Science.gov

Sample records for space probes implications

  1. Space Probe Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Managed by Marshall Space Flight Center, the Space Tug was a reusable multipurpose space vehicle designed to transport payloads to different orbital inclinations. Utilizing mission-specific combinations of its three primary modules (crew, propulsion, and cargo) and a variety of supplementary kits, the Space Tug was capable of numerous space applications. This 1970 artist's concept depicts the Tug's propulsion module launching a space probe into lunar orbit.

  2. Surface morphology implications on Langmuir probe measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, Padmashri

    2011-12-01

    Langmuir probes are extensively employed to study the plasmas in space and laboratory environments. Successful measurements require a comprehensive modeling of both the plasma environment and the probe conditions in the form of current collection models. In this thesis, the surface morphology implications on the probe current collection are investigated. This problem is applied and solved in the context of a CubeSat regime. The first problem that is investigated is the consequence of surface structural variability on the current measurements. A new model for dealing with non-uniformity of the probe surface structure is developed in this paper. This model is applied to analyze the Langmuir probe data from a sounding rocket mission that was subjected to surface structural non-homogeneities. This model would be particularly useful for CubeSat platforms where elaborate probe design procedures are not feasible. The second problem that is investigated is the surface area implications on Langmuir probe measurements. It has been established that surface area ratio of the spacecraft to that of the probe needs to be sufficiently large to make successful plasma measurements. CubeSats would therefore pose a challenge for employing Langmuir-type instruments to study the space plasma. We inspect the feasibility of making plasma measurements using Langmuir probes subjected to CubeSat area constraints. This analysis is done for a forthcoming Utah State University (USU)/Space Dynamics Lab (SDL) CubeSat mission.

  3. Gravity Probe B Space Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The space vehicle for Gravity Probe B (GP-B) arrives at the launch site at Vandenburg Air Force Base. GP-B is the relativity experiment being developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Scheduled for launch in 2003 and managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center, development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University, with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation.

  4. The navigation of space probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fliegel, H. F.; Ohandley, D. A.; Zielenbach, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    A new navigational method combining electronic measurement procedures and celestial mechanics makes it possible to conduct a space probe very close to a desired point in the neighborhood of a remote planet. Approaches for the determination of the position of the space probe in space are discussed, giving attention to the effects of errors in the employed data. The application of the navigational methods in a number of space missions is also considered.

  5. Probing planetary pollution from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Jack

    1991-01-01

    The data sets obtained from instruments that have measured carbon monoxide and tropospheric ozone from space are reviewed. These instruments include a gas cell correlation radiometer named MAPS (Measurement of Air Pollution from Satellites), the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer, and the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment. Particular attention is given to differential absorption lidar technology which can determine the vertical distribution of aerosols and selected trace gases with considerably more resolution than passive remote sensing techniques. The current plans for monitoring pollution from spaceborne platforms are also discussed.

  6. Encounter with Jupiter. [Pioneer 10 space probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Pioneer 10 space probe's encounter with the Jupiter is discussed in detail. Tables are presented which include data on the distances during the encounter, times of crossing satellite orbits, important events in the flight near Jupiter, and time of experiments. Educational study projects are also included.

  7. Compression of Space for Low Visibility Probes

    PubMed Central

    Born, Sabine; Krüger, Hannah M.; Zimmermann, Eckart; Cavanagh, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Stimuli briefly flashed just before a saccade are perceived closer to the saccade target, a phenomenon known as perisaccadic compression of space (Ross et al., 1997). More recently, we have demonstrated that brief probes are attracted towards a visual reference when followed by a mask, even in the absence of saccades (Zimmermann et al., 2014a). Here, we ask whether spatial compression depends on the transient disruptions of the visual input stream caused by either a mask or a saccade. Both of these degrade the probe visibility but we show that low probe visibility alone causes compression in the absence of any disruption. In a first experiment, we varied the regions of the screen covered by a transient mask, including areas where no stimulus was presented and a condition without masking. In all conditions, we adjusted probe contrast to make the probe equally hard to detect. Compression effects were found in all conditions. To obtain compression without a mask, the probe had to be presented at much lower contrasts than with masking. Comparing mislocalizations at different probe detection rates across masking, saccades and low contrast conditions without mask or saccade, Experiment 2 confirmed this observation and showed a strong influence of probe contrast on compression. Finally, in Experiment 3, we found that compression decreased as probe duration increased both for masks and saccades although here we did find some evidence that factors other than simply visibility as we measured it contribute to compression. Our experiments suggest that compression reflects how the visual system localizes weak targets in the context of highly visible stimuli. PMID:27013989

  8. Galileo Space Probe News Conference. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) video release presents Part 1 of a press conference regarding the successful entry of the Galileo Space Probe into Jupiter's atmosphere. The press conference panel is comprised of twelve principal investigators and project scientists that oversee the Galileo mission. Among these panelists, William J. O'Neil (Jet Propulsion Lab.) begins the video praising all of the scientists that worked on the orbiter mission. He then presents a visual overview of Galileo's overall mission trajectory and schedule. Marcie Smith (NASA Ames Research Center) then describes the Galileo Probe mission and the overall engineering and data acquisition aspects of the Probe's Jupiter atmospheric entry. Dr. Richard Young (NASA Ames Research Center) follows with a brief scientific overview, describing the measurements of the atmospheric composition as well as the instruments that were used to gather the data. Atmospheric pressure, temperature, density, and radiation levels of Jupiter were among the most important parameters measured. It is explained that these measurements would be helpful in determining among other things, the overall dynamic meteorology of Jupiter. A question and answer period follows the individual presentations. Atmospheric thermal structure, water abundances, wind profiles, radiation, cloud structure, chemical composition, and electricity are among the topics discussed. Parts 2 and 3 of the press conference can be found in document numbers NONP-NASA-VT-2000001074, and NONP-NASA-VT-2000001075.

  9. Employment of Asteroids for Movement Space Ship and Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    At present, rockets are used to change the trajectory of space ships and probes. This method is very expensive and requires a lot of fuel, which limits the feasibility of space stations, interplanetary space ships, and probes. Sometimes space probes use the gravity field of a planet. However, there are only 9 planets in our solar system and they are separated by great distances. There are tens of millions of asteroids in outer space. The author offers a revolutionary method for changing the trajectory of space probes. This method uses the kinetic or rotary energy of asteroids, meteorites or other space bodies (small planets, natural planet satellites, etc.). to increase (to decrease) ship (probe) speed up to 1000 m/sec (or more) and to get any new direction in outer space. The flight possibilities of space ships and probes are increased by a factor of millions.

  10. Wave Probe - New Instrument For Space Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korepanov, V.; Dudkin, F.

    2007-12-01

    The dispersion relations are very important for the wave activity study in space plasmas. One of the most efficient methods for their analysis is the simultaneous measurements of spatial current density and magnetic field fluctuations during such a wave process. Whereas the measurement of the magnetic field is a routine task realized onboard practically every spacecraft (SC), the direct measurement of spatial current density (SCD) still remains a complicated scientific and technological problem. First attempt to solve it was executed in late 60-ties by a group headed by F. Mozer. They proposed and launched in a rocket experiment the device named "Split Langmuir Probe" (SLP) - two conducting plates separated by a thin insulated split. Unfortunately this experiment failed what diverted the attention of experimenters in space branch from this instrument for many years, practically till now. But the importance to know the SCD stimulated the development of new principles and devices to measure it. A short review of known versions is discussed. The newly evoked interest to this problem caused next attempt to improve the SLP construction and methodology of its application for SCD measurements, which resulted in first successful attempt in 1985: the measured SCD onboard Prognos-10 SC in the bow shock region was in rather good agreement with the calculated value. This attempt was continued onboard Interball-Tail SC (1995-2000) where again a qualitatively good coincidence of measured and calculated values was observed. The obtained experience and further theoretical research allowed developing a new instrument - Wave Probe - which is a combination of induction magnetometer and SLP in one body. Both on-ground tests in plasma chamber and the spatial experiment executed onboard Ukrainian "Sich-1M" SC (2004) showed that the combined in-situ simultaneous measurements of SCD and magnetic field fluctuations allowed obtaining the wave number of the whistler wave. The same wave

  11. Huygens space probe ready to leave Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-03-01

    Over the past year, the Huygens probe has been integrated and extensively tested at the facilities of Daimler Benz Aerospace Dornier Satellitensysteme in Ottobrunn near Munich. It was designed and developed for ESA by a European industrial consortium led by Aerospatiale (F) as prime contractor. The European activities have been successfully completed and this is to be formalised by the Flight Acceptance Review which will release the probe for shipment to the USA. To mark this important milestone a press briefing is scheduled for Wednesday, 26 March at 10.00 hours at Daimler-Benz Aerospace Dornier Satellitensysteme in Ottobrunn. The detailed programme of the press briefing is attached. If you wish to attend the press briefing, please complete the attached accreditation form and return it, preferably by fax, to : Daimler Benz Aerospace Dornier Satellitensysteme Mr. Mathias Pikelj, Fax. + 49 7545 8 5589, Tel. + 49 7545 8 9123 NOTE FOR THE EDITORS: Background facts about the Cassini Huygens mission Huygens is a medium-sized mission of ESA's Horizons 2000 programme for space science, and a contribution to the joint NASA ESA Cassini mission. Christiaan Huygens discovered Saturn s moon Titan in 1655, and the mission named after him aims to land a 343 kilogram probe on Titan carrying a package of scientific instruments through the atmosphere. Six sets of instruments will analyse the chemical composition of the atmosphere, observe the weather and topography of Titan, and examine the nature of its surface. Titan is larger than the planet Mercury, and its unique atmosphere, rich in nitrogen and hydrocarbons, may resemble the atmosphere of the primitive Earth, before life began. Nominal dates for the Huygens mission are as follows: * launch, 6 October 1997 * arrival at Saturn, 1 July 2004 * release of Huygens, 6 November 2004 * entry into Titan's atmosphere, 27 November 2004. The Saturn Orbiter, the other element in the Cassini mission, will relay the signals from Huygens to

  12. Future studies of planetary rings by space probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    Recent space probe observations of the rings of Jupiter and Saturn have furnished a substantial enhancement of the current understanding of the outer planets' rings. Voyager 2 offers further opportunities for the study of the Neptune and Uranus ring systems. The Galileo mission to Jupiter furnishes the first opportunity for long term space probe studies of a planetary ring system. It is suggested that an appropriately instrumented Saturn orbiter would not only provide a similar opportunity for the study of the Saturn rings, but may also be the only means by which to adequately address the nature of the diverse phenomena displayed by this prototypical planetary ring system.

  13. Space-charge limits of ion sensitive probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, D.; LaBombard, B.; Ochoukov, R.; Sullivan, R.; Whyte, D.

    2013-12-01

    Ion sensitive probes (ISPs) are used to measure ion temperature and plasma potential in magnetized plasmas. Their operation relies on the difference in electron and ion Larmor radii to preferentially collect the ion species on a recessed electrode. Because of their simple two-electrode construction and optimal geometry for heat flux handling they are an attractive probe to use in the high heat flux boundary of magnetic confinement fusion experiments. However, the integrity of its measurements is rarely, if ever, checked under such conditions. Recent measurements with an ISP in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak have shown that its ion current is space-charge limited and thus its current-voltage (I-V) response does not contain information on the ion temperature. We numerically solve a 1D Vlasov-Poisson model of ion collection to determine how much bias is needed to overcome space-charge effects and regain the classic I-V characteristic with an exponential decay. Prompted by the observations of space charge in C-Mod, we have performed a survey of ISP measurements reported in the literature. Evidence of space-charge limited current collection is found on many probes, with few authors noting its presence. Some probes are able to apparently exceed the classic 1D space-charge limit because electrons can E × B drift into the probe volume, partially reducing the net ion charge; it is argued that this does not, however, change the basic problem that space charge compromises the measurement of ion temperature. Guidance is given for design of ISPs to minimize the effects of space charge.

  14. Citizens in Space: Participating in sub orbital student space probe development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, J.

    2012-12-01

    Volunteer students from Deer Valley High School participated in the development of a microcomputer-based sensor probe to be deployed on a sub orbital rocket during the 2011-2012 school year. The design was initiated by a group formerly known as Teachers in Space and now designated as Citizens in Space. Masten Space Systems has offered to launch the probes. Our student volunteers worked on Friday afternoons for most of a school year to develop a radiation probe based on a Vernier radiation sensor. The design, software, and current status of the project will be shared.

  15. The Evolving Space Weather System—Van Allen Probes Contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanetti, L. J.; Mauk, B. H.; Fox, N. J.; Barnes, R. J.; Weiss, M.; Sotirelis, T. S.; Raouafi, N.-E.; Kessel, R. L.; Becker, H. N.

    2014-10-01

    The overarching goal and purpose of the study of space weather is clear—to understand and address the issues caused by solar disturbances on humans and technological systems. Space weather has evolved in the past few decades from a collection of concerned agencies and researchers to a critical function of the National Weather Service of NOAA. The general effects have also evolved from the well-known telegraph disruptions of the mid-1800s to modern day disturbances of the electric power grid, communications and navigation, human spaceflight and spacecraft systems. The last two items in this list, and specifically the effects of penetrating radiation, were the impetus for the space weather broadcast implemented on NASA's Van Allen Probes' twin pair of satellites, launched in August of 2012 and orbiting directly through Earth's severe radiation belts. The Van Allen Probes mission, formerly the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP), was renamed soon after launch to honor the discoverer of Earth's radiation belts at the beginning of the space age, the late James Van Allen (the spacecraft themselves are still referred to as RBSP-A and RBSP-B). The Van Allen Probes are one part of NASA's Living With a Star program formulated to advance the scientific understanding of the connection between solar disturbances, the resulting heliospheric conditions, and their effects on the geospace and Earth environment.

  16. Mission to Jupiter. [Pioneer 10 and 11 space probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The Pioneer 10 and Pioneer 11 space probes and their missions to Jupiter are discussed along with the experiments and investigations which will be conducted onboard. Jupiter's atmosphere, its magnetic fields, radiation belts, the spacecraft instruments, and the Jovian system will be investigated. Educational study projects are also included.

  17. Features of the Gravity Probe B Space Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeve, William; Green, Gaylord

    2007-04-01

    Space vehicle performance enabled successful relativity data collection throughout the Gravity Probe B mission. Precision pointing and drag-free translation control was maintained using proportional helium micro-thrusters. Electrical power was provided by rigid, double sided solar arrays. The 1.8 kelvin science instrument temperature was maintained using the largest cryogenic liquid helium dewar ever flown in space. The flight software successfully performed autonomous operations and safemode protection. Features of the Gravity Probe B Space Vehicle mechanisms include: 1) sixteen helium micro-thrusters, the first proportional thrusters flown in space, and large-orifice thruster isolation valves, 2) seven precision and high-authority mass trim mechanisms, 3) four non-pyrotechnic, highly reliable solar array deployment and release mechanism sets. Early incremental prototyping was used extensively to reduce spacecraft development risk. All spacecraft systems were redundant and provided multiple failure tolerance in critical systems. Lockheed Martin performed the spacecraft design, systems engineering, hardware and software integration, environmental testing and launch base operations, as well as on-orbit operations support for the Gravity Probe B space science experiment.

  18. Van Allen Probes Science Gateway and Space Weather Data Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, G.; Barnes, R. J.; Weiss, M.; Fox, N. J.; Mauk, B.; Potter, M.; Kessel, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Van Allen Probes Science Gateway acts as a centralized interface to the instrument Science Operation Centers (SOCs), provides mission planning tools, and hosts a number of science related activities such as the mission bibliography. Most importantly, the Gateway acts as the primary site for processing and delivering the VAP Space Weather data to users. Over the past year, the web-site has been completely redesigned with the focus on easier navigation and improvements of the existing tools such as the orbit plotter, position calculator and magnetic footprint tool. In addition, a new data plotting facility has been added. Based on HTML5, which allows users to interactively plot Van Allen Probes summary and space weather data. The user can tailor the tool to display exactly the plot they wish to see and then share this with other users via either a URL or by QR code. Various types of plots can be created, including simple time series, data plotted as a function of orbital location, and time versus L-Shell. We discuss the new Van Allen Probes Science Gateway and the Space Weather Data Pipeline.

  19. Future exploration of the asteroids. [by space probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D.; Niehoff, J.

    1979-01-01

    Future possibilities for the further study of the asteroids are reviewed, with particular attention paid to space missions for their direct exploration. The role of traditional ground-based and earth orbiting techniques is examined briefly, and it is concluded that although astronomical techniques are presently at their peak, and despite the opportunities provided by the Infrared Astronomical satellite, the Space Telescope and Spacelab Infrared Telescope Facility, the next major step will require direct exploration by space probes to obtain information on asteroid surface chemistry, geology and bulk properties. Various mission modes and propulsion systems for a first multi-target asteroid mission are discussed, including flyby, rendezvous, landing and sample return, and ion-drive propulsion systems. Science payloads for a basic rendezvous mission are considered, and target selection for multi-asteroid flyby tours and rendezvous tours is discussed. Consideration is also given to sample return missions for the evaluation of the asteroid as potential resources.

  20. Deep Space Network Capabilities for Receiving Weak Probe Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, Sami; Johnston, Doug; Preston, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Planetary probes can encounter mission scenarios where communication is not favorable during critical maneuvers or emergencies. Launch, initial acquisition, landing, trajectory corrections, safing. Communication challenges due to sub-optimum antenna pointing or transmitted power, amplitude/frequency dynamics, etc. Prevent lock-up on signal and extraction of telemetry. Examples: loss of Mars Observer, nutation of Ulysses, Galileo antenna, Mars Pathfinder and Mars Exploration Rovers Entry, Descent, and Landing, and the Cassini Saturn Orbit Insertion. A Deep Space Network capability to handle such cases has been used successfully to receive signals to characterize the scenario. This paper will describe the capability and highlight the cases of the critical communications for the Mars rovers and Saturn Orbit Insertion and preparation radio tracking of the Huygens probe at (non-DSN) radio telescopes.

  1. Welded Titanium Case for Space-Probe Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brothers, A. J.; Boundy, R. A.; Martens, H. E.; Jaffe, L. D.

    1959-01-01

    The high strength-to-weight ratio of titanium alloys suggests their use for solid-propellant rocket-motor cases for high-performance orbiting or space-probe vehicles. The paper describes the fabrication of a 6-in.-diam., 0.025-in.-wall rocket-motor from the 6A1-4V titanium alloy. The rocket-motor case, used in the fourth stage of a successful JPL-NASA lunar-probe flight, was constructed using a design previously proven satisfactory for Type 410 stainless steel. The nature and scope of the problems peculiar to the use of the titanium alloy, which effected an average weight saving of 34%, are described.

  2. Space Science Education by Mathematica Demonstrations: Interactive Design of Moving Space Probe Elements Mechanics by Foldable and Extendable Structures for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabai, S.; Bérczi, Sz.

    2010-03-01

    By the interactive Mathematica Demonstrations of the Wolfram Research several mechanics for space probe operation and motion simulations were studied as space robotics and science educational program.

  3. Implications of conformal invariance in momentum space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzowski, Adam; McFadden, Paul; Skenderis, Kostas

    2014-03-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the implications of conformal invariance for 3-point functions of the stress-energy tensor, conserved currents and scalar operators in general dimension and in momentum space. Our starting point is a novel and very effective decomposition of tensor correlators which reduces their computation to that of a number of scalar form factors. For example, the most general 3-point function of a conserved and traceless stress-energy tensor is determined by only five form factors. Dilatations and special conformal Ward identities then impose additional conditions on these form factors. The special conformal Ward identities become a set of first and second order differential equations, whose general solution is given in terms of integrals involving a product of three Bessel functions (`triple- K integrals'). All in all, the correlators are completely determined up to a number of constants, in agreement with well-known position space results. In odd dimensions 3-point functions are finite without renormalisation while in even dimensions non-trivial renormalisation in required. In this paper we restrict ourselves to odd dimensions. A comprehensive analysis of renormalisation will be discussed elsewhere. This paper contains two parts that can be read independently of each other. In the first part, we explain the method that leads to the solution for the correlators in terms of triple- K integrals while the second part contains a self-contained presentation of all results. Readers interested only in results may directly consult the second part of the paper.

  4. Role of space charge in scanned probe oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagata, J. A.; Inoue, T.; Itoh, J.; Matsumoto, K.; Yokoyama, H.

    1998-12-01

    The growth rate and electrical character of nanostructures produced by scanned probe oxidation are investigated by integrating an in situ electrical force characterization technique, scanning Maxwell-stress microscopy, into the fabrication process. Simultaneous topographical, capacitance, and surface potential data are obtained for oxide features patterned on n- and p-type silicon and titanium thin-film substrates. The electric field established by an applied voltage pulse between the probe tip and substrate depends upon reactant and product ion concentrations associated with the water meniscus at the tip-substrate junction and within the growing oxide film. Space-charge effects are consistent with the rapid decline of high initial growth rates, account for observed doping and voltage-pulse dependencies, and provide a basis for understanding local density variations within oxide features. An obvious method for avoiding the buildup of space charge is to employ voltage modulation and other dynamic pulse-shaping techniques during the oxidation pulse. Voltage modulation leads to a significant enhancement of the growth rate and to improvements in the aspect ratio compared with static voltage pulses.

  5. IEC Thrusters for Space Probe Applications and Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George H.; Momota, Hiromu; Wu, Linchun; Reilly, Michael P.; Teofilo, Vince L.; Burton, Rodney; Dell, Richard; Dell, Dick; Hargus, William A.

    2009-03-01

    Earlier conceptual design studies (Bussard, 1990; Miley et al., 1998; Burton et al., 2003) have described Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) fusion propulsion to provide a high-power density fusion propulsion system capable of aggressive deep space missions. However, this requires large multi-GW thrusters and a long term development program. As a first step towards this goal, a progression of near-term IEC thrusters, stating with a 1-10 kWe electrically-driven IEC jet thruster for satellites are considered here. The initial electrically-powered unit uses a novel multi-jet plasma thruster based on spherical IEC technology with electrical input power from a solar panel. In this spherical configuration, Xe ions are generated and accelerated towards the center of double concentric spherical grids. An electrostatic potential well structure is created in the central region, providing ion trapping. Several enlarged grid opening extract intense quasi-neutral plasma jets. A variable specific impulse in the range of 1000-4000 seconds is achieved by adjusting the grid potential. This design provides high maneuverability for satellite and small space probe operations. The multiple jets, combined with gimbaled auxiliary equipment, provide precision changes in thrust direction. The IEC electrical efficiency can match or exceed efficiencies of conventional Hall Current Thrusters (HCTs) while offering advantages such as reduced grid erosion (long life time), reduced propellant leakage losses (reduced fuel storage), and a very high power-to-weight ratio. The unit is ideally suited for probing missions. The primary propulsive jet enables delicate maneuvering close to an object. Then simply opening a second jet offset 180 degrees from the propulsion one provides a "plasma analytic probe" for interrogation of the object.

  6. IEC Thrusters for Space Probe Applications and Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, George H.; Momota, Hiromu; Wu Linchun; Reilly, Michael P.; Teofilo, Vince L.; Burton, Rodney; Dell, Richard; Dell, Dick; Hargus, William A.

    2009-03-16

    Earlier conceptual design studies (Bussard, 1990; Miley et al., 1998; Burton et al., 2003) have described Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) fusion propulsion to provide a high-power density fusion propulsion system capable of aggressive deep space missions. However, this requires large multi-GW thrusters and a long term development program. As a first step towards this goal, a progression of near-term IEC thrusters, stating with a 1-10 kWe electrically-driven IEC jet thruster for satellites are considered here. The initial electrically-powered unit uses a novel multi-jet plasma thruster based on spherical IEC technology with electrical input power from a solar panel. In this spherical configuration, Xe ions are generated and accelerated towards the center of double concentric spherical grids. An electrostatic potential well structure is created in the central region, providing ion trapping. Several enlarged grid opening extract intense quasi-neutral plasma jets. A variable specific impulse in the range of 1000-4000 seconds is achieved by adjusting the grid potential. This design provides high maneuverability for satellite and small space probe operations. The multiple jets, combined with gimbaled auxiliary equipment, provide precision changes in thrust direction. The IEC electrical efficiency can match or exceed efficiencies of conventional Hall Current Thrusters (HCTs) while offering advantages such as reduced grid erosion (long life time), reduced propellant leakage losses (reduced fuel storage), and a very high power-to-weight ratio. The unit is ideally suited for probing missions. The primary propulsive jet enables delicate maneuvering close to an object. Then simply opening a second jet offset 180 degrees from the propulsion one provides a 'plasma analytic probe' for interrogation of the object.

  7. Space industrialization. Volume 3: World and domestic implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The status of worldwide space industralization activities is assessed as well as the benefits to be anticipated from enhanced activities. Methods for stimulating space industralization growth are discussed with emphasis on foreign and international activities, national and world impact assessments, industry/government interfaces, legal implications, institutional implications, economics and capitalization, and implementation issues and recommendations.

  8. Probing Asteroid Families for Evidence of Ultraviolet Space Weathering Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilas, Faith

    2005-07-01

    We propose six HST orbits to obtain UV reflectance spectra covering 200-460 nm of two Vesta asteroid family members, asteroid 832 Karin, and two Karin family members. These observations extend work done under a Cycle 13 AR grant, where we analyzed all of the existing IUE and HST S-class asteroids in the MAST database to investigate the effects of space weathering at UV wavelengths. Our hypothesis is that the manifestation of space weathering at UV wavelengths is a spectral bluing, in contrast with a spectral reddening at visible-NIR wavelengths, and that UV wavelengths can be more sensitive to relatively small amounts of weathering than longer wavelengths. The proposed observations will address two objectives: {1} Measure the UV-visible spectra of 832 Karin and two members of the young Karin family {absolute age of 5.8 My}, in order to determine whether intermediate space weathering is observable in objects likely pristine when they originated from the interior of Karin's pa rent body. {2} Measure the UV-visible spectra of two members of the Vesta family to compare with our analysis of IUE Vesta spectra. These observations will probe Vesta's interior, and test our hypothesis by contrasting the apparent amount of alteration on the surfaces of Vestoids with excavated material on Vesta.

  9. Electric Field Double Probe Measurements for Ionospheric Space Plasma Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.

    1999-01-01

    Double probes represent a well-proven technique for gathering high quality DC and AC electric field measurements in a variety of space plasma regimes including the magnetosphere, ionosphere, and mesosphere. Such experiments have been successfully flown on a variety of spacecraft including sounding rockets and satellites. Typical instrument designs involve a series of trades, depending on the science objectives, type of platform (e.g., spinning or 3-axis stabilized), expected plasma regime where the measurements will be made, available telemetry, budget, etc. In general, ionospheric DC electric field instruments that achieve accuracies of 0.1 mV/m or better, place spherical sensors at large distances (10m or more) from the spacecraft body in order to extend well beyond the spacecraft wake and sheath and to achieve large signal-to-noise ratios for DC and long wavelength measurements. Additional sets of sensors inboard of the primary, outermost sensors provide useful additional information, both for diagnostics of the plasma contact potentials, which particularly enhance the DC electric field measurements on non-spinning spacecraft, and for wavelength and phase velocity measurements that use the spaced receiver or "interferometer" technique. Accurate attitude knowledge enables B times V contributions to be subtracted from the measured potentials, and permits the measured components to be rotated into meaningful geophysical reference frames. We review the measurement technique for both DC and wave electric field measurements in the ionosphere discussing recent advances involving high resolution burst memories, multiple baseline double probes, new sensor surface materials, biasing techniques, and other considerations.

  10. U.S. commercial space policies - Implications for developing countries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillam, Isaac T., IV; Stone, Barbara A.

    1987-01-01

    Recent U.S. policy developments on the commercial use of space are summarized and their international implications are considered. Attention is given to successful applications of technology developed in space, including an implantable cancer medication system, an implantable defibrillator, an ultrasonic residual stress monitor, and aquaculture treatment techniques. NASA projects involving bioengineering and rehabilitation applications are summarized, and plans to investigate high-temperature superconductors in space are addressed. Recent agreements entred into by NASA for space commercial studies are reviewed.

  11. Floating Potential Probe Deployed on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.

    2001-01-01

    In the spring and summer of 2000, at the request of the International Space Station (ISS) Program Office, a Plasma Contactor Unit Tiger Team was set up to investigate the threat of the ISS arcing in the event of a plasma contactor outage. Modeling and ground tests done under that effort showed that it is possible for the external structure of the ISS to become electrically charged to as much as -160 V under some conditions. Much of this work was done in anticipation of the deployment of the first large ISS solar array in November 2000. It was recognized that, with this deployment, the power system would be energized to its full voltage and that the predicted charging would pose an immediate threat to crewmembers involved in extravehicular activities (EVA's), as well as long-term damage to the station structure, were the ISS plasma contactors to be turned off or stop functioning. The Floating Potential Probe was conceived, designed, built, and deployed in record time by a crack team of scientists and engineers led by the NASA Glenn Research Center in response to ISS concerns about crew safety.

  12. Preliminary Results from the Space Probe Pioneer V

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, C. Y.; Meyer, P.; Simpson, J. A.

