Science.gov

Sample records for spatial olap application

  1. Easier surveillance of climate-related health vulnerabilities through a Web-based spatial OLAP application

    PubMed Central

    Bernier, Eveline; Gosselin, Pierre; Badard, Thierry; Bédard, Yvan

    2009-01-01

    Background Climate change has a significant impact on population health. Population vulnerabilities depend on several determinants of different types, including biological, psychological, environmental, social and economic ones. Surveillance of climate-related health vulnerabilities must take into account these different factors, their interdependence, as well as their inherent spatial and temporal aspects on several scales, for informed analyses. Currently used technology includes commercial off-the-shelf Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Database Management Systems with spatial extensions. It has been widely recognized that such OLTP (On-Line Transaction Processing) systems were not designed to support complex, multi-temporal and multi-scale analysis as required above. On-Line Analytical Processing (OLAP) is central to the field known as BI (Business Intelligence), a key field for such decision-support systems. In the last few years, we have seen a few projects that combine OLAP and GIS to improve spatio-temporal analysis and geographic knowledge discovery. This has given rise to SOLAP (Spatial OLAP) and a new research area. This paper presents how SOLAP and climate-related health vulnerability data were investigated and combined to facilitate surveillance. Results Based on recent spatial decision-support technologies, this paper presents a spatio-temporal web-based application that goes beyond GIS applications with regard to speed, ease of use, and interactive analysis capabilities. It supports the multi-scale exploration and analysis of integrated socio-economic, health and environmental geospatial data over several periods. This project was meant to validate the potential of recent technologies to contribute to a better understanding of the interactions between public health and climate change, and to facilitate future decision-making by public health agencies and municipalities in Canada and elsewhere. The project also aimed at integrating an initial collection of geo-referenced multi-scale indicators that were identified by Canadian specialists and end-users as relevant for the surveillance of the public health impacts of climate change. This system was developed in a multidisciplinary context involving researchers, policy makers and practitioners, using BI and web-mapping concepts (more particularly SOLAP technologies), while exploring new solutions for frequent automatic updating of data and for providing contextual warnings for users (to minimize the risk of data misinterpretation). According to the project participants, the final system succeeds in facilitating surveillance activities in a way not achievable with today's GIS. Regarding the experiments on frequent automatic updating and contextual user warnings, the results obtained indicate that these are meaningful and achievable goals but they still require research and development for their successful implementation in the context of surveillance and multiple organizations. Conclusion Surveillance of climate-related health vulnerabilities may be more efficiently supported using a combination of BI and GIS concepts, and more specifically, SOLAP technologies (in that it facilitates and accelerates multi-scale spatial and temporal analysis to a point where a user can maintain an uninterrupted train of thought by focussing on "what" she/he wants (not on "how" to get it) and always obtain instant answers, including to the most complex queries that take minutes or hours with OLTP systems (e.g., aggregated, temporal, comparative)). The developed system respects Newell's cognitive band of 10 seconds when performing knowledge discovery (exploring data, looking for hypotheses, validating models). The developed system provides new operators for easily and rapidly exploring multidimensional data at different levels of granularity, for different regions and epochs, and for visualizing the results in synchronized maps, tables and charts. It is naturally adapted to deal with multiscale indicators such as those used in the surveillance community, as confirmed by thi

  2. Usability Evaluation of the Spatial OLAP Visualization and Analysis Tool (SOVAT)

    PubMed Central

    Scotch, Matthew; Parmanto, Bambang; Monaco, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly sophisticated technologies, such as On-Line Analytical Processing (OLAP) and Geospatial Information Systems (GIS), are being leveraged for conducting community health assessments (CHA). Little is known about the usability of OLAP and GIS interfaces with respect to CHA. We conducted an iterative usability evaluation of the Spatial OLAP Visualization and Analysis Tool (SOVAT), a software application that combines OLAP and GIS. A total of nine graduate students and six community health researchers were asked to think-aloud while completing five CHA questions using SOVAT. The sessions were analyzed after every three participants and changes to the interface were made based on the findings. Measures included elapsed time, answers provided, erroneous actions, and satisfaction. Traditional OLAP interface features were poorly understood by participants and combined OLAP-GIS features needed to be better emphasized. The results suggest that the changes made to the SOVAT interface resulted in increases in both usability and user satisfaction.

  3. Spatial Hierarchy and OLAP-Favored Search in Spatial Data Warehouse

    E-print Network

    Song, Il-Yeol

    Spatial Hierarchy and OLAP-Favored Search in Spatial Data Warehouse Fangyan Rao, Long Zhang, Xiu,longzh,yuxl,lying,yingch}@cn.ibm.com ABSTRACT Data warehouse and Online Analytical Processing(OLAP) play a key role in business intelligent an important issue of data ware- house and OLAP. However, traditional data warehouse and OLAP tools can

  4. Spatial OLAP Modeling: An Overview Base on Spatial Objects Changing over Gabriel Pestana Miguel Mira da Silva Yvan Bdard

    E-print Network

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) with Data Warehouse (DW) because these two technologies are in general computing and location-based services, even more amount of spatial data is being collected and stored. While

  5. The Composite OLAP-Object Data Model

    SciTech Connect

    Pourabbas, Elaheh; Shoshani, Arie

    2005-12-07

    In this paper, we define an OLAP-Object model that combines the main characteristics of OLAP and Object data models in order to achieve their functionalities in a common framework. We classify three different object classes: primitive, regular and composite. Then, we define a query language which uses the path concept in order to facilitate data navigation and data manipulation. The main feature of the proposed language is an anchor. It allows us to fix dynamically an object class (primitive, regular or composite) along the paths over the OLAP-Object data model for expressing queries. The queries can be formulated on objects, composite objects and combination of both. The power of the proposed query language is investigated through multiple query examples. The semantic of different clauses and syntax of the proposed language are investigated.

  6. March 29, 2008 DW/DM: DW & OLAP 1 Data Warehousing and OLAP

    E-print Network

    Adam, Salah

    source DW = Data warehouse DM = Data Mining SD = Staging Database #12;March 29, 2008 DW/DM: DW & OLAP 3 Chapter Outline What is a data warehouse? How to construct a Data Warehouse What is the Data Model used in data warehouse? Data warehouse architecture Data warehouse implementation #12;March 29, 2008 DW/DM: DW

  7. Database, Spatial Spatial databases are the foundation for computer-based applications involving spatially

    E-print Network

    Database, Spatial Spatial databases are the foundation for computer-based applications involving, an orientation and a size). Spatial databases can be implemented using various technologies, the most common now to their intended purpose. There are two categories of spatial databases: transactional and analytical

  8. Consistency-aware Evaluation of OLAP Queries in Replicated Data Warehouses

    E-print Network

    Ordonez, Carlos

    1 Consistency-aware Evaluation of OLAP Queries in Replicated Data Warehouses Javier Garc of Houston Houston, TX 77204, USA Abstract--OLAP tools for distributed data warehouses gener- ally assume to evaluate OLAP queries in distributed data warehouses assuming a lazy replication model. Considering

  9. Spatial Disease Surveillance: Methods and Applications

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Tonglin

    Chapter 15 Spatial Disease Surveillance: Methods and Applications Tonglin Zhang 15.1 Introduction the realistic investigation of spatial variation in disease risks, particular at the small unit level. Recently Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Due to the reason of privacy, CDC does not announce

  10. View discovery in OLAP databases through statistical combinatorial optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Hengartner, Nick W; Burke, John; Critchlow, Terence; Joslyn, Cliff; Hogan, Emilie

    2009-01-01

    OnLine Analytical Processing (OLAP) is a relational database technology providing users with rapid access to summary, aggregated views of a single large database, and is widely recognized for knowledge representation and discovery in high-dimensional relational databases. OLAP technologies provide intuitive and graphical access to the massively complex set of possible summary views available in large relational (SQL) structured data repositories. The capability of OLAP database software systems to handle data complexity comes at a high price for analysts, presenting them a combinatorially vast space of views of a relational database. We respond to the need to deploy technologies sufficient to allow users to guide themselves to areas of local structure by casting the space of 'views' of an OLAP database as a combinatorial object of all projections and subsets, and 'view discovery' as an search process over that lattice. We equip the view lattice with statistical information theoretical measures sufficient to support a combinatorial optimization process. We outline 'hop-chaining' as a particular view discovery algorithm over this object, wherein users are guided across a permutation of the dimensions by searching for successive two-dimensional views, pushing seen dimensions into an increasingly large background filter in a 'spiraling' search process. We illustrate this work in the context of data cubes recording summary statistics for radiation portal monitors at US ports.

  11. OLAP: A Fast, Easy, Affordable Executive Information System--Finally!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Henry M.

    1995-01-01

    The University of Rochester's experience with online analytical processing (OLAP), part of its executive information system, is reported. The server, a multiuser, local area network (LAN)-based database loaded from legacy systems or a data warehouse, can rapidly manipulate and display data, and allows quick creation and changing of analytical…

  12. Towards a Novel OLAP Interface for Distributed Data Warehouses

    E-print Network

    Zaiane, Osmar R.

    Towards a Novel OLAP Interface for Distributed Data Warehouses Ayman Ammoura, Osmar Za, and the centralized virtual data warehouse. Unlike traditional desktop decision support systems, virtual reality with data analysis and mining, researchers have developed the concept of a data warehouse [11] to model

  13. OLAP Technology for Business Process Intelligence: Challenges and Solutions

    E-print Network

    Scholl, Marc H.

    OLAP Technology for Business Process Intelligence: Challenges and Solutions Svetlana Mansmann1.Neumuth@medizin.uni-leipzig.de Abstract. The emerging area of business process intelligence aims at enhancing the analysis power Business Intelligence (BI) to business processes, claims that the convergence of BI and business process

  14. View Discovery in OLAP Databases through Statistical Combinatorial Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Joslyn, Cliff A.; Burke, Edward J.; Critchlow, Terence J.

    2009-05-01

    The capability of OLAP database software systems to handle data complexity comes at a high price for analysts, presenting them a combinatorially vast space of views of a relational database. We respond to the need to deploy technologies sufficient to allow users to guide themselves to areas of local structure by casting the space of ``views'' of an OLAP database as a combinatorial object of all projections and subsets, and ``view discovery'' as an search process over that lattice. We equip the view lattice with statistical information theoretical measures sufficient to support a combinatorial optimization process. We outline ``hop-chaining'' as a particular view discovery algorithm over this object, wherein users are guided across a permutation of the dimensions by searching for successive two-dimensional views, pushing seen dimensions into an increasingly large background filter in a ``spiraling'' search process. We illustrate this work in the context of data cubes recording summary statistics for radiation portal monitors at US ports.

  15. Web 2.0 OLAP: From Data Cubes to Tag Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aouiche, Kamel; Lemire, Daniel; Godin, Robert

    Increasingly, business projects are ephemeral. New Business Intelligence tools must support ad-lib data sources and quick perusal. Meanwhile, tag clouds are a popular community-driven visualization technique. Hence, we investigate tag-cloud views with support for OLAP operations such as roll-ups, slices, dices, clustering, and drill-downs. As a case study, we implemented an application where users can upload data and immediately navigate through its ad hoc dimensions. To support social networking, views can be easily shared and embedded in other Web sites. Algorithmically, our tag-cloud views are approximate range top-k queries over spontaneous data cubes. We present experimental evidence that iceberg cuboids provide adequate online approximations. We benchmark several browser-oblivious tag-cloud layout optimizations.

  16. OLAP Hierarchies: A Conceptual Perspective1 E. Malinowski2, E. Zimnyi

    E-print Network

    Libre de Bruxelles, Université

    of organizations. The structure of a DW is usually represented using the star/snowflake schema, also called. 1. Example of a star and a snowflake schemas. On-Line Analytical Processing (OLAP) tools allow

  17. IX-Cubes: Iceberg Cubes for Data Warehousing and OLAP on XML Data

    E-print Network

    Fu, Ada Waichee

    IX-Cubes: Iceberg Cubes for Data Warehousing and OLAP on XML Data Fianny Ming-fei Jian The Chinese is not available. In this paper, we introduce the IX-cube (Iceberg XML cube) over XML data to tackle the problem of supporting OLAP on XML data and develop an IX-Cube approach: we construct an iceberg data cube on an XML data

  18. Proposal of Interactive Applications to Enhance Student's Spatial Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Samuel; Rubio, Ramon; Gallego, Ramon; Suarez, Javier; Martin, Santiago

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this series of applications is to enhance students' spatial perception capacity by means of exercises that require the student to concentrate on mentally recreating the figures represented. Each application is designed with an increasing level of difficulty, designed to increase the students' concentration and train their spatial

  19. Spatial transformations: from fundamentals to applications

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Robert; Grant, Patrick; Hao, Yang; Hibbins, Alastair; Philbin, Thomas; Sambles, Roy

    2015-01-01

    This paper forms the introduction to this themed issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A on ‘Spatial transformations’, arising from the Royal Society Scientific Discussion Meeting held in January 2015. The paper begins with a review of the concepts and history of spatial transformations, followed by a discussion of the contributions from the papers in this themed issue. A summary of the advantages and current limitations of spatial transformations concludes the paper, with the key challenges identified at the Scientific Discussion Meeting also given. PMID:26217061

  20. APPLICATION OF SPATIAL INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY TO PETROLEUM RESOURCE ASSESSMENT ANALYSIS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Betty M.; Domaratz, Michael A.

    1984-01-01

    Petroleum resource assessment procedures require the analysis of a large volume of spatial data. The US Geological Survey (USGS) has developed and applied spatial information handling procedures and digital cartographic techniques to a recent study involving the assessment of oil and gas resource potential for 74 million acres of designated and proposed wilderness lands in the western United States. The part of the study which dealt with the application of spatial information technology to petroleum resource assessment procedures is reviewed. A method was designed to expedite the gathering, integrating, managing, manipulating and plotting of spatial data from multiple data sources that are essential in modern resource assessment procedures.

  1. Bayesian multivariate spatial models and their applications 

    E-print Network

    Song, Joon Jin

    2004-11-15

    Bayesian inference impossible. Therefore, it is imperative to ensure that the joint posterior is proper under vague flat prior. The studies to obtain sufficient condition on posterior propriety were found in Chen et al. (2002), Hobert and Casella (1996...), and Chen et al. (2003). Ghosh et al. (1998) provided sufficient conditions to gain a proper joint posterior with a univariate CAR prior for spatial random effect. Since vague flat prior is assigned to regression parameters in multivariate model setup...

  2. Application of liquid crystal on silicon spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Haruyoshi

    2015-08-01

    A high performance 2D Spatial Light Phase Modulator named LCOS-SLM has been developed for wide range usefulness from basic researches to practical applications. We show the fundamental characteristics of LCOS-SLM device we developed, and introduce the activity examples such as the scientific researches of singular optics, fluorescence microscopy and adaptive optics. We have also applied the device for industrial applications in laser processing and machining, and medical application using adaptive optics system in scanning laser opthalmoscope.

  3. Radiographic applications of spatial frequency multiplexing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macovski, A.

    1981-01-01

    The application of spacial frequency encoding techniques which allow different regions of the X-ray spectrum to be encoded on conventional radiographs was studied. Clinical considerations were reviewed, as were experimental studies involving the encoding and decoding of X-ray images at different energies and the subsequent processing of the data to produce images of specific materials in the body.

  4. The OLAP-Enabled Grid: Model and Query Processing Algorithms Michael Lawrence Andrew Rau-Chaplin

    E-print Network

    Rau-Chaplin, Andrew

    by copy- ing all of the raw data from the sites where it is generated to a cental location, where it is integrated, and then to route all queries to that central location. As the amount of data and number of sites data warehouse, pro- vides a virtual data warehouse to its users by transparently supporting OLAP

  5. Binomial Multifractal Curve Fitting for View Size Estimation in OLAP Thomas P. NADEAU

    E-print Network

    Runapongsa, Kanda

    on estimating the space required for an aggregate. We introduce a useful paradigm for understanding the dataBinomial Multifractal Curve Fitting for View Size Estimation in OLAP Thomas P. NADEAU EECS predictable trends in these diagrams. We present an original curve-fitting approach to the problem

  6. High spatial resolution probes for neurobiology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunning, D. E.; Kenney, C. J.; Litke, A. M.; Mathieson, K.

    2009-06-01

    Position-sensitive biological neural networks, such as the brain and the retina, require position-sensitive detection methods to identify, map and study their behavior. Traditionally, planar microelectrodes have been employed to record the cell's electrical activity with device limitations arising from the electrode's 2-D nature. Described here is the development and characterization of an array of electrically conductive micro-needles aimed at addressing the limitations of planar electrodes. The capability of this array to penetrate neural tissue improves the electrode-cell electrical interface and allows more complicated 3-D networks of neurons, such as those found in brain slices, to be studied. State-of-the-art semiconductor fabrication techniques were used to etch and passivate conformally the metal coat and fill high aspect ratio holes in silicon. These are subsequently transformed into needles with conductive tips. This process has enabled the fabrication of arrays of unprecedented dimensions: 61 hexagonally close-packed electrodes, ˜200 ?m tall with 60 ?m spacing. Electroplating the tungsten tips with platinum ensure suitable impedance values (˜600 k? at 1 kHz) for the recording of neuronal signals. Without compromising spatial resolution of the neuronal recordings, this array adds a new and exciting dimension to the study of biological neural networks.

  7. Application of Spatial Statistics to Ionosphere Estimation for WAAS

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    Application of Spatial Statistics to Ionosphere Estimation for WAAS Juan Blanch, Todd Walter, Per be required to increase performance substantially is the ionospheric correction algorithm. WAAS incorporates information from reference stations to create a correction map of the ionosphere. More importantly, this map

  8. Bayesian approaches for adaptive spatial sampling : an example application.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R. L.; LePoire, D.; Huttenga, A.; Quinn, J.

    2005-05-25

    BAASS (Bayesian Approaches for Adaptive Spatial Sampling) is a set of computational routines developed to support the design and deployment of spatial sampling programs for delineating contamination footprints, such as those that might result from the accidental or intentional environmental release of radionuclides. BAASS presumes the existence of real-time measurement technologies that provide information quickly enough to affect the progress of data collection. This technical memorandum describes the application of BAASS to a simple example, compares the performance of a BAASS-based program with that of a traditional gridded program, and explores the significance of several of the underlying assumptions required by BAASS. These assumptions include the range of spatial autocorrelation present, the value of prior information, the confidence level required for decision making, and ''inside-out'' versus ''outside-in'' sampling strategies. In the context of the example, adaptive sampling combined with prior information significantly reduced the number of samples required to delineate the contamination footprint.

  9. Design and implementation of GGEarth spatial data service application system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianhua; Miao, Fang; Wang, Weihong; Wang, Huajun

    2009-06-01

    The digital earth concept has aroused strong repercussions and been arousing researches boom both at home and abroad once it is proposed. Many digital earth prototype systems have been researched and distributed in worldwide, and the Google Earth is more typical. The booming development of digital earth's research and its prototype's development bring about G/S mode timely, a novel spatial information distributing access, and organization software architecture mode. Based on native GML spatial database system and Google Earth, with G/S mode as its architecture, and combination with GML/KML compressive transport and transformation, this paper proposed and designed the software architecture of GGEarth spatial data service application system, the research content and key implementation technologies were given. This system provides functions of data presentation, query, update and spatial analysis, which uses native GML spatial database (and GML, KML documents) as the standard data center, and the client based on Google Earth COM API as the front-end. This system can be applied in fields of digital city, digital tourism and traditional Web GIS. The authors developed the GGEarth experimental system and ran it with the data of '5.12' Wenchuan earthquake timing and the model data of digital Jiuzhaigou virtual tourism. Some running screenshots are also given.

  10. Spatial effects in real networks: Measures, null models, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzzenenti, Franco; Picciolo, Francesco; Basosi, Riccardo; Garlaschelli, Diego

    2012-12-01

    Spatially embedded networks are shaped by a combination of purely topological (space-independent) and space-dependent formation rules. While it is quite easy to artificially generate networks where the relative importance of these two factors can be varied arbitrarily, it is much more difficult to disentangle these two architectural effects in real networks. Here we propose a solution to this problem, by introducing global and local measures of spatial effects that, through a comparison with adequate null models, effectively filter out the spurious contribution of nonspatial constraints. Our filtering allows us to consistently compare different embedded networks or different historical snapshots of the same network. As a challenging application we analyze the World Trade Web, whose topology is known to depend on geographic distances but is also strongly determined by nonspatial constraints (degree sequence or gross domestic product). Remarkably, we are able to detect weak but significant spatial effects both locally and globally in the network, showing that our method succeeds in retrieving spatial information even when nonspatial factors dominate. We finally relate our results to the economic literature on gravity models and trade globalization.

  11. WAX : A High Performance Spatial Auto-Correlation Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monkewitz, S.; Wheelock, S.

    2005-12-01

    We describe the algorithms employed by WAX, a spatial auto-correlation application written in C and C++ which allows for both rapid grouping of multi-epoch apparitions as well as customizable statistical analysis of generated groups. The grouping algorithm, dubbed the swiss cheese algorithm, is designed to handle diverse input databases ranging from the 2MASS working point source database (an all sky database with relatively little coverage depth) to the 2MASS working calibration source database (a database with sparse but very deep coverage). WAX retrieves apparitions and stores groups directly from and to a DBMS, generating optimized C structures and ESQL/C code based on user defined retrieval and output columns. Furthermore, WAX allows generated groups to be spatially indexed via the HTM scheme and provides fast coverage queries for points and small circular areas on the sky. Finally, WAX operates on a declination based sky subdivision, allowing multiple instances to be run simultaneously and independently, further speeding the process of merging apparitions from very large databases. The Two Micron All Sky Survey will use WAX to create merged apparition catalogs from their working point and calibration source databases, linking generated groups to sources in the already publicly available all-sky catalogs. For a given 2MASS source, this will allow astronomers to examine the properties of many related (and as yet unpublished) 2MASS extractions, and further extends the scientific value of the 2MASS data sets.

  12. Pediatric and adolescent applications of the Taylor Spatial Frame.

    PubMed

    Paloski, Michael; Taylor, Benjamin C; Iobst, Christopher; Pugh, Kevin J

    2012-06-01

    Limb deformity can occur in the pediatric and adolescent populations from multiple etiologies: congenital, traumatic, posttraumatic sequelae, oncologic, and infection. Correcting these deformities is important for many reasons. Ilizarov popularized external fixation to accomplish this task. Taylor expanded on this by designing an external fixator in 1994 with 6 telescoping struts that can be sequentially manipulated to achieve multiaxial correction of deformity without the need for hinges or operative frame alterations. This frame can be used to correct deformities in children and has shown good anatomic correction with minimal morbidity. The nature of the construct and length of treatment affects psychosocial factors that the surgeon and family must be aware of prior to treatment. An understanding of applications of the Taylor Spatial Frame gives orthopedic surgeons an extra tool to correct simple and complex deformities in pediatric and adolescent patients. PMID:22691643

  13. Spatial and statistical GIS Applications for geological and environmental courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsellos, A.; Tsakiri, K.

    2012-12-01

    Building student's career through undergraduate and graduate courses integrated with modern statistical and GIS software foster a competitive curriculum for their future employment. We present examples that may be introduced in geological courses (e.g. mineralogy, geomorphology, geochronology, structural geology, tectonics, stratigraphy) and environmental courses (natural hazards, hydrology, atmospheric science). Univariate and multivariate statistical models can be used for the interpretation and mapping of the geological and environmental problems. Some of the main statistical univariate models such as the normal distribution as well as the multivariate methods such as the principal component analysis, cluster analysis and factor analysis are the basic methods for understanding the variables of the environmental and geological problems. Examples are presented describing the basic steps for the solution of the problems. Some of the geological problems in different scales are the interpretation of 3D structural data, identification of suitable outcrops for mapping shear sense kinematic indicators. categorical or cluster analysis on lineations depending on their origin, topology of mineral assemblages and spatial distribution of their c-axis, distinguishing paleo-elevations using cluster analysis in geomorphological structures using LiDAR intensity and elevation data for determination of meander evolution patterns and prediction of vulnerable sites for flooding or landsliding. Other applications in atmospheric and hydrology science are the prediction of ground level ozone and the decomposition of water use time series. Those fundamental statistical and spatial concepts may be used in the field or in the lab. In the lab, modern computers and friendly interface user software allow students to process data using advanced statistical methods and GIS techniques. Modern applications in tablets or smart phones may complement field work. Teaching those methods can facilitate advanced mapping, optimize sample collection distribution, field decisions, and later lab data processing.

  14. Using Data Mining and OLAP to Discover Patterns in a Database of Patients with Y-Chromosome Deletions

    E-print Network

    Dzeroski, Saso

    Using Data Mining and OLAP to Discover Patterns in a Database of Patients with Y-Chromosome presents a database of published Y chromosome deletions and the results of analyzing the database with data assisted reproduction techniques to the offspring. Over 150 Y chromosome specific DNA markers have been

  15. An interoperable XML encoding for the exchange of Spatial OLAP data cubes in SOA environments

    E-print Network

    Industrial Research Chair on Geospatial databases for Decision Support Université Laval Québec, Canada Phone Intelligence and Geo- graphic Information Systems domains. While Web Services specifications such as XML Geospatial Consortium (OGC) and International Organization for Standardization (ISO), along with Web Services

  16. Spatial Equilibrium Modeling with Imperfectly Competitive Markets: An Application to Rice Trade

    E-print Network

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Spatial Equilibrium Modeling with Imperfectly Competitive Markets: An Application to Rice Trade Chi: An Application to Rice Trade Abstract A general imperfect competition spatial equilibrium model is developed to estimate the trading country behaviors in the international rice market using a conjectural variation

  17. Correlation of Spatially Filtered Dynamic Speckles in Distance Measurement Application

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, Dmitry V.; Nippolainen, Ervin; Kamshilin, Alexei A.; Miridonov, Serguei V.

    2008-04-15

    In this paper statistical properties of spatially filtered dynamic speckles are considered. This phenomenon was not sufficiently studied yet while spatial filtering is an important instrument for speckles velocity measurements. In case of spatial filtering speckle velocity information is derived from the modulation frequency of filtered light power which is measured by photodetector. Typical photodetector output is represented by a narrow-band random noise signal which includes non-informative intervals. Therefore more or less precious frequency measurement requires averaging. In its turn averaging implies uncorrelated samples. However, conducting research we found that correlation is typical property not only of dynamic speckle patterns but also of spatially filtered speckles. Using spatial filtering the correlation is observed as a response of measurements provided to the same part of the object surface or in case of simultaneously using several adjacent photodetectors. Found correlations can not be explained using just properties of unfiltered dynamic speckles. As we demonstrate the subject of this paper is important not only from pure theoretical point but also from the point of applied speckle metrology. E.g. using single spatial filter and an array of photodetector can greatly improve accuracy of speckle velocity measurements.

  18. APPLICATION OF REDUCED-RANK MULTIVARIATE METHODS TO THE MONITORING OF SPATIAL UNIFORMITY OF WAFER ETCHING

    E-print Network

    Nikolaou, Michael

    1 APPLICATION OF REDUCED-RANK MULTIVARIATE METHODS TO THE MONITORING OF SPATIAL UNIFORMITY OF WAFER wafers. An industrial case study is discussed. 1 INTRODUCTION Spatially uniformity is necessary for high on 300-mm wafer surface, interpolated over 49 measurement points (black dots). Both wafers correspond

  19. Automated Spatial-Semantic Modeling with Applications to Place Labeling and Informed Search

    E-print Network

    Automated Spatial-Semantic Modeling with Applications to Place Labeling and Informed Search Pooja,dpmeger,tristram,little,mack}@cs.ubc.ca Abstract This paper presents a spatial-semantic modeling sys- tem featuring automated learning of object, bedrooms, and offices, while other exam- ple places might include lounges, libraries, and laun- dry rooms

  20. Implementing an SIG based platform of application and service for city spatial information in Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bailang; Wu, Jianping

    2006-10-01

    Spatial Information Grid (SIG) is an infrastructure that has the ability to provide the services for spatial information according to users' needs by means of collecting, sharing, organizing and processing the massive distributed spatial information resources. This paper presents the architecture, technologies and implementation of the Shanghai City Spatial Information Application and Service System, a SIG based platform, which is an integrated platform that serves for administration, planning, construction and development of the city. In the System, there are ten categories of spatial information resources, including city planning, land-use, real estate, river system, transportation, municipal facility construction, environment protection, sanitation, urban afforestation and basic geographic information data. In addition, spatial information processing services are offered as a means of GIS Web Services. The resources and services are all distributed in different web-based nodes. A single database is created to store the metadata of all the spatial information. A portal site is published as the main user interface of the System. There are three main functions in the portal site. First, users can search the metadata and consequently acquire the distributed data by using the searching results. Second, some spatial processing web applications that developed with GIS Web Services, such as file format conversion, spatial coordinate transfer, cartographic generalization and spatial analysis etc, are offered to use. Third, GIS Web Services currently available in the System can be searched and new ones can be registered. The System has been working efficiently in Shanghai Government Network since 2005.

  1. GIS application on spatial landslide analysis using statistical based models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Biswajeet; Lee, Saro; Buchroithner, Manfred F.

    2009-09-01

    This paper presents the assessment results of spatially based probabilistic three models using Geoinformation Techniques (GIT) for landslide susceptibility analysis at Penang Island in Malaysia. Landslide locations within the study areas were identified by interpreting aerial photographs, satellite images and supported with field surveys. Maps of the topography, soil type, lineaments and land cover were constructed from the spatial data sets. There are ten landslide related factors were extracted from the spatial database and the frequency ratio, fuzzy logic, and bivariate logistic regression coefficients of each factor was computed. Finally, landslide susceptibility maps were drawn for study area using frequency ratios, fuzzy logic and bivariate logistic regression models. For verification, the results of the analyses were compared with actual landslide locations in study area. The verification results show that bivariate logistic regression model provides slightly higher prediction accuracy than the frequency ratio and fuzzy logic models.

  2. Full Spatial Resolution Infrared Sounding Application in the Preconvection Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Liu, G.; Lin, T.

    2013-12-01

    Advanced infrared (IR) sounders such as the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) provide atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles with high vertical resolution and high accuracy in preconvection environments. The derived atmospheric stability indices such as convective available potential energy (CAPE) and lifted index (LI) from advanced IR soundings can provide critical information 1 ; 6 h before the development of severe convective storms. Three convective storms are selected for the evaluation of applying AIRS full spatial resolution soundings and the derived products on providing warning information in the preconvection environments. In the first case, the AIRS full spatial resolution soundings revealed local extremely high atmospheric instability 3 h ahead of the convection on the leading edge of a frontal system, while the second case demonstrates that the extremely high atmospheric instability is associated with the local development of severe thunderstorm in the following hours. The third case is a local severe storm that occurred on 7-8 August 2010 in Zhou Qu, China, which caused more than 1400 deaths and left another 300 or more people missing. The AIRS full spatial resolution LI product shows the atmospheric instability 3.5 h before the storm genesis. The CAPE and LI from AIRS full spatial resolution and operational AIRS/AMSU soundings along with Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) Sounder derived product image (DPI) products were analyzed and compared. Case studies show that full spatial resolution AIRS retrievals provide more useful warning information in the preconvection environments for determining favorable locations for convective initiation (CI) than do the coarser spatial resolution operational soundings and lower spectral resolution GOES Sounder retrievals. The retrieved soundings are also tested in a regional data assimilation WRF 3D-var system to evaluate the potential assist in the NWP model.

  3. Some aspects of optical spatial solitons in photorefractive media and their important applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konar, S.; Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.

    2015-11-01

    Some selected important properties of photorefractive spatial solitons and their applications have been reviewed in the present paper. Using band transport model, the governing principle of photorefractive nonlinearity has been addressed and nonlinear dynamical equations of spatial solitons owing to this nonlinearity have been discussed. Mechanisms of formation of screening and photovoltaic solitons of three different configurations i.e., bright, dark and grey varieties have been examined. Incoherently coupled vector solitons due to single and two-photon photorefractive phenomena have been highlighted. Modulation instability, which is precursor to soliton formation has been also discused briefly. Finally possible applications of photorefractive spatial solitons have been highlighted.

  4. Spatially-controlled complex molecules and their applications

    E-print Network

    Chang, Yuan-Pin; Trippel, Sebastian; Küpper, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of molecular structure and function is at the very heart of the chemical and molecular sciences. Experiments that allow for the creation of structurally pure samples and the investigation of their molecular dynamics and chemical function have developed tremendeously over the last few decades, although "there's plenty of room at the bottom" for better control as well as further applications. Here, we describe the use of inhomogeneous electric fields for the manipulation of neutral molecules in the gas-phase, \\ie, for the separation of complex molecules according to size, structural isomer, and quantum state. Current applications of these controlled samples are summarized and interesting future applications discussed.

  5. A Query Cache Tool for Optimizing Repeatable and Parallel OLAP Queries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Ricardo Jorge; Bernardino, Jorge

    On-line analytical processing against data warehouse databases is a common form of getting decision making information for almost every business field. Decision support information oftenly concerns periodic values based on regular attributes, such as sales amounts, percentages, most transactioned items, etc. This means that many similar OLAP instructions are periodically repeated, and simultaneously, between the several decision makers. Our Query Cache Tool takes advantage of previously executed queries, storing their results and the current state of the data which was accessed. Future queries only need to execute against the new data, inserted since the queries were last executed, and join these results with the previous ones. This makes query execution much faster, because we only need to process the most recent data. Our tool also minimizes the execution time and resource consumption for similar queries simultaneously executed by different users, putting the most recent ones on hold until the first finish and returns the results for all of them. The stored query results are held until they are considered outdated, then automatically erased. We present an experimental evaluation of our tool using a data warehouse based on a real-world business dataset and use a set of typical decision support queries to discuss the results, showing a very high gain in query execution time.

  6. Spatially-controlled complex molecules and their applications

    E-print Network

    Yuan-Pin Chang; Daniel A. Horke; Sebastian Trippel; Jochen Küpper

    2015-07-24

    The understanding of molecular structure and function is at the very heart of the chemical and molecular sciences. Experiments that allow for the creation of structurally pure samples and the investigation of their molecular dynamics and chemical function have developed tremendously over the last few decades, although "there's plenty of room at the bottom" for better control as well as further applications. Here, we describe the use of inhomogeneous electric fields for the manipulation of neutral molecules in the gas-phase, \\ie, for the separation of complex molecules according to size, structural isomer, and quantum state. For these complex molecules, all quantum states are strong-field seeking, requiring dynamic fields for their confinement. Current applications of these controlled samples are summarised and interesting future applications discussed.

  7. Characterization and applications of a pure phase reflective liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Joaquín O.; Ambs, Pierre

    2006-05-01

    We present the characterization of a pure phase reflective liquid crystal spatial light modulator. This modulator is electrically addressed and is based on nematic liquid crystal. Its performance in terms of frame rate, phase modulation versus gray level and wavefront distortion is experimentally evaluated. It is shown that after adding phase compensation and applying an appropriate Look-Up-Table, this spatial light modulator is an excellent candidate for applications such as dynamic diffractive optical elements, wavefront generation and dynamic zoom lens.

  8. SOIL PHOSPHOROUS SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION IN PASTURES RECEIVING POULTRY LITTER APPLICATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Environmentally-based P management strategies could be improved by delineating management zones incorporating the effects of landscape position on soil morphology, hydrology, and soil P distribution. Three farm pasture sites in SW Missouri receiving long-term poultry litter applications were sampled...

  9. Airborne multicamera system for geo-spatial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachnak, Rafic; Kulkarni, Rahul R.; Lyle, Stacey; Steidley, Carl W.

    2003-08-01

    Airborne remote sensing has many applications that include vegetation detection, oceanography, marine biology, geographical information systems, and environmental coastal science analysis. Remotely sensed images, for example, can be used to study the aftermath of episodic events such as the hurricanes and floods that occur year round in the coastal bend area of Corpus Christi. This paper describes an Airborne Multi-Spectral Imaging System that uses digital cameras to provide high resolution at very high rates. The software is based on Delphi 5.0 and IC Imaging Control's ActiveX controls. Both time and the GPS coordinates are recorded. Three successful test flights have been conducted so far. The paper present flight test results and discusses the issues being addressed to fully develop the system.

  10. Application of geo-spatial technology in schistosomiasis modelling in Africa: a review.

    PubMed

    Manyangadze, Tawanda; Chimbari, Moses John; Gebreslasie, Michael; Mukaratirwa, Samson

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis continues to impact socio-economic development negatively in sub-Saharan Africa. The advent of spatial technologies, including geographic information systems (GIS), Earth observation (EO) and global positioning systems (GPS) assist modelling efforts. However, there is increasing concern regarding the accuracy and precision of the current spatial models. This paper reviews the literature regarding the progress and challenges in the development and utilization of spatial technology with special reference to predictive models for schistosomiasis in Africa. Peer-reviewed papers identified through a PubMed search using the following keywords: geo-spatial analysis OR remote sensing OR modelling OR earth observation OR geographic information systems OR prediction OR mapping AND schistosomiasis AND Africa were used. Statistical uncertainty, low spatial and temporal resolution satellite data and poor validation were identified as some of the factors that compromise the precision and accuracy of the existing predictive models. The need for high spatial resolution of remote sensing data in conjunction with ancillary data viz. ground-measured climatic and environmental information, local presence/absence intermediate host snail surveys as well as prevalence and intensity of human infection for model calibration and validation are discussed. The importance of a multidisciplinary approach in developing robust, spatial data capturing, modelling techniques and products applicable in epidemiology is highlighted. PMID:26618307

  11. A Spatial Model of Tumor-Host Interaction: Application of Chemotherapy

    E-print Network

    Hinow, Peter

    A Spatial Model of Tumor-Host Interaction: Application of Chemotherapy Peter Hinow Institute, January 6th 2009 Peter Hinow et al. Tumor-Host Interaction, Chemotherapy #12;Origin of this model. Tumor-Host Interaction, Chemotherapy #12;Collaborators Philip Gerlee, Alexander R. A. Anderson (Division

  12. A review of spatial technologies with applications for malaria transmission modelling and control in Africa.

    PubMed

    Gebreslasie, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    Spatial technologies, i.e. geographic information systems, remote sensing, and global positioning systems, offer an opportunity for rapid assessment of malaria endemic areas. These technologies coupled with prevalence/incidence data can provide reliable estimates of population at risk, predict disease distributions in areas that lack baseline data and provide guidance for intervention strategies, so that scarce resources can be allocated in a cost-effective manner. This review focuses on the spatial technology applications that have been used in epidemiology and control of malaria in Africa. Peer-reviewed papers identified through a PubMed search using the following keywords: geospatial technology OR Geographic Information Systems OR Remote Sensing OR Earth Observation OR Global Positioning Systems OR geospatial modelling OR malaria incidence OR malaria prevalence OR malaria risk prediction OR malaria mapping AND malaria AND Africa were used. These included mapping malaria incidence and prevalence, assessing the relationship between malaria and environmental variables as well as applications for malaria early warning systems. The potential of new spatial technology applications utilising emerging satellite information, as they hold promise to further enhance infectious risk mapping and disease prediction, are outlined. We stress current research needs to overcome some of the remaining challenges of spatial technology applications for malaria so that further and sustainable progress can be made to control and eliminate this disease. PMID:26618308

  13. Parallelized genetic optimization of spatial light modulator addressing for diffractive applications.

    PubMed

    Haist, Tobias; Lingel, Christian; Adler, Rodolfo; Osten, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    We describe a new technique for optimizing the addressing of spatial light modulators in dynamic holographic applications. The method utilizes 200 times parallelization using imaging of subholograms in combination with genetic optimization. Compared to a fixed linear addressing curve for all different gratings, the diffraction efficiency can be improved by up to 25% for a Holoeye Pluto LCoS modulator. PMID:24663371

  14. APPLICATION OF THE DYNAMIC SPATIAL ORDERED PROBIT MODEL: PATTERNS OF OZONE CONCENTRATION IN AUSTIN, TEXAS

    E-print Network

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    As a gas in the stratosphere that protects Earth from harmful ultraviolet rays, the ozone layer shieldsAPPLICATION OF THE DYNAMIC SPATIAL ORDERED PROBIT MODEL: PATTERNS OF OZONE CONCENTRATION IN AUSTIN use is demonstrated for a case of ozone concentration categories. Using outputs of photochemical

  15. REMOTE SENSING AND GIS APPLICATIONS FOR MAPPING AND SPATIAL MODELLING OF INVASIVE SPECIES

    E-print Network

    REMOTE SENSING AND GIS APPLICATIONS FOR MAPPING AND SPATIAL MODELLING OF INVASIVE SPECIES Chudamani and remote sensing, Mapping techniques, Canopy cover classification ABSTRACT: Biological invasions form invaders. It has long been recognized that remote sensing (RS) and geographical information system (GIS

  16. A Spatial Econometric Approach to Measuring Pollution Externalities: An Application to Ozone Smog

    E-print Network

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    to analyze air pollution externalities. State-by-state source-receptor transfer coefficients that can be used of the six cri- teria pollutants for which National Ambient Air Quali- ty Standards have been establishedA Spatial Econometric Approach to Measuring Pollution Externalities: An Application to Ozone Smog C

  17. AUGMENTED REALITY MARKERS AS SPATIAL INDICES FOR INDOOR MOBILE AECFM APPLICATIONS

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    has focused more on traditional non-visual-sensor-based methods, such as Global Positioning System a user's 3D position continuously, they also have their own disadvantages respectively such as indoorAUGMENTED REALITY MARKERS AS SPATIAL INDICES FOR INDOOR MOBILE AECFM APPLICATIONS Chen Feng

  18. HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE OWNERSHIP AND FUEL ECONOMY ACROSS TEXAS: AN APPLICATION OF SPATIAL MODELS

    E-print Network

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE OWNERSHIP AND FUEL ECONOMY ACROSS TEXAS: AN APPLICATION OF SPATIAL MODELS of automobiles, and fuel-efficient hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) are achieving some marketplace success (Keith-efficient vehicles, including #12;hybrid EVs, are also more inclined to purchase plug-in EVs, these findings can

  19. Progressive phase conjugation and its application in reconfigurable spatial-mode extraction and conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Atsushi; Maeda, Tomohiro; Hirasaki, Yuki; Tomita, Akihisa; Sato, Kunihiro

    2014-05-01

    We develop a new technology, which is referred to as progressive phase conjugation (PPC), in which phase conjugation is electrically performed without requiring a coherent reference beam by fusion using a reference-free spatial phase detection and spatial phase modulation. This method enables remote setting of a phase detector from the signal transmitter without an additional transmission line for the reference beam. It also enables realization of high-speed and dynamic wavefront compensation owing to its open-loop architecture using the single-shot phase detection method. Therefore, the PPC is applicable to a wide range of optical communication technologies, including the reconfigurable spatial-mode extraction and conversion of mode transmission in a multi-mode fiber (MMF). In our experiment, spatial modes are generated by directing a laser beam into a MMF with a 50-micron core diameter. At the output side of the optical fiber, the phase distributions of the spatial modes are detected using the reference-free phase detector constructed by combining a spatial filtering method with holographic diversity interferometry using two CCD imagers. Then, the phase conjugate distribution of the detected phase pattern is displayed on a LCOS-type SLM. We confirm that the PPC system can extract a specific mode pattern with a considerably low crosstalk of less than 1% by displaying the corresponding phase-conjugation pattern on the SLM. In addition, we demonstrated a reconfigurable spatial-mode conversion by the phase control technology using the SLM. By applying the spatial phase modulation to an optical beam incident on the SLM, the spatial mode of the output beam is flexibly changed.

  20. Hybrid modeling of spatial continuity for application to numerical inverse problems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedel, Michael J.; Iwashita, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    A novel two-step modeling approach is presented to obtain optimal starting values and geostatistical constraints for numerical inverse problems otherwise characterized by spatially-limited field data. First, a type of unsupervised neural network, called the self-organizing map (SOM), is trained to recognize nonlinear relations among environmental variables (covariates) occurring at various scales. The values of these variables are then estimated at random locations across the model domain by iterative minimization of SOM topographic error vectors. Cross-validation is used to ensure unbiasedness and compute prediction uncertainty for select subsets of the data. Second, analytical functions are fit to experimental variograms derived from original plus resampled SOM estimates producing model variograms. Sequential Gaussian simulation is used to evaluate spatial uncertainty associated with the analytical functions and probable range for constraining variables. The hybrid modeling of spatial continuity is demonstrated using spatially-limited hydrologic measurements at different scales in Brazil: (1) physical soil properties (sand, silt, clay, hydraulic conductivity) in the 42 km2 Vargem de Caldas basin; (2) well yield and electrical conductivity of groundwater in the 132 km2 fractured crystalline aquifer; and (3) specific capacity, hydraulic head, and major ions in a 100,000 km2 transboundary fractured-basalt aquifer. These results illustrate the benefits of exploiting nonlinear relations among sparse and disparate data sets for modeling spatial continuity, but the actual application of these spatial data to improve numerical inverse modeling requires testing.

  1. Application of THz probe radiation in low-coherent tomographs based on spatially separated counterpropagating beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kuritsyn, I I; Shkurinov, A P; Nazarov, M M; Mandrosov, V I; Cherkasova, O P

    2013-10-31

    A principle of designing a high-resolution low-coherent THz tomograph, which makes it possible to investigate media with a high spatial resolution (in the range ?{sub 0} – 2?{sub 0}, where ?{sub 0} is the average probe wavelength) is considered. The operation principle of this tomograph implies probing a medium by radiation with a coherence length of 8?{sub 0} and recording a hologram of a focused image of a fixed layer of this medium using spatially separated counterpropagating object and reference beams. Tomograms of the medium studied are calculated using a temporal approach based on application of the time correlation function of probe radiation. (terahertz radiation)

  2. Simulation of spatially evolving turbulence and the applicability of Taylor's hypothesis in compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sangsan; Lele, Sanjiva K.; Moin, Parviz

    1992-01-01

    For the numerical simulation of inhomogeneous turbulent flows, a method is developed for generating stochastic inflow boundary conditions with a prescribed power spectrum. Turbulence statistics from spatial simulations using this method with a low fluctuation Mach number are in excellent agreement with the experimental data, which validates the procedure. Turbulence statistics from spatial simulations are also compared to those from temporal simulations using Taylor's hypothesis. Statistics such as turbulence intensity, vorticity, and velocity derivative skewness compare favorably with the temporal simulation. However, the statistics of dilatation show a significant departure from those obtained in the temporal simulation. To directly check the applicability of Taylor's hypothesis, space-time correlations of fluctuations in velocity, vorticity, and dilatation are investigated. Convection velocities based on vorticity and velocity fluctuations are computed as functions of the spatial and temporal separations. The profile of the space-time correlation of dilatation fluctuations is explained via a wave propagation model.

  3. [Application of spatial relative risk estimation in communicable disease risk evaluation].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yewu; Guo, Qing; Wang, Xiaofeng; Yu, Meng; Su, Xuemei; Dong, Yan; Zhang, Chunxi

    2015-05-01

    This paper summaries the application of adaptive kernel density algorithm in the spatial relative risk estimation of communicable diseases by using the reported data of infectious diarrhea (other than cholera, dysentery, typhoid and paratyphoid) in Ludian county and surrounding area in Yunnan province in 2013. Statistically significant fluctuations in an estimated risk function were identified through the use of asymptotic tolerance contours, and finally these data were visualized though disease mapping. The results of spatial relative risk estimation and disease mapping showed that high risk areas were in southeastern Shaoyang next to Ludian. Therefore, the spatial relative risk estimation of disease by using adaptive kernel density algorithm and disease mapping technique is a powerful method in identifying high risk population and areas. PMID:26080648

  4. Jackson State University's Center for Spatial Data Research and Applications: New facilities and new paradigms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Bruce E.; Elliot, Gregory

    1989-01-01

    Jackson State University recently established the Center for Spatial Data Research and Applications, a Geographical Information System (GIS) and remote sensing laboratory. Taking advantage of new technologies and new directions in the spatial (geographic) sciences, JSU is building a Center of Excellence in Spatial Data Management. New opportunities for research, applications, and employment are emerging. GIS requires fundamental shifts and new demands in traditional computer science and geographic training. The Center is not merely another computer lab but is one setting the pace in a new applied frontier. GIS and its associated technologies are discussed. The Center's facilities are described. An ARC/INFO GIS runs on a Vax mainframe, with numerous workstations. Image processing packages include ELAS, LIPS, VICAR, and ERDAS. A host of hardware and software peripheral are used in support. Numerous projects are underway, such as the construction of a Gulf of Mexico environmental data base, development of AI in image processing, a land use dynamics study of metropolitan Jackson, and others. A new academic interdisciplinary program in Spatial Data Management is under development, combining courses in Geography and Computer Science. The broad range of JSU's GIS and remote sensing activities is addressed. The impacts on changing paradigms in the university and in the professional world conclude the discussion.

  5. A Visible, Spatially-Modulated Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (SMIFTS) for Astronomical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafert, J. B.; Holbert, E. T.; Rusk, E. T.; Durham, S. E.; Caudill, E.; Keating, D.; Newby, H.

