Science.gov

Sample records for space weather modeling

  1. GPU Computing in Space Weather Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.; Zhong, D.; Xiang, C.; Zhang, Y.

    2013-04-01

    Space weather refers to conditions on the Sun and in the solar wind, magnetosphere, ionosphere, and thermosphere that can influence the performance and reliability of space-borne and ground-based technological systems and that affect human life or health. In order to make the real- or faster than real-time numerical prediction of adverse space weather events and their influence on the geospace environment, high-performance computational models are required. The main objective in this article is to explore the application of programmable graphic processing units (GPUs) to the numerical space weather modeling for the study of solar wind background that is a crucial part in the numerical space weather modeling. GPU programming is realized for our Solar-Interplanetary-CESE MHD model (SIP-CESE MHD model) by numerically studying the solar corona/interplanetary solar wind. The global solar wind structures is obtained by the established GPU model with the magnetic field synoptic data as input. The simulated global structures for Carrington rotation 2060 agrees well with solar observations and solar wind measurements from spacecraft near the Earth. The model's implementation of the adaptive-mesh-refinement (AMR) and message passing interface (MPI) enables the full exploitation of the computing power in a heterogeneous CPU/GPU cluster and significantly improves the overall performance. Our initial tests with available hardware show speedups of roughly 5x compared to traditional software implementation. This work presents a novel application of GPU to the space weather study.

  2. Adaptive Numerical Algorithms in Space Weather Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toth, Gabor; vanderHolst, Bart; Sokolov, Igor V.; DeZeeuw, Darren; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Fang, Fang; Manchester, Ward B.; Meng, Xing; Nakib, Dalal; Powell, Kenneth G.; Stout, Quentin F.; Glocer, Alex; Ma, Ying-Juan; Opher, Merav

    2010-01-01

    Space weather describes the various processes in the Sun-Earth system that present danger to human health and technology. The goal of space weather forecasting is to provide an opportunity to mitigate these negative effects. Physics-based space weather modeling is characterized by disparate temporal and spatial scales as well as by different physics in different domains. A multi-physics system can be modeled by a software framework comprising of several components. Each component corresponds to a physics domain, and each component is represented by one or more numerical models. The publicly available Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) can execute and couple together several components distributed over a parallel machine in a flexible and efficient manner. The framework also allows resolving disparate spatial and temporal scales with independent spatial and temporal discretizations in the various models. Several of the computationally most expensive domains of the framework are modeled by the Block-Adaptive Tree Solar wind Roe Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code that can solve various forms of the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations, including Hall, semi-relativistic, multi-species and multi-fluid MHD, anisotropic pressure, radiative transport and heat conduction. Modeling disparate scales within BATS-R-US is achieved by a block-adaptive mesh both in Cartesian and generalized coordinates. Most recently we have created a new core for BATS-R-US: the Block-Adaptive Tree Library (BATL) that provides a general toolkit for creating, load balancing and message passing in a 1, 2 or 3 dimensional block-adaptive grid. We describe the algorithms of BATL and demonstrate its efficiency and scaling properties for various problems. BATS-R-US uses several time-integration schemes to address multiple time-scales: explicit time stepping with fixed or local time steps, partially steady-state evolution, point-implicit, semi-implicit, explicit/implicit, and fully implicit numerical

  3. Adaptive numerical algorithms in space weather modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Gábor; van der Holst, Bart; Sokolov, Igor V.; De Zeeuw, Darren L.; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Fang, Fang; Manchester, Ward B.; Meng, Xing; Najib, Dalal; Powell, Kenneth G.; Stout, Quentin F.; Glocer, Alex; Ma, Ying-Juan; Opher, Merav

    2012-02-01

    Space weather describes the various processes in the Sun-Earth system that present danger to human health and technology. The goal of space weather forecasting is to provide an opportunity to mitigate these negative effects. Physics-based space weather modeling is characterized by disparate temporal and spatial scales as well as by different relevant physics in different domains. A multi-physics system can be modeled by a software framework comprising several components. Each component corresponds to a physics domain, and each component is represented by one or more numerical models. The publicly available Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) can execute and couple together several components distributed over a parallel machine in a flexible and efficient manner. The framework also allows resolving disparate spatial and temporal scales with independent spatial and temporal discretizations in the various models. Several of the computationally most expensive domains of the framework are modeled by the Block-Adaptive Tree Solarwind Roe-type Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code that can solve various forms of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations, including Hall, semi-relativistic, multi-species and multi-fluid MHD, anisotropic pressure, radiative transport and heat conduction. Modeling disparate scales within BATS-R-US is achieved by a block-adaptive mesh both in Cartesian and generalized coordinates. Most recently we have created a new core for BATS-R-US: the Block-Adaptive Tree Library (BATL) that provides a general toolkit for creating, load balancing and message passing in a 1, 2 or 3 dimensional block-adaptive grid. We describe the algorithms of BATL and demonstrate its efficiency and scaling properties for various problems. BATS-R-US uses several time-integration schemes to address multiple time-scales: explicit time stepping with fixed or local time steps, partially steady-state evolution, point-implicit, semi-implicit, explicit/implicit, and fully implicit

  4. Browsing Space Weather Data and Models with the Integrated Space Weather Analysis (iSWA) System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddox, Marlo M.; Mullinix, Richard E.; Berrios, David H.; Hesse, Michael; Rastaetter, Lutz; Pulkkinen, Antti; Hourcle, Joseph A.; Thompson, Barbara J.

    2011-01-01

    The Integrated Space Weather Analysis (iSWA) System is a comprehensive web-based platform for space weather information that combines data from solar, heliospheric and geospace observatories with forecasts based on the most advanced space weather models. The iSWA system collects, generates, and presents a wide array of space weather resources in an intuitive, user-configurable, and adaptable format - thus enabling users to respond to current and future space weather impacts as well as enabling post-impact analysis. iSWA currently provides over 200 data and modeling products, and features a variety of tools that allow the user to browse, combine, and examine data and models from various sources. This presentation will consist of a summary of the iSWA products and an overview of the customizable user interfaces, and will feature several tutorial demonstrations highlighting the interactive tools and advanced capabilities.

  5. Validation of Space Weather Models at Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsova, M. M.; Hesse, M.; Pulkkinen, A.; Maddox, M.; Rastaetter, L.; Berrios, D.; Zheng, Y.; MacNeice, P. J.; Shim, J.; Taktakishvili, A.; Chulaki, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a multi-agency partnership to support the research and developmental work necessary to substantially increase space weather modeling capabilities and to facilitate advanced models deployment in forecasting operations. Space weather models and coupled model chains hosted at the CCMC range from the solar corona to the Earth's upper atmosphere. CCMC has developed a number of real-time modeling systems, as well as a large number of modeling and data products tailored to address the space weather needs of NASA's robotic missions. The CCMC conducts unbiased model testing and validation and evaluates model readiness for operational environment. CCMC has been leading recent comprehensive modeling challenges under GEM, CEDAR and SHINE programs. The presentation will focus on experience in carrying out comprehensive and systematic validation of large sets of. space weather models

  6. Validation of Space Weather Models at Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsova, M. M.; Pulkkinen, A.; Rastaetter, L.; Hesse, M.; Chulaki, A.; Maddox, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a multiagency partnership, which aims at the creation of next generation space weather modes. CCMC goal is to support the research and developmental work necessary to substantially increase space weather modeling capabilities and to facilitate advanced models deployment in forecasting operations. The CCMC conducts unbiased model testing and validation and evaluates model readiness for operational environment. The presentation will demonstrate the recent progress in CCMC metrics and validation activities.

  7. Space Weather Models at the CCMC And Their Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Rastatter, Lutz; MacNeice, Peter; Kuznetsova, Masha

    2007-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a US inter-agency activity aiming at research in support of the generation of advanced space weather models. As one of its main functions, the CCMC provides to researchers the use of space science models, even if they are not model owners themselves. The second focus of CCMC activities is on validation and verification of space weather models, and on the transition of appropriate models to space weather forecast centers. As part of the latter activity, the CCMC develops real-time simulation systems that stress models through routine execution. A by-product of these real-time calculations is the ability to derive model products, which may be useful for space weather operators. In this presentation, we will provide an overview of the community-provided, space weather-relevant, model suite, which resides at CCMC. We will discuss current capabilities, and analyze expected future developments of space weather related modeling.

  8. Space Weather Products at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Kuznetsova, M.; Pulkkinen, A.; Maddox, M.; Rastaetter, L.; Berrios, D.; MacNeice, P.

    2010-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a US inter-agency activity aiming at research in support of the generation of advanced space weather models. As one of its main functions, the CCMC provides to researchers the use of space science models, even if they are not model owners themselves. The second CCMC activity is to support Space Weather forecasting at national Space Weather Forecasting Centers. This second activity involves model evaluations, model transitions to operations, and the development of space weather forecasting tools. Owing to the pace of development in the science community, new model capabilities emerge frequently. Consequently, space weather products and tools involve not only increased validity, but often entirely new capabilities. This presentation will review the present state of space weather tools as well as point out emerging future capabilities.

  9. Space Weather Modeling Services at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a multi-agency partnership, which aims at the creation of next generation space weather models. The goal of the CCMC is to support the research and developmental work necessary to substantially increase the present-day modeling capability for space weather purposes, and to provide models for transition to the Rapid Prototyping Centers at the space weather forecast centers. This goal requires close collaborations with and substantial involvement of the research community. The physical regions to be addressed by CCMC-related activities range from the solar atmosphere to the Earth's upper atmosphere. The CCMC is an integral part of the National Space Weather Program Implementation Plan, of NASA's Living With a Star (LWS) initiative, and of the Department of Defense Space Weather Transition Plan. CCMC includes a facility at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. CCMC also provides, to the research community, access to state-of-the-art space research models. In this paper we will provide a description of the current CCMC status, discuss current plans, research and development accomplishments and goals, and describe the model testing and validation process undertaken as part of the CCMC mandate. Special emphasis will be on solar and heliospheric models currently residing at CCMC, and on plans for validation and verification.

  10. Space Weather Model of July 22-23, 2012 CME

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Space Weather Research Center modeled the July 23, 2012 CME using a modeling program called ENLIL. The CME can be seen to expand dramatically as it travels through space. By comparing how we...

  11. Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis L.

    2010-01-01

    This video provides a narrated exploration of the history and affects of space weather. It includes information the earth's magnetic field, solar radiation, magnetic storms, and how solar winds affect electronics on earth, with specific information on how space weather affects space exploration in the future.

  12. Validating Physics-based Space Weather Models for Operational Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gombosi, Tamas; Singer, Howard; Millward, George; Toth, Gabor; Welling, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    The Geospace components of the Space Weather Modeling Framework developed at the University of Michigan is presently transitioned to operational use by the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center. This talk will discuss the various ways the model is validated and skill scores are calculated.

  13. Extracting Space Weather Information from Research Models: Opportunities and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In addition to supporting space research in the international community, the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) has as its second objective to apply the power of modern research models toward space weather specification and forecasting. Motivated by the objectives to test models and to ease the transition of research models to space weather forecasting organizations, the CCMC has developed a number of real-time modeling systems, as well as a large number of modeling and data products for space weather forecasting support. Over time, these activities have produced tailored products for partners, as well as tools, which address the space weather needs of NASA's robotic mission community. All tools are accessible via a configurable, flexible interface. During this process, CCMC has accumulated substantial experience in understanding model performance, as well as in the design and execution of realtime systems. This presentation will focus on lessons learned and it will suggest low hanging fruit for transition to operations at partner agencies.

  14. Space Weather Products at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In addition to supporting space research in the international community, the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) has as its second objective to bring to apply the power of modern research models toward space weather specification and forecasting. Initially motivated by the objective to test models and to ease the transition of research models to space weather forecasting organization, the CCMC has developed a number of real-time modeling systems, as well as large number of modeling and data products for space weather forecasting. Over time, these activities have evolved into tailored products for partners, as well as into a direct support of the space weather needs within NASA robotic mission community. Accessible through a customizable interface, users within the US or at partnering institutions internationally have access to space weather tools driven by the most advanced space research models. Through partnering with agencies and institutions in the US and abroad, the CCMC strives to set up further data sharing agreements to the benefit of all participating institutions. In this presentation, we provide an overview of existing CCMC space weather services and products, and we will explore additional avenues for international collaborations.

  15. Space weather products at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesse, Michael

    In addition to supporting space research in the international community, the Community Co-ordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) has as its second objective to bring to apply the power of modern research models toward space weather specification and forecasting. Initially motivated by the objective to test models and to ease the transition of research models to space weather forecasting organization, the CCMC has developed a number of real-time modeling systems, as well as large number of modeling and data products for space weather forecasting. Over time, these activities have evolved into tailored products for partners, as well as into a direct support of the space weather needs within NASA robotic mission community. Accessible through a customizable interface, users within the US or at partnering institutions internationally have access to space weather tools driven by the most advanced space research models. Through partnering with agencies and institutions in the US and abroad, the CCMC strives to set up further data sharing agreements to the benefit of all participating institutions. In this presen-tation, we provide an overview of existing CCMC space weather services and products, and we will explore additional avenues for international collaborations.

  16. Development of operational models for space weather prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Siqing; Gong, Jiancun

    Since space weather prediction is currently at the stage of transition from human experience to objective forecasting methods, developing operational forecasting models becomes an important way to improve the capabilities of space weather service. As the existing theoretical models are not fully operational when it comes to space weather prediction, we carried out researches on developing operational models, considering the user needs for prediction of key elements in space environment, which have vital impacts on space assets security. We focused on solar activities, geomagnetic activities, high-energy particles, atmospheric density, plasma environment and so forth. Great progresses have been made in developing 3D dynamic asymmetric magnetopause model, plasma sheet energetic electron flux forecasting model and 400km-atmospheric density forecasting model, and also in the prediction of high-speed solar-wind streams from coronal holes and geomagnetic AE indices. Some of these models have already been running in the operational system of Space Environment Prediction Center, National Space Science Center (SEPC/NSSC). This presentation will introduce the research plans for space weather prediction in China, and current progresses of developing operational models and their applications in daily space weather services in SEPC/NSSC.

  17. A regressive storm model for extreme space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terkildsen, Michael; Steward, Graham; Neudegg, Dave; Marshall, Richard

    2012-07-01

    Extreme space weather events, while rare, pose significant risk to society in the form of impacts on critical infrastructure such as power grids, and the disruption of high end technological systems such as satellites and precision navigation and timing systems. There has been an increased focus on modelling the effects of extreme space weather, as well as improving the ability of space weather forecast centres to identify, with sufficient lead time, solar activity with the potential to produce extreme events. This paper describes the development of a data-based model for predicting the occurrence of extreme space weather events from solar observation. The motivation for this work was to develop a tool to assist space weather forecasters in early identification of solar activity conditions with the potential to produce extreme space weather, and with sufficient lead time to notify relevant customer groups. Data-based modelling techniques were used to construct the model, and an extensive archive of solar observation data used to train, optimise and test the model. The optimisation of the base model aimed to eliminate false negatives (missed events) at the expense of a tolerable increase in false positives, under the assumption of an iterative improvement in forecast accuracy during progression of the solar disturbance, as subsequent data becomes available.

  18. Advancing Space Weather Modeling Capabilities at the CCMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, M. Leila; Kuznetsova, Maria; Boblitt, Justin; Chulaki, Anna; MacNeice, Peter; Mendoza, Michelle; Mullinix, Richard; Pembroke, Asher; Pulkkinen, Antti; Rastaetter, Lutz; Shim, Ja Soon; Taktakishvili, Aleksandre; Wiegand, Chiu; Zheng, Yihua

    2016-04-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC, http://ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov) serves as a community access point to an expanding collection of state-of-the-art space environment models and as a hub for collaborative development on next generation of space weather forecasting systems. In partnership with model developers and the international research and operational communities, the CCMC integrates new data streams and models from diverse sources into end-to-end space weather predictive systems, identifies weak links in data-model & model-model coupling and leads community efforts to fill those gaps. The presentation will focus on the latest model installations at the CCMC and advances in CCMC-led community-wide model validation projects.

  19. Characteristics of Operational Space Weather Forecasting: Observations and Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Thomas; Viereck, Rodney; Singer, Howard; Onsager, Terry; Biesecker, Doug; Rutledge, Robert; Hill, Steven; Akmaev, Rashid; Milward, George; Fuller-Rowell, Tim

    2015-04-01

    In contrast to research observations, models and ground support systems, operational systems are characterized by real-time data streams and run schedules, with redundant backup systems for most elements of the system. We review the characteristics of operational space weather forecasting, concentrating on the key aspects of ground- and space-based observations that feed models of the coupled Sun-Earth system at the NOAA/Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC). Building on the infrastructure of the National Weather Service, SWPC is working toward a fully operational system based on the GOES weather satellite system (constant real-time operation with back-up satellites), the newly launched DSCOVR satellite at L1 (constant real-time data network with AFSCN backup), and operational models of the heliosphere, magnetosphere, and ionosphere/thermosphere/mesophere systems run on the Weather and Climate Operational Super-computing System (WCOSS), one of the worlds largest and fastest operational computer systems that will be upgraded to a dual 2.5 Pflop system in 2016. We review plans for further operational space weather observing platforms being developed in the context of the Space Weather Operations Research and Mitigation (SWORM) task force in the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) at the White House. We also review the current operational model developments at SWPC, concentrating on the differences between the research codes and the modified real-time versions that must run with zero fault tolerance on the WCOSS systems. Understanding the characteristics and needs of the operational forecasting community is key to producing research into the coupled Sun-Earth system with maximal societal benefit.

  20. Improving the physics models in the Space Weather Modeling Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, G.; Fang, F.; Frazin, R. A.; Gombosi, T. I.; Ilie, R.; Liemohn, M. W.; Manchester, W. B.; Meng, X.; Pawlowski, D. J.; Ridley, A. J.; Sokolov, I.; van der Holst, B.; Vichare, G.; Yigit, E.; Yu, Y.; Buzulukova, N.; Fok, M. H.; Glocer, A.; Jordanova, V. K.; Welling, D. T.; Zaharia, S. G.

    2010-12-01

    The success of physics based space weather forecasting depends on several factors: we need sufficient amount and quality of timely observational data, we have to understand the physics of the Sun-Earth system well enough, we need sophisticated computational models, and the models have to run faster than real time on the available computational resources. This presentation will focus on a single ingredient, the recent improvements of the mathematical and numerical models in the Space Weather Modeling Framework. We have developed a new physics based CME initiation code using flux emergence from the convection zone solving the equations of radiative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Our new lower corona and solar corona models use electron heat conduction, Alfven wave heating, and boundary conditions based on solar tomography. We can obtain a physically consistent solar wind model from the surface of the Sun all the way to the L1 point without artificially changing the polytropic index. The global magnetosphere model can now solve the multi-ion MHD equations and take into account the oxygen outflow from the polar wind model. We have also added the options of solving for Hall MHD and anisotropic pressure. Several new inner magnetosphere models have been added to the framework: CRCM, HEIDI and RAM-SCB. These new models resolve the pitch angle distribution of the trapped particles. The upper atmosphere model GITM has been improved by including a self-consistent equatorial electrodynamics and the effects of solar flares. This presentation will very briefly describe the developments and highlight some results obtained with the improved and new models.

  1. Community Coordinated Modeling Center: A Powerful Resource in Space Science and Space Weather Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chulaki, A.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Rastaetter, L.; MacNeice, P. J.; Shim, J. S.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Taktakishvili, A.; Mays, M. L.; Mendoza, A. M. M.; Zheng, Y.; Mullinix, R.; Collado-Vega, Y. M.; Maddox, M. M.; Pembroke, A. D.; Wiegand, C.

    2015-12-01

    Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a NASA affiliated interagency partnership with the primary goal of aiding the transition of modern space science models into space weather forecasting while supporting space science research. Additionally, over the past ten years it has established itself as a global space science education resource supporting undergraduate and graduate education and research, and spreading space weather awareness worldwide. A unique combination of assets, capabilities and close ties to the scientific and educational communities enable this small group to serve as a hub for raising generations of young space scientists and engineers. CCMC resources are publicly available online, providing unprecedented global access to the largest collection of modern space science models (developed by the international research community). CCMC has revolutionized the way simulations are utilized in classrooms settings, student projects, and scientific labs and serves hundreds of educators, students and researchers every year. Another major CCMC asset is an expert space weather prototyping team primarily serving NASA's interplanetary space weather needs. Capitalizing on its unrivaled capabilities and experiences, the team provides in-depth space weather training to students and professionals worldwide, and offers an amazing opportunity for undergraduates to engage in real-time space weather monitoring, analysis, forecasting and research. In-house development of state-of-the-art space weather tools and applications provides exciting opportunities to students majoring in computer science and computer engineering fields to intern with the software engineers at the CCMC while also learning about the space weather from the NASA scientists.

  2. RBSP Space Weather data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, M.; Fox, N. J.; Mauk, B. H.; Barnes, R. J.; Potter, M.; Romeo, G.; Smith, D.

    2012-12-01

    On August 23, 2012, NASA will launch two identical probes into the radiation belts to provide unprecedented insight into the physical processes and dynamics of near-Earth space. The RBSP mission in addition to the scientific data return, provides a 1Kbps real-time space weather broadcast data in support of real time space weather modeling, forecast and prediction efforts. Networks of ground stations have been identified to downlink the space weather data. The RBSP instrument suites have selected space weather data to be broadcast from their collected space data on board the spacecraft, a subset from measurements based on information normally available to the instrument. The data subset includes particle fluxes at a variety of energies, and magnetic and electric field data. This selected space weather data is broadcast at all times through the primary spacecraft science downlink antennas when an observatory is not in a primary mission-related ground contact. The collected data will resolve important scientific issues and help researchers develop and improve various models for the radiation belts that can be used by forecasters to predict space weather phenomena and alert astronauts and spacecraft operators to potential hazards. The near real-time data from RBSP will be available to monitor and analyze current environmental conditions, forecast natural environmental changes and support anomaly resolution. The space weather data will be available on the RBSP Science Gateway at http://athena.jhuapl.edu/ and will provide access to the space weather data received from the RBSP real-time space weather broadcast. The near real-time data will be calibrated and displayed on the web as soon as possible. The CCMC will ingest the RBSP space weather data into real-time models. The raw space weather data will be permanently archived at APL. This presentation will provide a first look at RBSP space weather data products.

  3. Community Modeling Program for Space Weather: A CCMC Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael

    2009-01-01

    A community modeling program, which provides a forum for exchange and integration between modelers, has excellent potential for furthering our Space Weather modeling and forecasting capabilities. The design of such a program is of great importance to its success. In this presentation, we will argue that the most effective community modeling program should be focused on Space Weather-related objectives, and that it should be open and inclusive. The tremendous successes of prior community research activities further suggest that the most effective implementation of a new community modeling program should be based on community leadership, rather than on domination by individual institutions or centers. This presentation will provide an experience-based justification for these conclusions.

  4. Radiation Belt Environment Model: Application to Space Weather and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching H.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics and variability of the radiation belts are of great scientific and space weather significance. A physics-based Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model has been developed to simulate and predict the radiation particle intensities. The RBE model considers the influences from the solar wind, ring current and plasmasphere. It takes into account the particle drift in realistic, time-varying magnetic and electric field, and includes diffusive effects of wave-particle interactions with various wave modes in the magnetosphere. The RBE model has been used to perform event studies and real-time prediction of energetic electron fluxes. In this talk, we will describe the RBE model equation, inputs and capabilities. Recent advancement in space weather application and artificial radiation belt study will be discussed as well.

  5. Transitioning Space Weather Models Into Operations: The Basic Building Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo-Pradere, Eduardo A.

    2009-10-01

    New and improved space weather models that provide real-time or near-real time operational awareness to the long list of customers that the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) serves are critically needed. Recognizing this, SWPC recently established a Developmental Testbed Center (DTC [see Kumar, 2009]) at which models will be vetted for operational use. What characteristics should models have if they are to survive this transition? The difficulties around the implementation of real-time models are many. From the stability of the data input (frequently coming from third parties) to the elevated information technology (IT) security atmosphere present everywhere, scientists and developers are confronting a series of challenges in the implementation of their models. Quinn et al. [2009] noted that “the transition challenges are numerous and require ongoing interaction between model developers and users.” However, the 2006 Report of the Assessment Committee for the National Space Weather Program (NSWP; see http://www.nswp.gov/nswp_acreport0706.pdf) found that “there is an absence of suitable connection[s] for ‘academia-to-operations’ knowledge transfer and for the transition of research to operations in general.”

  6. The ESA Virtual Space Weather Modelling Centre - Phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poedts, Stefaan

    The ESA ITT project (AO/1-6738/11/NL/AT) to develop Phase 1 of a Virtual Space Weather Modelling Centre has the following objectives and scope: 1. The construction of a long term (~10 yrs) plan for the future development of a European virtual space weather modelling centre consisting of a new ‘open’ and distributed framework for the coupling of physics based models for space weather phenomena; 2. The assessment of model capabilities and the amount of work required to make them operational by integrating them in this framework and the identification of computing and networking requirements to do so. 3. The design of a system to enable models and other components to be installed locally or geographically distributed and the creation of a validation plan including a system of metrics for testing results. The consortium that took up this challenge involves: 1)the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Prime Contractor, coordinator: Prof. S. Poedts); 2) the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA-IASB); 3) the Royal Observatory of Belgium (ROB); 4) the Von Karman Institute (VKI); 5) DH Consultancy (DHC); 6) Space Applications Services (SAS). The project started on May 14 2012, and will finish in May 2014. Thus, by the time of the meeting, both Phase 1A and Phase 1B (the development of the prototype) will be finished. The final report will be presented incl. the architecture decisions made, the framework, the current models integrated already as well as the model couplers installed. The prototype VSWMC will be demonstrated.

  7. The Space Weather Reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kihn, E. A.; Ridley, A. J.; Zhizhin, M.

    2002-12-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a complete 11 year space weather representation using physically consistent data-driven space weather models. The project will create a consistent, integrated historical record of the near Earth space environment by coupling observational data from space environmental monitoring systems archived at NGDC with data-driven, physically based numerical models. The resulting product will be an enhanced look at the space environment on consistent grids, time resolution, coordinate systems and containing key fields allowing an interested user to quickly and easily incorporate the impact of the near-Earth space climate in environmentally sensitive models. Currently there are no easily accessible long term climate archives available for the space-weather environment. Just as with terrestrial weather it is crucial to understand both daily weather forecasts as well as long term climate changes, so this project will demonstrate the ability to generate a meaningful and physically derived space weather climatology. The results of this project strongly support the DOD's Environmental Scenario Generator (ESG) project. The ESG project provides tools for intellegent data mining, classification and event detection which could be applied to a historical space-weather database. The two projects together provide a suite of tools for the user interested in modeling the effect of the near-earth space environment. We will present results and methodologies developed during the first two years of effort in the project.

  8. Space Weather Models, Tools and Services at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsova, M. M.; Hesse, M.; Maddox, M.; Rastaetter, L.; Berrios, D.; Pulkkinen, A.; Zheng, Y.; MacNeice, P. J.; Shim, J.; Takakishvili, A.; Chulaki, A.

    2010-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling center (CCMC) is a multi-agency partnership to support the research and developmental work necessary to substantially increase space weather modeling capabilities and to facilitate advanced models deployment in forecasting operations. The CCMC conducts unbiased model testing and validation and evaluates model readiness for operational environment. Space weather models and coupled model chains hosted at the CCMC range from the solar corona to the Earth's upper atmosphere. CCMC has developed a number of real-time modeling systems, as well as a large number of modeling and data products tailored to address the space weather needs of NASA's robotic missions. The presentation will demonstrate the rapid progress towards development the system allowing using products derived from space weather models in applications associated with National Space Weather needs. The adaptable Integrated Space Weather Analysis (ISWA) System developed at CCMC for NASA-relevant space weather information combines forecasts based on advanced space weather models hosted at CCMC with concurrent space environment information. The system is also enabling post-impact analysis and flexible dissemination of space weather information.

  9. Prevention of Spacecraft Anomalies: The Role of Space Climate and Space Weather Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet L.

    2003-01-01

    Space-based systems are developing into critical infrastructure to support the quality of life on Earth. Mission requirements along with rapidly evolving technologies have outpaced efforts to accommodate detrimental space environment impacts on systems. This chapter describes approaches to accommodate space climate and space weather impacts on systems and notes areas where gaps in model development limit our ability to prevent spacecraft anomalies.

  10. Application of thermospheric general circulation models for space weather operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller-Rowell, T.; Minter, C.; Codrescu, M.

    Solar irradiance is the dominant source of heat, ionization, and dissociation of the thermosphere, and to a large extent drives the global dynamics, and controls the neutral composition and density structure. Neutral composition is important for space weather applications because of its impact on ionospheric loss rates, and neutral density is critical for satellite drag prediction. The future for thermospheric general circulation models for space weather operations lies in their use as state propagators in data assimilation techniques. The physical models can match empirical models in accuracy provided accurate drivers are available, but their true value comes when combined with data in an optimal way. Two such applications have recently been developed. The first utilizes a Kalman filter to combine space-based observation of airglow with physical model predictions to produce global maps of neutral composition. The output of the filter will be used within the GAIM (Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurement) model developed under a parallel effort. The second filter uses satellite tracking and remote sensing data for specification of neutral density. Both applications rely on accurate estimates of the solar EUV and magnetospheric drivers.

  11. Space Weather Education: Learning to Forecast at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wold, A.

    2015-12-01

    Enhancing space weather education is important to space science endeavors. While participating in the Space Weather Research, Education and Development Initiative (SW REDI) Bootcamp and working as a Space Weather Analyst Intern, several innovative technologies and tools were integral to my learning and understanding of space weather analysis and forecasting. Two of the tools utilized in learning about space weather were the Integrated Space Weather Analysis System (iSWA) and the Space Weather Database Of Notifications, Knowledge, Information (DONKI). iSWA, a web-based dissemination system, hosts many state-of-the-art space weather models as well as real time space weather data from spacecraft such as Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Advanced Composition Explorer. As a customizable tool that operates in real-time while providing access also to historical data, iSWA proved essential in my understanding the drivers and impacts of space weather. DONKI was instrumental in accessing historical space weather events to understand the connections between solar phenomena and their effects on Earth environments. DONKI operates as a database of space weather events including linkages between causes and effects of space weather events. iSWA and DONKI are tools available also to the public. They not only enrich the space weather learning process but also allow researchers and model developers access to essential heliophysics and magnetospheric data.

  12. Space Weathering of Olivine: Samples, Experiments and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Berger, E. L.; Christoffersen, R.

    2016-01-01

    Olivine is a major constituent of chondritic bodies and its response to space weathering processes likely dominates the optical properties of asteroid regoliths (e.g. S- and many C-type asteroids). Analyses of olivine in returned samples and laboratory experiments provide details and insights regarding the mechanisms and rates of space weathering. Analyses of olivine grains from lunar soils and asteroid Itokawa reveal that they display solar wind damaged rims that are typically not amorphized despite long surface exposure ages, which are inferred from solar flare track densities (up to 10 (sup 7 y)). The olivine damaged rim width rapidly approaches approximately 120 nm in approximately 10 (sup 6 y) and then reaches steady-state with longer exposure times. The damaged rims are nanocrystalline with high dislocation densities, but crystalline order exists up to the outermost exposed surface. Sparse nanophase Fe metal inclusions occur in the damaged rims and are believed to be produced during irradiation through preferential sputtering of oxygen from the rims. The observed space weathering effects in lunar and Itokawa olivine grains are difficult to reconcile with laboratory irradiation studies and our numerical models that indicate that olivine surfaces should readily blister and amorphize on relatively short time scales (less than 10 (sup 3 y)). These results suggest that it is not just the ion fluence alone, but other variable, the ion flux that controls the type and extent of irradiation damage that develops in olivine. This flux dependence argues for caution in extrapolating between high flux laboratory experiments and the natural case. Additional measurements, experiments, and modeling are required to resolve the discrepancies among the observations and calculations involving solar wind processing of olivine.

  13. #9 Using STEREO/SDO Data to Model Space Weather

    NASA Video Gallery

    The critical observations from STEREO and SDO will help provide accurate and timely space weather storm warnings, and will aid greatly in our efforts to protect the technologies we have become so d...

  14. Models and applications for space weather forecasting and analysis at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Maria

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC, http://ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov) was established at the dawn of the new millennium as a long-term flexible solution to the problem of transition of progress in space environment modeling to operational space weather forecasting. CCMC hosts an expanding collection of state-of-the-art space weather models developed by the international space science community. Over the years the CCMC acquired the unique experience in preparing complex models and model chains for operational environment and developing and maintaining custom displays and powerful web-based systems and tools ready to be used by researchers, space weather service providers and decision makers. In support of space weather needs of NASA users CCMC is developing highly-tailored applications and services that target specific orbits or locations in space and partnering with NASA mission specialists on linking CCMC space environment modeling with impacts on biological and technological systems in space. Confidence assessment of model predictions is an essential element of space environment modeling. CCMC facilitates interaction between model owners and users in defining physical parameters and metrics formats relevant to specific applications and leads community efforts to quantify models ability to simulate and predict space environment events. Interactive on-line model validation systems developed at CCMC make validation a seamless part of model development circle. The talk will showcase innovative solutions for space weather research, validation, anomaly analysis and forecasting and review on-going community-wide model validation initiatives enabled by CCMC applications.

  15. Space Weather Forecasting at NASA GSFC Space Weather Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Pulkkinen, A.; Maddox, M. M.; Taktakishvili, A.; Mays, M. L.; Chulaki, A.; Lee, H.; Hesse, M.; Evans, R. M.; Berrios, D.; Mullinix, R.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA GSFC Space Weather Research Center (http://swrc.gsfc.nasa.gov) is committed to providing research forecasts and notifications to address NASA's space weather needs - in addition to its critical role in space weather education. We provide a host of services including spacecraft anomaly resolution, historical impact analysis, real-time monitoring and forecasting, tailored space weather alerts and products, weekly summaries and reports, and most recently - video casts. In this presentation, we will focus on how near real-time data (both in space and on ground), in combination with modeling capabilities and an innovative dissemination system called the Integrated Space Weather Analysis System (iSWA http://iswa.gsfc.nasa.gov), enable space weather forecasting and quality space weather products provided by our Center. A few critical near real-time data streams for space weather forecasting will be identified and discussed.

  16. Transitioning Models and Model Output to Space Weather Operations: Challenges and Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Berrios, David; Chulaki, Anna; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; MacNeice, Peter J.; Maddox, Mario; Rastaetter, Lutz; Taktakishvili, Aleksandre

    2009-01-01

    The transition of space weather models or of information derived from space weather models to space weather forecasting is the last step of the chain from model development to model deployment in forecasting operations. As such, it is an extremely important element of the quest to increase our national capability to forecast and mitigate space weather hazards. It involves establishing customer requirements, and analyses of available models, which are, in principle, capable of delivering the required product. Models will have to be verified and validated prior to a selection of the best performing model. Further considerations include operational hardware, and the availability of data streams to drive the model. The final steps include the education of forecasters, and the implementation on gateway hardware prior to operational use. This presentation will provide a discussion of opportunities for rapid progress from the viewpoint of the Community Coordinated Modeling Center.

  17. Overview of NASA MSFC and UAH Space Weather Modeling and Data Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Linda Neergaard

    2016-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center, along with its industry and academia neighbors, has a long history of space environment model development and testing. Space weather efforts include research, testing, model development, environment definition, anomaly investigation, and operational support. This presentation will highlight a few of the current space weather activities being performed at Marshall and through collaborative efforts with University of Alabama in Huntsville scientists.

  18. Operational Space Weather Models: Trials, Tribulations and Rewards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunk, R. W.; Scherliess, L.; Sojka, J. J.; Thompson, D. C.; Zhu, L.

    2009-12-01

    There are many empirical, physics-based, and data assimilation models that can probably be used for space weather applications and the models cover the entire domain from the surface of the Sun to the Earth’s surface. At Utah State University we developed two physics-based data assimilation models of the terrestrial ionosphere as part of a program called Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements (GAIM). One of the data assimilation models is now in operational use at the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA) in Omaha, Nebraska. This model is a Gauss-Markov Kalman Filter (GAIM-GM) model, and it uses a physics-based model of the ionosphere and a Kalman filter as a basis for assimilating a diverse set of real-time (or near real-time) measurements. The physics-based model is the Ionosphere Forecast Model (IFM), which is global and covers the E-region, F-region, and topside ionosphere from 90 to 1400 km. It takes account of five ion species (NO+, O2+, N2+, O+, H+), but the main output of the model is a 3-dimensional electron density distribution at user specified times. The second data assimilation model uses a physics-based Ionosphere-Plasmasphere Model (IPM) and an ensemble Kalman filter technique as a basis for assimilating a diverse set of real-time (or near real-time) measurements. This Full Physics model (GAIM-FP) is global, covers the altitude range from 90 to 30,000 km, includes six ions (NO+, O2+, N2+, O+, H+, He+), and calculates the self-consistent ionospheric drivers (electric fields and neutral winds). The GAIM-FP model is scheduled for delivery in 2012. Both of these GAIM models assimilate bottom-side Ne profiles from a variable number of ionosondes, slant TEC from a variable number of ground GPS/TEC stations, in situ Ne from four DMSP satellites, line-of-sight UV emissions measured by satellites, and occultation data. Quality control algorithms for all of the data types are provided as an integral part of the GAIM models and these models take account of

  19. Space Weather Forecasting and Research at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronne, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Space Weather Research Center (SWRC), within the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC), provides experimental research forecasts and analysis for NASA's robotic mission operators. Space weather conditions are monitored to provide advance warning and forecasts based on observations and modeling using the integrated Space Weather Analysis Network (iSWA). Space weather forecasters come from a variety of backgrounds, ranging from modelers to astrophysicists to undergraduate students. This presentation will discuss space weather operations and research from an undergraduate perspective. The Space Weather Research, Education, and Development Initiative (SW REDI) is the starting point for many undergraduate opportunities in space weather forecasting and research. Space weather analyst interns play an active role year-round as entry-level space weather analysts. Students develop the technical and professional skills to forecast space weather through a summer internship that includes a two week long space weather boot camp, mentorship, poster session, and research opportunities. My unique development of research projects includes studying high speed stream events as well as a study of 20 historic, high-impact solar energetic particle events. This unique opportunity to combine daily real-time analysis with related research prepares students for future careers in Heliophysics.

  20. Space Weather Models - What They Can and Cannot Do.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacNeice, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    For more than 10 years, the CCMC has been hosting and testing almost all of the models currently used for space weather forecasting, and those in the pipeline for future use. This puts us in a unique position to review their capabilities, identify strengths and weaknesses, and project the arrival in the operational forecasting theatre of new, more accurate and more comprehensive forecasting tools. In this talk we will review the current status of forecasting models, focussing on those for the solar corona and inner heliosphere, including their impact on the Earth's magnetosphere. We will identify their capabilities and weaknesses. We will discuss how these weaknesses may be addressed in the near and mid-term, with new models, model updates and new supporting tools. We will assess the expected use of time dependent assimilative models of photospheric magnetic field and of time dependent high resolution and high cadence vector magnetograms on near term heliophysical model development. We will also discuss a web based semi-automated model validation project which the modeling community has been developing.

  1. Enabling Space Weather research, analysis, and forecasting at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddox, M. M.; Hesse, M.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Chulaki, A.; Rastaetter, L.; Berrios, D.; Pulkkinen, A.; Zheng, Y.; Mullinix, R.; MacNeice, P. J.; Taktakishvili, A.; Mendoza, A. M.; Shim, J.; Bakshi, S. S.; Patel, K. D.; Lee, H.; Donti, N.; Boblitt, J.; Lasota, J.; Zhou, P.; Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    2011-12-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center ( CCMC ) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Space Weather Laboratory is dedicated to enabling and performing research, analysis, and forecasting of both large-scale and local space environments. To accurately specify and forecast the space environment, the CCMC employs the use of a comprehensive collection of physics-based models that cover the entire space weather domain from the sun to the earth. The CCMC's utilization of advanced space weather models, coupled with data from NASA and other missions and facilities, creates a unique and data-rich environment that allows the group to provide a host of space weather products and services. The distribution of scientific research data is at the heart of the CCMC - which has two core goals: (1) facilitate community research and (2) address national space weather needs. These goals are being achieved by providing access to space weather model simulations, model output data, advanced visualization tools, and real-time space weather tools/products. These services cater to a wide audience ranging from expert plasma physicists who execute simulations on CCMC super computers, to citizen scientists who monitor space weather in real-time on CCMC developed mobile applications. This paper will present an overview of CCMC services, and outline some of the technical challenges and design patterns employed by the CCMC in distributing space weather resources.

  2. Cone Model for Halo CMEs: Application to Space Weather Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Hong; Ofman, Leon; Lawrence, Gareth

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we present an innovative analytical method to determine the angular width and propagation orientation of halo Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). The relation of CME actual speed with apparent speed and its components measured at different position angle has been investigated. The present work is based on the cone model proposed by Zhao et al. We have improved this model by: (1) eliminating the ambiguity via a new analytical approach, (2) using direct measurements of projection onto the plane of the sky (POS), and (3) determining the actual radial speeds from projection speeds at different position angles to clarify the uncertainty of projection speeds in previous empirical models. Our analytical approach allows us to use coronagraph data to determine accurately the geometrical features of POS projections, such as major axis, minor axis, and the displacement of the center of its projection, and to determine the angular width and orientation of a given halo CME. Our approach allows for the first time the determination of the actual CME speed, width, and source location by using coronagraph data quantitatively and consistently. The method greatly enhances the accuracy of the derived geometrical and kinematical properties of halo CMEs, and can be used to optimize Space Weather forecasts. The applied model predications are in good agreement with observations.

  3. Space Weather Services of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, KiChang; Kim, Jae-Hun; Kim, Young Yun; Kwon, Yongki; Wi, Gwan-sik

    2016-07-01

    The Korean Space Weather Center (KSWC) of the National Radio Research Agency (RRA) is a government agency which is the official source of space weather information for Korean Government and the primary action agency of emergency measure to severe space weather condition. KSWC's main role is providing alerts, watches, and forecasts in order to minimize the space weather impacts on both of public and commercial sectors of satellites, aviation, communications, navigations, power grids, and etc. KSWC is also in charge of monitoring the space weather condition and conducting research and development for its main role of space weather operation in Korea. In this study, we will present KSWC's recent efforts on development of application-oriented space weather research products and services on user needs, and introduce new international collaborative projects, such as IPS-Driven Enlil model, DREAM model estimating electron in satellite orbit, global network of DSCOVR and STEREO satellites tracking, and ARMAS (Automated Radiation Measurement for Aviation Safety).

  4. Accessing Space Weather Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, D.; Weiss, M.; Immer, E. A.; Patrone, D.; Potter, M.; Barnes, R. J.; Colclough, C.; Holder, R.

    2009-12-01

    To meet the needs of our technology based society, space weather forecasting needs to be advanced and this will entail collaboration amongst research, military and commercial communities to find new ways to understand, characterize, and forecast. In this presentation VITMO, the Virtual Ionosphere-Thermosphere-Mesosphere Observatory will be used as a prototype for a generalized system as a means to bring together a set of tools to access data, models and online collaboration tools to enable rapid progress. VITMO, available at http://vitmo.jhuapl.edu/, currently provides a data access portal for researchers and scientists to enable finding data products as well as access to tools and models. To further the needs of space weather forecasters, the existing VITMO data holdings need to be expanded to provide additional datasets as well as integrating relevant models and model output. VITMO can easily be adapted for the Space Weather domain in its entirety. In this presentation, we will demonstrate how VITMO and the VITMO architecture can be utilized as a prototype in support of integration of Space Weather forecasting tools, models and data.

  5. Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC): Providing Access to Space Weather Models and Research Support Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chulaki, A.; Bakshi, S. S.; Berrios, D.; Hesse, M.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Lee, H.; MacNeice, P. J.; Mendoza, A. M.; Mullinix, R.; Patel, K. D.; Pulkkinen, A.; Rastaetter, L.; Shim, J.; Taktakishvili, A.; Zheng, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center at NASA, Goddard Space flight Center, provides access to state-of-the-art space weather models to the research community. The majority of the models residing at the CCMC are comprehensive computationally intensive physics-based models. The CCMC also provides free services and tools to assist the research community in analyzing the results from the space weather model simulations. We present an overview of the available tools and services at the CCMC: the Runs-On-Request system, the online visualization, the Kameleon access and interpolation library and the Metrics Challenge tools suite.

  6. Tools and Products of Real-Time Modeling: Opportunities for Space Weather Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a US inter-agency activity aiming at research in support of the generation of advanced space weather models. As one of its main functions, the CCMC provides to researchers the use of space science models, even if they are not model owners themselves. The second CCMC activity is to support Space Weather forecasting at national Space Weather Forecasting Centers. This second activity involves model evaluations, model transitions to operations, and the development of draft Space Weather forecasting tools. This presentation will focus on the last element. Specifically, we will discuss present capabilities, and the potential to derive further tools. These capabilities will be interpreted in the context of a broad-based, bootstrapping activity for modern Space Weather forecasting.

  7. Space Weather Services of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, K.; Hong, S.; Park, S.; Kim, Y. Y.; Wi, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Korean Space Weather Center (KSWC) of the National Radio Research Agency (RRA) is a government agency which is the official source of space weather information for Korean Government and the primary action agency of emergency measure to severe space weather condition. KSWC's main role is providing alerts, watches, and forecasts in order to minimize the space weather impacts on both of public and commercial sectors of satellites, aviation, communications, navigations, power grids, and etc. KSWC is also in charge of monitoring the space weather condition and conducting research and development for its main role of space weather operation in Korea. In this study, we will present KSWC's recent efforts on development of application-oriented space weather research products and services on user needs, and introduce new international collaborative projects, such as IPS-Driven Enlil model, global network of DSCOVR and STEREO satellites tracking, and ARMAS (Automated Radiation Measurement for Aviation Safety).

  8. NASA Space Weather Center Services: Potential for Space Weather Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Yihua; Kuznetsova, Masha; Pulkkinen, Antti; Taktakishvili, A.; Mays, M. L.; Chulaki, A.; Lee, H.; Hesse, M.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Space Weather Center's primary objective is to provide the latest space weather information and forecasting for NASA's robotic missions and its partners and to bring space weather knowledge to the public. At the same time, the tools and services it possesses can be invaluable for research purposes. Here we show how our archive and real-time modeling of space weather events can aid research in a variety of ways, with different classification criteria. We will list and discuss major CME events, major geomagnetic storms, and major SEP events that occurred during the years 2010 - 2012. Highlights of major tools/resources will be provided.

  9. Community Coordinated Modeling Center: Paving the Way for Progress in Space Science Research to Operational Space Weather Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, M. M.; Maddox, M. M.; Mays, M. L.; Mullinix, R.; MacNeice, P. J.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Rastaetter, L.; Shim, J.; Taktakishvili, A.; Zheng, Y.; Wiegand, C.

    2013-12-01

    Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) was established at the dawn of the millennium as an essential element on the National Space Weather Program. One of the CCMC goals was to pave the way for progress in space science research to operational space weather forecasting. Over the years the CCMC acquired the unique experience in preparing complex models and model chains for operational environment, in developing and maintaining powerful web-based tools and systems ready to be used by space weather service providers and decision makers as well as in space weather prediction capabilities assessments. The presentation will showcase latest innovative solutions for space weather research, analysis, forecasting and validation and review on-going community-wide initiatives enabled by CCMC applications.

  10. Space weather circulation model of plasma clouds as background radiation medium of space environment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalu, A. E.

    A model for Space Weather (SW) Circulation with Plasma Clouds as background radiation medium of Space Environment has been proposed and discussed. Major characteristics of the model are outlined and the model assumes a baroclinic Space Environment in view of observed pronounced horizontal electron temperature gradient with prevailing weak vertical temperature gradient. The primary objective of the study is to be able to monitor and realistically predict on real- or near real-time SW and Space Storms (SWS) affecting human economic systems on Earth as well as the safety and Physiologic comfort of human payload in Space Environment in relation to planned increase in human space flights especially with reference to the ISS Space Shuttle Taxi (ISST) Programme and other prolonged deep Space Missions. Although considerable discussions are now available in the literature on SW issues, routine Meteorological operational applications of SW forecast data and information for Space Environment are still yet to receive adequate attention. The paper attempts to fill this gap in the literature of SW. The paper examines the sensitivity and variability in 3-D continuum of Plasmas in response to solar radiation inputs into the magnetosphere under disturbed Sun condition. Specifically, the presence of plasma clouds in the form of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) is stressed as a major source of danger to Space crews, spacecraft instrumentation and architecture charging problems as well as impacts on numerous radiation - sensitive human economic systems on Earth. Finally, the paper considers the application of model results in the form of effective monitoring of each of the two major phases of manned Spaceflights - take-off and re-entry phases where all-time assessment of spacecraft transient ambient micro-incabin and outside Space Environment is vital for all manned Spaceflights as recently evidenced by the loss of vital information during take-off of the February 1, 2003 US Columbia

  11. Access to space weather model data provided by the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chulaki, A.; Berrios, D.; Hesse, M.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; MacNeice, P. J.; Maddox, M.; Rastaetter, L.; Taktakishvili, A.

    2009-12-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC), located at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, provides access to state-of-the-art space weather models to the research community. The majority of the models residing at the CCMC are comprehensive, computationally intensive physics-based models. The CCMC provides access to output of performed model runs through a searchable and sortable online database and offers services and tools to assist the research community in analyzing results from space weather model simulations. Virtual Observatories can provide access to model output for corresponding events using the CCMC run database and interface. CCMC is planning to expand its database of run information to improve the service to users as well as its connection with VOs.

  12. Space Weather Data Dissemination Tools from the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donti, N.; Berrios, D.; Boblitt, J.; LaSota, J.; Maddox, M. M.; Mullinix, R.; Hesse, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has developed new space weather data dissemination products. These include a Java-based conversion software for space weather simulation data, an interactive and customizable timeline tool for time series data, and Android phone and tablet versions of the NASA Space Weather App for mobile devices. We highlight the new features of all the updated services, discuss the back-end capabilities required to realize these services, and talk about future services in development.

  13. Discussion Part 2: Metrics and Validation Needs for Space Weather Models and Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Alexi; Onsager, Terrance; Kuznetsova, Maria; Bingham, Suzy

    2016-07-01

    We invite the space weather community to contribute to a discussion on the main themes of this PSW1 event, with the aim of identifying and prioritising key issues and formulating recommendations and guidelines for policy makers, stakeholders, and data and service providers. This event particularly encourages dialogue between modellers, application developers, service providers and users of space weather products and services in order to review the state of model and service validation activities, to build upon successes, to identify challenges, and to develop a strategy for continuous assessment of space weather predictive capabilities and tracing the improvement over time, as recommended in the COSPAR Space Weather Roadmap. We discuss space weather verification & validation needs for the current generation of activities under development and in planning globally, together with perspectives for modellers and scientific community to further participate in the space weather endeavour. All Assembly participants are welcome to participate in this PSW discussion session and all are invited to submit input for the discussion to the authors ahead of the Assembly. The discussion will take place in two parts at the start and end of the PSW1 event. It is intended that the outcome of these discussion sessions will be formulated as a panel position paper on metrics and validation needs for space weather models and services.

  14. Introduction and Discussion Part 1: Metrics and Validation Needs for Space Weather Models and Services.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Alexi; Onsager, Terrance; Kuznetsova, Maria; Bingham, Suzy

    2016-07-01

    We invite the space weather community to contribute to a discussion on the main themes of this PSW1 event, with the aim of identifying and prioritising key issues and formulating recommendations and guidelines for policy makers, stakeholders, and data and service providers. This event particularly encourages dialogue between modellers, application developers, service providers and users of space weather products and services in order to review the state of model and service validation activities, to build upon successes, to identify challenges, and to develop a strategy for continuous assessment of space weather predictive capabilities and tracing the improvement over time, as recommended in the COSPAR Space Weather Roadmap. We discuss space weather verification & validation needs for the current generation of activities under development and in planning globally, together with perspectives for modellers and scientific community to further participate in the space weather endeavour. All Assembly participants are welcome to participate in this PSW discussion session and all are invited to submit input for the discussion to the authors ahead of the Assembly. The discussion will take place in two parts at the start and end of the PSW1 event. It is intended that the outcome of these discussion sessions will be formulated as a panel position paper on metrics and validation needs for space weather models and services.

  15. Innovative Tools and Systems Addressing Space Weather Needs Developed By the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddox, M. M.; Wiegand, C.; Mullinix, R.; Mays, M. L.; Chulaki, A.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Zheng, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has always been a pioneer in utilizing and developing innovative systems and tools in addressing the needs of the space weather community. This paper intends to introduce some of our cutting edge systems and tools that are available to everyone in the community. An important objective of the CCMC is to prototype, validate, and compare various methods for CME arrival predictions. As such, CCMC has developed three web based CME specific tools with the goal of facilitating advanced analysis and collaboration within the space weather community. The three tools we highlight in this abstract are: Stereoscopic CME Analysis Tool (StereoCAT), WSA-ENLIL+Cone Fast Track, and Space Weather Scoreboard. These three tools allow making CME measurements, executing space weather simulations in near real-time, and providing a systematic way for the scientific community to record and compare predictions both prior to, and after CME arrivals at near Earth. In order to address the space weather needs of NASA missions and encourage collaboration between various groups, CCMC has developed a web based system called the Space Weather Database Of Notifications, Knowledge, Information (SW DONKI). SW DONKI serves as an archive of all space weather activities including: flares, CMEs (including simulations), SEPs, and geomagnetic storms. An innovative feature of the system is the ability to generate, modify, and store complex linkages between activities - creating a comprehensive network of relationships between activities, and identifying potential cause-and-effect paradigms for each space weather "event". SW DONKI also provides public access to all human generated event analysis and other notifications produced by the Space Weather Research Center (SWRC) forecasting team.

  16. Space Weathering of Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Space weathering discussions have generally centered around soils but exposed rocks will also incur the effects of weathering. On the Moon, rocks make up only a very small percentage of the exposed surface and areas where rocks are exposed, like central peaks, are often among the least space weathered regions we find in remote sensing data. However, our studies of weathered Ap 17 rocks 76015 and 76237 show that significant amounts of weathering products can build up on rock surfaces. Because rocks have much longer surface lifetimes than an individual soil grain, and thus record a longer history of exposure, we can study these products to gain a deeper perspective on the weathering process and better assess the relative impo!1ance of various weathering components on the Moon. In contrast to the lunar case, on small asteroids, like Itokowa, rocks make up a large fraction of the exposed surface. Results from the Hayabusa spacecraft at Itokowa suggest that while the low gravity does not allow for the development of a mature regolith, weathering patinas can and do develop on rock surfaces, in fact, the rocky surfaces were seen to be darker and appear spectrally more weathered than regions with finer materials. To explore how weathering of asteroidal rocks may differ from lunar, a set of ordinary chondrite meteorites (H, L, and LL) which have been subjected to artificial space weathering by nanopulse laser were examined by TEM. NpFe(sup 0) bearing glasses were ubiquitous in both the naturally-weathered lunar and the artificially-weathered meteorite samples.

  17. Ensemble Modeling with Data Assimilation Models: A New Strategy for Space Weather Science, Specifications and Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunk, R. W.; Scherliess, L.; Eccles, J. V.; Gardner, L. C.; Sojka, J. J.; Zhu, L.; Pi, X.; Mannucci, A.; Wilson, B. D.; Komjathy, A.; Wang, C.; Rosen, G.; Tobiska, W.; Schaefer, R. K.; Paxton, L. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Earth's Ionosphere-Thermosphere-Electrodynamics (I-T-E) system varies markedly on a range of spatial and temporal scales and these variations can have adverse effects on human operations and systems. Consequently, there is a need to both mitigate and forecast near-Earth space weather. Following the meteorologists, our goal is to specify and forecast the global I-T-E system with data assimilation models, because they are reliable and the models are already available. Currently, our team has first-principles-based data assimilation models for the ionosphere, ionosphere-plasmasphere, thermosphere, high-latitude ionosphere-electrodynamics, and mid-low latitude ionosphere-electrodynamics. These models assimilate a myriad of different ground- and space-based observations, and there are several data assimilation models for each near-Earth space domain. This enables us to conduct Multimodel Ensemble Data Assimilation of the I-T-E system that can account for different physical modeling assumptions, numerical techniques, and model initialization approaches. The application of ensemble modeling with several different data assimilation models will lead to a paradigm shift in how basic physical processes are studied in near-Earth space, and it should also lead to a significant advance space weather forecasting.

  18. Using Online Space Weather Modeling Resources in a Capstone Undergraduate Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liemohn, M.

    2012-04-01

    The University of Michigan offers a senior-undergraduate-level course entitled, "Space Weather Modeling," taken by all of the space weather concentration students in the Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences department. This is the capstone course of our undergraduate series, using the foundational knowledge from the previous courses towards an integrative large-scale numerical modeling study. A fraction of the graduate students also take this course. Because the state-of-the-art modeling capabilities are well beyond what is possible in a single term of programming, this course uses available online model resources, in particular the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC), a multi-agency facility hosted by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. Students learn not only how to use the codes, but also the various options of what equations to solve to model a specific region of space and the various numerical approaches for implementing the equations within a code. The course is project-based, consisting of multiple written reports and oral presentations, and the technical communication skills are an important component of the grading rubric. Students learn how to conduct a numerical modeling study by critiquing several space weather modeling journal articles, and then carry out their our studies with several of the available codes. In the end, they are familiarized with the available models to know the ranges of validity and applicability for a wide array of space weather applications.

  19. Space Weather Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    This workshop will focus on what space weather is about and its impact on society. An overall picture will be "painted" describing the Sun's influence through the solar wind on the near-Earth space environment, including the aurora, killer electrons at geosynchronous orbit, million ampere electric currents through the ionosphere and along magnetic field lines, and the generation of giga-Watts of natural radio waves. Reference material in the form of Internet sites will be provided so that teachers can discuss space weather in the classroom and enable students to learn more about this topic.

  20. The Ensemble Space Weather Modeling System (eSWMS): Status, Capabilities and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, C. D.; Eccles, J. V.; Reich, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    Marking a milestone in space weather forecasting, the Space Weather Modeling System (SWMS) successfully completed validation testing in advance of operational testing at Air Force Weather Agency’s primary space weather production center. This is the first coupling of stand-alone, physics-based space weather models that are currently in operations at AFWA supporting the warfighter. Significant development effort went into ensuring the component models were portable and scalable while maintaining consistent results across diverse high performance computing platforms. Coupling was accomplished under the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF). The coupled space weather models are the Hakamada-Akasofu-Fry version 2 (HAFv2) solar wind model and GAIM1, the ionospheric forecast component of the Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements (GAIM) model. The SWMS was developed by team members from AFWA, Explorations Physics International, Inc. (EXPI) and Space Environment Corporation (SEC). The successful development of the SWMS provides new capabilities beyond enabling extended lead-time, data-driven ionospheric forecasts. These include ingesting diverse data sets at higher resolution, incorporating denser computational grids at finer time steps, and performing probability-based ensemble forecasts. Work of the SWMS development team now focuses on implementing the ensemble-based probability forecast capability by feeding multiple scenarios of 5 days of solar wind forecasts to the GAIM1 model based on the variation of the input fields to the HAFv2 model. The ensemble SWMS (eSWMS) will provide the most-likely space weather scenario with uncertainty estimates for important forecast fields. The eSWMS will allow DoD mission planners to consider the effects of space weather on their systems with more advance warning than is currently possible. The payoff is enhanced, tailored support to the warfighter with improved capabilities, such as point-to-point HF propagation forecasts

  1. Commercializing Space Weather using GAIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent; Schunk, Robert; Sojka, Jan J.

    Space weather's effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the en-ergy transfer processes from the Sun's photons, particles, and fields. Of the space environment domains that are affected by space weather, the ionosphere is the key region that affects com-munication and navigation systems. The Utah State University (USU) Space Weather Center (SWC) was organized in 2009 to develop commercial space weather applications. It uses the Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements (GAIM) system as the basis for providing improvements to communication and navigation systems. For example, in August 2009 SWC released, in conjunction with Space Environment Technologies, the world's first real-time space weather via an iPhone app, Space WX. It displays the real-time, current global ionosphere to-tal electron content along with its space weather drivers, is available through the Apple iTunes store, and is used around the world. The GAIM system is run operationally at SWC for global and regional (continental U.S.) conditions. Each run stream continuously ingests up to 10,000 slant TEC measurements every 15-minutes from approximately 500 stations in a Kalman filter to adjust the background output from the physics-based Ionosphere Forecast Model (IFM). Additionally, 80 real-time digisonde data streams from around the world provide ionosphere characterization up to the F-region peak. The combination of these data dramatically improves the current epoch ionosphere specification beyond the physics-based solution. The altitudinal range is 90-1500 km for output TEC, electron densities, and other data products with a few degrees resolution in latitude and longitude at 15-minute time granularity. We describe the existing SWC products that are used as commercial space weather information. SWC funding is provided by the State of Utah's Utah Science Technology and Research (USTAR) initiative. The SWC is physically located on the USU campus in Logan, Utah.

  2. Applying Forecast Models from the Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehmeyr, M.; Baker, D. N.; Millward, G.; Odstrcil, D.

