Science.gov

Sample records for space-based microlensing survey

  1. Galactic Planet Population and Astrophysics with a Space-Based Microlensing Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blandford, Roger

    Microlensing surveys have detected hundreds of events in the direction of the Galactic bulge, providing valuable information on the population of faint stars otherwise undetectable in our Galaxy. Within this sample of events approximately 20 planets have been uncovered, with about half of them being either unbound or at large separation (greater than 100 AU) from their host star. The majority of the current microlensing planetary detections have come from rare, high- magnification events which are alerted and immediately followed on with high cadence ground- based observations from a network of collaborations around the world. These results have established that microlensing is an effective technique that can be used distinguish planets from their host star, in particular planets at large separation, a regime in which the radial velocity and transiting methods for planet detection lose sensitivity. The next step in studies of Galactic microlensing involve development of space-based surveys, which provide better angular resolution and the ability resolve more faint stars. In anticipation of proposed spaced-based microlensing surveys such as the WFIRST satellite, this research will develop theoretical tools to understand and interpret future large samples of Galactic microlensing observations. We will study how to optimize a space-based microlensing survey to obtain the maximal scientific output for the costs available. As part of this theoretical research we plan to develop a fast and efficient numerical code that can be distributed to the larger community, incorporating modern aspects of Galactic astrophysics into microlensing theory. The simulations will include effects that will become important for space-based surveys, such as the finite size of main sequence source stars and understanding the microlensing signals from multiple planets. A major output of our analysis will be a quantification of the planetary detection efficiency over the entire range of planet

  2. Mass Measurements of Isolated Objects from Space-based Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Calchi Novati, S.; Gould, A.; Udalski, A.; Han, C.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Ranc, C.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Poleski, R.; Bozza, V.; Beichman, C.; Bryden, G.; Carey, S.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Pogge, R. W.; Porritt, I.; Wibking, B.; Yee, J. C.; SPITZER Team; Pawlak, M.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; OGLE Group; Choi, J.-Y.; Park, H.; Jung, Y. K.; Shin, I.-G.; Albrow, M. D.; Park, B.-G.; Kim, S.-L.; Lee, C.-U.; Cha, S.-M.; Kim, D.-J.; Lee, Y.; KMTNET Group; Friedmann, M.; Kaspi, S.; Maoz, D.; WISE Group; Hundertmark, M.; Street, R. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Bramich, D. M.; Cassan, A.; Dominik, M.; Bachelet, E.; Dong, Subo; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Horne, K.; Mao, S.; Menzies, J.; Schmidt, R.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Wambsganss, J.; RoboNeT Team; Skottfelt, J.; Andersen, M. I.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Ciceri, S.; D'Ago, G.; Evans, D. F.; Gu, S.-H.; Hinse, T. C.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Kuffmeier, M.; Mancini, L.; Peixinho, N.; Popovas, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Tronsgaard, R.; Scarpetta, G.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; von Essen, C.; Wang, Y.-B.; Wertz, O.; MiNDSTEP Group

    2016-07-01

    We report on the mass and distance measurements of two single-lens events from the 2015 Spitzer microlensing campaign. With both finite-source effect and microlens parallax measurements, we find that the lens of OGLE-2015-BLG-1268 is very likely a brown dwarf (BD). Assuming that the source star lies behind the same amount of dust as the Bulge red clump, we find the lens is a 45 ± 7 {M}{{J}} BD at 5.9 ± 1.0 kpc. The lens of of the second event, OGLE-2015-BLG-0763, is a 0.50 ± 0.04 {M}ȯ star at 6.9 ± 1.0 kpc. We show that the probability to definitively measure the mass of isolated microlenses is dramatically increased once simultaneous ground- and space-based observations are conducted.

  3. Faint detection of exoplanets in microlensing surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Robert A.

    2014-06-20

    We propose a new approach to discovering faint microlensing signals below traditional thresholds, and for estimating the binary-lens mass ratio and the apparent separation from such signals. The events found will be helpful in accurately estimating the true distribution of planetary semimajor axes, which is an important goal of space microlensing surveys.

  4. Planet Sensitivity from Combined Ground- and Space-based Microlensing Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Gould, Andrew; Beichman, Charles; Calchi Novati, Sebastiano; Carey, Sean; Gaudi, B. Scott; Henderson, Calen B.; Penny, Matthew; Shvartzvald, Yossi; Yee, Jennifer C.; Udalski, A.; Poleski, R.; Skowron, J.; Kozłowski, S.; Mróz, P.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; OGLE Collaboration; Abe, F.; Barry, R. K.; Bennett, D. P.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bond, I. A.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Hirao, Y.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Ling, H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Ohnishi, K.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Rattenbury, N.; Wakiyama, Y.; Yonehara, A.; MOA Collaboration; Maoz, D.; Kaspi, S.; Friedmann, M.; The Wise Group

    2015-12-01

    To move one step forward toward a Galactic distribution of planets, we present the first planet sensitivity analysis for microlensing events with simultaneous observations from space and the ground. We present this analysis for two such events, OGLE-2014-BLG-0939 and OGLE-2014-BLG-0124, which both show substantial planet sensitivity even though neither of them reached high magnification. This suggests that an ensemble of low to moderate magnification events can also yield significant planet sensitivity, and therefore probability, for detecting planets. The implications of our results to the ongoing and future space-based microlensing experiments to measure the Galactic distribution of planets are discussed.

  5. Discovering Extrasolar Planets with Microlensing Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wambsganss, J.

    2016-06-01

    An astronomical survey is commonly understood as a mapping of a large region of the sky, either photometrically (possibly in various filters/wavelength ranges) or spectroscopically. Often, catalogs of objects are produced/provided as the main product or a by-product. However, with the advent of large CCD cameras and dedicated telescopes with wide-field imaging capabilities, it became possible in the early 1990s, to map the same region of the sky over and over again. In principle, such data sets could be combined to get very deep stacked images of the regions of interest. However, I will report on a completely different use of such repeated maps: Exploring the time domain for particular kinds of stellar variability, namely microlens-induced magnifications in search of exoplanets. Such a time-domain microlensing survey was originally proposed by Bohdan Paczynski in 1986 in order to search for dark matter objects in the Galactic halo. Only a few years later three teams started this endeavour. I will report on the history and current state of gravitational microlensing surveys. By now, routinely 100 million stars in the Galactic Bulge are monitored a few times per week by so-called survey teams. All stars with constant apparent brightness and those following known variability patterns are filtered out in order to detect the roughly 2000 microlensing events per year which are produced by stellar lenses. These microlensing events are identified "online" while still in their early phases and then monitored with much higher cadence by so-called follow-up teams. The most interesting of such events are those produced by a star-plus-planet lens. By now of order 30 exoplanets have been discovered by these combined microlensing surveys. Microlensing searches for extrasolar planets are complementary to other exoplanet search techniques. There are two particular advantages: The microlensing method is sensitive down to Earth-mass planets even with ground-based telecopes, and it

  6. Stellar Angular Diameter Relations for Microlensing Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Arthur; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; von Braun, Kaspar

    2016-01-01

    Determining the physical properties of microlensing events depends on having accurate angular radii of the source star. Using long-baseline optical interferometry we are able to determine the angular sizes of nearby stars with uncertainties less than 2 percent. We present empirical estimates of angular diameters for both dwarfs/subgiants and giant stars as functions of five color indices which are relevant to planned microlensing surveys. We find in all considered colors that metallicity does not play a statistically significant role in predicting stellar size for the samples of stars considered.

  7. Space Based Dark Energy Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dore, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    Dark energy, the name given to the cause of the accelerating expansion of the Universe, is one of the most tantalizing mystery in modern physics. Current cosmological models hold that dark energy is currently the dominant component of the Universe, but the exact nature of DE remains poorly understood. There are ambitious ground-based surveys underway that seek to understand DE and NASA is participating in the development of significantly more ambitious space-based surveys planned for the next decade. NASA has provided mission enabling technology to the European Space Agency's (ESA) Euclid mission in exchange for US scientists to participate in the Euclid mission. NASA is also developing the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Asset (WFIRST) mission for possible launch in 2024. WFIRST was the highest ranked space mission in the Astro2010 Decadal Survey and the current design uses a 2.4m space telescope to go beyond what was then envisioned. Understanding DE is one of the primary science goals of WFIRST-AFTA. This talk will review the state of DE, the relevant activities of the Cosmic Structure Interest Group (CoSSIG) of the PhyPAG, and detail the status and complementarity between Euclid, WFIRST and ot ambitious ground-based efforts.

  8. The WFIRST Microlensing Survey: Expectations and Unexpectations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudi, B. Scott; Penny, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The WFIRST microlensing survey will provide the definitive determination of the demographics of cool planets with semimajor axes > 1 AU and masses greater than that of the Earth, including free-floating planets. Together with the results from Kepler, TESS, and PLATO, WFIRST will complete the statistical census of planets in the Galaxy. These expectations are based on the most basic and conservative assumptions about the data quality, and assumes that the analysis methodologies will be similar to that used for current ground-based microlensing. Yet, in fact, the data quality will be dramatically better, and information content substantially richer, for the WFIRST microlensing survey as compared to current ground-based surveys. Thus WFIRST should allow for orders of magnitude improvement in both sensitivity and science yield. We will review some of these expected improvements and opportunities (the "known unknowns"), and provide a "to do list" of what tasks will need to be completed in order to take advantage of these opportunities. We will then speculate on the opportunities that we may not be aware of yet (the "unknown unknowns"), how we might go about determining what those opportunities are, and how we might figure out what we will need to do to take advantage of them.This work was partially supported by NASA grant NNX14AF63G.

  9. Preparing for the Kepler K2 Microlensing Survey: A Call to Arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penny, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    In 2016 the ninth campaign of K2 (the extended, two-wheel Kepler mission) will be targeted towards the Galactic bulge, where it will perform the first wide-field, space-based microlensing survey. This survey will discover tens of both bound and free-floating planets by itself, but its real value will come from simultaneous ground-based observations that will provide parallax measurements enabling both mass and distance measurements for the majority of these planets and their hosts. These will include the first ever measurements of free-floating planet masses.K2's immediate public data release policy offers a huge one-time-only opportunity to build up the US's expertise in exoplanetary microlensing surveys in preparation for the WFIRST mission. Unbeknownst to most astronomers at home and abroad, the US also owns the best instrument in the world for conducting ground-based microlensing surveys -- DECam on the Blanco 4m, whose etendue is a factor of 20 larger than OGLE's at equal resolution. A simultaneous survey using ~80 half nights on DECam (as part of a NOAO large survey program) could also make its data immediately public, catapulting US astronomers to the forefront of planetary microlensing surveys, measuring masses of and distances to microlensing exoplanets on a never-before-possible scale. This is an opportunity that should not be missed and I will outline ways in which you can get involved.

  10. Testing LMC Microlensing Scenarios: The Discrimination Power of the SuperMACHO Microlensing Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Rest, A; Stubbs, C; Becker, A C; Miknaitis, G A; Miceli, A; Covarrubias, R; Hawley, S L; Smith, C; Suntzeff, N B; Olsen, K; Prieto, J; Hiriart, R; Welch, D L; Cook, K; Nikolaev, S; Proctor, G; Clocchiatti, A; Minniti, D; Garg, A; Challis, P; Keller, S C; Scmidt, B P

    2004-05-27

    Characterizing the nature and spatial distribution of the lensing objects that produce the observed microlensing optical depth toward the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) remains an open problem. They present an appraisal of the ability of the SuperMACHO Project, a next-generation microlensing survey pointed toward the LMC, to discriminate between various proposed lensing populations. they consider two scenarios: lensing by a uniform foreground screen of objects and self-lensing of LMC stars. The optical depth for ''screen-lensing'' is essentially constant across the face of the LMC; whereas, the optical depth for self-lensing shows a strong spatial dependence. they have carried out extensive simulations, based upon actual data obtained during the first year of the project, to assess the SuperMACHO survey's ability to discriminate between these two scenarios. In the simulations they predict the expected number of observed microlensing events for each of their fields by adding artificial stars to the images and estimating the spatial and temporal efficiency of detecting microlensing events using Monte-Carlo methods. They find that the event rate itself shows significant sensitivity to the choice of the LMC luminosity function shape and other parameters, limiting the conclusions which can be drawn from the absolute rate. By instead determining the differential event rate across the LMC, they can decrease the impact of these systematic uncertainties rendering the conclusions more robust. With this approach the SuperMACHO Project should be able to distinguish between the two categories of lens populations and provide important constraints on the nature of the lensing objects.

  11. Determination of Microlensing Selection Criteria for the SuperMACHO Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, A

    2008-10-10

    The SuperMACHO project is a 5 year survey to determine the nature of the lens population responsible for the excess microlensing rate toward the Large Magellanic Cloud observed by the MACHO project [1]. The survey probes deeper than earlier surveys unveiling many more extragalactic contaminants, particularly type Ia supernovae and active galactic nuclei. Using {approx}10{sup 7} simulated light curves of both microlensing events and type Ia supernovae we determine selection criteria optimized to maximize the microlensing detection efficiency while minimizing the contamination rate from non-microlensing events. We discuss these simulations and the selection criteria.

  12. Microlensing Surveys of M31 in the Wide Field Imaging ERA

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, E.

    2004-10-27

    The Andromeda Galaxy (M31) is the closest large galaxy to the Milky Way, thus it is an important laboratory for studying massive dark objects in galactic halos (MACHOs) by gravitational microlensing. Such studies strongly complement the studies of the Milky Way halo using the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. We consider the possibilities for microlensing surveys of M31 using the next generation of wide field imaging telescopes with fields of view in the square degree range. We consider proposals for such imagers both on the ground and in space. For concreteness, we specialize to the SNAP proposal for a space telescope and the LSST proposal for a ground based telescope. We find that a modest space-based survey of 50 visits of one hour each is considerably better than current ground based surveys covering 5 years. Crucially, systematic effects can be considerably better controlled with a space telescope because of both the infrared sensitivity and the angular resolution. To be competitive, 8 meter class wide-field ground based imagers must take exposures of several hundred seconds with several day cadence.

  13. The exoplanet microlensing survey by the proposed WFIRST Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, Richard; Kruk, Jeffery; Anderson, Jay; Beaulieu, Jean-Philippe; Bennett, David P.; Catanzarite, Joseph; Cheng, Ed; Gaudi, Scott; Gehrels, Neil; Kane, Stephen; Lunine, Jonathan; Sumi, Takahiro; Tanner, Angelle; Traub, Wesley

    2011-10-01

    The New Worlds, New Horizons report released by the Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey Board in 2010 listed the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) as the highest-priority large space mission for the coming decade. This observatory will provide wide-field imaging and slitless spectroscopy at near infrared wavelengths. The scientific goals are to obtain a statistical census of exoplanets using gravitational microlensing, measure the expansion history of and the growth of structure in the Universe by multiple methods, and perform other astronomical surveys to be selected through a guest observer program. A Science Definition Team has been established to assist NASA in the development of a Design Reference Mission that accomplishes this diverse array of science programs with a single observatory. In this paper we present the current WFIRST payload concept and the expected capabilities for planet detection. The observatory, with science goals that are complimentary to the Kepler exoplanet transit mission, is designed to complete the statistical census of planetary systems in the Galaxy, from habitable Earth-mass planets to free floating planets, including analogs to all of the planets in our Solar System except Mercury. The exoplanet microlensing survey will observe for 500 days spanning 5 years. This long temporal baseline will enable the determination of the masses for most detected exoplanets down to 0.1 Earth masses.

  14. The Exoplanet Microlensing Survey by the Proposed WFIRST Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Richard; Kruk, Jeffrey; Anderson, Jay; Beaulieu, Jean-Philippe; Bennett, David P.; Catanzarite, Joseph; Cheng, Ed; Gaudi, Scott; Gehrels, Neil; Kane, Stephen; Lunine, Jonathan; Sumi, Takahiro; Tanner, Angelle; Traub, Wesley

    2012-01-01

    The New Worlds, New Horizons report released by the Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey Board in 2010 listed the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) as the highest-priority large space mission for the . coming decade. This observatory will provide wide-field imaging and slitless spectroscopy at near infrared wavelengths. The scientific goals are to obtain a statistical census of exoplanets using gravitational microlensing. measure the expansion history of and the growth of structure in the Universe by multiple methods, and perform other astronomical surveys to be selected through a guest observer program. A Science Definition Team has been established to assist NASA in the development of a Design Reference Mission that accomplishes this diverse array of science programs with a single observatory. In this paper we present the current WFIRST payload concept and the expected capabilities for planet detection. The observatory. with science goals that are complimentary to the Kepler exoplanet transit mission, is designed to complete the statistical census of planetary systems in the Galaxy, from habitable Earth-mass planets to free floating planets, including analogs to all of the planets in our Solar System except Mercury. The exoplanet microlensing survey will observe for 500 days spanning 5 years. This long temporal baseline will enable the determination of the masses for most detected exoplanets down to 0.1 Earth masses.

  15. Synthesizing exoplanet demographics from radial velocity and microlensing surveys. I. Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Clanton, Christian; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2014-08-20

    Motivated by the order of magnitude difference in the frequency of giant planets orbiting M dwarfs inferred by microlensing and radial velocity (RV) surveys, we present a method for comparing the statistical constraints on exoplanet demographics inferred from these methods. We first derive the mapping from the observable parameters of a microlensing-detected planet to those of an analogous planet orbiting an RV-monitored star. Using this mapping, we predict the distribution of RV observables for the planet population inferred from microlensing surveys, taking care to adopt reasonable priors for, and properly marginalize over, the unknown physical parameters of microlensing-detected systems. Finally, we use simple estimates of the detection limits for a fiducial RV survey to predict the number and properties of analogs of the microlensing planet population such an RV survey should detect. We find that RV and microlensing surveys have some overlap, specifically for super-Jupiter mass planets (m{sub p} ≳ 1 M {sub Jup}) with periods between ∼3-10 yr. However, the steeply falling planetary mass function inferred from microlensing implies that, in this region of overlap, RV surveys should infer a much smaller frequency than the overall giant planet frequency (m{sub p} ≳ 0.1 M {sub Jup}) inferred by microlensing. Our analysis demonstrates that it is possible to statistically compare and synthesize data sets from multiple exoplanet detection techniques in order to infer exoplanet demographics over wider regions of parameter space than are accessible to individual methods. In a companion paper, we apply our methodology to several representative microlensing and RV surveys to derive the frequency of planets around M dwarfs with orbits of ≲ 30 yr.

  16. Space-based infrared surveys of small bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mommert, M.

    2014-07-01

    Most small bodies in the Solar System are too small and too distant to be spatially resolved, precluding a direct diameter derivation. Furthermore, measurements of the optical brightness alone only allow a rough estimate of the diameter, since the surface albedo is usually unknown and can have values between about 3 % and 60 % or more. The degeneracy can be resolved by considering the thermal emission of these objects, which is less prone to albedo effects and mainly a function of the diameter. Hence, the combination of optical and thermal-infrared observational data provides a means to independently derive an object's diameter and albedo. This technique is used in asteroid thermal models or more sophisticated thermophysical models (see, e.g., [1]). Infrared observations require cryogenic detectors and/or telescopes, depending on the actual wavelength range observed. Observations from the ground are additionally compromised by the variable transparency of Earth's atmosphere in major portions of the infrared wavelength ranges. Hence, space-based infrared telescopes, providing stable conditions and significantly better sensitivities than ground-based telescopes, are now used routinely to exploit this wavelength range. Two observation strategies are used with space-based infrared observatories: Space-based Infrared All-Sky Surveys. Asteroid surveys in the thermal infrared are less prone to albedo-related discovery bias compared to surveys with optical telescopes, providing a more complete picture of small body populations. The first space-based infrared survey of Solar System small bodies was performed with the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) for 10 months in 1983. In the course of the 'IRAS Minor Planet Survey' [2], 2228 asteroids (3 new discoveries) and more than 25 comets (6 new discoveries) were observed. More recent space-based infrared all-sky asteroid surveys were performed by Akari (launched 2006) and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE

  17. Microlensing detection of extrasolar planets.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Emanuela; Lunine, Jonathan I

    2013-05-01

    We review the method of exoplanetary microlensing with a focus on two-body planetary lensing systems. The physical properties of planetary systems can be successfully measured by means of a deep analysis of lightcurves and high-resolution imaging of planetary systems, countering the concern that microlensing cannot determine planetary masses and orbital radii. Ground-based observers have had success in diagnosing properties of multi-planet systems from a few events, but space-based observations will be much more powerful and statistically more complete. Since microlensing is most sensitive to exoplanets beyond the snow line, whose statistics, in turn, allow for testing current planetary formation and evolution theories, we investigate the retrieval of semi-major axis density by a microlensing space-based survey with realistic parameters. Making use of a published statistical method for projected exoplanets quantities (Brown 2011), we find that one year of such a survey might distinguish between simple power-law semi-major axis densities. We conclude by briefly reviewing ground-based results hinting at a high abundance of free-floating planets and describing the potential contribution of space-based missions to understanding the frequency and mass distribution of these intriguing objects, which could help unveil the formation processes of planetary systems. PMID:23604071

  18. Preparing for the WFIRST Microlensing Survey: Simulations, Requirements, Survey Strategies, and Precursor Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudi, Bernard

    As one of the four primary investigations of the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission, the microlensing survey will monitor several square degrees of the Galactic bulge for a total of roughly one year. Its primary science goal is to "Complete the statistical census of planetary systems in the Galaxy, from the outer habitable zone to free floating planets, including analogs of all of the planets in our Solar System with the mass of Mars or greater.'' WFIRST will therefore (a) measure the mass function of cold bound planets with masses greater than that of roughly twice the mass of the moon, including providing an estimate of the frequency of sub-Mars-mass embryos, (b) determine the frequency of free-floating planets with masses down to the Earth and below, (c) inform the frequency and habitability of potentially habitable worlds, and (d) revolutionize our understanding of the demographics of cold planets with its exquisite sensitivity to, and large expected yield of, planets in a broad and unexplored region of parameter space. In order for the microlensing survey to be successful, we must develop a plan to go from actual survey observations obtained by the WFIRST telescope and hardware to the final science products. This plan will involve many steps, the development of software, data reduction, and analysis tools at each step, and a list of requirements for each of these components. The overarching goal of this proposal is thus to develop a complete flowdown from the science goals of the microlensing survey to the mission design and hardware components. We have assembled a team of scientists with the breadth of expertise to achieve this primary goal. Our specific subgoals are as follows. Goal 1: We will refine the input Galactic models in order to provide improved microlensing event rates in the WFIRST fields. Goal 2: We will use the improved event rate estimates, along with improvements in our simulation methodology, to provide higher

  19. MOA-2011-BLG-322Lb: a `second generation survey' microlensing planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvartzvald, Y.; Maoz, D.; Kaspi, S.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Gould, A.; Bennett, D. P.; Han, C.; Abe, F.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Namba, S.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sweatman, W. L.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; Skowron, J.; Kozłowski, S.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Poleski, R.; Pietrukowicz, P.

    2014-03-01

    Global `second-generation' microlensing surveys aim to discover and characterize extrasolar planets and their frequency, by means of round-the-clock high-cadence monitoring of a large area of the Galactic bulge, in a controlled experiment. We report the discovery of a giant planet in microlensing event MOA-2011-BLG-322. This moderate-magnification event, which displays a clear anomaly induced by a second lensing mass, was inside the footprint of our second-generation microlensing survey, involving MOA, OGLE and the Wise Observatory. The event was observed by the survey groups, without prompting alerts that could have led to dedicated follow-up observations. Fitting a microlensing model to the data, we find that the time-scale of the event was tE = 23.2 ± 0.8 d, and the mass ratio between the lens star and its companion is q = 0.028 ± 0.001. Finite-source effects are marginally detected, and upper limits on them help break some of the degeneracy in the system parameters. Using a Bayesian analysis that incorporates a Galactic structure model, we estimate the mass of the lens at 0.39^{+0.45}_{-0.19} M_{⊙}, at a distance of 7.56 ± 0.91 kpc. Thus, the companion is likely a planet of mass 11.6^{+13.4}_{-5.6} M_J, at a projected separation of 4.3^{+1.5}_{-1.2} AU, rather far beyond the snow line. This is the first pure-survey planet reported from a second-generation microlensing survey, and shows that survey data alone can be sufficient to characterize a planetary model. With the detection of additional survey-only planets, we will be able to constrain the frequency of extrasolar planets near their systems' snow lines.

  20. Identifying Microlenses In Large, Non-uniformly Sampled Surveys: The Case Of PTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Agúeros, M.; Fournier, A.; Ofek, E.; Street, R.

    2012-05-01

    Many current photometric, time-domain surveys are driven by specific goals, such as supernova searches, transiting exoplanet discoveries, or stellar variability studies, which set the cadence with which individual fields get re-imaged. In the case of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), several such sub-surveys are being conducted in parallel, leading to an extremely non-uniform sampling gradient over the survey footprint of nearly 20,000 deg^2: while the typical 7.26 deg^2 PTF field has been imaged 15 times, 1000 deg^2 of the survey has been observed more than 150 times. We use the existing PTF data to study the trade-off between a large survey footprint and irregular sampling when searching for microlensing events, and to examine the probability that such events can be recovered in these data. We conduct Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate our detection efficiency in a hypothetical survey field as a function of both the baseline and number of observations. We also apply variability statistics to systematically differentiate between periodic, transient, and flat light curves. Preliminary results suggest that both recovery and discovery of microlensing events are possible with a careful consideration of photometric systematics. This work can help inform predictions about the observability of microlensing signals in future wide-field time-domain surveys such as that of LSST.

  1. Prospects for Gaia and other space-based surveys .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailer-Jones, Coryn A. L.

    Gaia is a fully-approved all-sky astrometric and photometric survey due for launch in 2011. It will measure accurate parallaxes and proper motions for everything brighter than G=20 (ca. 109 stars). Its primary objective is to study the composition, origin and evolution of our Galaxy from the 3D structure, 3D velocities, abundances and ages of its stars. In some respects it can be considered as a cosmological survey at redshift zero. Several other upcoming space-based surveys, in particular JWST and Herschel, will study star and galaxy formation in the early (high-redshift) universe. In this paper I briefly describe these missions, as well as SIM and Jasmine, and explain why they need to observe from space. I then discuss some Galactic science contributions of Gaia concerning dark matter, the search for substructure, stellar populations and the mass-luminosity relation. The Gaia data are complex and require the development of novel analysis methods; here I summarize the principle of the astrometric processing. In the last two sections I outline how the Gaia data can be exploited in connection with other observational and theoretical work in order to build up a more comprehensive picture of galactic evolution.

  2. Microlens Masses from Astrometry and Parallax in Space-based Surveys: From Planets to Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Andrew; Yee, Jennifer C.

    2014-03-01

    We show that space-based microlensing experiments can recover lens masses and distances for a large fraction of all events (those with individual photometric errors <~ 0.01 mag) using a combination of one-dimensional microlens parallaxes and astrometric microlensing. This will provide a powerful probe of the mass distributions of planets, black holes, and neutron stars, the distribution of planets as a function of Galactic environment, and the velocity distributions of black holes and neutron stars. While systematics are in principle a significant concern, we show that it is possible to vet against all systematics (known and unknown) using single-epoch precursor observations with the Hubble Space Telescope roughly 10 years before the space mission.

  3. Microlens masses from astrometry and parallax in space-based surveys: From planets to black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, Andrew; Yee, Jennifer C.

    2014-03-20

    We show that space-based microlensing experiments can recover lens masses and distances for a large fraction of all events (those with individual photometric errors ≲ 0.01 mag) using a combination of one-dimensional microlens parallaxes and astrometric microlensing. This will provide a powerful probe of the mass distributions of planets, black holes, and neutron stars, the distribution of planets as a function of Galactic environment, and the velocity distributions of black holes and neutron stars. While systematics are in principle a significant concern, we show that it is possible to vet against all systematics (known and unknown) using single-epoch precursor observations with the Hubble Space Telescope roughly 10 years before the space mission.

  4. Extinction and the rate of superstring microlensing detection for WFIRST survey of the Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Taylor Andrew; Chernoff, David F.

    2015-01-01

    A network of superstrings produced during the epoch of inflation gives birth to long-lived string loops if, as current observational constraints imply, the string tension G μ/c2 < 10-9. String loops track dark matter when galaxy formation occurs. As part of an ongoing Cornell project we investigate the detection rate of string loop microlensing of stars within the Galaxy and make detailed estimates for the WFIRST survey of the Bulge. In particular, here we compare the rate estimates for different models of J-band extinction. Most of the stars microlensed by strings reside near the Galactic center and the range of variation in extinction models induces a factor of 5 in the overall rate. While this rate-sensitivity is non-trivial we conclude that the overall microlensing rate is sufficiently large that detecting strings over a tension range 10-14 to 10-10 is feasible. For a well-defined model of the string loop population, stellar blending and our effective magnitude cutoff in the WFIRST survey currently dominate our rate uncertainties. For example, detection rates at S/N=102 (cutoff of 23) are about an order of magnitude less than rates at marginal S/N (cutoff of 27). Future work will explore the effective cutoff and the resultant rates.

  5. A GRAPHICS PROCESSING UNIT-ENABLED, HIGH-RESOLUTION COSMOLOGICAL MICROLENSING PARAMETER SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Bate, N. F.; Fluke, C. J.

    2012-01-10

    In the era of synoptic surveys, the number of known gravitationally lensed quasars is set to increase by over an order of magnitude. These new discoveries will enable a move from single-quasar studies to investigations of statistical samples, presenting new opportunities to test theoretical models for the structure of quasar accretion disks and broad emission line regions (BELRs). As one crucial step in preparing for this influx of new lensed systems, a large-scale exploration of microlensing convergence-shear parameter space is warranted, requiring the computation of O(10{sup 5}) high-resolution magnification maps. Based on properties of known lensed quasars, and expectations from accretion disk/BELR modeling, we identify regions of convergence-shear parameter space, map sizes, smooth matter fractions, and pixel resolutions that should be covered. We describe how the computationally time-consuming task of producing {approx}290,000 magnification maps with sufficient resolution (10,000{sup 2} pixel map{sup -1}) to probe scales from the inner edge of the accretion disk to the BELR can be achieved in {approx}400 days on a 100 teraflop s{sup -1} high-performance computing facility, where the processing performance is achieved with graphics processing units. We illustrate a use-case for the parameter survey by investigating the effects of varying the lens macro-model on accretion disk constraints in the lensed quasar Q2237+0305. We find that although all constraints are consistent within their current error bars, models with more densely packed microlenses tend to predict shallower accretion disk radial temperature profiles. With a large parameter survey such as the one described here, such systematics on microlensing measurements could be fully explored.

  6. K2 Microlensing and Campaign 9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penny, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    Campaign 9 of K2 will observe a contiguous 3.7 deg^2 region of the Galactic bulge in order to search for microlensing events and measure microlens parallaxes. It will also perform targeted follow-up of approximately 50 microlensing events spread throughout the Kepler focal plane. Parallax measurements are a critical ingredient for measurements of both the lens mass and distance, which contribute to our understanding of the formation of cold exoplanets, and the formation of planets as a function of Galactic environment. Additionally, as the first un-targeted, space-based microlensing survey, K2C9 offers us the first chance to measure the masses and kinematics of a large population of free-floating planet candidates, whose large abundance has been a puzzle since their discovery.I will review the scientific goals of the K2C9 survey, which will be well underway, and report on the ongoing activity of the K2 Campaign 9 Microlensing Science Team and the wider microlensing community, with a focus on the progress that has been made towards analyzing K2 data in crowded fields.

  7. Criteria for Sample Selection to Maximize Planet Sensitivity and Yield from Space-Based Microlens Parallax Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Jennifer C.; Gould, Andrew; Beichman, Charles; Calchi Novati, Sebastiano; Carey, Sean; Gaudi, B. Scott; Henderson, Calen B.; Nataf, David; Penny, Matthew; Shvartzvald, Yossi; Zhu, Wei

    2015-09-01

    Space-based microlens parallax measurements are a powerful tool for understanding planet populations, especially their distribution throughout the Galaxy. However, if space-based observations of the microlensing events must be specifically targeted, it is crucial that microlensing events enter the parallax sample without reference to the known presence or absence of planets. Hence, it is vital to define objective criteria for selecting events where possible and to carefully consider and minimize the selection biases where not possible so that the final sample represents a controlled experiment. We present objective criteria for initiating observations and determining their cadence for a subset of events, and we define procedures for isolating subjective decision making from information about detected planets for the remainder of events. We also define procedures to resolve conflicts between subjective and objective selections. These procedures maximize the planet sensitivity of the sample as a whole by allowing for planet detections even if they occur before satellite observations for objectively selected events and by helping to trigger fruitful follow-up observations for subjectively chosen events. This paper represents our public commitment to these procedures, which is a necessary component of enforcing objectivity on the experimental protocol. They will be implemented for the 2015 Spitzer microlensing campaign.

  8. Microlensing Optical Depth towards the Galactic Bulge Using Clump Giants from the MACHO Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Popowski, P; Griest, K; Thomas, C L; Cook, K H; Bennett, D P; Becker, A C; Alves, D R; Minniti, D; Drake, A J; Alcock, C; Allsman, R A; Axelrod, T S; Freeman, K C; Geha, M; Lehner, M J; Marshall, S L; Nelson, C A; Peterson, B A; Quinn, P J; Stubbs, C W; Sutherland, W; Vandehei, T; Welch, D

    2005-07-14

    Using 7 years of MACHO survey data, we present a new determination of the optical depth to microlensing towards the Galactic bulge. We select the sample of 62 microlensing events (60 unique) on clump giant sources and perform a detailed efficiency analysis. We use only the clump giant sources because these are bright bulge stars and are not as strongly affected by blending as other events. Using a subsample of 42 clump events concentrated in an area of 4.5 deg{sup 2} with 739000 clump giant stars, we find {tau} = 2.17{sub -0.38}{sup +0.47} x 10{sup -6} at (l,b) = (1{sup o}.50, -2{sup o}.68), somewhat smaller than found in most previous MACHO studies, but in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions. We also present the optical depth in each of the 19 fields in which we detected events, and find limits on optical depth for fields with no events. The errors in optical depth in individual fields are dominated by Poisson noise. We measure optical depth gradients of (1.06 {+-} 0.71) x 10{sup -6}deg{sup -1} and (0.29 {+-} 0.43) x 10{sup -6}deg{sup -1} in the galactic latitude b and longitude l directions, respectively. Finally, we discuss the possibility of anomalous duration distribution of events in the field 104 centered on (l,b) = (3{sup o}.11, -3{sup o}.01) as well as investigate spatial clustering of events in all fields.

