance testing of the IGT-designed pilot-scale natural gas-fired coal preheat combustor was completed</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Joseph Rabovitser; Bruce Bryan; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">402</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49953932"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">PC</span>-based multiprocessor robot vision system</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A robot vision system was designed, built, and tested in real-world applications (guidance of a mobile robot and tracking of colored objects). It consists of a commercial frame grabber and a number of processing elements using the Intel 80960CA RISC processor as CPU, each of them realized as a plug-in card for a standard <span class="hlt">PC</span>. The underlying system concepts and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Volker Graefe; Hans Meier</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">403</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2909009"> <span id="translatedtitle">Structure and Water Permeability of Fully Hydrated Diphytanoyl<span class="hlt">PC</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Diphytanoylphosphatidylcholine (DPhy<span class="hlt">PC</span>) is a branched chain lipid often used for model membrane studies, including peptide/lipid interactions, ion channels and lipid rafts. This work reports results of volume measurements, water permeability measurements Pf, X-ray scattering from oriented samples, and x-ray and neutron scattering from unilamellar vesicles at T=30 C. We measured the volume/lipid VL = 1426 1 3. The area/lipid was found to be 80.5 1.5 2 when both x-ray and neutron data were combined with the SDP model analysis (Ku?erka et al., 2008); this is substantially larger than the area of DOPC which has the largest area of the common linear chain lipids. Pf was measured to be 7.0 1.0 10?3 cm/sec; this is considerably smaller than predicted by the recently proposed 3-slab model (Nagle et al., 2008). This disagreement can be understood if there is a diminished diffusion coefficient in the hydrocarbon core of DPhy<span class="hlt">PC</span> and that is supported by previous molecular dynamics simulations (Shinoda et al., 2004). While the DPhy<span class="hlt">PC</span> head-head thickness (DHH= 36.4 ), and Hamaker parameter (H=4.5 10?21J) were similar to the linear chain lipid DOPC, the bending modulus (KC=5.2 0.5 10?21J) was 30% smaller. Our results suggest that, from the biophysical perspective, DPhy<span class="hlt">PC</span> belongs to a different family of lipids than phosphatidylcholines that have linear chain hydrocarbon chains. PMID:20447383</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Kim, Dong Joo; Akhunzada, Nadia; Ku?erka, Norbert; Mathai, John C.; Katsaras, John; Zeidel, Mark; Nagle, John F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">404</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/803712"> <span id="translatedtitle">METHANE de-NOX FOR UTILITY <span class="hlt">PC</span> BOILERS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The project seeks to develop and validate a new pulverized coal combustion system to reduce utility <span class="hlt">PC</span> boiler NO{sub x} emissions to 0.15 lb/million Btu or less without post-combustion flue gas cleaning. Work during previous reporting periods completed the design, installation, shakedown and initial PRB coal testing of a 3-million Btu/h pilot system at BBP's Pilot-Scale Combustion Facility (PSCF) in Worcester, MA. Based on these results, modifications to the gas-fired preheat combustor and <span class="hlt">PC</span> burner were defined, along with a modified testing plan and schedule. During the current reporting period, a revised subcontract was executed with BBP to reflect changes in the pilot testing program. Modeling activities were continued to develop and verify revised design approaches for both the Preheat gas combustor and <span class="hlt">PC</span> burner. Reactivation of the pilot test system was begun with BBP personnel. A presentation on the project results to date was given at the NETL-sponsored 2002 Conference on SCR and SNCR for NO{sub x} Control on May 15-16, 2002 in Pittsburgh PA. The overall project objective is the development and validation of an innovative combustion system, based on a novel coal preheating concept prior to combustion, that can reduce NO{sub x} emissions to 0.15 lb/million Btu or less on utility pulverized coal (<span class="hlt">PC</span>) boilers. This NO{sub x} reduction should be achieved without loss of boiler efficiency or operating stability, and at more than 25% lower levelized cost than state-of-the-art SCR technology. A further objective is to make this technology ready for full-scale commercial deployment in order to meet an anticipated market demand for NO{sub x} reduction technologies resulting from the EPA's NO{sub x} SIP call.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Joseph Rabovitser; Bruce Bryan; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-07-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">405</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49855716"> <span id="translatedtitle">An on-line <span class="hlt">PC</span>-based converter PWM modulator</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Developments in power control techniques for pulsewidth-modulated (PWM) inverters are often ignored because of lack of time for adequate testing and evaluation. The programmable <span class="hlt">PC</span>-based PWM described is designed to alleviate this problem. The modulator is capable of generating, in ready-to-use form, gating signals for any type of PWM scheme and most types of converters. It can also generate and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. Vincenti; P. D. Ziogas; R. V. Patel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">406</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/821161"> <span id="translatedtitle">A multithreaded Power<span class="hlt">PC</span> processor for commercial servers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper describes the microarchitecture of the RS64 IV, a multithreaded Power<span class="hlt">PC</span>, processor, and its memory system. Because this processor is used only in IBM iSeries, and pSeries, commercial servers, it is optimized solely for commercial server workloads. Increasing miss rates because of trends in commercial server applications and increasing latency of cache misses because of rapidly increasing clock frequency</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John M. Borkenhagen; Richard J. Eickemeyer; Ronald N. Kalla; Steven R. Kunkel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">407</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26642079"> <span id="translatedtitle">Heat pipe cooling technology for desktop <span class="hlt">PC</span> CPU</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">As Pentium-IV, a high-performance <span class="hlt">PC</span> CPU, emerges, CPUs thermal design power shows sharp increase. Since conventional cooling method, aluminum extruded heat sink has disadvantages like poor cooling performance, acoustic noise increase and weight rise, cooling module in the form of remote heat exchanger using heat pipe is developed. Especially, using system fan exhausting heat inside to cool CPU reduces acoustic</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kwang-Soo Kim; Myong-Hee Won; Jong-Wook Kim; Byung-Joon Back</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">408</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060036003&hterms=multibus&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dmultibus"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">PC</span>-Based Controller for Dextrous Arms</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper describes the architecture and performance of a <span class="hlt">PC</span>-based controller for 7-DOF dextrous manipulators. The computing platform is a 486-based personal computer equipped with a bus extender to access the robot Multibus controller, together with a single board computer as the graphical engine, and with a parallel I/O board to interface with a force-torque sensor mounted on the manipulator wrist.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fiorini, Paolo; Seraji, Homayoun; Long, Mark</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">409</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/96519"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sunrise effect on dayside <span class="hlt">Pc</span> pulsations at the dip equator</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The authors analyze data from a ground based magnetometer mounted in Peru which for one year took 3 second readings of field values. When analyzed for <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 3 and 4 waves, the data at this low latitude station shows an effect at the period just after sunrise where the polarization of the waves is observed to rotate. They propose an explanation for this observation based on an induced current in the ionospheric current system.