    1992-12-01

    We have constructed several visible, Spatially-Modulated Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometers (SMIFTS) for spatially resolved spectral imaging in the visible wavelength region based on work by several authors including Yoshihara and Kitade (1967), Okamoto et al. (1984), Barnes (1985) and Smith and Schempp (1991). Our spectrometers require no moving parts, are compact and enjoy a number of advantages over the other spectral data collection technologies. The unique combination of characteristics define an important niche for astronomical, remote sensing, and reconnaissance spectral data acquisition. Our SMIFTS simultaneously acquires hundreds or thousands of spectral bands for hundreds or thousands of spectral channesl. This type of sensor has been called a "hyperspectral" sensor to emphasize the major quantitative difference between this type of sensor and multispectral imagers which collect only a few spectral bands. The SMIFTS consists of input optics (a telescope), a field limiting aperture, a beamsplitter which divides the input beam into two paths, two mirrors which redirect the split beams through the same path, a collimating lens which forms the interferogram of the input aperture on the detector plane, and a cylindrical imaging lens. Thus on the detector array one axis contains spatial information and the other axis contains the spectral information for each point of the spatial axis. The result of this arrangement is that each row of the detector array contains the interferogram of the corresponding point on the aperture or slit. This slit can be fixed upon the target, or the slit can be scanned across the target to build up a second axis of spatial information resulting in a data set with four dimensions: two spatial, one spectral, and one temporal. We present sample data for both astronomical and remote sensing applications taken with the Malabar SMIFTS. Barnes, T.H. "Photodiode Array Fourier Transform Spectrometer with Improved Dynamic Range", Appl. Opt, 24, 3702, (1985)

  6. The market value of cultural heritage in urban areas: an application of spatial hedonic pricing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazrak, Faroek; Nijkamp, Peter; Rietveld, Piet; Rouwendal, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The current literature often values intangible goods like cultural heritage by applying stated preference methods. In recent years, however, the increasing availability of large databases on real estate transactions and listed prices has opened up new research possibilities and has reduced various existing barriers to applications of conventional (spatial) hedonic analysis to the real estate market. The present paper provides one of the first applications using a spatial autoregressive model to investigate the impact of cultural heritage—in particular, listed buildings and historic-cultural sites (or historic landmarks)—on the value of real estate in cities. In addition, this paper suggests a novel way of specifying the spatial weight matrix—only prices of sold houses influence current price—in identifying the spatial dependency effects between sold properties. The empirical application in the present study concerns the Dutch urban area of Zaanstad, a historic area for which over a long period of more than 20 years detailed information on individual dwellings, and their market prices are available in a GIS context. In this paper, the effect of cultural heritage is analysed in three complementary ways. First, we measure the effect of a listed building on its market price in the relevant area concerned. Secondly, we investigate the value that listed heritage has on nearby property. And finally, we estimate the effect of historic-cultural sites on real estate prices. We find that, to purchase a listed building, buyers are willing to pay an additional 26.9 %, while surrounding houses are worth an extra 0.28 % for each additional listed building within a 50-m radius. Houses sold within a conservation area appear to gain a premium of 26.4 % which confirms the existence of a `historic ensemble' effect.

  7. Quantitative characterization of the spatial distribution of particles in materials: Application to materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parse, Joseph B.; Wert, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    Inhomogeneities in the spatial distribution of second phase particles in engineering materials are known to affect certain mechanical properties. Progress in this area has been hampered by the lack of a convenient method for quantitative description of the spatial distribution of the second phase. This study intends to develop a broadly applicable method for the quantitative analysis and description of the spatial distribution of second phase particles. The method was designed to operate on a desktop computer. The Dirichlet tessellation technique (geometrical method for dividing an area containing an array of points into a set of polygons uniquely associated with the individual particles) was selected as the basis of an analysis technique implemented on a PC. This technique is being applied to the production of Al sheet by PM processing methods; vacuum hot pressing, forging, and rolling. The effect of varying hot working parameters on the spatial distribution of aluminum oxide particles in consolidated sheet is being studied. Changes in distributions of properties such as through-thickness near-neighbor distance correlate with hot-working reduction.

  8. Transformative Relation of Kinematical Descriptive Quantities Defined by Different Spatial Referential Frame, Its Property and Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ji

    2012-08-01

    Quantitative transformations between corresponding kinetic quantities defined by any two spatial referential frames, whose relative kinematics relations (purely rotational and translational movement) are known, are presented based on necessarily descriptive definitions of the fundamental concepts (instant, time, spatial referential frame that distinguishes from Maths. Coordination, physical point) had being clarified by directly empirical observation with artificially descriptive purpose. Inductive investigation of the transformation reveals that all physical quantities such as charge, temperature, time, volume, length, temporal rate of the quantities and relations like temporal relation between signal source and observer as such are independent to spatial frames transformation except above kinematical quantities transformations, kinematics related dynamics such as Newton ’ s second law existing only in inertial frames and exchange of kinetic energy of mass being valid only in a selected inertial frame. From above bas is, we demonstrate a series of inferences and applications such as phase velocity of light being direct respect to medium (including vacuum) rather than to the frame, using spatial referential frame to describe any measurable field (electric field, magnetic field, gravitational field) and the field ’ s variation; and have tables to contrast and evaluate all aspects of those hypotheses related with spacetime such as distorted spacetime around massive stellar, four dimension spacetime, gravitational time dilation and non - Euclid geometry with new one. The demonstration strongly suggests all the hypotheses are invalid in capable tested concepts ’ meaning and relations. The conventional work on frame transformation and its property, hypothesized by Voigt, Heaviside, Lorentz, Poincare and Einstein a century ago with some mathematical speculation lacking rigorous definition of the fundamental concepts such as instant, time, spatial reference, straight line, plane area, merely good in building up patchwork to do self p referred explanation by making up derivative concepts or accumulating new hypothesis, has disturbed people to describe the physical nature by setting up the sound basis of concept and relations with capable tested method, it’s time to be replaced by empirically effective alternative.

  9. High dimensional spatial modeling of extremes with applications to United States Rainfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jie

    2007-12-01

    Spatial statistical models are used to predict unobserved variables based on observed variables and to estimate unknown model parameters. Extreme value theory(EVT) is used to study large or small observations from a random phenomenon. Both spatial statistics and extreme value theory have been studied in a lot of areas such as agriculture, finance, industry and environmental science. This dissertation proposes two spatial statistical models which concentrate on non-Gaussian probability densities with general spatial covariance structures. The two models are also applied in analyzing United States Rainfalls and especially, rainfall extremes. When the data set is not too large, the first model is used. The model constructs a generalized linear mixed model(GLMM) which can be considered as an extension of Diggle's model-based geostatistical approach(Diggle et al. 1998). The approach improves conventional kriging with a form of generalized linear mixed structure. As for high dimensional problems, two different methods are established to improve the computational efficiency of Markov Chain Monte Carlo(MCMC) implementation. The first method is based on spectral representation of spatial dependence structures which provides good approximations on each MCMC iteration. The other method embeds high dimensional covariance matrices in matrices with block circulant structures. The eigenvalues and eigenvectors of block circulant matrices can be calculated exactly by Fast Fourier Transforms(FFT). The computational efficiency is gained by transforming the posterior matrices into lower dimensional matrices. This method gives us exact update on each MCMC iteration. Future predictions are also made by keeping spatial dependence structures fixed and using the relationship between present days and future days provided by some Global Climate Model(GCM). The predictions are refined by sampling techniques. Both ways of handling high dimensional covariance matrices are novel to analyze large data sets with extreme value distributions involved. One of the main outcomes of this model is for producing N-year return values and return years for a given value for precipitation at a single location given climate model projections based on a grid. This is very important, because in many applications, detailed precipitation information on pointwise locations is more important that predictions averaged over grids. The second model can be applied to those large data sets and is based on transformed Gaussian processes. These processes are thresholded due to the emphasis on rainfall extremes. Keywords. Block Circulant Matrix; Extreme value theory; Fast Fourier Transform; Generalized Linear Mixed Model; Kriging; Markov Chain Monte Carlo; Spectral Representation; Spatial statistics

  10. Comparison of alternative spatial resolutions in the application of a spatially distributed biogeochemical model over complex terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turner, D.P.; Dodson, R.; Marks, D.

    1996-01-01

    Spatially distributed biogeochemical models may be applied over grids at a range of spatial resolutions, however, evaluation of potential errors and loss of information at relatively coarse resolutions is rare. In this study, a georeferenced database at the 1-km spatial resolution was developed to initialize and drive a process-based model (Forest-BGC) of water and carbon balance over a gridded 54976 km2 area covering two river basins in mountainous western Oregon. Corresponding data sets were also prepared at 10-km and 50-km spatial resolutions using commonly employed aggregation schemes. Estimates were made at each grid cell for climate variables including daily solar radiation, air temperature, humidity, and precipitation. The topographic structure, water holding capacity, vegetation type and leaf area index were likewise estimated for initial conditions. The daily time series for the climatic drivers was developed from interpolations of meteorological station data for the water year 1990 (1 October 1989-30 September 1990). Model outputs at the 1-km resolution showed good agreement with observed patterns in runoff and productivity. The ranges for model inputs at the 10-km and 50-km resolutions tended to contract because of the smoothed topography. Estimates for mean evapotranspiration and runoff were relatively insensitive to changing the spatial resolution of the grid whereas estimates of mean annual net primary production varied by 11%. The designation of a vegetation type and leaf area at the 50-km resolution often subsumed significant heterogeneity in vegetation, and this factor accounted for much of the difference in the mean values for the carbon flux variables. Although area wide means for model outputs were generally similar across resolutions, difference maps often revealed large areas of disagreement. Relatively high spatial resolution analyses of biogeochemical cycling are desirable from several perspectives and may be particularly important in the study of the potential impacts of climate change.

  11. A novel artificial immune algorithm for spatial clustering with obstacle constraint and its applications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liping; Luo, Yonglong; Ding, Xintao; Zhang, Ji

    2014-01-01

    An important component of a spatial clustering algorithm is the distance measure between sample points in object space. In this paper, the traditional Euclidean distance measure is replaced with innovative obstacle distance measure for spatial clustering under obstacle constraints. Firstly, we present a path searching algorithm to approximate the obstacle distance between two points for dealing with obstacles and facilitators. Taking obstacle distance as similarity metric, we subsequently propose the artificial immune clustering with obstacle entity (AICOE) algorithm for clustering spatial point data in the presence of obstacles and facilitators. Finally, the paper presents a comparative analysis of AICOE algorithm and the classical clustering algorithms. Our clustering model based on artificial immune system is also applied to the case of public facility location problem in order to establish the practical applicability of our approach. By using the clone selection principle and updating the cluster centers based on the elite antibodies, the AICOE algorithm is able to achieve the global optimum and better clustering effect. PMID:25435862

  12. A Novel Artificial Immune Algorithm for Spatial Clustering with Obstacle Constraint and Its Applications

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liping; Luo, Yonglong; Ding, Xintao; Zhang, Ji

    2014-01-01

    An important component of a spatial clustering algorithm is the distance measure between sample points in object space. In this paper, the traditional Euclidean distance measure is replaced with innovative obstacle distance measure for spatial clustering under obstacle constraints. Firstly, we present a path searching algorithm to approximate the obstacle distance between two points for dealing with obstacles and facilitators. Taking obstacle distance as similarity metric, we subsequently propose the artificial immune clustering with obstacle entity (AICOE) algorithm for clustering spatial point data in the presence of obstacles and facilitators. Finally, the paper presents a comparative analysis of AICOE algorithm and the classical clustering algorithms. Our clustering model based on artificial immune system is also applied to the case of public facility location problem in order to establish the practical applicability of our approach. By using the clone selection principle and updating the cluster centers based on the elite antibodies, the AICOE algorithm is able to achieve the global optimum and better clustering effect. PMID:25435862

  13. Application of spatial frequency response as a criterion for evaluating thermal imaging camera performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lock, Andrew; Amon, Francine

    2008-04-01

    Police, firefighters, and emergency medical personnel are examples of first responders that are utilizing thermal imaging cameras in a very practical way every day. However, few performance metrics have been developed to assist first responders in evaluating the performance of thermal imaging technology. This paper describes one possible metric for evaluating spatial resolution using an application of Spatial Frequency Response (SFR) calculations for thermal imaging. According to ISO 12233, the SFR is defined as the integrated area below the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) curve derived from the discrete Fourier transform of a camera image representing a knife-edge target. This concept is modified slightly for use as a quantitative analysis of the camera's performance by integrating the area between the MTF curve and the camera's characteristic nonuniformity, or noise floor, determined at room temperature. The resulting value, which is termed the Effective SFR, can then be compared with a spatial resolution value obtained from human perception testing of task specific situations to determine the acceptability of the performance of thermal imaging cameras. The testing procedures described herein are being developed as part of a suite of tests for possible inclusion into a performance standard on thermal imaging cameras for first responders.

  14. Spatial and Temporal Simulation of Human Evolution. Methods, Frameworks and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Benguigui, Macarena; Arenas, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Analyses of human evolution are fundamental to understand the current gradients of human diversity. In this concern, genetic samples collected from current populations together with archaeological data are the most important resources to study human evolution. However, they are often insufficient to properly evaluate a variety of evolutionary scenarios, leading to continuous debates and discussions. A commonly applied strategy consists of the use of computer simulations based on, as realistic as possible, evolutionary models, to evaluate alternative evolutionary scenarios through statistical correlations with the real data. Computer simulations can also be applied to estimate evolutionary parameters or to study the role of each parameter on the evolutionary process. Here we review the mainly used methods and evolutionary frameworks to perform realistic spatially explicit computer simulations of human evolution. Although we focus on human evolution, most of the methods and software we describe can also be used to study other species. We also describe the importance of considering spatially explicit models to better mimic human evolutionary scenarios based on a variety of phenomena such as range expansions, range shifts, range contractions, sex-biased dispersal, long-distance dispersal or admixtures of populations. We finally discuss future implementations to improve current spatially explicit simulations and their derived applications in human evolution. PMID:25132795

  15. Microphone array signal processing with application in three-dimensional spatial hearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Mingsian R.; Lin, Chenpang

    2005-04-01

    Microphone arrays are known to enhance the directionality and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over single-channel sensors. This is considered beneficial in many applications such as video-conferencing systems and hearing aids. However, this advantage comes at the price of the sensation of spatial hearing. The spatial cues due to diffractions of the head and torso are lost if the array is not fitted in the ears. In this paper we present a system that incorporates binaural hearing synthesis into array signal processing, in an attempt to recover the three-dimensional sound image that a human listener would naturally perceive. In the system, the superdirective beamformer is exploited to estimate the direction of arrival (DOA) of the incoming sound. The spatial sound image is restored by steering the beam to the direction found in the DOA session and filtering the array output with the corresponding Head Related Transfer Functions (HRTF). The algorithms have been implemented in real-time fashion using a digital signal processor. Objective and subjective experiments were performed to validate the proposed system. The experimental results showed that the accurate localization of the sound source is achievable using the array system. .

  16. A hierarchical spatial model of avian abundance with application to Cerulean Warblers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thogmartin, W.E.; Sauer, J.R.; Knutson, M.G.

    2004-01-01

    Surveys collecting count data are the primary means by which abundance is indexed for birds. These counts are confounded, however, by nuisance effects including observer effects and spatial correlation between counts. Current methods poorly accommodate both observer and spatial effects because modeling these spatially autocorrelated counts within a hierarchical framework is not practical using standard statistical approaches. We propose a Bayesian approach to this problem and provide as an example of its implementation a spatial model of predicted abundance for the Cerulean Warbler (Dendroica cerulea) in the Prairie-Hardwood Transition of the upper midwestern United States. We used an overdispersed Poisson regression with fixed and random effects, fitted by Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. We used 21 years of North American Breeding Bird Survey counts as the response in a loglinear function of explanatory variables describing habitat, spatial relatedness, year effects, and observer effects. The model included a conditional autoregressive term representing potential correlation between adjacent route counts. Categories of explanatory habitat variables in the model included land cover composition and configuration, climate, terrain heterogeneity, and human influence. The inherent hierarchy in the model was from counts occurring, in part, as a function of observers within survey routes within years. We found that the percentage of forested wetlands, an index of wetness potential, and an interaction between mean annual precipitation and deciduous forest patch size best described Cerulean Warbler abundance. Based on a map of relative abundance derived from the posterior parameter estimates, we estimated that only 15% of the species' population occurred on federal land, necessitating active engagement of public landowners and state agencies in the conservation of the breeding habitat for this species. Models of this type can be applied to any data in which the response is counts, such as animal counts, activity (e.g.,nest) counts, or species richness. The most noteworthy practical application of this spatial modeling approach is the ability to map relative species abundance. The functional relationships that we elucidated for the Cerulean Warbler provide a basis for the development of management programs and may serve to focus management and monitoring on areas and habitat variables important to Cerulean Warblers.

  17. Lack of spatial and behavioral responses to immunocontraception application in African elephants (Loxodonta africana).

    PubMed

    Delsink, Audrey K; Kirkpatrick, Jay; van Altena, J J; Bertschinger, Henk J; Ferreira, Sam M; Slotow, Robert

    2013-12-01

    Opinions are divided as to whether human intervention to control elephant (Loxodonta africana) population growth is desirable, partly because of elephant welfare concerns. Female contraception through immunization with porcine zona pellucida (PZP) proteins is viable. The effects of sustained use and application of the PZP vaccine on elephant behavioral and spatial responses were examined by evaluating herd ranging, fission-fusion dynamics, association patterns, and reproductive and sexual behaviors. Minimal change was anticipated as a result of long calf dependence on and association with cows, a reduced but not indefinite 0% growth rate and the known mechanism of action of PZP vaccines, and minimal expected change in resource requirements necessitating behavioral or spatial use adaptations. Although behavioral effects identified in previous hormonal contraceptive trials were evident, it was demonstrated that immunocontraception caused no prolonged behavioral, social, or spatial changes over the 11-yr study period. Individually identified elephants were monitored from 1999 to 2011. Minimal, short-term social disruption, with temporary changes to the herds' core ranges, was observed during the annual treatment events, particularly in the first three treatment years, when vaccinations were conducted exclusively from the ground. Thereafter, when vaccinations were conducted aerially, minor disruptions were confined to the morning of administration only. Despite sustained treatments resulting in demographic changes of fewer calves being born, treatments did not alter spatial range use, and no adverse interherd-intraherd relations were observed. Similarly, resource requirements did not change as calving still occurred, although in fewer numbers. It was concluded that PZP immunocontraception has no detectable behavioral or social consequences in elephants over the course of 11 yr, providing a convincing argument for the use of sustained immunocontraception in the medium to long term as an important tool for elephant management. Behavioral consequences of alternative management approaches should all receive similar scrutiny to enable managers to make informed decisions when weighing management interventions. PMID:24437086

  18. A Compact "Water Window" Microscope with 60 nm Spatial Resolution for Applications in Biology and Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Torrisi, Alfio; Nawaz, Muhammad F; Bartnik, Andrzej; Adjei, Daniel; Vondrová, Šárka; Tur?ová, Jana; Jan?arek, Alexandr; Limpouch, Ji?í; Vrbová, Miroslava; Fiedorowicz, Henryk

    2015-10-01

    Short illumination wavelength allows an extension of the diffraction limit toward nanometer scale; thus, improving spatial resolution in optical systems. Soft X-ray (SXR) radiation, from "water window" spectral range, ?=2.3-4.4 nm wavelength, which is particularly suitable for biological imaging due to natural optical contrast provides better spatial resolution than one obtained with visible light microscopes. The high contrast in the "water window" is obtained because of selective radiation absorption by carbon and water, which are constituents of the biological samples. The development of SXR microscopes permits the visualization of features on the nanometer scale, but often with a tradeoff, which can be seen between the exposure time and the size and complexity of the microscopes. Thus, herein, we present a desk-top system, which overcomes the already mentioned limitations and is capable of resolving 60 nm features with very short exposure time. Even though the system is in its initial stage of development, we present different applications of the system for biology and nanotechnology. Construction of the microscope with recently acquired images of various samples will be presented and discussed. Such a high resolution imaging system represents an interesting solution for biomedical, material science, and nanotechnology applications. PMID:26373378

  19. Active crop canopy sensor optimal spatial scale for in-season variable-rate nitrogen application in corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Active crop canopy reflectance sensors have shown to be an efficient method for assessing spatially-variable crop nitrogen (N) need and controlling remedial in-season N applications in wheat. Recently, these sensors have been studied for N application in corn. This study will be conducted during the...

  20. Multi-storm, multi-catchment investigation of rainfall spatial resolution requirements for urban hydrological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa Rodriguez, Susana; ten Veldhuis, Marie-Claire; Bruni, Guendalina; Gires, Auguste; van Assel, Johan; Wang, Lipen; Reinoso-Rodinel, Ricardo; Ichiba, Abdellah; Kroll, Stefan; Schertzer, Daniel; Onof, Christian; Willems, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Rainfall estimates of the highest possible resolution are required for urban hydrological applications, given the small size and fast response which characterise urban catchments. While significant progress has been made over the last few decades in high resolution measurement of rainfall at urban scales and in the modelling of urban runoff processes, a number of questions as to the actual resolution requirements for input data and models remain to be answered. With the aim of answering some of these questions, this work investigates the impact of rainfall estimates of different spatial resolutions and structures on the hydraulic outputs of models of several urban catchments with different characteristics. For this purpose multiple storm events, including convective and stratiform ones, measured by a polarimetric X-band radar located in Cabauw (NL) were selected for analysis. The original radar estimates, at 100 m and 1 min resolutions, were aggregated to coarser spatial resolutions of up to 1000 m. These estimates were then applied to the high-resolution semi distributed hydraulic models of four urban catchments of similar size (approx. 7 km2), but different morphological and land use characteristics; these are: the Herent catchment (Belgium), the Cranbrook catchment (UK), the Morée Sausset catchment (France) and the Kralingen District of Rotterdam (The Netherlands). When doing so, methodologies for standardising rainfall inputs and making results comparable were implemented. Moreover, the results were analysed considering different points at each catchment, while also taking into account the particular storm and catchment characteristics. The results obtained for the storms used in this study show that flat and less compact catchments (e.g. polder areas) may be more sensitive to the spatial resolution of rainfall estimates, as compared to catchments with higher slopes and compactness, which in general show little sensitivity to changes in spatial resolution. While this study provides interesting insights, further investigation is still required in order to obtain a more complete answer regarding rainfall resolution requirements for urban hydrological applications. Future work should include testing on higher resolution fully distributed hydro models, as well as the analysis of many more storm events.

  1. Making digital phantoms with spectral and spatial light modulators for quantitative applications of hyperspectral optical medical imaging devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, Bonghwan; Tokumasu, Fuyuki; Lee, Ji Youn; Allen, David W.; Rice, Joseph P.; Hwang, Jeeseong

    2015-03-01

    We present a procedure to generate digital phantoms with a hyperspectral image projector (HIP) consisting of two liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) spatial light modulators (SLMs). The digital phantoms are 3D image data cubes of the spatial distribution of spectrally resolved abundances of intracellular light-absorbing oxy-hemoglobin molecules in single erythrocytes. Spectrally and spatially resolved image data indistinguishable from the real scene may be used as standards to calibrate image sensors and validate image analysis algorithms for their measurement quality, performance consistency, and inter-laboratory comparisons for quantitative biomedical imaging applications.

  2. From high spatial resolution imagery to spatial indicators : Application for hydromorphy follow-up on Bourgneuf wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailly, J. S.; Puech, C.; Lukac, F.; Massé, J.

    2003-04-01

    On Atlantic coastal wetlands, the understanding of hydrological processes may refer to hydraulic surface structures characterization as small ditches or channels networks, permanent and temporary water bodies. Moreover to improve the understanding, this characerization should be realized regarding different seasons and different spatial scales: elementary parcel, managment unit and whole wetland scales. In complement to usual observations on a few local ground points, high spatial resolution remote sensing may be a good information support for extraction and characterization on elementary objects, especially water bodies, permanents or temporary ones and ditches. To carry out a floow-up on wetlands, a seasonal image acquisition rate, reachable from most of satelite systems, is in that case informative for hydrological needs. In this work, georeferencing methods on openfield wetlands have been handled with care in order to use diachronic images or combined geographical data; lack of relief, short vegetation and well structured landscape make this preprocess easier in comparison to other landscape situations. In this presentation we focus on spatial hydromorphy parameters constructed from images with specific processes. Especially, hydromorphy indicators for parcels or managment units have been developped using an IRC winter-spring-summer metric resolution set of images: these descriptors are based on water areas evolution or hydrophyl vegetations presence traducing hydrodynamic submersion behaviour in temporary water bodies. An other example presents a surface water network circulation indicator elaborated on IRC aerial photography combined with vectorized geographic database. This indicator is based on ditches width and vegetation presence : a specific process uses vectorized geo data set to define transects across ditches on which classified image analysis is carried out (supervised classification). These first results proposing hydromorphy descriptors from very high resolution don't give complete indicators for follow-up and monitoring of coastal wetlands, but their combinaison, aggregation should present good technical bases to carry it out with success.

  3. Early non-destructive biofouling detection and spatial distribution: Application of oxygen sensing optodes.

    PubMed

    Farhat, N M; Staal, M; Siddiqui, A; Borisov, S M; Bucs, Sz S; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2015-10-15

    Biofouling is a serious problem in reverse osmosis/nanofiltration (RO/NF) applications, reducing membrane performance. Early detection of biofouling plays an essential role in an adequate anti-biofouling strategy. Presently, fouling of membrane filtration systems is mainly determined by measuring changes in pressure drop, which is not exclusively linked to biofouling. Non-destructive imaging of oxygen concentrations (i) is specific for biological activity of biofilms and (ii) may enable earlier detection of biofilm accumulation than pressure drop. The objective of this study was to test whether transparent luminescent planar O2 optodes, in combination with a simple imaging system, can be used for early non-destructive biofouling detection. This biofouling detection is done by mapping the two-dimensional distribution of O2 concentrations and O2 decrease rates inside a membrane fouling simulator (MFS). Results show that at an early stage, biofouling development was detected by the oxygen sensing optodes while no significant increase in pressure drop was yet observed. Additionally, optodes could detect spatial heterogeneities in biofouling distribution at a micro scale. Biofilm development started mainly at the feed spacer crossings. The spatial and quantitative information on biological activity will lead to better understanding of the biofouling processes, contributing to the development of more effective biofouling control strategies. PMID:26117369

  4. Application of spatially resolved high resolution crystal spectrometry to inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparacio, L.; Pablant, N. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Schneider, M.; Widmann, K.; Sanchez del Rio, M.; Zhang, L.

    2012-10-15

    High resolution ({lambda}/{Delta}{lambda}{approx} 10 000) 1D imaging x-ray spectroscopy using a spherically bent crystal and a 2D hybrid pixel array detector is used world wide for Doppler measurements of ion-temperature and plasma flow-velocity profiles in magnetic confinement fusion plasmas. Meter sized plasmas are diagnosed with cm spatial resolution and 10 ms time resolution. This concept can also be used as a diagnostic of small sources, such as inertial confinement fusion plasmas and targets on x-ray light source beam lines, with spatial resolution of micrometers, as demonstrated by laboratory experiments using a 250-{mu}m {sup 55}Fe source, and by ray-tracing calculations. Throughput calculations agree with measurements, and predict detector counts in the range 10{sup -8}-10{sup -6} times source x-rays, depending on crystal reflectivity and spectrometer geometry. Results of the lab demonstrations, application of the technique to the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and predictions of performance on NIF will be presented.

  5. Application of Spatially Resolved High Resolution Crystal Spectrometry to ICF Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth W. Hill, et. al.

    2012-09-15

    High resolution (?/?#3;? ~ 10 000) 1D imaging x-ray spectroscopy using a spherically bent crystal and a 2D hybrid pixel array detector is used world wide for Doppler measurements of ion-temperature and plasma flow-velocity profiles in magnetic confinement fusion plasmas. Meter sized plasmas are diagnosed with cm spatial resolution and 10 ms time resolution. This concept can also be used as a diagnostic of small sources, such as inertial confinement fusion plasmas and targets on x-ray light source beam lines, with spatial resolution of micrometers, as demonstrated by laboratory experiments using a 250-?m 55 Fe source, and by ray-tracing calculations. Throughput calculations agree with measurements, and predict detector counts in the range 10-8 -10-6 times source x-rays, depending on crystal reflectivity and spectrometer geometry. Results of the lab demonstrations, application of the technique to the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and predictions of performance on NIF will be presented.

  6. Fiber-Based, Spatially and Temporally Shaped Picosecond UV Laser for Advanced RF Gun Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shverdin, M Y; Anderson, S G; Betts, S M; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Hernandez, J E; Johnson, M; Jovanovic, I; Messerly, M; Pruet, J; Tremaine, A M; McNabb, D P; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2007-06-08

    The fiber-based, spatially and temporally shaped, picosecond UV laser system described here has been specifically designed for advanced rf gun applications, with a special emphasis on the production of high-brightness electron beams for free-electron lasers and Compton scattering light sources. The laser pulse can be shaped to a flat-top in both space and time with a duration of 10 ps at full width of half-maximum (FWHM) and rise and fall times under 1 ps. The expected pulse energy is 50 {micro}J at 261.75 nm and the spot size diameter of the beam at the photocathode is 2 mm. A fiber oscillator and amplifier system generates a chirped pump pulse at 1047 nm; stretching is achieved in a chirped fiber Bragg grating. A single multi-layer dielectric grating based compressor recompresses the input pulse to 250 fs FWHM and a two stage harmonic converter frequency quadruples the beam. Temporal shaping is achieved with a Michelson-based ultrafast pulse stacking device with nearly 100% throughput. Spatial shaping is achieved by truncating the beam at the 20% energy level with an iris and relay-imaging the resulting beam profile onto the photocathode. The integration of the system, as well as preliminary laser measurements will be presented.

  7. Ultra-spatial synchrotron radiation for imaging molecular chemical structure: Applications in plant and animal studies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yu, Peiqiang

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (S-FTIR) has been developed as a rapid, direct, non-destructive, bioanalytical technique. This technique takes advantage of synchrotron light brightness and small effective source size and is capable of exploring the molecular chemical features and make-up within microstructures of a biological tissue without destruction of inherent structures at ultra-spatial resolutions within cellular dimension. To date there has been very little application of this advanced synchrotron technique to the study of plant and animal tissues' inherent structure at a cellular or subcellular level. In this article, a novel approach was introduced to show the potential of themore »newly developed, advanced synchrotron-based analytical technology, which can be used to reveal molecular structural-chemical features of various plant and animal tissues.« less

  8. Ultra-Spatial Synchrotron Radiation for Imaging Molecular Chemical Structure: Applications in Plant and Animal Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yu,P.

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (S-FTIR) has been developed as a rapid, direct, non-destructive, bioanalytical technique. This technique takes advantage of synchrotron light brightness and small effective source size and is capable of exploring the molecular chemical features and make-up within microstructures of a biological tissue without destruction of inherent structures at ultra-spatial resolutions within cellular dimension. To date there has been very little application of this advanced synchrotron technique to the study of plant and animal tissues' inherent structure at a cellular or subcellular level. In this article, a novel approach was introduced to show the potential of the newly developed, advanced synchrotron-based analytical technology, which can be used to reveal molecular structural-chemical features of various plant and animal tissues.

  9. Modeling diffusion-weighted MRI as a spatially variant Gaussian mixture: Application to image denoising

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Juan Eugenio Iglesias; Thompson, Paul M.; Zhao, Aishan; Tu, Zhuowen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This work describes a spatially variant mixture model constrained by a Markov random field to model high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data. Mixture models suit HARDI well because the attenuation by diffusion is inherently a mixture. The goal is to create a general model that can be used in different applications. This study focuses on image denoising and segmentation (primarily the former). Methods: HARDI signal attenuation data are used to train a Gaussian mixture model in which the mean vectors and covariance matrices are assumed to be independent of spatial locations, whereas the mixture weights are allowed to vary at different lattice positions. Spatial smoothness of the data is ensured by imposing a Markov random field prior on the mixture weights. The model is trained in an unsupervised fashion using the expectation maximization algorithm. The number of mixture components is determined using the minimum message length criterion from information theory. Once the model has been trained, it can be fitted to a noisy diffusion MRI volume by maximizing the posterior probability of the underlying noiseless data in a Bayesian framework, recovering a denoised version of the image. Moreover, the fitted probability maps of the mixture components can be used as features for posterior image segmentation. Results: The model-based denoising algorithm proposed here was compared on real data with three other approaches that are commonly used in the literature: Gaussian filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and Rician-adapted nonlocal means. The comparison shows that, at low signal-to-noise ratio, when these methods falter, our algorithm considerably outperforms them. When tractography is performed on the model-fitted data rather than on the noisy measurements, the quality of the output improves substantially. Finally, ventricle and caudate nucleus segmentation experiments also show the potential usefulness of the mixture probability maps for classification tasks. Conclusions: The presented spatially variant mixture model for diffusion MRI provides excellent denoising results at low signal-to-noise ratios. This makes it possible to restore data acquired with a fast (i.e., noisy) pulse sequence to acceptable noise levels. This is the case in diffusion MRI, where a large number of diffusion-weighted volumes have to be acquired under clinical time constraints. PMID:21859036

  10. Spatial light modulators and applications III; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, Aug. 7, 8, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Efron, Uzi (editor)

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in the technology and applications of spatial light modulators (SLMs) are discussed in review essays by leading experts. Topics addressed include materials for SLMs, SLM devices and device technology, applications to optical data processing, and applications to artificial neural networks. Particular attention is given to nonlinear optical polymers, liquid crystals, magnetooptic SLMs, multiple-quantum-well SLMs, deformable-mirror SLMs, three-dimensional optical memories, applications of photorefractive devices to optical computing, photonic neurocomputers and learning machines, holographic associative memories, SLMs as parallel memories for optoelectronic neural networks, and coherent-optics implementations of neural-network models.

  11. Spatial stochastic processes for yield and reliability management with applications to nano electronics 

    E-print Network

    Hwang, Jung Yoon

    2005-02-17

    This study uses the spatial features of defects on the wafers to examine the detection and control of process variation in semiconductor fabrication. It applies spatial stochastic process to semiconductor yield modeling ...

  12. EMCCD based luminescence imaging system for spatially resolved geo-chronometric and radiation dosimetric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, N.; Adhyaru, P.; Vaghela, H.; Singhvi, A. K.

    2014-11-01

    We report the development of an Electron Multiplier Charge Coupled Device (EMCCD) based luminescence dating system. The system enables position sensitive measurements of luminescence for the estimation of spatially resolved distribution of equivalent dose for complex geological samples. The system includes: 1) a sample stimulation unit (with both thermal and optical stimulations), 2) an optics unit that comprises imaging optics and, 3) a data acquisition and processing unit. The system works in a LabVIEW environment with a graphical user interface (GUI). User specified stimulation protocols enable thermal and optical stimulation in any desired combination. The optics unit images the luminescence on to a EMCCD (512 × 512 pixels, each of 16?m × 16?m size) and maintains a unit magnification. This unit has flexible focusing and a filter housing that enables change of filters combinations without disturbing the setup. Time integrated EMCCD images of luminescence from the sample are acquired as a function of programmable dwell time and these images are processed using indigenously developed MATLAB based programs. Additionally, the programs align the acquired images using a set of control points (identifier features on the images) to a single pixel accuracy. The dose evaluation is based on integrated intensity from selected pixels followed by generation of a growth curve giving luminescence as a function of applied beta doses. Development of this EMCCD camera based luminescence system will enable in-situ luminescence measurements of the samples, without the requirement of separating mineral grains from their matrix. It will also allow age estimation of samples such as lithic artifacts/structures via dating of their surfaces, fusion crust of meteorites, pedogenic carbonates, etc and will additionally open up possibilities of application like testing spatial uniformity of doping in artificial luminescence phosphors, dating/dosimetry of inclusions etc.

  13. Using Geo-Spatial Technologies for Field Applications in Higher Geography Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karatepe, Akif

    2012-01-01

    Today's important geo-spatial technologies, GIS (Geographic Information Systems), GPS (Global Positioning Systems) and Google Earth have been widely used in geography education. Transferring spatially oriented data taken by GPS to the GIS and Google Earth has provided great benefits in terms of showing the usage of spatial technologies for field…

  14. DOTAGWA: A CASE STUDY IN WEB-BASED ARCHITECTURES FOR CONNECTING SURFACE WATER MODELS TO SPATIALLY ENABLED WEB APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment (AGWA) tool is a desktop application that uses widely available standardized spatial datasets to derive inputs for multi-scale hydrologic models (Miller et al., 2007). The required data sets include topography (DEM data), soils, clima...

  15. A spatially distributed energy balance snowmelt model for application in mountain basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marks, D.; Domingo, J.; Susong, D.; Link, T.; Garen, D.

    1999-01-01

    Snowmelt is the principal source for soil moisture, ground-water re-charge, and stream-flow in mountainous regions of the western US, Canada, and other similar regions of the world. Information on the timing, magnitude, and contributing area of melt under variable or changing climate conditions is required for successful water and resource management. A coupled energy and mass-balance model ISNOBAL is used to simulate the development and melting of the seasonal snowcover in several mountain basins in California, Idaho, and Utah. Simulations are done over basins varying from 1 to 2500 km2, with simulation periods varying from a few days for the smallest basin, Emerald Lake watershed in California, to multiple snow seasons for the Park City area in Utah. The model is driven by topographically corrected estimates of radiation, temperature, humidity, wind, and precipitation. Simulation results in all basins closely match independently measured snow water equivalent, snow depth, or runoff during both the development and depletion of the snowcover. Spatially distributed estimates of snow deposition and melt allow us to better understand the interaction between topographic structure, climate, and moisture availability in mountain basins of the western US. Application of topographically distributed models such as this will lead to improved water resource and watershed management.Snowmelt is the principal source for soil moisture, ground-water re-charge, and stream-flow in mountainous regions of the western US, Canada, and other similar regions of the world. Information on the timing, magnitude, and contributing area of melt under variable or changing climate conditions is required for successful water and resource management. A coupled energy and mass-balance model ISNOBAL is used to simulate the development and melting of the seasonal snowcover in several mountain basins in California, Idaho, and Utah. Simulations are done over basins varying from 1 to 2500 km2, with simulation periods varying from a few days for the smallest basin, Emerald Lake watershed in California, to multiple snow seasons for the Park City area in Utah. The model is driven by topographically corrected estimates of radiation, temperature, humidity, wind, and precipitation. Simulation results in all basins closely match independently measured snow water equivalent, snow depth, or runoff during both the development and depletion of the snowcover. Spatially distributed estimates of snow deposition and melt allow us to better understand the interaction between topographic structure, climate, and moisture availability in mountain basins of the western US. Application of topographically distributed models such as this will lead to improved water resource and watershed management.

  16. Spatial Preference Modelling for equitable infrastructure provision: an application of Sen's Capability Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wismadi, Arif; Zuidgeest, Mark; Brussel, Mark; van Maarseveen, Martin

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether the inclusion of spatial neighbourhood comparison factors in Preference Modelling allows spatial decision support systems (SDSSs) to better address spatial equity, we introduce Spatial Preference Modelling (SPM). To evaluate the effectiveness of this model in addressing equity, various standardisation functions in both Non-Spatial Preference Modelling and SPM are compared. The evaluation involves applying the model to a resource location-allocation problem for transport infrastructure in the Special Province of Yogyakarta in Indonesia. We apply Amartya Sen's Capability Approach to define opportunity to mobility as a non-income indicator. Using the extended Moran's I interpretation for spatial equity, we evaluate the distribution output regarding, first, `the spatial distribution patterns of priority targeting for allocation' (SPT) and, second, `the effect of new distribution patterns after location-allocation' (ELA). The Moran's I index of the initial map and its comparison with six patterns for SPT as well as ELA consistently indicates that the SPM is more effective for addressing spatial equity. We conclude that the inclusion of spatial neighbourhood comparison factors in Preference Modelling improves the capability of SDSS to address spatial equity. This study thus proposes a new formal method for SDSS with specific attention on resource location-allocation to address spatial equity.

  17. An electrostatic spatial resonance model for coaxial helical structures with applications to the filamentous bacteriophages.

    PubMed Central

    Marzec, C J; Day, L A

    1994-01-01

    A model is presented that treats the symmetry matching problem in structures made of two interacting coaxial helices of point charges. The charges are sources of a potential field that mediates a non-specific attractive interaction between the helices. The problem is represented in Fourier space, which affords the most generality. It is found that coaxial helices with optimally mated symmetries can lock into spatial resonance configurations that maximize their interaction. The resonances are represented as vectors in a discrete three-dimensional space. Two algebraic relations are given for the four symmetry parameters of two helices in resonance. One-start inner helices interacting with coaxial one-start or NR-start outer helices are considered. Applications are made to the filamentous bacteriophages Ff, Pf1, Xf, and Pf3. The interaction given by the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation is calculated in this formalism to allow comparison of the electrostatic free energy of interaction of different resonance structures. Experimental nucleotide/subunit ratios are accounted for, and models for the DNA-protein interfaces are presented, with particular emphasis on Pf1. PMID:7696463

  18. Fine-pitch high-efficiency spatial optical modulator for mobile display applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jong Hyeong; Yun, Sang Kyeong; Kim, Hee Yeoun; An, Seungdo; Park, Heung Woo; Choi, Yoon Joon; Yurlov, Victor; Lapchuk, Anatoliy; Yang, Chung Mo; Lee, Sung Jun; Jang, Jae Wook; Lee, Ki Un; Woo, Ki Suk; Bourim, El M.

    2009-02-01

    Diffractive spatial optical modulators (SOM) with fine pitch pixel array were introduced for the mobile applications of laser projection display which requires the small volume, low power consumption and high optical efficiency. Micromechanical designs of piezoelectric (PZT) actuator and mirror ribbon structure were optimized for small volume, but keeping the same level of the other performance. Even though the same design rule and fabrication equipment were used for 10 um pitch SOM and 16 um pitch SOM, the optical efficiency of the fine pitch SOM was 78 % for the 0th order diffraction and is better than that of 16 um pitch SOM (73%). The full on/off contrast ratio has no difference between 10 um pitch and 16 um pitch SOM. All the optical characteristics coincide well with the theoretical estimations. High displacement of 500nm, which is enough to modulate the three Red, Green and Blue colors were achieved by the control of the thicknesses and stresses of constituent structural layers. It was found that the stress of Pt/PZT/Pt actuating layer was the main parameter affecting the initial gap height of the ribbon and also its displacement. For improving the optical properties of the SOM devices, the required ribbon-flatness could be achieved by applying a stress gradient on the SiN layer to compensate for the stress unbalance between Al mirror and SiN supprting layer. The temperature sensitive characteristics of the SOM device, which degrades the image quality, could be minimized by a mechanical compensation method using a thermal expansion effect of Si substrates. This concept could be applied in most of the bridge type MEMS structure. The most critical parameter which limit the SOM device lifetime was found to be the ribbon displacement degradation. By using a temperature accelerating lifetime measurement method based on the displacement degradation the estimated lifetime was more than 4,000 hrs and is of acceptable level in the mobile application. In short, the developed fine pitch SOM device, for making small volume of optical module, has sufficient response time and ribbon displacement for modulating the red, blue and green colors with one SOM chip and is suitable for high quality embedded laser projection displays. Optical module with VGA is successfully demonstrated for its potential applications in mobile laser projection display such as a embed projection cellular phone.

  19. ASSET Queries: A Set-Oriented and Column-Wise Approach to Modern OLAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatziantoniou, Damianos; Sotiropoulos, Yannis

    Modern data analysis has given birth to numerous grouping constructs and programming paradigms, way beyond the traditional group by. Applications such as data warehousing, web log analysis, streams monitoring and social networks understanding necessitated the use of data cubes, grouping variables, windows and MapReduce. In this paper we review the associated set (ASSET) concept and discuss its applicability in both continuous and traditional data settings. Given a set of values B, an associated set over B is just a collection of annotated data multisets, one for each b(B. The goal is to efficiently compute aggregates over these data sets. An ASSET query consists of repeated definitions of associated sets and aggregates of these, possibly correlated, resembling a spreadsheet document. We review systems implementing ASSET queries both in continuous and persistent contexts and argue for associated sets' analytical abilities and optimization opportunities.

  20. Spatial Double Generalized Beta Regression Models: Extensions and Application to Study Quality of Education in Colombia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cepeda-Cuervo, Edilberto; Núñez-Antón, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    In this article, a proposed Bayesian extension of the generalized beta spatial regression models is applied to the analysis of the quality of education in Colombia. We briefly revise the beta distribution and describe the joint modeling approach for the mean and dispersion parameters in the spatial regression models' setting. Finally, we…

  1. Application of Data Fusion in the Production and Updating of Spatial Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Sun, Q.; Xu, L.; Xiong, Z.

    2013-07-01

    The increasing spatial data provide abundant material for data fusion, and the purpose of the paper is to apply data fusion into the production and updating of spatial data. After outlining the general framework and workflow, the processing contents and methods are specified in sequence. Facing various spatial data from different sources, how to design proper data fusion scheme is the toppriority problem. The method of analyzing and assessing various spatial data is introduced referring to images, which is shown by concrete examples. Then the technical workflow of multi-source data integration is present to eliminate differences and relevant contents are also specified. After building the relationships of homologous entities through spatial data matching, the data fusion which is similar to cartographic generalization in essence can be implemented. Different ways of updating spatial data is introduced to keep the currency of existing data. At last, the spatial data with good quality can be obtained. The efficient and reliability of the methodology in this paper has been proved through practical production.

  2. Design of data warehouse in teaching state based on OLAP and data mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lijuan; Wu, Minhua; Li, Shuang

    2009-04-01

    The data warehouse and the data mining technology is one of information technology research hot topics. At present the data warehouse and the data mining technology in aspects and so on commercial, financial industry as well as enterprise's production, market marketing obtained the widespread application, but is relatively less in educational fields' application. Over the years, the teaching and management have been accumulating large amounts of data in colleges and universities, while the data can not be effectively used, in the light of social needs of the university development and the current status of data management, the establishment of data warehouse in university state, the better use of existing data, and on the basis dealing with a higher level of disposal --data mining are particularly important. In this paper, starting from the decision-making needs design data warehouse structure of university teaching state, and then through the design structure and data extraction, loading, conversion create a data warehouse model, finally make use of association rule mining algorithm for data mining, to get effective results applied in practice. Based on the data analysis and mining, get a lot of valuable information, which can be used to guide teaching management, thereby improving the quality of teaching and promoting teaching devotion in universities and enhancing teaching infrastructure. At the same time it can provide detailed, multi-dimensional information for universities assessment and higher education research.

  3. Application of spatial Poisson process models to air mass thunderstorm rainfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eagleson, P. S.; Fennessy, N. M.; Wang, Qinliang; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.

    1987-01-01

    Eight years of summer storm rainfall observations from 93 stations in and around the 154 sq km Walnut Gulch catchment of the Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, in Arizona are processed to yield the total station depths of 428 storms. Statistical analysis of these random fields yields the first two moments, the spatial correlation and variance functions, and the spatial distribution of total rainfall for each storm. The absolute and relative worth of three Poisson models are evaluated by comparing their prediction of the spatial distribution of storm rainfall with observations from the second half of the sample. The effect of interstorm parameter variation is examined.

  4. Positive circuits and two-dimensional spatial differentiation: Application to the formation of sense

    E-print Network

    Provence Aix-Marseille I, Université de

    of sense organs in Drosophila Anne Crumi`ere CNRS - Institut de Math´ematiques de Luminy Campus de Luminy of sense organs in Drosophila. Key words: spatial differentiation, intercellular genetic interactions

  5. A SPATIALLY EXPLICIT HIERARCHICAL APPROACH TO MODELING COMPLEX ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS: THEORY AND APPLICATIONS. (R827676)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological systems are generally considered among the most complex because they are characterized by a large number of diverse components, nonlinear interactions, scale multiplicity, and spatial heterogeneity. Hierarchy theory, as well as empirical evidence, suggests that comp...

  6. Frequency stabilization, tuning, and spatial mode control of terahertz quantum cascade lasers for coherent transceiver applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danylov, Andriy

    THz quantum cascade lasers (TQCLs) first demonstrated in 2002 are a promising source of THz coherent radiation for use as both transmitters and local oscillators in coherent heterodyne detection systems. However, present TQCLs have deficiencies which include lack of frequency tunability, as well as inadequate spatial and temporal coherence. In this thesis we have addressed these issues to demonstrate an improved 2.408 TQCL which operated as a transmitter in a coherent heterodyne detection imaging system. The 2.408 THz QCL used in this thesis was grown and fabricated by the Photonics Center (University of Massachusetts Lowell). First, we showed that a short hollow Pyrex tube can act as a dielectric waveguide and transform the multimode, highly diverging TQCL beam into the lowest order dielectric waveguide hybrid mode, EH11, which then couples efficiently to the free-space Gaussian mode, TEMo0. This simple approach should enable TQCLs to be employed in applications where a spatially coherent beam is required. Next, the tunability problem was addressed. A compact, tunable, narrowband terahertz source was demonstrated by mixing a single longitudinal mode, 2.408 THz, free running quantum cascade laser with a 2-20 GHz microwave sweeper in a corner-cube-mounted Schottky diode (SD). The sideband spectra were characterized with a Fourier transform spectrometer, and the radiation was tuned through several D2O rotational transitions to estimate the longer term (t ? several seconds) bandwidth of the source. A spectral resolution of 2 MHz in the CW mode was observed. The temporal coherence of the TQCL was improved by assembling a simple analog locking circuit, which stabilizes the beat signal between the TQCL and a 2.40976 THz CO2 optically pumped molecular laser (OPL) line to 4 kHz full width at half maximum (FWHM). This is approximately a tenth of the observed long-term (t ˜ sec) linewidth of the OPL showing that the feedback loop corrects for much of the mechanical and acoustic-induced frequency jitter of the gas laser. The achieved stability is sufficient to enable the use of the TQCL as a transmitter in a coherent transceiver. Finally, a coherent transceiver using the TQCL as a transmitter and an OPL as the local oscillator was used, with a pair of SD mixers in the receiver and reference channels, to acquire high-resolution inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) images of fully illuminated targets, including scale models and concealed objects. Phase stability of the received signal was sufficient to allow coherent image processing of the rotating target (in azimuth and elevation). Several THz ISAR images with submillimeter resolution, obtained with the system, are presented. These images clearly illustrate the first use of a quantum cascade laser in a coherent detection system.