    1960-01-01

    The space probe Pioneer V was launched March 11, 1960, into an orbit around the sun and inside the orbit of earth. The scientific apparatus included instruments identical with the University of Chicago apparatus used on Explorer VI [Fan, Meyer, and Simpson, 1960b], namely, energetic particle detectors which measure fluxes of protons with energies greater than 75 Mev, electrons with energies greater than 15 Mev, and the bremsstrahlung from electrons and y rays of lower energy. Simultaneously with the measurements in Pioneer V a series of four neutron monitor piles were recording the changes in cosmic radiation intensity at the earth. We report here on some preliminary results obtained from the Chicago experiments during the time within which Pioneer V traveled to a distance of approximately 8 x 10 km from earth. Beginning on March 20, solar activity rapidly increased with many solar flares, radio noise bursts, etc., over a period of 10 days. Most of our results relate to this period. The preliminary data are given in Figures 1 and 2.

  13. Outer planet probe navigation. [considering Pioneer space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, L.

    1974-01-01

    A series of navigation studies in conjunction with outer planet Pioneer missions are reformed to determine navigation requirements and measurement systems in order to target probes. Some particular cases are established where optical navigation is important and some cases where radio alone navigation is suffucient. Considered are a direct Saturn mission, a Saturn Uranus mission, a Jupiter Uranus mission, and a Titan probe mission.

  14. Military space station implications. Study project

    SciTech Connect

    Bourne, G.D.; Skirvin, G.D.; Wilson, G.R.

    1987-03-23

    Justifying the relevancy of a Manned Military Space Station (MMSS) and subsequently proposing its deployment to capitalize upon the United States' national security interests is the essence and purpose of this group study project. The MMSS is intended to perform a two-fold purpose: (1) facilitate military peacetime operations while simultaneously supporting and promoting civilian space initiatives; and, (2) act as a force multiplier for space and terrestrial force operations in the event of conventional, theater nuclear, and/or strategic nuclear war. Data to support the future value of the MMSS was obtained from individual and group research using unclassified sources such as professional journals, books, US Air Force Staff College reference material, and information from the US Air Force space coordinating staff in Washington, DC. The importance of space to our future and especially of a MMSS by America's national leaders and its people has yet to be fully appreciated and/or realized. The significance of space and its nexus to the United States' national security has been growing dramatically in importance since the launching of the Sputnik in 1957 by Russian. Space, as the forth dimension, cannot and should not be understated in importance as it relates to commercialism, deterrence to war, and to the stability of world order.

  15. Deep Space Network capabilities for receiving weak probe signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, Sami; Johnston, Doug; Preston, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This paper will describe the capability and highlight the cases of the critical communications for the Mars rovers and Saturn Orbit Insertion and preparation radio tracking of the Huygens probe at (non-DSN) radio telescopes.

  16. Space Biosensor Systems: Implications for Technology Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, J. W.; Somps, C. J.; Madou, M.; Imprescia, Clifford C. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    To meet the need for continuous, automated monitoring of animal subjects, including; humans, during space flight, NASA is developing advanced physiologic sensor and biotelemetry system technologies. The ability to continuously track basic physiological parameters, such as heart rate, blood pH, and body temperature, in untethered subjects in space is a challenging task. At NASA's Ames Research Center, where a key focus is gravitational biology research, engineers have teamed with life scientists to develop wireless sensor systems for automated physiologic monitoring of animal models as small as the rat. This technology is also being adapted, in collaboration with medical professionals, to meet human clinical monitoring needs both in space and on the ground. Thus, these advanced monitoring technologies have important dual-use functions; they meet space flight data collection requirements and constraints, while concurrently addressing a number of monitoring and data acquisition challenges on the ground in areas of clinical monitoring and biomedical research. Additional applications for these and related technologies are being sought and additional partnerships established that enhance development efforts, reduce costs and facilitate technology infusion between the public and private sectors. This paper describes technology transfer and co-development projects that have evolved out of NASA's miniaturized, implantable chemical sensor development efforts.

  17. Probing Critical Surfaces in Momentum Space Using Real-Space Entanglement Entropy: Bose versus Fermi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kun; Lai, Hsin-Hua

    A co-dimension one critical surface in the momentum space can be either a familiar Fermi surface, which separates occupied states from empty ones in the non-interacting fermion case, or a novel Bose surface, where gapless bosonic excitations are anchored. Their presence gives rise to logarithmic violation of entanglement entropy area law. When they are convex, we show that the shape of these critical surfaces can be determined by inspecting the leading logarithmic term of real space entanglement entropy. The fundamental difference between a Fermi surface and a Bose surface is revealed by the fact that the logarithmic terms in entanglement entropies differ by a factor of two: SlogBose = 2SlogFermi , even when they have identical geometry. Our method has remarkable similarity with determining Fermi surface shape using quantum oscillation. We also discuss possible probes of concave critical surfaces in momentum space. HHL and KY acknowledge the National Science Foundation through Grants No. DMR-1004545, DMR-1157490, No. DMR-1442366, and State of Florida. HHL is also partially supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-1309531, and the Smalley Postdoctoral Fellowship in Quantum Ma.

  18. Toxicological implications of extended space flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Bernard; Utell, Mark; Morrow, Paul

    1992-01-01

    This paper draws attention to the needs and mechanisms for shielding crewmembers on long-duration space flights from hazards related to chemical toxicants. Specific attention is given to existing data on sources of impaired performance, namely, neurotoxicants, respiratory infections, pulmonary function. The behavioral effects associated with long-term exposure to volatile organic solvents can impair crucial functional parameters of space flight and mission objectives. Respiratory infections contribute to performance decrements of up to 20 percent, and pulmonary function can be impaired by contaminants such as ozone leading to reduced performance. It is concluded that these and other sources of toxicologically induced performance reductions be studied since they impinge on vehicle design and mission objectives.

  19. Positioning Reduction of Deep Space Probes Based on VLBI Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, S. B.

    2011-11-01

    ) Investigate the application of Kalman filter to the positioning reduction of deep space probes and develop related software systems. In summary, the progress in this dissertation is made in the positioning reduction of deep space probes tracked by VLBI concerning the algorithm study, software development, real observation processing and so on, while a further study is still urgent and arduous.

  20. Early Results from the Floating Potential Probe on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, Thomas L.; Ferguson, Dale C.

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the Floating Potential Probe (FPP) on the International Space Station (ISS). The FPP measures the body voltage (electric potential) of the, and the measurements are then transmitted to Earth.

  1. Data link relay design. [space probe with entry at Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, P.

    1974-01-01

    The data link for the Ames baseline probe as applied to the MJU spacecraft specifically with an entry at Uranus is analyzed. A frequency analysis, a trajectory analysis, and a discussion of the effects on the spacecraft design by the data link are presented. The possibilities of a two-way link are considered.

  2. MARINER 9 SPACE PROBE UNDERGOES FINAL CHECKS PRIOR TO ENCAPSULATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A technician checks the Mariner I spacecraft prior to its encapsulation for launch to Mars. An Atlas-Centaur rocket successfully launched the mars-bound spacecraft from Cape Kennedy at 6:23 p.m. EDT, May 30, 1971. Designated Mariner 9 following launch, the probe will arrive at Mars in mid-November. It will transmit scientific data about that planet's surface and atmosphere.

  3. Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data and the curvature of space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzan, Jean-Philippe; Kirchner, Ulrich; Ellis, George F. R.

    2003-10-01

    Inter alia, the high-precision Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data on cosmic background radiation marginally indicate that the Universe has positively curved (and hence spherical) spatial sections. In this Letter, we take this data seriously and consider some of the consequences for the background dynamics. In particular, we show that this implies a limit to the number of e-foldings that could have taken place in the inflationary epoch; however, this limit is consistent with some inflationary models that solve all the usual cosmological problems and that are consistent with standard structure formation theory.

  4. European Space Agency studies of the solar probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roxburgh, I. W.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility and scientific objectives of a solar probe were studied by a Mission Definition Group in 1975 and 1976. The orbit analysis program was developed and an extended study of the orbit analysis was done in 1977. The results of these studies are in the Report of the Mission Definition Study (1976) and an E.S.O.C. report (1978), and the reader is referred to these sources for greater details. In this report, only brief discussion on mission concept and objectives, satellite design, orbit, orbit analysis, are presented.

  5. Probing scalar tensor theories for gravity in redshift space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabiu, Cristiano G.; Mota, David F.; Llinares, Claudio; Park, Changbom

    2016-07-01

    We present measurements of the spatial clustering statistics in redshift space of various scalar field modified gravity simulations. We utilise the two-point and three-point correlation functions to quantify the spatial distribution of dark matter halos within these simulations and thus discriminate between the models. We compare Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) simulations to various modified gravity scenarios and find consistency with previous work in terms of two-point statistics in real and redshift space. However, using higher-order statistics such as the three-point correlation function in redshift space we find significant deviations from ΛCDM hinting that higher-order statistics may prove to be a useful tool in the hunt for deviations from General Relativity.

  6. Probing chemical space with alkaloid-inspired libraries.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Michael C; Singh, Gurpreet; Plampin, James N; Rane, Digamber; Wang, Jenna L; Day, Victor W; Aubé, Jeffrey

    2014-02-01

    Screening of small-molecule libraries is an important aspect of probe and drug discovery science. Numerous authors have suggested that bioactive natural products are attractive starting points for such libraries because of their structural complexity and sp(3)-rich character. Here, we describe the construction of a screening library based on representative members of four families of biologically active alkaloids (Stemonaceae, the structurally related cyclindricine and lepadiformine families, lupin and Amaryllidaceae). In each case, scaffolds were based on structures of the naturally occurring compounds or a close derivative. Scaffold preparation was pursued following the development of appropriate enabling chemical methods. Diversification provided 686 new compounds suitable for screening. The libraries thus prepared had structural characteristics, including sp(3) content, comparable to a basis set of representative natural products and were highly rule-of-five compliant. PMID:24451589

  7. Probing chemical space with alkaloid-inspired libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, Michael C.; Singh, Gurpreet; Plampin, James N.; Rane, Digamber; Wang, Jenna L.; Day, Victor W.; Aubé, Jeffrey

    2014-02-01

    Screening of small-molecule libraries is an important aspect of probe and drug discovery science. Numerous authors have suggested that bioactive natural products are attractive starting points for such libraries because of their structural complexity and sp3-rich character. Here, we describe the construction of a screening library based on representative members of four families of biologically active alkaloids (Stemonaceae, the structurally related cyclindricine and lepadiformine families, lupin and Amaryllidaceae). In each case, scaffolds were based on structures of the naturally occurring compounds or a close derivative. Scaffold preparation was pursued following the development of appropriate enabling chemical methods. Diversification provided 686 new compounds suitable for screening. The libraries thus prepared had structural characteristics, including sp3 content, comparable to a basis set of representative natural products and were highly rule-of-five compliant.

  8. Probing Planckian physics in de Sitter space with quantum correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Jun; Zhang, Yao-Zhong; Gould, Mark D.; Fan, Heng; Sun, Cheng-Yi; Yang, Wen-Li

    2014-12-15

    We study the quantum correlation and quantum communication channel of both free scalar and fermionic fields in de Sitter space, while the Planckian modification presented by the choice of a particular α-vacuum has been considered. We show the occurrence of degradation of quantum entanglement between field modes for an inertial observer in curved space, due to the radiation associated with its cosmological horizon. Comparing with standard Bunch–Davies choice, the possible Planckian physics causes some extra decrement on the quantum correlation, which may provide the means to detect quantum gravitational effects via quantum information methodology in future. Beyond single-mode approximation, we construct proper Unruh modes admitting general α-vacua, and find a convergent feature of both bosonic and fermionic entanglements. In particular, we show that the convergent points of fermionic entanglement negativity are dependent on the choice of α. Moreover, an one-to-one correspondence between convergent points H{sub c} of negativity and zeros of quantum capacity of quantum channels in de Sitter space has been proved. - Highlights: • Quantum correlation and quantum channel in de Sitter space are studied. • Gibbons–Hawking effect causes entanglement degradation for static observer. • Planckian physics causes extra decrement on quantum correlation. • Convergent feature of negativity relies on the choice of alpha-vacua. • Link between negativity convergence and quantum channel capacity is given.

  9. Space Weather data processing and Science Gateway for the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, G.; Barnes, R. J.; Weiss, M.; Fox, N. J.; Mauk, B.; Potter, M.; Kessel, R.

    2013-12-01

    A near real-time data processing pipeline for the Space Weather broadcast data from the Van Allen Probes is presented. The Van Allen Probes broadcasts a sub-set of the science data in real-time when not downlinking the principal science data. This broadcast is received by several ground stations and relayed to APL in near real time to be ingested into the space weather processing pipeline. This pipeline processes the available level zero space weather data into higher level science data products. These products are made available to the public via the Van Allen Probes Science Gateway website (http://athena.jhuapl.edu). The website acts as pivotal point though which all other instrument SOC's can be accessed. Several other data products (e.g KP/DST indices) and tools (e.g orbit calculator) are made also available to the general public.

  10. The Future of NASA's Deep Space Network and Applications to Planetary Probe Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, Leslie J.; Preston, Robert A.; Vrotsos, Peter

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) has been an invaluable tool in the world's exploration of space. It has served the space-faring community for more than 45 years. The DSN has provided a primary communication pathway for planetary probes, either through direct- to-Earth links or through intermediate radio relays. In addition, its radiometric systems are critical to probe navigation and delivery to target. Finally, the radio link can also be used for direct scientific measurement of the target body ('radio science'). This paper will examine the special challenges in supporting planetary probe missions, the future evolution of the DSN and related spacecraft technology, the advantages and disadvantages of radio relay spacecraft, and the use of the DSN radio links for navigation and scientific measurements.

  11. Probing Planckian physics in de Sitter space with quantum correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jun; Zhang, Yao-Zhong; Gould, Mark D.; Fan, Heng; Sun, Cheng-Yi; Yang, Wen-Li

    2014-12-01

    We study the quantum correlation and quantum communication channel of both free scalar and fermionic fields in de Sitter space, while the Planckian modification presented by the choice of a particular α-vacuum has been considered. We show the occurrence of degradation of quantum entanglement between field modes for an inertial observer in curved space, due to the radiation associated with its cosmological horizon. Comparing with standard Bunch-Davies choice, the possible Planckian physics causes some extra decrement on the quantum correlation, which may provide the means to detect quantum gravitational effects via quantum information methodology in future. Beyond single-mode approximation, we construct proper Unruh modes admitting general α-vacua, and find a convergent feature of both bosonic and fermionic entanglements. In particular, we show that the convergent points of fermionic entanglement negativity are dependent on the choice of α. Moreover, an one-to-one correspondence between convergent points Hc of negativity and zeros of quantum capacity of quantum channels in de Sitter space has been proved.

  12. Mass spectrometer experiments for the European space probe Giotto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, G.

    The Particulate Impact Analyzer (PIA) and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (NMS) experiments to be carried on board the Giotto cometary probe are presented. The NMS is designed to determine the chemical composition of gases and ions in the coma of Halley's Comet based on the ue of two spectrometers: an electrostatic parallel-plate analyzer, and a similar analyzer coupled with a magnetic analyzer with double-focusing geometry. The sensor structure consists of a monolithic multi-rib milled body with integral fixation points, with provisions for electromagnetic and thermal isolation, and dust protection. The PIA is intended for the measurement of the physical and chemical characteristics of cometary dust particles. It is based on an instrument comprising an entrance baffle and shutter unit, a target unit at which the dust is ionized, a light flash detector marking the flash of ionization, an acceleration grid sending the ions into the time-of-flight unit, and a multiplier unit for recording the time of flight spectrum. A microprocessor-based electronics system housed in a separate case next to the sensor performs tasks of power supply, signal processing, data processing and flow control.

  13. MARINER 8 SPACE PROBE'S SOLAR ARRAYS ARE INSTALLED

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Technicians prepare to install a solar panel on the Mariner H spacecraft in preparation for its launch to Mars, no earlier than May 7, 1971. The spacecraft will be launched aboard an Atlas Centaur space vehicle from Cape Kennedy's Complex 36A, and will go into orbit around Mars at the completion of a seven-month journey from Earth. It is designed to operate 90 days and return data about the planet's atmospheric and surface characteristics. Following launch, the spacecraft will be designated Mariner 8. A second Mariner Mars spacecraft is scheduled to be launched 10 days later.

  14. Space probe/satellite ejection apparatus for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyly, H. M.; Miller, C. D.; Cloyd, R. A.; Heller, C. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An ejection apparatus for spinning and propelling objects for ejection from a spacecraft at a desired velocity and rotational speed is discussed. The apparatus includes a launch cradle on which the space object to be ejected rests. The cradle is rotatably supported by a central hub secured to the upper end of the pneumatic cylinder piston shaft. Release mechanisms consisting of a retractable pin and locking lug is utilized to hold the cradle and object to be ejected. The release mechanism has a fixed barrier member which holds the retractable pin in engagement with the locking lug until release by upward movement of the launch cradle beyond the barrier height.

  15. MARINER 8 SPACE PROBE UNDERGOES INSTALLATION OF SOLAR ARRAYS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Technicians install solar panels aboard the mariner H spacecraft in a cleanroom facility at Cape Kennedy. The spacecraft will orbit Mars following a seven-month journey from Earth. Designed to function 90 days, the spacecraft, which will be designated Mariner 8 following launch, will provide data about the Red Planet's atmospheric and surface characteristics. Mariner Mars H will be launched aboard an Atlas-Centaur space vehicle no earlier than May 7, 1971, from Cape Kennedy's Launch Complex 36A. A second Mariner Mars spacecraft will be launched 10 days later.

  16. Space probe/satellite ejection apparatus for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyly, H. M.; Miller, C. D.; Cloyd, R. A.; Heller, C. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An ejection apparatus for spinning and propelling objects for ejection from a spacecraft at a desired velocity and rotational speed is discussed. The apparatus includes a launch cradle on which the space object to be ejected rests. The cradle is rotatably supported by a central hub secured to the upper end of the pneumatic cylinder piston shaft. Release mechanisms consisting of a retractable pin and locking lug is utilized to hold the cradle and object to be ejected. The release mechanism has a fixed barrier member which holds the retractable pin in engagement with the locking lug until release by upward movement of the launch cradle beyond the barrier height.

  17. Probing the shape of atoms in real space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herz, M.; Giessibl, F. J.; Mannhart, J.

    2003-07-01

    The structure of single atoms in real space is investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy. Very high resolution can be obtained by a dramatic reduction of the tip-sample distance. The instabilities which are normally encountered while using small tip-sample distances are avoided by oscillating the tip of the scanning tunneling microscope vertically with respect to the sample. The surface atoms of Si(111)-(7×7) with their well-known electronic configuration are used to image individual samarium, cobalt, iron, and silicon atoms. The resulting images resemble the charge density corresponding to 4f, 3d, and 3p atomic orbitals.

  18. Astrometric Gravitation Probe: a space mission concept for fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchiato, Alberto; Fienga, Agnes; Gai, Mario; Lattanzi, Mario G.; Riva, Alberto; Busonero, Deborah

    2015-08-01

    Modern technological developments have pushed the accuracy of astrometric measurements in the visible band down to the micro-arcsec level. This allows to test theories of gravity in the weak field limit to unprecedented level, with possible consequences spanning from the validity of fundamental physics principles, to tests of theories describing cosmological and galactic dynamics without resorting to Dark Matter and Dark Energy.This is the main goal of Astrometric Gravitation Probe (AGP) mission, which will be achieved by highly accurate astrometric determination of light deflection (as a modern rendition of the Dyson, Eddington, and Robertson eclipse experiment of 1919), aberration, and of the orbits of selected Solar System objects, with specific reference to the excess shift of the pericentre effect.The AGP concept was recently proposed for the recent call for ESA M4 missions as a collaboration among several scientists coming from many different European and US institutions. Its payload is based on a 1.15 m diameter telescope fed through a coronagraphic system by four fields, two set in symmetric positions around the Sun, and two in the opposite direction, all imaged on a CCD detector. Large parts of the instrument are common mode to all fields. The baseline operation mode is the scan of the ±1.13 deg Ecliptic strip, repeated for a minimum of 3 years and up to an optimal duration of 5 years. Operations and calibrations are simultaneous, defined in order to ensure common mode instrumental effects, identified and removed in data reduction. The astrometric and coronagraphic technologies build on the heritage of Gaia and Solar Orbiter.We review the mission concept and its science case, and discuss how this measurement concepts can be scaled to different mission implementations.

  19. Pu-powered space probes face uncertain future

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    When fragments of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 crashed into the gas clouds of Jupiter in July, the only representatives of humankind with a good view were a trio of spacecraft, Voyager 2, Galileo, and Ulysses. Radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) supplied by the Department of Energy provided the power to run the observing instruments on these spacecraft, but now that source of power-and all deep-space missions-may be in jeopardy. Despite the fact that the recently passed congressional appropriations bill increased funding for the RTG program by nearly 20 percent, from $51 million in 1994 to $61 million in 1995, rumors persist that the program is in danger of being discontinued. Peter Ulrich, chief of the Flight Programs Branch of the Solar System Exploration Division of the Office of Space Science at NASA, was confident that the program would stay alive through NASA`s next mission. RTGs will be on board the Cassini spacecraft scheduled to blast off in 1997 for an exploration of Saturn and its rings and moons. RTG`s use the heat produced by the alpha decay of plutonium-238 to heat a thermocouple, which generates electricity. Cassini is designed to carry three RTGs, producing a total of 750 W of electricity initially, decreasing to about 600 W by the time it reaches Saturn seven years after launch. The RTGs on Cassini will carry a total of about 70 lb of plutonium oxide. RTGs have no moving parts. They are simple, rugged, and reliable. According to Ulrich, {open_quotes}It`s really a very well-matched power source for something like a remote mission.{close_quotes} The political situation is less clear, though. {open_quotes}What I hear unofficially is funding looks dime,{close_quotes} said the DOE spokesperson, {open_quotes}and the lights are being turned off for these missions.{close_quotes} If that happens, the lights will go out on NASA`s deep-space missions to other parts of our solar system.

  20. Welded Titanium Case for Space-Probe Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brothers, A. J.; Boundy, R. A.; Martens, H. E.; Jaffe, L. D.

    1959-01-01

    Early in 1958, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology was requested to participate in a lunar-probe mission code-named Juno II which would place a 15-lb Instrumented payload (Pioneer IV) in the vicinity of the moon. The vehicle was to use the same high-speed upper-stage assembly as flown on the successful Jupiter-C configuration; however, the first-stage booster was to be a Jupiter rather than a Redstone. An analysis of the intended flight and payload configuration Indicated that the feasibility of accomplishing the mission was questionable and that additional performance would have to be obtained if the mission was to be feasible. Since the most efficient way of Increasing the performance of a staged vehicle is to increase the performance of the last stage, a study of possible ways of doing this was made.. Because of the time schedule placed on this effort It was decided to reduce the weight of the fourth-stage rocket-motor case by substituting the annealed 6Al--4V titanium alloy for the Type 410 stainless steel. Although this introduced an unfamiliar material, It reduced the changes in design and fabrication techniques. This particular titanium alloy was chosen on the basis of previous tests which proved the suitability of the alloy as a pressure-vessel material when used at an annealed yield strength of about 120, 000 psi. The titanium-case fourth stage of Juno U is shown with the payload and on the missile in Fig. 1; the stainless-steel motor cases used in the Jupiter-C vehicle are shown in Fig. 2. The fourth-stage motor case has a diameter of 6 in., a length of approximately 38 in. center dot and a nominal cylindrical wall thickness of 0.025 in. As shown in Fig. 1, the case serves as the structural support of the payload and is aligned to the upper stage assembly through an alignment ring. The nozzle is threaded into the end of the motor case, and is of the ceramic-coated steel design. Figure 3 shows a comparison of the

  1. Means to remove electrode contamination effect of Langmuir probe measurement in space

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, K.-I.; Lee, C. H.; Fang, H. K.; Cheng, C. Z.

    2012-05-15

    Precaution to remove the serious effect of electrode contamination in Langmuir probe experiments has not been taken in many space measurements because the effect is either not understood or ignored. We stress here that one should pay extra attention to the electrode contamination effect to get accurate and reliable plasma measurements so that the long time effort for sounding rocket/satellite missions does not end in vain or becomes less fruitful. In this paper, we describe two main features of voltage-current characteristic curves associated with the contaminated Langmuir probe, which are predicted from the equivalent circuit model, which we proposed in 1970's. We then show that fast sweeping dc Langmuir probes can give reliable results in the steady state regime. The fast sweeping probe can also give reliable results in transient situations such as satellite moves through plasma bubble in the ionosphere where the electron density drastically changes. This fact was first confirmed in our laboratory experiment.

  2. Means to remove electrode contamination effect of Langmuir probe measurement in space.

    PubMed

    Oyama, K-I; Lee, C H; Fang, H K; Cheng, C Z

    2012-05-01

    Precaution to remove the serious effect of electrode contamination in Langmuir probe experiments has not been taken in many space measurements because the effect is either not understood or ignored. We stress here that one should pay extra attention to the electrode contamination effect to get accurate and reliable plasma measurements so that the long time effort for sounding rocket/satellite missions does not end in vain or becomes less fruitful. In this paper, we describe two main features of voltage-current characteristic curves associated with the contaminated Langmuir probe, which are predicted from the equivalent circuit model, which we proposed in 1970's. We then show that fast sweeping dc Langmuir probes can give reliable results in the steady state regime. The fast sweeping probe can also give reliable results in transient situations such as satellite moves through plasma bubble in the ionosphere where the electron density drastically changes. This fact was first confirmed in our laboratory experiment. PMID:22667663

  3. Launch summary for 1978 - 1982. [sounding rockets, space probes, and satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hills, H. K.

    1984-01-01

    Data pertinent to the launching of space probes, soundings rockets, and satellites presented in tables include launch date, time, and site; agency rocket identification; sponsoring country or countries; instruments carried for experiments; the peak altitude achieved by the rockets; and the apoapsis and periapsis for satellites. The experimenter or institution involved in the launching is also cited.

  4. Deep Space Chronicle: A Chronology of Deep Space and Planetary Probes 1958-2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siddiqi, Asif A.; Launius, Roger (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This monograph contains brief descriptions of all robotic deep space missions attempted since the opening of the space age in 1957. The missions are listed strictly chronologically in order of launch date (not by planetary encounter).

  5. Legal Implications of Military Uses of Outer Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catena, Johanna

    2002-01-01

    Acquisition of Space Weapons, the Legal, Political and Military Impact for International Peace and At the dawn of a new century an immediate danger is upon us: The weaponization of outer space, including potential cost implications upon the prospect of ushering an era of peace and prosperity. But, can such statements be explained as pure sentimentality for hopes of a new era? Or is the danger misplaced that the threat to peace and security is an ever more ominous? By militarising outer space one could monitor crisis areas that could become a potential threat and this would in turn build confidence and security amongst nations. However the Outer Space Treaty prohibits placing in orbit nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction. This does not include other military systems. Many countries feel the prohibition should be extended in the Treaty. Other military systems may involve anti-satellite weapons, (ASATS), emitting or simply placing technologies in space using laser and /or particle beams from space to intercept presently specific military targets such as ballistic missiles and hostile satellites, but in the future this may extend to destroying a target on earth. Military presence in space however, is not founded on weapons alone, but also through military surveillance systems and seen by some countries as an effective measure in verification on arms control. It is also seen as intensifying an arms race. At the forefront of the debate for space weapons is the possibility of countries deploying a National Missile Defence system. How does one reconcile such a system with present treaties? There has always been a direct relationship between weapons and space exploration, particularly if traced through the history of the late nineteenth century to the era of the space race. Konstantin Tsiolkovsky, (1857 - 1935), was one of the founders to astronautics. Robert Goddard, (1882-1945) an Englishman, developed Tsiolkovskys' work further. He built the first liquid

  6. Advances in Impedance Probe Applications and Design in the NRL Space Physics Simulation Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, David; Walker, David; Cothran, Christopher; Gatling, George; Tejero, Erik; Amatucci, William

    2013-10-01

    We will present recent progress in plasma impedance probe experiments and design at NRL's Space Physics Simulation Chamber. These include our network analyzer S-parameter methods as well as more portable self-contained diagnostics with an eye towards space vehicle applications. The experiments are performed under a variety of conditions with magnetized and unmagnetized collisionless, cold (Te ~ 1 - 2 eV) plasmas in density ranges of 105-108 cm-3. Large and small spheres, disks, floating dipoles and monopoles are all in development with various electronic setups, along with traditional emissive and Langmuir probes for measurement redundancy. New computational results provide experimental predictions over a larger parameter space. This work supported by the Naval Research Laboratory Base Program.

  7. CIM in space: Corporate Information Management (CIM) implications for space-based information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mock, Richard V.

    1993-04-01

    This paper describes the DOD corporate information management (CIM) initiative, space forces, and space-based information systems used by the DOD. It then describes implications of CIM in the space industry. CIM is defined as a philosophy which has management and technical components. The CIM management philosophy includes concepts for standardization, system engineering, and the use of commercial systems and technology. The technical component uses the information engineering discipline to improve business processes. The paper provides examples of the CIM management philosophy in operation as well as opportunities for CIM application. Information engineering is described as it applies to space-based information systems. The appendix includes an illustrative example of the integrated definition (IDEF) methodology applied to the tactical warning/attack assessment mission.