    2007-12-01

    The Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling (CISM) has developed three forecast models (FMs) for the Sun-Earth chain. They have been matured by various degrees toward the operational stage. The Sun-Earth FM suite comprises empirical and physical models: the Planetary Equivalent Amplitude (AP-FM), the Solar Wind (SW- FM), and the Geospace (GS-FM) models. We give a brief overview of these forecast models and touch briefly on the associated validation studies. We demonstrate the utility of the models: AP-FM supporting the operations of the AIM (Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere) mission soon after launch; SW-FM providing assistance with the interpretation of the STEREO beacon data; and GS-FM combining model and observed data to characterize the aurora borealis. We will then discuss space weather tools in a more general sense, point out where the current capabilities and shortcomings are, and conclude with a look forward to what areas need improvement to facilitate better real-time forecasts.

  3. Predicting Material Performance in the Space Environment from Laboratory Test Data, Static Design Environments, and Space Weather Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Josep I.; Edwards, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Qualifying materials for use in the space environment is typically accomplished with laboratory exposures to simulated UV/EUV, atomic oxygen, and charged particle radiation environments with in-situ or subsequent measurements of material properties of interest to the particular application. Choice of environment exposure levels are derived from static design environments intended to represent either mean or extreme conditions that are anticipated to be encountered during a mission. The real space environment however is quite variable. Predictions of the on orbit performance of a material qualified to laboratory environments can be done using information on 'space weather' variations in the real environment. This presentation will first review the variability of space environments of concern for material degradation and then demonstrate techniques for using test data to predict material performance in a variety of space environments from low Earth orbit to interplanetary space using historical measurements and space weather models.

  4. Kazakhstan Space Weather Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryakunova, Olga

    2012-07-01

    Kazakhstan experimental complex is a center of experimental study of space weather. This complex is situated near Almaty, Kazakhstan and includes experimental setup for registration of cosmic ray intensity (neutron monitor) at altitude of 3340 m above sea level, geomagnetic observatory and setup for registration of solar flux density with frequency of 1 and 3 GHz with 1 second time resolution. Results of space environment monitoring in real time are accessible via Internet. This experimental information is used for space weather investigations and different cosmic ray effects. Almaty mountain cosmic ray station is one of the most suitable and sensitive stations for investigation and forecasting of the dangerous situations for satellites; for this reason Almaty cosmic ray station is included in the world-wide neutron monitor network for the real-time monitoring of the space weather conditions and European Database NMDB (www.nmdb.eu). All data are represented on the web-site of the Institute of Ionosphere (www.ionos.kz) in real time. Since July, 2006 the space environment prediction laboratory represents the forecast of geomagnetic activity every day on the same site (www.ionos.kz/?q=en/node/21).

  5. Using Science Data and Models for Space Weather Forecasting - Challenges and Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Pulkkinen, Antti; Zheng, Yihua; Maddox, Marlo; Berrios, David; Taktakishvili, Sandro; Kuznetsova, Masha; Chulaki, Anna; Lee, Hyesook; Mullinix, Rick; Rastaetter, Lutz

    2012-01-01

    Space research, and, consequently, space weather forecasting are immature disciplines. Scientific knowledge is accumulated frequently, which changes our understanding or how solar eruptions occur, and of how they impact targets near or on the Earth, or targets throughout the heliosphere. Along with continuous progress in understanding, space research and forecasting models are advancing rapidly in capability, often providing substantially increases in space weather value over time scales of less than a year. Furthermore, the majority of space environment information available today is, particularly in the solar and heliospheric domains, derived from research missions. An optimal forecasting environment needs to be flexible enough to benefit from this rapid development, and flexible enough to adapt to evolving data sources, many of which may also stem from non-US entities. This presentation will analyze the experiences obtained by developing and operating both a forecasting service for NASA, and an experimental forecasting system for Geomagnetically Induced Currents.

  6. Community Coordinated Modeling Center: Addressing Needs of Operational Space Weather Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsova, M.; Maddox, M.; Pulkkinen, A.; Hesse, M.; Rastaetter, L.; Macneice, P.; Taktakishvili, A.; Berrios, D.; Chulaki, A.; Zheng, Y.; Mullinix, R.

    2012-01-01

    Models are key elements of space weather forecasting. The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC, http://ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov) hosts a broad range of state-of-the-art space weather models and enables access to complex models through an unmatched automated web-based runs-on-request system. Model output comparisons with observational data carried out by a large number of CCMC users open an unprecedented mechanism for extensive model testing and broad community feedback on model performance. The CCMC also evaluates model's prediction ability as an unbiased broker and supports operational model selections. The CCMC is organizing and leading a series of community-wide projects aiming to evaluate the current state of space weather modeling, to address challenges of model-data comparisons, and to define metrics for various user s needs and requirements. Many of CCMC models are continuously running in real-time. Over the years the CCMC acquired the unique experience in developing and maintaining real-time systems. CCMC staff expertise and trusted relations with model owners enable to keep up to date with rapid advances in model development. The information gleaned from the real-time calculations is tailored to specific mission needs. Model forecasts combined with data streams from NASA and other missions are integrated into an innovative configurable data analysis and dissemination system (http://iswa.gsfc.nasa.gov) that is accessible world-wide. The talk will review the latest progress and discuss opportunities for addressing operational space weather needs in innovative and collaborative ways.

  7. The NASA Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) Next Generation Space Weather Data Warehouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddox, M. M.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Zheng, Y.; Rastaetter, L.; Chulaki, A.; Pembroke, A. D.; Wiegand, C.; Mullinix, R.; Boblitt, J.; Mendoza, A. M. M.; Swindell, M. J., IV; Bakshi, S. S.; Mays, M. L.; Shim, J. S.; Hesse, M.; Collado-Vega, Y. M.; Taktakishvili, A.; MacNeice, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables, supports, and performs research and development for next generation space science and space weather models. The CCMC currently hosts a large and expanding collection of state-or-the-art, physics-based space weather models that have been developed by the international research community. There are many tools and services provided by the CCMC that are currently available world-wide, along with the ongoing development of new innovative systems and software for research, discovery, validation, visualization, and forecasting. Over the history of the CCMC's existence, there has been one constant engineering challenge - describing, managing, and disseminating data. To address the challenges that accompany an ever-expanding number of models to support, along with a growing catalog of simulation output - the CCMC is currently developing a flexible and extensible space weather data warehouse to support both internal and external systems and applications. This paper intends to chronicle the evolution and future of the CCMC's data infrastructure, and the current infrastructure re-engineering activities that seek to leverage existing community data model standards like SPASE and the IMPEx Simulation Data Model.

  8. Operational Space Weather Activities in the US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Thomas; Singer, Howard; Onsager, Terrance; Viereck, Rodney; Murtagh, William; Rutledge, Robert

    2016-07-01

    We review the current activities in the civil operational space weather forecasting enterprise of the United States. The NOAA/Space Weather Prediction Center is the nation's official source of space weather watches, warnings, and alerts, working with partners in the Air Force as well as international operational forecast services to provide predictions, data, and products on a large variety of space weather phenomena and impacts. In October 2015, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy released the National Space Weather Strategy (NSWS) and associated Space Weather Action Plan (SWAP) that define how the nation will better forecast, mitigate, and respond to an extreme space weather event. The SWAP defines actions involving multiple federal agencies and mandates coordination and collaboration with academia, the private sector, and international bodies to, among other things, develop and sustain an operational space weather observing system; develop and deploy new models of space weather impacts to critical infrastructure systems; define new mechanisms for the transition of research models to operations and to ensure that the research community is supported for, and has access to, operational model upgrade paths; and to enhance fundamental understanding of space weather through support of research models and observations. The SWAP will guide significant aspects of space weather operational and research activities for the next decade, with opportunities to revisit the strategy in the coming years through the auspices of the National Science and Technology Council.

  9. Mexican Space Weather Service (SCIESMEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Esparza, A.; De la Luz, V.; Mejia-Ambriz, J. C.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Corona-Romero, P.; Gonzalez, L. X.

    2015-12-01

    Recent modifications of the Civil Protection Law in Mexico include now specific mentions to space hazards and space weather phenomena. During the last few years, the UN has promoted international cooperation on Space Weather awareness, studies and monitoring. Internal and external conditions motivated the creation of a Space Weather Service in Mexico (SCIESMEX). The SCIESMEX (www.sciesmex.unam.mx) is operated by the Geophysics Institute at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). The UNAM has the experience of operating several critical national services, including the National Seismological Service (SSN); besides that has a well established scientific group with expertise in space physics and solar- terrestrial phenomena. The SCIESMEX is also related with the recent creation of the Mexican Space Agency (AEM). The project combines a network of different ground instruments covering solar, interplanetary, geomagnetic, and ionospheric observations. The SCIESMEX has already in operation computing infrastructure running the web application, a virtual observatory and a high performance computing server to run numerical models. SCIESMEX participates in the International Space Environment Services (ISES) and in the Inter-progamme Coordination Team on Space Weather (ICTSW) of the Word Meteorological Organization (WMO).

  10. TS07D Empirical Geomagnetic Field Model as a Space Weather Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, N. M.; Stephens, G. K.; Sitnov, M. I.

    2011-12-01

    Empirical modeling and forecasting of the geomagnetic field is a key element of the space weather research. A dramatic increase in the number of data available for the terrestrial magnetosphere required a new generation of empirical models with large numbers of degrees of freedom and sophisticated data-mining techniques. A set of the corresponding data binning, fitting and visualization procedures known as the TS07D model is now available at \\url{http://geomag_field.jhuapl.edu/model/} and it is used for detailed investigation of storm-scale phenomena in the magnetosphere. However, the transformation of this research model into a practical space weather application, which implies its extensive running for validation and interaction with other space weather codes, requires its presentation in the form of a single state-of-the-art code, well documented and optimized for the highest performance. To this end, the model is implemented in the Java programming language with extensive self-sufficient library and a set of optimization tools, including multi-thread operations that assume the use of the code in multi-core computers and clusters. The results of the new code validation and optimization of its binning, fitting and visualization parts are presented as well as some examples of the processed storms are discussed.

  11. Weather impacts on space operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, J.; Boyd, B.; Bauman, W.; Wyse, N.; Adams, M.

    The efforts of the 45th Weather Squadron of the USAF to provide weather support to Patrick Air Force Base, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Eastern Range, and the Kennedy Space Center are discussed. Its weather support to space vehicles, particularly the Space Shuttle, includes resource protection, ground processing, launch, and Ferry Flight, as well as consultations to the Spaceflight Meteorology Group for landing forecasts. Attention is given to prelaunch processing weather, launch support weather, Shuttle launch commit criteria, and range safety weather restrictions. Upper level wind requirements are examined. The frequency of hourly surface observations with thunderstorms at the Shuttle landing facility, and lightning downtime at the Titan launch complexes are illustrated.

  12. The Integrated Space Weather Analysis System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddox, M. M.; Mullinix, R. E.; Jain, P.; Berrios, D.; Hesse, M.; Rastaetter, L.; MacNeice, P. J.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Taktakishvili, A.; Garneau, J. W.; Conti-Vock, J.

    2009-12-01

    The Integrated Space Weather Analysis System is a joint development project at NASA GSFC between the Space Weather Laboratory, Community Coordinated Modeling Center, Applied Engineering & Technology Directorate, and NASA HQ Office Of Chief Engineer. The iSWA system is a turnkey, web-based dissemination system for NASA-relevant space weather information that combines forecasts based on the most advanced space weather models with concurrent space environment information. A key design driver for the iSWA system is to generate and present vast amounts of space weather resources in an intuitive, user-configurable, and adaptable format - thus enabling users to respond to current and future space weather impacts as well as enabling post-imact analysis. This presentation will highlight several technical aspects of the iSWA system implementation including data collection methods, database design, customizable user interfaces, interactive system components, and innovative displays of quantitative information.

  13. Optical space weathering on Vesta: Radiative-transfer models and Dawn observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blewett, David T.; Denevi, Brett W.; Le Corre, Lucille; Reddy, Vishnu; Schröder, Stefan E.; Pieters, Carle M.; Tosi, Federico; Zambon, Francesca; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Ammannito, Eleonora; Roatsch, Thomas; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-02-01

    Exposure to ion and micrometeoroid bombardment in the space environment causes physical and chemical changes in the surface of an airless planetary body. These changes, called space weathering, can strongly influence a surface's optical characteristics, and hence complicate interpretation of composition from reflectance spectroscopy. Prior work using data from the Dawn spacecraft (Pieters, C.M. et al. [2012]. Nature 491, 79-82) found that accumulation of nanophase metallic iron (npFe0), which is a key space-weathering product on the Moon, does not appear to be important on Vesta, and instead regolith evolution is dominated by mixing with carbonaceous chondrite (CC) material delivered by impacts. In order to gain further insight into the nature of space weathering on Vesta, we constructed model reflectance spectra using Hapke's radiative-transfer theory and used them as an aid to understanding multispectral observations obtained by Dawn's Framing Cameras (FC). The model spectra, for a howardite mineral assemblage, include both the effects of npFe0 and that of a mixed CC component. We found that a plot of the 438-nm/555-nm ratio vs. the 555-nm reflectance for the model spectra helps to separate the effects of lunar-style space weathering (LSSW) from those of CC-mixing. We then constructed ratio-reflectance pixel scatterplots using FC images for four areas of contrasting composition: a eucritic area at Vibidia crater, a diogenitic area near Antonia crater, olivine-bearing material within Bellicia crater, and a light mantle unit (referred to as an "orange patch" in some previous studies, based on steep spectral slope in the visible) northeast of Oppia crater. In these four cases the observed spectral trends are those expected from CC-mixing, with no evidence for weathering dominated by production of npFe0. In order to survey a wider range of surfaces, we also defined a spectral parameter that is a function of the change in 438-nm/555-nm ratio and the 555-nm reflectance

  14. Space Weathering of Lunar Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, S. K.; Keller, L. P.; Christoffersen, R.; Rahman, Z.

    2012-01-01

    All materials exposed at the lunar surface undergo space weathering processes. On the Moon, boulders make up only a small percentage of the exposed surface, and areas where such rocks are exposed, like central peaks, are often among the least space weathered regions identified from remote sensing data. Yet space weathered surfaces (patina) are relatively common on returned rock samples, some of which directly sample the surface of larger boulders. Because, as witness plates to lunar space weathering, rocks and boulders experience longer exposure times compared to lunar soil grains, they allow us to develop a deeper perspective on the relative importance of various weathering processes as a function of time.

  15. Vodcasting Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins Petersen, Carolyn; Erickson, P. J.; Needles, M.

    2009-01-01

    The topic of space weather is the subject of a series of vodcasts (video podcasts) produced by MIT Haystack Observatory (Westford, MA) and Loch Ness Productions (Groton, MA). This paper discusses the production and distribution of the series via Webcast, Youtube, and other avenues. It also presents preliminary evaluation of the effectiveness and outreach of the project through feedback from both formal and information education venues. The vodcast series is linked to the NASA Living With a Star Targeted Research and Technology project award "Multi-Instrument Investigation of Inner-Magnetospheric/Ionosphere Disturbances.” It is being carried out by Principal Investigator Dr. John Foster, under the auspices of NASA Grant # NNX06AB86G. The research involves using ionospheric total electron content (TEC) observations to study the location, extent, and duration of perturbations within stormtime ionospheric electric fields at mid- to low latitudes. It combines ground-based global positioning system (GPS) TEC data, incoherent scatter radar measurements of the mid-latitude ionospheric state, and DMSP satellite observations to characterize conditions which lead to severe low-latitude ionospheric perturbations. Each vodcast episode covers a certain aspect of space weather and the research program.

  16. Experience Transitioning Models and Data at the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center has a long history of transitioning research data and models into operations and with the validation activities required. The first stage in this process involves demonstrating that the capability has sufficient value to customers to justify the cost needed to transition it and to run it continuously and reliably in operations. Once the overall value is demonstrated, a substantial effort is then required to develop the operational software from the research codes. The next stage is to implement and test the software and product generation on the operational computers. Finally, effort must be devoted to establishing long-term measures of performance, maintaining the software, and working with forecasters, customers, and researchers to improve over time the operational capabilities. This multi-stage process of identifying, transitioning, and improving operational space weather capabilities will be discussed using recent examples. Plans for future activities will also be described.

  17. Data Format Standardization of Space Weather Model Output at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddox, M.; Rastatter, L.; Hesse, M.

    2005-01-01

    The disparate nature of space weather model output provides many challenges with regards to the portability and reuse of not only the data itself, but also any tools that are developed for analysis and visualization. We are developing and implementing a comprehensive data format standardization methodology that allows heterogeneous model output data to be stored uniformly in any common science data format. We will discuss our approach to identifying core meta-data elements that can be used to supplement raw model output data, thus creating self-descriptive files. The meta-data should also contain information describing the simulation grid. This will ultimately assists in the development of efficient data access tools capable of extracting data at any given point and time. We will also discuss our experiences standardizing the output of two global magnetospheric models, and how we plan to apply similar procedures when standardizing the output of the solar, heliospheric, and ionospheric models that are also currently hosted at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center.

  18. Integration of the Radiation Belt Environment Model Into the Space Weather Modeling Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glocer, A.; Toth, G.; Fok, M.; Gombosi, T.; Liemohn, M.

    2009-01-01

    We have integrated the Fok radiation belt environment (RBE) model into the space weather modeling framework (SWMF). RBE is coupled to the global magnetohydrodynamics component (represented by the Block-Adaptive-Tree Solar-wind Roe-type Upwind Scheme, BATS-R-US, code) and the Ionosphere Electrodynamics component of the SWMF, following initial results using the Weimer empirical model for the ionospheric potential. The radiation belt (RB) model solves the convection-diffusion equation of the plasma in the energy range of 10 keV to a few MeV. In stand-alone mode RBE uses Tsyganenko's empirical models for the magnetic field, and Weimer's empirical model for the ionospheric potential. In the SWMF the BATS-R-US model provides the time dependent magnetic field by efficiently tracing the closed magnetic field-lines and passing the geometrical and field strength information to RBE at a regular cadence. The ionosphere electrodynamics component uses a two-dimensional vertical potential solver to provide new potential maps to the RBE model at regular intervals. We discuss the coupling algorithm and show some preliminary results with the coupled code. We run our newly coupled model for periods of steady solar wind conditions and compare our results to the RB model using an empirical magnetic field and potential model. We also simulate the RB for an active time period and find that there are substantial differences in the RB model results when changing either the magnetic field or the electric field, including the creation of an outer belt enhancement via rapid inward transport on the time scale of tens of minutes.

  19. Prediction Techniques in Operational Space Weather Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, Andrei

    2016-07-01

    The importance of forecasting space weather conditions is steadily increasing as our society is becoming more and more dependent on advanced technologies that may be affected by disturbed space weather. Operational space weather forecasting is still a difficult task that requires the real-time availability of input data and specific prediction techniques that are reviewed in this presentation, with an emphasis on solar and interplanetary weather. Key observations that are essential for operational space weather forecasting are listed. Predictions made on the base of empirical and statistical methods, as well as physical models, are described. Their validation, accuracy, and limitations are discussed in the context of operational forecasting. Several important problems in the scientific basis of predicting space weather are described, and possible ways to overcome them are discussed, including novel space-borne observations that could be available in future.

  20. Data-Model Comparisons of the October, 2002 Event Using the Space Weather Modeling Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welling, D. T.; Chappell, C. R.; Schunk, R. W.; Barakat, A. R.; Eccles, V.; Glocer, A.; Kistler, L. M.; Haaland, S.; Moore, T. E.

    2014-12-01

    The September 27 - October 4, 2002 time period has been selected by the Geospace Environment Modeling Ionospheric Outflow focus group for community collaborative study because of its high magnetospheric activity and extensive data coverage. The FAST, Polar, and Cluster missions, as well as others, all made key observations during this period, creating a prime event for data-model comparisons. The GEM community has come together to simulate this period using many different methods in order to evaluate models, compare results, and expand our knowledge of ionospheric outflow and its effects on global dynamics. This paper presents Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) simulations of this important period compared against observations from the Polar TIDE, Cluster CODIF and EFW instruments. Density and velocity of oxygen and hydrogen throughout the lobes, plasmasheet, and inner magnetosphere will be the focus of these comparisons. For these simulations, the SWMF couples the multifluid version of BATS-R-US MHD to a variety of ionospheric outflow models of varying complexity. The simplest is outflow arising from constant MHD inner boundary conditions. Two first-principles-based models are also leveraged: the Polar Wind Outflow Model (PWOM), a fluid treatment of outflow dynamics, and the Generalized Polar Wind (GPW) model, which combines fluid and particle-in-cell approaches. Each model is capable of capturing a different set of energization mechanisms, yielding different outflow results. The data-model comparisons will illustrate how well each approach captures reality and which energization mechanisms are most important. This work will also assess our current capability to reproduce ionosphere-magnetosphere mass coupling.

  1. Sources, Propagators, and Sinks of Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesnell, W. D.

    Space Weather is a complex web of sources propagators and sinks of energy mass and momentum A complete understanding of Space Weather would require specifying and an ability to predict each link in this web One important problem in Space Weather is ranking the importance of a particular measurement or model in a research program One way to do this ranking is to identify the sources propagators and sinks and produce the simplest linked diagram of the components Such a diagram will be shown and used to discuss how longterm effects of Space Weather can be separated from the impulsive effects

  2. Commercial Space Tourism and Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Ronald

    2007-08-01

    Space tourism, a concept which even a few years ago was perveived as science fantasy, is now a credible industry. Five individuals have paid up to $25 M to spend more than a week on the International Space Station. Several enterprises are working toward viable suborbital and orbital private space operations. while operational space weather support to human space flight has been the domain of government entities the emergence of space tourism now presents a new opportunity for the commercial space weather community. This article examines the space weather impact on crews and passengers of the future space tourism industry.

  3. Space weather models for radiation conditions outside and inside of the Earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nymmik, Rikho; Kalegaev, Vladimir; Panasyuk, Mikhail

    2016-07-01

    Radiation environment in the Earth magnetosphere can not be considered without taking into account the physical conditions in interplanetary space due to solar activity. Therefore, any realistic model of radiation inside the magnetosphere should take into account the physical condition determined by the models out of it. Since the flux of galactic and solar cosmic rays in the magnetosphere based on the model of radiation outside the magnetosphere with an indispensable view of the magnetic field of the Earth, due to changes in the solar wind, interplanetary shock waves and magnetic field. These factors are also influence the models of trapped radiation and circular current. Particularly, this report addressed to the methodological issues of generalization of experimental data to the level of computational models, which is unchanged properties of predicting all kinds of extreme situations. The complex of these problems has long been discussed under the pressure of public attention in connection with the problems of weather forecasting and hydrology. In the field of space weather the problem of operational models evaluation (so called "metric & validation" activity) is also of great interest now. In the light of changes in the factors of solar activity in the last minimum and in the solar cycle 24, the report discusses the problems of modeling particle fluxes outside the magnetosphere. Current status of near- Earth radiation modeling including radiation belt particles transport, acceleration and losses will be discussed as well from the experimental and theoretical viewpoint.

  4. Towards a National Space Weather Predictive Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, N. J.; Ryschkewitsch, M. G.; Merkin, V. G.; Stephens, G. K.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Barnes, R. J.; Anderson, B. J.; Paxton, L. J.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Kelly, M. A.; Berger, T. E.; Bonadonna, L. C. M. F.; Hesse, M.; Sharma, S.

    2015-12-01

    National needs in the area of space weather informational and predictive tools are growing rapidly. Adverse conditions in the space environment can cause disruption of satellite operations, communications, navigation, and electric power distribution grids, leading to a variety of socio-economic losses and impacts on our security. Future space exploration and most modern human endeavors will require major advances in physical understanding and improved transition of space research to operations. At present, only a small fraction of the latest research and development results from NASA, NOAA, NSF and DoD investments are being used to improve space weather forecasting and to develop operational tools. The power of modern research and space weather model development needs to be better utilized to enable comprehensive, timely, and accurate operational space weather tools. The mere production of space weather information is not sufficient to address the needs of those who are affected by space weather. A coordinated effort is required to support research-to-applications transition efforts and to develop the tools required those who rely on this information. In this presentation we will review the space weather system developed for the Van Allen Probes mission, together with other datasets, tools and models that have resulted from research by scientists at JHU/APL. We will look at how these, and results from future missions such as Solar Probe Plus, could be applied to support space weather applications in coordination with other community assets and capabilities.

  5. Small Sensors for Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory is actively pursuing enhancing the nation's space weather sensing capability. One aspect of this plan is the concept of flying Space Weather sensor suites on host spacecraft as secondary payloads. The emergence and advancement of the CubeSat spacecraft architecture has produced a viable platform for scientifically and operationally relevant Space Weather sensing. This talk will provide an overview of NRL's low size weight and power sensor technologies targeting Space Weather measurements. A summary of on-orbit results of past and current missions will be presented, as well as an overview of future flights that are manifested and potential constellation missions.

  6. Short-term Forecasting Ground Magnetic Perturbations with the Space Weather Modeling Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welling, Daniel; Toth, Gabor; Gombosi, Tamas; Singer, Howard; Millward, George

    2016-04-01

    Predicting ground-based magnetic perturbations is a critical step towards specifying and predicting geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) in high voltage transmission lines. Currently, the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF), a flexible modeling framework for simulating the multi-scale space environment, is being transitioned from research to operational use (R2O) by NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center. Upon completion of this transition, the SWMF will provide localized dB/dt predictions using real-time solar wind observations from L1 and the F10.7 proxy for EUV as model input. This presentation describes the operational SWMF setup and summarizes the changes made to the code to enable R2O progress. The framework's algorithm for calculating ground-based magnetometer observations will be reviewed. Metrics from data-model comparisons will be reviewed to illustrate predictive capabilities. Early data products, such as regional-K index and grids of virtual magnetometer stations, will be presented. Finally, early successes will be shared, including the code's ability to reproduce the recent March 2015 St. Patrick's Day Storm.

  7. Application of a new phenomenological coronal mass ejection model to space weather forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, T. A.; Tappin, S. J.

    2010-07-01

    Recent work by the authors has produced a new phenomenological model for coronal mass ejections (CMEs). This model, called the Tappin-Howard (TH) Model, takes advantage of the breakdown of geometrical linearity when CMEs are observed by white-light imagers at large distances from the Sun. The model extracts 3-D structure and kinematic information on the CME using heliospheric image data. This can estimate arrival times of the CME at 1 AU and impact likelihood with the Earth. Hence the model can be used for space weather forecasting. We present a preliminary evaluation of this potential with three mock trial forecasts performed using the TH Model. These are already-studied events from 2003, 2004 and 2007 but we performed the trials assuming that they were observed for the first time. The earliest prediction was made 17 hours before impact and predicted arrival times reached differences within one hour for at least one forecast for all three events. The most accurate predicted arrival time was 15 min from the actual, and all three events reach accuracies of the order of 30 min. Arrival speeds were predicted to be very similar to the bulk plasma speed within the CME near 1 AU for each event, with the largest difference around 300 km/s and the least 40 km/s. The model showed great potential and we aspire to fully validate it for integration with existing tools for space weather forecasting.

  8. Whole Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupled Model (GAIA) for Space Weather Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinagawa, H.; Jin, H.; Miyoshi, Y.; Fujiwara, H.; Tanaka, T.; Fujita, S.; Terada, K.; Murata, K. T.

    2011-12-01

    Space near the Earth, called geospace, is a highly complex system, consisting of the solar wind, the magnetosphere, the ionosphere, and the neutral atmosphere. Those regions have different physical characteristics with different temporal and spatial scales. In particular, the magnetosphere, the ionosphere, and the neutral atmosphere are strongly coupled with each other, and interaction between the regions is nonlinear and extremely complicated. Even within each region, there are strong interactions between physical processes with different temporal and spatial scales. Furthermore, the geospace environment significantly varies as electromagnetic energy and particles from the sun vary. In order to quantitatively understand such a complicated system, it is necessary to model the entire region by including all fundamental processes self-consistently. Various types of global numerical models of geospace have been constructed and used to study space weather disturbances in many institutions in the world. At the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) of Japan, a real-time solar wind model, magnetosphere model, and ionosphere-thermosphere model have been developed and used for daily space weather forecast. In addition to the effect of geospace disturbance on the upper atmosphere, recent observations of the ionosphere and the thermosphere have revealed that atmospheric waves generated in the lower atmosphere significantly influence the upper atmosphere, the ionosphere, and possibly the magnetosphere. In order to quantitatively study the effects of the lower atmosphere on the ionosphere, we have developed an atmosphere-ionosphere coupled model, which includes the whole neutral atmosphere and the ionosphere. The model is called GAIA (Ground-to-topside model of Atmosphere and Ionosphere for Aeronomy). Using GAIA, relationship between the ionosphere and the atmosphere is being studied. We plan to incorporate magnetospheric inputs to the polar

  9. International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Davila, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI) is an international scientific program to understand the external drivers of space weather. The science and applications of space weather has been brought to prominence because of the rapid development of space based technology that is useful for all human beings. The ISWI program has its roots in the successful International Heliophysical Year (IHY) program that ran during 2007 - 2009. The primary objective of the ISWI program is to advance the space weather science by a combination of instrument deployment, analysis and interpretation of space weather data from the deployed instruments in conjunction with space data, and communicate the results to the public and students. Like the IHY, the ISWI will be a grass roots organization with key participation from national coordinators in cooperation with an international steering committee. This talk outlines the ISWI program including its organization and proposed activities.

  10. Data Driven Ionospheric Modeling in Relation to Space Weather: Percent Cloud Coverage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulunay, Y.; Senalp, E. T.; Tulunay, E.

    2009-04-01

    Since 1990, a small group at METU has been developing data driven models in order to forecast some critical system parameters related with the near-Earth space processes. The background on the subject supports new achievements, which contributed the COST 724 activities, which will contribute to the new ES0803 activities. This work mentions one of the outstanding contributions, namely forecasting of meteorological parameters by considering the probable influence of cosmic rays (CR) and sunspot numbers (SSN). The data-driven method is generic and applicable to many Near-Earth Space processes including ionospheric/plasmaspheric interactions. It is believed that the EURIPOS initiative would be useful in supplying wide range reliable data to the models developed. Quantification of physical mechanisms, which causally link Space Weather to the Earth's Weather, has been a challenging task. In this basis, the percent cloud coverage (%CC) and cloud top temperatures (CTT) were forecast one month ahead of time between geographic coordinates of (22.5˚N; 57.5˚N); and (7.5˚W; 47.5˚E) at 96 grid locations and covering the years of 1983 to 2000 using the Middle East Technical University Fuzzy Neural Network Model (METU-FNN-M) [Tulunay, 2008]. The Near Earth Space variability at several different time scales arises from a number of separate factors and the physics of the variations cannot be modeled due to the lack of current information about the parameters of several natural processes. CR are shielded by the magnetosphere to a certain extent, but they can modulate the low level cloud cover. METU-FNN-M was developed, trained and applied for forecasting the %CC and CTT, by considering the history of those meteorological variables; Cloud Optical Depth (COD); the Ionization (I) value that is formulized and computed by using CR data and CTT; SSN; temporal variables; and defuzified cloudiness. The temporal and spatial variables and the cut off rigidity are used to compute the

  11. Interactive Visual Contextualization of Space Weather Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Törnros, M.; Ynnerman, A.; Emmart, C.; Berrios, D.; Harberts, R.

    2012-12-01

    Linköping University, the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH), and the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center are collaborating on a new open source visualization software for astrovisualization. The CCMC is providing real-time and historical space weather data from the Integrated Space Weather Analysis System (iSWA), including timely modeled coronal mass ejection events simulated by the Space Weather Research Center at NASA GSFC. Linköping University is developing a new modular visualization tool with multi-channel capabilities to support planetarium exhibits, displaying the real-time space weather data contextualized using fieldlines, volumetric visualization techniques, and planetary information. This collaboration aims to engage the public about space weather and real-time events at the AMNH. We present an overview of this collaboration and demo some of the capabilities.

  12. The International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01

    The International Heliophysical Year (IHY) provided a successful model for the deployment of arrays of small scientific instruments in new and scientifically interesting geographic locations, and outreach. The new International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI) is designed to build on this momentum to promote the observation, understanding, and prediction space weather phenomena, and to communicate the scientific results to the public.

  13. Public Awareness of Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzerotti, Louis J.

    2009-08-01

    As society increasingly relies on space-based infrastructure for communication and national security, there is a growing need to improve public awareness of the risks space weather poses. The National Space Weather Program (NSWP) should consider this need as it develops new strategic plans. The 2006 “Report of the Assessment Committee for the National Space Weather Program” (http://www.ofcm.gov/r24/fcm-r24.htm) continues to guide this important national program, which aims to improve space weather forecasting services and reduce technological vulnerabilities. NSWP, under the auspices of the Office of the Federal Coordinator for Meteorology (OFCM), is coordinated by the NSWP Council, which consists of eight federal agencies. This council, through its Committee for Space Weather, is in the process of formulating new Strategic and Implementation plans for the NSWP using recommendations from the Assessment Committee.

  14. Partnerships for Education and Diversity in the Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, R. E.

    2008-05-01

    The Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling (CISM) is a Science and Technology Center funded by the National Science Foundation that comprises 11 institutions from Boston to Berkeley. All such centers are mandated to have extensive education and diversity programs. In this presentation I will discuss our efforts in building a partnership with a leading HBCU, Alabama A&M University. I will also discuss some of the other education efforts that rely on the partnership between CISM institutions, in particular the CISM summer school, as well as some features of undergraduate research being conducted under CISM sponsorship.

  15. The science of space weather.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, Jonathan P

    2008-12-13

    The basic physics underpinning space weather is reviewed, beginning with a brief overview of the main causes of variability in the near-Earth space environment. Although many plasma phenomena contribute to space weather, one of the most important is magnetic reconnection, and recent cutting edge research in this field is reviewed. We then place this research in context by discussing a number of specific types of space weather in more detail. As society inexorably increases its dependence on space, the necessity of predicting and mitigating space weather will become ever more acute. This requires a deep understanding of the complexities inherent in the plasmas that fill space and has prompted the development of a new generation of scientific space missions at the international level. PMID:18812302

  16. Modeling Extreme Space Weather Scenarios: July 23, 2012 Rare-Type CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngwira, C. M.; Pulkkinen, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    Space weather is a major concern for modern day society because of its adverse impacts on technological infrastructure such as power grids, oil pipelines, and global navigation systems. Particularly, earth directed coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the main drivers of the most extreme geomagnetic storms in the near-Earth space environment. On 23 July 2012, NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory-Ahead (STEREO-A) spacecraft observed in situ an extremely fast CME that traveled 0.96 astronomical units (~1 AU) in about 19 h. In our study, we use the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF), a 3-D MHD based code, to perform simulations of this rare CME by considering STEREO-A in situ observations to represent the upstream L1 solar wind boundary conditions. The goal of the study is to investigate what would have happened if this Rare-type CME was Earth-bound. Global SWMF-generated ground geomagnetic field perturbations are used to compute the simulated induced geoelectric field at specific ground-based active magnetometer sites. Simulation results show that the July 23 CME would have produced ground effects comparable to previously observed extreme geomagnetic storms such as the Halloween 2003 storm. In addition, we discuss how this study compares to other independent studies on this same event.

  17. Towards a National Space Weather Predictive Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, N. J.; Lindstrom, K. L.; Ryschkewitsch, M. G.; Anderson, B. J.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Merkin, V. G.; Kelly, M. A.; Miller, E. S.; Sitnov, M. I.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Erlandson, R. E.; Barnes, R. J.; Paxton, L. J.; Sotirelis, T.; Stephens, G.; Comberiate, J.

    2014-12-01

    National needs in the area of space weather informational and predictive tools are growing rapidly. Adverse conditions in the space environment can cause disruption of satellite operations, communications, navigation, and electric power distribution grids, leading to a variety of socio-economic losses and impacts on our security. Future space exploration and most modern human endeavors will require major advances in physical understanding and improved transition of space research to operations. At present, only a small fraction of the latest research and development results from NASA, NOAA, NSF and DoD investments are being used to improve space weather forecasting and to develop operational tools. The power of modern research and space weather model development needs to be better utilized to enable comprehensive, timely, and accurate operational space weather tools. The mere production of space weather information is not sufficient to address the needs of those who are affected by space weather. A coordinated effort is required to support research-to-applications transition efforts and to develop the tools required those who rely on this information. In this presentation we will review datasets, tools and models that have resulted from research by scientists at JHU/APL, and examine how they could be applied to support space weather applications in coordination with other community assets and capabilities.

  18. Evaluation of the 29-km Eta Model for Weather Support to the United States Space Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manobianco, John; Nutter, Paul

    1997-01-01

    The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) conducted a year-long evaluation of NCEP's 29-km mesoscale Eta (meso-eta) weather prediction model in order to identify added value to forecast operations in support of the United States space program. The evaluation was stratified over warm and cool seasons and considered both objective and subjective verification methodologies. Objective verification results generally indicate that meso-eta model point forecasts at selected stations exhibit minimal error growth in terms of RMS errors and are reasonably unbiased. Conversely, results from the subjective verification demonstrate that model forecasts of developing weather events such as thunderstorms, sea breezes, and cold fronts, are not always as accurate as implied by the seasonal error statistics. Sea-breeze case studies reveal that the model generates a dynamically-consistent thermally direct circulation over the Florida peninsula, although at a larger scale than observed. Thunderstorm verification reveals that the meso-eta model is capable of predicting areas of organized convection, particularly during the late afternoon hours but is not capable of forecasting individual thunderstorms. Verification of cold fronts during the cool season reveals that the model is capable of forecasting a majority of cold frontal passages through east central Florida to within +1-h of observed frontal passage.

  19. eHeroes and Swiff: EC-Funded FP7 networks for modelling and observation of space weather events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni

    2013-04-01

    We report on two EC-FP7 funded projects: Swiff and eHeroes. Swiff (swiff.eu) is a modelling effort that aims at producing an integrated space weather modelling and forecasting network. We are unifying into a single approach fluid and kinetic models to track space weather events from their solar origin to their impact on the Earth environment, eHeores (eheroes.eu) is a observational and modelling effort that collects and processes data to produce new data services and new models to track and predict space weather. eHeores focuses on the impact of space weather on space exploration including the effects on spacecraft, on the exploration of the Moon and Mars. We will report on the results obtained in these projects highlighting their relevance to space weather and its impact on the Earth and on space exploration. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Commission's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under the grant agreement SWIFF (project n° 263340, www.swiff.eu).

  20. Space Weathering: An Ultraviolet Indicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrix, A. R.; Vilas, F.

    2003-01-01

    We present evidence suggesting that the spectral slope of airless bodies in the UV-visible wavelength range can be used as an indicator of exposure to space weathering. While space weathering generally produces a reddening of spectra in the visible-NIR spectral regions, it tends to result in a bluing of the UV-visible portion of the spectrum, and may in some cases produce a spectral reversal. The bluing effect may be detectable with smaller amounts of weathering than are necessary to detect the longer-wavelength weathering effects.

  1. Space Weathering: An Ultraviolet Indicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrix, A. R.; Vilas, F.

    2004-01-01

    We present evidence suggesting that the spectral slope of airless bodies in the UV-visible wavelength range can be used as an indicator of exposure to space weathering. While space weathering generally produces a reddening of spectra in the visible-NIR spectral regions, it tends to result in a bluing of the UV-visible portion of the spectrum, and may in some cases produce a spectral reversal. The bluing effect may be detectable with smaller amounts of weathering than are necessary to detect the longer-wavelength weathering effects.

  2. Space Weather Forecasting: An Enigma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojka, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    The space age began in earnest on October 4, 1957 with the launch of Sputnik 1 and was fuelled for over a decade by very strong national societal concerns. Prior to this single event the adverse effects of space weather had been registered on telegraph lines as well as interference on early WWII radar systems, while for countless eons the beauty of space weather as mid-latitude auroral displays were much appreciated. These prior space weather impacts were in themselves only a low-level science puzzle pursued by a few dedicated researchers. The technology boost and innovation that the post Sputnik era generated has almost single handedly defined our present day societal technology infrastructure. During the decade following Neil's walk on the moon on July 21, 1969 an international thrust to understand the science of space, and its weather, was in progress. However, the search for scientific understand was parsed into independent "stove pipe" categories: The ionosphere-aeronomy, the magnetosphere, the heliosphere-sun. The present day scientific infrastructure of funding agencies, learned societies, and international organizations are still hampered by these 1960's logical divisions which today are outdated in the pursuit of understanding space weather. As this era of intensive and well funded scientific research progressed so did societies innovative uses for space technologies and space "spin-offs". Well over a decade ago leaders in technology, science, and the military realized that there was indeed an adverse side to space weather that with each passing year became more severe. In 1994 several U.S. agencies established the National Space Weather Program (NSWP) to focus scientific attention on the system wide issue of the adverse effects of space weather on society and its technologies. Indeed for the past two decades a significant fraction of the scientific community has actively engaged in understanding space weather and hence crossing the "stove

  3. The Integrated Space Weather Analysis System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddox, M. M.; Hesse, M.; Kuznetsova, M.; Rastaetter, L.; MacNeice, P. J.; Jain, P.; Garneau, J. W.; Berrios, D. H.; Pulkinnen, A.; Rowland, D.

    2008-12-01

    Space weather affects virtually all of NASA's endeavors, from robotic missions to human exploration. Knowledge and prediction of space weather conditions is therefore essential to NASA operations. The diverse nature of currently available space environment measurements and modeling products, along with the lack of single-portal access, renders its practical use for space weather analysis and forecasting unfeasible. There exists a compelling need for accurate real-time forecasting of both large-scale and local space environments - and their probable impacts for missions. A vital design driver for any system that is created to solve this problem lies in the fact that information needs to be presented in a form that is useful and as such, must be both easily accessible and understandable. The Integrated Space Weather Analysis System is a joint development project at NASA GSFC between the Space Weather Laboratory, Community Coordinated Modeling Center, Applied Engineering & Technology Directorate, and NASA HQ Office Of Chief Engineer. The iSWA system will be a turnkey, web-based dissemination system for NASA-relevant space weather information that combines forecasts based on the most advanced space weather models with concurrent space environment information. It will be customer configurable and adaptable for use as a powerful decision making tool offering an unprecedented ability to analyze the present and expected future space weather impacts on virtually all NASA human and robotic missions. We will discuss some of the key design considerations for the system and present some of the initial space weather analysis products that have been created to date.

  4. Particle radiation transport and effects models from research to space weather operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santin, Giovanni; Nieminen, Petteri; Rivera, Angela; Ibarmia, Sergio; Truscott, Pete; Lei, Fan; Desorgher, Laurent; Ivanchenko, Vladimir; Kruglanski, Michel; Messios, Neophytos

    Assessment of risk from potential radiation-induced effects to space systems requires knowledge of both the conditions of the radiation environment and of the impact of radiation on sensi-tive spacecraft elements. During sensitivity analyses, test data are complemented by models to predict how external radiation fields are transported and modified in spacecraft materials. Radiation transport is still itself a subject of research and models are continuously improved to describe the physical interactions that take place when particles pass through shielding materi-als or hit electronic systems or astronauts, sometimes down to nanometre-scale interactions of single particles with deep sub-micron technologies or DNA structures. In recent years, though, such radiation transport models are transitioning from being a research subject by itself, to being widely used in the space engineering domain and finally being directly applied in the context of operation of space weather services. A significant "research to operations" (R2O) case is offered by Geant4, an open source toolkit initially developed and used in the context of fundamental research in high energy physics. Geant4 is also being used in the space domain, e.g. for modelling detector responses in science payloads, but also for studying the radiation environment itself, with subjects ranging from cosmic rays, to solar energetic particles in the heliosphere, to geomagnetic shielding. Geant4-based tools are now becoming more and more integrated in spacecraft design procedures, also through user friendly interfaces such as SPEN-VIS. Some examples are given by MULASSIS, offering multi-layered shielding analysis capa-bilities in realistic spacecraft materials, or GEMAT, focused on micro-dosimetry in electronics, or PLANETOCOSMICS, describing the interaction of the space environment with planetary magneto-and atmospheres, or GRAS, providing a modular and easy to use interface to various analysis types in simple or

  5. NASA GSFC Space Weather Center - Innovative Space Weather Dissemination: Web-Interfaces, Mobile Applications, and More

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddox, Marlo; Zheng, Yihua; Rastaetter, Lutz; Taktakishvili, A.; Mays, M. L.; Kuznetsova, M.; Lee, Hyesook; Chulaki, Anna; Hesse, Michael; Mullinix, Richard; Berrios, David

    2012-01-01

    The NASA GSFC Space Weather Center (http://swc.gsfc.nasa.gov) is committed to providing forecasts, alerts, research, and educational support to address NASA's space weather needs - in addition to the needs of the general space weather community. We provide a host of services including spacecraft anomaly resolution, historical impact analysis, real-time monitoring and forecasting, custom space weather alerts and products, weekly summaries and reports, and most recently - video casts. There are many challenges in providing accurate descriptions of past, present, and expected space weather events - and the Space Weather Center at NASA GSFC employs several innovative solutions to provide access to a comprehensive collection of both observational data, as well as space weather model/simulation data. We'll describe the challenges we've faced with managing hundreds of data streams, running models in real-time, data storage, and data dissemination. We'll also highlight several systems and tools that are utilized by the Space Weather Center in our daily operations, all of which are available to the general community as well. These systems and services include a web-based application called the Integrated Space Weather Analysis System (iSWA http://iswa.gsfc.nasa.gov), two mobile space weather applications for both IOS and Android devices, an external API for web-service style access to data, google earth compatible data products, and a downloadable client-based visualization tool.

  6. Development of an ionosphere-atmosphere coupled model for space weather forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinagawa, Hiroyuki; Jin, Hidekatsu; Miyoshi, Yasunobu; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Fujita, Shigeru; Tanaka, Takashi; Terada, Naoki; Terada, Kaori

    The solar-terrestrial system consists of the solar atmosphere, the solar wind, the magneto-sphere, the ionosphere, and the neutral atmosphere. Those regions have different physical characteristics with different temporal and spatial scales. In particular, the magnetosphere, the ionosphere, and the neutral atmosphere are strongly coupled with each other, and inter-action between the regions is nonlinear and extremely complicated. Even within each region, there are strong interactions between different physical processes. Furthermore, the geospace environment significantly varies as electromagnetic energy and particles from the sun vary. In order to quantitatively understand such a complicated system, it is necessary to model the entire region by including all fundamental processes self-consistently. Various types of global numerical models of the geospace have been constructed by many institutions in the world, and used to study and predict geospace disturbances. At the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), real-time solar wind, magnetosphere, and ionosphere-thermosphere models have been developed and used for daily space weather forecast. However, recent observations of the ionosphere and the thermosphere have revealed that atmospheric waves generated in the lower atmosphere significantly influence the upper atmosphere, the ionosphere, and possibly the magnetosphere. In order to quantitatively study the effects of the lower atmosphere on the ionosphere, we have developed an ionosphere-atmosphere coupled model, which includes the whole neutral atmosphere and the ionosphere. It is planned that the model is coupled with our magnetosphere and solar MHD models, which will be used for space weather forecast. We will report the status and future plan of our ionosphere-atmosphere coupled modeling.

  7. STEREO Space Weather and the Space Weather Beacon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biesecker, D. A.; Webb, D F.; SaintCyr, O. C.

    2007-01-01

    The Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) is first and foremost a solar and interplanetary research mission, with one of the natural applications being in the area of space weather. The obvious potential for space weather applications is so great that NOAA has worked to incorporate the real-time data into their forecast center as much as possible. A subset of the STEREO data will be continuously downlinked in a real-time broadcast mode, called the Space Weather Beacon. Within the research community there has been considerable interest in conducting space weather related research with STEREO. Some of this research is geared towards making an immediate impact while other work is still very much in the research domain. There are many areas where STEREO might contribute and we cannot predict where all the successes will come. Here we discuss how STEREO will contribute to space weather and many of the specific research projects proposed to address STEREO space weather issues. We also discuss some specific uses of the STEREO data in the NOAA Space Environment Center.

  8. The International Space Weather Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nat, Gopalswamy; Joseph, Davila; Barbara, Thompson

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI) is a program of international cooperation aimed at understanding the external drivers of space weather. The ISWI program has its roots in the successful International Heliophysical Year (IHY) program that ran during 2007 - 2009 and will continue with those aspects that directly affect life on Earth. The primary objective of the ISWI program is to advance the space weather science by a combination of instrument deployment, analysis and interpretation of space weather data from the deployed instruments in conjunction with space data, and communicate the results to the public and students. Like the IHY, the ISWI will be a grass roots organization with key participation from national coordinators in cooperation with an international steering committee. This presentation outlines the ISWI program including its organizational aspects and proposed activities. The ISWI observatory deployment and outreach activities are highly complementary to the CAWSES II activities of SCOSTEP.

  9. Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC): Using innovative tools and services to support worldwide space weather scientific communities and networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, A. M.; Bakshi, S.; Berrios, D.; Chulaki, A.; Evans, R. M.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Lee, H.; MacNeice, P. J.; Maddox, M. M.; Mays, M. L.; Mullinix, R. E.; Ngwira, C. M.; Patel, K.; Pulkkinen, A.; Rastaetter, L.; Shim, J.; Taktakishvili, A.; Zheng, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) was established to enhance basic solar terrestrial research and to aid in the development of models for specifying and forecasting conditions in the space environment. In achieving this goal, CCMC has developed and provides a set of innovative tools varying from: Integrated Space Weather Analysis (iSWA) web -based dissemination system for space weather information, Runs-On-Request System providing access to unique collection of state-of-the-art solar and space physics models (unmatched anywhere in the world), Advanced Online Visualization and Analysis tools for more accurate interpretation of model results, Standard Data formats for Simulation Data downloads, and recently Mobile apps (iPhone/Android) to view space weather data anywhere to the scientific community. The number of runs requested and the number of resulting scientific publications and presentations from the research community has not only been an indication of the broad scientific usage of the CCMC and effective participation by space scientists and researchers, but also guarantees active collaboration and coordination amongst the space weather research community. Arising from the course of CCMC activities, CCMC also supports community-wide model validation challenges and research focus group projects for a broad range of programs such as the multi-agency National Space Weather Program, NSF's CEDAR (Coupling, Energetics and Dynamics of Atmospheric Regions), GEM (Geospace Environment Modeling) and Shine (Solar Heliospheric and INterplanetary Environment) programs. In addition to performing research and model development, CCMC also supports space science education by hosting summer students through local universities; through the provision of simulations in support of classroom programs such as Heliophysics Summer School (with student research contest) and CCMC Workshops; training next generation of junior scientists in space weather forecasting; and educating

  10. Space weather center in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watari, S.

    2008-11-01

    Progress in information technology has enabled to collecting data in near real-time. This significantly improves our ability to monitor space weather conditions. We deliver information on near real-time space weather conditions via the internet. We have started two collaborations with space weather users. One is a measurement of geomagnetically induced current (GIC) of power grids in collaboration with a Japanese power company. The other concerns radiation hazards for aircrews. The radiation exposure level for aircrews was been determined by the Japanese government by the end of 2005. The proposed upper limit is 5 mSV a year. We are actively seeking ways to contribute to this subject. Our activities at the Japanese space weather center are reported in this paper.

  11. CCMC: Serving research and space weather communities with unique space weather services, innovative tools and resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yihua; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Pulkkinen, Antti; Maddox, Marlo

    2015-04-01

    With the addition of Space Weather Research Center (a sub-team within CCMC) in 2010 to address NASA’s own space weather needs, CCMC has become a unique entity that not only facilitates research through providing access to the state-of-the-art space science and space weather models, but also plays a critical role in providing unique space weather services to NASA robotic missions, developing innovative tools and transitioning research to operations via user feedback. With scientists, forecasters and software developers working together within one team, through close and direct connection with space weather customers and trusted relationship with model developers, CCMC is flexible, nimble and effective to meet customer needs. In this presentation, we highlight a few unique aspects of CCMC/SWRC’s space weather services, such as addressing space weather throughout the solar system, pushing the frontier of space weather forecasting via the ensemble approach, providing direct personnel and tool support for spacecraft anomaly resolution, prompting development of multi-purpose tools and knowledge bases, and educating and engaging the next generation of space weather scientists.

  12. Space Weather Influence on Power Systems: Prediction, Risk Analysis, and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsenko, Vitaliy

    2016-04-01

    This report concentrates on dynamic probabilistic risk analysis of optical elements for complex characterization of damages using physical model of solid state lasers and predictable level of ionizing radiation and space weather. The following main subjects will be covered by our report: (a) solid-state laser model; (b) mathematical models for dynamic probabilistic risk assessment; and (c) software for modeling and prediction of ionizing radiation. A probabilistic risk assessment method for solid-state lasers is presented with consideration of some deterministic and stochastic factors. Probabilistic risk assessment is a comprehensive, structured, and logical analysis method aimed at identifying and assessing risks in solid-state lasers for the purpose of cost-e®ectively improving their safety and performance. This method based on the Conditional Value-at-Risk measure (CVaR) and the expected loss exceeding Value-at-Risk (VaR). We propose to use a new dynamical-information approach for radiation damage risk assessment of laser elements by cosmic radiation. Our approach includes the following steps: laser modeling, modeling of ionizing radiation in°uences on laser elements, probabilistic risk assessment methods, and risk minimization. For computer simulation of damage processes at microscopic and macroscopic levels the following methods are used: () statistical; (b) dynamical; (c) optimization; (d) acceleration modeling, and (e) mathematical modeling of laser functioning. Mathematical models of space ionizing radiation in°uence on laser elements were developed for risk assessment in laser safety analysis. This is a so-called `black box' or `input-output' models, which seeks only to reproduce the behaviour of the system's output in response to changes in its inputs. The model inputs are radiation in°uences on laser systems and output parameters are dynamical characteristics of the solid laser. Algorithms and software for optimal structure and parameters of

  13. Operational Space Weather in USAF Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithtro, C.; Quigley, S.

    2006-12-01

    Most education programs offering space weather courses are understandably and traditionally heavily weighted with theoretical space physics that is the basis for most of what is researched and modeled. While understanding the theory is a good and necessary grounding for anyone working the field of space weather, few military or commercial jobs employ such theory in real-time operations. The operations sites/centers are much more geared toward use of applied theory-resultant models, tools and products. To ensure its operations centers personnel, commanders, real-time system operators and other customers affected by the space environment are educated on available and soon-to-be operational space weather models and products, the USAF has developed applicable course/lecture material taught at various institutions to include the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) and the Joint Weather Training Complex (335th/TRS/OUA). Less frequent training of operational space weather is available via other venues that will be discussed, and associated course material is also being developed for potential use at the National Security Space Institute (NSSI). This presentation provides an overview of the programs, locations, courses and material developed and/or taught by or for USAF personnel dealing with operational space weather. It also provides general information on student research project results that may be used in operational support, along with observations regarding logistical and professional benefits of teaching such non-theoretical/non-traditional material.

  14. Addressing Metrics and Validation Needs for Space Weather Models, Tools and Forecasting Techniques at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Systematic evaluation of space environment models and tools and confidence assessment of space weather forecasting techniques and procedures are critical for development and further improvements of operational space weather prediction capabilities. Quantifying the confidence and predictive accuracy of model calculations is a key information needed for making high-consequence decisions. The approach to the validation, uncertainty assessment and to the format of the metrics is strongly dependent on specific applications and end user needs. There is a need to understand which aspects of spatial and temporal characteristicsof space environment parameters are the most important for specific impacts on technological and biological systems. The presentation will review progress in on-going coordinated model validation activities and metrics studies organized and supported by the Community Coordinated Modeling Center. We will focus on tasks associated with model-data comparisons, such as appropriate metrics selection for specific applications, preparation of observational data, sensitivity analysis of model outputs to input parameters, boundary conditions, modeling assumptions, adjustable parameters. We will discuss ideas for community-wide initiatives to build upon successes and to address challenges of metrics and validation activities, to develop guidelines and procedures to trace improvements over time and to pave a path forward.

  15. Highlights of Space Weather Services/Capabilities at NASA/GSFC Space Weather Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Zheng, Yihua; Hesse, Michael; Kuznetsova, Maria; Pulkkinen, Antti; Taktakishvili, Aleksandre; Mays, Leila; Chulaki, Anna; Lee, Hyesook

    2012-01-01

    The importance of space weather has been recognized world-wide. Our society depends increasingly on technological infrastructure, including the power grid as well as satellites used for communication and navigation. Such technologies, however, are vulnerable to space weather effects caused by the Sun's variability. NASA GSFC's Space Weather Center (SWC) (http://science.gsfc.nasa.gov//674/swx services/swx services.html) has developed space weather products/capabilities/services that not only respond to NASA's needs but also address broader interests by leveraging the latest scientific research results and state-of-the-art models hosted at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC: http://ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov). By combining forefront space weather science and models, employing an innovative and configurable dissemination system (iSWA.gsfc.nasa.gov), taking advantage of scientific expertise both in-house and from the broader community as well as fostering and actively participating in multilateral collaborations both nationally and internationally, NASA/GSFC space weather Center, as a sibling organization to CCMC, is poised to address NASA's space weather needs (and needs of various partners) and to help enhancing space weather forecasting capabilities collaboratively. With a large number of state-of-the-art physics-based models running in real-time covering the whole space weather domain, it offers predictive capabilities and a comprehensive view of space weather events throughout the solar system. In this paper, we will provide some highlights of our service products/capabilities. In particular, we will take the 23 January and the 27 January space weather events as examples to illustrate how we can use the iSWA system to track them in the interplanetary space and forecast their impacts.

  16. The impact of the atmospheric model and of the space weather data on the dynamics of clouds of space debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Alexis; Lemaitre, Anne

    2016-06-01

    New tools are necessary to deal with more than hundred thousands of space debris, thus our aim is to develop software able to propagate numerous trajectories and manage collisions or fragmentations. Specifically in low orbits Earth, gravity and atmospheric drag are the two main forces that affect the dynamics of the artificial satellites or space debris. NIMASTEP, the local orbit propagator, initially designed for high altitudes, has been adapted to low altitude orbits. To study the future debris environment, we propose a suitable model of space weather and we compare three different atmospheric density models (Jacchia-Bowman 2008, DTM-2013, and TD-88) able to propagate with accuracy and efficiency a large population of space debris on long time scales. We compare the results in different altitudes and during the reentry regime; we show, with a ballistic coefficient constant, a trend to underestimate or overestimate the decrease of the semi-major axis, specifically during the periods of high solar activity. We parallelize our software and use the calculation power of a computing cluster, we propagate a huge cloud of debris and we show that its global evolution is in agreement with the observations on several years.

  17. Operational Space Weather Entering a New Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent

    2009-10-01

    U.S. operational space weather is caught between two competing factors. On one hand, directed agency funding at about $1 billion for model development over the past decade has brought modeling maturity to five broad Sun-to-Earth domains, i.e., the Sun, heliosphere, magnetosphere, ionosphere, and thermosphere. On the other hand, agency funding for transitioning these models into operations has been a small fraction of the level provided for model development. This situation has left implementation of operational space weather largely unfunded and woefully undirected, with the exception of a few U.S. Air Force Weather Agency projects. A new vision is needed so that operational space weather can help solve 21st-century challenges.

  18. Space Weather - the Economic Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisi, M. M.; Gibbs, M.

    2015-12-01

    Following on from the UK Government's placement of space weather on it's National Risk Register, in 2011, and the Royal Academy of Engineering's study into the impacts of a severe space weather event, the next piece of key evidence, to underpin future investment decisions, is understanding the socio-economic impact of space weather This poster outlines a study, funded by the UK Space Agency, which will assess the socio-economic cost of space weather, both severe events, such as 1989 & a modern day repeat of the Carrington storm and also the cost of day-to-day impacts. The study will go on to estimate the cost benefit of forecasting and also investigate options for an operational L5 spacecraft mission and knowledge exchange activities with the South African Space Agency. The findings from the initial space weather socio-economic literature review will be presented along with other findings to date and sets out the tasks for the remainder of this programme of work.

  19. Space Weathering of Small Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFadden, L. A.

    2002-12-01

    Space weathering is defined as any process that wears away and alters surfaces, here confined to small bodies in the Solar System. Mechanisms which possibly alter asteroid and comet surfaces include solar wind bombardment, UV radiation, cosmic ray bombardment, micrometeorite bombardment. These processes are likely to contribute to surface processes differently. For example, solar wind bombardment would be more important on a body closer to the Sun compared to a comet where cosmic ray bombardment might be a more significant weathering mechanism. How can we measure the effects of space weathering? A big problem is that we don't know the nature of the surface before it was weathered. We are in a new era in the study of surface processes on small bodies brought about by the availability of spatially resolved, color and spectral measurements of asteroids from Galileo and NEAR. What processes are active on which bodies? What physics controls surface processes in different regions of the solar system? How do processes differ on different bodies of different physical and chemical properties? What combinations of observable parameters best address the nature of surface processes? Are there alternative explanations for the observed parameters that have been attributed to space weathering? Should we retain the term, space weathering? How can our understanding of space weathering on the Moon help us understand it on asteroids and comets? Finally, we have to leave behind some presuppositions, one being that there is evidence of space weathering based on the fact that the optical properties of S-type asteroids differs from those of ordinary chondrites.