  7. Over-constraints and a unified mobility method for general spatial mechanisms part 2: Application of the principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wenjuan; Zeng, Daxing; Huang, Zhen

    2015-10-01

    The pre-research on mobility analysis presented a unified-mobility formula and a methodology based on reciprocal screw theory by HUANG, which focused on classical and modern parallel mechanisms. However its range of application needs to further extend to general multi-loop spatial mechanism. This kind of mechanism is not only more complex in structure but also with strong motion coupling among loops, making the mobility analysis even more complicated, and the relevant research has long been ignored. It is focused on how to apply the new principle for general spatial mechanism to those various multi-loop spatial mechanisms, and some new meaningful knowledge is further found. Several typical examples of the general multi-loop spatial mechanisms with motion couple even strong motion couple are considered. These spatial mechanisms include different closing way: over-constraint appearing in rigid closure, in movable closure, and in dynamic closure as well; these examples also include two different new methods to solve this kind of issue: the way to recognize over-constraints by analyzing relative movement between two connected links and by constructing a virtual loop to recognize over-constraints. In addition, over-constraint determination tabulation is brought to analyze the motion couple. The researches above are all based upon the screw theory. All these multi-loop spatial mechanisms with different kinds of structures can completely be solved by following the directions and examples, and the new mobility theory based on the screw theory is also proved to be valid. This study not only enriches and develops the theory and makes the theory more universal, but also has a special meaning for innovation in mechanical engineering.

  8. Application of Spatial Modelling Approaches, Sampling Strategies and 3s Technology Within AN Ecolgocial Framwork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.-C.; Lo, N.-J.; Chang, W.-I.; Huang, K.-Y.

    2012-07-01

    How to effectively describe ecological patterns in nature over broader spatial scales and build a modeling ecological framework has become an important issue in ecological research. We test four modeling methods (MAXENT, DOMAIN, GLM and ANN) to predict the potential habitat of Schima superba (Chinese guger tree, CGT) with different spatial scale in the Huisun study area in Taiwan. Then we created three sampling design (from small to large scales) for model development and validation by different combinations of CGT samples from aforementioned three sites (Tong-Feng watershed, Yo-Shan Mountain, and Kuan-Dau watershed). These models combine points of known occurrence and topographic variables to infer CGT potential spatial distribution. Our assessment revealed that the method performance from highest to lowest was: MAXENT, DOMAIN, GLM and ANN on small spatial scale. The MAXENT and DOMAIN two models were the most capable for predicting the tree's potential habitat. However, the outcome clearly indicated that the models merely based on topographic variables performed poorly on large spatial extrapolation from Tong-Feng to Kuan-Dau because the humidity and sun illumination of the two watersheds are affected by their microterrains and are quite different from each other. Thus, the models developed from topographic variables can only be applied within a limited geographical extent without a significant error. Future studies will attempt to use variables involving spectral information associated with species extracted from high spatial, spectral resolution remotely sensed data, especially hyperspectral image data, for building a model so that it can be applied on a large spatial scale.

  9. Application of spatially referenced regression modeling for the evaluation of total nitrogen loading in the Chesapeake Bay watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Preston, Stephen D.; Brakebill, John W.

    1999-01-01

    The reduction of stream nutrient loads is an important part of current efforts to improve water quality in the Chesapeake Bay. To design programs that will effectively reduce stream nutrient loading, resource managers need spatially detailed information that describes the location of nutrient sources and the watershed factors that affect delivery of nutrients to the Bay. To address this need, the U.S. Geological Survey has developed a set of spatially referenced regression models for the evaluation of nutrient loading in the watershed. The technique applied for this purpose is referred to as ?SPARROW? (SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes), which is a statistical modeling approach that retains spatial referencing for illustrating predictions, and for relating upstream nutrient sources to downstream nutrient loads. SPARROW is based on a digital stream-network data set that is composed of stream segments (reaches) that are attributed with traveltime and connectivity information. Drainage-basin boundaries are defined for each stream reach in the network data set through the use of a digital elevation model. For the Chesapeake Bay watershed, the spatial network was developed using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s River Reach File 1 digital stream network, and is composed of 1,408 stream reaches and watershed segments. To develop a SPARROW model for total nitrogen in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, data sets for sources and basin characteristics were incorporated into the spatial network and related to stream-loading information by using a nonlinear regression model approach. Total nitrogen source variables that were statistically significant in the model include point sources, urban area, fertilizer application, manure generation and atmospheric deposition. Total nitrogen loss variables that were significant in the model include soil permeability and instream-loss rates for four stream-reach classes. Applications of SPARROW for evaluating total nitrogen loading in the Chesapeake Bay watershed include the illustration of the spatial distributions of total nitrogen yields and of the potential for delivery of those yields to the Bay. This information is being used by the Chesapeake Bay Program to target nutrient-reduction areas (Priority Nutrient Reduction Areas) and to design nutrient-load reduction plans that are specific to each tributary (Tributary Strategies).

  10. An impedance method for spatial sensing of 3D cell constructs--towards applications in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Canali, C; Mazzoni, C; Larsen, L B; Heiskanen, A; Martinsen, Ø G; Wolff, A; Dufva, M; Emnéus, J

    2015-09-01

    We present the characterisation and validation of multiplexed 4-terminal (4T) impedance measurements as a method for sensing the spatial location of cell aggregates within large three-dimensional (3D) gelatin scaffolds. The measurements were performed using an array of four rectangular chambers, each having eight platinum needle electrodes for parallel analysis. The electrode positions for current injection and voltage measurements were optimised by means of finite element simulations to maximise the sensitivity field distribution and spatial resolution. Eight different 4T combinations were experimentally tested in terms of the spatial sensitivity. The simulated sensitivity fields were validated using objects (phantoms) with different conductivity and size placed in different positions inside the chamber. This provided the detection limit (volume sensitivity) of 16.5%, i.e. the smallest detectable volume with respect to the size of the measurement chamber. Furthermore, the possibility for quick single frequency analysis was demonstrated by finding a common frequency of 250 kHz for all the presented electrode combinations. As final proof of concept, a high density of human hepatoblastoma (HepG2) cells were encapsulated in gelatin to form artificial 3D cell constructs and detected when placed in different positions inside large gelatin scaffolds. Taken together, these results open new perspectives for impedance-based sensing technologies for non-invasive monitoring in tissue engineering applications providing spatial information of constructs within biologically relevant 3D environments. PMID:26198701

  11. SPHARA - A Generalized Spatial Fourier Analysis for Multi-Sensor Systems with Non-Uniformly Arranged Sensors: Application to EEG

    PubMed Central

    Graichen, Uwe; Eichardt, Roland; Fiedler, Patrique; Strohmeier, Daniel; Zanow, Frank; Haueisen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Important requirements for the analysis of multichannel EEG data are efficient techniques for signal enhancement, signal decomposition, feature extraction, and dimensionality reduction. We propose a new approach for spatial harmonic analysis (SPHARA) that extends the classical spatial Fourier analysis to EEG sensors positioned non-uniformly on the surface of the head. The proposed method is based on the eigenanalysis of the discrete Laplace-Beltrami operator defined on a triangular mesh. We present several ways to discretize the continuous Laplace-Beltrami operator and compare the properties of the resulting basis functions computed using these discretization methods. We apply SPHARA to somatosensory evoked potential data from eleven volunteers and demonstrate the ability of the method for spatial data decomposition, dimensionality reduction and noise suppression. When employing SPHARA for dimensionality reduction, a significantly more compact representation can be achieved using the FEM approach, compared to the other discretization methods. Using FEM, to recover 95% and 99% of the total energy of the EEG data, on average only 35% and 58% of the coefficients are necessary. The capability of SPHARA for noise suppression is shown using artificial data. We conclude that SPHARA can be used for spatial harmonic analysis of multi-sensor data at arbitrary positions and can be utilized in a variety of other applications. PMID:25885290

  12. Violent crime in San Antonio, Texas: an application of spatial epidemiological methods.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Corey S

    2011-12-01

    Violent crimes are rarely considered a public health problem or investigated using epidemiological methods. But patterns of violent crime and other health conditions are often affected by similar characteristics of the built environment. In this paper, methods and perspectives from spatial epidemiology are used in an analysis of violent crimes in San Antonio, TX. Bayesian statistical methods are used to examine the contextual influence of several aspects of the built environment. Additionally, spatial regression models using Bayesian model specifications are used to examine spatial patterns of violent crime risk. Results indicate that the determinants of violent crime depend on the model specification, but are primarily related to the built environment and neighborhood socioeconomic conditions. Results are discussed within the context of a rapidly growing urban area with a diverse population. PMID:22748228

  13. Spatial deconvolution of spectropolarimetric data: an application to quiet Sun magnetic elements

    E-print Network

    Noda, C Quintero; Suárez, D Orozco; Cobo, B Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    Observations of the Sun from the Earth are always limited by the presence of the atmosphere, which strongly disturbs the images. A solution to this problem is to place the telescopes in space satellites, which produce observations without any (or limited) atmospheric aberrations. However, even though the images from space are not affected by atmospheric seeing, the optical properties of the instruments still limit the observations. In the case of diffraction limited observations, the PSF establishes the maximum allowed spatial resolution, defined as the distance between two nearby structures that can be properly distinguished. In addition, the shape of the PSF induce a dispersion of the light from different parts of the image, leading to what is commonly termed as stray light or dispersed light. This effect produces that light observed in a spatial location at the focal plane is a combination of the light emitted in the object at relatively distant spatial locations. We aim to correct the effect produced by t...

  14. Unsupervised Spatial Event Detection in Targeted Domains with Applications to Civil Unrest Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Chen, Feng; Dai, Jing; Hua, Ting; Lu, Chang-Tien; Ramakrishnan, Naren

    2014-01-01

    Twitter has become a popular data source as a surrogate for monitoring and detecting events. Targeted domains such as crime, election, and social unrest require the creation of algorithms capable of detecting events pertinent to these domains. Due to the unstructured language, short-length messages, dynamics, and heterogeneity typical of Twitter data streams, it is technically difficult and labor-intensive to develop and maintain supervised learning systems. We present a novel unsupervised approach for detecting spatial events in targeted domains and illustrate this approach using one specific domain, viz. civil unrest modeling. Given a targeted domain, we propose a dynamic query expansion algorithm to iteratively expand domain-related terms, and generate a tweet homogeneous graph. An anomaly identification method is utilized to detect spatial events over this graph by jointly maximizing local modularity and spatial scan statistics. Extensive experiments conducted in 10 Latin American countries demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. PMID:25350136

  15. Evaluation of geostatistical estimators and their applicability to characterise the spatial patterns of recreational fishing catch rates

    PubMed Central

    Aidoo, Eric N.; Mueller, Ute; Goovaerts, Pierre; Hyndes, Glenn A.

    2015-01-01

    Western Australians are heavily engaged in recreational fishing activities with a participation rate of approximately 30%. An accurate estimation of the spatial distribution of recreational catch per unit effort (catch rates) is an integral component for monitoring fish population changes and to develop strategies for ecosystem-based marine management. Geostatistical techniques such as kriging can provide useful tools for characterising the spatial distributions of recreational catch rates. However, most recreational fishery data are highly skewed, zero-inflated and when expressed as ratios are impacted by the small number problem which can influence the estimates obtained from the traditional kriging. The applicability of ordinary, indicator and Poisson kriging to recreational catch rate data was evaluated for three aquatic species with different behaviours and distribution patterns. The prediction performance of each estimator was assessed based on cross-validation. For all three species, the accuracy plot of the indicator kriging (IK) showed a better agreement between expected and empirical proportions of catch rate data falling within probability intervals of increasing size, as measured by the goodness statistic. Also, indicator kriging was found to be better in predicting the latent catch rate for the three species compared to ordinary and Poisson kriging. For each species, the spatial maps from the three estimators displayed similar patterns but Poisson kriging produced smoother spatial distributions. We show that the IK estimator may be preferable for the spatial modelling of catch rate data exhibiting these characteristics, and has the best prediction performance regardless of the life history and distribution patterns of those three species. PMID:26120221

  16. Application of the adiabatic spatially dependent reactor kinetics method to voided pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Gundy, L.M.

    1984-01-01

    Computer simulations were conducted for experiments concerning an ex-core axial string of epi-cadmium neutron detectors acting as a coolant density and level gauge. Static transport calculations were performed for experiments conducted with the Pennsylvania State University TRIGA reactor with a downcomer simulator installed. This simulated the response of an ex-core neutron level gauge to varying downcomer voiding along. Static transport calculations were also performed with the TMI accident boiloff scenario, simulating the response of an axial string of three ex-core detectors. Two other TMI simulations, with varying downcomer voiding with the core full and the core empty, were also performed, which were compared to the TRIGA experimental results. Spatially dependent reactor kinetics simulations, using transport theory, were conducted for the LOFT large break tests L2-5, and LPO2-6. In these calculations, the axial neutron detector responses to a known spatially dependent voiding history were simulated. The static transport calculations were performed with the two-dimensional transport code DOT. The spatially dependent reactor kinetics calculations were performed using the adiabatic reactor kinetics method using reactor kinetics code and the transport code DOT. The adiabatic method of spatially dependent reactor kinetics was shown to give reasonably accurate simulations of the LOFT experiments.

  17. SPATIAL DATA ANALYSIS WITH GIS: AN INTRODUCTION TO APPLICATION IN THE SOCIAL

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    . A revised version of this paper is forthcoming as a chapter in Geographic Information Systems: A Handbook of a Geographic Information System (GIS), which makes it a natural tool to aid in the analysis of spatial data. I Anselin National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis University of California Santa Barbara, CA

  18. Spatial Lasso with Applications to GIS Model Selection Hsin-Cheng Huang

    E-print Network

    to a modification of the Lasso procedure. The LARS algorithm, which can be used in a fast implementation of Lasso include information on geology, topography, weather and climate, ownership, political administration, land to a modification of the Lasso procedure that we call spatial Lasso. The model and the implementation of standard

  19. Dynamic spatially-explicit mass-balance modeling for targeted watershed phosphorus management II: Model Application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cost-effective nonpoint source phosphorus (P) control should target the land areas at greatest risk for P loss. We combined mass-balance modeling and geographic analysis to identify and map high-risk areas for P export by integrating long-term P input/output accounting with spatially variable physi...

  20. Digital Hydrologic Networks Supporting Applications Related to Spatially Referenced Regression Modeling1

    PubMed Central

    Brakebill, JW; Wolock, DM; Terziotti, SE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Digital hydrologic networks depicting surface-water pathways and their associated drainage catchments provide a key component to hydrologic analysis and modeling. Collectively, they form common spatial units that can be used to frame the descriptions of aquatic and watershed processes. In addition, they provide the ability to simulate and route the movement of water and associated constituents throughout the landscape. Digital hydrologic networks have evolved from derivatives of mapping products to detailed, interconnected, spatially referenced networks of water pathways, drainage areas, and stream and watershed characteristics. These properties are important because they enhance the ability to spatially evaluate factors that affect the sources and transport of water-quality constituents at various scales. SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes (SPARROW), a process-based/statistical model, relies on a digital hydrologic network in order to establish relations between quantities of monitored contaminant flux, contaminant sources, and the associated physical characteristics affecting contaminant transport. Digital hydrologic networks modified from the River Reach File (RF1) and National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) geospatial datasets provided frameworks for SPARROW in six regions of the conterminous United States. In addition, characteristics of the modified RF1 were used to update estimates of mean-annual streamflow. This produced more current flow estimates for use in SPARROW modeling. PMID:22457575

  1. Application of spatial pedotransfer functions to understand soil modulation of vegetation response to climate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A fundamental knowledge gap in understanding land-atmosphere interactions is accurate, high resolution spatial representation of soil physical and hydraulic properties. We present a novel approach to predict hydraulic soil parameters by combining digital soil mapping techniques with pedotransfer fun...

  2. INTEGRATING HYDROLOGIC MODELS AND SPATIAL DATA IN A DISTRIBUTED INTERNET APPLICATION 1801

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DotAGWA is a shared application used to assist watershed planners in decision making processes and to offset the software and data requirements typically required in a desktop application. The features available in DotAGWA help planners share and visualize data. Groups can interact with the applic...

  3. High-fidelity spatially resolved multiphoton counting for quantum imaging applications

    E-print Network

    Radoslaw Chrapkiewicz; Wojciech Wasilewski; Konrad Banaszek

    2014-05-17

    We present a method for spatially resolved multiphoton counting based on an intensified camera with the retrieval of multimode photon statistics fully accounting for non-linearities in the detection process. The scheme relies on one-time quantum tomographic calibration of the detector. Faithful, high-fidelity reconstruction of single- and two-mode statistics of multiphoton states is demonstrated for coherent states and their statistical mixtures. The results consistently exhibit classical values of Mandel and Fano parameters in contrast to raw statistics of camera photo-events. Detector operation is reliable for illumination levels up to the average of one photon per an event area, substantially higher than in previous approaches to characterize quantum statistical properties of light with spatial resolution.

  4. High-fidelity spatially resolved multiphoton counting for quantum imaging applications

    E-print Network

    Chrapkiewicz, Radoslaw; Banaszek, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    We present a method for spatially resolved multiphoton counting based on an intensified camera with the retrieval of multimode photon statistics fully accounting for non-linearities in the detection process. The scheme relies on one-time quantum tomographic calibration of the detector. Faithful, high-fidelity reconstruction of single- and two-mode statistics of multiphoton states is demonstrated for coherent states and their statistical mixtures. The results consistently exhibit classical values of Mandel and Fano parameters in contrast to raw statistics of camera photo-events. Detector operation is reliable for illumination levels up to the average of one photon per an event area, substantially higher than in previous approaches to characterize quantum statistical properties of light with spatial resolution.

  5. Spatial glass transition temperature variations in polymer glass: application to a maltodextrin-water system.

    PubMed

    van Sleeuwen, Rutger M T; Zhang, Suying; Normand, Valéry

    2012-03-12

    A model was developed to predict spatial glass transition temperature (T(g)) distributions in glassy maltodextrin particles during transient moisture sorption. The simulation employed a numerical mass transfer model with a concentration dependent apparent diffusion coefficient (D(app)) measured using Dynamic Vapor Sorption. The mass average moisture content increase and the associated decrease in T(g) were successfully modeled over time. Large spatial T(g) variations were predicted in the particle, resulting in a temporary broadening of the T(g) region. Temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry confirmed that the variation in T(g) in nonequilibrated samples was larger than in equilibrated samples. This experimental broadening was characterized by an almost doubling of the T(g) breadth compared to the start of the experiment. Upon reaching equilibrium, both the experimental and predicted T(g) breadth contracted back to their initial value. PMID:22268547

  6. Compact, transmissive two-dimensional spatial disperser design with application in simultaneous endoscopic imaging and laser microsurgery.

    PubMed

    Metz, Philipp; Adam, Jost; Gerken, Martina; Jalali, Bahram

    2014-01-20

    Minimally invasive surgery procedures benefit from a reduced size of endoscopic devices. A prospective path to implement miniaturized endoscopy is single optical-fiber-based spectrally encoded imaging. While simultaneous spectrally encoded inertial-scan-free imaging and laser microsurgery have been successfully demonstrated in a large table setup, a highly miniaturized optical design would promote the development of multipurpose endoscope heads. This paper presents a highly scalable, entirely transmissive axial design for a spectral 2D spatial disperser. The proposed design employs a grating prism and a virtual imaged phased array (VIPA). Based on semi-analytical device modeling, we performed a systematic parameter analysis to assess the spectral disperser's manufacturability and to obtain an optimum application-specific design. We found that, in particular, a low grating period combined with a high optical input bandwidth and low VIPA tilt showed favorable results in terms of a high spatial resolution, a small device diameter, and a large field of view. Our calculations reveal that a reasonable imaging performance can be achieved with system diameters of below 5 mm, which renders the proposed 2D spatial disperser design highly suitable for use in future endoscope heads that combine mechanical-scan-free imaging and laser microsurgery. PMID:24514122

  7. Spatial Rule-Based Modeling: A Method and Its Application to the Human Mitotic Kinetochore

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Bashar; Henze, Richard; Gruenert, Gerd; Egbert, Matthew; Huwald, Jan; Dittrich, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A common problem in the analysis of biological systems is the combinatorial explosion that emerges from the complexity of multi-protein assemblies. Conventional formalisms, like differential equations, Boolean networks and Bayesian networks, are unsuitable for dealing with the combinatorial explosion, because they are designed for a restricted state space with fixed dimensionality. To overcome this problem, the rule-based modeling language, BioNetGen, and the spatial extension, SRSim, have been developed. Here, we describe how to apply rule-based modeling to integrate experimental data from different sources into a single spatial simulation model and how to analyze the output of that model. The starting point for this approach can be a combination of molecular interaction data, reaction network data, proximities, binding and diffusion kinetics and molecular geometries at different levels of detail. We describe the technique and then use it to construct a model of the human mitotic inner and outer kinetochore, including the spindle assembly checkpoint signaling pathway. This allows us to demonstrate the utility of the procedure, show how a novel perspective for understanding such complex systems becomes accessible and elaborate on challenges that arise in the formulation, simulation and analysis of spatial rule-based models. PMID:24709796

  8. Are songbirds at risk from lead at small arms ranges? An application of the spatially explicit exposure model.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mark S; Theodore Wickwire, Ward; Quinn, Michael J; Ziolkowski, David J; Burmistrov, Dima; Menzie, Charles A; Geraghty, Ciaran; Minnich, Michael; Parsons, Patrick J

    2007-10-01

    Use of small arms during training is an important activity associated with the development and proficiency of soldiers. These weapons traditionally have used copper-jacketed lead projectiles; the copper facilitates the oxidation of the metallic lead resulting in more mobile oxides and carbonates. Consequently, many ranges at installations have high soil concentrations of lead. Many of these ranges are no longer used and have become habitat for wildlife. To address the potential for adverse effects from lead exposure in songbirds, we compared the outputs of traditional deterministic exposure models with a spatial model and compared the results of both with blood-lead levels from songbird species at two small arms range complexes. An integrative data collection procedure was used and incorporated into the spatially explicit exposure model (SEEM) for two small arms range sites. Site-specific data were used to refine model input parameters. These data included lead soil concentrations, analysis of lead concentrations in nestling food items, acid-insoluble ash content of feces (to estimate soil ingestion), location and mapping of singing males, and nest site location and characteristics. Territorial males also were spot-mapped to determine likelihood of breeding activity. Modeled estimates of risk were compared with blood and feather lead levels of adults and nestlings. Overall, edge species had higher blood-lead concentrations; however, most had concentrations below subclinical effect levels. Conventional deterministic methods produced risk estimates exceeding 10-fold the highest SEEM estimates. The spatially explicit exposure model provided good agreement with field observations and therefore produced more accurate risk estimates. The present study provides support for the application of spatial methods over conventional deterministic methods. PMID:17867887

  9. Application of land use regression modelling to assess the spatial distribution of road traffic noise in three European cities.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Inmaculada; Foraster, Maria; Basagaña, Xavier; Corradi, Elisabetta; Deltell, Alexandre; Morelli, Xavier; Phuleria, Harish C; Ragettli, Martina S; Rivera, Marcela; Thomasson, Alexandre; Slama, Rémy; Künzli, Nino

    2015-01-01

    Noise prediction models and noise maps are used to estimate the exposure to road traffic noise, but their availability and the quality of the noise estimates is sometimes limited. This paper explores the application of land use regression (LUR) modelling to assess the long-term intraurban spatial variability of road traffic noise in three European cities. Short-term measurements of road traffic noise taken in Basel, Switzerland (n=60), Girona, Spain (n=40), and Grenoble, France (n=41), were used to develop two LUR models: (a) a "GIS-only" model, which considered only predictor variables derived with Geographic Information Systems; and (b) a "Best" model, which in addition considered the variables collected while visiting the measurement sites. Both noise measurements and noise estimates from LUR models were compared with noise estimates from standard noise models developed for each city by the local authorities. Model performance (adjusted R(2)) was 0.66-0.87 for "GIS-only" models, and 0.70-0.89 for "Best" models. Short-term noise measurements showed a high correlation (r=0.62-0.78) with noise estimates from the standard noise models. LUR noise estimates did not show any systematic differences in the spatial patterns when compared with those from standard noise models. LUR modelling with accurate GIS source data can be a promising tool for noise exposure assessment with applications in epidemiological studies. PMID:25227731

  10. Bivariate B-splines and its Applications in Spatial Data Analysis 

    E-print Network

    Pan, Huijun 1987-

    2011-08-09

    in the southern part of the island is an airport and the one in the north-eastern end is an oil re neries and a water puri cation plant. These two holes are not part of the domain and the spatial correlations between residency on opposite sides of each hole... domain. One is the soap smoother and the other is the nite element splines from the applied mathematics. Now we start to review these methods. 3.2.1 Finite element smoother The nite element technique is a sophisticated method in applied mathematics...

  11. The application of local measures of spatial autocorrelation for describing pattern in north Australian landscapes.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Diane M

    2002-01-01

    This paper tests the use of a spatial analysis technique, based on the calculation of local spatial autocorrelation, as a possible approach for modelling and quantifying structure in northern Australian savanna landscapes. Unlike many landscapes in the world, northern Australian savanna landscapes appear on the surface to be intact. They have not experienced the same large-scale land clearance and intensive land management as other landscapes across Australia. Despite this, natural resource managers are beginning to notice that processes are breaking down and declines in species are becoming more evident. With future declines of species looking more imminent it is particularly important that models are available that can help to assess landscape health, and quantify any structural change that takes place. GIS and landscape ecology provide a useful way of describing landscapes both spatially and temporally and have proved to be particularly useful for understanding vegetation structure or pattern in landscapes across the world. There are many measures that examine spatial structure in the landscape and most of these are now available in a GIS environment (e.g. FRAGSTATS* ARC, r.le, and Patch Analyst). All these methods depend on a landscape described in terms of patches, corridors and matrix. However, since landscapes in northern Australia appear to be relatively intact they tend to exist as surfaces of continuous variation rather than in clearly defined homogeneous units. As a result they cannot be easily described using entity-based models requiring patches and other essentially cartographic approaches. This means that more appropriate methods need to be developed and explored. The approach examined in this paper enables clustering and local pattern in the data to be identified and forms a generic method for conceptualising the landscape structure where patches are not obvious and where boundaries between landscape features are difficult to determine. Two sites are examined using this approach. They have been exposed to different degrees of disturbance by fire and grazing. The results show that savanna landscapes are very complex and that even where there is a high degree of disturbance the landscape is still relatively heterogeneous. This means that treating savanna landscapes as being made up of homogeneous units can limit analysis of pattern, as it can over simplify the structure present, and that methods such as the autocorrelation approach are useful tools for quantifying the variable nature of these landscapes. PMID:11876077

  12. Temporal and spatial variation of surface reaction rates in porous media: Applications to silicate weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, B.; Hunt, A. G.; Skinner, T. E.; Ewing, R. P.

    2013-12-01

    Percolation theory provides a promising framework for modeling transport in heterogeneous porous media, including hydraulic and electrical conductivity, air permeability, gas diffusivity, and solute transport. Using percolation concepts (e.g., critical path analysis, fractal scaling of percolation clusters, and cluster statistics), we developed a physically-based model for predicting solute transport. Our model predicted spatial solute distributions as a function of time, and arrival time distributions as a function of system size. Our solute transport predictions gave good matches to a wide range of experiments. We now apply our solute transport model to silicate weathering. We assume that surface chemical reactions are at equilibrium at the scale of a single pore, but that at larger length scales, reactions are limited by transport of reactants or products. Using results from published field experiments, we find that the temporal and spatial dependence derived from solute velocity successfully predicts the measured time- and length-dependence of reaction rates and weathering of silicate minerals over a wide range of time and length scale. A similar analysis of lab experiments (uranium breakthrough curves measured in two short and long columns from the Hanford site) indicates that normalized reaction rate versus normalized time follow 2D invasion and 3D random percolation.

  13. Spatially resolved spectroscopic measurements of a dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet applicable for soft ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olenici-Craciunescu, S. B.; Müller, S.; Michels, A.; Horvatic, V.; Vadla, C.; Franzke, J.

    2011-03-01

    An atmospheric pressure microplasma ionization source based on a dielectric barrier discharge with a helium plasma cone outside the electrode region has been developed for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and as ionization source for ion mobility spectrometry. It turned out that dielectric barrier discharge ionization could be regarded as a soft ionization technique characterized by only minor fragmentation similar to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI). Mainly protonated molecules were detected. In order to characterize the soft ionization mechanism spatially resolved optical emission spectrometry (OES) measurements were performed on plasma jets burning either in He or in Ar. Besides to spatial intensity distributions of noble gas spectral lines, in both cases a special attention was paid to lines of N 2+ and N 2. The obtained mapping of the plasma jet shows very different number density distributions of relevant excited species. In the case of helium plasma jet, strong N 2+ lines were observed. In contrast to that, the intensities of N 2 lines in Ar were below the present detection limit. The positions of N 2+ and N 2 distribution maxima in helium indicate the regions where the highest efficiency of the water ionization and the protonation process is expected.

  14. A mobile system for quantifying the spatial variability of the surface energy balance: design and application.

    PubMed

    Wohlfahrt, Georg; Tasser, Erich

    2015-05-01

    We present a mobile device for the quantification of the small-scale (a few square meters) spatial variability in the surface energy balance components and several auxiliary variables of short-statured (<1 m) canopies. The key element of the mobile device is a handheld four-component net radiometer for the quantification of net radiation, albedo and infrared surface temperature, which is complemented with measurements of air temperature, wind speed, soil temperature and soil water content. Data are acquired by a battery-powered data logger, which is mounted on a backpack together with the auxiliary sensors. The proposed device was developed to bridge between the spatial scales of satellite/airborne remote sensing and fixed, stationary tower-based measurements with an emphasis on micrometeorological, catchment hydrological and landscape-ecological research questions. The potential of the new device is demonstrated through four selected case studies, which cover the issues of net radiation heterogeneity within the footprint of eddy covariance flux measurements due to (1) land use and (2) slope and aspect of the underlying surface, (3) controls on landscape-scale variability in soil temperature and albedo and (4) the estimation of evapotranspiration based exclusively on measurements with the mobile device. PMID:25063050

  15. A mobile system for quantifying the spatial variability of the surface energy balance: design and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlfahrt, Georg; Tasser, Erich

    2015-05-01

    We present a mobile device for the quantification of the small-scale (a few square meters) spatial variability in the surface energy balance components and several auxiliary variables of short-statured (<1 m) canopies. The key element of the mobile device is a handheld four-component net radiometer for the quantification of net radiation, albedo and infrared surface temperature, which is complemented with measurements of air temperature, wind speed, soil temperature and soil water content. Data are acquired by a battery-powered data logger, which is mounted on a backpack together with the auxiliary sensors. The proposed device was developed to bridge between the spatial scales of satellite/airborne remote sensing and fixed, stationary tower-based measurements with an emphasis on micrometeorological, catchment hydrological and landscape-ecological research questions. The potential of the new device is demonstrated through four selected case studies, which cover the issues of net radiation heterogeneity within the footprint of eddy covariance flux measurements due to (1) land use and (2) slope and aspect of the underlying surface, (3) controls on landscape-scale variability in soil temperature and albedo and (4) the estimation of evapotranspiration based exclusively on measurements with the mobile device.

  16. Testing for spatial correlation and semiparametric spatial modeling of binary outcomes with application to aberrant crypt foci in colon carcinogenesis experiments 

    E-print Network

    Apanasovich, Tatiyana Vladimirovna

    2005-11-01

    In an experiment to understand colon carcinogenesis, all animals were exposed to a carcinogen while half the animals were also exposed to radiation. Spatially, we measured the existence of aberrant crypt foci (ACF), namely morphologically changed...

  17. Application of Geo-Spatial Techniques for Precise Demarcation of Village/Panchayat Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, S. S.; Banu, V.; Tiwari, A.; Bahuguna, S.; Uniyal, S.; Chavan, S. B.; Murthy, M. V. R.; Arya, V. S.; Nagaraja, R.; Sharma, J. R.

    2014-11-01

    In order to achieve the overall progress of the country with active and effective participation of all sections of society, the 12th Five Year Plan (FYP) would bring Panchayats centre-stage and achieve the inclusive growth agenda through inclusive governance. The concept of 'democratic decentralization' in the form of a three-tier administration was introduced in the name of "Panchayat Raj". Horizontally, it is a network of village Panchayats. Vertically, it is an organic growth of Panchayats rising up to national level. The Ministry of Panchayati Raj has three broad agenda: Empowerment, Enablement and Accountability. Space based Information Support for Decentralized Planning (SIS-DP) is one of the initiatives taken by Govt. of India with ISRO/DOS for generation and dissemination of spatial information for planning at the grass root level. The boundary layer for villages across different states/district/block is available with line departments. Most of these data exist at a much generalized scale. These boundaries do not overlay exactly with that of ground realities and may not be suitable for accurate analysis in terms of area, shape, position, etc. To deal with this problem, a strategy is adopted, which makes use of High Resolution Satellite Imagery (HRSI) from Indian Remote sensing satellites and cadastral maps at 1:4000 scale integrated with GIS techniques to enhance the accuracy of geo-spatial depiction of Village/Panchayat boundaries. Cadastral maps are used to depict the boundaries of land parcels and other features at the village level. These maps are registered to ortho products of HRSI using Ground Control Points. The cadastral maps are precisely overlaid on ortho-rectified HRSI and each parcel vertex is tagged with the real-world geographical coordinates. Village boundaries are extracted from the geo-referenced village cadastral maps. These boundaries are fine-tuned by considering under lap and overlap of neighboring villages and a mosaic is generated at the subdistrict and district level. Each village is coded with a unique number based on Ministry of Panchayati Raj and Census department codes. Villages are mapped to their respective Panchayat(s) directory and are dissolved in GIS environment based on code/nomenclature to obtain the final Gram Panchayat Layer. The present study attempts to showcase the methodology for deriving precise Village/Panchayat Boundaries using geo-spatial techniques. The final output will immensely help the Ministry of Panchayati Raj and Rural Development for implementing the developmental programs in tune with 73th and 74th constitutional amendments.

  18. Application of Bayesian spatial statistical methods to analysis of haplotypes effects and gene mapping.

    PubMed

    Molitor, John; Marjoram, Paul; Thomas, Duncan

    2003-09-01

    We propose a method to analyze haplotype effects using ideas derived from Bayesian spatial statistics. We assume that two haplotypes that are similar to one another in structure are likely to have similar risks, and define a distance metric to specify the appropriate level of closeness between the two haplotypes. Through the choice of distance metric, varying levels of population genetics theory can be incorporated into the modeling process, including some that allow estimation of the location of the disease causing mutation(s). This location can be estimated, along with the other parameters of the model, using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) estimation methods. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the model on two real datasets, a well-known dataset used to fine-map the gene for cystic fibrosis, and one used to localize the gene for Friedreich's ataxia. PMID:12916018

  19. Applications of high-resolution spatial discretization scheme and Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov method in two-phase flow problems

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Ling; Zhao, Haihua; Zhang, Hongbin

    2015-09-01

    The majority of the existing reactor system analysis codes were developed using low-order numerical schemes in both space and time. In many nuclear thermal–hydraulics applications, it is desirable to use higher-order numerical schemes to reduce numerical errors. High-resolution spatial discretization schemes provide high order spatial accuracy in smooth regions and capture sharp spatial discontinuity without nonphysical spatial oscillations. In this work, we adapted an existing high-resolution spatial discretization scheme on staggered grids in two-phase flow applications. Fully implicit time integration schemes were also implemented to reduce numerical errors from operator-splitting types of time integration schemes. The resulting nonlinear system has been successfully solved using the Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov (JFNK) method. The high-resolution spatial discretization and high-order fully implicit time integration numerical schemes were tested and numerically verified for several two-phase test problems, including a two-phase advection problem, a two-phase advection with phase appearance/disappearance problem, and the water faucet problem. Numerical results clearly demonstrated the advantages of using such high-resolution spatial and high-order temporal numerical schemes to significantly reduce numerical diffusion and therefore improve accuracy. Our study also demonstrated that the JFNK method is stable and robust in solving two-phase flow problems, even when phase appearance/disappearance exists.

  20. Application of spatial TDR-inversion technique during a field experiment in a complex mid mountainous area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graeff, T.; Bronstert, A.; Schlaeger, S.; Morgner, M.; Bauer, A.; Jackisch, C.; Zehe, E.

    2009-04-01

    Application of spatial TDR-inversion technique during a field experiment in a complex mid mountainous area Graeff, T., Schlaeger, S., Bauer, A., Morgner, M., Jakisch, C., Bronstert, A., Zehe, E. Transient soil moisture profiles yield valuable information of near surface processes. A recently developed reconstruction algorithm based on the telegraph equation allows the inverse estimation of soil moisture profiles along coated 3-rod TDR probes. This so called Spatial TDR (STDR) technique allows the investigation of highly spatially and temporally resolved soil moisture profiles. The performance of the inversion algorithm is assessed in different laboratory experiments. To validate the STDR technique under field conditions, an irrigation experiment was carried out at a gentle hillslope in a mid mountainous region (Eastern Ore Mountains, Saxony Germany). Complex soil layer structures formed by periglacial processes dominate the experimental site. 40 STDR were installed on an area of 12 m x 12 m. Additionally a TRIME-TDR (Time domain Reflectometry with Intelligent MicroElements) probe was used to measure soil moisture profiles with 10 cm resolution in 5 access tubes of 3 m depth. The irrigation was only accomplished for the upper half of the experimental site to observe the connectivity between the irrigated and the dry half of the experimental site. A brilliant blue dye tracer experiment in the irrigation field was realised for a better understanding of the near surface flow processes. In total 90 mm were irrigated in two experiments within two days. A physically based hillslope model, was used to evaluate the measured profiles of the irrigation experiment. The complex character of the soils leads to a heterogeneous reaction in the subsurface flow processes. We discuss the reliability of the STDR results in context to the experemental setup.

  1. Bayesian Models for Spatial Extremes Application to inferring high values of

    E-print Network

    Gilleland, Eric

    and control ambient concentrations for six prin- cipal air pollutants (also referred to as criteria pollutants to Ozone Application: Air Quality Standards As required by the Clean Air Act (CAA) of 1971, the EPA has estab- lished standards, known as the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS), to monitor

  2. Development of a web GIS application for emissions inventory spatial allocation based on open source software tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkatzoflias, Dimitrios; Mellios, Giorgos; Samaras, Zissis

    2013-03-01

    Combining emission inventory methods and geographic information systems (GIS) remains a key issue for environmental modelling and management purposes. This paper examines the development of a web GIS application as part of an emission inventory system that produces maps and files with spatial allocated emissions in a grid format. The study is not confined in the maps produced but also presents the features and capabilities of a web application that can be used by every user even without any prior knowledge of the GIS field. The development of the application was based on open source software tools such as MapServer for the GIS functions, PostgreSQL and PostGIS for the data management and HTML, PHP and JavaScript as programming languages. In addition, background processes are used in an innovative manner to handle the time consuming and computational costly procedures of the application. Furthermore, a web map service was created to provide maps to other clients such as the Google Maps API v3 that is used as part of the user interface. The output of the application includes maps in vector and raster format, maps with temporal resolution on daily and hourly basis, grid files that can be used by air quality management systems and grid files consistent with the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme Grid. Although the system was developed and validated for the Republic of Cyprus covering a remarkable wide range of pollutant and emissions sources, it can be easily customized for use in other countries or smaller areas, as long as geospatial and activity data are available.

  3. Spatial deconvolution of spectropolarimetric data: an application to quiet Sun magnetic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintero Noda, C.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Orozco Suárez, D.; Ruiz Cobo, B.

    2015-07-01

    Context. One of the difficulties in extracting reliable information about the thermodynamical and magnetic properties of solar plasmas from spectropolarimetric observations is the presence of light dispersed inside the instruments, known as stray light. Aims: We aim to analyze quiet Sun observations after the spatial deconvolution of the data. We examine the validity of the deconvolution process with noisy data as we analyze the physical properties of quiet Sun magnetic elements. Methods: We used a regularization method that decouples the Stokes inversion from the deconvolution process, so that large maps can be quickly inverted without much additional computational burden. We applied the method on Hinode quiet Sun spectropolarimetric data. We examined the spatial and polarimetric properties of the deconvolved profiles, comparing them with the original data. After that, we inverted the Stokes profiles using the Stokes Inversion based on Response functions (SIR) code, which allow us to obtain the optical depth dependence of the atmospheric physical parameters. Results: The deconvolution process increases the contrast of continuum images and makes the magnetic structures sharper. The deconvolved Stokes I profiles reveal the presence of the Zeeman splitting while the Stokes V profiles significantly change their amplitude. The area and amplitude asymmetries of these profiles increase in absolute value after the deconvolution process. We inverted the original Stokes profiles from a magnetic element and found that the magnetic field intensity reproduces the overall behavior of theoretical magnetic flux tubes, that is, the magnetic field lines are vertical in the center of the structure and start to fan when we move far away from the center of the magnetic element. The magnetic field vector inferred from the deconvolved Stokes profiles also mimic a magnetic flux tube but in this case we found stronger field strengths and the gradients along the line-of-sight are larger for the magnetic field intensity and for its inclination. Moreover, the discontinuity between the magnetic and non magnetic environment in the flux tube gets sharper. Conclusions: The deconvolution process used in this paper reveals information that the smearing induced by the point spread function (PSF) of the telescope hides. Additionally, the deconvolution is done with a low computational load, making it appealing for its use on the analysis of large data sets. A copy of the IDL code is available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/579/A3

  4. Spatial filtering self-velocimeter for vehicle application using a CMOS linear image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xin; Zhou, Jian; Nie, Xiaoming; Long, Xingwu

    2015-03-01

    The idea of using a spatial filtering velocimeter (SFV) to measure the velocity of a vehicle for an inertial navigation system is put forward. The presented SFV is based on a CMOS linear image sensor with a high-speed data rate, large pixel size, and built-in timing generator. These advantages make the image sensor suitable to measure vehicle velocity. The power spectrum of the output signal is obtained by fast Fourier transform and is corrected by a frequency spectrum correction algorithm. This velocimeter was used to measure the velocity of a conveyor belt driven by a rotary table and the measurement uncertainty is ˜0.54%. Furthermore, it was also installed on a vehicle together with a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) to measure self-velocity. The measurement result of the designed SFV is compared with that of the LDV. It is shown that the measurement result of the SFV is coincident with that of the LDV. Therefore, the designed SFV is suitable for a vehicle self-contained inertial navigation system.

  5. The Application of Spatial Signature Analysis to Electrical Test Data: Validation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, S.S.; Karnowski, T.P.; Lakhani, F.; Tobin, K.W.

    1999-03-15

    This paper presents the results of the Spatial Signature Analysis (SSA) Electrical-test (e-test) validation study that was conducted between February and June, 1998. SSA is an automated procedure developed by researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to address the issue of intelligent data reduction while providing feedback on current manufacturing processes. SSA was initially developed to automate the analysis of optical defect data. Optical defects can form groups, or clusters, which may have a distinct shape. These patterns can reveal information about the manufacturing process. Optical defect SSA uses image processing algorithms and a classifier system to interpret and identify these patterns, or signatures. SSA has been extended to analyze and interpret electrical test data. The algorithms used for optical defect SSA have been adapted and applied to e-test binmaps. An image of the binmap is created, and features such as geometric and invariant moments are extracted and presented to a pair-wise, fuzzy, k-NN classifier. The classifier itself was prepared by manually training, which consists of storing example signatures of interest in a library, then executing an automated process which treats the examples as prototype signatures. The training process includes a procedure for automatically determining which features are most relevant to each class. The evaluation was performed by installing the SSA software as a batch process at three SEMATECH member company sites. Feedback from member company representatives was incorporated and classifiers were built to automatically assign labels to the binmap signatures. The three sites produced memory devices (DRAM) and microprocessors in a mature process fabrication environment. For all of these products, 5,620 signatures that encompassed approximately 552 wafers were human-classified and analyzed. The performance of the SSA E-test system indicates that the approach was successful in reliably classifying binmap signatures in a manner similar to the human expert.

  6. Frequency assessment of spatially distributed generations of flood scenarios: an application on Italian territory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomazzi, M.; Roth, G.; Rudari, R.; Taramasso, A. C.; Ghizzoni, T.; Benedetti, R.; Espa, G.; Terpessi, C.

    2009-12-01

    The flooding risk impact on society cannot be understated: it influences land use and territorial planning and development at both physical and regulatory levels. To cope with it, a variety of actions can be put in place, involving multidisciplinary competences. Mitigation measures goes from the improvement of monitoring systems to the development of hydraulic structures, throughout land use restrictions, civil protection and insurance plans. All of those options present social and economic impacts, either positive or negative, whose proper estimate should rely on the assumption of appropriate - present and future - scenarios, i.e. quantitative event descriptions in terms of i) the flood hazard, with its probability of occurrence, extension, intensity, and duration, ii) the exposed values and iii) their vulnerability. At present, initial attention has been devoted to the design of flood scenarios, or ensembles of them, and to the evaluation of their frequency of occurrence. In the present work, a model for spatially distributed flood scenarios generation and frequency assessment is proposed and applied to the Italian territory. The study area has been divided into homogeneous regions according to their hydrologic, orographic and meteoclimatic characteristics. A statistical model for flood scenarios simulation has been implemented throughout a conditional approach based on MCMC simulations by using i) a historical flood events catalogue; ii) a homogeneous regions correlation matrix; and iii) an auxiliary variables data set. In this framework, the role of the information stored in the historical flood events catalogue "Aree Vulnerate Italiane" (AVI, http://avi.gndci.cnr.it/), produced by the Italian National Research Council, is of crucial importance.

  7. Application of spatial and non-spatial data analysis in determination of the factors that impact municipal solid waste generation rates in Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Keser, Saniye; Duzgun, Sebnem; Aksoy, Aysegul

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spatial autocorrelation exists in municipal solid waste generation rates for different provinces in Turkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Traditional non-spatial regression models may not provide sufficient information for better solid waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unemployment rate is a global variable that significantly impacts the waste generation rates in Turkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significances of global parameters may diminish at local scale for some provinces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GWR model can be used to create clusters of cities for solid waste management. - Abstract: In studies focusing on the factors that impact solid waste generation habits and rates, the potential spatial dependency in solid waste generation data is not considered in relating the waste generation rates to its determinants. In this study, spatial dependency is taken into account in determination of the significant socio-economic and climatic factors that may be of importance for the municipal solid waste (MSW) generation rates in different provinces of Turkey. Simultaneous spatial autoregression (SAR) and geographically weighted regression (GWR) models are used for the spatial data analyses. Similar to ordinary least squares regression (OLSR), regression coefficients are global in SAR model. In other words, the effect of a given independent variable on a dependent variable is valid for the whole country. Unlike OLSR or SAR, GWR reveals the local impact of a given factor (or independent variable) on the waste generation rates of different provinces. Results show that provinces within closer neighborhoods have similar MSW generation rates. On the other hand, this spatial autocorrelation is not very high for the exploratory variables considered in the study. OLSR and SAR models have similar regression coefficients. GWR is useful to indicate the local determinants of MSW generation rates. GWR model can be utilized to plan waste management activities at local scale including waste minimization, collection, treatment, and disposal. At global scale, the MSW generation rates in Turkey are significantly related to unemployment rate and asphalt-paved roads ratio. Yet, significances of these variables may diminish at local scale for some provinces. At local scale, different factors may be important in affecting MSW generation rates.

  8. Optimising the Application of Multiple-Capture Traps for Invasive Species Management Using Spatial Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Warburton, Bruce; Gormley, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Internationally, invasive vertebrate species pose a significant threat to biodiversity, agricultural production and human health. To manage these species a wide range of tools, including traps, are used. In New Zealand, brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula), stoats (Mustela ermine), and ship rats (Rattus rattus) are invasive and there is an ongoing demand for cost-effective non-toxic methods for controlling these pests. Recently, traps with multiple-capture capability have been developed which, because they do not require regular operator-checking, are purported to be more cost-effective than traditional single-capture traps. However, when pest populations are being maintained at low densities (as is typical of orchestrated pest management programmes) it remains uncertain if it is more cost-effective to use fewer multiple-capture traps or more single-capture traps. To address this uncertainty, we used an individual-based spatially explicit modelling approach to determine the likely maximum animal-captures per trap, given stated pest densities and defined times traps are left between checks. In the simulation, single- or multiple-capture traps were spaced according to best practice pest-control guidelines. For possums with maintenance densities set at the lowest level (i.e. 0.5/ha), 98% of all simulated possums were captured with only a single capacity trap set at each site. When possum density was increased to moderate levels of 3/ha, having a capacity of three captures per trap caught 97% of all simulated possums. Results were similar for stoats, although only two potential captures per site were sufficient to capture 99% of simulated stoats. For rats, which were simulated at their typically higher densities, even a six-capture capacity per trap site only resulted in 80% kill. Depending on target species, prevailing density and extent of immigration, the most cost-effective strategy for pest control in New Zealand might be to deploy several single-capture traps rather than investing in fewer, but more expense, multiple-capture traps. PMID:25782018

  9. Effect of spatial heterogeneities of water fluxes and application pattern on cadusafos fate on banana-cultivated andosols.

    PubMed

    Saison, C; Cattan, P; Louchart, X; Voltz, M

    2008-12-24

    In tropical humid environments under intensive banana production, pesticide transfer in waters can be of particular concern due to heavy rainfall, steep slopes, and soils with high infiltration capacities. The transfer in percolation and runoff waters of the nematicide cadusafos was investigated during a three month field experiment. The spatial heterogeneity of the banana plantation was taken into account by measuring percolation fluxes both under the banana plants and in the interrows with a specially designed lysimeter device installed at 60 cm depth. At the field scale, 0.34% of the pesticide applied was transferred in percolation, 0.13% in runoff. Forty-nine percent of cadusafos losses occurred by percolation under the banana plants, 23% by interrow percolation, and 28% by runoff. Losses were highest during the three weeks following cadusafos application, and this is also when dissipation in the soil was highest (calculated half-life in the soil: 7d). After this period, losses of cadusafos were low, both in soil and waters. Under the banana plant, saturated fluxes carried most of the pesticide, despite total percolation fluxes being at least five-times higher than saturated ones. Although overall pesticide transfer in water was low (0.5% of applied), it was not negligible due to the frequency of pesticide application in these areas. PMID:19053376

  10. Forbus, K. Usher, J. and Chapman, V. 2003. Qualitative spatial reasoning about sketch maps. Proceedings of the Fifteenth Annual Conference on Innovative Applications of Artificial Intelligence, Acapulco, Mexico.