  8. Cosmological Implications of the First Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verde, L.

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) team has recently analyzed and released the first-year data. We will review the implications for cosmology of these results. The highlight is that cosmology now has a standard cosmological model. With only 6 parameters the model fits not only WMAP data remarkably well, but also a host of other astronomical observations. We also present the results on neutrino mass limits and on dark energy properties from a joint likelihood analysis of WMAP data with small-scale CMB experiments and large-scale structure surveys. The data and supplementary information are publicly available and can be found on the experiment web site at .

  9. The Deep Space Network. An instrument for radio navigation of deep space probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renzetti, N. A.; Jordan, J. F.; Berman, A. L.; Wackley, J. A.; Yunck, T. P.

    1982-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) network configurations used to generate the navigation observables and the basic process of deep space spacecraft navigation, from data generation through flight path determination and correction are described. Special emphasis is placed on the DSN Systems which generate the navigation data: the DSN Tracking and VLBI Systems. In addition, auxiliary navigational support functions are described.

  10. Implications of Responsive Space on the Flight Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmot, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    The Responsive Space initiative has several implications for flight software that need to be addressed not only within the run-time element, but the development infrastructure and software life-cycle process elements as well. The runtime element must at a minimum support Plug & Play, while the development and process elements need to incorporate methods to quickly generate the needed documentation, code, tests, and all of the artifacts required of flight quality software. Very rapid response times go even further, and imply little or no new software development, requiring instead, using only predeveloped and certified software modules that can be integrated and tested through automated methods. These elements have typically been addressed individually with significant benefits, but it is when they are combined that they can have the greatest impact to Responsive Space. The Flight Software Branch at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center has been developing the runtime, infrastructure and process elements needed for rapid integration with the Core Flight software System (CFS) architecture. The CFS architecture consists of three main components; the core Flight Executive (cFE), the component catalog, and the Integrated Development Environment (DE). This paper will discuss the design of the components, how they facilitate rapid integration, and lessons learned as the architecture is utilized for an upcoming spacecraft.

  11. Investigation of interplanetary dust from out-of-ecliptic space probes. [astronomical models of interplanetary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fechtig, H.; Giese, R. H.; Hanner, M. S.; Zook, H. A.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of interplanetary dust via zodiacal light observations and direct detection are discussed for an out-of-ecliptic space probe. Particle fluxes and zodiacal light brightnesses were predicted for three models of the dust distribution. These models predict that most of the information will be obtained at space probe distances less than 1 A.U. from the ecliptic plane. Joint interpretation of the direct particle measurements and the zodiacal light data can yield the best knowledge of the three-dimensional particle dynamics, spatial distribution, and physical characteristics of the interplanetary dust. Such measurements are important for an understanding of the origin and role of the dust in relation to meteoroids, asteroids, and comets, as well as the interaction of the dust with solar forces.

  12. On the detection of a cometary mass distribution. [by perturbations on space probe orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, A. P.; Peale, S. J.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of detecting a possible cometary distribution on the fringes of the solar system is examined. The acceleration of a space probe due to a hypothetical cometary mass distribution with the surface density rising to a maximum and subsequently falling off with increasing distance from the sun is analyzed. The total minimum detectable cometary mass for the Pioneer and Mariner spacecraft is estimated on the basis of this model to be on the order of 1000 earth masses. Precision tracking of deep space probes is less sensitive by three orders of magnitude for the detection of an unseen cometary mass distribution at the fringes of the solar system than are the secular perturbations of long-period comets.

  13. Physical limitations in sensors for a drag-free deep space probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juillerat, R.

    1971-01-01

    The inner perturbing forces acting on sensors were analyzed, taking into account the technological limitations imposed on the proof mass position pickup and proof mass acquisition system. The resulting perturbing accelerations are evaluated as a function of the drag-free sensor parameters. Perturbations included gravitational attraction, electrical action, magnetic action, pressure effects, radiation effects, and action of the position pickup. These data can be used to study the laws of guidance, providing an optimization of the space probe as a whole.

  14. Planetary and Space Science Education by Mathematica Demonstrations: Lunar Probe Planning, Instrumentations and Field Operation Simulations for Hunveyor Model by Studies of Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabai, S.; Bérczi, Sz.

    2008-03-01

    By interactive Mathematica Demonstrations of the Wolfram Research instrumentation, mechatronics and field operation simulations of lunar and martian space probes were studied focusing on our Surveyor- type educational space probe model: Hunveyor.

  15. Mir Contamination Observations and Implications to the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soares, Carlos; Mikatarian, Ron

    2000-01-01

    A series of external contamination measurements were made on the Russian Mir Space Station. The Mir external contamination observations summarized in this paper were essential in assessing the system level impact of Russian Segment induced contamination on the International Space Station (ISS). Mir contamination observations include results from a series of flight experiments: CNES Comes-Aragatz, retrieved NASA camera bracket, Euro-Mir '95 ICA, retrieved NASA Trek blanket, Russian Astra-II, Mir Solar Array Return Experiment (SARE), etc. Results from these experiments were studied in detail to characterize Mir induced contamination. In conjunction with Mir contamination observations, Russian materials samples were tested for condensable outgassing rates in the U.S. These test results were essential in the characterization of Mir contamination sources. Once Mir contamination sources were identified and characterized, activities to assess the implications to ISS were implemented. As a result, modifications in Russian materials selection and/or usage were implemented to control contamination and mitigate risk to ISS.

  16. The deep space network. [tracking and communication support for space probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The objectives, functions, and organization of the deep space network are summarized. Progress in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations is reported. Interface support for the Mariner Venus Mercury 1973 flight and Pioneer 10 and 11 missions is included.

  17. Cosmological Implications of the First Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verde, L.

    2004-02-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) team has recently analyzed and released the first-year data. We will review the implications for cosmology of these results. The highlight is that cosmology now has a standard cosmological model. With only 6 parameters the model fits not only WMAP data remarkably well, but also a host of other astronomical observations. We also present the results on neutrino mass limits and on dark energy properties from a joint likelihood analysis of WMAP data with small-scale CMB experiments and large-scale structure surveys. The data and supplementary information are publicly available and can be found on the experiment web site at .

  18. ULF Waves Observed at MAGDAS Stations as Probes for Litho-Space Weather Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, Kiyohumi

    K.Yumoto, Space Environment Research Center (SERC), Kyushu University started the MAGDAS Project effectively in May of 2005, with the installation of the first unit in Hualien, Taiwan (Yumoto et al., 2006, 2007). Since then, over 50 units have been deployed around the world. They are concentrated along three chains: (1) North and South of Japan (the so-called "210o Magnetic Meridian Chain"), (2) Dip Equator Chain, and (3) Africa Chain (the so-called "96o Magnetic Meridian Chain"). The main goals of MAGDAS project are: (1) study magnetospheric pro-cesses by distinguishing between temporal changes and spatial variations in the phenomena, (2) clarify global structures and propagation characteristics of magnetospheric variations from higher to equatorial latitudes, and (3) understand global generation mechanisms of the Solar-Terrestrial phenomena (see Yumoto, 2004). From MAGDAS observations, ULF waves are found to be used as good probes for litho-space weather study in developing and developed countries. In the present paper, we will introduce the following examples: Pc 5 magnetic amplitudes at lower-latitude MAGDAS station show a linear relation with the solar wind velocity, thus we can use the Pc 5 amplitudes as a monitoring probe of the solar wind velocity. Pc 3-4 magnetic pulsations have skin depth comparable with the depth of epicentre of earthquakes in the lithosphere. Therefore, we can use Pc 3-4 as a probe for detecting ULF anomaly and precursors associated with great earthquakes. Pi 2 magnetic pulsations are observed globally at MAGDAS stations located at high, middle, low, and equatorial latitudes in night-and day-time. We can use the Pi 2s as a good indicator of onsets of magnetospheric substorms. Sudden commencements (sc), sudden impulse (si), and solar flare effects (sfe) create magnetic variations at MAGDAS stations. Therefore, MAGDAS data can be used as a probe of interplanetary shocks and interplanetary discontinuities in the solar wind, and solar flare

  19. Van Allen Probes Mission Space Academy: Educating middle school students about Earth's mysterious radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, L.; Turney, D.; Matiella Novak, A.; Smith, D.; Simon, M.

    2013-12-01

    How's the weather in space? Why on Earth did NASA send two satellites above Earth to study radiation belts and space weather? To learn the answer to questions about NASA's Van Allen Probes mission, 450 students and their teachers from Maryland middle schools attended Space Academy events highlighting the Van Allen Probes mission. Sponsored by the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) and Discovery Education, the events are held at the APL campus in Laurel, MD. Space Academies take students and teachers on behind-the-scenes exploration of how spacecraft are built, what they are designed to study, and introduces them to the many professionals that work together to create some of NASA's most exciting projects. Moderated by a public relations representative in the format of an official NASA press conference, the daylong event includes a student press conference with students as reporters and mission experts as panelists. Lunch with mission team members gives students a chance to ask more questions. After lunch, students don souvenir clean room suits, enjoy interactive science demonstrations, and tour APL facilities where the Van Allen Probes were built and tested before launch. Students may even have an opportunity to peek inside a clean room to view spacecraft being assembled. Prior to the event, teachers are provided with classroom activities, lesson plans, and videos developed by APL and Discovery Education to help prepare students for the featured mission. The activities are aligned to National Science Education Standards and appropriate for use in the classroom. Following their visit, student journalists are encouraged to write a short article about their field trip; selections are posted on the Space Academy web site. Designed to engage, inspire, and influence attitudes about space science and STEM careers, Space Academies provide an opportunity to attract underserved populations and emphasize that space science is for everyone. Exposing students to a diverse group of

  20. In situ temperature measurements of reaction spaces under microwave irradiation using photoluminescent probes.

    PubMed

    Ano, Taishi; Kishimoto, Fuminao; Sasaki, Ryo; Tsubaki, Shuntaro; Maitani, Masato M; Suzuki, Eiichi; Wada, Yuji

    2016-05-11

    We demonstrate two novel methods for the measurement of the temperatures of reaction spaces locally heated by microwaves, which have been applied here to two example systems, i.e., BaTiO3 particles covered with a SiO2 shell (BaTiO3-SiO2) and layered tungstate particles. Photoluminescent (PL) probes showing the temperature-sensitivity in their PL lifetimes are located in the nanospaces of the above systems. In the case of BaTiO3-SiO2 core-shell particles, rhodamine B is loaded into the mesopores of the SiO2 shell covering the BaTiO3 core, which generates the heat through the dielectric loss of microwaves. The inner nanospace temperature of the SiO2 shell is determined to be 28 °C higher than the bulk temperature under microwave irradiation at 24 W. On the other hand, Eu(3+) is immobilized in the interlayer space of layered tungstate as the PL probe, showing that the nanospace temperature of the interlayer is only 4 °C higher than the bulk temperature. This method for temperature-measurement is powerful for controlling microwave heating and elucidates the ambiguous mechanisms of microwave special effects often observed in chemical reactions, contributing greatly to the practical application of microwaves in chemistry and materials sciences. PMID:27136754

  1. The implications of force reflection for teleoperation in space

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, J.V.; Herndon, J.N.; Moore, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews previous research on teleoperator force feedback and reports results of a testing program which assessed the impact of force reflection on teleoperator task performance. Force reflection is a type of force feedback in which the forces acting on the remote portion of the teleoperator are displayed to the operator by back-driving the master controller. The testing program compared three force reflection levels: 4 to 1 (four units of force on the slave produce one unit of force at the master controller), 1 to 1, and infinity to 1 (no force reflection). Time required to complete tasks, rate of occurrence of errors, the maximum force applied to tasks components, and variability in forces applied to components during completion of representative remote handling tasks were used as dependent variables. Operators exhibited lower error rates, lower peak forces, and more consistent application of forces using force reflection than they did without it. These data support the hypothesis that force reflection provides useful information for teleoperator users. The earlier literature and the results of the experiment are discussed in terms of their implications for space-based teleoperator systems. The discussion describes the impact of force reflection on task completion performance and task strategies, as suggested by the literature. It is important to understand the trade-offs involved in using telerobotic systems with and without force reflection. Force-reflecting systems are typically more expensive (in mass, volume, and price per unit), but they reduce mean time to repair and may be safer to use, compared to systems without force reflection.

  2. Exploring Local Electrostatic Effects with Scanning Probe Microscopy: Implications for Piezoresponse Force Microscopy and Triboelectricity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Balke, Nina; Maksymovych, Petro; Jesse, Stephen; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Li, Qian; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-09-25

    The implementation of contact mode Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) utilizes the electrostatic interactions between tip and sample when the tip and sample are in contact with each other. Surprisingly, the electrostatic forces in contact are large enough to be measured even with tips as stiff as 4.5 N/m. As for traditional non-contact KPFM, the signal depends strongly on electrical properties of the sample, such as the dielectric constant, and the tip-properties, such as the stiffness. Since the tip is in contact with the sample, bias-induced changes in the junction potential between tip and sample can be measured with highermore » lateral and temporal resolution compared to traditional non-contact KPFM. Significant and reproducible variations of tip-surface capacitance are observed and attributed to surface electrochemical phenomena. Lastly, observations of significant surface charge states at zero bias and strong hysteretic electromechanical responses at non-ferroelectric surface have significant implications for fields such as triboelectricity and piezoresponse force microscopy.« less

  3. Exploring Local Electrostatic Effects with Scanning Probe Microscopy: Implications for Piezoresponse Force Microscopy and Triboelectricity

    SciTech Connect

    Balke, Nina; Maksymovych, Petro; Jesse, Stephen; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Li, Qian; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-09-25

    The implementation of contact mode Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) utilizes the electrostatic interactions between tip and sample when the tip and sample are in contact with each other. Surprisingly, the electrostatic forces in contact are large enough to be measured even with tips as stiff as 4.5 N/m. As for traditional non-contact KPFM, the signal depends strongly on electrical properties of the sample, such as the dielectric constant, and the tip-properties, such as the stiffness. Since the tip is in contact with the sample, bias-induced changes in the junction potential between tip and sample can be measured with higher lateral and temporal resolution compared to traditional non-contact KPFM. Significant and reproducible variations of tip-surface capacitance are observed and attributed to surface electrochemical phenomena. Lastly, observations of significant surface charge states at zero bias and strong hysteretic electromechanical responses at non-ferroelectric surface have significant implications for fields such as triboelectricity and piezoresponse force microscopy.

  4. Getting together in deep space - The Rosetta space probe's long trek to Comet 67/P Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-02-01

    The countdown to Rosetta’s rendezvous in space began on 1 March 1997. At the end of February 2004, seven years and not a few headaches later, the European Space Agency (ESA) probe will at last be setting off on its journey to meet Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The long-planned get-together will not however take place until the middle of 2014. A few months after arriving at the comet, Rosetta will release a small lander onto its surface. Then, for almost two years it will investigate Churyumov-Gerasimenko from close up. Dr Gerhard Schwehm, lead scientist for the Rosetta project, explains that, “With this mission we will be breaking new ground - this will be the first protracted cometary encounter.” The trip to the meeting place in space will certainly be a long one, located as it is some 4.5 astronomical units from the Sun, which translates into something like 675 million kilometres. Rosetta will be on the road for ten years, during which time it will clock up in excess of five billion kilometres. Launch in February 2004 Rosetta will be waved off on 26 February when it lifts off from the space centre in Kourou, French Guiana, aboard an Ariane 5 launcher. Shortly after the spacecraft’s release, its solar panels will be deployed and turned towards the Sun to build up the necessary power reserves. Its various systems and experiments will be gradually brought into operation and tested. Just three months into the mission the first active phase will be over, followed by final testing of the experiments in October 2004. Rosetta will then spend the following years flying a lonely path to the comet, passing by the Earth, Mars, the Earth and the Earth again. There is no alternative to this detour, for even Ariane 5, the most powerful launcher on the market today, lacks the power to hurl the probe on a direct route to the comet. To get the required momentum, it will rely on swing-by manœuvres, using the gravitation pull of Mars (in 2007) and the Earth (three times, in

  5. Wall current probe: A non-invasive in situ plasma diagnostic for space and time resolved current density distribution measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Baude, R.; Gaboriau, F.; Hagelaar, G. J. M.

    2013-08-15

    In the context of low temperature plasma research, we propose a wall current probe to determine the local charged particle fluxes flowing to the chamber walls. This non-intrusive planar probe consists of an array of electrode elements which can be individually biased and for which the current can be measured separately. We detail the probe properties and present the ability of the diagnostic to be used as a space and time resolved measurement of the ion and electron current density at the chamber walls. This diagnostic will be relevant to study the electron transport in magnetized low-pressure plasmas.

  6. Gradual Diffusion and Punctuated Phase Space Density Enhancements of Highly Relativistic Electrons: Van Allen Probes Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Li, X.; Henderson, M. G.; Kanekal, S. G.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Hudson, M. K.

    2014-01-01

    The dual-spacecraft Van Allen Probes mission has provided a new window into mega electron volt (MeV) particle dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts. Observations (up to E (is) approximately 10MeV) show clearly the behavior of the outer electron radiation belt at different timescales: months-long periods of gradual inward radial diffusive transport and weak loss being punctuated by dramatic flux changes driven by strong solar wind transient events. We present analysis of multi-MeV electron flux and phase space density (PSD) changes during March 2013 in the context of the first year of Van Allen Probes operation. This March period demonstrates the classic signatures both of inward radial diffusive energization and abrupt localized acceleration deep within the outer Van Allen zone (L (is) approximately 4.0 +/- 0.5). This reveals graphically that both 'competing' mechanisms of multi-MeV electron energization are at play in the radiation belts, often acting almost concurrently or at least in rapid succession.

  7. Probing theories of gravity with phase space-inferred potentials of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Alejo; Miller, Christopher J.; Kern, Nicholas; Gifford, Daniel; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Li, Baojiu; Koyama, Kazuya; Nichol, Robert C.

    2016-04-01

    Modified theories of gravity provide us with a unique opportunity to generate innovative tests of gravity. In Chameleon f (R ) gravity, the gravitational potential differs from the weak-field limit of general relativity (GR) in a mass dependent way. We develop a probe of gravity which compares high mass clusters, where Chameleon effects are weak, to low mass clusters, where the effects can be strong. We utilize the escape velocity edges in the radius/velocity phase space to infer the gravitational potential profiles on scales of 0.3-1 virial radii. We show that the escape edges of low mass clusters are enhanced compared to GR, where the magnitude of the difference depends on the background field value |fR 0 ¯ | . We validate our probe using N-body simulations and simulated light cone galaxy data. For a Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument Bright Galaxy Sample, including observational systematics, projection effects, and cosmic variance, our test can differentiate between GR and Chameleon f (R ) gravity models, |fR 0 ¯ |=4 ×10-6 (2 ×10-6) at >5 σ (>2 σ ), more than an order of magnitude better than current cluster-scale constraints.

  8. Real-space measurement of potential distribution in PECVD ONO electrets by Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmerich, F.; Thielemann, C.

    2016-05-01

    Multilayers of silicon oxide/silicon nitride/silicon oxide (ONO) are known for their good electret properties due to deep energy traps near the material interfaces, facilitating charge storage. However, measurement of the space charge distribution in such multilayers is a challenge for conventional methods if layer thickness dimensions shrink below 1 μm. In this paper, we propose an atomic force microscope based method to determine charge distributions in ONO layers with spatial resolution below 100 nm. By applying Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) on freshly cleaved, corona-charged multilayers, the surface potential is measured directly along the z-axis and across the interfaces. This new method gives insights into charge distribution and charge movement in inorganic electrets with a high spatial resolution.

  9. Real-space measurement of potential distribution in PECVD ONO electrets by Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Emmerich, F; Thielemann, C

    2016-05-20

    Multilayers of silicon oxide/silicon nitride/silicon oxide (ONO) are known for their good electret properties due to deep energy traps near the material interfaces, facilitating charge storage. However, measurement of the space charge distribution in such multilayers is a challenge for conventional methods if layer thickness dimensions shrink below 1 μm. In this paper, we propose an atomic force microscope based method to determine charge distributions in ONO layers with spatial resolution below 100 nm. By applying Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) on freshly cleaved, corona-charged multilayers, the surface potential is measured directly along the z-axis and across the interfaces. This new method gives insights into charge distribution and charge movement in inorganic electrets with a high spatial resolution. PMID:27053633

  10. Probing Real-Space and Time-Resolved Correlation Functions with Many-Body Ramsey Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knap, Michael; Kantian, Adrian; Giamarchi, Thierry; Bloch, Immanuel; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Demler, Eugene

    2013-10-01

    We propose to use Ramsey interferometry and single-site addressability, available in synthetic matter such as cold atoms or trapped ions, to measure real-space and time-resolved spin correlation functions. These correlation functions directly probe the excitations of the system, which makes it possible to characterize the underlying many-body states. Moreover, they contain valuable information about phase transitions where they exhibit scale invariance. We also discuss experimental imperfections and show that a spin-echo protocol can be used to cancel slow fluctuations in the magnetic field. We explicitly consider examples of the two-dimensional, antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model and the one-dimensional, long-range transverse field Ising model to illustrate the technique.

  11. Scalar field probes of power-law space-time singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blau, Matthias; Frank, Denis; Weiss, Sebastian

    2006-08-01

    We analyse the effective potential of the scalar wave equation near generic space-time singularities of power-law type (Szekeres-Iyer metrics) and show that the effective potential exhibits a universal and scale invariant leading inverse square behaviour ~ x-2 in the ``tortoise coordinate'' x provided that the metrics satisfy the strict Dominant Energy Condition (DEC). This result parallels that obtained in [1] for probes consisting of families of massless particles (null geodesic deviation, a.k.a. the Penrose Limit). The detailed properties of the scalar wave operator depend sensitively on the numerical coefficient of the x-2-term, and as one application we show that timelike singularities satisfying the DEC are quantum mechanically singular in the sense of the Horowitz-Marolf (essential self-adjointness) criterion. We also comment on some related issues like the near-singularity behaviour of the scalar fields permitted by the Friedrichs extension.

  12. Light as a probe of the structure of space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartaglia, Angelo

    2016-05-01

    Light is an intrinsically relativistic probe and when used in an adequately sized array of ring lasers it is sensible to the curvature and to the chirality of space-time. On this basis the GINGER experiment is being implemented at the underground National Laboratories at Gran Sasso. The experiment, whose objective is the measurement of the terrestrial frame dragging effect or deviations from it, will be presented and discussed in its foundation. Furthermore, at a bigger scale, the possibilities given by the under way GAIA mission and the proposed AGP, will be analyzed with a special attention paied to the possibility of extracting information concerning the angular momenta of the sun and the main bodies of the solar system.

  13. Probing the bioactivity-relevant chemical space of robust reactions and common molecular building blocks.

    PubMed

    Hartenfeller, Markus; Eberle, Martin; Meier, Peter; Nieto-Oberhuber, Cristina; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Schneider, Gisbert; Jacoby, Edgar; Renner, Steffen

    2012-05-25

    In the search for new bioactive compounds, there is a trend toward increasingly complex compound libraries aiming to target the demanding targets of the future. In contrast, medicinal chemistry and traditional library design rely mainly on a small set of highly established and robust reactions. Here, we probe a set of 58 such reactions for their ability to sample the chemical space of known bioactive molecules, and the potential to create new scaffolds. Combined with ~26,000 common available building blocks, the reactions retrieve around 9% of a scaffold-diverse set of compounds active on human target proteins covering all major pharmaceutical target classes. Almost 80% of generated scaffolds from virtual one-step synthesis products are not present in a large set of known bioactive molecules for human targets, indicating potential for new discoveries. The results suggest that established synthesis resources are well suited to cover the known bioactivity-relevant chemical space and that there are plenty of unexplored regions accessible by these reactions, possibly providing valuable "low-hanging fruit" for hit discovery. PMID:22512717

  14. Application of high stability oscillators to radio science experiments using deep space probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kursinski, Emil R.

    1990-01-01

    The microwave telecommunication links between the earth and deep space probes have long been used to conduct radio science experiments which take advantage of the phase coherency and stability of these links. These experiments measure changes in the phase delay of the signals to infer electrical, magnetic and gravitational properties of the solar system environment and beyond through which the spacecraft and radio signals pass. The precision oscillators, from which the phase of the microwave signals are derived, play a key role in the stability of these links and therefore the sensitivity of these measurements. These experiments have become a driving force behind recent and future improvements in the Deep Space Network and spacecraft oscillators and frequency and time distribution systems. Three such experiments which are key to these improvements are briefly discussed and relationship between their sensitivity and the signal phase stability is described. The first is the remote sensing of planetary atmospheres by occultation in which the radio signal passes through the atmosphere and is refracted causing the signal pathlength to change from which the pressure and the temperature of the atmosphere can be derived. The second experiment is determination of the opacity of planetary rings by passage of the radio signals through the rings. The third experiment is the research for very low frequency gravitational radiation. The fractional frequency variation of the signal is comparable to the spatial strain amplitude the system is capable of detecting. A summary of past results and future possibilities for these experiments are presented.

  15. Evidence of Second-Order Factor Structure in a Diagnostic Problem Space: Implications for Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papa, Frank J.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Chest pain was identified as a specific medical problem space, and disease classes were modeled to define it. Results from a test taken by 628 medical residents indicate a second-order factor structure that suggests that chest pain is a multidimensional problem space. Implications for medical education are discussed. (SLD)

  16. Implications of Privacy Needs and Interpersonal Distancing Mechanisms for Space Station Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, A. A.; Sommer, R.; Struthers, N.; Hoyt, K.

    1986-01-01

    The literature on privacy needs, personal space, interpersonal distancing, and crowding is reveiwed with special reference to spaceflight and spaceflight analogous conditions. A quantitative model is proposed for understanding privacy, interpersonal distancing, and performance. The implications for space station design is described.

  17. IMPLICATIONS OF NEW MEDIA FOR SPACE AND BUILDING DESIGN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHRISTIANSEN, KENNETH A.

    THE EXPANDING ROLE OF EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION AND OTHER INSTRUCTIONAL AIDS AND MEDIA IN THE LEARNING MEDIA IS DISCUSSED IN TERMS OF APPROPRIATE SPACE DESIGN AND SPACE UTILIZATION. THREE AREAS ARE IDENTIFIED IN THE NEW MEDIA--(1) PROJECTION DEVICES, (2) NONPROJECTION DEVICES, AND (3) TELEVISION. ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN CONCERNS ARE DEFINED AS--(1)…

  18. Atrial Arrhythmias and Their Implications for Space Flight - Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, J. D.; Barr, Y. R.; Bauer, P.; Hamilton, D. R.; Kerstman, E.; Tarver, B.

    2010-01-01

    This panel will discuss the implications of atrial arrhythmias in astronauts from a variety of perspectives; including historical data, current practices, and future challenges for exploration class missions. The panelists will present case histories, outline the evolution of current NASA medical standards for atrial arrhythmias, discuss the use of predictive tools, and consider potential challenges for current and future missions.

  19. DC Langmuir Probe for Measurement of Space Plasma: A Brief Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Koichiro

    2015-09-01

    Herein, we discuss the in situ measurement of the electron temperature in the ionosphere/plasmasphere by means of DC Langmuir probes. Major instruments which have been reported are a conventional DC Langmuir probe, whose probe voltage is swept; a pulsed probe, which uses pulsed bias voltage; a rectification probe, which uses sinusoidal signal; and a resonance cone probe, which uses radio wave propagation. The content reviews past observations made with the instruments above. We also discuss technical factors that should be taken into account for reliable measurement, such as problems related to the contamination of electrodes and the satellite surface. Finally, we discuss research topics to be studied in the near future.

  20. Space Weathering of Itokawa Particles: Implications for Regolith Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Eve L.; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2015-01-01

    Space weathering processes such as solar wind irradiation and micrometeorite impacts are known to alter the the properties of regolith materials exposed on airless bodies. The rates of space weathering processes however, are poorly constrained for asteroid regoliths, with recent estimates ranging over many orders of magnitude. The return of surface samples by JAXA's Hayabusa mission to asteroid 25143 Itokawa, and their laboratory analysis provides "ground truth" to anchor the timescales for space weathering processes on airless bodies. Here, we use the effects of solar wind irradiation and the accumulation of solar flare tracks recorded in Itokawa grains to constrain the rates of space weathering and yield information about regolith dynamics on these timescales.

  1. Space-Derived Transparency: Players, Policies, Implications, and Synergies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinnan, C. J.

    2001-06-01

    Space-derived transparency will become a common means of monitoring, preventing, and mitigating crises, verifying compliance with treaties and law, and enabling confidence and security building measures. Democratization and globalization, the proliferation of information technologies, the availability of commercial space high-resolution imagery, and the growing influence of NGOs invite this question: What is (space-derived) transparency and what effect does it have on US security policy? Three camps have emerged in the debate -Horaeists who seek to build a transnational society through complete transparency; Preservationists, mostly military, who fear the threat to national security, want to deny most space-derived information to non-traditional/non-state actors; and Synergists who seek to capitalize on the best of both camps. There is evidence suggesting that space-derived transparency is an inevitable trend and will resist even the best means of preservationist control. Space-derived transparency may change the dynamic of the security environment by introducing new players into the policy fomentation and implementation process. These players, if not properly schooled in imagery analysis or the potential effects of their use of misinterpreted space-derived imagery, could force policy makers to make fast, ill-considered decisions in order to respond to incidents. In some cases this fast response will defuse potential crises and in other situations these rushed decisions might result in policies without considering the potential consequences, which could turn incidents into crises. Space-derived transparency is a step forward into the future for each camp . . . the challenge for the United States lies in forging synergies in an increasingly transparent world while maintaining the balance between openness and security.