  20. Ensemble downscaling in coupled solar wind-magnetosphere modeling for space weather forecasting

    PubMed Central

    Owens, M J; Horbury, T S; Wicks, R T; McGregor, S L; Savani, N P; Xiong, M

    2014-01-01

    Advanced forecasting of space weather requires simulation of the whole Sun-to-Earth system, which necessitates driving magnetospheric models with the outputs from solar wind models. This presents a fundamental difficulty, as the magnetosphere is sensitive to both large-scale solar wind structures, which can be captured by solar wind models, and small-scale solar wind “noise,” which is far below typical solar wind model resolution and results primarily from stochastic processes. Following similar approaches in terrestrial climate modeling, we propose statistical “downscaling” of solar wind model results prior to their use as input to a magnetospheric model. As magnetospheric response can be highly nonlinear, this is preferable to downscaling the results of magnetospheric modeling. To demonstrate the benefit of this approach, we first approximate solar wind model output by smoothing solar wind observations with an 8 h filter, then add small-scale structure back in through the addition of random noise with the observed spectral characteristics. Here we use a very simple parameterization of noise based upon the observed probability distribution functions of solar wind parameters, but more sophisticated methods will be developed in the future. An ensemble of results from the simple downscaling scheme are tested using a model-independent method and shown to add value to the magnetospheric forecast, both improving the best estimate and quantifying the uncertainty. We suggest a number of features desirable in an operational solar wind downscaling scheme. Key Points Solar wind models must be downscaled in order to drive magnetospheric models Ensemble downscaling is more effective than deterministic downscaling The magnetosphere responds nonlinearly to small-scale solar wind fluctuations PMID:26213518

  1. Space Weathering Processes on Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, S. K.; Pieters, C. M.

    2002-01-01

    Like the Moon, Mercury has no atmosphere to protect it from the harsh space environment and therefore it is expected that it will incur the effects of space weathering. These weathering processes are capable of both creating regolith and altering its optical properties. However, there are many important differences between the environments of Mercury and the Moon. These environmental differences will almost certainly affect the weathering processes as well as the products of those processes. It should be possible to observe the effects of these differences in Vis/NIR spectra of the type expected to be returned by MESSENGER. More importantly, understanding these weathering processes and their consequences is essential for evaluating the spectral data returned from MESSENGER and other missions in order to determine the mineralogy and the iron content of the Mercurian surface. Theoretical and experimental work has been undertaken in order to better understand these consequences.

  2. Sources, Propagators, and Sinks of Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesnell, William D.

    2006-01-01

    Space Weather is a complex web of sources, propagators, and sinks of energy, mass, and momentum. A complete understanding of Space Weather requires specifying, and an ability to predict, each link in this web. One important problem in Space Weather is ranking the importance of a particular measurement or model in a research program. One way to do this ranking is to examine the simplest linked diagram of the sources, propagators, and sinks and produce. By analyzing only those components that contribute to a particular area the individual contributions can be better appreciated. Several such diagrams will be shown and used to discuss how long-term effects of Space Weather can be separated from the impulsive effects.

  3. Sources, Propagators, and Sinks of Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesnell, W. D.

    2006-12-01

    Space Weather is a complex web of sources, propagators, and sinks of energy, mass, and momentum. A complete understanding of Space Weather requires specifying, and an ability to predict, each link in this web. One important problem in Space Weather is ranking the importance of a particular measurement or model in a research program. One way to do this ranking is to examine the simplest linked diagram of the sources, propagators, and sinks and produce. By analyzing only those components that contribute to a particular area the individual contributions can be better appreciated. Several such diagrams will be shown and used to discuss how long-term effects of Space Weather can be separated from the impulsive effects.

  4. Characterization of Lunar Swirls at Mare Ingenii: A Model for Space Weathering at Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Georgianna Y.; Combe, Jean-Philippe; Harnett, Erika M.; Hawke, Bernard Ray; Noble, Sarah K.; Blewett, David T.; McCord, Thomas B.; Giguere, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of spectra from the Clementine ultraviolet-visible and near-infrared cameras of small, immature craters and surface soils both on and adjacent to the lunar swirls at Marc Ingenii has yielded the following conclusions about space weathering at a magnetic anomaly. (l) Despite having spectral characteristics of immaturity, the lunar swirls arc not freshly exposed surfaces. (2) The swirl surfaces arc regions of retarded weathering, while immediately adjacent regions experience accelerated weathering, (3) Weathering in the off-swirl regions darkens and flattens the spectrum with little to no reddening, which suggests that the production of larger (greater than 40 nm) nanophase iron dominates in these locations as a result of charged particle sorting by the magnetic field. Preliminaty analysis of two other lunar swirl regions, Reiner Gamma and Mare Marginis, is consistent with our observations at Mare Ingenii. Our results indicate that sputtering/vapor deposition, implanted solar wind hydrogen, and agglutination share responsibility for creating the range in npFe(sup 0) particle sizes responsible for the spectral effects of space weathering.

  5. Modelling the perception of weather conditions by users of outdoor public spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, H.; Oliveira, S.; Alcoforado, M.-J.

    2009-09-01

    Outdoor public spaces play an important role for the quality of life in urban areas. Their usage depends, among other factors, on the bioclimatic comfort of the users. Climate change can modify the uses of outdoor spaces, by changing temperature and rainfall patterns. Understanding the way people perceive the microclimatic conditions is an important tool to the design of more comfortable outdoor spaces and in anticipating future needs to cope with climate change impacts. The perception of bioclimatic comfort by users of two different outdoor spaces was studied in Lisbon. A survey of about one thousand inquires was carried out simultaneously with weather measurements (air temperature, wind speed, relative humidity and solar and long wave radiation), during the years 2006 and 2007. The aim was to assess the relationships between weather variables, the individual characteristics of people (such as age and gender, among others) and their bioclimatic comfort. The perception of comfort was evaluated through the preference votes of the interviewees, which consisted on their answers concerning the desire to decrease, maintain or increase the values of the different weather parameters, in order to improve their comfort at the moment of the interview. The perception of the atmospheric conditions and of the bioclimatic comfort are highly influenced by subjective factors, which are difficult to integrate in a model. Nonetheless, the use of the multiple logistic regression allows the definition of patterns in the quantitative relation between preference votes and environmental and personal parameters. The thermal preference depends largely on the season and is associated with wind speed. Comfort in relation to wind depends not only on the speed but also on turbulence: a high variability in wind speed is generally perceived as uncomfortable. It was also found that the acceptability of warmer conditions is higher than for cooler conditions and the majority of people declared

  6. Interplanetary Disturbances Affecting Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    The Sun somehow accelerates the solar wind, an incessant stream of plasma originating in coronal holes and some, as yet unidentified, regions. Occasionally, coronal, and possibly sub-photospheric structures, conspire to energize a spectacular eruption from the Sun which we call a coronal mass ejection (CME). These can leave the Sun at very high speeds and travel through the interplanetary medium, resulting in a large-scale disturbance of the ambient background plasma. These interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs) can drive shocks which in turn accelerate particles, but also have a distinct intrinsic magnetic structure which is capable of disturbing the Earth's magnetic field and causing significant geomagnetic effects. They also affect other planets, so they can and do contribute to space weather throughout the heliosphere. This paper presents a historical review of early space weather studies, a modern-day example, and discusses space weather throughout the heliosphere.

  7. Space Weather Services at Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, M.; Pulkkinen, A.; Zheng, Y.; Maddox, M.; Kuznetsova, M.; Taktakishvil, A.; Rastaetter, L.

    2010-01-01

    The Space Weather Laboratory (SWL) forms a focal point at GSFC for the generation of space weather tools and information. This information is based on data from space mission and ground observatories, as well as on forefront model calculations conducted at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC). CCMC works with the research community to bring to bear the power of communitydeveloped space science models on space weather problems. Data from primarily from NASA missions but also from NOAA and other partner agencies are combined with model results into a fully configurable space weather information display by means of the iSWA system. This information and iSWA form the basis for and SWL-provided service to NASA's robotic mission fleet, which includes forecasts, regular updates, and warnings. This service benefits from a strong partnership with NASA's Space Radiation Analysis Group, and with the US Air Force Weather Agency. In this presentation, we provide a summary of space weather capabilities and services and we present an outlook into the future.

  8. Space weather: Challenges and Opportunities (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdan, T. J.

    2009-12-01

    The Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) has the following legal mandates to: a) Continuously monitor, measure, and specify the space environment, b) Provide timely and accurate space weather data, operational forecasts, alerts, and warnings of hazardous space weather phenomena, c) Provide scientific stewardship of, and public access to, space weather data and products, d) Understand the processes that influence space weather and develop applications for the user community and e) Develop new and improved products and transition them into operations to meet evolving space weather user needs. This presentation will discuss the challenges and opportunities that NOAA and the SWPC face in addressing these mandates. This includes coordination of space environment activities across federal agencies and the strategic planning for NOAA's space weather services, integration of space weather activities as well as critical dependencies of space weather services on current and future operational environmental satellites.

  9. Solar EUV irradiance for space weather applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viereck, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Solar EUV irradiance is an important driver of space weather models. Large changes in EUV and x-ray irradiances create large variability in the ionosphere and thermosphere. Proxies such as the F10.7 cm radio flux, have provided reasonable estimates of the EUV flux but as the space weather models become more accurate and the demands of the customers become more stringent, proxies are no longer adequate. Furthermore, proxies are often provided only on a daily basis and shorter time scales are becoming important. Also, there is a growing need for multi-day forecasts of solar EUV irradiance to drive space weather forecast models. In this presentation we will describe the needs and requirements for solar EUV irradiance information from the space weather modeler's perspective. We will then translate these requirements into solar observational requirements such as spectral resolution and irradiance accuracy. We will also describe the activities at NOAA to provide long-term solar EUV irradiance observations and derived products that are needed for real-time space weather modeling.

  10. The Planeterrella: an Analog Model for Teaching About the Invisible Electromagnetic Processes Driving Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masongsong, E. V.; Glesener, G. B.; Angelopoulos, V.; Lilensten, J.; Bingley, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Planeterrella can be used as an analog to help students visualize and understand the electromagnetic processes driving space weather that affect our daily lives. Solar storms and solar wind charged particles (plasma) cause "space weather" via their interaction with Earth's protective magnetic shield, the magnetosphere. The Planeterrella uses magnetized spheres in a vacuum chamber to demonstrate solar wind energy transfer to Earth and planets, with polar localization of aurora due to charged particles traveling along geomagnetic field lines. The Planeterrella provides a unique opportunity to experience and manipulate plasma, the dominant form of matter in our universe, yet seldom observable on Earth. Severe space weather events produce spectacular auroral displays as well as devastating consequences: radiation exposure to air and space travelers, prolonged radio blackouts, and damage to critical GPS and communications satellites. We will (1) discuss ways in which the Planeterrella may be most useful in classroom settings, including large lecture halls, laboratories, and small discussion sessions; (2) provide information on how instructors can produce their own Planeterrella for their courses; and (3) invite meeting attendees to engage in a discussion on how we might be able to improve on the current design of the Planeterrella, and how to reach students in more parts of the world.

  11. NASA Space Weather Research Center: Addressing the Unique Space Weather Needs of NASA Robotic Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Maddox, M. M.; Mays, M. L.; Taktakishvili, A.; Chulaki, A.; Thompson, B. J.; Collado-Vega, Y. M.; Muglach, K.; Evans, R. M.; Wiegand, C.; MacNeice, P. J.; Rastaetter, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Space Weather Research Center (SWRC) has been providing space weather monitoring and forecasting services to NASA's robotic missions since its establishment in 2010. Embedded within the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) (see Maddox et al. in Session IN026) and located at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, SWRC has easy access to state-of-the-art modeling capabilities and proximity to space science and research expertise. By bridging space weather users and the research community, SWRC has been a catalyst for the efficient transition from research to operations and operations to research. In this presentation, we highlight a few unique aspects of SWRC's space weather services, such as addressing space weather throughout the solar system, pushing the frontier of space weather forecasting via the ensemble approach, providing direct personnel and tool support for spacecraft anomaly resolution, prompting development of multi-purpose tools and knowledge bases (see Wiegand et al. in the same session SM004), and educating and engaging the next generation of space weather scientists.

  12. Training Early Career Space Weather Researchers and other Space Weather Professionals at the CISM Space Weather Summer School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, N. A.; Hughes, W.

    2011-12-01

    This talk will outline the organization of a summer school designed to introduce young professions to a sub-discipline of geophysics. Through out the 10 year life time of the Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling (CISM) the CISM Team has offered a two week summer school that introduces new graduate students and other interested professional to the fundamentals of space weather. The curriculum covers basic concepts in space physics, the hazards of space weather, and the utility of computer models of the space environment. Graduate students attend from both inside and outside CISM, from all the sub-disciplines involved in space weather (solar, heliosphere, geomagnetic, and aeronomy), and from across the nation and around the world. In addition, between 1/4 and 1/3 of the participants each year are professionals involved in space weather in some way, such as: forecasters from NOAA and the Air Force, Air Force satellite program directors, NASA specialists involved in astronaut radiation safety, and representatives from industries affected by space weather. The summer school has adopted modern pedagogy that has been used successfully at the undergraduate level. A typical daily schedule involves three morning lectures followed by an afternoon lab session. During the morning lectures, student interaction is encouraged using "Timeout to Think" questions and peer instruction, along with question cards for students to ask follow up questions. During the afternoon labs students, working in groups of four, answer thought provoking questions using results from simulations and observation data from a variety of source. Through the interactions with each other and the instructors, as well as social interactions during the two weeks, students network and form bonds that will last them through out their careers. We believe that this summer school can be used as a model for summer schools in a wide variety of disciplines.

  13. The Sun and Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanslmeier, Arnold

    2002-06-01

    What are the terrestrial effects of solar activity and the solar activity cycle? The modern term used for solar terrestrial relations is `Space Weather'. This term describes all external effects on the space environment of the Earth and the Earth's atmosphere. The main driver for space weather is our Sun. Explosive events on the Sun that are modulated by the solar activity cycle lead to enhanced particle emission and short wavelength radiation. This affects satellites: for example surface charging and enhanced drag forces on satellites in low Earth orbit can cause satellite crashes etc. Enhanced radiation also poses a problem for astronauts, especially for extravehicular activities. Another source of space weather effects is space debris and micrometeoroids. Since the Sun is the main source of space weather effects, the first part of the book is devoted to a general introduction to the physics of the Sun. A better understanding of the phenomena underlying solar activity is also important for prediction of solar outbursts and thus for establishing alert systems for space missions and telecommunication systems. The book contains the following topics: * possible influence of the Sun on the Earth's climate; * the effects of radiation on humans in space and the expected radiation dose from various solar events; * disturbances of the Earth's ionosphere and the implications of radio communication at different wavelength ranges; * possible hazardous asteroids and meteoroids and their detection; and * space debris and special shielding of spacecraft. In the cited literature the reader can find more detailed information about the topics. This book provides an introduction and overview of modern solar-terrestrial physics for students as well as for researchers in the field of astrophysics, solar physics, geophysics, and climate research. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/1-4020-0684-5

  14. Space weather activities in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, D.

    Space Weather Plan Australia has a draft space weather plan to drive and focus appropriate research into services that meet future industry and social needs. The Plan has three main platforms, space weather monitoring and service delivery, support for priority research, and outreach to the community. The details of monitoring, service, research and outreach activities are summarised. A ground-based network of 14 monitoring stations from Antarctica to Papua New Guinea is operated by IPS, a government agency. These sites monitor ionospheric and geomagnetic characteristics, while two of them also monitor the sun at radio and optical wavelengths. Services provided through the Australian Space Forecast Centre (ASFC) include real-time information on the solar, space, ionospheric and geomagnetic environments. Data are gathered automatically from monitoring sites and integrated with data exchanged internationally to create snapshots of current space weather conditions and forecasts of conditions up to several days ahead. IPS also hosts the WDC for Solar-Terrestrial Science and specialises in ground-based solar, ionospheric, and geomagnetic data sets, although recent in-situ magnetospheric measurements are also included. Space weather activities A research consortium operates the Tasman International Geospace Environment Radar (TIGER), an HF southward pointing auroral radar operating from Hobart (Tasmania). A second cooperative radar (Unwin radar) is being constructed in the South Island of New Zealand. This will intersect with TIGER over the auroral zone and enhance the ability of the radar to image the surge of currents that herald space environment changes entering the Polar Regions. Launched in November 2002, the micro satellite FEDSAT, operated by the Cooperative Research Centre for Satellite Systems, has led to successful space science programs and data streams. FEDSAT is making measurements of the magnetic field over Australia and higher latitudes. It also carries a

  15. Asteroids: Does Space Weathering Matter?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffey, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    The interpretive calibrations and methodologies used to extract mineralogy from asteroidal spectra appear to remain valid until the space weathering process is advanced to a degree which appears to be rare or absent on asteroid surfaces. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Cosmic Rays and Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, Lev

    In this review-paper we consider following problems. 1. Cosmic rays (CR) as element of space weather 1.1. Influence of CR on the Earth's atmosphere and global climate change 1.2. Radia-tion hazard from galactic CR 1.3. Radiation hazard from solar CR 1.4. Radiation hazard from energetic particle precipitation from radiation belts 2. CR as tool for space weather forecasting 2.1. Forecasting of the part of global climate change caused by CR intensity variations 2.2. Forecasting of radiation hazard for aircrafts and spacecrafts caused by variations of galactic CR intensity 2.3. Forecasting of the radiation hazard from solar CR events by using on-line one-min ground neutron monitors network and satellite data 2.4. Forecasting of great magnetic storms hazard by using on-line one hour CR intensity data from ground based world-wide network of neutron monitors and muon telescopes 3. CR, space weather, and satellite anomalies 4. CR, space weather, and people health

  17. Current and future challenges in space weather science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, Andrei

    The main objective of the space weather science is to provide a scientific basis for reliable space weather forecasting. The importance of space weather forecasting is increasing as our society is becoming more and more dependent on advanced technologies that may be affected by adverse space weather conditions. Space weather forecasting is still a difficult task and requires specific observational inputs that are reviewed in this presentation, with an emphasis on solar and interplanetary weather. A list of key observations that are essential for real-time operational space weather forecasting is established. Further on, the use of observational data to produce reliable predictions requires development of empirical and statistical methods, as well as physical models. Scientific basis of space weather forecasting is briefly described. Several important problems are emphasized, and possible ways of improving our predictive capabilities are discussed, including possible novel space observations to be made in future.

  18. Verification of Space Weather Forecasts using Terrestrial Weather Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henley, E.; Murray, S.; Pope, E.; Stephenson, D.; Sharpe, M.; Bingham, S.; Jackson, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Met Office Space Weather Operations Centre (MOSWOC) provides a range of 24/7 operational space weather forecasts, alerts, and warnings, which provide valuable information on space weather that can degrade electricity grids, radio communications, and satellite electronics. Forecasts issued include arrival times of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and probabilistic forecasts for flares, geomagnetic storm indices, and energetic particle fluxes and fluences. These forecasts are produced twice daily using a combination of output from models such as Enlil, near-real-time observations, and forecaster experience. Verification of forecasts is crucial for users, researchers, and forecasters to understand the strengths and limitations of forecasters, and to assess forecaster added value. To this end, the Met Office (in collaboration with Exeter University) has been adapting verification techniques from terrestrial weather, and has been working closely with the International Space Environment Service (ISES) to standardise verification procedures. We will present the results of part of this work, analysing forecast and observed CME arrival times, assessing skill using 2x2 contingency tables. These MOSWOC forecasts can be objectively compared to those produced by the NASA Community Coordinated Modelling Center - a useful benchmark. This approach cannot be taken for the other forecasts, as they are probabilistic and categorical (e.g., geomagnetic storm forecasts give probabilities of exceeding levels from minor to extreme). We will present appropriate verification techniques being developed to address these forecasts, such as rank probability skill score, and comparing forecasts against climatology and persistence benchmarks. As part of this, we will outline the use of discrete time Markov chains to assess and improve the performance of our geomagnetic storm forecasts. We will also discuss work to adapt a terrestrial verification visualisation system to space weather, to help

  19. Overview of Space Weather Impacts and NASA Space Weather Center Services and Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Y.

    2012-01-01

    The presentation is divided into two major components. First, I will give an overview of space weather phenomenon and their associated impacts. Then I will describe the comprehensive list of products and tools that NASA Space Weather Center has developed by leveraging more than a decade long modeling experience enabled by the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) and latest scientific research results from the broad science community. In addition, a summary of the space weather activities we have been engaged in and our operational experience will be provided.

  20. Industry and Government Space Weather Experts Meet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intriligator, Devrie S.

    2011-07-01

    The fifth annual NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC)-Commercial Space Weather Interest Group (CSWIG) Summit was held on 28 April 2011 in Boulder, Colo., in association with the 2011 Space Weather Workshop. Interest was high, in the United States and internationally, in potential space weather impacts on many aspects of everyday life because of the increased vulnerability of technological systems and the possibility that a major space weather event may occur as the twenty-fourth solar cycle begins to progress toward solar maximum. Industry and government space weather experts participated in the summit. Devrie Intriligator (Carmel Research Center, Inc.) and W. Kent Tobiska (Space Environment Technologies (SET)) served as cochairs.

  1. Health Issues and Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, N.

    2009-04-01

    The possibility that solar activity and variations in the Earth's magnetic field may affect human health has been debated for many decades but is still a "scientific topic" in its infancy. By learning whether and, if so, how much the Earth's space weather can influence the daily health of people will be of practical importance. Knowing whether human genetics, include regulating factors that take into account fluctuations of the Earth's magnetic field and solar disturbances, indeed exist will also benefit future interplanetary space travelers. Because the atmospheres on other planets are different from ours, as well as their interaction with the space environment, one may ask whether we are equipped with the genetics necessary to take this variability into account. The goal of this presentation is to define what is meant by space weather as a health risk and identify the long-term socio-economic effects on society that such health risks would have. Identifying the physical links between space weather sources and different effects on human health, as well as the parameters (direct and indirect) to be monitored, the potential for such a cross-disciplinary study will be invaluable, for scientists and medical doctors, as well as for engineers.

  2. Activities of NICT space weather project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Ken T.; Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Watari, Shinichi; Shinagawa, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Mamoru

    NICT (National Institute of Information and Communications Technology) has been in charge of space weather forecast service in Japan for more than 20 years. The main target region of the space weather is the geo-space in the vicinity of the Earth where human activities are dominant. In the geo-space, serious damages of satellites, international space stations and astronauts take place caused by energetic particles or electromagnetic disturbances: the origin of the causes is dynamically changing of solar activities. Positioning systems via GPS satellites are also im-portant recently. Since the most significant effect of positioning error comes from disturbances of the ionosphere, it is crucial to estimate time-dependent modulation of the electron density profiles in the ionosphere. NICT is one of the 13 members of the ISES (International Space Environment Service), which is an international assembly of space weather forecast centers under the UNESCO. With help of geo-space environment data exchanging among the member nations, NICT operates daily space weather forecast service every day to provide informa-tion on forecasts of solar flare, geomagnetic disturbances, solar proton event, and radio-wave propagation conditions in the ionosphere. The space weather forecast at NICT is conducted based on the three methodologies: observations, simulations and informatics (OSI model). For real-time or quasi real-time reporting of space weather, we conduct our original observations: Hiraiso solar observatory to monitor the solar activity (solar flare, coronal mass ejection, and so on), domestic ionosonde network, magnetometer HF radar observations in far-east Siberia, and south-east Asia low-latitude ionosonde network (SEALION). Real-time observation data to monitor solar and solar-wind activities are obtained through antennae at NICT from ACE and STEREO satellites. We have a middle-class super-computer (NEC SX-8R) to maintain real-time computer simulations for solar and solar

  3. Space weathering: from laboratory to observations .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetto, R.; Orofino, V.; Strazzulla, G.

    An ongoing research program in our laboratories is focusing on the effects of laser ablation and ion irradiation on silicates, meteorites, and ices, as a simulation of space weathering on Solar System minor bodies (asteroids, Trans-Neptunian Objects, etc.). Spectroscopic results show a general reddening and darkening of the various materials in the 0.3-2.7 mu m range. Laboratory data are then compared with observations, through spectral characterization and scattering models, indicating that space weathering is a very efficient process both in the inner and outer Solar System. In particular, we demonstrated that the majority of TNOs and Centaurs can develop an organic crust mantle produced after irradiation of simple C-bearing molecules. Another relevant result is that the exposure to surface space weathering of asteroid 832 Karin, as calculated from our experiments and models, is in agreement with a dynamical time-scale, i.e. the age of the corresponding Karin family.

  4. Modelling natural electromagnetic interference in man-made conductors for space weather applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trichtchenko, Larisa

    2016-04-01

    Power transmission lines above the ground, cables and pipelines in the ground and under the sea, and in general all man-made long grounded conductors are exposed to the variations of the natural electromagnetic field. The resulting currents in the networks (commonly named geomagnetically induced currents, GIC), are produced by the conductive and/or inductive coupling and can compromise or even disrupt system operations and, in extreme cases, cause power blackouts, railway signalling mis-operation, or interfere with pipeline corrosion protection systems. To properly model the GIC in order to mitigate their impacts it is necessary to know the frequency dependence of the response of these systems to the geomagnetic variations which naturally span a wide frequency range. For that, the general equations of the electromagnetic induction in a multi-layered infinitely long cylinder (representing cable, power line wire, rail or pipeline) embedded in uniform media have been solved utilising methods widely used in geophysics. The derived electromagnetic fields and currents include the effects of the electromagnetic properties of each layer and of the different types of the surrounding media. This exact solution then has been used to examine the electromagnetic response of particular samples of long conducting structures to the external electromagnetic wave for a wide range of frequencies. Because the exact solution has a rather complicated structure, simple approximate analytical formulas have been proposed, analysed and compared with the results from the exact model. These approximate formulas show good coincidence in the frequency range spanning from geomagnetic storms (less than mHz) to pulsations (mHz to Hz) to atmospherics (kHz) and above, and can be recommended for use in space weather applications.

  5. Sunspots, Space Weather and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Four hundred years ago this year the telescope was first used for astronomical observations. Within a year, Galileo in Italy and Harriot in England reported seeing spots on the surface of the Sun. Yet, it took over 230 years of observations before a Swiss amateur astronomer noticed that the sunspots increased and decreased in number over a period of about 11 years. Within 15 years of this discovery of the sunspot cycle astronomers made the first observations of a flare on the surface of the Sun. In the 150 years since that discovery we have learned much about sunspots, the sunspot cycle, and the Sun s explosive events - solar flares, prominence eruptions and coronal mass ejections that usually accompany the sunspots. These events produce what is called Space Weather. The conditions in space are dramatically affected by these events. Space Weather can damage our satellites, harm our astronauts, and affect our lives here on the surface of planet Earth. Long term changes in the sunspot cycle have been linked to changes in our climate as well. In this public lecture I will give an introduction to sunspots, the sunspot cycle, space weather, and the possible impact of solar variability on our climate.

  6. Space weather forecasting: Past, Present, Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2012-12-01

    There have been revolutionary advances in electrical technologies over the last 160 years. The historical record demonstrates that space weather processes have often provided surprises in the implementation and operation of many of these technologies. The historical record also demonstrates that as the complexity of systems increase, including their interconnectedness and interoperability, they can become more susceptible to space weather effects. An engineering goal, beginning during the decades following the 1859 Carrington event, has been to attempt to forecast solar-produced disturbances that could affect technical systems, be they long grounded conductor-based or radio-based or required for exploration, or the increasingly complex systems immersed in the space environment itself. Forecasting of space weather events involves both frontier measurements and models to address engineering requirements, and industrial and governmental policies that encourage and permit creativity and entrepreneurship. While analogies of space weather forecasting to terrestrial weather forecasting are frequently made, and while many of the analogies are valid, there are also important differences. This presentation will provide some historical perspectives on the forecast problem, a personal assessment of current status of several areas including important policy issues, and a look into the not-too-distant future.

  7. Space Weather Operational Products in the NOAA Space Environment Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtagh, W. J.; Onsager, T. G.

    2006-12-01

    The NOAA Space Environment Center (SEC) is the Nation's official source of space weather alerts and warnings, and provides real-time monitoring and forecasting of solar and geophysical events. The SEC, a 24- hour/day operations center, provides space weather products to the scientific and user communities in the United States and around the world. This presentation will provide a brief overview of the SEC current suite of space weather products, with an emphasis on models and products recently introduced into the Operations Center. Customer uses of products will be discussed, which will highlight the diverse customer base for space weather services. Also, models in SEC's testbed will be introduced. SEC's testbed facility is dedicated to moving space environment models from a research-development mode to an operational mode. The status of efforts to replace NASA's aging real-time monitor (ACE) in the solar wind ahead of Earth, an "upstream data buoy", will also be described. Numerous existing and planned space weather products and models rely on near real-time solar wind data.

  8. Two way coupling RAM-SCB to the space weather modeling framework

    SciTech Connect

    Welling, Daniel T; Jordanova, Vania K; Zaharia, Sorin G; Toth, Gabor

    2010-12-03

    The Ring current Atmosphere interaction Model with Self-Consistently calculated 3D Magnetic field (RAM-SCB) has been used to successfully study inner magnetosphere dynamics during different solar wind and magnetosphere conditions. Recently, one way coupling of RAM-SCB with the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) has been achieved to replace all data or empirical inputs with those obtained through first-principles-based codes: magnetic field and plasma flux outer boundary conditions are provided by the Block Adaptive Tree Solar wind Roe-type Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) MHO code, convection electric field is provided by the Ridley Ionosphere Model (RIM), and ion composition is provided by the Polar Wind Outflow Model (PWOM) combined with a multi-species MHO approach. These advances, though creating a powerful inner magnetosphere virtual laboratory, neglect the important mechanisms through which the ring current feeds back into the whole system, primarily the stretching of the magnetic field lines and shielding of the convection electric field through strong region two Field Aligned Currents (FACs). In turn, changing the magnetosphere in this way changes the evolution of the ring current. To address this shortcoming, the coupling has been expanded to include feedback from RAM-SCB to the other coupled codes: region two FACs are returned to the RIM while total plasma pressure is used to nudge the MHO solution towards the RAMSCB values. The impacts of the two way coupling are evaluated on three levels: the global magnetospheric level, focusing on the impact on the ionosphere and the shape of the magnetosphere, the regional level, examining the impact on the development of the ring current in terms of energy density, anisotropy, and plasma distribution, and the local level to compare the new results to in-situ measurements of magnetic and electric field and plasma. The results will also be compared to past simulations using the one way coupling and no coupling

  9. Two Way Coupling RAM-SCB to the Space Weather Modeling Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welling, D. T.; Jordanova, V. K.; Zaharia, S. G.; Toth, G.

    2010-12-01

    The Ring current Atmosphere interaction Model with Self-Consistently calculated 3D Magnetic field (RAM-SCB) has been used to successfully study inner magnetosphere dynamics during different solar wind and magnetosphere conditions. Recently, one way coupling of RAM-SCB with the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) has been achieved to replace all data or empirical inputs with those obtained through first-principles-based codes: magnetic field and plasma flux outer boundary conditions are provided by the Block Adaptive Tree Solar wind Roe-type Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) MHD code, convection electric field is provided by the Ridley Ionosphere Model (RIM), and ion composition is provided by the Polar Wind Outflow Model (PWOM) combined with a multi-species MHD approach. These advances, though creating a powerful inner magnetosphere virtual laboratory, neglect the important mechanisms through which the ring current feeds back into the whole system, primarily the stretching of the magnetic field lines and shielding of the convection electric field through strong region two Field Aligned Currents (FACs). In turn, changing the magnetosphere in this way changes the evolution of the ring current. To address this shortcoming, the coupling has been expanded to include feedback from RAM-SCB to the other coupled codes: region two FACs are returned to the RIM while total plasma pressure is used to nudge the MHD solution towards the RAM-SCB values. The impacts of the two way coupling are evaluated on three levels: the global magnetospheric level, focusing on the impact on the ionosphere and the shape of the magnetosphere, the regional level, examining the impact on the development of the ring current in terms of energy density, anisotropy, and plasma distribution, and the local level to compare the new results to in-situ measurements of magnetic and electric field and plasma. The results will also be compared to past simulations using the one way coupling and no coupling

  10. Development of a Space Weather forecast service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsch, Peter; Isles, John; Burge, Christina

    2014-05-01

    Space weather describes changes in the near-Earth space environment, it includes the monitoring of magnetic fields, plasma, radiation and other matter. Ejections of plasma from the Sun and magnetic storms at the Earth can increase the number of high energy particles trapped in the Earth's magnetic field; these events can present risks and hazards to space-borne instrumentation and personnel. Improved knowledge of space weather processes acquired through monitoring via both satellite and ground based instruments and related collaborative research projects (European Union Framework 7 - SPACECAST) has allowed the further development of forecasting models such as the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) Radiation Belt model. A system is being developed which enables real-time access to a space weather forecast service. This service will provide a 3-hourly forward look, updated hourly. To enable this forecast, systems are in place to gather, in real-time, ancillary data required for input into the BAS model, in particular data from the GOES satellite instruments. Auxiliary information from other satellites (e.g. ACE) and ground based magnetometers are also gathered and presented to assist in the interpretation of current space weather activity. BAS is working in collaboration with satellite operators and other interested parties to provide an interface which will inform them, in a timely fashion, of events that may require mitigating action to prevent possible extensive (and costly) effects to, for example, communication services. Data can be obtained via a web service, or viewed directly via a browser interface. In addition, it is anticipated that a post-event analysis suite be available, enabling the more detailed view of recent and past events and the possibility of running the model to "replay" periods of space weather history.

  11. Space weathering on S-complex asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willman, M.

    Space weathering was hypothesized to reconcile the different spectra from meteorites and their putative source, S-complex asteroids. We measured a new space weathering time and the first regolith gardening time for changing surface color on S-complex asteroids. We also measured the principal component color (PC1) range over which space weathering operates. Our space weathering models evolved from the single tau model with only one weathering time, to the dual tau model incorporating the gardening time, and finally to the enhanced dual tau model using a probability density function to represent an asteroid's PC1 and age. The first two models were fit to pre-existing data plus new observations of the youngest families and even younger sub-Myr clusters. The third model used a sample common to SMASS and SDSS. The enhanced dual tau model best represents space weathering but it was fit to a small data sample of limited size and age range. Therefore we believe that the best estimate of space weathering and gardening times comes from the dual tau model which yields 960 +/- 160 Myr and 2000 +/- 290 Myr, respectively. On the other hand, the enhanced dual tau model solved a PC1 truncation problem when inverting the dual tau model, so we prefer its initial and maximum likely PC 1 values of --0.05 +/- 0.01 and 1.29 +/- 0.04. We independently calculated an average resurfacing time of tau g = 270 +/- 110 My from impact rates and cratering physics that is 7x smaller than our measured gardening time. Hence, we postulate that due to internal porosity, small asteroids absorb impactors up to 10--20 m diameter through inelastic deformation without producing significant ejecta blankets, a 'honeycomb' mechanism. This may also explain the paucity of craters <200 m on Eros. The only data point not fitting our models was from asteroid two-members families that have an average color of PC1 = 0.49 +/- 0.03, 5sigma redder than predicted. This anomaly may be due to a different formation

  12. National Space Policy and Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzerotti, Louis J.

    2006-12-01

    The new national space policy, authorized by President Bush on 31 August 2006, has been the cause of considerable discussion among space professionals. The policy statement is a broad umbrella that lays out the nation's objectives in space, from science to commercial to national security and intelligence. The policy appears to support numerous national space objectives that were contained in the previous (1996) policy statement, of the Clinton administration. It also articulates in one location many of the pronouncements on space activities that have been promulgated since 2001. Some of the unhappiness expressed in editorial comments would seem to occur because words such as "Mars" and "Moon" do not appear explicitly. At the same time, neither do the words "space weather."

  13. Updates on CCMC Activities and GSFC Space Weather Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhengm Y.; Hesse, M.; Kuznetsova, M.; Pulkkinen, A.; Rastaetter, L.; Maddox, M.; Taktakishvili, A.; Berrios, D.; Chulaki, A.; Lee, H.; Macneice, P.; Mays, L.; Mendoza, A. M.; Mullinix, R.

    2011-01-01

    In this presentation, we provide updates on CCMC modeling activities, CCMC metrics and validation studies, and other CCMC efforts. In addition, an overview of GSFC Space Weather Services (a sibling organization to the Community Coordinated Modeling Center) and its products/capabilities will be given. We show how some of the research grade models, if running in an operational mode, can help address NASA's space weather needs by providing forecasting/now casting capabilities of significant space weather events throughout the solar system.

  14. Space Weather and GOCE Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ince, E. S.; Pagiatakis, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    The latest gravity field mission GOCE (Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer) has mapped the Earth's static gravity field with an unrivalled precision. The satellite completed its mission in November 2013 and the most recent gravity field models (e.g., GOCE 5th generation gravity field models) have already been released. However, there are still unanswered questions in the data processing which leak into GOCE Level 1b and 2 products. It is found that there are signals of non-gravitational origin present in the cross-track gravity gradients that are about three to five times larger than the expected noise level of the gravity field components derived from GOCE gradiometer. These disturbances are observed around the magnetic poles during particular time periods that correspond to geomagnetically active days. In this study, we investigate the unexpected disturbances present in GOCE gradiometer gravity tensor's diagonal components along the satellite track and analyze possible causes. External datasets, interplanetary magnetic, and electric field observations from the solar wind monitoring spacecraft ACE- (Advanced Composition Explorer) and WIND, geomagnetic activity observed at CARISMA (Canadian Array for Real-time Investigations of Magnetic Activity) stations and Ionospheric Equivalent Currents (EICS) and Elementary Current Amplitudes (SECS) derived from terrestrial geomagnetic field disturbances observed over North America and Greenland are used to understand the effect of the space weather variations and ionospheric dynamics on the GOCE Gradiometer measurements. We have shown that the variation in the amplitude of the equivalent currents and changes in the current directions show high correlation with the disturbances observed in GOCE measurements along the satellite track which hints the interaction between the two.

  15. Space weather applications with PICARD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudok de Wit, Thierry; Thuillier, Gerard

    The PICARD mission aims at providing a better understanding of the origin of solar variability and the relations between the Sun and Earth's climate. Some of the instruments from PICARD will also be of direct interest to space weather. SODISM will provide regular UV images at 215 and 393 nm wavelength and PREMOS will measure the solar spectral irradiance in 5 channels, 3 of which are in the visible and in the near-infrared. Some potential applications will be discussed as well as synergies with other spectral irradiance observations, such as by LYRA on PROBA2 and EVE on SDO.

  16. Progress in Space Weather Modeling and Observations Needed to Improve the Operational NAIRAS Model Aircraft Radiation Exposure Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, C. J.; Kress, B. T.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Tobiska, W.; Xu, X.

    2011-12-01

    The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) is a prototype operational model for predicting commercial aircraft radiation exposure from galactic and solar cosmic rays. NAIRAS predictions are currently streaming live from the project's public website, and the exposure rate nowcast is also available on the SpaceWx smartphone app for iPhone, IPad, and Android. Cosmic rays are the primary source of human exposure to high linear energy transfer radiation at aircraft altitudes, which increases the risk of cancer and other adverse health effects. Thus, the NAIRAS model addresses an important national need with broad societal, public health and economic benefits. The processes responsible for the variability in the solar wind, interplanetary magnetic field, solar energetic particle spectrum, and the dynamical response of the magnetosphere to these space environment inputs, strongly influence the composition and energy distribution of the atmospheric ionizing radiation field. During the development of the NAIRAS model, new science questions were identified that must be addressed in order to obtain a more reliable and robust operational model of atmospheric radiation exposure. Addressing these science questions require improvements in both space weather modeling and observations. The focus of this talk is to present these science questions, the proposed methodologies for addressing these science questions, and the anticipated improvements to the operational predictions of atmospheric radiation exposure. The overarching goal of this work is to provide a decision support tool for the aviation industry that will enable an optimal balance to be achieved between minimizing health risks to passengers and aircrew while simultaneously minimizing costs to the airline companies.

  17. International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Joseph; Gopalswamy, Nathanial; Thompson, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    The International Heliophysical Year (IHY), an international program of scientific collaboration to understand the external drivers of planetary environments, has come to an end. The IHY was a major international event of great interest to the member States, which involved the deployment of new instrumentation, new observations from the ground and in space, and an education component. We propose to continue the highly successful collaboration between the heliophysics science community and the United Nations Basic Space Science (UNBSS) program. One of the major thrust of the IHY was to deploy arrays of small instruments such as magnetometers, radio antennas, GPS receivers, all-sky cameras, particle detectors, etc. around the world to provide global measurements of heliospheric phenomena. The United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative (UNBSSI) played a major role in this effort. Scientific teams were organized through UNBSS, which consisted of a lead scientist who provided the instruments or fabrication plans for instruments in the array. As a result of the this program, scientists from UNBSS member states now participate in the instrument operation, data collection, analysis, and publication of scientific results, working at the forefront of science research. As part of this project, support for local scientists, facilities and data acquisition is provided by the host nation. In addition, support at the Government level is provided for local scientists to participate. Building on momentum of the IHY, we propose to continue the highly successful collaboration with the UNBSS program to continue the study of universal processes in the solar system that affect the interplanetary and terrestrial environments, and to continue to coordinate the deployment and operation of new and existing instrument arrays aimed at understanding the impacts of Space Weather on Earth and the near-Earth environment. Toward this end, we propose a new program, the International Space

  18. International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Joseph M.; Gopalswamy, Nat; Thompson, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The International Heliophysical Year (IHY), an international program of scientific collaboration to understand the external drivers of planetary environments, has come to an end. The IHY was a major international event of great interest to the member States, which involved the deployment of new instrumentation, new observations from the ground and in space, and an education component. We propose to continue the highly successful collaboration between the heliophysics science community and the United Nations Basic Space Science (UNBSS) program. One of the major thrust of the IHY was to deploy arrays of small instruments such as magnetometers, radio antennas, GPS receivers, all-sky cameras, particle detectors, etc. around the world to provide global measurements of heliospheric phenomena. The United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative (UNBSSI) played a major role in this effort. Scientific teams were organized through UNBSS, which consisted of a lead scientist who provided the instruments or fabrication plans for instruments in the array. As a result of the this program, scientists from UNBSS member states now participate in the instrument operation, data collection, analysis, and publication of scientific results, working at the forefront of science research. As part of this project, support for local scientists, facilities and data acquisition is provided by the host nation. In addition, support at the Government level is provided for local scientists to participate. Building on momentum of the IHY, we propose to continue the highly successful collaboration with the UNBSS program to continue the study of universal processes in the solar system that affect the interplanetary and terrestrial environments, and to continue to coordinate the deployment and operation of new and existing instrument arrays aimed at understanding the impacts of Space Weather on Earth and the near-Earth environment. Toward this end, we propose a new program, the International Space

  19. Space Weather Outreach: An Informal Education Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P. B.

    2008-12-01

    Informal science education institutions, such as science centers, play an important role in science education. They serve millions of people, including students and teachers. Within the last decade, many have tried to improve the public's understanding of science and scientific research through informal education projects. The recent success of several space weather-related missions and research programs and the launch of the International Heliophysical Year (IHY) research and education programs make this an ideal time to inform the public about the importance and relevance of space weather to our understanding of heliophysical science. Communication efforts associated with space weather both benefit and are compromised by analogies to terrestrial weather. This paper summarizes the benefits and challenges of the terrestrial weather analogy using two exhibit evaluation studies. The paper also describes three components of the Space Science Institute's Space Weather Outreach Program: Space Weather Center Website, Educator Workshops, and Small Exhibits for Libraries and Science Centers.

  20. Space Weather Outreach: An informal education perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P. B.; Harold, J. B.; McLain, B.; Curtis, L.

    2008-12-01

    Informal science education institutions, such as science centers, play an important role in science education. They serve millions of people, including students and teachers. Within the last decade, many have tried to improve the public's understanding of science and scientific research through informal education projects. The recent success of several space weather-related missions and research programs and the launch of the International Heliophysical Year (IHY) research and education programs make this an ideal time to inform the public about the importance and relevance of space weather to our understanding of heliophysical science. Communication efforts associated with space weather both benefit and are compromised by analogies to terrestrial weather. This paper summarizes the benefits and challenges of the terrestrial weather analogy using two exhibit evaluation studies. The paper also describes three components of the Space Science Institute's Space Weather Outreach Program - Space Weather Center Website, Educator Workshops, and Small Exhibits - and how they can help to achieve the education goals of IHY.

  1. Space Weather Outreach: An Informal Education Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P. B.; Harold, J.; McLain, B.; Curtis, L.

    2008-05-01

    Informal science education institutions, such as science centers, play an important role in science education. They serve millions of people, including students and teachers. Within the last decade, many have tried to improve the public's understanding of science and scientific research through informal education projects. The recent success of several space weather-related missions and research programs and the launch of the International Heliophysical Year (IHY) research and education programs make this an ideal time to inform the public about the importance and relevance of space weather to our understanding of heliophysical science. Communication efforts associated with space weather both benefit and are compromised by analogies to terrestrial weather. This paper summarizes the benefits and challenges of the terrestrial weather analogy using two exhibit evaluation studies. The paper also describes three components of the Space Science Institute's Space Weather Outreach Program - Space Weather Center Website, Educator Workshops, and Small Exhibits - and how they can help to achieve the education goals of IHY.

  2. Space Weather: The Solar Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenn, Rainer

    2006-08-01

    The term space weather refers to conditions on the Sun and in the solar wind, magnetosphere, ionosphere, and thermosphere that can influence the performance and reliability of space-borne and ground-based technological systems and that can affect human life and health. Our modern hi-tech society has become increasingly vulnerable to disturbances from outside the Earth system, in particular to those initiated by explosive events on the Sun: Flares release flashes of radiation that can heat up the terrestrial atmosphere such that satellites are slowed down and drop into lower orbits, solar energetic particles accelerated to near-relativistic energies may endanger astronauts traveling through interplanetary space, and coronal mass ejections are gigantic clouds of ionized gas ejected into interplanetary space that after a few hours or days may hit the Earth and cause geomagnetic storms. In this review, I describe the several chains of actions originating in our parent star, the Sun, that affect Earth, with particular attention to the solar phenomena and the subsequent effects in interplanetary space.

  3. Approach to Integrate Global-Sun Models of Magnetic Flux Emergence and Transport for Space Weather Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, N. N.; Wray, A. A.; Mehrotra, P.; Arge, C. N.; Henney, C.; Manchester, W.; Godinez, H. C.; Koller, J.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Scherrer, P. H.; Zhao, J.; Stein, B.; Duvall, T.; Fan, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The Sun lies at the center of space weather and is the source of its variability. The primary input to coronal and solar wind models is the activity of the magnetic field in the solar photosphere. Recent advancements in solar observations and numerical simulations provide a basis for developing physics-based models for the dynamics of the magnetic field from the deep convection zone of the Sun to the corona with the goal of providing robust near real-time boundary conditions at the base of space weather forecast models. The goal is to develop new strategic capabilities that enable characterization and prediction of the magnetic field structure and flow dynamics of the Sun by assimilating data from helioseismology and magnetic field observations into physics-based realistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations. The integration of first-principle modeling of solar magnetism and flow dynamics with real-time observational data via advanced data assimilation methods is a new, transformative step in space weather research and prediction. This approach will substantially enhance an existing model of magnetic flux distribution and transport developed by the Air Force Research Lab. The development plan is to use the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) to develop Coupled Models for Emerging flux Simulations (CMES) that couples three existing models: (1) an MHD formulation with the anelastic approximation to simulate the deep convection zone (FSAM code), (2) an MHD formulation with full compressible Navier-Stokes equations and a detailed description of radiative transfer and thermodynamics to simulate near-surface convection and the photosphere (Stagger code), and (3) an MHD formulation with full, compressible Navier-Stokes equations and an approximate description of radiative transfer and heating to simulate the corona (Module in BATS-R-US). CMES will enable simulations of the emergence of magnetic structures from the deep convection zone to the corona. Finally, a plan

  4. Approach to Integrate Global-Sun Models of Magnetic Flux Emergence and Transport for Space Weather Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, Nagi N.; Wray, Alan A.; Mehrotra, Piyush; Henney, Carl; Arge, Nick; Godinez, H.; Manchester, Ward; Koller, J.; Kosovichev, A.; Scherrer, P.; Zhao, J.; Stein, R.; Duvall, T.; Fan, Y.

    2013-01-01

    The Sun lies at the center of space weather and is the source of its variability. The primary input to coronal and solar wind models is the activity of the magnetic field in the solar photosphere. Recent advancements in solar observations and numerical simulations provide a basis for developing physics-based models for the dynamics of the magnetic field from the deep convection zone of the Sun to the corona with the goal of providing robust near real-time boundary conditions at the base of space weather forecast models. The goal is to develop new strategic capabilities that enable characterization and prediction of the magnetic field structure and flow dynamics of the Sun by assimilating data from helioseismology and magnetic field observations into physics-based realistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations. The integration of first-principle modeling of solar magnetism and flow dynamics with real-time observational data via advanced data assimilation methods is a new, transformative step in space weather research and prediction. This approach will substantially enhance an existing model of magnetic flux distribution and transport developed by the Air Force Research Lab. The development plan is to use the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) to develop Coupled Models for Emerging flux Simulations (CMES) that couples three existing models: (1) an MHD formulation with the anelastic approximation to simulate the deep convection zone (FSAM code), (2) an MHD formulation with full compressible Navier-Stokes equations and a detailed description of radiative transfer and thermodynamics to simulate near-surface convection and the photosphere (Stagger code), and (3) an MHD formulation with full, compressible Navier-Stokes equations and an approximate description of radiative transfer and heating to simulate the corona (Module in BATS-R-US). CMES will enable simulations of the emergence of magnetic structures from the deep convection zone to the corona. Finally, a plan

  5. A nested-grid mesoscale numerical weather prediction model modified for Space Shuttle operational requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, M. L.; Zack, J. W.; Wong, V. C.; Coats, G. D.

    1983-01-01

    A nested-grid mesoscale atmospheric simulation system (MASS) is tested over Florida for the case of intense seabreeze-induced convection. The goal of this modeling system is to provide real-time aviation weather support which is designed to fit local terminal operations such as those supporting NASA's STS. Results from a 58 km and a 14.5 km nested-grid simulation show that this version of the MASS is capable of simulating many of the basic characteristics of convective complexes during periods of relatively weak synoptic scale flow regimes. However, it is noted that extensive development work is required with nested-grid cumulus and planetary boundary layer parameterization schemes before many of the meso-beta scale features such as thunderstorm downdraft-produced bubble high pressure centers can be accurately simulated. After these schemes are properly tuned, MASS can be utilized to initialize microscale modeling systems.

  6. Identification of Non-Linear Space Weather Models of the Van Allen Radiation Belts Using Volterra Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M.; Daglis, I. A.; Anastasiadis, A.; Vassiliadis, D.

    2010-07-01

    Many efforts have been made to develop general dynamical models of the Van Allen radiation belts based on data alone. Early linear prediction filter studies focused on the response of daily-averaged relativistic electrons at geostationary altitudes Nagai 1988, Baker et al. 1990). Vassiliadis et al (2005) extended this technique spatially by incorporating SAMPEX electron flux data into linear prediction filters for a broad range of L-shells from 1.1 to 10.0 RE. Nonlinear state space models (Rigler & Baker 2008) have provided useful initial results on the timescales involved in modeling the impulse-response of the radiation belts. Here, we show how NARMAX models, in conjunction with nonlinear time-delay FIR neural networks (Volterra networks) hold great promise for the development of accurate and fully data-derived space weather specification and forecast tools.

  7. Space Weather Impacts on Technological Infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtagh, W.; Viereck, R. A.; Rutledge, R.

    2012-12-01

    The Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC), one of the nine National Weather Service (NWS), National Centers for Environmental Prediction, is the nation's official source for space weather alerts and warnings. The rapid advances in the technology sector and our fast growing dependency on space-based systems have resulted in an ever-increasing vulnerability to hazardous space weather. NWS efforts to support aviation, emergency response efforts, and electric power grids, now extend to space and solar storms. Other key sectors impacted by space weather include satellite communications, and GPS applications, which pervade modern society. And the concerns are growing as we approach the next solar maximum, expected to peak in 2013. This presentation will address the different types of space weather events and how they impact our technological infrastructure.

  8. Quantifying the VNIR Effects of Nanophase Iron Generated through the Space Weathering of Silicates: Reconciling Modeled Data with Laboratory Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legett, C., IV; Glotch, T. D.; Lucey, P. G.

    2015-12-01

    Space weathering is a diverse set of processes that occur on the surfaces of airless bodies due to exposure to the space environment. One of the effects of space weathering is the generation of nanophase iron particles in glassy rims on mineral grains due to sputtering of iron-bearing minerals. These particles have a size-dependent effect on visible and near infrared (VNIR) reflectance spectra with smaller diameter particles (< 50 nm) causing both reddening and darkening of the spectra with respect to unweathered material (Britt-Pieters particle behavior), while larger particles (> 300 nm) darken without reddening. Between these two sizes, a gradual shift between these two behaviors occurs. In this work, we present results from the Multiple Sphere T-Matrix (MSTM) scattering model in combination with Hapke theory to explore the particle size and iron content parameter spaces with respect to VNIR (700-1700 nm) spectral slope. Previous work has shown that the MSTM-Hapke hybrid model offers improvements over Mie-Hapke models. Virtual particles are constructed out of an arbitrary number of spheres, and each sphere is assigned a refractive index and extinction coefficient for each wavelength of interest. The model then directly solves Maxwell's Equations at every wave-particle interface to predict the scattering, extinction and absorption efficiencies. These are then put into a simplified Hapke bidirectional reflectance model that yields a predicted reflectance. Preliminary results show an area of maximum slopes for iron particle diameters < 80 nm and iron concentrations of ~1-10wt% in an amorphous silica matrix. Further model runs are planned to better refine the extent of this region. Companion laboratory work using mixtures of powdered aerogel and nanophase iron particles provides a point of comparison to modeling efforts. The effects on reflectance and emissivity values due to particle size in a nearly ideal scatterer (aerogel) are also observed with comparisons to

  9. Validation of Community Models: Identifying Events in Space Weather Model Timelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacNeice, Peter

    2009-01-01

    I develop and document a set of procedures which test the quality of predictions of solar wind speed and polarity of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) made by coupled models of the ambient solar corona and heliosphere. The Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model is used to illustrate the application of these validation procedures. I present an algorithm which detects transitions of the solar wind from slow to high speed. I also present an algorithm which processes the measured polarity of the outward directed component of the IMF. This removes high-frequency variations to expose the longer-scale changes that reflect IMF sector changes. I apply these algorithms to WSA model predictions made using a small set of photospheric synoptic magnetograms obtained by the Global Oscillation Network Group as input to the model. The results of this preliminary validation of the WSA model (version 1.6) are summarized.

  10. Investigating Space Weather Events Impacting the Spitzer Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Leo Y.; Hunt, Joseph C. Jr.; Stowers, Kennis; Lowrance, Patrick; Stewart, Andrzej; Travis, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the dynamical process in the space environment has increased dramatically. A relatively new field of study called "Space Weather" has emerged in the last few decades. Fundamental to the study of space weather is an understanding of how space weather events such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections impact spacecraft in varying orbits and distances around the Sun. Specialized space weather satellite monitoring systems operated by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) allow scientists to predict space weather events affecting critical systems on and orbiting the Earth. However, the Spitzer Space Telescope is in an orbit far outside the areas covered by those space weather monitoring systems. This poses a challenge for the Spitzer's Mission Operations Team in determining whether space weather events affect Spitzer.

  11. Extreme space weather studies: Addressing societal needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngwira, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Extreme space weather events can adversely impact the operations of critical modern-day technological infrastructure such as high-voltage electric power transmission grids. Understanding of coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere dynamics under extreme solar wind driving conditions is still a major challenge mainly because of a lack of data during such time intervals. This presentation will highlight some of the past and on-going investigations on extreme space weather events, and how these investigations are used to address societal needs. Particularly, I will describe how first principles physics-based 3-D global MHD models are playing a major role in advancing our knowledge on extreme geomagnetically induced currents. These MHD models represent a very important component of attempts to understand the response of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system to varying solar wind conditions.

  12. Space Weather - Sun Earth Relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, K. Sundara

    2011-03-01

    Sun, a star of spectral type G2 is the main source of energy to the Earth. Being close to the Earth, Sun produces a resolvable disk of great detail, which is not possible for other stars. Solar flares and coronal mass ejections are the enigmatic phenomena that occur in the solar atmosphere and regularly bombard the Earth's environment in addition to the solar wind. Thus it becomes important for us not only to understand these physical processes of the Sun, but in addition how these activities affect the Earth and it's surrounding. Thus a branch of study called "Space Weather" had emerged in the recent past, which connects the Sun Earth rela-tions. This paper details about the solar activity and associated energetic phenomena that occur in the atmosphere of the Sun and their influence on the Earth.

  13. Modeling impact of FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2 mission on ionospheric space weather monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, I. T.; Tsai, H. F.; Liu, J. Y.; Lin, C. H.; Matsuo, T.; Chang, L. C.

    2013-10-01

    the past decade, the paucity of ionospheric observations has made it almost impossible to reconstruct the three-dimensional structures of global ionospheric electron density. The Formosa Satellite-3/Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC, F3/C) constellation has provided ionospheric electron density profiles with high vertical resolution through radio occultation measurements. Slated for deployment starting in 2016, the FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2 (F7/C2) constellation will further provide more than 4 times the number of the F3/C occultation soundings. An observing system simulation experiment is conducted to determine the impact of F7/C2 on ionospheric weather monitoring. The results first show that the F7/C2 observations can reconstruct 3-D ionospheric structure with a data accumulation period of 1 h, which can advance studies of small spatial/temporal scale variation/signatures in the ionosphere. Comparing to assimilation results of F3/C, the assimilation system significantly reduces the error arising in the models and observations after assimilating synthetic observations of F7/C2. During this observing system simulation experiment period, the averaged root-mean-square error percentage for the results of F7/C2 is about 4.4%, lower than that of F3/C 7.3%. Furthermore, even with an assimilation window of less than 60 min, the F7/C2 RMS errors still yield reliable values compared to the F3/C results. This paper represents a major advance in ionospheric weather monitoring for the future mission.

  14. The Los Alamos dynamic radiation environment assimilation model (DREAM) for space weather specification and forecasting

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, Geoffrey D; Friedel, Reiner H W; Chen, Yue; Koller, Josef; Henderson, Michael G

    2008-01-01

    The Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to assess, quantify, and predict the hazards from the natural space environment and the anthropogenic environment produced by high altitude nuclear explosions (HANE). DREAM was initially developed as a basic research activity to understand and predict the dynamics of the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts. It uses Kalman filter techniques to assimilate data from space environment instruments with a physics-based model of the radiation belts. DREAM can assimilate data from a variety of types of instruments and data with various levels of resolution and fidelity by assigning appropriate uncertainties to the observations. Data from any spacecraft orbit can be assimilated but DREAM was designed to function with as few as two spacecraft inputs: one from geosynchronous orbit and one from GPS orbit. With those inputs, DREAM can be used to predict the environment at any satellite in any orbit whether space environment data are available in those orbits or not. Even with very limited data input and relatively simple physics models, DREAM specifies the space environment in the radiation belts to a high level of accuracy. DREAM has been extensively tested and evaluated as we transition from research to operations. We report here on one set of test results in which we predict the environment in a highly-elliptical polar orbit. We also discuss long-duration reanalysis for spacecraft design, using DREAM for real-time operations, and prospects for 1-week forecasts of the radiation belt environment.

  15. Space Radiation Protection, Space Weather, and Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapp, Neal; Fry, Dan; Lee, Kerry

    2010-01-01

    Management of crew exposure to radiation is a major concern for manned spaceflight and will be even more important for the modern concept of longer-duration exploration. The inherent protection afforded to astronauts by the magnetic field of the Earth in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) makes operations on the space shuttle or space station very different from operations during a deep space exploration mission. In order to experience significant radiation-derived Loss of Mission (LOM) or Loss of Crew (LOC) risk for LEO operations, one is almost driven to dictate extreme duration or to dictate an extreme sequence of solar activity. Outside of the geo-magnetosphere, however, this scenario changes dramatically. Exposures to the same event on the ISS and on the surface of the Moon may differ by multiple orders of magnitude. This change in magnitude, coupled with the logistical constraints present in implementing any practical operational mitigation make situational awareness with regard to space weather a limiting factor for our ability to conduct exploration operations. With these differences in risk to crew, vehicle and mission in mind, we present the status of the efforts currently underway as the required development to enable exploration operations. The changes in the operating environment as crewed operations begin to stretch away from the Earth are changing the way we think about the lines between research and operations . The real, practical work to enable a permanent human presence away from Earth has already begun

  16. Near Real Time Data for Operational Space Weather Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, T. E.

    2014-12-01

    Space weather operations presents unique challenges for data systems and providers. Space weather events evolve more quickly than terrestrial weather events. While terrestrial weather occurs on timescales of minutes to hours, space weather storms evolve on timescales of seconds to minutes. For example, the degradation of the High Frequency Radio communications between the ground and commercial airlines is nearly instantaneous when a solar flare occurs. Thus the customer is observing impacts at the same time that the operational forecast center is seeing the event unfold. The diversity and spatial scale of the space weather system is such that no single observation can capture the salient features. The vast space that encompasses space weather and the scarcity of observations further exacerbates the situation and make each observation even more valuable. The physics of interplanetary space, through which many major storms propagate, is very different from the physics of the ionosphere where most of the impacts are felt. And while some observations can be made from ground-based observatories, many of the most critical data comes from satellites, often in unique orbits far from Earth. In this presentation, I will describe some of the more important sources and types of data that feed into the operational alerts, watches, and warnings of space weather storms. Included will be a discussion of some of the new space weather forecast models and the data challenges that they bring forward.

  17. Non-standard Space Weather Products and Services from NOAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denig, W. F.; Viereck, R. A.