    E-print Network

    Forbus, Kenneth D.

    . Proceedings of the Fifteenth Annual Conference on Innovative Applications of Artificial Intelligence, Acapulco, Mexico. Abstract Sketch maps are an important spatial representa- tion used in many geospatial reasoning for human geospatial reason- ing. Computer support for geospatial reasoning often takes the form

  11. The effect of application method on the temporal and spatial distribution of neonicotinoid insecticides in greenhouse zinnia and impact on aphid populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Greenhouse trials were designed to evaluate the effect the application technique would have on temporal and spatial movement of neonicotinoid insecticides imidacloprid and thiamethoxam through plant tissue. Mature Zinnia elegans plants were treated by either a soil drench of neonicotinoid insectici...

  12. DotAGWA: A case study in web-based architectures for connecting surface water models to spatially enabled web applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment (AGWA) tool is a desktop application that uses widely available standardized spatial datasets to derive inputs for multi-scale hydrologic models (Miller et al., 2007). The required data sets include topography (DEM data), soils, climate, and land-cover ...

  13. An application of spatially constrained inversion using FD Helicopter EM data to characterise spatial variations in groundwater salinity across the floodplains of the Murray River in South-eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munday, T. J.; Viezzoli, A.; Fitzpatrick, A.

    2008-12-01

    The floodplains of the Murray River, situated in the southeast of Australia, have become extensively salinised, related in part to the discharge of naturally saline groundwater linked to increased recharge from land clearing and irrigation adjacent to the river. This problem has been compounded by extended drought conditions that prevail across the Murray Basin, resulting in increase in the accumulation and concentration of salt within the floodplain soils and an increase in salt loads to the river. Consequently in many floodplain areas along the Murray, the native riparian vegetation communities are in severe decline and Eucalyptus largiflorens (Black Box) and E. camaldulensis (Red Gum) communities are being significantly affected. A range management strategies are being employed to manage these issues, the manipulation of river flows to enhance biodiversity values (ie restore vegetation health) and the development of a hydro-dynamic models to better understand surface flows and the role of soils and elevation in floodplain vegetation health. Integral to these strategies is the acquisition of detailed spatial data on the distribution of salinity in floodplain soils and groundwater, thereby indicating patterns of groundwater evapotranspiration and baseflow across these areas. Hydrogeophysical data from electrical (inductive) methods have considerable potential to provide such data. We present an application of the Spatially Constrained Inversion (SCI) of RESOLVE FDHEM (airborne EM) data for defining spatial patterns of salinisation in the sunraysia irrigation area located in the lower Murray Basin of South Australia. Spatially Constrained Inversion uses Delaunay triangulation to set three dimensional constraints between neighbouring soundings, taking advantage of the spatial coherency that may be present in the data set. Conductivity information for individual soundings is linked through the spatial constraints, from well determined parameters to locally poorly determined parameters. For the survey presented here, SCI generated maps detail the spatial variability of floodplain salinisation, the extent of floodplain sediments influenced by lateral recharge and flushing along stretches of the Murray River, and the variability quality of groundwater in deeper semi-confined aquifers. Available borehole and other ancillary information, such as vegetation density and health patterns, match the observed conductivity variations seen in the SCI results, even at the very near surface (~2m depth). The SCI provide more accurate and spatially consistent results compared with those from single site inversions. We also compare the SCI inversion against that generated from a Holistic inversion of the same data set. The results compare well in the near surface, although the observed responses at depth for the latter depart from that expected, with more resistive responses being defined.

  14. The application of quaternions and other spatial representations to the reconstruction of re-entry vehicle motion.

    SciTech Connect

    De Sapio, Vincent

    2010-09-01

    The analysis of spacecraft kinematics and dynamics requires an efficient scheme for spatial representation. While the representation of displacement in three dimensional Euclidean space is straightforward, orientation in three dimensions poses particular challenges. The unit quaternion provides an approach that mitigates many of the problems intrinsic in other representation approaches, including the ill-conditioning that arises from computing many successive rotations. This report focuses on the computational utility of unit quaternions and their application to the reconstruction of re-entry vehicle (RV) motion history from sensor data. To this end they will be used in conjunction with other kinematic and data processing techniques. We will present a numerical implementation for the reconstruction of RV motion solely from gyroscope and accelerometer data. This will make use of unit quaternions due to their numerical efficacy in dealing with the composition of many incremental rotations over a time series. In addition to signal processing and data conditioning procedures, algorithms for numerical quaternion-based integration of gyroscope data will be addressed, as well as accelerometer triangulation and integration to yield RV trajectory. Actual processed flight data will be presented to demonstrate the implementation of these methods.

  15. How Students Solve Problems in Spatial Geometry while Using a Software Application for Visualizing 3D Geometric Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widder, Mirela; Gorsky, Paul

    2013-01-01

    In schools, learning spatial geometry is usually dependent upon a student's ability to visualize three dimensional geometric configurations from two dimensional drawings. Such a process, however, often creates visual obstacles which are unique to spatial geometry. Useful software programs which realistically depict three dimensional geometric…

  16. Enhancing a Low-Cost Virtual Reality Application through Constructivist Approach: The Case of Spatial Training of Middle Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samsudin, Khairulanuar; Rafi, Ahmad; Mohamad Ali, Ahmad Zamzuri; Abd. Rashid, Nazre

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop and to test a low-cost virtual reality spatial trainer in terms of its effectiveness in spatial training. The researchers adopted three features deriving from the constructivist perspective to guide the design of the trainer, namely interaction, instruction, and support. The no control pre test post test…

  17. Condensation of earthquake location distributions: Optimal spatial information encoding and application to multifractal analysis of South Californian seismicity

    E-print Network

    Kamer, Y; Sornette, D; Woessner, J

    2014-01-01

    We present the "condensation" method that exploits the heterogeneity of the probability distribution functions (PDF) of event locations to improve the spatial information content of seismic catalogs. As its name indicates, the condensation method reduces the size of seismic catalogs while improving the access to the spatial information content of seismic catalogs. Ranked by decreasing location errors, the PDFs of events are successively condensed onto better located and lower variance event PDFs. The obtained condensed catalog differs from the initial catalog by attributing different weights to each event, the set of weights providing an optimal spatial representation with respect to the spatially varying location capability of the seismic network. As a result of this condensation, which preserves the overall spatial probability density distribution, a large portion of the events (~25%) can be discarded without reducing the information content of the original catalog. Applied to Southern California seismicity...

  18. Application of spatial synoptic classification in evaluating links between heat stress and cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in Prague, Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Aleš; Kyselý, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Spatial synoptic classification (SSC) is here first employed in assessing heat-related mortality and morbidity in Central Europe. It is applied for examining links between weather patterns and cardiovascular (CVD) mortality and morbidity in an extended summer season (16 May-15 September) during 1994-2009. As in previous studies, two SSC air masses (AMs)—dry tropical (DT) and moist tropical (MT)—are associated with significant excess CVD mortality in Prague, while effects on CVD hospital admissions are small and insignificant. Excess mortality for ischaemic heart diseases is more strongly associated with DT, while MT has adverse effect especially on cerebrovascular mortality. Links between the oppressive AMs and excess mortality relate also to conditions on previous days, as DT and MT occur in typical sequences. The highest CVD mortality deviations are found 1 day after a hot spell's onset, when temperature as well as frequency of the oppressive AMs are highest. Following this peak is typically DT- to MT-like weather transition, characterized by decrease in temperature and increase in humidity. The transition between upward (DT) and downward (MT) phases is associated with the largest excess CVD mortality, and the change contributes to the increased and more lagged effects on cerebrovascular mortality. The study highlights the importance of critically evaluating SSC's applicability and benefits within warning systems relative to other synoptic and epidemiological approaches. Only a subset of days with the oppressive AMs is associated with excess mortality, and regression models accounting for possible meteorological and other factors explain little of the mortality variance.

  19. Developing an entropy-based model of spatial information estimation and its application in the design of precipitation gauge networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ho-Ting; You, Gene Jiing-Yun

    2014-11-01

    This study proposed a spatial information estimation model for the analysis of precipitation gauge networks, to improve on previous methods based on information theory. The proposed model employs a two-dimensional transinformation-distance (T-D) relationship in conjunction with multivariate information approximation to estimate transinformation to ungauged locations from existing stations, while taking into consideration the influence of multiple stations and anisotropy. The proposed model is used to evaluate the spatial distribution of precipitation data and the characteristics of information transfer, which are then applied in a spatial optimization algorithm for the selection of additional station locations. This framework was implemented to investigate temporal and spatial patterns in information content in the Shihmen Reservoir watershed. The results demonstrate obvious anisotropy associated with the delivery of information. By comparing different cases, it was determined that the efficiency of information delivery dominates the spatial distribution of the information content, such that eccentricity is merely supplemental. Efficiency in information delivery is also heavily influenced by temporal scale. For data covering long intervals (monthly and annual), efficiency in the delivery of information is relatively high, while the uncertainty or heterogeneity of hourly or daily time series produces low spatial correlations due to the inefficient delivery of information. The proposed spatial optimization algorithm confirmed that the optimal location for new stations lies close to the center of low information zones. Additional stations could improve information content considerably; however, the margin of improvement decreases with the number of stations.

  20. Identifying Spatial Clusters of Schistosomiasis in Anhui Province of China: A Study from the Perspective of Application

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liqian; Chen, Yue; Lynn, Henry; Wang, Qizhi; Zhang, Shiqing; Li, Rui; Xia, Congcong; Jiang, Qingwu; Hu, Yi; Gao, Fenghua; Zhang, Zhijie

    2015-01-01

    With the strategy shifting from morbidity control to transmission interruption, the burden of schistosomiasis in China has been declining over the past decade. However, further controls of the epidemic in the lake and marshland regions remain a challenge. Prevalence data at county level were obtained from the provincial surveillance system in Anhui during 1997–2010. Spatial autocorrelation analysis and spatial scan statistics were combined to assess the spatial pattern of schistosomiasis. The spatial-temporal cluster analysis based on retrospective space-time scan statistics was further used to detect risk clusters. The Global Moran’s I coefficients were mostly statistically significant during 1997–2004 but not significant during 2005–2010. The clusters detected by two spatial cluster methods occurred in Nanling, Tongling, Qingyang and Wuhu during 1997–2004, and Guichi and Wuhu from 2005 to 2010, respectively. Spatial-temporal cluster analysis revealed 2 main clusters, namely Nanling (1999–2002) and Guichi (2005–2008). The clustering regions were significantly narrowed while the spatial extent became scattered during the study period. The high-risk areas shifted from the low reaches of the Yangtze River to the upper stream, suggesting the focus of schistosomiasis control should be shifted accordingly and priority should be given to the snail habitats within the high-risk areas of schistosomiasis. PMID:26393632

  1. Identifying Spatial Clusters of Schistosomiasis in Anhui Province of China: A Study from the Perspective of Application.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liqian; Chen, Yue; Lynn, Henry; Wang, Qizhi; Zhang, Shiqing; Li, Rui; Xia, Congcong; Jiang, Qingwu; Hu, Yi; Gao, Fenghua; Zhang, Zhijie

    2015-09-01

    With the strategy shifting from morbidity control to transmission interruption, the burden of schistosomiasis in China has been declining over the past decade. However, further controls of the epidemic in the lake and marshland regions remain a challenge. Prevalence data at county level were obtained from the provincial surveillance system in Anhui during 1997-2010. Spatial autocorrelation analysis and spatial scan statistics were combined to assess the spatial pattern of schistosomiasis. The spatial-temporal cluster analysis based on retrospective space-time scan statistics was further used to detect risk clusters. The Global Moran's I coefficients were mostly statistically significant during 1997-2004 but not significant during 2005-2010. The clusters detected by two spatial cluster methods occurred in Nanling, Tongling, Qingyang and Wuhu during 1997-2004, and Guichi and Wuhu from 2005 to 2010, respectively. Spatial-temporal cluster analysis revealed 2 main clusters, namely Nanling (1999-2002) and Guichi (2005-2008). The clustering regions were significantly narrowed while the spatial extent became scattered during the study period. The high-risk areas shifted from the low reaches of the Yangtze River to the upper stream, suggesting the focus of schistosomiasis control should be shifted accordingly and priority should be given to the snail habitats within the high-risk areas of schistosomiasis. PMID:26393632

  2. The spatial Probit model-An application to the study of banking crises at the end of the 1990’s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, Andrea; Abreu, Margarida; Mendes, Victor

    2014-12-01

    We use a spatial Probit model to study the effect of contagion between banking systems of different countries. Applied to the late 1990s banking crisis in Asia we show that the phenomena of contagion is better seized using a spatial than a traditional Probit model. Unlike the latter, the spatial Probit model allows one to consider the cascade of cross and feedback effects of contagion that result from the outbreak of one initial crisis in one country or system. These contagion effects may result either from business connections between institutions of different countries or from institutional similarities between banking systems.

  3. Spatial wildlife-vehicle collision models: a review of current work and its application to transportation mitigation projects.

    PubMed

    Gunson, Kari E; Mountrakis, Giorgos; Quackenbush, Lindi J

    2011-04-01

    In addition to posing a serious risk to motorist safety, vehicle collisions with wildlife are a significant threat for many species. Previous spatial modeling has concluded that wildlife-vehicle collisions (WVCs) exhibit clustering on roads, which is attributed to specific landscape and road-related factors. We reviewed twenty-four published manuscripts that used generalized linear models to statistically determine the influence that numerous explanatory predictors have on the location of WVCs. Our motivation was to summarize empirical WVC findings to facilitate application of this knowledge to planning, and design of mitigation strategies on roads. In addition, commonalities between studies were discussed and recommendations for future model design were made. We summarized the type and measurement of each significant predictor and whether they potentially increased or decreased the occurrence of collisions with ungulates, carnivores, small-medium vertebrates, birds, and amphibians and reptiles. WVCs commonly occurred when roads bisect favorable cover, foraging, or breeding habitat for specific species or groups of species. WVCs were generally highest on road sections with high traffic volumes, or low motorist visibility, and when roads cut through drainage movement corridors, or level terrain. Ungulates, birds, small-medium vertebrates, and carnivore collision locations were associated with road-side vegetation and other features such as salt pools. In several cases, results were spurious due to confounding and interacting predictors within the same model. For example, WVCs were less likely to occur when a road bisected steep slopes; however, steep slopes may be located along specific road-types and habitat that also influence the occurrence of WVCs. In conclusion, this review showed that much of the current literature has gleaned the obvious, broad-scale relationships between WVCs and predictors from available data sets, and localized studies can provide unique and novel results. Future research requires specific modeling for each target species on a road-by-road basis, and measuring the predictive power of model results within similar landscapes. In addition, research that builds on the current literature by investigating rare anomalies and interacting variables will assist in providing sound comprehensive guidelines for wildlife mitigation planning on roads. PMID:21190788

  4. Condensation of earthquake location distributions: Optimal spatial information encoding and application to multifractal analysis of south Californian seismicity.

    PubMed

    Kamer, Yavor; Ouillon, Guy; Sornette, Didier; Wössner, Jochen

    2015-08-01

    We present the "condensation" method that exploits the heterogeneity of the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of event locations to improve the spatial information content of seismic catalogs. As its name indicates, the condensation method reduces the size of seismic catalogs while improving the access to the spatial information content of seismic catalogs. The PDFs of events are first ranked by decreasing location errors and then successively condensed onto better located and lower variance event PDFs. The obtained condensed catalog differs from the initial catalog by attributing different weights to each event, the set of weights providing an optimal spatial representation with respect to the spatially varying location capability of the seismic network. Synthetic tests on fractal distributions perturbed with realistic location errors show that condensation improves spatial information content of the original catalog, which is quantified by the likelihood gain per event. Applied to Southern California seismicity, the new condensed catalog highlights major mapped fault traces and reveals possible additional structures while reducing the catalog length by ?25%. The condensation method allows us to account for location error information within a point based spatial analysis. We demonstrate this by comparing the multifractal properties of the condensed catalog locations with those of the original catalog. We evidence different spatial scaling regimes characterized by distinct multifractal spectra and separated by transition scales. We interpret the upper scale as to agree with the thickness of the brittle crust, while the lower scale (2.5 km) might depend on the relocation procedure. Accounting for these new results, the epidemic type aftershock model formulation suggests that, contrary to previous studies, large earthquakes dominate the earthquake triggering process. This implies that the limited capability of detecting small magnitude events cannot be used to argue that earthquakes are unpredictable in general. PMID:26382455

  5. Condensation of earthquake location distributions: Optimal spatial information encoding and application to multifractal analysis of south Californian seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamer, Yavor; Ouillon, Guy; Sornette, Didier; Wössner, Jochen

    2015-08-01

    We present the "condensation" method that exploits the heterogeneity of the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of event locations to improve the spatial information content of seismic catalogs. As its name indicates, the condensation method reduces the size of seismic catalogs while improving the access to the spatial information content of seismic catalogs. The PDFs of events are first ranked by decreasing location errors and then successively condensed onto better located and lower variance event PDFs. The obtained condensed catalog differs from the initial catalog by attributing different weights to each event, the set of weights providing an optimal spatial representation with respect to the spatially varying location capability of the seismic network. Synthetic tests on fractal distributions perturbed with realistic location errors show that condensation improves spatial information content of the original catalog, which is quantified by the likelihood gain per event. Applied to Southern California seismicity, the new condensed catalog highlights major mapped fault traces and reveals possible additional structures while reducing the catalog length by ˜25 % . The condensation method allows us to account for location error information within a point based spatial analysis. We demonstrate this by comparing the multifractal properties of the condensed catalog locations with those of the original catalog. We evidence different spatial scaling regimes characterized by distinct multifractal spectra and separated by transition scales. We interpret the upper scale as to agree with the thickness of the brittle crust, while the lower scale (2.5 km) might depend on the relocation procedure. Accounting for these new results, the epidemic type aftershock model formulation suggests that, contrary to previous studies, large earthquakes dominate the earthquake triggering process. This implies that the limited capability of detecting small magnitude events cannot be used to argue that earthquakes are unpredictable in general.

  6. Relative impacts of the fragmentation and spatial structure of habitats on freshwater fish distributions: application on French watersheds (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pichon, C.; Belliard, J.; Talès, E.; Gorges, G.; Clément, F.

    2009-12-01

    Most of the rivers of the Ile de France region, intimately linked with the megalopolis of Paris, are severely altered and freshwater fishes are exposed to habitat alteration, reduced connectivity and pollution. Several species thus present fragmented distributions and decreasing densities. In this context, the European Water Framework Directive (2000) has goals of hydrosystems rehabilitation and no further damage. In particular, the preservation and restoration of ecological connectivity of river networks is a key element for fish populations. These goals require the identification of natural and anthropological factors which influence the spatial distribution of species. We have proposed a riverscape approach, based on landscape ecology concepts, combined with a set of spatial analysis methods to assess the multiscale relationships between the spatial pattern of fish habitats and processes depending on fish movements. In particular, we used this approach to test the relative roles of spatial arrangement of fish habitats and the presence of physical barriers in explaining fish spatial distributions in a small rural watershed (106 km2). We performed a spatially continuous analysis of fish-habitat relationships. Fish habitats and physical barriers were mapped along the river network (33 km) with a GPS and imported into a GIS. In parallel, a longitudinal electrofishing survey of the distribution and abundance of fishes was made using a point abundance sampling scheme. Longitudinal arrangement of fish habitats were evaluated using spatial analysis methods: patch/distance metrics and moving window analysis. Explanatory models were developed to test the relative contribution of local environmental variables and spatial context in explaining fish presence. We have recorded about 100 physical barriers, on average one every 330 meters; most artificial barriers were road pipe culverts, falls associated with ponds and sluice gates. Contrasted fish communities and densities were observed in the different areas of the watershed, related to various land use (riparian forest or agriculture). The first results of fish-habitat association analysis on a 5 km stream are that longitudinal distribution of fish species was mainly impacted by falls associated with ponds. The impact was both due to the barrier effect and to the modification of aquatic habitats. Abundance distribution of Salmo trutta and Cottus gobio was particularly affected. Spatially continuous analysis of fish-habitat relationships allowed us to identify the relative impacts of habitat alteration and presence of physical barriers to fish movements. These techniques could help prioritize preservation and restoration policies in human-impacted watersheds, in particular, identifying the key physical barriers to remove.

  7. Application of Inverse Path Distance Weighting for high-density spatial mapping of coastal water quality patterns

    E-print Network

    Stachelek, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    One of the primary goals of coastal water quality monitoring is to characterize spatial variation. Generally, this monitoring takes place at a limited number of fixed sampling points. The alternative sampling methodology explored in this paper involves high density sampling from an onboard flow-through water analysis system (Dataflow). Dataflow has the potential to provide better spatial resolution of water quality features because it generates many closely spaced (< 10 m) measurements. Regardless of the measurement technique, parameter values at unsampled locations must be interpolated from nearby measurement points in order to generate a comprehensive picture of spatial variations. Standard Euclidean interpolations in coastal settings tend to yield inaccurate results because they extend through barriers in the landscape such as peninsulas, islands, and submerged banks. We recently developed a method for non-Euclidean interpolation by inverse path distance weighting (IPDW) in order to account for these ba...

  8. An application of GIS and Bayesian network in studying spatial-causal relations between enterprises and environmental factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Tiyan; Li, Xi; Li, Maiqing

    2009-10-01

    The paper intends to employ Geographic Information System (GIS) and Bayesian Network to discover the spatial causality between enterprises and environmental factors in Beijing Metropolis. The census data of Beijing was spatialized by means of GIS in the beginning, and then the training data was made using density mapping technique. Base on the training data, the structure of a Bayesian Network was learnt with the help of Maximum Weight Spanning Tree. Eight direct relations were discussed in the end, of which, the most exciting discovery, "Enterprise-Run Society", as the symbol of the former planned economy, was emphasized in the spatial relations between heavy industry and schools. Though the final result is not so creative in economic perspective, it is of significance in technique view due to all discoveries were drawn from data, therefore leading to the realization of the importance of GIS and data mining to economic geography research.

  9. Investigation of Non-homogenous hidden Markov models and their Application to Spatially-distributed Precipitation Types 

    E-print Network

    Song, Jae Young

    2012-08-29

    . In this study, non-homogenous hidden Markov models (NHMM) are explored as a means of generating the probability of precipitation occurrence in small scale given large-scaled weather patterns. Three different spatial models: (1) independent (2) auto-logistic (3...

  10. High-speed one-dimensional spatial light modulator for Laser Direct Imaging and other patterning applications

    E-print Network

    Jonsson, Fredrik

    High-speed one-dimensional spatial light modulator for Laser Direct Imaging and other patterning. This SLM is the core element of the Swedish company's new LDI 5sp series of Laser-Direct-Imaging systems of ultraviolet light needs to be combined with high throughput and high precision. Keywords: Laser Direct Imaging

  11. S-OLAP: an OLAP system for analyzing sequence data

    E-print Network

    Cheung, David Wai-lok

    -XXXXX-XX-X/XX/XX ...$10.00. time session ID url product 090101T00:01 688 /product.jsp?id=128 Nike Shoes - Air Max 90i.jsp?id=324 Puma Shoes - King FG 090101T00:31 688 /product.jsp?id=128 Nike Shoes - Air Max 90i

  12. Method and apparatus for spatially variable rate application of agricultural chemicals based on remotely sensed vegetation data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Kenneth Brown (Inventor); Seal, Michael R. (Inventor); Lewis, Mark David (Inventor); Johnson, James William (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Remotely sensed spectral image data are used to develop a Vegetation Index file which represents spatial variations of actual crop vigor throughout a field that is under cultivation. The latter information is processed to place it in a format that can be used by farm personnel to correlate and calibrate it with actually observed crop conditions existing at control points within the field. Based on the results, farm personnel formulate a prescription request, which is forwarded via email or FTP to a central processing site, where the prescription is prepared. The latter is returned via email or FTP to on-side farm personnel, who can load it into a controller on a spray rig that directly applies inputs to the field at a spatially variable rate.

  13. Method and system for spatially variable rate application of agricultural chemicals based on remotely sensed vegetation data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Kenneth Brown (Inventor); Seal, Michael R. (Inventor); Lewis, Mark David (Inventor); Johnson, James William (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Remotely sensed spectral image data are used to develop a Vegetation Index file which represents spatial variations of actual crop vigor throughout a field that is under cultivation. The latter information is processed to place it in a format that can be used by farm personnel to correlate and calibrate it with actually observed crop conditions existing at control points within the field. Based on the results, farm personnel formulate a prescription request, which is forwarded via email or FTP to a central processing site, where the prescription is prepared. The latter is returned via email or FTP to on-side farm personnel, who can load it into a controller on a spray rig that directly applies inputs to the field at a spatially variable rate.

  14. SEHR-ECHO v1.0: a Spatially-Explicit Hydrologic Response model for ecohydrologic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefli, Bettina; Nicótina, Ludovico; Da Ronco, Pierfrancesco; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    We present here the SEHR-ECHO model, which stands for Spatially Explicit Hydrologic Response (SEHR) model developed at the Laboratory of Ecohydrology (ECHO) of the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne. The model is being developed for the spatially-explicit simulation of streamflow and transport processes at the catchment scale. The key concept of the model is the formulation of water transport by geomorphologic travel time distributions: the mobilization of water (and possibly dissolved solutes) is simulated at the subcatchment scale and the resulting responses are convolved with the travel paths distribution within the river network to obtain the hydrologic response at the catchment outlet. The Matlab source code of the current version for alpine streamflow simulation is already freely available. A truly free open source version using Python will become available in the future.

  15. Regional Variation in the Severity of Pesticide Exposure Outcomes: Applications of Geographic Information Systems and Spatial Scan Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Sudakin, Daniel L.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction In a previous study, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and spatial scan statistics were utilized to assess regional clustering of symptomatic pesticide exposure incidents that were reported to a state Poison Control Center (PCC) during a single year. In the current study, we analyzed five subsequent years of PCC data to test whether there are significant geographic differences in pesticide exposure incidents resulting in serious (moderate, major, and fatal) medical outcomes. Methods A Poison Control Center provided data on unintentional pesticide exposure incidents for the time period 2001?2005. Data were abstracted to identify the geographic location of the caller, the location where the exposure occurred, the exposure route, and the medical outcome. Results The results yielded 273 incidents resulting in moderate (n=261), major effects (n=10), or fatalities (n=2). Analysis of these data using spatial scan statistics resulted in the identification of a geographic area consisting of 2 adjacent counties (one urban, one rural) where statistically significant clustering of serious outcomes was observed. The relative risk of moderate, major, and fatal outcomes was 2.0 in this spatial cluster (p=0.0005). Conclusions Poison Control Center data, GIS, and spatial scan statistics can be effectively utilized to identify clustering of serious incidents involving human exposure to pesticides. These analyses may be useful for public health officials to target preventive interventions. Further investigation is warranted to better understand the potential explanations for geographical clustering, and to assess whether preventive interventions have an impact on reducing pesticide exposure incidents resulting in serious medical outcomes. PMID:19306192

  16. Properties of a Phase-Conjugate Etalon Mirror and its Application to Laser Resonator Spatial-Mode Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaohui H.; Leger, James R.

    2004-07-01

    The concept of a phase-conjugate etalon mirror consisting of one flat and one aspheric surface is introduced. This new element can be used as an end mirror of a conventional resonator to promote spatial-mode selection and mode shaping. A phase-conjugate etalon designed for the fundamental Gaussian mode is experimentally implemented and tested with a single-mode He-Ne laser.

  17. Evaluating uncertainty in predicting spatially variable representative elementary scales in fractured aquifers, with application to Turkey Creek Basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wellman, T.P.; Poeter, E.P.

    2006-01-01

    Computational limitations and sparse field data often mandate use of continuum representation for modeling hydrologic processes in large-scale fractured aquifers. Selecting appropriate element size is of primary importance because continuum approximation is not valid for all scales. The traditional approach is to select elements by identifying a single representative elementary scale (RES) for the region of interest. Recent advances indicate RES may be spatially variable, prompting unanswered questions regarding the ability of sparse data to spatially resolve continuum equivalents in fractured aquifers. We address this uncertainty of estimating RES using two techniques. In one technique we employ data-conditioned realizations generated by sequential Gaussian simulation. For the other we develop a new approach using conditioned random walks and nonparametric bootstrapping (CRWN)- We evaluate the effectiveness of each method under three fracture densities, three data sets, and two groups of RES analysis parameters. In sum, 18 separate RES analyses are evaluated, which indicate RES magnitudes may be reasonably bounded using uncertainty analysis, even for limited data sets and complex fracture structure. In addition, we conduct a field study to estimate RES magnitudes and resulting uncertainty for Turkey Creek Basin, a crystalline fractured rock aquifer located 30 km southwest of Denver, Colorado. Analyses indicate RES does not correlate to rock type or local relief in several instances but is generally lower within incised creek valleys and higher along mountain fronts. Results of this study suggest that (1) CRWN is an effective and computationally efficient method to estimate uncertainty, (2) RES predictions are well constrained using uncertainty analysis, and (3) for aquifers such as Turkey Creek Basin, spatial variability of RES is significant and complex. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Statistical monitoring of spatial patterns of environmental indices for integrated ecosystem assessment: Application to the Bay of Biscay pelagic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woillez, Mathieu; Petitgas, Pierre; Huret, Martin; Struski, Caroline; Léger, Fabien

    2010-10-01

    Monitoring the environment of fish is a key component of the ecosystem approach to fisheries management. Here, we propose a methodology to statistically monitor time series of maps of environmental indices. These maps were derived from a 37-year hindcast of a coupled physical-biogeochemical model. The space-time variability in the maps was decomposed using empirical orthogonal functions into time-invariant spatial patterns and time-varying amplitudes for these patterns. A statistical process control chart was then applied to the time series of the amplitudes. In that way, changes were detected with known statistical performance. The monitoring system also specified how long the changes lasted and which years, seasons and zones were affected. Results for all indices were assembled in an integrative dashboard of the detected deviations. For illustration, the procedure was applied to the Bay of Biscay pelagic zone. The selected environmental indices characterized the evolution of hydrological structures such as fronts and river plumes, as well as changes in temperature, water column stratification, horizontal current flow and primary production. A major result was that, in the last decade, sea surface temperature showed repeated significant shifts towards warming, which were largest in the northern half of the Bay, while the spatial extension of river plumes over the shelf alternated between wet and dry years. From 2005, several other indices showed repeated significant deviations: increase in sea bottom temperature, increase in the depth of the pycnocline and changes in coastal currents. The procedure provided an integrated view of ecosystem variability and change for all its components and their spatial organization.

  19. A Critical Examination of Spatial Biases Between MODIS and MISR Aerosol Products - Application for Potential AERONET Deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Y.; Zhang, J.; Reid, J. S.; Hyer, E. J.; Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Kahn, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) data are the primary benchmark for evaluating satellite-retrieved aerosol properties. However, despite its extensive coverage, the representativeness of the AERONET data is rarely discussed. Indeed, many studies have shown that satellite retrieval biases have a significant degree of spatial correlation that may be problematic for higher-level processes or inverse-emissions-modeling studies. To consider these issues and evaluate relative performance in regions of few surface observations, cross-comparisons between the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) products of operational MODIS Collection 5.1 Dark Target (DT) and operational MODIS Collection 5.1 Deep Blue (DB) with MISR version 22 were conducted. Through such comparisons, we can observe coherent spatial features of the AOD bias while side-stepping the full analysis required for determining when or where either retrieval is more correct. We identify regions where MODIS to MISR AOD ratios were found to be above 1.4 and below 0.7. Regions where lower boundary condition uncertainty is likely to be a dominant factor include portions of Western North America, the Andes mountains, Saharan Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, and Central Asia. Similarly, microphysical biases may be an issue in South America, and specific parts of Southern Africa, India Asia, East Asia, and Indonesia. These results help identify high-priority locations for possible future deployments of both in situ and ground based remote sensing measurements. The Supplement includes a km1 file.

  20. Spatial nonlinear optics anisotropy and directional growth of TbCOB crystal by micro-pulling-down for SHG application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Dongsheng; Li, Yang; Shu, Jun; Gao, Zeliang; Jia, Zhitai; Wang, Zhengping; Tao, Xutang

    2016-01-01

    Towards the spatial optimum phase matching (PM) crystal device through a novel way, the micro-pulling-down (?-PD) technique was used for crystal growth along second-order harmonic generation (SHG) direction for the first time to the best of our knowledge. In this paper, the spatial distribution of |deff| for a potential nonlinear optical (NLO) crystal TbCa4O(BO3)3 (TbCOB) at 1064 nm was calculated and analyzed firstly, and the PM angle (113°, 46°) was found to possess the largest deff value (type-I) being on the order of 1.39 pm/V. Along the optimum SHG direction, a rod-shape TbCOB crystal with 3 mm in diameter was successfully grown by using the ?-PD method. After simple cutting and polishing of the ends for ?-PD grown crystal, a high SHG efficiency (single-pass light reached up to 57%) was realized through a Nd:YAG pico-second laser at 1064 nm, which was comparable to that of crystal samples from Czochralski (Cz) growth. TbCOB crystals also exhibit a high laser damage threshold of >15 GW/cm2.

  1. Texture-based measurement of spatial frequency response using the dead leaves target: extensions, and application to real camera systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElvain, Jon; Campbell, Scott P.; Miller, Jonathan; Jin, Elaine W.

    2010-01-01

    The dead leaves model was recently introduced as a method for measuring the spatial frequency response (SFR) of camera systems. The target consists of a series of overlapping opaque circles with a uniform gray level distribution and radii distributed as r-3. Unlike the traditional knife-edge target, the SFR derived from the dead leaves target will be penalized for systems that employ aggressive noise reduction. Initial studies have shown that the dead leaves SFR correlates well with sharpness/texture blur preference, and thus the target can potentially be used as a surrogate for more expensive subjective image quality evaluations. In this paper, the dead leaves target is analyzed for measurement of camera system spatial frequency response. It was determined that the power spectral density (PSD) of the ideal dead leaves target does not exhibit simple power law dependence, and scale invariance is only loosely obeyed. An extension to the ideal dead leaves PSD model is proposed, including a correction term to account for system noise. With this extended model, the SFR of several camera systems with a variety of formats was measured, ranging from 3 to 10 megapixels; the effects of handshake motion blur are also analyzed via the dead leaves target.

  2. A critical examination of spatial biases between MODIS and MISR aerosol products - application for potential AERONET deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Y.; Zhang, J.; Reid, J. S.; Hyer, E. J.; Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Kahn, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) data are the primary benchmark for evaluating satellite-retrieved aerosol properties. However, despite its extensive coverage, the representativeness of the AERONET data is rarely discussed. Indeed, many studies have shown that satellite retrieval biases have a significant degree of spatial correlation that may be problematic for higher-level processes or inverse-emissions-modeling studies. To consider these issues and evaluate relative performance in regions of few surface observations, cross-comparisons between the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) products of operational MODIS Collection 5.1 Dark Target (DT) and operational MODIS Collection 5.1 Deep Blue (DB) with MISR version 22 were conducted. Through such comparisons, we can observe coherent spatial features of the AOD bias while sidestepping the full analysis required for determining when or where either retrieval is more correct. We identify regions where MODIS to MISR AOD ratios were found to be above 1.4 and below 0.7. Regions where lower boundary condition uncertainty is likely to be a dominant factor include portions of Western North America, the Andes mountains, Saharan Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, and Central Asia. Similarly, microphysical biases may be an issue in South America, and specific parts of Southern Africa, India Asia, East Asia, and Indonesia. These results help identify high-priority locations for possible future deployments of both in situ and ground based remote sensing measurements. The Supplement includes a kml file.

  3. High-Field fMRI for Human Applications: An Overview of Spatial Resolution and Signal Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Olman, Cheryl A; Yacoub, Essa

    2011-01-01

    In the last decade, dozens of 7 Tesla scanners have been purchased or installed around the world, while 3 Tesla systems have become a standard. This increased interest in higher field strengths is driven by a demonstrated advantage of high fields for available signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the magnetic resonance signal. Functional imaging studies have additional advantages of increases in both the contrast and the spatial specificity of the susceptibility based BOLD signal. One use of this resultant increase in the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) for functional MRI studies at high field is increased image resolution. However, there are many factors to consider in predicting exactly what kind of resolution gains might be made at high fields, and what the opportunity costs might be. The first part of this article discusses both hardware and image quality considerations for higher resolution functional imaging. The second part draws distinctions between image resolution, spatial specificity, and functional specificity of the fMRI signals that can be acquired at high fields, suggesting practical limitations for attainable resolutions of fMRI experiments at a given field, given the current state of the art in imaging techniques. Finally, practical resolution limitations and pulse sequence options for studies in human subjects are considered. PMID:22216080

  4. Uncertainty in spatial data mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Kun; Tian, Yangge; Bian, Fulin

    2007-11-01

    Spatial data mining, i.e., mining knowledge from large amounts of spatial data, is a demanding field since huge amounts of spatial data have been collected in various applications. The collected data far exceeds people's ability to analyze it. Thus, new and efficient methods are needed to discover knowledge from large spatial databases. Most of the spatial data mining methods do not take into account the uncertainty of spatial information. In our work we use objects with broad boundaries, the concept that absorbs all the uncertainty by which spatial data is commonly affected and allows computations in the presence of uncertainty without rough simplifications of the reality. And we propose an uncertainty model that enables efficient analysis of such data. The study case of suitable flounder fishery search indicates the benefit of uncertainty research in spatial data mining.

  5. Achievements of the DOT-NASA Joint Program on Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Technologies: Application to Multimodal Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This report presents three-year accomplishments from the national program on Commercial Remote Sensing and Geospatial Technology (CRSGT) application to transportation, administered by the U.S. Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) in collaboration with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The joint program was authorized under Section 5113 of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21). This is the first national program of its type focusing on transportation applications of emerging commercial remote sensing technologies. U.S. DOT's Research and Special Programs Administration manages the program in coordination with NASA's Earth Science Enterprise's application programs. The program focuses on applications of CRSGT products and systems for providing smarter and more efficient transportation operations and services. The program is performed in partnership with four major National Consortia for Remote Sensing in Transportation (NCRST). Each consortium focuses on research and development of products in one of the four priority areas for transportation application, and includes technical application and demonstration projects carried out in partnership with industries and service providers in their respective areas. The report identifies products and accomplishments from each of the four consortia in meeting the goal of providing smarter and more efficient transportation services. The products and results emerging from the program are being implemented in transportation operations and services through state and local agencies. The Environmental Assessment and Application Consortium (NCRST-E) provides leadership for developing and deploying cost effective environmental and transportation planning services, and integrates CRSGT advances for achieving smarter and cost effective corridor planning. The Infrastructure Management Consortium (NCRST-I) provides leadership in technologies that achieve smarter and cheaper ways of managing transportation infrastructure assets, operation, and inspection, and integrates CRSGT advances for achieving infrastructure security. The Traffic Flow Consortium (NCRST-F) provides leadership to develop new tools for regional traffic flow management including heavy vehicles and intermodal flow of freight, and integrates CRSGT advances for complementing and extending the reach of ITS user services. The Safety, Hazards and Disasters (NCRST-H) provides leadership for deploying remote sensing technology to locate transportation hazards and improve disaster recovery, and integrates CRSGT advances for application to protect transportation systems from terrorism. The DOT-NASA team is proud to present this report of accomplishments on products and results emerging from the joint program for application to transportation practice.

  6. Spatial symmetry and equivalence with unrestricted Hartree-Fock wavefunctions: application to the prediction of spin densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayatilaka, Dylan; Chandler, Graham S.

    1997-10-01

    A theory is presented for enforcing spatial symmetry and equivalence with unrestricted Hartree-Fock (UHF) wavefunctions. This generalized UHF (GUHF) wavefunction is a simple way to obtain qualitatively correct ab initio spin densities, for comparison with polarized neutron diffraction experiments. Quasi Newton-Raphson equations are presented, based on generalized energy expressions which use coupling coefficients, and an exponential parametrization of orbital rotation parameters. The coupling coefficients for the common case of a high spin partially occupied degenerate shell are given. The new method is applied to the triplet oxygen atom, and used to calculate spin densities for the FeCl4 anion. It is found that the energy of the GUHF wavefunction lies above the symmetry broken UHF wavefunction, but below the restricted Hartree-Fock methods, and that the expectation value of S 2 is worsened (i.e., spin contamination increases). 6

  7. Approximate message-passing with spatially coupled structured operators, with applications to compressed sensing and sparse superposition codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbier, Jean; Schülke, Christophe; Krzakala, Florent

    2015-05-01

    We study the behavior of approximate message-passing (AMP), a solver for linear sparse estimation problems such as compressed sensing, when the i.i.d matrices—for which it has been specifically designed—are replaced by structured operators, such as Fourier and Hadamard ones. We show empirically that after proper randomization, the structure of the operators does not significantly affect the performances of the solver. Furthermore, for some specially designed spatially coupled operators, this allows a computationally fast and memory efficient reconstruction in compressed sensing up to the information-theoretical limit. We also show how this approach can be applied to sparse superposition codes, allowing the AMP decoder to perform at large rates for moderate block length.

  8. Application of multi-scale variography for inferring the spatial variability of the hydraulic conductivity of a sandy aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogiers, Bart; Vienken, Thomas; Gedeon, Matej; Batelaan, Okke; Mallants, Dirk; Huysmans, Marijke; Dassargues, Alain

    2014-05-01

    In the framework of the disposal of short-lived low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste in a near-surface disposal facility in Dessel (Belgium), extensive characterization of the hydraulic conductivity (K) in the shallow Neogene aquifer has been performed at a regional scale. In the last few years the small-scale heterogeneity has been additionally characterized by outcrop analogue, hydraulic direct push, and borehole core air permeameter studies. The gathered data now include a) more than 350 hydraulic conductivity measurements on samples from 8 cored boreholes, mostly reaching depths of ~50 m and data at 2 m intervals, b) more than 5000 air permeability measurements on the same borehole cores, c) more than 250 cone penetration tests (CPTs) with depths down to 40 m and data at 2 cm intervals, d) over 100 dissipation tests performed during the CPT campaigns, e) 17 direct push injections loggings, 6 hydraulic profiling tool logs, and 6 direct push slug tests, f) several hundreds of air permeability measurements on outcrop analogues of the aquifer sediments, and g) numerous grain size analyses. The current study aims to quantify the heterogeneity of K from the centimetre- to the kilometre-scale and to check the compatibility of the spatial variability revealed by the different datasets. This is achieved through gathering all K values (either direct measurements, calibrated relative K values, or K estimates from secondary data), and the use of variography to quantify spatial variability in terms of two-points geostatistics. The results are discussed, and the main differences between the different data sources are explained. In a final step, different multi-scale variogram models are proposed for capturing the main characteristics of multi-scale variability within the shallow Neogene aquifer in Belgium.

  9. Data-driven spatial b value estimation with applications to California seismicity: To b or not to b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamer, Yavor; Hiemer, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we present a penalized likelihood-based method for spatial estimation of Gutenberg-Richter's b value. Our method incorporates a nonarbitrary partitioning scheme based on Voronoi tessellation, which allows for the optimal partitioning of space using a minimum number of free parameters. By random placement of an increasing number of Voronoi nodes, we are able to explore the whole solution space in terms of model complexity. We obtain an overall likelihood for each model by estimating the b values in all Voronoi regions and calculating its joint likelihood using Aki's formula. Accounting for the number of free parameters, we then calculate the Bayesian Information Criterion for all random realizations. We investigate the ensemble of the best performing models and demonstrate the robustness and validity of our method through extensive synthetic tests. We apply our method to the seismicity of California using two different time spans of the Advanced National Seismic System catalog (1984-2014 and 2004-2014). The results show that for the last decade, the b value variation in the well-instrumented parts of mainland California is limited to the range of (0.94 ± 0.04-1.15 ± 0.06). Apart from the Geysers region, the observed variation can be explained by network-related discrepancies in the magnitude estimations. Our results suggest that previously reported spatial b value variations obtained using classical fixed radius or nearest neighbor methods are likely to have been overestimated, mainly due to subjective parameter choices. We envision that the likelihood-based model selection criteria used in this study can be a useful tool for generating improved earthquake forecasting models.

  10. Spatial Displays and Spatial Instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, S.R.; Kaiser, M.K.; Grunwald, A.J.

    1989-07-01

    The conference proceedings topics are divided into two main areas: (1) issues of spatial and picture perception raised by graphical electronic displays of spatial information; and (2) design questions raised by the practical experience of designers actually defining new spatial instruments for use in new aircraft and spacecraft. Each topic is considered from both a theoretical and an applied direction. Emphasis is placed on discussion of phenomena and determination of design principles.

  11. Spatial Displays and Spatial Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Stephen R. (editor); Kaiser, Mary K. (editor); Grunwald, Arthur J. (editor)

    1989-01-01

    The conference proceedings topics are divided into two main areas: (1) issues of spatial and picture perception raised by graphical electronic displays of spatial information; and (2) design questions raised by the practical experience of designers actually defining new spatial instruments for use in new aircraft and spacecraft. Each topic is considered from both a theoretical and an applied direction. Emphasis is placed on discussion of phenomena and determination of design principles.

  12. Spatial variability of soil total and DTPA-extractable cadmium caused by long-term application of phosphate fertilizers, crop rotation, and soil characteristics.

    PubMed

    Jafarnejadi, A R; Sayyad, Gh; Homaee, M; Davamei, A H

    2013-05-01

    Increasing cadmium (Cd) accumulation in agricultural soils is undesirable due to its hazardous influences on human health. Thus, having more information on spatial variability of Cd and factors effective to increase its content on the cultivated soils is very important. Phosphate fertilizers are main contamination source of cadmium (Cd) in cultivated soils. Also, crop rotation is a critical management practice which can alter soil Cd content. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of long-term consumption of the phosphate fertilizers, crop rotations, and soil characteristics on spatial variability of two soil Cd species (i.e., total and diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) extractable) in agricultural soils. The study was conducted in wheat farms of Khuzestan Province, Iran. Long-term (27-year period (1980 to 2006)) data including the rate and the type of phosphate fertilizers application, the respective area, and the rotation type of different regions were used. Afterwards, soil Cd content (total or DTPA extractable) and its spatial variability in study area (400,000 ha) were determined by sampling from soils of 255 fields. The results showed that the consumption rate of di-ammonium phosphate fertilizer have been varied enormously in the period study. The application rate of phosphorus fertilizers was very high in some subregions with have extensive agricultural activities (more than 95 kg/ha). The average and maximum contents of total Cd in the study region were obtained as 1.47 and 2.19 mg/kg and DTPA-extractable Cd as 0.084 and 0.35 mg/kg, respectively. The spatial variability of Cd indicated that total and DTPA-extractable Cd contents were over 0.8 and 0.1 mg/kg in 95 and 25 % of samples, respectively. The spherical model enjoys the best fitting and lowest error rate to appraise the Cd content. Comparing the phosphate fertilizer consumption rate with spatial variability of the soil cadmium (both total and DTPA extractable) revealed the high correlation between the consumption rate of P fertilizers and soil Cd content. Rotation type was likely the main effective factor on variations of the soil DTPA-extractable Cd contents in some parts (eastern part of study region) and could explain some Cd variation. Total Cd concentrations had significant correlation with the total neutralizing value (p < 0.01), available P (p < 0.01), cation exchange capacity (p < 0.05), and organic carbon (p < 0.05) variables. The DTPA-extractable Cd had significant correlation with OC (p < 0.01), pH, and clay content (p < 0.05). Therefore, consumption rate of the phosphate fertilizers and crop rotation are important factors on solubility and hence spatial variability of Cd content in agricultural soils. PMID:22948289

  13. The Spatial Distribution of Hepatitis C Virus Infections and Associated Determinants—An Application of a Geographically Weighted Poisson Regression for Evidence-Based Screening Interventions in Hotspots

    PubMed Central

    Kauhl, Boris; Heil, Jeanne; Hoebe, Christian J. P. A.; Schweikart, Jürgen; Krafft, Thomas; Dukers-Muijrers, Nicole H. T. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infections are a major cause for liver diseases. A large proportion of these infections remain hidden to care due to its mostly asymptomatic nature. Population-based screening and screening targeted on behavioural risk groups had not proven to be effective in revealing these hidden infections. Therefore, more practically applicable approaches to target screenings are necessary. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and spatial epidemiological methods may provide a more feasible basis for screening interventions through the identification of hotspots as well as demographic and socio-economic determinants. Methods Analysed data included all HCV tests (n = 23,800) performed in the southern area of the Netherlands between 2002–2008. HCV positivity was defined as a positive immunoblot or polymerase chain reaction test. Population data were matched to the geocoded HCV test data. The spatial scan statistic was applied to detect areas with elevated HCV risk. We applied global regression models to determine associations between population-based determinants and HCV risk. Geographically weighted Poisson regression models were then constructed to determine local differences of the association between HCV risk and population-based determinants. Results HCV prevalence varied geographically and clustered in urban areas. The main population at risk were middle-aged males, non-western immigrants and divorced persons. Socio-economic determinants consisted of one-person households, persons with low income and mean property value. However, the association between HCV risk and demographic as well as socio-economic determinants displayed strong regional and intra-urban differences. Discussion The detection of local hotspots in our study may serve as a basis for prioritization of areas for future targeted interventions. Demographic and socio-economic determinants associated with HCV risk show regional differences underlining that a one-size-fits-all approach even within small geographic areas may not be appropriate. Future screening interventions need to consider the spatially varying association between HCV risk and associated demographic and socio-economic determinants. PMID:26352611

  14. Development of a Statistical Model to Identify Spatial and Meteorological Drivers of Elevated O3 in Rural Nevada and Its Application to Other Rural, Mountainous Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fine, R.; Miller, M. B.; Gustin, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    Baseline ozone (O3) has been defined as the mixing ratio of O3 measured at sites not influenced by recent, local emissions. Measurements of O3 at relatively remote monitoring sites, particularly in the western US, are useful for quantifying baseline O3 and subsequently the magnitude of O3 not controllable by local regulations. As the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for O3 becomes more stringent, there is an increased need to quantify baseline O3 particularly in the western US where regional and global sources can significantly enhance O3 measured at surface sites yielding baseline mixing ratios approaching or exceeding the NAAQS threshold. With the pending reduction in O3 NAAQS, there is a growing need to develop tools to quantify baseline O3 that are readily comprehensible to a wide range of stakeholders. Past work has indicated that meteorological conditions as well as site specific spatial characteristics (e.g. elevation, basin size, gradient) were significantly correlated with O3 intercepted at rural monitoring sites. Here, we used 2 years of data measured at sites throughout rural Nevada to develop a readily comprehensible Categorical And Regression Tree (CART) model to identify spatial and meteorological characteristics that lead to elevated baseline O3. A third year of data from rural Nevada sites was used to test the model and its applicability to the state of Nevada. Data from other sites in the intermountain west were used to test the representativeness of the model for sites throughout the region.