  2. Some Implications of Space Tourism for Extraterrestrial Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, T. F.

    1999-01-01

    The Purpose and Scope of the Roundtable "to bring together people with ideas about what will be useful products in the space environment with those who know how to produce materials on Earth." When considering extraterrestrial resources in the context of their use in support of general public space tourism it is important to broaden this definition of Scope in certain ways. The first stages of extraterrestrial space tourism will probably take place in the Earth's lower atmosphere - far from the Moon or the planets, and even well below Earth orbit. Sophisticated aircraft could take tourists up to altitudes approaching 20 miles for short periods. And the earliest of fully reusable space transportation vehicles should be able to reach some 50 miles in altitude for short trips. Later, Earth multi-orbit trips could be offered, to be followed by stays in residence in LEO hotels for days. In time, trips could take place to/from the Moon, eventually with stays there. It should be appreciated that there are two most important extraterrestrial resources immediately available for space tourism use. They are not "materials" or "products," but are two vital space "resource intangibles."

  3. Legal Implications of Nuclear Propulsion for Space Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, V.

    2002-01-01

    This paper is intended to examine nuclear propulsion concepts such as "Project Orion", "Project Daedalus", NERVA, VASIMIR, from the legal point of view. The UN Principles Relevant to the Use of Nuclear Power Sources in Outer Space apply to nuclear power sources in outer space devoted to the generation of electric power on board space objects for non-propulsive purposes, and do not regulate the use of nuclear energy as a means of propulsion. However, nuclear propulsion by means of detonating atomic bombs (ORION) is, in principle, banned under the 1963 Treaty Banning Nuclear Weapon Tests in the Atmosphere, in Outer Space, and Under Water. The legality of use of nuclear propulsion will be analysed from different approaches - historical (i.e. the lawfulness of these projects at the time of their proposal, at the present time, and in the future - in the light of the mutability and evolution of international law), spatial (i.e. the legal regime governing peaceful nuclear explosions in different spatial zones - Earth atmosphere, Earth orbit, Solar System, and interstellar space), and technical (i.e, the legal regime applicable to different nuclear propulsion techniques, and to the various negative effects - e.g. damage to other space systems as an effect of the electromagnetic pulse, etc). The paper will analyse the positive law, and will also come with suggestions "de lege ferenda".

  4. Magnetically insulated baffled probe for real-time monitoring of equilibrium and fluctuating values of space potentials, electron and ion temperatures, and densities

    SciTech Connect

    Demidov, V. I.; Koepke, M. E.; Raitses, Y.

    2010-10-15

    By restricting the electron-collection area of a cold Langmuir probe compared to the ion-collection area, the probe floating potential can become equal to the space potential, and thus conveniently monitored, rather than to a value shifted from the space potential by an electron-temperature-dependent offset, i.e., the case with an equal-collection-area probe. This design goal is achieved by combining an ambient magnetic field in the plasma with baffles, or shields, on the probe, resulting in species-selective magnetic insulation of the probe collection area. This permits the elimination of electron current to the probe by further adjustment of magnetic insulation which results in an ion-temperature-dependent offset when the probe is electrically floating. Subtracting the floating potential of two magnetically insulated baffled probes, each with a different degree of magnetic insulation, enables the electron or ion temperature to be measured in real time.

  5. A Model Space Mission to probe Einstein's Equivalence Principle - The STE-QUEST Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heske, Astrid; Cacciapuoti, Luigi; Gehler, Martin

    Understanding General Relativity at all scales requires, in particular, understanding gravity at quantum level. To attempt this, tests of the most prominent aspect of General Relativity, the Einstein Equivalence Principle, can be performed with the next generation of atomic quantum sensors to significantly improved accuracy. To exploit the ultimate limits of atomic sensors a dedicated space platform is needed; the advantages space offers are, among others, unperturbed free-fall conditions, longer interaction times per measurement and large variations in velocity and gravitational field. In the frame of the third medium class launch opportunity of ESA's Cosmic Vision 2015 - 2025 programme a study was conducted - STE-QUEST (Space-Time Explorer and QUantum Equivalence principle Test), one of the candidates for a medium class mission - and the feasibility of such a mission assessed. The spacecraft would carry two instruments probing the different aspects of the Einstein Equivalence Principle: begin{enumerate} A dual species ( (87) Rb and (85) Rb) atom interferometer to probe the universality of propagation of matter waves. A high-performance time and frequency link dedicated to comparison of atomic clocks on ground. The specific primary science objectives for STE-QUEST are: begin{enumerate} Universality of propagation of matter waves test begin{itemize} Test of the universality of free fall of matter waves to an uncertainty of the Eötvös ratio lower than 2*10 (-15) . Gravitational redshift tests begin{itemize} Sun gravitational red-shift measurement to a fractional uncertainty of 2*10 (-6) , with an ultimate goal of 5*10 (-7) . Moon gravitational red-shift measurement to a fractional uncertainty of 4*10 (-4) , with an ultimate goal of 9*10 (-5) . Such a measurement has never been attempted before. The availability of an atomic clock on-board the spacecraft (optional) would additionally allow testing the Earth gravitational red-shift measurement to a fractional

  6. Implications of Public Opinion for Space Program Planning, 1980 - 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overholt, W.; Wiener, A. J.; Yokelson, D.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of public opinion on future space programs is discussed in terms of direct support, apathy, or opposition, and concern about the tax burden, budgetary pressures, and national priorities. Factors considered include: the salience and visibility of NASA as compared with other issues, the sources of general pressure on the federal budget which could affect NASA, the public's opinions regarding the size and priority of NASA'S budget, the degree to which the executive can exercise leverage over NASA's budget through influencing or disregarding public opinion, the effects of linkages to other issues on space programs, and the public's general attitudes toward the progress of science.

  7. Probing cosmology and gravity with redshift-space distortions around voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaus, Nico; Sutter, P. M.; Lavaux, Guilhem; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2015-11-01

    Cosmic voids in the large-scale structure of the Universe affect the peculiar motions of objects in their vicinity. Although these motions are difficult to observe directly, the clustering pattern of their surrounding tracers in redshift space is influenced in a unique way. This allows to investigate the interplay between densities and velocities around voids, which is solely dictated by the laws of gravity. With the help of N-body simulations and derived mock-galaxy catalogs we calculate the average density fluctuations around voids identified with a watershed algorithm in redshift space and compare the results with the expectation from general relativity and the ΛCDM model. We find linear theory to work remarkably well in describing the dynamics of voids. Adopting a Bayesian inference framework, we explore the full posterior of our model parameters and forecast the achievable accuracy on measurements of the growth rate of structure and the geometric distortion through the Alcock-Paczyński effect. Systematic errors in the latter are reduced from ~15% to ~5% when peculiar velocities are taken into account. The relative parameter uncertainties in galaxy surveys with number densities comparable to the SDSS MAIN (CMASS) sample probing a volume of 1h-3Gpc3 yield σf/b/(f/b).~2% (20%) and σDAH/DAH~0.2% (2%), respectively. At this level of precision the linear-theory model becomes systematics dominated, with parameter biases that fall beyond these values. Nevertheless, the presented method is highly model independent; its viability lies in the underlying assumption of statistical isotropy of the Universe.

  8. Implications of Gun Launch to Space for Nanosatellite Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Miles R.

    1995-01-01

    Engineering and economic scaling factors for gun launch to space (GLTS) systems are compared to conventional rocket launch systems. It is argued that GLTS might reduce the cost of small satellite development and launch in the mid to far term, thereby inducing a shift away from large centralized geosynchronous communications satellites to small proliferated low earth orbit systems.

  9. International Space Station Execution Replanning Process: Trends and Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCormick, Robet J.

    2007-01-01

    International Space Station is a joint venture. Because of this, ISS execution planning- planning within the week for the ISS requires coordination across multiple partner, and the associated processes and tools to allow this coordination to occur. These processes and tools are currently defined and are extensively used. This paper summarizes these processes, and documents the current data trends associated with these processes and tools, with a focus on the metrics provided from the ISS Planning Product Change Request (PPCR) tool. As NASA's Vision for Space Exploration and general Human spaceflight trends are implemented, the probability of joint venture long duration programs such as ISS, with varying levels of intergovernmental and/or corporate partnership, will increase. Therefore, the results of this PPCR analysis serve as current Lessons learned for the ISS and for further similar ventures.

  10. Reacting to nuclear power systems in space: American public protests over outer planetary probes since the 1980s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Launius, Roger D.

    2014-03-01

    The United States has pioneered the use of nuclear power systems for outer planetary space probes since the 1970s. These systems have enabled the Viking landings to reach the surface of Mars and both Pioneers 10 and 11 and Voyagers 1 and 2 to travel to the limits of the solar system. Although the American public has long been concerned about safety of these systems, in the 1980s a reaction to nuclear accidents - especially the Soviet Cosmos 954 spacecraft destruction and the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accidents - heightened awareness about the hazards of nuclear power and every spacecraft launch since that time has been contested by opponents of nuclear energy. This has led to a debate over the appropriateness of the use of nuclear power systems for spacecraft. It has also refocused attention on the need for strict systems of control and rigorous checks and balances to assure safety. This essay describes the history of space radioisotope power systems, the struggles to ensure safe operations, and the political confrontation over whether or not to allow the launch the Galileo and Cassini space probes to the outer planets. Effectively, these efforts have led to the successful flights of 12 deep space planetary probes, two-thirds of them operated since the accidents of Cosmos 954, Three Mile Island, and Chernobyl.

  11. Insurance and indemnification implications of future space projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, John E.

    1987-01-01

    NASA options regarding insurance and indemnification policies as they relate to NASA customers and contractors are described. The foundation for the discussion is the way in which NASA is planning to return the Space Shuttle fleet to safe flight as well as current U.S. policy concerning future uses of the Shuttle fleet. Issues discussed include: the nature of the Shuttle manifest; the policy regarding property damage or destruction; insurance against liability to third parties; the reduction of the scope of the risk to be insured; NASA as the insurer; a sharing arrangement between the user and NASA; and contractors and subcontractors involved in Shuttle operations.

  12. Fluorescent probe partitioning in GUVs of binary phospholipid mixtures: implications for interpreting phase behavior.

    PubMed

    Juhasz, Janos; Davis, James H; Sharom, Frances J

    2012-01-01

    The phase behavior of membrane lipids is known to influence the organization and function of many integral proteins. Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) provide a very useful model system in which to examine the details of lipid phase separation using fluorescence imaging. The visualization of domains in GUVs of binary and ternary lipid mixtures requires fluorescent probes with partitioning preference for one of the phases present. To avoid possible pitfalls when interpreting the phase behavior of these lipid mixtures, sufficiently thorough characterization of the fluorescent probes used in these studies is needed. It is now evident that fluorescent probes display different partitioning preferences between lipid phases, depending on the specific lipid host system. Here, we demonstrate the benefit of using a panel of fluorescent probes and confocal fluorescence microscopy to examine phase separation in GUVs of binary mixtures of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC)/1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC). Patch and fibril gel phase domains were found to co-exist with liquid disordered (l(d)) domains on the surface of GUVs composed of 40:60 mol% DOPC/DPPC, over a wide range of temperatures (14-25°C). The fluorescent lipid, 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-(7-nitro-2-1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl (NBD-DPPE), proved to be the most effective probe for visualization of fibril domains. In the presence of Lissamine(TM) rhodamine B 1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (Rh-DPPE) we were unable to detect fibril domains. This fluorophore also affected the partitioning behavior of other fluorescent probes. Overall, we show that the selection of different fluorescent probes as lipid phase reporters can result in very different interpretation of the phase behavior of DOPC/DPPC mixtures. PMID:21945563

  13. Human factors in space station architecture 1: Space station program implications for human factors research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, M. M.

    1985-01-01

    The space station program is based on a set of premises on mission requirements and the operational capabilities of the space shuttle. These premises will influence the human behavioral factors and conditions on board the space station. These include: launch in the STS Orbiter payload bay, orbital characteristics, power supply, microgravity environment, autonomy from the ground, crew make-up and organization, distributed command control, safety, and logistics resupply. The most immediate design impacts of these premises will be upon the architectural organization and internal environment of the space station.

  14. Group-galaxy correlations in redshift space as a probe of the growth of structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, F. G.; de la Torre, S.; Bianchi, D.; Guzzo, L.; Peacock, J. A.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the use of the cross-correlation between galaxies and galaxy groups to measure redshift-space distortions (RSD) and thus probe the growth rate of cosmological structure. This is compared to the classical approach based on using galaxy auto-correlation. We make use of realistic simulated galaxy catalogues that have been constructed by populating simulated dark matter haloes with galaxies through halo occupation prescriptions. We adapt the classical RSD dispersion model to the case of the group-galaxy cross-correlation function and estimate the RSD parameter β by fitting both the full anisotropic correlation function ξs(rp, π) and its multipole moments. In addition, we define a modified version of the latter statistics by truncating the multipole moments to exclude strongly non-linear distortions at small transverse scales. We fit these three observable quantities in our set of simulated galaxy catalogues and estimate statistical and systematic errors on β for the case of galaxy-galaxy, group-group, and group-galaxy correlation functions. When ignoring off-diagonal elements of the covariance matrix in the fitting, the truncated multipole moments of the group-galaxy cross-correlation function provide the most accurate estimate, with systematic errors below 3 per cent when fitting transverse scales larger than 10 h-1 Mpc. Including the full data covariance enlarges statistical errors but keep unchanged the level of systematic error. Although statistical errors are generally larger for groups, the use of group-galaxy cross-correlation can potentially allow the reduction of systematics while using simple linear or dispersion models.

  15. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, W.S.; O'Rourke, P.E.

    1994-08-02

    A support structure is described bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe. 3 figs.

  16. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, William S.; O'Rourke, Patrick E.

    1994-01-01

    A support structure bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe.

  17. Gravitational biology and space life sciences: current status and implications for the Indian space programme.

    PubMed

    Dayanandan, P

    2011-12-01

    This paper is an introduction to gravitational and space life sciences and a summary of key achievements in the field. Current global research is focused on understanding the effects of gravity/microgravity onmicrobes, cells, plants, animals and humans. It is now established that many plants and animals can progress through several generations in microgravity. Astrobiology is emerging as an exciting field promoting research in biospherics and fabrication of controlled environmental life support systems. India is one of the 14-nation International Space Exploration Coordination Group (2007) that hopes that someday humans may live and work on other planets within the Solar System. The vision statement of the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) includes planetary exploration and human spaceflight. While a leader in several fields of space science, India is yet to initiate serious research in gravitational and life sciences. Suggestions are made here for establishing a full-fledged Indian space life sciences programme. PMID:22116289

  18. Loss of Water to Space from Mars: Processes and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kass, D. M.

    2001-12-01

    One of the major sinks for water on Mars is the loss to space. This occurs via a complex series of processes that transport the individual atoms to the upper atmosphere, where several escape mechanisms remove them. Hydrogen and deuterium are lost primarily by Jeans escape. Non-thermal processes also remove H and D, but are only important in determining D loss at solar minimum under modern conditions. The present H loss rate is equivalent to the loss of 10-3~pr-\\micron~yr-1 of water. The loss of oxygen is more complicated. The three main processes are indirect (or ionospheric) sputtering, solar wind pickup of O+, and O2+ dissociative recombination. Their relative importance has varied over the history of Mars. The combined effect of the O loss processes is to remove a ~ 50~m global layer of water over the last 3.5 Gyr. Based on photochemical modeling, the loss of oxygen and hydrogen are balanced (over geological timescales) by a feedback process. During the early history of Mars, impact erosion and hydrodynamic blow-off may have removed significant water. But, it is difficult to estimate their quantitative effects. The transport of individual H, D and O atoms to the exosphere where they can escape is not completely understood. It occurs primarily via intermediate species, H2, HD, O2 and CO2. The H2 and HD are formed by photolysis of water and the odd hydrogen photochemistry. One open issue is the mechanism regulating the partitioning of D between HDO and HD (which controls the supply of D available for escape from the exosphere). The various loss processes isotopically enrich Martian water since the exospheric escape source region is depleted. Jeans escape and the transport from the lower atmosphere further fractionate hydrogen, the most useful isotopic system. Based on recent observations, the D/H fractionation factor, F ~ 0.02. Measurements of atmospheric water vapor indicate it is enriched in deuterium, with a D/H ratio ~ 5 times the terrestrial value. Since

  19. Space shuttle ram glow: Implication of NO2 recombination continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, G. R.; Mende, S. B.; Clifton, S.

    1985-01-01

    The ram glow data gathered to data from imaging experiments on space shuttle suggest the glow is a continuum (within 34 angstrom resolution); the continuum shape is such that the peak is near 7000 angstroms decreasing to the blue and red, and the average molecular travel leading to emission after leaving the surface is 20 cm (assuming isotropic scattering from the surface). Emission continuum is rare in molecular systems but the measured spectrum does resemble the laboratory spectrum of NO2 (B) recombination continuum. The thickness of the observed emission is consistent with the NO2 hypothesis given an exit velocity of approx. 2.5 km/sec (1.3 eV) which leaves approx. 3.7 eV of ramming OI energy available for unbonding the recombined NO2 from the surface. The NO2 is formed in a 3-body recombination of OI + NO + m = NO2 + m where OI originates from the atmosphere and NO is chemically formed on the surface from atmospheric NI and OI. The spacecraft surface then acts as the n for the reaction: Evidence exists from orbital mass spectrometer data that the NO and NO2 chemistry described in this process does occur on surfaces of spectrometer orifices in orbit. Surface temperature effects are likely a factor in the NO sticking efficiency and, therefore, glow intensities.

  20. Space shuttle Ram glow: Implication of NO2 recombination continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, G. R.; Mende, S. B.; Clifton, S.

    1985-09-01

    The ram glow data gathered to data from imaging experiments on space shuttle suggest the glow is a continuum (within 34 angstrom resolution); the continuum shape is such that the peak is near 7000 angstroms decreasing to the blue and red, and the average molecular travel leading to emission after leaving the surface is 20 cm (assuming isotropic scattering from the surface). Emission continuum is rare in molecular systems but the measured spectrum does resemble the laboratory spectrum of NO2 (B) recombination continuum. The thickness of the observed emission is consistent with the NO2 hypothesis given an exit velocity of approx. 2.5 km/sec (1.3 eV) which leaves approx. 3.7 eV of ramming OI energy available for unbonding the recombined NO2 from the surface. The NO2 is formed in a 3-body recombination of OI + NO + m = NO2 + m where OI originates from the atmosphere and NO is chemically formed on the surface from atmospheric NI and OI. The spacecraft surface then acts as the n for the reaction: Evidence exists from orbital mass spectrometer data that the NO and NO2 chemistry described in this process does occur on surfaces of spectrometer orifices in orbit. Surface temperature effects are likely a factor in the NO sticking efficiency and, therefore, glow intensities.

  1. Bioavailability of xenobiotics in unsaturated soils – implications for nucleic acid based stable isotope probing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of stable isotopes to label phylogenetically informative biomolecules (phospholipid fatty acids, DNA, or RNA), typically referred to as stable isotope probing (SIP) has the potential of providing definitive evidence that a detected population is active in a specific process, if that process ...

  2. Practical implications of probe- and sample-related variables in puncture testing of clingstone peaches

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fruit processors want to correlate processing-relevant field measurements (such as the Magness-Taylor penetrometer test) with similar measurements (such as the puncture test) obtained on laboratory instruments. The objective of this work was to compare a Magness-Taylor probe to standard, flat-tippe...

  3. Space and time-resolved probing of heterogeneous catalysis reactions using lab-on-a-chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navin, Chelliah V.; Krishna, Katla Sai; Theegala, Chandra S.; Kumar, Challa S. S. R.

    2016-03-01

    Probing catalytic reactions on a catalyst surface in real time is a major challenge. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of a continuous flow millifluidic chip reactor coated with a nanostructured gold catalyst as an effective platform for in situ investigation of the kinetics of catalytic reactions by taking 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) conversion as a model reaction. The idea conceptualized in this paper can not only dramatically change the ability to probe the time-resolved kinetics of heterogeneous catalysis reactions but also used for investigating other chemical and biological catalytic processes, thereby making this a broad platform for probing reactions as they occur within continuous flow reactors.Probing catalytic reactions on a catalyst surface in real time is a major challenge. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of a continuous flow millifluidic chip reactor coated with a nanostructured gold catalyst as an effective platform for in situ investigation of the kinetics of catalytic reactions by taking 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) conversion as a model reaction. The idea conceptualized in this paper can not only dramatically change the ability to probe the time-resolved kinetics of heterogeneous catalysis reactions but also used for investigating other chemical and biological catalytic processes, thereby making this a broad platform for probing reactions as they occur within continuous flow reactors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06752a

  4. New method for probing Kerr space-time based on imaging observation of in-falling gas blob

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriyama, Kotaro; Mineshige, Shin

    2016-06-01

    We propose a new observational method to probe the black hole space-time described by Einstein's theory. We consider a gas blob with an arc shape falling from the marginally stable orbit onto a black hole, carrying a finite amount of angular momentum. Previously, we proposed measuring the black hole spin from the flux variation data of the in-falling blob, assuming the Kerr space-time. We demonstrate here that we can independently measure the black hole spin solely by using the imaging data of the in-falling blob. We then introduce a Kerr-like hole (with one additional parameter which describes a stronger or weaker frame-dragging effect than that of the Kerr hole) and apply the two different methods of spin measurement: one based on the flux variation data and the other based on the imaging data. We obtain different spin values by the different methods for the Kerr-like hole. This is because these methods are sensitive to different components of the metric. We can in this way probe the black hole space-time through the comparison of the estimated spin values; that is, if the black hole space-time is described by the Kerr metric, all of them should coincide.

  5. Human physiological adaptation to extended Space Flight and its implications for Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutyna, F. A.; Shumate, W. H.

    1985-01-01

    Current work evaluating short-term space flight physiological data on the homeostatic changes due to weightlessness is presented as a means of anticipating Space Station long-term effects. An integrated systems analysis of current data shows a vestibulo-sensory adaptation within days; a loss of body mass, fluids, and electrolytes, stabilizing in a month; and a loss in red cell mass over a month. But bone demineralization which did not level off is seen as the biggest concern. Computer algorithms have been developed to simulate the human adaptation to weightlessness. So far these paradigms have been backed up by flight data and it is hoped that they will provide valuable information for future Space Station design. A series of explanatory schematics is attached.

  6. Galactic exploration by directed self-replicating probes, and its implications for the Fermi paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, Martin T.

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a long-term scheme for robotic exploration of the galaxy, and then considers the implications in terms of the `Fermi paradox' and our search for extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI). We discuss the `Galactic ecology' of civilizations in terms of the parameters T (time between ET civilizations arising) and L, the lifetime of these civilizations. Six different regions are described.

  7. On the accuracy of the relativistic parameters beta, gamma, and the solar oblateness coefficient J2, as deduced from ranging data of a drag-free space probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, E. A.

    1971-01-01

    Motion in the general gravity field is described mathematically. A covariance analysis, based on two simple models, is presented. Two drag-free space probes were considered, for which the orbital elements are given.

  8. Chemistry Experiments — For Comparative Analyses for Demonstrating Environmental Differences on Venus, Earth, Mars and Titan, — Built on Educational Space Probes Hunveyor and Husar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérczi, Sz.; Róka, A.; Nyíri, Z.; Varga, T.; Fabriczy, A. Sz.; Peták, Cs.; Hudoba, Gy.; Hegyi, S.; Lang, A.; Gyollai, I.; Gucsik, A.

    2014-11-01

    We compared chemical environments of Venus, Earth, Mars and Titan by experiments planned for selection to realize them on educational space probe landers and rovers (Hunveyor and Husar) built by Hungarian universities and high schools.

  9. Space and time-resolved probing of heterogeneous catalysis reactions using lab-on-a-chip.

    PubMed

    Navin, Chelliah V; Krishna, Katla Sai; Theegala, Chandra S; Kumar, Challa S S R

    2016-03-01

    Probing catalytic reactions on a catalyst surface in real time is a major challenge. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of a continuous flow millifluidic chip reactor coated with a nanostructured gold catalyst as an effective platform for in situ investigation of the kinetics of catalytic reactions by taking 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) conversion as a model reaction. The idea conceptualized in this paper can not only dramatically change the ability to probe the time-resolved kinetics of heterogeneous catalysis reactions but also used for investigating other chemical and biological catalytic processes, thereby making this a broad platform for probing reactions as they occur within continuous flow reactors. PMID:26888331

  10. Sealing scientific probes against deep space and the Venusian environment A tough job

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pokras, J.; Reinert, R. P.; Switz, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    The Pioneer Venus mission evolved from studies conducted during the late 1960s and early 1970s. It was found that a need existed for low cost orbiters and landers to explore the planet. The considered mission was to be accomplished with six separate vehicles arriving at Venus nearly simultaneously in mid-December 1978. The probes are designed to survive entry and descent into the atmosphere. A description is presented of the approaches used to maintain sealing integrity for the large and small probes under the constraints imposed by the harsh Venusian environment. Attention is given to probe vehicle configuration, pressure vessel sealing requirements, material and configuration considerations, permanent seals, separable seals, development problems, and aspects of seal testing.

  11. The space density of magnetic and non-magnetic cataclysmic variables, and implications for CV evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pretorius, M.

    2014-07-01

    I will present estimates of the space densities of both non-magnetic and magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs), based on X-ray flux-limited samples. The measurements can be used to address several questions relevant to the evolution of CVs and to the makeup of Galactic X-ray source populations. I will discuss the implications of these results for the high predicted space density of non-magnetic CVs, the evolutionary relationship between intermediate polars and polars, the fraction of CVs with strongly magnetic white dwarfs, and for the contribution of magnetic CVs to Galactic populations of hard X-ray sources.

  12. Implications for Earth and space in new K-12 science standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysession, Michael E.

    2012-11-01

    New science standards for national K-12 science education are in the process of being written by a states-led team of writers organized by Achieve, Inc., with important implications for teaching Earth and space sciences. The final version of these "Next Generation Science Standards" (NGSS) is scheduled to be released in early 2013, but a second draft of the standards will be made public in December 2012. Members of the Earth and space science (ESS) research communities can review this draft of NGSS and provide constructive feedback. Such feedback will help ensure that American students receive instruction that is accurate, relevant, and engaging.

  13. 1958 NASA/USAF Space Probes (ABLE-1). Volume 3; Vehicles, Trajectories, and Flight Histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    The three NASA/USAF lunar probes of August 17, October 13, and November 8, 1958 are described. Details of the program, the vehicles, the payloads, the firings, the tracking, and the results are presented. Principal result was the first experimental verification of a confined radiation zone of the type postulated by Van Allen and others.

  14. Gravity Probe B: Examining Einstein's Spacetime with Gyroscopes. An Educator's Guide with Activities in Space Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Range, Shannon K'doah; Mullins, Jennifer

    This teaching guide introduces a relativity gyroscope experiment aiming to test two unverified predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. An introduction to the theory includes the following sections: (1) "Spacetime, Curved Spacetime, and Frame-Dragging"; (2) "'Seeing' Spacetime with Gyroscopes"; (3) "The Gravity Probe B…

  15. Nano-optical scan probes: Opening doors to previously-inaccessible parameter spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Schuck, James

    2014-06-08

    I will discuss recent progress on new near-field probe geometries, including the “campanile” geometry, which has been used in recent hyperspectral imaging experiments, providing nanoscale spectral information distinct from what is obtained with other methods. Article not available.

  16. 1958 NASA/USAF Space Probes (ABLE-1). Volume 2; Payload and Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    The three NASA/USAF lunar probes of August 17, October 13, and November 8, 1958 are described. Details of the program, the vehicles, the payloads, the firings, the tracking, and the results are presented. Principal result was the first experimental verification of a confined radiation zone of the type postulated by Van Allen and others.

  17. Modeling the disequilibrium species for Jupiter and Saturn: Implications for Juno and Saturn entry probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Mousis, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Disequilibrium species have been used previously to probe the deep water abundances and the eddy diffusion coefficient for giant planets. In this paper, we present a diffusion-kinetics code that predicts the abundances of disequilibrium species in the tropospheres of Jupiter and Saturn with updated thermodynamic and kinetic data. The dependence on the deep water abundance and the eddy diffusion coefficient is investigated. We quantified the disagreements in CO kinetics that comes from using different reaction networks and identified C2H6 as a useful tracer for the eddy diffusion coefficient. We first apply an H/P/O reaction network to Jupiter and Saturn's atmospheres and suggest a new PH3 destruction pathway. New chemical pathways for SiH4 and GeH4 destruction are also suggested, and another AsH3 destruction pathway is investigated thanks to new thermodynamic and kinetic data. These new models should enhance the interpretation of the measurement of disequilibrium species by JIRAM on board Juno and allow disentangling between methods for constraining the Saturn's deep water abundance with the Saturn entry probes envisaged by NASA or ESA.