  9. Statistical searches for microlensing events in large, non-uniformly sampled time-domain surveys: A test using palomar transient factory data

    SciTech Connect

    Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Agüeros, Marcel A.; Fournier, Amanda P.; Street, Rachel; Ofek, Eran O.; Covey, Kevin R.; Levitan, David; Sesar, Branimir; Laher, Russ R.; Surace, Jason

    2014-01-20

    Many photometric time-domain surveys are driven by specific goals, such as searches for supernovae or transiting exoplanets, which set the cadence with which fields are re-imaged. In the case of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), several sub-surveys are conducted in parallel, leading to non-uniform sampling over its ∼20,000 deg{sup 2} footprint. While the median 7.26 deg{sup 2} PTF field has been imaged ∼40 times in the R band, ∼2300 deg{sup 2} have been observed >100 times. We use PTF data to study the trade off between searching for microlensing events in a survey whose footprint is much larger than that of typical microlensing searches, but with far-from-optimal time sampling. To examine the probability that microlensing events can be recovered in these data, we test statistics used on uniformly sampled data to identify variables and transients. We find that the von Neumann ratio performs best for identifying simulated microlensing events in our data. We develop a selection method using this statistic and apply it to data from fields with >10 R-band observations, 1.1 × 10{sup 9} light curves, uncovering three candidate microlensing events. We lack simultaneous, multi-color photometry to confirm these as microlensing events. However, their number is consistent with predictions for the event rate in the PTF footprint over the survey's three years of operations, as estimated from near-field microlensing models. This work can help constrain all-sky event rate predictions and tests microlensing signal recovery in large data sets, which will be useful to future time-domain surveys, such as that planned with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  10. Microlensing Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Andrew

    The theory and practice of microlensing planet searches is developed in a systematic way, from an elementary treatment of the deflection of light by a massive body to a thorough discussion of the most recent results. The main concepts of planetary microlensing, including microlensing events, finite-source effects, and microlens parallax, are first introduced within the simpler context of point-lens events. These ideas are then applied to binary (and hence planetary) lenses and are integrated with concepts specific to binaries, including caustic topologies, orbital motion, and degeneracies, with an emphasis on analytic understanding. The most important results from microlensing planet searches are then reviewed, with emphasis both on understanding the historical process of discovery and the means by which scientific conclusions were drawn from light-curve analysis. Finally, the future prospects of microlensing planets searches are critically evaluated. Citations to original works provide the reader with multiple entry points into the literature.

  11. Optimal survey strategies and predicted planet yields for the Korean microlensing telescope network

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Calen B.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Skowron, Jan; Penny, Matthew T.; Gould, Andrew P.; Han, Cheongho; Nataf, David

    2014-10-10

    The Korean Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet) will consist of three 1.6 m telescopes each with a 4 deg{sup 2} field of view (FoV) and will be dedicated to monitoring the Galactic Bulge to detect exoplanets via gravitational microlensing. KMTNet's combination of aperture size, FoV, cadence, and longitudinal coverage will provide a unique opportunity to probe exoplanet demographics in an unbiased way. Here we present simulations that optimize the observing strategy for and predict the planetary yields of KMTNet. We find preferences for four target fields located in the central Bulge and an exposure time of t {sub exp} = 120 s, leading to the detection of ∼2200 microlensing events per year. We estimate the planet detection rates for planets with mass and separation across the ranges 0.1 ≤ M{sub p} /M {sub ⊕} ≤ 1000 and 0.4 ≤ a/AU ≤ 16, respectively. Normalizing these rates to the cool-planet mass function of Cassan et al., we predict KMTNet will be approximately uniformly sensitive to planets with mass 5 ≤ M{sub p} /M {sub ⊕} ≤ 1000 and will detect ∼20 planets per year per dex in mass across that range. For lower-mass planets with mass 0.1 ≤ M{sub p} /M {sub ⊕} < 5, we predict KMTNet will detect ∼10 planets per year. We also compute the yields KMTNet will obtain for free-floating planets (FFPs) and predict KMTNet will detect ∼1 Earth-mass FFP per year, assuming an underlying population of one such planet per star in the Galaxy. Lastly, we investigate the dependence of these detection rates on the number of observatories, the photometric precision limit, and optimistic assumptions regarding seeing, throughput, and flux measurement uncertainties.

  12. Synthesizing exoplanet demographics from radial velocity and microlensing surveys. II. The frequency of planets orbiting M dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Clanton, Christian; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2014-08-20

    In contrast to radial velocity (RV) surveys, results from microlensing surveys indicate that giant planets with masses greater than the critical mass for core accretion (∼0.1 M {sub Jup}) are relatively common around low-mass stars. Using the methodology developed in the first paper, we predict the sensitivity of M-dwarf RV surveys to analogs of the population of planets inferred by microlensing. We find that RV surveys should detect a handful of super-Jovian (>M {sub Jup}) planets at the longest periods being probed. These planets are indeed found by RV surveys, implying that the demographic constraints inferred from these two methods are consistent. Finally, we combine the results from both methods to estimate planet frequencies spanning wide regions of parameter space. We find that the frequency of Jupiters and super-Jupiters (1 ≲ m{sub p} sin i/M {sub Jup} ≲ 13) with periods 1 ≤ P/days ≤ 10{sup 4} is f{sub J}=0.029{sub −0.015}{sup +0.013}, a median factor of 4.3 (1.5-14 at 95% confidence) smaller than the inferred frequency of such planets around FGK stars of 0.11 ± 0.02. However, we find the frequency of all giant planets with 30 ≲ m{sub p} sin i/M {sub ⊕} ≲ 10{sup 4} and 1 ≤ P/days ≤ 10{sup 4} to be f{sub G}=0.15{sub −0.07}{sup +0.06}, only a median factor of 2.2 (0.73-5.9 at 95% confidence) smaller than the inferred frequency of such planets orbiting FGK stars of 0.31 ± 0.07. For a more conservative definition of giant planets (50 ≲ m{sub p} sin i/M {sub ⊕} ≲ 10{sup 4}), we find f{sub G{sup ′}}=0.11±0.05, a median factor of 2.2 (0.73-6.7 at 95% confidence) smaller than that inferred for FGK stars of 0.25 ± 0.05. Finally, we find the frequency of all planets with 1 ≤ m{sub p} sin i/M {sub ⊕} ≤ 10{sup 4} and 1 ≤ P/days ≤ 10{sup 4} to be f{sub p} = 1.9 ± 0.5.

  13. Synthesizing Exoplanet Demographics from Radial Velocity and Microlensing Surveys. II. The Frequency of Planets Orbiting M Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clanton, Christian; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2014-08-01

    In contrast to radial velocity (RV) surveys, results from microlensing surveys indicate that giant planets with masses greater than the critical mass for core accretion (~0.1 M Jup) are relatively common around low-mass stars. Using the methodology developed in the first paper, we predict the sensitivity of M-dwarf RV surveys to analogs of the population of planets inferred by microlensing. We find that RV surveys should detect a handful of super-Jovian (>M Jup) planets at the longest periods being probed. These planets are indeed found by RV surveys, implying that the demographic constraints inferred from these two methods are consistent. Finally, we combine the results from both methods to estimate planet frequencies spanning wide regions of parameter space. We find that the frequency of Jupiters and super-Jupiters (1 <~ mp sin i/M Jup <~ 13) with periods 1 <= P/days <= 104 is f_J=0.029^{+0.013}_{-0.015}, a median factor of 4.3 (1.5-14 at 95% confidence) smaller than the inferred frequency of such planets around FGK stars of 0.11 ± 0.02. However, we find the frequency of all giant planets with 30 <~ mp sin i/M ⊕ <~ 104 and 1 <= P/days <= 104 to be f_G=0.15^{+0.06}_{-0.07}, only a median factor of 2.2 (0.73-5.9 at 95% confidence) smaller than the inferred frequency of such planets orbiting FGK stars of 0.31 ± 0.07. For a more conservative definition of giant planets (50 <~ mp sin i/M ⊕ <~ 104), we find f_G^{\\prime }=0.11+/- 0.05, a median factor of 2.2 (0.73-6.7 at 95% confidence) smaller than that inferred for FGK stars of 0.25 ± 0.05. Finally, we find the frequency of all planets with 1 <= mp sin i/M ⊕ <= 104 and 1 <= P/days <= 104 to be fp = 1.9 ± 0.5.

  14. Interferometric observation of microlensing events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassan, Arnaud; Ranc, Clément

    2016-05-01

    Interferometric observations of microlensing events have the potential to provide unique constraints on the physical properties of the lensing systems. In this work, we first present a formalism that closely combines interferometric and microlensing observable quantities, which lead us to define an original microlensing (u, v) plane. We run simulations of long-baseline interferometric observations and photometric light curves to decide which observational strategy is required to obtain a precise measurement on vector Einstein radius. We finally perform a detailed analysis of the expected number of targets in the light of new microlensing surveys (2011+) which currently deliver 2000 alerts per year. We find that a few events are already at reach of long-baseline interferometers (CHARA, VLTI), and a rate of about six events per year is expected with a limiting magnitude of K ≃ 10. This number would increase by an order of magnitude by raising it to K ≃ 11. We thus expect that a new route for characterizing microlensing events will be opened by the upcoming generations of interferometers.

  15. Rapidly rotating lenses: repeating features in the light curves of short-period binary microlenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penny, Matthew T.; Kerins, Eamonn; Mao, Shude

    2011-11-01

    Microlensing is most sensitive to binary lenses with relatively large orbital separations, and as such, typical binary microlensing events show little or no orbital motion during the event. However, despite the strength of binary microlensing features falling off rapidly as the lens separation decreases, we show that it is possible to detect repeating features in the light curve of binary microlenses that complete several orbits during the microlensing event. We investigate the light-curve features of such rapidly rotating lens (RRL) events. We derive analytical limits on the range of parameters where these effects are detectable, and confirm these numerically. Using a population synthesis Galactic model, we estimate the RRL event rate for a ground-based and a space-based microlensing survey to be 0.32fb and 7.8fb events per year, respectively, assuming year-round monitoring, where fb is the binary fraction. We detail how RRL event parameters can be quickly estimated from their light curves, and suggest a method to model RRL events using timing measurements of light-curve features. Modelling RRL light curves will yield the lens orbital period and possibly measurements of all orbital elements, including the inclination and eccentricity. Measurement of the period from the light curve allows a mass-distance relation to be defined, which when combined with a measurement of microlens parallax or finite-source effects can yield a mass measurement to a twofold degeneracy. With sub-per cent accuracy photometry, it is possible to detect planetary companions, but the likelihood of this is very small.

  16. Gravitational microlensing I: A unique astrophysical tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahvar, Sohrab

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we review the astrophysical application of gravitational microlensing. After introducing the history of gravitational lensing, we present the key equations and concept of microlensing. The most frequent microlensing events are single-lens events and historically it has been used for searching dark matter in the form of compact astrophysical halo objects in the Galactic halo. We discuss about the degeneracy problem in the parameters of lens and perturbation effects that can partially break the degeneracy between the lens parameters. The rest of paper is about the astrophysical applications of microlensing. One of the important applications is in the stellar physics by probing the surface of source stars in the high magnification microlensing events. The astrometric and polarimetric observations will be complimentary for probing the atmosphere and stellar spots on the surface of source stars. Finally we discuss about the future projects as space-based telescopes for parallax and astrometry observations of microlensing events. With this project, we would expect to produce a complete stellar and remnant mass function and study the structure of Galaxy in term of distribution of stars along our line of sight towards the center of galaxy.

  17. Thermally tunable polymer microlenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xian; Cheng, Chao-Min; Wang, Li; Wang, Bin; Su, Chih-Chuan; Ho, Mon-Shu; LeDuc, Philip R.; Lin, Qiao

    2008-06-01

    Polymer microlenses capable of using heat to control its focal length are presented. The microlenses are created by exposing droplets of the polymer SU-8 to UV light. By altering the temperature of the microlenses via on-chip heating, their curvature and focal length are actively controlled without mechanical movements. By directly and indirectly measuring temperature-dependent changes of the focal length, we test the ability of the microlenses as a tunable imaging component. The microlenses have potential use in applications such as laser systems, functional biomimetics, and endoscopy.

  18. Synthesizing Exoplanet Demographics: A Single Population of Long-period Planetary Companions to M Dwarfs Consistent with Microlensing, Radial Velocity, and Direct Imaging Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clanton, Christian; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2016-03-01

    We present the first study to synthesize results from five different exoplanet surveys using three independent detection methods: microlensing, radial velocity, and direct imaging. The constraints derived herein represent the most comprehensive picture of the demographics of large-separation (≳2 AU) planets orbiting the most common stars in our Galaxy that has been constructed to date. We assume a simple, joint power-law planet distribution function of the form {d}2{N}{{pl}}/(d{log} {m}p d{log} a)={ A }{({m}p/{M}{{Sat}})}α {(a/2.5{{AU}})}β with an outer cutoff radius of the separation distribution function of aout. Generating populations of planets from these models and mapping them into the relevant observables for each survey, we use actual or estimated detection sensitivities to determine the expected observations for each survey. Comparing with the reported results, we derive constraints on the parameters \\{α ,β ,{ A },{a}{{out}}\\} that describe a single population of planets that is simultaneously consistent with the results of microlensing, radial velocity, and direct imaging surveys. We find median and 68% confindence intervals of α =-{0.86}-0.19+0.21 (-{0.85}-0.19+0.21), β ={1.1}-1.4+1.9 ({1.1}-1.3+1.9), { A }={0.21}-0.15+0.20 {{dex}}-2 ({0.21}-0.15+0.20 {{dex}}-2), and {a}{{out}}={10}-4.7+26 AU ({12}-6.2+50 AU) assuming “hot-start” (“cold-start”) planet evolutionary models. These values are consistent with all current knowledge of planets on orbits beyond ∼2 AU around single M dwarfs.

  19. Prospects for Gaia and other planned space-based Galactic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.

    2006-08-01

    Gaia is an all sky astrometric and photometric survey mission which will observe all objects in the sky brighter than magnitude G=20 (V=20-22), some 10^ 9 stars. Gaia will achieve an astrometric accuracy of 12- 25 μas at G=15 (providing a distance accuracy of 1-2% at 1 kpc) and 100-300 μas at G=20 and will measure radial velocities to a precision of 1-10 km/s for brighter sources. To characterize all sources (which are detected in real time), each is observed via low dispersion integral field spectrophotometry. The data processing for Gaia is very complex (self-calibrating; heterogeneous data; little prior information; intrinsically iterative) and is being undertaken by a large consortium of institutes. Fully exploiting the resulting data products will likewise be a challenge: Gaia will be a first in combining photometric and 6D phase space information on such a large scale. The scientific potential is immense. For example, using the kinematics and 3D positions of large numbers of stars across the whole Galaxy we can map its large and small scale structures and thus from a chronology of its formation and evolution (e.g. merger history). Gaia will measure both the gravitational potential of the Galaxy and the stellar luminosity function, from which the distribution of dark matter can be accurately mapped on small scales (< 1 Mpc) for the first time. Accurate distances to thousands of globular and open clusters will significantly improve models of stellar structure and evolution, and the detection of tens of millions of binary systems will permit a calibration of the stellar Mass-Luminosity relation over a wide range of masses and to high accuracy. Gaia is a fully-funded ESA mission due for launch in late 2011. With a nominal mission of five years and 2-3 years planned for post-mission processing, the final catalogue will only be available in about 2020. As it is the only large scale, high-accuracy astrometry mission under construction, it will be a unique source

  20. Minimizing follow-up for space-based transit surveys using full lightcurve analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefs, S. V.; Snellen, I. A. G.; de Mooij, E. J. W.

    2012-07-01

    Context. One of the biggest challenges facing large transit surveys is the elimination of false-positives from the vast number of transit candidates. A large amount of expensive follow-up time is spent on verifying the nature of these systems. Aims: We investigate to what extent information from the lightcurves can identify blend scenarios and eliminate them as planet candidates, to significantly decrease the amount of follow-up observing time required to identify the true exoplanet systems. Methods: If a lightcurve has a sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio, a distinction can be made between the lightcurve of a stellar binary blended with a third star and the lightcurve of a transiting exoplanet system. We first simulate lightcurves of stellar blends and transiting planet systems to determine what signal-to-noise level is required to make the distinction between blended and non-blended systems as function of transit depth and impact parameter. Subsequently we test our method on real data from the first IRa01 field observed by the CoRoT satellite, concentrating on the 51 candidates already identified by the CoRoT team. Results: Our simulations show that blend scenarios can be constrained for transiting systems at low impact parameters. At high impact parameter, blended and non-blended systems are indistinguishable from each other because they both produce V-shaped transits. About 70% of the planet candidates in the CoRoT IRa01 field are best fit with an impact parameter of b > 0.85, while less than 15% are expected in this range considering random orbital inclinations. By applying a cut at b < 0.85, meaning that ~15% of the potential planet population would be missed, the candidate sample decreases from 41 to 11. The lightcurves of 6 of those are best fit with such low host star densities that the planet-to-star size ratii imply unrealistic planet radii of R > 2 RJup. Two of the five remaining systems, CoRoT1b and CoRoT4b, have been identified as planets by the

  1. Dynamics and Origin of Extra-solar Planetary Systems and Microlensing Detection of Extra-solar Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peale, S. J.

    2003-01-01

    We compare a space-based microlensing search for planets, with a ground based microlensing search originally proposed by D. Tytler (Beichman, et al. 1996). Perturbations of microlensing light curves when the lens star has a planetary companion are sought by one wide angle survey telescope and an array of three or four followup narrow angle telescopes distributed in longitude that follow events with high precision, high time resolution photometry. Alternative ground based programs are considered briefly. With the four 2 meter telescopes distributed in longitude in the southern hemisphere in the Tytler proposal, observational constraints on a ground-based search for planets during microlensing events toward the center of the galaxy are severe. Probably less than 100 events could be monitored per year with high precision, high time resolution photometry with only about 42% coverage on the average regardless of how many events were discovered by the survey telescope. Statistics for the occurrence and properties for Jupiter-mass planets would be meaningful but relatively meager four years after the program was started, and meaningful statistics for Earth-mass planets would be non existent. In contrast, the 14,500 events in a proposed 4 year space based program (GEST = Galactic Exoplanet Survey Telescope) would yield very sound statistics on the occurrence, masses and separations of Jupiter-mass planets, and significant constraints on similar properties for Earth-mass planets. The significance of the Jupiter statistics would be to establish the frequency of planetary systems like our own, where terrestrial planets could exist inside the orbits of the giants.

  2. Accurately Mapping M31's Microlensing Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotts, Arlin

    2004-07-01

    We propose to augment an existing microlensing survey of M31 with source identifications provided by a modest amount of ACS {and WFPC2 parallel} observations to yield an accurate measurement of the masses responsible for microlensing in M31, and presumably much of its dark matter. The main benefit of these data is the determination of the physical {or "einstein"} timescale of each microlensing event, rather than an effective {"FWHM"} timescale, allowing masses to be determined more than twice as accurately as without HST data. The einstein timescale is the ratio of the lensing cross-sectional radius and relative velocities. Velocities are known from kinematics, and the cross-section is directly proportional to the {unknown} lensing mass. We cannot easily measure these quantities without knowing the amplification, hence the baseline magnitude, which requires the resolution of HST to find the source star. This makes a crucial difference because M31 lens m ass determinations can be more accurate than those towards the Magellanic Clouds through our Galaxy's halo {for the same number of microlensing events} due to the better constrained geometry in the M31 microlensing situation. Furthermore, our larger survey, just completed, should yield at least 100 M31 microlensing events, more than any Magellanic survey. A small amount of ACS+WFPC2 imaging will deliver the potential of this large database {about 350 nights}. For the whole survey {and a delta-function mass distribution} the mass error should approach only about 15%, or about 6% error in slope for a power-law distribution. These results will better allow us to pinpoint the lens halo fraction, and the shape of the halo lens spatial distribution, and allow generalization/comparison of the nature of halo dark matter in spiral galaxies. In addition, we will be able to establish the baseline magnitude for about 50, 000 variable stars, as well as measure an unprecedentedly deta iled color-magnitude diagram and luminosity

  3. The Angstrom Project: a new microlensing candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerins, E.; Darnley, M. J.; Newsam, A. M.; Duke, J. P.; Gould, A.; Street, C. Han B.-G. Park R. A.

    2008-12-01

    We report the discovery of a new microlensing candidate in M31 by the Angstrom Project M31 bulge microlensing survey using the Liverpool Telescope (La Palma). The candidate was discovered using difference imaging techniques by the Angstrom Project Alert System (APAS) in a series of Sloan i'-band images of the bulge of M31.

  4. Evaluating the effect of stellar multiplicity on the point spread function of space-based weak lensing surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntzer, T.; Courbin, F.; Meylan, G.

    2016-02-01

    The next generation of space-based telescopes used for weak lensing surveys will require exquisite point spread function (PSF) determination. Previously negligible effects may become important in the reconstruction of the PSF, in part because of the improved spatial resolution. In this paper, we show that unresolved multiple star systems can affect the ellipticity and size of the PSF and that this effect is not cancelled even when using many stars in the reconstruction process. We estimate the error in the reconstruction of the PSF due to the binaries in the star sample both analytically and with image simulations for different PSFs and stellar populations. The simulations support our analytical finding that the error on the size of the PSF is a function of the multiple stars distribution and of the intrinsic value of the size of the PSF, i.e. if all stars were single. Similarly, the modification of each of the complex ellipticity components (e1,e2) depends on the distribution of multiple stars and on the intrinsic complex ellipticity. Using image simulations, we also show that the predicted error in the PSF shape is a theoretical limit that can be reached only if large number of stars (up to thousands) are used together to build the PSF at any desired spatial position. For a lower number of stars, the PSF reconstruction is worse. Finally, we compute the effect of binarity for different stellar magnitudes and show that bright stars alter the PSF size and ellipticity more than faint stars. This may affect the design of PSF calibration strategies and the choice of the related calibration fields.

  5. PLANETESIMAL DISK MICROLENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Heng, Kevin; Keeton, Charles R. E-mail: keeton@physics.rutgers.ed

    2009-12-10

    Motivated by debris disk studies, we investigate the gravitational microlensing of background starlight by a planetesimal disk around a foreground star. We use dynamical survival models to construct a plausible example of a planetesimal disk and study its microlensing properties using established ideas of microlensing by small bodies. When a solar-type source star passes behind a planetesimal disk, the microlensing light curve may exhibit short-term, low-amplitude residuals caused by planetesimals several orders of magnitude below Earth mass. The minimum planetesimal mass probed depends on the photometric sensitivity and the size of the source star, and is lower when the planetesimal lens is located closer to us. Planetesimal lenses may be found more nearby than stellar lenses because the steepness of the planetesimal mass distribution changes how the microlensing signal depends on the lens/source distance ratio. Microlensing searches for planetesimals require essentially continuous monitoring programs that are already feasible and can potentially set constraints on models of debris disks, the progeny of the supposed extrasolar analogues of Kuiper Belts.

  6. Detection of planets in extremely weak central perturbation microlensing events via next-generation ground-based surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Sun-Ju; Lee, Chung-Uk; Koo, Jae-Rim E-mail: leecu@kasi.re.kr

    2014-04-20

    Even though the recently discovered high-magnification event MOA-2010-BLG-311 had complete coverage over its peak, confident planet detection did not happen due to extremely weak central perturbations (EWCPs, fractional deviations of ≲ 2%). For confident detection of planets in EWCP events, it is necessary to have both high cadence monitoring and high photometric accuracy better than those of current follow-up observation systems. The next-generation ground-based observation project, Korea Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet), satisfies these conditions. We estimate the probability of occurrence of EWCP events with fractional deviations of ≤2% in high-magnification events and the efficiency of detecting planets in the EWCP events using the KMTNet. From this study, we find that the EWCP events occur with a frequency of >50% in the case of ≲ 100 M {sub E} planets with separations of 0.2 AU ≲ d ≲ 20 AU. We find that for main-sequence and sub-giant source stars, ≳ 1 M {sub E} planets in EWCP events with deviations ≤2% can be detected with frequency >50% in a certain range that changes with the planet mass. However, it is difficult to detect planets in EWCP events of bright stars like giant stars because it is easy for KMTNet to be saturated around the peak of the events because of its constant exposure time. EWCP events are caused by close, intermediate, and wide planetary systems with low-mass planets and close and wide planetary systems with massive planets. Therefore, we expect that a much greater variety of planetary systems than those already detected, which are mostly intermediate planetary systems, regardless of the planet mass, will be significantly detected in the near future.

  7. Astrometric microlensing with the GAIA satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belokurov, V. A.; Evans, N. W.

    2002-04-01

    GAIA is the `super-Hipparcos ' survey satellite selected as a Cornerstone 6 mission by the European Space Agency. GAIA can measure microlensing by the brightening of source stars. For the broad G -band photometer, the all-sky source-averaged photometric optical depth is ~10-7 . There are ~1300 photometric microlensing events for which GAIA will measure at least one data point on the amplified light curve. GAIA can also measure microlensing by the small excursions of the light centroid that occur during events. The all-sky source-averaged astrometric microlensing optical depth is ~2.5×10-5 . Some ~25000 sources will have a significant variation of the centroid shift, together with a closest approach, during the lifetime of the mission. This is not the actual number of events that can be extracted from the GAIA data set, as the false detection rate has not been assessed. A covariance analysis is used to study the propagation of errors and the estimation of parameters from realistic sampling of the GAIA data stream of transits in the along-scan direction during microlensing events. The mass of the lens can be calculated to good accuracy if the lens is nearby so that the angular Einstein radius θ E is large; if the Einstein radius projected on to the observer plane r~ E is approximately an astronomical unit; or if the duration of the astrometric event is long (>~1yr) or the source star is bright . Monte Carlo simulations are used to study the ~2500 events for which the mass can be recovered with an error of <50 per cent. These high-quality events are dominated by disc lenses within a few tens of parsecs and source stars within a few hundred parsecs. We show that the local mass function can be recovered from the high-quality sample to good accuracy. GAIA is the first instrument with the capability of measuring the mass locally in very faint objects such as black holes and very cool white and brown dwarfs. For only ~5 per cent of all astrometric events will GAIA record

  8. Gravitational Microlensing Events as a Target for the SETI project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahvar, Sohrab

    2016-09-01

    The detection of signals from a possible extrasolar technological civilization is one of the most challenging efforts of science. In this work, we propose using natural telescopes made of single or binary gravitational lensing systems to magnify leakage of electromagnetic signals from a remote planet that harbors Extraterrestrial Intelligent (ETI) technology. Currently, gravitational microlensing surveys are monitoring a large area of the Galactic bulge to search for microlensing events, finding more than 2000 events per year. These lenses are capable of playing the role of natural telescopes, and, in some instances, they can magnify radio band signals from planets orbiting around the source stars in gravitational microlensing systems. Assuming that the frequency of electromagnetic waves used for telecommunication in ETIs is similar to ours, we propose follow-up observation of microlensing events with radio telescopes such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), the Low Frequency Demonstrators, and the Mileura Wide-Field Array. Amplifying signals from the leakage of broadcasting by an Earth-like civilization will allow us to detect them as far as the center of the Milky Way galaxy. Our analysis shows that in binary microlensing systems, the probability of amplification of signals from ETIs is more than that in single microlensing events. Finally, we propose the use of the target of opportunity mode for follow-up observations of binary microlensing events with SKA as a new observational program for searching ETIs. Using optimistic values for the factors of the Drake equation provides detection of about one event per year.

  9. Theory of dispersive microlenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, B.; Gal, George

    1993-01-01

    A dispersive microlens is a miniature optical element which simultaneously focuses and disperses light. Arrays of dispersive mircolenses have potential applications in multicolor focal planes. They have a 100 percent optical fill factor and can focus light down to detectors of diffraction spot size, freeing up areas on the focal plane for on-chip analog signal processing. Use of dispersive microlenses allows inband color separation within a pixel and perfect scene registration. A dual-color separation has the potential for temperature discrimination. We discuss the design of dispersive microlenses and present sample results for efficient designs.

  10. Microlensing Signature of Binary Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy; Sahu, Kailash; Littenberg, Tyson

    2012-01-01

    We calculate the light curves of galactic bulge stars magnified via microlensing by stellar-mass binary black holes along the line-of-sight. We show the sensitivity to measuring various lens parameters for a range of survey cadences and photometric precision. Using public data from the OGLE collaboration, we identify two candidates for massive binary systems, and discuss implications for theories of star formation and binary evolution.

  11. A study of the performance of the transit detection tool DST in space-based surveys. Application of the CoRoT pipeline to Kepler data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, J.; Csizmadia, Sz.; Erikson, A.; Rauer, H.; Kirste, S.

    2012-12-01

    Context. Transit detection algorithms are mathematical tools used for detecting planets in the photometric data of transit surveys. In this work we study their application to space-based surveys. Aims: Space missions are exploring the parameter space of the transit surveys where classical algorithms do not perform optimally, either because of the challenging signal-to-noise ratio of the signal or its non-periodic characteristics. We have developed an algorithm addressing these challenges for the mission CoRoT. Here we extend the application to the data from the space mission Kepler. We aim at understanding the performances of algorithms in different data sets. Methods: We built a simple analytical model of the transit signal and developed a strategy for the search that improves the detection performance for transiting planets. We analyzed Kepler data with a set of stellar activity filtering and transit detection tools from the CoRoT community that are designed for the search of transiting planets. Results: We present a new algorithm and its performances compared to one of the most widely used techniques in the literature using CoRoT data. Additionally, we analyzed Kepler data corresponding to quarter Q1 and compare our results with the most recent list of planetary candidates from the Kepler survey. We found candidates that went unnoticed by the Kepler team when analyzing longer data sets. We study the impact of instrumental features on the production of false alarms and false positives. These results show that the analysis of space mission data advocates the use of complementary detrending and transit detection tools also for future space-based transit surveys such as PLATO.

  12. Difference Image Analysis of Galactic Microlensing. II. Microlensing Events

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, C.; Allsman, R. A.; Alves, D.; Axelrod, T. S.; Becker, A. C.; Bennett, D. P.; Cook, K. H.; Drake, A. J.; Freeman, K. C.; Griest, K.

    1999-09-01

    The MACHO collaboration has been carrying out difference image analysis (DIA) since 1996 with the aim of increasing the sensitivity to the detection of gravitational microlensing. This is a preliminary report on the application of DIA to galactic bulge images in one field. We show how the DIA technique significantly increases the number of detected lensing events, by removing the positional dependence of traditional photometry schemes and lowering the microlensing event detection threshold. This technique, unlike PSF photometry, gives the unblended colors and positions of the microlensing source stars. We present a set of criteria for selecting microlensing events from objects discovered with this technique. The 16 pixel and classical microlensing events discovered with the DIA technique are presented. (c) (c) 1999. The American Astronomical Society.

  13. Astrophysical applications of gravitational microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Subo

    The first few topics are on searching and characterizing extrasolar planets by means of high-magnification microlensing events. The detection efficiency analysis of the A max ~ 3000 event OGLE-2004-BLG-343 is presented. Due to human error, intensive monitoring did not begin until 43 minutes after peak, at which point the magnification had fallen to A ~ 1200. It is shown that, had a similar event been well sampled over the peak, it would have been sensitive to almost all Neptune-mass planets over a factor of 5 in projected separation and even would have had some sensitivity to Earth-mass planets. New algorithms optimized for fast evaluation of binary-lens models with finite-sources effects have been developed. These algorithms have enabled efficient and thorough parameter-space searches in modeling planetary high- magnification events. The detection of the cool, Jovian-mass planet MOA-2007- BLG-400Lb, discovered from an A max = 628 event with severe finite-source effects, is reported. Detailed analysis yields a fairly precise planet/star mass ratio of q = ([Special characters omitted.] ) × 10^-3 , while the planet/ star projected separation is subject to a strong close/wide degeneracy. Photometric and astrometric measurements from Hubble Space Telescope, as well as constraints from higher order effects extracted from the ground-based light curve (microlens parallax, planetary orbital motion and finite-source effects) are used to constrain the nature of planetary event OGLE-2005-BLG-071Lb. Our primary analysis leads to the conclusion that the host is an M = 0.46 ± 0.04 [Special characters omitted.] M dwarf and that the planet has mass M p = 3.8 ± 0.4 M Jupiter , which is likely to be the most massive planet yet discovered that is hosted by an M dwarf. Next a spaced-based microlens parallax is determined for the first time using Spitzer and ground-based observations for binary-lens event OGLE-2005-SMC-001. The parallax measurement yields a projected velocity v

  14. A Space-Based Near-Earth Object Survey Telescope in Support of Human Exploration, Solar System Science, and Planetary Defense

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abell, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Human exploration of near-Earth objects (NEOs) beginning in 2025 is one of the stated objectives of U.S. National Space Policy. Piloted missions to these bodies would further development of deep space mission systems and technologies, obtain better understanding of the origin and evolution of our Solar System, and support research for asteroid deflection and hazard mitigation strategies. As such, mission concepts have received much interest from the exploration, science, and planetary defense communities. One particular system that has been suggested by all three of these communities is a space-based NEO survey telescope. Such an asset is crucial for enabling affordable human missions to NEOs circa 2025 and learning about the primordial population of objects that could present a hazard to the Earth in the future.

  15. A new parameter space study of cosmological microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernardos, G.; Fluke, C. J.

    2013-09-01

    Cosmological gravitational microlensing is a useful technique for understanding the structure of the inner parts of a quasar, especially the accretion disc and the central supermassive black hole. So far, most of the cosmological microlensing studies have focused on single objects from ˜90 currently known lensed quasars. However, present and planned all-sky surveys are expected to discover thousands of new lensed systems. Using a graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerated ray-shooting code, we have generated 2550 magnification maps uniformly across the convergence (κ) and shear (γ) parameter space of interest to microlensing. We examine the effect of random realizations of the microlens positions on map properties such as the magnification probability distribution (MPD). It is shown that for most of the parameter space a single map is representative of an average behaviour. All of the simulations have been carried out on the GPU Supercomputer for Theoretical Astrophysics Research.

  16. The MACHO Project HST Follow-Up: The Large Magellanic Cloud Microlensing Source Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C.A.; Drake, A.J.; Cook, K.H.; Bennett, D.P.; Popowski, P.; Dalal, N.; Nikolaev, S.; Alcock, C.; Axelrod, T.S.; Becker, A.C. Freeman, K.C.; Geha, M.; Griest, K.; Keller, S.C.; Lehner, M.J.; Marshall, S.L.; Minniti, D.; Pratt, M.R.; Quinn, P.J.; Stubbs, C.W.; Sutherland, W.; /Oxford U. /Oran, Sci. Tech. U. /Garching, Max Planck Inst. /McMaster U.