  15. Chapter J: Issues and challenges in the application of geostatistics and spatial-data analysis to the characterization of sand-and-gravel resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hack, Daniel R.

    2005-01-01

    Sand-and-gravel (aggregate) resources are a critical component of the Nation's infrastructure, yet aggregate-mining technologies lag far behind those of metalliferous mining and other sectors. Deposit-evaluation and site-characterization methodologies are antiquated, and few serious studies of the potential applications of spatial-data analysis and geostatistics have been published. However, because of commodity usage and the necessary proximity of a mine to end use, aggregate-resource exploration and evaluation differ fundamentally from comparable activities for metalliferous ores. Acceptable practices, therefore, can reflect this cruder scale. The increasing use of computer technologies is colliding with the need for sand-and-gravel mines to modernize and improve their overall efficiency of exploration, mine planning, scheduling, automation, and other operations. The emergence of megaquarries in the 21st century will also be a contributing factor. Preliminary research into the practical applications of exploratory-data analysis (EDA) have been promising. For example, EDA was used to develop a linear-regression equation to forecast freeze-thaw durability from absorption values for Lower Paleozoic carbonate rocks mined for crushed aggregate from quarries in Oklahoma. Applications of EDA within a spatial context, a method of spatial-data analysis, have also been promising, as with the investigation of undeveloped sand-and-gravel resources in the sedimentary deposits of Pleistocene Lake Bonneville, Utah. Formal geostatistical investigations of sand-and-gravel deposits are quite rare, and the primary focus of those studies that have been completed is on the spatial characterization of deposit thickness and its subsequent effect on ore reserves. A thorough investigation of a gravel deposit in an active aggregate-mining area in central Essex, U.K., emphasized the problems inherent in the geostatistical characterization of particle-size-analysis data. Beyond such factors as common drilling methods jeopardizing the accuracy of the size-distribution curve, the application of formal geostatistical principles has other limitations. Many of the variables used in evaluating gravel deposits, including such sedimentologic parameters as sorting and such United Soil Classification System parameters as gradation coefficient, are nonadditive. Also, uniform sampling methods, such as drilling, are relatively uncommon, and sampling is generally accomplished by a combination of boreholes, water-well logs, test pits, trenches, stratigraphic columns from exposures, and, possibly, some geophysical cross sections. When evaluated in consideration of the fact that uniform mining blocks are also uncommon in practice, subsequent complexities in establishment of the volume/variance relation are inevitable. Several approaches exist to confront the limitations of geostatistical methods in evaluating sand-and-gravel deposits. Initially, we must acknowledge the practical requirements of the aggregate industry, as well as the limitations of the data collected by that industry, as a function of what the industry requires at the practical level, and consider that broader acceptance of formal geostatistics may require modifications of typical exploration and sampling protocols. Future investigations should utilize data from the full spectrum of sand-and-gravel deposits (flood plain, glacial, catastrophic flood, and marine), integrate such other disci plines as sedimentology and geophysics into the research, develop commodity-specific approaches to nonadditive variables, and include the results of comparative drilling.

  16. Development of high-spatial and high-mass resolution mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) and its application to the study of small metabolites and endogenous molecules of plants

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Ji Hyun

    2011-11-30

    High-spatial and high-mass resolution laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometric (MS) imaging technology was developed for the attainment of MS images of higher quality containing more information on the relevant cellular and molecular biology in unprecedented depth. The distribution of plant metabolites is asymmetric throughout the cells and tissues, and therefore the increase in the spatial resolution was pursued to reveal the localization of plant metabolites at the cellular level by MS imaging. For achieving high-spatial resolution, the laser beam size was reduced by utilizing an optical fiber with small core diameter (25 ?m) in a vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-linear ion trap (vMALDI-LTQ) mass spectrometer. Matrix application was greatly improved using oscillating capillary nebulizer. As a result, single cell level spatial resolution of ~ 12 ?m was achieved. MS imaging at this high spatial resolution was directly applied to a whole Arabidopsis flower and the substructures of an anther and single pollen grains at the stigma and anther were successfully visualized. MS imaging of high spatial resolution was also demonstrated to the secondary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana and a high degree of localization of detected metabolites was successfully unveiled. This was the first MS imaging on the root for molecular species. MS imaging with high mass resolution was also achieved by utilizing the LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer for the direct identification of the surface metabolites on the Arabidopsis stem and root and differentiation of isobaric ions having the same nominal mass with no need of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). MS imaging at high-spatial and high-mass resolution was also applied to cer1 mutant of the model system Arabidopsis thaliana to demonstrate its usefulness in biological studies and reveal associated metabolite changes in terms of spatial distribution and/or abundances compared to those of wild-type. The spatial distribution of targeted metabolites, mainly waxes and flavonoids, was systematically explored on various organs, including flowers, leaves, stems, and roots at high spatial resolution of ~ 12-50 ?m and the changes in the abundance level of these metabolites were monitored on the cer1 mutant with respect to the wild-type. This study revealed the metabolic biology of CER1 gene on each individual organ level with very detailed high spatial resolution. The separate MS images of isobaric metabolites, i.e. C29 alkane vs. C28 aldehyde could be constructed on both genotypes from MS imaging at high mass resolution. This allows tracking of abundance changes for those compounds along with the genetic mutation, which is not achievable with low mass resolution mass spectrometry. This study supported previous hypothesis of molecular function of CER1 gene as aldehyde decarbonylase, especially by displaying hyper accumulation of aldehydes and C30 fatty acid and decrease in abundance of alkanes and ketones in several plant organs of cer1 mutant. The scope of analytes was further directed toward internal cell metabolites from the surface metabolites of the plant. MS profiling and imaging of internal cell metabolites were performed on the vibratome section of Arabidopsis leaf. Vibratome sectioning of the leaf was first conducted to remove the surface cuticle layer and it was followed by enzymatic treatment of the section to induce the digestion of primary cell walls, middle lamella, and expose the internal cells underneath to the surface for detection with the laser by LDI-MS. The subsequent MS imaging onto the enzymatically treated vibratome section allowed us to map the distribution of the metabolites in the internal cell layers, linolenic acid (C18:3 FA) and linoleic acid (C18:2 FA). The development of an assay for relative quantification of analytes at the single subcellular/organelle level by LDI-MS imaging was attempted and both plausibility and significant obstacles were seen. As a test system, native plant organelle, chloroplasts isolated from the spinach leaves were used

  17. Improvement of model forecast on the Asian summer rainfall anomaly with the application of a spatial filtering scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Zhu, C.; Yun, W.-T.

    2007-03-01

    A revised 25-point Shuman-Shapiro Spatial Filter (RSSSF) has been applied to six atmospheric circulation models and multi-model ensemble (MME) predictions, and its effect on the improvement of model forecast skill scores of the Asian summer precipitation anomaly is discussed in this paper. On the basis of 21-yr model ensemble predictions, the RSSSF can remove the unpredictable ‘noise’ with respect to the 2-grid wavelength in the model precipitation anomaly fields and maintain the large-scale counterpart, which is related to the response of the model to large-scale boundary forcing. Therefore, this could possibly enhance the forecast skill of the Asian summer rainfall anomaly in the models and the MME. The potential improvement of model forecasting skill is found in the Asian summer monsoon region, where the anomaly correlation coefficient (ACC) has been improved by 7-40%, corresponding to the decreased root mean square error (RMSE) in the model and the MME precipitation anomaly forecasts.

  18. THE TWO-DIMENSIONAL PROJECTED SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. I. METHOD AND APPLICATION TO NGC 4261

    SciTech Connect

    D'Abrusco, R.; Fabbiano, G.; Zezas, A.; Mineo, S.; Fragos, T.; Kim, D.-W.; Strader, J.; Bonfini, P.; Luo, B.; King, A.

    2013-08-20

    We present a new method for the determination of the two-dimensional (2D) projected spatial distribution of globular clusters (GCs) in external galaxies. This method is based on the K-Nearest Neighbor density estimator of Dressler, complemented by Monte-Carlo simulations to establish the statistical significance of the results. We apply this method to NGC 4261, a ''test galaxy'' where significant 2D anisotropy in the GC distribution has been reported. We confirm that the 2D distribution of GC is not azimuthally isotropic. Moreover, we demonstrate that the 2D distribution departures from the average GC radial distribution results in highly significant spiral-like or broken shell features. Overall, the same perturbations are found in ''red'' and ''blue'' GCs, but with some differences. In particular, we observe a central feature, roughly aligned with the minor axis of NGC 4261, composed of red and most luminous GCs. Blue and fainter GCs are more frequent at large radial distances and follow the spiral-like features of the overall density structure. These results suggest a complex merging history for NGC 4261.

  19. Effect of spatial confinement on magnetic hyperthermia via dipolar interactions in Fe3O4 nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sadat, M E; Patel, Ronak; Sookoor, Jason; Bud'ko, Sergey L; Ewing, Rodney C; Zhang, Jiaming; Xu, Hong; Wang, Yilong; Pauletti, Giovanni M; Mast, David B; Shi, Donglu

    2014-09-01

    In this work, the effect of nanoparticle confinement on the magnetic relaxation of iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NP) was investigated by measuring the hyperthermia heating behavior in high frequency alternating magnetic field. Three different Fe3O4 nanoparticle systems having distinct nanoparticle configurations were studied in terms of magnetic hyperthermia heating rate and DC magnetization. All magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) systems were constructed using equivalent ~10nm diameter NP that were structured differently in terms of configuration, physical confinement, and interparticle spacing. The spatial confinement was achieved by embedding the Fe3O4 nanoparticles in the matrices of the polystyrene spheres of 100 nm, while the unconfined was the free Fe3O4 nanoparticles well-dispersed in the liquid via PAA surface coating. Assuming the identical core MNPs in each system, the heating behavior was analyzed in terms of particle freedom (or confinement), interparticle spacing, and magnetic coupling (or dipole-dipole interaction). DC magnetization data were correlated to the heating behavior with different material properties. Analysis of DC magnetization measurements showed deviation from classical Langevin behavior near saturation due to dipole interaction modification of the MNPs resulting in a high magnetic anisotropy. It was found that the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) of the unconfined nanoparticle systems were significantly higher than those of confined (the MNPs embedded in the polystyrene matrix). This increase of SAR was found to be attributable to high Néel relaxation rate and hysteresis loss of the unconfined MNPs. It was also found that the dipole-dipole interactions can significantly reduce the global magnetic response of the MNPs and thereby decrease the SAR of the nanoparticle systems.

  20. Effect of spatial confinement on magnetic hyperthermia via dipolar interactions in Fe?O? nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Sadat, M E; Patel, Ronak; Sookoor, Jason; Bud'ko, Sergey L; Ewing, Rodney C; Zhang, Jiaming; Xu, Hong; Wang, Yilong; Pauletti, Giovanni M; Mast, David B; Shi, Donglu

    2014-09-01

    In this work, the effect of nanoparticle confinement on the magnetic relaxation of iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NP) was investigated by measuring the hyperthermia heating behavior in high frequency alternating magnetic field. Three different Fe3O4 nanoparticle systems having distinct nanoparticle configurations were studied in terms of magnetic hyperthermia heating rate and DC magnetization. All magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) systems were constructed using equivalent ~10nm diameter NP that were structured differently in terms of configuration, physical confinement, and interparticle spacing. The spatial confinement was achieved by embedding the Fe3O4 nanoparticles in the matrices of the polystyrene spheres of 100 nm, while the unconfined was the free Fe3O4 nanoparticles well-dispersed in the liquid via PAA surface coating. Assuming the identical core MNPs in each system, the heating behavior was analyzed in terms of particle freedom (or confinement), interparticle spacing, and magnetic coupling (or dipole-dipole interaction). DC magnetization data were correlated to the heating behavior with different material properties. Analysis of DC magnetization measurements showed deviation from classical Langevin behavior near saturation due to dipole interaction modification of the MNPs resulting in a high magnetic anisotropy. It was found that the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) of the unconfined nanoparticle systems were significantly higher than those of confined (the MNPs embedded in the polystyrene matrix). This increase of SAR was found to be attributable to high Néel relaxation rate and hysteresis loss of the unconfined MNPs. It was also found that the dipole-dipole interactions can significantly reduce the global magnetic response of the MNPs and thereby decrease the SAR of the nanoparticle systems. PMID:25063092

  1. The application of line imaging velocimetry to provide high resolution spatially resolved velocity data in plate impact experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philpott, M. K.; George, A.; Whiteman, G.; De’Ath, J.; Millett, J. C. F.

    2015-12-01

    A single streak camera line imaging velocimeter has been applied to Armco® iron plate impact experiments to study material response at the grain scale. The grain size and phase distribution were determined with electron back scatter diffraction. The optical system resolution and fringe size were optimised to suit the grain size distribution. Comparisons of the performance and merits of several analysis algorithms including the ‘Fourier transform’, ‘fringe tracking’, ‘quadrature’ and the ‘continuous wavelet transform’ have been made by application to synthetic data. Point heterodyne velocimetry measurements made at the same location on the target surface have been compared with the line imaging velocimetry data for confirmation.

  2. Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Human Movements and Applications for Disaster Response Management Utilizing Cell Phone Usage Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasumiishi, M.; Renschler, C. S.; Bittner, T. E.

    2015-07-01

    As cell phone usage becomes a norm in our daily lives, analysis and application of the data has become part of various research fields. This study focuses on the application of cell phone usage data to disaster response management. Cell phones work as a communication link between emergency responders and victims during and after a major disaster. This study recognizes that there are two kinds of disasters, one with an advance warning, and one without an advance warning. Different movement distance between a day with a blizzard (advanced warning) and a normal weather day was identified. In the scenario of a day with an extreme event without advanced warning (earthquake), factors that alter the phone users' movements were analyzed. Lastly, combining both cases, a conceptual model of human movement factors is proposed. Human movements consist of four factors that are push factors, movement-altering factors, derived attributes and constraint factors. Considering each category of factors in case of emergency, it should be necessary that we prepare different kinds of emergency response plans depending on the characteristics of a disaster.

  3. Spatial On-Line Analytical Processing (SOLAP): Concepts, Architectures and Solutions from a Geomatics Engineering Perspective.

    E-print Network

    a Geomatics Engineering Perspective, Data Warehouses and OLAP : Concepts, Architectures and Solutions, EDA (SOLAP): Concepts, Architectures and Solutions from a Geomatics Engineering Perspective. ABSTRACTSpatial On-Line Analytical Processing (SOLAP): Concepts, Architectures and Solutions from

  4. Example Applications of A Physically-Based 3D Surface-Subsurface Hydrologic Model Over Multiple Spatial and Temporal Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudicky, E. A.; Park, Y. J.; Hwang, H. T.; Berg, S.; Frey, S.

    2014-12-01

    It is now generally accepted within the scientific community that the climate is changing, and that future climate change may have significant impact on water resources in both quantity and quality. Alterations of base flow to rivers due to changing subsurface flow patterns, fluctuations in soil moisture and in the depth of the groundwater table, water levels in lakes and wetlands, and altered groundwater recharge/discharge patterns are examples of possible consequences of future climate change. In this presentation, our physically-based model, HydroGeoSphere (HGS), is first briefly described. It is a physically-based 3D control-volume finite element model representing 2D surface water flow and transport on the land surface together with 3D variably-saturated flow and transport in the subsurface. A globally implicit scheme used to solve the nonlinear surface and subsurface flow and transport equations simultaneously. The model can explicitly account for the hydrologic, solute and thermal interactions between surface and subsurface flow regimes as well as the atmospheric inputs in terms of air temperature, solar radiation and sensible/latent heat fluxes. A parallel computational framework has been implemented to facilitate model applications in high performance computing environments. The applicability of the model is demonstrated for a variety of problems, covering the hill slope scale to improve the understanding of the physical and chemical processes in the water cycle, to the assessment of the impact of climate change on water resources over the Canadian landmass in three dimensions. The climate-driven 3D basin-scale examples range from that of a highly characterized watershed in Southern Ontario having an area of about 7000 km2 to a large basin in Western Canada that covers an area of about 120,000 km2. The continental scale simulations explore the impacts of global climate change on Canada's surface and groundwater resources.

  5. Planetary Spatial Analyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keely, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    This is a status report for the project entitled Planetary Spatial Analyst (PSA). This report covers activities from the project inception on October 1, 2007 to June 1, 2008. Originally a three year proposal, PSA was awarded funding for one year and required a revised work statement and budget. At the time of this writing the project is well on track both for completion of work as well as budget. The revised project focused on two objectives: build a solid connection with the target community and implement a prototype software application that provides 3D visualization and spatial analysis technologies for that community. Progress has been made for both of these objectives.

  6. Application of knowledge-driven spatial modelling approaches and uncertainty management to a study of Rift Valley fever in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Archie CA; Pfeiffer, Dirk U; Martin, Vincent

    2006-01-01

    Background There are few studies that have investigated uncertainties surrounding the scientific community's knowledge of the geographical distribution of major animal diseases. This is particularly relevant to Rift Valley fever (RVF), a zoonotic disease causing destructive outbreaks in livestock and man, as the geographical range of the disease is widening to involve previously unaffected regions. In the current study we investigate the application of methods developed in the decision sciences: multiple criteria decision making using weighted linear combination and ordered weighted averages, and Dempster-Shafer theory, implemented within the geographical information system IDRISI, to obtain a greater understanding of uncertainty related to the geographical distribution of RVF. The focus is on presenting alternate methods where extensive field data are not available and traditional, model-based approaches to disease mapping are impossible to conduct. Results Using a compensatory multiple criteria decision making model based on weighted linear combination, most of sub-Saharan Africa was suitable for endemic circulation of RVF. In contrast, areas where rivers and lakes traversed semi-arid regions, such as those bordering the Sahara, were highly suitable for RVF epidemics and wet, tropical areas of central Africa had low suitability. Using a moderately non-compensatory model based on ordered weighted averages, the areas considered suitable for endemic and epidemic RVF were more restricted. Varying the relative weights of the different factors in the models did not affect suitability estimates to a large degree, but variations in model structure had a large impact on our suitability estimates. Our Dempster-Shafer analysis supported the belief that a range of semi-arid areas were suitable for RVF epidemics and the plausibility that many other areas of the continent were suitable. Areas where high levels of uncertainty were highlighted included the Ethiopian Highlands, southwest Kenya and parts of West Africa. Conclusion We have demonstrated the potential of methods developed in the decision sciences to improve our understanding of uncertainties surrounding the geographical distribution of animal diseases, particularly where information is sparse, and encourage wider application of the decision science methodology in the field of animal health. PMID:17156467

  7. A spatial analysis of cultural ecosystem service valuation by regional stakeholders in Florida: a coastal application of the social values for ecosystem services (SolVES) tool

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coffin, Alisa W.; Swett, Robert A.; Cole, Zachary D.

    2012-01-01

    Livelihoods and lifestyles of people throughout the world depend on essential goods and services provided by marine and coastal ecosystems. However, as societal demand increases and available ocean and coastal space diminish, better methods are needed to spatially and temporally allocate ocean and coastal activities such as shipping, energy production, tourism, and fishing. While economic valuation is an important mechanism for doing so, cultural ecosystem services often do not lend themselves to this method. Researchers from the U.S. Geological Survey are working collaboratively with the Florida Sea Grant College Program to map nonmonetary values of cultural ecosystem services for a pilot area (Sarasota Bay) in the Gulf of Mexico. The research seeks to close knowledge gaps about the attitudes and perceptions, or nonmonetary values, held by coastal residents toward cultural ecosystem services, and to adapt related, terrestrial-based research methods to a coastal setting. A critical goal is to integrate research results with coastal and marine spatial planning applications, thus making them relevant to coastal planners and managers in their daily efforts to sustainably manage coastal resources. Using information about the attitudes and preferences of people toward places and uses in the landscape, collected from value and preference surveys, the USGS SolVES 2.0 tool will provide quantitative models to relate social values, or perceived nonmonetary values, assigned to locations by survey respondents with the underlying environmental characteristics of those same locations. Project results will increase scientific and geographic knowledge of how Sarasota Bay residents value their area’s cultural ecosystem services.

  8. Applicability of the single equivalent point dipole model to represent a spatially distributed bio-electrical source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armoundas, A. A.; Feldman, A. B.; Sherman, D. A.; Cohen, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Although the single equivalent point dipole model has been used to represent well-localised bio-electrical sources, in realistic situations the source is distributed. Consequently, position estimates of point dipoles determined by inverse algorithms suffer from systematic error due to the non-exact applicability of the inverse model. In realistic situations, this systematic error cannot be avoided, a limitation that is independent of the complexity of the torso model used. This study quantitatively investigates the intrinsic limitations in the assignment of a location to the equivalent dipole due to distributed electrical source. To simulate arrhythmic activity in the heart, a model of a wave of depolarisation spreading from a focal source over the surface of a spherical shell is used. The activity is represented by a sequence of concentric belt sources (obtained by slicing the shell with a sequence of parallel plane pairs), with constant dipole moment per unit length (circumferentially) directed parallel to the propagation direction. The distributed source is represented by N dipoles at equal arc lengths along the belt. The sum of the dipole potentials is calculated at predefined electrode locations. The inverse problem involves finding a single equivalent point dipole that best reproduces the electrode potentials due to the distributed source. The inverse problem is implemented by minimising the chi2 per degree of freedom. It is found that the trajectory traced by the equivalent dipole is sensitive to the location of the spherical shell relative to the fixed electrodes. It is shown that this trajectory does not coincide with the sequence of geometrical centres of the consecutive belt sources. For distributed sources within a bounded spherical medium, displaced from the sphere's centre by 40% of the sphere's radius, it is found that the error in the equivalent dipole location varies from 3 to 20% for sources with size between 5 and 50% of the sphere's radius. Finally, a method is devised to obtain the size of the distributed source during the cardiac cycle.

  9. Spatial networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthélemy, Marc

    2011-02-01

    Complex systems are very often organized under the form of networks where nodes and edges are embedded in space. Transportation and mobility networks, Internet, mobile phone networks, power grids, social and contact networks, and neural networks, are all examples where space is relevant and where topology alone does not contain all the information. Characterizing and understanding the structure and the evolution of spatial networks is thus crucial for many different fields, ranging from urbanism to epidemiology. An important consequence of space on networks is that there is a cost associated with the length of edges which in turn has dramatic effects on the topological structure of these networks. We will thoroughly explain the current state of our understanding of how the spatial constraints affect the structure and properties of these networks. We will review the most recent empirical observations and the most important models of spatial networks. We will also discuss various processes which take place on these spatial networks, such as phase transitions, random walks, synchronization, navigation, resilience, and disease spread.

  10. Applications of a spatial extension to CIELAB X-M. Zhanga, J.E. Farrell, b, and B.A. Wandella

    E-print Network

    Wandell, Brian A.

    Department of Psychology, Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305 USA bHewlett Packard Laboratories, 1501 Page Mill Road of multi-level halftone images. Our com- putations were based on a spatial color di erence metric, S color patches. S-CIELAB includes a pre-processing stage that accounts for certain aspects of the spatial

  11. Thermodynamic Model of Spatial Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Miron; Allen, P.

    1998-03-01

    We develop and test a thermodynamic model of spatial memory. Our model is an application of statistical thermodynamics to cognitive science. It is related to applications of the statistical mechanics framework in parallel distributed processes research. Our macroscopic model allows us to evaluate an entropy associated with spatial memory tasks. We find that older adults exhibit higher levels of entropy than younger adults. Thurstone's Law of Categorical Judgment, according to which the discriminal processes along the psychological continuum produced by presentations of a single stimulus are normally distributed, is explained by using a Hooke spring model of spatial memory. We have also analyzed a nonlinear modification of the ideal spring model of spatial memory. This work is supported by NIH/NIA grant AG09282-06.

  12. Development of a spatially universal framework for classifying stream assemblages with application to conservation planning for Great Lakes lotic fish communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenna, James E., Jr.; Schaeffer, Jeffrey S.; Stewart, Jana S.; Slattery, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Classifications are typically specific to particular issues or areas, leading to patchworks of subjectively defined spatial units. Stream conservation is hindered by the lack of a universal habitat classification system and would benefit from an independent hydrology-guided spatial framework of units encompassing all aquatic habitats at multiple spatial scales within large regions. We present a system that explicitly separates the spatial framework from any particular classification developed from the framework. The framework was constructed from landscape variables that are hydrologically and biologically relevant, covered all space within the study area, and was nested hierarchically and spatially related at scales ranging from the stream reach to the entire region; classifications may be developed from any subset of the 9 basins, 107 watersheds, 459 subwatersheds, or 10,000s of valley segments or stream reaches. To illustrate the advantages of this approach, we developed a fish-guided classification generated from a framework for the Great Lakes region that produced a mosaic of habitat units which, when aggregated, formed larger patches of more general conditions at progressively broader spatial scales. We identified greater than 1,200 distinct fish habitat types at the valley segment scale, most of which were rare. Comparisons of biodiversity and species assemblages are easily examined at any scale. This system can identify and quantify habitat types, evaluate habitat quality for conservation and/or restoration, and assist managers and policymakers with prioritization of protection and restoration efforts. Similar spatial frameworks and habitat classifications can be developed for any organism in any riverine ecosystem.

  13. Spatial coherence of random laser emission

    E-print Network

    Redding, Brandon; Cao, Hui

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally studied the spatial coherence of random laser emission from dye solutions containing nanoparticles. The spatial coherence, measured in a double-slit experiment, varied significantly with the density of scatterers and the size and shape of the excitation volume. A qualitative explanation is provided, illustrating the dramatic difference from the spatial coherence of a conventional laser. This work demonstrates that random lasers can be controlled to provide intense, spatially incoherent emission for applications in which spatial cross talk or speckle limit performance.

  14. Spatial Manipulation with Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Benjamin; Levchenko, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical gradients convey information through space, time, and concentration, and are ultimately capable of spatially resolving distinct cellular phenotypes, such as differentiation, proliferation, and migration. How these gradients develop, evolve, and function during development, homeostasis, and various disease states is a subject of intense interest across a variety of disciplines. Microfluidic technologies have become essential tools for investigating gradient sensing in vitro due to their ability to precisely manipulate fluids on demand in well-controlled environments at cellular length scales. This review will highlight their utility for studying gradient sensing along with relevant applications to biology. PMID:25905100

  15. Theoretical prediction of the source-detector separation distance suited to the application of the spatially resolved spectroscopy from the near-infrared attenuation data cube of tissues

    E-print Network

    Ri, Yong-Wu; Im, Song-Jin

    2014-01-01

    The modified Beer-Lambert law (MBL) and the spatially resolved spectroscopy are used to measure the tissue oxidation in muscles and brains by the continuous wave near-infrared spectroscopy. The spatially resolved spectroscopy predicts the change in the concentration of the absorber by measuring the slope of attenuation data according to the separation and calculating the absorption coefficients of tissue on the basis of the slop in attenuation at the separation distance satisfying the linearity of this slop. This study analyzed the appropriate source-detector separation distance by using the diffuse approximation resolution for photon migration when predicting the absorption coefficient by the spatially resolved spectroscopy on the basis of the reflective image of the tissue. We imagine the 3 dimensional attenuation image with the absorption coefficient, reduced scattering coefficient and separation distance as its axes and obtained the attenuation data cube by calculating the attenuation on a certain interva...

  16. SMART: A Spatially Explicit Bio-Economic Model for Assessing and Managing Demersal Fisheries, with an Application to Italian Trawlers in the Strait of Sicily

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Tommaso; Parisi, Antonio; Garofalo, Germana; Gristina, Michele; Cataudella, Stefano; Fiorentino, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Management of catches, effort and exploitation pattern are considered the most effective measures to control fishing mortality and ultimately ensure productivity and sustainability of fisheries. Despite the growing concerns about the spatial dimension of fisheries, the distribution of resources and fishing effort in space is seldom considered in assessment and management processes. Here we propose SMART (Spatial MAnagement of demersal Resources for Trawl fisheries), a tool for assessing bio-economic feedback in different management scenarios. SMART combines information from different tasks gathered within the European Data Collection Framework on fisheries and is composed of: 1) spatial models of fishing effort, environmental characteristics and distribution of demersal resources; 2) an Artificial Neural Network which captures the relationships among these aspects in a spatially explicit way and uses them to predict resources abundances; 3) a deterministic module which analyzes the size structure of catches and the associated revenues, according to different spatially-based management scenarios. SMART is applied to demersal fishery in the Strait of Sicily, one of the most productive fisheries of the Mediterranean Sea. Three of the main target species are used as proxies for the whole range exploited by trawlers. After training, SMART is used to evaluate different management scenarios, including spatial closures, using a simulation approach that mimics the recent exploitation patterns. Results evidence good model performance, with a noteworthy coherence and reliability of outputs for the different components. Among others, the main finding is that a partial improvement in resource conditions can be achieved by means of nursery closures, even if the overall fishing effort in the area remains stable. Accordingly, a series of strategically designed areas of trawling closures could significantly improve the resource conditions of demersal fisheries in the Strait of Sicily, also supporting sustainable economic returns for fishermen if not applied simultaneously for different species. PMID:24465971

  17. Mathematical Modeling of spatial disease variables by Spatial Fuzzy Logic for Spatial Decision Support Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platz, M.; Rapp, J.; Groessler, M.; Niehaus, E.; Babu, A.; Soman, B.

    2014-11-01

    A Spatial Decision Support System (SDSS) provides support for decision makers and should not be viewed as replacing human intelligence with machines. Therefore it is reasonable that decision makers are able to use a feature to analyze the provided spatial decision support in detail to crosscheck the digital support of the SDSS with their own expertise. Spatial decision support is based on risk and resource maps in a Geographic Information System (GIS) with relevant layers e.g. environmental, health and socio-economic data. Spatial fuzzy logic allows the representation of spatial properties with a value of truth in the range between 0 and 1. Decision makers can refer to the visualization of the spatial truth of single risk variables of a disease. Spatial fuzzy logic rules that support the allocation of limited resources according to risk can be evaluated with measure theory on topological spaces, which allows to visualize the applicability of this rules as well in a map. Our paper is based on the concept of a spatial fuzzy logic on topological spaces that contributes to the development of an adaptive Early Warning And Response System (EWARS) providing decision support for the current or future spatial distribution of a disease. It supports the decision maker in testing interventions based on available resources and apply risk mitigation strategies and provide guidance tailored to the geo-location of the user via mobile devices. The software component of the system would be based on open source software and the software developed during this project will also be in the open source domain, so that an open community can build on the results and tailor further work to regional or international requirements and constraints. A freely available EWARS Spatial Fuzzy Logic Demo was developed wich enables a user to visualize risk and resource maps based on individual data in several data formats.

  18. A component-based, integrated spatially distributed hydrologic/water quality model: AgroEcoSystem-Watershed (AgES-W) overview and application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    AgroEcoSystem-Watershed (AgES-W) is a modular, Java-based spatially distributed model which implements hydrologic/water quality simulation components. The AgES-W model was previously evaluated for streamflow and recently has been enhanced with the addition of nitrogen (N) and sediment modeling compo...

  19. A Bayesian mixed shrinkage prior procedure for spatial-stochastic basis selection and evaluation of gPC expansions: Applications to elliptic SPDEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagiannis, Georgios; Konomi, Bledar A.; Lin, Guang

    2015-03-01

    We propose a new fully Bayesian method to efficiently obtain the spectral representation of a spatial random field, which can conduct spatial-stochastic basis selection and evaluation of generalized Polynomial Chaos (gPC) expansions when the number of the available basis functions is significantly larger than the size of the training data-set. We develop a fully Bayesian stochastic procedure, called mixed shrinkage prior (MSP), which performs both basis selection and coefficient evaluation simultaneously. MSP involves assigning a prior probability to the gPC structure and assigning conjugate priors to the expansion coefficients that can be thought of as mixtures of Ridge-LASSO shrinkage priors, in augmented form. The method offers a number of advantages over existing compressive sensing methods in gPC literature, such that it recovers possible sparse structures in both stochastic and spatial domains while the resulting expansion can be re-used directly to economically obtain results at any spatial input values. Yet, it inherits all the advantages of Bayesian model uncertainty methods, e.g. accounts for uncertainty about basis significance and provides interval estimation through posterior distributions. A unique highlight of the MSP procedure is that it can address heterogeneous sparsity in the spatial domain for different random dimensions. Furthermore, it yields a compromise between Ridge and LASSO regressions, and hence combines a weak (l2-norm) and strong (l1-norm) shrinkage, in an adaptive, data-driven manner. We demonstrate the good performance of the proposed method, and compare it against other existing compressive sensing ones on elliptic stochastic partial differential equations.

  20. Influence-Based Model Decomposition For Reasoning About Spatially Distributed

    E-print Network

    Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    , computation, and actuation at a fine grain. Recent MEMS applications include manipulation of parts important science and engineering applications, such as regulating the tem- perature distribution over applications require interpreting data and designing decentralized controllers for spatially distributed

  1. A Rational Probabilistic Method for Spatially Distributed Landslide Hazard Assessment

    E-print Network

    Haneberg, William C.

    A Rational Probabilistic Method for Spatially Distributed Landslide Hazard Assessment WILLIAM C, Landslides, Probabi- listic, Computer Applications, West Virginia ABSTRACT First-order, second-moment (FOSM models to perform spatially distributed probabilistic landslide hazard analyses. This is most easily

  2. Spatial-Operator Algebra For Robotic Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Guillermo; Kreutz, Kenneth K.; Milman, Mark H.

    1991-01-01

    Report discusses spatial-operator algebra developed in recent studies of mathematical modeling, control, and design of trajectories of robotic manipulators. Provides succinct representation of mathematically complicated interactions among multiple joints and links of manipulator, thereby relieving analyst of most of tedium of detailed algebraic manipulations. Presents analytical formulation of spatial-operator algebra, describes some specific applications, summarizes current research, and discusses implementation of spatial-operator algebra in the Ada programming language.

  3. Spatial Encounters: Exercises in Spatial Awareness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque.

    This series of activities on spatial relationships was designed to help users acquire the skills of spatial visualization and orientation and to improve their effectiveness in applying those skills. The series contains an introduction to spatial orientation with several self-directed activities to help improve that skill. It also contains seven…

  4. Combination of remote sensing data products to derive spatial climatologies of "degree days" and downscale meteorological reanalyses: application to the Upper Indus Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsythe, N. D.; Rutter, N.; Brock, B. W.; Fowler, H. J.; Blenkinsop, S.

    2014-12-01

    Lack of observations for the full range of required variables is a critical reason why many cryosphere-dominated hydrological modelling studies adopt a temperature index (degree day) approach to meltwater simulation rather than resolving the full surface energy balance. Thus spatial observations of "degree days" would be extremely useful in constraining model parameterisations. Even for models implementing a full energy balance, "degree day" observations provide a characterisation of the spatial distribution of climate inputs to the cryosphere-hydrological system. This study derives "degree days" for the Upper Indus Basin by merging remote sensing data products: snow cover duration (SCD), from MOD10A1 and land surface temperature (LST), from MOD11A1 and MYD11A1. Pixel-wise "degree days" are calculated, at imagery-dependent spatial resolution, by multiplying SCD by (above-freezing) daily LST. This is coherent with the snowpack-energy-to-runoff conversion used in temperature index algorithms. This allows assessment of the spatial variability of mass inputs (accumulated snowpack) because in nival regime areas - where complete ablation is regularly achieved - mass is the limiting constraint. The GLIMS Randolph Glacier Inventory is used to compare annual totals and seasonal timings of "degree days" over glaciated and nival zones. Terrain-classified statistics (by elevation and aspect) for the MODIS "degree-day" hybrid product are calculated to characterise of spatial precipitation distribution. While MODIS data products provide detailed spatial resolution relative to tributary catchment areas, the limited instrument record length is inadequate for assessing climatic trends and greatly limits use for hydrological model calibration and validation. While multi-decadal MODIS equivalent data products may be developed in the coming years, at present alternative methods are required for "degree day" trend analysis. This study thus investigates the use of the hybrid MODIS "degree day" product to downscale an ensemble of modern global meteorological reanalyses including ERA-Interim, NCEP CFSR, NASA MERRA and JRA-55 which overlap MODIS instrument record. This downscaling feasibility assessment is a prerequisite to applying the method to regional climate projections.

  5. Building Analysis from a Spatial Cognition Perspective

    E-print Network

    Building Analysis from a Spatial Cognition Perspective Georg Vrachliotis 1 , Christoph Hölscher 2 on the application of concepts and methods of Spatial Cognition to building analysis. We investigate the close comments and behavioral data. Based on an empirical study in a complex multi-level-building two main aspect

  6. Multi-beam second-harmonic generation in beta barium borate with a spatial light modulator and application to internal structuring in poly(methyl methacrylate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Perrie, W.; Kuang, Z.; Scully, P. J.; Baum, A.; Liang, S.; Edwardson, S. P.; Fearon, E.; Dearden, G.; Watkins, K. G.

    2012-06-01

    Parallel beam frequency doubling of 170 fs, NIR pulses is demonstrated by placing a thin beta barium borate (BBO) nonlinear crystal after a spatial light modulator. Computer-generated holograms applied to the spatial light modulator create 18 parallel diffracted beams at the fundamental wavelength ?=775 nm, then frequency doubled to ?=387 nm and focussed inside the poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrate for refractive index structuring. This procedure, demonstrated for the first time in PMMA, requires careful attention to phase matching of multiple beams and opens up dynamic parallel processing at UV wavelengths where nematic liquid crystal devices are more sensitive to optical damage. By overlapping filamentary modifications, an efficient, stable volume phase grating with dimensions 5×5×2.0 mm3 and pitch ?=15 ?m was fabricated in 18 minutes and reached a first-order diffraction efficiency of 70 % at the Bragg angle.

  7. Oracle Spatial Data Option Spatial Cartridge Oracle8i SpatialIBM ESRI DB2 Spatial ExtenderInformix Informix Spatial

    E-print Network

    Li, Xiang

    ; ---- Oracle Spatial Data Option Spatial Cartridge Oracle8i SpatialIBM ESRI DB2 Spatial ExtenderInformix Informix Spatial Datablade Oracle Oracle8i Spatial Oracle Spatial ----SDO_GEOMETRY SDO_GEOMETRY Oracle

  8. Spatial Standard Observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to devices and methods for the measurement and/or for the specification of the perceptual intensity of a visual image, or the perceptual distance between a pair of images. Grayscale test and reference images are processed to produce test and reference luminance images. A luminance filter function is convolved with the reference luminance image to produce a local mean luminance reference image. Test and reference contrast images are produced from the local mean luminance reference image and the test and reference luminance images respectively, followed by application of a contrast sensitivity filter. The resulting images are combined according to mathematical prescriptions to produce a Just Noticeable Difference, JND value, indicative of a Spatial Standard Observer, SSO. Some embodiments include masking functions, window functions, special treatment for images lying on or near borders and pre-processing of test images.

  9. Spatial Standard Observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrw B. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to devices and methods for the measurement and/or for the specification of the perceptual intensity of a visual image. or the perceptual distance between a pair of images. Grayscale test and reference images are processed to produce test and reference luminance images. A luminance filter function is convolved with the reference luminance image to produce a local mean luminance reference image . Test and reference contrast images are produced from the local mean luminance reference image and the test and reference luminance images respectively, followed by application of a contrast sensitivity filter. The resulting images are combined according to mathematical prescriptions to produce a Just Noticeable Difference, JND value, indicative of a Spatial Standard Observer. SSO. Some embodiments include masking functions. window functions. special treatment for images lying on or near border and pre-processing of test images.

  10. THE SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL DISTRIBUTION OF CHLORPYRIFOS IN THE U.S. EPA INDOOR AIR QUALITY (IAQ) TEST HOUSE FOLLOWING CRACK AND CREVICE TYPE APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pesticides found in homes may result from indoor applications to control household pests or by translocation from outdoor sources. Pesticides disperse according to their physical properties and other factors such as human activity, air exchange, temperature and humidity. Insect...

  11. Evaluation of spatially resolved diffuse reflectance imaging for subsurface pattern visualization towards applicability for fiber optic lensless imaging setup: phantom experiments and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelkanova, I.; Pandya, A.; Saiko, G.; Nacy, L.; Babar, H.; Shah, D.; Lilge, L.; Douplik, A.

    2015-07-01

    A portable, spatially resolved diffuse reflectance (SRDR) lensless imaging technique based on the charge coupled device (CCD), or complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor directly coupled with fiber optic bundle can be proposed for visualization of subsurface structures such as intrapapillary capillary loops (IPCLs). In this article, we discuss an experimental method for emulating a lensless imaging setup via raster scanning a single fiberoptic cable (where image is relayed onto the sensor surface through a fiber-optic cable equivalent to coupling a fiber optic conduit directly onto the sensor surface without any lenses) over a microfluidic phantom containing periodic hemoglobin absorption contrast. For mimicking scattering properties of turbid media, a diffusive layer formed of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) was placed atop of the microfluidic phantom. Thickness of the layers ranged from 0.2-0.7mm, and the ?s` value of the layers were in the range of 0.85 mm-1 - 4.25mm-1. The results demonstrate that a fiber-optic bundle/plate coupled lensless imaging setup has a high potential to recover intensity modulations from the subsurface patterns. Decreasing of the interrogation volumes leads to enhanced spatial resolution of diffuse reflectance imaging, and hence, can potentially overcome the scattering caused blurring.

  12. Application of composite water quality identification index on the water quality evaluation in spatial and temporal variations: a case study in Honghu Lake, China.

    PubMed

    Ban, Xuan; Wu, Qiuzhen; Pan, Baozhu; Du, Yun; Feng, Qi

    2014-07-01

    Composite Water Quality Identification Index (CWQII) and multivariate statistical techniques were used to investigate the temporal and spatial variations of water quality in Honghu Lake. The aims are to explore the characteristics of water quality trends in annual, monthly, and site spatial distribution and to identify the main pollution factors. The results showed that the values of CWQII increased from 2.0 to 4.0 from the years 2001 to 2005, then decreased from 2006 and kept a balance between 2.0 and 3.0 from 2006 to 2011, indicating that the water quality of Honghu Lake deteriorated from 2001 to 2005 and has gradually improved since 2006, which were likely achieved after water protection measurements taken since 2004. The monthly change rules of water quality were influenced by a superposition of natural processes and human activities. In samples numbered 1-9 from upstream to downstream, the maximum values of CWQII often occurred in sample site 9 while the minimum ones often occurred in sample site 2, indicating that the water quality near the upstream tributary was the poorest and that in the core zone was the best. Incoming water from the trunk canal of the Sihu area upstream was the largest pollution source. The sensitive pollution nutrients were mainly caused by the total nitrogen, followed by the total phosphorus. PMID:24615690

  13. Spatially DistributedSpatially Distributed Experimentation toExperimentation to

    E-print Network

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    : Spatially distributed atomic layer deposition Spatially Distributed Atomic LayerSpatially Distributed Atomic properties Significance Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is widely sought for its atomic-scale thickness control, MKS Instruments #12;Rubloff: Spatially distributed atomic layer deposition Spatially Distributed

  14. Policy applications of a highly resolved spatial and temporal onroad carbon dioxide emissions data product for the U.S.: Analyses and their implications for mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza Lebrun, Daniel

    Onroad CO2 emissions were analyzed as part of overall GHG emissions, but those studies have suffered from one or more of these five shortcomings: 1) the spatial resolution was coarse, usually encompassing a region, or the entire U.S.; 2) the temporal resolution was coarse (annual or monthly); 3) the study region was limited, usually a metropolitan planning organization (MPO) or state; 4) fuel sales were used as a proxy to quantify fuel consumption instead of focusing on travel; 5) the spatial heterogeneity of fleet and road network composition was not considered and instead national averages are used. Normalized vehicle-type state-level spatial biases range from 2.6% to 8.1%, while the road type classification biases range from -6.3% to 16.8%. These biases are found to cause errors in reduction estimates as large as ±60%, corresponding to ±0.2 MtC, for a national-average emissions mitigation strategy focused on a 10% emissions reduction from a single vehicle class. Temporal analysis shows distinct emissions seasonality that is particularly visible in the northernmost latitudes, demonstrating peak-to-peak deviations from the annual mean of up to 50%. The hourly structure shows peak-to-peak deviation from a weekly average of up to 200% for heavy-duty (HD) vehicles and 140% for light-duty (LD) vehicles. The present study focuses on reduction of travel and fuel economy improvements by putting forth several mitigation scenarios aimed at reducing VMT and increasing vehicle fuel efficiency. It was found that the most effective independent reduction strategies are those that increase fuel efficiency by extending standards proposed by the corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) or reduction of fuel consumption due to price increases. These two strategies show cumulative emissions reductions of approximately 11% and 12%, respectively, from a business as usual (BAU) approach over the 2000-2050 period. The U.S. onroad transportation sector is long overdue a comprehensive study of CO2 emissions at a highly resolved level. Such a study would improve fossil fuel flux products by enhancing measurement accuracy and prompt location-specific mitigation policy. The carbon cycle science and policymaking communities are both poised to benefit greatly from the development of a highly resolved spatiotemporal emissions product.

  15. Differentiating Spatial Memory from Spatial Transformations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Street, Whitney N.; Wang, Ranxiao Frances

    2014-01-01

    The perspective-taking task is one of the most common paradigms used to study the nature of spatial memory, and better performance for certain orientations is generally interpreted as evidence of spatial representations using these reference directions. However, performance advantages can also result from the relative ease in certain…

  16. A new leveling method without the direct use of crossover data and its application in marine magnetic surveys: weighted spatial averaging and temporal filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Takemi

    2015-12-01

    The author has developed a new leveling method for use with magnetic survey data, which consists of adjusting each measurement using the weighted spatial average of its neighboring data and subsequent temporal filtering. There are two key parameters in the method: the `weight distance' represents the characteristic distance of the weight function and the `filtering width' represents the full width of the Gaussian filtering function on the time series. This new method was applied to three examples of actual marine survey data. Leveling using optimum values of these two parameters for each example was found to significantly reduce the standard deviations of crossover differences by one third to one fifth of the values before leveling. The obtained time series of correction values for each example had a good correlation with the magnetic observatory data obtained relatively close to the survey areas, thus validating this new leveling method.

  17. Spatially correlated underwater acoustic multiple-input and multiple-output channel model and its application to estimation of channel capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joonsuk; Koh, Il-Suek; Lee, Yongshik

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we present a multiple-input and multiple-output (MIMO) channel signal model for underwater acoustic communication systems. This model uses the ray-tracing method to obtain the deterministic part of a channel signal, whereas the fluctuating part is obtained on the basis of the scattering coefficient of the time-varying ocean surface. For the accurate estimation of the channel capacity, spatial correlation is considered during channel signal generation. The validity of the proposed model is verified by comparing it with known ideal solutions. Moreover, results obtained from experimental data are provided to support the proposed model. MIMO channel signals generated by the model can be used to estimate the channel capacity in various communication scenarios.

  18. The Role of Stimulus-to-Rule Consistency in Learning Rapid Application of Spatial Rules. Final Technical Report, May-September 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisk, Arthur D.; Lloyd, Shirley J.

    1989-01-01

    Five experiments involving a total of 44 college students addressed the effects of intercomponent consistency on skill acquisition in a class of cognitively demanding tasks requiring rapid integration of information and rapid application of rules. The role of consistency of external stimulus-to-rule linkage in facilitating learning and performing…

  19. Spatial Solitons in Algaas Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jin Ung

    In this work, by measuring the two-, three-photon absorption, and the nonlinear refractive index coefficients, a useful bandwidth for an all-optical switching applications in the AlGaAs below half the band gap is identified. Operating in this material system, several types of spatial solitons such as fundamental bright solitons, Vector solitons, and Manakov solitons are experimentally demonstrated. The propagation and the interaction behaviors of these solitons are studied experimentally and numerically. The distinct properties of each soliton are discussed along with some possible applications. Some applications, such as all -optical switching based on spatial soliton dragging and the efficient guiding of orthogonally polarized femtosecond pulses by a bright spatial soliton, are experimentally demonstrated. The signal gain due to an ultrafast polarization coupling, better known as Four Wave Mixing (FWM) is demonstrated in a channel waveguide. The effects of FWM are studied experimentally and numerically. This effect is also used to demonstrate polarization switching. The linear and nonlinear properties of AlGaAs/GaAs multiple quantum well waveguides are measured. Anisotropic two photon absorption and nonlinear refractive indices near half the band gap are measured along with the linear birefringence for several different quantum well structures. The usefulness of multiple quantum well structures for an all -optical switching because of anisotropic nature of this material system is discussed.