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Saka, O. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Alperovich, L. [Tel-Aviv Univ. (Israel)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">410</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007JAP...102d3512S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Structural analysis of zinc phthalocyanine (Zn<span class="hlt">Pc</span>) thin films: X-ray diffraction study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to analyze the structure of thermally evaporated zinc phthalocyanine (Zn<span class="hlt">Pc</span>) organic thin films, as functions of the substrate temperature and film thickness. A metastable ? to stable ? phase transformation has been observed when the films are coated at higher substrate temperatures. The core structure of the zinc phthalocyanine macrocycle is formed by four isoindole units, which endows the molecule with a two-dimensional conjugated ? electron system. The structural analysis and high-resolution transmittance electron microscope images, along with simulation, support the formation of molecular arrays, with the electronic structure fixing the molecular <span class="hlt">spacing</span> and producing mainly parallel arrays in small domains. These arrays produce the frontier orbital gap, which match the experimental values, and also the experimental data of periodicity, which can be reproduced theoretically.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Senthilarasu, S.; Hahn, Y. B.; Lee, Soo-Hyoung</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">411</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ChPhL..27f7204L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Capacitance of Organic Schottky Diodes Based on Copper Phthalocyanine (Cu<span class="hlt">Pc</span>)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The capacitance of an organic Schottky diode based on copper phthalocyanine (Cu<span class="hlt">Pc</span>) is investigated. Based on the organic small-signal equivalent model established, we calculate the reverse capacitance CMetal of the organic Schottky diode with different kinds of metal cathodes (Mg, Al, Au). It is found that the reverse capacitance of the organic Schottky diode shows behavior as CMg > CAl > CAu at the same frequency, and according to our analysis, the reverse Schottky junction capacitance Cj is expected to have little effect on the reverse capacitance of the organic Schottky diode, and the <span class="hlt">space</span>-charge limited current capacitance CS is considered to dominate the reverse capacitance, which limits the improvement of frequency characteristics of organic Schottky diodes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, Zhong-Liang; Wu, Zhao-Xin; Jiao, Bo; Mao, Gui-Lin; Hou, Xun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">412</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3543756"> <span id="translatedtitle">Decreased Immunoreactivity of the Polypeptide Precursor Pro-Opiomelanocortin (POMC) and the Prohormone Convertase <span class="hlt">PC</span>1/3 after Chronic Ethanol Exposure in Sprague-Dawley Rats</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background The Melanocortin (MC) peptides and opiod peptide ?-endorphin are cleaved from the polypeptide precursor proopiomelanocortin (POMC). POMC-derived peptides are generated by extensive post-translational processing that involves several enzymes including prohormome convertase 1/3 and 2 (<span class="hlt">PC</span>1/3 and <span class="hlt">PC</span>2). Because ethanol decreases POMC mRNA levels, we determined if exposure to an ethanol-containing diet (ED) would significantly reduce central immunoreactivity of POMC, <span class="hlt">PC</span>1/3, <span class="hlt">PC</span>2 and ?-endorphin. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given 18 days of access to a normal rodent chow or a control diet (CD), or short-term (4 days) or long term (18 days) access to an ED. At the end of the study, rats were perfused with 4% paraformaldehyde and their brains were sectioned into sets for processing with POMC, <span class="hlt">PC</span>1/3, <span class="hlt">PC</span>2 and ?-endorphin immunoreactivity (IR). Results Rats exposed to an ethanol containing diet for 18 days (ED18) exhibited significant reductions of POMC and <span class="hlt">PC</span>1/3 IR in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (Arc) relative to rats pair-fed a control diet (CD). On the other hand, rats exposed to an ethanol containing diet did not show any changes of central ?-endorphin or <span class="hlt">PC</span>2 IR relative to rats pair-fed a CD, regardless of length of exposure. Because there were no differences in body weights or caloric intake between the CD and ED <span class="hlt">groups</span>, reductions of POMC and <span class="hlt">PC</span>1/3 IR in ED-treated rats are best explain by ethanol exposure rather than altered energy balance. Conclusions The present study shows that ethanol site-specifically reduces POMC and <span class="hlt">PC</span>1/3 IR in rat brain. These observations are consistent with ethanol-induced reductions of ?-MSH and POMC IR that were previously reported. Since MC agonists have been shown to blunt ethanol intake in rodents, exogenous MC receptor agonists, as well as targets that may increase the synthesis of endogenous ?-MSH (e.g. <span class="hlt">PC</span>1/3) may have therapeutic value for treating alcohol abuse disorders and alcoholism. PMID:23050949</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Navarro, Montserrat; Cubero, Inmaculada; Thiele, Todd E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">413</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6292445"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of the catecholamine uptake system in <span class="hlt">PC</span>12</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The catecholamine uptake system of <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 was characterized. <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cells took up both norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) from the external medium. Uptake of both substances had Na/sup +/-dependent and Na/sup +/-independent portions. The Na/sup +/-dependent portion followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics. For NE the K/sub m/ was 0.5 ..mu..M, and the V/sub max/ was 2.7 pmol min/sup -1/ (mg protein)/sup -1/. For DA the K/sub m/ was 0.2 ..mu..M and the V/sub max/ was 3.8 pmol min/sup -1/ (mg protein)/sup -1/. The uptake of both substances was inhibited by desmethylimipramine with an IC/sub 50/ of 0.01 ..mu..M and by benztropine with an IC/sub 50/ of 1 ..mu..M. These results suggest that NE and DA are transported by the same uptake system. Xylamine (N-2-chloroethyl-N-ethyl-2-methylbenzylamine) irreversibly inhibited the NE uptake (IC/sub 50/ = 15 ..mu..M). This inhibitions was Na/sup +/-dependent and was prevented by the coincubation of xylamine with cocaine or NE during the exposure of the cells to xylamine. These results indicate that xylamine must interact with the functioning NE uptake system to inhibit the uptake. <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 accumulated (/sup 3/H)xylamine; this uptake had Na/sup +/-dependent and Na/sup +/-independent portions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Koide, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">414</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9790861"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reconstitution of synaptic vesicle biogenesis from <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cell membranes.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Neuroendocrine <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cells contain small microvesicles that closely resemble synaptic vesicles in their physical and chemical properties. Two defining characteristics of synaptic vesicles are their homogeneous size and their unique protein composition. Since synaptic vesicles arise by endocytosis from the plasma membrane, nerve terminals and <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cells must contain the molecular machinery to sort synaptic vesicles from other membrane proteins and pinch off vesicles of the correct diameter from a precursor compartment. A cell-free reconstitution system was developed that generates vesicles from <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 membrane precursors in the presence of ATP and brain cytosol and is temperature dependent. At 15 degrees C, surface-labeled synaptic vesicle proteins accumulate in a donor compartment, while labeled synaptic vesicles cannot be detected. The block of synaptic vesicle formation at 15 degrees C enables the use of the monoclonal antibody, KT3, a specific marker for the epitope-tagged synaptic vesicle protein, VAMP-TAg, to label precursors in the synaptic vesicle biogenesis pathway. From membranes labeled in vivo at 15 degrees C, vesicles generated in vitro at 37 degreesC had the sedimentation characteristics of neuroendocrine synaptic vesicles on glycerol velocity gradients, and excluded the transferrin receptor. Therefore, vesiculation and sorting can be studied in this cell-free system. PMID:9790861</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Clift-O'Grady, L; Desnos, C; Lichtenstein, Y; Fandez, V; Horng, J T; Kelly, R B</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">415</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3198073"> <span id="translatedtitle">Deletion of the G6<span class="hlt">pc</span>2 Gene Encoding the Islet-Specific Glucose-6-Phosphatase Catalytic SubunitRelated Protein Does Not Affect the Progression or Incidence of Type 1 Diabetes in NOD/ShiLtJ Mice</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">OBJECTIVE Islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunitrelated protein (IGRP), now known as G6<span class="hlt">PC</span>2, is a major target of autoreactive T cells implicated in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes in both mice and humans. This study aimed to determine whether suppression of G6p2 gene expression might therefore prevent or delay disease progression. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS G6<span class="hlt">pc</span>2?/? mice were generated on the NOD/ShiLtJ genetic background, and glycemia was monitored weekly up to 35 weeks of age to determine the onset and incidence of diabetes. The antigen specificity of CD8+ T cells infiltrating islets from NOD/ShiLtJ G6<span class="hlt">pc</span>2+/+ and G6<span class="hlt">pc</span>2?/? mice at 12 weeks was determined in parallel. RESULTS The absence of G6<span class="hlt">pc</span>2 did not affect the time of onset, incidence, or sex bias of type 1 diabetes in NOD/ShiLtJ mice. Insulitis was prominent in both <span class="hlt">groups</span>, but whereas NOD/ShiLtJ G6<span class="hlt">pc</span>2+/+ islets contained CD8+ T cells reactive to the G6<span class="hlt">pc</span>2 NRP peptide, G6<span class="hlt">pc</span>2 NRP-reactive T cells were absent in NOD/ShiLtJ G6<span class="hlt">pc</span>2?/? islets. CONCLUSIONS These results demonstrate that G6<span class="hlt">pc</span>2 is an important driver for the selection and expansion of islet-reactive CD8+ T cells infiltrating NOD/ShiLtJ islets. However, autoreactivity to G6<span class="hlt">pc</span>2 is not essential for the emergence of autoimmune diabetes. The results remain consistent with previous studies indicating that insulin may be the primary autoimmune target, at least in NOD/ShiLtJ mice. PMID:21896930</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Oeser, James K.; Parekh, Vrajesh V.; Wang, Yingda; Jegadeesh, Naresh K.; Sarkar, Suparna A.; Wong, Randall; Lee, Catherine E.; Pound, Lynley D.; Hutton, John C.; Van Kaer, Luc; OBrien, Richard M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">416</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.messenger-education.org/library/pdf/ice_space.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ice in <span class="hlt">Space</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This is a detailed lesson about <span class="hlt">space</span> and how Earth fits in it. Learners will consider the essential question, "What is <span class="hlt">space</span>?" Activities include small <span class="hlt">group</span> miming, speaking, drawing, and/or writing about <span class="hlt">space</span> and the evidence for ice in <span class="hlt">space</span>. Included are detailed games and dialogue. Native stories are shared. This is lesson 9 of 12 in the unit, Exploring Ice in the Solar System.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">417</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1407.0284v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Tensor Theory <span class="hlt">Space</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The tensor track is a background-independent discretization of quantum gravity which includes a sum over all topologies. We discuss how to define a functional renormalization <span class="hlt">group</span> flow and the Wetterich equation in the corresponding theory <span class="hlt">space</span>. This <span class="hlt">space</span> is different from the Einsteinian theory <span class="hlt">space</span> of asymptotic safety. It includes all fixed-rank tensor-invariant interactions, hence generalizes matrix models and the (Moyal) non-commutative field theory <span class="hlt">space</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vincent Rivasseau</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">418</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=80630"> <span id="translatedtitle">DIFFERENTIAL MODULATION OF CATECHOLAMINES BY CHLOROTRIAZINE HERBICIDES IN PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA (<span class="hlt">PC</span>12) CELLS IN VITRO</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Differential modulation of catecholamines by chlorotriazine herbicides in pheochromocytoma (<span class="hlt">PC</span>12) cells in vitro. Das <span class="hlt">PC</span>, McElroy WK, Cooper RL. Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 27599, USA. Epidemiological, wildlife, and lab...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">419</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/files/SpacePartnerships_NAC_2010_09_21.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">National Aeronautics and <span class="hlt">Space</span> Administration International <span class="hlt">Space</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">: Enabling Exploration · International Activities ­ Global Exploration Strategy (GES) ­ International <span class="hlt">Space</span> Exploration Coordination <span class="hlt">Group</span> (ISECG) · 14 Int'l <span class="hlt">Space</span> Agencies ­ Developing the Global Exploration Roadmap-traditional ­ Strong NASA interest in enabling commercial opportunities that contribute to exploration program success</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Waliser, Duane E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">420</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890005618&hterms=bees&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dbees"> <span id="translatedtitle">An overview of the evaluation plan for <span class="hlt">PC</span>/MISI: <span class="hlt">PC</span>-based Multiple Information System Interface</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An initial evaluation plan for the personal computer multiple information system interface (<span class="hlt">PC</span>/MISI) project is discussed. The document is intend to be used as a blueprint for the evaluation of this system. Each objective of the design project is discussed along with the evaluation parameters and methodology to be used in the evaluation of the implementation's achievement of those objectives. The potential of the system for research activities related to more general aspects of information retrieval is also discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dominick, Wayne D. (editor); Lim, Bee Lee; Hall, Philip P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a 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href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">421</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41845198"> <span id="translatedtitle">Photovoltaic characteristics of TCNQ-incorporated Cu<span class="hlt">Pc</span>-poly(p-phenylene) composite films</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Composite films (Cu<span class="hlt">Pc</span>PPPTCNQ) were produced by simultaneous deposition using copper phthalocyanine (Cu<span class="hlt">Pc</span>) as a carrier generation material, poly(p-phenylene) (PPP) as a hole transport material, and tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) as a incorporation material. Schottky barrier photovoltaic cells, consisting of a semitransparent aluminum and the Cu<span class="hlt">Pc</span>PPPTCNQ composite films, were fabricated. The junction properties and the photovoltaic properties on Al\\/Cu<span class="hlt">Pc</span>PPPTCNQ\\/ITO sandwich cells were investigated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Takayuki Iwase; Yutaka Haga</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">422</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://jnci.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/94/17/1275.