    2012-12-01

    The NOAA National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) and Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) have developed and are continuing to develop a variety of "non-standard" data products for near real-time space weather applications. Core space weather services provided by SWPC include access to space environmental data from NOAA operational satellites and leveraged data from NASA and USAF assets. Core services also include operational space weather model results providing environmental specifications and forecasts. Non-standard products to be discussed include space weather services and applications that have either not yet reached operational maturity or are being released as beta-version test products. Included are the Forecasting Ionospheric Real-time Scintillation Tool (FIRST), the Ovation Prime Real-Time product, the Space Environment Anomaly Expert System Real Time (SEAESRT) and the PEople Empowered Product (PEEP). The status of these products, including how to access and provide comments, will be presented.

  18. NASA's Internal Space Weather Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Cyr, O. C.; Guhathakurta, M.; Bell, H.; Niemeyer, L.; Allen, J.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements from many of NASA's scientific spacecraft are used routinely by space weather forecasters, both in the U.S. and internationally. ACE, SOHO (an ESA/NASA collaboration), STEREO, and SDO provide images and in situ measurements that are assimilated into models and cited in alerts and warnings. A number of years ago, the Space Weather laboratory was established at NASA-Goddard, along with the Community Coordinated Modeling Center. Within that organization, a space weather service center has begun issuing alerts for NASA's operational users. NASA's operational user community includes flight operations for human and robotic explorers; atmospheric drag concerns for low-Earth orbit; interplanetary navigation and communication; and the fleet of unmanned aerial vehicles, high altitude aircraft, and launch vehicles. Over the past three years we have identified internal stakeholders within NASA and formed a Working Group to better coordinate their expertise and their needs. In this presentation we will describe this activity and some of the challenges in forming a diverse working group.

  19. New approaches to space weather forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnowski, Aleksei; Cheremnykh, Oleg; Yatsenko, Vitaly

    2010-05-01

    We developed several approaches to the problem of real-time space weather indices forecasting using readily available data from ACE and a number of ground stations. The first one is based on a dynamical-information approach to nonlinear modeling of space plasma [1]. It uses new nonlinear mathematical models of geomagnetic indices and original algorithms for detection of structure and parameters. The identification problem is formulated as a constrained optimization problem. Novel algorithms provide an optimal structure of discrete dynamical system using fuzzy systems modeling. The second one is based on the regression modeling method [2], which combines the benefits of empirical and statistical approaches. It uses such statistical methods as the linear regression analysis, maximum likelihood method, dispersion analysis and Monte-Carlo simulations to deduce the empirical relationships in the system. In both cases the typical elapsed time per forecast is about several seconds on an average PC. Such techniques can be easily extended to other indices like AE and Kp. The proposed system can also be useful for investigating of physical phenomena related to interactions between the solar wind and the magnetosphere - it already helped uncovering two new geoeffective parameters. In addition, we performed the risk analysis of damage to VUV, EUV and X-ray optics due to space weather factors and analyzed the safety of space instruments. We plan combining short-term and medium-term approaches to accurately predict geomagnetic storms at least 5-10 hours before commencement. Practical applications of such a system include (but are not limited to): - spacecraft safety (prediction of radiation threat); - human health (putting emergency services on alert); - prevention of technological disasters (power grid failures, major radio blackouts). 1. Cheremnykh O.K., Yatsenko V.A., Semeniv O.V., Shatokhina Yu.V. Nonlinear dynamics and prediction for space weather // Ukr. J. Phys. — 2008

  20. Space Radiation Protection, Space Weather, and Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapp, Neal; Rutledge, R.; Semones, E. J.; Johnson, A. S.; Guetersloh, S.; Fry, D.; Stoffle, N.; Lee, K.

    2008-01-01

    Management of crew exposure to radiation is a major concern for manned spaceflight -- and will be even more important for the modern concept of longer-duration exploration. The inherent protection afforded to astronauts by the magnetic field of the Earth in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) makes operations on the space shuttle or space station very different from operations during an exploration mission. In order to experience significant radiation-derived Loss of Mission (LOM) or Loss of Crew (LOC) risk for LEO operations, one is almost driven to dictate extreme duration or to dictate an extreme sequence of solar activity. Outside of the geo-magnetosphere, however, this scenario changes dramatically. Exposures to the same event on the ISS and on the surface of the Moon may differ by multiple orders of magnitude. This change in magnitude, coupled with the logistical constraints present in implementing any practical operational mitigation make situational awareness with regard to space weather a limiting factor for our ability to conduct exploration operations. With these differences in risk to crew, vehicle and mission in mind, we present the status of the efforts currently underway as the required development to enable exploration operations. The changes in the operating environment as crewed operations begin to stretch away from the Earth are changing the way we think about the lines between "research" and "operations". The real, practical work to enable a permanent human presence away from Earth has already begun.

  1. Forecasting Space Weather from Magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David A.; Moore, Ronald L.; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F.; Khazanov, Igor

    2012-01-01

    Large flares and fast CMEs are the drivers of the most severe space weather including Solar Energetic Particle Events (SEP Events). Large flares and their co-produced CMEs are powered by the explosive release of free magnetic energy stored in non-potential magnetic fields of sunspot active regions. The free energy is stored in and released from the low-beta regime of the active region s magnetic field above the photosphere, in the chromosphere and low corona. From our work over the past decade and from similar work of several other groups, it is now well established that (1) a proxy of the free magnetic energy stored above the photosphere can be measured from photospheric magnetograms, maps of the measured field in the photosphere, and (2) an active region s rate of production of major CME/flare eruptions in the coming day or so is strongly correlated with its present measured value of the free-energy proxy. These results have led us to use the large database of SOHO/MDI full-disk magnetograms spanning Solar Cycle 23 to obtain empirical forecasting curves that from an active region s present measured value of the free-energy proxy give the active region s expected rates of production of major flares, CMEs, fast CMEs, and SEP Events in the coming day or so (Falconer et al 2011, Space Weather, 9, S04003). For each type of event, the expected rate is readily converted to the chance that the active region will produce such an event in any given forward time window of a day or so. If the chance is small enough (e.g. <5%), the forecast is All Clear for that type of event. We will present these forecasting curves and demonstrate the accuracy of their forecasts. In addition, we will show that the forecasts for major flares and fast CMEs can be made significantly more accurate by taking into account not only the value of the free energy proxy but also the active region s recent productivity of major flares; specifically, whether the active region has produced a major flare

  2. Compilation of 3D global conductivity model of the Earth for space weather applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, Dmitry; Kuvshinov, Alexey; Palshin, Nikolay

    2015-07-01

    We have compiled a global three-dimensional (3D) conductivity model of the Earth with an ultimate goal to be used for realistic simulation of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC), posing a potential threat to man-made electric systems. Bearing in mind the intrinsic frequency range of the most intense disturbances (magnetospheric substorms) with typical periods ranging from a few minutes to a few hours, the compiled 3D model represents the structure in depth range of 0-100 km, including seawater, sediments, earth crust, and partly the lithosphere/asthenosphere. More explicitly, the model consists of a series of spherical layers, whose vertical and lateral boundaries are established based on available data. To compile a model, global maps of bathymetry, sediment thickness, and upper and lower crust thicknesses as well as lithosphere thickness are utilized. All maps are re-interpolated on a common grid of 0.25×0.25 degree lateral spacing. Once the geometry of different structures is specified, each element of the structure is assigned either a certain conductivity value or conductivity versus depth distribution, according to available laboratory data and conversion laws. A numerical formalism developed for compilation of the model, allows for its further refinement by incorporation of regional 3D conductivity distributions inferred from the real electromagnetic data. So far we included into our model four regional conductivity models, available from recent publications, namely, surface conductance model of Russia, and 3D conductivity models of Fennoscandia, Australia, and northwest of the United States.

  3. [Space Weather Impact on the Electricity Market

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SaintCyr, O. Chris

    2007-01-01

    Forbes & St. Cyr (2004, hereafter "FISC") have provided evidence that the electricity market can be impacted by space weather. Our analysis indicated that the estimated market impact for PJM was 3.7 % or approximately $500 million dollars over the 19 month sample period. Kappenman has taken exception to this estimate and contends that we have exaggerated the magnitude of the problem that space weather poses to PJM. There are four specific issues: (1) he claims that we have ignored relevant literature; (2) he asserts that Dst is not an appropriate proxy for GICs in PJM; (3) he charges that our findings are inconsistent with the impact of the 17 September 2000 storm; and (4) he alleges that our discussion of October 2003 storms is misleading. In our article, we have explained our methodology, multivariate regression analysis, with a particular focus on how it compares to correlation analysis. We have also explained the limitations of our analysis. We noted that "...While the Dstlprice relationship was found to be robust, the precise estimate should be treated with a relatively high degree of caution given that econometric modeling is not an exact science as well as the fact that the measure of space weather may be a poor proxy for GICs" (paragraph 96). We have also noted that additional research using local magnetometer data are needed (paragraph 97). We did not claim that that our findings for PJM are representative of the impact of space weather on other power grids. On the contrary, we noted that ... "Only analysis of other power grids will tell. " (paragraph 97). Kappenman inaccurately asserts that we have indicated that our findings . . . "imply much higher total costs are likely across the US and elsewhere in the world." He also inaccurately asserts that we have claimed that " . . . Dst is the most suited proxy for GIC in the PJM grid.. ." Moreover, he inaccurately refers to our analysis as a correlation study that uses Dst as quasi-binary indicator.

  4. Book Review: Space Weather: Physics and Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Phil

    2007-11-01

    At 438 pages, Space Weather: Physics and Effects, edited by Volker Bothmer and Ioannis A. Daglis, seems like a daunting read. But its thickness belies its conversational tone, and its content provides a different presentation of material aimed at drawing in a new audience while satisfying the present space weather audience's interest in their subject. I found reading this book a pleasure.

  5. Space Weather with GONG+ Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, F.; Komm, R.; Gonzalez-Hernandez, I.; Petrie, G.; Harvey, J. W.

    2008-05-01

    The Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) is now routinely producing several data products that are useful for space weather predictions. These products are one-minute cadence full-disk magnetograms obtained continually; ten-miniute averages of these magnetograms; one-hour cadence synoptic magnetic field maps and potential field source-surface extrapolations; and twelve-hour far-side maps that show the presence of large active regions. Most of these these products are made available over the Internet in near-real time. In addition, we are developing flare predictors based on subsurface vorticity obtained from helioseismic ring diagrams in conjunction with surface magnetic field observations. We find that, when both the subsurface vorticity and the surface magnetic field are above certain thresholds for a specific active region, then that active region has a very high probability of producing vigorous flare activity. We will present the quantitative results for this predictor and also report on progress developing a predictor based on the temporal evolution of the vorticity.

  6. Pushing the Envelope of Extreme Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesnell, W. D.

    2014-12-01

    Extreme Space Weather events are large solar flares or geomagnetic storms, which can cost billions of dollars to recover from. We have few examples of such events; the Carrington Event (the solar superstorm) is one of the few that had superlatives in three categories: size of solar flare, drop in Dst, and amplitude of aa. Kepler observations show that stars similar to the Sun can have flares releasing millions of times more energy than an X-class flare. These flares and the accompanying coronal mass ejections could strongly affect the atmosphere surrounding a planet. What level of solar activity would be necessary to strongly affect the atmosphere of the Earth? Can we map out the envelope of space weather along the evolution of the Sun? What would space weather look like if the Sun stopped producing a magnetic field? To what extreme should Space Weather go? These are the extremes of Space Weather explored in this talk.

  7. Global economic impacts of severe Space Weather.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte In Den Baeumen, Hagen; Cairns, Iver

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) strong enough to create electromagnetic effects at latitudes below the auroral oval are frequent events, and could have substantial impacts on electric power transmission and telecommunication grids. Modern society’s heavy reliance on these domestic and international networks increases our susceptibility to such a severe Space Weather event. Using a new high-resolution model of the global economy we simulate the economic impact of large CMEs for 3 different planetary orientations. We account for the economic impacts within the countries directly affected as well as the post-disaster economic shock in partner economies through international trade. For the CMEs modeled the total global economic impacts would range from US 380 billion to US 1 trillion. Of this total economic shock 50 % would be felt in countries outside the zone of direct impact, leading to a loss in global GDP of 0.1 - 1 %. A severe Space Weather event could lead to global economic damages of the same order as other weather disasters, climate change, and extreme financial crisis.

  8. Toward a Space Weather Virtual Organization (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxton, L. J.; Holm, J. M.; Schaefer, R. K.; Weiss, M.

    2009-12-01

    On the 150th anniversary of the Carrington Event, it behooves us to reflect upon the impact of space weather on our technology-intensive, communications-driven, socitey. Over the period since the last solar maximum in 2001, the commercial, defense department, and other national entities have become increasingly dependent on the electronic command, control, & communication systems that are vulnerable to Space Weather events. There has not been a concomitant increase in our ability to reliably predict space weather nor in our ability to separate natural effects from human ones. Now we need to quickly gear up space situational awareness capability in time for the next solar max predicted to occur in about 3-4 years. Unfortunately, space weather expertise is spread over institutions and academic disciplines and communication between space weather forecasters, forecast users, and the research community is poor. We would like to set up a demonstration space weather virtual organization to find a more efficient way to communicate and manage knowledge to ensure the operational community can get actionable information in a timely manner. We call this system concept SWIFTER-ACTION (Space Weather Informatics, Forecasting, and Technology through Enabling Research - Accessibility, Content, & Timely Information On the Network.) In this paper we provide an overview of the issues that must be addressed in order to transform data into knowledge that enables action.

  9. The Future of Operational Space Weather Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, T. E.

    2015-12-01

    We review the current state of operational space weather observations, the requirements for new or evolved space weather forecasting capablities, and the relevant sections of the new National strategy for space weather developed by the Space Weather Operations, Research, and Mitigation (SWORM) Task Force chartered by the Office of Science and Technology Policy of the White House. Based on this foundation, we discuss future space missions such as the NOAA space weather mission to the L1 Lagrangian point planned for the 2021 time frame and its synergy with an L5 mission planned for the same period; the space weather capabilities of the upcoming GOES-R mission, as well as GOES-Next possiblities; and the upcoming COSMIC-2 mission for ionospheric observations. We also discuss the needs for ground-based operational networks to supply mission critical and/or backup space weather observations including the NSF GONG solar optical observing network, the USAF SEON solar radio observing network, the USGS real-time magnetometer network, the USCG CORS network of GPS receivers, and the possibility of operationalizing the world-wide network of neutron monitors for real-time alerts of ground-level radiation events.

  10. Fifty Years of Space Weather Forecasting from Boulder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, T. E.

    2015-12-01

    The first official space weather forecast was issued by the Space Disturbances Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, in 1965, ushering in an era of operational prediction that continues to this day. Today, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) charters the Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) as one of the nine National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) to provide the nation's official watches, warnings, and alerts of space weather phenomena. SWPC is now integral to national and international efforts to predict space weather events, from the common and mild, to the rare and extreme, that can impact critical technological infrastructure. In 2012, the Strategic National Risk Assessment included extreme space weather events as low-to-medium probability phenomena that could, unlike any other meteorogical phenomena, have an impact on the government's ability to function. Recognizing this, the White House chartered the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) to produce the first comprehensive national strategy for the prediction, mitigation, and response to an extreme space weather event. The implementation of the National Strategy is ongoing with NOAA, its partners, and stakeholders concentrating on the goal of improving our ability to observe, model, and predict the onset and severity of space weather events. In addition, work continues with the research community to improve our understanding of the physical mechanisms - on the Sun, in the heliosphere, and in the Earth's magnetic field and upper atmosphere - of space weather as well as the effects on critical infrastructure such as electrical power transmission systems. In fifty years, people will hopefully look back at the history of operational space weather prediction and credit our efforts today with solidifying the necessary developments in observational systems, full-physics models of the entire Sun-Earth system, and tools for predicting the impacts to infrastructure to protect

  11. Kinetic models for space weather: from the solar wind to the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierrard, Viviane; Moschou, Sofia; Lopez Rosson, Graciela; Borremans, Kris

    2016-04-01

    Kinetic models for the solar wind and different regions of the inner magnetosphere have been developed at IASB-BIRA. The velocity distribution functions (VDF) of the particles are determined by solving the evolution equation. The moments are obtained by integration of the velocity distribution function on the velocity space. An exospheric model of the solar wind assuming a kappa VDF for the electrons has been developed in three dimensions for predictions at 1 AU. Photospheric magnetograms serve as observationally driven input and semi-empirical coronal models are used for the estimation of the plasma characteristics at the lower heliospheric distances to obtain the best comparison with available observations at the Earth's orbit. A 3D dynamic model of the plasmasphere has also been developed on similar kinetic assumptions and provides the position of the plasmapause, the number density and the temperature of the electrons and protons in the ionosphere as well as inside and outside the plasmasphere. During geomagnetic storms driven by solar wind parameters, the plasmasphere is eroded and structures like plasmaspheric plumes and shoulders can appear. The radiation belts as observed with the Energetic Particle Telescope on board the PROBA-V satellite are also very dynamic during geomagnetic storms and show some links with the plasmapause positions just after the storms. The year 2015 was very active and was especially instructive for studies of the dynamic properties in the inner magnetosphere during geomagnetic storms.

  12. Presenting Critical Space Weather Information to Customers and Stakeholders (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viereck, R. A.; Singer, H. J.; Murtagh, W. J.; Rutledge, B.

    2013-12-01

    Space weather involves changes in the near-Earth space environment that impact technological systems such as electric power, radio communication, satellite navigation (GPS), and satellite opeartions. As with terrestrial weather, there are several different kinds of space weather and each presents unique challenges to the impacted technologies and industries. But unlike terrestrial weather, many customers are not fully aware of space weather or how it impacts their systems. This issue is further complicated by the fact that the largest space weather events occur very infrequently with years going by without severe storms. Recent reports have estimated very large potential costs to the economy and to society if a geomagnetic storm were to cause major damage to the electric power transmission system. This issue has come to the attention of emergency managers and federal agencies including the office of the president. However, when considering space weather impacts, it is essential to also consider uncertainties in the frequency of events and the predicted impacts. The unique nature of space weather storms, the specialized technologies that are impacted by them, and the disparate groups and agencies that respond to space weather forecasts and alerts create many challenges to the task of communicating space weather information to the public. Many customers that receive forecasts and alerts are highly technical and knowledgeable about the subtleties of the space environment. Others know very little and require ongoing education and explanation about how a space weather storm will affect their systems. In addition, the current knowledge and understanding of the space environment that goes into forecasting storms is quite immature. It has only been within the last five years that physics-based models of the space environment have played important roles in predictions. Thus, the uncertainties in the forecasts are quite large. There is much that we don't know about space

  13. Resource Letter SW1: Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel N.; Lanzerotti, Louis J.

    2016-03-01

    This Resource Letter describes the phenomena and effects on technological systems that are known collectively as space weather. A brief history of the topic is provided, and the scientific understandings of drivers for such phenomena are discussed. The impacts of space disturbances are summarized, and the strategies for dealing with space weather threats are examined. The Resource Letter concludes with description of approaches that have been proposed to deal with threats to our increasingly technological society.

  14. Sentinels of the Sun: Forecasting Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poland, Arthur I.

    2006-08-01

    The story of humanity's interest in space weather may go back to prehistoric times when people at high latitudes noticed the northern lights. Interest became more acute after the development of electrical technologies such as the telegraph, and certainly during World War II when shortwave radio communication came into practical use. Solar observing actually began to be supported by the military, with the observatory at Climax, Colorado being established to monitor the Sun during the war. With the advent of satellites and manned space travel to the Moon, space weather became a seriously funded endeavor both for basic research and forecasting. In the book, Sentinels of the Sun: Forecasting Space Weather, Barbara Poppe does an excellent job of telling this story for the nonprofessional. Moreover, as a professional who has studied space weather since before humans landed on the Moon, I found the book to be a very enjoyable read.

  15. Realtime Space Weather Forecasts Via Android Phone App

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, G.; Haacke, B.; Reynolds, A.

    2010-12-01

    For the past several years, ASTRA has run a first-principles global 3-D fully coupled thermosphere-ionosphere model in real-time for space weather applications. The model is the Thermosphere-Ionosphere Mesosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIMEGCM). ASTRA also runs the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE) in real-time. Using AMIE to drive the high latitude inputs to the TIMEGCM produces high fidelity simulations of the global thermosphere and ionosphere. These simulations can be viewed on the Android Phone App developed by ASTRA. The SpaceWeather app for the Android operating system is free and can be downloaded from the Google Marketplace. We present the current status of realtime thermosphere-ionosphere space-weather forcasting and discuss the way forward. We explore some of the issues in maintaining real-time simulations with assimilative data feeds in a quasi-operational setting. We also discuss some of the challenges of presenting large amounts of data on a smartphone. The ASTRA SpaceWeather app includes the broadest and most unique range of space weather data yet to be found on a single smartphone app. This is a one-stop-shop for space weather and the only app where you can get access to ASTRA’s real-time predictions of the global thermosphere and ionosphere, high latitude convection and geomagnetic activity. Because of the phone's GPS capability, users can obtain location specific vertical profiles of electron density, temperature, and time-histories of various parameters from the models. The SpaceWeather app has over 9000 downloads, 30 reviews, and a following of active users. It is clear that real-time space weather on smartphones is here to stay, and must be included in planning for any transition to operational space-weather use.

  16. Integration of space weather into space situational awareness

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, Geoffrey D

    2010-11-09

    Rapid assessment of space weather effects on satellites is a critical step in anomaly resolution and satellite threat assessment. That step, however, is often hindered by a number of factors including timely collection and delivery of space weather data and the inherent com plexity of space weather information. As part of a larger, integrated space situational awareness program, Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed prototype operational space weather tools that run in real time and present operators with customized, user-specific information. The Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) focuses on the penetrating radiation environment from natural or nuclear-produced radiation belts. The penetrating radiation environment is highly dynamic and highly orbit-dependent. Operators often must rely only on line plots of 2 MeV electron flux from the NOAA geosynchronous GOES satellites which is then assumed to be representative of the environment at the satellite of interest. DREAM uses data assimilation to produce a global, real-time, energy dependent specification. User tools are built around a distributed service oriented architecture (SOA) which will allow operators to select any satellite from the space catalog and examine the environment for that specific satellite and time of interest. Depending on the application operators may need to examine instantaneous dose rates and/or dose accumulated over various lengths of time. Further, different energy thresholds can be selected depending on the shielding on the satellite or instrument of interest. In order to rapidly assess the probability that space weather was the cause of anomalous operations, the current conditions can be compared against the historical distribution of radiation levels for that orbit. In the simplest operation a user would select a satellite and time of interest and immediately see if the environmental conditions were typical, elevated, or extreme based on how often those

  17. Integration Of Space Weather Into Space Situational Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, G.

    2010-09-01

    Rapid assessment of space weather effects on satellites is a critical step in anomaly resolution and satellite threat assessment. That step, however, is often hindered by a number of factors including timely collection and delivery of space weather data and the inherent complexity of space weather information. As part of a larger, integrated space situational awareness program, Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed prototype operational space weather tools that run in real time and present operators with customized, user-specific information. The Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) focuses on the penetrating radiation environment from natural or nuclear-produced radiation belts. The penetrating radiation environment is highly dynamic and highly orbitdependent. Operators often must rely only on line plots of 2 MeV electron flux from the NOAA geosynchronous GOES satellites which is then assumed to be representative of the environment at the satellite of interest. DREAM uses data assimilation to produce a global, real-time, energy dependent specification. User tools are built around a distributed service oriented architecture (SOA) which allows operators to select any satellite from the space catalog and examine the environment for that specific satellite and time of interest. Depending on the application operators may need to examine instantaneous dose rates and/or dose accumulated over various lengths of time. Further, different energy thresholds can be selected depending on the shielding on the satellite or instrument of interest. In order to rapidly assess the probability that space weather effects, the current conditions can be compared against the historical distribution of radiation levels for that orbit. In the simplest operation a user would select a satellite and time of interest and immediately see if the environmental conditions were typical, elevated, or extreme based on how often those conditions occur in that orbit. This

  18. Space Weather Studies at Istanbul Technical University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaymaz, Zerefsan

    2016-07-01

    This presentation will introduce the Upper Atmosphere and Space Weather Laboratory of Istanbul Technical University (ITU). It has been established to support the educational needs of the Faculty of Aeronautics and Astronautics in 2011 to conduct scientific research in Space Weather, Space Environment, Space Environment-Spacecraft Interactions, Space instrumentation and Upper Atmospheric studies. Currently the laboratory has some essential infrastructure and the most instrumentation for ionospheric observations and ground induced currents from the magnetosphere. The laboratory has two subunits: SWIFT dealing with Space Weather Instrumentation and Forecasting unit and SWDPA dealing with Space Weather Data Processing and Analysis. The research area covers wide range of upper atmospheric and space science studies from ionosphere, ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling, magnetic storms and magnetospheric substorms, distant magnetotail, magnetopause and bow shock studies, as well as solar and solar wind disturbances and their interaction with the Earth's space environment. We also study the spacecraft environment interaction and novel plasma instrument design. Several scientific projects have been carried out in the laboratory. Operational objectives of our laboratory will be carried out with the collaboration of NASA's Space Weather Laboratory and the facilities are in the process of integration to their prediction services. Educational and research objectives, as well as the examples from the research carried out in our laboratory will be demonstrated in this presentation.

  19. Space Weathering in the Thermal Infrared: Lessons from LRO Diviner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhagen, B. T.; Lucey, P. G.; Glotch, T. D.; Arnold, J. A.; Bandfield, J. L.; Bowles, N. E.; Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; Hayne, P. O.; Lemelin, M.; Shirley, K. A.; Song, E.; Paige, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    Before LRO, it was suggested that TIR spectroscopy would be less susceptible to the effects of space weathering. Diviner has shown the TIR is affected by space weathering. We will discuss this unanticipated space weathering dependence.

  20. Space weathering on Mercury: Simulation of plagioclase weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Sho; Hiroi, Takahiro; Helbert, Jorn; Arai, Tomoko

    The optical property of the surfaces of airless silicate bodies such as the Moon, Mercury and asteroids should change in time. Typical characteristics of the change, "space weathering", are darkening, spectral reddening, and attenuation of absorption bands in reflectance spectra. The space weathering is caused by the formation of nanophase metallic iron particles in amorphous surface coatings from the deposition of ferrous silicate vapor, which was formed by high velocity dust impacts as well as irradiation of the solar wind ions. Nanophase iron particles have been confirmed in the lunar soil coating [1]. Moreover, experimental studies using pulse laser showed the formation of nanophase ion particles on the surface should control the spectral darkening and reddening [2]. Mariner 10 and MESSENGER spacecraft showed that Mercury has more impact craters asso-ciated with bright rays than the Moon. The space weathering rate on Mercury's surface might be slower than that of the lunar surface, although dust flux and solar wind flux causing the weathering should be one order of magnitude of greater on Mercury than on the Moon [3]. The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) on board MES-SENGER measured reflectance spectra from Mercury's surface during the two flybys in 2008 [4] with the wavelength range between 0.2 and 1.3 microns. MASCS spectra show variation in the slope, which can be explained by lunar-like maturity trend due to the difference of space weathering degree. Spectral absorption in the UV range shows that the ferrous oxide (Fe2+) content in average surface/subsurface material is as low as a few weight percent. This could explain apparent low weathering rate on Mercury. Growth of size of nanophase iron could also have lowered the weathering degree. Size of nanophase iron particles should increase by Ostwald ripening under high temperature of several 100C [5] . And repeated irradiation by high velocity dust impacts as well as solar wind

  1. NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center, Forecast Office

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Forecast Office of NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center is the nation's official source of alerts, warnings, and watches. The office, staffed 24/7, is always vigilant for solar activity that ...

  2. Merging Space Weather With NOAA's National Weather Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzerotti, Louis

    2004-07-01

    A major change in the reporting structure of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Space Environment Center (SEC) is poised to occur later this year when Congress approves the fiscal year 2005 budget proposed by the Bush administration. The activities of the center, together with its proposed budget, will move from under NOAA's research budget and administration to that of the National Weather Service (NWS), which is also administered by NOAA. The weather service will receive augmented funding to accommodate the SEC as one of the service's National Centers for Environmental Prediction.

  3. Space weather effects and commerical airlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J.; Bentley, R.; Hunter, R.; Taylor, G.; Thomas, D.

    Space Weather (SW) phenomena can effect many areas of commercial airline operations including avionics, communications and GPS navigation systems. Of particular importance at present is the recently introduced EU legislation requiring the monitoring of aircrew radiation exposure, including any variations at aircraft altitudes due to solar activity. The Mullard Space Science Laboratory is collaborating with Virgin Atlantic Airways, the Civil Aviation Authority and the National Physical Laboratory on a 3- year project to monitor the levels of cosmic radiation on long-haul flights. The study will determine whether computer models currently used to predict radiation exposure of aircrew are adequate. It also aims to determine whether solar or geomagnetic activity can cause significant modifications to the doses. This presentation will begin by showing some of the preliminary results obtained so far. As an example, we present a comparison of flight doses measured following the 14t h July 2000 X - class flare that was accompanied by a major Solar Particle Event (SPE). The results highlight the importance of a range of external factors that can strongly influence how SPEs may effect the measured dose at aircraft altitudes. At present, any SPE contributions in the airlines' dose records can only be poorly estimated retrospectively. Ideally, it would be better to try to avoid operating during these possibly significant radiation - enhancing events by utilising SW information (alerts, warnings, etc.). However, doing so poses many difficult operational problems for such a heavily regulated international industry, in terms of safety, security and procedures. Therefore, the use of timely SW information, which is still very unreliable, in a similar manner to terrestrial weather will require agreement from the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) and International Air Transport Association (IATA) to Air Traffic Control and Aviation Regulatory Authority's. This

  4. Space Weather Gets Real—on Smartphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent; Crowley, Geoff; Oh, Seung Jun; Guhathakurta, Madhulika

    2010-10-01

    True to the saying that "a picture is worth a thousand words," society's affinity for visual images has driven innovative efforts to see space weather as it happens. The newest frontiers of these efforts involve applications, or apps, on cellular phones, allowing space weather researchers, operators, and teachers, as well as other interested parties, to have the ability to monitor conditions in real time with just the touch of a button.

  5. The Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) and its Contributions to Space Weather Research, the Flare Energy Budget, and Instrument Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, Phillip

    2008-01-01

    The Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) is an empirical model of the solar irradiance spectrum from 0.1 to 190 nm at 1 nm spectral resolution and on a 1-minute time cadence. The goal of FISM is to provide accurate solar spectral irradiances over the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV: 0-200 nm) range as input for ionospheric and thermospheric models. The seminar will begin with a brief overview of the FISM model, and also how the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) will contribute to improving FISM. Some current studies will then be presented that use FISM estimations of the solar VUV irradiance to quantify the contributions of the increased irradiance from flares to Earth's increased thermospheric and ionospheric densites. Initial results will also be presented from a study looking at the electron density increases in the Martian atmosphere during a solar flare. Results will also be shown quantifying the VUV contributions to the total flare energy budget for both the impulsive and gradual phases of solar flares. Lastly, an example of how FISM can be used to simplify the design of future solar VUV irradiance instruments will be discussed, using the future NOAA GOES-R Extreme Ultraviolet and X-Ray Sensors (EXIS) space weather instrument.

  6. Operational Space Weather Forecasting: Requirements and Future Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henley, E.; Gibbs, M.; Jackson, D.; Marsh, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Met Office has over 150 years' experience in providing operational forecasting to meet the UK's terrestrial weather needs, and is developing a similar capability in space weather. Since April 2014 the Met Office Space Weather Operations Centre (MOSWOC) has issued 24/7 operational forecasts, alerts and warnings on space weather which can have impacts on electricity grids, radio communications and satellite electronics. In this talk we will summarise the current requirements and future needs for operational space weather forecasting. We will review what the terrestrial weather community considers as operational forecasts, and use MOSWOC as an example of the underpinning research, IT and collaborations required to accomplish this. We will also discuss the policy, science evidence base and user support requirements needed to obtain sufficient long-term funding for operational activities, illustrating this with the UK's national risk register, Royal Academy of Engineering report, and the forthcoming IPSP economic study, as well as work done with users to ensure services match their needs. These are similar activities to those being undertaken in SWORM and the COSPAR/ILWS Space Weather Shield to Society Roadmap. Future needs will also be considered, considering the need for operational observations, particularly focussing on the role an L5 mission could play; a chain of coupled operational models covering the Sun, Earth, and intervening space; and how these observations and models can be integrated via data assimilation.

  7. Understanding Space Weather and the Physics Behind It

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knipp, D. J.; Gross, N. A.

    2011-12-01

    A new textbook on space weather, Understanding Space Weather and the Physics Behind It, aimed at upper-level undergraduates and beginning graduate students, contains numerous examples of basic physics applications in space weather. We will highlight a few of the examples from the text. In addition, new material is being developed to support the many references to NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) graphics and scales. Our intent is to provide background and improved understanding of the underpinnings of the operational images. In this presentation we provide a set of questions, tools, and exercises that guide inquiry into the observations and proxies behind some of elements on SWPC's home page. Our materials include observation sequences for the types of space weather disturbances discussed in SWPC's Report of Solar and Geophysical Activity and the NOAA Space Weather Scales. Our instructional materials are in standard electronic document formats and in "dashboard" format supported by tools from the Integrated Space Weather Analysis platform at NASA's Community Coordinated Modeling Center.

  8. Space Weathering in the Mercurian Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, S. K.; Pieters, C. M.

    2001-01-01

    Space weathering processes are known to be important on the Moon. These processes both create the lunar regolith and alter its optical properties. Like the Moon, Mercury has no atmosphere to protect it from the harsh space environment and therefore it is expected that it will also incur the effects of space weathering. However, there are many important differences between the environments of Mercury and the Moon. These environmental differences will almost certainly affect the weathering processes and the products of those processes. It should be possible to observe the effects of these differences in Vis (visible)/NIR (near infrared) spectra of the type expected to be returned by MESSENGER. More importantly, understanding these weathering processes and their consequences is essential for evaluating the spectral data returned from MESSENGER and other missions in order to determine the mineralogy and the Fe content of the Mercurian surface. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Recent Activities on the Embrace Space Weather Regional Warning Center: the New Space Weather Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denardini, Clezio Marcos; Dal Lago, Alisson; Mendes, Odim; Batista, Inez S.; SantAnna, Nilson; Gatto, Rubens; Takahashi, Hisao; Costa, D. Joaquim; Banik Padua, Marcelo; Campos Velho, Haroldo

    2016-07-01

    On August 2007 the National Institute for Space Research started a task force to develop and operate a space weather program, which is known by the acronyms Embrace that stands for the Portuguese statement "Estudo e Monitoramento BRAasileiro de Clima Espacial" Program (Brazilian Space Weather Study and Monitoring program). The mission of the Embrace/INPE program is to monitor the Solar-Terrestrial environment, the magnetosphere, the upper atmosphere and the ground induced currents to prevent effects on technological and economic activities. The Embrace/INPE system monitors the physical parameters of the Sun-Earth environment, such as Active Regions (AR) in the Sun and solar radiation by using radio telescope, Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) information by satellite and ground-based cosmic ray monitoring, geomagnetic activity by the magnetometer network, and ionospheric disturbance by ionospheric sounders and using data collected by four GPS receiver network, geomagnetic activity by a magnetometer network, and provides a forecasting for Total Electronic Content (TEC) - 24 hours ahead - using a version of the SUPIM model which assimilates the two latter data using nudging approach. Most of these physical parameters are daily published on the Brazilian space weather program web portal, related to the entire network sensors available. Regarding outreach, it has being published a daily bulletin in Portuguese and English with the status of the space weather environment on the Sun, the Interplanetary Medium and close to the Earth. Since December 2011, all these activities are carried out at the Embrace Headquarter, a building located at the INPE's main campus. Recently, a comprehensive data bank and an interface layer are under commissioning to allow an easy and direct access to all the space weather data collected by Embrace through the Embrace web Portal. The information being released encompasses data from: (a) the Embrace Digisonde Network (Embrace DigiNet) that monitors

  10. Space Weathering in the Inner Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, Sarah K.

    2010-01-01

    "Space weathering" is the term given to the cumulative effects incurred by surfaces which are exposed to the harsh environment of space. Lunar sample studies over the last decade or so have produced a clear picture of space weathering processes in the lunar environment. By combining laboratory and remote spectra with microanalytical methods (scanning and transmission electron microscopy), we have begun to unravel the various processes (irradiation, micrometeorite bombardment, etc) that contribute to space weathering and the physical and optical consequences of those processes on the Moon. Using the understanding gleaned from lunar samples, it is possible to extrapolate weathering processes to other airless bodies from which we have not yet returned samples (i.e. Mercury, asteroids). Through experiments which simulate various components of weathering, the expected differences in environment (impact rate, distance from Sun, presence of a magnetic field, reduced or enhanced gravity, etc) and composition (particularly iron content) can be explored to understand how space weathering will manifest on a given body.

  11. Simulating Space Weather at Pluto

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows a simulation of the space environment all the way out to Pluto in the months surrounding New Horizons’ July 2015 flyby. At the time, scientists at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Cente...

  12. Space Weather Outreach: Connection to STEM Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P. B.

    2008-12-01

    Many scientists are studying the Sun-Earth system and attempting to provide timely, accurate, and reliable space environment observations and forecasts. Research programs and missions serve as an ideal focal point for creating educational content, making this an ideal time to inform the public about the importance and value of space weather research. In order to take advantage of this opportunity, the Space Science Institute (SSI) is developing a comprehensive Space Weather Outreach program to reach students, educators, and other members of the public, and share with them the exciting discoveries from this important scientific discipline. The Space Weather Outreach program has the following five components: (1) the Space Weather Center Website that includes online educational games; (2) Small Exhibits for Libraries, Shopping Malls, and Science Centers; (3) After-School Programs; (4) Professional Development Workshops for Educators, and (5) an innovative Evaluation and Education Research project. Its overarching goal is to inspire, engage, and educate a broad spectrum of the public and make strategic and innovative connections between informal and K-12 education communities. An important factor in the success of this program will be its alignment with STEM standards especially those related to science and mathematics. This presentation will describe the Space Weather Outreach program and how standards are being used in the development of each of its components.

  13. Ionospheric research for space weather service support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanislawska, Iwona; Gulyaeva, Tamara; Dziak-Jankowska, Beata

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of the behavior of the ionosphere is very important for space weather services. A wide variety of ground based and satellite existing and future systems (communications, radar, surveillance, intelligence gathering, satellite operation, etc) is affected by the ionosphere. There are the needs for reliable and efficient support for such systems against natural hazard and minimalization of the risk failure. The joint research Project on the 'Ionospheric Weather' of IZMIRAN and SRC PAS is aimed to provide on-line the ionospheric parameters characterizing the space weather in the ionosphere. It is devoted to science, techniques and to more application oriented areas of ionospheric investigation in order to support space weather services. The studies based on data mining philosophy increasing the knowledge of ionospheric physical properties, modelling capabilities and gain applications of various procedures in ionospheric monitoring and forecasting were concerned. In the framework of the joint Project the novel techniques for data analysis, the original system of the ionospheric disturbance indices and their implementation for the ionosphere and the ionospheric radio wave propagation are developed since 1997. Data of ionosonde measurements and results of their forecasting for the ionospheric observatories network, the regional maps and global ionospheric maps of total electron content from the navigational satellite system (GNSS) observations, the global maps of the F2 layer peak parameters (foF2, hmF2) and W-index of the ionospheric variability are provided at the web pages of SRC PAS and IZMIRAN. The data processing systems include analysis and forecast of geomagnetic indices ap and kp and new eta index applied for the ionosphere forecasting. For the first time in the world the new products of the W-index maps analysis are provided in Catalogues of the ionospheric storms and sub-storms and their association with the global geomagnetic Dst storms is

  14. International Collaboration in Space Weather Situational Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boteler, David; Trichtchenko, Larisa; Danskin, Donald

    Space weather is a global phenomena so interntional collaboration is necessary to maintain awareness of potentially dangerous conditions. The Regional Warning Centres (RWCs) of the International Space Environment Service were set up during the International Geophysical Year to alert the scientific community to conditions requiring special measurements. The information sharing continues to this day with URSIGRAM messages exchanged between RWCs to help them produce space weather forecasts. Venturing into space, especially with manned missions, created a need to know about the space environment and particularly radiation dangers to man in space. Responding to this need led to the creation of a network of stations around the world to provide continuous monitoring of solar activity. Solar wind monitoring is now provided by the ACE satellite, operated by one country, but involving international collaborators to bring the information down in real time. Disturbances in the Earth's magnetic field are monitored by many magnetic observatories that are collaborating through INTERMAGNET to provide reliable data. Space weather produces effects on the ionosphere that can interfere with a variety of systems: the International GNSS Service provides information about effects on positioning systems, and the International Space Environment Service is providing information about iono-spheric absorption, particularly for trans-polar airline operations. The increasing availability of internet access, even at remote locations, is making it easier to obtain the raw information. The challenge now is how to integrate that information to provide effective international situational awareness of space weather.

  15. ESA situational awareness of space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luntama, Juha-Pekka; Glover, Alexi; Keil, Ralf; Kraft, Stefan; Lupi, Adriano

    2016-07-01

    ESA SSA Period 2 started at the beginning of 2013 and will last until the end of 2016. For the Space Weather Segment, transition to Period 2 introduced an increasing amount of development of new space weather service capability in addition to networking existing European assets. This transition was started already towards the end of SSA Period 1 with the initiation of the SSA Space Weather Segment architecture definition studies and activities enhancing existing space weather assets. The objective of Period 2 has been to initiate SWE space segment developments in the form of hosted payload missions and further expand the federated service network. A strong focus has been placed on demonstration and testing of European capabilities in the range of SWE service domains with a view to establishing core products which can form the basis of SWE service provision during SSA Period 3. This focus has been particularly addressed in the SSA Expert Service Centre (ESC) Definition and Development activity that was started in September 2015. This presentation will cover the current status of the SSA SWE Segment and the achievements during SSA Programme Periods 1 and 2. Particular attention is given to the federated approach that allow building the end user services on the best European expertise. The presentation will also outline the plans for the Space Weather capability development in the framework of the ESA SSA Programme in 2017-2020.

  16. How MAG4 Improves Space Weather Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David; Khazanov, Igor; Barghouty, Nasser

    2013-01-01

    Dangerous space weather is driven by solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejection (CMEs). Forecasting flares and CMEs is the first step to forecasting either dangerous space weather or All Clear. MAG4 (Magnetogram Forecast), developed originally for NASA/SRAG (Space Radiation Analysis Group), is an automated program that analyzes magnetograms from the HMI (Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager) instrument on NASA SDO (Solar Dynamics Observatory), and automatically converts the rate (or probability) of major flares (M- and X-class), Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), and Solar Energetic Particle Events.

  17. THOR contribution to space weather science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaivads, Andris; Opgenoorth, Hermann; Retinò, Alessandro; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Soucek, Jan; Valentini, Francesco; Escoubet, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Turbulence Heating ObserveR - THOR is a mission proposal to study energy dissipation and particle acceleration in turbulent space plasma. THOR will focus on turbulent plasma in pristine solar wind, bow shock and magnetosheath. The orbit of THOR is tuned to spend long times in those regions allowing THOR to obtain high resolution data sets that can be used also for space weather science. In addition, THOR is designed with enough propellant to reach L1 in the second phase of the mission if necessary. Here we will discuss the space weather science questions that can be addressed and significantly advanced using THOR. Link to THOR: http://thor.irfu.se.

  18. Statistical Analysis of Model Data for Operational Space Launch Weather Support at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., III

    2010-01-01

    The 12-km resolution North American Mesoscale (NAM) model (MesoNAM) is used by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Launch Weather Officers at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) to support space launch weather operations. The 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit to conduct an objective statistics-based analysis of MesoNAM output compared to wind tower mesonet observations and then develop a an operational tool to display the results. The National Centers for Environmental Prediction began running the current version of the MesoNAM in mid-August 2006. The period of record for the dataset was 1 September 2006 - 31 January 2010. The AMU evaluated MesoNAM hourly forecasts from 0 to 84 hours based on model initialization times of 00, 06, 12 and 18 UTC. The MesoNAM forecast winds, temperature and dew point were compared to the observed values of these parameters from the sensors in the KSC/CCAFS wind tower network. The data sets were stratified by model initialization time, month and onshore/offshore flow for each wind tower. Statistics computed included bias (mean difference), standard deviation of the bias, root mean square error (RMSE) and a hypothesis test for bias = O. Twelve wind towers located in close proximity to key launch complexes were used for the statistical analysis with the sensors on the towers positioned at varying heights to include 6 ft, 30 ft, 54 ft, 60 ft, 90 ft, 162 ft, 204 ft and 230 ft depending on the launch vehicle and associated weather launch commit criteria being evaluated. These twelve wind towers support activities for the Space Shuttle (launch and landing), Delta IV, Atlas V and Falcon 9 launch vehicles. For all twelve towers, the results indicate a diurnal signal in the bias of temperature (T) and weaker but discernable diurnal signal in the bias of dewpoint temperature (T(sub d)) in the MesoNAM forecasts. Also, the standard deviation of the bias and RMSE of T, T(sub d), wind speed and wind

  19. Operational Space Weather Needs - Perspectives from SEASONS 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comberiate, J.; Kelly, M. A.; Paxton, L. J.; Schaefer, R. K.; Bust, G. S.; Sotirelis, T.; Fox, N. J.

    2014-12-01

    A key challenge for the operational space weather community is the gap between the latest scientific data, models, methods, and indices and those that are currently used in operational systems. The November 2014 SEASONS (Space Environment Applications, Systems, and Operations for National Security) Workshop at JHU/APL in Laurel, Maryland, brings together representatives from the operational and scientific communities. The theme of SEASONS 2014 is "Beyond Climatology," with a focus on how space weather events threaten operational assets and disrupt missions. Here we present perspectives from SEASONS 2014 on new observations, models in development, and forecasting methods that are of interest to the operational space weather community. Highlighted topics include ionospheric data assimilation and forecasting models, HF propagation models, radiation belt observations, and energetic particle modeling. The SEASONS 2014 web site can be found at https://secwww.jhuapl.edu/SEASONS/

  20. Space Weather: Physics and Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, W. Jeffrey

    2009-03-01

    With the launching of Sputnik, Explorer 1, and the other early satellites, the new discipline of space physics was born, about 50 years ago. Although earlier ground-based observations had provided strong hints about the nature of our space environment above the upper atmosphere, those early satellites initiated a series of surprises and discoveries, including Van Allen's discovery of the Earth's radiation belts. Young scientists were attracted to this new field, and it grew quickly. When the Journal of Geophysical Research was divided into two sections, in 1964, one section was devoted to space physics. The field explored not only new regions of space but also a new state of matter: the rarefied, fully ionized plasma that fills space and interacts intimately with magnetic fields.

  1. Operational Simulation of Heliospheric Space Weather: Improvements of the WSA-ENLIL-Cone Modeling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odstrcil, Dusan

    2016-07-01

    The ENLIL-based heliospheric modeling system enables faster-than-real-time simulations of corotating and transient disturbances. This hybrid system does not simulate origin of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) but uses appearance in coronagraphs, its geometric and kinematic parameters, and launches a CME-like structure into the solar wind computed using the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) coronal model. Propagation and interaction in the heliosphere is then solved by a 3-D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code. This modeling system is operationally used at NOAA/SWPC, NASA/CCMC, UK/MetOffice, and Korea/KSWPC. In this presentation, we introduce the recent improvements that support modeling of the evolving background solar wind, launching of CME-like transients, and further facilitate comparison with in-situ and remote observations. Further, we introduce the project testbed system (http://heliowether.net) that has helped us to monitor the model development, verify robustness of new model features, and evaluate the prediction accuracy. Finally, we present results of the verification and validation studies, show improvements over the currently-used version, and illustrate broader applications of the new ENLIL version to support various heliospheric missions.

  2. Recent Applications of Space Weather Research to NASA Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Emily M.; Howard, James W., Jr.; Miller, J. Scott; Minow, Joseph I.; NeergardParker, L.; Suggs, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center s Space Environments Team is committed to applying the latest research in space weather to NASA programs. We analyze data from an extensive set of space weather satellites in order to define the space environments for some of NASA s highest profile programs. Our goal is to ensure that spacecraft are designed to be successful in all environments encountered during their missions. We also collaborate with universities, industry, and other federal agencies to provide analysis of anomalies and operational impacts to current missions. This presentation is a summary of some of our most recent applications of space weather data, including the definition of the space environments for the initial phases of the Space Launch System (SLS), acquisition of International Space Station (ISS) frame potential variations during geomagnetic storms, and Nascap-2K charging analyses.

  3. Space Weather: The Physics Behind a Slogan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldwin, Mark

    2005-09-01

    Space weather is an emerging field of space physics that has as its focus the understanding of the societal and technological impacts of the solar-terrestrial relationship.The variable Sun's electromagnetic and charged particle outflows affect the Earth's space environment and the satellites, communications systems, electrical power grids, astronauts, and airline passengers that operate within it. The energy, mass, and momentum outflow from the Sun changes over all timescales and gives rise to dynamics of the magnetic field and plasma environment around the Earth. Many terms used in space physics have been borrowed from meteorology: The mass outflow of the Sun is called the ``solar wind,'' and the constant drizzle of energetic electrons into the polar cap is called ``polar rain.'' In the last decade, the term ``space weather'' has become the umbrella term to describe space physics research.

  4. Planetary Space Weather Services for the Europlanet 2020 Research Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, N.; Grande, M.

    2015-10-01

    Under Horizon 2020, the Europlanet 2020 Research Infrastructure (EPN2020-RI) will include an entirely new Virtual Access Service, WP5 VA1 "Planetary Space Weather Services" (PSWS) that will extend the concepts of space weather and space situational awareness to other planets in our Solar System and in particular to spacecraft that voyage through it. VA1 will make five entirely new 'toolkits' accessible to the research community and to industrial partners planning for space missions: a general planetary space weather toolkit, as well as three toolkits dedicated to the following key planetary environments: Mars (in support ExoMars), comets (building on the expected success of the ESA Rosetta mission), and outer planets (in preparation for the ESA JUICE mission to be launched in 2022). This will give the European planetary science community new methods, interfaces, functionalities and/or plugins dedicated to planetary space weather in the tools and models available within the partner institutes. It will also create a novel event-diary toolkit aiming at predicting and detecting planetary events like meteor showers and impacts. A variety of tools (in the form of web applications, standalone software, or numerical models in various degrees of implementation) are available for tracing propagation of planetary and/or solar events through the Solar System and modelling the response of the planetary environment (surfaces, atmospheres, ionospheres, and magnetospheres) to those events. But these tools were not originally designed for planetary event prediction and space weather applications. So WP10 JRA4 "Planetary Space Weather Services" (PSWS) will provide the additional research and tailoring required to apply them for these purposes. The overall objectives of this JRA will be to review, test, improve and adapt methods and tools available within the partner institutes in order to make prototype planetary event and space weather services operational in Europe at the end of

  5. Predicting Space Weather: Challenges for Research and Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, H. J.; Onsager, T. G.; Rutledge, R.; Viereck, R. A.; Kunches, J.

    2013-12-01

    Society's growing dependence on technologies and infrastructure susceptible to the consequences of space weather has given rise to increased attention at the highest levels of government as well as inspired the need for both research and improved space weather services. In part, for these reasons, the number one goal of the recent National Research Council report on a Decadal Strategy for Solar and Space Physics is to 'Determine the origins of the Sun's activity and predict the variations in the space environment.' Prediction of conditions in our space environment is clearly a challenge for both research and operations, and we require the near-term development and validation of models that have sufficient accuracy and lead time to be useful to those impacted by space weather. In this presentation, we will provide new scientific results of space weather conditions that have challenged space weather forecasters, and identify specific areas of research that can lead to improved capabilities. In addition, we will examine examples of customer impacts and requirements as well as the challenges to the operations community to establish metrics that enable the selection and transition of models and observations that can provide the greatest economic and societal benefit.

  6. Weathering a Perfect Storm from Space

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    Extreme space-weather events — intense solar and geomagnetic storms — have occurred in the past: most recently in 1859, 1921 and 1989. So scientists expect that, sooner or later, another extremely intense spaceweather event will strike Earth again. Such storms have the potential to cause widespread interference with and damage to technological systems. A National Academy of Sciences study projects that an extreme space-weather event could end up costing the American economy more than $1 trillion. The question now is whether or not we will take the actions needed to avoid such expensive consequences. Let’s assume that we do. Below is an imagined scenario of how, sometime in the future, an extreme space-weather event might play out.

  7. Space Weather in Magnetic Observatory Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilder, S. A.; Truong, F.

    2012-12-01

    Space weather impacts human activity by degrading satellite operation or disrupting electrical power grids. By exploiting small differences in the time stamp between magnetometer pairs to facilitate data filtering, we find that ground-based magnetic observatories are well suited to measure space weather phenomena, and in particular, high frequency fluctuations known as pulsations. Several of the world's consortium of INTERMAGNET observatories are used in the analyses. They show that pulsation amplitudes attain a maximum near local noon over diurnal periods. Long-term trends in pulsation amplitude correlate well with the solar cycle, with the greatest effect occurring during the waning part of the cycle when the derivative of the number of sunspots attains a maximum rate of decrease. Seasonal variability and total amplitude of the diurnal expression of pulsations depends on latitude. Our study highlights the utility of ground-based observatories to understand solar phenomena and suggests how INTERMAGNET data and protocol could be better tuned to monitor space weather.

  8. Space Weather affects on Air Transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. B. L.; Bentley, R. D.; Dyer, C.; Shaw, A.

    In Europe, legislation requires the airline industry to monitor the occupational exposure of aircrew to cosmic radiation. However, there are other significant impacts of space weather phenomena on the technological systems used for day-to-day operations which need to be considered by the airlines. These were highlighted by the disruption caused to the industry by the period of significant solar activity in late October and early November 2003. Next generation aircraft will utilize increasingly complex avionics as well as expanding the performance envelopes. These and future generation platforms will require the development of a new air-space management infrastructure with improved position accuracy (for route navigation and landing in bad weather) and reduced separation minima in order to cope with the expected growth in air travel. Similarly, greater reliance will be placed upon satellites for command, control, communication and information (C3I) of the operation. However, to maximize effectiveness of this globally interoperable C3I and ensure seamless fusion of all components for a safe operation will require a greater understanding of the space weather affects, their risks with increasing technology, and the inclusion of space weather information into the operation. This paper will review space weather effects on air transport and the increasing risks for future operations cause by them. We will examine how well the effects can be predicted, some of the tools that can be used and the practicalities of using such predictions in an operational scenario. Initial results from the SOARS ESA Space Weather Pilot Project will also be discussed,

  9. Space Weather Effects of Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, K. N.; Jadav, R. M.; Jadeja, A. K.; Manoharan, P. K.; Sharma, Som; Vats, Hari Om

    2006-09-01

    This paper describes the space weather effects of a major CME which was accompanied by extremely violent events on the Sun. The signatures of the event in the interplanetary medium (IPM) sensed by Ooty Radio Telescope, the solar observations by LASCO coronagraph onboard SOHO, GOES X-ray measurements, satellite measurements of the interplanetary parameters, GPS based ionospheric measurements, the geomagnetic storm parameter Dst and ground based ionosonde data are used in the study to understand the space weather effects in the different regions of the solar-terrestrial environment. The effects of this event are compared and possible explanations attempted.

  10. Solar Drivers for Space Weather Operations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Most space weather effects can be tied back to the Sun, and major research efforts are devoted to understanding the physics of the relevant phenomena with a long-term view of predicting their occurrence. This talk will focus on the current state of knowledge regarding the solar drivers of space weather, and in particular the connection between the science and operational needs. Topics covered will include the effects of solar ionizing flux on communications and navigation, radio interference, flare forecasting, the solar wind and the arrival of coronal mass ejections at Earth.

  11. Proposed U.S. Space Weather Budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2009-08-01

    The Obama administration's proposed federal budget for fiscal year (FY) 2010 includes $147.6 billion for research and development, which would be an increase of $555 million, or 0.4%, above the enacted 2009 budget. Tucked away in the budget is funding for research and operations related to space weather. The budget, which needs approval by Congress, includes increases for space weather-related initiatives at the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) and NOAA and fairly flat funding for NASA.

  12. An Extended Objective Evaluation of the 29-km Eta Model for Weather Support to the United States Space Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nutter, Paul; Manobianco, John

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the Applied Meteorology Unit's objective verification of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction 29-km eta model during separate warm and cool season periods from May 1996 through January 1998. The verification of surface and upper-air point forecasts was performed at three selected stations important for 45th Weather Squadron, Spaceflight Meteorology Group, and National Weather Service, Melbourne operational weather concerns. The statistical evaluation identified model biases that may result from inadequate parameterization of physical processes. Since model biases are relatively small compared to the random error component, most of the total model error results from day-to-day variability in the forecasts and/or observations. To some extent, these nonsystematic errors reflect the variability in point observations that sample spatial and temporal scales of atmospheric phenomena that cannot be resolved by the model. On average, Meso-Eta point forecasts provide useful guidance for predicting the evolution of the larger scale environment. A more substantial challenge facing model users in real time is the discrimination of nonsystematic errors that tend to inflate the total forecast error. It is important that model users maintain awareness of ongoing model changes. Such changes are likely to modify the basic error characteristics, particularly near the surface.

  13. MAGDAS Project at SERC for Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, Kiyohumi

    The Space Environment Research Center (SERC), Kyushu University has deployed the MAG-netic Data Acqusition System (MAGDAS) at 50 stations along the 210-and 96-degree mag-netic meridians (MM) and the magnetic Dip equator, and three FM-CW radars along the 210-degree MM during the International Heliophysical Year (IHY) period of 2005-2009 (see http://magdas.serc.kyushu-u.ac.jp/ and http://magdas2.serc.kyushu-u.ac.jp/). The goal of MAGDAS project is to become the most comprehensive ground-based monitoring system of the earth's magnetic field. It does not compete with space-based observation. Rather, this ground-based network complements observation from space. To properly study solar-terrestrial events, data from both are required. This project intends to get the MAGDAS network fully operational and provide data for studies on space weather. By analyzing these new MAGDAS data, we can perform a real-time monitoring and modeling of the global (e.g. Sq, EEJ) current system and the ambient plasma mass density for understanding the electromagnetic and plasma environment changes in geospace during helio-magnetospheric storms. In order to examine the propagation mechanisms of transient disturbances, i.e., sc/si, Pi 2, and DP2, relations of iono-spheric electric and magnetic fields are investigated by analyzing the MAGDAS magnetic data and the Doppler data of our FM-CW ionospheric radar. A new EE-index (EDst, EU, and EL) was also proposed by SERC for real-time and long-term geo-space monitoring. The basic algorithm to obtain EE-index was constructed by Uozumi et al. (2008). EU and EL mainly represent the range of the EEJ (equatorial electrojet) and CEJ (equatorial counter electrojet) components, respectively. The baseline levels of EU and EL are obtained by averaging the H-component magnetic variations observed at the nightside (LT = 18-06) MAGDAS/CPMN (Circum-pan Pacific Magnetometer Network) stations along the magnetic equator. The base-line value is defined as EDst and its

  14. Planetary space weather: scientific aspects and future perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plainaki, Christina; Lilensten, Jean; Radioti, Aikaterini; Andriopoulou, Maria; Milillo, Anna; Nordheim, Tom A.; Dandouras, Iannis; Coustenis, Athena; Grassi, Davide; Mangano, Valeria; Massetti, Stefano; Orsini, Stefano; Lucchetti, Alice

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we review the scientific aspects of planetary space weather at different regions of our Solar System, performing a comparative planetology analysis that includes a direct reference to the circum-terrestrial case. Through an interdisciplinary analysis of existing results based both on observational data and theoretical models, we review the nature of the interactions between the environment of a Solar System body other than the Earth and the impinging plasma/radiation, and we offer some considerations related to the planning of future space observations. We highlight the importance of such comparative studies for data interpretations in the context of future space missions (e.g. ESA JUICE; ESA/JAXA BEPI COLOMBO). Moreover, we discuss how the study of planetary space weather can provide feedback for better understanding the traditional circum-terrestrial space weather. Finally, a strategy for future global investigations related to this thematic is proposed.

  15. A Milestone in Commercial Space Weather: USTAR Center for Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W.; Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.; Thompson, D. C.; Scherliess, L.; Zhu, L.; Gardner, L. C.

    2009-12-01

    As of 2009, Utah State University (USU) hosts a new organization to develop commercial space weather applications using funding that has been provided by the State of Utah’s Utah Science Technology and Research (USTAR) initiative. The USTAR Center for Space Weather (UCSW) is located on the USU campus in Logan, Utah and is developing innovative applications for mitigating adverse space weather effects in technological systems. Space weather’s effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the Sun’s photons, particles, and fields. Of the space environment domains that are affected by space weather, the ionosphere is the key region that affects communication and navigation systems. The UCSW has developed products for users of systems that are affected by space weather-driven ionospheric changes. For example, on September 1, 2009 USCW released, in conjunction with Space Environment Technologies, the world’s first real-time space weather via an iPhone app. Space WX displays the real-time, current global ionosphere total electron content along with its space weather drivers; it is available through the Apple iTunes store and is used around the planet. The Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements (GAIM) system is now being run operationally in real-time at UCSW with the continuous ingestion of hundreds of global data streams to dramatically improve the ionosphere’s characterization. We discuss not only funding and technical advances that have led to current products but also describe the direction for UCSW that includes partnering opportunities for moving commercial space weather into fully automated specification and forecasting over the next half decade.