    2009-06-25

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 photometry of 13 microlensed source stars from the 5.7 year Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) survey conducted by the MACHO Project. The microlensing source stars are identified by deriving accurate centroids in the ground-based MACHO images using difference image analysis (DIA) and then transforming the DIA coordinates to the HST frame. None of these sources is coincident with a background galaxy, which rules out the possibility that the MACHO LMC microlensing sample is contaminated with misidentified supernovae or AGN in galaxies behind the LMC. This supports the conclusion that the MACHO LMC microlensing sample has only a small amount of contamination due to non-microlensing forms of variability. We compare the WFPC2 source star magnitudes with the lensed flux predictions derived from microlensing fits to the light curve data. In most cases the source star brightness is accurately predicted. Finally, we develop a statistic which constrains the location of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) microlensing source stars with respect to the distributions of stars and dust in the LMC and compare this to the predictions of various models of LMC microlensing. This test excludes at {approx}> 90% confidence level models where more than 80% of the source stars lie behind the LMC. Exotic models that attempt to explain the excess LMC microlensing optical depth seen by MACHO with a population of background sources are disfavored or excluded by this test. Models in which most of the lenses reside in a halo or spheroid distribution associated with either the Milky Way or the LMC are consistent which these data, but LMC halo or spheroid models are favored by the combined MACHO and EROS microlensing results.

  17. Kicked Neutron Stars and Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollerach, Silvia; Roulet, Esteban

    1997-04-01

    Because of the large kick velocities with which neutron stars are born in supernova explosions, their spatial distribution is more extended than that of their progenitor stars. The large scale height of the neutron stars above the disk plane makes them potential candidates for microlensing of stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Adopting for the distribution of kicks the measured velocities of young pulsars, we obtain a microlensing optical depth of τ ~ 2N10 × 10-8 (where N10 is the total number of neutron stars born in the disk in units of 1010). The event duration distribution has the interesting property of being peaked at T ~ 60-80 days, but for the rates to be relevant for the present microlensing searches, it would require N10 >~ 1, a value larger than the usually adopted ones (N10 ~ 0.1-0.2).

  18. Liquid tunable microlenses based on MEMS techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xuefeng; Jiang, Hongrui

    2013-08-01

    The recent rapid development in microlens technology has provided many opportunities for miniaturized optical systems, and has found a wide range of applications. Of these microlenses, tunable-focus microlenses are of special interest as their focal lengths can be tuned using micro-scale actuators integrated with the lens structure. Realization of such tunable microlens generally relies on the microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technologies. Here, we review the recent progress in tunable liquid microlenses. The underlying physics relevant to these microlenses are first discussed, followed by description of three main categories of tunable microlenses involving MEMS techniques, mechanically driven, electrically driven and those integrated within microfluidic systems.

  19. Liquid Tunable Microlenses based on MEMS techniques

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xuefeng; Jiang, Hongrui

    2013-01-01

    The recent rapid development in microlens technology has provided many opportunities for miniaturized optical systems, and has found a wide range of applications. Of these microlenses, tunable-focus microlenses are of special interest as their focal lengths can be tuned using micro-scale actuators integrated with the lens structure. Realization of such tunable microlens generally relies on the microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technologies. Here, we review the recent progress in tunable liquid microlenses. The underlying physics relevant to these microlenses are first discussed, followed by description of three main categories of tunable microlenses involving MEMS techniques, mechanically driven, electrically driven, and those integrated within microfluidic systems. PMID:24163480

  20. Microlensing Parallax for Observers in Heliocentric Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calchi Novati, S.; Scarpetta, G.

    2016-06-01

    Motivated by the ongoing Spitzer observational campaign, and the forthcoming K2 one, we revisit, working in an heliocentric reference frame, the geometrical foundation for the analysis of the microlensing parallax, as measured with the simultaneous observation of the same microlensing event from two observers with relative distance of order au. For the case of observers at rest, we discuss the well-known fourfold microlensing parallax degeneracy and determine an equation for the degenerate directions of the lens trajectory. For the case of observers in motion, we write down an extension of the Gould relationship between the microlensing parallax and the observable quantities and, at the same time, highlight the functional dependence of these same quantities from the timescale of the underlying microlensing event. Furthermore, through a series of examples, we show the importance of taking into account themotion of the observers to correctly recover the parameters of the underlying microlensing event. In particular, we discuss the cases of the amplitude of the microlensing parallax and that of the difference of the timescales between the observed microlensing events, which are key to understand the breaking of the microlensing parallax degeneracy. Finally, we consider the case of the simultaneous observation of the same microlensing event from the ground and two satellites, a case relevant for the expected joint K2 and Spitzer observational programs in 2016.

  1. The effect of macromodel uncertainties on microlensing modelling of lensed quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernardos, G.; Fluke, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Cosmological gravitational microlensing has been proven to be a powerful tool to constrain the structure of multiply imaged quasars, especially the accretion disc and central supermassive black hole system. However, the derived constraints on models may be affected by large systematic errors introduced in the various stages of modelling, namely, the macromodels, the microlensing magnification maps, and the convolution with realistic disc profiles. In particular, it has been known that different macromodels of the galaxy lens that fit the observations equally well, can lead to different values of convergence, κ, and shear, γ, required to generate magnification maps. So far, ˜25 microlensed quasars have been studied using microlensing techniques, where each system has been modelled and analysed individually, or in small samples. This is about to change due to the upcoming synoptic all-sky surveys, which are expected to discover thousands of quasars suitable for microlensing studies. In this study, we investigate the connection between macromodels of the galaxy lens and microlensing magnification maps throughout the parameter space in preparation for future studies of large statistical samples of systems displaying microlensing. In particular, we use 55 900 maps produced by the GERLUMPH parameter survey (available online at http://gerlumph.swin.edu.au) and identify regions of parameter space where macromodel uncertainties (Δκ, Δγ) lead to statistically different magnification maps. Strategies for mitigating the effect of Δκ, Δγ uncertainties are discussed in order to understand and control this potential source of systematic errors in accretion disc constraints derived from microlensing.

  2. Microlensing Towards M31: Candidates and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calchi Novati, S.

    2004-01-01

    Recent results of the SLOTT-AGAPE and POINT-AGAPE collaborations on a search for microlensing events in direction of the Andromeda galaxy, by using the pixel method, are reported. The detection of 4 microlensing events, some likely to be due to self--lensing, is discussed. One microlensing light curve is shown to be compatible with a binary lens. The present analysis still does not allow us to draw conclusions on the MACHO content of the M31 galaxy.

  3. Microlensing Towards M31:. Candidates and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novati, S. Calchi

    Recent results of the SLOTT-AGAPB and POINT-AGAPE collaborations on a search for microlensing events in direction of the Andromeda galaxy, by using the pixel method, are reported. The detection of 4 microlensing events, some likely to be due to self-lensing, is discussed. One microlensing light curve is shown to be compatible with a binary lens. The present analysis still does not allow us to draw conclusions on the MACHO content of the M31 galaxy.

  4. Gravitational microlensing results from MACHO

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, C.; MACHO Collaboration

    1996-09-01

    The MACHO project is searching for dark qter inthe form of massive compact haio objects (Machos), by monitoring the brightness of millions of stars in the Magellanic Clouds to search for gravitational microlensing events. Analysis of our 1st 2.3 years of data for 8.5 million stars in the LMC yields 8 candidate microlensing events, well in excess of the {approx} 1 event expected from lensing by known low-mass stars. The event timescales range from 34 to 145 days, and the estimated optical depth is N 2x10{sup -7}, about half of that expected from a `standard` halo. Likelihood analysis indicates the typical lens mass is 0.5{sup +0.3}{sub -0.2}M{sub {circle_dot}}, suggesting they may be old white dwarfs.

  5. Quasar microlensing and dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rix, Hans-Walter; Hogan, Craig J.

    1988-01-01

    The amplification of quasar brightness due to gravitational lensing by foreground objects is discussed. It is shown that a recently published sample of X-ray-selected quasars behind foreground galaxies shows a statistically significant brightening compared to a control sample. Correlations with galaxy redshift and impact parameter predicted by microlensing are also demonstrated. A technique is described to measure the mean density of the lenses from a small number of identified cases of microlensing. It is shown that, in this sample, amplification bias is important in determining the mean intensity enhancement and must be included in the density estimate. Assuming that at least two of the four intrinsically brightest quasars behind galaxies are indeed microlensed, the present data yield a formal lower limit on the mean density parameter of lenses Omega(l) greater than 0.25 at 95 percent confidence. These data also imply that a considerable quantity of dark matter exists in macroscopic objects outside the visible parts of galaxies but is still highly correlated with them.

  6. HST imaging of MEGA Microlensing Candidates in M31

    SciTech Connect

    Cseresnjes, Patrick; Crotts, Arlin P.S.; de Jong, Jelte T.A.; Bergier, Alex; Baltz, Edward A.; Gyuk, Geza; Kuijken, Konrad; Widrow, Lawrence M.; /Columbia U., Astron. Astrophys. /Kapteyn Astron. Inst., Groningen /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Leiden Observ. /Queen's U., Kingston

    2005-07-14

    We investigate HST/ACS and WFPC2 images at the positions of five candidate microlensing events from a large survey of variability in M31 (MEGA). Three closely match unresolved sources, and two produce only flux upper limits. All are confined to regions of the color-magnitude diagram where stellar variability is unlikely to be easily confused with microlensing. Red variable stars cannot explain these events (although background supernova are possible for two). If these lenses arise in M31's halo, they are due to masses 0.08 < m/M{sub {circle_dot}} < 0.85 (95% certainty, for a {delta}-function mass distribution), brown dwarfs for disk/disk, and stellar masses for disk/bulge ''self-lensing''.

  7. Microlensing by Kuiper, Oort, and Free-Floating Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Microlensing is generally thought to probe planetary systems only out to a few Einstein radii. Microlensing events generated by bound planets beyond about 10 Einstein radii generally do not yield any trace of their hosts, and so would be classified as free floating planets (FFPs). I show that it is already possible, using adaptive optics (AO), to constrain the presence of potential hosts to FFP candidates at separations comparable to the Oort Cloud. With next-generation telescopes, planets at Kuiper-Belt separations can be probed. Next generation telescopes will also permit routine vetting for all FFP candidates, simply by obtaining second epochs 4-8 years after the event.At present, the search for such hosts is restricted to within the ``confusion limit'' of θ_\\confus ˜ 0.25'' but future WFIRST (Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope) observations will allow one to probe beyond this confusion limit as well.

  8. The frequency of snowline-region planets from four years of OGLE-MOA-Wise second-generation microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvartzvald, Y.; Maoz, D.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Friedmann, M.; Kaspi, S.; Poleski, R.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Mróz, P.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Abe, F.; Barry, R. K.; Bennett, D. P.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bond, I. A.; Freeman, M.; Inayama, K.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Fukui, A.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Wakiyama, Y.; Yonehara, A.

    2016-04-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the first four seasons from a `second-generation' microlensing survey for extrasolar planets, consisting of near-continuous time coverage of 8 deg2 of the Galactic bulge by the Optical Gravitational Lens Experiment (OGLE), Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics (MOA), and Wise microlensing surveys. During this period, 224 microlensing events were observed by all three groups. Over 12 per cent of the events showed a deviation from single-lens microlensing, and for ˜one-third of those the anomaly is likely caused by a planetary companion. For each of the 224 events, we have performed numerical ray-tracing simulations to calculate the detection efficiency of possible companions as a function of companion-to-host mass ratio and separation. Accounting for the detection efficiency, we find that 55^{+34}_{-22} per cent of microlensed stars host a snowline planet. Moreover, we find that Neptune-mass planets are ˜10 times more common than Jupiter-mass planets. The companion-to-host mass-ratio distribution shows a deficit at q ˜ 10-2, separating the distribution into two companion populations, analogous to the stellar-companion and planet populations, seen in radial-velocity surveys around solar-like stars. Our survey, however, which probes mainly lower mass stars, suggests a minimum in the distribution in the super-Jupiter mass range, and a relatively high occurrence of brown-dwarf companions.

  9. Space Based Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, James; Denson, Erik; Valencia, Lisa; Birr, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Current space lift launches on the Eastern and Western Range require extensive ground-based real-time tracking, communications and command/control systems. These are expensive to maintain and operate and cover only limited geographical areas. Future spaceports will require new technologies to provide greater launch and landing opportunities, support simultaneous missions, and offer enhanced decision support models and simulation capabilities. These ranges must also have lower costs and reduced complexity while continuing to provide unsurpassed safety to the public, flight crew, personnel, vehicles and facilities. Commercial and government space-based assets for tracking and communications offer many attractive possibilities to help achieve these goals. This paper describes two NASA proof-of-concept projects that seek-to exploit the advantages of a space-based range: Iridium Flight Modem and Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety (STARS). Iridium Flight Modem uses the commercial satellite system Iridium for extremely low cost, low rate two-way communications and has been successfully tested on four aircraft flights. A sister project at Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) using the Globalstar system has been tested on one rocket. The basic Iridium Flight Modem system consists of a L1 carrier Coarse/Acquisition (C/A)-Code Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, an on-board computer, and a standard commercial satellite modem and antennas. STARS uses the much higher data rate NASA owned Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS), a C/A-Code GPS receiver, an experimental low-power transceiver, custom built command and data handler processor, and digitized flight termination system (FTS) commands. STARS is scheduled to fly on an F-15 at Dryden Flight Research Center in the spring of 2003, with follow-on tests over the next several years.

  10. Space Base One

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snead, James M.

    Space Base One (SB1) is a 'good enough' (rather than 'best') performance engineering-oriented, permanently manned space station design employing Space Shuttle External Tank manufacturing capabilities, Space Shuttle-derived launch systems such as the Shuttle-C, and subsystem technologies under development for Space Station Freedom. The structure of SB1 is geometrically simple in arrangement, consisting of paired spokes radiating from a central hub. Attention is given to the assembly sequence for an initial operational capability phase of SB1 development.

  11. The OGLE-III planet detection efficiency from six years of microlensing observations (2003-2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsapras, Y.; Hundertmark, M.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Horne, K.; Udalski, A.; Snodgrass, C.; Street, R.; Bramich, D. M.; Dominik, M.; Bozza, V.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Kains, N.; Skowron, J.; Szymański, M. K.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Kozłowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Poleski, R.

    2016-04-01

    We use six years (2003-2008) of Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment-III microlensing observations to derive the survey detection efficiency for a range of planetary masses and projected distances from the host star. We perform an independent analysis of the microlensing light curves to extract the event parameters and compute the planet detection probability given the data. 2433 light curves satisfy our quality selection criteria and are retained for further processing. The aggregate of the detection probabilities over the range explored yields the expected number of microlensing planet detections. We employ a Galactic model to convert this distribution from dimensionless to physical units, α/au and M⊕. The survey sensitivity to small planets is highest in the range 1-4 au, shifting to slightly larger separations for more massive ones.

  12. GERLUMPH DATA RELEASE 1: HIGH-RESOLUTION COSMOLOGICAL MICROLENSING MAGNIFICATION MAPS AND eResearch TOOLS

    SciTech Connect

    Vernardos, G.; Fluke, C. J.; Croton, D.; Bate, N. F.

    2014-03-01

    As synoptic all-sky surveys begin to discover new multiply lensed quasars, the flow of data will enable statistical cosmological microlensing studies of sufficient size to constrain quasar accretion disk and supermassive black hole properties. In preparation for this new era, we are undertaking the GPU-Enabled, High Resolution cosmological MicroLensing parameter survey (GERLUMPH). We present here the GERLUMPH Data Release 1, which consists of 12,342 high resolution cosmological microlensing magnification maps and provides the first uniform coverage of the convergence, shear, and smooth matter fraction parameter space. We use these maps to perform a comprehensive numerical investigation of the mass-sheet degeneracy, finding excellent agreement with its predictions. We study the effect of smooth matter on microlensing induced magnification fluctuations. In particular, in the minima and saddle-point regions, fluctuations are enhanced only along the critical line, while in the maxima region they are always enhanced for high smooth matter fractions (≈0.9). We describe our approach to data management, including the use of an SQL database with a Web interface for data access and online analysis, obviating the need for individuals to download large volumes of data. In combination with existing observational databases and online applications, the GERLUMPH archive represents a fundamental component of a new microlensing eResearch cloud. Our maps and tools are publicly available at http://gerlumph.swin.edu.au/.

  13. Space-Based Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Space-Based Range (SBR), previously known as Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety (STARS), is a multicenter NASA proof-of-concept project to determine if space-based communications using NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) can support the Range Safety functions of acquiring tracking data and generating flight termination signals, while also providing broadband Range User data such as voice, video, and vehicle/payload data. There was a successful test of the Range Safety system at Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) on December 20, 2005, on a two-stage Terrier-Orion spin-stabilized sounding rocket. SBR transmitted GPS tracking data and maintained links with two TDRSS satellites simultaneously during the 10-min flight. The payload section deployed a parachute, landed in the Atlantic Ocean about 90 miles downrange from the launch site, and was successfully recovered. During the Terrier-Orion tests flights, more than 99 percent of all forward commands and more than 95 percent of all return frames were successfully received and processed. The time latency necessary for a command to travel from WFF over landlines to White Sands Complex and then to the vehicle via TDRSS, be processed onboard, and then be sent back to WFF was between 1.0 s and 1.1 s. The forward-link margins for TDRS-10 (TDRS East [TDE]) were 11 dB to 12 dB plus or minus 2 dB, and for TDRS-4 (TDRS Spare [TDS]) were 9 dB to 10 dB plus or minus 1.5 dB. The return-link margins for both TDE and TDS were 6 dB to 8 dB plus or minus 3 dB. There were 11 flights on an F-15B at Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) between November 2006 and February 2007. The Range User system tested a 184-element TDRSS Ku-band (15 GHz) phased-array antenna with data rates of 5 Mbps and 10 Mbps. This data was a combination of black-and-white cockpit video, Range Safety tracking and transceiver data, and aircraft and antenna controller data streams. IP data formatting was used.

  14. Eclipsing negative-parity image of gravitational microlensing by a giant-lens star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahvar, Sohrab

    2016-07-01

    Gravitational microlensing has been used as a powerful tool for astrophysical studies and exoplanet detections. In the gravitational microlensing, we have two images with negative and positive parities. The negative-parity image is a fainter image and is produced at a closer angular separation with respect to the lens star. In the case of a red-giant lens star and large impact parameter of lensing, this image can be eclipsed by the lens star. The result would be dimming the flux receiving from the combination of the source and the lens stars and the light curve resembles to an eclipsing binary system. In this work, we introduce this phenomenon and propose an observational procedure for detecting this eclipse. The follow-up microlensing telescopes with lucky imaging camera or space-based telescopes can produce high-resolution images from the events with reddish sources and confirm the possibility of blending due to the lens star. After conforming a red-giant lens star and source star, we can use the advance photometric methods and detect the relative flux change during the eclipse in the order of 10-4-10-3. Observation of the eclipse provides the angular size of source star in the unit of Einstein angle and combination of this observation with the parallax observation enable us to calculate the mass of lens star. Finally, we analysed seven microlensing event and show the feasibility of observation of this effect in future observations.

  15. The Angstrom Project: M31 microlensing alert ANG-08B-M31-07

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnley, M. J.; Kerins, E.; Newsam, A. M.; Duke, J. P.; Gould, A.; Street, C. Han B.-G. Park R. A.

    2008-12-01

    We report an ongoing microlensing candidate in M31 by the Angstrom Project M31 bulge microlensing survey using the Liverpool Telescope (La Palma). The candidate was detected from difference imaging photometry generated by the Angstrom Project Alert System (APAS) in a series of Sloan i'-band images of the bulge of M31.

  16. SPACE BASED INTERCEPTOR SCALING

    SciTech Connect

    G. CANAVAN

    2001-02-01

    Space Based Interceptor (SBI) have ranges that are adequate to address rogue ICBMs. They are not overly sensitive to 30-60 s delay times. Current technologies would support boost phase intercept with about 150 interceptors. Higher acceleration and velocity could reduce than number by about a factor of 3 at the cost of heavier and more expensive Kinetic Kill Vehicles (KKVs). 6g SBI would reduce optimal constellation costs by about 35%; 8g SBI would reduce them another 20%. Interceptor ranges fall rapidly with theater missile range. Constellations increase significantly for ranges under 3,000 km, even with advanced interceptor technology. For distributed launches, these estimates recover earlier strategic scalings, which demonstrate the improved absentee ratio for larger or multiple launch areas. Constellations increase with the number of missiles and the number of interceptors launched at each. The economic estimates above suggest that two SBI per missile with a modest midcourse underlay is appropriate. The SBI KKV technology would appear to be common for space- and surface-based boost phase systems, and could have synergisms with improved midcourse intercept and discrimination systems. While advanced technology could be helpful in reducing costs, particularly for short range theater missiles, current technology appears adequate for pressing rogue ICBM, accidental, and unauthorized launches.

  17. The advantages of using a Lucky Imaging camera for observations of microlensing events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajadian, Sedighe; Rahvar, Sohrab; Dominik, Martin; Hundertmark, Markus

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we study the advantages of using a Lucky Imaging camera for the observations of potential planetary microlensing events. Our aim is to reduce the blending effect and enhance exoplanet signals in binary lensing systems composed of an exoplanet and the corresponding parent star. We simulate planetary microlensing light curves based on present microlensing surveys and follow-up telescopes where one of them is equipped with a Lucky Imaging camera. This camera is used at the Danish 1.54-m follow-up telescope. Using a specific observational strategy, for an Earth-mass planet in the resonance regime, where the detection probability in crowded fields is smaller, Lucky Imaging observations improve the detection efficiency which reaches 2 per cent. Given the difficulty of detecting the signal of an Earth-mass planet in crowded-field imaging even in the resonance regime with conventional cameras, we show that Lucky Imaging can substantially improve the detection efficiency.

  18. Microlenses and their applications in endoscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xuefeng

    Microlenses have been developed in the past and play an important role in many fields, including optical communication, photolithography, imaging systems and lab on chips. Microlenses with fixed focal length and tunable focus have their individual applications. Several methods and mechanisms have been reported to realize microlenses; however, they have their advantages and disadvantages. In this work, two kinds of microlenses are studied: microlens arrays with fixed focal length and liquid tunable-focus microlenses actuated by stimuli-responsive hydrogels. The design, fabrication, testing and applications of these microlenses are explored. The gist of these microlenses is to utilize surface tension of liquid-air and/or immiscible liquid-liquid interfaces because surface tension dominates over gravity at the micro-scale. Microlens arrays with fixed focal length, made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), are fabricated through liquid-phase photopolymerization and molding. Liquid menisci of photopolymerizable solutions at liquid-air interfaces are first formed and cured under ultraviolet (UV) radiance to obtain the mold. The resultant polymerized mold is then transferred to PDMS utilizing two molding steps to form a microlens array. The liquid tunable-focus microlens is formed by a water-oil interface that is pinned at a hydrophobic-hydrophilic boundary at the top edge of an aperture. Multiple hydrogel microstructures, whose volume is responsive to a certain stimuli, are formed around the lens aperture under UV radiance and regulate the pressure across the meniscus of the water-oil interface, varying the focal length of the microlens. The liquid tunable-focus microlenses responsive to infrared (IR) light are integrated at the end of fiber endoscopes and can scan the areas of interest with minimal back-and-forth movements of the scopes themselves. The operation of the microlens and the image acquisition are realized through light transmitted via optical fibers. Benefitting

  19. Influence of chemical processing on the imaging properties of microlenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiljević, Darko; Murić, Branka; Pantelić, Dejan; Panić, Bratimir

    2009-07-01

    Microlenses are produced by irradiation of a layer of tot'hema and eosin sensitized gelatin (TESG) by using a laser beam (Nd:YAG 2nd harmonic; 532 nm). All the microlenses obtained are concave with a parabolic profile. After the production, the microlenses are chemically processed with various concentrations of alum. The following imaging properties of microlenses were calculated and analyzed: the root mean square (rms) wavefront aberration, the geometric encircled energy and the spot diagram. The microlenses with higher concentrations of alum in solution had a greater effective focal length and better image quality. The microlenses chemically processed with 10% alum solution had near-diffraction-limited performance.

  20. The Angstrom Project: two new microlensing/nova transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerins, Eamonn

    2008-11-01

    We report the discovery of two new optical transients in M31 by the Angstrom Project M31 bulge microlensing survey using the Liverpool Telescope (La Palma). These transients were discovered using difference imaging techniques by the Angstrom Project Alert System (APAS) in a series of Sloan i'-band images of the bulge of M31.

  1. Relativity and Exoplanets: Gravitational Microlensing, Doppler Beaming, and More

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudi, Scott

    2016-03-01

    Perhaps surprisingly, the theories of both special and general relativity play important roles in several areas of exoplanet research. I will review the most important and intriguing of these applications. The most obvious case is gravitational microlensing, which has become a fairly routine method of finding planets, and is poised to become even more important in the next decade. I will also briefly survey the numerous other areas where relativity plays a role in exoplanet theory and observations, including photometric Doppler beaming, general relativistic precession, transits of compact objects, and even (potentially) gravitational wave experiments.

  2. Space-based detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sesana, A.; Weber, W. J.; Killow, C. J.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Robertson, D. I.; Ward, H.; Fitzsimons, E. D.; Bryant, J.; Cruise, A. M.; Dixon, G.; Hoyland, D.; Smith, D.; Bogenstahl, J.; McNamara, P. W.; Gerndt, R.; Flatscher, R.; Hechenblaikner, G.; Hewitson, M.; Gerberding, O.; Barke, S.; Brause, N.; Bykov, I.; Danzmann, K.; Enggaard, A.; Gianolio, A.; Vendt Hansen, T.; Heinzel, G.; Hornstrup, A.; Jennrich, O.; Kullmann, J.; Møller-Pedersen, S.; Rasmussen, T.; Reiche, J.; Sodnik, Z.; Suess, M.; Armano, M.; Sumner, T.; Bender, P. L.; Akutsu, T.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    2014-12-01

    The parallel session C5 on Space-Based Detectors gave a broad overview over the planned space missions related to gravitational wave detection. Overviews of the revolutionary science to be expected from LISA was given by Alberto Sesana and Sasha Buchman. The launch of LISA Pathfinder (LPF) is planned for 2015. This mission and its payload "LISA Technology Package" will demonstrate key technologies for LISA. In this context, reference masses in free fall for LISA, and gravitational physics in general, was described by William Weber, laser interferometry at the pico-metre level and the optical bench of LPF was presented by Christian Killow and the performance of the LPF optical metrology system by Paul McNamara. While LPF will not yet be sensitive to gravitational waves, it may nevertheless be used to explore fundamental physics questions, which was discussed by Michele Armano. Some parts of the LISA technology that are not going to be demonstrated by LPF, but under intensive development at the moment, were presented by Oliver Jennrich and Oliver Gerberding. Looking into the future, Japan is studying the design of a mid-frequency detector called DECIGO, which was discussed by Tomotada Akutsu. Using atom interferometry for gravitational wave detection has also been recently proposed, and it was critically reviewed by Peter Bender. In the nearer future, the launch of GRACE Follow-On (for Earth gravity observation) is scheduled for 2017, and it will include a Laser Ranging Interferometer as technology demonstrator. This will be the first inter-spacecraft laser interferometer and has many aspects in common with the LISA long arm, as discussed by Andrew Sutton.

  3. Microlensing by the galactic bar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Hongsheng; Spergel, David N.; Rich, R. Michael

    1995-01-01

    We compute the optical depth and duration distribution of microlensing events towrd Baade's window in a model composed of a Galactic disk and a bar. The bar model is a self-consistent dynamical model built out of individual orbits that has been populated to be consistent with the COBE maps of the Galaxy and kinematic observations of the Galactic bulge. We find that most of the lenses are in the bulge with a line-of-sight distance 6.25 kpc (adopting R(sub 0) = 8 kpc). The microlensing optical depth of a 2 x 10(exp 10) solar mass bar plus a truncated disk is (2.2 +/- 0.45) x 10(exp -6), consistent with the large optical depth (3.2 +/- 1.2) x 10(exp -6) found by Udalski et al. (1994). This model optical depth is enhanced over the predictions of axisymmetric models by Kiraga & Paczynski (1994) by slightly more than a factor of 2, since the bar is elongated along the line of sight. The large Einstein radius and small transverse velocity dispersion also predict a longer event duration in the self-consistent bar model than in the Kiraga-Paczynski model. The event rate and duration distribution also depend on the lower mass cutoff of the lens mass function. With a 0.1 solar mass cutoff, five to seven events (depending on the contribution of disk lenses) with a logarithmic mean duration of 20 days are expected for the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) according to our model, while Udalski et al. (1994) observed nine events with durations from 8 to 62 days. On the other hand, if most of the lenses are brown dwarfs, our model predicts too many short-duration events. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov test finds only 7% probability for the model with 0.01 solar mass cutoff to be consistent with current data.

  4. Stellar Rotation Effects in Polarimetric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajadian, Sedighe

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that the polarization signal in microlensing events of hot stars is larger than that of main-sequence stars. Most hot stars rotate rapidly around their stellar axes. The stellar rotation creates ellipticity and gravity-darkening effects that break the spherical symmetry of the source's shape and the circular symmetry of the source's surface brightness respectively. Hence, it causes a net polarization signal for the source star. This polarization signal should be considered in polarimetric microlensing of fast rotating stars. For moderately rotating stars, lensing can magnify or even characterize small polarization signals due to the stellar rotation through polarimetric observations. The gravity-darkening effect due to a rotating source star creates asymmetric perturbations in polarimetric and photometric microlensing curves whose maximum occurs when the lens trajectory crosses the projected position of the rotation pole on the sky plane. The stellar ellipticity creates a time shift (i) in the position of the second peak of the polarimetric curves in transit microlensing events and (ii) in the peak position of the polarimetric curves with respect to the photometric peak position in bypass microlensing events. By measuring this time shift via polarimetric observations of microlensing events, we can evaluate the ellipticity of the projected source surface on the sky plane. Given the characterizations of the FOcal Reducer and low dispersion Spectrograph (FORS2) polarimeter at the Very Large Telescope, the probability of observing this time shift is very small. The more accurate polarimeters of the next generation may well measure these time shifts and evaluate the ellipticity of microlensing source stars.

  5. Candidate Gravitational Microlensing Events for Future Direct Lens Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, C. B.; Park, H.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Gould, A.; Tsapras, Y.; Han, C.; Gaudi, B. S.; Bozza, V.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Namba, S.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Sweatman, W. L.; Tristram, P. J.; Tsurumi, N.; Wada, K.; Yamai, N.; Yock, P. C. M.; Yonehara, A.; MOA Collaboration; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Skowron, J.; Kozłowski, S.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pietrukowicz, P.; OGLE Collaboration; Almeida, L. A.; Bos, M.; Choi, J.-Y.; Christie, G. W.; Depoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Friedmann, M.; Hwang, K.-H.; Jablonski, F.; Jung, Y. K.; Kaspi, S.; Lee, C.-U.; Maoz, D.; McCormick, J.; Moorhouse, D.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Shin, I.-G.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Tan, T.-G.; Thornley, G.; Yee, J. C.; μFUN Collaboration; Allan, A.; Bramich, D. M.; Browne, P.; Dominik, M.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Kains, N.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Street, R. A.; RoboNet Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    The mass of the lenses giving rise to Galactic microlensing events can be constrained by measuring the relative lens-source proper motion and lens flux. The flux of the lens can be separated from that of the source, companions to the source, and unrelated nearby stars with high-resolution images taken when the lens and source are spatially resolved. For typical ground-based adaptive optics (AO) or space-based observations, this requires either inordinately long time baselines or high relative proper motions. We provide a list of microlensing events toward the Galactic bulge with high relative lens-source proper motion that are therefore good candidates for constraining the lens mass with future high-resolution imaging. We investigate all events from 2004 to 2013 that display detectable finite-source effects, a feature that allows us to measure the proper motion. In total, we present 20 events with μ >~ 8 mas yr-1. Of these, 14 were culled from previous analyses while 6 are new, including OGLE-2004-BLG-368, MOA-2005-BLG-36, OGLE-2012-BLG-0211, OGLE-2012-BLG-0456, MOA-2012-BLG-532, and MOA-2013-BLG-029. In lsim12 yr from the time of each event the lens and source of each event will be sufficiently separated for ground-based telescopes with AO systems or space telescopes to resolve each component and further characterize the lens system. Furthermore, for the most recent events, comparison of the lens flux estimates from images taken immediately to those estimated from images taken when the lens and source are resolved can be used to empirically check the robustness of the single-epoch method currently being used to estimate lens masses for many events.

  6. Candidate gravitational microlensing events for future direct lens imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, C. B.; Gould, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Park, H.; Han, C.; Sumi, T.; Koshimoto, N.; Udalski, A.; Tsapras, Y.; Bozza, V.; Abe, F.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Masuda, K.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Ling, C. H.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Collaboration: MOA Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; μFUN Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; and others

    2014-10-10

    The mass of the lenses giving rise to Galactic microlensing events can be constrained by measuring the relative lens-source proper motion and lens flux. The flux of the lens can be separated from that of the source, companions to the source, and unrelated nearby stars with high-resolution images taken when the lens and source are spatially resolved. For typical ground-based adaptive optics (AO) or space-based observations, this requires either inordinately long time baselines or high relative proper motions. We provide a list of microlensing events toward the Galactic bulge with high relative lens-source proper motion that are therefore good candidates for constraining the lens mass with future high-resolution imaging. We investigate all events from 2004 to 2013 that display detectable finite-source effects, a feature that allows us to measure the proper motion. In total, we present 20 events with μ ≳ 8 mas yr{sup –1}. Of these, 14 were culled from previous analyses while 6 are new, including OGLE-2004-BLG-368, MOA-2005-BLG-36, OGLE-2012-BLG-0211, OGLE-2012-BLG-0456, MOA-2012-BLG-532, and MOA-2013-BLG-029. In ≲12 yr from the time of each event the lens and source of each event will be sufficiently separated for ground-based telescopes with AO systems or space telescopes to resolve each component and further characterize the lens system. Furthermore, for the most recent events, comparison of the lens flux estimates from images taken immediately to those estimated from images taken when the lens and source are resolved can be used to empirically check the robustness of the single-epoch method currently being used to estimate lens masses for many events.