  18. Probing BoNT/A protease exosites: implications for inhibitor design and light chain longevity.

    PubMed

    Xue, Song; Javor, Sacha; Hixon, Mark S; Janda, Kim D

    2014-11-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) is one of the most lethal toxins known. Its extreme toxicity is due to its light chain (LC), a zinc protease that cleaves SNAP-25, a synaptosome-associated protein, leading to the inhibition of neuronal activity. Studies on BoNT/A LC have revealed that two regions, termed exosites, can play an important role in BoNT catalytic activity. A clear understanding of how these exosites influence neurotoxin catalytic activity would provide a critical framework for deciphering the mechanism of SNAP-25 cleavage and the design of inhibitors. Herein, based on the crystallographic structure of BoNT/A LC complexed with its substrate, we designed an α-exosite binding probe. Experiments with this unique probe demonstrated that α-exosite binding enhanced both catalytic activity and stability of the LC. These data help delineate why α-exosite binding is needed for SNAP-25 cleavage and also provide new insights into the extended lifetime observed for BoNT/A LC in vivo. PMID:25295706

  19. Muscle changes with eccentric exercise: implications on Earth and in space.

    PubMed

    Hargens, A R; Parazynski, S; Aratow, M; Friden, J

    1989-01-01

    The effects of eccentric exercise on skeletal muscle fluid pressure, morphology, and enzyme activities are reviewed. Topics related to muscle injury are the exercise protocol, intramuscular pressures, muscle soreness, resting intramuscular pressures, peak pressure during eccentric and concentric exercise, and peak pressure during isometric contractions. Enzyme activity examined levels of serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, lactic dehydrogenase, and serum creatine kinase. Muscle morphology was examined with light microscopy and electron microscopy. Implications for exercise in space are examined. PMID:11540912

  20. Payload test philosophy. [implications of STS development at Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arman, A.

    1979-01-01

    The implications of STS development for payload testing at the Goddard Space Flight Center are reviewed. The biggest impact of STS may be that instead of testing the entire payload, most of the testing may have to be limited to the subsystem or subassembly level. Particular consideration is given to the Goddard protoflight concept in which the test is geared to the design qualification levels, the test durations being those that are expected during the actual launch sequence.

  1. Space adaptation syndrome: Incidence and operational implications for the space transportation system program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homick, J. L.; Reschke, M. F.; Vanderploeg, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Better methods for the prediction, prevention, and treatment of the space adaptation syndome (SAS) were developed. A systematic, long range program of operationally oriented data collection on all individuals flying space shuttle missions was initiated. Preflight activities include the use of a motion experience questionnaire, laboratory tests of susceptibility to motion sickness induced by Coriolis stimuli and determinations of antimotion sickness drug efficacy and side effects. During flight, each crewmember is required to provide a daily report of symptom status, use of medications, and other vestibular related sensations. Additional data are obtained postflight. During the first nine shuttle missions, the reported incidence of SAS has been48%. Self-induced head motions and unusual visual orientation attitudes appear to be the principal triggering stimuli. Antimotion sickness medication, was of limited therapeutic value. Complete recovery from symptoms occurred by mission day three or four. Also of relevance is the lack of a statistically significant correlation between the ground based Coriolis test and SAS. The episodes of SAS have resulted in no impact to shuttle mission objectives and, no significant impact to mission timelines.

  2. Waves in Venus's middle and upper atmosphere - Implications of Pioneer Venus probe data above the clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiff, Alvin

    1991-01-01

    This paper reevaluates Pioneer Venus probe data which show the presence of waves in Venus's middle and upper atmosphere. The data are extended to 138 km. Uncertainties in the temperature are typically about 0.1 times amplitude, supporting the reliability of large-amplitude oscillations approaching 40 K at 120 km. Growth rates above 100 km follow approximately the inverse square root of density and 'saturation' occurs. The waves then break at the 120 km level, providing a source for the 'friction' required in models to match the observed day-night temperature contrast in the lower thermosphere. The data correlated to an unexpected degree with temperatures from the Pioneer Venus orbiter atmospheric drag experiment. The observations lead to the suggestion that the thermospheric waves are solar-fixed, induced either by the major subsidence across the termination or as continuation upward of waves in the middle atmosphere.

  3. Leonid Shower Probe of Aerothermochemistry in Meteoric Plasmas and Implication for the Origin of Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter S. I.; Packan, D.; Laux, C.; Wilson, Mike; Boyd, I. D.; Kruger, C. H.; Popova, O.; Fonda, M.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The rarefied and high Mach number (up to 270) of the flow field of a typical meteoroid as it enters the Earth's atmosphere implies conditions of ablation and atmospheric chemistry that have proven to be as difficult to grasp as the proverbial shooting star. An airborne campaign was organized to study these processes during an intense Leonid shower. A probe of molecular band emission now demonstrates that the flash of light from a common meteor originates in the wake of the object rather than in the meteor head. A new theoretical approach using the direct simulation Monte Carlo technique demonstrates that the ablation process is critical in heating the air in that wake. Air molecules impinge on a dense cloud of ablated material in front of the meteoroid head into an extended wake that has the observed excitation temperatures. These processes determine what extraterrestrial materials may have been delivered to Earth at the time of the origin of life.

  4. The Phase Space of z=1.2 Clusters: Probing Dust Temperature and Star Formation Rate as a Function of Environment and Accretion History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Allison; SpARCS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the influence of environment is a fundamental goal in studies of galaxy formation and evolution, and galaxy clusters offer ideal laboratories with which to examine environmental effects on their constituent members. Clusters continually evolve and build up mass through the accumulation of galaxies and groups, resulting in distinct galaxy populations based on their accretion history. In Noble et al. 2013, we presented a novel definition for environment using the phase space of line-of-sight velocity and clustercentric radius, which probes the time-averaged density to which a galaxy has been exposed and traces out accretion histories. Using this dynamical definition of environment reveals a decline in specific star formation towards the cluster core in the earliest accreted galaxies, and was further shown to isolate post-starburst galaxies within clusters (Muzzin et al. 2014). We have now extended this work to higher-redshift clusters at z=1.2 using deep Herschel-PACS and -SPIRE data. With a sample of 120 spectroscopically-confirmed cluster members, we investigate various galaxy properties as a function of phase-space environment. Specifically, we use 5-band Herschel photometry to estimate the dust temperature and star formation rate for dynamically distinct galaxy populations, namely recent infalls and those that were accreted into the cluster at an earlier epoch (Noble et al. submitted). These properties are then compared to a field sample of star-forming galaxies at 1.1 < z < 1.2 to shed light on cluster-specific processes in galaxy evolution. In this talk I will discuss the various implications of a phase-space definition for environment, and present our most recent results, focusing on how this accretion-based definition aids our understanding of quenching mechanisms within z=1.2 galaxies.

  5. The Use of Langmuir Probes in Non-Maxwellian Space Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, Walter R.; Brace, Larry H.

    1998-01-01

    Disturbance of the Maxwellian plasma may occur in the vicinity of a spacecraft due to photoemission, interactions between the spacecraft and thermospheric gases, or electron emissions from other devices on the spacecraft. Significant non-maxwellian plasma distributions may also occur in nature as a mixture of ionospheric and magnetospheric plasmas or secondaries produced by photoionization in the thermosphere or auroral precipitation. The general formulas for current collection (volt-ampere curves) by planar, cylindrical, and spherical Langmuir probes in isotropic and anisotropic non-maxwellian plasmas are examined. Examples are given of how one may identify and remove the non-maxwellian components in the Langmuir probe current to permit the ionospheric parameters to be determined. Theoretical volt-ampere curves presented for typical examples of non-maxwellian distributions include: two-temperature plasmas and a thermal plasma with an energetic electron beam. If the non-ionospheric electrons are Maxwellian at a temperature distinct from that of the ionosphere electrons, the volt-ampere curves can be fitted directly to obtain the temperatures and densities of both electron components without resorting to differenting the current. For an arbitrary isotropic distribution, the current for retarded particles is shown to be identical for the three geometries. For anisotropic distributions, the three probe geometries are not equally suited for measuring the ionospheric electron temperature and density or for determining the distribution function in the presence of non-maxwellian back-round electrons.

  6. Fiber-Optic Imaging Probe Developed for Space Used to Detect Diabetes Through the Eye

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Chenault, Michelle V.; Datiles, Manuel B., III; Sebag, J.; Suh, Kwang I.

    2000-01-01

    Approximately 16 million Americans have diabetes mellitus, which can severely impair eyesight by causing cataracts, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Cataracts are 1.6 times more common in people with diabetes than in those without diabetes, and cataract extraction is the only surgical treatment. In many cases, diabetes-related ocular pathologies go undiagnosed until visual function is compromised. This ongoing pilot project seeks to study the progression of diabetes in a unique animal model by monitoring changes in the lens with a safe, sensitive, dynamic light-scattering probe. Dynamic light scattering (DLS), has the potential to diagnose cataracts at the molecular level. Recently, a new DLS fiber-optic probe was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field for noncontact, accurate, and extremely sensitive particle-sizing measurements in fluid dispersions and suspensions (ref. 1). This compact, portable, and rugged probe is free of optical alignment, offers point-and-shoot operation for various online field applications and challenging environments, and yet is extremely flexible in regards to sample container sizes, materials, and shapes. No external vibration isolation and no index matching are required. It can measure particles as small as 1 nm and as large as few micrometers in a wide concentration range from very dilute (waterlike) dispersions to very turbid (milklike) suspensions. It is safe and fast to use, since it only requires very low laser power (10 nW to 3 mW) with very short data acquisition times (2 to 10 sec).

  7. Radial space potential measurements in the central cell of the tandem mirror experiment with a heavy-ion-beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Hallock, G.A.

    1983-04-11

    Spatial and temporal profiles of the space potential in the central-cell midplane of TMX have been obtained with a heavy-ion-beam probe. The absolute accuracy of measurements is +- 25 volts (with respect to the machine vacuum walls) with a resolution of approx. 2 volts. During moderate fueling with the gas boxes (i/sub gas/ approx. = 1200 Atom-Amperes D/sub 2/), the plasma potential is parabolic to at least 25 cm radius, with phi/sub e/ approx. = phi/sub max/(1-(r/32)/sup 2/) and 300 < phi/sub max/ <450 volts. With puffer-valve fueling, the space potential is relatively flat to at least 27 cm radius, with 250 < phi/sub e/ < 350 volts.

  8. Flight Experience from Space Photovoltaic Concentrator Arrays and its Implication on Terrestrial Concentrator Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, Michael F., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Nearly all photovoltaic solar arrays flown in space have used a planar (non- concentrating) design. However, there have been a few notable exceptions where photovoltaic concentrators have been tested and used as the mission s primary power source. Among these are the success experienced by the SCARLET (Solar Concentrator Array with Refractive Linear Element Technology) concept used to power NASA's Deep Space 1 mission and the problems encountered by the original Boeing 702 reflective trough concentrator design. This presentation will give a brief overview of past photovoltaic concentrator systems that have flown in space, specifically addressing the valuable lessons learned from flight experience, and other viable concentrator concepts that are being proposed for the future. The general trends of this flight experience will be noted and discussed with regard to its implications on terrestrial photovoltaic concentrator designs.

  9. Implications of privacy needs and interpersonal distancing mechanisms for space station design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, A. A.; Sommer, R.; Struthers, N.; Hoyt, K.

    1985-01-01

    Privacy needs, or the need of people to regulate their degree of contact with one another, and interpersonal distancing mechanisms, which serve to satisfy these needs, are common in all cultures. Isolation, confinement, and other conditions accociated with space flight may at once accentuate privacy needs and limit the availability of certain common interpersonal contact. Loneliness occurs when people have less contact with one another than they desire. Crowding occurs when people have more contact with one another than they desire. Crowding, which is considered the greater threat to members of isolated and confined groups, can contribute to stress, a low quality of life, and poor performance. Drawing on the general literature on privacy, personal space, and interpersonal distancing, and on specialized literature on life aboard spacecraft and in spacecraft-analogous environments, a quantitative model for understanding privacy, interpersonal distancing, loneliness, and crowding was developed and the practical implications of this model for space station design were traced.

  10. The Global Positioning System constellation as a space weather monitor: Comparison of electron measurements with Van Allen Probes data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, Steven K.; Sullivan, John P.; Henderson, Michael G.; Blake, J. Bernard; Baker, Daniel N.

    2016-02-01

    Energetic electron observations in Earth's radiation belts are typically sparse, and multipoint studies often rely on serendipitous conjunctions. This paper establishes the scientific utility of the Combined X-ray Dosimeter (CXD), currently flown on 19 satellites in the Global Positioning System (GPS) constellation, by cross-calibrating energetic electron measurements against data from the Van Allen Probes. By breaking our cross calibration into two parts—one that removes any spectral assumptions from the CXD flux calculation and one that compares the energy spectra—we first validate the modeled instrument response functions, then the calculated electron fluxes. Unlike previous forward modeling of energetic electron spectra, we use a combination of four distributions that together capture a wide range of observed spectral shapes. Our two-step approach allowed us to identify, and correct for, small systematic offsets between block IIR and IIF satellites. Using the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer and Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope on Van Allen Probes as a "gold standard," we demonstrate that the CXD instruments are well understood. A robust statistical analysis shows that CXD and Van Allen Probes fluxes are similar and the measured fluxes from CXD are typically within a factor of 2 of Van Allen Probes at energies ≲4 MeV. We present data from 17 CXD-equipped GPS satellites covering the 2015 "St. Patrick's Day" geomagnetic storm to illustrate the scientific applications of such a high data density satellite constellation and therefore demonstrate that the GPS constellation is positioned to enable new insights in inner magnetospheric physics and space weather forecasting.

  11. The Global Positioning System constellation as a space weather monitor. Comparison of electron measurements with Van Allen Probes data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Morley, Steven K.; Sullivan, John P.; Henderson, Michael G.; Blake, J. Bernard; Baker, Daniel N.

    2016-02-06

    Energetic electron observations in Earth's radiation belts are typically sparse, and multipoint studies often rely on serendipitous conjunctions. This paper establishes the scientific utility of the Combined X-ray Dosimeter (CXD), currently flown on 19 satellites in the Global Positioning System (GPS) constellation, by cross-calibrating energetic electron measurements against data from the Van Allen Probes. By breaking our cross calibration into two parts—one that removes any spectral assumptions from the CXD flux calculation and one that compares the energy spectra—we first validate the modeled instrument response functions, then the calculated electron fluxes. Unlike previous forward modeling of energetic electron spectra, wemore » use a combination of four distributions that together capture a wide range of observed spectral shapes. Moreover, our two-step approach allowed us to identify, and correct for, small systematic offsets between block IIR and IIF satellites. Using the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer and Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope on Van Allen Probes as a “gold standard,” here we demonstrate that the CXD instruments are well understood. A robust statistical analysis shows that CXD and Van Allen Probes fluxes are similar and the measured fluxes from CXD are typically within a factor of 2 of Van Allen Probes at energies inline image4 MeV. Our team present data from 17 CXD-equipped GPS satellites covering the 2015 “St. Patrick's Day” geomagnetic storm to illustrate the scientific applications of such a high data density satellite constellation and therefore demonstrate that the GPS constellation is positioned to enable new insights in inner magnetospheric physics and space weather forecasting.« less

  12. Ceruloplasmin (ferroxidase) oxidizes hydroxylamine probes: deceptive implications for free radical detection

    PubMed Central

    Ganini, Douglas; Canistro, Donatella; Jang, JinJie; Stadler, Krisztian; Mason, Ronald P.; Kadiiska, Maria B.

    2012-01-01

    Ceruloplasmin (ferroxidase) is a copper-binding protein known to promote Fe2+ oxidation in plasma of mammals. Besides its classical ferroxidase activity, ceruloplasmin is known to catalyze the oxidation of various substrates, such as amines and catechols. Assays based on cyclic hydroxylamine oxidation are used to quantify and detect free radicals in biological samples ex vivo and in vitro. We show here that human ceruloplasmin promotes the oxidation of the cyclic hydroxylamine 1-hydroxy-3-carboxy-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine hydrochloride (CPH) and related probes in Chelex-treated phosphate buffer and rat serum. The reaction is suppressed by the metal chelators DTPA, EDTA and Desferal, while heparin and bathocuproine have no effect. Catalase or SOD additions do not interfere with the CPH-oxidation yield, demonstrating that free radicals are not involved in the CPH oxidation mediated by ceruloplasmin. Plasma samples immunodepleted of ceruloplasmin have lower levels of CPH oxidation, which confirms the role of ceruloplasmin (ferroxidase) as a biological oxidizing agent of cyclic hydroxylamines. In conclusion, we show that the ferroxidase activity of ceruloplasmin is a possible biological source of artifacts in the cyclic hydroxylamine-oxidation assay used for ROS detection and quantification. PMID:22824865

  13. Probing the Chemical Stability of Mixed Ferrites: Implications for MR Contrast Agent Design

    PubMed Central

    Schultz-Sikma, Elise A.; Joshi, Hrushikesh M.; Ma, Qing; MacRenaris, Keith W.; Eckermann, Amanda L.; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Nanomaterials with mixed composition, in particular magnetic spinel ferrites, are emerging as efficient contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Many factors, including size, composition, atomic structure, and surface properties are crucial in the design of such nanoparticle-based probes due to their influence on the magnetic properties. Silica-coated iron oxide (IO-SiO2) and cobalt ferrite (CoIO-SiO2) nanoparticles were synthesized using standard high temperature thermal decomposition and base-catalyzed water-in-oil microemulsion techniques. Under neutral aqueous conditions, it was found that 50–75% of the cobalt content in the CoIO-SiO2 nanoparticles leached out of the core structure. Leaching caused a 7.2-fold increase in longitudinal relaxivity and an increase in the saturation magnetization from ~48 emu/g core to ~65 emu/g core. X-ray absorption fine structure studies confirmed that the atomic structure of the ferrite core was altered following leaching, while TEM and DLS confirmed that the morphology and size of the nanoparticle remained unchanged. The CoIO-SiO2 nanoparticles converted from a partially inverted spinel cation arrangement (unleached state) to an inverse spinel arrangement (leached state). The control IO-SiO2 nanoparticles remained stable with no change in structure and negligible changes in magnetic behavior. This detailed analysis highlights how important understanding the properties of nanomaterials is in the development of reliable agents for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:21603070

  14. Modeling gradual diffusion changes in radiation belt electron phase space density for the March 2013 Van Allen Probes case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhao; Hudson, Mary; Jaynes, Allison; Boyd, Alexander; Malaspina, David; Thaller, Scott; Wygant, John; Henderson, Michael

    2014-10-01

    March 2013 provided the first equinoctial period when all of the instruments on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft were fully operational. This interval was characterized by disturbances of outer zone electrons with two time scales of variation, diffusive and rapid dropout and restoration. A radial diffusion model was applied to the monthlong interval to confirm that electron phase space density is well described by radial diffusion for the whole month at low first invariant ≤ 400 MeV/G but peaks in phase space density observed by the Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma (ECT) instrument suite at higher first invariant are not reproduced by radial transport from a source at higher L. The model does well for much of the monthlong interval, capturing three of four enhancements in phase space density which emerge from the outer boundary, while the strong enhancement following dropout on 17-18 March requires local acceleration at higher first invariant (M=1000 MeV/G versus 200 MeV/G) not included in our model. We have incorporated phase space density from ECT measurement at the outer boundary and plasmapause determination from the Electric Field and Waves (EFW) instrument to separate hiss and chorus loss models.

  15. Improvements in Electron-Probe Microanalysis: Applications to Terrestrial, Extraterrestrial, and Space-Grown Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Paul; Armstrong, John

    2004-01-01

    Improvement in the accuracy of electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA) has been accomplished by critical assessment of standards, correction algorithms, and mass absorption coefficient data sets. Experimental measurement of relative x-ray intensities at multiple accelerating potential highlights errors in the absorption coefficient. The factor method has been applied to the evaluation of systematic errors in the analysis of semiconductor and silicate minds. Accurate EPMA of Martian soil stimulant is necessary in studies that build on Martian rover data in anticipation of missions to Mars.

  16. Probing the Chemical Stability of Mixed Ferrites: Implications for Magnetic Resonance Contrast Agent Design

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz-Sikma, Elise A.; Joshi, Hrushikesh M.; Ma, Qing; MacRenaris, Keith W.; Eckermann, Amanda L.; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2011-09-16

    Nanomaterials with mixed composition, in particular magnetic spinel ferrites, are emerging as efficient contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Many factors, including size, composition, atomic structure, and surface properties, are crucial in the design of such nanoparticle-based probes because of their influence on the magnetic properties. Silica-coated iron oxide (IO-SiO{sub 2}) and cobalt ferrite (CoIO-SiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles were synthesized using standard high-temperature thermal decomposition and base-catalyzed water-in-oil microemulsion techniques. Under neutral aqueous conditions, it was found that 50-75% of the cobalt content in the CoIO-SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles leached out of the core structure. Leaching caused a 7.2-fold increase in the longitudinal relaxivity and an increase in the saturation magnetization from {approx}48 to {approx}65 emu/g of the core. X-ray absorption fine structure studies confirmed that the atomic structure of the ferrite core was altered following leaching, while transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering confirmed that the morphology and size of the nanoparticle remained unchanged. The CoIO-SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles converted from a partially inverted spinel cation arrangement (unleached state) to an inverse spinel arrangement (leached state). The control IO-SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles remained stable with no change in the structure and negligible changes in the magnetic behavior. This detailed analysis highlights how important understanding the properties of nanomaterials is in the development of reliable agents for diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  17. DNA-based stable isotope probing coupled with cultivation methods implicates Methylophaga in hydrocarbon degradation

    PubMed Central

    Mishamandani, Sara; Gutierrez, Tony; Aitken, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria perform a fundamental role in the oxidation and ultimate removal of crude oil and its petrochemical derivatives in coastal and open ocean environments. Those with an almost exclusive ability to utilize hydrocarbons as a sole carbon and energy source have been found confined to just a few genera. Here we used stable isotope probing (SIP), a valuable tool to link the phylogeny and function of targeted microbial groups, to investigate hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in coastal North Carolina sea water (Beaufort Inlet, USA) with uniformly labeled [13C]n-hexadecane. The dominant sequences in clone libraries constructed from 13C-enriched bacterial DNA (from n-hexadecane enrichments) were identified to belong to the genus Alcanivorax, with ≤98% sequence identity to the closest type strain—thus representing a putative novel phylogenetic taxon within this genus. Unexpectedly, we also identified 13C-enriched sequences in heavy DNA fractions that were affiliated to the genus Methylophaga. This is a contentious group since, though some of its members have been proposed to degrade hydrocarbons, substantive evidence has not previously confirmed this. We used quantitative PCR primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene of the SIP-identified Alcanivorax and Methylophaga to determine their abundance in incubations amended with unlabeled n-hexadecane. Both showed substantial increases in gene copy number during the experiments. Subsequently, we isolated a strain representing the SIP-identified Methylophaga sequences (99.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity) and used it to show, for the first time, direct evidence of hydrocarbon degradation by a cultured Methylophaga sp. This study demonstrates the value of coupling SIP with cultivation methods to identify and expand on the known diversity of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in the marine environment. PMID:24578702

  18. Probing Galaxy Formation and Evolution with Space Born Sub-Millimeter Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli; Arendt, Richard G.; Moseley, Harvey; Benford, Dominic; Shafer, Richard; Mather, John; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A major unresolved question in cosmology is how the complex system of galaxies we see in the present universe evolved from an almost perfectly smooth beginning. Multiwavelength observations of galaxies have revealed that a significant fraction of their UV-visible starlight is absorbed and reradiated by dust at infrared JR) and submillimeter wavelengths. The cumulative IR-submm. emission from galaxies since the epoch of recombination, the cosmic IR background, has recently been recorded by the COBE satellite. The COBE observations in combination with recent submm surveys conducted with the SCUBA on the 15 m JCMT have shown that most of the radiation from star formation that has taken place in the early stages of galaxy evolution is reradiated by dust at submm wavelengths. Therefore, submm telescopes offer a unique probe of the early stages of galaxy formation and evolution. This talk will: (1) consider the impact of telescope diameter on the depth of the survey (what redshift can be probed) at different wavelengths; (2) discuss the relative scientific merits of high-resolution narrow-field surveys versus lower resolution deep surveys; and (3) show how both strategies offer complementary information crucial to our understanding of the structure and evolution of galaxies in the universe.

  19. Amateur Radio Communications with a Deep Space Probe (Yes, It's Possible)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cudnik, Brian; Rahman, Mahmudur; Saganti, Seth; Erickson, Gary M.; Saganti, Premkumar

    2015-05-01

    Prairie View A&M University through the collaboration with NASA-Johnson Space Center has partnered with the Kyushu Institute of Technology (KIT), Japan and developed a payload for the Shinen-2 spacecraft that was launched from Japan on December 3, 2014 as part of the Hayabusa2 mission. The main purpose of the Shinen-2 spacecraft is deep space communication experiment to test the feasibility of deep-space radio communications from the spacecraft to Earth without the need of the Deep Space Network (DSN) of NASA. This presents an opportunity to the wider community of amateur astronomers, ham radio operators, and other research personnel in that they will have the opportunity to work with deep space communication such as Shinen-2 spacecraft. It should be possible to detect a signal as an increased strength from Shinen-2 spacecraft at a rest frequency of 437.385 MHz, using commercially available equipment procured at low-cost, when the spacecraft approaches to within 3,000,000 km of the Earth during December 2015.

  20. On Determining Wood Thermal Diffusivity and Probe Spacing for Sap Flow Measurements using In-Situ Heat Response Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Miller, G.; Baldocchi, D.; Rubin, Y.

    2008-12-01

    The heat pulse method is widely used to measure water flux in plants and soil; it works by inferring the velocity of water in a porous medium from the speed at which a heat pulse is propagated through the system. No systematic, non-destructive calibration procedure exists to determine the site-specific parameters necessary for calculating sap velocity: wood thermal diffusivity and probe spacing. Such parameter calibration is crucial to obtaining the correct transpiration amount from the sap flow measurements at the plant scale and consequently to the up-scaling of water flux to a larger scale and to the water cycle modeling along the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum. The purpose of this study is to present a statistical framework to simultaneously estimate these parameters from in-situ heat response curves collected by the implanted probes of heat ratio apparatus. Conditioned on the heat response data, the parameters are inferred using a Bayesian inversion technique with Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling method. The primary advantage of the proposed methodology is that, unlike most of the existing work, it does not require known probe spacing or any further intrusive sampling of sapwood. The Bayesian framework also enables direct quantification of uncertainty in estimated sap flow velocity. Experiments using synthetic data show that multiple tests on the same apparatus are essential to obtain reliable, accurate solutions. When applied to field conditions, these tests are conducted during different seasons and automated using the existing data logging system. The seasonality of wood thermal diffusivity is obtained as a by-product of the parameter estimation process, and it shows consistency with the seasonal change of tree diameters monitored using tree dendrometer. An empirical factor is adopted to account for flow deformation caused by the implanted probes, and it is also estimated in this study. The proposed methodology is ready to be applied to calibrate

  1. Probing phase-space noncommutativity through quantum mechanics and thermodynamics of free particles and quantum rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Jonas F. G.; Bernardini, Alex E.; Bastos, Catarina

    2015-11-01

    Novel quantization properties related to the state vectors and the energy spectrum of a two-dimensional system of free particles are obtained in the framework of noncommutative (NC) quantum mechanics (QM) supported by the Weyl-Wigner formalism. Besides reproducing the magnetic field aspect of a Zeeman-like effect, the momentum space NC parameter introduces mutual information properties quantified by the quantum purity related to the relevant coordinates of the corresponding Hilbert space. Supported by the QM in the phase-space, the thermodynamic limit is obtained, and the results are extended to three-dimensional systems. The noncommutativity imprints on the thermodynamic variables related to free particles are identified and, after introducing some suitable constraints to fix an axial symmetry, the analysis is extended to two- and- three dimensional quantum rotor systems, for which the quantization aspects and the deviation from standard QM results are verified.

  2. FIB-SEM Tomography Probes the Mesoscale Pore Space of an Individual Catalytic Cracking Particle

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The overall performance of a catalyst particle strongly depends on the ability of mass transport through its pore space. Characterizing the three-dimensional structure of the macro- and mesopore space of a catalyst particle and establishing a correlation with transport efficiency is an essential step toward designing highly effective catalyst particles. In this work, a generally applicable workflow is presented to characterize the transport efficiency of individual catalyst particles. The developed workflow involves a multiscale characterization approach making use of a focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM). SEM imaging is performed on cross sections of 10.000 μm2, visualizing a set of catalyst particles, while FIB-SEM tomography visualized the pore space of a large number of 8 μm3 cubes (subvolumes) of individual catalyst particles. Geometrical parameters (porosity, pore connectivity, and heterogeneity) of the material were used to generate large numbers of virtual 3D volumes resembling the sample’s pore space characteristics, while being suitable for computationally demanding transport simulations. The transport ability, defined as the ratio of unhindered flow over hindered flow, is then determined via transport simulations through the virtual volumes. The simulation results are used as input for an upscaling routine based on an analogy with electrical networks, taking into account the spatial heterogeneity of the pore space over greater length scales. This novel approach is demonstrated for two distinct types of industrially manufactured fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particles with zeolite Y as the active cracking component. Differences in physicochemical and catalytic properties were found to relate to differences in heterogeneities in the spatial porosity distribution. In addition to the characterization of existing FCC particles, our method of correlating pore space with transport efficiency does also allow for an up-front evaluation of

  3. Considerations Affecting Satellite and Space Probe Research with Emphasis on the "Scout" as a Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posner, Jack (Editor)

    1961-01-01

    This report reviews a number of the factors which influence space flight experiments. Included are discussions of payload considerations, payload design and packaging, environmental tests, launch facilities, tracking and telemetry requirements, data acquisition, processing and analysis procedures, communication of information, and project management. Particular emphasis is placed on the "Scout" as a launching vehicle. The document includes a description of the geometry of the "Scout" as well as its flight capabilities and limitations. Although oriented toward the "Scout" vehicle and its payload capabilities, the information presented is sufficiently general to be equally applicable to most space vehicle systems.