  20. Investigating the spatial micro-epidemiology of diseases within a point-prevalence sample: a field applicable method for rapid mapping of households using low-cost GPS-dataloggers

    PubMed Central

    Stothard, J. Russell; Sousa-Figueiredo, Jose C.; Betson, Martha; Seto, Edmund Y.W.; Kabatereine, Narcis B.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Point-prevalence recording of the distribution of tropical parasitic diseases at village level is usually sufficient for general monitoring and surveillance. Whilst within-village spatial patterning of diseases exists, and can be important, mapping infected cases in a household-by-household setting is arduous and time consuming. With the development of low-cost GPS-data loggers (< £40) and available GoogleEarthTM satellite imagery, we present a field-applicable method based on crowdsourcing for rapid identification of infected cases (intestinal schistosomiasis, malaria and hookworm) by household. A total of 126 mothers with their 247 preschool children from Bukoba village (Mayuge District, Uganda) were examined with half of these mothers given a GPS-data logger to walk home with, returning the unit the same day for data off-loading, after which, households were assigned GPS coordinates. A satellite image of Bukoba was annotated with households denoting the infection status of each mother and child. General prevalence of intestinal schistosomiasis, malaria and hookworm in mothers and children was: 27.2 vs 7.7%, 28.6 vs 87.0% and 60.0 vs 22.3%, respectively. Different spatial patterns of disease could be identified likely representing the intrinsic differences in parasite biology and interplay with human behaviour(s) across this local landscape providing a better insight into reasons for disease micro-patterning. PMID:21714979

  1. FRACTAL ANALYSIS OF SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIABILITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to compare spatial variability of soil nitrate in a VRAT nitrogen (N) application study and temporal variability of soybean (Glycine max L.) yield in a long-term organic vs. inorganic study. In the VRAT study, conventional uniform N application was compared with variable rat...

  2. Development of atomic radical monitoring probe and its application to spatial distribution measurements of H and O atomic radical densities in radical-based plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Shunji; Takashima, Seigo; Yamakawa, Koji; Den, Shoji; Kano, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Keigo; Hori, Masaru

    2009-09-01

    Atomic radicals such as hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O) play important roles in process plasmas. In a previous study, we developed a system for measuring the absolute density of H, O, nitrogen, and carbon atoms in plasmas using vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy (VUVAS) with a compact light source using an atmospheric pressure microplasma [microdischarge hollow cathode lamp (MHCL)]. In this study, we developed a monitoring probe for atomic radicals employing the VUVAS with the MHCL. The probe size was 2.7 mm in diameter. Using this probe, only a single port needs to be accessed for radical density measurements. We successfully measured the spatial distribution of the absolute densities of H and O atomic radicals in a radical-based plasma processing system by moving the probe along the radial direction of the chamber. This probe allows convenient analysis of atomic radical densities to be carried out for any type of process plasma at any time. We refer to this probe as a ubiquitous monitoring probe for atomic radicals.

  3. An application of remotely derived climatological fields for risk assessment of vector-borne diseases : a spatial study of filariasis prevalence in the Nile Delta, Egypt.

    SciTech Connect

    Crombie, M. K.; Gillies, R. R.; Arvidson, R. E.; Brookmeyer, P.; Weil, G. J.; Sultan, M.; Harb, M.; Environmental Research; Washington Univ.; Utah State Univ.; Egyptian Ministry of Health

    1999-12-01

    This paper applies a relatively straightforward remote sensing method that is commonly used to derive climatological variables. Measurements of surface reflectance and surface radiant temperature derived from Landsat Thematic Mapper data were used to create maps of fractional vegetation and surface soil moisture availability for the southern Nile delta in Egypt. These climatological variables were subsequently used to investigate the spatial distribution of the vector borne disease Bancroftian filariasis in the Nile delta where it is focally endemic and a growing problem. Averaged surface soil moisture values, computed for a 5-km border area around affected villages, were compared to filariasis prevalence rates. Prevalence rates were found to be negligible below a critical soil moisture value of 0.2, presumably because of a lack of appropriate breeding sites for the Culex Pipiens mosquito species. With appropriate modifications to account for local conditions and vector species, this approach should be useful as a means to map, predict, and control insect vector-borne diseases that critically depend on wet areas for propagation. This type of analysis may help governments and health agencies that are involved in filariasis control to better focus limited resources to identifiable high-risk areas.

  4. Interactive Exploration of Multigranularity Spatial and Temporal Datacubes: Providing ComputerAssisted Geovisualization Support

    E-print Network

    (CRG) Canada NSERC Industrial Research Chair in Geospatial Databases for Decision Support 1 it nowadays in the field of Business Intelligence for nonspatial data (e.g. using OLAP: OnLine Analytical GIS or map visualisation technology with existing business intelligence (BI) technologies

  5. G E O M A T I C A TOWARD BETTER SUPPORT FOR SPATIAL

    E-print Network

    dimensions of a data warehouse, new tools are needed. It has been shown that OLAP possesses a certain collect increasingly significant volumes of data. Once stored in data warehouses, they form the basis code, global positioning system location, (...) region or country" [ESRI 2000]. Indeed, it has been

  6. Application of a two-dimensional model to describe the CO2 exchange between a spatially non-uniform forest stand and the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhartova, Yulia; Olchev, Alexander; Shapkina, Natalia

    2014-05-01

    Within the framework of the study a two dimensional hydrodynamic high-resolution model of the energy, H2O, CO2 turbulent exchange was developed and applied to describe effect of the horizontal and vertical heterogeneity of a forest canopy on CO2exchange between soil surface, forest stand and the atmosphere under different weather conditions. Most attention in the study was paid to analyze the influence of forest clearing, windthrow of different sizes, forest edges, etc. on turbulent exchange rate and CO2 flux partitioning between forest overstorey, understorey and soil surface. The modeling experiments were provided under different wind conditions, thermal stratification of the atmospheric boundary layer, incoming solar radiation, etc. To quantify effect of spatial heterogeneity on total ecosystem fluxes the modeling results were compared with CO2 fluxes modeled for a spatially uniform forest canopy under similar ambient conditions. The averaged system of hydrodynamic equations is used for calculating the components of the mean velocity ?V = {V1, V2}: ( ( ) ) ?Vi+ V ?Vi= - 1-??P- - -?- ? E - K ?Vi-+ ?Vj- + F, ?Vi = 0, ?t j?xj ?0 ?xi ?xj ij ?xj ?xi i ?xi where E is the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), K is the turbulent diffusivity, ?P is the deviation of pressure from the hydrostatic distribution and ?0?F is the averaged force of air flow interaction with vegetation. F? was parameterized as ?F = -cd ·LAD ·| | ||V?||·?V, where cd is the drag coefficient and LAD is the leaf area density. The turbulent diffusivity K can be expressed by means of TKE and the velocity of TKE dissipation ? as follows: K = C?E2?-1, where C? is the proportionality coefficient. One of the ways to obtain E and ? is to solve the additional system of two differential equations of diffusion-transport type: ( ) ( ) ?E- -?E- -?- -K-?E- ?-? ??- -?- K-?? -? ( 1 2 ) ?t +Vj?xj = ?xi ?E ?xi +PE - ?, ?t +Vj ?xj = ?xi ???xi +E C ?PE - C?? - ? ?, where ?E and ?? are the Prandtl numbers, PE is the TKE production by shear, C?1 and C?2 are the model constants. The term ?? = ?- E(C ?1 - C?2) · 12C?1/2c dLAD||? || |V |E describes the increase of TKE dissipation due to the interaction with vegetation elements. The function ? can be any of the following variables: ?, ?/ E, or El, where l is the mixing length. Detailed analysis of these equations performed by Sogachev (Sogachev, Panferov, 2006) showed that for ? = ?/ E the model is less sensible to the errors of the input data. Transfer equation for CO2 within and above a plant canopy can be written as: ( ) ?C- -?C- -?- -K-?C- ?t + Vj?xj = ?xi ?C ?xi + FC, where C is CO2 concentration, ?C is the Prandtl number, and the term FC describes the sources/sinks of CO2 in the vegetation and soil. For parameterization of the photosynthesis rate in the forest canopy the Monsi and Saeki approach (Monsi M., Saeki T., 1953) was applied. Stem respiration was ignored in the study. The CO2 emission from the soil surface into the atmosphere was assumed to be constant for entire forest area. This study was supported by grants of the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (RFBR 14-04-01568-a).

  7. Application of Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis to Geoelectric and Geologic Parameters for Spatial Prediction of Groundwater Resources Potential and Aquifer Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adiat, K. A. N.; Nawawi, M. N. M.; Abdullah, K.

    2013-03-01

    Prediction of groundwater resources potential is a spatial decision problem that involves a set of multiple evaluation parameters. In order to produce a groundwater resources potential prediction model of higher reliability and precision in a given study area, the effects of all the important parameters that can contribute to the groundwater occurrence in the area must be integrated. However, the methodology of integrating these parameters such that the relative importance of each is reflected is still a challenge that has not been efficiently handled. In this study, the principle of multi-criteria decision analysis in the context of the analytical hierarchy process is proposed as a technique that can yield a prediction model of higher reliability and precision. The proposed technique was applied to geoelectric and geologic parameters, derived from the results of the interpretation of 2D resistivity imaging data acquired from the study area. The advantage of the proposed technique is that it reduces bias in decision making. The main objective of the study is to produce groundwater potential map for the area. Furthermore, an attempt was also made in the study to characterize the aquifer of the area by estimating the Dar-Zarrouk parameters, using the integration of borehole and 2D resistivity data. The success rate (accuracy) of the prediction was established to be 80 %. Furthermore, the regression line fitted to the aquifer transmissivity and transverse resistance data shows linear relationship with a high regression coefficient of 0.79. The prediction success rate obtained showed that the method proposed in this study is reliable, accurate, and an improved technique of integrating multiple parameters for holistic evaluation of groundwater resources.

  8. Development and application of methods to quantify spatial and temporal hyperpolarized 3He MRI ventilation dynamics: preliminary results in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Miranda; Wheatley, Andrew; McCormack, David G.; Parraga, Grace

    2010-03-01

    Hyperpolarized helium-3 (3He) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a non-invasive research method for quantifying lung structural and functional changes, enabling direct visualization in vivo at high spatial and temporal resolution. Here we described the development of methods for quantifying ventilation dynamics in response to salbutamol in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Whole body 3.0 Tesla Excite 12.0 MRI system was used to obtain multi-slice coronal images acquired immediately after subjects inhaled hyperpolarized 3He gas. Ventilated volume (VV), ventilation defect volume (VDV) and thoracic cavity volume (TCV) were recorded following segmentation of 3He and 1H images respectively, and used to calculate percent ventilated volume (PVV) and ventilation defect percent (VDP). Manual segmentation and Otsu thresholding were significantly correlated for VV (r=.82, p=.001), VDV (r=.87 p=.0002), PVV (r=.85, p=.0005), and VDP (r=.85, p=.0005). The level of agreement between these segmentation methods was also evaluated using Bland-Altman analysis and this showed that manual segmentation was consistently higher for VV (Mean=.22 L, SD=.05) and consistently lower for VDV (Mean=-.13, SD=.05) measurements than Otsu thresholding. To automate the quantification of newly ventilated pixels (NVp) post-bronchodilator, we used translation, rotation, and scaling transformations to register pre-and post-salbutamol images. There was a significant correlation between NVp and VDV (r=-.94 p=.005) and between percent newly ventilated pixels (PNVp) and VDP (r=- .89, p=.02), but not for VV or PVV. Evaluation of 3He MRI ventilation dynamics using Otsu thresholding and landmark-based image registration provides a way to regionally quantify functional changes in COPD subjects after treatment with beta-agonist bronchodilators, a common COPD and asthma therapy.

  9. Application of Spatial and Closed Capture-Recapture Models on Known Population of the Western Derby Eland (Taurotragus derbianus derbianus) in Senegal

    PubMed Central

    J?nek, Tomáš; J?nková Vymyslická, Pavla; Hozdecká, Kate?ina; Hejcmanová, Pavla

    2015-01-01

    Camera trapping with capture-recapture analyses has provided estimates of the abundances of elusive species over the last two decades. Closed capture-recapture models (CR) based on the recognition of individuals and incorporating natural heterogeneity in capture probabilities are considered robust tools; however, closure assumption is often questionable and the use of an Mh jackknife estimator may fail in estimations of real abundance when the heterogeneity is high and data is sparse. A novel, spatially explicit capture-recapture (SECR) approach based on the location-specific capture histories of individuals overcomes the limitations of closed models. We applied both methods on a closed population of 16 critically endangered Western Derby elands in the fenced 1,060-ha Fathala reserve, Senegal. We analyzed the data from 30 cameras operating during a 66-day sampling period deployed in two densities in grid and line arrays. We captured and identified all 16 individuals in 962 trap-days. Abundances were estimated in the programs CAPTURE (models M0, Mh and Mh Chao) and R, package secr (basic Null and Finite mixture models), and compared with the true population size. We specified 66 days as a threshold in which SECR provides an accurate estimate in all trapping designs within the 7-times divergent density from 0.004 to 0.028 camera trap/ha. Both SECR models showed uniform tendency to overestimate abundance when sampling lasted shorter with no major differences between their outputs. Unlike the closed models, SECR performed well in the line patterns, which indicates promising potential for linear sampling of properly defined habitats of non-territorial and identifiable herbivores in dense wooded savanna conditions. The CR models provided reliable estimates in the grid and we confirmed the advantage of Mh Chao estimator over Mh jackknife when data appeared sparse. We also demonstrated the pooling of trapping occasions with an increase in the capture probabilities, avoiding violation of results. PMID:26334997

  10. Spatially-Heterodyned Holography

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Clarence E [Knoxville, TN; Hanson, Gregory R [Clinton, TN

    2006-02-21

    A method of recording a spatially low-frequency heterodyne hologram, including spatially heterodyne fringes for Fourier analysis, includes: splitting a laser beam into a reference beam and an object beam; interacting the object beam with an object; focusing the reference beam and the object beam at a focal plane of a digital recorder to form a spatially low-frequency heterodyne hologram including spatially heterodyne fringes for Fourier analysis; digital recording the spatially low-frequency heterodyne hologram; Fourier transforming axes of the recorded spatially low-frequency heterodyne hologram including spatially heterodyne fringes in Fourier space to sit on top of a heterodyne carrier frequency defined by an angle between the reference beam and the object beam; cutting off signals around an origin; and performing an inverse Fourier transform.

  11. Solving Large-scale Spatial Optimization Problems in Water Resources Management through Spatial Evolutionary Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Cai, X.

    2007-12-01

    A water resources system can be defined as a large-scale spatial system, within which distributed ecological system interacts with the stream network and ground water system. Water resources management, the causative factors and hence the solutions to be developed have a significant spatial dimension. This motivates a modeling analysis of water resources management within a spatial analytical framework, where data is usually geo- referenced and in the form of a map. One of the important functions of Geographic information systems (GIS) is to identify spatial patterns of environmental variables. The role of spatial patterns in water resources management has been well established in the literature particularly regarding how to design better spatial patterns for satisfying the designated objectives of water resources management. Evolutionary algorithms (EA) have been demonstrated to be successful in solving complex optimization models for water resources management due to its flexibility to incorporate complex simulation models in the optimal search procedure. The idea of combining GIS and EA motivates the development and application of spatial evolutionary algorithms (SEA). SEA assimilates spatial information into EA, and even changes the representation and operators of EA. In an EA used for water resources management, the mathematical optimization model should be modified to account the spatial patterns; however, spatial patterns are usually implicit, and it is difficult to impose appropriate patterns to spatial data. Also it is difficult to express complex spatial patterns by explicit constraints included in the EA. The GIS can help identify the spatial linkages and correlations based on the spatial knowledge of the problem. These linkages are incorporated in the fitness function for the preference of the compatible vegetation distribution. Unlike a regular GA for spatial models, the SEA employs a special hierarchical hyper-population and spatial genetic operators to represent spatial variables in a more efficient way. The hyper-population consists of a set of populations, which correspond to the spatial distributions of the individual agents (organisms). Furthermore spatial crossover and mutation operators are designed in accordance with the tree representation and then applied to both organisms and populations. This study applies the SEA to a specific problem of water resources management- maximizing the riparian vegetation coverage in accordance with the distributed groundwater system in an arid region. The vegetation coverage is impacted greatly by the nonlinear feedbacks and interactions between vegetation and groundwater and the spatial variability of groundwater. The SEA is applied to search for an optimal vegetation configuration compatible to the groundwater flow. The results from this example demonstrate the effectiveness of the SEA. Extension of the algorithm for other water resources management problems is discussed.

  12. A compute-Efficient Bitmap Compression Index for Database Applications

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-01-01

    FastBit: A Compute-Efficient Bitmap Compression Index for Database Applications The Word-Aligned Hybrid (WAH) bitmap compression method and data structure is highly efficient for performing search and retrieval operations on large datasets. The WAH technique is optimized for computational efficiency. The WAH-based bitmap indexing software, called FastBit, is particularly appropriate to infrequently varying databases, including those found in the on-line analytical processing (OLAP) industry. Some commercial database products already include some Version of a bitmap index,more »which could possibly be replaced by the WAR bitmap compression techniques for potentially large operational speedup. Experimental results show performance improvements by an average factor of 10 over bitmap technology used by industry, as well as increased efficiencies in constructing compressed bitmaps. FastBit can be use as a stand-alone index, or integrated into a database system. ien integrated into a database system, this technique may be particularly useful for real-time business analysis applications. Additional FastRit applications may include efficient real-time exploration of scientific models, such as climate and combustion simulations, to minimize search time for analysis and subsequent data visualization. FastBit was proven theoretically to be time-optimal because it provides a search time proportional to the number of elements selected by the index.« less

  13. Application of thermal analysis to measure the spatial heterogeneity of organic matter degradation after wildfire: implications for post-fire rehabilitation treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merino, Agustin; Fonturbel, M. Teresa; Vega, Jose A.

    2015-04-01

    Severe wildfires can cause drastic changes in SOM content and quality with important implications for soil conservation and global C balance. Soil heating usually leads to loss of the most labile SOM compounds (e.g. carbohydrates, lipids and peptides) and to generation of aromatic substances. However, these fire-related damages are not uniform over large areas, because of the spatial heterogeneity of different factors such as fire type and environmental conditions. Rapid diagnosis of soil burn severity is required to enable the design of emergency post-fire rehabilitation treatments. The study was conducted in soils from NW Spain, an Atlantic-climate zone that is particularly prone to wildfires. Intact soil cores (forest floor and uppermost mineral soil layer) were taken from a soil developed under granitic rock and subjected to experimental burning (in a bench positioned at the outlet of a wind tunnel). Soil temperature during fire was monitorised and five visual levels of soil burn severity (SBS) were recorded immediately after fire. Solid-state 13C CP-MAS NMR spectroscopy analyses were performed in an Agilent (Varian) VNMRS-500-WB spectrometer. The samples were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry (TGA/DSC, Mettler-Toledo Intl. Inc.). The analyses were performed with 4 mg of samples placed in open aluminium pans under dry air (flow rate, 50 mL-1) and at a scanning rate of 10 °C min-1. The temperature ranged between 50 and 600 °C. In the organic layer, the temperature reached during fire influenced the formation and characteristics of charred material. These materials showed an increasing degree of carbonization/aromatization in relation to the increase of temperature during burning. Burning also led to compounds of higher thermal recalcitrance (increases in T50 values -the temperature at which 50% of the energy stored in SOM is released-). However, values recorded in some samples were lower than those measured in highly polycondensed aromatic compounds. In the mineral soil, large reductions in SOM content were found in both moderate and high SBS (up to 70 %), whereas important effects on SOM quality were only associated with high SBS. NMR analysis revealed these changes as losses of O-alkyl, alkyl and carboxylic structures and increases of the aromatic structures (up to 50 %). In both organic and mineral soils the DSC analysis revealed decreased combustion heat released up to 375 °C, and increased T50. Relationships between thermal properties and chemical-shift regions in the NMR helped provide a better understanding of SOM quality after wildfire. The results also show that thermal analysis can be used as a rapid tool to assess the different degrees of SOM degradation, in areas where the complex heterogeneity of the fire damage requires different emergency post-fire rehabilitation treatments.

  14. Application of Spatial Data Modeling and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Identification of Potential Siting Options for Various Electrical Generation Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mays, Gary T; Belles, Randy; Blevins, Brandon R; Hadley, Stanton W; Harrison, Thomas J; Jochem, Warren C; Neish, Bradley S; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Rose, Amy N

    2012-05-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) initiated an internal National Electric Generation Siting Study, which is an ongoing multiphase study addressing several key questions related to our national electrical energy supply. This effort has led to the development of a tool, OR-SAGE (Oak Ridge Siting Analysis for power Generation Expansion), to support siting evaluations. The objective in developing OR-SAGE was to use industry-accepted approaches and/or develop appropriate criteria for screening sites and employ an array of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data sources at ORNL to identify candidate areas for a power generation technology application. The initial phase of the study examined nuclear power generation. These early nuclear phase results were shared with staff from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), which formed the genesis and support for an expansion of the work to several other power generation forms, including advanced coal with carbon capture and storage (CCS), solar, and compressed air energy storage (CAES). Wind generation was not included in this scope of work for EPRI. The OR-SAGE tool is essentially a dynamic visualization database. The results shown in this report represent a single static set of results using a specific set of input parameters. In this case, the GIS input parameters were optimized to support an economic study conducted by EPRI. A single set of individual results should not be construed as an ultimate energy solution, since US energy policy is very complex. However, the strength of the OR-SAGE tool is that numerous alternative scenarios can be quickly generated to provide additional insight into electrical generation or other GIS-based applications. The screening process divides the contiguous United States into 100 x 100 m (1-hectare) squares (cells), applying successive power generation-appropriate site selection and evaluation criteria (SSEC) to each cell. There are just under 700 million cells representing the contiguous United States. If a cell meets the requirements of each criterion, the cell is deemed a candidate area for siting a specific power generation form relative to a reference plant for that power type. Some SSEC parameters preclude siting a power plant because of an environmental, regulatory, or land-use constraint. Other SSEC assist in identifying less favorable areas, such as proximity to hazardous operations. All of the selected SSEC tend to recommend against sites. The focus of the ORNL electrical generation source siting study is on identifying candidate areas from which potential sites might be selected, stopping short of performing any detailed site evaluations or comparisons. This approach is designed to quickly screen for and characterize candidate areas. Critical assumptions supporting this work include the supply of cooling water to thermoelectric power generation; a methodology to provide an adequate siting footprint for typical power plant applications; a methodology to estimate thermoelectric plant capacity while accounting for available cooling water; and a methodology to account for future ({approx}2035) siting limitations as population increases and demands on freshwater sources change. OR-SAGE algorithms were built to account for these critical assumptions. Stream flow is the primary thermoelectric plant cooling source evaluated in this study. All cooling was assumed to be provided by a closed-cycle cooling (CCC) system requiring makeup water to account for evaporation and blowdown. Limited evaluations of shoreline cooling and the use of municipal processed water (gray) cooling were performed. Using a representative set of SSEC as input to the OR-SAGE tool and employing the accompanying critical assumptions, independent results for the various power generation sources studied were calculated.

  15. Part I: temporal and spatial distribution of multiclass pesticide residues in lake waters of Northern Greece: application of an optimized SPE-UPLC-MS/MS pretreatment and analytical method.

    PubMed

    Kalogridi, Eleni-Chrysoula; Christophoridis, Christophoros; Bizani, Erasmia; Drimaropoulou, Garyfallia; Fytianos, Konstantinos

    2014-06-01

    The present work describes the application of an analytical procedure, utilizing ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled with mass spectrometry instrumentation, for the determination of 253 multiclass pesticides, classified in six different groups. Solid phase extraction was applied for the isolation and pre-concentration of target compounds in water samples. Surface waters of the lakes located in Northern Greece (Volvi, Doirani, and Kerkini), were collected in two time periods (fall/winter 2010 and spring/summer 2011) and analyzed, applying the developed analytical methods. Spatial distribution of detected pesticides was visualized using interpolation methods and geographical information systems (GIS). Pesticides with maximum concentrations were amitrole, propoxur, simazine, chlorpyrifos, carbendazim, triazophos, disulfoton-sulfone, pyridaben, sebuthylazine, terbuthylazine, atrazine, atrazine-desethyl, bensulfuron-methyl, metobromuron, metribuzin, rotenone, pyriproxyfen, and rimsulfuron. In Lake Kerkini, mainly carbamates and triazines were determined at elevated concentrations, near the coastal point of the NW side of the lake. Seasonal variations were strong among the applied pesticide classes and determined concentrations, indicating the contribution of pesticide application patterns and rainfall. Lake Doirani exhibited organophosphate pesticides at higher concentrations mainly at coastal points, while triazines emerged as the main pollutant during spring sampling. Lake Volvi exhibited the highest pesticide concentrations, mostly triazines and ureas at the central part of the lake. The occurrence of extreme values and nonconstant seasonal variations indicated that the concentrations were increased disproportionately during the second sampling, as a result of the varying contribution of pollution sources right after the application period. In all cases, the total concentration of pesticides increased during the second sampling period. PMID:24696214

  16. Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Arthur M.

    1986-07-01

    Economic incentives have spurred numerous applications of genetically engineered organisms in manufacture of pharmaceuticals and industrial chemicals. These successes, involving a variety of methods of genetic manipulation, have dispelled early fears that genetic engineering could not be handled safely, even in the laboratory. Consequently, the potential for applications in the wider environment without physical containment is being considered for agriculture, mining, pollution control, and pest control. These proposed applications range from modest extensions of current plant breeding techniques for new disease-resistant species to radical combinations of organisms (for example, nitrogen-fixing corn plants). These applications raise concerns about potential ecological impacts (see chapter 5), largely because of adverse experiences with both deliberate and inadvertent introductions of nonindigenous species.

  17. Parcellating connectivity in spatial maps

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Diane M.; Fei-Fei, Li

    2015-01-01

    A common goal in biological sciences is to model a complex web of connections using a small number of interacting units. We present a general approach for dividing up elements in a spatial map based on their connectivity properties, allowing for the discovery of local regions underlying large-scale connectivity matrices. Our method is specifically designed to respect spatial layout and identify locally-connected clusters, corresponding to plausible coherent units such as strings of adjacent DNA base pairs, subregions of the brain, animal communities, or geographic ecosystems. Instead of using approximate greedy clustering, our nonparametric Bayesian model infers a precise parcellation using collapsed Gibbs sampling. We utilize an infinite clustering prior that intrinsically incorporates spatial constraints, allowing the model to search directly in the space of spatially-coherent parcellations. After showing results on synthetic datasets, we apply our method to both functional and structural connectivity data from the human brain. We find that our parcellation is substantially more effective than previous approaches at summarizing the brain’s connectivity structure using a small number of clusters, produces better generalization to individual subject data, and reveals functional parcels related to known retinotopic maps in visual cortex. Additionally, we demonstrate the generality of our method by applying the same model to human migration data within the United States. This analysis reveals that migration behavior is generally influenced by state borders, but also identifies regional communities which cut across state lines. Our parcellation approach has a wide range of potential applications in understanding the spatial structure of complex biological networks. PMID:25737822

  18. Robustness of Spatial Micronetworks

    E-print Network

    McAndrew, Thomas C; Bagrow, James P

    2015-01-01

    Power lines, roadways, pipelines and other physical infrastructure are critical to modern society. These structures may be viewed as spatial networks where geographic distances play a role in the functionality and construction cost of links. Traditionally, studies of network robustness have primarily considered the connectedness of large, random networks. Yet for spatial infrastructure physical distances must also play a role in network robustness. Understanding the robustness of small spatial networks is particularly important with the increasing interest in microgrids, small-area distributed power grids that are well suited to using renewable energy resources. We study the random failures of links in small networks where functionality depends on both spatial distance and topological connectedness. By introducing a percolation model where the failure of each link is proportional to its spatial length, we find that, when failures depend on spatial distances, networks are more fragile than expected. Accounting...

  19. Risk assessment of down-the-drain chemicals at large spatial scales: Model development and application to contaminants originating from urban areas in the Saint Lawrence River Basin.

    PubMed

    Grill, Günther; Khan, Usman; Lehner, Bernhard; Nicell, Jim; Ariwi, Joseph

    2016-01-15

    Chemicals released into freshwater systems threaten ecological functioning and may put aquatic life and the health of humans at risk. We developed a new contaminant fate model (CFM) that follows simple, well-established methodologies and is unique in its cross-border, seamless hydrological and geospatial framework, including lake routing, a critical component in northern environments. We validated the model using the pharmaceutical Carbamazepine and predicted eco-toxicological risk for 15 pharmaceuticals in the Saint-Lawrence River Basin, Canada. The results indicated negligible to low environmental risk for the majority of tested chemicals, while two pharmaceuticals showed elevated risk in up to 13% of rivers affected by municipal effluents. As an integrated model, our CFM is designed for application at very large scales with the primary goal of detecting high risk zones. In regulatory frameworks, it can help screen existing or new chemicals entering the market regarding their potential impact on human and environmental health. Due to its high geospatial resolution, our CFM can also facilitate the prioritization of actions, such as identifying regions where reducing contamination sources or upgrading treatment plants is most pertinent to achieve targeted pollutant removal or to protect drinking water resources. PMID:26437353

  20. Development of EMC-based empirical model for estimating spatial distribution of pollutant loads and its application in rural areas of Korea.

    PubMed

    Yi, Qitao; Li, Hui; Lee, Jin-Woo; Kim, Youngchul

    2015-09-01

    An integrated approach to easily calculate pollutant loads from agricultural watersheds is suggested and verified in this research. The basic concepts of this empirical tool were based on the assumption that variations in event mean concentrations (EMCs) of pollutants from a given agricultural watershed during rainstorms were only attributable to the rainfall pattern. Fifty one sets of EMC values were obtained from nine different watersheds located in the rural areas of Korea, and these data were used to develop predictive tools for the EMCs in rainfall runoff. The results of statistical tests of these formulas show that they are fairly good in predicting actual EMC values of some parameters, and useful in terms of calculating pollutant loads for any rainfall event time span such as daily, weekly, monthly, and yearly. This model was further checked in for its field applicability in a reservoir receiving stormwater after a cleanup of the sediments, covering 17 consecutive rainfall events from 1 July to 15 August in 2007. Overall the predicted values matched the observed values, indicating the feasibility of this empirical tool as a simple and useful solution in evaluating timely distribution of nonpoint source pollution loads from small rural watersheds of Korea. PMID:26354686

  1. Minimising Mortality in Endangered Raptors Due to Power Lines: The Importance of Spatial Aggregation to Optimize the Application of Mitigation Measures

    PubMed Central

    Guil, Francisco; Fernández-Olalla, Mariana; Moreno-Opo, Rubén; Mosqueda, Ignacio; Gómez, María Elena; Aranda, Antonio; Arredondo, Ángel; Guzmán, José; Oria, Javier; González, Luis Mariano; Margalida, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    Electrocution by power lines is one of the main causes of non-natural mortality in birds of prey. In an area in central Spain, we surveyed 6304 pylons from 333 power lines to determine electrocution rates, environmental and design factors that may influence electrocution and the efficacy of mitigation measures used to minimise electrocution cases. A total of 952 electrocuted raptors, representing 14 different species, were observed. Electrocuted raptors were concentrated in certain areas and the environmental factors associated with increased electrocution events were: greater numbers of prey animals; greater vegetation cover; and shorter distance to roads. The structural elements associated with electrocutions were shorter strings of insulators, one or more phases over the crossarm, cross-shaped design and pylon function. Of the 952 carcasses found, 148 were eagles, including golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), Spanish imperial eagle (Aquila adalberti) and Bonelli's eagle (Aquila fasciata). Electrocuted eagles were clustered in smaller areas than other electrocuted raptors. The factors associated with increased eagle electrocution events were: pylons function, shorter strings of insulators, higher slopes surrounding the pylon, and more numerous potential prey animals. Pylons with increased string of insulators had lower raptor electrocution rates than unimproved pylons, although this technique was unsuccessful for eagles. Pylons with cable insulation showed higher electrocution rates than unimproved pylons, both for raptors and eagles, despite this is the most widely used and recommended mitigation measure in several countries. To optimize the application of mitigation measures, our results recommend the substitution of pin-type insulators to suspended ones and elongating the strings of insulators. PMID:22140549

  2. Individual Differences in Spatial Text Processing: High Spatial Ability Can Compensate for Spatial Working Memory Interference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meneghetti, Chiara; Gyselinck, Valerie; Pazzaglia, Francesca; De Beni, Rossana

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigates the relation between spatial ability and visuo-spatial and verbal working memory in spatial text processing. In two experiments, participants listened to a spatial text (Experiments 1 and 2) and a non-spatial text (Experiment 1), at the same time performing a spatial or a verbal concurrent task, or no secondary task.…

  3. Implementing OLAP Query Fragment Aggregation and Recombination for the OLAP Enabled Grid

    E-print Network

    Dehene, Frank

    of the en- terprise's data in that location. This data warehouse would then be the sole site which computes backend data warehouses. We have implemented and experimentally evaluated our query processing method at the location where it is generated. Many enterprises oper- ate in a highly distributed fashion, and hence

  4. Bootstrap percolation on spatial networks.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian; Zhou, Tao; Hu, Yanqing

    2015-01-01

    Bootstrap percolation is a general representation of some networked activation process, which has found applications in explaining many important social phenomena, such as the propagation of information. Inspired by some recent findings on spatial structure of online social networks, here we study bootstrap percolation on undirected spatial networks, with the probability density function of long-range links' lengths being a power law with tunable exponent. Setting the size of the giant active component as the order parameter, we find a parameter-dependent critical value for the power-law exponent, above which there is a double phase transition, mixed of a second-order phase transition and a hybrid phase transition with two varying critical points, otherwise there is only a second-order phase transition. We further find a parameter-independent critical value around -1, about which the two critical points for the double phase transition are almost constant. To our surprise, this critical value -1 is just equal or very close to the values of many real online social networks, including LiveJournal, HP Labs email network, Belgian mobile phone network, etc. This work helps us in better understanding the self-organization of spatial structure of online social networks, in terms of the effective function for information spreading. PMID:26423347

  5. Entropy, complexity, and spatial information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batty, Michael; Morphet, Robin; Masucci, Paolo; Stanilov, Kiril

    2014-10-01

    We pose the central problem of defining a measure of complexity, specifically for spatial systems in general, city systems in particular. The measures we adopt are based on Shannon's (in Bell Syst Tech J 27:379-423, 623-656, 1948) definition of information. We introduce this measure and argue that increasing information is equivalent to increasing complexity, and we show that for spatial distributions, this involves a trade-off between the density of the distribution and the number of events that characterize it; as cities get bigger and are characterized by more events—more places or locations, information increases, all other things being equal. But sometimes the distribution changes at a faster rate than the number of events and thus information can decrease even if a city grows. We develop these ideas using various information measures. We first demonstrate their applicability to various distributions of population in London over the last 100 years, then to a wider region of London which is divided into bands of zones at increasing distances from the core, and finally to the evolution of the street system that characterizes the built-up area of London from 1786 to the present day. We conclude by arguing that we need to relate these measures to other measures of complexity, to choose a wider array of examples, and to extend the analysis to two-dimensional spatial systems.

  6. Entropy, complexity, and spatial information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batty, Michael; Morphet, Robin; Masucci, Paolo; Stanilov, Kiril

    2014-09-01

    We pose the central problem of defining a measure of complexity, specifically for spatial systems in general, city systems in particular. The measures we adopt are based on Shannon's (in Bell Syst Tech J 27:379-423, 623-656, 1948) definition of information. We introduce this measure and argue that increasing information is equivalent to increasing complexity, and we show that for spatial distributions, this involves a trade-off between the density of the distribution and the number of events that characterize it; as cities get bigger and are characterized by more events—more places or locations, information increases, all other things being equal. But sometimes the distribution changes at a faster rate than the number of events and thus information can decrease even if a city grows. We develop these ideas using various information measures. We first demonstrate their applicability to various distributions of population in London over the last 100 years, then to a wider region of London which is divided into bands of zones at increasing distances from the core, and finally to the evolution of the street system that characterizes the built-up area of London from 1786 to the present day. We conclude by arguing that we need to relate these measures to other measures of complexity, to choose a wider array of examples, and to extend the analysis to two-dimensional spatial systems.

  7. Bootstrap percolation on spatial networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jian; Zhou, Tao; Hu, Yanqing

    2015-10-01

    Bootstrap percolation is a general representation of some networked activation process, which has found applications in explaining many important social phenomena, such as the propagation of information. Inspired by some recent findings on spatial structure of online social networks, here we study bootstrap percolation on undirected spatial networks, with the probability density function of long-range links’ lengths being a power law with tunable exponent. Setting the size of the giant active component as the order parameter, we find a parameter-dependent critical value for the power-law exponent, above which there is a double phase transition, mixed of a second-order phase transition and a hybrid phase transition with two varying critical points, otherwise there is only a second-order phase transition. We further find a parameter-independent critical value around -1, about which the two critical points for the double phase transition are almost constant. To our surprise, this critical value -1 is just equal or very close to the values of many real online social networks, including LiveJournal, HP Labs email network, Belgian mobile phone network, etc. This work helps us in better understanding the self-organization of spatial structure of online social networks, in terms of the effective function for information spreading.

  8. Bootstrap percolation on spatial networks

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jian; Zhou, Tao; Hu, Yanqing

    2015-01-01

    Bootstrap percolation is a general representation of some networked activation process, which has found applications in explaining many important social phenomena, such as the propagation of information. Inspired by some recent findings on spatial structure of online social networks, here we study bootstrap percolation on undirected spatial networks, with the probability density function of long-range links’ lengths being a power law with tunable exponent. Setting the size of the giant active component as the order parameter, we find a parameter-dependent critical value for the power-law exponent, above which there is a double phase transition, mixed of a second-order phase transition and a hybrid phase transition with two varying critical points, otherwise there is only a second-order phase transition. We further find a parameter-independent critical value around ?1, about which the two critical points for the double phase transition are almost constant. To our surprise, this critical value ?1 is just equal or very close to the values of many real online social networks, including LiveJournal, HP Labs email network, Belgian mobile phone network, etc. This work helps us in better understanding the self-organization of spatial structure of online social networks, in terms of the effective function for information spreading. PMID:26423347

  9. Children's Spatial Thinking: Does Talk about the Spatial World Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruden, Shannon M.; Levine, Susan C.; Huttenlocher, Janellen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we examine the relations between parent spatial language input, children's own production of spatial language, and children's later spatial abilities. Using a longitudinal study design, we coded the use of spatial language (i.e. words describing the spatial features and properties of objects; e.g. big, tall, circle, curvy, edge) from…

  10. Bibliography of spatial interferometry in optical astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.; Roddier, Francois; Roddier, Claude

    1990-01-01

    The Bibliography of Spatial Interferometry in Optical Astronomy is a guide to the published literature in applications of spatial interferometry techniques to astronomical observations, theory and instrumentation at visible and infrared wavelengths. The key words spatial and optical define the scope of this discipline, distinguishing it from spatial interferometry at radio wavelengths, interferometry in the frequency domain applied to spectroscopy, or more general electro-optics theoretical and laboratory research. The main bibliography is a listing of all technical articles published in the international scientific literature and presented at the major international meetings and workshops attended by the spatial interferometry community. Section B summarizes publications dealing with the basic theoretical concepts and algorithms proposed and applied to optical spatial interferometry and imaging through a turbulent atmosphere. The section on experimental techniques is divided into twelve categories, representing the most clearly identified major areas of experimental research work. Section D, Observations, identifies publications dealing specifically with observations of astronomical sources, in which optical spatial interferometry techniques have been applied.

  11. Architectural Implications for Spatial Object Association Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V S; Kurc, T; Saltz, J; Abdulla, G; Kohn, S R; Matarazzo, C

    2009-01-29

    Spatial object association, also referred to as cross-match of spatial datasets, is the problem of identifying and comparing objects in two or more datasets based on their positions in a common spatial coordinate system. In this work, we evaluate two crossmatch algorithms that are used for astronomical sky surveys, on the following database system architecture configurations: (1) Netezza Performance Server R, a parallel database system with active disk style processing capabilities, (2) MySQL Cluster, a high-throughput network database system, and (3) a hybrid configuration consisting of a collection of independent database system instances with data replication support. Our evaluation provides insights about how architectural characteristics of these systems affect the performance of the spatial crossmatch algorithms. We conducted our study using real use-case scenarios borrowed from a large-scale astronomy application known as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST).

  12. A spatial light modulator for terahertz beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hou-tong; Taylor, Antoinette J

    2009-01-01

    Spatial light modulators that control the spatial transmission of a terahertz beam either electrically or optically, have been difficult to build due to the lack of suitable materials. Here we propose the use of active terahertz metamaterials for the construction of a multi-pixel spatial modulator for terahertz beams. Our first-generation device consists of a 4 x 4 pixel array, where each pixel is an array of sub-wavelength-sized split-ring resonator elements fabricated on a semiconductor substrate, and is independently controlled by applying an external voltage. Through terahertz transmission experiments, we show that the spatial modulator has a uniform modulation depth of around 40 percent across all pixels at the resonant frequency. Around this operating frequency, the crosstalk between pixels is negligible. This device can operate under small voltage levels, at room temperature, with low power consumption and reasonably high switching speed, and can therefore benefit future applications in terahertz imaging and communications.

  13. Arbitrary manipulation of spatial amplitude and phase using phase-only spatial light modulators

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Long; Wang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Spatial structure of a light beam is an important degree of freedom to be extensively explored. By designing simple configurations with phase-only spatial light modulators (SLMs), we show the ability to arbitrarily manipulate the spatial full field information (i.e. amplitude and phase) of a light beam. Using this approach to facilitating arbitrary and independent control of spatial amplitude and phase, one can flexibly generate different special kinds of light beams for different specific applications. Multiple collinear orbital angular momentum (OAM) beams, Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beams, and Bessel beams, having both spatial amplitude and phase distributions, are successfully generated in the experiments. Some arbitrary beams with odd-shaped intensity are also generated in the experiments. PMID:25501584

  14. Extreme Learning Machines for spatial environmental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuenberger, Michael; Kanevski, Mikhail

    2015-12-01

    The use of machine learning algorithms has increased in a wide variety of domains (from finance to biocomputing and astronomy), and nowadays has a significant impact on the geoscience community. In most real cases geoscience data modelling problems are multivariate, high dimensional, variable at several spatial scales, and are generated by non-linear processes. For such complex data, the spatial prediction of continuous (or categorical) variables is a challenging task. The aim of this paper is to investigate the potential of the recently developed Extreme Learning Machine (ELM) for environmental data analysis, modelling and spatial prediction purposes. An important contribution of this study deals with an application of a generic self-consistent methodology for environmental data driven modelling based on Extreme Learning Machine. Both real and simulated data are used to demonstrate applicability of ELM at different stages of the study to understand and justify the results.

  15. Robustness of spatial micronetworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAndrew, Thomas C.; Danforth, Christopher M.; Bagrow, James P.

    2015-04-01

    Power lines, roadways, pipelines, and other physical infrastructure are critical to modern society. These structures may be viewed as spatial networks where geographic distances play a role in the functionality and construction cost of links. Traditionally, studies of network robustness have primarily considered the connectedness of large, random networks. Yet for spatial infrastructure, physical distances must also play a role in network robustness. Understanding the robustness of small spatial networks is particularly important with the increasing interest in microgrids, i.e., small-area distributed power grids that are well suited to using renewable energy resources. We study the random failures of links in small networks where functionality depends on both spatial distance and topological connectedness. By introducing a percolation model where the failure of each link is proportional to its spatial length, we find that when failures depend on spatial distances, networks are more fragile than expected. Accounting for spatial effects in both construction and robustness is important for designing efficient microgrids and other network infrastructure.

  16. Multicriteria Spatial Price Networks: Statics and Dynamics

    E-print Network

    Nagurney, Anna

    of applications arising in agricultural markets, energy, and in interregional and international trade;1. Introduction Spatial price equilibrium problems have provided a basic formalism for the study of a wide variety of the equilibrium pattern, using the theory of variational inequalities, as well as from a dynamic perspective

  17. SPATIAL VARIABILITY AND DOWNSCALLING OF PRECIPITATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To fully take advantage of regional climate forecast information for agricultural applications, the relationship between precipitation characteristics at regional and local scales must be quantified. The spatial variability of precipitation within a region is defined as the difference between the st...

  18. MAPPING SPATIAL ACCURACY AND ESTIMATING LANDSCAPE INDICATORS FROM THEMATIC LAND COVER MAPS USING FUZZY SET THEORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The accuracy of thematic map products is not spatially homogenous, but instead variable across most landscapes. Properly analyzing and representing the spatial distribution (pattern) of thematic map accuracy would provide valuable user information for assessing appropriate applic...

  19. Crop growth and soil water spatial variability under a variable rate center pivot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precision agriculture has mostly emphasized variable-rate nutrients, seeding, and pesticide applications. More recently, variable-rate irrigation equipment has been developed to explore the potential for managing irrigation spatially. Managing irrigation spatially can enhance water conservation and ...

  20. Spatial reconstruction of single-cell gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Satija, Rahul; Farrell, Jeffrey A.; Gennert, David; Schier, Alexander F.; Regev, Aviv

    2015-01-01

    Spatial localization is a key determinant of cellular fate and behavior, but spatial RNA assays traditionally rely on staining for a limited number of RNA species. In contrast, single-cell RNA-seq allows for deep profiling of cellular gene expression, but established methods separate cells from their native spatial context. Here we present Seurat, a computational strategy to infer cellular localization by integrating single-cell RNA-seq data with in situ RNA patterns. We applied Seurat to spatially map 851 single cells from dissociated zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos, inferring a transcriptome-wide map of spatial patterning. We confirmed Seurat’s accuracy using several experimental approaches, and used it to identify a set of archetypal expression patterns and spatial markers. Additionally, Seurat correctly localizes rare subpopulations, accurately mapping both spatially restricted and scattered groups. Seurat will be applicable to mapping cellular localization within complex patterned tissues in diverse systems. PMID:25867923

  1. Spatial Data Supply Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadharajulu, P.; Azeem Saqiq, M.; Yu, F.; McMeekin, D. A.; West, G.; Arnold, L.; Moncrieff, S.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes current research into the supply of spatial data to the end user in as close to real time as possible via the World Wide Web. The Spatial Data Infrastructure paradigm has been discussed since the early 1990s. The concept has evolved significantly since then but has almost always examined data from the perspective of the supplier. It has been a supplier driven focus rather than a user driven focus. The current research being conducted is making a paradigm shift and looking at the supply of spatial data as a supply chain, similar to a manufacturing supply chain in which users play a significant part. A comprehensive consultation process took place within Australia and New Zealand incorporating a large number of stakeholders. Three research projects that have arisen from this consultation process are examining Spatial Data Supply Chains within Australia and New Zealand and are discussed within this paper.

  2. Mapping spatial relations

    E-print Network

    Kasturirangan, Rajesh, 1971-

    2004-01-01

    One of the fundamental issues in cognitive science is the problem of grounding concepts in the perceptual world. In this thesis, I present a computational theory for how spatial relations are grounded in the perceptual ...

  3. TOWARDS MANAGING THE RISKS OF DATA MISUSE FOR SPATIAL DATACUBES M-A. Levesque a,b

    E-print Network

    NSERC Industrial Research Chair in Geospatial Databases for Decision Support c Dept. of Geography used BI (Business Intelligence) solutions. They allow users to easily, quickly, and interactively Intelligence) solutions. OLAP tools were initially introduced to solve some limitations of the traditional

  4. Grounding language in spatial routines

    E-print Network

    Tellex, Stefanie, 1980-

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes a spatial language understanding system based on a lexicon of words defined in terms of spatial routines. A spatial routine is a script composed from a set of primitive operations on sensor data, ...

  5. 2009 IEEE Workshop on Applications of Signal Processing to Audio and Acoustics October 18-21, 2009, New Paltz, NY MULTIZONE 2D SOUNDFIELD REPRODUCTION VIA SPATIAL BAND STOP FILTERS

    E-print Network

    Abhayapala, Thushara D.

    , New Paltz, NY MULTIZONE 2D SOUNDFIELD REPRODUCTION VIA SPATIAL BAND STOP FILTERS Yan Jennifer Wu-zone soundfield. Index Terms-- soundfield reproduction, multizone, cylindri- cal harmonic expansions, spatial band stop filters. 1. INTRODUCTION Reproduction of multiple independent soundfields in separate zones over

  6. Numerical modeling of spatial coherence using the elementary function method

    E-print Network

    Dainty, Chris

    Numerical modeling of spatial coherence using the elementary function method Arlene Smith1 calculations in spatially, partially coherent light in two dimensions. In this paper, we present the numerical application of this method to a 248 nm UVexcimer laser source. We present experimental results

  7. Estimates of perceived spatial quality across the listening area

    E-print Network

    Jackson, Philip JB

    - tion systems. Perceptual models that predict the sound quality impairments of speech and audio coding distortions in terms of basic audio quality and do not explicitly consider spatial dis- tortions. The model. A model for predicting spatial audio quality has many applications in audio engineer- ing, including

  8. METHODS FOR MULTI-SPATIAL SCALE CHARACTERIZATION OF RIPARIAN CORRIDORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the application of aerial photography and GIS technology to develop flexible and transferable methods for multi-spatial scale characterization and analysis of riparian corridors. Relationships between structural attributes of riparian corridors and indicator...

  9. 1985 NAPAP EMISSIONS INVENTORY: DEVELOPMENT OF SPATIAL ALLOCATION FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents the development and application of spatial allocation factors for the 1985 National Acid Precipitation Assessment program(NAPAP) Emissions Inventory (Version 2). The 1985 annual inventory and related modelers' inventory represent the most comprehensive and hi...

  10. Reconstructing Spatial Distributions from Anonymized Locations

    SciTech Connect

    Horey, James L; Forrest, Stephanie; Groat, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Devices such as mobile phones, tablets, and sensors are often equipped with GPS that accurately report a person's location. Combined with wireless communication, these devices enable a wide range of new social tools and applications. These same qualities, however, leave location-aware applications vulnerable to privacy violations. This paper introduces the Negative Quad Tree, a privacy protection method for location aware applications. The method is broadly applicable to applications that use spatial density information, such as social applications that measure the popularity of social venues. The method employs a simple anonymization algorithm running on mobile devices, and a more complex reconstruction algorithm on a central server. This strategy is well suited to low-powered mobile devices. The paper analyzes the accuracy of the reconstruction method in a variety of simulated and real-world settings and demonstrates that the method is accurate enough to be used in many real-world scenarios.

  11. Dealing with spatial heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsily, Gh.; Delay, F.; Gonçalvès, J.; Renard, Ph.; Teles, V.; Violette, S.