  16. Space Weather, Cosmic Rays, and Satellite Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Dorman

    Results are presented of the Satellite Anomaly Project, which aims to improve the methods of safeguarding satellites in the Earth’s magnetosphere from the negative effects of the space environment. Anomaly data from the USSR and Russian “Kosmos” series satellites in the period 1971-1999 are combined into one database, together with similar information on other spacecraft. This database contains, beyond the anomaly information, various characteristics of space weather: geomagnetic activity indices (Ap, AE and Dst), fluxes and fluencies of electrons and protons at different energies, high energy cosmic ray variations and other solar, interplanetary and solar wind data. A comparative analysis of the distribution of each of these parameters relative to satellite anomalies was carried out for the total number of anomalies (about 6000 events), and separately for high altitude orbit satellites ( 5000 events) and low altitude (about 800 events). No relation was found between low and high altitude satellite anomalies. Daily numbers of satellite anomalies, averaged by a superposed epoch method around sudden storm commencements and proton event onsets for high (>1500 km) and low (<1500 km) altitude orbits revealed a big difference in behavior. Satellites were divided into several groups according to their orbital characteristics (altitude and inclination). The relation of satellite anomalies to the environmental parameters was found to be different for various orbits, and this should be taken into account when developing anomaly frequency models. The preliminary anomaly frequency models are presented.

  17. System Science approach to Space Weather forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balikhin, Michael A.

    There are many dynamical systems in nature that are so complex that mathematical models of their behaviour can not be deduced from first principles with the present level of our knowledge. Obvious examples are organic cell, human brain, etc often attract system scientists. A example that is closer to space physics is the terrestrial magnetosphere. The system approach has been developed to understand such complex objects from the observation of their dynamics. The systems approach employs advanced data analysis methodologies to identify patterns in the overall system behaviour and provides information regarding the linear and nonlinear processes involved in the dynamics of the system. This, in combination with the knowledge deduced from the first principles, creates the opportunity to find mathematical relationships that govern the evolution of a particular physical system. Advances and problems of systems science applications to provide a reliable forecasts of space weather phenomena such as geomagnetic storms, substorms and radiation belts particle fluxes are reviewed and compared with the physics based models.

  18. Space weather and the electricity market: An initial assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Kevin F.; St. Cyr, O. C.

    2004-10-01

    The paper examines the economic impact of space weather by drawing on hourly data from the PJM power grid over the period 1 June 2000 through 31 December 2001. The PJM grid is one of the largest power pools in North America. As of 31 December 2001, its service area had a population of approximately 22 million and included all or part of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, and the District of Columbia. Market prices are determined for every hour of the day. As of June 2000, there are actually two markets for energy: a real-time market in which market participants can buy and sell electricity in "real time" and a day ahead market that allows participants to enter into transactions one day ahead of time. The existence of these two markets allows us to disentangle the effect of space weather conditions from other factors (such as fuel prices and expected demand) that affect the baseline price (as established in the day ahead market) for wholesale electricity. Several econometric analyses are conducted. The first examines the contribution of space weather to transmission congestion within the power grid. Building on the first analysis, the second analysis constructs an econometric model that examines the impact of space weather on the real-time market. Factors considered in the model include the outcome in the day ahead market, the level of generation utilization, unexpected demand, generation outages, unexpected transmission outages that are believed to be terrestrial in origin, and space weather. The results indicate the presence of space weather effects on the real-time price even after controlling for the other factors. A third model examines whether these space weather impacts affect subsequent prices in the far larger day ahead market.

  19. Innovative Information Technology for Space Weather Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Qu, M.; Shih, F.; Denker, C.; Gerbessiotis, A.; Lofdahl, M.; Rees, D.; Keller, C.

    2004-05-01

    Solar activity is closely related to the near earth environment -- summarized descriptively as space weather. Changes in space weather have adverse effect on many aspects of life and systems on earth and in space. Real-time, high-quality data and data processing would be a key element to forecast space weather promptly and accurately. Recently, we obtained a funding from US National Science Foundation to apply innovative information technology for space weather prediction. (1) We use the technologies of image processing and pattern recognition, such as image morphology segmentation, Support Vector Machines (SVMs), and neural networks to detect and characterize three important solar activities in real-time: filament eruptions, flares, and emerging flux regions (EFRs). Combining the real time detection with the recent statistical study on the relationship among filament eruptions, flares, EFRs, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and geomagnetic storms, we are establishing real time report of solar events and automatic forecasting of earth directed CMEs and subsequent geomagnetic storms. (2) We combine state-of-art parallel computing techniques with phase diverse speckle imaging techniques, to yield near real-time diffraction limited images with a cadence of approximately 10 sec. We utilize the multiplicity of parallel paradigms to optimize the calculation of phase diverse speckle imaging to improve calculation speed. With such data, we can monitor flare producing active regions continuously and carry out targeted studies of the evolution and flows in flare producing active regions. (3) We are developing Web based software tools to post our processed data, events and forecasting in real time, and to be integrated with current solar activity and space weather prediction Web pages at BBSO. This will also be a part of Virtual Solar Observatory (VSO) being developed by the solar physics community. This research is supported by NSF ITR program.

  20. Briefing highlights space weather risks to GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretkoff, Ernie

    2011-07-01

    Solar storms, which are expected to increase as the Sun nears the most active phase of the solar cycle, can disrupt a variety of technologies on which society relies. Speakers at a 22 June briefing on Capitol Hill in Washington, D. C., focused on how space weather can affect the Global Positioning System (GPS), which is used in a wide range of industries, including commercial air travel, agriculture, national security, and emergency response. Rocky Stone, chief technical pilot for United Airlines, noted that GPS allows more aircraft to be in airspace, saves fuel, and helps aircraft move safely on runways. “Improvements in space weather forecasting need to be pursued,” he said. Precision GPS has also “changed the whole nature of farming,” said Ron Hatch, Director of Navigation Systems, NavCom Technology/John Deere. GPS makes it possible for tractors to be driven in the most efficient paths and for fertilizer and water to be applied precisely to the areas that most need them. Space weather-induced degradation of GPS signals can cause significant loss to farms that rely on GPS. Elizabeth Zimmerman, Deputy Associate Administrator for the Office of Response and Recovery at the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), described how FEMA relies on GPS for disaster recovery. The agency is developing an operations plan for dealing with space weather, she said.

  1. High-latitude space weather monitoring in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulich, Th.

    2009-04-01

    Today, space weather is of important concern in many respects. Space weather phenomena are subject of extensive scientific research programmes and the consequences of space weather events are of great operational concern for a number of technologies including satellites, humans in space, and global positioning and communications. Due to the Earth's magnetic field, the high latitudes are most strongly affected by space weather phenomena. Naturally, monitoring and understanding of the high-latitude space environment is important for forecasting and modelling operational conditions. The Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory (SGO) was established as a magnetic observatory in 1913. With the sole exception of a year at the end of WWII, the record of geomagnetic field variations is continuous. Since the IGY in 1957, many other routine measurements have been added to the observatory's operations and today SGO is a highly versatile observatory. Here we will present examples of high-latitude space weather data from a selection of instruments including the Sodankylä ionosonde, the Finnish Riometer Chain, and the Tomography (GNSS) receiver chain. We invite collaboration and use of our data products. We will further outline the current EU Framework VII "Access to Research Infrastructures" project of SGO "LAPBIAT2."

  2. Innovative Near Real-Time Data Dissemination Tools Developed by the Space Weather Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullinix, R.; Maddox, M. M.; Berrios, D.; Kuznetsova, M.; Pulkkinen, A.; Rastaetter, L.; Zheng, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Space weather affects virtually all of NASA's endeavors, from robotic missions to human exploration. Knowledge and prediction of space weather conditions are therefore essential to NASA operations. The diverse nature of currently available space environment measurements and modeling products compels the need for a single access point to such information. The Integrated Space Weather Analysis (iSWA) System provides this single point access along with the capability to collect and catalog a vast range of sources including both observational and model data. NASA Goddard Space Weather Research Center heavily utilizes the iSWA System daily for research, space weather model validation, and forecasting for NASA missions. iSWA provides the capabilities to view and analyze near real-time space weather data from any where in the world. This presentation will describe the technology behind the iSWA system and describe how to use the system for space weather research, forecasting, training, education, and sharing.

  3. Asteroid Surface Alteration by Space Weathering Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetto, R.; Loeffler, M. J.; Nesvorný, D.; Sasaki, S.; Strazzulla, G.

    Micrometeorite bombardment and irradiation by solar wind and cosmic-ray ions cause variations in the optical properties of small solar system bodies surfaces, affecting efforts to draw connections between specific meteorites and asteroid types. These space weathering processes have been widely studied for the Moon and S- and V-type asteroids, and they are currently being investigated for other asteroid types. Here we review the laboratory studies performed by several groups on meteorites and asteroid surface analogs, aimed at simulating space weathering by using ion irradiation and laser ablation. Together with direct evidence of weathering of particles from asteroid Itokawa acquired by the Hayabusa mission, these results have provided a fundamental contribution to the spectral interpretation of asteroid observations, to establish a solid asteroids-meteorites link, and to understand the energetic processes affecting the surfaces of minor bodies. A general scheme for asteroid optical maturation is thus emerging. Slope trends from large surveys and in particular of young asteroid families have confirmed that solar wind is the main source of rapid (104-106 yr) weathering, and that a number of rejuvenating processes (impacts by small meteorites, planetary encounters, regolith shaking, etc.) efficiently counterbalance the fast weathering timescales.

  4. CME front and severe space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, N.; Skoug, R.; Tulasi Ram, S.; Rajesh, P. K.; Shiokawa, K.; Otsuka, Y.; Batista, I. S.; Ebihara, Y.; Nakamura, T.

    2014-12-01

    Thanks to the work of a number of scientists who made it known that severe space weather can cause extensive social and economic disruptions in the modern high-technology society. It is therefore important to understand what determines the severity of space weather and whether it can be predicted. We present results obtained from the analysis of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), solar energetic particle (SEP) events, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), CME-magnetosphere coupling, and geomagnetic storms associated with the major space weather events since 1998 by combining data from the ACE and GOES satellites with geomagnetic parameters and the Carrington event of 1859, the Quebec event of 1989, and an event in 1958. The results seem to indicate that (1) it is the impulsive energy mainly due to the impulsive velocity and orientation of IMF Bz at the leading edge of the CMEs (or CME front) that determine the severity of space weather. (2) CMEs having high impulsive velocity (sudden nonfluctuating increase by over 275 km s-1 over the background) caused severe space weather (SvSW) in the heliosphere (failure of the solar wind ion mode of Solar Wind Electron Proton Alpha Monitor in ACE) probably by suddenly accelerating the high-energy particles in the SEPs ahead directly or through the shocks. (3) The impact of such CMEs which also show the IMF Bz southward from the leading edge caused SvSW at the Earth including extreme geomagnetic storms of mean DstMP < -250 nT during main phases, and the known electric power outages happened during some of these SvSW events. (4) The higher the impulsive velocity, the more severe the space weather, like faster weather fronts and tsunami fronts causing more severe damage through impulsive action. (5) The CMEs having IMF Bz northward at the leading edge do not seem to cause SvSW on Earth, although, later when the IMF Bz turns southward, they can lead to super geomagnetic storms of intensity (Dstmin) less than even -400 nT.

  5. Monitoring and Modeling of Ionosphere Irregularities Caused By Space Weather Activity on the Base of GNSS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, I.; Zakharenkova, I.; Krankowski, A.; Shagimuratov, I.

    2014-12-01

    The ionosphere plays an important role in GNSS applications because it influences on the radio wave propagation through out. The ionosphere delay is the biggest error source for satellite navigation systems, but it can be directly measured and mitigated with using dual frequency GNSS receivers. However GNSS signal fading due to electron density gradients and irregularities in the ionosphere can decrease the operational availability of navigation system. The intensity of such irregularities on high and mid latitudes essentially rises during space weather events. For monitoring of the ionospheric irregularities data collected from all available permanent GNSS stations in the Northern Hemisphere are processed and analyzed. Here we used parameters ROT (rate of GPS TEC change) and ROTI (index of ROT) to study the occurrence of TEC fluctuations. ROTI maps are constructed with the grid of 2 deg x 2 deg resolution as a function of the magnetic local time and corrected magnetic latitude. The ROTI maps allow to estimate the overall fluctuation activity and auroral oval evolutions, in general the ROTI values are corresponded to the probability of GPS signals phase fluctuations. There were developed several models in order to represent ionospheric fluctuations and scintillation activity under different geophysical conditions, but they were calibrated with data sets, that did not include GNSS derived data. It is very actual to develop empirical model based on GNSS derived measurements which can represent strong fluctuations of the ionosphere plasma density at high latitudes. The measurements provided by the existing permanent GNSS networks accumulated in order to develop the empirical model of ionospheric irregularities over the Northern hemisphere. As initial data the daily dependences of the ROTI index are used as a function of geomagnetic Local Time on the specific grid. With ROTI index maps it was determined the irregularities oval border and averaging parameter - semi

  6. Solar and Interplanetary Data availability for space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothmer, Volker

    2012-07-01

    Multi-point space missions, such as STEREO, SDO, SOHO, ACE and Proba2, with dedicated instrumentations operating in the Sun-Earth system currently provide a huge amount of unprecedented solar and interplanetary observations. The data from these missions as well as unique other long-term datasets already established provide to date unique input resources for quantification of space weather processes and the development of reliable space weather models. In this presentation I will give an overview on the availability of these datasets to the scientific community, the tools required for access of these datasets, namely the VOs and website resources, and brief comments on their individual importance for the various fields of space weather research.

  7. Geospace Missions for Space Weather and the Next Scientific Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James

    2014-01-01

    Currently there is an active international flotilla of spacecraft that continuously observe and measure the dynamic space environment that surrounds our planet. These spacecraft have remote sensors for photons and particles, and in situ instruments for plasmas, fields and particles. They provide the data input to guide, motivate, and validate predictive space weather models used by decision makers and for a myriad of scientific investigations. This talk will briefly survey the current Geospace missions relevant to space weather, what they observe, and why. This talk will conclude with the description of two most significant scientific challenges that must be met in order to advance our understanding and prediction of space weather, and its impacts to society. They are the genesis and evolution of ionospheric variability and the interplanetary magnetic field. Concepts of possible solutions for these two challenges will be discussed.

  8. Space weather at different planetary environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plainaki, Christina; Milillo, Anna; Andriopoulou, Maria; Dandouras, Iannis; Radioti, Aikaterini; Lilensten, Jean; Coustenis, Athena; Nordheim, Tom; Orsini, Stefano; Mura, Alessandro; Mangano, Valeria

    2015-04-01

    Different aspects of the conditions in the Sun, solar wind and magnetospheric plasmas, at various planetary systems of our Solar System, can influence the performance and reliability of space-borne technological systems. The science study of the so-called Planetary Space Weather considers different cross-disciplinary issues, including: - the interaction of solar wind/magnetospheric plasmas with planetary/satellite surfaces, ionospheres and thick (e.g. at Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Mars, Venus, Titan) or tenuous (e.g. Ganymede, Europa, Mercury, our Moon) atmospheres, including the generation of auroras - the satellite interactions with their neutral environments and dust - the variability of the magnetospheric regions under different solar wind conditions - radiation belts, and their interactions with atmospheres/satellites/rings, in different planetary environments - the inter-comparisons of space weather conditions in different planetary environments In this paper, a brief review of theoretical and data analysis studies regarding planetary space weather in different bodies of our Solar System is presented. The importance of such studies for the in-situ data interpretations as well as for the preparation of future space missions is outlined.

  9. Analysis of real-time Earth magnetosphere simulation for space weather using space weather cloud computing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watari, S.; Tsubouchi, K.; Kato, H.; Tanaka, T.; Shinagawa, H.; Murata, K. T.

    2011-12-01

    The Earth magnetosphere simulation is continuously running in real-time for space weather in the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). Code of this simulation was originally developed by Tanaka (JGR, 1995) and was implemented as one of the NICT real-time space weather simulations by Den et al. (Space Weather, 2006). The space weather cloud computing system has a distributed large storage system and a data analysis system and has been constructed in the NICT. Using this space weather cloud computing system, it becomes possible to preserve the result of the real-time magnetosphere simulation. It enables to analyze the response of the magnetosphere for various solar wind conditions. There are several works on the real-time simulation using AE index (Kitamura et al., JGR, 2008), the polar cap potential (Kunitake et al, Journal of NICT, 2009), the plasma environment at gestational orbit (Nakamura et al., Journal of NICT, 2009). In this analysis, we focused magnetic variation at gestational orbit and location of magnetopause. At gestational orbit, there are continuous magnetic field observations by the GOES satellites. On magnetopause location, there is an empirical model called the Shue model, which takes account of dynamic pressure and south-ward IMF of solar wind. We compared the result of the real-time simulation with magnetic field variations observed by the GOES satellites and magnetopause location calculated by the Shue model. We will report the result of this study.

  10. Understanding Space Weather: The Sun as a Variable Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Keith; Saba, Julia; Kucera, Therese

    2012-01-01

    The Sun is a complex system of systems and until recently, less than half of its surface was observable at any given time and then only from afar. New observational techniques and modeling capabilities are giving us a fresh perspective of the solar interior and how our Sun works as a variable star. This revolution in solar observations and modeling provides us with the exciting prospect of being able to use a vastly increased stream of solar data taken simultaneously from several different vantage points to produce more reliable and prompt space weather forecasts. Solar variations that cause identifiable space weather effects do not happen only on solar-cycle timescales from decades to centuries; there are also many shorter-term events that have their own unique space weather effects and a different set of challenges to understand and predict, such as flares, coronal mass ejections, and solar wind variations.

  11. Understanding Space Weather: The Sun as a Variable Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Keith; Saba, Julia; Kucera, Therese

    2011-01-01

    The Sun is a complex system of systems and until recently, less than half of its surface was observable at any given time and then only from afar. New observational techniques and modeling capabilities are giving us a fresh perspective of the solar interior and how our Sun works as a variable star. This revolution in solar observations and modeling provides us with the exciting prospect of being able to use a vastly increased stream of solar data taken simultaneously from several different vantage points to produce more reliable and prompt space weather forecasts. Solar variations that cause identifiable space weather effects do not happen only on solar-cycle timescales from decades to centuries; there are also many shorter-term events that have their own unique space weather effects and a different set of challenges to understand and predict, such as flares, coronal mass ejections, and solar wind variations

  12. Aviation & Space Weather Policy Research: Integrating Space Weather Observations & Forecasts into Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, G.; Jones, B.

    2006-12-01

    The American Meteorological Society and SolarMetrics Limited are conducting a policy research project leading to recommendations that will increase the safety, reliability, and efficiency of the nation's airline operations through more effective use of space weather forecasts and information. This study, which is funded by a 3-year National Science Foundation grant, also has the support of the Federal Aviation Administration and the Joint Planning and Development Office (JPDO) who is planning the Next Generation Air Transportation System. A major component involves interviewing and bringing together key people in the aviation industry who deal with space weather information. This research also examines public and industrial strategies and plans to respond to space weather information. The focus is to examine policy issues in implementing effective application of space weather services to the management of the nation's aviation system. The results from this project will provide government and industry leaders with additional tools and information to make effective decisions with respect to investments in space weather research and services. While space weather can impact the entire aviation industry, and this project will address national and international issues, the primary focus will be on developing a U.S. perspective for the airlines.

  13. Space Weather At George Mason University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poland, A. I.; Zhang, J.

    2005-05-01

    George Mason University (GMU), located in Fairfax, Virginia has an exciting and rapidly growing set of graduate programs in Astrophysics, Space Weather, Planetary Sciences, and Earth Sciences. The faculty members in these programs are affiliated with the Department of Physics and Astronomy and the School of Computational Sciences (SCS). The synergy between these two departments creates opportunities for learning not found in traditional programs. Our curriculum emphasizes multi-disciplinary science that crosses traditional department boundaries. Space Weather/solar terrestrial physics is one of these multi-disciplinary areas. We expect our students to develop a deep understanding of the Sun, the heliosphere, geospace, and their interactions; we emphasize a systems view. The graduate program in Space Weather at GMU offers degrees at the Masters (M.S.) and Doctoral (Ph. D) levels through the School of Computational Sciences (SCS) and the Department of Physics and Astronomy of the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS). A wide variety of relevant courses are offered through (SCS) in partnership with (CAS). Students also have the opportunity to do research associated with the Goddard Space Flight Center and the Navel Research Laboratory. For more information on the program see: http://www.scs.gmu.edu/spaceweather/ Undergraduates and people from local industry are also taking some of our courses to further their education in this area. Many of them are finding the lectures directly relevant to their daily work, such as satellite orbit maintenance.

  14. Russia's national space weather service in 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, Viatcheslav; Avdyushin, Sergei; Denisova, Valentina

    RWC Russia (Institute of Applied Geophysics, Moscow) -forecasting center unites activity of the National Heliogeophysics Service of Russia and the Regional Warning Center of ISES. Nowadays the centre operates and fulfils numerous functions such as space weather monitoring, collecting, working and handing out the data to both Russian and foreign customers, compiling and spreading various kinds of the space weather condition forecasts. The first regular space weather forecast is known to have been issued on June 10, 1974. Since then this kind of activity has been processed and issued permanently 7 days a week. During year 2009 there were more than 17000 various short terms (semi -day, 1,2,3 and five days) forecasts of the geomagnetic fields and ionosphere conditions, magnetic fields, flare activity, radiation hazard in polar zones and the satellites traces. In the end of 2008 the Institute of Applied Geophysics was provided with necessary subsidizing to support the Space Weather Center. The fundamental repairs of the Institute's building have begun and are being done at present. They are to be completed this year. The allocated funds are sufficient to start the technical renovation of the Service, including: provision of the staff with up-to-date computing machinery; up-grading the observation stations equipment; preparing the apparatus and instruments for monitoring the near-earth space by two of our satellites "Meteor" and "Electro" ("Electro" -geostationary satellite). The "Meteor" satellite (subpolar orbit on altitude of 900 km) equipped with complex including: measurements of electron fluxes with energy more than 0.15 MeV, and proton fluxes with energy more than 5 MeV (40 channels) was launched on September 2009. These data (as well as ionosphere and geomagnetic data) are available on Web page www.geospace.ru since 2 quarter of the2010.

  15. Linking Space Weather Science and Decision Making (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, G. M.

    2009-12-01

    Linking scientific knowledge to decision making is a challenge for both the science and policy communities. In particular, in the field of space weather, there are unique challenges such as decision makers may not know that space has weather that poses risks to our technologically-dependent economy. Additionally, in an era of limited funds for scientific research, hazards posed by other natural disasters such as flooding and earthquakes are by contrast well known to policy makers, further making the importance of space weather research and monitoring a tough sell. Today, with industries and individuals more dependent on the Global Positioning System, wireless technology, and satellites than ever before, any disruption or inaccuracy can result in severe economic impacts. Therefore, it is highly important to understand how space weather science can most benefit society. The key to connecting research to decision making is to ensure that the information is salient, credible, and legitimate. To achieve this, scientists need to understand the decision makers' perspectives, including their language and culture, and recognize that their needs may evolve. This presentation will take a closer look at the steps required to make space weather research, models, and forecasts useful to decision makers and ultimately, benefit society.

  16. Space weather and power grids: findings and outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krausmann, Elisabeth; Andersson, Emmelie; Murtagh, William; Mitchison, Neil

    2014-05-01

    The impact of space weather on the power grid is a tangible and recurring threat with potentially serious consequences on society. Of particular concern is the long-distance high-voltage power grid, which is vulnerable to the effects of geomagnetic storms that can damage or destroy equipment or lead to grid collapse. In order to launch a dialogue on the topic and encourage authorities, regulators and operators in European countries and North America to learn from each other, the European Commission's Joint Research Centre, the Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency, and NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Centre, with the contribution of the UK Civil Contingencies Secretariat, jointly organised a workshop on the impact of extreme space weather on the power grid on 29-30 October 2013. Being structured into 6 sessions, the topics addressed were space-weather phenomena and the dynamics of their impact on the grid, experiences with prediction and now-casting in the USA and in Europe, risk assessment and preparedness, as well as policy implications arising from increased awareness of the space-weather hazard. The main workshop conclusions are: • There is increasing awareness of the risk of space-weather impact among power-grid operators and regulators and some countries consider it a priority risk to be addressed. • The predictability of space-weather phenomena is still limited and relies, in part, on data from ageing satellites. NOAA is working with NASA to launch the DSCOVR solar wind spacecraft, the replacement for the ACE satellite, in early 2015. • In some countries, models and tools for GIC prediction and grid impact assessment have been developed in collaboration with national power grids but equipment vulnerability models are scarce. • Some countries have successfully hardened their transmission grids to space-weather impact and sustained relatively little or no damage due to currents induced by past moderate space-weather events. • While there is preparedness

  17. Space Weather: The Physics Behind a Slogan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Klaus; Fichtner, Horst; Heber, Bernd; Mall, Urs

    The various processes that connect the physics of the Sun with that of the Earth`s environment has become known as "Space Weather" during recent years, a slogan that has emerged in connection with many other expressions adapted from meteorology, such as solar wind, magnetic clouds or polar rain. This volume is intended as a first graduate-level textbook-style account on the physics of these solar-terrestrial relations and their impact on our natural and technological environment.

  18. Radiation Storm vs. The Magnetic Shield: Superheroes of Magnetism & Space Weather Education - A Model for Teacher Professional Development Workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, R. M.; Johnson, R. M.

    2010-12-01

    Magnetic and electric fields and phenomena play important roles in various situations in astronomy, planetary science, and Earth science. Students often lack an intuitive sense of electromagnetic phenomena, and therefore struggle with the complexities of planetary and stellar magnetic fields. Hands-on magnetism activities can provide students with an intuitive grasp of the basics of magnetism, preparing them for more challenging conceptual studies of magnetic phenomena. For the past six years, we have been presenting a professional development workshop for teachers covering the topics of magnetism and space weather. The workshop, which has been conducted more than 20 times for a range of audiences, blends together several simple hands-on activities, background information on space weather and geomagnetism, a collection of images, animations, and interactives that illustrate important concepts, and guidance about specific links between these topics and national science education standards. These workshops have been very well-received, and have consistently been rated highly by participants in surveys. We believe the methods used in these workshops can be applied to other topics in science education and to astronomy and Earth science education specifically. In this presentation, we will describe our magnetism and space weather workshop, including some of the hands-on activities. We will describe successful aspects of the workshop and comment on ways we think this approach could be replicated for other topics. We will also display some of the interactives, graphics, and animations shown during the workshops. Resources have been added to the workshop over the years in response to recurring questions from teachers; we will comment on this process and how it might be applied to other topics. The activities and extensive background content used or referenced in the workshop are available for free on the Windows to the Universe web site (www.windows2universe.org). Hands on

  19. Third Space Weather Summit Held for Industry and Government Agencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intriligator, Devrie S.

    2009-12-01

    The potential for space weather effects has been increasing significantly in recent years. For instance, in 2008 airlines flew about 8000 transpolar flights, which experience greater exposure to space weather than nontranspolar flights. This is up from 368 transpolar flights in 2000, and the number of such flights is expected to continue to grow. Transpolar flights are just one example of the diverse technologies susceptible to space weather effects identified by the National Research Council's Severe Space Weather Events—Understanding Societal and Economic Impacts: A Workshop Report (2008). To discuss issues related to the increasing need for reliable space weather information, experts from industry and government agencies met at the third summit of the Commercial Space Weather Interest Group (CSWIG) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC), held 30 April 2009 during Space Weather Week (SWW), in Boulder, Colo.

  20. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center's Space Weather Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Presentation involves educating Goddard Space Weather staff about what our needs are, what type of aircraft we have and to learn what we have done in the past to minimize our exposure to Space Weather Hazards.

  1. ​The LAGO Space Weather Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asorey, Hernan; Dasso, Sergio

    The LAGO project is a non-centralized and distributed collaborative network composed by more than 30 institutions from nine ​Latin American countries. It is an extended cosmic ray​ observatory ​formed by water Cherenkov detectors (WCDs), that measure​ with extreme detail​ the temporal evolution of the radiation flux at ground level. It is mainly oriented to make basic research on three branches: extreme universe, space weather, and atmospheric radiation at ground level. The LAGO WCDs network spans over different sites located at significantly different latitudes (from equatorial latitudes up to the antartic region) and different altitudes (from sea level up to more than 5000 meters over sea level), covering a huge range of geomagnetic rigidity cut-offs and atmospheric absorption/reaction levels. Thus, using observations from the LAGO network, it is possible to study the solar modulation of galactic cosmic rays from combining different ground sites, in particular it is possible to study the long-term modulation as well as transient events. This presentation will introduce the LAGO ​Space Weather Program. In particular, real data of the Forbush decrease event of March 2012 will be presented to show how the LAGO network of WCDs can complement present measurements of space weather related phenomena from ground level. This study will be combined with numerical simulations of the expected flux​ at each site​ and with the analysis of the interplanetary conditions from 'in situ' observations recorded by spacecraft in the solar wind.

  2. Solar Sources of Severe Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Yashiro, S.; Shibasaki, K.

    2012-01-01

    Severe space weather is characterized by intense particle radiation from the Sun and severe geomagnetic storm caused by magnetized solar plasma arriving at Earth. Intense particle radiation is almost always caused by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) traveling from the Sun at super-Alfvenic speeds leading to fast-mode MHD shocks and particle acceleration by the shocks. When a CME arrives at Earth, it can interact with Earth's magnetopause resulting in solar plasma entry into the magnetosphere and a geomagnetic storm depending on the magnetic structure of the CME. Particle radiation starts affecting geospace as soon as the CMEs leave the Sun and the geospace may be immersed in the radiation for several days. On the other hand, the geomagnetic storm happens only upon arrival of the CME at Earth. The requirements for the production of particles and magnetic storms by CMEs are different in a number of respects: solar source location, CME magnetic structure, conditions in the ambient solar wind, and shock-driving ability of CMEs. Occasionally, intense geomagnetic storms are caused by corotating interaction regions (CIRs) that form in the interplanetary space when the fast solar wind from coronal holes overtakes the slow wind from the quiet regions. CIRs also accelerate particles, but when they reach several AU from the Sun, so their impact on Earth's space environment is not significant. In addition to these plasma effects, solar flares that accompany CMEs also produce excess ionization in the ionosphere causing sudden ionospheric disturbances. This paper highlights these space weather effects using space weather events observed by space and ground based instruments during of solar cycles 23 and 24.

  3. Interplanetary Space Weather and Its Planetary Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, Norma; Bothmer, Volker; Facius, Rainer; Grießmeier, Jean-Mathias; Moussas, Xenophon; Panasyuk, Mikhail; Romanova, Natalia; Withers, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Interplanetary travel is not just a science fiction scenario anymore, but a goal as realistic as when our ancestors started to cross the oceans. With curiosity driving humans to visit other planets in our solar system, the understanding of interplanetary space weather is a vital subject today, particularly because the physical conditions faced during a space vehicle's transit to its targeted solar system object are crucial to a mission's success and vital to the health and safety of spacecraft crew, especially when scheduling planned extravehicular activities.

  4. Industry and Government Officials Meet for Space Weather Summit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intriligator, Devrie S.

    2008-10-01

    Commercial airlines, electric power grids, cell phones, handheld Global Positioning Systems: Although the Sun is less active due to solar minimum, the number and types of situations and technologies that can benefit from up-to-date space weather information are growing. To address this, the second annual summit of the Commercial Space Weather Interest Group (CSWIG) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) was held on 1 May 2008 during Space Weather Workshop (SWW), in Boulder, Colo.

  5. Space Weather Monitoring Iniciative of the Peruvian Space Agency - CONIDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara Day, W. R.; Otiniano, L. J.; Samanes, J.; Raulin, J.; Rengifo, J.

    2013-05-01

    We show the new instrumental facilities implemented by CONIDA to perform scientific research in Space Weather. Different equipments have been installed since 2006 in order to monitor long-term and transient events from geospace anomalies. CONIDA has implemented and is currently operating: a cosmic ray telescope from the LAGO network, a solar spectrometer from e-CALLISTO network, VLF radio receiving antennae from SAVNET and atmospheric electric field sensors. We will describe in details the performances of each instruments and future plans for a Space Weather monitoring center in Peru.

  6. Evidence for Intense Space Weathering on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucey, P. G.; Riner, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    The optical effects of exposure of lunar materials to space are well-characterized (e.g [1]) and similar effects are expected on Mercury. In the lunar case perhaps the most notable effect is strong reddening of lunar materials relative to powdered lunar rocks. There is consensus that this is due to the effect of extremely fine grained (10’s of nm) particles of iron that occur in rims on mineral grains generated during micrometeorite impact and sputtering [2]. Noble et al. 2007 [3] studied silica gel samples infused with fine grained iron and observed lunar-like optical effects. Hapke 2001 [4] used Maxwell-Garnett theory to combine the optical properties of iron metal with the optical properties of the host lunar material to successfully produce the reddening and darkening effects observed. Lucey and Noble 2008 [5] tested the Hapke 2001 formulation against the Noble et al. (2007) data and found good agreement when particles were small with respect to the wavelength. However, particles that were larger than about 50 nm showed sharp deviations from the predictions of the Hapke 2001 treatment. At present there is no theoretical treatment of iron metal inclusions that darken, but do not redden. The Hapke 2001 formulation for modeling the optical effect of iron particles within grains relates the complex index of refraction of the host mineral, iron and particle size of the host to the single scattering albedo to account for absorption due to subwavelength particle inclusions, and adds this to his previously defined absorption coefficient. This absorbing effect, based on equivalent medium Maxwell-Garnett theory, assumes the particles are much smaller than the wavelength, and hence has no particle size dependence. While [5] showed Hapke’s model for space weathering works well for very small particles, the larger particles in the Noble et al. 2007 experiments did not conform well to predictions. To introduce a wavelength dependent term we replace Hapke’s term that

  7. Funding to Boost the Commercialization of Space Weather Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohi

    2009-03-01

    Space weather research at Utah State University (USU), in Logan, has been awarded a grant from the state of Utah to help transition models originally developed for the U.S. Department of Defense into commercially viable products. The grant, awarded by the Utah Science Technology and Research Initiative (USTAR), will distribute US$4 million over 5 years to the USU team working on a research effort called Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements (GAIM). GAIM creates specifications and forecasts for global, regional, and local distributions of upper atmospheric and ionospheric densities, temperatures, and winds. It is the operational space weather model for the U.S. Air Force Weather Agency and is used in studies at air force and naval research laboratories.

  8. Ionospheric climate and weather modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Schunk, R.W.; Sojka, J.J.

    1988-03-01

    Simulations of the ionospheric model of Schunk et al. (1986) have been used for climatology and weather modeling. Steady state empirical models were used in the climatology model to provide plasma convection and particle precipitation patterns in the northern high-latitude region. The climatology model also depicts the ionospheric electron density and ion and electron temperatures for solar maximum, winter solstice, and strong geomagnetic activity conditions. The weather model describes the variations of ionospheric features during the solar cycle, seasonal changes, and geomagnetic activity. Prospects for future modeling are considered. 23 references.

  9. Integrating policy issues into a university space weather curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, G.

    2004-12-01

    The integration of science and policy has been a challenge, or even absent, in graduate research programs at universities. While some universities offer science policy courses on a broad scale, offering science policy courses catered to graduate science students has been a major challenge for various reasons. This presentation will discuss a project aimed at integrating policy into a space weather curriculum. The goal is to educate the next generation of space weather scientists to gain an understanding and appreciation of policy so that they can assist policy makers to make sound public policy decisions. Space weather is a field where policy, societal, and economic aspects are becoming increasingly important as our society is becoming more dependent on activities and technology that are affected by conditions in the space environment. Solar and geomagnetic events can impact many different sectors that affect our daily lives--navigation, satellites, communications, pipelines, electric power systems, and human health in space and flight. A new generation of scientists are increasingly interested in the social and policy impacts of their science. It is important that young scientists are prepared to fully participate in the challenging opportunities that lie ahead, including communicating to policy makers, making sound public policy decisions, and communicating science to the public. Although this project is focused on the development of a space weather policy curriculum, it is anticipated that the project will serve as a model for broader science policy curricula.

  10. Space Weather Services and Studies at RWC-China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huaning

    In China, space weather programs have long been supported by Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Chinese Science and Technology Ministry (CSTM) and Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC). A series of major scientific programs was implemented after 1993. In order to provide users reliable space weather forecasts, members of RWC-China have been making great efforts to improve the forecasting methods. There are many scientists involved in model researches. The contents of the studied models cover a wild range including solar activity, interplanetary space environment, geomagnetic activity, ionosphere and atmosphere environment. The main purpose of the model researches is to integrate different models to form a forecast chain from the Sun to the Earth.

  11. Workstation-Based Real-Time Mesoscale Modeling Designed for Weather Support to Operations at the Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manobianco, John; Zack, John W.; Taylor, Gregory E.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the capabilities and operational utility of a version of the Mesoscale Atmospheric Simulation System (MASS) that has been developed to support operational weather forecasting at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS). The implementation of local, mesoscale modeling systems at KSC/CCAS is designed to provide detailed short-range (less than 24 h) forecasts of winds, clouds, and hazardous weather such as thunderstorms. Short-range forecasting is a challenge for daily operations, and manned and unmanned launches since KSC/CCAS is located in central Florida where the weather during the warm season is dominated by mesoscale circulations like the sea breeze. For this application, MASS has been modified to run on a Stardent 3000 workstation. Workstation-based, real-time numerical modeling requires a compromise between the requirement to run the system fast enough so that the output can be used before expiration balanced against the desire to improve the simulations by increasing resolution and using more detailed physical parameterizations. It is now feasible to run high-resolution mesoscale models such as MASS on local workstations to provide timely forecasts at a fraction of the cost required to run these models on mainframe supercomputers. MASS has been running in the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) at KSC/CCAS since January 1994 for the purpose of system evaluation. In March 1995, the AMU began sending real-time MASS output to the forecasters and meteorologists at CCAS, Spaceflight Meteorology Group (Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas), and the National Weather Service (Melbourne, Florida). However, MASS is not yet an operational system. The final decision whether to transition MASS for operational use will depend on a combination of forecaster feedback, the AMU's final evaluation results, and the life-cycle costs of the operational system.

  12. Planetary Space Weather Services for the Europlanet 2020 Research Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Nicolas; Grande, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Under Horizon 2020, the Europlanet 2020 Research Infrastructure (EPN2020-RI) will include an entirely new Virtual Access Service, WP5 VA1 "Planetary Space Weather Services" (PSWS) that will extend the concepts of space weather and space situational awareness to other planets in our Solar System and in particular to spacecraft that voyage through it. VA1 will make five entirely new 'toolkits' accessible to the research community and to industrial partners planning for space missions: a general planetary space weather toolkit, as well as three toolkits dedicated to the following key planetary environments: Mars (in support ExoMars), comets (building on the expected success of the ESA Rosetta mission), and outer planets (in preparation for the ESA JUICE mission to be launched in 2022). This will give the European planetary science community new methods, interfaces, functionalities and/or plugins dedicated to planetary space weather in the tools and models available within the partner institutes. It will also create a novel event-diary toolkit aiming at predicting and detecting planetary events like meteor showers and impacts. A variety of tools (in the form of web applications, standalone software, or numerical models in various degrees of implementation) are available for tracing propagation of planetary and/or solar events through the Solar System and modelling the response of the planetary environment (surfaces, atmospheres, ionospheres, and magnetospheres) to those events. But these tools were not originally designed for planetary event prediction and space weather applications. So WP10 JRA4 "Planetary Space Weather Services" (PSWS) will provide the additional research and tailoring required to apply them for these purposes. The overall objectives of this Joint Research Aactivities will be to review, test, improve and adapt methods and tools available within the partner institutes in order to make prototype planetary event and space weather services operational in

  13. Historical Space Weather Datasets within NOAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denig, W. F.; Mabie, J. J.; Horan, K.; Clark, C.

    2013-12-01

    The National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is primarily responsible for scientific data stewardship of operational space weather data from NOAA's fleet of environmental satellites in geostationary and polar, low-earth orbits. In addition to this and as the former World Data Center for Solar Terrestrial Physics from 1957 to 2011 NGDC acquired a large variety of solar and space environmental data in differing formats including paper records and on film. Management of this heterogeneous collection of environmental data is a continued responsibility of NGDC as a participant in the new World Data System. Through the former NOAA Climate Data Modernization Program many of these records were converted to digital format and are readily available online. However, reduced funding and staff have put a strain on NGDC's ability to effectively steward these historical datasets, some of which are unique and, in particular cases, were the basis of fundamental scientific breakthroughs in our understanding of the near-earth space environment. In this talk, I will provide an overview of the historical space weather datasets which are currently managed by NGDC and discuss strategies for preserving these data during these fiscally stressing times.

  14. International Polar Research and Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzerotti, Louis J.

    2009-02-01

    The fiftieth anniversary of the International Geophysical Year (IGY), currently celebrated in the 2007-2009 International Polar Year (IPY), highlights space weather's heritage from polar research. The polar regions were still very much "terra incognito" 50 years ago. At the same time, communications technologies had significantly advanced since the time of the second IPY, in 1932-1933. Yet even before the second IPY, several directors of international meteorological services stated in a 1928 resolution that "increased knowledge [of the polar regions] will be of practical application to problems connected with terrestrial magnetism, marine and aerial navigation, wireless telegraphy and weather forecasting" (see http://scaa.usask.ca/gallery/northern/currie/en_polaryear.shtml).

  15. Weather support activities for the Space Shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigdon, Gerald G.

    The work of the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) at the Mission Control Center (MCC) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) is discussed. The primary function of the SMG is to provide operational meteorological support to the MCC. SMG meteorologists have the final responsibility for all weather forecasts and meteorological advice used by the MCC. This responsibility includes mission planning, launch-abort-site decisions (which could delay a launch), emergency landing prior to the normal end of mission, and the normal end-of-mission forecast. Another SMG function is computer system management, which involves the node management of the JSC Meteorological Interactive Data Display system. Weather flight rules, mission planning and training support, on-orbit and end-of-mission support, and equipment and data sources are also discussed.

  16. Synopsis of the Review on Space Weather in Latin America: Space Science, Research Networks and Space Weather Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denardini, Clezio Marcos; Dasso, Sergio; Gonzalez-Esparza, Americo

    2016-07-01

    The present work is a synopsis of a three-part review on space weather in Latin America. The first paper (part 1) comprises the evolution of several Latin American institutions investing in space science since the 1960's, focusing on the solar-terrestrial interactions, which today is commonly called space weather. Despite recognizing advances in space research in all of Latin America, this part 1 is restricted to the development observed in three countries in particular (Argentina, Brazil and Mexico), due to the fact that these countries have recently developed operational centers for monitoring space weather. The review starts with a brief summary of the first groups to start working with space science in Latin America. This first part of the review closes with the current status and the research interests of these groups, which are described in relation to the most significant works and challenges of the next decade in order to aid in the solving of space weather open issues. The second paper (part 2) comprises a summary of scientific challenges in space weather research that are considered to be open scientific questions and how they are being addressed in terms of instrumentation by the international community, including the Latin American groups. We also provide an inventory of the networks and collaborations being constructed in Latin America, including details on the data processing, capabilities and a basic description of the resulting variables. These instrumental networks currently used for space science research are gradually being incorporated into the space weather monitoring data pipelines as their data provides key variables for monitoring and forecasting space weather, which allow these centers to monitor space weather and issue warnings and alerts. The third paper (part 3) presents the decision process for the spinning off of space weather prediction centers from space science groups with our interpretation of the reason/opportunities that leads to

  17. Predicting Space Weather Effects on Close Approach Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, L.; Besser, R.; Hejduk, M.

    The NASA Robotic Conjunction Assessment Risk Analysis (CARA) team sends ephemeris data to the Joint Space Operations Center (JSpOC) for screening against the high accuracy catalog, then assesses risk posed to protected assets from predicted close approaches. Since most spacecraft supported by the CARA team are located in LEO orbits, atmospheric drag is a primary source of state estimate uncertainty, and drag is directly governed by space weather. At present the actual effect of space weather on atmospheric density cannot be accurately predicted because most atmospheric density models are empirical in nature. The Jacchia-Bowman-HASDM 2009 atmospheric density model used at the JSpOC employs a solar storm active compensation feature that predicts storm sizes and arrival times, and thus the resulting neutral density alterations. With this feature, estimation errors can occur in either direction (i.e., over- or under-estimation of density and thus drag), giving rise to several questions. Does a change in space weather make a close approach safer or riskier? Might performing a maneuver make the approach worse due to uncertainty in predicted location at a given time? What if there are errors in the predicted timing or magnitude of the space weather event? Although the exact effect of a solar storm on atmospheric drag cannot be determined, one can explore the effects of drag perturbations on conjuncting objects' trajectories to determine if a conjunction can become riskier or less risky. The CARA team has constructed a Space Weather Trade-Space tool that systematically alters the drag coefficient of the conjuncting objects and recalculates the probability of collision for each case to determine the effect is likely to have on the collision risk. In addition to a review of the theory and the particulars of the tool, all of the observed output will be explained, along with statistics of their frequency.

  18. A Coordinated Effort to Address Space Weather and Environment Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joe; Spann, James F.; Edward, David L.; Burns, Howard D.; Gallagher, Dennis; Xapos, Mike; DeGroh, Kim

    2010-01-01

    The growing need for coordination of the many aspects of space environments is directly related to our increasing dependence on space assets. An obvious result is that there is a need for a coordinated effort to organize and make accessible the increasing number of space environment products that include space environment models and observations, material testing, and forecasting tools. This paper outlines a concept to establish a NASA-level Applied Spaceflight Environments (ASE) office that will provide coordination and funding for sustained multi-program support in three technical areas; (1) natural environments characterization and modeling, (2) environmental effects on materials and systems, (3) and operational and forecasting space environments modeling. Additionally the ASE office will serve as an entry point of contact for external users who wish to take advantage of data and assets associated with space environments, including space weather.

  19. The Solar Atmosphere and Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothmer, Volker

    -based observers. The remote-sensing observations undertaken by Yohkoh, followed by multi-wavelength movies from SoHO (Solar Heliospheric Observatory) and high resolution EUV imaging by TRACE (Transition Region and Coronal Explorer) have revealed to date that the Sun's atmosphere is highly dynamic and never at rest. Solar eruptions have been tracked into space in unprecedented detail. In combination with near-Earth satellites, their interplanetary and geo-space effects could be investigated in depth, having provided the roots for space weather forecasts. This chapter summarizes the discoveries about the origin and evolution of solar storms and their space weather effects, providing a comprehensive picture of the most important links in the Sun-Earth system. It finally provides an outlook to future research in the field of space weather.

  20. An overview on the Space Weather in Latin America: from Space Research to Space Weather and its Forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Nardin, C. M.; Gonzalez-Esparza, A.; Dasso, S.

    2015-12-01

    We present an overview on the Space Weather in Latin America, highlighting the main findings from our review the recent advances in the space science investigations in Latin America focusing in the solar-terrestrial interactions, modernly named space weather, which leaded to the creation of forecast centers. Despite recognizing advances in the space research over the whole Latin America, this review is restricted to the evolution observed in three countries (Argentina, Brazil and Mexico) only, due to the fact that these countries have recently developed operational center for monitoring the space weather. The work starts with briefly mentioning the first groups that started the space science in Latin America. The current status and research interest of such groups are then described together with the most referenced works and the challenges for the next decade to solve space weather puzzles. A small inventory of the networks and collaborations being built is also described. Finally, the decision process for spinning off the space weather prediction centers from the space science groups is reported with an interpretation of the reason/opportunities that lead to it. Lastly, the constraints for the progress in the space weather monitoring, research, and forecast are listed with recommendations to overcome them.

  1. The Solar Origins of Severe Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2011-01-01

    Solar cycle 23 witnessed an unprecedented array of space- and ground-based instruments observing the violent eruptions from the Sun that had huge impact on the heliosphere. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) contribute to space weather by producing geomagnetic storms and accelerating energetic particles, the two aspects that concern the space weather community. This paper discusses the kinematic and solar-source properties of these CMEs and how they vary with the solar activity cycle with particular emphasis on the following issues. Intense geomagnetic storms are caused by the out-of-the-ecliptic component of the magnetic field in CMEs and/or their sheath. Geoeffective CMEs originate close to the disk center of the Sun. Geoeffective CMEs are more energetic (average speed approx.1000 km/s, mostly halo CMEs or partial halo CMEs). CMEs producing solar energetic particles are the fastest (average speed approx. 1600 km/s) of all CME populations and have very high halo CME fraction. The source location requirement is different for Geoeffective and SEP-producing CMEs because of the different paths taken by CME plasma and energetic particles.

  2. Solar Energetic Particles and Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.; Tylka, Allan J.; Ng, Chee K.

    2001-01-01

    The solar energetic particles (SEPs) of consequence to space weather are accelerated at shock waves driven out from the Sun by fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In the large events, these great shocks fill half of the heliosphere. SEP intensity profiles change appearance with longitude. Events with significant intensities of greater than ten MeV protons occur at an average rate of approx. 13 per year near solar maximum and several events with high intensities of > 100 McV protons occur each decade. As particles stream out along magnetic field lines from a shock near the Sun, they generate waves that scatter subsequent particles. At high intensities, wave growth throttles the flow below the 'streaming limit.' However, if the shock maintains its strength, particle intensities can rise above this limit to a peak when the shock itself passes over the observer creating a 'delayed' radiation hazard, even for protons with energies up to approx. one GeV. The streaming limit makes us blind to the intensities at the oncoming shock, however, heavier elements such as He, O, and Fe probe the shape of the wave spectrum, and variation in abundances of these elements allow us to evade the limit and probe conditions at the shock, with the aid of detailed modeling. At high energies, spectra steepen to form a spectral 'knee'. The location of the proton spectral knee can vary from approx. ten MeV to approx. one GeV, depending on shock conditions, greatly affecting the radiation hazard. Hard spectra are a serious threat to astronauts, placing challenging requirements for shielding, especially on long-duration missions to the moon or Mars.

  3. HELIO as a Space Weather tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, Robert; Hapgood, Mike; Messerotti, Mauro; Aboudarham, Jean; Jacquey, Christian; Fox, Peter

    The Heliophysics Integrated Observatory, HELIO, is primarily designed to support research into the connection between solar phenomena, interplanetary disturbances and their effects on the planets. However, many of the techniques that are being developed and standards that we are proposing have direct relevance to the more immediate requirements of the space weather community. HELIO is being developed around a service-oriented architecture and the services that can be used either independently or as part of a work flow. The HELIO event and feature catalogues, context service and metadata evaluation service may all be of use to the community as capa-bilities in their own right; they could also be combined in workflows that are specific to the needs of research into space-weather. We have been examining ways of enhancing the quality of the output produced by the services by adding annotation that is compliant with standards proposed by the IVOA, IPDA and IAU; if adopted across the space weather community these additions could improve the interoperability of our data products with related communities. Of necessity HELIO has to address data providers in a number of different and well estab-lished communities, each with its own way of describing and handling the data; in addition, the capabilities of the providers and means of access to the data also vary considerably. We have therefore had to develop techniques to handle this, including archives where interesting observations may be available but not easily accessible. HELIO is a research infrastructure funded under Capacities programme of the EC's 7th Frame-work Programme (FP7); the project started in June 2009 and has a duration of 36 months. The HELIO Consortium includes thirteen groups from the UK, France, Ireland, Italy, Switzerland, Spain and the US.

  4. Integration of Space Weather Forecasts into Space Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, G.

    2012-09-01

    How would the US respond to a clandestine attack that disabled one of our satellites? How would we know that it was an attack, not a natural failure? The goal of space weather programs as applied to space protection are simple: Provide a rapid and reliable assessment of the probability that satellite or system failure was caused by the space environment. Achieving that goal is not as simple. However, great strides are being made on a number of fronts. We will report on recent successes in providing rapid, automated anomaly/attack assessment for the penetrating radiation environment in the Earth's radiation belts. We have previously reported on the Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) that was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to assess hazards posed by the natural and by nuclear radiation belts. This year we will report on recent developments that are moving this program from the research, test, and evaluation phases to real-time implementation and application. We will discuss the challenges of leveraging space environment data sets for applications that are beyond the scope of mission requirements, the challenges of moving data from where they exist to where they are needed, the challenges of turning data into actionable information, and how those challenges were overcome. We will discuss the state-of-the-art as it exists in 2012 including the new capabilities that have been enabled and the limitations that still exist. We will also discuss how currently untapped data resources could advance the state-of-the-art and the future steps for implementing automatic real-time anomaly forensics.

  5. Characterizing Space Weather Effects in the Post-DMSP Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groves, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    Space weather generally refers to heliophysical phenomena or events that produce a negative impact on manmade systems. While many space weather events originate with impulsive disturbances on the sun, others result from complex internal interactions in the ionosphere-thermosphere system. The reliance of mankind on satellite-based services continues to increase rapidly, yet the global capacity for sensing space weather in the ionosphere seems headed towards decline. A number of recent ionospheric-focused space-based missions are either presently, or soon-to-be, no longer available, and the end of the multi-decade Defense Meteorological Satellite Program is now in sight. The challenge facing the space weather community is how to maintain or increase sensing capabilities in an operational environment constrained by a decreasing numbers of sensors. The upcoming launch of COSMIC-2 in 2016/2018 represents the most significant new capability planned for the future. GNSS RO data has some benefit for background ionospheric models, particularly over regions where ground-based GNSS TEC measurements are unavailable, but the space weather community has a dire need to leverage such missions for far more knowledge of the ionosphere, and specifically for information related to space weather impacts. Meanwhile, the number of ground-based GNSS sensors worldwide has increased substantially, yet progress instrumenting some vastly undersampled regions, such as Africa, remains slow. In fact, the recent loss of support for many existing ground stations in such areas under the former Scintillation Network Decision Aid (SCINDA) program may actually result in a decrease in such sensing sites over the next 1-2 years, abruptly reversing a positive trend established over the last decade. Here we present potential solutions to the challenges these developments pose to the space weather enterprise. Specific topics include modeling advances required to detect and accurately characterize

  6. Filament Eruptions, Jets, and Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald; Sterling, Alphonse; Robe, Nick; Falconer, David; Cirtain, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    -plasma component of coronal X-ray jets. This favors the idea that Type-II spicules are miniature counterparts of coronal X-ray jets. In Moore et al (2011, ApJ, 731, L18), we pointed out that if Type-II spicules are magnetic eruptions that work like coronal X-ray jets, they carry an area-averaged mechanical energy flux of approximately 7x10)(exp 5) erg cm(exp -2) s(exp-1) into the corona in the form of MHD waves and jet outflow, enough to power the heating of the global corona and solar wind. On this basis, from our observations of mini-filament eruptions in blowout X-ray jets, we infer that magnetic explosions of the type that have erupting filaments in them are the main engines of both (1) the steady solar wind and (2) the CMEs that produce the most severe space weather by blasting out through the corona and solar wind, making solar energetic particle storms, and bashing the Earth's magnetosphere. We conclude that in focusing on prominences and filament eruptions, Einar had his eye on the main bet for understanding what powers all space weather, both the extreme and the normal.

  7. Activity of Science and Operational Research of NICT Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Mamoru; Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Watari, Shinichi; Shinagawa, Hiroyuki; Tsugawa, Takuya; Kubo, Yuki

    Operational space weather forecast is for contribution to social infrastructure than for academic interests. These user need will determine the target of research, e.g., the precision level, spatial and temporal resolution and/or required lead time. We, NICT, aim two target in the present mid-term strategic plan, which are (1) forecast of ionospheric disturbance influencing to satellite positioning, and (2) forecast of disturbance in radiation belt influencing to satellite operation. We have our own observation network and develop empirical and numerical models for achieving each target. However in actual situation, it is much difficult to know the user needs quantitatively. Most of space weather phenomena makes the performance of social infrastructure poor, for example disconnect of HF communication, increase of GNSS error. Most of organizations related to these operation are negative to open these information. We have personal interviews to solve this issue. In this interview, we try to collect incident information related to space weather in each field, and to retrieve which space weather information is necessary for users. In this presentation we will introduce our research and corresponding new service, in addition to our recent scientific results.

  8. Space Weather applications with CDPP/AMDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Génot, V.; Jacquey, C.; Bouchemit, M.; Gangloff, M.; Fedorov, A.; Lavraud, B.; André, N.; Broussillou, L.; Harvey, C.; Pallier, E.; Penou, E.; Budnik, E.; Hitier, R.; Cecconi, B.; Dériot, F.; Heulet, D.; Pinçon, J.-L.

    2010-05-01

    AMDA (Automated Multi-Dataset Analysis), a new data analysis service, recently opened at the French Plasma Physics Data Center (CDPP). AMDA is developed according to the Virtual Observatory paradigm: it is a web-based facility for on-line analyses of space physics. Data may come from its own local database as well as remote ones. This tool allows the user to perform classical manipulations such as data visualization, parameter computation and data extraction. AMDA also offers innovative functionalities such as event searches on the content of the data in either visual or automated ways, generation, use and management of time tables (event lists). The general functionalities of AMDA are presented in the context of Space Weather with example scientific use cases.

  9. Solar Weather Event Modelling and Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messerotti, Mauro; Zuccarello, Francesca; Guglielmino, Salvatore L.; Bothmer, Volker; Lilensten, Jean; Noci, Giancarlo; Storini, Marisa; Lundstedt, Henrik

    2009-11-01

    Key drivers of solar weather and mid-term solar weather are reviewed by considering a selection of relevant physics- and statistics-based scientific models as well as a selection of related prediction models, in order to provide an updated operational scenario for space weather applications. The characteristics and outcomes of the considered scientific and prediction models indicate that they only partially cope with the complex nature of solar activity for the lack of a detailed knowledge of the underlying physics. This is indicated by the fact that, on one hand, scientific models based on chaos theory and non-linear dynamics reproduce better the observed features, and, on the other hand, that prediction models based on statistics and artificial neural networks perform better. To date, the solar weather prediction success at most time and spatial scales is far from being satisfactory, but the forthcoming ground- and space-based high-resolution observations can add fundamental tiles to the modelling and predicting frameworks as well as the application of advanced mathematical approaches in the analysis of diachronic solar observations, that are a must to provide comprehensive and homogeneous data sets.

  10. Space Weathering: From Itokawa to Mercury via the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, S.; Okazaki, M.; Hiroi, T.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Miyake, A.; Matsumoto, T.

    2015-11-01

    A small S-type asteroid Itokawa provided new aspects on space weathering, which are confirmed by experiments using pulse laser. Rocky surface could be weathered as regolith and sulfur would be another key element especially on Mercury.

  11. Space weather activities at SERC for IHY: MAGDAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, Kiyohumi; MAGDAS Group

    2007-12-01

    We will introduce MAGDAS project of Space Environment Research Center (SERC), Kyushu University (KU) for space weather. The new MAGDAS data can be used to monitor global electromagnetic and plasma environment change in geospace, and then to bring about a better understanding of the complex and compound Sun-Earth system. The SERC also conducts daily space weather ``now casting'', to train and educate KU students, and to globally disseminate space weather information to the scientific community and the general public.

  12. A survey of customers of space weather information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijver, C. J.; Rabanal, J. P.

    2013-09-01

    We present an analysis of the users of space weather information based on 2783 responses to an online survey among subscribers of NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center e-mail services. The survey requested information focused on the three NOAA space weather scales: geomagnetic storms, solar radiation storms, and radio blackouts. Space weather information is most commonly obtained for reasons of human safety and continuity or reliability of operations. The information is primarily used for situational awareness, as aid to understand anomalies, to avoid impacts on current and near-future operations by implementing mitigating strategies, and to prepare for potential near-future impacts that might occur in conjunction with contingencies that include electric power outages or GPS perturbations. Interest in, anticipated impacts from, and responses to the three main categories of space weather are quite uniform across societal sectors. Approximately 40% of the respondents expect serious to very serious impacts from space weather events if no action were taken to mitigate or in the absence of adequate space weather information. The impacts of space weather are deemed to be substantially reduced because of the availability of, and their response to, space weather forecasts and alerts. Current and near-future space weather conditions are generally highly valued, considered useful, and generally, though not fully, adequate to avoid or mitigate societal impacts. We conclude that even among those receiving space weather information, there is considerable uncertainty about the possible impacts of space weather and thus about how to act on the space weather information that is provided.

  13. A framework of space weather satellite data pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fuli; Zou, Ziming

    Various applications indicate a need of permanent space weather information. The diversity of available instruments enables a big variety of products. As an indispensable part of space weather satellite operation system, space weather data processing system is more complicated than before. The information handled by the data processing system has been used in more and more fields such as space weather monitoring and space weather prediction models. In the past few years, many satellites have been launched by China. The data volume downlinked by these satellites has achieved the so-called big data level and it will continue to grow fast in the next few years due to the implementation of many new space weather programs. Because of the huge amount of data, the current infrastructure is no longer incapable of processing data timely, so we proposed a new space weather data processing system (SWDPS) based on the architecture of cloud computing. Similar to Hadoop, SWDPS decomposes the tasks into smaller tasks which will be executed by many different work nodes. Control Center in SWDPS, just like NameNode and JobTracker within Hadoop which is the bond between the data and the cluster, will establish work plan for the cluster once a client submits data. Control Center will allocate node for the tasks and the monitor the status of all tasks. As the same of TaskTrakcer, Compute Nodes in SWDPS are the salves of Control Center which are responsible for calling the plugins(e.g., dividing and sorting plugins) to execute the concrete jobs. They will also manage all the tasks’ status and report them to Control Center. Once a task fails, a Compute Node will notify Control Center. Control Center decides what to do then; it may resubmit the job elsewhere, it may mark that specific record as something to avoid, and it may even blacklist the Compute Node as unreliable. In addition to these modules, SWDPS has a different module named Data Service which is used to provide file

  14. AFWA-CCMC Partnership to Augment USAF Space Weather Forecasting Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, J. P.; Cox, J.; Davila, R.; Parsons, A.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Berrios, D.; Hesse, M.; Pulkkinen, A.; MacNeice, P. J.; Maddox, M.; Rastaetter, L.; Taktakishvili, A.