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Herbal Composition <span class="hlt">PC</span>-SPES for Management of Prostate Cancer: Identification of Active Principles</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background: The herbal mixture <span class="hlt">PC</span>-SPES, used to manage advanced prostate cancer, has proven thrombogenic and highly estrogenic in clinical trials. However, attempts to identify the active compounds in <span class="hlt">PC</span>-SPES have yielded in- congruous results. Moreover, warfarin was identified in the serum of a patient taking <span class="hlt">PC</span>-SPES who experienced a bleed- ing disorder. To determine the active components in <span class="hlt">PC</span>- SPES</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Milos Sovak; Allen L. Seligson; Martin Konas; Marian Hajduch; Marek Dolezal; Miroslav Machala; Robert Nagourney</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">423</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000JChEd..77..706R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Molecular Modeling on the <span class="hlt">PC</span> (by Matthew F. Schlecht)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">"Computeraided molecular modeling doesn't exist for its own sake, but to contribute to scientific endeavor, and enable the scientist to work smarter." This is the last sentence of Schlecht's preface and it says something very important about contemporary scientific research in the academic and industrial venues. Owing to the accelerating improvement in computer technology (hardware and software) and its widespread availability, molecular modeling has become a reliable and important tool in chemical research. Consequently, experimentalists have incorporated molecular modeling techniques in their research, and partnerships with computational chemists have become common. This is a wellorganized and thorough monograph that devotes its attention to one type of molecular modeling, molecular mechanics, and one molecular modeling software package, PCMODEL. Schlecht targets two reader-user <span class="hlt">groups</span>, the novice and the journeyman modeler, and articulates three goals. He wants to provide the novice with an introduction to molecular mechanics, and after that with some practical examples of the use of empirical force field calculations. His third goal is to provide the journeyman modeler with a reference work that will aid "further study and practice". These are potentially conflicting goals, but Schlecht is, in my opinion, successful because of the way his book is organized. A comprehensive treatment such as this one is not meant to be read from cover to cover, because it is both an exposition of basic principles and a user's manual. Therefore, the novice and the experienced modeler will undoubtedly use this book in different ways. For example, a novice modeler might be advised to read the Preface and Chapter 1, which together provide a broad introduction to the historical development and goals of molecular mechanics. From there the novice could go to Chapter 5 and read section 5.1 on the components of the molecular mechanics force field, which is presented in 22 pages with plenty of graphical support. The reader is now ready to move to Chapter 6 on applications and work through the 32 exercises (Chapters 3 and 4 have an additional 11 exercises) designed to illustrate the current uses of molecular modeling in academic and industrial research. Chapter 3 (Input and Output), Chapter 4 (File Formats), and the balance of Chapter 5 can be consulted as needed. For example, Chapter 5 contains 160 pages on the evolution of the various empirical force fields in use today and important information in each case on parameterization and implementation. Besides finding a clearly written, wellorganized, thorough presentation, the reader will appreciate a number of other important features. There are numerous references (993) to the primary literature covering the field of molecular mechanics from its beginnings to mid1997, when the book went to press. There is a complete glossary of PCMODEL commands, and a comprehensive and valuable glossary (77 pages) of frequently used computer terms. There are 392 figures (many of them screen captures) providing illustrations of the PCMODEL interface in use and examples of input and output files. To aid the reader/user in obtaining expertise as a modeler, a diskette containing all the structure files for all the exercises accompanies the text. In addition, the author provides, on the same diskette, a browserreadable HTML file that contains links to a large number of pertinent resources on the World Wide Web. In summary, Molecular Modeling on the <span class="hlt">PC</span>, by Matthew Schlecht, is a very impressive contribution to the molecular modeling literature. Schlecht's book should be in every college and university library and in the personal libraries of those who want to learn more about molecular mechanics or who anticipate its use in their teaching or research.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rioux, Reviewed Frank</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">424</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://edutice.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/03/07/53/PDF/b58p129.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">LE BULLETIN DE L'EPI N 58 DES SECONDES ET DES <span class="hlt">PC</span> EN HISTOIRE-GOGRAPHIE DES "SECONDES" ET DES "<span class="hlt">PC</span>"</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">allumer le <span class="hlt">PC</span>, mettre la disquette système, mettre la disquette du programme. Avec la multiplication de l : comprendre) ses erreurs (cf. La vie du lac sur <span class="hlt">PC</span>, ou Esporif sur Nanoréseau). D'autres programmes permettent129 LE BULLETIN DE L'EPI N° 58 DES SECONDES ET DES <span class="hlt">PC</span> EN HISTOIRE-G?OGRAPHIE DES "SECONDES" ET DES</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paris-Sud XI, Université de</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">425</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-03-15/pdf/2010-5508.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 12150 - Airworthiness Directives; PILATUS Aircraft Ltd. Model <span class="hlt">PC</span>-7 Airplanes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Directives; PILATUS Aircraft Ltd. Model <span class="hlt">PC</span>-7 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation...PILATUS Aircraft Ltd. has issued PILATUS <span class="hlt">PC</span>-7 Service Bulletin No. 53-007, dated...Applicability (c) This AD applies to Model <span class="hlt">PC</span>-7 airplanes, all serial numbers,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-03-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">426</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-06-08/pdf/2010-13400.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 32251 - Airworthiness Directives; PILATUS Aircraft Ltd. Model <span class="hlt">PC</span>-7 Airplanes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Directives; PILATUS Aircraft Ltd. Model <span class="hlt">PC</span>-7 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation...Applicability (c) This AD applies to Model <span class="hlt">PC</span>-7 airplanes, all serial numbers, certificated...C.(1), (2), and (3) of PILATUS <span class="hlt">PC</span>- 7 Service Bulletin No. 53-007,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-06-08</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">427</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=power+AND+electronics&pg=5&id=EJ783218"> <span id="translatedtitle">Integrating a Single Tablet <span class="hlt">PC</span> in Chemistry, Engineering, and Physics Courses</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A tablet <span class="hlt">PC</span> is a versatile computer that combines the computing power of a notebook with the pen functionality of a PDA (Cox and Rogers 2005b). The authors adopted tablet <span class="hlt">PC</span> technology in order to improve the process and product of the lecture format in their chemistry, engineering, and physics courses. In this high-tech model, a single tablet <span class="hlt">PC</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rogers, James W.; Cox, James R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">428</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.people.vcu.edu/~clarson/gpc-total-domination.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Graffiti.<span class="hlt">pc</span> on the total domination number of a tree</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Graffiti.<span class="hlt">pc</span> on the total domination number of a tree Ermelinda DeLaVi~na , Craig E. Larson , Ryan- provements over known results for all connected graphs. keywords: Graffiti.<span class="hlt">pc</span>, total dominating set, total graphs (as was the case in Theorems 3 and 5 in [4].) Graffiti.<span class="hlt">pc</span> is a program that makes graph</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Larson, Craig E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">429</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.people.vcu.edu/~clarson/r07.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Graffiti.<span class="hlt">pc</span> on the 2-domination number of a Ermelinda DeLaVi~na</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Graffiti.<span class="hlt">pc</span> on the 2-domination number of a graph Ermelinda DeLaVi~na , Craig E. Larson , Ryan-generating computer program, Graffiti.<span class="hlt">pc</span>, was queried for upperbounds on the 2-domination number. In this paper we how they relate to our results. In 2010 Graffiti.