  4. A simple real space density functional theory of freezing, with implications for the glass transition

    SciTech Connect

    Stoessel, J.P.; Wolynes, P.G.

    1989-01-01

    With analogy to the ''highly accurate'' summation of cluster diagrams for hard sphere fluids a la Carnahan-Starling, we present a simple, real space free energy density functional for arbitrary potential systems, based on the generalization of the second virial coefficient to inhomogeneous systems which, when applied to hard sphere, soft-sphere, and Lennard-Jones freezing, yield melting characteristics in remarkable agreement with experiment. Implications for the liquid-glass transition in all three potential systems are also presented. 45 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Probing the interstellar medium in early-type galaxies with Infrared Space Oberservatory observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malhotra, S.; Hollenbach, D.; Helou, D.; Silbermann, N.; Valjavec, E.; Rubin, R.; Dale, D.; Hunter, D.; Lu, N.; Lord, S.; Dinerstein, H.; Thronson, H.

    2000-01-01

    Four IRAS-detected early-type galaxies were observed with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). With the exception of the 15 mu m image of NGC 1052, the mid-IR images of NGC 1052, NGC 1155, NGC 5866, and NGC 6958 at 4.5, 7, and 15 mu m show extended emission.

  6. Gravity Probe B Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The space vehicle Gravity Probe B (GP-B) is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. In this photograph, engineer Gary Reynolds is inspecting the inside of the probe neck during probe thermal repairs. GP-B is scheduled for launch in April 2004 and managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Leese, Gravity Probe B, Stanford University)

  7. Reciprocal space XRD mapping with varied incident angle as a probe of structure variation within surface depth

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Qiguang; Williams, Frances; Zhao, Xin; Reece, Charles E.; Krishnan, Mahadevan

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we used a differential-depth X-Ray diffraction Reciprocal Spacing Mapping (XRD RSM) technique to investigate the crystal quality of a variety of SRF-relevant Nb film and bulk materials. By choosing different X-ray probing depths, the RSM study successfully revealed evolution the of materials microstructure after different materials processes, such as energetic condensation or surface polishing. The RSM data clearly measured the materials crystal quality at different thickness. Through a novel differential-depth RSM technique, this study found: I. for a heteroepitaxy Nb film Nb(100)/MgO(100), the film thickening process, via a cathodic arc-discharge Nb ion deposition, created a near-perfect single crystal Nb on the surfaces top-layer; II. for a mechanically polished single-crystal bulk Nb material, the microstructure on the top surface layer is more disordered than that in-grain.

  8. Probing space charge and resolving overlimiting current mechanisms at the microchannel-nanochannel interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffbauer, Jarrod; Liel, Uri; Leibowitz, Neta; Park, Sinwook; Yossifon, Gilad

    2015-07-01

    We present results demonstrating the space charge-mediated transition between classical, diffusion-limited current and surface-conduction dominant over-limiting current in a shallow microchannel-nanochannel device. The extended space charge layer develops at the depleted microchannel-nanochannel entrance at high current and is correlated with a distinctive maximum in the dc resistance. Experimental results for a shallow surface-conduction dominated system are compared with theoretical models, allowing estimates of the effective surface charge at high voltage to be obtained. In comparison to an equilibrium estimate of the surface charge obtained from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, it is further observed that the effective surface charge appears to change under applied voltage.

  9. Probing phase-space noncommutativity through quantum beating, missing information, and the thermodynamic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, A. E.; Bertolami, O.

    2013-07-01

    In this work we examine the effect of phase-space noncommutativity on some typically quantum properties such as quantum beating, quantum information, and decoherence. To exemplify these issues we consider the two-dimensional noncommutative quantum harmonic oscillator whose component behavior we monitor in time. This procedure allows us to determine how the noncommutative parameters are related to the missing information quantified by the linear quantum entropy and by the mutual information between the relevant Hilbert space coordinates. Particular questions concerning the thermodynamic limit of some relevant properties are also discussed in order to evidence the effects of noncommutativity. Finally, through an analogy with the Zeeman effect, we identify how some aspects of the axial symmetry of the problem suggest the possibility of decoupling the noncommutative quantum perturbations from unperturbed commutative well-known solutions.

  10. Probing the Allende meteorite with a miniature laser-ablation mass analyser for space application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuland, M. B.; Meyer, S.; Mezger, K.; Riedo, A.; Tulej, M.; Wurz, P.

    2014-10-01

    We measured the elemental composition on a sample of Allende meteorite with a miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer. This laser mass spectrometer (LMS) has been designed and built at the University of Bern in the Department of Space Research and Planetary Sciences with the objective of using such an instrument on a space mission. Utilising the meteorite Allende as the test sample in this study, it is demonstrated that the instrument allows the in situ determination of the elemental composition and thus mineralogy and petrology of untreated rocky samples, particularly on planetary surfaces. In total, 138 measurements of elemental compositions have been carried out on an Allende sample. The mass spectrometric data are evaluated and correlated with an optical image. It is demonstrated that by illustrating the measured elements in the form of mineralogical maps, LMS can serve as an element imaging instrument with a very high spatial resolution of μm scale. The detailed analysis also includes a mineralogical evaluation and an investigation of the volatile element content of Allende. All findings are in good agreement with published data and underline the high sensitivity, accuracy and capability of LMS as a mass analyser for space exploration.

  11. Debris Disk Science Enabled by a Probe-scale Space Coronagraph Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Trauger, J. T.; Krist, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Debris disks are the signposts of planetary systems: collisions between rocky/icy parent bodies maintain debris dust around main sequence stars against losses to radiation pressure and P-R drag. Debris disk structures show the location of asteroid/Kuiper belts around nearby stars, and reflect dynamical interactions with local extrasolar planets. Only 17 debris disks with high optical depth have been spatially resolved to date in scattered light images made with the Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based adaptive optics. Hundreds more with lower optical depth have been identified among nearby stars through far-IR photometry with the Spitzer Space Telescope, and more should follow in the next few years from Herschel. The most capable means for imaging this larger disk population is a next-generation coronagraphic instrument on a 1.5m class optical space telescope. Utilizing high-contrasat imaging simulations validated by laboratory demonstrations on the JPL High Contrast Imaging Testbed, we show that such a mission will be capable of imaging Kuiper disk structures down to the 10 zodi level, and exozodiacal dust down to the 1 zodi level, around a major sample of nearby stars. This performance goes well beyond what is about to be achieved with upcoming extreme adaptive optics systems or the ALMA array, and thus provides the best path for imaging exploration of planetary systems in the solar neighborhood.

  12. Technological implications of SNAP reactor power system development on future space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.V.

    1982-11-16

    Nuclear reactor systems are one method of satisfying space mission power needs. The development of such systems must proceed on a path consistent with mission needs and schedules. This path, or technology roadmap, starts from the power system technology data base available today. Much of this data base was established during the 1960s and early 1970s, when government and industry developed space nuclear reactor systems for steady-state power and propulsion. One of the largest development programs was the Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) Program. By the early 1970s, a technology base had evolved from this program at the system, subsystem, and component levels. There are many implications of this technology base on future reactor power systems. A review of this base highlights the need for performing a power system technology and mission overview study. Such a study is currently being performed by Rockwell's Energy Systems Group for the Department of Energy and will assess power system capabilities versus mission needs, considering development, schedule, and cost implications. The end product of the study will be a technology roadmap to guide reactor power system development.

  13. Full data acquisition in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy: Mapping dynamic electric phenomena in real space

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Liam; Belianinov, Alex; Somnath, Suhas; Balke, Nina; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has provided deep insights into the local electronic, ionic and electrochemical functionalities in a broad range of materials and devices. In classical KPFM, which utilizes heterodyne detection and closed loop bias feedback, the cantilever response is down-sampled to a single measurement of the contact potential difference (CPD) per pixel. This level of detail, however, is insufficient for materials and devices involving bias and time dependent electrochemical events; or at solid-liquid interfaces, where non-linear or lossy dielectrics are present. Here, we demonstrate direct recovery of the bias dependence of the electrostatic force at high temporal resolution using General acquisition Mode (G-Mode) KPFM. G-Mode KPFM utilizes high speed detection, compression, and storage of the raw cantilever deflection signal in its entirety at high sampling rates. We show how G-Mode KPFM can be used to capture nanoscale CPD and capacitance information with a temporal resolution much faster than the cantilever bandwidth, determined by the modulation frequency of the AC voltage. In this way, G-Mode KPFM offers a new paradigm to study dynamic electric phenomena in electroactive interfaces as well as a promising route to extend KPFM to the solid-liquid interface. PMID:27514987

  14. Angular distribution of cosmological parameters as a probe of space-time inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, C. Sofia; Marques, Katrine

    2016-08-01

    We develop a method based on the angular distribution on the sky of cosmological parameters to probe the inhomogeneity of large-scale structure and cosmic acceleration. We demonstrate this method on the largest type Ia supernova (SN) data set available to date, as compiled by the Joint Light-curve Analysis (JLA) collaboration and, hence, consider the cosmological parameters that affect the luminosity distance. We divide the SN sample into equal surface area pixels and estimate the cosmological parameters that minimize the chi-square of the fit to the distance modulus in each pixel, hence producing maps of the cosmological parameters {ΩM,ΩΛ,H0} . In poorly sampled pixels, the measured fluctuations are mostly due to an inhomogeneous coverage of the sky by the SN surveys; in contrast, in well-sampled pixels, the measurements are robust enough to suggest a real fluctuation. We also measure the anisotropy of the parameters by computing the power spectrum of the corresponding maps of the parameters up to ℓ = 3. For an analytical toy model of an inhomogeneous ensemble of homogeneous pixels, we derive the backreaction term in the deceleration parameter due to the fluctuations of H0 across the sky and measure it to be of order 10-3 times the corresponding average over the pixels in the absence of backreaction. We conclude that, for the toy model considered, backreaction is not a viable dynamical mechanism to emulate cosmic acceleration.

  15. Full data acquisition in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy: Mapping dynamic electric phenomena in real space.

    PubMed

    Collins, Liam; Belianinov, Alex; Somnath, Suhas; Balke, Nina; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has provided deep insights into the local electronic, ionic and electrochemical functionalities in a broad range of materials and devices. In classical KPFM, which utilizes heterodyne detection and closed loop bias feedback, the cantilever response is down-sampled to a single measurement of the contact potential difference (CPD) per pixel. This level of detail, however, is insufficient for materials and devices involving bias and time dependent electrochemical events; or at solid-liquid interfaces, where non-linear or lossy dielectrics are present. Here, we demonstrate direct recovery of the bias dependence of the electrostatic force at high temporal resolution using General acquisition Mode (G-Mode) KPFM. G-Mode KPFM utilizes high speed detection, compression, and storage of the raw cantilever deflection signal in its entirety at high sampling rates. We show how G-Mode KPFM can be used to capture nanoscale CPD and capacitance information with a temporal resolution much faster than the cantilever bandwidth, determined by the modulation frequency of the AC voltage. In this way, G-Mode KPFM offers a new paradigm to study dynamic electric phenomena in electroactive interfaces as well as a promising route to extend KPFM to the solid-liquid interface. PMID:27514987

  16. Implications of previous space commercialization experiences for the reusable launch vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermann, Richard M.; Williamson, Ray A.

    2003-07-01

    The United States' 1994 National Space Transportation Policy directed the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to work with industry on the development of technologies required for a reusable launch vehicle (RLV). In the partnership that has evolved from that directive, NASA envisions its role as providing support for technological risk reduction and for developing space transportation to serve government needs. NASA officials assume that the development of an operational, commercial RLV will be carried out by the private sector without use of government funds. Under that scenario, the Federal government will simply become a customer for commercial RLV services. In evaluating the prospects for the development of a commercially viable RLV, it may be useful to examine "lessons learned" from previous space commercialization efforts—both those that succeeded and those that did not. It can be argued that several distinct streams of market and technological development may have to converge for successful commercialization of space systems to occur. Potential factors influencing the prospects for commercialization include the size and growth rate of the potential customer base, the extent to which a governmental customer exists to underpin the market, the development of associated "value-added" markets, the stability of governmental policies, the levels of technological and business risk, and the degree to which competitive markets exist. This paper examines two previous space commercialization experiences, evaluates the relative importance of the various factors that influence the prospects for success of commercialization efforts, and assesses the implications of those factors for the commercial viability of the proposed RLV.

  17. Three-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Implications for Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spergel, D. N.; Bean, R.; Doré, O.; Nolta, M. R.; Bennett, C. L.; Dunkley, J.; Hinshaw, G.; Jarosik, N.; Komatsu, E.; Page, L.; Peiris, H. V.; Verde, L.; Halpern, M.; Hill, R. S.; Kogut, A.; Limon, M.; Meyer, S. S.; Odegard, N.; Tucker, G. S.; Weiland, J. L.; Wollack, E.; Wright, E. L.

    2007-06-01

    A simple cosmological model with only six parameters (matter density, Ωmh2, baryon density, Ωbh2, Hubble constant, H0, amplitude of fluctuations, σ8, optical depth, τ, and a slope for the scalar perturbation spectrum, ns) fits not only the 3 year WMAP temperature and polarization data, but also small-scale CMB data, light element abundances, large-scale structure observations, and the supernova luminosity/distance relationship. Using WMAP data only, the best-fit values for cosmological parameters for the power-law flat Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model are (Ωmh2,Ωbh2,h,ns,τ,σ8)=(0.1277+0.0080-0.0079,0.02229+/-0.00073,0.732+0.031-0.032,0.958+/-0.016,0.089+/-0.030,0.761+0.049-0.048). The 3 year data dramatically shrink the allowed volume in this six-dimensional parameter space. Assuming that the primordial fluctuations are adiabatic with a power-law spectrum, the WMAP data alone require dark matter and favor a spectral index that is significantly less than the Harrison-Zel'dovich-Peebles scale-invariant spectrum (ns=1, r=0). Adding additional data sets improves the constraints on these components and the spectral slope. For power-law models, WMAP data alone puts an improved upper limit on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r0.002<0.65 (95% CL) and the combination of WMAP and the lensing-normalized SDSS galaxy survey implies r0.002<0.30 (95% CL). Models that suppress large-scale power through a running spectral index or a large-scale cutoff in the power spectrum are a better fit to the WMAP and small-scale CMB data than the power-law ΛCDM model; however, the improvement in the fit to the WMAP data is only Δχ2=3 for 1 extra degree of freedom. Models with a running-spectral index are consistent with a higher amplitude of gravity waves. In a flat universe, the combination of WMAP and the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) data yields a significant constraint on the equation of state of the dark energy, w=-0.967+0.073-0.072. If we assume w=-1, then the deviations from the

  18. Availability of feature-oriented scanning probe microscopy for remote-controlled measurements on board a space laboratory or planet exploration Rover.

    PubMed

    Lapshin, Rostislav V

    2009-06-01

    Prospects for a feature-oriented scanning (FOS) approach to investigations of sample surfaces, at the micrometer and nanometer scales, with the use of scanning probe microscopy under space laboratory or planet exploration rover conditions, are examined. The problems discussed include decreasing sensitivity of the onboard scanning probe microscope (SPM) to temperature variations, providing autonomous operation, implementing the capabilities for remote control, self-checking, self-adjustment, and self-calibration. A number of topical problems of SPM measurements in outer space or on board a planet exploration rover may be solved via the application of recently proposed FOS methods. PMID:19566423

  19. 1958 NASA/USAF Space Probes (Able-1). Volume 1; Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    Early in calendar year 1958 Space Technology Laboratories, Inc. (STL) (then Space Technology Laboratories, a division of the Ramo-Wooldridge Corp.) developed for the Air Force Ballistic Missile Division (AFBMD) an Advanced Re-entry Test Vehicle (ARTV) for the purpose of testing ballistic missile nose cones at the full range of 5500 nautical miles. The two-stage ARTV utilized the Thor ballistic missile and the second stage propulsion system developed for the Vanguard program. In late 1957 and early 1958, STL/AFBMD prepared studies of various missile combinations which could be utilized for space testing. The Thor, in combination with the Vanguard second and third stages, was one of the vehicles considered which offered a very early capability of placing a reasonable payload in a lunar orbit. These STL/AFBMD studies were presented to various appropriate groups including the Killian, Millikan, H. J . Stewart Committees; Headquarters, Air Research and Development Command, and ARDC Centers. Subsequently the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) contacted STL relative to the availability of hardware for an early lunar shot. By utilizing existing spares already purchased for the ARTV, and by making use of the ARTV contractors already in being, it appeared feasible to launch by the third quarter of calendar year 1958 a payload which would be captured by the moon's gravitational force. On 27 March 1958, ARPA directed STL to proceed with a program of three lunar shots. As much as possible, these shots were to utilize existing ARTV spare hardware and impose no interference with the ballistic missile programs. In September this program was transferred to the direction of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). On 17 August 1958 the first launching of the Able-1 vehicle was attempted, but the flight was terminated by a propulsion failure of the first stage. Subsequent launchings were attempted on 13 October and 8 November 1958. Of these launchirigs the

  20. Full data acquisition in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy: Mapping dynamic electric phenomena in real space

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Balke, Nina; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen; Collins, Liam; Belianinov, Alex; Somnath, Suhas

    2016-08-12

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has provided deep insights into the role local electronic, ionic and electrochemical processes play on the global functionality of materials and devices, even down to the atomic scale. Conventional KPFM utilizes heterodyne detection and bias feedback to measure the contact potential difference (CPD) between tip and sample. This measurement paradigm, however, permits only partial recovery of the information encoded in bias- and time-dependent electrostatic interactions between the tip and sample and effectively down-samples the cantilever response to a single measurement of CPD per pixel. This level of detail is insufficient for electroactive materials, devices, ormore » solid-liquid interfaces, where non-linear dielectrics are present or spurious electrostatic events are possible. Here, we simulate and experimentally validate a novel approach for spatially resolved KPFM capable of a full information transfer of the dynamic electric processes occurring between tip and sample. General acquisition mode, or G-Mode, adopts a big data approach utilising high speed detection, compression, and storage of the raw cantilever deflection signal in its entirety at high sampling rates (> 4 MHz), providing a permanent record of the tip trajectory. We develop a range of methodologies for analysing the resultant large multidimensional datasets involving classical, physics-based and information-based approaches. Physics-based analysis of G-Mode KPFM data recovers the parabolic bias dependence of the electrostatic force for each cycle of the excitation voltage, leading to a multidimensional dataset containing spatial and temporal dependence of the CPD and capacitance channels. We use multivariate statistical methods to reduce data volume and separate the complex multidimensional data sets into statistically significant components that can then be mapped onto separate physical mechanisms. Overall, G-Mode KPFM offers a new paradigm to study

  1. Probing the Depths of Space Weathering: A Cross-sectional View of Lunar Rock 76015

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, Sarah K.; Keller, L. P.; Stroud, Rhonda

    2007-01-01

    The term "space weathering" refers to the cumulative effects of several processes operating at the surface of any solar system body not protected by a thick atmosphere. These processes include cosmic and solar ray irradiation, solar wind implantation and sputtering, as well as melting and vaporization due to micrometeorite bombardment. Space weathering discussions have generally centered around soils but exposed rocks will also incur the effects of weathering. Rocks have much longer surface lifetimes than an individual soil grain and thus record a longer history of exposure. By studying the weathering products which have built up on a rock surface, we can gain a deeper perspective on the weathering process and better assess the relative importance of various weathering components. The weathered coating, or patina, of the lunar rock 76015 has been previously studied using SEM and TEM. It is a noritic breccia with both "glazed" (smooth glassy) and "classic" (microcratered and pancake-bearing) patina coatings. Previous TEM work on 76015 relied on ultramicrotomy to prepare cross sections of the patina coating, but these sections were limited by the "chatter" and loss of material in these brittle samples. Here we have used a focused ion beam (FIB) instrument to prepare cross sections in which the delicate stratigraphy of the patina coating is beautifully preserved.

  2. The Atmospheric Circulation of a Nine-hot-Jupiter Sample: Probing Circulation and Chemistry over a Wide Phase Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataria, Tiffany; Sing, David K.; Lewis, Nikole K.; Visscher, Channon; Showman, Adam P.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Marley, Mark S.

    2016-04-01

    We present results from an atmospheric circulation study of nine hot Jupiters that compose a large transmission spectral survey using the Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes. These observations exhibit a range of spectral behavior over optical and infrared wavelengths, suggesting diverse cloud and haze properties in their atmospheres. By utilizing the specific system parameters for each planet, we naturally probe a wide phase space in planet radius, gravity, orbital period, and equilibrium temperature. First, we show that our model “grid” recovers trends shown in traditional parametric studies of hot Jupiters, particularly equatorial superrotation and increased day–night temperature contrast with increasing equilibrium temperature. We show how spatial temperature variations, particularly between the dayside and nightside and west and east terminators, can vary by hundreds of kelvin, which could imply large variations in Na, K, CO and {{{CH}}}4 abundances in those regions. These chemical variations can be large enough to be observed in transmission with high-resolution spectrographs, such as ESPRESSO on VLT, METIS on the E-ELT, or MIRI and NIRSpec aboard JWST. We also compare theoretical emission spectra generated from our models to available Spitzer eclipse depths for each planet and find that the outputs from our solar-metallicity, cloud-free models generally provide a good match to many of the data sets, even without additional model tuning. Although these models are cloud-free, we can use their results to understand the chemistry and dynamics that drive cloud formation in their atmospheres.

  3. k-space image correlation to probe the intracellular dynamics of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzin, M.; Sironi, L.; Chirico, G.; D'Alfonso, L.; Inverso, D.; Pallavicini, P.; Collini, M.

    2016-04-01

    The collective action of dynein, kinesin and myosin molecular motors is responsible for the intracellular active transport of cargoes, vesicles and organelles along the semi-flexible oriented filaments of the cytoskeleton. The overall mobility of the cargoes upon binding and unbinding to motor proteins can be modeled as an intermittency between Brownian diffusion in the cell cytoplasm and active ballistic excursions along actin filaments or microtubules. Such an intermittent intracellular active transport, exhibited by star-shaped gold nanoparticles (GNSs, Gold Nanostars) upon internalization in HeLa cancer cells, is investigated here by combining live-cell time-lapse confocal reflectance microscopy and the spatio-temporal correlation, in the reciprocal Fourier space, of the acquired image sequences. At first, the analytical theoretical framework for the investigation of a two-state intermittent dynamics is presented for Fourier-space Image Correlation Spectroscopy (kICS). Then simulated kICS correlation functions are employed to evaluate the influence of, and sensitivity to, all the kinetic and dynamic parameters the model involves (the transition rates between the diffusive and the active transport states, the diffusion coefficient and drift velocity of the imaged particles). The optimal procedure for the analysis of the experimental data is outlined and finally exploited to derive whole-cell maps for the parameters underlying the GNSs super-diffusive dynamics. Applied here to the GNSs subcellular trafficking, the proposed kICS analysis can be adopted for the characterization of the intracellular (super-) diffusive dynamics of any fluorescent or scattering biological macromolecule.

  4. Implications of privacy needs and interpersonal distancing mechanisms for space station design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Albert A.; Sommer, Robert; Struthers, Nancy; Hoyt, Kathleen

    1988-01-01

    Isolation, confinement, and the characteristics of microgravity will accentuate the need for privacy in the proposed NASA space station, yet limit the mechanism available for achieving it. This study proposes a quantitative model for understanding privacy, interpersonal distancing, and performance, and discusses the practical implications for Space Station design. A review of the relevant literature provided the basis for a database, definitions of physical and psychological distancing, loneliness, and crowding, and a quantitative model of situational privacy. The model defines situational privacy (the match between environment and task), and focuses on interpersonal contact along visual, auditory, olfactory, and tactile dimensions. It involves summing across pairs of crew members, contact dimensions, and time, yet also permits separate analyses of subsets of crew members and contact dimensions. The study concludes that performance will benefit when the type and level of contact afforded by the environment align with that required by the task. The key to achieving this is to design a flexible, definable, and redefinable interior environment that provides occupants with a wide array of options to meet their needs for solitude, limited social interaction, and open group activity. The report presents 49 recommendations in five categories to promote a wide range of privacy options despite the space station's volumetric limitations.

  5. Tone-Based Command of Deep Space Probes using Ground Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokulic, Robert S.; Jensen, J. Robert

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses a technique for enabling the reception of spacecraft commands at received signal levels as much as three orders of magnitude below those of current deep space systems. Tone-based commanding deals with the reception of commands that are sent in the form of precise frequency offsets using an open-loop receiver. The key elements of this technique are an ultrastable oscillator and open-loop receiver onboard the spacecraft, both of which are part of the existing New Horizons (Pluto flyby) communications system design. This enables possible flight experimentation for tone-based commanding during the long cruise of the spacecraft to Pluto. In this technique, it is also necessary to accurately remove Doppler shift from the uplink signal presented to the spacecraft. A signal processor in the spacecraft performs a discrete Fourier transform on the received signal to determine the frequency of the received signal. Due to the long-term drift in the oscillators and orbit prediction model, the system is likely to be implemented differentially, where changes in the uplink frequency convey the command information.

  6. The implications of the LDEF results on Space Station Freedom power system materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Degroh, Kim K.; Mirtich, Michael J.; Gebauer, Linda; Olle, Raymond; Hill, Carol M.

    1993-01-01

    Results and implications of Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) exposure of materials relevant to the Space Station Freedom (SSF) power system materials are presented. Atomic oxygen interactions with potential synergistic UV effects on silicone materials on LDEF were shown to result in the deposition of a dark contaminant film on adjoining surfaces. Silicones associated with solar array construction have the potential for causing reduced solar illumination of the solar cells if such silicone molecular fragments are found to be surface mobile. Results of LDEF atomic oxygen protective coatings on polyimide Kapton indicated acceptable durability to the synergistic effects of atomic oxygen, UV, thermal cycling, and micrometeoroid or debris impact. Results of combined atomic oxygen, UV radiation, thermal cycling, and micrometeoroid and debris impacts on LDEF high emittance radiator coatings indicate long term emittance and absorptance durability of Z 93 (zinc oxide pigment in a potassium silicate binder) coatings which have been selected for SSF radiator surfaces.