    2009-12-01

    Accurate specification and prediction of the space environment is essential to successful US military operations. We report on progress of joint AFWA-CCMC efforts to develop space weather products to supplement existing AFWA forecasting capabilities that are readily usable by AFWA forecasters. CCMC has built upon their web-based customer configurable dissemination ISWA system developed at CCMC for NASA-relevant space weather information. The adaptable ISWA system combines forecasts based on advanced space weather models hosted at CCMC with concurrent space environment information. AFWA-CCMC collaborations are taking advantage of operational capabilities at AFWA and unique space weather tools at CCMC. In addition to furthering AFWA's move toward advanced, physics-based coupled models, the experience gained during this collaboration will allow warfighters to take advantage of latest advances in space weather modeling.

  15. Estimating the Composition and the Degree of Space Weathering of Asteroids 6 Hebe, 433 Eros, and 25143 Itokawa by Reflectance Spectroscopy Using a New Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimura, T.; Abe, M.; Hiroi, T.; Pieters, C. M.

    2011-03-01

    We have estimated the mineral assemblage, chemical compositions of the component minerals, grain-size, and degree of space weathering of asteroids 6 Hebe, 433 Eros, and 25143 Itokawa from their visible and near-infrared reflectance spectra.

  16. Dynamic Geomagnetic Hazard Maps in Space Weather Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigler, E. J.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Balch, C. C.; Wiltberger, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Traditionally, the use of geomagnetic data in space weather operations has been limited to specific geographic coordinates (i.e., magnetic observatories), or to global indices that average magnetic measurements into latitudinal bands of relatively general space weather interest (e.g., Dst, Kp, AE). However, modern technological systems (e.g., power grids, directional drilling platforms) are beginning to require and request information about ground magnetic variations that is more tailored to a specific locale. One solution is to simply install magnetic observatories near every newly built technological system, but this is both economically and operationally impractical. We have chosen instead to adopt an optimal interpolation scheme that inverts for spherical elementary current systems (SECS, Amm-1997), which in turn are used to fill gaps between magnetic observatories. The SECS technique has undergone extensive scientific vetting over the last decade-and-a-half, and will soon be implemented operationally over the continental U.S. as a joint NASA-NOAA-USGS space weather data product, disseminated by the Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC). Because it will employ a relatively sparse array of high-quality geomagnetic observatories as input, it is important to characterize its ability to reproduce spatial variations in geomagnetic field at sub-continental scales, so the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global geospace model is used to generate realistic synthetic observations. These include virtual magnetic observatories as input, and a regular geographic grid to serve as a proxy for "ground truth". We look specifically at LFM output for the Whole Heliosphere Interval (WHI) in order to obtain statistically valid performance measures for a variety of quiet-to-moderate space weather conditions.

  17. Space Weather Research in Greece: The Solar Energetic Particle Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malandraki, Olga E.

    2015-03-01

    Space Weather Research carried out in the National Observatory of Athens (NOA), within the SEPServer and COMESEP projects under the Seventh Framework Programme (FP7-SPACE) of the European Union (EU) is presented. Results and services that these projects provide to the whole scientific community as well as stakeholders are underlined. NOA strongly contributes in terms of crucial Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) dataset provided, data analysis and SEP catalogue items provided as well as comparative results of the various components of the project server, greatly facilitating the investigation of SEPs and their origin. SEP research highlights carried out at NOA are also presented, used to test and validate the particle SEP model developed and incorporated within the SEP forecasting tools of the COronal Mass Ejections and Solar Energetic Particles (COMESEP) Space Weather Alert System, i.e. the First European Alert System for geomagnetic storms and SEP radiation hazards.

  18. Space Weather Status for Exploration Radiation Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, Dan J.; Lee, Kerry; Zapp, Neal; Barzilla, Janet; Dunegan, Audrey; Johnson, Steve; Stoffle, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    Management of crew exposure to radiation is a major concern for manned spaceflight and will be even more important for the modern concept of longer-duration exploration. The inherent protection afforded to astronauts by the magnetic field of the Earth in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) makes operations on the space shuttle or space station very different from operations during an exploration mission. In order to experience significant radiation-derived Loss of Mission (LOM) or Loss of Crew (LOC) risk for LEO operations, one is almost driven to dictate extreme duration or to dictate an extreme sequence of solar activity. Outside of the geo-magnetosphere, however, this scenario changes dramatically. Exposures to the same event on the ISS and in free space, for example, may differ by orders of magnitude. This change in magnitude, coupled with the logistical constraints present in implementing any practical operational mitigation make situational awareness with regard to space weather a limiting factor for the ability to conduct exploration operations. We present a current status of developing operational concepts for manned exploration and expectations for asset viability and available predictive and characterization toolsets.

  19. Successfully Transitioning Science Research to Space Weather Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James

    2012-01-01

    The awareness of potentially significant impacts of space weather on spaceand ground ]based technological systems has generated a strong desire in many sectors of government and industry to effectively transform knowledge and understanding of the variable space environment into useful tools and applications for use by those entities responsible for systems that may be vulnerable to space weather impacts. Essentially, effectively transitioning science knowledge to useful applications relevant to space weather has become important. This talk will present proven methodologies that have been demonstrated to be effective, and how in the current environment those can be applied to space weather transition efforts.

  20. 2011 Space Weather Workshop to Be Held in April

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltzer, Thomas

    2011-04-01

    The annual Space Weather Workshop will be held in Boulder, Colo., 26-29 April 2011. The workshop will bring customers, forecasters, commercial service providers, researchers, and government agencies together in a lively dialogue about space weather. The workshop will include 4 days of plenary sessions on a variety of topics, with poster sessions focusing on the Sun, interplanetary space, the magnetosphere, and the ionosphere. The conference will address the remarkably diverse impacts of space weather on today's technology. Highlights on this year's agenda will include presentations on space weather impacts on the Global Positioning System (GPS), the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory's (STEREO) mission milestone of a 360° view of the Sun, the latest from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), and space weather impacts on emergency response by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Additionally, the vulnerabilities of satellites and the power grid to space weather will be addressed. Additional highlights will include the Commercial Space Weather Interest Group's (CSWIG) roundtable session and a presentation from the Office of the Federal Coordinator for Meteorology (OFCM). The CSWIG roundtable session on the growth of the space weather enterprise will feature distinguished panelists. As always, lively interaction between the audience and the panel is anticipated. The OFCM will present the National Space Weather Program's new strategic plan.

  1. Space weathering of asteroids: Lessons from Itokawa for future observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Sho; HIroi, Takahiro

    2016-07-01

    weathered. The presence of opposition effect in rocky terrain of Itokawa suggested that the surface would be covered by particulate materials or porous enough to scatter light. Spectral variations were observed, that can be explained by Hapke's space weathering model, where the amount of npFe0 controls spectral reddening. As for color variation of Itokawa, we can interpret that seismic shaking caused by impacts or planetary encounters should lead to exposure of underlying relatively fresh bright area by removing weathered darker boulder-rich layer. Itokawa - Evidence from Returned Samples In 2011, HAYABUSA returned more than 1000 particulate samples of Itokawa back to the Earth. Analysis of mineral assemblies and composition of Itokawa particles supports that Itokawa has LL-chondrite composition. The most notable discoveries in Itokawa particles is amorphous space-weathering rims containing npFe0 16, 17, 18). Sometimes ion-implanted type-II layers contains vesicles, probably due mainly to trapping solar wind energetic helium with penetration depth up to a few tens µm (composite vesicular rim in 17, 18)). Large vesicles are observed as blisters on the surface of Itokawa particles. Matsumoto et al. 18) identified space weathered rims with blisters on eleven out of twenty regolith particles of Itokawa. It was confirmed that a blister corresponds to a vesicle in npFe0-bearing amorphous layer. These rims with blisters are heterogeneously distributed even in one particle. Sometimes blistered rims are observed in opposite surfaces of the same particle. This is a strong evidence of regolith mixing. So far, there is no correlation between the blister distribution and surface morphologies such as roundness of particles. A few 10 nm amorphous rim can be developed in timescale 1000 yr (based on solar flare density, Regolith mixing processes may prolong timescale of optical maturation on smooth regions of Itokawa. References 1) Hapke B., Cassidy, W. And Wells. E.: Effects of vapor

  2. Space Weather Effects on Aircraft Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, J. C.; Cade, W. B.

    2012-12-01

    Many aircraft today use satellites for GPS navigation, arrival and departure to and from airspaces, and for "shooting" non-precision and precision Instrument Approaches into airports. Also in development is an Air Traffic Control system based on satellite technology that seeks to modernize current air traffic control and improve safety, eventually phasing out radar (though not yet in the very near future). Due to the general, commercial, and military aviation fields all becoming more and more reliant on satellite and GPS technologies, the effects of space weather events on these systems is of paramount concern to militaries, airlines, private pilots, and other aviation operators. In this study we analyze data from airlines and other resources regarding effects on satellite and GPS systems, which is crucial to the conduct of safe flight operations now and improving systems for future and continued use.

  3. Cosmic Ray Observatories for Space Weather Studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    The Mexican Space Weather Service (SCiESMEX) was created in October 2014. Some observatories measure data for the service at different frequencies and particles. Two cosmic ray observatories detect the particle variations attributed to solar emissions, and are an important source of information for the SCiESMEX. The Mexico City Cosmic Ray Observatory consists of a neutron monitor (6-NM-64) and a muon telescope, that detect the hadronic and hard component of the secondary cosmic rays in the atmosphere. It has been in continous operation since 1990. The Sierra Negra Cosmic Ray Observatory consists of a solar neutron telescope and the scintillator cosmic ray telescope. These telescopes can detect the neutrons, generated in solar flares and the hadronic and hard components of the secondary cosmic rays. It has been in continous operation since 2004. We present the two observatories and the capability to detect variations in the cosmic rays, generated by the emissions of the solar activity.

  4. Space Weather Simulators Developed at NICT : the Solar Surface-Solar Wind Coupling Model and the Next Generation Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Den, Mitsue; Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Watari, Shinichi; Tanaka, Takashi; Ishii, Mamoru; Kubo, Yuki; Kubota, Yasubumi; Washimi, Haruichi

    We report two global MHD simulators developed at NICT (National Institute of Information and Communications Technology): one is for the solar surface-solar wind coupling system and the other is for the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling system. One important feature of our simulation model is the 3-D grid system, which has no polar singularity despite of a spherical grid configuration. By this grid system, fine grids can be allocated near the inner boundary which represents the sun or the earth. Some complicated magnetic structures on the solar surface is closely related with the solar disturbances, and in the same way the ionospheric aurora is closely related with the the magnetospheric reconfiguration processes. In views of these situation, it is very crucial for both models to achieve the simultaneous implementations for the fine grid structure on the inner boundary and the wide range grids in global configuration. For the solar surface-solar wind coupling system, the observed magnetic field data are input at the inner boundary, and the solar wind structure can be updated at every day by optimizing the simulation code. For the magnetospheric model, we are developing "the next generation" realtime MHD simulation system. The model is developed by NICT and co-workers, and the extreme phenomena such as the magnetopause crossing are simulated successfully. For the magnetic disturbance event, the westward traveling surge, the most characteristic feature of the substorm, is reproduced quite realistically. In this paper, we describe those two space weather simulator systems and represent several numerical results obtained by using these models.

  5. Space Science and Space Weather: A Research to Operations Continuum at NOAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, H. J.; Millward, G. H.; Balch, C. C.; Onsager, T. G.

    2014-12-01

    NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) is the nation's official source of space weather alerts, watches and warnings with a mission to "deliver space weather products and services that meet the evolving needs of the nation." The scope of SWPC activities ranges from understanding the needs of those affected by space weather to the delivery of products and services that protect national assets and human activities. To carry out this work we benefit from partnerships such as those with other agencies, universities, the international community and commercial service providers. In this presentation we will describe the continuum of activities involved in the research to operations process and the essential role played by scientific research throughout the process. We will identify research that is needed to provide better scientific understanding, to enable improved models and to carry out much needed observations. The presentation will highlight recent work on the transition of space weather models to operations and focus on examples related to large scale numerical models of the Geospace environment. As an example of the process for evaluating potential new products, we will describe initial research results that examine the prediction of storm enhanced density affecting Global Position System navigation services.

  6. Government and Public Awareness of Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzerotti, Louis J.

    2011-07-01

    Solar cycle 24 continues to provide confusion in its start and its unsteady rise toward an uncertain maximum. Nevertheless, many entities, including the popular press and influential government agencies, are becoming more aware of the effects of the Sun and the near-Earth space environment on essential modern-day technologies. Within the past 6 months, news articles in the printed and digital press have included such headlines as "Solar storm delivers glancing blow to Earth—and a warning" (Christian Science Monitor, 9 June 2011), "Magnetic north pole shifts, forces runway closures at Florida airport" (http://FoxNews.com, 6 January 2011), "Major solar flare erupts, may make auroras visible in northern U.S." (SPACE.com, 10 March 2011, but picked up by FoxNews.com and Yahoo News), and "As the sun awakens, the power grid stands vulnerable" (Washington Post, 20 June 2011). All such news stories for the general public are a welcome recognition that weather in space can have important implications for human activities, including the performance—and even survivability—of some technologies.

  7. Communicating space weather to policymakers and the wider public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Bárbara

    2014-05-01

    As a natural hazard, space weather has the potential to affect space- and ground-based technological systems and cause harm to human health. As such, it is important to properly communicate this topic to policymakers and the general public alike, informing them (without being unnecessarily alarmist) about the potential impact of space-weather phenomena and how these can be monitored and mitigated. On the other hand, space weather is related to interesting phenomena on the Sun such as coronal-mass ejections, and incorporates one of the most beautiful displays in the Earth and its nearby space environment: aurora. These exciting and fascinating aspects of space weather should be cultivated when communicating this topic to the wider public, particularly to younger audiences. Researchers have a key role to play in communicating space weather to both policymakers and the wider public. Space scientists should have an active role in informing policy decisions on space-weather monitoring and forecasting, for example. And they can exercise their communication skills by talking about space weather to school children and the public in general. This presentation will focus on ways to communicate space weather to wider audiences, particularly policymakers. It will also address the role researchers can play in this activity to help bridge the gap between the space science community and the public.

  8. Collaboration Between Government and Commercial Space Weather Information Providers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intriligator, Devrie

    2007-10-01

    Many systems and situations require up-to-date space weather information. These include navigation systems in cars, boats, and commercial freight; the specific location information needed for construction and oil drilling; communications; airline navigation; avionic systems; and passengers and personnel on polar airline flights. Thus, as the world's industries become increasingly more reliant on satellite data and more vulnerable to space weather conditions, new collaborations will have to be formed between commercial providers of space weather information and the government scientists who monitor space weather.

  9. Gombosi Receives 2013 Space Weather and Nonlinear Waves and Processes Prize: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Robert P.

    2014-08-01

    The Space Physics and Aeronomy section of AGU awards the Space Weather and Nonlinear Waves and Processes Prize to Tamas Gombosi of the University of Michigan. Gombosi, the founding director of the Center for Space Environment Modeling, has been a leader in space weather research, a visionary in space weather numerical modeling for several decades, and a pioneer of international space physics collaboration. Gombosi's major contributions to space weather include the development of the first time-dependent numerical model of the terrestrial polar wind and the creation of the BATS-R-US magnetohydrodynamic model, a powerful and versatile numerical tool widely used today for modeling the global geospace, the heliosphere, and the solar interior.

  10. Solar thematic maps for space weather operations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rigler, E. Joshua; Hill, Steven M.; Reinard, Alysha A.; Steenburgh, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Thematic maps are arrays of labels, or "themes", associated with discrete locations in space and time. Borrowing heavily from the terrestrial remote sensing discipline, a numerical technique based on Bayes' theorem captures operational expertise in the form of trained theme statistics, then uses this to automatically assign labels to solar image pixels. Ultimately, regular thematic maps of the solar corona will be generated from high-cadence, high-resolution SUVI images, the solar ultraviolet imager slated to fly on NOAA's next-generation GOES-R series of satellites starting ~2016. These thematic maps will not only provide quicker, more consistent synoptic views of the sun for space weather forecasters, but digital thematic pixel masks (e.g., coronal hole, active region, flare, etc.), necessary for a new generation of operational solar data products, will be generated. This paper presents the mathematical underpinnings of our thematic mapper, as well as some practical algorithmic considerations. Then, using images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Advanced Imaging Array (AIA) as test data, it presents results from validation experiments designed to ascertain the robustness of the technique with respect to differing expert opinions and changing solar conditions.

  11. The Nature of Reduction in Space Weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, D. S.; Allen, C. C.

    1993-07-01

    Space weathering is a broad term that includes a number of complex effects of the exposure of materials to the environment of space. The processes that drive space weathering include micrometeorite impact, radiation from the Sun and cosmic rays, and exposure to the vacuum of space. One of the important effects caused by these processes is the tendency for chemical reduction of oxide and silicate materials (including glasses), with accompanying loss of oxygen and production of reduced metal. Such chemical reduction and accompanying metal production may have an important influence on the chemistry of the outermost volume of individual grains as well as on the optical properties of this material. Hapke [1] discussed five processes that have been suggested for producing submicroscopic iron metal in the lunar soil: (1) shock reduction, (2) heating in a thermal blanket in vacuum, (3) shock heating of solar-wind-impregnated grains, (4) coatings deposited by solar wind sputtering, and (5) coatings deposited by impact vaporization. As noted by Hapke, "Processes (1) and (2) have been refuted by laboratory experiments. Processes (4) and (5) have produced submicroscopic iron metal in laboratory simulations. Although no experiments have been done to simulate process (3), it is widely accepted." We have been performing experimental reduction of simulated and actual lunar materials [2-5] and have shown that, under conditions of exposure to hydrogen at elevated temperatures, reduction of FeO readily occurs in ilmenite and lunar composition glass, and occurs at a slower rate in pyroxene and olivine. Even plagioclase feldspar containing minor FeO is readily reduced with formation of metallic iron blebs on surfaces [4]. A comparison of natural lunar samples to hydrogen-reduced samples or simulants in which we are searching for reduction evidence in various soil phases is underway. Preliminary data for mature soils show, in agreement with earlier results, that reduced iron produced in

  12. The Space Weather Prediction Testbed: Bridging the Gap Between Research and Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viereck, R. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Space Weather Prediction Testbed (SWPT), was established to facilitate the transition of research models into operational Space Weather Forecast Offices. The SWPT is part of the National Weather Service's Space Weather Prediction Center. In addition to transitioning models from research to operations (R2O) the SWPT also identifies the most urgent needs and requirements of the Forecast Office and translates them into research and model development needs so that the scientists can better identify ways in which these operational requirements can be met by current research activities (O2R). The current high priority operational requirements for improved space weather products and services will be discussed along with the data and modeling activities needed to meet these requirements. Some of the SWPT model development activities and how they apply to the operational requirements will also be presented.

  13. Space Weather and Management of Environmental Risks and Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirjola, R.; Kauristie, K.; Lappalainen, H.

    "Space Weather" is defined as electromagnetic and particle conditions in the space environment that can disturb space-borne and ground-based technological systems (e.g. satellite operation, telecommunication, aviation, electric power transmission) and even endanger human health. Thus, space weather is of great importance to the society since people are dependent on reliable operation of modern technology, interruptions of which may lead to large economical and other losses. Physical processes involved in space weather constitute a complicated chain from the Sun to the Earth's surface. Thus, a full understanding of space weather and the risks it produces requires expertise in many different disciplines of science and technology. Space weather is a new subject among the natural risks and hazards which threaten the society and its infrastructure (although the first observations of ground effects of space weather were already made about 150 years ago). Monitoring systems for the management of other risks, such as floods, forest fires, etc., and for security are, to a great extent, based on satellite observations. Spacecraft and the communication between satellites and the ground are vulnerable to space weather. Thus, besides being a direct risk to technological systems, space weather may also be indirectly adverse to risk management. These two aspects of space weather are considered in a proposal to be submitted to EU's Sixth Framework Programme under the "Aeronautics and Space" priority in the "Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) / Risk Management" area in March 2004. The proposal coordinated by the Finnish Meteorological Institute with five to ten participating institutes is called SW-RISK ("Space Weather - Risk Indices from Scientific Know-how").

  14. LOFAR new tool for Space Weather Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothkaehl, Hanna; Krankowski, Andrzej; Wronowski, Roman; Przepiórka, Dorota; Matyjasiak, Barbara; Błaszkiewicz, Leszek; Dabrowski, Bartosz

    2016-04-01

    LOFAR is the Low-Frequency Array, exploring yet poorly studied range between 30-240 MHz frequencies. It constitutes a European array of thousands of antennas - a challenge for data transfer and processing techniques. The project is based on an interferometry array of radio telescopes using about thousand small antennas concentrated in at least 52 larger stations, 40 of these stations are distributed across the Netherlands, six stations in Germany, 3 in Poland and one each in Great Britain, France and Sweden. The data processing is performed by a Blue Gene/P supercomputer situated in the Netherlands at the University of Groningen. Novel ground based wide area sensor networks, such as the LOFAR (Low Frequency Array) radar facility, comprising wide band, and vector sensing radio receivers and multi-spacecraft plasma diagnostics should help solve outstanding problems of space physics and describe long-term environmental changes. The three new LOFAR stations were installed during 2015 in Poland. The LOFAR facilities in Poland are distributed among three sites: Borówiec near Poznan, Bałdy near Olsztyn and Łazy near Krakow. All they are connected via PIONIER dedicated links to Poznan. The frequency range of LOFAR (10-250 MHz) is a very important for the cosmic plasma physics. In this spectral domain we can observe for a first time the regions of normal and radio galaxies yet unseen at higher frequencies: their radio flux rapidly fades with frequency because of ageing population of high-energy relativistic electrons. This is also the optimum domain for observing the radio emission from magnetospheres of pulsars and giant (solar or extrasolar) planets. LOFAR will also give us chance for monitoring and diagnostic of different processes in space plasma enviroment of the Earth's and rado emissions from Sun. All this provides a trip to yet unexplored domains of the Universe and can be the exelent tool for SSA and Space Weather program

  15. Global Cooperation in the Science of Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2011-01-01

    The international space science community had recognized the importance of space weather more than a decade ago, which resulted in a number of international collaborative activities such as the Climate and Weather of the Sun Earth System (CAWSES) by SCOSTEP and the International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI). The ISWI program is a continuation of the successful International Heliophysical Year (IHY) program. These programs have brought scientists together to tackle the scientific issues behind space weather. In addition to the vast array of space instruments, ground based instruments have been deployed, which not only filled voids in data coverage, but also inducted young scientists from developing countries into the scientific community. This paper presents a summary of CAWSES and ISWI activities that promote space weather science via complementary approaches in international scientific collaborations. capacity building. and public outreach.

  16. Space Weather Workshop 2010 to Be Held in April

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltzer, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    The annual Space Weather Workshop will be held in Boulder, Colo., 27-30 April 2010. The workshop will bring customers, forecasters, commercial service providers, researchers, and government agencies together in a lively dialogue about space weather. The workshop will include 4 days of plenary sessions on a variety of topics, with poster sessions focusing on the Sun, interplanetary space, the magnetosphere, and the ionosphere. The conference will address the remarkably diverse impacts of space weather on today's technology. Highlights on this year's agenda include ionospheric storms and their impacts on the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), an update on NASA's recently launched Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), and new space weather-related activities in the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Also this year, the Commercial Space Weather Interest Group will feature a presentation by former NOAA administrator, Vice Admiral Conrad Lautenbacher, U.S. Navy (Ret.).

  17. Introduction to the Space Weather Monitoring System at KASI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, J.; Choi, S.; Kim, Y.; Cho, K.; Bong, S.; Lee, J.; Kwak, Y.; Hwang, J.; Park, Y.; Hwang, E.

    2014-05-01

    We have developed the Space Weather Monitoring System (SWMS) at the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI). Since 2007, the system has continuously evolved into a better system. The SWMS consists of several subsystems: applications which acquire and process observational data, servers which run the applications, data storage, and display facilities which show the space weather information. The applications collect solar and space weather data from domestic and oversea sites. The collected data are converted to other format and/or visualized in real time as graphs and illustrations. We manage 3 data acquisition and processing servers, a file service server, a web server, and 3 sets of storage systems. We have developed 30 applications for a variety of data, and the volume of data is about 5.5 GB per day. We provide our customers with space weather contents displayed at the Space Weather Monitoring Lab (SWML) using web services.

  18. Maintaining US Space Weather Capabilities after DMSP: Research to Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machuzak, J. S.; Gentile, L. C.; Burke, W. J.; Holeman, E. G.; Ober, D. M.; Wilson, G. R.

    2012-12-01

    The first Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft was launched in 1972; the last is scheduled to fly in 2020. Presently, there is no replacement for the space-weather monitoring sensors that now fly on DMSP. The present suite has provided comprehensive, long-term records that constitute a critical component of the US space weather corporate memory. Evolving operational needs and research accomplishments justify continued collection of space environmental data. Examples include measurements to: (1) Monitor the Dst index in real time as a driver of next-generation satellite drag models; (2) Quantify electromagnetic energy fluxes from deep space to the ionosphere/ thermosphere that heat neutrals, drive disturbance-dynamo winds and degrade precise orbit determinations; (3) Determine strengths of stormtime electric fields at high and low latitudes that lead to severe blackouts and spacecraft anomalies; (4) Specify variability of plasma density irregularities, equatorial plasma bubbles, and the Appleton anomaly to improve reliability of communication, navigation and surveillance links; (5) Characterize energetic particle fluxes responsible for auroral clutter and radar degradation; (6) Map regions of L-Band scintillation for robust GPS applications; and (7) Update the World Magnetic Field Model needed to maintain guidance system superiority. These examples illustrate the utility of continued space environment awareness. Comprehensive assessments of both operational requirements and research advances are needed to make informed selections of sensors and spacecraft that support future capabilities. A proposed sensor set and satellite constellation to provide the needed measurement capabilities will be presented.

  19. Predicting Space Weather Effects on Close Approach Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hejduk, Matthew D.; Newman, Lauri K.; Besser, Rebecca L.; Pachura, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Robotic Conjunction Assessment Risk Analysis (CARA) team sends ephemeris data to the Joint Space Operations Center (JSpOC) for conjunction assessment screening against the JSpOC high accuracy catalog and then assesses risk posed to protected assets from predicted close approaches. Since most spacecraft supported by the CARA team are located in LEO orbits, atmospheric drag is the primary source of state estimate uncertainty. Drag magnitude and uncertainty is directly governed by atmospheric density and thus space weather. At present the actual effect of space weather on atmospheric density cannot be accurately predicted because most atmospheric density models are empirical in nature, which do not perform well in prediction. The Jacchia-Bowman-HASDM 2009 (JBH09) atmospheric density model used at the JSpOC employs a solar storm active compensation feature that predicts storm sizes and arrival times and thus the resulting neutral density alterations. With this feature, estimation errors can occur in either direction (i.e., over- or under-estimation of density and thus drag). Although the exact effect of a solar storm on atmospheric drag cannot be determined, one can explore the effects of JBH09 model error on conjuncting objects' trajectories to determine if a conjunction is likely to become riskier, less risky, or pass unaffected. The CARA team has constructed a Space Weather Trade-Space tool that systematically alters the drag situation for the conjuncting objects and recalculates the probability of collision for each case to determine the range of possible effects on the collision risk. In addition to a review of the theory and the particulars of the tool, the different types of observed output will be explained, along with statistics of their frequency.

  20. Asteroidal Space Weathering: The Major Role of FeS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Rahman, Z.; Hiroi, T.; Sasaki, S.; Noble, S. K.; Horz, F.; Cintala, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Space weathering (SW) effects on the lunar surface are reasonably well-understood from sample analyses, remote-sensing data, and experiments, yet our knowledge of asteroidal SW effects are far less constrained. While the same SW processes are operating on asteroids and the Moon, namely solar wind irradiation, impact vaporization and condensation, and impact melting, their relative rates and efficiencies are poorly known, as are their effects on such vastly different parent materials. Asteroidal SW models based on remote-sensing data and experiments are in wide disagreement over the dominant mechanisms involved and their kinetics. Lunar space weathering effects observed in UVVIS-NIR spectra result from surface- and volume-correlated nanophase Fe metal (npFe(sup 0)) particles. In the lunar case, it is the tiny vapor-deposited npFe(sup 0) that provides much of the spectral reddening, while the coarser (largely melt-derived) npFe(sup 0) produce lowered albedos. Nanophase FeS (npFeS) particles are expected to modify reflectance spectra in much the same way as npFe(sup 0) particles. Here we report the results of experiments designed to explore the efficiency of npFeS production via the main space weathering processes operating in the asteroid belt.

  1. The idea of Space Weather A historical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, R. P.

    This paper reports the results of a search to determine who originated the concept and/or the term Space Weather. Though many people have been identified with an early use of the term "Space Weather", the first one to have introduced the term seems to be Thomas Gold of Harvard College Observatory, in a 1959 publication in the Journal of Geophysical Research.

  2. Space Weather Needs of an Evolving Customer Base (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutledge, B.; Viereck, R. A.; Onsager, T. G.

    2013-12-01

    Great progress has been made in raising the global awareness of space weather and the associated impacts on Earth and our technological systems. However, significant gaps still exist in providing comprehensive and easily understood space weather information, products, and services to the diverse and growing customer base. As technologies, such as Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), have become more ingrained in applications and fields of work that previously did not rely on systems sensitive to space weather, the customer base has grown substantially. Furthermore, the causes and effects of space weather can be difficult to interpret without a detailed understanding of the scientific underpinnings. In response to this change, space weather service providers must address this evolution by both improving services and by representing space weather information and impacts in ways that are meaningful to each facet of this diverse customer base. The NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) must work with users, spanning precision agriculture, emergency management, power grid operators and beyond, to both identify unmet space weather service requirements and to ensure information and decision support services are provided in meaningful and more easily understood forms.

  3. On the Nature of People's Reaction to Space Weather and Meteorological Weather Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarova, O. V.; Dimitrova, S.

    2009-12-01

    Our environment includes many natural and artificial agents affecting any person on the Earth in one way or other. This work is focused on two of them - weather and space weather, which are permanently effective. Their cumulative effect is proved by means of the modeling. It is shown that combination of geomagnetic and solar indices and weather strength parameter (which includes six main meteorological parameters) correlates with health state significantly better (up to R=0.7), than separate environmental parameters do. The typical shape of any health characteristics' time-series during human body reaction to any negative impact represents a curve, well-known in medicine as a General Adaptation Syndrome curve by Hans Selye. We demonstrate this on the base of blood pressure time-series and acupunctural experiment data, averaged by group. The first stage of adaptive stress-reaction (resistance to stress) is sometimes observed 1-2 days before geomagnetic storm onset. The effect of "outstripping reaction to magnetic storm", named Tchizhevsky- Velkhover effect, had been known for many years, but its explanation was obtained recently due to the consideration of the near-Earth space plasma processes. It was shown that lowfrequency variations of the solar wind density on a background of the density growth can stimulate the development of the geomagnetic filed (GMF) variations of the wide frequency range. These variations seem to have "bioeffective frequencies", resonant with own frequencies of body organs and systems. The mechanism of human body reaction is supposed to be a parametrical resonance in low-frequency range (which is determined by the resonance in large-scale organs and systems) and a simple forced resonance in GHz-range of variations (the resonance of micro-objects in the organism such as DNA, cell membranes, blood ions etc.) Given examples of mass-reaction of the objects to ULF-range GMF variations during quiet space weather time prove this hypothesis.

  4. A New Source of Space Weather Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    The twin STEREO spacecraft were launched on October 26,2006 and, after spending several weeks in alignment orbits, became operational in heliocentric orbits on January 2 1,2007. The spacecraft are now in orbits similar to Earth's and are separating from each other at a rate of about 45 degrees per year as viewed from the sun. The STEREO spacecraft are each equipped with a complement of EUV, and white light imagers as well as particles and fields in situ instruments and a radio burst tracker. In addition to full resolution data downloaded once per day, each spacecraft broadcasts a real time telemetry 'beacon' stream containing compressed images and typically one minute averages of solar wind measurements and radio intensities. These real time data streams are received by a mix of NOAA and NASA-managed tracking stations and the data is transmitted by these stations to the STEREO Science Center at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center where they are processed into useable parameters with a latency of less than five minutes from receipt. As the two spacecraft recede from the sun-Earth line, triangulation of the imaging and radio measurements should allow better estimate of the speed and direction of coronal mass ejections, allowing a more precise estimate of their arrival at Earth. In situ particles and fields measurements, particularly for the spacecraft (Behind) trailing Earth in its orbit, will sample the solar wind that will eventually co-rotate around to the sun-Earth line. Late in the prime mission when the spacecraft are very far (>90 degrees) from the sun-Earth line, observations from the Behind spacecraft, will be particularly valuable for providing a preview of active regions well beyond the sun's East limb (as seen from Earth). Continually updated STEREO space weather data can be viewed and downloaded at http:/lstereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.govldata/beacon/.

  5. Comparative science and space weather around the heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grande, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    Space weather refers to the variable state of the coupled space environment related to changing conditions on the Sun and in the terrestrial atmosphere. The presentation will focus on the critical missing knowledge or observables needed to significantly advance our modelling and forecasting capabilities throughout the solar system putting these in perspective to the recommendations in the recent COSPAR/ILWS roadmap. The COSPAR/ILWS RoadMap focuses on high-priority challenges in key areas of research leading to a better understanding of the space environment and a demonstrable improvement in the provision of timely, reliable information pertinent to effects on civilian space- and ground-based systems, for all stakeholders around the world. The RoadMap prioritizes those advances that can be made on short, intermediate and decadal time scales, identifying gaps and opportunities from a predominantly, but not exclusively, geocentric perspective. While discussion of space weather effects has so far largely been confined to the near-Earth environment, there are significant present and future applications to the locations beyond, and to other planets. Most obviously, perhaps, are the radiation hazards experienced by astronauts on the way to, and on the surface of, the Moon and Mars. Indeed, the environment experienced by planetary spacecraft in transit and at their destinations is of course critical to their design and successful operation. The case of forthcoming missions to Jupiter and Europa is an extreme example. Moreover, such craft can provide information which in turn increases our understanding of geospace. One initiative is that under Horizon 2020, Europlanet RI will set up a Europlanet Planetary Space Weather Service (PSWS). PSWS will make five entirely new 'toolkits' accessible to the research community and to industrial partners planning for space missions: - a General planetary space weather toolkit; Mars (in support of the ESA ExoMars missions to be launched

  6. Space Weathering Investigations Enabled by NASA's Virtual Heliophysical Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.; King, Joseph H.; Papitashvili, Natalia E.; Lal, Nand; Sittler, Edward C.; Sturner, Steven J.; Hills, Howard K.; Lipatov, Alexander S.; Kovalick, Tamara J.; Johnson, Rita C.; McGuire, Robert E.; Narock, Thomas W.; Szabo, Adam; Armstrong, Thomas P.; Manweiler, Jerry W.; Patterson, J. Douglas; McKibben, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Structural and chemical impact of the heliospheric space environment on exposed planetary surfaces and interplanetary dust grains may be generally defined as space weathering . In the inner solar system, from the asteroid belt inwards towards the Sun, the surface regolith structures of airless bodies are primarily determined by cumulative meteoritic impacts over billions of years, but the molecular composition to meters in depth can be substantially modified by irradiation effects. Plasma ions at eV to keV energies may both erode uppermost surfaces by sputtering, and implant or locally produce exogenic material, e.g. He-3 and H2O, while more energetic ions drive molecular change through electronic ionization. Galactic cosmic ray ions and more energetic solar ions can impact chemistry to meters in depth. High energy cosmic ray interactions produce showers of secondary particles and energetic photons that present hazards for robotic and human exploration missions but also enable detection of potentially useable resources such as water ice, oxygen, and many other elements. Surface sputtering also makes ejected elemental and molecular species accessible for in-situ compositional analysis by spacecraft with ion and neutral mass spectrometers. Modeling of relative impacts for these various space weathering processes requires knowledge of the incident species-resolved ion flux spectra at plasma to cosmic ray energies and as integrated over varying time scales. Although the main drivers for investigations of these processes come from NASA's planetary science and human exploration programs, the NASA heliophysics program provides the requisite data measurement and modeling resources to enable specification of the field & plasma and energetic particle irradiation environments for application to space weather and surface weathering investigations. The Virtual Heliospheric Observatory (VHO), Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO), Lunar Solar Origins Exploration (Luna

  7. The Design of Solar Synoptic Chart for Space Weather Forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qiao; Wang, JinSong; Feng, Xueshang; Zhang, XiaoXin

    2015-08-01

    The influence of space weather has already been an important part of our modern society. A chart with key concepts and objects in space weather is needed for space weather forecast. In this work, we search space weather liter- atures during the past forty years and investigate a variety of solar data sets, which including our own data observed by the vector magnetic field telescope and the Hα telescope at Wenquan and Shidao stations of National Center for Space Weather. Based on the literatures and data, we design the solar synoptic chart (SSC) that covers main objects of solar activities and contains images from different heights and temperatures of solar atmosphere. The SSC includes the information of active regions, coronal holes, filaments/prominences, flares and coronal mass ejections, and reveals magnetic structures from cooler photosphere to hotter corona. We use the SSC method to analyze the condition of the Sun and give two typical examples of the SSC. The result shows that the SSC is timely, comprehensive, concise and easy to understand, and it meets the needs of space weather forecast and can help improving the public education of space weather.

  8. Forecasting space weather: Can new econometric methods improve accuracy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reikard, Gordon

    2011-06-01

    Space weather forecasts are currently used in areas ranging from navigation and communication to electric power system operations. The relevant forecast horizons can range from as little as 24 h to several days. This paper analyzes the predictability of two major space weather measures using new time series methods, many of them derived from econometrics. The data sets are the A p geomagnetic index and the solar radio flux at 10.7 cm. The methods tested include nonlinear regressions, neural networks, frequency domain algorithms, GARCH models (which utilize the residual variance), state transition models, and models that combine elements of several techniques. While combined models are complex, they can be programmed using modern statistical software. The data frequency is daily, and forecasting experiments are run over horizons ranging from 1 to 7 days. Two major conclusions stand out. First, the frequency domain method forecasts the A p index more accurately than any time domain model, including both regressions and neural networks. This finding is very robust, and holds for all forecast horizons. Combining the frequency domain method with other techniques yields a further small improvement in accuracy. Second, the neural network forecasts the solar flux more accurately than any other method, although at short horizons (2 days or less) the regression and net yield similar results. The neural net does best when it includes measures of the long-term component in the data.

  9. Discover Space Weather and Sun's Superpowers: Using CCMC's innovative tools and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, A. M. M.; Maddox, M. M.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Chulaki, A.; Rastaetter, L.; Mullinix, R.; Weigand, C.; Boblitt, J.; Taktakishvili, A.; MacNeice, P. J.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Pembroke, A. D.; Mays, M. L.; Zheng, Y.; Shim, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) has developed a comprehensive set of tools and applications that are directly applicable to space weather and space science education. These tools, some of which were developed by our student interns, are capable of serving a wide range of student audiences, from middle school to postgraduate research. They include a web-based point of access to sophisticated space physics models and visualizations, and a powerful space weather information dissemination system, available on the web and as a mobile app. In this demonstration, we will use CCMC's innovative tools to engage the audience in real-time space weather analysis and forecasting and will share some of our interns' hands-on experiences while being trained as junior space weather forecasters. The main portals to CCMC's educational material are ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov and iswa.gsfc.nasa.gov

  10. Space Weather - Current Capabilities, Future Requirements, and the Path to Improved Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Ian

    2016-07-01

    We present an overview of Space Weather activities and future opportunities including assessments of current status and capabilities, knowledge gaps, and future directions in relation to both observations and modeling. The review includes input from the scientific community including from SCOSTEP scientific discipline representatives (SDRs), COSPAR Main Scientific Organizers (MSOs), and SCOSTEP/VarSITI leaders. The presentation also draws on results from the recent activities related to the production of the COSPAR-ILWS Space Weather Roadmap "Understanding Space Weather to Shield Society" [Schrijver et al., Advances in Space Research 55, 2745 (2015) http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.asr.2015.03.023], from the activities related to the United Nations (UN) Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS) actions in relation to the Long-term Sustainability of Outer Space (LTS), and most recently from the newly formed and ongoing efforts of the UN COPUOS Expert Group on Space Weather.

  11. NACON - A Nano-Satellite Constellation for Space Weather Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappas, V.; van der Ha, J.; Schwartz, S.; Underwood, C. I.; da Silva Curiel, A.

    Space Weather has a tremendous effect not only on our day-to-day activities on Earth but also on our space assets. Communications, weather prediction, Internet, TV broadcasting and space mission planning depend heavily on ground and space infrastructure. Thus it becomes more important than ever to establish a space- based network which is capable of providing the necessary data to scientists. The data may be used to predict and analyse all types of weather phenomena, either in our atmosphere or near our planet (earth magneto-tail/ field) or in our solar system (Sun). Such a comprehensive, operational space weather network will heavily depend on the necessary science and data requirements, and of most importance in this study is to design a practical, affordable, autonomous and versatile space solution composed of multiple spacecraft. The number and configuration of these satellites is key into bringing the relevant space weather data to the end user. The paper details a new approach into defining a modular architecture composed of three-level (low, medium and high) solutions pending on the end user requirements. The goal is to design a pragmatic, innovative, versatile, low cost and complete end-to-end system for space weather monitoring with a 10-year lifetime.

  12. Experimental space weathering of regolith material. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, D. S.; Allen, C. C.

    1994-01-01

    Significant advances in the understanding of space weathering processes were recently reported. Submicroscopic iron blebs were produced in lunar simulant glass and natural terrestrial minerals by high-temperature reduction in controlled atmosphere furnaces. These experiments altered the samples' optical properties and microtextures so that they resembled those of extremely mature lunar soil. The results contributed to a revised model for natural reduction in the regolith. Subsequently, supporting results were obtained by reduction of lunar samples. Research to date has focused on reduction of three lunar surface components: basalt, pyroclastic glass, and mare soil. An extensive set of H reduction experiments with simulants has led to a detailed understanding of reaction mechanisms and kinetics. Reduction experiments using lunar basalt were recently conducted by Carbotek. Reduced samples from these test were analyzed. Reduction experiments on lunar glass 74220 were run at temperatures of 900-1100 C. Reduction efficiency of volcanic glass proved to be a function of the sample's FeO abundance and reaction temperature. We also reduced mare soil 75061 at temperatures of 900-1050 C. Partial reduction of FeO in olivine and pyroxene occurred, but was slower and less complete than reduction of ilmenite. Our experiments on simulants and lunar samples have indicated that the most readily reduced phases in the regolith are ilmenite and glass. Based on initial tests with simulants we proposed refinements to the accepted model for space weathering of the regolith. The impact of a micrometeoroid flash heats and melts and ejects from the impact point a small volume of soil that contains trapped solar wind H and C. Reduction occurs rapidly, while the melt volume is still in motion. When a droplet encounters unmelted soil, it envelopes cold mineral grains. The melt is chilled rapidly. Our analyses of experimentally reduced lunar basalt, glass, and mare soil support the proposed

  13. Forecasting Space Weather Events for a Neighboring World

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Yihua; Mason, Tom; Wood, Erin L.

    2015-01-01

    Shortly after NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN mission (MAVEN) spacecraft entered Mars' orbit on 21 September 2014, scientists glimpsed the Martian atmosphere's response to a front of solar energetic particles (SEPs) and an associated coronal mass ejection (CME). In response to some solar flares and CMEs, streams of SEPs burst from the solar atmosphere and are further accelerated in the interplanetary medium between the Sun and the planets. These particles deposit their energy and momentum into anything in their path, including the Martian atmosphere and MAVEN particle detectors. MAVEN scientists had been alerted to the likely CME-Mars encounter by a space weather prediction system that had its origins in space weather forecasting for Earth but now forecasts space weather for Earth's neighboring planets. The two Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft and Solar Heliospheric Observatory observed a CME on 26 September, with a trajectory that suggested a Mars intercept. A computer model developed for solar wind prediction, the Wang-Sheeley-Arge-Enlil cone model [e.g., Zheng et al., 2013; Parsons et al., 2011], running in real time at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) located at NASA Goddard since 2006, showed the CME propagating in the direction of Mars (Figure 1). According to MAVEN particle detectors, the disturbance and accompanying SEP enhancement at the leading edge of the CME reached Mars at approximately 17 hours Universal Time on 29 September 2014. Such SEPs may have a profound effect on atmospheric escape - they are believed to be a possible means for driving atmospheric loss. SEPs can cause loss of Mars' upper atmosphere through several loss mechanisms including sputtering of the atmosphere. Sputtering occurs when atoms are ejected from the atmosphere due to impacts with energetic particles.

  14. Operational Numerical Weather Prediction at the Met Office and potential ways forward for operational space weather prediction systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, David

    NICT (National Institute of Information and Communications Technology) has been in charge of space weather forecast service in Japan for more than 20 years. The main target region of the space weather is the geo-space in the vicinity of the Earth where human activities are dominant. In the geo-space, serious damages of satellites, international space stations and astronauts take place caused by energetic particles or electromagnetic disturbances: the origin of the causes is dynamically changing of solar activities. Positioning systems via GPS satellites are also im-portant recently. Since the most significant effect of positioning error comes from disturbances of the ionosphere, it is crucial to estimate time-dependent modulation of the electron density profiles in the ionosphere. NICT is one of the 13 members of the ISES (International Space Environment Service), which is an international assembly of space weather forecast centers under the UNESCO. With help of geo-space environment data exchanging among the member nations, NICT operates daily space weather forecast service every day to provide informa-tion on forecasts of solar flare, geomagnetic disturbances, solar proton event, and radio-wave propagation conditions in the ionosphere. The space weather forecast at NICT is conducted based on the three methodologies: observations, simulations and informatics (OSI model). For real-time or quasi real-time reporting of space weather, we conduct our original observations: Hiraiso solar observatory to monitor the solar activity (solar flare, coronal mass ejection, and so on), domestic ionosonde network, magnetometer HF radar observations in far-east Siberia, and south-east Asia low-latitude ionosonde network (SEALION). Real-time observation data to monitor solar and solar-wind activities are obtained through antennae at NICT from ACE and STEREO satellites. We have a middle-class super-computer (NEC SX-8R) to maintain real-time computer simulations for solar and solar

  15. Ground effects of space weather - geomagnetically induced currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirjola, Risto

    2002-03-01

    A space storm creates intense rapidly-varying currents in the ionosphere. The most important are auroral electrojet systems. At the Earth's surface, the currents cause a geomagnetic disturbance and an induced electric field. Besides the primary space currents, the surface fields are also affected by secondary currents flowing in the Earth. The electric field drives harmful "geomagnetically induced currents" (GIC) in technological systems with a possibility of large economic losses. The first observations of space weather effects on technological systems were already made in early telegraph equipment 150 years ago. Theoretical modelling of GIC in a technological system firstly requires a "geophysical" calculation of the electric field at the Earth's surface and secondly an "engineering" computation of GIC in the particular earthed network of conductors. In this paper, we summarize the basic principles associated with GIC and consider the research done on the topic in Finland for almost twenty-five years.

  16. Space Weather Monitoring for ISS Space Environments Engineering and Crew Auroral Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph; Pettit, Donald R.; Hartman, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Today s presentation describes how real time space weather data is used by the International Space Station (ISS) space environments team to obtain data on auroral charging of the ISS vehicle and support ISS crew efforts to obtain auroral images from orbit. Topics covered include: Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU), . Auroral charging of ISS, . Real ]time space weather monitoring resources, . Examples of ISS auroral charging captured from space weather events, . ISS crew observations of aurora.

  17. Space weathering of asteroids: Lessons from Itokawa for future observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Sho; HIroi, Takahiro

    2016-07-01

    weathered. The presence of opposition effect in rocky terrain of Itokawa suggested that the surface would be covered by particulate materials or porous enough to scatter light. Spectral variations were observed, that can be explained by Hapke's space weathering model, where the amount of npFe0 controls spectral reddening. As for color variation of Itokawa, we can interpret that seismic shaking caused by impacts or planetary encounters should lead to exposure of underlying relatively fresh bright area by removing weathered darker boulder-rich layer. Itokawa - Evidence from Returned Samples In 2011, HAYABUSA returned more than 1000 particulate samples of Itokawa back to the Earth. Analysis of mineral assemblies and composition of Itokawa particles supports that Itokawa has LL-chondrite composition. The most notable discoveries in Itokawa particles is amorphous space-weathering rims containing npFe0 16, 17, 18). Sometimes ion-implanted type-II layers contains vesicles, probably due mainly to trapping solar wind energetic helium with penetration depth up to a few tens µm (composite vesicular rim in 17, 18)). Large vesicles are observed as blisters on the surface of Itokawa particles. Matsumoto et al. 18) identified space weathered rims with blisters on eleven out of twenty regolith particles of Itokawa. It was confirmed that a blister corresponds to a vesicle in npFe0-bearing amorphous layer. These rims with blisters are heterogeneously distributed even in one particle. Sometimes blistered rims are observed in opposite surfaces of the same particle. This is a strong evidence of regolith mixing. So far, there is no correlation between the blister distribution and surface morphologies such as roundness of particles. A few 10 nm amorphous rim can be developed in timescale 1000 yr (based on solar flare density, Regolith mixing processes may prolong timescale of optical maturation on smooth regions of Itokawa. References 1) Hapke B., Cassidy, W. And Wells. E.: Effects of vapor

  18. MAGDAS project and its application for space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, K.; Magdas Group

    We introduce a real-time MAGnetic Data Acquisition System of Circum-pan Pacific Magnetometer Network, i.e. MAGDAS/CPMN for space weather study and application, and its preliminary results. By using this system, we will conduct real-time monitoring and modeling of (1) global 3-dimensional current system, (2) plasma mass density, and (3) penetrating process of polar electric fields into the equatorial ionosphere, in order to understand electromagnetic and plasma environment changes in the geospace during the period of ILWS/CAWSES/IHY.

  19. Space Weathering: Laboratory Analyses and In-Situ Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bentley, M. S.; Ball, A. J.; Dyar, M. D.; Pieters, C. M.; Wright, I. P.; Zarnecki, J. C.

    2005-01-01

    Space weathering is now understood to be a key modifier of visible and near infrared reflectance spectra of airless bodies. Believed to be caused by vapour recondensation after either ion sputtering or impact vaporization, space weathering has been successfully simulated in the laboratory over the past few years. The optical changes caused by space weathering have been attributed to the accumulation of sub-microscopic iron on regolith grain surfaces. Such fine-grained metallic iron has distinctive magnetic properties that can be used to study it.

  20. Utilizing real-time and near real-time data in the iNtegrated Space Weather Analysis System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddox, M. M.; Mullinix, R. E.; Rastaetter, L.; Pulkkinen, A.; Zheng, Y.; Berrios, D.; Hesse, M.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Taktakishvili, A.; Chulaki, A.; Shim, J.; Bakshi, S. S.; Patel, K. D.; Jain, P.

    2010-12-01

    Access to near real-time and real-time space weather data is essential to accurately specifying and forecasting the space environment. The Space Weather Desk at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Space Weather Laboratory provides vital space weather forecasting services primarily to NASA robotic mission operators, as well as external space weather stakeholders including the Air Force Weather Agency. A key component in this activity is the iNtegrated Space Weather Analysis System which is a joint development project at NASA GSFC between the Space Weather Laboratory, Community Coordinated Modeling Center, Applied Engineering & Technology Directorate, and NASA HQ Office Of Chief Engineer. The iSWA system was developed to address technical challenges in acquiring and disseminating space weather environment information. A key design driver for the iSWA system was to generate and present vast amounts of space weather resources in an intuitive, user-configurable, and adaptable format - thus enabling users to respond to current and future space weather impacts as well as enabling post-impact analysis. Having access to near real-time and real-time data is essential to not only ensuring that relevant observational data is available for analysis - but also in ensuring that models can be driven with the requisite input parameters at proper and efficient temporal and spacial resolutions. The iSWA system currently manages over 250 unique near-real and real-time data feeds from various sources consisting of both observational and simulation data. A comprehensive suite of actionable space weather analysis tools and products are generated and provided utilizing a mixture of the ingested data - enabling new capabilities in quickly assessing past, present, and expected space weather effects. This paper will highlight current and future iSWA system capabilities and also discuss some of the challenges and lessons-learned in dealing with diverse real-time and near-real time space

  1. MAGDAS/CPMN Observations for Space Weather Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, K.

    2004-05-01

    An objective of the STP (nderline{S}olar nderline{T}errestrial nderline{P}hysics) researches is to support human activities in the geospace in the twenty-first century from an aspect of fundamental study. In order to understand the Sun-Earth system and effects to human lives, the international LWS (nderline{L}iving nderline{W}ith nderline{S}tar) and CAWSES (nderline{C}limate nderline{a}nd nderline{W}eather of nderline{S}un-nderline{E}arth nderline{S}ystem) programs start from 2004. The objective of CAWSES-WG 2 & 3 in Japan for the region from the solar surface through the solar wind, the magnetosphere, the ionosphere, and the thermosphere, to the atmosphere is a creation of new physics; (1) couplings of the complex and composite systems and (2) macro-and-micro-scale couplings in the Solar-Terrestrial system. The goals of CAWSES-WG 2 & 3 in Japan are to construct space weather stations (for observations) and modeling stations (for simulation/empirical modeling) during the period (2004-2008) of the international CAWSES program. Japanese STP groups will coordinate a research network to reach these goals for the space weather study. In order to study the complexity in the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere-Earth's surface system, the nderline{S}pace nderline{E}nvironment nderline{R}esearch nderline{C}enter (SERC), Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan will carry out coordinated ground-based network observations for space weather studies, in cooperation with about 30 organizations in the world during the international CAWSES period (2004-2008). In the present paper, we will introduce a real-time nderline{MAC}netic nderline{D}ata nderline{A}cquisition nderline{S}ystem of nderline{C}ircumpan nderline{P}acific nderline{M}agnetometer nderline{N}etwork, i.e. MAGDAS/CPMN system in Kyushu University. By using this system, we will conduct the real-time monitoring and modeling of (1) the global 3-dimensional current system and (2) the plasma density variations for space weather

  2. Terrestrial Planet Space Weather Information: An Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Li, Y.; Lee, C.; Mays, M. L.; Odstrcil, D.; Jian, L.; Galvin, A. B.; Mewaldt, R. A.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Russell, C. T.; Halekas, J. S.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Jakosky, B. M.; Thompson, W. T.; Baker, D. N.; Dewey, R. M.; Zheng, Y.; Holmstrom, M.; Futaana, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Space weather research is now a solar system-wide enterprise. While with the end of the Venus Express Express mission and MESSENGER, we lost our 'inside' sentinels, new missions such as Solar Orbiter and SPP, and Bepi-Colombo will soon be launched and operating. In the meantime the combination of L1 resources (ACE,WIND,SOHO) and STEREO-A at 1 AU, and Mars Express and MAVEN missions at ~1.5 AU, provide opportunities. Comparative conditions at the Earth orbit and Mars orbit locations are of special interest because they are separated by the region where most solar wind stream interaction regions develop. These alter the propagation of disturbances including the interplanetary CME-driven shocks that make the space radiation affecting future Human mission planning. We share some observational and modeling results thatillustrate present capabilities, as well as developing ones such as ENLIL-based SEP event models that use a range of available observations.

  3. Space Weather Tools of the Trade - A Changing Mix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunches, J.; Crowley, G.; Pilinski, M.; Winkler, C.; Fish, C. S.; Hunton, D.; Reynolds, A.; Azeem, I.

    2014-12-01

    Historically, operational space weather tools have focused on the large-scale. The Sun, solar wind, magnetosphere, and ionosphere were the domains that, rightly so, needed the attention of experimentalists and scientists to fashion the best sensors and physics-based models available. These initiatives resulted in significant improvements for operational forecasters. For example, geomagnetic storm predictions now do not have to rely on proxies for CMEs, such as type II sweep, but rather make use of available actual observations of CMEs from which the true velocity vector may be determined. The users of space weather services profited from the better large-scale observations, but now have expressed their desire for even better spatially and time-resolved granularity of products and services. This natural evolution towards refining products has ushered in the era of the smaller mission, the more efficient sensor. CubeSats and compact ionospheric monitors are examples of the instrumental suite now emerging to bring in this new era. This presentation will show examples of the new mix of smaller systems that enable finer, more well-resolved products and services for the operational world. A number of technologies are now in the marketplace demonstrating the value of more observations at a decreasing cost. In addition, new models are looming to take advantage of these better observations. Examples of models poised to take advantage of new observations will be given.

  4. Brief History of Using GONG for Space Weather Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arge, Nick; Henney, Carl; Hill, Frank

    2015-04-01

    In 2006 the National Solar Observatory’s (NSO) Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) completed the upgrade of their magnetographs with new polarization modulators permitting, for the first time, proper inter-calibration of the magnetic field data from a global network of six different instruments. This development was ground breaking for at least three reasons. First, it allowed the magnetograms from the different magnetographs to be merged together into global maps of the photospheric magnetic field. Second, it was the first ground based system that could monitor the full-disk solar magnetic field 24/7 at moderate spatial resolution (2 arcsec) and high temporal cadence (60 seconds). Third, techniques for merging magnetic field data from the six (technically identical but practically) different instruments were developed, which can now be applied to future ground based networks. Approximately one year after the GONG upgrade, NOAA/SWPC began routinely using the new GONG maps as input to the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) coronal and solar wind model. Since this time, use of GONG data for space weather applications has grown rapidly. For example, GONG photospheric field maps are now the primary data driving the operational WSA+Enlil model at NOAA/SWPC. In addition, GONG magnetograph and helioseismic farside data are beginning to be used as input to the ADAPT flux transport model to generate synchronic maps and forecast F10.7 and EUV. This talk provides a brief history of the use of GONG for practical space weather forecasting purposes.

  5. Space Weathering on Icy Satellites in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. N.; Perlman, Z.; Pearson, N.; Cruikshank, D. P.

    2014-01-01

    Space weathering produces well-known optical effects in silicate minerals in the inner Solar System, for example, on the Moon. Space weathering from solar wind and UV (ultraviolet radiation) is expected to be significantly weaker in the outer Solar System simply because intensities are low. However, cosmic rays and micrometeoroid bombardment would be similar to first order. That, combined with the much higher volatility of icy surfaces means there is the potential for space weathering on icy outer Solar System surfaces to show optical effects. The Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn is providing evidence for space weathering on icy bodies. The Cassini Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) instrument has spatially mapped satellite surfaces and the rings from 0.35-5 microns and the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) instrument from 0.1 to 0.2 microns. These data have sampled a complex mixing space between H2O ice and non-ice components and they show some common spectral properties. Similarly, spectra of the icy Galilean satellites and satellites in the Uranian system have some commonality in spectral properties with those in the Saturn system. The UV absorber is spectrally similar on many surfaces. VIMS has identified CO2, H2 and trace organics in varying abundances on Saturn's satellites. We postulate that through the spatial relationships of some of these compounds that they are created and destroyed through space weathering effects. For example, the trapped H2 and CO2 observed by VIMS in regions with high concentrations of dark material may in part be space weathering products from the destruction of H2O and organic molecules. The dark material, particularly on Iapetus which has the highest concentration in the Saturn system, is well matched by space-weathered silicates in the .4 to 2.6 micron range, and the spectral shapes closely match those of the most mature lunar soils, another indicator of space weathered material.

  6. China-Brazil Joint Laboratory for Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shengyu

    2016-07-01

    The Joint Laboratory for Space Weather in South America, jointly constructed by National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences (NSSC, CAS) and Brazilian National Institute for Space Research (INPE) plays a key role in the formation of International Space Weather Meridian Circle Programme (ISWMCP). This Lab is responsible for the joint Meridian chains observation and data converging in the west hemisphere, the joint space environment exploration and research in the low latitude area both in the east and west hemisphere, as well as the bridge for Sino-Brazilian culture exchanges.

  7. Workshop Report on Space Weather Risks and Society

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langhoff, Stephanie R.; Straume, Tore

    2012-01-01

    As technological innovations produce new capabilities, complexities, and interdependencies, our susceptibility to the societal impacts of space weather increase. There is real concern in the scientific community that our infrastructure would be at significant risk if a major geomagnetic storm should occur. To discuss the societal impacts of space weather, we brought together an interdisciplinary group of subject matter experts and societal stakeholders to participate in a workshop entitled Space Weather Risks and Society. The workshop was held at Ames Research Center (ARC) on 15-16 October 2011. The workshop was co-sponsored by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), the Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center (LMATC), the Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC, part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA), and the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL, part of the UK Science and Technology Facilities Council STFC). The workshop is part of a series of informal weekend workshops hosted by Center Director Pete Worden.