  7. A PUZZLE INVOLVING GALACTIC BULGE MICROLENSING EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Judith G.; Gould, Andrew; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Thompson, Ian B.; Feltzing, Sofia; Bensby, Thomas; Huang Wenjin; Melendez, Jorge; Lucatello, Sara; Asplund, Martin E-mail: gould@astronomy.ohio-state.edu E-mail: ian@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: tbensby@eso.org E-mail: jorge@astro.up.pt E-mail: asplund@MPA-Garching.MPG.DE

    2010-03-01

    We study a sample of 16 microlensed Galactic bulge main-sequence turnoff region stars for which high-dispersion spectra have been obtained with detailed abundance analyses. We demonstrate that there is a very strong and highly statistically significant correlation between the maximum magnification of the microlensed bulge star and the value of the [Fe/H] deduced from the high resolution spectrum of each object. Physics demands that this correlation, assuming it to be real, be the result of some sample bias. We suggest several possible explanations, but are forced to reject them all, and are left puzzled. To obtain a reliable metallicity distribution in the Galactic bulge based on microlensed dwarf stars, it will be necessary to resolve this issue through the course of additional observations.

  8. Microlensing candidate selection and detection efficiency for the SuperMACHO Dark Matter search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Arti

    One of the outstanding questions in modern cosmology is understanding the composition of the Dark Matter within our own Galaxy. The 5.7 year MACHO project which was completed in 2000, provided a rather vexing answer to this question. The MACHO project sought to place constraints on the fraction of the Galactic Dark Matter composed of MAssive Compact Halo Objects (MACHOs), or sub- stellar mass objects in the Milky Way halo. To accomplish this goal, the MACHO team measured the rate of gravitational microlensing toward the Magellanic Clouds to infer the MACHO concentration along the line-of-sight. The project's finding was vexing in that while the largest Milky Way halo mass fraction consistent with the results was not sufficient to explain all the "missing" matter in the Galaxy, the rate of microlensing observed could not be explained by known populations of objects. The SuperMACHO project seeks to independently verify the optical depth toward the Large Magellanic Cloud and also provide additional clues regarding the location of the lens. By determining the differential rate of microlensing across the face of the LMC, SuperMACHO distinguishes between "screen-" and "self-" lensing scenarios. This thesis describes the selection criteria used to arrive at a candidate set of microlensing events from the SuperMACHO survey and the efficiency with which the SuperMACHO project detects microlensing. The efficiency analysis is accomplished by simulating light curves over a spatial and temporal subset of the survey data. Assuming the optical depth observed by the MACHO project, we expect 14 microlensing events to pass our tighter set of selection criteria in this subset of data. Because type Ia supernovae remain a persistent contaminant in the SuperMACHO candidate set, this thesis also describes a method for determining the expected number of supernova contaminants in the SuperMACHO candidate set. We expect between 6 and 12 type Ia supernovae depending on which supernova rate

  9. Augmenting WFIRST Microlensing with a Ground-Based Telescope Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Gould, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Augmenting the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) microlensing campaigns with intensive observations from a ground-based network of wide-field survey telescopes would have several major advantages. First, it would enable full two-dimensional (2-D) vector microlens parallax measurements for a substantial fraction of low-mass lenses as well as planetary and binary events that show caustic crossing features. For a significant fraction of the free-floating planet (FFP) events and all caustic-crossing planetary/binary events, these 2-D parallax measurements directly lead to complete solutions (mass, distance, transverse velocity) of the lens object (or lens system). For even more events, the complementary ground-based observations will yield 1-D parallax measurements. Together with the 1-D parallaxes from WFIRST alone, they can probe the entire mass range M > M_Earth. For luminous lenses, such 1-D parallax measurements can be promoted to complete solutions (mass, distance, transverse velocity) by high-resolution imaging. This would provide crucial information not only about the hosts of planets and other lenses, but also enable a much more precise Galactic model. Other benefits of such a survey include improved understanding of binaries (particularly with low mass primaries), and sensitivity to distant ice-giant and gas-giant companions of WFIRST lenses that cannot be detected by WFIRST itself due to its restricted observing windows. Existing ground-based microlensing surveys can be employed if WFIRST is pointed at lower-extinction fields than is currently envisaged. This would come at some cost to the event rate. Therefore the benefits of improved characterization of lenses must be weighed against these costs.

  10. Chalcogenide glass microlenses by inkjet printing

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Eric A.; Waldmann, Maike; Arnold, Craig B.

    2011-05-10

    We demonstrate micrometer scale mid-IR lenses for integrated optics, using solution-based inkjet printing techniques and subsequent processing. Arsenic sulfide spherical microlenses with diameters of 10-350 {mu}m and focal lengths of 10-700 {mu}m have been fabricated. The baking conditions can be used to tune the precise focal length.

  11. Empirical microlensing event rates predicted by a phenomenological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poleski, Radosław

    2016-02-01

    Estimating the number of microlensing events observed in different parts of the Galactic bulge is a crucial point in planning microlensing experiments. Reliable estimates are especially important if observing resources are scarce, as is the case for space missions: K2, WFIRST, and Euclid. Here we show that the number of detected events can be reliably estimated based on statistics of stars observed in targeted fields. The statistics can be estimated relatively easily, which makes presented method suitable for planning future microlensing experiments.

  12. Is Space-based Interferometry Dead?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisawitz, David; Benford, D.; Blain, A.; Carr, J.; Fich, M.; Fischer, J.; Goldsmith, P.; Greaves, J.; Griffin, M.; Helou, G.; Ivison, R.; Kuchner, M.; Lyon, R.; Matsuo, H.; Rinehart, S. A.; Serabyn, E.; Shibai, H.; Silverberg, R.; Staguhn, J.; Unwin, S.; Wilner, D.; Wootten, A.; Wright, E. L.

    2011-05-01

    In the wake of the Decadal Survey and a January 2011 meeting of NASA's Exoplanet Exploration Program Analysis Group (ExoPAG), one might be tempted to conclude that space interferometry is dead. We explain why this slogan is hyperbole, summarize the steps currently being taken to prepare for a space-based far-IR interferometer, and reiterate the science case for an imaging and spectroscopic interferometer - SPIRIT - that would operate in space at long infrared wavelengths. Space-based interferometry is alive and well, but the center of activity has shifted to a spectral region (25 to 400 microns) in which no alternative measurement technique can provide information essential to answering several scientific questions deemed compelling by the Decadal Survey. Astrophysicists will use SPIRIT to: discover how the conditions for habitability arise during planetary system formation; find and characterize exoplanets by measuring their sculpting effects on protoplanetary and debris disks; and study the formation, merger history, and star formation history of galaxies.

  13. Halo cold dark matter and microlensing

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, Evalyn; Turner, Michael S.

    1993-12-01

    There is good evidence that most of the baryons in the Universe are dark and some evidence that most of the matter in the Universe is nonbaryonic with cold dark matter (cdm) being a promising possibility. We discuss expectations for the abundance of baryons and cdm in the halo of our galaxy and locally. We show that in plausible cdm models the local density of cdm is at least $10^{-25}\\gcmm3$. We also discuss what one can learn about the the local cdm density from microlensing of stars in the LMC by dark stars in the halo and, based upon a suite of reasonable two-component halo models, conclude that microlensing is not a sensitive probe of the local cdm density.

  14. Microlensing of quasar ultraviolet iron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Guerras, E.; Mediavilla, E.; Kochanek, C. S.; Muñoz, J. A.; Falco, E.; Motta, V.; Rojas, K.

    2013-12-01

    We measure the differential microlensing of the UV Fe II and Fe III emission line blends between 14 quasar image pairs in 13 gravitational lenses. We find that the UV iron emission is strongly microlensed in four cases with amplitudes comparable to that of the continuum. Statistically modeling the magnifications, we infer a typical size of r{sub s}∼4√(M/M{sub ⊙}) light-days for the Fe line-emitting regions, which is comparable to the size of the region generating the UV continuum (∼3-7 light-days). This may indicate that a significant part of the UV Fe II and Fe III emission originates in the quasar accretion disk.

  15. The MACHO project: Microlensing and variable stars

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, C.; Alves, D. R.; Axelrod, T. S.; Bennett, D. P.; Marshall, S. L.; Minniti, D.

    1996-10-01

    The MACHO Project monitors millions of stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud, the Small Magellanic Cloud and the bulge of the Milky Way searching for the gravitational microlensing signature of baryonic dark matter. This Project has yielded surprising results. An analysis of two years of data monitoring the Large Magellanic Cloud points to {approximately} 50% of the mass of the Milky Way`s halo in compact objects of {approximately} 0.5 solar mass. An analysis of one year of monitoring the bulge has yielded more microlensing than predicted without invocation of a massive bar or significant disk dark matter. The huge database of light curves created by this search is yielding information on extremely rare types of astrophysical variability as well as providing temporal detail for the study of well known variable astrophysical phenomena. The variable star catalog created from this database is previewed and example light curves are presented. 31 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Topics in microlensing and dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashar, Mark

    In this dissertation we describe two separate research projects. The first project involves the utilization and development of reddening models, color magnitude diagrams (CMDs), and microlensing population models of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) to constrain the locations of micro-lensing source stars and micro-lensing objects in the Large Magellanic Cloud and the Milky Way (MW) halo using data of 13 microlensing source stars obtained by the MACHO (massive compact halo objects) collaboration with the Hubble Space Telescope. This analysis suggests that the source stars are located in the LMC disk and the lenses are located in the MW halo. For the second project, we report on the results of a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) analysis of an inverse power law (IPL) quintessence model using the Dark Energy Task Force (DETF) simulated data models as a representation of future dark energy experiments. Simulated data sets were generated for a Lambda cold dark matter (L CDM ) background cosmology as well as a case where the dark energy is provided by a specific IPL fiducial model. The results are presented in the form of error contours generated by these two background cosmologies which are then used to consider the effects of future dark energy projects on IPL scalar field models and are able to demonstrate the power of DETF Stage 4 data sets in the context of the IPL model. We find that the respective increase in constraining power with higher quality data sets produced by our analysis gives results that are broadly consistent with the DETF results for the w 0 - w a parameterization of dark energy. Finally, using our simulated data sets constructed around a fiducial IPL model, we find that for a universe containing dark energy described by such a scalar field, a cosmological constant can be excluded by Stage 4 data at the 3s level.

  17. Improved Theoretical Predictions of Microlensing Rates for the Detection of Primordial Black Hole Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Agnieszka M.; Griest, Kim

    2013-04-01

    Primordial black holes (PBHs) remain a dark matter (DM) candidate of the Standard Model of Particle Physics. Previously, we proposed a new method of constraining the remaining PBH DM mass range using microlensing of stars monitored by NASA's Kepler mission. We improve this analysis using a more accurate treatment of the population of the Kepler source stars, their variability, and limb darkening. We extend the theoretically detectable PBH DM mass range down to 2 × 10-10 M ⊙, two orders of magnitude below current limits and one-third order of magnitude below our previous estimate. We address how to extract the DM properties, such as mass and spatial distribution, if PBH microlensing events were detected. We correct an error in a well-known finite-source limb-darkening microlensing formula and also examine the effects of varying the light curve cadence on PBH DM detectability. We also introduce an approximation for estimating the predicted rate of detection per star as a function of the star's properties, thus allowing for selection of source stars in future missions, and extend our analysis to planned surveys, such as the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope.

  18. MICROLENSING DISCOVERY OF A POPULATION OF VERY TIGHT, VERY LOW MASS BINARY BROWN DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J.-Y.; Han, C.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Gaudi, B. S.; Gould, A.; Bennett, D. P.; Dominik, M.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Tsapras, Y.; Bozza, V.; Abe, F.; Furusawa, K.; Itow, Y.; Bond, I. A.; Ling, C. H.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Chote, P.; Fukui, A.; Collaboration: MOA Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; muFUN Collaboration; MiNDSTEp Consortium; PLANET Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; and others

    2013-05-10

    Although many models have been proposed, the physical mechanisms responsible for the formation of low-mass brown dwarfs (BDs) are poorly understood. The multiplicity properties and minimum mass of the BD mass function provide critical empirical diagnostics of these mechanisms. We present the discovery via gravitational microlensing of two very low mass, very tight binary systems. These binaries have directly and precisely measured total system masses of 0.025 M{sub Sun} and 0.034 M{sub Sun }, and projected separations of 0.31 AU and 0.19 AU, making them the lowest-mass and tightest field BD binaries known. The discovery of a population of such binaries indicates that BD binaries can robustly form at least down to masses of {approx}0.02 M{sub Sun }. Future microlensing surveys will measure a mass-selected sample of BD binary systems, which can then be directly compared to similar samples of stellar binaries.

  19. WFIRST-AFTA: What Can We Learn by Detecting Thousands of Cold Exoplanets via Microlensing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penny, Matthew

    2014-06-01

    The WFIRST-AFTA microlensing survey will monitor a few hundred million stars in the Galactic bulge every ~15 minutes to measure the microlensing signatures of thousands of both bound and free-floating planets with masses ranging from super-Jupiters down to that of Ganymede. This huge sample of cold planets will perfectly compliment the sample of warm and hot planets that have been found by Kepler and will be further expanded by TESS and PLATO. I will review the measurements that WFIRST-AFTA will make for each of the planets it finds, and attempt to predict the impact that these will have on our understanding of exoplanet demographics and the planet formation process.

  20. Detectability of orbital motion in stellar binary and planetary microlenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penny, Matthew T.; Mao, Shude; Kerins, Eamonn

    2011-03-01

    A standard binary microlensing event light curve allows just two parameters of the lensing system to be measured: the mass ratio of the companion to its host and the projected separation of the components in units of the Einstein radius. However, other exotic effects can provide more information about the lensing system. Orbital motion in the lens is one such effect, which, if detected, can be used to constrain the physical properties of the lens. To determine the fraction of binary-lens light curves affected by orbital motion (the detection efficiency), we simulate light curves of orbiting binary star and star-planet (planetary) lenses and simulate the continuous, high-cadence photometric monitoring that will be conducted by the next generation of microlensing surveys that are beginning to enter operation. The effect of orbital motion is measured by fitting simulated light-curve data with standard static binary microlensing models; light curves that are poorly fitted by these models are considered to be detections of orbital motion. We correct for systematic false positive detections by also fitting the light curves of static binary lenses. For a continuous monitoring survey without intensive follow-up of high-magnification events, we find the orbital motion detection efficiency for planetary events with caustic crossings to be 0.061 ± 0.010, consistent with observational results, and 0.0130 ± 0.0055 for events without caustic crossings (smooth events). Similarly, for stellar binaries, the orbital motion detection efficiency is 0.098 ± 0.011 for events with caustic crossings and is 0.048 ± 0.006 for smooth events. These result in combined (caustic-crossing and smooth) orbital motion detection efficiencies of 0.029 ± 0.005 for planetary lenses and 0.070 ± 0.006 for stellar binary lenses. We also investigate how various microlensing parameters affect the orbital motion detectability. We find that the orbital motion detection efficiency increases as the binary

  1. Using microlensed quasars to probe the structure of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Smith, Martin C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation into the gravitational microlensing of quasars by stars and stellar remnants in the Milky Way. We present predictions for the all-sky microlensing optical depth, time-scale distributions and event rates for future large-area sky surveys. As expected, the total event rate increases rapidly with increasing magnitude limit, reflecting the fact that the number density of quasars is a steep function of magnitude. Surveys, such as Pan-STARRS and LSST, should be able to detect more than 10 events per year, with typical event durations of around 1 month. Since microlensing of quasar sources suffers from fewer degeneracies than lensing of Milky Way sources, they could be used as a powerful tool for recovering the mass of the lensing object in a robust, often model-independent, manner. As a consequence, for a subset of these events, it will be possible to directly `weigh' the star (or stellar remnant) that is causing the lensing signal, either through higher order microlensing effects and/or high-precision astrometric observations of the lens star (using e.g. Gaia or SIM-lite). This means that such events could play a crucial role in stellar astronomy. Given the current operational timelines for Pan-STARRS and LSST, by the end of the decade, they could potentially detect up to 100 events. Although this is still too few events to place detailed constraints on Galactic models, consistency checks can be carried out and such samples could lead to exciting and unexpected discoveries.

  2. Adventures in the microlensing cloud: Large datasets, eResearch tools, and GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernardos, G.; Fluke, C. J.

    2014-10-01

    As astronomy enters the petascale data era, astronomers are faced with new challenges relating to storage, access and management of data. A shift from the traditional approach of combining data and analysis at the desktop to the use of remote services, pushing the computation to the data, is now underway. In the field of cosmological gravitational microlensing, future synoptic all-sky surveys are expected to bring the number of multiply imaged quasars from the few tens that are currently known to a few thousands. This inflow of observational data, together with computationally demanding theoretical modeling via the production of microlensing magnification maps, requires a new approach. We present our technical solutions to supporting the GPU-Enabled, High Resolution cosmological MicroLensing parameter survey (GERLUMPH). This extensive dataset for cosmological microlensing modeling comprises over 70 000 individual magnification maps and ˜106 related results. We describe our approaches to hosting, organizing, and serving ˜ 30 TB of data and metadata products. We present a set of online analysis tools developed with PHP, JavaScript and WebGL to support access and analysis of GELRUMPH data in a Web browser. We discuss our use of graphics processing units (GPUs) to accelerate data production, and we release the core of the GPU-D direct inverse ray-shooting code (Thompson et al., 2010, 2014) used to generate the magnification maps. All of the GERLUMPH data and tools are available online from http://gerlumph.swin.edu.au. This project made use of gSTAR, the GPU Supercomputer for Theoretical Astrophysical Research.

  3. Space-Based Lidar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiaoli

    2012-01-01

    An overview of space-based lidar systems is presented. from the first laser altimeter on APOLLO 15 mission in 1971 to the Mercury Laser Altimeter on MESSENGER mission currently in orbit, and those currently under development. Lidar, which stands for Light Detection And Ranging, is a powerful tool in remote sensing from space. Compared to radars, lidars operate at a much shorter wavelength with a much narrower beam and much smaller transmitter and receiver. Compared to passive remote sensing instruments. lidars carry their own light sources and can continue measuring day and night. and over polar regions. There are mainly two types of lidars depending on the types of measurements. lidars that are designed to measure the distance and properties of hard targets are often called laser rangers or laser altimeters. They are used to obtain the surface elevation and global shape of a planet from the laser pulse time-of-night and the spacecraft orbit position. lidars that are designed to measure the backscattering and absorption of a volume scatter, such as clouds and aerosols, are often just called lidars and categorized by their measurements. such as cloud and aerosol lidar, wind lidar, CO2 lidar, and so on. The advantages of space-based lidar systems over ground based lidars are the abilities of global coverage and continuous measurements.

  4. Searching for MACHOs with microlensing

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, C.

    1996-04-01

    Baryonic matter, in the form of Machos (Massive Compact Halo Objects), might be a significant constituent of the dark matter that dominates the Milky Way. This article describes the experimental searches for Machos that exploit the gravitational microlens magnification of extragalactic stars. These surveys monitor millions of stars, in some cases every night, looking for magnification events. The early results from the surveys have yielded some spectacular events, and pose a significant new puzzle for galactic structure: toward the Large Magellanic Cloud we see fewer events than anticipated for a standard dark halo dominated by Machos, but toward the galactic bulge, the event rate is much higher than anticipated. This is a field of research that is ripe with opportunities for beginning (and senior) scientists.

  5. Gravitational microlensing searches and results

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, C.

    1997-05-08

    Baryonic matter, in the form of Machos (MAssive Compact Halo Objects), might be a significant constituent of the dark matter that dominates the Milky Way. This article describes how surveys for Machos exploit the gravitational microlens magnification of extragalactic stars. The experimental searches for this effect monitor millions of stars, in some cases every night, looking for magnification events. The early results of these surveys indicate that Machos make up a significant fraction of the dark matter in the Milky Way, and that these objects have stellar masses. Truly substellar objects do not contribute much to the total. Additionally, the relatively high event rate towards the Galactic bulge seems to require that the bulge be elongated, and massive.

  6. Space based astronomy: Teacher's guide with activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, Carla B. (Editor); Weiler, Edward; Morrow, Cherilyn; Bacon, Pamela M.; Thorne, Muriel; Blanchard, Paul A.; Howard, Sethane; Pengra, Patricia R.; Brown, Deborah A.; Winrich, Ralph

    1994-01-01

    This curriculum guide uses hands-on activities to help students and teachers understand the significance of space-based astronomy - astronomical observations made from outer space. The guide contains few of the traditional activities found in many astronomy guides such as constellation studies, lunar phases, and planetary orbits. Instead, it tells the story of why it is important to observe celestial objects from outer space and how to study the entire electromagnetic spectrum. The guide begins with a survey of astronomy related NASA spacecraft. This is followed by a collection of activities in four units: (1) the atmospheric filter; (2) the electromagnetic spectrum; (3) collecting electromagnetic radiation; and (4) down to Earth. A curriculum index identifies the curriculum areas each activity addresses. The guide concludes with a glossary, reference list, a NASA Resources list, and an evaluation card. It is designed for students in grades 5 through 8.

  7. Microlensing Events from the 11 Year Observations of the Wendelstein Calar Alto Pixellensing Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.-H.; Riffeser, A.; Seitz, S.; Bender, R.; Koppenhoefer, J.

    2015-06-01

    We present the results of the decade-long M31 observation from the Wendelstein Calar Alto Pixellensing Project (WeCAPP). WeCAPP has monitored M31 from 1997 until 2008 in both R- and I-filters, and thus provides the longest baseline of all M31 microlensing surveys. The data are analyzed with difference imaging analysis, which is most suitable for studying variability in crowded stellar fields. We extracted light curves based on each pixel, and devised selection criteria that are optimized to identify microlensing events. This leads to 10 new events, and adds up to a total of 12 microlensing events from WeCAPP, for which we derive their timescales, flux excesses, and colors from their light curves. The colors of the lensed stars fall in the range (R - I) = 0.56 to 1.36, with a median of 1.0 mag, in agreement with our expectation that the sources are most likely bright, red stars at the post-main-sequence stage. The event FWHM timescales range from 0.5 to 14 days, with a median of 3 days, in good agreement with predictions based on the model of Riffeser et al.

  8. Space-Based Astronomy: A Teacher's Guide with Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This curriculum guide uses hands-on activities to help grade 5-8 students and teachers understand the significance of space-based astronomy--astronomical observations made from outside the Earth's atmosphere. The guide begins with a survey of astronomy-related spacecraft that the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has sent into…

  9. On space-based SETI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuiver, Willem

    1990-01-01

    Space-based antenna systems for the search of signals from extra-terrestrial intelligence are discussed. Independent studies of the ecliptic solar-sailing transfer problem from the geosynchronous departure orbit to Sun-Earth collinear transterrestrial liberation point were conducted. They were based on a relatively simple mathematical model describing attitude-controlled spacecraft motion in the ecliptic plane as governed by solar and terrestrial gravitational attraction together with the solar radiation pressure. The resulting equations of motion were integrated numerically for a relevant range of values of spacecraft area-to-mass ratio and for an appropriate spacecraft attitude-control law known to lead to Earth escape. Experimentation with varying initial conditions in the departure orbit, and with attitude-control law modification after having achieved Earth escape, established the feasibility of component deployment by means of solar sailing. Details are presented.

  10. Magnification bias in galactic microlensing searches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemiroff, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    It is shown that a significant amount of detectable gravitational microlensing events that could potentially be found by Massively Parallel Photometry (MAPP) project (such as the MACHO, EROS, and OGLE collaborations) will occur for stars too dim to be easily noticed individually by these projects. This is the result of a large magnification bias effect, a bias of including high-magnification events in any flux-limited sample. The probablility of detecting these events may be as high as 2.3 times the lensing probability of stars currently being monitored by MAPP collaborations.

  11. Searches for Exoplanets with Gravitational Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    There are different methods for finding exoplanets such as radial spectral shifts, astrometrical measurements, transits, timing etc. Gravitational microlensing (including pixel-lensing) is among the most promising techniques with the potentiality of detecting Earth-like planets at distances about a few astronomical units from their host star. We emphasize the importance of polarization measurements which can help to resolve degeneracies in theoretical models. In particular, the polarization angle could give additional information about the relative position of the lens with respect to the source.

  12. Large Magellanic Cloud Microlensing Optical Depth with Imperfect Event Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, David P.

    2005-11-01

    I present a new analysis of the MACHO Project 5.7 yr Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) microlensing data set that incorporates the effects of contamination of the microlensing event sample by variable stars. Photometric monitoring of MACHO LMC microlensing event candidates by the EROS and OGLE groups has revealed that one of these events is likely to be a variable star, while additional data have confirmed that many of the other events are very likely to be microlensing. These additional data on the nature of the MACHO microlensing candidates are incorporated into a simple likelihood analysis to derive a probability distribution for the number of MACHO microlens candidates that are true microlensing events. This analysis shows that 10-12 of the 13 events that passed the MACHO selection criteria are likely to be microlensing events, with the other 1-3 being variable stars. This likelihood analysis is also used to show that the main conclusions of the MACHO LMC analysis are unchanged by the variable star contamination. The microlensing optical depth toward the LMC is τ=(1.0+/-0.3)×10-7. If this is due to microlensing by known stellar populations plus an additional population of lens objects in the Galactic halo, then the new halo population would account for 16% of the mass of a standard Galactic halo. The MACHO detection exceeds the expected background of two events expected from ordinary stars in standard models of the Milky Way and LMC at the 99.98% confidence level. The background prediction is increased to three events if maximal disk models are assumed for both the Milky Way and LMC, but this model fails to account for the full signal seen by MACHO at the 99.8% confidence level.

  13. Halo Microlensing and Dark Baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotts, A. P. S.

    1993-12-01

    (While Pierce lectures review past accomplishments, customarily, this talk concerns efforts which we have pursued for some years and which are now reaching fruition. We present elsewhere at this meeting results from research cited for the Prize.) Dark matter exists in the halos of spiral galaxies, and the least radical alternative for its identity is normal matter produced by primordial nucleosynthesis. This matter could easily be hidden in large, condensed objects. Paczynski pointed out in 1986 that if condensations of Galactic halo matter are sufficiently massive, they will produce detectable amplification of background starlight by gravitational lensing. Several groups recently reported possible detections of this effect after surveying large numbers of stars in the Galactic Bulge and LMC. The connection between these events and massive, dark halos is unclear and likely to remain so for some time, given the rate at which they are detected. Following Paczynski's realization, we stressed that a much higher event rate, a statistical control sample, sensitivity to a much broader mass range, and modulation of the predicted lensing rate with galactocentric distance can all be realized by a different experiment: observing the halo of M31 (and the Galaxy) using stars in M31. In some ways, M31 is a more difficult target than the LMC or the Bulge, given the faintness of its stars, but our observations in 1991 and 1993 indicate that these problems have been surmounted. We can detect stellar variability even under extremely crowded conditions like those in M31's inner disk, and can monitor a sufficient number of stars to study halo lensing. We present results from our initial survey which indicates that the required sensitivity can be reached to confirm or reject the hypothesis that sub-solar masses like those detected in our Galaxy make up the missing spiral galaxy mass. It is possible that we may use the data already obtained (and still being analyzed) to place

  14. MICROLENSING BINARIES WITH CANDIDATE BROWN DWARF COMPANIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, I.-G.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Skowron, J.; Udalski, A.; Szymanski, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Soszynski, I.; Pietrzynski, G.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozlowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Sumi, T.; Dominik, M.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Tsapras, Y.; Bozza, V.; Abe, F.; Collaboration: OGLE Collaboration; MOA Collaboration; muFUN Collaboration; and others

    2012-12-01

    Brown dwarfs are important objects because they may provide a missing link between stars and planets, two populations that have dramatically different formation histories. In this paper, we present the candidate binaries with brown dwarf companions that are found by analyzing binary microlensing events discovered during the 2004-2011 observation seasons. Based on the low mass ratio criterion of q < 0.2, we found seven candidate events: OGLE-2004-BLG-035, OGLE-2004-BLG-039, OGLE-2007-BLG-006, OGLE-2007-BLG-399/MOA-2007-BLG-334, MOA-2011-BLG-104/OGLE-2011-BLG-0172, MOA-2011-BLG-149, and MOA-201-BLG-278/OGLE-2011-BLG-012N. Among them, we are able to confirm that the companions of the lenses of MOA-2011-BLG-104/OGLE-2011-BLG-0172 and MOA-2011-BLG-149 are brown dwarfs by determining the mass of the lens based on the simultaneous measurement of the Einstein radius and the lens parallax. The measured masses of the brown dwarf companions are 0.02 {+-} 0.01 M {sub Sun} and 0.019 {+-} 0.002 M {sub Sun} for MOA-2011-BLG-104/OGLE-2011-BLG-0172 and MOA-2011-BLG-149, respectively, and both companions are orbiting low-mass M dwarf host stars. More microlensing brown dwarfs are expected to be detected as the number of lensing events with well-covered light curves increases with new-generation searches.

  15. Determination of Stellar Shape via Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rattenbury, Nicholas J.; Yock, Phil; Bond, Ian

    2006-06-01

    Einstein predicted that light from a distant ``source'' star would be deflected by the gravitational field of an intervening ``lens'' star: the phenomenon known as gravitational microlensing. The lens star produces magnified and distorted images of the source, and as the lens passes between the observer and the source, the magnification changes. For lens systems in our Galaxy, events occur on timescales of weeks to months. Lens systems comprised of more than one object can produce complex light curves. Such light curves can be analysed to obtain information about both the lens and the source systems. These analyses include the detection of low-mass extra-solar planets and the limb-darkening characteristics of distant stars. In this paper, we present the results from one extreme microlensing event for which the limb-darkening of the 5 kpc distant source star was determined, as well as limits on the shape of the projected source star profile. The effective resolution of these measurements is approximately 0.04 microarcsec.

  16. Microlenses with focal length controlled by chemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muric, B. D.; Panic, B. M.

    2012-05-01

    The influence of chemical processing on the optical properties of microlenses formed on a gelatin-sensitized layer was investigated. The gelatin is sensitized with tot'hema and eosin, irradiated with a Gaussian profile laser beam and subsequently chemically processed. Microlenses with a focal length of 400 μm were obtained after alcohol processing. Additionally, focal lengths could be controlled by varying the alum concentration, and lenses with focal length up to 1.2 mm were obtained. The microlenses become stable after alum processing. Their optical properties remain unchanged.

  17. Resolving the Nature of the LMC Microlensing Event LMC-5

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, A J; Cook, K H; Keller, S C

    2004-04-22

    The authors present the results from an analysis of Hubble Space Telescope High Resolution Camera data for the Large Magellanic Cloud microlensing event MACHO-LMC-5. By determining the parallax and proper motion of this object they find that the lens is an M dwarf star at a distance of 578{sub -53}{sup +65}pc with a proper motion of 21.39 {+-} 0.04 mas/yr. Based on the kinematics and location of this star is it more likely to be part of the Galactic thick disk than thin disk population. They confirm that the microlensing event LMC-5 is a jerk-parallax microlensing event.

  18. MOA-II Galactic Microlensing Constraints: The Inner Milky Way has a Low Dark Matter Fraction and a Near Maximal Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegg, Christopher; Gerhard, Ortwin; Portail, Matthieu

    2016-08-01

    Microlensing provides a unique tool to break the stellar to dark matter degeneracy in the inner Milky Way. We combine N-body dynamical models fitted to the Milky Way's Boxy/Peanut bulge with exponential disk models outside this, and compute the microlensing properties. Considering the range of models consistent with the revised MOA-II data, we find low dark matter fractions in the inner Galaxy: at the peak of their stellar rotation curve a fraction fv = (0.88 ± 0.07) of the circular velocity is baryonic (at 1σ, fv > 0.72 at 2σ). These results are in agreement with constraints from the EROS-II microlensing survey of brighter resolved stars, where we find fv = (0.9 ± 0.1) at 1σ. Our fiducial model of a disk with scale length 2.6 kpc, and a bulge with a low dark matter fraction of 12%, agrees with both the revised MOA-II and EROS-II microlensing data. The required baryonic fractions, and the resultant low contribution from dark matter, are consistent with the NFW profiles produced by dissipationless cosmological simulations in Milky Way mass galaxies. They are also consistent with recent prescriptions for the mild adiabatic contraction of Milky Way mass haloes without the need for strong feedback, but there is some tension with recent measurements of the local dark matter density. Microlensing optical depths from the larger OGLE-III sample could improve these constraints further when available.

  19. Gravitational microlensing by a single star plus external shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Shude

    1992-01-01

    Gravitational microlensing by a single star plus external shear is considered. It is shown that for a general cusp the magnification probability distribution follows pc(A)dA of about (A exp -7/2)dA for sufficiently large magnifications. An adaptive grid technique is developed to calculate the magnification probability distributions. The results could be useful for cases of microlensing where the surface-mass density is low.

  20. Microlensing observations rapid search for exoplanets: MORSE code for GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDougall, Alistair; Albrow, Michael D.

    2016-02-01

    The rapid analysis of ongoing gravitational microlensing events has been integral to the successful detection and characterization of cool planets orbiting low-mass stars in the Galaxy. In this paper, we present an implementation of search and fit techniques on graphical processing unit (GPU) hardware. The method allows for the rapid identification of candidate planetary microlensing events and their subsequent follow-up for detailed characterization.

  1. Difference Image Analysis of Galactic Microlensing. I. Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, C.; Allsman, R. A.; Alves, D.; Axelrod, T. S.; Becker, A. C.; Bennett, D. P.; Cook, K. H.; Drake, A. J.; Freeman, K. C.; Griest, K.

    1999-08-20

    This is a preliminary report on the application of Difference Image Analysis (DIA) to Galactic bulge images. The aim of this analysis is to increase the sensitivity to the detection of gravitational microlensing. We discuss how the DIA technique simplifies the process of discovering microlensing events by detecting only objects that have variable flux. We illustrate how the DIA technique is not limited to detection of so-called ''pixel lensing'' events but can also be used to improve photometry for classical microlensing events by removing the effects of blending. We will present a method whereby DIA can be used to reveal the true unblended colors, positions, and light curves of microlensing events. We discuss the need for a technique to obtain the accurate microlensing timescales from blended sources and present a possible solution to this problem using the existing Hubble Space Telescope color-magnitude diagrams of the Galactic bulge and LMC. The use of such a solution with both classical and pixel microlensing searches is discussed. We show that one of the major causes of systematic noise in DIA is differential refraction. A technique for removing this systematic by effectively registering images to a common air mass is presented. Improvements to commonly used image differencing techniques are discussed. (c) 1999 The American Astronomical Society.