  7. New developments at Hunveyor and Husar space probe model constructions in Hungarian Universities and Colleges: status report of 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegzi, S.; Bérczi, Sz.; Hudoba, Gy.; Magyar, I.; Lang, A.; Istenes, Z.; Weidinger, T.; Tepliczky, I.; Varga, T.; Hargitai, H.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction Hunveyor and Husar space probe models are the main school robotics program in Hungary in the last decade initiated by our Cosmic Materials Space research Group (CMSRG). As a new form of planetary science education in Hungary students build their lander and rover robots and test them on test tables, carry out simulations, and go with their instruments to field works of planetary geology analog sites. Recently 10 groups work in this program and here is a status report about the new results. Planetary robot construction and simulations steps We summarized in 10 steps the main "constructional and industrial research and technology" description of planetary material studying and collecting by space probes (landers, rovers). We focused on the activity we began and teach to carry out at those steps. (Main planets considered were the Moon and Mars): 1. Reconnaissance and survey of the surface of a planet by orbital space probes (i.e. Lunar Orbiter, MGS, MRO etc.) Our studies: photogeology, geomorphology, preparations to cartography. 2. Mapping of the surface of the selected planet with geographical and stratigraphical methods. We (CMSRG) prepared thematic maps on Moon, Mercury, Mars, Venus [1] and Atlas (3) in the series [2,3]. 3. Identification of various surface materials by albedo, spectroscopic [4], thermal IR, identification and selection of the target sites. (in terrestrial analog sites during field works) 4. Planning the space probe system lander and rover working together (MPF-Sojourner type assembly). Planning of the Hunveyor and Husar models. 5. Construction and manufacturing lander and rover units. All Hunveyor groups built their models [5]. 6. Launching and traveling the space probes to the planetary surface. (No rocket building, we simulate [6] some events during the voyage only). 7. Measuring the planetary surface environment on the surface of target planet [7]. (CMSRG) groups carry out test-table measurements [8] and simulations, and later they

  8. Cosmological probes of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rassat, Anais Marie Melanie

    This Thesis is concerned with two cosmological probes of linear gravity. The first relates to Large Scale Structure (LSS) in the Universe, probed by galaxy surveys. The second to temperature anisotropics of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), probed by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Map (WMAP). Both probe the matter and dark energy distributions in the Universe and can be used to test general relativity. The first part of this Thesis (Chapters 2 to 4) is concerned with the analysis of galaxy clustering in redshift space. The second part (Chapters 5 to 7) is concerned with the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect using LSS-CMB cross-correlations. Chapter 1 introduces the cosmological theory and overviews the subsequent chapters. Chapter 2 gives a review of recent results from the 2 Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) and its Redshift Survey (2MRS). It includes work published in Erdogdu (a) et al. (2006) and Erdogdu (b) et al. (2006). Chapter 3 quantifies the clustering of 2MRS galaxies in redshift space. Chapter 4 uses results from Chapter 3 to constrain cosmological parameters. A selection of work from Chapters 3 and 4 will shortly become available in Rassat et al. (2008), entitled 'Redshift Space Analysis of 2MRS'. Chapter 5 overviews the late-time Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect (ISW) and cross- correlations between the LSS and the CMB. Chapter 6 is also published in Rassat et al. (2007), entitled "Cross-correlation of 2MASS and WMAP3: Implications for the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect". It investigates a detection of the ISW effect and correlations which may affect statistical isotropy in the CMB ('Axis of Evil'). Chapter 7 uses the ISW effect to forecast constraints on dark energy parameters and general modifications of general relativity for the next generation of galaxy surveys, particularly the Dark UNiverse Explorer (DUNE) and the Dark Energy Survey (DES). Chapter 8 presents the overall conclusions of this Thesis. Chapter 9 discusses possible extensions to

  9. Implications of Prolonged Solar Minimum Conditions for the Space Debris Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Hugh G.; Horbury, Timothy

    2013-08-01

    Observations of the current solar cycle show the likely continuation of a long-term decline in solar activity that began during the 1980s. This decline could lead to conditions similar to the Maunder minimum within 40 years [1], which would have consequences for the space debris environment. Solar activity is a key driver of atmospheric mass density and, subsequently, drag on orbiting spacecraft and debris. Whilst several studies have investigated potential effects on the global climate, no assessment has been made of the impact of a Maunder-like minimum on the space debris population in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). Consequently, we present a new study of the future debris environment under Maunder minimum conditions and provide an assessment of the possible consequences to the LEO space debris population and space operations. The University of Southampton's Debris Analysis and Monitoring Architecture to the Geosynchronous Environment (DAMAGE) has been used to analyse the consequences of a Maunder minimum of approximately 50 years duration and to quantify the impact on the effectiveness of debris mitigation measures. Results from these studies suggest an increase in collision activity and a corresponding, rapid growth of the debris population during a Maunder minimum period, in spite of on-going mitigation efforts. In the best case, the DAMAGE results suggest that the population of debris > 10 cm could double in number by the end of Maunder minimum conditions. However, the rapid growth in the population is followed by a strong recovery period on exit from a Maunder minimum. The recovery is characterised by a decrease in the debris population, which can be to a level similar to that seen before the onset of the Maunder minimum, if mitigation efforts are sustained. As such, prolonged solar minimum conditions may have relatively benign implications for the long-term evolution of the debris environment. However, the risks to spacecraft from collisions with debris during a

  10. Observed Coupling Between the International Space Station PCU Plasma and a FPMU Langmuir Probe Facilitated by the Geomagnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, William; Koontz, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    Electrical charging of the International Space Station (ISS) is a matter of serious concern resulting from the possibility of vehicle arcing and electrical shock hazard to crew during extravehicular activity (EVA). A Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU) was developed and integrated into ISS in order to control the ISS floating potential, thereby, minimize vehicle charging and associated hazards. One of the principle factors affecting ISS electrical charging is the ionosphere plasma state (i.e., electron temperature and density). To support ISS electrical charging studies a Floating Potential Monitoring Unit (FPMU) is also integrated into ISS in order to measure the ionosphere properties using Langmuir probes (LP). The FPMU was located on the Starboard side of ISS. The PCU is located near the center of ISS with its plasma exhaust pointed to port. From its integration on ISS in 2006 through November of 2009, the FPMU data exhibited nominal characteristics during PCU operation. On November 21, 2009 the FPMU was relocated from the Starboard location to a new Port location. After relocation significant enhanced noise was observed in both the LP current-voltage sweeps and the derived electron temperature data. The enhanced noise only occurred when the PCU was in discharge and at unique and repeatable locations of the ISS orbit. The cause of this enhanced noise was investigated. It was found that there is coupling occurring between the PCU plasma and the FPMU LP. In this paper we shall 1) present the on-orbit data and the presence of enhanced noise, 2) demonstrate that the coupling of the PCU plasma and the FPMU measurements is geomagnetically organized, 3) show that coupling of the PCU plasma and the FPMU is primarily due to and driven by particle-wave interaction and 4) show that the ionosphere conditions are adequate for Alfven waves to be generated by the PCU plasma.

  11. Consolidated fuel reprossing program: The implications of force reflection for teleoperation in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, John V.; Herndon, Joseph N.; Moore, Wendy E.

    1987-01-01

    Previous research on teleoperator force feedback is reviewed and results of a testing program which assessed the impact of force reflection on teleoperator task performance are reported. Force relection is a type of force feedback in which the forces acting on the remote portion of the teleoperator are displayed to the operator by back-driving the master controller. The testing program compared three force reflection levels: 4 to 1 (four units of force on the slave produce one unit of force at the master controller), 1 to 1, and infinity to 1 (no force reflection). Time required to complete tasks, rate of occurrence of errors, the maximum force applied to tasks components, and variability in forces applied to components during completion of representative remote handling tasks were used as dependent variables. Operators exhibited lower error rates, lower peak forces, and more consistent application of forces using force relection than they did without it. These data support the hypothesis that force reflection provides useful information for teleoperator users. The earlier literature and the results of the experiment are discussed in terms of their implications for space based teleoperator systems. The discussion described the impact of force reflection on task completion performance and task strategies, as suggested by the literature. It is important to understand the trade-offs involved in using telerobotic systems with and without force reflection.

  12. Scientific Implications of the Modified Observing Strategy of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEnery, Julie E.; Fermi-LAT Collaboration; Fermi-GBM Team

    2014-01-01

    Near the end of 2013 the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) mission plans to change to a modified observing strategy designed to favor the Galactic center while maintaining full sky-survey capabilities. This change would have important implications for the science of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT). In particular, this change will 1) substantially increase the Fermi-LAT sensitivity to young pulsars in the inner Galaxy, 2) provide simultaneous observations of the Galactic center with a suite of other instruments that have extended observing campaigns of the expected disruption of the G2 gas cloud complex (see https://wiki.mpe.mpg.de/gascloud/ProposalList) , 3) double the rate of improvement of statistical power for of searches for spectral lines from the Galactic center. In this contribution we discuss these topics. We also investigate ways in which the modified observing strategy can induce systematic biases, and discuss how those biases can be studied and mitigated with studies of control samples of LAT data.

  13. Lower limb kinematics during treadmill walking after space flight: implications for gaze stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, P. V.; Basdogan, C.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Layne, C. S.

    1996-01-01

    We examined the lower limb joint kinematics observed during pre- and postflight treadmill walking performed by seven subjects from three Space Shuttle flights flown between March 1992 and February 1994. Basic temporal characteristics of the gait patterns, such as stride time and duty cycle, showed no significant changes after flight. Evaluation of phaseplane variability across the gait cycle suggests that postflight treadmill walking is more variable than preflight, but the response throughout the course of a cycle is joint dependent and, furthermore, the changes are subject dependent. However, analysis of the phaseplane variability at the specific locomotor events of heel strike and toe off indicated statistically significant postflight increases in knee variability at the moment of heel strike and significantly higher postflight hip joint variability at the moment of toe off. Nevertheless, the observation of component-specific variability was not sufficient to cause a change in the overall lower limb joint system stability, since there was no significant change in an index used to evaluate this at both toe off and heel strike. The implications of the observed lower limb kinematics for head and gaze control during locomotion are discussed in light of a hypothesized change in the energy attenuation capacity of the musculoskeletal system in adapting to weightlessness.

  14. Preliminary results of a gamma-ray burst study in the Konus experiment on the Venera-11 and Venera-12 space probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazets, Y. P.; Golentskiy, S. V.; Ilinskiy, V. N.; Panov, V. N.; Aptekar, R. L.; Guryan, Y. A.; Sokolov, I. A.; Sokolova, Z. Y.; Kharitonova, T. V.

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-one gamma-ray bursts and 68 solar flares in the hard X-ray range were detected on Venera-11 and Venera-12 space probes during the initial 50-day observation period. Major characteristics of the equipment used and preliminary data on the temporal structure and energy spectra of the gamma-ray bursts are considered. The pattern of gamma-ray burst frequency distribution vs. intensity, N(S), is established.

  15. Gravity Probe B Encapsulated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In this photo, the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) space vehicle is being encapsulated atop the Delta II launch vehicle. The GP-B is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Launched April 20, 2004 , the GP-B program was managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Underwood, Lockheed Martin Corporation).

  16. HNO/NO Conversion Mechanisms of Cu-Based HNO Probes with Implications for Cu,Zn-SOD

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    HNO has broad biological effects and pharmacological activities. Direct HNO probes for in vivo applications were recently reported, which are CuII-based complexes having fluorescence reporters with reaction to HNO resulting in CuI systems and the release of NO. Their coordination environments are similar to that in Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD), which plays a significant role in cellular HNO/NO conversion. However, none of these conversion mechanisms are known. A quantum chemical investigation was performed here to provide structural, energetic, and electronic profiles of HNO/NO conversion pathways via the first CuII-based direct HNO probe. Results not only are consistent with experimental observations but also provide numerous structural and mechanistic details unknown before. Results also suggest the first HNO/NO conversion mechanism for Cu,Zn-SOD, as well as useful guidelines for future design of metal-based HNO probes. These results shall facilitate development of direct HNO probes and studies of HNO/NO conversions via metal complexes and metalloproteins. PMID:24803995

  17. Conductivity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air.

    The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air.

    The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  18. A model of heat transfer in sapwood and implications for sap flux density measurements using thermal dissipation probes

    SciTech Connect

    Wullschleger, Stan D; Childs, Kenneth W; King, Anthony Wayne; Hanson, Paul J

    2011-01-01

    A variety of thermal approaches are used to estimate sap flux density in stems of woody plants. Models have proven valuable tools for interpreting the behavior of heat pulse, heat balance, and heat field deformation techniques, but have seldom been used to describe heat transfer dynamics for the heat dissipation method. Therefore, to better understand the behavior of heat dissipation probes, a model was developed that takes into account the thermal properties of wood, the physical dimensions and thermal characteristics of the probes, and the conductive and convective heat transfer that occurs due to water flow in the sapwood. Probes were simulated as aluminum tubes 20 mm in length and 2 mm in diameter, whereas sapwood, heartwood, and bark each had a density and water fraction that determined their thermal properties. Base simulations assumed a constant sap flux density with sapwood depth and no wounding or physical disruption of xylem beyond the 2 mm diameter hole drilled for probe installation. Simulations across a range of sap flux densities showed that the dimensionless quantity k defined as ( Tm T)/ T where Tm is the temperature differential ( T) between the heated and unheated probe under zero flow conditions was dependent on the thermal conductivity of the sapwood. The relationship between sap flux density and k was also sensitive to radial gradients in sap flux density and to xylem disruption near the probe. Monte Carlo analysis in which 1000 simulations were conducted while simultaneously varying thermal conductivity and wound diameter revealed that sap flux density and k showed considerable departure from the original calibration equation used with this technique. The departure was greatest for abrupt patterns of radial variation typical of ring-porous species. Depending on the specific combination of thermal conductivity and wound diameter, use of the original calibration equation resulted in an 81% under- to 48% over-estimation of sap flux density at

  19. Laser-pump/X-ray-probe experiments with electrons ejected from a Cu(111) target: space-charge acceleration.

    PubMed

    Schiwietz, G; Kühn, D; Föhlisch, A; Holldack, K; Kachel, T; Pontius, N

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive investigation of the emission characteristics for electrons induced by X-rays of a few hundred eV at grazing-incidence angles on an atomically clean Cu(111) sample during laser excitation is presented. Electron energy spectra due to intense infrared laser irradiation are investigated at the BESSY II slicing facility. Furthermore, the influence of the corresponding high degree of target excitation (high peak current of photoemission) on the properties of Auger and photoelectrons liberated by a probe X-ray beam is investigated in time-resolved pump and probe measurements. Strong electron energy shifts have been found and assigned to space-charge acceleration. The variation of the shift with laser power and electron energy is investigated and discussed on the basis of experimental as well as new theoretical results. PMID:27577771

  20. Interaction of solar wind with Mercury and its magnetic field. [as observed by Mariner 10 space probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Behannon, K. W.; Lepping, R. P.; Whang, Y. C.

    1976-01-01

    A brief review is presented of magnetic field and solar wind electron observations by Mariner 10 spacecraft. The intrinsic magnetic field of the planet Mercury and the implications of such a field for the planetary interior are also discussed.

  1. Radiation Effects on Emerging Technologies: Implications of Space Weather Risk Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Barth, Janet L.

    2000-01-01

    As NASA and its space partners endeavor to develop a network of satellites capable of supporting humankind's needs for advanced space weather prediction and understanding, one of the key challenges is to design a space system to operate in the natural space radiation environment In this paper, we present a description of the natural space radiation environment, the effects of interest to electronic or photonic systems, and a sample of emerging technologies and their specific issues. We conclude with a discussion of operations in the space radiation hazard and considerations for risk management.

  2. Probing in Space and Time the Nuclear Motion Driven by Nonequilibrium Electronic Dynamics in Ultrafast Pumped N2.

    PubMed

    Ajay, J; Šmydke, J; Remacle, F; Levine, R D

    2016-05-19

    An ultrafast electronic excitation of N2 in the vacuum ultraviolet creates a nonstationary coherent linear superposition of interacting valence and Rydberg states resulting in a net oscillating dipole moment. There is therefore a linear response to an electrical field that can be queried by varying the time delay between the pump and a second optical probe pulse. Both the pump and probe pulses are included in our computation as part of the Hamiltonian, and the time-dependent wave function for both electronic and nuclear dynamics is computed using a grid representation for the internuclear coordinate. Even on an ultrafast time scale there are several processes that can be discerned beyond the expected coherence oscillations. In particular, the coupling between the excited valence and Rydberg states of the same symmetry is very evident and can be directly probed by varying the delay between pulse and probe. For quite a number of vibrations the nuclear motion does not dephase the electronic disequilibrium. However, the nuclear motion does modulate the dipolar response by taking the wave packet in and out of the Franck-Condon region and by its strong influence on the coupling of the Rydberg and valence states. A distinct isotope effect arises from the dependence of the interstate coupling on the nuclear mass. PMID:26937745

  3. Nitroxidative chemistry interferes with fluorescent probe chemistry: implications for nitric oxide detection using 2,3-diaminonaphthalene.

    PubMed

    Hu, Teh-Min; Chiu, Shih-Jiuan; Hsu, Yu-Ming

    2014-08-22

    Simultaneous production of nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide generates peroxynitrite and causes nitroxidative stress. The fluorometric method for NO detection is based on the formation of a fluorescent product from the reaction of a nonfluorescent probe molecule with NO-derived nitrosating species. Here, we present an example of how nitroxidative chemistry could interact with fluorescent probe chemistry. 2,3-Naphthotriazole (NAT) is the NO-derived fluorescent product of 2,3-diaminonaphthalene (DAN), a commonly used NO-detecting molecule. We show that NO/superoxide cogeneration, and particularly peroxynitrite, mediates the chemical decomposition of NAT. Moreover, the extent of NAT decomposition depends on the relative fluxes of NO and superoxide; the maximum effect being reached at almost equivalent generation rates for both radicals. The rate constant for the reaction of NAT with peroxynitrite was determined to be 2.2×10(3)M(-1)s(-1). Further, various peroxynitrite scavengers were shown to effectively inhibit NO/superoxide- and peroxynitrite-mediated decomposition of NAT. Taken together, the present study suggests that the interference of a fluorometric NO assay can be originated from the interaction between the final fluorescent product and the formed reactive nitrogen and oxygen species. PMID:25078618

  4. Data analysis to separate particles of different speed regimes and charges. [lunar ejecta and meteorite experiment and pioneer space probe data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, H.

    1977-01-01

    Although the instruments on the lunar ejecta and meteorite experiment (LEAM) and the Pioneer 8 and 9 space probes were essentially similar, a comparison of their results indicates that different sets of particles caused the different responses. On Pioneer, the events were caused by the impact of cosmic dust, the so-called beta particles expelled from the vicinity of the sun by solar radiation pressure, augmented by extremely high energy but definitely identifiable interstellar grains. On the moon, the events were due to the impact of slowly moving, highly charged lunar dust being propelled electrostatically across the terminator. Both theoretical analysis and experimental testing confirming these conclusions are discussed.

  5. The Phase Space of z~1.2 SpARCS Clusters: Using Herschel to Probe Dust Temperature as a Function of Environment and Accretion History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, A. G.; Webb, T. M. A.; Yee, H. K. C.; Muzzin, A.; Wilson, G.; van der Burg, R. F. J.; Balogh, M. L.; Shupe, D. L.

    2016-01-01

    We present a five-band Herschel study (100-500 μm) of three galaxy clusters at z˜ 1.2 from the Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey. With a sample of 120 spectroscopically confirmed cluster members, we investigate the role of environment on galaxy properties utilizing the projected cluster phase space (line-of-sight velocity versus clustercentric radius), which probes the time-averaged galaxy density to which a galaxy has been exposed. We divide cluster galaxies into phase-space bins of (r/{r}200)× ({{Δ }}v/{σ }v), tracing a sequence of accretion histories in phase space. Stacking optically star-forming cluster members on the Herschel maps, we measure average infrared star formation rates, and, for the first time in high-redshift galaxy clusters, dust temperatures for dynamically distinct galaxy populations—namely, recent infalls and those that were accreted onto the cluster at an earlier epoch. Proceeding from the infalling to virialized (central) regions of phase space, we find a steady decrease in the specific star formation rate and increase in the stellar age of star-forming cluster galaxies. We perform a probability analysis to investigate all acceptable infrared spectral energy distributions within the full parameter space and measure a ˜ 4σ drop in the average dust temperature of cluster galaxies in an intermediate phase-space bin, compared to an otherwise flat trend with phase space. We suggest one plausible quenching mechanism which may be consistent with these trends, invoking ram-pressure stripping of the warmer dust for galaxies within this intermediate accretion phase. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  6. Effects of target fragmentation on evaluation of LET spectra from space radiations: implications for space radiation protection studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Badavi, F. F.; Badhwar, G. D.

    1996-01-01

    We present calculations of linear energy transfer (LET) spectra in low earth orbit from galactic cosmic rays and trapped protons using the HZETRN/BRYNTRN computer code. The emphasis of our calculations is on the analysis of the effects of secondary nuclei produced through target fragmentation in the spacecraft shield or detectors. Recent improvements in the HZETRN/BRYNTRN radiation transport computer code are described. Calculations show that at large values of LET (> 100 keV/micrometer) the LET spectra seen in free space and low earth orbit (LEO) are dominated by target fragments and not the primary nuclei. Although the evaluation of microdosimetric spectra is not considered here, calculations of LET spectra support that the large lineal energy (y) events are dominated by the target fragments. Finally, we discuss the situation for interplanetary exposures to galactic cosmic rays and show that current radiation transport codes predict that in the region of high LET values the LET spectra at significant shield depths (> 10 g/cm2 of Al) is greatly modified by target fragments. These results suggest that studies of track structure and biological response of space radiation should place emphasis on short tracks of medium charge fragments produced in the human body by high energy protons and neutrons.

  7. Measuring the Thickness and Potential Profiles of the Space-Charge Layer at Organic/Organic Interfaces under Illumination and in the Dark by Scanning Kelvin Probe Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Geoffrey A; Wu, Yanfei; Haugstad, Greg; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Scanning Kelvin probe microscopy was used to measure band-bending at the model donor/acceptor heterojunction poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)/fullerene (C60). Specifically, we measured the variation in the surface potential of C60 films with increasing thicknesses grown on P3HT to produce a surface potential profile normal to the substrate both in the dark and under illumination. The results confirm a space-charge carrier region with a thickness of 10 nm, consistent with previous observations. We discuss the possibility that the domain size in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells, which is comparable to the space-charge layer thickness, is actually partly responsible for less than expected electron/hole recombination rates. PMID:26890658

  8. Fifty years of human space travel: implications for bone and calcium research.

    PubMed

    Smith, S M; Abrams, S A; Davis-Street, J E; Heer, M; O'Brien, K O; Wastney, M E; Zwart, S R

    2014-01-01

    Calcium and bone metabolism remain key concerns for space travelers, and ground-based models of space flight have provided a vast literature to complement the smaller set of reports from flight studies. Increased bone resorption and largely unchanged bone formation result in the loss of calcium and bone mineral during space flight, which alters the endocrine regulation of calcium metabolism. Physical, pharmacologic, and nutritional means have been used to counteract these changes. In 2012, heavy resistance exercise plus good nutritional and vitamin D status were demonstrated to reduce loss of bone mineral density on long-duration International Space Station missions. Uncertainty continues to exist, however, as to whether the bone is as strong after flight as it was before flight and whether nutritional and exercise prescriptions can be optimized during space flight. Findings from these studies not only will help future space explorers but also will broaden our understanding of the regulation of bone and calcium homeostasis on Earth. PMID:24995691

  9. Space Flight Calcium: Implications for Astronaut Health, Spacecraft Operations, and Earth

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Scott M.; McCoy, Torin; Gazda, Daniel; Morgan, Jennifer L. L.; Heer, Martina; Zwart, Sara R.

    2012-01-01

    The space flight environment is known to induce bone loss and, subsequently, calcium loss. The longer the mission, generally the more bone and calcium are lost. This review provides a history of bone and calcium studies related to space flight and highlights issues related to calcium excretion that the space program must consider so that urine can be recycled. It also discusses a novel technique using natural stable isotopes of calcium that will be helpful in the future to determine calcium and bone balance during space flight. PMID:23250146

  10. Space flight calcium: implications for astronaut health, spacecraft operations, and Earth.

    PubMed

    Smith, Scott M; McCoy, Torin; Gazda, Daniel; Morgan, Jennifer L L; Heer, Martina; Zwart, Sara R

    2012-12-01

    The space flight environment is known to induce bone loss and, subsequently, calcium loss. The longer the mission, generally the more bone and calcium are lost. This review provides a history of bone and calcium studies related to space flight and highlights issues related to calcium excretion that the space program must consider so that urine can be recycled. It also discusses a novel technique using natural stable isotopes of calcium that will be helpful in the future to determine calcium and bone balance during space flight. PMID:23250146

  11. Cancer Risk from Exposure to Galactic Cosmic Rays - Implications for Human Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Durant, marco

    2006-01-01

    Current space programs are shifting toward planetary exploration, and in particular towards human missions to the moon and Mars. However, space radiation is a major barrier to human exploration of the solar system because the biological effects of high-energy and charge (HZE) ions, which are the main contributors to radiation risks in deep space, are poorly understood. Predictions of the nature and magnitude of the risks posed by space radiation are subject to very large uncertainties. Great efforts have been dedicated worldwide in recent years toward a better understanding of the oncogenic potential of galactic cosmic rays. A review of the new results in this field will be presented here.

  12. Legal and Political Implications of Offensive Actions from and Against the Space Segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, Iole M.

    2002-01-01

    Hundreds of satellites now present in space benefit the people of the world economically, scientifically and by their contribution to international security. So far, activities in space have proceeded without much conflict. Means have been found for regulation and agreement to minimize interference in the radio spectrum, while making more efficient use of limited spectrum resources. The Outer Space Treaty bars the stationing of nuclear weapons in space, or other weapons of mass destruction. Nations are responsible for damages that their space activities may cause to others, perhaps including destruction of the space assets of another nation. Today, maintaining the peaceful use of space is becoming more complicated by the privatisation of the notion of security by commercial actors and by the emerging of high technology non-state threats, that are not bind by international treaties. SPACE WEAPONS The Outer Space Treaty had been adopted to avoid the possible denial of peaceful uses of outer space, and because, technically speaking, jeopardizing a satellite was a difficult task to perform. For example, an orbiting laser might take hours or days for the Earth to rotate and the laser to be at an appropriate point in its orbit to threaten a target on the ground or in the air. Conversely, a substantial number of such weapons in space might be able to destroy targets within minutes of the command to do so, if the targets were visible and not below clouds. It is currently very difficult to oppose space weapons. For this reason, they could be significantly effective against an adversary. However, there are several obvious ways to counter nation controlled space-based weapons: anti-satellite systems, economic and technological blockade and an international legal system that forbids/restricts such weapons. The problem remains for non-state international actors which are not bound by international treaties. For this reason, the principle established by the United States to tie

  13. Comparison of Metal-Backed Free-Space and Open-Ended Coaxial Probe Techniques for the Dielectric Characterization of Aeronautical Composites †

    PubMed Central

    López-Rodríguez, Patricia; Escot-Bocanegra, David; Poyatos-Martínez, David; Weinmann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The trend in the last few decades is that current unmanned aerial vehicles are completely made of composite materials rather than metallic, such as carbon-fiber or fiberglass composites. From the electromagnetic point of view, this fact forces engineers and scientists to assess how these materials may affect their radar response or their electronics in terms of electromagnetic compatibility. In order to evaluate this, electromagnetic characterization of different composite materials has become a need. Several techniques exist to perform this characterization, all of them based on the utilization of different sensors for measuring different parameters. In this paper, an implementation of the metal-backed free-space technique, based on the employment of antenna probes, is utilized for the characterization of composite materials that belong to an actual drone. Their extracted properties are compared with those given by a commercial solution, an open-ended coaxial probe (OECP). The discrepancies found between both techniques along with a further evaluation of the methodologies, including measurements with a split-cavity resonator, conclude that the implemented free-space technique provides more reliable results for this kind of composites than the OECP technique. PMID:27347966

  14. Comparison of Metal-Backed Free-Space and Open-Ended Coaxial Probe Techniques for the Dielectric Characterization of Aeronautical Composites.

    PubMed

    López-Rodríguez, Patricia; Escot-Bocanegra, David; Poyatos-Martínez, David; Weinmann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The trend in the last few decades is that current unmanned aerial vehicles are completely made of composite materials rather than metallic, such as carbon-fiber or fiberglass composites. From the electromagnetic point of view, this fact forces engineers and scientists to assess how these materials may affect their radar response or their electronics in terms of electromagnetic compatibility. In order to evaluate this, electromagnetic characterization of different composite materials has become a need. Several techniques exist to perform this characterization, all of them based on the utilization of different sensors for measuring different parameters. In this paper, an implementation of the metal-backed free-space technique, based on the employment of antenna probes, is utilized for the characterization of composite materials that belong to an actual drone. Their extracted properties are compared with those given by a commercial solution, an open-ended coaxial probe (OECP). The discrepancies found between both techniques along with a further evaluation of the methodologies, including measurements with a split-cavity resonator, conclude that the implemented free-space technique provides more reliable results for this kind of composites than the OECP technique. PMID:27347966

  15. Exercise Countermeasures for Bone Loss During Space Flight: A Method for the Study of Ground Reaction Forces and Their Implications for Bone Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterman, M.; McCrory, J. L.; Sharkey, N. A.; Piazza, S.; Cavanagh, P. R.

    1999-01-01

    The human zero-gravity locomotion simulator and the cadaver simulator offer a powerful combination for the study of the implications of exercise for maintaining bone quality during space flight. Such studies, when compared with controlled in-flight exercise programs, could help in the identification of a strain threshold for the prevention of bone loss during space flight.

  16. Heat pipe cooled probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, C. J. (Inventor); Couch, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    The basic heat pipe principle is employed to provide a self-contained passively cooled probe that may be placed into a high temperature environment. The probe consists of an evaporator region of a heat pipe and a sensing instrument. Heat is absorbed as the working fluid evaporates in the probe. The vapor is transported to the vapor space of the condenser region. Heat is dissipated from the condenser region and fins causing condensation of the working fluid, which returns to the probe by gravity and the capillary action of the wick. Working fluid, wick and condenser configurations and structure materials can be selected to maintain the probe within an acceptable temperature range.

  17. Quantitative Aspects of Space Weathering: Implications for Regolith Breccia Meteorites and Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, S. K.; Pieters, C. M.; Keller, L. P.

    2004-01-01

    Space weathering is defined as the physical and optical changes incurred by material exposed to the space environment. Through studies of lunar soils, these changes are becoming well understood. However, the effects of space weathering are dependent on the physical environment to which the host materials are exposed, and thus, the effects will likely vary from body to body. The optical effects of space weathering result from nanophase iron (npFe(sup 0)) created during micrometeorite bombardment and solar wind sputtering. In the asteroid belt, bodies are farther from the sun than our Moon, and are widely known to incur less solar wind implantation and sputtering. The velocity of impacts is smaller resulting in less melting and vaporization, and therefore fewer space weathering products. The impact rate in the asteroid belt is greater, which will result in more comminution, further diluting any weathering products. Ergo, asteroidal regoliths should contain fewer space weathering products than lunar soils. However, even very small degrees of space weathering can have dramatic consequences for the optical properties of soils. A discussion on the optical effects of space weathering is presented.

  18. Creating a "Third Space" in Student Teaching: Implications for the University Supervisor's Status as Outsider

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuenca, Alexander; Schmeichel, Mardi; Butler, Brandon M.; Dinkelman, Todd; Nichols, Joseph R., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The work of teacher education during student teaching typically takes place in two distinct "spaces": placement sites and college/university settings. The program featured in this article is structured in ways that clearly mark out those two spaces. Yet this configuration led our university supervisors, whose work primarily took place in the…

  19. Space Psychology: A New Frontier. Implications for the Profession of Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponterotto, Joseph G.; Hayden, Davis C.