<span class="hlt">pc</span> was queried for upperbounds on the 2-domination</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Larson, Craig E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">430</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/12583399"> <span id="translatedtitle">Chapter: Reflection <span class="hlt">groups</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This chapter is concerned with the theory of finite reflection <span class="hlt">groups</span>, that is, finite <span class="hlt">groups</span> generated by reflections in a real or complex vector <span class="hlt">space</span>. This is a rich theory, both for intrinsic reasons and as far as applications in other mathematical areas or mathematical physics are concerned. The origin of the theory can be traced back to the ancient</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">MEINOLF GECK; GUNTER MALLE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">431</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19386244"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of curcumin in <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cells.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Neurotoxicity induced by reactive oxygen species can appear as an adverse effect of chemotherapy treatment with platinum compounds, such as cisplatin. The use of this drug in clinical practice is limited due to its adverse effects, including nephrotoxicity, ototoxicity, neurotoxicity and genotoxicity. Functional foods or nutraceuticals have demonstrated potential neuroprotective activity in several experiments and models. This study aimed to investigate the possible cytotoxicity and genotoxicity/antigenotoxic effects of curcumin in <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cells exposed to cisplatin. Cell viability and genotoxicity/antigenotoxicity were evaluated by the MTT assay and micronucleus test, respectively. <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cells were treated with different concentrations of cisplatin and curcumin (0.5 -- 128 microg/mL). Analysis of the results showed that high concentrations of curcumin were cytotoxic and increased micronuclei frequency compared to the control <span class="hlt">group</span>. In the associated treatments, at all three concentrations evaluated, curcumin significantly reduced the total frequency of micronuclei induced by cisplatin. Determining the cytotoxic and genotoxic/antigenotoxic effects of this frequently used antioxidant in a neuronal model is important to assess possible hazards when combined with other chemical agents, including chemotherapy drugs used in cancer therapy. PMID:19386244</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mendona, Leonardo Meneghin; Dos Santos, Graciela Cristina; Antonucci, Gilmara Ausech; Dos Santos, Antonio Cardozo; Bianchi, Maria de Lourdes Pires; Antunes, Lusnia Maria Greggi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">432</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060026022&hterms=microprocessor&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dmicroprocessor"> <span id="translatedtitle">Single-Event Upset and Scaling Trends in New Generation of the Commercial SOI Power<span class="hlt">PC</span> Microprocessors</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">SEU from heavy-ions is measured for SOI Power<span class="hlt">PC</span> microprocessors. Results for 0.13 micron Power<span class="hlt">PC</span> with 1.1V core voltages increases over 1.3V versions. This suggests that improvement in SEU for scaled devices may be reversed. In recent years there has been interest in the possible use of unhardened commercial microprocessors in <span class="hlt">space</span> because of their superior performance compared to hardened processors. However, unhardened devices are susceptible to upset from radiation <span class="hlt">space</span>. More information is needed on how they respond to radiation before they can be used in <span class="hlt">space</span>. Only a limited number of advanced microprocessors have been subjected to radiation tests, which are designed with lower clock frequencies and higher internal core voltage voltages than recent devices [1-6]. However the trend for commercial Silicon-on-insulator (SOI) microprocessors is to reduce feature size and internal core voltage and increase the clock frequency. Commercial microprocessors with the Power<span class="hlt">PC</span> architecture are now available that use partially depleted SOI processes with feature size of 90 nm and internal core voltage as low as 1.0 V and clock frequency in the GHz range. Previously, we reported SEU measurements for SOI commercial PowerPCs with feature size of 0.18 and 0.13 m [7, 8]. The results showed an order of magnitude reduction in saturated cross section compared to CMOS bulk counterparts. This paper examines SEUs in advanced commercial SOI microprocessors, focusing on SEU sensitivity of D-Cache and hangs with feature size and internal core voltage. Results are presented for the Motorola SOI processor with feature sizes of 0.13 microns and internal core voltages of 1.3 and 1.1 V. These results are compared with results for the Motorola SOI processors with feature size of 0.18 microns and internal core voltage of 1.6 and 1.3 V.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Irom, Farokh; Farmanesh, Farhad; Kouba, Coy K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">433</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950011137&hterms=short+implants&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dshort%2Bimplants"> <span id="translatedtitle">Small satellite <span class="hlt">space</span> operations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">CTA <span class="hlt">Space</span> Systems has played a premier role in the development of the 'lightsat' programs of the 80's and 90's. The high costs and development times associated with conventional LEO satellite design, fabrication, launch, and operations continue to motivate the development of new methodologies, techniques, and generally low cost and less stringently regulated satellites. These spacecraft employ low power 'lightsat' communications (versus TDRSS for NASA's LEO's) and typically fly missions with payload/experiment suites that can succeed, for example, without heavily redundant backup systems and large infrastructures of personnel and ground support systems. Such small yet adaptable satellites are also typified by their very short contract-to-launch times (often one to two years). This paper reflects several of the methodologies and perspectives of our successful involvement in these innovative programs and suggests how they might relieve NASA's mounting pressures to reduce the cost of both the spacecraft and their companion mission operations. It focuses on the use of adaptable, sufficiently powerful yet inexpensive <span class="hlt">PC</span>-based ground systems for wide ranging user terminal (UT) applications and master control facilities for mission operations. These systems proved themselves in successfully controlling more than two dozen USAF, USN, and ARPA satellites at CTA/SS. UT versions have linked with both GEO and LEO satellites and functioned autonomously in relay roles often in remote parts of the world. LEO applications particularly illustrate the efficacy of these concepts since a user can easily mount a lightweight antenna, usually an omni or helix with light duty rotors and <span class="hlt">PC</span>-based drivers. A few feet of coax connected to a small transceiver module (the size of a small <span class="hlt">PC</span>) and a serial line to an associated <span class="hlt">PC</span> establishes a communications link and together with the <span class="hlt">PC</span> constitute a viable ground station. Applications included geomagnetic mapping; spaceborne solid state recorder validation; global store-and-forward data communications for both scientific and military purposes such as Desert Storm; UHF transponder services for both digital data and voice using a constellation; remote sensor monitoring of weather and oceanographic conditions; classified payloads; and UHF spectrum surveillance. Ground processing has been accomplished by automatic unattended or manual operation. Management of multiple assets highlights the relative ease with which two constellations totaling nine satellites were controlled from one system including constellation station keeping. Our experience in small end-to-end systems including concurrent design, development, and testing of the flight and operational ground systems offers low cost approaches to NASA scientific satellite operations of the 1990's.