  2. CHEAP SPACE-BASED MICROLENS PARALLAXES FOR HIGH-MAGNIFICATION EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, Andrew; Yee, Jennifer C. E-mail: jyee@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2012-08-10

    We show that for high-magnification (A{sub max} {approx}> 100) microlensing events, accurate microlens parallaxes can be obtained from three or fewer photometric measurements from a small telescope on a satellite in solar orbit at O(AU) from Earth. This is 1-2 orders of magnitude less observing resources than are required for standard space-based parallaxes. Such microlens parallax measurements would yield accurate mass and distance measurements to the lens for all cases in which finite-source effects were observed from the ground over peak. This would include virtually all high-magnification events with detected planets and a substantial fraction of those without. Hence, it would permit accurate estimates of the Galactic distribution of planets.

  3. Speeding up low-mass planetary microlensing simulations and modeling: The caustic region of influence

    SciTech Connect

    Penny, Matthew T.

    2014-08-01

    Extensive simulations of planetary microlensing are necessary both before and after a survey is conducted: before to design and optimize the survey and after to understand its detection efficiency. The major bottleneck in such computations is the computation of light curves. However, for low-mass planets, most of these computations are wasteful, as most light curves do not contain detectable planetary signatures. In this paper, I develop a parameterization of the binary microlens that is conducive to avoiding light curve computations. I empirically find analytic expressions describing the limits of the parameter space that contain the vast majority of low-mass planet detections. Through a large-scale simulation, I measure the (in)completeness of the parameterization and the speed-up it is possible to achieve. For Earth-mass planets in a wide range of orbits, it is possible to speed up simulations by a factor of ∼30-125 (depending on the survey's annual duty-cycle) at the cost of missing ∼1% of detections (which is actually a smaller loss than for the arbitrary parameter limits typically applied in microlensing simulations). The benefits of the parameterization probably outweigh the costs for planets below 100 M{sub ⊕}. For planets at the sensitivity limit of AFTA-WFIRST, simulation speed-ups of a factor ∼1000 or more are possible.

  4. Microlensing of the broad line region in 17 lensed quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluse, D.; Hutsemékers, D.; Courbin, F.; Meylan, G.; Wambsganss, J.

    2012-08-01

    When an image of a strongly lensed quasar is microlensed, the different components of its spectrum are expected to be differentially magnified owing to the different sizes of the corresponding emitting region. Chromatic changes are expected to be observed in the continuum while the emission lines should be deformed as a function of the size, geometry and kinematics of the regions from which they originate. Microlensing of the emission lines has been reported only in a handful of systems so far. In this paper we search for microlensing deformations of the optical spectra of pairs of images in 17 lensed quasars with bolometric luminosities between 1044.7 - 47.4 erg/s and black hole masses 107.6 - 9.8 M⊙. This sample is composed of 13 pairs of previously unpublished spectra and four pairs of spectra from literature. Our analysis is based on a simple spectral decomposition technique which allows us to isolate the microlensed fraction of the flux independently of a detailed modeling of the quasar emission lines. Using this technique, we detect microlensing of the continuum in 85% of the systems. Among them, 80% show microlensing of the broad emission lines. Focusing on the most common emission lines in our spectra (C III] and Mg II) we detect microlensing of either the blue or the red wing, or of both wings with the same amplitude. This observation implies that the broad line region is not in general spherically symmetric. In addition, the frequent detection of microlensing of the blue and red wings independently but not simultaneously with a different amplitude, does not support existing microlensing simulations of a biconical outflow. Our analysis also provides the intrinsic flux ratio between the lensed images and the magnitude of the microlensing affecting the continuum. These two quantities are particularly relevant for the determination of the fraction of matter in clumpy form in galaxies and for the detection of dark matter substructures via the identification

  5. MEASURING MICROLENSING USING SPECTRA OF MULTIPLY LENSED QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Motta, V.; Mediavilla, E.; Munoz, J. A. E-mail: emg@iac.es E-mail: jmunoz@uv.es

    2012-08-10

    We report on a program of spectroscopic observations of gravitationally lensed QSOs with multiple images. We seek to establish whether microlensing is occurring in each QSO image using only single-epoch observations. We calculate flux ratios for the cores of emission lines in image pairs to set a baseline for no microlensing. The offset of the continuum flux ratios relative to this baseline yields the microlensing magnification free from extinction, as extinction affects the continuum and the lines equally. When we find chromatic microlensing, we attempt to constrain the size of the QSO accretion disk. SDSSJ1004+4112 and HE1104-1805 show chromatic microlensing with amplitudes 0.2 < |{Delta}m| < 0.6 and 0.2 < |{Delta}m| < 0.4 mag, respectively. Modeling the accretion disk with a Gaussian source (I{proportional_to}exp (- R{sup 2}/2r{sup 2}{sub s})) of size r{sub s} {proportional_to}{lambda}{sup p} and using magnification maps to simulate microlensing, we find r{sub s} ({lambda}3363) = 7 {+-} 3 lt-day(18.1 {+-} 7.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm) and p = 1.1 {+-} 0.4 for SDSS1004+4112, and r{sub s} ({lambda}3363) = 6 {+-} 2 lt-day(15.5 {+-} 5.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm) and p = 0.7 {+-} 0.1 for HE1104-1805. For SDSSJ1029+2623, we find strong chromaticity of {approx}0.4 mag in the continuum flux ratio, which probably arises from microlensing, although not all the available data fit within this explanation. For Q0957+561, we measure B - A magnitude differences of 0.4 mag, much greater than the {approx}0.05 mag amplitude usually inferred from light-curve variability. It may substantially modify the current interpretations of microlensing in this system, likely favoring the hypothesis of smaller sources and/or larger microdeflectors. For HS0818+1227, our data yield possible evidence of microlensing.

  6. Short duration microlensing events: Searching for rogue planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Laurent, Kathryn E.; Di Stefano, Rosanne; Primini, Francis A.; Lew, Wei Peng; Gau, Lai Su; Benson, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Einstein described gravitational microlensing in 1936, at the same time suggesting it to be an unobservable phenomenon. He did not foresee technological advancements that would lead to microlensing becoming a productive tool for astronomy. Of particular interest may be the role it has begun to play in the discovery of rogue planets - exoplanets that are not bound to a star or stars. Rogue planets may be formed independently, or they may be formed in the confines of a stellar system and then ejected by gravitational interactions. Currently fewer than a dozen rogue planets are known but estimates of their abundance conservatively start at double the number of stars in our galaxy.The Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) and Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics (MOA) teams have collectively detected approximately 2500 events this year alone. A significant portion of these events are of short duration, with an Einstein crossing time of less than 10 days. Microlensing events generally occur on a timescale of weeks to months, so short duration events are an interesting class for study, particularly with regard to searches for rogue planets. We have undertaken a systematic study and categorization of the short duration microlensing events from recent OGLE and MOA alerts, with a special eye to identifying exoplanet candidates.

  7. Free-floating planets from core accretion theory: microlensing predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Sizheng; Mao, Shude; Ida, Shigeru; Zhu, Wei; Lin, Douglas N. C.

    2016-09-01

    We calculate the microlensing event rate and typical time-scales for the free-floating planet (FFP) population that is predicted by the core accretion theory of planet formation. The event rate is found to be ˜1.8 × 10-3 of that for the stellar population. While the stellar microlensing event time-scale peaks at around 20 d, the median time-scale for FFP events (˜0.1 d) is much shorter. Our values for the event rate and the median time-scale are significantly smaller than those required to explain the Sumi et al. result, by factors of ˜13 and ˜16, respectively. The inclusion of planets at wide separations does not change the results significantly. This discrepancy may be too significant for standard versions of both the core accretion theory and the gravitational instability model to explain satisfactorily. Therefore, either a modification to the planet formation theory is required or other explanations to the excess of short-time-scale microlensing events are needed. Our predictions can be tested by ongoing microlensing experiment such as Korean Microlensing Telescope Network, and by future satellite missions such as WFIRST and Euclid.

  8. GRAVITATIONAL MICROLENSING BY THE ELLIS WORMHOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, F.

    2010-12-10

    A method to calculate light curves of the gravitational microlensing of the Ellis wormhole is derived in the weak-field limit. In this limit, lensing by the wormhole produces one image outside the Einstein ring and another image inside. The weak-field hypothesis is a good approximation in Galactic lensing if the throat radius is less than 10{sup 11} km. The light curves calculated have gutters of approximately 4% immediately outside the Einstein ring crossing times. The magnification of the Ellis wormhole lensing is generally less than that of Schwarzschild lensing. The optical depths and event rates are calculated for the Galactic bulge and Large Magellanic Cloud fields according to bound and unbound hypotheses. If the wormholes have throat radii between 100 and 10{sup 7} km, are bound to the galaxy, and have a number density that is approximately that of ordinary stars, detection can be achieved by reanalyzing past data. If the wormholes are unbound, detection using past data is impossible.

  9. Searching for intermediate-mass black holes with gravitational microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kains, Noé; Bramich, Dan; Sahu, Kailash C.; Calamida, Annalisa

    2016-06-01

    Despite a lot of indirect observational evidence, no intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) has been detected unambiguously so far. A clear detection would shed light on the possible role of IMBHs in the formation of supermassive black holes, and on the evolution of Galaxies. This could be achieved with gravitational microlensing. We present the results of simulations to estimate the expected astrometric microlensing rates by IMBHs in globular clusters, and show that microlensing has the potential to detect signals that can be unambiguously attributed to an IMBH in several Galactic globular clusters. We also discuss the implication of our simulations for archival studies with available Hubble Space Telescope data, and the impact of JWST and WFIRST on possible future detections.

  10. Probability distributions for the magnification of quasars due to microlensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wambsganss, Joachim

    1992-01-01

    Gravitational microlensing can magnify the flux of a lensed quasar considerably and therefore possibly influence quasar source counts or the observed quasar luminosity function. A large number of distributions of magnification probabilities due to gravitational microlensing for finite sources are presented, with a reasonable coverage of microlensing parameter space (i.e., surface mass density, external shear, mass spectrum of lensing objects). These probability distributions were obtained from smoothing two-dimensional magnification patterns with Gaussian source profiles. Different source sizes ranging from 10 exp 14 cm to 5 x 10 exp 16 cm were explored. The probability distributions show a large variety of shapes. Coefficients of fitted slopes for large magnifications are presented.

  11. Discovery of a Jupiter/Saturn Analog with Gravitational Microlensing

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudi, B; Bennett, D; Udalski, A; Gould, A; Christie, G; Maoz, D; Dong, S; McCormick, J; Szymanski, M; Tristram, P; Nikolaev, S; Paczynski, B; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I; Szewczyk, O; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, L; DePoy, D; Han, C; Kaspi, S; Lee, C; Mallia, F; Natusch, T; Pogge, R; Park, B; Abe, F; Bond, I; Botzler, C; Fukui, A; Hearnshaw, J; Itow, Y; Kamiya, K; Korpela, A; Kilmartin, P; Lin, W; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Motomura, M; Muraki, Y; Nakamura, S; Okumura, T; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N; Sako, T; Saito, T; Sato, S; Skuljan, L; Sullivan, D; Sumi, T; Sweatman, W; Yock, P; Albrow, M; Beaulieu, J; Burgdorf, M; Cook, K; Coutures, C; Dominik, M; Dieters, S; Fouque, P; Greenhill, J; Horne, K; Steele, I; Tsapras, Y; Chaboyer, B; Crocker, A; Frank, S; Macintosh, B

    2007-11-08

    Searches for extrasolar planets have uncovered an astonishing diversity of planetary systems, yet the frequency of solar system analogs remains unknown. The gravitational microlensing planet search method is potentially sensitive to multiple-planet systems containing analogs of all the solar system planets except Mercury. We report the first detection of a multiple-planet system with microlensing. We identify two planets with masses of {approx} 0.71 and {approx} 0.27 times the mass of Jupiter and orbital separations of {approx} 2.3 and {approx} 4.6 astronomical units orbiting a primary of mass {approx} 0.50 solar masses. This system resembles a scaled version of our solar system in that the mass ratio, separation ratio, and equilibrium temperatures of the planets are similar to those of Jupiter and Saturn. These planets could not have been detected with other techniques; their discovery from only 6 confirmed microlensing planet detections suggests that solar system analogs may be common.

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF MICROLENSING PLANETS WITH MODERATELY WIDE SEPARATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Cheongho

    2009-08-01

    In future high-cadence microlensing surveys, planets can be detected through a new channel of an independent event produced by the planet itself. The two populations of planets to be detected through this channel are wide-separation planets and free-floating planets. Although they appear as similar short timescale events, the two populations of planets are widely different in nature and thus distinguishing them is important. In this paper, we investigate the lensing properties of events produced by planets with moderately wide separations from host stars. We find that the lensing behavior of these events is well described by the Chang-Refsdal lensing, and the shear caused by the primary not only produces a caustic but also makes the magnification contour elongated along the primary-planet axis. The elongated magnification contour implies that the light curves of these planetary events are generally asymmetric, and thus the asymmetry can be used to distinguish the events from those produced by free-floating planets. The asymmetry can be noticed from the overall shape of the light curve and thus can hardly be missed unlike the very short duration central perturbation caused by the caustic. In addition, the asymmetry occurs regardless of the event magnification, and thus the bound nature of the planet can be identified for majority of these events. The close approximation of the lensing light curve to that of the Chang-Refsdal lensing implies that the analysis of the light curve yields only the information about the projected separation between the host star and the planet.

  13. CHARACTERIZING LOW-MASS BINARIES FROM OBSERVATION OF LONG-TIMESCALE CAUSTIC-CROSSING GRAVITATIONAL MICROLENSING EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, I.-G.; Han, C.; Choi, J.-Y.; Udalski, A.; Szymanski, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Soszynski, I.; Pietrzynski, G.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozlowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Sumi, T.; Gould, A.; Skowron, J.; Bozza, V.; Dominik, M.; Horne, K.; Fouque, P.; Collaboration: OGLE Collaboration; MOA Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; MiNDSTEp Consortium; muFUN Collaboration; PLANET Collaboration; and others

    2012-08-20

    Despite the astrophysical importance of binary star systems, detections are limited to those located in small ranges of separations, distances, and masses and thus it is necessary to use a variety of observational techniques for a complete view of stellar multiplicity across a broad range of physical parameters. In this paper, we report the detections and measurements of two binaries discovered from observations of microlensing events MOA-2011-BLG-090 and OGLE-2011-BLG-0417. Determinations of the binary masses are possible by simultaneously measuring the Einstein radius and the lens parallax. The measured masses of the binary components are 0.43 M{sub Sun} and 0.39 M{sub Sun} for MOA-2011-BLG-090 and 0.57 M{sub Sun} and 0.17 M{sub Sun} for OGLE-2011-BLG-0417 and thus both lens components of MOA-2011-BLG-090 and one component of OGLE-2011-BLG-0417 are M dwarfs, demonstrating the usefulness of microlensing in detecting binaries composed of low-mass components. From modeling of the light curves considering full Keplerian motion of the lens, we also measure the orbital parameters of the binaries. The blended light of OGLE-2011-BLG-0417 comes very likely from the lens itself, making it possible to check the microlensing orbital solution by follow-up radial-velocity observation. For both events, the caustic-crossing parts of the light curves, which are critical for determining the physical lens parameters, were resolved by high-cadence survey observations and thus it is expected that the number of microlensing binaries with measured physical parameters will increase in the future.

  14. Reevaluating the feasibility of ground-based Earth-mass microlensing planet detections

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Youn Kil; Park, Hyuk; Han, Cheongho; Hwang, Kyu-Ha; Shin, In-Gu; Choi, Joon-Young

    2014-05-10

    An important strength of the microlensing method to detect extrasolar planets is its high sensitivity to low-mass planets. However, many believe that microlensing detections of Earth-mass planets from ground-based observation would be difficult because of limits set by finite-source effects. This view comes from the previous estimation of planet detection probability based on the fractional deviation of planetary signals; however, a proper probability estimation is required when considering the source brightness, which is directly related to the photometric precision. In this paper, we reevaluate the feasibility of low-mass planet detections by considering photometric precision for different populations of source stars. From this, we find that the contribution of improved photometric precision to the planetary signal of a giant-source event is large enough to compensate for the decrease in magnification excess caused by finite-source effects. As a result, we conclude that giant-source events are suitable targets for Earth-mass planet detections with significantly higher detection probability than events involved with source stars of smaller radii, and we predict that Earth-mass planets could be detected by prospective high-cadence surveys.

  15. Signatures of rotating binaries in microlensing experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucita, A. A.; Giordano, M.; De Paolis, F.; Ingrosso, G.

    2014-03-01

    Gravitational microlensing offers a powerful method with which to probe a variety of binary-lens systems, as the binarity of the lens introduces deviations from the typical (single-lens) Paczyński behaviour in the event light curves. Generally, a static binary lens is considered to fit the observed light curve and, when the orbital motion is taken into account, an oversimplified model is usually employed. In this paper, we treat the binary-lens motion in a realistic way and focus on simulated events that are fitted well by a Paczyński curve. We show that an accurate timing analysis of the residuals (calculated with respect to the best-fitting Paczyński model) is usually sufficient to infer the orbital period of the binary lens. It goes without saying that the independently estimated period may be used to further constrain the orbital parameters obtained by the best-fitting procedure, which often gives degenerate solutions. We also present a preliminary analysis of the event OGLE-2011-BLG-1127 / MOA-2011-BLG-322, which has been recognized to be the result of a binary lens. The period analysis results in a periodicity of ≃12 d, which confirms the oscillation of the observed data around the best-fitting model. The estimated periodicity is probably associated with an intrinsic variability of the source star, and therefore there is an opportunity to use this technique to investigate either the intrinsic variability of the source or the effects induced by the binary-lens orbital motion.

  16. Requirements for Space-Based Wind Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, Robert M.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Global wind profiles are needed for a wide range of meteorological applications. Since the 1980's, observing system simulation experiments have been conducted in order to evaluate the potential impact of space-based wind profiler data on numerical weather prediction, and to evaluate trade-offs in lidar design. These experiments indicated tremendous potential for satellite lidar observations to improve atmospheric analyses and forecasts. More recent experiments are aimed at assessing the precise requirements for space-based lidar wind profile data and to evaluate the potential for alternative technologies. At the workshop, OSSE methodology, and results from experiments conducted at the DAO to the define requirements for space-based lidar wind will be presented.

  17. Seismology and space-based geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tralli, David M.; Tajima, Fumiko

    1993-01-01

    The potential of space-based geodetic measurement of crustal deformation in the context of seismology is explored. The achievements of seismological source theory and data analyses, mechanical modeling of fault zone behavior, and advances in space-based geodesy are reviewed, with emphasis on realizable contributions of space-based geodetic measurements specifically to seismology. The fundamental relationships between crustal deformation associated with an earthquake and the geodetically observable data are summarized. The response and spatial and temporal resolution of the geodetic data necessary to understand deformation at various phases of the earthquake cycle is stressed. The use of VLBI, SLR, and GPS measurements for studying global geodynamics properties that can be investigated to some extent with seismic data is discussed. The potential contributions of continuously operating strain monitoring networks and globally distributed geodetic observatories to existing worldwide modern digital seismographic networks are evaluated in reference to mutually addressable problems in seismology, geophysics, and tectonics.

  18. Gravitational Microlensing in Modified Gravity Theories - Inverse-Square Theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asada, H.

    2011-02-01

    Microlensing studies are usually based on the lens equation that is valid only to the first order in the gravitational constant G and lens mass M. We consider corrections to the conventional lens equation in terms of differentiable functions, so that they can express not only the second-order effects of GM in general relativity but also modified gravity theories. As a generalization of Ebina et al. (Prog. Theor. Phys. 104 (2000), 1317), we show that, provided that the spacetime is static, spherically symmetric and asymptotically flat, the total amplification by microlensing remains unchanged at the linear order of the correction to the deflection angle, if and only if the correction takes a particular form as the inverse square of the impact parameter, whereas the magnification factor for each image is corrected. It is concluded that the light curve shape by microlensing is inevitably changed and will thus allow us to probe modified gravity, unless a modificati on to the deflection angle takes the particular form. No systematic deviation in microlensing observations has been reported. For instance, therefore, the Yukawa-type correction is constrained as the characteristic length > 10^{14} m.

  19. Compact IR laser for calibration of space based sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Kietrick, K.M.; Dezenberg, G.; Hamilton, C.; Vann, J.; LaSala, J.

    1996-04-17

    An Er:YAG laser, operating at 2.94 microns, has been developed for in-theater calibration of space based infrared sensors. The laser is used to illuminate a spaceborne sensor focal plane from a surveyed ground reference point. The known reference point is compared to the laser position reported by the sensor, and boresight corrections are made. The Er:YAG laser is side pumped by a InGaAs diode array and is tuned to an atmospheric microwindow with and intracavity etalon. This technology is being directly applied to meet Army requirements for enhanced deep strike targeting information supplied to theater weapons systems.

  20. Effect of Binary Source Companions on the Microlensing Optical Depth Determination toward the Galactic Bulge Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Cheongho

    2005-11-01

    Currently, gravitational microlensing survey experiments toward the Galactic bulge field use two different methods of minimizing the blending effect for the accurate determination of the optical depth τ. One is measuring τ based on clump giant (CG) source stars, and the other is using ``difference image analysis'' (DIA) photometry to measure the unblended source flux variation. Despite the expectation that the two estimates should be the same assuming that blending is properly considered, the estimates based on CG stars systematically fall below the DIA results based on all events with source stars down to the detection limit. Prompted by the gap, we investigate the previously unconsidered effect of companion-associated events on τ determination. Although the image of a companion is blended with that of its primary star and thus not resolved, the event associated with the companion can be detected if the companion flux is highly magnified. Therefore, companions work effectively as source stars to microlensing, and thus the neglect of them in the source star count could result in a wrong τ estimation. By carrying out simulations based on the assumption that companions follow the same luminosity function as primary stars, we estimate that the contribution of the companion-associated events to the total event rate is ~5fbi% for current surveys and can reach up to ~6fbi% for future surveys monitoring fainter stars, where fbi is the binary frequency. Therefore, we conclude that the companion-associated events comprise a nonnegligible fraction of all events. However, their contribution to the optical depth is not large enough to explain the systematic difference between the optical depth estimates based on the two different methods.

  1. Microlensing of sub-parsec massive binary black holes in lensed QSOs: Light curves and size-wavelength relation

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Chang-Shuo; Lu, Youjun; Mao, Shude; Yu, Qingjuan; Wambsganss, Joachim E-mail: luyj@nao.cas.cn

    2014-04-01

    Sub-parsec binary massive black holes (BBHs) have long been thought to exist in many QSOs but remain observationally elusive. In this paper, we propose a novel method to probe sub-parsec BBHs through microlensing of lensed QSOs. If a QSO hosts a sub-parsec BBH in its center, it is expected that the BBH is surrounded by a circumbinary disk, each component of the BBH is surrounded by a small accretion disk, and a gap is opened by the secondary component in between the circumbinary disk and the two small disks. Assuming such a BBH structure, we generate mock microlensing light curves for some QSO systems that host BBHs with typical physical parameters. We show that microlensing light curves of a BBH QSO system at the infrared-optical-UV bands can be significantly different from those of corresponding QSO system with a single massive black hole (MBH), mainly because of the existence of the gap and the rotation of the BBH (and its associated small disks) around the center of mass. We estimate the half-light radii of the emission region at different wavelengths from mock light curves and find that the obtained half-light radius versus wavelength relations of BBH QSO systems can be much flatter than those of single MBH QSO systems at a wavelength range determined by the BBH parameters, such as the total mass, mass ratio, separation, accretion rates, etc. The difference is primarily due to the existence of the gap. Such unique features on the light curves and half-light radius-wavelength relations of BBH QSO systems can be used to select and probe sub-parsec BBHs in a large number of lensed QSOs to be discovered by current and future surveys, including the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System, the Large Synoptic Survey telescope, and Euclid.

  2. Improved Predictions of Kepler Microlensing Rates for Primordial Black Hole Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Agnieszka; Griest, K.

    2013-01-01

    Primordial Black Holes (PBHs) remain a viable Dark Matter (DM) candidate of the Standard Model of Particle Physics. Previously, we have proposed a new method to constrain the remaining PBH DM mass range using microlensing of Kepler source stars, with the possibility of closing up to 40% of the remaining mass window. Here we re-address this analysis using a more accurate treatment of the distribution of the source stars, including limb-darkening as well as reflecting a more accurate number of variable stars. Including the extended Kepler mission the theoretically detectable PBH DM mass range could be extended down to 2*10^-10 solar masses. We address the possible PBH parameters that could be detected if such an event would be observed as well as possible improvements for future survey satellite missions.

  3. Overview of characterization and metrology techniques for microlenses and microlens arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myun-Sik; Allegre, Lisa; Sunarjo, Jonathan; Noell, Wilfried; Voelkel, Reinhard

    2015-05-01

    We review various metrology techniques for the characterization of refractive microlenses and microlens arrays (MLAs). The limitations and strength of each technique are analyzed. The goal is to obtain more stable and repeatable metrology routines for micro-optics manufacturing. This analysis comprises both techniques for the characterization of individual microlenses and the analysis of a very large number of microlenses in array configurations. Metrology of spherical and aspherical lens profiles, surface properties, aberrations, Strehl ratio, and focal properties will be presented.

  4. A New Method of Detecting Primordial Black Hole Dark Matter using Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Agnieszka; Griest, K.; Lehner, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    Primordial Black Holes (PBHs) are the only remaining Dark Matter (DM) candidate of the Standard Model of Particle Physics. We present a new method of constraining up to 40% of the remaining mass range of the PBH DM using microlensing of stars targeted by NASA's Kepler mission. Kepler's exceptional photometric precision and finite-source effects allow for a higher microlensing rate than previously thought. We introduce a new formalism with these effects for the optical depth and microlensing rate.

  5. Space-based monitoring of ground deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobakht Ersi, Fereydoun; Safari, Abdolreza; Gamse, Sonja

    2016-07-01

    Ground deformation monitoring is valuable to understanding of the behaviour of natural phenomena. Space-Based measurement systems such as Global Positioning System are useful tools for continuous monitoring of ground deformation. Ground deformation analysis based on space geodetic techniques have provided a new, more accurate, and reliable source of information for geodetic positioning which is used to detect deformations of the Ground surface. This type of studies using displacement fields derived from repeated measurments of space-based geodetic networks indicates how crucial role the space geodetic methods play in geodynamics. The main scope of this contribution is to monitor of ground deformation by obtained measurements from GPS sites. We present ground deformation analysis in three steps: a global congruency test on daily coordinates of permanent GPS stations to specify in which epochs deformations occur, the localization of the deformed GPS sites and the determination of deformations.

  6. A space-based microwave radar concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakraborty, D.

    1992-01-01

    A space-based microwave radar (SBR) concept is defined using a tether trans-receive antenna supported between two gravity gradient low earth-orbiting satellites. A cluster of four tether antennas each of 6 km maximum length and 1.5 km separation between tethers constitutes a radar. A system of eight to eleven such clusters constitutes the overall radar scheme which will cover approximately one third of the earth surface for detecting sea-based targets. Issues identified are the array structure, coherence of tethered arrays, grating lobe energy clamping, clutter effects, communications, system requirements and the overall radar system concept including stability considerations. This paper presents the base-line definition of an alternate space-based radar scheme.

  7. Adaptive control of space based robot manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Michael W.; Wee, Liang-Boon

    1991-01-01

    For space based robots in which the base is free to move, motion planning and control is complicated by uncertainties in the inertial properties of the manipulator and its load. A new adaptive control method is presented for space based robots which achieves globally stable trajectory tracking in the presence of uncertainties in the inertial parameters of the system. A partition is made of the fifteen degree of freedom system dynamics into two parts: a nine degree of freedom invertible portion and a six degree of freedom noninvertible portion. The controller is then designed to achieve trajectory tracking of the invertible portion of the system. This portion consist of the manipulator joint positions and the orientation of the base. The motion of the noninvertible portion is bounded, but unpredictable. This portion consist of the position of the robot's base and the position of the reaction wheel.

  8. Toward a Space based Gravitational Wave Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebbins, Robin T.

    2015-01-01

    A space-based GW observatory will produce spectacular science. The LISA mission concept: (a) Long history, (b) Very well-studied, including de-scopes, (c) NASAs Astrophysics Strategic Plan calls for a minority role in ESAs L3 mission opportunity. To that end, NASA is Participating in LPF and ST7 Developing appropriate technology for a LISA-like mission Preparing to seek an endorsement for L3 participation from the 2020 decadal review.

  9. The origin of the microlensing events observed towards the LMC and the stellar counterpart of the Magellanic stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besla, Gurtina; Hernquist, Lars; Loeb, Abraham

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a novel theoretical model to explain the longstanding puzzle of the nature of the microlensing events reported towards the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) by the massive compact halo object (MACHO) and Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) collaborations. We propose that a population of tidally stripped stars from the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) located ˜4-10 kpc behind a lensing population of LMC disc stars can naturally explain the observed event durations (17-71 d), event frequencies and spatial distribution of the reported events. Differences in the event frequencies reported by the OGLE (˜0.33 yr-1) and MACHO (˜1.75 yr-1) surveys appear to be naturally accounted for by their different detection efficiencies and sensitivity to faint sources. The presented models of the Magellanic System were constructed without prior consideration of the microlensing implications. These results favour a scenario for the interaction history of the Magellanic Clouds, wherein the Clouds are on their first infall towards the Milky Way and the SMC has recently collided with the LMC 100-300 Myr ago, leading to a large number of faint sources distributed non-uniformly behind the LMC disc. In contrast to self-lensing models, microlensing events are also expected to occur in fields off the LMC's stellar bar since the stellar debris is not expected to be concentrated in the bar region. This scenario leads to a number of observational tests: the sources are low-metallicity SMC stars; they exhibit high velocities relative to LMC disc stars that may be detectable via proper motion studies and, most notably, there should exist a stellar counterpart to the gaseous Magellanic Stream and Bridge with a V-band surface brightness of >34 mag arcsec-2. In particular, the stellar Bridge should contain enough RR Lyrae stars to be detected by the ongoing OGLE survey of this region.

  10. OGLE-2011-BLG-0417: A RADIAL VELOCITY TESTBED FOR MICROLENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, Andrew; Yee, Jennifer C.; Shin, In-Gu; Han, Cheongho; Udalski, Andrzej

    2013-05-10

    Microlensing experiments are returning increasingly detailed information about the planetary and binary systems that are being detected, far beyond what was originally expected. In several cases the lens mass and distance are measured, and a few very special cases have yielded complete eight-parameter Kepler solutions, i.e., the masses of both components, five Kepler invariants, and the phase. We identify one such case that is suitable for a precision test that could be carried out by comparing Doppler radial velocity (RV) measurements with the predictions from the microlensing solution. The lens primary is reasonably bright (I = 16.3, V = 18.2) and is expected to have a relatively large RV semi-amplitude (K {approx} 6.35 km s{sup -1}).

  11. Using Microlensing Maps to Determine Spin of Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Juan; O'Dowd, Matthew; Webster, Rachel L.; Labrie, Kathleen; Ford, Saavik; McKernan, Barry; Bate, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Quasar accretion disks are expected to have central cavities corresponding to their Supermassive Black Hole's (SMBH) Innermost Stable Circular Orbit (ISCO). Cavity size depends on black hole mass, spin, and relative accretion direction, and so given a mass estimate, measurement of ISCO size constrains SMBH spin; such a measurement would be invaluable in determining the role of spin in AGN emission processes, and also in understanding SMBH growth by constraining the magnitude of accretion events. While not spatially resolvable, ISCO cavities are expected to leave a signature on the light curves of gravitationally lensed quasars when they undergo a strong microlensing event. Using simulations of these events for Q2237+030, the Einstein Cross, we have shown that ISCO width can be measured using current observatories if monitored through a cusp-crossing microlensing event.

  12. Broadband Plasmonic Microlenses based on Patches of Nanoholes

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hanwei; Hyun, Jerome K.; Lee, Min Hyung; Yang, Jiun-Chan; Lauhon, Lincoln J.; Odom, Teri W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports a new type of diffractive microlens based on finite-areas of 2D arrays of circular nanoholes (patches). The plasmonic microlenses can focus single wavelengths of light across the entire visible spectrum as well as broadband white light with little divergence. The focal length is determined primarily by the overall size of the patch and is tolerant to significant changes in patch substructure, including lattice geometry and local order of the circular nanoholes. The optical throughput, however, depends sensitively on the patch substructure and is determined by the wavelengths of surface plasmon resonances. This simple diffractive lens design enables millions of broadband plasmonic microlenses to be fabricated in parallel using soft nanolithographic techniques. PMID:20839781

  13. Forward electrohydrodynamic inkjet printing of optical microlenses on microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Vespini, V; Coppola, S; Todino, M; Paturzo, M; Bianco, V; Grilli, S; Ferraro, P

    2016-01-21

    We report a novel method for direct printing of viscous polymers based on a pyro-electrohydrodynamic repulsion system capable of overcoming limitations on the material type, geometry and thickness of the receiving substrate. In fact, the results demonstrate that high viscosity polymers can be easily manipulated for optical functionalizing of lab-on-a-chip devices through demonstration of direct printing of polymer microlenses onto microfluidic chips and optical fibre terminations. The present system has great potential for applications from biomolecules to nano-electronics. Moreover, in order to prove the effectiveness of the system, the optical performance of such microlenses has been characterized by testing their imaging capabilities when the fibroblast cells were allowed to flow inside the microfluidic channel, showing one of their possible applications on-board a LoC platform. PMID:26660423

  14. A method for the microlensed flux variance of QSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Jeremy; Sun, Ai-Lei

    2014-06-01

    A fast and practical method is described for calculating the microlensed flux variance of an arbitrary source by uncorrelated stars. The required inputs are the mean convergence and shear due to the smoothed potential of the lensing galaxy, the stellar mass function, and the absolute square of the Fourier transform of the surface brightness in the source plane. The mathematical approach follows previous authors but has been generalized, streamlined, and implemented in publicly available code. Examples of its application are given for Dexter and Agol's inhomogeneous-disc models as well as the usual Gaussian sources. Since the quantity calculated is a second moment of the magnification, it is only logarithmically sensitive to the sizes of very compact sources. However, for the inferred sizes of actual quasi-stellar objects (QSOs), it has some discriminatory power and may lend itself to simple statistical tests. At the very least, it should be useful for testing the convergence of microlensing simulations.