  8. Space Weathering of Itokawa Particles: Implications for Regolith Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Eve L.; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2015-01-01

    Space weathering processes such as solar wind irradiation and micrometeorite impacts are known to alter the the properties of regolith materials exposed on airless bodies. The rates of space weathering processes however, are poorly constrained for asteroid regoliths, with recent estimates ranging over many orders of magnitude. The return of surface samples by JAXA's Hayabusa mission to asteroid 25143 Itokawa, and their laboratory analysis provides "ground truth" to anchor the timescales for space weathering processes on airless bodies. Here, we use the effects of solar wind irradiation and the accumulation of solar flare tracks recorded in Itokawa grains to constrain the rates of space weathering and yield information about regolith dynamics on these timescales.

  9. Challenges for Transitioning Science Research to Space Weather Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James

    2013-01-01

    Effectively transitioning science knowledge to useful applications relevant to space weather has become important. The effort to transition scientific knowledge to a useful application is not a research nor is it operations, but an activity that connects two. Successful transitioning must be an intentional effort with a clear goal and measureable outcome. This talk will present proven methodologies that have been demonstrated to be effective, and how in the current environment those can be applied to space weather transition efforts.

  10. Space Weather and Satellite Engineering: An Interview With Michael Bodeau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretkoff, Ernie

    2010-03-01

    Michael Bodeau is a technical fellow at Northrop Grumman. Over his career, which has included positions at TRW, Hughes, and Boeing, he has designed telecommunications and scientific satellites for government and commercial operators and has studied the effects of space weather on satellites. In this interview, Bodeau describes how satellite engineers create "building codes" to help them design satellites that can withstand space weather events.

  11. International Heliophysical Year Contributions to Space Weather Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Joseph M.

    2008-01-01

    The International Heliophysical Year (IHY) is concerned with the study of universal processes in the heliosphere, and international scientific cooperation. The result has been an international cooperative effort, jointly with the United Nations COPUOS, to study process which form the basis of our understanding of Space Weather. It this talk I will review the objectives of the IHY, and the progress made in the deployment of several instrument arrays and investigations which study space weather phenomena.

  12. Space Weather Effects on Spacecraft Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet L.

    2003-01-01

    Space-based systems are developing into critical infrastructure required to support the quality of life on Earth. Hence, spacecraft reliability is a serious issue that is complicated by exposure to the space environment. Complex mission designs along with rapidly evolving technologies have outpaced efforts to accommodate detrimental space environment impacts on systems. Hazardous space environments, the effects on systems, and the accommodation of the effects are described with a focus on the need to predict space environments.

  13. Improved in Situ Space Weather Data Services from the NOAA National Geophysical Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, J. V.; Denig, W. F.; Green, J. C.; Lotoaniu, T. M.; McGuire, R. E.; Redmon, R. J.; Rowland, W. F.; Turner, D. L.; Weigel, R. S.; Wilkinson, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    The international space weather enterprise relies heavily on in situ plasma, particle and magnetic field measurements from U. S. weather satellites. This year marks the 40th anniversary of the launch of the first U. S. geostationary weather satellite (SMS-1), which carried the direct ancestor of the current GOES Space Environment Monitor (SEM) suite. The GOES space weather observations support the issuance of real-time alerts by the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC). The publicly-available archive of space weather observations at the NOAA National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) includes NOAA geostationary observations since 1974 and POES/MetOp and Air Force DMSP polar-orbiting observations since 1978 and 1982, respectively. This archive supports the retrospective aspect of the space weather enterprise, which includes model development and anomaly resolution efforts. Over the last several years, NGDC has made a concerted effort to improve its data services in cooperation with the broader space weather community. These improvements include (1) taking over the processing of existing products, (2) creating science-quality versions of existing products, (3) developing new products, (4) improving the distribution of these products, and (5) validating products via on-orbit cross-comparisons. Complementing this retrospective role, NGDC is also responsible for the next-generation GOES-R space weather instrument science and is working as part of the GOES-R calibration/validation group to ensure that these new instruments and their products meet NOAA's requirements. This presentation will survey NGDC's efforts in each of these areas, including (1) POES/MetOp SEM-2 fluxes and radiation belt indices, (2) GOES fluxes with data quality flags and error bars, (3) in situ products from GOES-R(S,T,U), (4) cooperative distribution efforts with the NASA Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) and the Space Physics Environmental Data Analysis System (SPEDAS), and (5) inter

  14. Notes on a Vision for the Global Space Weather Enterprise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, James N.

    2015-07-01

    Space weather phenomena impacts human civilization on a global scale and hence calls for a global approach to research, monitoring, and operational forecasting. The Global Space Weather Enterprise (GSWE) could be arranged along lines well established in existing international frameworks related to space exploration or to the use of space to benefit humanity. The Enterprise need not establish a new organization, but could evolve from existing international organizations. A GSWE employing open architectural concepts could be arranged to promote participation by all interested States regardless of current differences in science and technical capacity. Such an Enterprise would engender capacity building and burden sharing opportunities.

  15. Space Weather Monitoring for ISS Space Environments Engineering and Crew Auroral Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Pettit, Donald R.; Hartman, William A.

    2012-01-01

    The awareness of potentially significant impacts of space weather on spaceand ground ]based technological systems has generated a strong desire in many sectors of government and industry to effectively transform knowledge and understanding of the variable space environment into useful tools and applications for use by those entities responsible for systems that may be vulnerable to space weather impacts. Essentially, effectively transitioning science knowledge to useful applications relevant to space weather has become important. This talk will present proven methodologies that have been demonstrated to be effective, and how in the current environment those can be applied to space weather transition efforts.

  16. A weather-driven model of malaria transmission

    PubMed Central

    Hoshen, Moshe B; Morse, Andrew P

    2004-01-01

    Background Climate is a major driving force behind malaria transmission and climate data are often used to account for the spatial, seasonal and interannual variation in malaria transmission. Methods This paper describes a mathematical-biological model of the parasite dynamics, comprising both the weather-dependent within-vector stages and the weather-independent within-host stages. Results Numerical evaluations of the model in both time and space show that it qualitatively reconstructs the prevalence of infection. Conclusion A process-based modelling structure has been developed that may be suitable for the simulation of malaria forecasts based on seasonal weather forecasts. PMID:15350206

  17. Space Weather Phenomena at the Galilean Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cessateur, Gaël; Barthelemy, Mathieu

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the JUICE mission, characterization of Galilean satellites atmospheres is a priority. Although Ganymede and Europa possess a faint atmosphere, their exosphere show emissions features due to both solar UV flux as well as precipitating particles. Using the atmospheric model proposed by Marconi (2006,2007), we have developed a model of exospheric emissions by only considering primary collisions. Two regions will be considered for Ganymede, a polar one mainly dominated by oxygen, and an equatorial one with the predominance of water. Model of Europa's atmosphere presents an uniform one dominated by oxygen. Since Ganymede has its own magnetic field, the polar regions are mainly affected by particle precipitations while in case of Europe, the whole atmosphere has to be considered. Comparison with direct observations such as local measurements from Galileo (electronic density), or remote observations with the Hubble Space Telescope in the UV (oxygen lines at 130.5 and 135.5 nm), shows a good agreement which ensures us to provide reasonable constraints for the JUICE mission.

  18. GOES-R Space Weather Data: Ensuring Access and Usability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilton, M.; Rowland, W. F.; Wilkinson, D. C.; Denig, W. F.; Darnel, J.; Kress, B. T.; Loto'aniu, P. T. M.; Machol, J. L.; Redmon, R. J.; Rodriguez, J. V.

    2015-12-01

    The upcoming Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite series, GOES-R, will provide critical space weather data. These data are used to prevent communication outages, mitigate the damage solar weather causes to satellites and power grids, and reduce astronaut radiation exposure. The space weather instruments aboard GOES-R will deliver an operational dataset of unprecedented breadth. However, NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI)—the organization that provides access to archived GOES-R data—has faced several challenges in delivering this information to customers in usable form. For instance, the GOES-R ground system was contracted to develop higher-level products for terrestrial data but not space weather data. Variations in GOES-R data file formats and archive locations have also threatened to create an inconsistent user experience. This presentation will examine the ways in which NCEI is making GOES-R space weather data more accessible and actionable for customers. These efforts include NCEI's development of high-level data products to meet the requirements of NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center—a role NCEI has not previously played. In addition, NCEI is creating a demonstration system to show how these products can be produced in real-time. The organization is also examining customer usage of the GOES-NOP data access system and using these access patterns to drive decisions about the GOES-R user interface.

  19. Space Weather Research at the National Science Foundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretto, T.

    2015-12-01

    There is growing recognition that the space environment can have substantial, deleterious, impacts on society. Consequently, research enabling specification and forecasting of hazardous space effects has become of great importance and urgency. This research requires studying the entire Sun-Earth system to understand the coupling of regions all the way from the source of disturbances in the solar atmosphere to the Earth's upper atmosphere. The traditional, region-based structure of research programs in Solar and Space physics is ill suited to fully support the change in research directions that the problem of space weather dictates. On the observational side, dense, distributed networks of observations are required to capture the full large-scale dynamics of the space environment. However, the cost of implementing these is typically prohibitive, especially for measurements in space. Thus, by necessity, the implementation of such new capabilities needs to build on creative and unconventional solutions. A particularly powerful idea is the utilization of new developments in data engineering and informatics research (big data). These new technologies make it possible to build systems that can collect and process huge amounts of noisy and inaccurate data and extract from them useful information. The shift in emphasis towards system level science for geospace also necessitates the development of large-scale and multi-scale models. The development of large-scale models capable of capturing the global dynamics of the Earth's space environment requires investment in research team efforts that go beyond what can typically be funded under the traditional grants programs. This calls for effective interdisciplinary collaboration and efficient leveraging of resources both nationally and internationally. This presentation will provide an overview of current and planned initiatives, programs, and activities at the National Science Foundation pertaining to space weathe research.

  20. NOAA Environmental Satellite Measurements of Extreme Space Weather Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denig, W. F.; Wilkinson, D. C.; Redmon, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    For over 40 years the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has continuously monitored the near-earth space environment in support of space weather operations. Data from this period have covered a wide range of geophysical conditions including periods of extreme space weather such as the great geomagnetic March 1989, the 2003 Halloween storm and the more recent St Patrick's Day storm of 2015. While not specifically addressed here, these storms have stressed our technology infrastructure in unexpected and surprising ways. Space weather data from NOAA geostationary (GOES) and polar (POES) satellites along with supporting data from the Air Force are presented to compare and contrast the space environmental conditions measured during extreme events.

  1. Distributed networks enable advances in US space weather operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent; Bouwer, S. Dave

    2011-06-01

    Space weather, the shorter-term variable impact of the Sun’s photons, solar wind particles, and interplanetary magnetic field upon the Earth’s environment, adversely affects our technological systems. These technological systems, including their space component, are increasingly being seen as a way to help solve 21st Century problems such as climate change, energy access, fresh water availability, and transportation coordination. Thus, the effects of space weather on space systems and assets must be mitigated and operational space weather using automated distributed networks has emerged as a common operations methodology. The evolution of space weather operations is described and the description of distributed network architectures is provided, including their use of tiers, data objects, redundancy, and time domain definitions. There are several existing distributed networks now providing space weather information and the lessons learned in developing those networks are discussed along with the details of examples for the Solar Irradiance Platform (SIP), Communication Alert and Prediction System (CAPS), GEO Alert and Prediction System (GAPS), LEO Alert and Prediction System (LAPS), Radiation Alert and Prediction System (RAPS), and Magnetosphere Alert and Prediction System (MAPS).

  2. Space Weather Monitoring and Forecasting Activity in NICT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Watari, Shinichi; T. Murata, Ken

    Disturbances of Space environment around the Earth (geospace) is controlled by the activity of the Sun and the solar wind. Disturbances in geospace sometimes cause serious problems to satellites, astronauts, and telecommunications. To minimize the effect of the problems, space weather forecasting is necessary. In Japan, NICT (National Institute of Information and Communications Technology) is in charge of space weather forecasting services as a regional warning center of International Space Environment Service. With help of geospace environment data exchanging among the international cooperation, NICT operates daily space weather forecast service every day to provide information on nowcasts and forecasts of solar flare, geomagnetic disturbances, solar proton event, and radio-wave propagation conditions in the ionosphere. For prompt reporting of space weather information, we also conduct our original observation networks from the Sun to the upper atmosphere: Hiraiso solar observatory, domestic ionosonde networks, magnetometer & HF radar observations in far-east Siberia and Alaska, and south-east Asia low-latitude ionospheric network (SEALION). ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer) and STEREO (Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory) real-time beacon data are received using our antenna facilities to monitor the solar and solar wind conditions in near real-time. Our current activities and future perspective of space weather monitoring and forecasting will be introduced in this report.

  3. The Space Weather and Ultraviolet Solar Variability (SWUSV) Microsatellite Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damé, Luc

    2013-05-01

    We present the ambitions of the SWUSV (Space Weather and Ultraviolet Solar Variability) Microsatellite Mission that encompasses three major scientific objectives: (1) Space Weather including the prediction and detection of major eruptions and coronal mass ejections (Lyman-Alpha and Herzberg continuum imaging); (2) solar forcing on the climate through radiation and their interactions with the local stratosphere (UV spectral irradiance from 180 to 400 nm by bands of 20 nm, plus Lyman-Alpha and the CN bandhead); (3) simultaneous radiative budget of the Earth, UV to IR, with an accuracy better than 1% in differential. The paper briefly outlines the mission and describes the five proposed instruments of the model payload: SUAVE (Solar Ultraviolet Advanced Variability Experiment), an optimized telescope for FUV (Lyman-Alpha) and MUV (200-220 nm Herzberg continuum) imaging (sources of variability); UPR (Ultraviolet Passband Radiometers), with 64 UV filter radiometers; a vector magnetometer; thermal plasma measurements and Langmuir probes; and a total and spectral solar irradiance and Earth radiative budget ensemble (SERB, Solar irradiance & Earth Radiative Budget). SWUSV is proposed as a small mission to CNES and to ESA for a possible flight as early as 2017-2018.

  4. The Space Weather and Ultraviolet Solar Variability (SWUSV) Microsatellite Mission

    PubMed Central

    Damé, Luc; Meftah, Mustapha; Hauchecorne, Alain; Keckhut, Philippe; Sarkissian, Alain; Marchand, Marion; Irbah, Abdenour; Quémerais, Éric; Bekki, Slimane; Foujols, Thomas; Kretzschmar, Matthieu; Cessateur, Gaël; Shapiro, Alexander; Schmutz, Werner; Kuzin, Sergey; Slemzin, Vladimir; Urnov, Alexander; Bogachev, Sergey; Merayo, José; Brauer, Peter; Tsinganos, Kanaris; Paschalis, Antonis; Mahrous, Ayman; Khaled, Safinaz; Ghitas, Ahmed; Marzouk, Besheir; Zaki, Amal; Hady, Ahmed A.; Kariyappa, Rangaiah

    2013-01-01

    We present the ambitions of the SWUSV (Space Weather and Ultraviolet Solar Variability) Microsatellite Mission that encompasses three major scientific objectives: (1) Space Weather including the prediction and detection of major eruptions and coronal mass ejections (Lyman-Alpha and Herzberg continuum imaging); (2) solar forcing on the climate through radiation and their interactions with the local stratosphere (UV spectral irradiance from 180 to 400 nm by bands of 20 nm, plus Lyman-Alpha and the CN bandhead); (3) simultaneous radiative budget of the Earth, UV to IR, with an accuracy better than 1% in differential. The paper briefly outlines the mission and describes the five proposed instruments of the model payload: SUAVE (Solar Ultraviolet Advanced Variability Experiment), an optimized telescope for FUV (Lyman-Alpha) and MUV (200–220 nm Herzberg continuum) imaging (sources of variability); UPR (Ultraviolet Passband Radiometers), with 64 UV filter radiometers; a vector magnetometer; thermal plasma measurements and Langmuir probes; and a total and spectral solar irradiance and Earth radiative budget ensemble (SERB, Solar irradiance & Earth Radiative Budget). SWUSV is proposed as a small mission to CNES and to ESA for a possible flight as early as 2017–2018. PMID:25685424

  5. 2015 Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School Research Reports

    SciTech Connect

    Cowee, Misa; Chen, Yuxi; Desai, Ravindra; Hassan, Ehab; Kalmoni, Nadine; Lin, Dong; Depascuale, Sebastian; Hughes, Randall Scott; Zhou, Hong

    2015-11-24

    The fifth Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School was held June 1st - July 24th, 2015, at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). With renewed support from the Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures (IGPPS) and additional support from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science, we hosted a new class of five students from various U.S. and foreign research institutions. The summer school curriculum includes a series of structured lectures as well as mentored research and practicum opportunities. Lecture topics including general and specialized topics in the field of space weather were given by a number of researchers affiliated with LANL. Students were given the opportunity to engage in research projects through a mentored practicum experience. Each student works with one or more LANL-affiliated mentors to execute a collaborative research project, typically linked with a larger ongoing research effort at LANL and/or the student’s PhD thesis research. This model provides a valuable learning experience for the student while developing the opportunity for future collaboration. This report includes a summary of the research efforts fostered and facilitated by the Space Weather Summer School. These reports should be viewed as work-in-progress as the short session typically only offers sufficient time for preliminary results. At the close of the summer school session, students present a summary of their research efforts. Titles of the papers included in this report are as follows: Full particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation of whistler wave generation, Hybrid simulations of the right-hand ion cyclotron anisotropy instability in a sub-Alfvénic plasma flow, A statistical ensemble for solar wind measurements, Observations and models of substorm injection dispersion patterns, Heavy ion effects on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability: hybrid study, Simulating plasmaspheric electron densities with a two

  6. Weather Forecaster Understanding of Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bol, A.; Kiehl, J. T.; Abshire, W. E.

    2013-12-01

    Weather forecasters, particularly those in broadcasting, are the primary conduit to the public for information on climate and climate change. However, many weather forecasters remain skeptical of model-based climate projections. To address this issue, The COMET Program developed an hour-long online lesson of how climate models work, targeting an audience of weather forecasters. The module draws on forecasters' pre-existing knowledge of weather, climate, and numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. In order to measure learning outcomes, quizzes were given before and after the lesson. Preliminary results show large learning gains. For all people that took both pre and post-tests (n=238), scores improved from 48% to 80%. Similar pre/post improvement occurred for National Weather Service employees (51% to 87%, n=22 ) and college faculty (50% to 90%, n=7). We believe these results indicate a fundamental misunderstanding among many weather forecasters of (1) the difference between weather and climate models, (2) how researchers use climate models, and (3) how they interpret model results. The quiz results indicate that efforts to educate the public about climate change need to include weather forecasters, a vital link between the research community and the general public.

  7. Oh! I Slipped the Surly Bounds of Earth....and Ran into Space Weather!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golightly, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    ) flight controllers use real-time space weather data to detect and assess the impact of solar particle events, outer electron belt enhancements, the formation of pseudo-stable additional trapped radiation belts, and the solar cycle modulation of trapped radiation belts and galactic cosmic rays. Energetic particle data from GOES spacecraft are automatically ingested from NOAA Space Environment Center data servers and used to drive a model for the estimating the exposure to astronauts from solar particle events. While adequate for current manned space flight support, the existing operational space weather support system requires improvements to address the anticipated evolution in both the character of manned missions as well as space flight operations management. Necessary space weather data improvements include: reliably available (near) real-time space weather data on a fixed schedule via redundant access methods that support autonomous data acquisition by computer systems behind enterprise firewalls; and rapid transition of promising research sensors into operational systems.

  8. Automated shock detection and analysis algorithm for space weather application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorotnikov, Vasiliy S.; Smith, Charles W.; Hu, Qiang; Szabo, Adam; Skoug, Ruth M.; Cohen, Christina M. S.

    2008-03-01

    Space weather applications have grown steadily as real-time data have become increasingly available. Numerous industrial applications have arisen with safeguarding of the power distribution grids being a particular interest. NASA uses short-term and long-term space weather predictions in its launch facilities. Researchers studying ionospheric, auroral, and magnetospheric disturbances use real-time space weather services to determine launch times. Commercial airlines, communication companies, and the military use space weather measurements to manage their resources and activities. As the effects of solar transients upon the Earth's environment and society grow with the increasing complexity of technology, better tools are needed to monitor and evaluate the characteristics of the incoming disturbances. A need is for automated shock detection and analysis methods that are applicable to in situ measurements upstream of the Earth. Such tools can provide advance warning of approaching disturbances that have significant space weather impacts. Knowledge of the shock strength and speed can also provide insight into the nature of the approaching solar transient prior to arrival at the magnetopause. We report on efforts to develop a tool that can find and analyze shocks in interplanetary plasma data without operator intervention. This method will run with sufficient speed to be a practical space weather tool providing useful shock information within 1 min of having the necessary data to ground. The ability to run without human intervention frees space weather operators to perform other vital services. We describe ways of handling upstream data that minimize the frequency of false positive alerts while providing the most complete description of approaching disturbances that is reasonably possible.

  9. Growing Diversity in Space Weather and Climate Change Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L. P.; Ng, C.; Marchese, P.; Austin, S.; Frost, J.; Cheung, T. D.; Robbins, I.; Carlson, B. E.; Steiner, J. C.; Tremberger, G.; Paglione, T.; Damas, C.; Howard, A.; Scalzo, F.

    2013-12-01

    Space Weather and Global Climate Impacts are critical items on the present national and international science agendas. Understanding and forecasting solar activity is increasingly important for manned space flight, unmanned missions (including communications satellites, satellites that monitor the space and earth environment), and regional power grids. The ability to predict the effects of forcings and feedback mechanisms on global and local climate is critical to survival of the inhabitants of planet Earth. It is therefore important to motivate students to continue their studies via advanced degrees and pursue careers related to these areas. This CUNY-based initiative, supported by NASA and NSF, provided undergraduate research experience for more than 70 students in topics ranging from urban impacts of global climate change to magnetic rope structure, solar flares and CMEs. Other research topics included investigations of the ionosphere using a CubeSat, stratospheric aerosols in Jupiter's atmosphere, and ocean climate modeling. Mentors for the primarily summer research experiences included CUNY faculty, GISS and GSFC scientists. Students were recruited from CUNY colleges as well as other colleges including Spelman, Cornell, Rutgers and SUNY colleges. Fifty-eight percent of the undergraduate students were under-represented minorities and thirty-four percent were female. Many of the research teams included high school teachers and students as well as graduate students. Supporting workshops for students included data analysis and visualization tools, space weather, planetary energy balance and BalloonSats. The project is supported by NASA awards NNX10AE72G and NNX09AL77G, and NSF REU Site award 0851932.

  10. Fifth Space Weather Enterprise Forum Reaches New Heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Samuel P.; Babcock, Michael R.; Bonadonna, Michael F.

    2011-09-01

    As the world's commercial infrastructure grows more dependent on sensitive electronics and space-based technologies, the global economy is becoming increasingly vulnerable to solar storms. Experts from the federal government, academia, and the private sector met to discuss the societal effects of major solar storms and other space weather at the fifth annual Space Weather Enterprise Forum (SWEF), held on 21 June 2011 at the National Press Club in Washington, D. C. More than 200 members of the space weather community attended this year's SWEF, which focused on the consequences of severe space weather for national security, critical infrastructure, and human safety. Participants also addressed the question of how to prepare for and mitigate those consequences as the current solar cycle approaches and reaches its peak, expected in 2013. This year's forum included details of plans for a "Unified National Space Weather Capability," a new interagency initiative which will be implemented over the next two years, designed to improve forecasting, warning, and other services ahead of the coming solar maximum.

  11. The DSCOVR Solar Wind Mission and Future Space Weather Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cash, M. D.; Biesecker, D. A.; Reinard, A. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) mission, scheduled for launch in mid-2014, will provide real-time solar wind thermal plasma and magnetic measurements to ensure continuous monitoring for space weather forecasting. DSCOVR will orbit L1 and will serve as a follow-on mission to NASA's Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), which was launched in 1997. DSCOVR will have a total of six instruments, two of which will provide real-time data necessary for space weather forecasting: a Faraday cup to measure the proton and alpha components of the solar wind, and a triaxial fluxgate magnetometer to measure the magnetic field in three dimensions. Real-time data provided by DSCOVR will include Vx, Vy, Vz, n, T, Bx, By, and Bz. Such real-time L1 data is used in generating space weather applications and products that have been demonstrated to be highly accurate and provide actionable information for customers. We evaluate current space weather products driven by ACE and discuss future products under development for DSCOVR. New space weather products under consideration include: automated shock detection, more accurate L1 to Earth delay time, and prediction of rotations in solar wind Bz within magnetic clouds. Suggestions from the community on product ideas are welcome.

  12. Future L5 Missions for Solar Physics and Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchere, Frederic; Gopalswamy, Nat

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and corotating interaction regions (CIR) are the sources of intense space weather in the heliosphere. Most of the current knowledge on CMEs accumulated over the past few decades has been derived from observations made from the Sun-Earth line, which is not the ideal vantage point to observe Earth-affecting CMEs (Gopalswamy et al., 2011a,b). In this paper, the advantages of remote-sensing and in-situ observations from the Sun-Earth L5 point are discussed. Locating a mission at Sun-Earth L5 has several key benefits for solar physics and space weather: (1) off the Sun-Earth line view is critical in observing Earth-arriving parts of CMEs, (2) L5 coronagraphic observations can also provide near-Sun space speed of CMEs, which is an important input to models that forecast Earth-arrival time of CMEs, (3) backside and frontside CMEs can be readily distinguished even without inner coronal imagers, (4) preceding CMEs in the path of Earth-affecting CMEs can be identified for a better estimate of the travel time, (5) CIRs reach the L5 point a few days before they arrive at Earth, and hence provide significant lead time before CIR arrival, (6) L5 observations can provide advance knowledge of CME and CIR source regions (coronal holes) rotating to Earth view, and (7) magnetograms obtained from L5 can improve the surface magnetic field distribution used as input to MHD models that predict the background solar wind. The paper also discusses L5 mission concepts that can be achieved in the near future. References Gopalswamy, N., Davila, J. M., St. Cyr, O. C., Sittler, E. C., Auchère, F., Duvall, T. L., Hoeksema, J. T., Maksimovic, M., MacDowall, R. J., Szabo, A., Collier, M. R. (2011a), Earth-Affecting Solar Causes Observatory (EASCO): A potential International Living with a Star Mission from Sun-Earth L5 JASTP 73, 658-663, DOI: 10.1016/j.jastp.2011.01.013 Gopalswamy, N., Davila, J. M., Auchère, F., Schou, J., Korendyke, C. M. Shih, A., Johnston, J. C

  13. eHEROES: where Space Weather and Communication meet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanlomel, Petra; Gressl, Corinna; Lapenta, Giovanni; Crosby, Norma B.; Cessateur, Gaël

    2014-05-01

    Involvement of people outside the scientific community in space weather becomes more and more an issue. To raise awareness and reach involvement, we have to come up with a tide communication plan that answers the questions: what, to whom, why, when, how, by whom? One of the tools to get peoples attention and to communicate about space weather is education, both formal and informal. In the FP7 project eHEROES, a considerable effort was put in communication and dissemination through education to different sorts of audiences. We will shed some light on 'Classroom', 'Hitchhiker's guide to space' and our Quiz-database.

  14. White House and agencies focus on space weather concerns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-06-01

    "Space weather is a serious matter that can affect human economies around the world," Tamara Dickinson, a senior policy analyst with the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), told attendees at the 2012 Space Weather Enterprise Forum, held 5 June in Washington, D. C. With the 2013 solar maximum nearing, researchers and government agencies are focusing on how the greater solar activity could affect our increasingly technological society and what measures can be taken to help prevent or mitigate any threats to the electricity grid, GPS, and other potentially vulnerable technologies. Dickenson said that there has been an increased awareness about space weather in the White House and that President Barack Obama recently has requested briefing memos on the topic. She highlighted several efforts the administration is taking related to space weather, including a forthcoming national Earth observation strategy, which could be released in July and will include an assessment of space weather. She explained that the strategy document will be part of the fiscal year 2014 presidential budget request and that it will be updated every 3 years.

  15. Understanding space weather with new physical, mathematical and philosophical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateev, Lachezar; Velinov, Peter; Tassev, Yordan

    2016-07-01

    The actual problems of solar-terrestrial physics, in particular of space weather are related to the prediction of the space environment state and are solved by means of different analyses and models. The development of these investigations can be considered also from another side. This is the philosophical and mathematical approach towards this physical reality. What does it constitute? We have a set of physical processes which occur in the Sun and interplanetary space. All these processes interact with each other and simultaneously participate in the general process which forms the space weather. Let us now consider the Leibniz's monads (G.W. von Leibniz, 1714, Monadologie, Wien; Id., 1710, Théodicée, Amsterdam) and use some of their properties. There are total 90 theses for monads in the Leibniz's work (1714), f.e. "(1) The Monad, of which we shall here speak, is nothing but a simple substance, which enters into compounds. By 'simple' is meant 'without parts'. (Theod. 10.); … (56) Now this connexion or adaptation of all created things to each and of each to all, means that each simple substance has relations which express all the others, and, consequently, that it is a perpetual living mirror of the universe. (Theod. 130, 360.); (59) … this universal harmony, according to which every substance exactly expresses all others through the relations it has with them. (63) … every Monad is, in its own way, a mirror of the universe, and the universe is ruled according to a perfect order. (Theod. 403.)", etc. Let us introduce in the properties of monads instead of the word "monad" the word "process". We obtain the following statement: Each process reflects all other processes and all other processes reflect this process. This analogy is not formal at all, it reflects accurately the relation between the physical processes and their unity. The category monad which in the Leibniz's Monadology reflects generally the philosophical sense is fully identical with the

  16. Concept for an International Standard related to Space Weather Effects on Space Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent; Tomky, Alyssa

    There is great interest in developing an international standard related to space weather in order to specify the tools and parameters needed for space systems operations. In particular, a standard is important for satellite operators who may not be familiar with space weather. In addition, there are others who participate in space systems operations that would also benefit from such a document. For example, the developers of software systems that provide LEO satellite orbit determination, radio communication availability for scintillation events (GEO-to-ground L and UHF bands), GPS uncertainties, and the radiation environment from ground-to-space for commercial space tourism. These groups require recent historical data, current epoch specification, and forecast of space weather events into their automated or manual systems. Other examples are national government agencies that rely on space weather data provided by their organizations such as those represented in the International Space Environment Service (ISES) group of 14 national agencies. Designers, manufacturers, and launchers of space systems require real-time, operational space weather parameters that can be measured, monitored, or built into automated systems. Thus, a broad scope for the document will provide a useful international standard product to a variety of engineering and science domains. The structure of the document should contain a well-defined scope, consensus space weather terms and definitions, and internationally accepted descriptions of the main elements of space weather, its sources, and its effects upon space systems. Appendices will be useful for describing expanded material such as guidelines on how to use the standard, how to obtain specific space weather parameters, and short but detailed descriptions such as when best to use some parameters and not others; appendices provide a path for easily updating the standard since the domain of space weather is rapidly changing with new advances

  17. Regimes for the ocean, outer space, and weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, S.; Cornell, N. W.; Fabian, L. L.; Weiss, E. B.

    1977-01-01

    The allocation of resources among users of the oceans, outer space and the weather is discussed. Attention is given to the international management of maritime navigation, the control of fisheries, offshore oil and gas exploitation, mineral exploitation in the deep seabed (especially the mining of manganese nodules), and the regulation of oceanographic studies. The management of outer space is considered, with special reference to remote sensing by satellites, television broadcasting, the technical requirements of maritime satellites, and problems associated with satellite frequency and orbit allocation. Rainmaking and typhoon modification, as well as the distribution of weather modification capabilities in the world, are also mentioned. The United Nations, international agencies and tribunals, and multi- or bilateral agreements are some of the implements suggested for use in the regulation of the oceans, outer space and the weather.

  18. The Solar Dynamics Observatory and Its Contributions to Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, Phillip C.

    2011-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) was launched on 11 February 2010 and has worked flawlessly in its first year and a half of operation. SDO was the first mission launched for NASA's Living With a Star Program (LWS), so its focus is not only studying the causes and drivers of the variable Sun, but also how these variations force similar changes in the Earth and other objects within the Heliosphere. Due to SDO's many Space Weather goals, this presentation will not only show some of the recent, ground-breaking new results provided by SDO, but also focus on the real-time Space Weather advances provided by this spacecraft. A main theme throughout this talk will be methods and tools that researchers around the world can utilize to access and manipulate the SDO data real-time for both fundamental science and Space Weather monitoring purposes.

  19. Space weather services: now and in the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunches, J.; Murtagh, W.

    The NOAA Space Environment Center has provided continuous 24 hours per day 7 days per week space weather products and services to the United States and the international community via the International Space Environment Service for more than 30 years Over that time span an evolutionary process has occurred In the early days the products consisted of short text and coded messages to accommodate the communications technologies of the period The birth of the Internet made the sharing of graphical imagery and real-time data possible enabling service providers to communicate more information more quickly to the users Now in parallel with the advances in telecommunications the space weather user community has grown dramatically and is enunciating ever-stronger requirements back to the service providers The commercial airline community is probably the best example of an industry wanting more from space weather How are the users going to continue to change over the next 10-20 years and what services might they need How will they get this information and how might they use it This is the overall thrust of the presentation offering a look to the future and a challenge to the space weather community

  20. Space Weather Influence on the Earth wheat markets: past, present, and future.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustil'Nik, Lev

    solar wind, high cosmic ray flux and North Atlantic cloudiness, caused by CR excess, with negative sequences for wheat agriculture in this humid zone. In the same time wheat markets in the South Europe (Spain, Italy) show reliable sensitivity to space weather state in the opposite (maximum) phase of solar activity with strong solar wind, low cosmic ray flux and deficit of CR input in cloudiness in North Atlantic with next deficit of precipitations in the arid zones of the South Europe. In the same time the large part of markets in the Central Europe zone, functioned far from "high risk agriculture state" show the absence of any effects-responses on space weather. This asymmetry is in accordance with model expectation in the frame of proposed approach. For extremely case of the Iceland agriculture we show that drop of agriculture production in unfavorable states of space weather leads to mass mortality from famines correlated with phase of solar activity with high confi- dence level. We discuss possible increasing of sensitivity of wheat markets to space weather effects in condition of drastic and fast change of modern climate, caused by global warming of the Earth atmosphere with fast and unexpected shift of numerous agriculture regions in the world to state of "high risk agriculture zone". Publications on the theme of review: I. "INFLUENCE OF SOLAR ACTIVITY ON THE STATE OF THE WHEAT MARKET IN MEDIEVAL ENGLAND", Solar Physics 223: 335-356, 2004. c 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers II. "SPACE CLIMATE MANIFESTATION IN EARTH PRICES - FROM MEDIEVAL ENGLAND UP TO MODERN U.S.A.", LEV PUSTIL'NIK and GREGORY YOM DIN, Solar Physics, 224: 473-481 c Springer 2005

  1. Space weathering on volatile deposits in lunar cold traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crider, D.; Vondrak, R.

    There are several mechanisms acting at the cold traps that can alter the inventory of volatiles there, including micrometeoroid bombardment, solar wind and magnetospheric ion sputtering, photon-stimulated desorption, and sublimation. We investigate the effects of these space weathering processes on a deposit of volatiles in a lunar cold trap by simulating the development of a column of material near the surface of the Moon. This simulation treats a column of material at a lunar cold trap and focuses on the hydrogen content of the column. We model space weathering processes on several time and spatial scales to simulate the constant rain of micrometeoroids as well as sporadic larger impactors occurring near the cold traps to determine the retention efficiency of the cold traps. We perform the Monte Carlo simulation over many columns of material to determine the expected hydrogen content of the top few meters of soil for comparison with Lunar Prospector neutron data. Each column is initialized with a random starting depth profile of hydrogen content assuming very immature soil. Time is allowed to run for 1 billion years and all changes to the column are calculated. An impactor flux from Gault [1972] is imposed to determine the timing and location of all nearby impacts. Nearby impacts excavate material from the column, exposing material from depth. More distant impacts cover the column with an ejecta blanket with a size and time dependent maturity value. In between impacts, the competing short term effects are simulated. Using the steady state delivery rate of water vapor to the lunar cold traps from Crider and Vondrak [2002], we find that the removal rate from space weathering processes does not exceed the rate at which volatiles are delivered to the cold traps on average. Together with the steady migration of hydrogen released from the soil elsewhere on the Moon, the predicted hydrogen content of the topmost meter of regolith in cold traps is within a factor of 2 of

  2. How are Space Weather and Space Climate Connected to Solar Phenomena?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Many aspects of modern society are susceptible to space weather effects. Pertinent space weather effects include high-energy electromagnetic and particle radiation, changes of atmospheric drag, reduction of GPS accuracy or complete loss of GPS signals, communication outages, and the generation of potentially harmful DC currents in our electric power grid. Beginning in the early 1990s, researchers and government have been increasingly aware of the need to understand the causes of space weather, and to find ways to mitigate deleterious effects associated with it. New research and development programs have been created to address space weather primarily at NASA but also at other agencies. This investment has been very fruitful by generating a new class of entirely new space weather specification and forecast capabilities. This presentation provides an overview of space weather causes and effects, as well as of research and development to forecast and mitigate space weather effects. It will include a discussion of modern space weather analysis and forecasting, and conclude by pointing out paths into the future.

  3. Space Weather Activities of IONOLAB Group: TEC Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikan, F.; Yilmaz, A.; Arikan, O.; Sayin, I.; Gurun, M.; Akdogan, K. E.; Yildirim, S. A.

    2009-04-01

    Being a key player in Space Weather, ionospheric variability affects the performance of both communication and navigation systems. To improve the performance of these systems, ionosphere has to be monitored. Total Electron Content (TEC), line integral of the electron density along a ray path, is an important parameter to investigate the ionospheric variability. A cost-effective way of obtaining TEC is by using dual-frequency GPS receivers. Since these measurements are sparse in space, accurate and robust interpolation techniques are needed to interpolate (or map) the TEC distribution for a given region in space. However, the TEC data derived from GPS measurements contain measurement noise, model and computational errors. Thus, it is necessary to analyze the interpolation performance of the techniques on synthetic data sets that can represent various ionospheric states. By this way, interpolation performance of the techniques can be compared over many parameters that can be controlled to represent the desired ionospheric states. In this study, Multiquadrics, Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW), Cubic Splines, Ordinary and Universal Kriging, Random Field Priors (RFP), Multi-Layer Perceptron Neural Network (MLP-NN), and Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBF-NN) are employed as the spatial interpolation algorithms. These mapping techniques are initially tried on synthetic TEC surfaces for parameter and coefficient optimization and determination of error bounds. Interpolation performance of these methods are compared on synthetic TEC surfaces over the parameters of sampling pattern, number of samples, the variability of the surface and the trend type in the TEC surfaces. By examining the performance of the interpolation methods, it is observed that both Kriging, RFP and NN have important advantages and possible disadvantages depending on the given constraints. It is also observed that the determining parameter in the error performance is the trend in the Ionosphere

  4. Space Weather Phenomena at the Galilean Moons and Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cessateur, G.; Barthelemy, M.; De Keyser, J.; Dhooghe, F.; Loreau, J.; Maggiolo, R.; Gibbons, A.; Vaeck, N.; Altwegg, K.; Le Roy, L.; Berthelier, J.-J.; Calmonte, U.; Fuselier, S. A.; Hässig, M.; Rubin, M.; Gombosi, T. I.; Combi, M.

    2015-10-01

    The exploration of planetary environments other than Earth has led to the definition of planetary space weather. We will mainly focus on the impact of the solar UV radiation which is responsible for the photoionization and photodissociation processes within planetary and cometary atmospheres. Those studies are of primary importance especially in the framework of the JUICE and ROSETTA missions. A 1-D model has been developed in order to infer airglow emissions from Europa and Ganymede, from neutral atmospheric models. Considering various production and loss mechanisms, we estimate red and green line emission for atomic oxygen. The impact of precipitating particles has also been studied in order to estimate auroral emission, for the oxygen lines at 130.5 and 135.5 nmusing radiative transfermodelling. Comparisonwith observations such as in situ measurements from Galileo, or remote observations from the Hubble Space Telescope, shows a good agreement that ensures us to provide reasonable constraints for the JUICE mission. Modelling of the impact of the solar UV flux has also been done regarding cometary atmospheres, using insitu measurement fromthe DFMS/ROSINA spectrometer onboard the ROSETTA spacecraft. Airglow emissions for the red line at 630 nm have then been estimated, considering various volatiles within the coma such as water, CO, and CO2.

  5. Ground-based Space Weather Monitoring with LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Michael; van Haarlem, Michiel; Lawrence, Gareth; Reid, Simon; Bos, Andre; Rawlings, Steve; Salvini, Stef; Mitchell, Cathryn; Soleimani, Manuch; Amado, Sergio; Teresa, Vital

    capable of generating various responses including alerting external observatories or reallocating internal observing capacity to create short cadence (1-10 sec) images of the Sun. More uniquely, the core development, already invested by LOFAR to produce astronomical images of the sky, makes an excellent framework on which to build a near real-time ionospheric monitor and thereby study the effects of space weather events on our atmosphere. One of the key technical challenges to producing high quality scientific images in the low frequency radio regime are the effects of the active ionosphere over the detector array on signal propagation through the earth's atmosphere. To correct for these effects, the current LOFAR system includes an adaptive calibration employing both single and multi-layer phase screen models for the ionosphere. The output of this calibration automatically produces continuous ionospheric measurements with a data cadence in seconds. Although limited to the sky over the array, the resulting TEC maps can have vertical and horizontal resolutions down to 2m and relative accuracies of 0.001 TECU. The intent is to publish both Solar and ionospheric data-streams to the space weather community providing an excellent complement to existing space-based monitoring assets. In this presentation, we will describe the current and planned capabilities of the LOFAR system as well as show some first examples of the potential data products taken during the ongoing commissioning phase. We will also discuss plans to build upon the current LOFAR infrastructure and provide a source of near real-time monitoring data to the space weather community.

  6. Solar Eruptions, CMEs and Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2011-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large-scale magnetized plasma structures ejected from the Sun and propagate far into the interplanetary medium. CMEs represent energy output from the Sun in the form of magnetized plasma and electromagnetic radiation. The electromagnetic radiation suddenly increases the ionization content of the ionosphere, thus impacting communication and navigation systems. The plasma clouds can drive shocks that accelerate charged particles to very high energies in the interplanetary space, which pose radiation hazard to astronauts and space systems. The plasma clouds also arrive at Earth in about two days and impact Earth's magnetosphere, producing geomagnetic storms. The magnetic storms result in a number of effects including induced currents that can disrupt power grids, railroads, and underground pipelines. This lecture presents an overview of the origin, propagation, and geospace consequences of solar storms.

  7. Tethered Satellites as an Enabling Platform for Operational Space Weather Monitoring Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilchrist, Brian E.; Krause, Linda Habash; Gallagher, Dennis Lee; Bilen, Sven Gunnar; Fuhrhop, Keith; Hoegy, Walt R.; Inderesan, Rohini; Johnson, Charles; Owens, Jerry Keith; Powers, Joseph; Voronka, Nestor; Williams, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Tethered satellites offer the potential to be an important enabling technology to support operational space weather monitoring systems. Space weather "nowcasting" and forecasting models rely on assimilation of near-real-time (NRT) space environment data to provide warnings for storm events and deleterious effects on the global societal infrastructure. Typically, these models are initialized by a climatological model to provide "most probable distributions" of environmental parameters as a function of time and space. The process of NRT data assimilation gently pulls the climate model closer toward the observed state (e.g., via Kalman smoothing) for nowcasting, and forecasting is achieved through a set of iterative semi-empirical physics-based forward-prediction calculations. Many challenges are associated with the development of an operational system, from the top-level architecture (e.g., the required space weather observatories to meet the spatial and temporal requirements of these models) down to the individual instruments capable of making the NRT measurements. This study focuses on the latter challenge: we present some examples of how tethered satellites (from 100s of m to 20 km) are uniquely suited to address certain shortfalls in our ability to measure critical environmental parameters necessary to drive these space weather models. Examples include long baseline electric field measurements, magnetized ionospheric conductivity measurements, and the ability to separate temporal from spatial irregularities in environmental parameters. Tethered satellite functional requirements are presented for two examples of space environment observables.

  8. Real-Time and Near Real-Time Data for Space Weather Applications and Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, H. J.; Balch, C. C.; Biesecker, D. A.; Matsuo, T.; Onsager, T. G.

    2015-12-01

    Space weather can be defined as conditions in the vicinity of Earth and in the interplanetary environment that are caused primarily by solar processes and influenced by conditions on Earth and its atmosphere. Examples of space weather are the conditions that result from geomagnetic storms, solar particle events, and bursts of intense solar flare radiation. These conditions can have impacts on modern-day technologies such as GPS or electric power grids and on human activities such as astronauts living on the International Space Station or explorers traveling to the moon or Mars. While the ultimate space weather goal is accurate prediction of future space weather conditions, for many applications and services, we rely on real-time and near-real time observations and model results for the specification of current conditions. In this presentation, we will describe the space weather system and the need for real-time and near-real time data that drive the system, characterize conditions in the space environment, and are used by models for assimilation and validation. Currently available data will be assessed and a vision for future needs will be given. The challenges for establishing real-time data requirements, as well as acquiring, processing, and disseminating the data will be described, including national and international collaborations. In addition to describing how the data are used for official government products, we will also give examples of how these data are used by both the public and private sector for new applications that serve the public.

  9. Operational Space Weather Products at IPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neudegg, D.; Steward, G.; Marshall, R.; Terkildsen, M.; Kennewell, J.; Patterson, G.; Panwar, R.

    2008-12-01

    IPS Radio and Space Services operates an extensive network (IPSNET) of monitoring stations and observatories within the Australasian and Antarctic regions to gather information on the space environment. This includes ionosondes, magnetometers, GPS-ISM, oblique HF sounding, riometers, and solar radio and optical telescopes. IPS exchanges this information with similar organisations world-wide. The Regional Warning Centre (RWC) is the Australian Space Forecast Centre (ASFC) and it utilizes this data to provide products and services to support customer operations. A wide range of customers use IPS services including; defence force and emergency services using HF radio communications and surveillance systems, organisations involved in geophysical exploration and pipeline cathodic protection, GPS users in aviation. Subscriptions to the alerts, warnings, forecasts and reports regarding the solar, geophysical and ionospheric conditions are distributed by email and Special Message Service (SMS). IPS also develops and markets widely used PC software prediction tools for HF radio skywave and surface wave (ASAPS/GWPS) and provides consultancy services for system planning.

  10. Increasing Diversity in Global Climate Change, Space Weather and Space Technology Research and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L. P.; Austin, S. A.; Howard, A. M.; Boxe, C.; Jiang, M.; Tulsee, T.; Chow, Y. W.; Zavala-Gutierrez, R.; Barley, R.; Filin, B.; Brathwaite, K.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation describes projects at Medgar Evers College of the City University of New York that contribute to the preparation of a diverse workforce in the areas of ocean modeling, planetary atmospheres, space weather and space technology. Specific projects incorporating both undergraduate and high school students include Assessing Parameterizations of Energy Input to Internal Ocean Mixing, Reaction Rate Uncertainty on Mars Atmospheric Ozone, Remote Sensing of Solar Active Regions and Intelligent Software for Nano-satellites. These projects are accompanied by a newly developed Computational Earth and Space Science course to provide additional background on methodologies and tools for scientific data analysis. This program is supported by NSF award AGS-1359293 REU Site: CUNY/GISS Center for Global Climate Research and the NASA New York State Space Grant Consortium.

  11. Imaging Space Weather Over Europe from a Single Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendillo, M.; Wroten, J.; Baumgardner, J. L.; Barbieri, C.; Umbriaco, G.

    2012-12-01

    We have recently installed a low-light-level, all-sky-imager (ASI) at the astronomical observatory in Asiago, Italy (45.8 N, 11.5 E, 41 N geomagnetic). The field-of-view for such a system can yield reliable observations from zenith down to about five degrees elevation angle. Atmospheric emissions arise from different altitudes and thus the spatial region observed by an ASI depends on the specific wavelength (and process) involved. For 6300 A emissions from atomic oxygen, diffuse aurora occur at ~200 km, ambient airglow at ~300 km and so-called Stable Auroral Red (SAR) arcs at ~400 km. From the Asiago site, the FOV at 400 km spans latitudes extending from southern Scandanavia to Northern Africa. For a magnetic latitude of 50 N, longitudes observed to the north extend from Ireland to Belarus. For a magnetic latitude of 30 N, longitudes to the south can be observed from Spain to Turkey. The SAR arc that occurred during the geomagnetic storm 26-27 September 2011 was, we think, the first-ever such event imaged from the ground in Europe. The SAR arc's location throughout the night maps to the inner magnetosphere where the plasmapause and inner edge of the ring current coincide. The spatial-temporal positions of these features determine the lowest latitudes of magnetosphere-ionospheric energy input during space weather events. We show that an all-sky-imager can thus be used to provide real-time information of this boundary over most of Europe—and thus the low-latitude limit of the radiowave scintillations associated with SAR arcs. Moreover, such information can be used for retrospective validations of global models that predict the latitude extent of space weather effects.

  12. MAGDAS Project for Space Weather during IHY/ISWI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, K.; Group, M.

    2009-05-01

    The Space Environment Research Center (SERC), Kyushu University has deployed the MAGnetic Data Acqusition System (MAGDAS) at 50 stations along the 210- and 96-degree magnetic meridians (MM) and the magnetic Dip equator, and several FM-CW radars along the 210-degree MM during the International Heliophysical Year (IHY) period of 2005-2009 (see http://magdas.serc.kyushu-u.ac.jp/ and http://magdas2.serc.kyushu-u.ac.jp/). The goal of MAGDAS project is to become the most comprehensive ground-based monitoring system of the earth's magnetic field. It does not compete with space-based observation. Rather, this ground-based network complements observation from space. To properly study solar-terrestrial events, data from both are required. This project intends to get the MAGDAS network fully operational and provide data for studies on space weather. By analyzing these new MAGDAS data, we can perform a real-time monitoring and modeling of the global (e.g. Sq, EEJ) current system and the ambient plasma mass density for understanding the electromagnetic and plasma environment changes in geospace during helio-magnetospheric storms. In order to examine the propagation mechanisms of transient disturbances, i.e., sc/si, Pi 2, and DP2, relations of ionospheric electric and magnetic fields are investigated by analyzing the MAGDAS magnetic data and the Doppler data of our FM-CW ionospheric radar. A new EE-index (EDst, EU, and EL) was also proposed by SERC for real-time and long-term geo-space monitoring. The basic algorithm to obtain EE-index was constructed by Uozumi et al. (2008). EU and EL mainly represent the range of the EEJ (equatorial electrojet) and CEJ (equatorial counter electrojet) components, respectively. The baseline levels of EU and EL are obtained by averaging the H-component magnetic variations observed at the nightside (LT = 18-06) MAGDAS/CPMN (Circum-pan Pacific Magnetometer Network) stations along the magnetic equator. The baseline value is defined as EDst and its

  13. Space weather in the EU's FP7 Space Theme. Preface to the special issue on "EU-FP7 funded space weather projects"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiarini, Paola

    2013-11-01

    Technological infrastructures in space and on ground provide services on which modern society and economies rely. Space weather related research is funded under the 7th Framework Programme for Research and Innovation (FP7) of the European Union in response to the need of protecting such critical infrastructures from the damage which could be caused by extreme space weather events. The calls for proposals published under the topic "Security of space assets from space weather events" of the FP7 Space Theme aimed to improve forecasts and predictions of disruptive space weather events as well as identify best practices to limit the impacts on space- and ground-based infrastructures and their data provision. Space weather related work was also funded under the topic "Exploitation of space science and exploration data", which aims to add value to space missions and Earth-based observations by contributing to the effective scientific exploitation of collected data. Since 2007 a total of 20 collaborative projects have been funded, covering a variety of physical phenomena associated with space weather, from ionospheric disturbances and scintillation, to geomagnetically induced currents at Earth's surface, to coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particles. This article provides an overview of the funded projects, touching upon some results and referring to specific websites for a more exhaustive description of the projects' outcomes.

  14. Adaptation of Mesoscale Weather Models to Local Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manobianco, John T.; Taylor, Gregory E.; Case, Jonathan L.; Dianic, Allan V.; Wheeler, Mark W.; Zack, John W.; Nutter, Paul A.

    2003-01-01

    Methodologies have been developed for (1) configuring mesoscale numerical weather-prediction models for execution on high-performance computer workstations to make short-range weather forecasts for the vicinity of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) and (2) evaluating the performances of the models as configured. These methodologies have been implemented as part of a continuing effort to improve weather forecasting in support of operations of the U.S. space program. The models, methodologies, and results of the evaluations also have potential value for commercial users who could benefit from tailoring their operations and/or marketing strategies based on accurate predictions of local weather. More specifically, the purpose of developing the methodologies for configuring the models to run on computers at KSC and CCAFS is to provide accurate forecasts of winds, temperature, and such specific thunderstorm-related phenomena as lightning and precipitation. The purpose of developing the evaluation methodologies is to maximize the utility of the models by providing users with assessments of the capabilities and limitations of the models. The models used in this effort thus far include the Mesoscale Atmospheric Simulation System (MASS), the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction Eta Model ( Eta for short). The configuration of the MASS and RAMS is designed to run the models at very high spatial resolution and incorporate local data to resolve fine-scale weather features. Model preprocessors were modified to incorporate surface, ship, buoy, and rawinsonde data as well as data from local wind towers, wind profilers, and conventional or Doppler radars. The overall evaluation of the MASS, Eta, and RAMS was designed to assess the utility of these mesoscale models for satisfying the weather-forecasting needs of the U.S. space program. The evaluation methodology includes

  15. Space Weather Around the World: An IHY Education Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieman, J. R.; Ng, C.; Hawkins, I.; Lewis, E.; Cline, T.

    2007-05-01

    Fifty years ago the International Geophysical Year organized a unique and unprecedented program of research that united 60,000 scientists from 66 nations to study global phenomena concerning the Earth and its space environment. In that same spirit, "Space Weather Around the World" is a program to coordinate and facilitate the involvement of NASA heliophysics missions and scientists to inspire and educate a world-wide audience about the International Heliophysical Year (IHY). We will use the popular Sun-Earth Day annual event framework sponsored by the Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum to promote IHY science and the spirit of international collaboration. The theme for the March 2007 Sun-Earth Day: "IHY: Living in the Atmosphere of the Sun" was selected a year ago in anticipation of the IHY celebration. These efforts will be expanded through a series of coordinated programs under the theme "Space Weather Around the World" for Sun-Earth Day 2008. We will produce a live broadcast from China of the total solar eclipse on August 1st 2008 as the central event, highlighting investigations associated with the eclipse by the international heliophysics community. Additional collaborative efforts will include: a Space Weather Media Maker web-tool to allow educators and scientists to create their own multi-media resource to enhance teaching and learning at all levels; Rock-n-Sol, a musical composition by children internationally inspired by space weather and incorporating sonifications of solar data; and Space Weather Action Centers for students to track a solar storm featuring podcasts of multi-cultural perspectives on IHY. The anticipated audience would be millions of people internationally The science and E/PO heliophysics community has an exciting story to tell about IHY, and we look forward to the opportunity to share it globally.

  16. Modeling Weather Impact on Ground Delay Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yao; Kulkarni, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    Scheduled arriving aircraft demand may exceed airport arrival capacity when there is abnormal weather at an airport. In such situations, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) institutes ground-delay programs (GDP) to delay flights before they depart from their originating airports. Efficient GDP planning depends on the accuracy of prediction of airport capacity and demand in the presence of uncertainties in weather forecast. This paper presents a study of the impact of dynamic airport surface weather on GDPs. Using the National Traffic Management Log, effect of weather conditions on the characteristics of GDP events at selected busy airports is investigated. Two machine learning methods are used to generate models that map the airport operational conditions and weather information to issued GDP parameters and results of validation tests are described.

  17. Forecasting of Weather Effects for the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendoza, Ricardo; Benjauthrit, Boonsieng

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a proposed approach for Ka-band link management for deep space applications using daily weather forecasts and discusses the tools that will be employed for operations. Performance metrics are also presented. The proposed approach will be tested in a two-year experiment campaign.

  18. The Evolving Space Weather System—Van Allen Probes Contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanetti, L. J.; Mauk, B. H.; Fox, N. J.; Barnes, R. J.; Weiss, M.; Sotirelis, T. S.; Raouafi, N.-E.; Kessel, R. L.; Becker, H. N.

    2014-10-01

    The overarching goal and purpose of the study of space weather is clear—to understand and address the issues caused by solar disturbances on humans and technological systems. Space weather has evolved in the past few decades from a collection of concerned agencies and researchers to a critical function of the National Weather Service of NOAA. The general effects have also evolved from the well-known telegraph disruptions of the mid-1800s to modern day disturbances of the electric power grid, communications and navigation, human spaceflight and spacecraft systems. The last two items in this list, and specifically the effects of penetrating radiation, were the impetus for the space weather broadcast implemented on NASA's Van Allen Probes' twin pair of satellites, launched in August of 2012 and orbiting directly through Earth's severe radiation belts. The Van Allen Probes mission, formerly the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP), was renamed soon after launch to honor the discoverer of Earth's radiation belts at the beginning of the space age, the late James Van Allen (the spacecraft themselves are still referred to as RBSP-A and RBSP-B). The Van Allen Probes are one part of NASA's Living With a Star program formulated to advance the scientific understanding of the connection between solar disturbances, the resulting heliospheric conditions, and their effects on the geospace and Earth environment.

  19. Extreme Space Weather Impact: An Emergency Management Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacAlester, Mark H.; Murtagh, William

    2014-08-01

    In 2010, the Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) partnered with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) to investigate the potential for extreme space weather conditions to impact National Security/Emergency Preparedness communications—those communications vital to a functioning government and to emergency and disaster response—in the United States. Given the interdependencies of modern critical infrastructure, the initial systematic review of academic research on space weather effects on communications expanded to other critical infrastructure sectors, federal agencies, and private sector organizations. While the effort is ongoing, and despite uncertainties inherent with this hazard, FEMA and the SWPC did draw some conclusions. If electric power remains available, an extreme space weather event will result in the intermittent loss of HF and similar sky wave radio systems, minimal direct impact to public safety line-of-sight radio and commercial cellular services, a relatively small loss of satellite services as a percentage of the total satellite fleet, interference or intermittent loss of satellite communications and GPS navigation and timing signals, and no first-order impact to consumer electronic devices. Vulnerability of electric power to an extreme geomagnetic storm remains the primary concern from an emergency management perspective, but actual impact is not well understood at present. A discussion of potential impacts to infrastructure from the loss of electric power from any hazard is provided using the 2011 record tornado outbreak in Alabama as an example.

  20. Tethered Satellites as Enabling Platforms for an Operational Space Weather Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. Habash; Gilchrist, B. E.; Bilen, S.; Owens, J.; Voronka, N.; Furhop, K.

    2013-01-01

    Space weather nowcasting and forecasting models require assimilation of near-real time (NRT) space environment data to improve the precision and accuracy of operational products. Typically, these models begin with a climatological model to provide "most probable distributions" of environmental parameters as a function of time and space. The process of NRT data assimilation gently pulls the climate model closer toward the observed state (e.g. via Kalman smoothing) for nowcasting, and forecasting is achieved through a set of iterative physics-based forward-prediction calculations. The issue of required space weather observatories to meet the spatial and temporal requirements of these models is a complex one, and we do not address that with this poster. Instead, we present some examples of how tethered satellites can be used to address the shortfalls in our ability to measure critical environmental parameters necessary to drive these space weather models. Examples include very long baseline electric field measurements, magnetized ionospheric conductivity measurements, and the ability to separate temporal from spatial irregularities in environmental parameters. Tethered satellite functional requirements will be presented for each space weather parameter considered in this study.

  1. Space Weather Influence on the Earth Climate: Possible Manifestations in Wheat Markets Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustilnik, Lev; Yom Din, Gregory; Zagnetko, Alexander

    solar wind, high cosmic ray flux and North Atlantic cloudiness, caused by CR excess, with negative sequences for wheat agriculture in this humid zone. In the same time wheat markets in the South Europe (Spain, Italy) show reliable sensitivity to space weather state in the opposite (maximum) phase of solar activity with strong solar wind, low cosmic ray flux and deficit of CR input in cloudiness in North Atlantic with next deficit of precipitations in the arid zones of the South Europe. In the same time the large part of markets in the Central Europe zone, functioned far from "high risk agriculture state" show the absence of any effects-responses on space weather. This asymmetry is in accordance with model expectation in the frame of proposed approach. We discuss possible increasing of sensitivity of wheat markets to space weather effects in condition of drastic and fast change of modern climate, caused by global warming of the Earth atmosphere with fast and unexpected shift of numerous agriculture regions in the world to state of "high risk agriculture zone".

  2. Space data routers: Space networking for enhancing data exploitation for space weather applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daglis, I.; Anastasiadis, A.; Balasis, G.; Paronis, D.; Diamantopoulos, S.

    2013-09-01

    Data sharing and access are major issues in space sciences, as they influence the degree of data exploitation. The project “Space-Data Routers” relies on space internetworking and in particular on Delay Tolerant Networking (DTN), which marks the new era in space communications, unifies space and earth communication infrastructures and delivers a set of tools and protocols for space-data exploitation. The main goal is to allow space agencies, academic institutes and research centers to share space-data generated by single or multiple missions, in an efficient, secure and automated manner. Here we are presenting the architecture and basic functionality of a DTN-based application specifically designed in the framework of the SDR project, for data query, retrieval and administration that will enable to address outstanding science questions related to space weather, by providing simultaneous real- time sampling of space plasmas from multiple points with cost-effective means and measuring of phenomena with higher resolution and better coverage. This work has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7-SPACE-2010-1, SP1 Cooperation, Collaborative project) under grant agreement No 263330 (project title: Space-Data Routers for Exploiting Space Data). This presentation reflects only the authors’ views and the Union is not liable for any use that may be made of the information contained therein.