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Reiss, Keith</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">434</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56756133"> <span id="translatedtitle">Causality Implies the Lorentz <span class="hlt">Group</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Causality is represented by a partial ordering on Minkowski <span class="hlt">space</span>, and the <span class="hlt">group</span> of all automorphisms that preserve this partial ordering is shown to be generated by the inhomogeneous Lorentz <span class="hlt">group</span> and dilatations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E. C. Zeeman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1964-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">435</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3994845"> <span id="translatedtitle">Communication <span class="hlt">spaces</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background and objective Annotations to physical workspaces such as signs and notes are ubiquitous. When densely annotated, work areas become communication <span class="hlt">spaces</span>. This study aims to characterize the types and purpose of such annotations. Methods A qualitative observational study was undertaken in two wards and the radiology department of a 440-bed metropolitan teaching hospital. Images were purposefully sampled; 39 were analyzed after excluding inferior images. Results Annotation functions included signaling identity, location, capability, status, availability, and operation. They encoded data, rules or procedural descriptions. Most aggregated into <span class="hlt">groups</span> that either created a workflow by referencing each other, supported a common workflow without reference to each other, or were heterogeneous, referring to many workflows. Higher-level assemblies of such <span class="hlt">groupings</span> were also observed. Discussion Annotations make visible the gap between work done and the capability of a <span class="hlt">space</span> to support work. Annotations are repairs of an environment, improving fitness for purpose, fixing inadequacy in design, or meeting emergent needs. Annotations thus record the missing information needed to undertake tasks, typically added post-implemented. Measuring annotation levels post-implementation could help assess the fit of technology to task. Physical and digital <span class="hlt">spaces</span> could meet broader user needs by formally supporting user customization, programming through annotation. Augmented reality systems could also directly support annotation, addressing existing information gaps, and enhancing work with context sensitive annotation. Conclusions Communication <span class="hlt">spaces</span> offer a model of how work unfolds. Annotations make visible local adaptation that makes technology fit for purpose post-implementation and suggest an important role for annotatable information systems and digital augmentation of the physical environment. PMID:24005797</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Coiera, Enrico</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">436</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940003073&hterms=syntax&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dsyntax"> <span id="translatedtitle">CLIPS - C LANGUAGE INTEGRATED PRODUCTION SYSTEM (IBM <span class="hlt">PC</span> VERSION)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The C Language Integrated Production System, CLIPS, is a shell for developing expert systems. It is designed to allow artificial intelligence research, development, and delivery on conventional computers. The primary design goals for CLIPS are portability, efficiency, and functionality. For these reasons, the program is written in C. CLIPS meets or outperforms most micro- and minicomputer based artificial intelligence tools. CLIPS is a forward chaining rule-based language. The program contains an inference engine and a language syntax that provide a framework for the construction of an expert system. It also includes tools for debugging an application. CLIPS is based on the Rete algorithm, which enables very efficient pattern matching. The collection of conditions and actions to be taken if the conditions are met is constructed into a rule network. As facts are asserted either prior to or during a session, CLIPS pattern-matches the number of fields. Wildcards and variables are supported for both single and multiple fields. CLIPS syntax allows the inclusion of externally defined functions (outside functions which are written in a language other than CLIPS). CLIPS itself can be embedded in a program such that the expert system is available as a simple subroutine call. Advanced features found in CLIPS version 4.3 include an integrated microEMACS editor, the ability to generate C source code from a CLIPS rule base to produce a dedicated executable, binary load and save capabilities for CLIPS rule bases, and the utility program CRSV (Cross-Reference, Style, and Verification) designed to facilitate the development and maintenance of large rule bases. Five machine versions are available. Each machine version includes the source and the executable for that machine. The UNIX version includes the source and binaries for IBM RS/6000, Sun3 series, and Sun4 series computers. The UNIX, DEC VAX, and DEC RISC Workstation versions are line oriented. The <span class="hlt">PC</span> version and the Macintosh version each contain a windowing variant of CLIPS as well as the standard line oriented version. The mouse/window interface version for the <span class="hlt">PC</span> works with a Microsoft compatible mouse or without a mouse. This window version uses the proprietary CURSES library for the <span class="hlt">PC</span>, but a working executable of the window version is provided. The window oriented version for the Macintosh includes a version which uses a full Macintosh-style interface, including an integrated editor. This version allows the user to observe the changing fact base and rule activations in separate windows while a CLIPS program is executing. The IBM <span class="hlt">PC</span> version is available bundled with CLIPSITS, The CLIPS Intelligent Tutoring System for a special combined price (COS-10025). The goal of CLIPSITS is to provide the student with a tool to practice the syntax and concepts covered in the CLIPS User's Guide. It attempts to provide expert diagnosis and advice during problem solving which is typically not available without an instructor. CLIPSITS is divided into 10 lessons which mirror the first 10 chapters of the CLIPS User's Guide. The program was developed for the IBM <span class="hlt">PC</span> series with a hard disk. CLIPSITS is also available separately as MSC-21679. The CLIPS program is written in C for interactive execution and has been implemented on an IBM <span class="hlt">PC</span> computer operating under DOS, a Macintosh and DEC VAX series computers operating under VMS or ULTRIX. The line oriented version should run on any computer system which supports a full (Kernighan and Ritchie) C compiler or the ANSI standard C language. CLIPS was developed in 1986 and Version 4.2 was released in July of 1988. Version 4.3 was released in June of 1989.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Riley, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">437</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22199741"> <span id="translatedtitle">Minocycline attenuates both OGD-induced HMGB1 release and HMGB1-induced cell death in ischemic neuronal injury in <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cells</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">High mobility <span class="hlt">group</span> box-1 (HMGB1), a non-histone DNA-binding protein, is massively released into the extracellular <span class="hlt">space</span> from neuronal cells after ischemic insult and exacerbates brain tissue damage in rats. Minocycline is a semisynthetic second-generation tetracycline antibiotic which has recently been shown to be a promising neuroprotective agent. In this study, we found that minocycline inhibited HMGB1 release in oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-treated <span class="hlt">PC</span>12 cells and triggered the activation of p38mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2). The ERK kinase (MEK)1/2 inhibitor U-0126 and p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580 blocked HMGB1 release in response to OGD. Furthermore, HMGB1 triggered cell death in a dose-dependent fashion. Minocycline significantly rescued HMGB1-induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. In light of recent observations as well as the good safety profile of minocycline in humans, we propose that minocycline might play a potent neuroprotective role through the inhibition of HMGB1-induced neuronal cell death in cerebral infarction.