  15. Microlensing in the Q0957 + 561 gravitational mirage

    SciTech Connect

    Schild, R.E.; Smith, R.C. )

    1991-03-01

    Analysis of the 10 yr record from monitoring the continuum brightness of Q0957 + 561 A, B shows a systematic increase of the B relative to the A component. The B brightness has leveled off in the last 2 yr at a value 32 percent higher than would be predicted from the ratio of Mg II 2798 A emission line strengths. This is taken to be the signature of microlensing by a star or stars in the lens galaxy. 11 refs.

  16. Gravitational Microlensing as a probe of Quasar Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floyd, David

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational microlensing provides information at the micro-to-nano arcsecond scale necessary to probe the structure of the central engine of quasars. We can now determine the radius of the broad line emitting regions, and measure the temperature profile of the continuum emitting region using single-epoch observations. I will present X-shooter spectroscopy that provides new insight into the accretion mechanism, and the structure of the broad line region.

  17. Discovery of a Jupiter/Saturn analog with gravitational microlensing.

    PubMed

    Gaudi, B S; Bennett, D P; Udalski, A; Gould, A; Christie, G W; Maoz, D; Dong, S; McCormick, J; Szymanski, M K; Tristram, P J; Nikolaev, S; Paczynski, B; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I; Szewczyk, O; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, L; Depoy, D L; Han, C; Kaspi, S; Lee, C-U; Mallia, F; Natusch, T; Pogge, R W; Park, B-G; Abe, F; Bond, I A; Botzler, C S; Fukui, A; Hearnshaw, J B; Itow, Y; Kamiya, K; Korpela, A V; Kilmartin, P M; Lin, W; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Motomura, M; Muraki, Y; Nakamura, S; Okumura, T; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N J; Sako, T; Saito, To; Sato, S; Skuljan, L; Sullivan, D J; Sumi, T; Sweatman, W L; Yock, P C M; Albrow, M D; Allan, A; Beaulieu, J-P; Burgdorf, M J; Cook, K H; Coutures, C; Dominik, M; Dieters, S; Fouqué, P; Greenhill, J; Horne, K; Steele, I; Tsapras, Y; Chaboyer, B; Crocker, A; Frank, S; Macintosh, B

    2008-02-15

    Searches for extrasolar planets have uncovered an astonishing diversity of planetary systems, yet the frequency of solar system analogs remains unknown. The gravitational microlensing planet search method is potentially sensitive to multiple-planet systems containing analogs of all the solar system planets except Mercury. We report the detection of a multiple-planet system with microlensing. We identify two planets with masses of approximately 0.71 and approximately 0.27 times the mass of Jupiter and orbital separations of approximately 2.3 and approximately 4.6 astronomical units orbiting a primary star of mass approximately 0.50 solar mass at a distance of approximately 1.5 kiloparsecs. This system resembles a scaled version of our solar system in that the mass ratio, separation ratio, and equilibrium temperatures of the planets are similar to those of Jupiter and Saturn. These planets could not have been detected with other techniques; their discovery from only six confirmed microlensing planet detections suggests that solar system analogs may be common. PMID:18276883

  18. Parallax and Orbital Effects in Astrometric Microlensing with Binary Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucita, A. A.; De Paolis, F.; Ingrosso, G.; Giordano, M.; Manni, L.

    2016-06-01

    In gravitational microlensing, binary systems may act as lenses or sources. Identifying lens binarity is generally easy, in particular in events characterized by caustic crossing since the resulting light curve exhibits strong deviations from a smooth single-lensing light curve. In contrast, light curves with minor deviations from a Paczyński behavior do not allow one to identify the source binarity. A consequence of gravitational microlensing is the shift of the position of the multiple image centroid with respect to the source star location — the so-called astrometric microlensing signal. When the astrometric signal is considered, the presence of a binary source manifests with a path that largely differs from that expected for single source events. Here, we investigate the astrometric signatures of binary sources taking into account their orbital motion and the parallax effect due to the Earth’s motion, which turn out not to be negligible in most cases. We also show that considering the above-mentioned effects is important in the analysis of astrometric data in order to correctly estimate the lens-event parameters.

  19. Fabrication, replication, and characterization of microlenses for optofluidic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonusauskas, L.; Žukauskas, A.; Danilevicius, P.; Malinauskas, M.

    2013-03-01

    Here we report Direct Laser Writing (DLW) based fabrication of aspheric microlenses out of hybrid organicinorganic photopolymer ORMOSIL. Using the advantages of the flexible manufacturing technique the produced microlenses are embedded inside a fluidic channel. Applying the soft-lithography molding technique the structures are transferred to the elastomer PDMS and hydrogel PEG-DA-258 materials. Measurements show that such replica transferring can reproduce the initial structures into other materials on desired substrates with no noticeable losses of quality. Furthermore, it makes femtosecond laser redundant once the original structure is made. The embedded structures are immersed into several liquid media (acetone, methanol) and the focusing performance corresponding to the change of the optical path length of the microlenses is obtained. It well matches with the estimated values. In conclusion, we report a combination of laser fabrication and replication methods as an efficient way to produce optofluidic components, which can be used for light based sensing, trapping or other applications such as MOEMS devices.

  20. Predictions for microlensing planetary events from core accretion theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Wei; Mao, Shude; Penny, Matthew; Gould, Andrew; Gendron, Rieul

    2014-06-10

    We conduct the first microlensing simulation in the context of a planet formation model. The planet population is taken from the Ida and Lin core accretion model for 0.3 M {sub ☉} stars. With 6690 microlensing events, we find that for a simplified Korea Microlensing Telescopes Network (KMTNet), the fraction of planetary events is 2.9%, out of which 5.5% show multiple-planet signatures. The numbers of super-Earths, super-Neptunes, and super-Jupiters detected are expected to be almost equal. Our simulation shows that high-magnification events and massive planets are favored by planet detections, which is consistent with previous expectation. However, we notice that extremely high-magnification events are less sensitive to planets, which is possibly because the 10 minute sampling of KMTNet is not intensive enough to capture the subtle anomalies that occur near the peak. This suggests that while KMTNet observations can be systematically analyzed without reference to any follow-up data, follow-up observations will be essential in extracting the full science potential of very high magnification events. The uniformly high-cadence observations expected for KMTNet also result in ∼55% of all detected planets not being caustic crossing, and more low-mass planets even down to Mars mass being detected via planetary caustics. We also find that the distributions of orbital inclinations and planet mass ratios in multiple-planet events agree with the intrinsic distributions.

  1. Quasar-microlensing versus star-microlensing evidence of small-planetary-mass objects as the dominant inner-halo galactic dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.; Schild, Rudolph E.

    2011-11-01

    We examine recent results of two kinds of microlensing experiments intended to detect galactic dark matter objects, and we suggest that the lack of short period star-microlensing events observed for stars near the Galaxy does not preclude either the "rogue planets" identified from quasar-microlensing by Schild 1996 as the missing-mass of a lens galaxy, or the "Primordial Fog Particles" (PFPs) in Proto-Globular-star-Cluster (PGC) clumps predicted by Gibson 1996 - 2000 as the dominant inner-halo galactic dark matter component from a new hydrodynamic gravitational structure formation theory. We point out that hydro-gravitational processes acting on a massive population of such micro-brown-dwarfs in their nonlinear accretional cascades to form stars gives intermittent lognormal number density np distributions for the PFPs within the PGC gas-stabilized-clumps. Hence, star-microlensing searches that focus on a small fraction of the sky assuming a uniform distribution for np are subject to vast underestimates of the mean ⟨np⟩mean. Sparse independent samples give modes 10-4 - 10-6 smaller than means of the highly skewed lognormal distributions expected. Quasar-microlensing searches with higher optical depths are less affected by np intermittency. We attempt to reconcile the results of the star-microlensing and quasar-microlensing studies, with particular reference to the necessarily hydrogenous and primordial small-planetary-mass range. We conclude that star microlensing searches cannot exclude and are unlikely even to detect these low-mass candidate-galactic-dark-matter-objects so easily observed by quasar-microlensing and so robustly predicted by the new theory.

  2. The microlensing event rate and optical depth toward the galactic bulge from MOA-II

    SciTech Connect

    Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Wada, K.; Collaboration: MOA Collaboratoin; and others

    2013-12-01

    We present measurements of the microlensing optical depth and event rate toward the Galactic Bulge (GB) based on two years of the MOA-II survey. This sample contains ∼1000 microlensing events, with an Einstein radius crossing time of t {sub E} ≤ 200 days in 22 bulge fields covering ∼42 deg{sup 2} between –5° < l < 10° and –7° < b < –1°. Our event rate and optical depth analysis uses 474 events with well-defined microlensing parameters. In the central fields with |l| < 5°, we find an event rate of Γ = [2.39 ± 1.1]e {sup [0.60±0.05](3–|b|)} × 10{sup –5} star{sup –1} yr{sup –1} and an optical depth (for events with t {sub E} ≤ 200 days) of τ{sub 200} = [2.35 ± 0.18]e {sup [0.51±0.07](3–|b|)} × 10{sup –6} for the 427 events, using all sources brighter than I{sub s} ≤ 20 mag. The distribution of observed fields is centered at (l, b) = (0.°38, –3.°72). We find that the event rate is maximized at low latitudes and a longitude of l ≈ 1°. For the 111 events in 3.2 deg{sup 2} of the central GB at |b| ≤ 3.°0 and 0.°0 ≤ l ≤ 2.°0, centered at (l, b) = (0.°97, –2.°26), we find Γ=4.57{sub −0.46}{sup +0.51}×10{sup −5} star{sup –1} yr{sup –1} and τ{sub 200}=3.64{sub −0.45}{sup +0.51}×10{sup −6}. We also consider a red clump giant (RCG) star sample with I{sub s} < 17.5, and we find that the event rate for the RCG sample is slightly lower than but consistent with the all-source event rate. The main difference is the lack of long duration events in the RCG sample due to a known selection effect. Our results are consistent with previous optical depth measurements, but they are somewhat lower than previous all-source measurements, and slightly higher than previous RCG optical depth measurements. This suggests that the previously observed difference in optical depth measurements between all-source and RCG samples may largely be due to statistical fluctuations. These event rate measurements toward the central GB

  3. Space transfer vehicles and space basing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Joe

    1991-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: (1) space basing agenda; (2) mission scenario 4E-5B, crew and Lunar Excursion Vehicle (LEV) delivery; (3) final concept candidate, crew concept 4E-2B; (4) space transfer vehicle (STV) concept 4E-5B; (5) configuration summary for crew concept 4E-5B; (6) configuration definition for crew concept 4E-5B; (7) low earth orbit node assembly and checkout operations; (8) criteria for operation objectives; (9) LTV and STV main engines; (10) Space Station Freedom impacts; (11) aerobrakes; and (12) on orbit operations. This document is presented in viewgraph form.

  4. Space-based Tests of Relativistic Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turyshev, Vyacheslav G.

    Since its initial publication, Einstein's general theory of relativity had been tested to a very high precision and presently is considered to be the standard theory of gravitation, especially when the phenomena in astrophysics, cosmology, and fundamental physics are concerned. As such, this theory has many practically important applications including spacecraft navigation, relativistic geodesy, time transfer, etc. Here we discuss the foundations of general relativity, present its current empirical status, and highlight the need for the new generation of high-accuracy tests. We present some space-based gravitational experiments and discuss anticipated advances in our understanding of the fundamental laws of nature.

  5. Space Based Range Demonstration and Certification (SBRDC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakahara, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the development, utilization and testing of technologies for range safety and range user systems. The contents include: 1) Space Based Range (SBR) Goals and Objectives; 2) Today s United States Range; 3) Future Range; 4) Another Vision for the Future Range; 5) STARS Project Goals; 6) STARS Content; 7) STARS Configuration Flight Demonstrations 1 & 2; 8) Spaceport And Range Technologies STARS Objectives and Results; 9) Spaceport And Range Technologies STARS FD2 Objectives; 10) Range Safety Hardware; 11) Range User Hardware; and 12) Past/Future Flight Demo Plans

  6. Imprints of the quasar structure in time-delay light curves: Microlensing-aided reverberation mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluse, D.; Tewes, M.

    2014-11-01

    The advent of large area photometric surveys has raised a great deal of interest in the possibility of using broadband photometric data, instead of spectra, to measure the size of the broad line region of active galactic nuclei. We describe here a new method that uses time-delay lensed quasars where one or several images are affected by microlensing due to stars in the lensing galaxy. Because microlensing decreases (or increases) the flux of the continuum compared to the broad line region, it changes the contrast between these two emission components. We show that this effect can be used to effectively disentangle the intrinsic variability of those two regions, offering the opportunity to perform reverberation mapping based on single-band photometric data. Based on simulated light curves generated using a damped random walk model of quasar variability, we show that measurement of the size of the broad line region can be achieved using this method, provided one spectrum has been obtained independently during the monitoring. This method is complementary to photometric reverberation mapping and could also be extended to multi-band data. Because the effect described above produces a variability pattern in difference light curves between pairs of lensed images that is correlated with the time-lagged continuum variability, it can potentially produce systematic errors in measurement of time delays between pairs of lensed images. Simple simulations indicate that time-delay measurement techniques that use a sufficiently flexible model for the extrinsic variability are not affected by this effect and produce accurate time delays.

  7. Space-based Operations Grid Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Robert N.; Welch, Clara L.

    2003-01-01

    The Space based Operations Grid is intended to integrate the "high end" network services and compute resources that a remote payload investigator needs. This includes integrating and enhancing existing services such as access to telemetry, payload commanding, payload planning and internet voice distribution as well as the addition of services such as video conferencing, collaborative design, modeling or visualization, text messaging, application sharing, and access to existing compute or data grids. Grid technology addresses some of the greatest challenges and opportunities presented by the current trends in technology, i.e. how to take advantage of ever increasing bandwidth, how to manage virtual organizations and how to deal with the increasing threats to information technology security. We will discuss the pros and cons of using grid technology in space-based operations and share current plans for the prototype. It is hoped that early on the prototype can incorporate many of the existing as well as future services that are discussed in the first paragraph above to cooperating International Space Station Principle Investigators both nationally and internationally.

  8. MERLIN: a space-based methane monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, C.; Alpers, M.; Millet, B.; Ehret, G.; Flamant, P.; Deniel, C.

    2011-10-01

    Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas. The radiative forcing caused by methane contributes significantly to the warming of the atmosphere. To better understand the complex global Methane Cycle, it is necessary to apply space-based measurements techniques in order to obtain global coverage at high precision The Methane Remote Sensing Lidar Mission (MERLIN) is a joint French-German cooperation on a micro satellite mission for space-based measurement of spatial and temporal gradients of atmospheric methane columns on a global scale. MERLIN will be the first Integrated Path Differential Absorption LIDAR for methane monitoring from space. In contrast to passive methane missions, the LIDAR instrument allows to retrieve methane fluxes at all-latitudes, allseasons and during night as it is not relying on sunlight. First scientific studies show a substantial reduction of the prior methane flux uncertainties in key observational regions when using synthetic MERLIN observations in the flux inversion experiments. Furthermore, MERLIN observations can help to quantify and verify in scientific credible way national emission reduction scenarios as formulated in the Kyoto protocol. This paper reports on the present status of MERLIN and gives an overview on the joint mission concept with the German LIDAR on the French satellite platform MYRIADE.

  9. Space-based Science Operations Grid Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Robert N.; Welch, Clara L.; Redman, Sandra

    2004-01-01

    Grid technology is the up and coming technology that is enabling widely disparate services to be offered to users that is very economical, easy to use and not available on a wide basis. Under the Grid concept disparate organizations generally defined as "virtual organizations" can share services i.e. sharing discipline specific computer applications, required to accomplish the specific scientific and engineering organizational goals and objectives. Grids are emerging as the new technology of the future. Grid technology has been enabled by the evolution of increasingly high speed networking. Without the evolution of high speed networking Grid technology would not have emerged. NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Flight Projects Directorate, Ground Systems Department is developing a Space-based Science Operations Grid prototype to provide to scientists and engineers the tools necessary to operate space-based science payloads/experiments and for scientists to conduct public and educational outreach. In addition Grid technology can provide new services not currently available to users. These services include mission voice and video, application sharing, telemetry management and display, payload and experiment commanding, data mining, high order data processing, discipline specific application sharing and data storage, all from a single grid portal. The Prototype will provide most of these services in a first step demonstration of integrated Grid and space-based science operations technologies. It will initially be based on the International Space Station science operational services located at the Payload Operations Integration Center at MSFC, but can be applied to many NASA projects including free flying satellites and future projects. The Prototype will use the Internet2 Abilene Research and Education Network that is currently a 10 Gb backbone network to reach the University of Alabama at Huntsville and several other, as yet unidentified, Space Station based

  10. ARTEMiS (Automated Robotic Terrestrial Exoplanet Microlensing Search): A possible expert-system based cooperative effort to hunt for planets of Earth mass and below

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominik, M.; Horne, K.; Allan, A.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Tsapras, Y.; Snodgrass, C.; Bode, M. F.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Fraser, S. N.; Kerins, E.; Mottram, C. J.; Steele, I. A.; Street, R. A.; Wheatley, P. J.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.

    2008-03-01

    The technique of gravitational microlensing is currently unique in its ability to provide a sample of terrestrial exoplanets around both Galactic disk and bulge stars, allowing to measure their abundance and determine their distribution with respect to mass and orbital separation. Thus, valuable information for testing models of planet formation and orbital migration is gathered, constituting an important piece in the puzzle for the existence of life forms throughout the Universe. In order to achieve these goals in reasonable time, a well-coordinated effort involving a network of either 2m or 4×1m telescopes at each site is required. It could lead to the first detection of an Earth-mass planet outside the Solar system, and even planets less massive than Earth could be discovered. From April 2008, ARTEMiS (Automated Robotic Terrestrial Exoplanet Microlensing Search) is planned to provide a platform for a three-step strategy of survey, follow-up, and anomaly monitoring. As an expert system embedded in eSTAR (e-Science Telescopes for Astronomical Research), ARTEMiS will give advice for follow-up based on a priority algorithm that selects targets to be observed in order to maximize the expected number of planet detections, and will also alert on deviations from ordinary microlensing light curves by means of the SIGNALMEN anomaly detector. While the use of the VOEvent (Virtual Observatory Event) protocol allows a direct interaction with the telescopes that are part of the HTN (Heterogeneous Telescope Networks) consortium, additional interfaces provide means of communication with all existing microlensing campaigns that rely on human observers. The success of discovering a planet by microlensing critically depends on the availability of a telescope in a suitable location at the right time, which can mean within 10 min. To encourage follow-up observations, microlensing campaigns are therefore releasing photometric data in real time. On ongoing planetary anomalies, world

  11. Broadband Metallic Planar Microlenses in an Array: the Focusing Coupling Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yiting; Wang, Ping; Zhu, Yechuan; Diao, Jinshuai

    2016-02-01

    The microlens arrays (MLAs) are widely utilized for various applications. However, when the lens size and the spacing between two adjacent microlenses are of the length scale of the working wavelength, the diffraction effect plays a vital role in the final focusing performance. We suggest a kind of broadband metallic planar microlenses, based on which the ultra-compact microlens arrays are also constructed. The focusing coupling effect revealing for such devices is then investigated in detail by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, with the emphasis on the changing spacing between adjacent microlenses, the working wavelength, the diameter of microlenses, and the array size. The results show that a larger spacing, a larger lens size, a shorter wavelength, or a smaller array scale can lead to a weaker focusing coupling effect. This research provides an important technological reference to design an array of metallic planar microlenses with the well-controlled focusing performance.

  12. Influence of TESG layer viscoelasticity on the imaging properties of microlenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiljević, Darko; Murić, Branka; Pantelić, Dejan; Panić, Bratimir

    2012-05-01

    Microlenses were produced by the irradiation of a layer of tot'hema and eosin sensitized gelatin (TESG) with laser light (second harmonic Nd:YAG, 532 nm). For this research, eight microlenses were written on a dog-bone-shaped TESG layer. After production, microlenses were uniaxially stretched on a tensile testing machine. Each microlens had different amounts of strain (0, 30, 60, 80, 120, 140, 180 and 240% strain). The influence of TESG layer extensibility on the imaging properties of microlenses was characterized by calculating the root mean square wavefront aberration, the modulation transfer function and the geometrical spot diagram. All microlenses had very good imaging properties and the microlens with 0% strain had diffraction-limited performance.

  13. Broadband Metallic Planar Microlenses in an Array: the Focusing Coupling Effect.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yiting; Wang, Ping; Zhu, Yechuan; Diao, Jinshuai

    2016-12-01

    The microlens arrays (MLAs) are widely utilized for various applications. However, when the lens size and the spacing between two adjacent microlenses are of the length scale of the working wavelength, the diffraction effect plays a vital role in the final focusing performance. We suggest a kind of broadband metallic planar microlenses, based on which the ultra-compact microlens arrays are also constructed. The focusing coupling effect revealing for such devices is then investigated in detail by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, with the emphasis on the changing spacing between adjacent microlenses, the working wavelength, the diameter of microlenses, and the array size. The results show that a larger spacing, a larger lens size, a shorter wavelength, or a smaller array scale can lead to a weaker focusing coupling effect. This research provides an important technological reference to design an array of metallic planar microlenses with the well-controlled focusing performance. PMID:26922796

  14. Space Based Gravitational Wave Observatories (SGOs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatories (SGOs) will enable the systematic study of the frequency band from 0.0001 - 1 Hz of gravitational waves, where a rich array of astrophysical sources is expected. ESA has selected The Gravitational Universe as the science theme for the L3 mission opportunity with a nominal launch date in 2034. This will be at a minimum 15 years after ground-based detectors and pulsar timing arrays announce their first detections and at least 18 years after the LISA Pathfinder Mission will have demonstrated key technologies in a dedicated space mission. It is therefore important to develop mission concepts that can take advantage of the momentum in the field and the investment in both technology development and a precision measurement community on a more near-term timescale than the L3 opportunity. This talk will discuss a mission concept based on the LISA baseline that resulted from a recent mission architecture study.

  15. Gravitational microlensing by double stars and planetary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Shunde; Paczynski, Bohdan

    1991-01-01

    Almost all stars are in binary systems. When the separation between the two components is comparable to the Einstein ring radius corresponding to the combined mass of the binary acting as a gravitational lens, then an extra pair of images can be created, and the light curve of a lensed source becomes complicated. It is estimated that about 10 percent of all lensing episodes of the Galactic bulge stars will strongly display the binary nature of the lens. The effect is strong even if the companion is a planet. A massive search for microlensing of the Galactic bulge stars may lead to a discovery of the first extrasolar planetary systems.

  16. Space-based Search for Transiting Exoplanets Orbiting Bright Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetanov, Zlatan

    At the current stage of research transiting planets hold the key to advancing our knowledge of exoplanets as they are the only targets that allow determination of many of the key plane-tary parameters. Because the employed techniques are differential (either photometry or spec-troscopy) and the planet is significantly fainter the host star the dominant limitation is simply the number of photons. This puts a very high premium on transiting planets with bright parent stars. The ExoPlanet Task Force recognized the high value of planets transiting bright stars and identified the need to perform a wide area space-based transit survey. In this presentation I will describe a program that addresses the ExoPTF recommendation by using the output of one of the instruments on the currently operating space mission STEREO. STEREO is the third mission in NASA's Solar Terrestrial Probes program. It uses two nearly identical spacecrafts -one on an Earth-leading orbit and one on an Earth-trailing orbit -each equipped with a suit of five small telescopes to provide a stereoscopic view of the coronal mass ejections (CME) as they propagate away from the Sun. As each of these telescopes observes a portion of the heliospehre, they also image the star field in the background. For the purposes of this study we will consider only the images obtained by the HI-1 instruments. Other instruments, although showing the stellar background as well, do not have the data output suitable for a search for transiting exoplanets. This project described here has the potential of delivering a number of very high value targets for follow-up studies with a wide range of facilities, both ground-based and space-based. It will provide a complete survey of all bright stars (<10m) for 18% of the sky. The photometric data series have the sensitivity to detect all transiting hot-Jupiters and other gas giants with periods up to ˜20 days and even some Neptune size planets orbiting bright and/or late type stars. On

  17. Space-based lasers - Ultimate ABM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, W. D.

    1982-05-01

    Technical details and the possibilities of near term development of a series of space-based high energy lasers (HEL) capable of providing an effective missile and hostile aircraft defense system are discussed. The crucial parameter is the deposition of sufficient kill energy on any chosen target, and is estimated to be a few tens of kilojoules/sq cm, with a wavelength of 1 micron, at a range of 3000 km, and with a dwell time of 1/2 sec. The chemical laser is asserted to be receiving most R and D activity, while the free electron laser is also a candidate for the mission. Targeting thousands of ballistic missiles in the boost phase before deployment of MIRVs is noted to be a formidable problem, while the existence of the HEL satellites will result in threats of attack from ASATs, nuclear ASATs, space mines, or other HEL satellites. A more in-depth study is indicated before decisions are made to embark on a full scale HEL program.

  18. Space-based ballistic-missile defense

    SciTech Connect

    Bethe, H.A.; Garwin, R.L.; Gottfried, K.; Kendall, H.W.

    1984-10-01

    This article, based on a forthcoming book by the Union for Concerned Scientists, focuses on the technical aspects of the issue of space-based ballistic-missile defense. After analysis, the authors conclude that the questionable performance of the proposed defense, the ease with which it could be overwhelmed or circumvented, and its potential as an antisatellite system would cause grievous damage to the security of the US if the Strategic Defense Initiative were to be pursued. The path toward greater security lies in quite another direction, they feel. Although research on ballistic-missile defense should continue at the traditional level of expenditure and within the constraints of the ABM Treaty, every effort should be made to negotiate a bilateral ban on the testing and use of space weapons. The authors think it is essential that such an agreement cover all altitudes, because a ban on high-altitude antisatellite weapons alone would not viable if directed energy weapons were developed for ballistic-missile defense. Further, the Star Wars program, unlikely ever to protect the entire nation against a nuclear attack, would nonetheless trigger a major expansion of the arms race.

  19. Studying wave optics in the light curves of exoplanet microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrabi, Ahmad; Rahvar, Sohrab

    2013-05-01

    We study the wave optics features of gravitational microlensing by a binary lens composed of a planet and a parent star. In this system, the source star near the caustic line produces a pair of images in which they can play the role of secondary sources for the observer. This optical system is similar to the Young double-slit experiment. The coherent wavefronts from a source on the lens plane can form a diffraction pattern on the observer plane. This diffraction pattern has two modes from the close- and wide-pair images. From the observational point of view, we study the possibility of detecting this effect through the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project in the resonance and high-magnification channels of binary lensing. While the red giant sources do not seem to satisfy the spatial coherency condition, during the caustic crossing a small part of a source traversing the caustic line can produce coherent pair images. Observations of wave optics effects at longer wavelengths accompanied by optical observations of a microlensing event provide extra information on the parameter space of the planet. These observations can provide a new basis for the study of exoplanets.

  20. Galactic Bulge Microlensing Events from the MACHO Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, C L; Griest, K; Popowski, P; Cook, K H; Drake, A J; Minniti, D; Myer, D G; Alcock, C; Allsman, R A; Alves, D R; Axelrod, T S; Becker, A C; Bennett, D P; Freeman, K C; Geha, M; Lehner, M J; Marshall, S L; Nelson, C A; Peterson, B A; Quinn, P J; Stubbs, C W; Sutherland, W; Vandehei, T; Welch, D L

    2005-06-16

    The authors present a catalog of 450 relatively high signal-to-noise microlensing events observed by the MACHO collaboration between 1993 and 1999. The events are distributed throughout the fields and, as expected, they show clear concentration toward the Galactic center. No optical depth is given for this sample since no blending efficiency calculation has been performed, and they find evidence for substantial blending. In a companion paper they give optical depths for the sub-sample of events on clump giant source stars, where blending is a less significant effect. Several events with sources that may belong to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy are identified. For these events even relatively low dispersion spectra could suffice to classify these events as either consistent with Sagittarius membership or as non-Sagittarius sources. Several unusual events, such as microlensing of periodic variable source stars, binary lens events, and an event showing extended source effects are identified. They also identify a number of contaminating background events as cataclysmic variable stars.

  1. Microlensing planet detection via geosynchronous and low Earth orbit satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogavero, F.; Beaulieu, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Planet detection through microlensing is usually limited by a well-known degeneracy in the Einstein timescale tE, which prevents mass and distance of the lens to be univocally determined. It has been shown that a satellite in geosynchronous orbit could provide masses and distances for most standard planetary events (tE ≈ 20 days) via a microlens parallax measurement. This paper extends the analysis to shorter Einstein timescales, tE ≈ 1 day, when dealing with the case of Jupiter-mass lenses. We then study the capabilities of a low Earth orbit satellite on even shorter timescales, tE ≈ 0.1 days. A Fisher matrix analysis is employed to predict how the 1-σ error on parallax depends on tE and the peak magnification of the microlensing event. It is shown that a geosynchronous satellite could detect parallaxes for Jupiter-mass free floaters and discover planetary systems around very low-mass brown dwarfs. Moreover, a low Earth orbit satellite could lead to the discovery of Earth-mass free-floating planets. Limitations to these results can be the strong requirements on the photometry, the effects of blending, and in the case of the low orbit, the Earth's umbra.

  2. Confocal microscopy and variable-focal length microlenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mac Raighne, Aaron M.; Yang, Lisong; Dunbar, L. Andrea; McCabe, Eithne M.; Scharf, Toralf

    2004-07-01

    Confocal microscopy has a unique optical sectioning property which allows three-dimensional images at different depths. Use of a microlens array is a potential alternative to the Nipkow disk for parallel imaging with high throughput in real-time confocal microscopy. The use of variable-focal-length microlenses can provide a way to axially scan the foci electronically avoiding the inflexible mechanical movement of the lens or the sample. Here we demonstrate a combination of a variable-focal-length microlens array and a fiber optic bundle as a way to create a high throughput aperture array that would be potentially applied as confocal imaging in vivo biological specimens. Variable focal length microlenses that we use consist of a liquid crystal film sandwiched between a pair of conductive substrates with patterned electrodes. The incident side of the microlens array was determined by examining the focus distribution in the axial direction. The variation of the focal length obtained by changing the voltage and corresponding focus intensity were measured through a conventional microscope. Meanwhile, the fiber bundle was characterized by coupling with either coherent or incoherent light source. We use the fiber bundle as both a multiple aperture and an image-carrying element and combine it with a microlens array to built up a confocal system. Axial responses are measured in two optical arrangements as a route to investigate endoscope potential.

  3. Caustic Structures and Detectability of Circumbinary Planets in Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhn, Jacob K.; Penny, Matthew T.; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2016-08-01

    Recent discoveries of circumbinary planets in Kepler data show that there is a viable channel of planet formation around binary main-sequence stars. Motivated by these discoveries, we have investigated the caustic structures and detectability of circumbinary planets in microlensing events. We have produced a suite of animations of caustics as a function of the projected separation and angle of the binary host to efficiently explore caustic structures over the entire circumbinary parameter space. Aided by these animations, we have derived a semi-empirical analytic expression for the location of planetary caustics, which are displaced in circumbinary lenses relative to those of planets with a single host. We have used this expression to show that the dominant source of caustic motion will be due to the planet’s orbital motion and not that of the binary star. Finally, we estimate the fraction of circumbinary microlensing events that are recognizable as such to be significant (5%–50%) for binary projected separations in the range 0.1–0.5 in units of Einstein radii.

  4. Empirical study of simulated two-planet microlensing events

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Wei; Gould, Andrew; Penny, Matthew; Mao, Shude; Gendron, Rieul

    2014-10-10

    We undertake the first study of two-planet microlensing models recovered from simulations of microlensing events generated by realistic multiplanet systems in which 292 planetary events, including 16 two-planet events, were detected from 6690 simulated light curves. We find that when two planets are recovered, their parameters are usually close to those of the two planets in the system most responsible for the perturbations. However, in 1 of the 16 examples, the apparent mass of both detected planets was more than doubled by the unmodeled influence of a third, massive planet. This fraction is larger than but statistically consistent with the roughly 1.5% rate of serious mass errors due to unmodeled planetary companions for the 274 cases from the same simulation in which a single planet is recovered. We conjecture that an analogous effect due to unmodeled stellar companions may occur more frequently. For 7 out of 23 cases in which two planets in the system would have been detected separately, only one planet was recovered because the perturbations due to the two planets had similar forms. This is a small fraction (7/274) of all recovered single-planet models, but almost a third of all events that might plausibly have led to two-planet models. Still, in these cases, the recovered planet tends to have parameters similar to one of the two real planets most responsible for the anomaly.

  5. Gravitational microlensing as a probe for dark matter clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorova, E.; Sliusar, V. M.; Zhdanov, V. I.; Alexandrov, A. N.; Del Popolo, A.; Surdej, J.

    2016-04-01

    Extended dark matter (DM) substructures may play the role of microlenses in the Milky Way and in extragalactic gravitational lens systems (GLSs). We compare microlensing effects caused by point masses (Schwarzschild lenses) and extended clumps of matter using a simple model for the lens mapping. A superposition of the point mass and the extended clump is also considered. For special choices of the parameters, this model may represent a cusped clump of cold DM, a cored clump of self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) or an ultra-compact minihalo of DM surrounding a massive point-like object. We built the resulting micro-amplification curves for various parameters of one clump moving with respect to the source in order to estimate differences between the light curves caused by clumps and by point lenses. The results show that it may be difficult to distinguish between these models. However, some region of the clump parameters can be restricted by considering the high amplification events at the present level of photometric accuracy. Then we estimate the statistical properties of the amplification curves in extragalactic GLSs. For this purpose, an ensemble of amplification curves is generated yielding the autocorrelation functions (ACFs) of the curves for different choices of the system parameters. We find that there can be a significant difference between these ACFs if the clump size is comparable with typical Einstein radii; as a rule, the contribution of clumps makes the ACFs less steep.

  6. Crosstalk reduction in free space optical interconnects systems using microlenses with Gaussian transmittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ababneh, Nedal

    2014-05-01

    A novel method to reduce the diffraction crosstalk for micro-lens based free space optical interconnects is presented. Instead of using microlenses with uniform transmittance apertures, the use of microlenses with non-uniform transmittance apertures is proposed. It is shown that the diffraction crosstalk which exists in the free space interconnects systems that use microlenses with uniform transmittance apertures can be substantially reduced by using microlenses with Gaussian transmittance. The optical field at the detectors array using both the uniform and Gaussian apertures have been derived and used to calculate the crosstalk. Numerical results have been introduced to show the improvement of the signal-to-crosstalk ratio when using the Gaussian transmittance for the microlens.

  7. A Space Based Solar Power Satellite System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, J. M.; Polling, D.; Ustamujic, F.; Yaldiz, R.; et al.