  3. Investigation and Modeling of Cranberry Weather Stress.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Paul Joseph

    Cranberry bog weather conditions and weather-related stress were investigated for development of crop yield prediction models and models to predict daily weather conditions in the bog. Field investigations and data gathering were completed at the Rutgers University Blueberry/Cranberry Research Center experimental bogs in Chatsworth, New Jersey. Study indicated that although cranberries generally exhibit little or no stomatal response to changing atmospheric conditions, the evaluation of weather-related stress could be accomplished via use of micrometeorological data. Definition of weather -related stress was made by establishing critical thresholds of the frequencies of occurrence, and magnitudes of, temperature and precipitation in the bog based on values determined by a review of the literature and a grower questionnaire. Stress frequencies were correlated with cranberry yield to develop predictive models based on the previous season's yield, prior season data, prior and current season data, current season data; and prior and current season data through July 31 of the current season. The predictive ability of the prior season models was best and could be used in crop planning and production. Further examination of bog micrometeorological data permitted the isolation of those weather conditions conducive to cranberry scald and allowed for the institution of a pilot scald advisory program during the 1991 season. The micrometeorological data from the bog was also used to develop models to predict daily canopy temperature and precipitation, based on upper air data, for grower use. Models were developed for each month for maximum and minimum temperatures and for precipitation and generally performed well. The modeling of bog weather conditions is an important first step toward daily prediction of cranberry weather-related stress.

  4. Space weather and cardiovascular system. New findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurfinkel, Yury; Breus, Tamara

    2014-05-01

    Researches of last two decades have shown that the cardiovascular system represents the most probable target for influence of helio - and geomagnetic activity. Both cardiovascular system and system of blood are connected very closely: one system cannot exist without another. For the same reason the effects perceived by one system, are easily transferred to another. Laboratory tests such as blood coagulation, platelet aggregation, and capillary blood velocity (CBV) performed in Scientific Clinical Center JSC "Russian Railways in patients suffering from coronary heart disease (CHD) revealed a high dependence with a level of geomagnetic activity. Results of these and other findings allow to assume that blood itself can be a sensor of geomagnetic fields variations because erythrocytes, platelets, and leucocytes bearing electric charge on membranes, and in a comparable magnetic field can change as own properties and properties of blood flow. It is interesting that not only geomagnetic disturbances, but also the periods of very quiet geomagnetic conditions affect a capillary blood velocity, slowing down it. It was shown during long-term experiment with isolation named 'MARS-500' in spatial facility of the Institute of Biomedical Problems in Moscow as imitation of an extended space mission to Mars. Using digital capillaroscope 'Russia', two crewmembers - medical doctors made records of microcirculation parameters at themselves and other four participants of 'Martian' team. Capillary records were performed before, during, and after period of isolation in medical module of MARS-500 facility. At the period of experiment nobody of crewmembers knew about real geomagnetic conditions. In days of active geomagnetic conditions average CBV has registered as 389 ± 167 μm/s, that statistically significant (p

  5. An Initial Study of the Sensitivity of Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS) Spacing Sensitivity to Weather and Configuration Input Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddick, Stephen E.; Hinton, David A.

    2000-01-01

    A study has been performed on a computer code modeling an aircraft wake vortex spacing system during final approach. This code represents an initial engineering model of a system to calculate reduced approach separation criteria needed to increase airport productivity. This report evaluates model sensitivity toward various weather conditions (crosswind, crosswind variance, turbulent kinetic energy, and thermal gradient), code configurations (approach corridor option, and wake demise definition), and post-processing techniques (rounding of provided spacing values, and controller time variance).

  6. Probing Asteroid Families for Evidence of Ultraviolet Space Weathering Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilas, Faith

    2005-07-01

    We propose six HST orbits to obtain UV reflectance spectra covering 200-460 nm of two Vesta asteroid family members, asteroid 832 Karin, and two Karin family members. These observations extend work done under a Cycle 13 AR grant, where we analyzed all of the existing IUE and HST S-class asteroids in the MAST database to investigate the effects of space weathering at UV wavelengths. Our hypothesis is that the manifestation of space weathering at UV wavelengths is a spectral bluing, in contrast with a spectral reddening at visible-NIR wavelengths, and that UV wavelengths can be more sensitive to relatively small amounts of weathering than longer wavelengths. The proposed observations will address two objectives: {1} Measure the UV-visible spectra of 832 Karin and two members of the young Karin family {absolute age of 5.8 My}, in order to determine whether intermediate space weathering is observable in objects likely pristine when they originated from the interior of Karin's pa rent body. {2} Measure the UV-visible spectra of two members of the Vesta family to compare with our analysis of IUE Vesta spectra. These observations will probe Vesta's interior, and test our hypothesis by contrasting the apparent amount of alteration on the surfaces of Vestoids with excavated material on Vesta.

  7. Investigating the feasibility of Visualising Complex Space Weather Data in a CAVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loughlin, S.; Habash Krause, L.

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of visualising complex space weather data in a Cave Automatic Virtual Environment (CAVE). Space weather is increasingly causing disruptions on Earth, such as power outages and disrupting communication to satellites. We wanted to display this space weather data within the CAVE since the data from instruments, models and simulations are typically too complex to understand on their own, especially when they are of 7 dimensions. To accomplish this, I created a VTK to NetCDF converter. NetCDF is a science data format, which stores array oriented scientific data. The format is maintained by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, and is used extensively by the atmospheric and space communities.

  8. Strategies and Innovative Approaches for the Future of Space Weather Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeksema, J. T.

    2012-12-01

    The real and potential impacts of space weather have been well documented, yet neither the required research and operations programs, nor the data, modeling and analysis infrastructure necessary to develop and sustain a reliable space weather forecasting capability for a society are in place. The recently published decadal survey "Solar and Space Physics: A Science for a Technological Society" presents a vision for the coming decade and calls for a renewed national commitment to a comprehensive program in space weather and climatology. New resources are imperative. Particularly in the current fiscal environment, implementing a responsible strategy to address these needs will require broad participation across agencies and innovative approaches to make the most of existing resources, capitalize on current knowledge, span gaps in capabilities and observations, and focus resources on overcoming immediate roadblocks.

  9. Development of a real-time geospace simulator for space weather forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinagawa, H.; Shimazu, H.; Fujita, S.; Tanaka, T.; Terada, N.; Nakamura, M.; Obara, T.

    Space weather forecast requires real-time numerical models along with various real-time observational data on the ground and in space Real-time numerical models not only give present information on the space environment but also predict upcoming space weather disturbances Recently a real-time global MHD model of the solar wind interaction with the earth s magnetosphere has been developed by National Institute of Information and Communications Technology NICT in collaboration with Kyushu University The model is now operated at the NICT s space weather forecast center to understand present state of the magnetospheric environment and to predict magnetic disturbances However the present real-time model has not satisfactorily included particle effects on the space environment and realistic ionosphere and thermosphere High-energy particles could damage satellite instruments and human bodies in space while ionospheric storms could affect various communication and broadcasting systems Therefore it is important to develop a numerical model which is able to predict such disturbances We have started to improve our real-time magnetospheric model by including the particle effects as well as the ionosphere-thermosphere system We will describe the current status and future prospect of the real-time geospace model

  10. Aurorasaurus: Citizen Scientists Experiencing Extremes of Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, E.; Hall, M.; Tapia, A.

    2013-12-01

    Aurorasaurus is a new citizen science mapping platform to nowcast the visibility of the Northern Lights for the public in the current solar maximum, the first with social media. As a recently funded NSF INSPIRE program, we have joint goals among three research disciplines: space weather forecasting, the study of human-computer interactions, and informal science education. We will highlight results from the prototype www.aurorasaurus.org and outline future efforts to motivate online participants and crowdsource viable data. Our citizen science effort is unique among space programs as it includes both reporting observations and data analysis activities to engage the broadest participant network possible. In addition, our efforts to improve space weather nowcasting by including real-time mapping of ground truth observers for rare, sporadic events are a first in the field.

  11. The utility of polarized heliospheric imaging for space weather monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeForest, C. E.; Howard, T. A.; Webb, D. F.; Davies, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    A polarizing heliospheric imager is a critical next generation tool for space weather monitoring and prediction. Heliospheric imagers can track coronal mass ejections (CMEs) as they cross the solar system, using sunlight scattered by electrons in the CME. This tracking has been demonstrated to improve the forecasting of impact probability and arrival time for Earth-directed CMEs. Polarized imaging allows locating CMEs in three dimensions from a single vantage point. Recent advances in heliospheric imaging have demonstrated that a polarized imager is feasible with current component technology.Developing this technology to a high technology readiness level is critical for space weather relevant imaging from either a near-Earth or deep-space mission. In this primarily technical review, we developpreliminary hardware requirements for a space weather polarizing heliospheric imager system and outline possible ways to flight qualify and ultimately deploy the technology operationally on upcoming specific missions. We consider deployment as an instrument on NOAA's Deep Space Climate Observatory follow-on near the Sun-Earth L1 Lagrange point, as a stand-alone constellation of smallsats in low Earth orbit, or as an instrument located at the Sun-Earth L5 Lagrange point. The critical first step is the demonstration of the technology, in either a science or prototype operational mission context.

  12. The utility of polarized heliospheric imaging for space weather monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeForest, C. E.; Howard, T. A.; Webb, D. F.; Davies, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    A polarizing heliospheric image is a critical next generation tool for space weather monitoring and prediction. Heliospheric imagers can track coronal mass ejections (CMEs) as they cross the solar system, using sunlight scattered by electrons in the CME. This tracking has been demonstrated to improve the forecasting of impact probability and arrival time for Earth-directed CMEs. Polarized imaging allows locating CMEs in three dimensions from a single vantage point. Recent advances in heliospheric imaging have demonstrated that a polarized imager is feasible with current component technology. Developing this technology to a high technology readiness level is critical for space weather relevant imaging from either a near-Earth or deep-space mission. In this primarily technical review, we developpreliminary hardware requirements for a space weather polarizing heliospheric imager system and outline possible ways to flight qualify and ultimately deploy the technology operationally on upcoming specific missions. We consider deployment as an instrument on NOAA's Deep Space Climate Observatory follow-on near the Sun-Earth L1 Lagrange point, as a stand-alone constellation of smallsats in low Earth orbit, or as an instrument located at the Sun-Earth L5 Lagrange point. The critical first step is the demonstration of the technology, in either a science or prototype operational mission context.

  13. Near-Real Time Data for Space Weather Analyses: Present Status and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Pulkkinen, Antti; Zheng, Yihua; Maddox, Marlo H.; Kuznetsova, Maria M.

    2011-01-01

    Assessments of the present state and future evolution of the space environment heavily relies on timely access to appropriate environmental measurements. These, near real-time (nrt), measurements provide a direct assessment of local or remote space environment conditions, they contribute to a more global description of Space Weather parameters through assimilative models, and they provide essential input into forecasting models. Unlike meteorology, however, the provision of these data is not a mainstream activity in the sense that critical space environment data are often derived from research rather than operational sensors. In addition, space research is a relatively immature field, where SUbstantial gaps in our knowledge impede our ability to optimally use available data streams. In this presentation, we provide examples of presently employed nrt data streams and their utility. We further discuss challenges and opportunities associated with the present approach to space weather forecasting. Finally, an outlook toward the future will be presented.

  14. Space Weathering of Lunar Rocks and Regolith Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.

    2013-01-01

    The exposed surfaces of lunar soil grains and lunar rocks become modified and coated over time with a thin rind of material (patina) through complex interactions with the space environment. These interactions encompass many processes including micrometeorite impacts, vapor and melt deposition, and solar wind implantation/sputtering effects that collectively are referred to as "space weathering". Studies of space weathering effects in lunar soils and rocks provide important clues to understanding the origin and evolution of the lunar regolith as well as aiding in the interpretation of global chemical and mineralogical datasets obtained by remote-sensing missions. The interpretation of reflectance spectra obtained by these missions is complicated because the patina coatings obscure the underlying rock mineralogy and compositions. Much of our understanding of these processes and products comes from decades of work on remote-sensing observations of the Moon, the analysis of lunar samples, and laboratory experiments. Space weathering effects collectively result in a reddened continuum slope, lowered albedo, and attenuated absorption features in reflectance spectra of lunar soils as compared to finely comminuted rocks from the same Apollo sites. Space weathering effects are largely surface-correlated, concentrated in the fine size fractions, and occur as amorphous rims on individual soil grains. Rims on lunar soil grains are highly complex and span the range between erosional surfaces modified by solar wind irradiation to depositional surfaces modified by the condensation of sputtered ions and impact-generated vapors. The optical effects of space weathering effects are directly linked to the production of nanophase Fe metal in lunar materials]. The size of distribution of nanophase inclusions in the rims directly affect optical properties given that large Fe(sup o) grains (approx 10 nm and larger) darken the sample (lower albedo) while the tiny Fe(sup o) grains (<5nm

  15. Space Weather Monitoring for ISS Geomagnetic Storm Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Parker, Linda Neergaard

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) space environments community utilizes near real time space weather data to support a variety of ISS engineering and science activities. The team has operated the Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) suite of plasma instruments (two Langmuir probes, a floating potential probe, and a plasma impedance probe) on ISS since 2006 to obtain in-situ measurements of plasma density and temperature along the ISS orbit and variations in ISS frame potential due to electrostatic current collection from the plasma environment (spacecraft charging) and inductive (vxB) effects from the vehicle motion across the Earth s magnetic field. An ongoing effort is to use FPMU for measuring the ionospheric response to geomagnetic storms at ISS altitudes and investigate auroral charging of the vehicle as it passes through regions of precipitating auroral electrons. This work is challenged by restrictions on FPMU operations that limit observation time to less than about a third of a year. As a result, FPMU campaigns ranging in length from a few days to a few weeks are typically scheduled weeks in advance for ISS engineering and payload science activities. In order to capture geomagnetic storm data under these terms, we monitor near real time space weather data from NASA, NOAA, and ESA sources to determine solar wind disturbance arrival times at Earth likely to be geoeffective (including coronal mass ejections and high speed streams associated with coronal holes) and activate the FPMU ahead of the storm onset. Using this technique we have successfully captured FPMU data during a number of geomagnetic storm periods including periods with ISS auroral charging. This presentation will describe the strategies and challenges in capturing FPMU data during geomagnetic storms, the near real time space weather resources utilized for monitoring the space weather environment, and provide examples of auroral charging data obtained during storm operations.

  16. The ESA Nanosatellite Beacons for Space Weather Monitoring Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapgood, M.; Eckersley, S.; Lundin, R.; Kluge, M.

    2008-09-01

    This paper will present final results from this ESA-funded study that has investigated how current and emerging concepts for nanosats may be used to monitor space weather conditions and provide improved access to data needed for space weather services. The study has reviewed requirements developed in previous ESA space weather studies to establish a set of service and measurements requirements appropriate to nanosat solutions. The output is conveniently represented as a set of five distinct classes of nanosat constellations, each in different orbit locations and which can address a specific group of measurement requirements. One example driving requirement for several of the constellations was the need for real-time data reception. Given this background, the study then iterated a set of instrument and spacecraft solutions to address each of the nanosat constellations from the requirements. Indeed, iteration has proved to be a critical aspect of the study. The instrument solutions have driven a refinement of requirements through assessment of whether or not the physical parameters to be measured dictate instrument components too large for a nanosat. In addition, the study has also reviewed miniaturization trends for instruments relevant to space weather monitoring by nanosats, looking at the near, mid and far-term timescales. Within the spacecraft solutions the study reviewed key technology trends relevant to space weather monitoring by nanosats: (a) micro and nano-technology devices for spacecraft communications, navigation, propulsion and power, and (b) development and flight experience with nanosats for science and for engineering demonstration. These requirements and solutions were then subject to an iterative system and mission analysis including key mission design issues (e.g. launch/transfer, mission geometry, instrument accommodation, numbers of spacecraft, communications architectures, de-orbit, nanosat reliability and constellation robustness) and the

  17. Severe Space Weather Events--Understanding Societal and Economic Impacts: A Workshop Report - Extended Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    The effects of space weather on modern technological systems are well documented in both the technical literature and popular accounts. Most often cited perhaps is the collapse within 90 seconds of northeastern Canada's Hydro-Quebec power grid during the great geomagnetic storm of March 1989, which left millions of people without electricity for up to 9 hours. This event exemplifies the dramatic impact that severe space weather can have on a technology upon which modern society critically depends. Nearly two decades have passed since the March 1989 event. During that time, awareness of the risks of severe space weather has increased among the affected industries, mitigation strategies have been developed, new sources of data have become available, new models of the space environment have been created, and a national space weather infrastructure has evolved to provide data, alerts, and forecasts to an increasing number of users. Now, 20 years later and approaching a new interval of increased solar activity, how well equipped are we to manage the effects of space weather? Have recent technological developments made our critical technologies more or less vulnerable? How well do we understand the broader societal and economic impacts of severe space weather events? Are our institutions prepared to cope with the effects of a 'space weather Katrina,' a rare, but according to the historical record, not inconceivable eventuality? On May 22 and 23, 2008, a one-and-a-half-day workshop held in Washington, D.C., under the auspices of the National Research Council's (NRC's) Space Studies Board brought together representatives of industry, the federal government, and the social science community to explore these and related questions. The key themes, ideas, and insights that emerged during the presentations and discussions are summarized in 'Severe Space Weather Events--Understanding Societal and Economic Impacts: A Workshop Report' (The National Academies Press, Washington, D

  18. Planetary Space Weather Service: Part of the the Europlanet 2020 Research Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grande, Manuel; Andre, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    Over the next four years the Europlanet 2020 Research Infrastructure will set up an entirely new European Planetary Space Weather service (PSWS). Europlanet RI is a part of of Horizon 2020 (EPN2020-RI, http://www.europlanet-2020-ri.eu). The Virtual Access Service, WP5 VA1 "Planetary Space Weather Services" will extend the concepts of space weather and space situational awareness to other planets in our Solar System and in particular to spacecraft that voyage through it. VA1 will make five entirely new 'toolkits' accessible to the research community and to industrial partners planning for space missions: a general planetary space weather toolkit, as well as three toolkits dedicated to the following key planetary environments: Mars (in support ExoMars), comets (building on the expected success of the ESA Rosetta mission), and outer planets (in preparation for the ESA JUICE mission to be launched in 2022). This will give the European planetary science community new methods, interfaces, functionalities and/or plugins dedicated to planetary space weather in the tools and models available within the partner institutes. It will also create a novel event-diary toolkit aiming at predicting and detecting planetary events like meteor showers and impacts. A variety of tools (in the form of web applications, standalone software, or numerical models in various degrees of implementation) are available for tracing propagation of planetary and/or solar events through the Solar System and modelling the response of the planetary environment (surfaces, atmospheres, ionospheres, and magnetospheres) to those events. But these tools were not originally designed for planetary event prediction and space weather applications. So WP10 JRA4 "Planetary Space Weather Services" (PSWS) will provide the additional research and tailoring required to apply them for these purposes. The overall objectives of this Joint Research Aactivities will be to review, test, improve and adapt methods and tools

  19. Nanoscale Analysis of Space-Weathering Features in Soils from Itokawa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, M. S.; Christoffersen, R.; Zega, T. J.; Keller, L. P.

    2014-01-01

    Space weathering alters the spectral properties of airless body surface materials by redden-ing and darkening their spectra and attenuating characteristic absorption bands, making it challenging to characterize them remotely [1,2]. It also causes a discrepency between laboratory analysis of meteorites and remotely sensed spectra from asteroids, making it difficult to associate meteorites with their parent bodies. The mechanisms driving space weathering include mi-crometeorite impacts and the interaction of surface materials with solar energetic ions, particularly the solar wind. These processes continuously alter the microchemical and structural characteristics of exposed grains on airless bodies. The change of these properties is caused predominantly by the vapor deposition of reduced Fe and FeS nanoparticles (npFe(sup 0) and npFeS respectively) onto the rims of surface grains [3]. Sample-based analysis of space weathering has tra-ditionally been limited to lunar soils and select asteroidal and lunar regolith breccias [3-5]. With the return of samples from the Hayabusa mission to asteroid Itoka-wa [6], for the first time we are able to compare space-weathering features on returned surface soils from a known asteroidal body. Analysis of these samples will contribute to a more comprehensive model for how space weathering varies across the inner solar system. Here we report detailed microchemical and microstructal analysis of surface grains from Itokawa.

  20. The Space Weather Living History: Connecting Scientists with Students, Educators and the Public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C.; Thompson, B. J.; Major, E. R.; Odenwald, S. F.; Cline, T. D.; Fox, K.; Lewis, E.; Stephenson, B.; Spadaccini, J.; Davis, H.

    2013-12-01

    Space Weather is a relatively new discipline that studies the sun and Earth as a connected system with much relevance to our technological society. The Space Weather Living History project has gathered stories of observations, discoveries, events and impacts to build a timeline that will highlight the contributions of many scientists. In particular, pioneers and leaders who are active from the International Geophysical Year (IGY) to the present share their personal stories of how they are creating the history of space weather. The goal is to capture not just anecdotes, but careful analogies and insights of researchers and historians associated with various programs and events. Original historical materials also known as primary sources will allow both science and education communities to tell the stories of pioneers and leaders in space weather studies. Utilizing interactive media, this program aims to address important STEM needs, inspire the next generation of explorers, and feature women as role model. The products will align with Appendix H of the Next Generation Science Standards, the Nature of Science, where it is emphasized that 'science knowledge is cumulative and many people, from many generations and nations, have contributed to science knowledge.' This project augments existing historical records with education technology; connect the pioneers, current leaders and the nature and history of space weather with students, educators and the public, covering all areas of studies in Heliophysics. The project is supported by NASA award NNX11AJ61G.

  1. Addressing the Influence of Space Weather on Airline Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    The advent of satellite-based augmentation systems has made it possible to navigate aircraft safely using radio signals emitted by global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) such as the Global Positioning System. As a signal propagates through the earth's ionosphere, it suffers delay that is proportional to the total electron content encountered along the raypath. Since the magnitude of this total electron content is strongly influenced by space weather, the safety and reliability of GNSS for airline navigation requires continual monitoring of the state of the ionosphere and calibration of ionospheric delay. This paper examines the impact of space weather on GNSS-based navigation and provides an overview of how the Wide Area Augmentation System protects its users from positioning error due to ionospheric disturbances

  2. Rates of Space Weathering in Lunar Regolith Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, S.; Keller, L. P.

    2012-01-01

    While the processes and products of lunar space weathering are reasonably well-studied, their accumulation rates in lunar soils are poorly constrained. Previously, we showed that the thickness of solar wind irradiated rims on soil grains is a smooth function of their solar flare particle track density, whereas the thickness of vapor-deposited rims was largely independent of track density [1]. Here, we have extended these preliminary results with data on additional grains from other mature soils.

  3. Experts Caution About Potential Increased Risks From Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-06-01

    The backdrop for a 4 June Space Weather Enterprise Forum included a May 2013 report by the insurance company Lloyd's, "Solar storm risk to the North American electric grid," which warns that a geomagnetic storm similar to a strong event in 1859 (the Carrington Event, named after British astronomer Richard Carrington, who observed it) could put 20-40 million Americans at risk of a power outage that could extend from a few days to several years, with enormous societal and economic impacts.

  4. Space Weather Concerns for All-Electric Propulsion Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Richard B.; Pitchford, David

    2015-08-01

    The introduction of all-electric propulsion satellites is a game changer in the quest for low-cost access to space. It also raises new questions for satellite manufacturers, operators, and the insurance industry regarding the general risks and specifically the threat of adverse space weather. The issues surrounding this new concept were discussed by research scientists and up to 30 representatives from the space industry at a special meeting at the European Space Weather Week held in November 2014. Here we report on the discussions at that meeting. We show that for a satellite undergoing electric orbit raising for 200 days the radiation dose due to electrons is equivalent to approximately 6.7 year operation at geostationary orbit or approximately half the typical design life. We also show that electrons can be injected into the slot region (8000 km) where they pose a risk of satellite internal charging. The results highlight the importance of additional radiation protection. We also discuss the benefits, the operational considerations, the other risks from the Van Allen radiation belts, the new business opportunities for space insurance, and the need for space situation awareness in medium Earth orbit where electric orbit raising takes place.

  5. Services available at the Brazilian Study and Monitoring of Space Weather (Embrace) Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Lago, A.; Cecatto, J. R.; Costa, J. E. R.; Da Silva, L. A.; Rockenbach, M.; Braga, C. R.; Mendonca, R. R. S.; Mendes, O., Jr.; Koga, D.; Alves, L. R.; Becker-Guedes, F.; Wrasse, C. M.; Takahashi, H.; Banik de Padua, M.; De Nardin, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2008, Brazilian government has been supporting a Space Weather Program at the National Institute for Space Research (INPE). The main objective of the "Brazilian Study and Monitoring of Space Weather (Embrace) Program" is to proceed with data collection and maintenance of Space Weather observation, modeling processes of the Sun-Earth on a global and regional scale, provide information in real time and make Space Weather forecast, and provide diagnostics of their effects on different technology systems through the collection of satellite data, surface and computational modeling. Advantage was taken on the long lasting expertise of the local scientific community, specially regarding local phenomena, such as the equatorial ionosphere and effects of the South American Magnetic Anomaly. Since April 2012, weekly briefings are held where scientists discuss and evaluate in a comprehensive manner all the chains of events from the sun, interplanetary space, earth magnetosphere, radiation belts, ionosphere, upper atmosphere, and reaching the effects on ground. One unique aspect of Embrace program is the strong emphasis on ionospheric and upper atmospheric disturbances. Recently, strong focus on radiation belt variability is progressively been included. Another important particularity of this program is the use of cosmic ray observations to develop nowcasting and forecasting of solar wind structures. In this work, we present an overview of activities and contributions related to the EMBRACE Program.

  6. Space Weathering Effects in the Thermal Infrared: Lessons from LRO Diviner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhagen, B. T.; Lucey, P. G.; Song, E.; Arnold, J. A.; Lemelin, M.; Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; Bowles, N. E.; Glotch, T. D.; Paige, D. A.

    2015-11-01

    We quantify the degree to which space weathering affects the thermal infrared Christiansen Feature measured by LRO Diviner, and presents techniques to normalize space weathering effects and enable examination of the underlying composition.

  7. Monitoring and Forecasting Space Weather in Geospace Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyatsky, Wladislaw; Khazanov, George V.

    2008-01-01

    For improving the reliability of Space Weather prediction, we developed a new, Polar Magnetic (PM) index of geomagnetic activity, which shows high correlation with both upstream solar wind data and related events in the magnetosphere and ionosphere. Similarly to the existing polar cap PC index, the new PM index was computed from data from two near-pole geomagnetic observatories; however, the method for computing the PM index is different. The high correlation of the PM index with both solar wind data and events in Geospace environment makes possible to improve significantly forecasting geomagnetic disturbances and such important parameters as the cross-polar-cap voltage and global Joule heating, which play an important role in the development of geomagnetic, ionospheric and thermospheric disturbances. We tested the PM index for 10-year period (1995-2004). The correlation between PM index and upstream solar wind data for these years is very high (the average correlation coefficient R approximately equal to 0.86). The PM index also shows the high correlation with the cross-polar-cap voltage and hemispheric Joule heating (the correlation coefficient between the actual and predicted values of these parameters approximately equal to 0.9), which results in significant increasing the prediction reliability of these parameters. Using the PM index of geomagnetic activity provides a significant increase in the forecasting reliability of geomagnetic disturbances and related events in Geospace environment. The PM index may be also used as an important input parameter in modeling ionospheric, magnetospheric, and thermospheric processes.

  8. How severe Space Weather can disrupt global supply chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte in den Bäumen, H.; Moran, D.; Lenzen, M.; Cairns, I.; Steenge, A.

    2014-06-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) strong enough to create electromagnetic effects at latitudes below the auroral oval are frequent events that could soon have substantial impacts on electrical grids. Modern society's heavy reliance on these domestic and international networks increases our susceptibility to such a severe space weather event. Using a new high-resolution model of the global economy we simulate the economic impact of strong CMEs for 3 different planetary orientations. We account for the economic impacts within the countries directly affected as well as the post-disaster economic shock in partner economies linked by international trade. For a 1989 Quebec-like event the global economic impacts would range from USD 2.4 to 3.4 trillion over a year. Of this total economic shock about 50% would be felt in countries outside the zone of direct impact, leading to a loss in global GDP of 3.9 to 5.6%. The global economic damages are of the same order as wars, extreme financial crisis and estimated for future climate change.

  9. How severe space weather can disrupt global supply chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte in den Bäumen, H.; Moran, D.; Lenzen, M.; Cairns, I.; Steenge, A.

    2014-10-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) strong enough to create electromagnetic effects at latitudes below the auroral oval are frequent events that could soon have substantial impacts on electrical grids. Modern society's heavy reliance on these domestic and international networks increases our susceptibility to such a severe space-weather event. Using a new high-resolution model of the global economy, we simulate the economic impact of strong CMEs for three different planetary orientations. We account for the economic impacts within the countries directly affected, as well as the post-disaster economic shock in partner economies linked by international trade. For a 1989 Quebec-like event, the global economic impacts would range from USD 2.4 to 3.4 trillion over a year. Of this total economic shock, about 50% would be felt in countries outside the zone of direct impact, leading to a loss in global Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of 3.9 to 5.6%. The global economic damage is of the same order as wars, extreme financial crisis and estimated for future climate change.

  10. Solar observations from PROBA2: ready for space weather operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berghmans, David; Hochedez, Jean-François

    The ESA micro satellite PROBA2 was launched on November 2, 2009. It carries two solar instruments, the radiometer LYRA and the coronal imager SWAP whose commissioning ended in March 2010. LYRA (PI: J.-F. Hochedez) observes the solar irradiance in 4 wavelengths chosen for their relevance to space weather, solar physics and Earth aeronomy. LYRA is able to follow the time evolution of solar flares at very high temporal resolution. SWAP (PI: D. Berghmans) takes an image of the EUV corona of the sun every minute in an extended field of view. SWAP is able to image all space weather significant events such as flares, coronal holes, dimmings, etc. We will present the technical capabilities of the two instruments and show their complementarity with e.g. SDO. We will discuss the SWAP and LYRA data products and how to make use of them in an operational space weather context. More information is available at http://proba2.sidc.be.

  11. National Space Weather Program Releases Strategy for the New Decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Samuel P.; Babcock, Michael R.; Bonadonna, Michael F.

    2010-12-01

    The National Space Weather Program (NSWP; http://www.nswp.gov) is a U.S. federal government interagency program established by the Office of the Federal Coordinator for Meteorology (OFCM) in 1995 to coordinate, collaborate, and leverage capabilities across stakeholder agencies, including space weather researchers, service providers, users, policy makers, and funding agencies, to improve the performance of the space weather enterprise for the United States and its international partners. Two important documents released in recent months have established a framework and the vision, goals, and strategy to move the enterprise forward in the next decade. The U.S. federal agency members of the NSWP include the departments of Commerce, Defense, Energy, Interior, State, and Transportation, plus NASA, the National Science Foundation, and observers from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). The OFCM is also working with the Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency to formally join the program.

  12. Van Allen Probes Science Gateway and Space Weather Data Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, G.; Barnes, R. J.; Weiss, M.; Fox, N. J.; Mauk, B.; Potter, M.; Kessel, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Van Allen Probes Science Gateway acts as a centralized interface to the instrument Science Operation Centers (SOCs), provides mission planning tools, and hosts a number of science related activities such as the mission bibliography. Most importantly, the Gateway acts as the primary site for processing and delivering the VAP Space Weather data to users. Over the past year, the web-site has been completely redesigned with the focus on easier navigation and improvements of the existing tools such as the orbit plotter, position calculator and magnetic footprint tool. In addition, a new data plotting facility has been added. Based on HTML5, which allows users to interactively plot Van Allen Probes summary and space weather data. The user can tailor the tool to display exactly the plot they wish to see and then share this with other users via either a URL or by QR code. Various types of plots can be created, including simple time series, data plotted as a function of orbital location, and time versus L-Shell. We discuss the new Van Allen Probes Science Gateway and the Space Weather Data Pipeline.

  13. Space weathering of asteroids as observable with GAIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanuchova, Z.; Brunetto, R.; Fulvio, D.; Strazzulla, G.

    2015-10-01

    Among the scientific objectives of the GAIA mission, there is great scientific interest in detecting asteroids and comets in our Solar System. In the next years, GAIA is expected to strongly contribute to this search because of its unprecedented sensitivity to faint, moving objects. We investigate how to use the spectrophotometric data of asteroids that GAIA is in the process of acquiring (scientific mission started in summer 2014 for 5 years) to evidence space weathering processes. Along with asteroid spectral reflectivities, one of the products are the Spectra Shape Coefficients, a sort of colours obtained by integrating the spectra in predefined bands. To this end we have checked which colours, among those chosen by the GAIA team as wavelengths for the spectral shape coefficients, can be more useful to evidence the spectral alteration induced by space weathering as simulated in the laboratory by irradiation with energetic ions and pulsed lasers. We show that a diagram plotting the colour index SSC530-SSC953 vs the SSC752-SSC953 one, well defines a region where the GAIA observations of S-type asteroids and Vestoids can evidence the space weathering experienced by the observed objects.

  14. Resilient Sensor Networks with Spatiotemporal Interpolation of Missing Sensors: An Example of Space Weather Forecasting by Multiple Satellites.

    PubMed

    Tokumitsu, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Keisuke; Ishida, Yoshiteru

    2016-01-01

    This paper attempts to construct a resilient sensor network model with an example of space weather forecasting. The proposed model is based on a dynamic relational network. Space weather forecasting is vital for a satellite operation because an operational team needs to make a decision for providing its satellite service. The proposed model is resilient to failures of sensors or missing data due to the satellite operation. In the proposed model, the missing data of a sensor is interpolated by other sensors associated. This paper demonstrates two examples of space weather forecasting that involves the missing observations in some test cases. In these examples, the sensor network for space weather forecasting continues a diagnosis by replacing faulted sensors with virtual ones. The demonstrations showed that the proposed model is resilient against sensor failures due to suspension of hardware failures or technical reasons. PMID:27092508

  15. Resilient Sensor Networks with Spatiotemporal Interpolation of Missing Sensors: An Example of Space Weather Forecasting by Multiple Satellites

    PubMed Central

    Tokumitsu, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Keisuke; Ishida, Yoshiteru

    2016-01-01

    This paper attempts to construct a resilient sensor network model with an example of space weather forecasting. The proposed model is based on a dynamic relational network. Space weather forecasting is vital for a satellite operation because an operational team needs to make a decision for providing its satellite service. The proposed model is resilient to failures of sensors or missing data due to the satellite operation. In the proposed model, the missing data of a sensor is interpolated by other sensors associated. This paper demonstrates two examples of space weather forecasting that involves the missing observations in some test cases. In these examples, the sensor network for space weather forecasting continues a diagnosis by replacing faulted sensors with virtual ones. The demonstrations showed that the proposed model is resilient against sensor failures due to suspension of hardware failures or technical reasons. PMID:27092508

  16. Energetic particles in geospace: Physics and space weather effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daglis, I.

    2013-09-01

    Geospace is populated by charged particles covering a wide range of energies and densities. Influenced by electromagnetic fields and waves, a subset of these particles are accelerated and driven into the inner magnetosphere, creating the storm-time ring current and the radiation belts - the two dominant energetic particle populations in geospace. The acceleration processes are associated with a variety of space weather related phenomena, some of which are detrimental for space infrastructure and ground facilities alike. We present recent advances in our understanding of the complex interplay of particles, fields and waves in geospace, with an emphasis on the role of magnetic storms and wave-particle interactions.

  17. New Chains of Space Weather Monitoring Stations in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengkuan

    2016-07-01

    Chinese Meridian Project is a ground based space environment monitoring instrument network along 120 degree east meridian line, 30 degree latitude. The observation instruments include active and passive optical instruments: MST radars, Ionosphere digital sounders DSP-4, VHF Coherent Ionosphere Radar, Incoherent ionosphere radar, magnetometers, GPS receivers, and sounding rockets. The instrument network is now being extended to the north in Russian, to the south in Australia, and to the other side of the globe along 60 degree west. The new instrument chain is called the International Space Weather Meridian Circle Program (ISWMCP). NSSC is the leading institute of the program and has already reached agreements with many countries along this circle.

  18. A Space Weather Forecasting System with Multiple Satellites Based on a Self-Recognizing Network

    PubMed Central

    Tokumitsu, Masahiro; Ishida, Yoshiteru

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a space weather forecasting system at geostationary orbit for high-energy electron flux (>2 MeV). The forecasting model involves multiple sensors on multiple satellites. The sensors interconnect and evaluate each other to predict future conditions at geostationary orbit. The proposed forecasting model is constructed using a dynamic relational network for sensor diagnosis and event monitoring. The sensors of the proposed model are located at different positions in space. The satellites for solar monitoring equip with monitoring devices for the interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind speed. The satellites orbit near the Earth monitoring high-energy electron flux. We investigate forecasting for typical two examples by comparing the performance of two models with different numbers of sensors. We demonstrate the prediction by the proposed model against coronal mass ejections and a coronal hole. This paper aims to investigate a possibility of space weather forecasting based on the satellite network with in-situ sensing. PMID:24803190

  19. DAWN observations of Vesta versus lunar-type space weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohout, Tomas; Malina, Ondrej; Penttila, Antti; Kroger, Anni; Britt, Daniel; Fillip, Jan; Muinonen, Karri; Zboril, Radek

    2015-11-01

    The major reason for spectral changes in lunar-type space weathering is production of nanophase iron (npFe0) in the lunar regolith. The spectral changes include attenuation of silicate absorption bands, darkening, and slope change (reddening). Spectral observations of the asteroid Vesta by DAWN mission revealed a different pattern. The darkening and the absorption band attenuation occur in similar way as on the Moon. The reddening, however, is not apparent. Thus, is space weathering on Vesta different from that we see on the Moon?In order to study effects of npFe0 on thereflectance spectra, pyroxene (En 90) and howardite (NWA 1929) powder samples were subjected to the space weathering experiments. Both enstatite and howardite show progressive changes in their spectra as a function of the increasing npFe0 amount. An interesting feature is observed in the comparison of the slope over the 1 and 2 µm bands in both pyroxene and howardite. While the slope over 2 µm band show progressive reddening with increasing npFe0 amount (similarly to olivine), the situation is reversed in the 1 µm band region. The relative reduction in the spectral slope is observed in this region.This is due to the fact that the decrease in reflectance when adding npFe0 is a nonlinear process where higher reflectance values will decrease more than lower values. If the original slope is positive, as the slope over the 1 µm band in pyroxene and howardite, the slope will flatten with increasing npFe0 (relative bluing).This finding can potentially explain some of the space weathering observations for Vesta. The majority of the DAWN observations were done in the 1 µm region where the lack of reddening is observed, similar to our pyroxene and howardite results. Thus, the lack of reddening over the 1 µm region as observed on Vesta does not contradict the space weathering mechanism driven by the presence of npFe0. In order to confirm this more NIR data from Vesta are needed over the 2 µm region

  20. Intuitive Space Weather Displays to Improve Space Situational Awareness (SSA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picciano, P.; Reis, G.

    2011-09-01

    Making definitive attributions concerning satellite anomalies proves to be a challenging endeavor given the dynamic space environment, the threat of adversarial actions, and unanticipated system failures. Further, decision makers are usually contending with performance shaping factors such as time pressure and the knowledge that errors can be extremely costly. Significant consequences can emerge with erroneous conclusions, whether it’s failing to thwart an adversary’s attack against our space assets, or misconstruing an environment effect for a hostile action that drives a response. Although accurate and reliable measurements of the disturbances in the earth’s magnetic field and the flux of high energy protons and electrons have been available for decades, it remains challenging to translate these data into actionable information concerning the potential threat to on-orbit assets. Even though satellite operators actively monitor these hazards, until very recently there has been limited statistical relationship between the measured radiation environment and the likelihood of an anomaly to the on-orbit asset [5]. To address this need, the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) is supporting work to make space environmental effects information more accessible and actionable for users in the operational community. The tool under development leverages O’Brien’s “hazard quotients” (which are derived from historical records of on-orbit anomalies) to relay the potential effect by presenting anomaly likelihood information related to surface charging, internal charging, single event effects, and the total accumulated particle dose.

  1. ESA-SSA Review of Space Weather Measurement Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luntama, Juha-Pekka; Glover, Alexi; Hilgers, Alain

    2012-07-01

    The ESA Space Situational Awareness (SSA) Preparatory Programme was started in 2009. The objective of the programme is to support the European independent utilisation of and access to space. The first phase of the ESA SSA system development will be finished in 2012 and the next phase is foreseen to be started after the ESA Ministerial Council meeting in November 2012. The definition of measurement requirements for the Space Weather Segment (SWE) of the ESA SSA system has been based on the space weather service requirements defined the by expected users of the system. This document, SSA SWE Customer Requirements Document (CRD), has been defined in a iterative process together with the members of the SSA User Representative Group (URG) and the delegates representing the European states participating the programme. Based on the SWE CRD, ESA with the support of the European industry has produced two documents: SSA SWE System Requirements Document (SRD) and SSA SWE Product Specification (PS). SWE PS contains the requirements for the measurements data required by the SSA SWE system. The SWE PS document has been recently rigorously reviewed by the SSA URG in the framework of the SSA System Requirements Review (SRR). The support provided by the Steering Board of the ESA Space Weather Working Team (SWWT) in this review was extremely useful. The members of the SWWT SB representing the scientific community and the provisional service providers were able to give very detailed comments regarding the measurement requirements for accuracy, cadence, timeliness, etc. As these parameters will be provisional design and cost drivers for the ESA SSA system, definition of the appropriate values at this point in the programme is crucial. This paper provides an overview of the measurement requirements for the SWE Segment of the ESA SSA Programme. The paper discusses the requirement definition process, the customer and service provider inputs, and the critical requirements as they have

  2. Challenges in Heliophysics and Space Weather: What Instrumentation for the Future?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guhathakurta, Madhulika

    A hundred years ago, the sun-Earth connection (the field of heliophysics research and space weather impacts) was of interest to only a small number of scientists. Solar activity had little effect on daily life. Today, a single strong solar flare could bring civilization to its knees. Modern society has come to depend on technologies sensitive to solar radiation and geomagnetic storms. Particularly vulnerable are intercontinental power grids, interplanetary robotic and human exploration, satellite operations and communications, and GPS navigation. These technologies are woven into the fabric of daily life, from health care and finance to basic utilities. Both short- and long-term forecasting models are urgently needed to mitigate the effects of solar storms and to anticipate their collective impact on aviation, astronaut safety, terrestrial climate and others. Even during a relatively weak solar maximum, the potential consequences that such events can have on society are too important to ignore. The challenges associated with space weather affect all developed and developing countries. Work on space weather specification, modeling, and forecasting has great societal benefit: It is basic research with a high public purpose. At present, we have a fleet “Heliophysics System Observatory” of dedicated spacecraft titled (e.g. SOHO, STEREO, SDO, ACE), and serendipitous resources contributing data for space weather modeling from both remote observations of the sun and in-situ measurements to provide sparse space weather situational awareness which were mostly built for a 2-3 year lifetime and are wearing out and won’t be around for very long. Missions currently in formulation will significantly enhance the capability of physics-based models that are used to understand and predict the impact of the variable sun. To enhance current models, and make them effective in predicting space weather throughout the solar system, we need a distributed network of spacecraft

  3. Tool for evaluating the evolution Space Weather Regional Warning Centers under the innovation point of view: the Case Study of the Embrace Space Weather Program Early Stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denardini, Clezio Marcos

    2016-07-01

    We have developed a tool for measuring the evolutional stage of the space weather regional warning centers using the approach of the innovative evolution starting from the perspective presented by Figueiredo (2009, Innovation Management: Concepts, metrics and experiences of companies in Brazil. Publisher LTC, Rio de Janeiro - RJ). It is based on measuring the stock of technological skills needed to perform a certain task that is (or should) be part of the scope of a space weather center. It also addresses the technological capacity for innovation considering the accumulation of technological and learning capabilities, instead of the usual international indices like number of registered patents. Based on this definition, we have developed a model for measuring the capabilities of the Brazilian Study and Monitoring Program Space Weather (Embrace), a program of the National Institute for Space Research (INPE), which has gone through three national stages of development and an international validation step. This program was created in 2007 encompassing competence from five divisions of INPE in order to carry out the data collection and maintenance of the observing system in space weather; to model processes of the Sun-Earth system; to provide real-time information and to forecast space weather; and provide diagnostic their effects on different technological systems. In the present work, we considered the issues related to the innovation of micro-processes inherent to the nature of the Embrace program, not the macro-economic processes, despite recognizing the importance of these. During the development phase, the model was submitted to five scientists/managers from five different countries member of the International Space Environment Service (ISES) who presented their evaluations, concerns and suggestions. It was applied to the Embrace program through an interview form developed to be answered by professional members of regional warning centers. Based on the returning

  4. MAGDAS Project for Space Weather Research and Application

    SciTech Connect

    Yumoto, Kiyohumi

    2009-06-16

    The Space Environment Research Center (SERC), Kyushu University, is currently deploying a new ground-based magnetometer network of MAGnetic Data Acqusition System (MAGDAS), in cooperation with about 30 organizations in the world, in order to understand the complex Sun-Earth system for space weather research and application. SERC will conducts MAGDAS observation at 50 stations in the Circum-pan Pacific Magnetometer Network (CPMN) region, and FM-CW radar observation along the 210 deg. magnetic meridian (MM) during the IHY/ILWS/CAWSES periods. This project is actively providing the following space weather monitoring:(1) Global 3-dimensional current system to know electromagnetic coupling of the region 1 and 2 field-aligned currents, auroral electrojet current, Sq current, and equatorial electrojet current. (2) Plasma mass density along the 210 deg. MM to understand plasma environment change during space storms. (3) Ionospheric electric field intensity with 10-sec sampling at L = 1.26 to understand how the external electric field penetrates into the equatorial ionosphere.

  5. MAGDAS Project for Space Weather Research and Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, Kiyohumi

    2009-06-01

    The Space Environment Research Center (SERC), Kyushu University, is currently deploying a new ground-based magnetometer network of MAGnetic Data Acqusition System (MAGDAS), in cooperation with about 30 organizations in the world, in order to understand the complex Sun-Earth system for space weather research and application. SERC will conducts MAGDAS observation at 50 stations in the Circum-pan Pacific Magnetometer Network (CPMN) region, and FM-CW radar observation along the 210° magnetic meridian (MM) during the IHY/ILWS/CAWSES periods. This project is actively providing the following space weather monitoring: (1) Global 3-dimensional current system to know electromagnetic coupling of the region 1 and 2 field-aligned currents, auroral electrojet current, Sq current, and equatorial electrojet current. (2) Plasma mass density along the 210° MM to understand plasma environment change during space storms. (3) Ionospheric electric field intensity with 10-sec sampling at L = 1.26 to understand how the external electric field penetrates into the equatorial ionosphere.

  6. From Early Exploration to Space Weather Forecasts: Canada's Geomagnetic Odyssey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Hing-Lan

    2011-05-01

    Canada is a region ideally suited for the study of space weather: The north magnetic pole is encompassed within its territory, and the auroral oval traverses its vast landmass from east to west. Magnetic field lines link the country directly to the outer magnetosphere. In light of this geographic suitability, it has been a Canadian tradition to install ground monitors to remotely sense the space above Canadian territory. The beginning of this tradition dates back to 1840, when Edward Sabine, a key figure in the “magnetic crusade” to establish magnetic observatories throughout the British Empire in the nineteenth century, founded the first Canadian magnetic observatory on what is now the campus of the University of Toronto, 27 years before the birth of Canada. This observatory, which later became the Toronto Magnetic and Meteorological Observatory, marked the beginning of the Canadian heritage of installing magnetic stations and other ground instruments in the years to come. This extensive network of ground-based measurement devices, coupled with space-based measurements in more modern times, has enabled Canadian researchers to contribute significantly to studies related to space weather.

  7. ON THE PUZZLE OF SPACE WEATHERING ALTERATION OF BASALTIC ASTEROIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Marchi, S.; Lazzarin, M.; Magrin, S.; De Sanctis, M. C. E-mail: monica.lazzarin@unipd.i E-mail: mariacristina.desanctis@iasf-roma.inaf.i

    2010-10-01

    The majority of basaltic asteroids are found in the inner main belt, although a few have also been observed in the outer main belt and near-Earth space. These asteroids-referred to as V-types-have surface compositions that resemble that of the 530 km sized asteroid Vesta. Besides the compositional similarity, dynamical evidence also links many V-type asteroids to Vesta. Moreover, Vesta is one of the few asteroids to have been identified as source of specific classes of meteorites, the howardite, eucrite, and diogenite achondrites (HEDs). Despite the general consensus on the outlined scenario, several questions remain unresolved. In particular, it is not clear if the observed spectral diversity among Vesta, V-types, and HEDs is due to space weathering, as is thought to be the case for S-type asteroids. In this Letter, SDSS photometry is used to address the question of whether the spectral diversity among candidate V-types and HEDs can be explained by space weathering. We show that visible spectral slopes of V-types are systematically redder with respect to HEDs, in a similar way to what is found for ordinary chondrite meteorites and S-types. On the assumption that space weathering is responsible for the slope mismatch, we estimated an upper limit for the reddening timescale of about 0.5 Ga. Nevertheless, the observed slope mismatch between HEDs and V-types poses several puzzles to understanding its origin. The implication of our findings is also discussed in light of the Dawn mission to Vesta.

  8. Using Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) For Space-Weather Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisi, M. M.; Jackson, B. V.; Fallows, R. A.; Tokumaru, M.; Jensen, E. A.; Lee, J.; Harrison, R.; Hapgood, M. A.; Wu, C.; Davies, J.

    2013-12-01

    There have been several recent space-weather events where few or no signatures of an impending Earth-affecting large-scale heliospheric structure have been detected until the structure has impacted the Earth's space environment or is at least in close proximity. In addition, some of these (for example, the late-May/early-June 2013 geomagnetic storm) have been relatively-small coronal mass ejection (CME) ';like' structures complicated by stream-interaction and/or co-rotating features. Significant progress has been made over the last few years on the implementation of, and science resulting from, interplanetary scintillation (IPS) radio remote-sensing observations of the inner heliosphere. These observations of IPS have been undertaken using the European Incoherent SCATter (EISCAT) radar and the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) radio-telescope systems, as well as with the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STEL/STELab) IPS arrays and the new IPS system at the Korean Space Weather Center (KSWC). LOFAR is a low-frequency pathfinder for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), which is expected to be the World's largest ever radio-telescope system. Here, we will primarily use the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) three-dimensional (3-D) tomography by incorporating STELab IPS data along with, where data are available, the use of additional targeted individual observations of IPS from other systems as well as 3-D MHD simulations. The overall aim is to try to ascertain how well current IPS methods can be used for space-weather forecasting (and aftcasting), particularly for events seemingly missed by other extant forecasting methods.

  9. The STEREO Mission: A New Approach to Space Weather Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, michael L.

    2006-01-01

    With the launch of the twin STEREO spacecraft in July 2006, a new capability will exist for both real-time space weather predictions and for advances in space weather research. Whereas previous spacecraft monitors of the sun such as ACE and SOH0 have been essentially on the sun-Earth line, the STEREO spacecraft will be in 1 AU orbits around the sun on either side of Earth and will be viewing the solar activity from distinctly different vantage points. As seen from the sun, the two spacecraft will separate at a rate of 45 degrees per year, with Earth bisecting the angle. The instrument complement on the two spacecraft will consist of a package of optical instruments capable of imaging the sun in the visible and ultraviolet from essentially the surface to 1 AU and beyond, a radio burst receiver capable of tracking solar eruptive events from an altitude of 2-3 Rs to 1 AU, and a comprehensive set of fields and particles instruments capable of measuring in situ solar events such as interplanetary magnetic clouds. In addition to normal daily recorded data transmissions, each spacecraft is equipped with a real-time beacon that will provide 1 to 5 minute snapshots or averages of the data from the various instruments. This beacon data will be received by NOAA and NASA tracking stations and then relayed to the STEREO Science Center located at Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland where the data will be processed and made available within a goal of 5 minutes of receipt on the ground. With STEREO's instrumentation and unique view geometry, we believe considerable improvement can be made in space weather prediction capability as well as improved understanding of the three dimensional structure of solar transient events.

  10. Mahali: Space Weather Monitoring Using Multicore Mobile Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratius, V.; Lind, F. D.; Coster, A. J.; Erickson, P. J.; Semeter, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Analysis of Total Electron Content (TEC) measurements derived from Global Positioning System (GPS) signals has led to revolutionary new data products for space weather monitoring and ionospheric research. However, the current sensor network is sparse, especially over the oceans and in regions like Africa and Siberia, and the full potential of dense, global, real-time TEC monitoring remains to be realized. The Mahali project will prototype a revolutionary architecture that uses mobile devices, such as phones and tablets, to form a global space weather monitoring network. Mahali exploits the existing GPS infrastructure - more specifically, delays in multi-frequency GPS signals observed at the ground - to acquire a vast set of global TEC projections, with the goal of imaging multi-scale variability in the global ionosphere at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. With connectivity available worldwide, mobile devices are excellent candidates to establish crowd sourced global relays that feed multi-frequency GPS sensor data into a cloud processing environment. Once the data is within the cloud, it is relatively straightforward to reconstruct the structure of the space environment, and its dynamic changes. This vision is made possible owing to advances in multicore technology that have transformed mobile devices into parallel computers with several processors on a chip. For example, local data can be pre-processed, validated with other sensors nearby, and aggregated when transmission is temporarily unavailable. Intelligent devices can also autonomously decide the most practical way of transmitting data with in any given context, e.g., over cell networks or Wifi, depending on availability, bandwidth, cost, energy usage, and other constraints. In the long run, Mahali facilitates data collection from remote locations such as deserts or on oceans. For example, mobile devices on ships could collect time-tagged measurements that are transmitted at a later point in

  11. Nanosatellites : A paradigm change for space weather studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelemy, Mathieu

    2016-04-01

    Nanosatellites are changing the paradigm of space exploration and engineering. The past 15 years have seen a growing activity in this field, with a marked acceleration in the last 3 years. Whereas the educational value of nanosatellites is well recognized, their scientific and technological use is potentially extremely rich but not fully explored. Conventional attitudes towards space engineering need to be reviewed in light of the capabilities and characteristics of these miniature devices that enable approaches and applications not possible with traditional satellite platforms. After an evaluation of the past and near future nanosatellites missions in the domain of space weather and from the example of the Zegrensat/ATISE mission, we will give some perspectives on the possibilities opened by these small satellites.

  12. Space Weather Sonification for scientists, educators, and musicians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peticolas, L. M.; Morales Manzanares, R.; Bithell, D.; Craig, N.; Luhmann, J. G.; Bale, S.

    2005-05-01

    The Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) Mission will be launched in 2006 in order to understand the origin and consequences of Coronal Mass Ejections (CME's). Two spacecrafts will orbit the Sun with instruments imaging the Sun and instruments measuring in-situ particle and fields. In preparation for the data gathered by the STEREO instruments, we have developed software to convert this space weather data into sound, a process known as sonification. We will show how this sonification project has been adapted to serve not only educators and the public wanting to hear data gathered from space, but also to serve the needs of scientists and musicians. Three separate software programs have been created in the Max/MSP programming language to map bins of data to musical sounds. This mapping varies from converting data to simple frequencies to converting the data to complicated filtered musical resonances. One program is designed for use in the classroom as well as for use as a tutorial for those new to sonification. A second program is designed for use by scientists who want to study data from the two STEREO spacecraft. And a third program is designed for use by musicians to use space weather data as an input to musical compositions. This project is part of the Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) component of the STEREO In-situ Measurements of Particles and CME Transients (IMPACT) suite of seven instruments with additional support from the STEREO/WAVES instrument suite.

  13. Distinctive space weathering on Vesta from regolith mixing processes.

    PubMed

    Pieters, C M; Ammannito, E; Blewett, D T; Denevi, B W; De Sanctis, M C; Gaffey, M J; Le Corre, L; Li, J-Y; Marchi, S; McCord, T B; McFadden, L A; Mittlefehldt, D W; Nathues, A; Palmer, E; Reddy, V; Raymond, C A; Russell, C T

    2012-11-01

    The surface of the asteroid Vesta has prominent near-infrared absorption bands characteristic of a range of pyroxenes, confirming a direct link to the basaltic howardite-eucrite-diogenite class of meteorites. Processes active in the space environment produce 'space weathering' products that substantially weaken or mask such diagnostic absorption on airless bodies observed elsewhere, and it has long been a mystery why Vesta's absorption bands are so strong. Analyses of soil samples from both the Moon and the asteroid Itokawa determined that nanophase metallic particles (commonly nanophase iron) accumulate on the rims of regolith grains with time, accounting for an observed optical degradation. These nanophase particles, believed to be related to solar wind and micrometeoroid bombardment processes, leave unique spectroscopic signatures that can be measured remotely but require sufficient spatial resolution to discern the geologic context and history of the surface, which has not been achieved for Vesta until now. Here we report that Vesta shows its own form of space weathering, which is quite different from that of other airless bodies visited. No evidence is detected on Vesta for accumulation of lunar-like nanophase iron on regolith particles, even though distinct material exposed at several fresh craters becomes gradually masked and fades into the background as the craters age. Instead, spectroscopic data reveal that on Vesta a locally homogenized upper regolith is generated with time through small-scale mixing of diverse surface components. PMID:23128227

  14. The SupraThermal Ion Monitor for space weather predictions.

    PubMed

    Allegrini, F; Desai, M I; Livi, S; McComas, D J; Ho, G C

    2014-05-01

    Measurement of suprathermal energy ions in the heliosphere has always been challenging because (1) these ions are situated in the energy regime only a few times higher than the solar wind plasma, where intensities are orders of magnitude higher and (2) ion energies are below or close to the threshold of state-of-art solid-state detectors. Suprathermal ions accelerated at coronal mass ejection-driven shocks propagate out ahead of the shocks. These shocks can cause geomagnetic storms in the Earth's magnetosphere that can affect spacecraft and ground-based power and communication systems. An instrument with sufficient sensitivity to measure these ions can be used to predict the arrival of the shocks and provide an advance warning for potentially geo-effective space weather. In this paper, we present a novel energy analyzer concept, the Suprathermal Ion Monitor (STIM) that is designed to measure suprathermal ions with high sensitivity. We show results from a laboratory prototype and demonstrate the feasibility of the concept. A list of key performances is given, as well as a discussion of various possible detectors at the back end. STIM is an ideal candidate for a future space weather monitor in orbit upstream of the near-earth environment, for example, around L1. A scaled-down version is suitable for a CubeSat mission. Such a platform allows proofing the concept and demonstrating its performance in the space environment. PMID:24880387

  15. On the Probability of Occurrence of Extreme Space Weather Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Pete

    2012-01-01

    By virtue of their rarity, extreme space weather events, such as the Carrington event of 1859, are difficult to study, their rates of occurrence are difficult to estimate, and prediction of a specific future event is virtually impossible. Additionally, events may be extreme relative to one parameter but normal relative to others. In this study, we analyze several measures of the severity of space weather events (flare intensity, coronal mass ejection speeds, Dst, and greater than 30 MeV proton fluences as inferred from nitrate records) to estimate the probability of occurrence of extreme events. By showing that the frequency of occurrence scales as an inverse power of the severity of the event, and assuming that this relationship holds at higher magnitudes, we are able to estimate the probability that an event larger than some criteria will occur within a certain interval of time in the future. For example, the probability of another Carrington event (based on Dst less than - 850 nT) occurring within the next decade is approximately 12%. We also identify and address several limitations with this approach. In particular, we assume time stationarity, and thus, the effects of long-term space climate change are not considered. While this technique cannot be used to predict specific events, it may ultimately be useful for probabilistic forecasting.

  16. High Performance Parallel Methods for Space Weather Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Paul (Technical Monitor); Gombosi, Tamas I.

    2003-01-01

    This is the final report of our NASA AISRP grant entitled 'High Performance Parallel Methods for Space Weather Simulations'. The main thrust of the proposal was to achieve significant progress towards new high-performance methods which would greatly accelerate global MHD simulations and eventually make it possible to develop first-principles based space weather simulations which run much faster than real time. We are pleased to report that with the help of this award we made major progress in this direction and developed the first parallel implicit global MHD code with adaptive mesh refinement. The main limitation of all earlier global space physics MHD codes was the explicit time stepping algorithm. Explicit time steps are limited by the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) condition, which essentially ensures that no information travels more than a cell size during a time step. This condition represents a non-linear penalty for highly resolved calculations, since finer grid resolution (and consequently smaller computational cells) not only results in more computational cells, but also in smaller time steps.

  17. Stealth CMEs: A Challenge for Solar Physics and Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, N.; Srivastava, N.

    2013-12-01

    It is commonly believed that coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are a primary driver of intense disturbances in the inner heliosphere. Although many of these CMEs are associated with clear solar transient phenomena such as flares, there have been a number of events without unambiguous solar origin, presenting a significant challenge not only for solar physics research, but also for