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kikuchi, Kiyoshi [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan) [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Department of Neurosurgery, Omuta City General Hospital, 2-19-1 Takarazaka, Omuta-City, Fukuoka 836-8567 (Japan); Kawahara, Ko-ichi; Biswas, Kamal Krishna; Ito, Takashi [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan)] [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Tancharoen, Salunya [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Dentistry, Mahidol University, 6 Yothe Rd., Rajthevee Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)] [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Dentistry, Mahidol University, 6 Yothe Rd., Rajthevee Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Morimoto, Yoko [Department of Periodontology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)] [Department of Periodontology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Matsuda, Fumiyo [Division of Physical Therapy, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8560 (Japan)] [Division of Physical Therapy, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8560 (Japan); Oyama, Yoko; Takenouchi, Kazunori [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan)] [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Miura, Naoki [Laboratory of Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Arimura, Noboru; Nawa, Yuko; Meng, Xiaojie; Shrestha, Binita; Arimura, Shinichiro [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan)] [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); and others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-24</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">438</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988SPIE..914.1257K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Development Of A <span class="hlt">PC</span>-Based Radiological Imaging Workstation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Low-cost image processing systems which can provide convenient access to image processing and analysis techniques hold great potential as diagnostic and research tools in medical imaging. At the University of Washington, we have developed a <span class="hlt">PC</span>-based medium performance image processing system for use as an experimental radiological workstation. The workstation uses a standard IBM <span class="hlt">PC</span>/AT personal computer augmented with a custom designed image processor implemented on two IBM <span class="hlt">PC</span>/AT prototyping boards. Features of the system include up to 52 512 x 512 x 8 bit frame buffers (4 on the image processor board and up to 48 in the host computer memory) and a 512 x 512 x 4 bit graphics overlay memory, hardware zoom, pan and scroll, pseudo coloring, and a 60 Hz noninterlaced display. Many image processing and analysis functions are provided in this workstation, and all user requests are supported in an interactive fashion. For example, arithmetic and logical point operations between two 512 x 512 frame buffers require approximately 170 ms, while computationally intensive functions such as an 11 x 11 convolution or a full screen geometric transformation (warping) can be completed in less than 10 seconds. A full screen 2-D Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and Inverse FFT (IFFT) based on the row-column method can be completed in less than 20 seconds. The developed system can easily be configured into a DIN/PACS workstation or a biological imaging system. Hardware and software details of this workstation as well as user interface functions implemented will be discussed in the paper.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, Y.; Fahy, J. B.; DeSoto, L. A.; Haynor, D. R.; Loop, J. W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">439</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940002909&hterms=waals&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dwaals"> <span id="translatedtitle">FLUID- THERMODYNAMIC AND TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF FLUIDS (IBM <span class="hlt">PC</span> VERSION)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The accurate computation of the thermodynamic and transport properties of fluids is a necessity for many engineering calculations. The FLUID program was developed to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids in both the liquid and gas phases. Fluid properties are calculated using a simple gas model, empirical corrections, and an efficient numerical interpolation scheme. FLUID produces results that are in very good agreement with measured values, while being much faster than older more complex programs developed for the same purpose. A Van der Waals equation of state model is used to obtain approximate state values. These values are corrected for real-gas effects by model correction factors obtained from tables based on experimental data. These tables also accurately compensate for the special circumstances which arise whenever phase conditions occur. Viscosity and thermal conductivity values are computed directly from tables. Interpolation within tables is based on Lagrange's three point formula. A set of tables must be generated for each fluid implemented. FLUID currently contains tables for nine fluids including dry air and steam. The user can add tables for any fluid for which adequate thermal property data is available. The FLUID routine is structured so that it may easily be incorporated into engineering programs. The IBM 360 version of FLUID was developed in 1977. It is written in FORTRAN IV and has been implemented on an IBM 360 with a central memory requirement of approximately 222K of 8 bit bytes. The IBM <span class="hlt">PC</span> version of FLUID is written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77 and has been implemented on an IBM <span class="hlt">PC</span> with a memory requirement of 128K of 8 bit bytes. The IBM <span class="hlt">PC</span> version of FLUID was developed in 1986.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fessler, T. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">440</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AIPC.1255..417G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Isobaric PVT Behavior of Poly(Carbonate) (<span class="hlt">PC</span>)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The scaling law for relaxation times, ?(V,T) = ?(TV?), recently proposed by Casalini and Roland, is utilized in the framework of KAHR (Kovacs Aklonis Hutchinson and Ramos) phenomenological theory. With this approach it is shown that the Pressure, Volume, Temperature (PVT) data obtained on Poly(carbonate)(<span class="hlt">PC</span>) can be reliably predicted, in the region of the alpha relaxation, by using only two fitting parameters, namely: the relaxation time in the reference condition, ?g, and the fractional exponent, ? that describes the dispersion of the alpha relaxation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" 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href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">441</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002PYunO..90...50X"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">PC</span>'s printer port as an interface for astronomy instrument</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The printer port is an interface that comes with each <span class="hlt">PC</span>, and we find that it is suitable for astronomical applications. Our photometer and CCD are connected to the computers by the PRN port, and the photometer is in SPP mode and the CCD camera is in EPP mode. In this paper, the concept of SPP and EPP is described, and a brief introduction of SPP and EPP programming is given. The details in our design are illustrated in this paper. The operation system of our laptop is Windows 98, and our software is developed with the Microsoft Visual C++ 6.0.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xu, Jun; Jin, Zhen-Yu; Li, Zhi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">442</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApPhA.116.1379R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electrical properties and conduction mechanism of an organic-modified Au/Ni<span class="hlt">Pc</span>/n-InP Schottky barrier diode</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The effect of nickel phthalocyanine (Ni<span class="hlt">Pc</span>) organic interlayer on the electronic parameters of Au/n-InP Schottky contacts has been investigated using current-voltage ( I- V) and capacitance-voltage ( C- V) measurements. Measurements showed that the barrier heights and ideality factors are 0.58 eV ( I- V), 0.69 eV( C- V) and 1.32 for Au/n-InP Schottky contact and 0.80 eV ( I- V), 1.12 eV ( C- V) and 1.73 for Au/Ni<span class="hlt">Pc</span>/n-InP Schottky contact, respectively. Experimental results show that the interfacial layer of Ni<span class="hlt">Pc</span> increases the effective barrier height by the influence of the <span class="hlt">space</span> charge region of the Au/n-InP Schottky junction. Further, Cheung's and modified Norde functions are used to extract the barrier height, series resistance and ideality factors. The discrepancy between barrier heights estimated from I- V to C- V methods is also explained. Moreover, the energy distribution of interface state density is determined from the forward bias I- V data. Results show that the interface states and series resistance play an important role on electrical properties of the structures studied. The reverse leakage current conduction mechanism is investigated. Results reveal that the Schottky conduction mechanism is found to be dominant in the Au/n-InP Schottky contact. However, in the case of Au/Ni<span class="hlt">Pc</span>/n-InP Schottky contact, the Schottky conduction mechanism is found to be dominant in the higher bias region, while Poole-Frenkel conduction is found to be dominant in the lower bias region.