    2005-03-01

    Heterogeneity can be dealt with by defining homogeneous equivalent properties, known as averaging, or by trying to describe the spatial variability of the rock properties from geologic observations and local measurements. The techniques available for these descriptions are mostly continuous Geostatistical models, or discontinuous facies models such as the Boolean, Indicator or Gaussian-Threshold models and the Markov chain model. These facies models are better suited to treating issues of rock strata connectivity, e.g. buried high permeability channels or low permeability barriers, which greatly affect flow and, above all, transport in aquifers. Genetic models provide new ways to incorporate more geology into the facies description, an approach that has been well developed in the oil industry, but not enough in hydrogeology. The conclusion is that future work should be focused on improving the facies models, comparing them, and designing new in situ testing procedures (including geophysics) that would help identify the facies geometry and properties. A world-wide catalog of aquifer facies geometry and properties, which could combine site genesis and description with methods used to assess the system, would be of great value for practical applications. On peut aborder le problème de l'hétérogénéité en s'efforçant de définir une perméabilité équivalente homogène, par prise de moyenne, ou au contraire en décrivant la variation dans l'espace des propriétés des roches à partir des observations géologiques et des mesures locales. Les techniques disponibles pour une telle description sont soit continues, comme l'approche Géostatistique, soit discontinues, comme les modèles de faciès, Booléens, ou bien par Indicatrices ou Gaussiennes Seuillées, ou enfin Markoviens. Ces modèles de faciès sont mieux capables de prendre en compte la connectivité des strates géologiques, telles que les chenaux enfouis à forte perméabilité, ou au contraire les faciès fins de barrières de perméabilité, qui ont une influence importante sur les écoulement, et, plus encore, sur le transport. Les modè les génétiques récemment apparus ont la capacité de mieux incorporer dans les modèles de faciès les observations géologiques, chose courante dans l'industrie pétrolière, mais insuffisamment développée en hydrogéologie. On conclut que les travaux de recherche ultérieurs devraient s'attacher à développer les modèles de faciès, à les comparer entre eux, et à mettre au point de nouvelles méthodes d'essais in situ, comprenant les méthodes géophysiques, capables de reconnaître la géométrie et les propriétés des faciès. La constitution d'un catalogue mondial de la géométrie et des propriétés des faciès aquifères, ainsi que des méthodes de reconnaissance utilisées pour arriver à la détermination de ces systèmes, serait d'une grande importance pratique pour les applications. La heterogeneidad se puede manejar por medio de la definición de características homogéneas equivalentes, conocidas como promediar o tratando de describir la variabilidad espacial de las características de las rocas a partir de observaciones geológicas y medidas locales. Las técnicas disponibles para estas descripciones son generalmente modelos geoestadísticos continuos o modelos de facies discontinuos como los modelos Boolean, de Indicador o de umbral de Gaussian y el modelo de cadena de Markow. Estos modelos de facies son mas adecuados para tratar la conectvidad de estratos geológicos (por ejemplo canales de alta permeabilidad enterrados o barreras de baja permeabilidad que tienen efectos importantes sobre el flujo y especialmente sobre el transporte en los acuíferos. Los modelos genéticos ofrecen nuevas formas de incorporar más geología en las descripciones de facies, un enfoque que está bien desarollado en la industria petrolera, pero insuficientemente en la hidrogeología. Se concluye que los trabajos futuros deberían estar más enfocados en mejorar los modelos de facies, en establecer comparaciones y en

  12. Making a Place for Space: Spatial Thinking in Social Science

    PubMed Central

    Logan, John R.

    2013-01-01

    New technologies and multilevel data sets that include geographic identifiers have heightened sociologists’ interest in spatial analysis. I review several of the key concepts, measures, and methods that are brought into play in this work, and offer examples of their application in a variety of substantive fields. I argue that the most effective use of the new tools requires greater emphasis on spatial thinking. A device as simple as an illustrative map requires some understanding of how people respond to visual cues; models as complex as HLM with spatial lags require thoughtful measurement decisions and raise questions about what a spatial effect represents. PMID:24273374

  13. Spatial Knowledge Capture Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-05-16

    The Spatial Knowledge Capture Library is a set of algorithms to capture regularities in shapes and trajectories through space and time. We have applied Spatial Knowledge Capture to model the actions of human experts in spatial domains, such as an AWACS Weapons Director task simulation. The library constructs a model to predict the expert?s response to sets of changing cues, such as the movements and actions of adversaries on a battlefield, The library includes amore »highly configurable feature extraction functionality, which supports rapid experimentation to discover causative factors. We use k-medoid clustering to group similar episodes of behavior, and construct a Markov model of system state transitions induced by agents? actions.« less

  14. Heredity Factors in Spatial Visualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandenberg, S. G.

    Spatial visualization is not yet clearly understood. Some researchers have concluded that two factors or abilities are involved, spatial orientation and spatial visualization. Different definitions and different tests have been proposed for these two abilities. Several studies indicate that women generally perform more poorly on spatial tests than…

  15. The Spatial Standard Observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Ahumada, Albert J, Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The spatial standard observer is a computational model that provides a measure of the visibility of a target in a uniform background image or of the visual discriminability of two images. Standard observers have long been used in science and industry to quantify the discriminability of colors. Color standard observers address the spectral characteristics of visual stimuli, while the spatial standard observer (SSO), as its name indicates, addresses spatial characteristics. The SSO is based on a model of human vision. The SSO was developed in a process that included evaluation of a number of earlier mathematical models that address optical, physiological, and psychophysical aspects of spatial characteristics of human visual perception. Elements of the prior models are incorporated into the SSO, which is formulated as a compromise between accuracy and simplicity. The SSO operates on a digitized monochrome still image or on a pair of such images. The SSO consists of three submodels that operate sequentially on the input image(s): 1. A contrast model, which converts an input monochrome image to a luminance contrast image, wherein luminance values are expressed as excursions from, and normalized to, a mean; 2. A contrast-sensitivity-filter model that includes an oblique-effect filter (which accounts for the decline in contrast sensitivity at oblique viewing angles); and 3. A spatial summation model, in which responses are spatially pooled by raising each pixel to the power beta, adding the results, and raising the sum to the 1/b power. In this model, b=2.9 was found to be a suitable value. The net effect of the SSO is to compute a numerical measure of the perceptual strength of the single image, or of the visible difference (denoted the perceptual distance) between two images. The unit of a measure used in the SSO is the just noticeable difference (JND), which is a standard measure of perceptual discriminability. A target that is just visible has a measure of 1 JND.

  16. Embodied spatial cognition.

    PubMed

    Trafton, J Gregory; Harrison, Anthony M

    2011-10-01

    We present a spatial system called Specialized Egocentrically Coordinated Spaces embedded in an embodied cognitive architecture (ACT-R Embodied). We show how the spatial system works by modeling two different developmental findings: gaze-following and Level 1 perspective taking. The gaze-following model is based on an experiment by Corkum and Moore (1998), whereas the Level 1 visual perspective-taking model is based on an experiment by Moll and Tomasello (2006). The models run on an embodied robotic system. PMID:25164505

  17. The spatial ultimatum game.

    PubMed Central

    Page, K M; Nowak, M A; Sigmund, K

    2000-01-01

    In the ultimatum game, two players are asked to split a certain sum of money. The proposer has to make an offer. If the responder accepts the offer, the money will be shared accordingly. If the responder rejects the offer, both players receive nothing. The rational solution is for the proposer to offer the smallest possible share, and for the responder to accept it. Human players, in contrast, usually prefer fair splits. In this paper, we use evolutionary game theory to analyse the ultimatum game. We first show that in a non-spatial setting, natural selection chooses the unfair, rational solution. In a spatial setting, however, much fairer outcomes evolve. PMID:11413630

  18. Spatial pattern of diarrhea based on regional economic and environment by spatial autoregressive model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekti, Rokhana Dwi; Nurhadiyanti, Gita; Irwansyah, Edy

    2014-10-01

    The diarrhea case pattern information, especially for toddler, is very important. It is used to show the distribution of diarrhea in every region, relationship among that locations, and regional economic characteristic or environmental behavior. So, this research uses spatial pattern to perform them. This method includes: Moran's I, Spatial Autoregressive Models (SAR), and Local Indicator of Spatial Autocorrelation (LISA). It uses sample from 23 sub districts of Bekasi Regency, West Java, Indonesia. Diarrhea case, regional economic, and environmental behavior of households have a spatial relationship among sub district. SAR shows that the percentage of Regional Gross Domestic Product is significantly effect on diarrhea at ? = 10%. Therefore illiteracy and health center facilities are significant at ? = 5%. With LISA test, sub districts in southern Bekasi have high dependencies with Cikarang Selatan, Serang Baru, and Setu. This research also builds development application that is based on java and R to support data analysis.

  19. Spatial search by quantum walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, Andrew M.; Goldstone, Jeffrey

    2004-08-01

    Grover’s quantum search algorithm provides a way to speed up combinatorial search, but is not directly applicable to searching a physical database. Nevertheless, Aaronson and Ambainis showed that a database of N items laid out in d spatial dimensions can be searched in time of order N for d>2 , and in time of order Npoly(logN) for d=2 . We consider an alternative search algorithm based on a continuous-time quantum walk on a graph. The case of the complete graph gives the continuous-time search algorithm of Farhi and Gutmann, and other previously known results can be used to show that N speedup can also be achieved on the hypercube. We show that full N speedup can be achieved on a d -dimensional periodic lattice for d>4 . In d=4 , the quantum walk search algorithm takes time of order Npoly(logN) , and in d<4 , the algorithm does not provide substantial speedup.

  20. Optical vortex array in spatially varying lattice

    E-print Network

    Kapoor, Amit; Senthilkumaran, P; Joseph, Joby

    2015-01-01

    We present an experimental method based on a modified multiple beam interference approach to generate an optical vortex array arranged in a spatially varying lattice. This method involves two steps which are: numerical synthesis of a consistent phase mask by using two-dimensional integrated phase gradient calculations and experimental implementation of produced phase mask by utilizing a phase only spatial light modulator in an optical 4f Fourier filtering setup. This method enables an independent variation of the orientation and period of the vortex lattice. As working examples, we provide the experimental demonstration of various spatially variant optical vortex lattices. We further confirm the existence of optical vortices by formation of fork fringes. Such lattices may find applications in size dependent trapping, sorting, manipulation and photonic crystals.

  1. Spatial cluster detection using dynamic programming

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The task of spatial cluster detection involves finding spatial regions where some property deviates from the norm or the expected value. In a probabilistic setting this task can be expressed as finding a region where some event is significantly more likely than usual. Spatial cluster detection is of interest in fields such as biosurveillance, mining of astronomical data, military surveillance, and analysis of fMRI images. In almost all such applications we are interested both in the question of whether a cluster exists in the data, and if it exists, we are interested in finding the most accurate characterization of the cluster. Methods We present a general dynamic programming algorithm for grid-based spatial cluster detection. The algorithm can be used for both Bayesian maximum a-posteriori (MAP) estimation of the most likely spatial distribution of clusters and Bayesian model averaging over a large space of spatial cluster distributions to compute the posterior probability of an unusual spatial clustering. The algorithm is explained and evaluated in the context of a biosurveillance application, specifically the detection and identification of Influenza outbreaks based on emergency department visits. A relatively simple underlying model is constructed for the purpose of evaluating the algorithm, and the algorithm is evaluated using the model and semi-synthetic test data. Results When compared to baseline methods, tests indicate that the new algorithm can improve MAP estimates under certain conditions: the greedy algorithm we compared our method to was found to be more sensitive to smaller outbreaks, while as the size of the outbreaks increases, in terms of area affected and proportion of individuals affected, our method overtakes the greedy algorithm in spatial precision and recall. The new algorithm performs on-par with baseline methods in the task of Bayesian model averaging. Conclusions We conclude that the dynamic programming algorithm performs on-par with other available methods for spatial cluster detection and point to its low computational cost and extendability as advantages in favor of further research and use of the algorithm. PMID:22443103

  2. Spatial symmetry breaking in rapidly rotating convective spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Keke; Schubert, Gerald

    1995-01-01

    Many problems in geophysical and astrophysical convection systems are characterized by fast rotation and spherical shell geometry. The combined effects of Coriolis forces and spherical shell geometry produce a unique spatial symmetry for the convection pattern in a rapidly rotating spherical shell. In this paper, we first discuss the general spatial symmetries for rotating spherical shell convection. A special model, a spherical shell heated from below, is then used to illustrate how and when the spatial symmetries are broken. Symmetry breaking occurs via a sequence of spatial transitions from the primary conducting state to the complex multiple-layered columnar structure. It is argued that, because of the dominant effects of rotation, the sequence of spatial transitions identified from this particular model is likely to be generally valid. Applications of the spatial symmetry breaking to planetary convection problems are also discussed.

  3. Integrating spatially resolved three-

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    imaged by in vivo imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and positronIntegrating spatially resolved three- dimensional MALDI IMS with in vivo magnetic resonance imaging from MALDI IMS data with corresponding in vivo data provided by magnetic resonance imaging. In recent

  4. Luke Spadavecchia Thinking Spatially

    E-print Network

    Luke Spadavecchia 1 Thinking Spatially When people ask me what I do, I generally tell them I. Try telling people that you are interested in statistics, and they switch off pretty quickly. I choose to ignore the coordinates of our data? The reasons for this lie in our dependence on the seminal

  5. ECOREGION SPATIAL DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This spatial database contains boundaries and attributes describing Level III ecoregions in EPA Region 8. The ecoregions shown here have been derived from Omernik (1987) and from refinements of Omernik's framework that have been made for other projects. These ongoing or re...

  6. Spatial Terahertz Modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhenwei; Wang, Xinke; Ye, Jiasheng; Feng, Shengfei; Sun, Wenfeng; Akalin, Tahsin; Zhang, Yan

    2013-11-01

    Terahertz (THz) technology is a developing and promising candidate for biological imaging, security inspection and communications, due to the low photon energy, the high transparency and the broad band properties of the THz radiation. However, a major encountered bottleneck is lack of efficient devices to manipulate the THz wave, especially to modulate the THz wave front. A wave front modulator should allow the optical or electrical control of the spatial transmission (or reflection) of an input THz wave and hence the ability to encode the information in a wave front. Here we propose a spatial THz modulator (STM) to dynamically control the THz wave front with photo-generated carriers. A computer generated THz hologram is projected onto a silicon wafer by a conventional spatial light modulator (SLM). The corresponding photo-generated carrier spatial distribution will be induced, which forms an amplitude hologram to modulate the wave front of the input THz beam. Some special intensity patterns and vortex beams are generated by using this method. This all-optical controllable STM is structure free, high resolution and broadband. It is expected to be widely used in future THz imaging and communication systems.

  7. Chunking in Spatial Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sargent, Jesse; Dopkins, Stephen; Philbeck, John; Chichka, David

    2010-01-01

    In order to gain insight into the nature of human spatial representations, the current study examined how those representations are affected by blind rotation. Evidence was sought on the possibility that whereas certain environmental aspects may be updated independently of one another, other aspects may be grouped (or chunked) together and updated…

  8. Handbook of Spatial Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, David, Ed.; Nadel, Lynn, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Spatial cognition is a branch of cognitive psychology that studies how people acquire and use knowledge about their environment to determine where they are, how to obtain resources, and how to find their way home. Researchers from a wide range of disciplines, including neuroscience, cognition, and sociology, have discovered a great deal about how…

  9. Cartography: LACIE's spatial processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rader, M. L.; Vela, R. R. (principal investigators)

    1979-01-01

    The spatial processing needs of LACIE include the location of agricultural test sites, and the registration of ground truth to LANDSAT imagery. The technological aspects of LACIE cartographic support, the need for cartography in satellite crop surveys, and proposed improvements which would enhance support of future programs are discussed.

  10. RADSS: an integration of GIS, spatial statistics, and network service for regional data mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Haitang; Bao, Shuming; Lin, Hui; Zhu, Qing

    2005-10-01

    Regional data mining, which aims at the discovery of knowledge about spatial patterns, clusters or association between regions, has widely applications nowadays in social science, such as sociology, economics, epidemiology, crime, and so on. Many applications in the regional or other social sciences are more concerned with the spatial relationship, rather than the precise geographical location. Based on the spatial continuity rule derived from Tobler's first law of geography: observations at two sites tend to be more similar to each other if the sites are close together than if far apart, spatial statistics, as an important means for spatial data mining, allow the users to extract the interesting and useful information like spatial pattern, spatial structure, spatial association, spatial outlier and spatial interaction, from the vast amount of spatial data or non-spatial data. Therefore, by integrating with the spatial statistical methods, the geographical information systems will become more powerful in gaining further insights into the nature of spatial structure of regional system, and help the researchers to be more careful when selecting appropriate models. However, the lack of such tools holds back the application of spatial data analysis techniques and development of new methods and models (e.g., spatio-temporal models). Herein, we make an attempt to develop such an integrated software and apply it into the complex system analysis for the Poyang Lake Basin. This paper presents a framework for integrating GIS, spatial statistics and network service in regional data mining, as well as their implementation. After discussing the spatial statistics methods involved in regional complex system analysis, we introduce RADSS (Regional Analysis and Decision Support System), our new regional data mining tool, by integrating GIS, spatial statistics and network service. RADSS includes the functions of spatial data visualization, exploratory spatial data analysis, and spatial statistics. The tool also includes some fundamental spatial and non-spatial database in regional population and environment, which can be updated by external database via CD or network. Utilizing this data mining and exploratory analytical tool, the users can easily and quickly analyse the huge mount of the interrelated regional data, and better understand the spatial patterns and trends of the regional development, so as to make a credible and scientific decision. Moreover, it can be used as an educational tool for spatial data analysis and environmental studies. In this paper, we also present a case study on Poyang Lake Basin as an application of the tool and spatial data mining in complex environmental studies. At last, several concluding remarks are discussed.

  11. Modeling spatial variation in avian survival and residency probabilities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saracco, James F.; Royle, J. Andrew; DeSante, David F.; Gardner, Beth

    2010-01-01

    The importance of understanding spatial variation in processes driving animal population dynamics is widely recognized. Yet little attention has been paid to spatial modeling of vital rates. Here we describe a hierarchical spatial autoregressive model to provide spatially explicit year-specific estimates of apparent survival (phi) and residency (pi) probabilities from capture-recapture data. We apply the model to data collected on a declining bird species, Wood Thrush (Hylocichla mustelina), as part of a broad-scale bird-banding network, the Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship (MAPS) program. The Wood Thrush analysis showed variability in both phi and pi among years and across space. Spatial heterogeneity in residency probability was particularly striking, suggesting the importance of understanding the role of transients in local populations. We found broad-scale spatial patterning in Wood Thrush phi and pi that lend insight into population trends and can direct conservation and research. The spatial model developed here represents a significant advance over approaches to investigating spatial pattern in vital rates that aggregate data at coarse spatial scales and do not explicitly incorporate spatial information in the model. Further development and application of hierarchical capture-recapture models offers the opportunity to more fully investigate spatiotemporal variation in the processes that drive population changes.

  12. Spatial Relation Predicates in Topographic Feature Semantics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Varanka, Dalia E.; Caro, Holly K.

    2013-01-01

    Topographic data are designed and widely used for base maps of diverse applications, yet the power of these information sources largely relies on the interpretive skills of map readers and relational database expert users once the data are in map or geographic information system (GIS) form. Advances in geospatial semantic technology offer data model alternatives for explicating concepts and articulating complex data queries and statements. To understand and enrich the vocabulary of topographic feature properties for semantic technology, English language spatial relation predicates were analyzed in three standard topographic feature glossaries. The analytical approach drew from disciplinary concepts in geography, linguistics, and information science. Five major classes of spatial relation predicates were identified from the analysis; representations for most of these are not widely available. The classes are: part-whole (which are commonly modeled throughout semantic and linked-data networks), geometric, processes, human intention, and spatial prepositions. These are commonly found in the ‘real world’ and support the environmental science basis for digital topographical mapping. The spatial relation concepts are based on sets of relation terms presented in this chapter, though these lists are not prescriptive or exhaustive. The results of this study make explicit the concepts forming a broad set of spatial relation expressions, which in turn form the basis for expanding the range of possible queries for topographical data analysis and mapping.

  13. Optimization techniques for integrating spatial data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herzfeld, U.C.; Merriam, D.F.

    1995-01-01

    Two optimization techniques ta predict a spatial variable from any number of related spatial variables are presented. The applicability of the two different methods for petroleum-resource assessment is tested in a mature oil province of the Midcontinent (USA). The information on petroleum productivity, usually not directly accessible, is related indirectly to geological, geophysical, petrographical, and other observable data. This paper presents two approaches based on construction of a multivariate spatial model from the available data to determine a relationship for prediction. In the first approach, the variables are combined into a spatial model by an algebraic map-comparison/integration technique. Optimal weights for the map comparison function are determined by the Nelder-Mead downhill simplex algorithm in multidimensions. Geologic knowledge is necessary to provide a first guess of weights to start the automatization, because the solution is not unique. In the second approach, active set optimization for linear prediction of the target under positivity constraints is applied. Here, the procedure seems to select one variable from each data type (structure, isopachous, and petrophysical) eliminating data redundancy. Automating the determination of optimum combinations of different variables by applying optimization techniques is a valuable extension of the algebraic map-comparison/integration approach to analyzing spatial data. Because of the capability of handling multivariate data sets and partial retention of geographical information, the approaches can be useful in mineral-resource exploration. ?? 1995 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  14. Children's spatial thinking: does talk about the spatial world matter?

    PubMed

    Pruden, Shannon M; Levine, Susan C; Huttenlocher, Janellen

    2011-11-01

    In this paper we examine the relations between parent spatial language input, children's own production of spatial language, and children's later spatial abilities. Using a longitudinal study design, we coded the use of spatial language (i.e. words describing the spatial features and properties of objects; e.g. big, tall, circle, curvy, edge) from child age 14 to 46 months in a diverse sample of 52 parent-child dyads interacting in their home settings. These same children were given three non-verbal spatial tasks, items from a Spatial Transformation task (Levine et al., 1999), the Block Design subtest from the WPPSI-III (Wechsler, 2002), and items on the Spatial Analogies subtest from Primary Test of Cognitive Skills (Huttenlocher & Levine, 1990) at 54 months of age. We find that parents vary widely in the amount of spatial language they use with their children during everyday interactions. This variability in spatial language input, in turn, predicts the amount of spatial language children produce, controlling for overall parent language input. Furthermore, children who produce more spatial language are more likely to perform better on spatial problem solving tasks at a later age. PMID:22010900

  15. FROM TRANSACTIONAL SPATIAL DATABASES INTEGRITY CONSTRAINTS TO SPATIAL DATACUBES INTEGRITY CONSTRAINTS

    E-print Network

    FROM TRANSACTIONAL SPATIAL DATABASES INTEGRITY CONSTRAINTS TO SPATIAL DATACUBES INTEGRITY, Sherbrooke, Canada - brodeur@nrcan.gc.ca KEY WORDS: Integrity Constraint, Spatial Datacube, Spatio spatial databases, spatial integrity constraints have been employed to improve internal quality of spatial

  16. Spatially resolved multicomponent gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, Emily R.; Eden, Edward G. B.; McDonald, Tom O.; Adams, Dave J.

    2015-10-01

    Multicomponent supramolecular systems could be used to prepare exciting new functional materials, but it is often challenging to control the assembly across multiple length scales. Here we report a simple approach to forming patterned, spatially resolved multicomponent supramolecular hydrogels. A multicomponent gel is first formed from two low-molecular-weight gelators and consists of two types of fibre, each formed by only one gelator. One type of fibre in this ‘self-sorted network’ is then removed selectively by a light-triggered gel-to-sol transition. We show that the remaining network has the same mechanical properties as it would have done if it initially formed alone. The selective irradiation of sections of the gel through a mask leads to the formation of patterned multicomponent networks, in which either one or two networks can be present at a particular position with a high degree of spatial control.

  17. Spatially resolved multicomponent gels.

    PubMed

    Draper, Emily R; Eden, Edward G B; McDonald, Tom O; Adams, Dave J

    2015-10-01

    Multicomponent supramolecular systems could be used to prepare exciting new functional materials, but it is often challenging to control the assembly across multiple length scales. Here we report a simple approach to forming patterned, spatially resolved multicomponent supramolecular hydrogels. A multicomponent gel is first formed from two low-molecular-weight gelators and consists of two types of fibre, each formed by only one gelator. One type of fibre in this 'self-sorted network' is then removed selectively by a light-triggered gel-to-sol transition. We show that the remaining network has the same mechanical properties as it would have done if it initially formed alone. The selective irradiation of sections of the gel through a mask leads to the formation of patterned multicomponent networks, in which either one or two networks can be present at a particular position with a high degree of spatial control. PMID:26391086

  18. Particle detector spatial resolution

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA)

    1992-01-01

    Method and apparatus for producing separated columns of scintillation layer material, for use in detection of X-rays and high energy charged particles with improved spatial resolution. A pattern of ridges or projections is formed on one surface of a substrate layer or in a thin polyimide layer, and the scintillation layer is grown at controlled temperature and growth rate on the ridge-containing material. The scintillation material preferentially forms cylinders or columns, separated by gaps conforming to the pattern of ridges, and these columns direct most of the light produced in the scintillation layer along individual columns for subsequent detection in a photodiode layer. The gaps may be filled with a light-absorbing material to further enhance the spatial resolution of the particle detector.

  19. Spatial Phase Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Frequently, scientists grow crystals by dissolving a protein in a specific liquid solution, and then allowing that solution to evaporate. The methods used next have been, variously, invasive (adding a dye that is absorbed by the protein), destructive (crushing protein/salt-crystal mixtures and observing differences between the crushing of salt and protein), or costly and time-consuming (X-ray crystallography). In contrast to these methods, a new technology for monitoring protein growth, developed in part through NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) funding from Marshall Space Flight Center, is noninvasive, nondestructive, rapid, and more cost effective than X-ray analysis. The partner for this SBIR, Photon-X, Inc., of Huntsville, Alabama, developed spatial phase imaging technology that can monitor crystal growth in real time and in an automated mode. Spatial phase imaging scans for flaws quickly and produces a 3-D structured image of a crystal, showing volumetric growth analysis for future automated growth.

  20. Asymmetric spatial soliton dragging.

    PubMed

    Blair, S; Wagner, K; McLeod, R

    1994-12-01

    A new low-latency, cascadable optical logic gate with gain, high contrast, and three-terminal input-output isolation is introduced. The interaction between two orthogonally polarized spatial solitons brought into coincidence at the boundary of a saturating nonlinear medium and propagating in different directions results in the phase-insensitive spatial dragging of a strong pump soliton by a weaker signal. As a result, the strong pump is transmitted through an aperture when the weak signal is not present, and it is dragged to the side by more than a beam width and blocked in the presence of the weak signal, thus implementing an inverter with gain. A multi-input, logically complete NOR gate also can be implemented in a cascaded system. PMID:19855703

  1. Particle detector spatial resolution

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    1992-12-15

    Method and apparatus for producing separated columns of scintillation layer material, for use in detection of X-rays and high energy charged particles with improved spatial resolution is disclosed. A pattern of ridges or projections is formed on one surface of a substrate layer or in a thin polyimide layer, and the scintillation layer is grown at controlled temperature and growth rate on the ridge-containing material. The scintillation material preferentially forms cylinders or columns, separated by gaps conforming to the pattern of ridges, and these columns direct most of the light produced in the scintillation layer along individual columns for subsequent detection in a photodiode layer. The gaps may be filled with a light-absorbing material to further enhance the spatial resolution of the particle detector. 12 figs.

  2. GENERATING SOPHISTICATED SPATIAL SURROGATES USING THE MIMS SPATIAL ALLOCATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Multimedia Integrated Modeling System (MIMS) Spatial Allocator is open-source software for generating spatial surrogates for emissions modeling, changing the map projection of Shapefiles, and performing other types of spatial allocation that does not require the use of a comm...

  3. The agent-based spatial information semantic grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Wei; Zhu, YaQiong; Zhou, Yong; Li, Deren

    2006-10-01

    Analyzing the characteristic of multi-Agent and geographic Ontology, The concept of the Agent-based Spatial Information Semantic Grid (ASISG) is defined and the architecture of the ASISG is advanced. ASISG is composed with Multi-Agents and geographic Ontology. The Multi-Agent Systems are composed with User Agents, General Ontology Agent, Geo-Agents, Broker Agents, Resource Agents, Spatial Data Analysis Agents, Spatial Data Access Agents, Task Execution Agent and Monitor Agent. The architecture of ASISG have three layers, they are the fabric layer, the grid management layer and the application layer. The fabric layer what is composed with Data Access Agent, Resource Agent and Geo-Agent encapsulates the data of spatial information system so that exhibits a conceptual interface for the Grid management layer. The Grid management layer, which is composed with General Ontology Agent, Task Execution Agent and Monitor Agent and Data Analysis Agent, used a hybrid method to manage all resources that were registered in a General Ontology Agent that is described by a General Ontology System. The hybrid method is assembled by resource dissemination and resource discovery. The resource dissemination push resource from Local Ontology Agent to General Ontology Agent and the resource discovery pull resource from the General Ontology Agent to Local Ontology Agents. The Local Ontology Agent is derived from special domain and describes the semantic information of local GIS. The nature of the Local Ontology Agents can be filtrated to construct a virtual organization what could provides a global scheme. The virtual organization lightens the burdens of guests because they need not search information site by site manually. The application layer what is composed with User Agent, Geo-Agent and Task Execution Agent can apply a corresponding interface to a domain user. The functions that ASISG should provide are: 1) It integrates different spatial information systems on the semantic The Grid management layer establishes a virtual environment that integrates seamlessly all GIS notes. 2) When the resource management system searches data on different spatial information systems, it transfers the meaning of different Local Ontology Agents rather than access data directly. So the ability of search and query can be said to be on the semantic level. 3) The data access procedure is transparent to guests, that is, they could access the information from remote site as current disk because the General Ontology Agent could automatically link data by the Data Agents that link the Ontology concept to GIS data. 4) The capability of processing massive spatial data. Storing, accessing and managing massive spatial data from TB to PB; efficiently analyzing and processing spatial data to produce model, information and knowledge; and providing 3D and multimedia visualization services. 5) The capability of high performance computing and processing on spatial information. Solving spatial problems with high precision, high quality, and on a large scale; and process spatial information in real time or on time, with high-speed and high efficiency. 6) The capability of sharing spatial resources. The distributed heterogeneous spatial information resources are Shared and realizing integrated and inter-operated on semantic level, so as to make best use of spatial information resources,such as computing resources, storage devices, spatial data (integrating from GIS, RS and GPS), spatial applications and services, GIS platforms, 7) The capability of integrating legacy GIS system. A ASISG can not only be used to construct new advanced spatial application systems, but also integrate legacy GIS system, so as to keep extensibility and inheritance and guarantee investment of users. 8) The capability of collaboration. Large-scale spatial information applications and services always involve different departments in different geographic places, so remote and uniform services are needed. 9) The capability of supporting integration of heterogeneous systems. Large-scale spatial information

  4. Abstract--Data mining aims at extraction of previously unidentified information from large databases. It can be

    E-print Network

    Fong, Chi Chiu "Simon"

    1 Abstract-- Data mining aims at extraction of previously unidentified information from large the last few years. Several works in the past emphasized the integration of OLAP and data mining. More recently, data mining techniques along with OLAP have been applied in decision support applications

  5. Modeling of Students' Profile and Learning Chronicle with Data Cubes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ola, Ade G.; Bai, Xue; Omojokun, Emmanuel E.

    2014-01-01

    Over the years, companies have relied on On-Line Analytical Processing (OLAP) to answer complex questions relating to issues in business environments such as identifying profitability, trends, correlations, and patterns. This paper addresses the application of OLAP in education and learning. The objective of the research presented in the paper is…

  6. Business Intelligence for Home Care Source Data and ETL Process

    E-print Network

    Kaiserslautern, Universität

    Business Intelligence for Home Care Source Data and ETL Process OLAP Cube and BI Application Future Work and Conclusion Business Intelligence in the Home Care Sector Peter Poulsen Lars Schunk Lasse Care Sector 1 / 32 #12;Business Intelligence for Home Care Source Data and ETL Process OLAP Cube and BI

  7. Spatial Premise Integration in Hindi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Ramesh Kumar

    2007-01-01

    Spatial reasoning or locating objects in a spatial space has long been an important area of research in cognitive science because analyzing space categorically and finding objects is a fundamental act of mental perception and cognition. Premise integration in tasks of spatial reasoning has recently received considerable research attention. This is…

  8. Contour Integration across Spatial Frequency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persike, Malte; Olzak, Lynn A.; Meinhardt, Gunter

    2009-01-01

    Association field models of contour integration suggest that local band-pass elements are spatially grouped to global contours within limited bands of spatial frequency (Field, Hayes, & Hess, 1993). While results for local orientation and spacing variation render support for AF models, effects of spatial frequency (SF) have rarely been addressed.…

  9. Bayesian semiparametric model with spatially-temporally varying coefficients selection.

    PubMed

    Cai, Bo; Lawson, Andrew B; Hossain, Monir; Choi, Jungsoon; Kirby, Russell S; Liu, Jihong

    2013-09-20

    In spatiotemporal analysis, the effect of a covariate on the outcome usually varies across areas and time. The spatial configuration of the areas may potentially depend on not only the structured random intercept but also spatially varying coefficients of covariates. In addition, the normality assumption of the distribution of spatially varying coefficients could lead to potential biases of estimations. In this article, we proposed a Bayesian semiparametric space-time model where the spatially-temporally varying coefficient is decomposed as fixed, spatially varying, and temporally varying coefficients. We nonparametrically modeled the spatially varying coefficients of space-time covariates by using the area-specific Dirichlet process prior with weights transformed via a generalized transformation. We modeled the temporally varying coefficients of covariates through the dynamic model. We also took into account the uncertainty of inclusion of the spatially-temporally varying coefficients by variable selection procedure through determining the probabilities of different effects for each covariate. The proposed semiparametric approach shows its improvement compared with the Bayesian spatial-temporal models with normality assumption on spatial random effects and the Bayesian model with the Dirichlet process prior on the random intercept. We presented a simulation example to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach with the competing models. We used an application to low birth weight data in South Carolina as an illustration. PMID:23526312

  10. Bayesian semiparametric model with spatially-temporally varying coefficients selection

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Bo; Lawson, Andrew B.; Hossain, Md. Monir; Choi, Jungsoon; Kirby, Russell S.; Liu, Jihong

    2013-01-01

    In spatio-temporal analysis, the effect of a covariate on the outcome usually varies across areas and time. The spatial configuration of the areas may potentially depend on not only the structured random intercept but also spatially varying coefficients of covariates. In addition, the normality assumption of the distribution of spatially varying coefficients could lead to potential biases of estimations. In this article, we propose a Bayesian semiparametric space-time model where the spatially-temporally varying coefficient is decomposed as fixed, spatially varying and temporally varying coefficients. The spatially varying coefficients of space-time covariates are modeled nonparametrically by using the area-specific Dirichlet process prior with weights transformed via a generalized transformation. Temporally varying coefficients of covariates are modeled through the dynamic model. Uncertainty of inclusion of the spatially-temporally varying coefficients is also taken into account by variable selection procedure through determining the probabilities of different effects for each covariate. The proposed semiparametric approach shows the improvement compared to the Bayesian spatial-temporal models with normality assumption on spatial random effects and the Bayesian model with the Dirichlet process prior on the random intercept. A simulation example is presented to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach with the competing models. An application to low birth weight data in South Carolina is used for an illustration. PMID:23526312

  11. Design and Optimization of Spatial Organizations For Context Exchange and Surveillance

    E-print Network

    de Veciana, Gustavo

    quantities of con- textual information that is mainly relevant/useful when a user/mobile is situated associated with each cell. The model uses random tessellations to generate spatial partitions of the space of applications' spatial content scaling. I. Introduction Context-awareness refers to the ability of applications

  12. Earthquake spatial distribution: the correlation dimension

    E-print Network

    Kagan, Yan Y

    2007-01-01

    EARTHQUAKE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION X - 15 Fig. 3 green ? simulationearthquake spatial pattern. We test these formulae by simulation.simulation. We consider lacunarity or intermittency of spatial earthquake

  13. Robust quantum spatial search

    E-print Network

    Avatar Tulsi

    2015-12-03

    Quantum spatial search has been widely studied with most of study focusing on quantum walk (QW) algorithms. We show that QW algorithms are extremely sensitive to systematic errors. We present a recursive algorithm which is significantly robust to certain systematic errors. To search $N$ items, our algorithm can tolerate errors of size $O(1/\\sqrt{\\ln N})$ which is exponentially better than QW algorithms which can only tolerate error size of $O(\\ln N/\\sqrt{N})$. Thus recursive algorithms are easier to implement and like QW algorithms, they also deserve a detailed study both theoretically and experimentally.

  14. Modeling structural change in spatial system dynamics: A Daisyworld example

    PubMed Central

    Neuwirth, C.; Peck, A.; Simonovi?, S.P.

    2015-01-01

    System dynamics (SD) is an effective approach for helping reveal the temporal behavior of complex systems. Although there have been recent developments in expanding SD to include systems’ spatial dependencies, most applications have been restricted to the simulation of diffusion processes; this is especially true for models on structural change (e.g. LULC modeling). To address this shortcoming, a Python program is proposed to tightly couple SD software to a Geographic Information System (GIS). The approach provides the required capacities for handling bidirectional and synchronized interactions of operations between SD and GIS. In order to illustrate the concept and the techniques proposed for simulating structural changes, a fictitious environment called Daisyworld has been recreated in a spatial system dynamics (SSD) environment. The comparison of spatial and non-spatial simulations emphasizes the importance of considering spatio-temporal feedbacks. Finally, practical applications of structural change models in agriculture and disaster management are proposed. PMID:26109906

  15. Chemistry with spatial control using particles and streams†

    PubMed Central

    Kalinin, Yevgeniy V.; Murali, Adithya

    2012-01-01

    Spatial control of chemical reactions, with micro- and nanometer scale resolution, has important consequences for one pot synthesis, engineering complex reactions, developmental biology, cellular biochemistry and emergent behavior. We review synthetic methods to engineer this spatial control using chemical diffusion from spherical particles, shells and polyhedra. We discuss systems that enable both isotropic and anisotropic chemical release from isolated and arrayed particles to create inhomogeneous and spatially patterned chemical fields. In addition to such finite chemical sources, we also discuss spatial control enabled with laminar flow in 2D and 3D microfluidic networks. Throughout the paper, we highlight applications of spatially controlled chemistry in chemical kinetics, reaction-diffusion systems, chemotaxis and morphogenesis. PMID:23145348

  16. Reversing desertification as a spatial resonance problem.

    PubMed

    Mau, Yair; Haim, Lev; Meron, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    An important environmental application of pattern control by periodic spatial forcing is the restoration of vegetation patterns in water-limited ecosystems that went through desertification. Vegetation restoration is often based on periodic landscape modulations that intercept overland water flow and form favorable conditions for vegetation growth. Viewing this method as a spatial resonance problem, we show that plain realizations of this method, assuming a complete vegetation response to the imposed modulation pattern, suffer from poor resilience to rainfall variability. By contrast, less intuitive realizations, based on the inherent spatial modes of vegetation growth and involving partial vegetation implantation, can be highly resilient and equally productive. We derive these results using two complementary models, a realistic vegetation model, and a simple pattern formation model that lends itself to mathematical analysis and highlights the universal aspects of the behaviors found with the vegetation model. We focus on reversing desertification as an outstanding environmental problem, but the main conclusions hold for any spatially forced system near the onset of a finite-wave-number instability that is subjected to noisy conditions. PMID:25679678

  17. Demonstration of polarization-insensitive spatial light modulation using a single polarization-sensitive spatial light modulator

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple configuration incorporating a single polarization-sensitive phase-only liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) to facilitate polarization-insensitive spatial light modulation. The polarization-insensitive configuration is formed by a polarization beam splitter (PBS), a polarization-sensitive phase-only LC-SLM, a half-wave plate (HWP), and a mirror in a loop structure. We experimentally demonstrate polarization-insensitive spatial light modulations for incident linearly polarized beams with different polarization states and polarization-multiplexed beams. Polarization-insensitive spatial light modulations generating orbital angular momentum (OAM) beams are demonstrated in the experiment. The designed polarization-insensitive configuration may find promising applications in spatial light modulations accommodating diverse incident polarizations. PMID:26146032

  18. Digital phantoms generated by spectral and spatial light modulators.

    PubMed

    Chon, Bonghwan; Tokumasu, Fuyuki; Lee, Ji Youn; Allen, David W; Rice, Joseph P; Hwang, Jeeseong

    2015-11-01

    A hyperspectral image projector (HIP) based on liquid crystal on silicon spatial light modulators is explained and demonstrated to generate data cubes. The HIP-constructed data cubes are three-dimensional images of the spatial distribution of spectrally resolved abundances of intracellular light-absorbing oxyhemoglobin molecules in single erythrocytes. Spectrally and spatially resolved image data indistinguishable from the real scene may be used as standard data cubes, so-called digital phantoms, to calibrate image sensors and validate image analysis algorithms for their measurement quality, performance consistency, and interlaboratory comparisons for quantitative biomedical imaging applications. PMID:26361340

  19. Spatial uncertainty analysis: Propagation of interpolation errors in spatially distributed models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, D.L.; Marks, D.G.

    1996-01-01

    In simulation modelling, it is desirable to quantify model uncertainties and provide not only point estimates for output variables but confidence intervals as well. Spatially distributed physical and ecological process models are becoming widely used, with runs being made over a grid of points that represent the landscape. This requires input values at each grid point, which often have to be interpolated from irregularly scattered measurement sites, e.g., weather stations. Interpolation introduces spatially varying errors which propagate through the model We extended established uncertainty analysis methods to a spatial domain for quantifying spatial patterns of input variable interpolation errors and how they propagate through a model to affect the uncertainty of the model output. We applied this to a model of potential evapotranspiration (PET) as a demonstration. We modelled PET for three time periods in 1990 as a function of temperature, humidity, and wind on a 10-km grid across the U.S. portion of the Columbia River Basin. Temperature, humidity, and wind speed were interpolated using kriging from 700- 1000 supporting data points. Kriging standard deviations (SD) were used to quantify the spatially varying interpolation uncertainties. For each of 5693 grid points, 100 Monte Carlo simulations were done, using the kriged values of temperature, humidity, and wind, plus random error terms determined by the kriging SDs and the correlations of interpolation errors among the three variables. For the spring season example, kriging SDs averaged 2.6??C for temperature, 8.7% for relative humidity, and 0.38 m s-1 for wind. The resultant PET estimates had coefficients of variation (CVs) ranging from 14% to 27% for the 10-km grid cells. Maps of PET means and CVs showed the spatial patterns of PET with a measure of its uncertainty due to interpolation of the input variables. This methodology should be applicable to a variety of spatially distributed models using interpolated inputs.

  20. Automated Verification of Spatial Resolution in Remotely Sensed Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Bruce; Ryan, Robert; Holekamp, Kara; Vaughn, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Image spatial resolution characteristics can vary widely among sources. In the case of aerial-based imaging systems, the image spatial resolution characteristics can even vary between acquisitions. In these systems, aircraft altitude, speed, and sensor look angle all affect image spatial resolution. Image spatial resolution needs to be verified with estimators that include the ground sample distance (GSD), the modulation transfer function (MTF), and the relative edge response (RER), all of which are key components of image quality, along with signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and dynamic range. Knowledge of spatial resolution parameters is important to determine if features of interest are distinguishable in imagery or associated products, and to develop image restoration algorithms. An automated Spatial Resolution Verification Tool (SRVT) was developed to rapidly determine the spatial resolution characteristics of remotely sensed aerial and satellite imagery. Most current methods for assessing spatial resolution characteristics of imagery rely on pre-deployed engineered targets and are performed only at selected times within preselected scenes. The SRVT addresses these insufficiencies by finding uniform, high-contrast edges from urban scenes and then using these edges to determine standard estimators of spatial resolution, such as the MTF and the RER. The SRVT was developed using the MATLAB programming language and environment. This automated software algorithm assesses every image in an acquired data set, using edges found within each image, and in many cases eliminating the need for dedicated edge targets. The SRVT automatically identifies high-contrast, uniform edges and calculates the MTF and RER of each image, and when possible, within sections of an image, so that the variation of spatial resolution characteristics across the image can be analyzed. The automated algorithm is capable of quickly verifying the spatial resolution quality of all images within a data set, enabling the appropriate use of those images in a number of applications.

  1. A performance evaluation framework for association mining in spatial data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang

    2010-01-01

    The evaluation of the process of mining associations is an important and challenging problem in database systems and especially those that store critical data and are used for making critical decisions. Within the context of spatial databases we present an evaluation framework in which we use probability distributions to model spatial regions, and Bayesian networks to model the joint probability distribution and the structural relationships among spatial and non-spatial predicates. We demonstrate the applicability of the proposed framework by evaluating representatives from two well-known approaches that are used for learning associations, i.e., dependency analysis (using statistical tests of independence) and Bayesian methods. By controlling the parameters of the framework we provide extensive comparative results of the performance of the two approaches. We obtain measures of recovery of known associations as a function of the number of samples used, the strength, number and type of associations in the model, the number of spatial predicates associated with a particular non-spatial predicate, the prior probabilities of spatial predicates, the conditional probabilities of the non-spatial predicates, the image registration error, and the parameters that control the sensitivity of the methods. In addition to performance we investigate the processing efficiency of the two approaches. PMID:21170170

  2. Analyzing spatial and temporal (222)Rn trends in Maine.

    PubMed

    Farah, Christopher; Beard, Kate; Hess, C T; Hock, Janet M

    2012-02-01

    Prolonged radon exposure has been linked to lung cancer. Cancer registry data indicates excess risk for age-adjusted lung cancer in Maine. Maine's mean residential radon activity exceeds the EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL). This paper describes the application of spatial autocorrelation methods to retrospective data as a means of analyzing radon activity in Maine. Retrospective air and well water radon activity data, sampled throughout Maine between 1993 and 2008, are standardized and geocoded for analysis. Three spatial autocorrelation algorithms-local Getis-Ord, local Moran, and spatial scan statistic-are used to identify spatial, temporal, and spatiotemporal radon activity clusters and/or outliers. Spatial clusters of high air- and well water-Rn activity are associated with Maine's Lucerne and Sebago granitic formations. Spatial clusters of low air- and well water-Rn activity are associated with Biddeford Granite and the metamorphic bedrock formation Silurian Ordovician Vassalboro. Space-time analysis indicates that most spatial clusters persist over the period of sampling. No significant temporal clusters are identified. Persistent spatial variations in radon may help to better understand and predict radon-related health risks associated with Maine residences. PMID:22217584

  3. SAGEO'2007, pages 00 00 Service Web de constitution en temps rel

    E-print Network

    towards desktop computer environments. In order to enable geospatial decision support in mobility contexts, architecture orientée service. KEYWORDS: Spatial OLAP, SOLAP, geospatial decisional data warehouse, wireless Business Intelligence (BI), soit « intelligence d'affaires » ou « informatique décisionnelle », et

  4. Une architecture oriente service Web pour la constitution de mini-cubes SOLAP pour

    E-print Network

    towards desktop computer environments. In order to enable geospatial decision support in mobility contexts, architecture orientée service. KEYWORDS: Spatial OLAP, SOLAP, geospatial decisional data warehouse, wireless du domaine appelé Business Intelligence (BI), soit « intelligence d'affaires » ou « informatique

  5. Synthesis of hybrid spatial coherence.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, A W; Shabtay, G; Mendlovic, D

    1999-07-10

    Spatial coherence plays a major role in characterizing quasi-monochromatic, partially coherent, optical signals. Here a fairly simple system for synthesizing special cases of spatial coherence is proposed. The special cases, called hybrid, include the case of total coherence in the x direction and, simultaneously, total incoherence in the y direction. The optical setup is based on a quasi-monochromatic, spatially coherent light source, such as a laser, and a simple moving optical element. PMID:18323912

  6. ALGORITHM DEVELOPMENT FOR SPATIAL OPERATORS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Claire, Robert W.

    1984-01-01

    An approach is given that develops spatial operators about the basic geometric elements common to spatial data structures. In this fashion, a single set of spatial operators may be accessed by any system that reduces its operands to such basic generic representations. Algorithms based on this premise have been formulated to perform operations such as separation, overlap, and intersection. Moreover, this generic approach is well suited for algorithms that exploit concurrent properties of spatial operators. The results may provide a framework for a geometry engine to support fundamental manipulations within a geographic information system.

  7. Spatial Query for Planetary Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Khawaja S.; Crockett, Thomas M.; Powell, Mark W.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Fox, Jason M.

    2011-01-01

    Science investigators need to quickly and effectively assess past observations of specific locations on a planetary surface. This innovation involves a location-based search technology that was adapted and applied to planetary science data to support a spatial query capability for mission operations software. High-performance location-based searching requires the use of spatial data structures for database organization. Spatial data structures are designed to organize datasets based on their coordinates in a way that is optimized for location-based retrieval. The particular spatial data structure that was adapted for planetary data search is the R+ tree.