    2002-01-01

    . Based on the expected revenues from about 300 customers, SPoTS needs a significant contribution from public funding to be commercial viable. However, even though the system might seem to be a huge investment first, it provides a unique steppingstone for future space based wireless transfer of energy to the Earth. Also the public funding is considered as an interest free loan and is due to be paid back over de lifetime period of SPoTS. These features make the SPoTS very attractive in comparison to other space projects of the same science field.

  8. Flat Panel Space Based Space Surveillance Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, R.; Duncan, A.; Wilm, J.; Thurman, S. T.; Stubbs, D. M.; Ogden, C.

    2013-09-01

    limited telescope is, therefore, replaced by in-process integration and test as part of the PIC fabrication that substantially reduces associated schedule and cost. The low profile and low SWaP of a SPIDER system enables high resolution imaging with a payload that is similar in size and aspect ratio to a solar panel. This allows high resolution low cost options for space based space surveillance telescopes. The low SWaP design enables hosted payloads, cubesat designs as well as traditional bus options that are lower cost. We present a description of the concept and preliminary simulation and experimental data that demonstrate the imaging capabilities of the SPIDER technique.

  9. Magnetic space-based field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    Satellite measurements of the geomagnetic field began with the launch of Sputnik 3 in May 1958 and have continued sporadically in the intervening years. A list of spacecraft that have made significant contributions to an understanding of the near-earth geomagnetic field is presented. A new era in near-earth magnetic field measurements began with NASA's launch of Magsat in October 1979. Attention is given to geomagnetic field modeling, crustal magnetic anomaly studies, and investigations of the inner earth. It is concluded that satellite-based magnetic field measurements make global surveys practical for both field modeling and for the mapping of large-scale crustal anomalies. They are the only practical method of accurately modeling the global secular variation. Magsat is providing a significant contribution, both because of the timeliness of the survey and because its vector measurement capability represents an advance in the technology of such measurements.

  10. Real time and in situ monitoring of microlenses fabricated with deep proton writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Virginia; Ottevaere, Heidi; Thienpont, Hugo

    2008-04-01

    Micro-optical components are of growing interest and used in very different applications such as displays, biophotonics, optical-data communication... More in particular, refractive microlenses and refractive microlens arrays are widely used. The fabrication of these components has been extensively investigated and today different technologies are already commercially available such as thermal reflow, laser ablation, reactive ion etching, microject printing... These technologies allow the fabrication of high-quality microlenses in different materials, however these fabrication methods are often too expensive and too time-consuming for prototyping. In our facilities, we implemented Deep Proton Writing (DPW) as a rapid prototyping technology to fabricate plastic refractive microlenses and microlens arrays. To reduce the calibration time and minimize the influence of uncontrollable external parameters we built a transmission Mach-Zehnder interferometer allowing to monitor in situ and in real-time the growing of the refractive microlenses. This means that we can stop the growing process of the microlenses as soon as the predefined specifications are reached. Additionally we can determine out of this interferometric data the geometrical properties and optical quality of each of the microlenses. We have studied the precision and accuracy of our interferometer for the characterization of the latter components. In this paper, we will present the latest results showing the performance of our set-up and the resulting enhancements of our technology.

  11. Caustic-induced features in microlensing magnification probability distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, Kevin P.; Mao, Shude; Wambsganss, Joachim; Paczynski, Bohdan

    1992-01-01

    Numerical simulations have uncovered a previously unrecognized 'bump' in the macroimage magnification probabilities produced by a planar distribution of point masses. The result could be relevant to cases of microlensing by star fields in single galaxies, for which this lensing geometry is an excellent approximation. The bump is produced by bright pairs of microimages formed by sources lying near the caustics of the lens. The numerically calculated probabilities for the magnifications in the range between 3 and 30 are significantly higher than those given by the asymptotic relation derived by Schneider. The bump present in the two-dimensional lenses appears not to exist in the magnification probability distribution produced by a fully three-dimensional lens.

  12. Gravitational Microlensing by Ellis Wormhole: Second Order Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukmanova, Regina; Kulbakova, Aliya; Izmailov, Ramil; Potapov, Alexander A.

    2016-07-01

    Gravitational lensing is the effect of light bending in a gravitational field. It can be used as a possible observational method to detect or exclude the existence of wormholes. In this work, we extend the work by Abe on gravitational microlensing by Ellis wormhole by including the second order deflection term. Using the lens equation and definition of Einstein radius, we find the angular locations of the physical image inside and outside Einstein ring. The work contains a comparative analysis of light curves between the Schwarzschild black hole and the Ellis wormhole that can be used to distinguish such objects though such distinctions are too minute to be observable even in the near future. We also tabulate the optical depth and event rate for lensing by bulge and Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) stars.

  13. Oil droplets of bird eyes: microlenses acting as spectral filters

    PubMed Central

    Stavenga, Doekele G.; Wilts, Bodo D.

    2014-01-01

    An important component of the cone photoreceptors of bird eyes is the oil droplets located in front of the visual-pigment-containing outer segments. The droplets vary in colour and are transparent, clear, pale or rather intensely yellow or red owing to various concentrations of carotenoid pigments. Quantitative modelling of the filter characteristics using known carotenoid pigment spectra indicates that the pigments’ absorption spectra are modified by the high concentrations that are present in the yellow and red droplets. The high carotenoid concentrations not only cause strong spectral filtering but also a distinctly increased refractive index at longer wavelengths. The oil droplets therefore act as powerful spherical microlenses, effectively channelling the spectrally filtered light into the photoreceptor's outer segment, possibly thereby compensating for the light loss caused by the spectral filtering. The spectral filtering causes narrow-band photoreceptor spectral sensitivities, which are well suited for spectral discrimination, especially in birds that have feathers coloured by carotenoid pigments. PMID:24395968

  14. THE IMPORTANCE OF BINARY GRAVITATIONAL MICROLENSING EVENTS THROUGH HIGH-MAGNIFICATION CHANNEL

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Cheongho; Hwang, Kyu-Ha E-mail: kyuha@astroph.chungbuk.ac.k

    2009-12-20

    We estimate the detection efficiency of binary gravitational lensing events through the channel of high-magnification events. From this estimation, we find that binaries in the separation ranges of 0.1 approx< s approx< 10, 0.2 approx< s approx< 5, and 0.3 approx< s approx< 3 can be detected with approx100% efficiency for events with magnifications higher than A = 100, 50, and 10, respectively, where s represents the projected separation between the lens components normalized by the Einstein radius. We also find that the range of high efficiency covers nearly the whole mass-ratio range of stellar companions. Due to the high efficiency in wide ranges of parameter space, we point out that the majority of binary-lens events will be detected through the high-magnification channel in lensing surveys that focus on high-magnification events for efficient detections of microlensing planets. In addition to the high efficiency, the simplicity of the efficiency estimation makes the sample of these binaries useful in the statistical studies of the distributions of binary companions as functions of mass ratio and separation. We also discuss other implications of these events.

  15. Observational limits on Omega in stars, brown dwarfs, and stellar remnants from gravitational microlensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Canizares, Claude R.; Granados, Arno; Steidel, Charles C.; Stocke, John T.

    1994-01-01

    Microlensing by compact objects with masses between approximately 0.001 solar masses and approximately 300 solar masses will amplify the continuum emission of a quasar, without significantly changing its line emission. Thus, compact objects with masses associated with stars, subdwarfs, and stellar remnants will reduce the apparent equivalent widths of quasar emission lines. It is possible to detect this population of lenses by searching for an increase in the number of small equivalent width quasars with redshift. This increase was looked for, but not found, in quasar samples taken from the Einstein Medium Sensitivity Survey and the Steidel & Sargent absorption-line studies. Thus, Omega(sub c), the cosmological density of compact objects relative to the critical density, is less than or approximately equal to 0.1 in the mass range 0.01 solar masses-20 solar masses (for Omega less than 0.6). For any value of Omega, Omega(sub c) less than or approximately equal to 0.2 in the larger mass range 0.001 solar masses-60 solar masses, and Omega(sub c) less than 1 for 0.001 solar masses-300 solar masses. Subdwarfs, stellar objects, or their remnants (e.g., MACHOS) cannot close the universe.

  16. The Importance of Binary Gravitational Microlensing Events Through High-Magnification Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Cheongho; Hwang, Kyu-Ha

    2009-12-01

    We estimate the detection efficiency of binary gravitational lensing events through the channel of high-magnification events. From this estimation, we find that binaries in the separation ranges of 0.1 lsim s lsim 10, 0.2 lsim s lsim 5, and 0.3 lsim s lsim 3 can be detected with ~100% efficiency for events with magnifications higher than A = 100, 50, and 10, respectively, where s represents the projected separation between the lens components normalized by the Einstein radius. We also find that the range of high efficiency covers nearly the whole mass-ratio range of stellar companions. Due to the high efficiency in wide ranges of parameter space, we point out that the majority of binary-lens events will be detected through the high-magnification channel in lensing surveys that focus on high-magnification events for efficient detections of microlensing planets. In addition to the high efficiency, the simplicity of the efficiency estimation makes the sample of these binaries useful in the statistical studies of the distributions of binary companions as functions of mass ratio and separation. We also discuss other implications of these events.

  17. M dwarfs, microlensing, and the mass budget of the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, John N.; Flynn, Chris; Gould, Andrew; Kirhakos, Sofia

    1994-01-01

    We show that faint red stars do not contribute significantly to the mass budget of the Galaxy or to microlensing statistics. Our results are obtained by analyzing two long exposures of a high-latitude field taken with the Wide Field Camera (WFC) on the newly repaired Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Stars are easily distinguished from galaxies essentially to the limiting magnitudes of the images. We find five stars with 2.0 less than V - I less than 3.0 and I less than 25.3 and no stars with V - I greater than 3.0. Therefore, main-sequence stars with M(sub I) greater than 10 that are above the hydrogen-burning limit in the dark halo or the spheroid contribute less than 6% of the unseen matter. Faint red disk stars, M-dwarfs, contribute at most 15% to the mass of the disk. We parameterize the faint end of the cumulative distribution of stars, Phi, as a function of luminosity L(sub V), d Phi/d ln L(sub V) proportional to L(sub V exp -gamma). For spheroid stars, gamma less than 0.32 over the range 6 less than M(sub V) less than 17, with 98% confidence. The disk luminosity function falls, gamma less than 0, for 15 approximately less than M(sub V) approximately less than 19. Faint red stars in the disk or thick disk, and stars with M(sub V) less than 16 in the spheroid contribute tau less than 10(exp -8) to the optical depth to microlensing toward the Large Magellanic Cloud.

  18. Magnetic space-based field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    Because the near Earth magnetic field is a complex combination of fields from outside the Earth of fields from its core and of fields from its crust, measurements from space prove to be the only practical way to obtain timely, global surveys. Due to difficulty in making accurate vector measurements, early satellites such as Sputnik and Vanguard measured only the magnitude survey. The attitude accuracy was 20 arc sec. Both the Earth's core fields and the fields arising from its crust were mapped from satellite data. The standard model of the core consists of a scalar potential represented by a spherical harmonics series. Models of the crustal field are relatively new. Mathematical representation is achieved in localized areas by arrays of dipoles appropriately located in the Earth's crust. Measurements of the Earth's field are used in navigation, to map charged particles in the magnetosphere, to study fluid properties in the Earth's core, to infer conductivity of the upper mantels, and to delineate regional scale geological features.

  19. First Space-based Microlens Parallax Measurement of an Isolated Star: Spitzer Observations of OGLE-2014-BLG-0939

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, J. C.; Udalski, A.; Calchi Novati, S.; Gould, A.; Carey, S.; Poleski, R.; Gaudi, B. S.; Pogge, R. W.; Skowron, J.; Kozłowski, S.; Mróz, P.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.

    2015-04-01

    We present the first space-based microlens parallax measurement of an isolated star. From the striking differences in the lightcurve as seen from Earth and from Spitzer (˜ 1 AU to the west), we infer a projected velocity {{\\tilde{v}}hel}˜ 250 km {{s}-1}, which strongly favors a lens in the Galactic Disk with mass M=0.23+/- 0.07 {{M}⊙ } and distance {{D}L}=3.1+/- 0.4 kpc. An ensemble of such measurements drawn from our ongoing program could be used to measure the single-lens mass function including dark objects, and also is necessary for measuring the Galactic distribution of planets since the ensemble reflects the underlying Galactic distribution of microlenses. We study the application of the many ideas to break the four-fold degeneracy first predicted by Refsdal 50 years ago. We find that this degeneracy is clearly broken, but by two unanticipated mechanisms: a weak constraint on the orbital parallax from the ground-based data and a definitive measurement of the source proper motion.

  20. TIME DELAY AND ACCRETION DISK SIZE MEASUREMENTS IN THE LENSED QUASAR SBS 0909+532 FROM MULTIWAVELENGTH MICROLENSING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Hainline, Laura J.; Morgan, Christopher W.; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Landaal, Zachary D.; Kochanek, C. S.; Harris, Hugh C.; Tilleman, Trudy; Goicoechea, L. J.; Shalyapin, V. N.

    2013-09-01

    We present three complete seasons and two half-seasons of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) r-band photometry of the gravitationally lensed quasar SBS 0909+532 from the U.S. Naval Observatory, as well as two seasons each of SDSS g-band and r-band monitoring from the Liverpool Robotic Telescope. Using Monte Carlo simulations to simultaneously measure the system's time delay and model the r-band microlensing variability, we confirm and significantly refine the precision of the system's time delay to {Delta}t{sub AB} = 50{sub -4}{sup +2} days, where the stated uncertainties represent the bounds of the formal 1{sigma} confidence interval. There may be a conflict between the time delay measurement and a lens consisting of a single galaxy. While models based on the Hubble Space Telescope astrometry and a relatively compact stellar distribution can reproduce the observed delay, the models have somewhat less dark matter than we would typically expect. We also carry out a joint analysis of the microlensing variability in the r and g bands to constrain the size of the quasar's continuum source at these wavelengths, obtaining log {l_brace}(r{sub s,r}/cm)[cos i/0.5]{sup 1/2}{r_brace} = 15.3 {+-} 0.3 and log {l_brace}(r{sub s,g}/cm)[cos i/0.5]{sup 1/2}{r_brace} = 14.8 {+-} 0.9, respectively. Our current results do not formally constrain the temperature profile of the accretion disk but are consistent with the expectations of standard thin disk theory.

  1. MICROLENSING-BASED ESTIMATE OF THE MASS FRACTION IN COMPACT OBJECTS IN LENS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Mediavilla, E.; Guerras, E.; Canovas, H.; Oscoz, A.; Falco, E.; Motta, V.; Jean, C.; Mosquera, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    We estimate the fraction of mass that is composed of compact objects in gravitational lens galaxies. This study is based on microlensing measurements (obtained from the literature) of a sample of 29 quasar image pairs seen through 20 lens galaxies. We determine the baseline for no microlensing magnification between two images from the ratios of emission line fluxes. Relative to this baseline, the ratio between the continua of the two images gives the difference in microlensing magnification. The histogram of observed microlensing events peaks close to no magnification and is concentrated below 0.6 mag, although two events of high magnification, DELTAm approx 1.5, are also present. We study the likelihood of the microlensing measurements using frequency distributions obtained from simulated microlensing magnification maps for different values of the fraction of mass in compact objects, alpha. The concentration of microlensing measurements close to DELTAm approx 0 can be explained only by simulations corresponding to very low values of alpha (10% or less). A maximum likelihood test yields alpha = 0.05{sup +0.09}{sub -0.03} (90% confidence interval) for a quasar continuum source of intrinsic size r{sub s{sub 0}}approx2.6x10{sup 15} cm. This estimate is valid in the 0.1-10 M {sub sun} range of microlens masses. We study the dependence of the estimate of alpha with r{sub s{sub 0}}, and find that alpha approx< 0.1 for r{sub s{sub 0}}approx<1.3x10{sup 16} cm. High values of alpha are possible only for source sizes much larger than commonly expected (r{sub s{sub 0}}>>2.6x10{sup 16} cm). Regarding the current controversy about Milky Way/LMC and M31 microlensing studies, our work supports the hypothesis of a very low content in MACHOS (Massive Compact Halo Objects). In fact, according to our study, quasar microlensing probably arises from the normal star populations of lens galaxies and there is no statistical evidence for MACHOS in the dark halos.

  2. Acoustic Shaping: Enabling Technology for a Space-Based Economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komerath, N. M.; Matos, C. A.; Coker, A.; Wanis, S.; Hausaman, J.; Ames, R. G.; Tan, X. Y.

    1999-01-01

    This abstract presents three points for discussion: (1) Key to the development of civilization in space, is a space-based marketplace, where the need to compete in earth-based markets is removed, along with the constraint of launch costs from Earth. (2) A body of technical results, obtained by the authors' team, indicates promise for non-contact manufacturing in space, of low-cost items required for human presence in space. This is presented along with various other techniques which hold promise. (3) The economics of starting a space-based production company are heavily dependent on the presence of a rudimentary infrastructure. A national-level investment in space-based infrastructure, would be an essential catalyst for the development of a space-based economy. Some suggestions for the beginnings of this infrastructure are repeated from the literature.

  3. COSMIC ERROR CAUSED BY THE GRAVITATIONAL MICROLENSING EFFECT IN HIGH-PRECISION ASTROMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Taihei

    2012-10-01

    We have investigated an expected deviation of the positions or the proper motions of stars as the cosmic error caused by the gravitational microlensing effect. In observing stars in the Galactic bulge region, we obtain an expected deviation of a star positions by the gravitational microlensing effect of about 7 {mu}as. We have also estimated the expected deviation of the proper motions of stars in the Galactic bulge caused by the gravitational microlensing effect. The expected deviation of the proper motions is mainly caused by the lens object located at the nearest angular distance from the source star. Each deviation of the proper motion has a value of less than 0.02 {mu}as yr{sup -1} for 99% of the sources. We have investigated the correlation of the deviation of Galactic bulge stars caused by the gravitational microlensing effect. The value of the correlation angle of the positional deviation is estimated to be about 1 arcmin. In the same way, we have estimated the correlation angle of the deviation of the proper motions. The angle is estimated to be about 1 arcsec. The following difference distinguishes the deviation of the position and that of the proper motion. The positional deviation is affected not only by lenses near the source but also by the lenses far from the source. On the other hand, the deviation of the proper motion by microlensing is mainly only caused by the nearest lens from the source. This difference causes that of the correlation angle.

  4. BINARY MICROLENSING EVENT OGLE-2009-BLG-020 GIVES VERIFIABLE MASS, DISTANCE, AND ORBIT PREDICTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Skowron, J.; Gould, A.; Nelson, C. R.; Kozlowski, S.; Udalski, A.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Kubiak, M.; Szymanski, M. K.; Dong, Subo; Monard, L. A. G.; Han, C.; McCormick, J.; Moorhouse, D.; Thornley, G.; Maury, A.; Bramich, D. M.; Greenhill, J.; Bond, I.; Wyrzykowski, L.

    2011-09-01

    We present the first example of binary microlensing for which the parameter measurements can be verified (or contradicted) by future Doppler observations. This test is made possible by a confluence of two relatively unusual circumstances. First, the binary lens is bright enough (I = 15.6) to permit Doppler measurements. Second, we measure not only the usual seven binary-lens parameters, but also the 'microlens parallax' (which yields the binary mass) and two components of the instantaneous orbital velocity. Thus, we measure, effectively, six 'Kepler+1' parameters (two instantaneous positions, two instantaneous velocities, the binary total mass, and the mass ratio). Since Doppler observations of the brighter binary component determine five Kepler parameters (period, velocity amplitude, eccentricity, phase, and position of periapsis), while the same spectroscopy yields the mass of the primary, the combined Doppler + microlensing observations would be overconstrained by 6 + (5 + 1) - (7 + 1) = 4 degrees of freedom. This makes possible an extremely strong test of the microlensing solution. We also introduce a uniform microlensing notation for single and binary lenses, define conventions, summarize all known microlensing degeneracies, and extend a set of parameters to describe full Keplerian motion of the binary lenses.

  5. Gravitational microlensing of a reverberating quasar broad-line region - I. Method and qualitative results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garsden, H.; Bate, N. F.; Lewis, G. F.

    2011-12-01

    The kinematics and morphology of the broad emission-line region (BELR) of quasars are the subject of significant debate. The two leading methods for constraining BELR properties are microlensing and reverberation mapping. Here we combine these two methods with a study of the microlensing behaviour of the BELR in Q2237+0305, as a change in continuum emission (a 'flare') passes through it. Beginning with some generic models of the BELR - sphere, bicones, disc - we slice in velocity and time to produce brightness profiles of the BELR over the duration of the flare. These are numerically microlensed to determine whether microlensing of reverberation mapping provides new information about the properties of BELRs. We describe our method and show images of the models as they are flaring, and the unlensed and lensed spectra that are produced. Qualitative results and a discussion of the spectra are given in this paper, highlighting some effects that could be observed. Our conclusion is that the influence of microlensing, while not strong, can produce significant observable effects that will help in differentiating the properties of BELRs. Research undertaken as part of the Commonwealth Cosmology Initiative (CCI: ), an international collaboration supported by the Australian Research Council.

  6. DISCOVERY OF ENERGY-DEPENDENT X-RAY MICROLENSING IN Q2237+0305

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Bin; Dai Xinyu; Kochanek, C. S.; Blackburne, Jeffrey A.; Chartas, George; Kozlowski, Szymon

    2011-10-20

    We present our long-term Chandra X-ray monitoring data for the gravitationally lensed quasar Q2237+0305 with 20 epochs spanning 10 years. We easily detect microlensing variability between the images in the full (0.2-8 keV), soft (0.2-2 keV), and hard (2-8 keV) bands at very high confidence. We also detect, for the first time, chromatic microlensing differences between the soft and hard X-ray bands. The hard X-ray band is more strongly microlensed than the soft band, suggesting that the corona above the accretion disk thought to generate the X-rays has a non-uniform electron distribution, in which the hotter and more energetic electrons occupy more compact regions surrounding the black holes. Both the hard and soft X-ray bands are more strongly microlensed than the optical (rest-frame UV) emission, indicating that the X-ray emission is more compact than the optical, confirming the microlensing results from other lenses.

  7. An expert systems application to space base data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babb, Stephen M.

    1988-01-01

    The advent of space vehicles with their increased data requirements are reflected in the complexity of future telemetry systems. Space based operations with its immense operating costs will shift the burden of data processing and routine analysis from the space station to the Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV). A research and development project is described which addresses the real time onboard data processing tasks associated with a space based vehicle, specifically focusing on an implementation of an expert system.

  8. MICROLENSING BINARIES DISCOVERED THROUGH HIGH-MAGNIFICATION CHANNEL

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, I.-G.; Choi, J.-Y.; Park, S.-Y.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Dominik, M.; Allen, W.; Bos, M.; Christie, G. W.; Depoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Drummond, J.; Gal-Yam, A.; Hung, L.-W.; Janczak, J.; Kaspi, S.; Collaboration: muFUN Collaboration; MOA Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; PLANET Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; MiNDSTEp Consortium; and others

    2012-02-20

    Microlensing can provide a useful tool to probe binary distributions down to low-mass limits of binary companions. In this paper, we analyze the light curves of eight binary-lensing events detected through the channel of high-magnification events during the seasons from 2007 to 2010. The perturbations, which are confined near the peak of the light curves, can be easily distinguished from the central perturbations caused by planets. However, the degeneracy between close and wide binary solutions cannot be resolved with a 3{sigma} confidence level for three events, implying that the degeneracy would be an important obstacle in studying binary distributions. The dependence of the degeneracy on the lensing parameters is consistent with a theoretical prediction that the degeneracy becomes severe as the binary separation and the mass ratio deviate from the values of resonant caustics. The measured mass ratio of the event OGLE-2008-BLG-510/MOA-2008-BLG-369 is q {approx} 0.1, making the companion of the lens a strong brown dwarf candidate.

  9. Adaptable acylindrical microlenses fabricated by femtosecond laser micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiè, Petra; Bragheri, Francesca; Claude, Theo; Osellame, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    Microfluidic lenses are a powerful tool for many lab on a chip applications ranging from sensing to detection and also to imaging purpose, with the great advantage to increase the degree of integration and compactness of these micro devices. In this work we present the realization of such a compact microfluidic lens with reconfigurable optical properties. The technique used to realize the device we present is femtosecond laser micromachining followed by chemical etching, which allows to easily fabricate 3D microfluidic devices with an arbitrary shape. Thanks to that it has been possible to easily fabricate different lens made up by cylindrical microchannel in fused silica glasses filled with liquids with a proper refractive index. The optical properties of these devices are tested and shown to be in a good agreement with the theoretical model previously implemented. Furthermore we have also optimized the design of these microlenses in order to reduce the effects of spherical aberrations in the focal region, thus allowing us to obtain a set of different acylindrical microfluidic lenses, whose validation is also reported. In this work the lens adaptability can be achieved by replacing the liquid inside the microchannel, so that we can easily tune the feature of the focused beam. Thus increasing the possible range of applications of these micro optical elements, as an example we report on the validation of the device as a fast integrated optofluidic shutter.

  10. Prospects for Observing Ultracompact Binaries with Space-Based Gravitational Wave Interferometers and Optical Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littenberg, T. B.; Larson, S. L.; Nelemans, G.; Cornish, N. J.

    2012-01-01

    Space-based gravitational wave interferometers are sensitive to the galactic population of ultracompact binaries. An important subset of the ultracompact binary population are those stars that can be individually resolved by both gravitational wave interferometers and electromagnetic telescopes. The aim of this paper is to quantify the multimessenger potential of space-based interferometers with arm-lengths between 1 and 5 Gm. The Fisher information matrix is used to estimate the number of binaries from a model of the Milky Way which are localized on the sky by the gravitational wave detector to within 1 and 10 deg(exp 2) and bright enough to be detected by a magnitude-limited survey.We find, depending on the choice ofGW detector characteristics, limiting magnitude and observing strategy, that up to several hundred gravitational wave sources could be detected in electromagnetic follow-up observations.

  11. Microlensing of Kepler stars as a method of detecting primordial black hole dark matter.

    PubMed

    Griest, Kim; Lehner, Matthew J; Cieplak, Agnieszka M; Jain, Bhuvnesh

    2011-12-01

    If the dark matter consists of primordial black holes (PBHs), we show that gravitational lensing of stars being monitored by NASA's Kepler search for extrasolar planets can cause significant numbers of detectable microlensing events. A search through the roughly 150,000 light curves would result in large numbers of detectable events for PBHs in the mass range 5×10(-10) M(⊙) to 10(-4) M(⊙). Nondetection of these events would close almost 2 orders of magnitude of the mass window for PBH dark matter. The microlensing rate is higher than previously noticed due to a combination of the exceptional photometric precision of the Kepler mission and the increase in cross section due to the large angular sizes of the relatively nearby Kepler field stars. We also present a new formalism for calculating optical depth and microlensing rates in the presence of large finite-source effects. PMID:22182077

  12. Probing the gravitational Faraday rotation using quasar X-ray microlensing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The effect of gravitational Faraday rotation was predicted in the 1950s, but there is currently no practical method for measuring this effect. Measuring this effect is important because it will provide new evidence for correctness of general relativity, in particular, in the strong field limit. We predict that the observed degree and angle of the X-ray polarization of a cosmologically distant quasar microlensed by the random star field in a foreground galaxy or cluster lens vary rapidly and concurrently with flux during caustic-crossing events using the first simulation of quasar X-ray microlensing polarization light curves. Therefore, it is possible to detect gravitational Faraday rotation by monitoring the X-ray polarization of gravitationally microlensed quasars. Detecting this effect will also confirm the strong gravity nature of quasar X-ray emission. PMID:26574051

  13. New limits on primordial black hole dark matter from an analysis of Kepler source microlensing data.

    PubMed

    Griest, Kim; Cieplak, Agnieszka M; Lehner, Matthew J

    2013-11-01

    We present new limits on the allowed masses of a dark matter (DM) halo consisting of primordial black holes (PBH) (or any other massive compact halo object). We analyze two years of data from the Kepler satellite, searching for short-duration bumps caused by gravitational microlensing. After removing background events consisting of variable stars, flare events, and comets or asteroids moving through the Kepler field, we find no microlensing candidates. We measure the efficiency of our selection criteria by adding millions of simulated microlensing lensing events into the Kepler light curves. We find that PBH DM with masses in the range 2 × 10(-9) M[Symbol: see text] to 10(-7)M[Symbol: see text] cannot make up the entirety of the DM in the Milky Way. At the low-mass end, this decreases the allowed mass range by more than an order of magnititude. PMID:24237504

  14. New Limits on Primordial Black Hole Dark Matter from an Analysis of Kepler Source Microlensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griest, Kim; Cieplak, Agnieszka M.; Lehner, Matthew J.

    2013-11-01

    We present new limits on the allowed masses of a dark matter (DM) halo consisting of primordial black holes (PBH) (or any other massive compact halo object). We analyze two years of data from the Kepler satellite, searching for short-duration bumps caused by gravitational microlensing. After removing background events consisting of variable stars, flare events, and comets or asteroids moving through the Kepler field, we find no microlensing candidates. We measure the efficiency of our selection criteria by adding millions of simulated microlensing lensing events into the Kepler light curves. We find that PBH DM with masses in the range 2×10-9M⊙ to 10-7M⊙ cannot make up the entirety of the DM in the Milky Way. At the low-mass end, this decreases the allowed mass range by more than an order of magnititude.

  15. Microlensing of Kepler Stars as a Method of Detecting Primordial Black Hole Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griest, Kim; Lehner, Matthew J.; Cieplak, Agnieszka M.; Jain, Bhuvnesh

    2011-12-01

    If the dark matter consists of primordial black holes (PBHs), we show that gravitational lensing of stars being monitored by NASA’s Kepler search for extrasolar planets can cause significant numbers of detectable microlensing events. A search through the roughly 150 000 light curves would result in large numbers of detectable events for PBHs in the mass range 5×10-10M⊙ to 10-4M⊙. Nondetection of these events would close almost 2 orders of magnitude of the mass window for PBH dark matter. The microlensing rate is higher than previously noticed due to a combination of the exceptional photometric precision of the Kepler mission and the increase in cross section due to the large angular sizes of the relatively nearby Kepler field stars. We also present a new formalism for calculating optical depth and microlensing rates in the presence of large finite-source effects.

  16. Probing the gravitational Faraday rotation using quasar X-ray microlensing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The effect of gravitational Faraday rotation was predicted in the 1950s, but there is currently no practical method for measuring this effect. Measuring this effect is important because it will provide new evidence for correctness of general relativity, in particular, in the strong field limit. We predict that the observed degree and angle of the X-ray polarization of a cosmologically distant quasar microlensed by the random star field in a foreground galaxy or cluster lens vary rapidly and concurrently with flux during caustic-crossing events using the first simulation of quasar X-ray microlensing polarization light curves. Therefore, it is possible to detect gravitational Faraday rotation by monitoring the X-ray polarization of gravitationally microlensed quasars. Detecting this effect will also confirm the strong gravity nature of quasar X-ray emission. PMID:26574051

  17. Future Photovoltaic Power Generation for Space-Based Power Utilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, S.; Landis, G.; Raffaelle, R.; Hepp, A.

    2002-01-01

    A recent NASA program, Space Solar Power Exploratory Research and Technology (SERT), investigated the technologies needed to provide cost-competitive ground baseload electrical power from space based solar energy conversion. This goal mandated low cost, light weight gigawatt (GW) power generation. Investment in solar power generation technologies would also benefit high power military, commercial and science missions. These missions are generally those involving solar electric propulsion, surface power systems to sustain an outpost or a permanent colony on the surface of the moon or mars, space based lasers or radar, or as large earth orbiting power stations which can serve as central utilities for other orbiting spacecraft, or as in the SERT program, potentially beaming power to the earth itself. This paper will discuss requirements for the two latter options, the current state of the art of space solar cells, and a variety of both evolving thin film cells as well as new technologies which may impact the future choice of space solar cells for a high power mission application. The space world has primarily transitioned to commercially available III-V (GaInP/GaAs/Ge) cells with 24-26% air mass zero (AMO) efficiencies. Research in the III-V multi-junction solar cells has focused on fabricating either lattice-mismatched materials with optimum stacking bandgaps or new lattice matched materials with optimum bandgaps. In the near term this will yield a 30% commercially available space cell and in the far term possibly a 40% cell. Cost reduction would be achieved if these cells could be grown on a silicon rather than a germanium substrate since the substrate is ~65% of the cell cost or, better yet, on a polyimide or possibly a ceramic substrate. An overview of multi-junction cell characteristics will be presented here. Thin film cells require substantially less material and have promised the advantage of large area, low cost manufacturing. However, space cell requirements

  18. Galactic Distribution of Planets From High-Magnification Microlensing Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Andrew; Yee, Jennifer; Carey, Sean

    2015-10-01

    We will use Spitzer to measure microlens parallaxes for ~14 microlensing events that are high-magnification (as seen from Earth), in order to determine the Galactic distribution of planets. Simultaneous observations from Spitzer and Earth yield parallaxes because they are separated by ~1 AU, which is of order the size of the Einstein radius projected on the observer plane. Hence, Earth and Spitzer see substantially different lightcurves for the same event. These Spitzer parallaxes enable measurements of the distances to the lenses (and their masses), which is a crucial element for measuring the Galactic distribution of planets. High-mag events are exceptionally sensitive to planets: Gould+ (2010) detected 6 planets from 13 high-mag events. However, previously it was believed impossible to measure their parallaxes using Spitzer: scheduling constraints imply a 3-10 day delay from event recognition to first observation, while high-mag events are typically recognized only 1-2 days before peak. By combining aggressive observing protocols, a completely new photometry pipeline, and new mathematical techniques, we successfully measured parallaxes for 7 events with peak magnification A>100 and another ~7 with 50

  19. Determining the Mass of Proxima Centauri through Astrometric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash

    2012-10-01

    We propose to determine the mass of our nearest neighbor, Proxima Centauri, using the novel technique of astrometric microlensing. Proxima is a dM6e star, with an estimated mass of about 0.12 Msun, lying at a distance of 1.3 pc and having a large proper motion of 3.8 arcsec/yr. In a reprise of the famous 1919 solar eclipse that verified general relativity, Proxima will pass in front of a pair of 18th-magnitude background stars in 2015, affording us two independent opportunities to measure the relativistic deflection. The first passage will occur in May 2015 {impact parameter 1.5 arcsec}, and the second in June 2015 {impact parameter 1.4 arcsec}. As Proxima passes in front, it will cause a relativistic deflection of the background stars' images by 0.5 milliarcsec, an amount readily detectable with HST/WFC3.The gravitational deflection angle depends only upon the distances and relative positions of the stars, and the mass of the lens {Proxima}. Since the distance to Proxima is well known from accurate parallax measurements, and the relative stellar positions can be determined precisely before the event, the astrometric measurement offers a unique and direct method to measure the mass of a single, isolated star. We anticipate better than 10% accuracy for the mass determination. The mass of Proxima is of special interest because it is the nearest M dwarf, representing the most common type of star in the Galaxy, for which the mass-luminosity relation is still uncertain at present.