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rajagopal Reddy, V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">443</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880010499&hterms=good+bad+CORPORATE+SOcial+responsibility&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dgood%2Bbad%2BCORPORATE%2BSOcial%2Bresponsibility"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Space</span> Station Human Factors Research Review. Volume 3: <span class="hlt">Space</span> Station Habitability and Function: Architectural Research</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Articles are presented on a <span class="hlt">space</span> station architectural elements model study, <span class="hlt">space</span> station <span class="hlt">group</span> activities habitability module study, full-scale architectural simulation techniques for <span class="hlt">space</span> stations, and social factors in <span class="hlt">space</span> station interiors.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cohen, Marc M. (editor); Eichold, Alice (editor); Heers, Susan (editor)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">444</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JBO....15e1604R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Binding to and photo-oxidation of cardiolipin by the phthalocyanine photosensitizer <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 4</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cardiolipin is a unique phospholipid of the mitochondrial inner membrane. Its peroxidation correlates with release of cytochrome c and induction of apoptosis. The phthalocyanine photosensitizer <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 4 binds preferentially to the mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. Earlier Frster resonance energy transfer studies showed colocalization of <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 4 and cardiolipin, which suggests cardiolipin as a target of photodynamic therapy (PDT) with <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 4. Using liposomes as membrane models, we find that <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 4 binds to cardiolipin-containing liposomes similarly to those that do not contain cardiolipin. <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 4 binding is also studied in MCF-7c3 cells and those whose cardiolipin content was reduced by treatment with palmitate. Decreased levels of cardiolipin are quantified by thin-layer chromatography. The similar level of binding of <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 4 to cells, irrespective of palmitate treatment, supports the lack of specificity of <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 4 binding. Thus, factors other than cardiolipin are likely responsible for the preferential localization of <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 4 in mitochondria. Nonetheless, cardiolipin within liposomes is readily oxidized by <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 4 and light, yielding apparently mono- and dihydroperoxidized cardiolipin. If similar products result from exposure of cells to <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 4-PDT, they could be part of the early events leading to apoptosis following <span class="hlt">Pc</span> 4-PDT.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rodriguez, Myriam E.; Kim, Junhwan; Delos Santos, Grace B.; Azizuddin, Kashif; Berlin, Jeffrey; Anderson, Vernon E.; Kenney, Malcolm E.; Oleinick, Nancy L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">445</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ieor.berkeley.edu/~oren/pubs/III.B.2.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Els UK Job: CDI Ch06-I047172 13-11-2007 11:15a.m. Page:245 Trim:165240MM Float:Top/Bot TS: Integra, India Fonts: Palatino & Helvetica 9/11 Margins:Top:4<span class="hlt">PC</span> Gutter:5<span class="hlt">PC</span> T. W:30<span class="hlt">PC</span> open recto 1 Color 49 Lines</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">, India Fonts: Palatino & Helvetica 9/11 Margins:Top:4<span class="hlt">PC</span> Gutter:5<span class="hlt">PC</span> T. W:30<span class="hlt">PC</span> open recto 1 Color 49 Lines: Palatino & Helvetica 9/11 Margins:Top:4<span class="hlt">PC</span> Gutter:5<span class="hlt">PC</span> T. W:30<span class="hlt">PC</span> open recto 1 Color 49 Lines 246 Competitive) and subsequent reforms under the British Elec- tricity Trading and Transmission Agreements (BETTA), which were</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Oren, Shmuel S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">446</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20090007559&hterms=communication+protocol+standards&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dcommunication%2Bprotocol%2Bstandards"> <span id="translatedtitle">Overview of International <span class="hlt">Space</span> Standards</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This presentation reviews <span class="hlt">space</span> standards as put forth by the International Organization for Standardization, additionally the organizational structure for both the international and US <span class="hlt">groups</span> are presented. A new technical committee for <span class="hlt">space</span> is proposed, areas of technical coverage are highlighted and models of <span class="hlt">space</span> communications protocol and <span class="hlt">space</span> link access service are presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hooke, Adrian J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">447</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39170219"> <span id="translatedtitle">Collagenolytic serine protease <span class="hlt">PC</span> and trypsin <span class="hlt">PC</span> from king crab Paralithodes camtschaticus: cDNA cloning and primary structure of the enzymes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">BACKGROUND: In this paper, we describe cDNA cloning of a new anionic trypsin and a collagenolytic serine protease from king crab Paralithodes camtschaticus and the elucidation of their primary structures. Constructing the phylogenetic tree of these enzymes was undertaken in order to prove the evolutionary relationship between them. RESULTS: The mature trypsin <span class="hlt">PC</span> and collagenolytic protease <span class="hlt">PC</span> contain 237 (Mcalc</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Galina N Rudenskaya; Yuri A Kislitsin; Denis V Rebrikov</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">448</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21344798"> <span id="translatedtitle">Enhanced photodynamic efficacy towards melanoma cells by encapsulation of <span class="hlt">Pc</span>4 in silica nanoparticles</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nanoparticles have been explored recently as an efficient means of delivering photosensitizers for cancer diagnosis and photodynamic therapy (PDT). Silicon phthalocyanine 4 (<span class="hlt">Pc</span>4) is currently being clinically tested as a photosensitizer for PDT. Unfortunately, <span class="hlt">Pc</span>4 aggregates in aqueous solutions, which dramatically reduces its PDT efficacy and therefore limits its clinical application. We have encapsulated <span class="hlt">Pc</span>4 using silica nanoparticles (<span class="hlt">Pc</span>4SNP), which not only improved the aqueous solubility, stability, and delivery of the photodynamic drug but also increased its photodynamic efficacy compared to free <span class="hlt">Pc</span>4 molecules. <span class="hlt">Pc</span>4SNP generated photo-induced singlet oxygen more efficiently than free <span class="hlt">Pc</span>4 as measured by chemical probe and EPR trapping techniques. Transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering measurements showed that the size of the particles is in the range of 25-30 nm. Cell viability measurements demonstrated that <span class="hlt">Pc</span>4SNP was more phototoxic to A375 or B16-F10 melanoma cells than free <span class="hlt">Pc</span>4. <span class="hlt">Pc</span>4SNP photodamaged melanoma cells primarily through apoptosis. Irradiation of A375 cells in the presence of <span class="hlt">Pc</span>4SNP resulted in a significant increase in intracellular protein-derived peroxides, suggesting a Type II (singlet oxygen) mechanism for phototoxicity. More <span class="hlt">Pc</span>4SNP than free <span class="hlt">Pc</span>4 was localized in the mitochondria and lysosomes. Our results show that these stable, monodispersed silica nanoparticles may be an effective new formulation for <span class="hlt">Pc</span>4 in its preclinical and clinical studies. We expect that modifying the surface of silicon nanoparticles encapsulating the photosensitizers with antibodies specific to melanoma cells will lead to even better early diagnosis and targeted treatment of melanoma in the future.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhao Baozhong [Laboratory of Pharmacology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Yin Junjie [Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, Food and Drug Administration, College Park, MD (United States); Bilski, Piotr J.; Chignell, Colin F. [Laboratory of Pharmacology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Roberts, Joan E. [Fordham University, Department of Natural Sciences, Lincoln Center, NY (United States); He Yuying, E-mail: yyhe@medicine.bsd.uchicago.ed [Se