    As many of the physical problems of space travel are solved, scientists are beginning to address the psychological needs of the astronauts. While the last decade has produced technological advances making space travel and work a definite possibility, psychologists and the public are largely unaware of the psychological and socio-psychological…

  20. Information Disclosure on MySpace--the What, the Why and the Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Souza, Zaineb; Dick, Geoffrey N.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the results of the first academic study of the use of a major social networking website, MySpace, by children. The study examined the degree of, and reasons for, information disclosure by children in high schools in Sydney, Australia. Social networking sites such as MySpace are a huge Internet phenomenon, some with hundreds of…

  1. The Space Radiation Environment and Its Implication for Designing Reliable Electronic Systems: A NASA Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2004-01-01

    The contents include the following: The space radiation environment. The effects on electronics. The environment in action NASA approaches to commercial electronics: flight projects; and proactive research. Living with a star space environment testbed status. Final thoughts: atomic interactions; direct ionization; interaction with nucleus.

  2. Fifty years of human space travel: implications for bone and calcium research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium and bone metabolism remain key concerns for space travelers, and ground-based models of space flight have provided a vast literature to complement the smaller set of reports from flight studies. Increased bone resorption and largely unchanged bone formation result in the loss of calcium and ...

  3. Building a quality culture in the Office of Space Flight: Approach, lessons learned and implications for the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, C. Shannon

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the approach and lessons learned by the Office of Space Flight (OSF), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), in its introduction of quality. In particular, the experience of OSF Headquarters is discussed as an example of an organization within NASA that is considering both the business and human elements of the change and the opportunities the quality focus presents to improve continuously. It is hoped that the insights shared will be of use to those embarking upon similar cultural changes. The paper is presented in the following parts: the leadership challenge; background; context of the approach to quality; initial steps; current initiatives; lessons learned; and implications for the future.

  4. Building a quality culture in the Office of Space Flight: Approach, lessons learned and implications for the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, C. Shannon

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the approach and lessons learned by the Office of Space Flight (OSF), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), in its introduction of quality. In particular, the experience of OSF Headquarters is discussed as an example of an organization within NASA that is considering both the business and human elements of the change and the opportunities the quality focus presents to improve continuously. It is hoped that the insights shared will be of use to those embarking upon similar cultural changes. The paper is presented in the following parts: the leadership challenge; background; context of the approach to quality; initial steps; current initiatives; lessons learned; and implications for the future.

  5. A review of adaptive change in musculoskeletal impedance during space flight and associated implications for postflight head movement control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, P. V.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Layne, C. S.

    1997-01-01

    We present a review of converging sources of evidence which suggest that the differences between loading histories experienced in 1-g and weightlessness are sufficient to stimulate adaptation in mechanical impedance of the musculoskeletal system. As a consequence of this adaptive change we argue that we should observe changes in the ability to attenuate force transmission through the musculoskeletal system both during and after space flight. By focusing attention on the relation between human sensorimotor activity and support surfaces, the importance of controlling mechanical energy flow through the musculoskeletal system is demonstrated. The implications of such control are discussed in light of visual-vestibular function in the specific context of head and gaze control during postflight locomotion. Evidence from locomotory biomechanics, visual-vestibular function, ergonomic evaluations of human vibration, and specific investigations of locomotion and head and gaze control after space flight, is considered.

  6. Slab melting in the Aleutians: implications of an ion probe study of clinopyroxene in primitive adakite and basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogodzinski, G. M.; Kelemen, P. B.

    1998-05-01

    An ion probe study of trace elements in Mg-rich clinopyroxene phenocrysts in primitive Aleutian lavas provides constraints on the genesis of Aleutian adakites, and possible insights into the source of common Aleutian magmas. Clinopyroxene (cpx) phenocrysts in the primitive adakites have high Sr and Nd/Yb compared to cpx in Aleutian basalts. In the adakites, Sr and Nd/Yb are highest for high Mg# cpx, and these concentrations decrease toward lower Mg# compositions. These trends are the opposite of those seen in basalt cpx which generally show increasing incompatible trace element contents with decreasing Mg#, and are unlike antithetic compatible-incompatible trace element trends produced by chemical or kinetic effects of crystal growth. Petrographic observations and major and trace element zonation in cpx phenocrysts indicate that primitive Aleutian adakites are in part the product of mixing between primitive and relatively evolved magmas. The adakite trace element signature (high Sr, Nd/Yb) is clearly associated with the primitive mixing end-member. This observation supports the idea that adakites are derived by equilibration of slab melts with mantle olivine, and appears to rule out an origin by melting in the lower crust. Adakites are relatively rare in the Aleutians, but arc-wide correlations between Sr and La/Yb indicates that an adakite-type slab melt component may be present in the magmatic source throughout the arc.

  7. Gravity Probe B Assembled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In this photo, the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) space vehicle is being assembled at the Sunnyvale, California location of the Lockheed Martin Corporation. The GP-B is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Launched April 20, 2004 , the GP-B program was managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Underwood, Lockheed Martin Corporation).

  8. Detection of GRB 060927 at zeta = 5.47: Implications for the Use of Gamma-Ray Bursts as Probes of the End of the Dark Ages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruiz-Velasco, A. E.; Swan, H.; Troja, E.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Sterling, R. L. C.; Xu, D.; Aharonian, F.; Akerlof, C.; Andersen, M. I.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Bersier, D.; CastroCeron, J. M.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gehrels, N.; Gogus, E.; Gorosabel, J.; Guidorzi, C.; Guver, T.; Hjorth, J.; Horns, D.; Huang, K. Y.; Jakobsson, P.; Jensen, B. L.

    2007-01-01

    We report on follow-up observations of the gamma-ray burst GRB 060927 using the robotic ROTSE-IIIa telescope and a suite of larger aperture groundbased telescopes. An optical afterglow was detected 20 s after the burst, the earliest rest-frame detection of optical emission from any GRB. Spectroscopy performed with the VLT about 13 hours after the trigger shows a continuum break at lambda approx. equals 8070 A, produced by neutral hydrogen absorption at zeta = 5.6. We also detect an absorption line at 8158 A which we interpret as Si II lambda 1260 at zeta = 5.467. Hence, GRB 060927 is the second most distant GRB with a spectroscopically measured redshift. The shape of the red wing of the spectral break can be fitted by a damped Ly(alpha) profile with a column density with log(N(sub HI)/sq cm) = 22.50 +/- 0.15. We discuss the implications of this work for the use of GRBs as probes of the end of the dark ages and draw three main conclusions: i) GRB afterglows originating from zeta greater than or approx. equal to 6 should be relatively easy to detect from the ground, but rapid near-infrared monitoring is necessary to ensure that they are found; ii) The presence of large H I column densities in some GRBs host galaxies at zeta > 5 makes the use of GRBs to probe the reionization epoch via spectroscopy of the red damping wing challenging; iii) GRBs appear crucial to locate typical star-forming galaxies at zeta > 5 and therefore the type of galaxies responsible for the reionization of the universe.

  9. Global Survey on Future Trends in Human Spaceflight: the Implications for Space Tourism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurtuna, O.; Garneau, S.

    2002-01-01

    With the much-publicized first ever space tourist flight, of Dennis Tito, and the announcement of the second space tourist flight to take place in April 2002, it is clear that an alternative motivation for human spaceflight has emerged. Human spaceflight is no longer only about meeting the priorities of national governments and space agencies, but is also about the tangible possibility of ordinary people seeing the Earth from a previously exclusive vantage point. It is imperative that major space players look beyond the existing human spaceflight rationale to identify some of the major driving forces behind space tourism, including the evolving market potential and developments in enabling technologies. In order to determine the influence of these forces on the future of commercial human spaceflight, the responses of a Futuraspace survey on future trends in human spaceflight are analyzed and presented. The motivation of this study is to identify sought-after space destinations, explore the expected trends in enabling technologies, and understand the future role of emerging space players. The survey will reflect the opinions of respondents from around the world including North America, Europe (including Russia) and Asia. The profiles of targeted respondents from space industry, government and academia are high-level executives/managers, senior researchers, as well as former and current astronauts. The survey instrument is a questionnaire which is validated by a pilot study. The sampling method is non-probabilistic, targeting as many space experts as possible who fit our intended respondent profile. Descriptive and comparative statistical analysis methods are implemented to investigate both global and regional perceptions of future commercial trends in human spaceflight. This study is not intended to be a formal market study of the potential viability of the space tourism market. Instead, the focus is on the future trends of human spaceflight, by drawing on the

  10. Autonomic neural control and implications for remote medical monitoring in space.

    PubMed

    Cooke, William H

    2007-07-01

    Long-duration space travel or extended stays on the moon or Mars will pose new challenges for maintaining and monitoring the health status of astronauts. Remote medical monitoring systems will need to be developed for a number of applications, including providing decision support for care-givers in the event of traumatic injury in space. The focus of this brief review is to introduce potential methods of monitoring astronaut status remotely from simple ECG recordings. PMID:18372692

  11. Implications of number-space synesthesia on the automaticity of numerical processing

    PubMed Central

    Gertner, Limor; Henik, Avishai; Reznik, Daniel; Cohen Kadosh, Roi

    2013-01-01

    Number-space synesthetes visualize numbers in specific spatial configurations. Their spatial-numerical perceptions are assumed to be automatic in nature and have been found to affect performance in various numerical tasks. The current study tested whether synesthetic number-space associations can modulate the well-established Size Congruency Effect (SiCE), which is considered to be an indication for the automaticity of numerical processing. Two groups, number-space synesthetes and matched controls, were tested on a numerical Stroop task (Henik and Tzelgov, 1982). In separate blocks, participants were presented with two digits and asked to make comparative judgments regarding either numerical values (numerical comparison) or physical size (physical comparison). Both dimensions were manipulated orthogonally, creating three congruency levels: congruent (e.g., 2 7), incongruent (e.g., 2 7) and neutral (e.g., 2 2 and 2 7 for physical and numerical blocks, respectively). For the numerical block, both synesthetes and controls showed the classic SiCE, indicating similar automatic processing of physical magnitude. However, in the physical block, synesthetes showed a lack of automatic numerical magnitude processing when the numbers to be compared were presented incompatibly with their relative position on the synesthetic number-form. This finding strongly suggests that synesthetes’ number-space perceptions affect their ability to automatically process the semantic meaning of numerals. The involvement of space in automatic magnitude processing for number-space synesthetes and non-synesthetes is discussed. PMID:22578710

  12. Probing the Solar System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, John

    2013-01-01

    Humans have always had the vision to one day live on other planets. This vision existed even before the first person was put into orbit. Since the early space missions of putting humans into orbit around Earth, many advances have been made in space technology. We have now sent many space probes deep into the Solar system to explore the planets and…

  13. Fluid volume control during short-term space flight and implications for human performance.

    PubMed

    Watenpaugh, D E

    2001-09-01

    Space flight exerts substantial effects on fluid volume control in humans. Cardiac distension occurs during the first 1-2 days of space flight relative to supine and especially upright 1g conditions. Plasma volume contraction occurs quickly in microgravity, probably as a result of transcapillary fluid filtration into upper-body interstitial spaces. No natriuresis or diuresis has been observed in microgravity, such that diuresis cannot explain microgravity-induced hypovolemia. Reduction of fluid intake occurs irrespective of space motion sickness and leads to hypovolemia. The fourfold elevation of urinary antidiuretic hormone (ADH) levels on flight day 1 probably results from acceleration exposures and other stresses of launch. Nevertheless, it is fascinating that elevated ADH levels and reduced fluid intake occur simultaneously early in flight. Extracellular fluid volume decreases by 10-15% in microgravity, and intracellular fluid volume appears to increase. Total red blood cell mass decreases by approximately 10% within 1 week in space. Inflight Na(+) and volume excretory responses to saline infusion are approximately half those seen in pre-flight supine conditions. Fluid volume acclimation to microgravity sets the central circulation to homeostatic conditions similar to those found in an upright sitting posture on Earth. Fluid loss in space contributes to reduced exercise performance upon return to 1g, although not necessarily in flight. In-flight exercise training may help prevent microgravity-induced losses of fluid and, therefore, preserve the capacity for upright exercise post-flight. Protection of orthostatic tolerance during space flight probably requires stimulation of orthostatic blood pressure control systems in addition to fluid maintenance or replacement. PMID:11581336

  14. Observations of Radiative Cooling By Nitric Oxide and Carbon Dioxide in the E and F Regions: Implications for Space Weather and Space Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynczak, M. G.; Hunt, L. A.; Russell, J. M., III

    2014-12-01

    Infrared emission by nitric oxide (NO, 5.3 um), carbon dioxide (CO2, 15 um), and atomic oxygen (O, 63 um) is the mechanism for radiative cooling of the thermosphere. Heat conduction transports energy from the warmer, higher layers of the thermosphere to lower layers where CO2 and NO ultimately radiate the energy. These radiative processes play a large role in governing the neutral temperature of the ionosphere E and F regions. The SABER instrument on the NASA TIMED satellite has been observing radiative cooling by NO and CO2 for 13 years. Substantial variability in the radiative cooling is observed on timescales ranging from one day to the 11-year solar cycle. Harmonics of the annual cycle are evident in the CO2 cooling rates, implying strong coupling to the lower atmosphere. Harmonics of the solar rotation period are evident in the NO cooling, but only during solar minimum conditions. To date the NO cooling data have been helpful in understanding space weather forecasts and the interaction of co-rotating interaction regions with the ionosphere. The cooling rate data will be reviewed in light of their observed variability over the past 13 years, including the implications for variations in the thermal structure of the E and F regions. The potential for development of proxies and empirical models of the NO and CO2 emissions will also be presented. Such models could become part of an overall space weather forecasting tool.

  15. Functional implications of variation in tooth spacing and crown size in pinnipedimorpha (mammalia: carnivora).

    PubMed

    Churchill, Morgan; Clementz, Mark T

    2015-05-01

    Pinnipeds (seals, sea lions, and walruses) show variation in tooth morphology that relates to ecology. However, crown size and spacing are two aspects of morphology that have not been quantified in prior studies. We measured these characters for nearly all extant pinnipeds and three fossil taxa and then determined the principal sources of variation in tooth size and spacing using principal components (PCAs) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). PCA and HCA showed that species sorted into three groups: taxa with small crowns and large diastemata, taxa with large crowns and small diastemata, and taxa that fell between these two extremes. We then performed discriminant function analysis (DFA) to determine if tooth morphology correlated with foraging strategy or diet. DFA results indicated weak correlation with diet, and stronger correlation with prey capture strategies. Tooth size and spacing were most strongly correlated with the importance of teeth in prey acquisition, with tooth size decreasing and tooth spacing increasing as teeth become less necessary in capturing food items. Taxa which relied on teeth for filtering prey from the water column or processing larger or tougher food items generally had larger crowns and smaller tooth spacing then taxa which swallowed prey whole. We found the fossil taxa Desmatophoca and Enaliarctos were most similar in tooth morphology to extant otariids, suggesting that both taxa were generalist feeders. This study established the relationship between tooth size and feeding behavior, and provides a new tool to explore the paleoecology of fossil pinnipeds and other aquatic tetrapods. PMID:25367223

  16. Effects of isolation and confinement on humans-implications for manned space explorations.

    PubMed

    Pagel, J I; Choukèr, A

    2016-06-15

    Human psychology and physiology are significantly altered by isolation and confinement. In light of planned exploration class interplanetary missions, the related adverse effects on the human body need to be explored and defined as they have a large impact on a mission's success. Terrestrial space analogs offer an excellent controlled environment to study some of these stressors during a space mission in isolation without the complex environment of the International Space Station. Participants subjected to these space analog conditions can encounter typical symptoms ranging from neurocognitive changes, fatigue, misaligned circadian rhythm, sleep disorders, altered stress hormone levels, and immune modulatory changes. This review focuses on both the psychological and the physiological responses observed in participants of long-duration spaceflight analog studies, such as Mars500 or Antarctic winter-over. They provide important insight into similarities and differences encountered in each simulated setting. The identification of adverse effects from confinement allows not only the crew to better prepare for but also to design feasible countermeasures that will help support space travelers during exploration class missions in the future. PMID:26846554

  17. Electrical resistivity probes

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex; Faybishenko, Boris A.; Solbau, Ray D.

    2003-10-21

    A miniaturized electrical resistivity (ER) probe based on a known current-voltage (I-V) electrode structure, the Wenner array, is designed for local (point) measurement. A pair of voltage measuring electrodes are positioned between a pair of current carrying electrodes. The electrodes are typically about 1 cm long, separated by 1 cm, so the probe is only about 1 inch long. The electrodes are mounted to a rigid tube with electrical wires in the tube and a sand bag may be placed around the electrodes to protect the electrodes. The probes can be positioned in a borehole or on the surface. The electrodes make contact with the surrounding medium. In a dual mode system, individual probes of a plurality of spaced probes can be used to measure local resistance, i.e. point measurements, but the system can select different probes to make interval measurements between probes and between boreholes.

  18. Lessons learned in creating spacecraft computer systems: Implications for using Ada (R) for the space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomayko, James E.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty-five years of spacecraft onboard computer development have resulted in a better understanding of the requirements for effective, efficient, and fault tolerant flight computer systems. Lessons from eight flight programs (Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, Shuttle, Mariner, Voyager, and Galileo) and three reserach programs (digital fly-by-wire, STAR, and the Unified Data System) are useful in projecting the computer hardware configuration of the Space Station and the ways in which the Ada programming language will enhance the development of the necessary software. The evolution of hardware technology, fault protection methods, and software architectures used in space flight in order to provide insight into the pending development of such items for the Space Station are reviewed.

  19. Behavioral health in Antarctica: implications for long-duration space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lugg, Desmond J.

    2005-01-01

    Ideally, evidence from long-duration spaceflight should be used to predict likely occurrences of behavioral health events and for planning management strategies for such events. With small numbers of space travelers, and limited long-duration missions of a year or more, Earth analogues and simulations must be used as the evidence base, despite such analogues lacking microgravity, radiation, rapidly altering photoperiodicity, and fidelity to space. Antarctic health data are reviewed and an assessment made of the likely frequency of behavioral health events. Based on the Antarctic evidence, the likelihood of behavioral health problems in space is low. However, such cases may be serious and of high consequence, placing considerable demands on the mission crew and ground support to achieve a successful outcome, given the availability of pharmaceuticals and resources.

  20. Effects of Varying Surface Inclines and Suit Pressure: Implications on Space Suit Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clowers, Kurt; Clark, Timothy; Harvill, Lauren; Morency, Richard; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2008-01-01

    Suited human performance studies in reduced gravity environments to date include limited observations from Apollo Lunar surface Extravehicular Activities (EVA) and from previous studies conducted in partial gravity simulation environments. The Constellation Program EVA Systems Project office has initiated tests to develop design requirements for the next generation Lunar EVA suit. Theses studies were conducted in the Space Vehicle Mock-Up Facility (SVMF) at Johnson Space Center from which the results provided recommendations for suit weight, mass, center of gravity, pressure, and suit kinematic constraints that optimize human performance in partial gravity environments.

  1. Science with the space-based interferometer eLISA. III: probing the expansion of the universe using gravitational wave standard sirens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamanini, Nicola; Caprini, Chiara; Barausse, Enrico; Sesana, Alberto; Klein, Antoine; Petiteau, Antoine

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the capability of various configurations of the space interferometer eLISA to probe the late-time background expansion of the universe using gravitational wave standard sirens. We simulate catalogues of standard sirens composed by massive black hole binaries whose gravitational radiation is detectable by eLISA, and which are likely to produce an electromagnetic counterpart observable by future surveys. The main issue for the identification of a counterpart resides in the capability of obtaining an accurate enough sky localisation with eLISA. This seriously challenges the capability of four-link (2 arm) configurations to successfully constrain the cosmological parameters. Conversely, six-link (3 arm) configurations have the potential to provide a test of the expansion of the universe up to z ~ 8 which is complementary to other cosmological probes based on electromagnetic observations only. In particular, in the most favourable scenarios, they can provide a significant constraint on H0 at the level of 0.5%. Furthermore, (ΩM, ΩΛ) can be constrained to a level competitive with present SNIa results. On the other hand, the lack of massive black hole binary standard sirens at low redshift allows to constrain dark energy only at the level of few percent.

  2. Small sensor probe for monitoring the space electromagnetic environments by the application of the miniaturized plasma wave receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Hirotsugu; Fukuhara, Hajime; Okada, Satoshi; Yagitani, Satoshi; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Miyake, Yohei; Usui, Hideyuki; Yamakawa, Hiroshi; Ueda, Yoshikatsu

    2010-05-01

    Plasma waves act as the medium in the transport of kinetic energies through wave-particle interactions in space plasmas. Therefore, most of the space missions to investigate space plasmas carry the onboard plasma wave receivers, which is a kind of radio receivers with very high sensitivities. Recently, the downsized satellites in science missions such as formation flights and small satellites require the further reduction of power and mass budget for onboard instruments. We also face the similar requirement from the lack of the spacecraft resources in planetary missions. To meet the requirement, we developed the very small plasma wave receiver using the analogue ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) technology. Since the plasma wave receiver needs to receive very weak signals in the various frequency ranges, it accommodates filters with different frequency responses, low noise amplifiers with high gains and oscillators. This leads to the large occupation of the board by the analogue circuits. Therefore, the breakthrough to the extreme miniaturization of the plasma wave receiver does not occur without the miniaturization of the analogue electronic circuit. We have already confirmed the feasibility in realizing six channels (three for electric fields and three for magnetic fields) of waveform receivers inside the small chip with the size of 3mm x 3mm. The developed waveform receiver shows the good feature enough for the use in scientific missions. This success in the miniaturization of plasma wave receivers allow us to develop a new system measuring plasma waves in multiple points. Based on the technology of the miniaturization of plasma wave receivers, we propose a new system for monitoring the electromagnetic environment in space. We address it MSEE (Monitor System for space Electromagnetic Environments). The MSEE is a kind of the sensor network system in space. It consists of palm-sized sensor nodes, which are randomly distributed in the target area. The

  3. Response of Silicon-Based Linear Energy Transfer Spectrometers: Implication for Radiation Risk Assessment in Space Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; O'Neill, P. M.

    2001-01-01

    There is considerable interest in developing silicon-based telescopes because of their compactness and low power requirements. Three such telescopes have been flown on board the Space Shuttle to measure the linear energy transfer spectra of trapped, galactic cosmic ray, and solar energetic particles. Dosimeters based on single silicon detectors have also been flown on the Mir orbital station. A comparison of the absorbed dose and radiation quality factors calculated from these telescopes with that estimated from measurements made with a tissue equivalent proportional counter show differences which need to be fully understood if these telescopes are to be used for astronaut radiation risk assessments. Instrument performance is complicated by a variety of factors. A Monte Carlo-based technique was developed to model the behavior of both single element detectors in a proton beam, and the performance of a two-element, wide-angle telescope, in the trapped belt proton field inside the Space Shuttle. The technique is based on: (1) radiation transport intranuclear-evaporation model that takes into account the charge and angular distribution of target fragments, (2) Landau-Vavilov distribution of energy deposition allowing for electron escape, (3) true detector geometry of the telescope, (4) coincidence and discriminator settings, (5) spacecraft shielding geometry, and (6) the external space radiation environment, including albedo protons. The value of such detailed modeling and its implications in astronaut risk assessment is addressed. c2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Response of silicon-based linear energy transfer spectrometers: implication for radiation risk assessment in space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; O'Neill, P. M.

    2001-07-01

    There is considerable interest in developing silicon-based telescopes because of their compactness and low power requirements. Three such telescopes have been flown on board the Space Shuttle to measure the linear energy transfer spectra of trapped, galactic cosmic ray, and solar energetic particles. Dosimeters based on single silicon detectors have also been flown on the Mir orbital station. A comparison of the absorbed dose and radiation quality factors calculated from these telescopes with that estimated from measurements made with a tissue equivalent proportional counter show differences which need to be fully understood if these telescopes are to be used for astronaut radiation risk assessments. Instrument performance is complicated by a variety of factors. A Monte Carlo-based technique was developed to model the behavior of both single element detectors in a proton beam, and the performance of a two-element, wide-angle telescope, in the trapped belt proton field inside the Space Shuttle. The technique is based on: (1) radiation transport intranuclear-evaporation model that takes into account the charge and angular distribution of target fragments, (2) Landau-Vavilov distribution of energy deposition allowing for electron escape, (3) true detector geometry of the telescope, (4) coincidence and discriminator settings, (5) spacecraft shielding geometry, and (6) the external space radiation environment, including albedo protons. The value of such detailed modeling and its implications in astronaut risk assessment is addressed.

  5. Response of silicon-based linear energy transfer spectrometers: implication for radiation risk assessment in space flights.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, G D; O'Neill, P M

    2001-07-11

    There is considerable interest in developing silicon-based telescopes because of their compactness and low power requirements. Three such telescopes have been flown on board the Space Shuttle to measure the linear energy transfer spectra of trapped, galactic cosmic ray, and solar energetic particles. Dosimeters based on single silicon detectors have also been flown on the Mir orbital station. A comparison of the absorbed dose and radiation quality factors calculated from these telescopes with that estimated from measurements made with a tissue equivalent proportional counter show differences which need to be fully understood if these telescopes are to be used for astronaut radiation risk assessments. Instrument performance is complicated by a variety of factors. A Monte Carlo-based technique was developed to model the behavior of both single element detectors in a proton beam, and the performance of a two-element, wide-angle telescope, in the trapped belt proton field inside the Space Shuttle. The technique is based on: (1) radiation transport intranuclear-evaporation model that takes into account the charge and angular distribution of target fragments, (2) Landau-Vavilov distribution of energy deposition allowing for electron escape, (3) true detector geometry of the telescope, (4) coincidence and discriminator settings, (5) spacecraft shielding geometry, and (6) the external space radiation environment, including albedo protons. The value of such detailed modeling and its implications in astronaut risk assessment is addressed. PMID:11858255

  6. Real space tests of the statistical isotropy and Gaussianity of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe cosmic microwave background data

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, Bartosz

    2008-08-15

    We introduce and analyze a method for testing statistical isotropy and Gaussianity and apply it to the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) cosmic microwave background (CMB) foreground reduced temperature maps. We also test cross-channel difference maps to constrain levels of residual foreground contamination and systematic uncertainties. We divide the sky into regions of varying size and shape and measure the first four moments of the one-point distribution within these regions, and using their simulated spatial distributions we test the statistical isotropy and Gaussianity hypotheses. By randomly varying orientations of these regions, we sample the underlying CMB field in a new manner, that offers a richer exploration of the data content, and avoids possible biasing due to a single choice of sky division. In our analysis we account for all two-point correlations between different regions and also show the impact on the results when these correlations are neglected. The statistical significance is assessed via comparison with realistic Monte Carlo simulations. We find the three-year WMAP maps to agree well with the isotropic, Gaussian random field simulations as probed by regions corresponding to the angular scales ranging from 6 Degree-Sign to 30 Degree-Sign at 68% confidence level (CL). We report a strong, anomalous (99.8% CL) dipole 'excess' in the V band of the three-year WMAP data and also in the V band of the WMAP five-year data (99.3% CL). Using our statistics, we notice large scale hemispherical power asymmetry, and find that it is not highly statistically significant in the WMAP three-year data ( Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 97%) at scales l{<=}40. The significance is even smaller if multipoles up to l=1024 are considered ({approx}90% CL). We give constraints on the amplitude of the previously proposed CMB dipole modulation field parameter. We find some hints of foreground contamination in the form of a locally strong, anomalous kurtosis excess in

  7. Physical and Social Organization of Space in a Combined Credential Programme: Implications for Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Kathryn S.

    2008-01-01

    Social geography brings a new perspective to understanding longstanding separation between general and special education in higher education. This paper uses methods from social geography to consider how the structures and processes of space function to maintain longstanding divisions between general and special education in a US teacher education…

  8. A new method of spatial analysis of irregularly spaced HLB data and biological implications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field data on intensity of plant diseases is very often irregularly spaced (i.e., there are varying amounts of distance between rows, ponds, voids, roads, houses, or other land areas). A new method of analysis, sometimes called second-generation wavelet analysis, can be used on this type of irregula...

  9. Implications of Outside-the-Box Technologies on Future Space Exploration and Colonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loder, Theodore C.

    2003-01-01

    In general, planning for future manned space exploration either to the moon, Mars, or an asteroid has depended on a somewhat linear extrapolation of our present technologies. Two major prohibitive cost issues regarding such planning are payload lift and in-flight energy generation. The costs of these in both engineering and actual flight costs, coupled with the planning necessary to carry out such exploration have prevented us from actively moving forward. Although, it will be worthwhile to continue to plan for such exploration using ``present'' technologies, I recommend that planning be concerned mainly with mission strategies and goals utilizing both present technology and totally new energy breakthroughs. There are presently in research and development an entire suite of relevant outside-the-box technologies which will include both zero point energy generation and antigravity technologies that will replace our present solar/nuclear/fuel cell energy technologies and liquid/solid fuel rockets. This paper describes some of these technologies, the physics behind them and their potential use for manned space exploration. The companies and countries that first incorporate these technologies into their space programs will lead the way in exploring and colonizing space.

  10. Space science to the twenty-first century and the technological implications for implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents the specific plan for NASA space science missions to the 21st century and highlights the major technological advances that must be effected to accomplish the planned missions. Separate consideration is given to plans for astrophysics, planetary exploration, the solar terrestrial area, and life sciences. The technological consequences of the plans in these separate areas are discussed.