  20. Determining the Mass of Proxima Centauri through Astrometric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash

    2013-10-01

    We propose to determine the mass of our nearest neighbor, Proxima Centauri, using the novel technique of astrometric microlensing. Proxima is a dM6e star, with an estimated mass of about 0.12 Msun, lying at a distance of 1.3 pc and having a large proper motion of 3.8 arcsec/yr. In a reprise of the famous 1919 solar eclipse that verified general relativity, Proxima will pass in front of a pair of 18th-magnitude background stars in 2015, affording us two independent opportunities to measure the relativistic deflection. The first passage will occur in May 2015 {impact parameter 1.5 arcsec}, and the second in June 2015 {impact parameter 1.4 arcsec}. As Proxima passes in front, it will cause a relativistic deflection of the background stars' images by 0.5 milliarcsec, an amount readily detectable with HST/WFC3.The gravitational deflection angle depends only upon the distances and relative positions of the stars, and the mass of the lens {Proxima}. Since the distance to Proxima is well known from accurate parallax measurements, and the relative stellar positions can be determined precisely before the event, the astrometric measurement offers a unique and direct method to measure the mass of a single, isolated star. We anticipate better than 10% accuracy for the mass determination. The mass of Proxima is of special interest because it is the nearest M dwarf, representing the most common type of star in the Galaxy, for which the mass-luminosity relation is still uncertain at present.

  1. Determining the Mass of Proxima Centauri through Astrometric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash

    2014-10-01

    We propose to determine the mass of our nearest neighbor, Proxima Centauri, using the novel technique of astrometric microlensing. Proxima is a dM6e star, with an estimated mass of about 0.12 Msun, lying at a distance of 1.3 pc and having a large proper motion of 3.8 arcsec/yr. In a reprise of the famous 1919 solar eclipse that verified general relativity, Proxima will pass in front of a pair of 18th-magnitude background stars in 2015, affording us two independent opportunities to measure the relativistic deflection. The first passage will occur in May 2015 (impact parameter 1.5 arcsec), and the second in June 2015 (impact parameter 1.4 arcsec). As Proxima passes in front, it will cause a relativistic deflection of the background stars' images by ~0.5 milliarcsec, an amount readily detectable with HST/WFC3.The gravitational deflection angle depends only upon the distances and relative positions of the stars, and the mass of the lens (Proxima). Since the distance to Proxima is well known from accurate parallax measurements, and the relative stellar positions can be determined precisely before the event, the astrometric measurement offers a unique and direct method to measure the mass of a single, isolated star. We anticipate better than 10% accuracy for the mass determination. The mass of Proxima is of special interest because it is the nearest M dwarf, representing the most common type of star in the Galaxy, for which the mass-luminosity relation is still uncertain at present.

  2. Technology for a NASA Space-Based Science Operations Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Robert N.; Redman, Sandra H.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph representation presents an overview of a proposal to develop a space-based operations grid in support of space-based science experiments. The development of such a grid would provide a dynamic, secure and scalable architecture based on standards and next-generation reusable software and would enable greater science collaboration and productivity through the use of shared resources and distributed computing. The authors propose developing this concept for use on payload experiments carried aboard the International Space Station. Topics covered include: grid definitions, portals, grid development and coordination, grid technology and potential uses of such a grid.

  3. Control of Space-Based Electron Beam Free Form Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seifzer. W. J.; Taminger, K. M.

    2007-01-01

    Engineering a closed-loop control system for an electron beam welder for space-based additive manufacturing is challenging. For earth and space based applications, components must work in a vacuum and optical components become occluded with metal vapor deposition. For extraterrestrial applications added components increase launch weight, increase complexity, and increase space flight certification efforts. Here we present a software tool that closely couples path planning and E-beam parameter controls into the build process to increase flexibility. In an environment where data collection hinders real-time control, another approach is considered that will still yield a high quality build.

  4. Space-based augmentation for global navigation satellite systems.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Mohinder S

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes space-based augmentation for global navigation satellite systems (GNSS). Space-based augmentations increase the accuracy and integrity of the GNSS, thereby enhancing users' safety. The corrections for ephemeris, ionospheric delay, and clocks are calculated from reference station measurements of GNSS data in wide-area master stations and broadcast via geostationary earth orbit (GEO) satellites. This paper discusses the clock models, satellite orbit determination, ionospheric delay estimation, multipath mitigation, and GEO uplink subsystem (GUS) as used in the Wide Area Augmentation System developed by the FAA. PMID:22481784

  5. Intelligibility and Space-based Voice with Relaxed Delay Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Sam; Okino, Clayton; Cheng, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The inherent aspects and flaws surrounding space based communication is technically described and the math surrounding encoding and decoding LT Codes is examined. Utilizing LT codes as a means of reducing packet erasures due to corrupted packets on an RF link can result in higher voice quality. PESQ-MOS measure was used to analyze voice degradation over space links tested for LT codec size and number of 10ms per packet.Extensions utilizing LT codes to improve the packet erasure performance and combining the use of ASR could provide for a solid means of identifying the benefit in terms of intelligibility of voice communications in space-based networks

  6. Space-based aperture array for ultra-long wavelength radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Raj Thilak; Boonstra, Albert-Jan; Bentum, Mark; Klein-Wolt, Marc; Belien, Frederik; Arts, Michel; Saks, Noah; van der Veen, Alle-Jan

    2016-02-01

    The past decade has seen the advent of various radio astronomy arrays, particularly for low-frequency observations below 100 MHz. These developments have been primarily driven by interesting and fundamental scientific questions, such as studying the dark ages and epoch of re-ionization, by detecting the highly red-shifted 21 cm line emission. However, Earth-based radio astronomy observations at frequencies below 30 MHz are severely restricted due to man-made interference, ionospheric distortion and almost complete non-transparency of the ionosphere below 10 MHz. Therefore, this narrow spectral band remains possibly the last unexplored frequency range in radio astronomy. A straightforward solution to study the universe at these frequencies is to deploy a space-based antenna array far away from Earths' ionosphere. In the past, such space-based radio astronomy studies were principally limited by technology and computing resources, however current processing and communication trends indicate otherwise. Furthermore, successful space-based missions which mapped the sky in this frequency regime, such as the lunar orbiter RAE-2, were restricted by very poor spatial resolution. Recently concluded studies, such as DARIS (Disturbuted Aperture Array for Radio Astronomy In Space) have shown the ready feasibility of a 9 satellite constellation using off the shelf components. The aim of this article is to discuss the current trends and technologies towards the feasibility of a space-based aperture array for astronomical observations in the Ultra-Long Wavelength (ULW) regime of greater than 10 m i.e., below 30 MHz. We briefly present the achievable science cases, and discuss the system design for selected scenarios such as extra-galactic surveys. An extensive discussion is presented on various sub-systems of the potential satellite array, such as radio astronomical antenna design, the on-board signal processing, communication architectures and joint space-time estimation of the

  7. National Coordination Office for Space-Based PNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, M. E.

    2008-12-01

    In December 2004, President Bush issued the US Policy on space-based positioning, navigation, and timing (PNT), providing guidance on the management of the Global Positioning System (GPS) and other space- based PNT systems. The policy established the National Executive Committee (EXCOM) to advise and coordinate federal agencies on matters related to space-based PNT. Chaired jointly by the deputy secretaries of defense and transportation, the EXCOM includes equivalent level officials from the Departments of State, the Interior, Agriculture, Commerce, and Homeland Security, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). A National Coordination Office (NCO) supports the EXCOM through an interagency staff. Since establishing the EXCOM and NCO in 2005, the organizations have quickly grown in influence and effectiveness, leading or managing many interagency initiatives including the development of a Five-Year National Space-Based PNT Plan, the Space-Based PNT Interference Detection and Mitigation (IDM) Plan, and other strategic documents. The NCO has also facilitated interagency coordination on numerous policy issues and on external communications intended to spread a consistent, positive US message about space-based PNT. Role of the NCO - The purpose of the EXCOM is to provide top-level guidance to US agencies regarding space-based PNT infrastructure. The president established it at the deputy secretary level to ensure its strategic recommendations effect real change in agency budgets. Recognizing such high-level officials could only meet every few months, the president directed the EXCOM to establish an NCO to carry out its day-to-day business, including overseeing the implementation of EXCOM action items across the member agencies. These range from the resolution of funding issues to the assessment of strategic policy options. They also include the completion of specific tasks and documents requested by the EXCOM co

  8. Quasi-toric planar microlenses for oblique-incidence light beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Hisakazu; Kawai, Shigeru

    1997-02-01

    Novel quasi-toric planar microlenses (PML s) suitable for planar optics are proposed. The PML s have elliptical apertures, and they are astigmatism free for oblique-incidence light beams. A simple PML model is proposed for designing the quasi-toric PML. Fabricated quasi-toric PML s were evaluated to demonstrate their chip-to-chip interconnection probability.

  9. MICROLENSING OF QUASAR BROAD EMISSION LINES: CONSTRAINTS ON BROAD LINE REGION SIZE

    SciTech Connect

    Guerras, E.; Mediavilla, E.; Kochanek, C. S.; Munoz, J. A.; Falco, E.; Motta, V.

    2013-02-20

    We measure the differential microlensing of the broad emission lines between 18 quasar image pairs in 16 gravitational lenses. We find that the broad emission lines are in general weakly microlensed. The results show, at a modest level of confidence (1.8{sigma}), that high ionization lines such as C IV are more strongly microlensed than low ionization lines such as H{beta}, indicating that the high ionization line emission regions are more compact. If we statistically model the distribution of microlensing magnifications, we obtain estimates for the broad line region size of r{sub s} = 24{sup +22} {sub -15} and r{sub s} = 55{sup +150} {sub -35} lt-day (90% confidence) for the high and low ionization lines, respectively. When the samples are divided into higher and lower luminosity quasars, we find that the line emission regions of more luminous quasars are larger, with a slope consistent with the expected scaling from photoionization models. Our estimates also agree well with the results from local reveberation mapping studies.

  10. Digital holographic characterization of liquid microlenses array fabricated in electrode-less configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miccio, L.; Vespini, V.; Grilli, S.; Paturzo, M.; Finizio, A.; De Nicola, S.; Ferraro, P.

    2009-06-01

    We show how thin liquid film on polar dielectric substrate can form an array of liquid micro-lenses. The effect is driven by the pyroelectric effect leading to a new concept in electro-wetting (EW). EW is a viable method for actuation of liquids in microfluidic systems and requires the design and fabrication of complex electrodes for suitable actuation of liquids. When compared to conventional electrowetting devices, the pyroelectric effect allowed to have an electrode-less and circuitless configuration. In our case the surface electric charge induced by the thermal stimulus is able to pattern selectively the surface wettability according to geometry of the ferroelectric domains micro-engineered into the lithium niobate crystal. We show that different geometries of liquid microlenses can be obtained showing also a tuneability of the focal lenses down to 1.6 mm. Thousand of liquid microlenses, each with 100 μm diameter, can be formed and actuated. Also different geometries such as hemi-cylindrical and toroidal liquid structures can be easily obtained. By means of a digital holography method, an accurate characterization of the micro-lenses curvature is performed and presented. The preliminary results concerning the imaging capability of the micro-lens array are also reported. Microlens array can find application in medical stereo-endoscopy, imaging, telecommunication and optical data storage too.

  11. Optically recorded tunable microlenses based on dye-doped liquid crystal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchetti, Liana; Tasseva, Jordanka

    2012-04-01

    We report on optically recorded microlenses in conventional liquid crystal cells doped with the azo-dye methyl-red. The focal length can be tuned electrically and changed in a wide range with just a small variation of the applied dc voltage. No patterned electrodes, built-in polymeric lens, or patterned molecular reorientation are required.

  12. Dark Matter in the Galactic Bulge: A Microlensing Point of View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alard, C.

    The recent results obtained by the different microlensing projects towards the Bulge of the Milky Way raise the problem of dark matter in the inner part of our Galaxy. The observations may suggest an important contribution of low mass objects to the lensing rates. However, these observations are affected by important biases in the brown dwarf regime. More reliable estimates of the lensing rates can be obtained from analyses restricted to the Bulge giant sources. Unfortunately, most of the microlensing events detected by the different collaborations are associated with sources much fainter than the Bulge giant, it makes the interpretation of the results difficult. However, the rapid progress of the Microlensing technique promise that reliable estimates of the mass function at the low mass end will be obtained in the incoming years. Estimates of the amount of dark matter by various techniques, depend on the model of Galactic structure that is adopted. In particular, the microlensing projects brings new evidence for a massive bar in the inner part of our Galaxy. We will review the most recent data on this topic, and will examine the remaining uncertainties on the bar models. Finally, I will show how the unperfect knowledge of the Galactic structure affects the determination of the mass function towards the center of the Galaxy. To conclude we will compare the Milky way to Galaxies of similar types. In particular we will examine the distribution of dark matter in the central area of barred spiral galaxies.

  13. Relativity effects for space-based coherent lidar experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gudimetla, V. S. Rao

    1996-01-01

    An effort was initiated last year in the Astrionics Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center to examine and incorporate, if necessary, the effects of relativity in the design of space-based lidar systems. A space-based lidar system, named AEOLUS, is under development at Marshall Space Flight Center and it will be used to accurately measure atmospheric wind profiles. Effects of relativity were also observed in the performance of space-based systems, for example in case of global positioning systems, and corrections were incorporated into the design of instruments. During the last summer, the effects of special relativity on the design of space-based lidar systems were studied in detail, by analyzing the problem of laser scattering off a fixed target when the source and a co-located receiver are moving on a spacecraft. Since the proposed lidar system uses a coherent detection system, errors even in the order of a few microradians must be corrected to achieve a good signal-to-noise ratio. Previous analysis assumed that the ground is flat and the spacecraft is moving parallel to the ground, and developed analytical expressions for the location, direction and Doppler shift of the returning radiation. Because of the assumptions used in that analysis, only special relativity effects were involved. In this report, that analysis is extended to include general relativity and calculate its effects on the design.

  14. Contamination in the MACHO data set and the puzzle of Large Magellanic Cloud microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griest, Kim; Thomas, Christian L.

    2005-05-01

    In a recent series of three papers, Belokurov, Evans & Le Du and Evans & Belokurov reanalysed the MACHO collaboration data and gave alternative sets of microlensing events and an alternative optical depth to microlensing towards the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Although these authors examined less than 0.2 per cent of the data, they reported that by using a neural net program they had reliably selected a better (and smaller) set of microlensing candidates. Estimating the optical depth from this smaller set, they claimed that the MACHO collaboration overestimated the optical depth by a significant factor and that the MACHO microlensing experiment is consistent with lensing by known stars in the Milky Way and LMC. As we show below, the analysis by these authors contains several errors, and as a result their conclusions are incorrect. Their efficiency analysis is in error, and since they did not search through the entire MACHO data set, they do not know how many microlensing events their neural net would find in the data nor what optical depth their method would give. Examination of their selected events suggests that their method misses low signal-to-noise ratio events and thus would have lower efficiency than the MACHO selection criteria. In addition, their method is likely to give many more false positives (non-lensing events identified as lensing). Both effects would increase their estimated optical depth. Finally, we note that the EROS discovery that LMC event 23 is a variable star reduces the MACHO collaboration estimates of optical depth and the Macho halo fraction by around 8 per cent, and does open the question of additional contamination.

  15. Arrays of microlenses with variable focal lengths fabricated by restructuring polymer surfaces with an ink-jet device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pericet-Camara, Ramon; Best, Andreas; Nett, Sebastian K.; Gutmann, Jochen S.; Bonaccurso, Elmar

    2007-07-01

    We report of a method for fabricating two-dimensional, regular arrays of polymer microlenses with focal lengths variable between 0.2 and 4.5 mm. We first make concave microlenses by ink-jetting solvent on a polymer substrate with a commercial drop-on-demand device. Solvent evaporation restructures the surface by a series of combined effects, which are discussed. In the second step we obtain convex elastomeric microlenses by casting the template made in the first step. We demonstrate the good optical quality of the microlenses by characterising their surfaces with atomic force microscopy and white light interferometry, and by directly measuring their focal lengths with ad-hoc confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  16. Arrays of microlenses with variable focal lengths fabricated by restructuring polymer surfaces with an ink-jet device.

    PubMed

    Pericet-Camara, Ramon; Best, Andreas; Nett, Sebastian K; Gutmann, Jochen S; Bonaccurso, Elmar

    2007-07-23

    We report of a method for fabricating two-dimensional, regular arrays of polymer microlenses with focal lengths variable between 0.2 and 4.5 mm. We first make concave microlenses by ink-jetting solvent on a polymer substrate with a commercial drop-on-demand device. Solvent evaporation restructures the surface by a series of combined effects, which are discussed. In the second step we obtain convex elastomeric microlenses by casting the template made in the first step. We demonstrate the good optical quality of the microlenses by characterising their surfaces with atomic force microscopy and white light interferometry, and by directly measuring their focal lengths with ad-hoc confocal laser scanning microscopy. PMID:19547338

  17. Highly indistinguishable photons from deterministic quantum-dot microlenses utilizing three-dimensional in situ electron-beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gschrey, M.; Thoma, A.; Schnauber, P.; Seifried, M.; Schmidt, R.; Wohlfeil, B.; Krüger, L.; Schulze, J.-H.; Heindel, T.; Burger, S.; Schmidt, F.; Strittmatter, A.; Rodt, S.; Reitzenstein, S.

    2015-07-01

    The success of advanced quantum communication relies crucially on non-classical light sources emitting single indistinguishable photons at high flux rates and purity. We report on deterministically fabricated microlenses with single quantum dots inside which fulfil these requirements in a flexible and robust quantum device approach. In our concept we combine cathodoluminescence spectroscopy with advanced in situ three-dimensional electron-beam lithography at cryogenic temperatures to pattern monolithic microlenses precisely aligned to pre-selected single quantum dots above a distributed Bragg reflector. We demonstrate that the resulting deterministic quantum-dot microlenses enhance the photon-extraction efficiency to (23+/-3)%. Furthermore we prove that such microlenses assure close to pure emission of triggered single photons with a high degree of photon indistinguishability up to (80+/-7)% at saturation. As a unique feature, both single-photon purity and photon indistinguishability are preserved at high excitation power and pulsed excitation, even above saturation of the quantum emitter.

  18. Self-aligned process for forming microlenses at the tips of vertical silicon nanowires by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Dan, Yaping Chen, Kaixiang; Crozier, Kenneth B.

    2015-01-01

    The microlens is a key enabling technology in optoelectronics, permitting light to be efficiently coupled to and from devices such as image sensors and light-emitting diodes. Their ubiquitous nature motivates the development of new fabrication techniques, since existing methods face challenges as microlenses are scaled to smaller dimensions. Here, the authors demonstrate the formation of microlenses at the tips of vertically oriented silicon nanowires via a rapid atomic layer deposition process. The nature of the process is such that the microlenses are centered on the nanowires, and there is a self-limiting effect on the final sizes of the microlenses arising from the nanowire spacing. Finite difference time domain electromagnetic simulations are performed of microlens focusing properties, including showing their ability to enhance visible-wavelength absorption in silicon nanowires.

  19. Distant Retrograde Orbits for space-based Near Earth Objects detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stramacchia, Michele; Colombo, Camilla; Bernelli-Zazzera, Franco

    2016-09-01

    We analyse a concept for the detection of Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs) from a space-based network of telescopes on retrograde Distant Periodic Orbits. Planar periodic orbits are designed in the Sun-Earth circular restricted three-body problem, starting from initial conditions in the Hill's problem available from the literature. A family of retrograde orbits centred at the Earth is selected as baseline, based on their maximum distance from Earth, larger than the Earth-L2 distance. Indeed, spacecraft on such orbits can detect PHAs incoming from the Sun direction, which could not otherwise be monitored from current Earth-based systems. A trade-off on the orbit amplitude, asteroid diameter to be detected, and the constellation size is performed considering current visible sensor telescope technology. The Chelyabinsk meteor scenario is studied and the potential warning time that could be gained with a space-based survey system with respect to an Earth based-survey system is shown.

  20. Technology for subsystems of space-based plant growth facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bula, R. J.; Morrow, R. C.; Tibbitts, T. W.; Corey, R. B.

    1990-01-01

    Technologies for different subsystems of space-based plant growth facilities are being developed at the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics, a NASA Center for the Commercial Development of Space. The technologies include concepts for water and nutrient delivery, for nutrient composition control, and for irradiation. Effort is being concentrated on these subsystems because available technologies cannot be effectively utilized for space applications.

  1. Space-Based Range Safety and Future Space Range Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, Donald E.; Valencia, Lisa M.; Simpson, James C.

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety (STARS) study is a multiphase project to demonstrate the performance, flexibility and cost savings that can be realized by using space-based assets for the Range Safety [global positioning system (GPS) metric tracking data, flight termination command and range safety data relay] and Range User (telemetry) functions during vehicle launches and landings. Phase 1 included flight testing S-band Range Safety and Range User hardware in 2003 onboard a high-dynamic aircraft platform at Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California, USA) using the NASA Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) as the communications link. The current effort, Phase 2, includes hardware and packaging upgrades to the S-band Range Safety system and development of a high data rate Ku-band Range User system. The enhanced Phase 2 Range Safety Unit (RSU) provided real-time video for three days during the historic Global Flyer (Scaled Composites, Mojave, California, USA) flight in March, 2005. Additional Phase 2 testing will include a sounding rocket test of the Range Safety system and aircraft flight testing of both systems. Future testing will include a flight test on a launch vehicle platform. This paper discusses both Range Safety and Range User developments and testing with emphasis on the Range Safety system. The operational concept of a future space-based range is also discussed.

  2. Earth & Space-Based Power Generation Systems - A Comparison Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerta, M.; Blandow, V.; Collins, P.; Guillet, J.; Nordmann, Thomas; Schmidt, Patrick; Weindorf, Werner; Zittel, Werner

    2004-12-01

    The objective of the study [1] is to comparatively assess the economic viability, energy investment, risk and reliability issues of broad-scale introduction of terrestrial and space based solar power systems for a European power supply in 2030 at various scenario power levels. The scenario design in terms of base load and non-base load cases is only suited to gain principle knowledge about both terrestrial and space-based solar power system architectures. The comparative cost, energy, risk and reliability discussions and evaluations are based on highly asymmetrical input data due to different magnitudes of practical experiences. However, under the study assumptions given, space- based solar power systems may potentially provide a firm power supply and could be economically competitive to terrestrial solar power systems if space transportation costs in the lower hundreds EUR/kg payload are achieved. The energy payback time could be in the range of other solar power technologies far below their operational lifetimes. Risks attributed with SPS are mainly in the field of health and public acceptance of microwave power transmission, the general R&D risk and geopolitical implications.

  3. Space-Based Range Safety and Future Space Range Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, Donald E.; Valencia, Lisa M.; Simpson, James C.

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety study is a multiphase project to demonstrate the performance, flexibility and cost savings that can be realized by using space-based assets for the Range Safety (global positioning system metric tracking data, flight termination command and range safety data relay) and Range User (telemetry) functions during vehicle launches and landings. Phase 1 included flight testing S-band Range Safety and Range User hardware in 2003 onboard a high-dynamic aircraft platform at Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) using the NASA Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System as the communications link. The current effort, Phase 2, includes hardware and packaging upgrades to the S-band Range Safety system and development of a high data rate Ku-band Range User system. The enhanced Phase 2 Range Safety Unit provided real-time video for three days during the historic GlobalFlyer (Scaled Composites, Mojave, California) flight in March, 2005. Additional Phase 2 testing will include a sounding rocket test of the Range Safety system and aircraft flight testing of both systems. Future testing will include a flight test on a launch vehicle platform. This report discusses both Range Safety and Range User developments and testing with emphasis on the Range Safety system. The operational concept of a future space-based range is also discussed.

  4. A super-jupiter orbiting a late-type star: A refined analysis of microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406

    SciTech Connect

    Tsapras, Y.; Street, R. A.; Choi, J.-Y.; Han, C.; Bozza, V.; Gould, A.; Dominik, M.; Browne, P.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Udalski, A.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Sumi, T.; Bramich, D. M.; Kains, N.; Ipatov, S.; Alsubai, K. A.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Collaboration: RoboNet Collaboration; MiNDSTEp Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; PLANET Collaboration; μFUN Collaboration; MOA Collaboration; and others

    2014-02-10

    We present a detailed analysis of survey and follow-up observations of microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406 based on data obtained from 10 different observatories. Intensive coverage of the light curve, especially the perturbation part, allowed us to accurately measure the parallax effect and lens orbital motion. Combining our measurement of the lens parallax with the angular Einstein radius determined from finite-source effects, we estimate the physical parameters of the lens system. We find that the event was caused by a 2.73 ± 0.43 M {sub J} planet orbiting a 0.44 ± 0.07 M {sub ☉} early M-type star. The distance to the lens is 4.97 ± 0.29 kpc and the projected separation between the host star and its planet at the time of the event is 3.45 ± 0.26 AU. We find that the additional coverage provided by follow-up observations, especially during the planetary perturbation, leads to a more accurate determination of the physical parameters of the lens.

  5. A Super-Jupiter Orbiting a Late-type Star: A Refined Analysis of Microlensing Event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsapras, Y.; Choi, J.-Y.; Street, R. A.; Han, C.; Bozza, V.; Gould, A.; Dominik, M.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Udalski, A.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Sumi, T.; Bramich, D. M.; Browne, P.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Ipatov, S.; Kains, N.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; RoboNet Collaboration; Alsubai, K. A.; Andersen, J. M.; Calchi Novati, S.; Damerdji, Y.; Diehl, C.; Elyiv, A.; Giannini, E.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Juncher, D.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Liebig, C.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Vilela, C.; Wambsganss, J.; MiNDSTEp Collaboration; Skowron, J.; Poleski, R.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; OGLE Collaboration; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Barry, R.; Batista, V.; Bhattacharya, A.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Dominis Prester, D.; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Kane, S. R.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J.-B.; Menzies, J.; Père, C.; Pollard, K. R.; Zub, M.; PLANET Collaboration; Christie, G.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Drummond, J.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Hwang, K. H.; Jung, Y. K.; Kavka, A.; Koo, J.-R.; Lee, C.-U.; Maoz, D.; Monard, L. A. G.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Park, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Porritt, I.; Shin, I.-G.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Tan, T. G.; Yee, J. C.; μFUN Collaboration; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Namba, S.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sweatman, W. L.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Tsurumi, N.; Wada, K.; Yamai, N.; Yock, P. C. M.; Yonehara, A.; MOA Collaboration

    2014-02-01

    We present a detailed analysis of survey and follow-up observations of microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406 based on data obtained from 10 different observatories. Intensive coverage of the light curve, especially the perturbation part, allowed us to accurately measure the parallax effect and lens orbital motion. Combining our measurement of the lens parallax with the angular Einstein radius determined from finite-source effects, we estimate the physical parameters of the lens system. We find that the event was caused by a 2.73 ± 0.43 M J planet orbiting a 0.44 ± 0.07 M ⊙ early M-type star. The distance to the lens is 4.97 ± 0.29 kpc and the projected separation between the host star and its planet at the time of the event is 3.45 ± 0.26 AU. We find that the additional coverage provided by follow-up observations, especially during the planetary perturbation, leads to a more accurate determination of the physical parameters of the lens.

  6. Stellar, Remnant, Planetary, and Dark-Object Masses from Astrometric Microlensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Andrew P.; Bennett, David P.; Boden, Andrew; Depoy, Darren L.; Gaudi, Scott B.; Griest, Kim; Han, Cheongho; Paczynski, Bohdan; Reid, I. Neill

    2004-01-01

    The primary goal of our project is to make a complete census of the stellar population of the Galaxy. We are broadening the term stellar here to include both ordinary stars and dark stars. Ordinary stars, burning their nuclear fuel and shining, can perhaps best be studied with traditional astronomical techniques, but dark stars, by which we include old brown dwarfs, black holes, old white dwarfs, neutron stars, and perhaps exotic objects such as mirror matter stars or primordial black holes, can only be studied by their gravitational effects. Traditionally, these objects have been probed in binaries, and thus selected in a way that may or may not be representative of their respective field populations. The only way to examine the field population of these stars is through microlensing, the deflection of light from a visible star in the background by an object (dark or not) in the foreground. When lensed, there are two images of the background star. Although these images cannot be resolved when the lens has a stellar mass, the lensing effect can be detected in two ways: photometrically, i.e. by measuring the magnification of the source by the lens, and astrometrically, i.e. by measuring the shift in the centroid of the two images. Photometric microlensing experiments have detected hundreds of microlensing events over the past decade. Despite its successes, photometric microlensing has so far been somewhat frustrating because these events are difficult to interpret. Almost nothing is known about the masses of individual lenses and very little is known about the statistical properties of the lenses treated as a whole, such as their average mass. Although probably over 100 of the lenses are in fact dark objects, we can't determine which they are, let alone investigate finer details such as what their masses are, and where they are in the Galaxy. With SIM, we will break the microlensing degeneracy, and allow detailed interpretation of individual microlensing events. We

  7. Besançon Galactic model analysis of MOA-II microlensing: evidence for a mass deficit in the inner bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awiphan, S.; Kerins, E.; Robin, A. C.

    2016-02-01

    Galactic bulge microlensing surveys provide a probe of Galactic structure. We present the first field-by-field comparison between microlensing observations and the Besançon population synthesis Galactic model. Using an updated version of the model we provide maps of optical depth, average event duration and event rate for resolved source populations and for difference imaging analysis (DIA) events. We also compare the predicted event time-scale distribution to that observed. The simulation follows the selection criteria of the MOA-II survey. We modify the Besançon model to include M dwarfs and brown dwarfs. Our best-fitting model requires a brown dwarf mass function slope of -0.4. The model provides good agreement with the observed average duration, and respectable consistency with the shape of the time-scale distribution (reduced χ2 ≃ 2.2). The DIA and resolved source limiting yields bracket the observed number of events by MOA-II (2.17 × and 0.83 × the number observed, respectively). We perform a two-dimensional fit to the event spatial distribution to predict the optical depth and event rate across the Galactic bulge. The most serious difficulty for the model is that it provides only ˜50 per cent of the measured optical depth and event rate per star at low Galactic latitude around the inner bulge (|b| < 3°). This discrepancy most likely is associated with known underestimated extinction and star counts in the innermost regions and therefore provides additional support for a missing inner stellar population.

  8. MOA 2010-BLG-477Lb: CONSTRAINING THE MASS OF A MICROLENSING PLANET FROM MICROLENSING PARALLAX, ORBITAL MOTION, AND DETECTION OF BLENDED LIGHT

    SciTech Connect

    Bachelet, E.; Fouque, P.; Shin, I.-G.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Dong, Subo; Marshall, J.; Skowron, J.; Menzies, J. W.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Marquette, J.-B.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Heyrovsky, D.; Street, R. A.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Abe, L.; Agabi, K.; Albrow, M. D.; Collaboration: PLANET Collaboration; FUN muCollaboration; MOA Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; MiNDSTEp Consortium; and others

    2012-07-20

    Microlensing detections of cool planets are important for the construction of an unbiased sample to estimate the frequency of planets beyond the snow line, which is where giant planets are thought to form according to the core accretion theory of planet formation. In this paper, we report the discovery of a giant planet detected from the analysis of the light curve of a high-magnification microlensing event MOA 2010-BLG-477. The measured planet-star mass ratio is q = (2.181 {+-} 0.004) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} and the projected separation is s = 1.1228 {+-} 0.0006 in units of the Einstein radius. The angular Einstein radius is unusually large {theta}{sub E} = 1.38 {+-} 0.11 mas. Combining this measurement with constraints on the 'microlens parallax' and the lens flux, we can only limit the host mass to the range 0.13 < M/M{sub Sun} < 1.0. In this particular case, the strong degeneracy between microlensing parallax and planet orbital motion prevents us from measuring more accurate host and planet masses. However, we find that adding Bayesian priors from two effects (Galactic model and Keplerian orbit) each independently favors the upper end of this mass range, yielding star and planet masses of M{sub *} = 0.67{sup +0.33}{sub -0.13} M{sub Sun} and m{sub p} = 1.5{sup +0.8}{sub -0.3} M{sub JUP} at a distance of D = 2.3 {+-} 0.6 kpc, and with a semi-major axis of a = 2{sup +3}{sub -1} AU. Finally, we show that the lens mass can be determined from future high-resolution near-IR adaptive optics observations independently from two effects, photometric and astrometric.

  9. Microlensing probes the AGN structure of the lensed quasar J1131-1231

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluse, D.; Claeskens, J.-F.; Hutsemékers, D.; Surdej, J.

    2008-04-01

    We present the analysis of single epoch long slit spectra of the three brightest images of the gravitationally lensed system J1131-1231. These spectra provide one of the clearest observational evidence for differential micro-lensing of broad emission lines (BELs) in a gravitationally lensed quasar. The micro-lensing effect enables us: (1) to confirm that the width of the emission lines is anti-correlated to the size of the emitting region; (2) to show that the bulk of Fe II is emitted in the outer parts of the Broad Line Region (BLR) while another fraction of Fe II is produced in a compact region; (3) to derive interesting informations on the origin of the narrow intrinsic Mg II absorption doublet observed in that system.

  10. Precision compression molding of glass microlenses and microlens arrays--an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Firestone, G C; Yi, A Y

    2005-10-10

    An innovative manufacturing process utilizing high-temperature compression molding to fabricate aspherical microlenses by using optical glasses, such as BK7, K-PG325, and soda-lime glass, is investigated. In a departure from conventional approaches, a unique hollow contactless mold design is adopted. Polished glass substrates and the mold assembly are heated above the glass transition temperature first, followed by initial forming, then annealing. The forming rate is controlled in real time to ensure mold position accuracy. Mold materials used include tungsten carbides, 316 stainless steel, 715 copper nickel, and aluminum alloys. The geometric control of the microlenses or microlens arrays can be precisely controlled by the forming temperature, forming speed, mold design, and annealing time. PMID:16237925