  8. Fractals and Spatial Methods for Mining Remote Sensing Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Nina; Emerson, Charles; Quattrochi, Dale

    2003-01-01

    The rapid increase in digital remote sensing and GIS data raises a critical problem -- how can such an enormous amount of data be handled and analyzed so that useful information can be derived quickly? Efficient handling and analysis of large spatial data sets is central to environmental research, particularly in global change studies that employ time series. Advances in large-scale environmental monitoring and modeling require not only high-quality data, but also reliable tools to analyze the various types of data. A major difficulty facing geographers and environmental scientists in environmental assessment and monitoring is that spatial analytical tools are not easily accessible. Although many spatial techniques have been described recently in the literature, they are typically presented in an analytical form and are difficult to transform to a numerical algorithm. Moreover, these spatial techniques are not necessarily designed for remote sensing and GIS applications, and research must be conducted to examine their applicability and effectiveness in different types of environmental applications. This poses a chicken-and-egg problem: on one hand we need more research to examine the usability of the newer techniques and tools, yet on the other hand, this type of research is difficult to conduct if the tools to be explored are not accessible. Another problem that is fundamental to environmental research are issues related to spatial scale. The scale issue is especially acute in the context of global change studies because of the need to integrate remote-sensing and other spatial data that are collected at different scales and resolutions. Extrapolation of results across broad spatial scales remains the most difficult problem in global environmental research. There is a need for basic characterization of the effects of scale on image data, and the techniques used to measure these effects must be developed and implemented to allow for a multiple scale assessment of the data before any useful process-oriented modeling involving scale-dependent data can be conducted. Through the support of research grants from NASA, we have developed a software module called ICAMS (Image Characterization And Modeling System) to address the need to develop innovative spatial techniques and make them available to the broader scientific communities. ICAMS provides new spatial techniques, such as fractal analysis, geostatistical functions, and multiscale analysis that are not easily available in commercial GIS/image processing software. By bundling newer spatial methods in a user-friendly software module, researchers can begin to test and experiment with the new spatial analysis methods and they can gauge scale effects using a variety of remote sensing imagery. In the following, we describe briefly the development of ICAMS and present application examples.

  9. Low Voltage Spatial Light Modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, A

    2003-02-19

    This project studied the feasibility of a Low-Voltage actuator technology that promises to reduce the switched voltage requirements and linearize the response of spatial light modulators. We created computer models that demonstrate substantial advantages offered by this technology, and fabricated and tested those devices. SLMs are electro-optic devices for modulating the phase, amplitude or angle of light beams, laser or other. Applications for arrays of SLMs include turbulence correction for high-speed optical communications, imaging through distorting media, input devices for holographic memories, optical manipulation of DNA molecules, and optical computers. Devices based on micro electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology have recently become of special interest because of their potential for greatly improved performance at a much lower cost than piezoelectric or liquid crystal based devices. The new MEMS-based SLM devices could have important applications in high-speed optical communication and remote optical sensing, in support of DoD and DOE missions. Virtually all previously demonstrated MEMS SLMs are based on parallel-plate capacitors where an applied voltage causes a mirror attached to a suspended electrode to move towards a fixed electrode. They require relatively high voltages, typically on the order of 100 V, resulting in (1) large transistor sizes, available only from specialized foundries at significant cost and limiting the amount/sophistication of electronics under each SLM pixel, and (2) large power dissipation/area, resulting in a heat removal issue because of the optical precision required ({approx} 1/50-th of a wavelength). The actuator described in this process uses an advanced geometry that was invented at LLNL and is currently still proprietary. The new geometry allows the application of a bias voltage. This applied bias voltage results in a reduction of the required switched voltage and a linearization of the response curve. When this advanced actuator is coupled with non-linear springs, the response curve becomes even more linear. The response curve of the springs is tailored to produce an actuator with extremely linear displacement vs. voltage characteristics.

  10. Spatial Information and Intelligence http://spatial.ist.psu.edu

    E-print Network

    Squicciarini, Anna Cinzia

    -Computer Interaction. He conducts research in the areas of geographical information systems, geocollaboration, human approaches toward natural, multi-modal, multi-user dialogue-enabled interfaces to geographic information. OVERVIEW Current computing systems for spatial information and spatial intelligence restrict human

  11. One Spatial Map or Many? Spatial Coding of Connected Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Xue; Becker, Suzanna

    2014-01-01

    We investigated how humans encode large-scale spatial environments using a virtual taxi game. We hypothesized that if 2 connected neighborhoods are explored jointly, people will form a single integrated spatial representation of the town. However, if the neighborhoods are first learned separately and later observed to be connected, people will…

  12. Constructing Spatial Meaning: Spatial Affordances in Museum Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wineman, Jean D.; Peponis, John

    2010-01-01

    Informal education in museums is structured through movement in space. This article summarizes a range of research that examines the role of spatial layout in shaping the ways in which visitors explore, engage, and understand museums and museum exhibitions. It is demonstrated that behavior patterns are systematically linked to spatial

  13. One spatial map or many? Spatial coding of connected environments.

    PubMed

    Han, Xue; Becker, Suzanna

    2014-03-01

    We investigated how humans encode large-scale spatial environments using a virtual taxi game. We hypothesized that if 2 connected neighborhoods are explored jointly, people will form a single integrated spatial representation of the town. However, if the neighborhoods are first learned separately and later observed to be connected, people will form separate spatial representations; this should incur an accuracy cost when inferring directions from one neighborhood to the other. Interestingly, our data instead suggest that people have a very strong tendency to form local representations, regardless of whether the neighborhoods were learned together or separately. Only when all visible distinctions between neighborhoods were removed did people behave as if they formed one integrated spatial representation. These data are broadly consistent with evidence from rodent hippocampal place cell recordings in connected boxes, and with hierarchical models of spatial coding. PMID:24364723

  14. Virtual-memory tiling for spatial data handling in GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormack, J. E.; Hogg, J.

    1997-07-01

    Virtual-memory tiling enables applications efficiently to handle much larger arrays of raster spatial data more efficiently than is otherwise possible, without requiring specialist computing resources. It has particular application to geographical information systems (GIS) given the wide availability of large sets of digital raster spatial data from remote sensing and other sources. The size of these data sets often greatly exceeds the capabilities of most applications on standard computer platforms. In this paper, a virtual memory tiling approach is developed and implemented in C++. A tiled array class with a similar syntax and usage to standard arrays is constructed, which is readily integrated with existing algorithms and applications. A framework is developed for classifying operations on spatial data in terms of small and large regions. These two categories are representative of a broad range of operations on spatial data in GIS. Experimental results on a standard desktop platform are presented for an application (river catchment hydrology) using a 297-Mb array (10,800 × 9600 cells) of USGS digital elevation data.

  15. [Spatial orientation under microgravity].

    PubMed

    Koizuka, Izumi

    2012-01-01

    On Earth, humans are constantly exposed to the gravity. During head and body tilts, the otolith organs sense changes in head orientation with respect to the gravitational vertical. These graviceptors also transduce transient linear acceleration generated by translational head motion and centripetal acceleration during rotation about a distant axis. When individuals are rotated at a constant velocity in a centrifuge, they sense the direction of the summed gravitational and centripetal acceleration as the vertical in the steady state. Consequently they experience a roll-tilt of the body when upright and oriented either left-ear-out or right-ear-out. This perception of tilt has been called the somatogravic illusion. Under the microgravity, the graviceptors no longer respond during static tilt of the head or head and body, but they are still activated by linear acceleration. Adaptation to weightlessness early in space flight has been proposed to entail a reinterpretation of the signals from the graviceptors (primarily the otolith organs), so that on return to Earth pitch or roll of the head with respect to the vertical is sensed as fore-aft or left-right translation. In this article, formulation of the spatial orientation on the earth and under microgravity was described. PMID:23196604

  16. Auditory Spatial Layout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wightman, Frederic L.; Jenison, Rick

    1995-01-01

    All auditory sensory information is packaged in a pair of acoustical pressure waveforms, one at each ear. While there is obvious structure in these waveforms, that structure (temporal and spectral patterns) bears no simple relationship to the structure of the environmental objects that produced them. The properties of auditory objects and their layout in space must be derived completely from higher level processing of the peripheral input. This chapter begins with a discussion of the peculiarities of acoustical stimuli and how they are received by the human auditory system. A distinction is made between the ambient sound field and the effective stimulus to differentiate the perceptual distinctions among various simple classes of sound sources (ambient field) from the known perceptual consequences of the linear transformations of the sound wave from source to receiver (effective stimulus). Next, the definition of an auditory object is dealt with, specifically the question of how the various components of a sound stream become segregated into distinct auditory objects. The remainder of the chapter focuses on issues related to the spatial layout of auditory objects, both stationary and moving.

  17. Spatial invasion of cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Philipp; Nowak, Martin A.; Hauert, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    The evolutionary puzzle of cooperation describes situations where cooperators provide a fitness benefit to other individuals at some cost to themselves. Under Darwinian selection, the evolution of cooperation is a conundrum, whereas non-cooperation (or defection) is not. In the absence of supporting mechanisms, cooperators perform poorly and decrease in abundance. Evolutionary game theory provides a powerful mathematical framework to address the problem of cooperation using the prisoner’s dilemma. One well-studied possibility to maintain cooperation is to consider structured populations, where each individual interacts only with a limited subset of the population. This enables cooperators to form clusters such that they are more likely to interact with other cooperators instead of being exploited by defectors. Here we present a detailed analysis of how a few cooperators invade and expand in a world of defectors. If the invasion succeeds, the expansion process takes place in two stages: first, cooperators and defectors quickly establish a local equilibrium and then they uniformly expand in space. The second stage provides good estimates for the global equilibrium frequencies of cooperators and defectors. Under hospitable conditions, cooperators typically form a single, ever growing cluster interspersed with specks of defectors, whereas under more hostile conditions, cooperators form isolated, compact clusters that minimize exploitation by defectors. We provide the first quantitative assessment of the way cooperators arrange in space during invasion and find that the macroscopic properties and the emerging spatial patterns reveal information about the characteristics of the underlying microscopic interactions. PMID:18068731

  18. Bayesian Integration of Spatial Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Ken; Shettleworth, Sara J.; Huttenlocher, Janellen; Rieser, John J.

    2007-01-01

    Spatial judgments and actions are often based on multiple cues. The authors review a multitude of phenomena on the integration of spatial cues in diverse species to consider how nearly optimally animals combine the cues. Under the banner of Bayesian perception, cues are sometimes combined and weighted in a near optimal fashion. In other instances…

  19. The Space in Spatial Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Laura A.; Van Deman, Shannon R.

    2004-01-01

    Projective spatial terms such as ''below'' specify the location of one object by indicating its spatial relation with respect to a reference object. These relations are defined via a reference frame that consists of a number of parameters (orientation, direction, origin, and distance) whose settings configure the space surrounding the reference…

  20. Mechanisms for Human Spatial Competence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunzelmann, Glenn; Lyon, Don R.

    Research spanning decades has generated a long list of phenomena associated with human spatial information processing. Additionally, a number of theories have been proposed about the representation, organization and processing of spatial information by humans. This paper presents a broad account of human spatial competence, integrated with the ACT-R cognitive architecture. Using a cognitive architecture grounds the research in a validated theory of human cognition, enhancing the plausibility of the overall account. This work posits a close link of aspects of spatial information processing to vision and motor planning, and integrates theoretical perspectives that have been proposed over the history of research in this area. In addition, the account is supported by evidence from neuropsychological investigations of human spatial ability. The mechanisms provide a means of accounting for a broad range of phenomena described in the experimental literature.

  1. Spatial, Temporal and Spectral Satellite Image Fusion via Sparse Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Huihui

    Remote sensing provides good measurements for monitoring and further analyzing the climate change, dynamics of ecosystem, and human activities in global or regional scales. Over the past two decades, the number of launched satellite sensors has been increasing with the development of aerospace technologies and the growing requirements on remote sensing data in a vast amount of application fields. However, a key technological challenge confronting these sensors is that they tradeoff between spatial resolution and other properties, including temporal resolution, spectral resolution, swath width, etc., due to the limitations of hardware technology and budget constraints. To increase the spatial resolution of data with other good properties, one possible cost-effective solution is to explore data integration methods that can fuse multi-resolution data from multiple sensors, thereby enhancing the application capabilities of available remote sensing data. In this thesis, we propose to fuse the spatial resolution with temporal resolution and spectral resolution, respectively, based on sparse representation theory. Taking the study case of Landsat ETM+ (with spatial resolution of 30m and temporal resolution of 16 days) and MODIS (with spatial resolution of 250m ~ 1km and daily temporal resolution) reflectance, we propose two spatial-temporal fusion methods to combine the fine spatial information of Landsat image and the daily temporal resolution of MODIS image. Motivated by that the images from these two sensors are comparable on corresponding bands, we propose to link their spatial information on available Landsat- MODIS image pair (captured on prior date) and then predict the Landsat image from the MODIS counterpart on prediction date. To well-learn the spatial details from the prior images, we use a redundant dictionary to extract the basic representation atoms for both Landsat and MODIS images based on sparse representation. Under the scenario of two prior Landsat-MODIS image pairs, we build the corresponding relationship between the difference images of MODIS and ETM+ by training a low- and high-resolution dictionary pair from the given prior image pairs. In the second scenario, i.e., only one Landsat- MODIS image pair being available, we directly correlate MODIS and ETM+ data through an image degradation model. Then, the fusion stage is achieved by super-resolving the MODIS image combining the high-pass modulation in a two-layer fusion framework. Remarkably, the proposed spatial-temporal fusion methods form a unified framework for blending remote sensing images with phenology change or land-cover-type change. Based on the proposed spatial-temporal fusion models, we propose to monitor the land use/land cover changes in Shenzhen, China. As a fast-growing city, Shenzhen faces the problem of detecting the rapid changes for both rational city planning and sustainable development. However, the cloudy and rainy weather in region Shenzhen located makes the capturing circle of high-quality satellite images longer than their normal revisit periods. Spatial-temporal fusion methods are capable to tackle this problem by improving the spatial resolution of images with coarse spatial resolution but frequent temporal coverage, thereby making the detection of rapid changes possible. On two Landsat-MODIS datasets with annual and monthly changes, respectively, we apply the proposed spatial-temporal fusion methods to the task of multiple change detection. Afterward, we propose a novel spatial and spectral fusion method for satellite multispectral and hyperspectral (or high-spectral) images based on dictionary-pair learning and sparse non-negative matrix factorization. By combining the spectral information from hyperspectral image, which is characterized by low spatial resolution but high spectral resolution and abbreviated as LSHS, and the spatial information from multispectral image, which is featured by high spatial resolution but low spectral resolution and abbreviated as HSLS, this method aims to generate the fused data with both high spa

  2. Chromatic spatial superresolution with infrared adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadrozny, Andrew

    1999-09-01

    The diffraction-limited spatial cut-off frequency D/(lambda) of a telescope aperture is not an absolute limit to imaging resolution, and various methods exist to obtain spatial information at frequencies much higher than D/(lambda) under specialized circumstances. In particular, spectrally dissimilar objects can be discerned at separations far smaller than the Airy radius, by exploiting both the spatial and spectral information available. This general method is applied in differential speckle interferometry and chromatic position difference imaging. We describe proposed experiments, using the University of Durham's ELECTRA adaptive optics instrument, to perform a variant of chromatic position different imaging at IR wavelengths, but incorporating the very large resolution gain provided by AO image correction. This method, related in principle to differential speckle interferometry, involves measuring the shift of image centroid with wavelength across a spectrally dispersed image. The implementation of this experiment on ELECTRA requires only a simple modification to the standard ELECTRA optical configuration. The optical arrangement is described, and examples of astronomical applications are presented.

  3. Spatial dependences among precipitation maxima over Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannitsem, S.; Naveau, P.

    2007-09-01

    For a wide range of applications in hydrology, the probability distribution of precipitation maxima represents a fundamental quantity to build dykes, propose flood planning policies, or more generally, to mitigate the impact of precipitation extremes. Classical Extreme Value Theory (EVT) has been applied in this context by usually assuming that precipitation maxima can be considered as Independent and Identically Distributed (IID) events, which approximately follow a Generalized Extreme Value distribution (GEV) at each recording site. In practice, weather stations records can not be considered as independent in space. Assessing the spatial dependences among precipitation maxima provided by two Belgium measurement networks is the main goal of this work. The pairwise dependences are estimated by a variogram of order one, also called madogram, that is specially tailored to be in compliance with spatial EVT and to capture EVT bivariate structures. Our analysis of Belgium precipitation maxima indicates that the degree of dependence varies greatly according to three factors: the distance between two stations, the season (summer or winter) and the precipitation accumulation duration (hourly, daily, monthly, etc.). Increasing the duration (from one hour to 20 days) strengthens the spatial dependence. The full independence is reached after about 50 km (100 km) for summer (winter) for a duration of one hour, while for long durations only after a few hundred kilometers. In addition this dependence is always larger in winter than in summer whatever is the duration. An explanation of these properties in terms of the dynamical processes dominating during the two seasons is advanced.

  4. Quantum Phase Imaging using Spatial Entanglement

    E-print Network

    Chien-Hung Lu; Matthew Reichert; Xiaohang Sun; Jason W. Fleischer

    2015-09-03

    Entangled photons have the remarkable ability to be more sensitive to signal and less sensitive to noise than classical light. Joint photons can sample an object collectively, resulting in faster phase accumulation and higher spatial resolution, while common components of noise can be subtracted. Even more, they can accomplish this while physically separate, due to the nonlocal properties of quantum mechanics. Indeed, nearly all quantum optics experiments rely on this separation, using individual point detectors that are scanned to measure coincidence counts and correlations. Scanning, however, is tedious, time consuming, and ill-suited for imaging. Moreover, the separation of beam paths adds complexity to the system while reducing the number of photons available for sampling, and the multiplicity of detectors does not scale well for greater numbers of photons and higher orders of entanglement. We bypass all of these problems here by directly imaging collinear photon pairs with an electron-multiplying CCD camera. We show explicitly the benefits of quantum nonlocality by engineering the spatial entanglement of the illuminating photons and introduce a new method of correlation measurement by converting time-domain coincidence counting into spatial-domain detection of selected pixels. We show that classical transport-of-intensity methods are applicable in the quantum domain and experimentally demonstrate nearly optimal (Heisenberg-limited) phase measurement for the given quantum illumination. The methods show the power of direct imaging and hold much potential for more general types of quantum information processing and control.

  5. Early Warning Signals of Ecological Transitions: Methods for Spatial Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Brock, William A.; Carpenter, Stephen R.; Ellison, Aaron M.; Livina, Valerie N.; Seekell, David A.; Scheffer, Marten; van Nes, Egbert H.; Dakos, Vasilis

    2014-01-01

    A number of ecosystems can exhibit abrupt shifts between alternative stable states. Because of their important ecological and economic consequences, recent research has focused on devising early warning signals for anticipating such abrupt ecological transitions. In particular, theoretical studies show that changes in spatial characteristics of the system could provide early warnings of approaching transitions. However, the empirical validation of these indicators lag behind their theoretical developments. Here, we summarize a range of currently available spatial early warning signals, suggest potential null models to interpret their trends, and apply them to three simulated spatial data sets of systems undergoing an abrupt transition. In addition to providing a step-by-step methodology for applying these signals to spatial data sets, we propose a statistical toolbox that may be used to help detect approaching transitions in a wide range of spatial data. We hope that our methodology together with the computer codes will stimulate the application and testing of spatial early warning signals on real spatial data. PMID:24658137

  6. Evaluation methods for association rules in spatial knowlegde base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, X.; Ji, X.

    2014-04-01

    Association rule is an important model in data mining. It describes the relationship between predicates in transactions, makes the expression of knowledge hidden in data more specific and clear. While the developing and applying of remote sensing technology and automatic data collection tools in recent decades, tremendous amounts of spatial and non-spatial data have been collected and stored in large spatial database, so association rules mining from spatial database becomes a significant research area with extensive applications. How to find effective, reliable and interesting association rules from vast information for helping people analyze and make decision has become a significant issue. Evaluation methods measure spatial association rules with evaluation criteria. On the basis of analyzing the existing evaluation criteria, this paper improved the novelty evaluation method, built a spatial knowledge base, and proposed a new evaluation process based on the support-confidence evaluation system. Finally, the feasibility of the new evaluation process was validated by an experiment with real-world geographical spatial data.

  7. Software for Bayesian cross section and panel spatial model comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeSage, James P.

    2015-10-01

    A wide variety of spatial regression specifications that include alternative types of spatial dependence (e.g., lagged values of the dependent variable, spatial lags of explanatory variables, dependence in the model disturbances) have been the focus of a literature on statistical tests for distinguishing between alternative specifications. LeSage (Spat Stat 9:122-145, 2014) argues that a Bayesian approach to model comparison for cross-sectional and static panel models considerably simplifies the task of selecting an appropriate model. MATLAB software functions for carrying out Bayesian cross-sectional and static spatial panel model comparisons described in LeSage (2014) are described here along with a number of illustrative applications.

  8. Femtosecond spatial pulse shaping at the focal plane.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Matos, Ó; Vaveliuk, P; Izquierdo, J G; Loriot, V

    2013-10-21

    Spatial shaping of ultrashort laser beams at the focal plane is theoretically analyzed. The description of the pulse is performed by its expansion in terms of Laguerre-Gaussian orthonormal modes. This procedure gives both a comprehensive interpretation of the propagation dynamics and the required signal to encode onto a spatial light modulator for spatial shaping, without using iterative algorithms. As an example, pulses with top-hat and annular spatial profiles are designed and their dynamics analyzed. The interference of top-hat pulses is also investigated finding potential applications in high precision pump-probe experiments (without using delay lines) and for the creation of subwavelength ablation patterns. In addition, a novel class of ultrashort pulses possessing non-stationary orbital angular momentum is also proposed. These exotic pulses provide additional degrees of freedom that open up new perspectives in fields such as laser-matter interaction and micro-machining. PMID:24150344

  9. Empirical Bayes regionalization methods for spatial stochastic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butcher, Jonathan B.; Medina, Miguel A., Jr.; Marin, Carlos M.

    1991-01-01

    Many geophysical properties can be described as spatial stochastic processes, including spatially correlated hydraulic conductivity fields. Use of regional data can potentially improve estimation of such processes. We consider the case in which observations at each of several sites are described by a general linear model, while the parameters of these models arise from a common regional distribution. Parametric empirical Bayes methods enable the determination of the parameters of the regional distribution via maximum likelihood. However, such methods have not been utilized for spatial stochastic processes. We develop the application of a simple iterative technique for maximum likelihood estimation of the regional parameters, and demonstrate its use with a common parameterization of the spatial covariance structure. Synthetic data tests show the potential for substantial reduction in estimation risk through use of such techniques.

  10. Manakov spatial solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, J. U.; Stegeman, G. I.; Aitchison, J. S.; Akhmediev, N.

    1996-12-01

    The Manakov soliton is a two-component soliton that was first considered by Manakov in the early 1970s.1 Based on the work of Zakharov and Shabat,2 Manakov found that the coupled nonlinear Schrodinger (CNSE) equations with special choice of the coefficients in front of nonlinear terms can be solved exactly. This system is integrable and solitons have therefore a number of special properties which might be useful in practice. In particular, for same total power, the soliton of a single nonlinear Schrodinger equation and the Manakov soliton behave similarly. There are certain conditions for the integrability of the CNSE. Namely, for the coupled set of equations with cubic nonlinearity, the ratio between the self-phase modulation (SPM) to the cross-phase modulation coefficients has to be equal to unity, and the SPM coefficients need to be equal for the two polarizations. Moreover, the energy exchange terms or four-wave mixing (FWM) terms must be zero. Physically, the Manakov soliton is a mutually trapped state of two orthogonally polarized beams where each component of the soliton experiences exactly the same index potential which is proportional to the total intensity of the beam. There are no crystal symmetries that a priori lead to a SPM/XPM ratio of unity. Thus, the Manakov soliton has not been observed experimentally prior to the work we reported.3 Based on our previous work, we found that in AlGaAs, for photon energies just below half the band gap, the conditions for integrability can be satisfied. This led to the first experimental observation of spatial Manakov solitons.

  11. Adaptive Spatial Resampling for Seismic Inverse Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, C.; Mukerji, T.; Mariethoz, G.

    2011-12-01

    Inverse modeling is an essential process to integrate geophysical information in reservoir characterization. We propose a Markov chain Monte Carlo (McMC) workflow for sampling posteriors consistent with geology, well-logs, seismic data and rock-physics information. The workflow uses Direct Sampling (DS) as a multiple-point geostatistical method for generating realizations from the prior distribution, Adaptive Spatial Resampling (ASR) for forming a Markov chain, and Metropolis sampler for sampling from the posterior distribution conditioned to the geophysical data. To produce samples from the posterior probability density is a key issue in any inversion problems posed in a Bayesian framework. Sampling is a more general approach than optimization as it can assess important uncertainties and not just the most likely model. Rejection sampling is the only way to represent perfect posterior pdf. However, since it requires a large number of evaluations of forward model, it is inefficient and not suitable for reservoir modeling. Metropolis sampling is able to perform a reasonably equivalent sampling by forming a Markov chain. The spatial resampling algorithm perturbs realizations of a spatially dependent variable while preserving its spatial structure by conditioning to randomly selected subset points at every iteration. The method is used as a transition kernel to produce a Markov chain of geostatistical realizations. These realizations are then used in a forward seismic model to compute the predicted data which are compared to the observed data. Through this comparison for likelihood calculation we obtain a spatial error map at every iteration and the information can be used for generating the next model. Instead of randomly sampling a subset of points to condition the next realization, we adaptively sample important points with a probability proportional to the inverse of the residual error in the spatial error map. Thus the ASR accelerates to reach the posterior distribution and to find an optimal model consistent with the given data. Depending on the acceptation/rejection criterion in the Markov process, it is possible to obtain a chain of realizations aimed either at characterizing the posterior distribution with Metropolis sampling or at calibrating a single realization until an optimum is reached. Thus the algorithm can be tuned to work either as an optimizer or as a sampler. The validity and applicability of the proposed method, and sensitivity to different parameters is demonstrated by results for seismic lithofacies inversion on the synthetic Stanford VI data set.

  12. Spatial-multiblock procedure for radiation heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, J.C.; Moder, J.P.

    1996-12-31

    A spatial-multiblock procedure for radiation heat transfer is presented in this article. The proposed procedure is applicable to isothermal or nonisothermal, absorbing, emitting and scattering of transparent media with black or reflecting walls. Although not shown in this article, the procedure is also applicable to nongray conditions. The proposed procedure can be used with the discrete ordinates method and the finite volume method. The heat transfer rate, net radiation power and other full-range and half-range moments are conserved between spatial blocks by the proposed procedure. The utilities of the proposed procedure are shown using four sample problems. The solutions indicate that the multiblock procedure can reproduce the results of a single-block procedure even when very coarse spatial grids are used in the multiblock procedure.

  13. A spatial operator algebra for manipulator modeling and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Kreutz, K.; Milman, M.

    1988-01-01

    A powerful new spatial operator algebra for modeling, control, and trajectory design of manipulators is discussed along with its implementation in the Ada programming language. Applications of this algebra to robotics include an operator representation of the manipulator Jacobian matrix; the robot dynamical equations formulated in terms of the spatial algebra, showing the complete equivalence between the recursive Newton-Euler formulations to robot dynamics; the operator factorization and inversion of the manipulator mass matrix which immediately results in O(N) recursive forward dynamics algorithms; the joint accelerations of a manipulator due to a tip contact force; the recursive computation of the equivalent mass matrix as seen at the tip of a manipulator; and recursive forward dynamics of a closed chain system. Finally, additional applications and current research involving the use of the spatial operator algebra are discussed in general terms.

  14. Multivariate - Intervariable, Spatial, and Temporal - Bias Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friederichs, Petra; Vrac, Mathieu

    2015-04-01

    Statistical methods to bias correct global or regional climate model output are now common to get data closer to observations in distribution. However, most bias correction (BC) methods work for one variable and one location at a time and basically reproduce the temporal structure of the models. The intervariable, spatial, and temporal dependencies of the corrected data are usually poor compared to observations. Here, we propose a novel method for multivariate BC. The empirical copula-bias correction (EC-BC) combines a one-dimensional BC with a shuffling technique that restores an empirical multidimensional copula. Several BC methods are investigated and compared to high-resolution reference data over the French Mediterranean basin: notably, (i) a 1D BC method applied independently to precipitation and temperature fields, (ii) a recent conditional correction approach developed for producing correct two-dimensional intervariable structures, and (iii) the EC-BC method. Assessments are realized in terms of intervariable, spatial, and temporal dependencies, and an objective evaluation using the integrated quadratic distance (IQD) is presented. As expected, the 1D methods cannot produce correct multidimensional properties. The conditional technique appears efficient for intervariable properties but not for spatial and temporal dependencies. EC-BC provides realistic dependencies in all respects: intervariable, spatial, and temporal. The IQD results are clearly in favor of EC-BC. As many BC methods, EC-BC relies on a stationarity assumption and is only able to reproduce patterns inherited from historical data. However, because of its ease of coding, its speed of application, and the quality of its results, the EC-BC method is a very good candidate for all needs in multivariate bias correction.

  15. Extinction and the spatial dynamics of biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, David

    2008-01-01

    The fossil record amply shows that the spatial fabric of extinction has profoundly shaped the biosphere; this spatial dimension provides a powerful context for integration of paleontological and neontological approaches. Mass extinctions evidently alter extinction selectivity, with many factors losing effectiveness except for a positive relation between survivorship and geographic range at the clade level (confirmed in reanalyses of end-Cretaceous extinction data). This relation probably also holds during “normal” times, but changes both slope and intercept with increasing extinction. The strong geographical component to clade dynamics can obscure causation in the extinction of a feature or a clade, owing to hitchhiking effects on geographic range, so that multifactorial analyses are needed. Some extinctions are spatially complex, and regional extinctions might either reset a diversity ceiling or create a diversification debt open to further diversification or invasion. Evolutionary recoveries also exhibit spatial dynamics, including regional differences in invasibilty, and expansion of clades from the tropics fuels at least some recoveries, as well as biodiversity dynamics during normal times. Incumbency effects apparently correlate more closely with extinction intensities than with standing diversities, so that regions with higher local and global extinctions are more subject to invasion; the latest Cenozoic temperate zones evidently received more invaders than the tropics or poles, but this dynamic could shift dramatically if tropical diversity is strongly depleted. The fossil record can provide valuable insights, and their application to present-day issues will be enhanced by partitioning past and present-day extinctions by driving mechanism rather than emphasizing intensity. PMID:18695229

  16. Spatial wave field characteristics in Arctic seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmrich, Johannes; Rogers, Erick; Lehner, Susanne; Pleskachevsky, Andrey; Thomson, Jim

    2015-04-01

    The reduction of the sea ice coverage during the boreal summer will lead to an increased importance of wind waves for the dynamic processes of the Arctic Seas. Larger ice free areas lead to longer fetch and thus longer and higher sea state. Wind waves will enhance upper-ocean mixing, may affect the breakup of ice sheets, and will likely lead to increased coastal erosion. Our long-term goal is a better understanding of the two-way interaction of waves and sea-ice, in order to improve wave models as well as ice models applicable to a changing Arctic wave- and ice climate. Wind, wave and ice information has been retrieved from space-borne SAR imagery (TerraSAR-X), collected during the period August-September 2014 in the Beaufort Sea. The SAR data were co-located with drifting wave-buoys and wave gliders. This information complements and validates model data (Wavewatch III) for the spatial and temporal evolution of sea state in the Arctic. We will present examples of wind and wave fields under different wind forcing and ice conditions, and discuss the advantages of each of the three observational/modelling approaches. These examples highlight the strong spatial heterogeneity of the wave field in arctic regions, and the need for high resolution spatial wave observations. Satellite-based wave field observations can bridge the gap between the single point buoy observation that provide high resolution time series of wave parameters, and the output of wave models which are of relatively coarse resolution and are inherently limited by the quality of the wind and ice input fields, but are unlimited in their spatial and temporal extent.

  17. Hadoop-GIS: A High Performance Spatial Data Warehousing System over MapReduce.

    PubMed

    Aji, Ablimit; Wang, Fusheng; Vo, Hoang; Lee, Rubao; Liu, Qiaoling; Zhang, Xiaodong; Saltz, Joel

    2013-08-01

    Support of high performance queries on large volumes of spatial data becomes increasingly important in many application domains, including geospatial problems in numerous fields, location based services, and emerging scientific applications that are increasingly data- and compute-intensive. The emergence of massive scale spatial data is due to the proliferation of cost effective and ubiquitous positioning technologies, development of high resolution imaging technologies, and contribution from a large number of community users. There are two major challenges for managing and querying massive spatial data to support spatial queries: the explosion of spatial data, and the high computational complexity of spatial queries. In this paper, we present Hadoop-GIS - a scalable and high performance spatial data warehousing system for running large scale spatial queries on Hadoop. Hadoop-GIS supports multiple types of spatial queries on MapReduce through spatial partitioning, customizable spatial query engine RESQUE, implicit parallel spatial query execution on MapReduce, and effective methods for amending query results through handling boundary objects. Hadoop-GIS utilizes global partition indexing and customizable on demand local spatial indexing to achieve efficient query processing. Hadoop-GIS is integrated into Hive to support declarative spatial queries with an integrated architecture. Our experiments have demonstrated the high efficiency of Hadoop-GIS on query response and high scalability to run on commodity clusters. Our comparative experiments have showed that performance of Hadoop-GIS is on par with parallel SDBMS and outperforms SDBMS for compute-intensive queries. Hadoop-GIS is available as a set of library for processing spatial queries, and as an integrated software package in Hive. PMID:24187650

  18. Hadoop-GIS: A High Performance Spatial Data Warehousing System over MapReduce

    PubMed Central

    Aji, Ablimit; Wang, Fusheng; Vo, Hoang; Lee, Rubao; Liu, Qiaoling; Zhang, Xiaodong; Saltz, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Support of high performance queries on large volumes of spatial data becomes increasingly important in many application domains, including geospatial problems in numerous fields, location based services, and emerging scientific applications that are increasingly data- and compute-intensive. The emergence of massive scale spatial data is due to the proliferation of cost effective and ubiquitous positioning technologies, development of high resolution imaging technologies, and contribution from a large number of community users. There are two major challenges for managing and querying massive spatial data to support spatial queries: the explosion of spatial data, and the high computational complexity of spatial queries. In this paper, we present Hadoop-GIS – a scalable and high performance spatial data warehousing system for running large scale spatial queries on Hadoop. Hadoop-GIS supports multiple types of spatial queries on MapReduce through spatial partitioning, customizable spatial query engine RESQUE, implicit parallel spatial query execution on MapReduce, and effective methods for amending query results through handling boundary objects. Hadoop-GIS utilizes global partition indexing and customizable on demand local spatial indexing to achieve efficient query processing. Hadoop-GIS is integrated into Hive to support declarative spatial queries with an integrated architecture. Our experiments have demonstrated the high efficiency of Hadoop-GIS on query response and high scalability to run on commodity clusters. Our comparative experiments have showed that performance of Hadoop-GIS is on par with parallel SDBMS and outperforms SDBMS for compute-intensive queries. Hadoop-GIS is available as a set of library for processing spatial queries, and as an integrated software package in Hive. PMID:24187650

  19. The emergence of spatial cyberinfrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Dawn J.; Wang, Shaowen

    2011-01-01

    Cyberinfrastructure integrates advanced computer, information, and communication technologies to empower computation-based and data-driven scientific practice and improve the synthesis and analysis of scientific data in a collaborative and shared fashion. As such, it now represents a paradigm shift in scientific research that has facilitated easy access to computational utilities and streamlined collaboration across distance and disciplines, thereby enabling scientific breakthroughs to be reached more quickly and efficiently. Spatial cyberinfrastructure seeks to resolve longstanding complex problems of handling and analyzing massive and heterogeneous spatial datasets as well as the necessity and benefits of sharing spatial data flexibly and securely. This article provides an overview and potential future directions of spatial cyberinfrastructure. The remaining four articles of the special feature are introduced and situated in the context of providing empirical examples of how spatial cyberinfrastructure is extending and enhancing scientific practice for improved synthesis and analysis of both physical and social science data. The primary focus of the articles is spatial analyses using distributed and high-performance computing, sensor networks, and other advanced information technology capabilities to transform massive spatial datasets into insights and knowledge. PMID:21467227

  20. Mapping the knowledge of spatial data mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zuocheng; Xue, Lixia; Li, Yongshu; Wang, Linlin

    2005-10-01

    Map is the model of spatial data. It is the basis of spatial database. Because of the complexity of spatial data mining and the diversity of spatial relations, too many spatial rules have been discovered in spatial data mining. In order to comprehending the knowledge contained in spatial rules, spatial data mining visualization has attracted a great deal of attention. In fact, map is not only one of the objects of spatial data mining, but also one of the predominant visualization tools of spatial rules or knowledge. This paper proposes that map is the proper visual method of spatial rules from spatial data mining. By the visual variables of map expressing, such as static variables, including shape, size, color, brightness, design, texture and dynamic variables, including video, sound, and so on, Map can visualize static and dynamic knowledge. From the point of view of map expressing, spatial knowledge or rules can be classified four categories, spatial characteristic rules, spatial distribution rules, spatial relation rules and temporal-spatial evolution rules. We propose visualization models and methods for each category by virtue of the visual variables of map expressing. Along with the development of 3D map, map can visualize spatial knowledge better and facilitate comprehending the spatial rules from spatial data mining.

  1. The Detection of Clusters with Spatial Heterogeneity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Zuoyi

    2011-01-01

    This thesis consists of two parts. In Chapter 2, we focus on the spatial scan statistics with overdispersion and Chapter 3 is devoted to the randomized permutation test for identifying local patterns of spatial association. The spatial scan statistic has been widely used in spatial disease surveillance and spatial cluster detection. To apply it, a…

  2. Free vibrations of spatial Timoshenko arches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliò, I.; Greco, A.; D'Urso, D.

    2014-09-01

    This paper addresses the evaluation of the exact natural frequencies and vibration modes of structures obtained by assemblage of plane circular arched Timoshenko beams. The exact dynamic stiffness matrix of the single circular arch, in which both the in-plane and out-of-plane motions are taken into account, is derived in an useful dimensionless form by revisiting the mathematical approach already adopted by Howson and Jemah (1999 [18]), for the in plane and the out-of-plan natural frequencies of curved Timoshenko beams. The knowledge of the exact dynamic stiffness matrix of the single arch makes the direct evaluation of the exact global dynamic stiffness matrix of spatial arch structures possible. Furthermore, it allows the exact evaluation of the frequencies and the corresponding vibration modes, for the distributed parameter model, through the application of the Wittrick and Williams algorithm. Consistently with the dimensionless form proposed in the derivation of the equations of motion and the dynamic stiffness matrix, an original and extensive parametric analysis on the in-plane and out-of-plane dynamic behaviour of the single arch, for a wide range of structural and geometrical dimensionless parameters, has been performed. Moreover, some numerical applications, relative to the evaluation of exact frequencies and the corresponding mode shapes in spatial arched structures, are reported. The exact solution has been numerically validated by comparing the results with those obtained by a refined finite element simulation.

  3. Spatial computation with gamma oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Engelhard, Ben; Vaadia, Eilon

    2014-01-01

    Gamma oscillations in cortex have been extensively studied with relation to behavior in both humans and animal models; however, their computational role in the processing of behaviorally relevant signals is still not clear. One oft-overlooked characteristic of gamma oscillations is their spatial distribution over the cortical space and the computational consequences of such an organization. Here, we advance the proposal that the spatial organization of gamma oscillations is of major importance for their function. The interaction of specific spatial distributions of oscillations with the functional topography of cortex enables select amplification of neuronal signals, which supports perceptual and cognitive processing. PMID:25249950

  4. Routing Algorithm Exploits Spatial Relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okino, Clayton; Jennings, Esther

    2004-01-01

    A recently developed routing algorithm for broadcasting in an ad hoc wireless communication network takes account of, and exploits, the spatial relationships among the locations of nodes, in addition to transmission power levels and distances between the nodes. In contrast, most prior algorithms for discovering routes through ad hoc networks rely heavily on transmission power levels and utilize limited graph-topology techniques that do not involve consideration of the aforesaid spatial relationships. The present algorithm extracts the relevant spatial-relationship information by use of a construct denoted the relative-neighborhood graph (RNG).

  5. Time Constrained Randomized Path Planning Using Spatial Networks Christopher Lum*

    E-print Network

    Lum, Christopher

    Time Constrained Randomized Path Planning Using Spatial Networks Christopher Lum* Department time planning of optimal paths remains an open problem in many applications of autonomous systems an open problem. The path planning problem is often addressed as a non- holonomic planning problem

  6. Identifying the Most Endangered Objects from Spatial Datasets

    E-print Network

    Yiu, Man Lung

    various practical applications such as business planning, online war games, and wild animal protec- tion.g., price and star). Con- ventionally, spatial objects are retrieved by using two orthogonal query types. Such a hotel may be considered to be shut down. Note that the business of a hotel is not significantly affected

  7. Assessing Spatial Point Process Models for California Earthquakes Using Weighted

    E-print Network

    Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

    Assessing Spatial Point Process Models for California Earthquakes Using Weighted K distribution of California earthquakes. 1 Introduction Ripley's K-function [Rip76], K(h), is a widely used] for an application to earthquake occurrence models. We focus here on Ripley's K-function, and in particular

  8. Modeling Urban Structures Using Graph-Based Spatial Patterns

    E-print Network

    Aksoy, Selim

    Modeling Urban Structures Using Graph-Based Spatial Patterns Emel Dogrus¨oz and Selim Aksoy information about urban development. I. INTRODUCTION Remotely sensed imagery is a critical resource for urban planning, development, and monitoring applications. Although there is no exact definition for urbanization

  9. A SPATIAL MODELING FRAMEWORK FOR ANALYZING POTENTIAL EARTHQUAKE DAMAGE

    E-print Network

    Smith, Tony E.

    autocorrelation on the uncertainties embodied in an earthquake mitigation plan. While it can be accepted1 A SPATIAL MODELING FRAMEWORK FOR ANALYZING POTENTIAL EARTHQUAKE DAMAGE: AN APPLICATION TO MEMPHIS and making decisions to reduce natural hazard losses from large earthquakes rely on vulnerability and hazard

  10. Spatial-Semantics: How Users Derive Shape from Information Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of user problems with navigating large spaces in virtual information environments focuses on a top-down application of semantic knowledge by the user from experiences within the sociocognitive context of information production and consumption. Considers individual differences in studies of interaction; spatial and semantic cues; and…

  11. Spatial distribution visualization of PWM continuous variable-rate spray

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemical application is a dynamic spatial distribution process, during which spray liquid covers the targets with certain thickness and uniformity. Therefore, it is important to study the 2-D and 3-D (dimensional) spray distribution to evaluate spraying quality. The curve-surface generation methods ...

  12. Spatial features register: toward standardization of spatial features

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cascio, Janette

    1994-01-01

    As the need to share spatial data increases, more than agreement on a common format is needed to ensure that the data is meaningful to both the importer and the exporter. Effective data transfer also requires common definitions of spatial features. To achieve this, part 2 of the Spatial Data Transfer Standard (SDTS) provides a model for a spatial features data content specification and a glossary of features and attributes that fit this model. The model provides a foundation for standardizing spatial features. The glossary now contains only a limited subset of hydrographic and topographic features. For it to be useful, terms and definitions must be included for other categories, such as base cartographic, bathymetric, cadastral, cultural and demographic, geodetic, geologic, ground transportation, international boundaries, soils, vegetation, water, and wetlands, and the set of hydrographic and topographic features must be expanded. This paper will review the philosophy of the SDTS part 2 and the current plans for creating a national spatial features register as one mechanism for maintaining part 2.

  13. Proc. IEE Conf. On Image Processing and its Applications, IPA99, pp. 216-219, July 1999. IMAGE DE-NOISING IN THE WAVELET DOMAIN USING PRIOR SPATIAL CONSTRAINTS

    E-print Network

    Pizurica, Aleksandra

    Proc. IEE Conf. On Image Processing and its Applications, IPA99, pp. 216-219, July 1999. IMAGE DE-NOISING. We are, however, mostly interested in de-noising infrared images of natu- ral terrain for the noise removal in the wavelet domain, which takes into account not only the local noise measure, but also

  14. HIGH-RESOLUTION SPATIAL MODELING OF DAILY WEATHER ELEMENTS FOR A CATCHMENT IN THE OREGON CASCADE MOUNTAINS, UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-quality, daily meteorological data at high spatial resolution are essential for a variety of hydrologic and ecological modeling applications that support environmental risk assessments and decision making. This paper describes the development, application, and assessment of ...

  15. Extending Complex AdHoc OLAP Theodore Johnson Damianos Chatziantoniou

    E-print Network

    Chatziantoniou, Damianos

    ­Feature (EMF) syntax as the basis for expressing nested aggre­ gation. An advantage of this approach is that EMF SQL can already express a wide range of complex aggregation in a succinct way, and EMF SQL efficiently by using a small extension to the EMF SQL query evaluation algorithm. A side effect

  16. Graph Cube: On Warehousing and OLAP Multidimensional Networks

    E-print Network

    Cortes, Corinna

    - works, Graph Cube goes beyond the traditional data cube model involved solely with numeric value based well-studied data cube techniques. We perform extensive experimental studies on a series of real world the so-called multidimensional networks. While studies on contemporary networks have been around

  17. Soil Water Content Spatial Correlation Estimation Using GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grote, K. R.; Hubbard, S. S.; Rubin, Y.

    2001-12-01

    Spatial correlation estimates of water content in the shallow subsurface are needed as input for stochastic generation of representative vadose zone models. Improved vadose zone characterization is also important for applications such as precision agriculture, environmental monitoring, and optimizing data collection strategies. However, water content in the vadose zone is often highly variable. As such, using only traditional vadose zone sampling techniques, it is difficult to collect accurate point estimates of water content, and it is even more challenging to obtain accurate estimates of spatial correlation. We are investigating the use of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) to provide accurate, very high resolution estimates of water content and its spatial correlation in the very shallow subsurface. Using surface GPR groundwave techniques, estimates of shallow water content (~10 to 20 cm below ground surface) can be obtained quickly; these high resolution measurements can then be used to estimate the spatial structure and correlation length of the water content. This concept is being investigated in a five acre field located within the Robert Mondavi vineyards in Napa County, California. At several times during the year, we collected a grid of GPR measurements along selected rows using 10 cm sampling intervals. Using petrophysical relationships, these measurements were converted to water content and then analyzed for spatial and temporal correlation. To calibrate and verify the GPR measurements, we are comparing the GPR-obtained information with data collected at the same site using multispectral remote sensing, time domain reflectometry, electrical resistivity, neutron probe, and soil texture analysis techniques. This presentation will focus on water content spatial correlation estimation and its variation with season using the different measurement techniques. Based on this analysis, we will discuss the spatial support scales associated with the different types of vadose zone measurement techniques, the benefits of incorporating GPR into the spatial correlation estimation procedure, and the practical implementation of these methods for spatial correlation estimation.

  18. Using spatial principles to optimize distributed computing for enabling the physical science discoveries

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chaowei; Wu, Huayi; Huang, Qunying; Li, Zhenlong; Li, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Contemporary physical science studies rely on the effective analyses of geographically dispersed spatial data and simulations of physical phenomena. Single computers and generic high-end computing are not sufficient to process the data for complex physical science analysis and simulations, which can be successfully supported only through distributed computing, best optimized through the application of spatial principles. Spatial computing, the computing aspect of a spatial cyberinfrastructure, refers to a computing paradigm that utilizes spatial principles to optimize distributed computers to catalyze advancements in the physical sciences. Spatial principles govern the interactions between scientific parameters across space and time by providing the spatial connections and constraints to drive the progression of the phenomena. Therefore, spatial computing studies could better position us to leverage spatial principles in simulating physical phenomena and, by extension, advance the physical sciences. Using geospatial science as an example, this paper illustrates through three research examples how spatial computing could (i) enable data intensive science with efficient data/services search, access, and utilization, (ii) facilitate physical science studies with enabling high-performance computing capabilities, and (iii) empower scientists with multidimensional visualization tools to understand observations and simulations. The research examples demonstrate that spatial computing is of critical importance to design computing methods to catalyze physical science studies with better data access, phenomena simulation, and analytical visualization. We envision that spatial computing will become a core technology that drives fundamental physical science advancements in the 21st century. PMID:21444779

  19. Spatial Water Balance in Texas 

    E-print Network

    Reed, Seann; Maidment, David; Patoux, Jerome

    1994-01-01

    understanding of the spatial water balance - the partitioning of precipitation between evaporation, runoff, and groundwater recharge at different points in space - will directly benefit those who wish to assess water resource availability and non-point source...

  20. Spatial modulation: theory to practice 

    E-print Network

    Younis, Abdelhamid

    2014-06-30

    Spatial modulation (SM) is a transmission technique proposed for multiple–input multiple– output (MIMO) systems, where only one transmit antenna is active at a time, offering an increase in the spectral efficiency equal ...

  1. Analyzing spatially-varying blur

    E-print Network

    Chakrabarti, Ayan

    Blur is caused by a pixel receiving light from multiple scene points, and in many cases, such as object motion, the induced blur varies spatially across the image plane. However, the seemingly straight-forward task of ...

  2. A reliable spatially normalized template of the human spinal cord--Applications to automated white matter/gray matter segmentation and tensor-based morphometry (TBM) mapping of gray matter alterations occurring with age.

    PubMed

    Taso, Manuel; Le Troter, Arnaud; Sdika, Michaël; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Arnoux, Pierre-Jean; Guye, Maxime; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Callot, Virginie

    2015-08-15

    Recently, a T2*-weighted template and probabilistic atlas of the white and gray matter (WM, GM) of the spinal cord (SC) have been reported. Such template can be used as tissue-priors for automated WM/GM segmentation but can also provide a common reference and normalized space for group studies. Here, a new template has been created (AMU40), and accuracy of automatic template-based WM/GM segmentation was quantified. The feasibility of tensor-based morphometry (TBM) for studying voxel-wise morphological differences of SC between young and elderly healthy volunteers was also investigated. Sixty-five healthy subjects were divided into young (n=40, age<40years old, mean age 28±5years old) and elderly (n=25, age>50years old, mean age 57±5years old) groups and scanned at 3T using an axial high-resolution T2*-weighted sequence. Inhomogeneity correction and affine intensity normalization of the SC and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) signal intensities across slices were performed prior to both construction of the AMU40 template and WM/GM template-based segmentation. The segmentation was achieved using non-linear spatial normalization of T2*-w MR images to the AMU40 template. Validation of WM/GM segmentations was performed with a leave-one-out procedure by calculating DICE similarity coefficients between manual and automated WM/GM masks. SC morphological differences between young and elderly healthy volunteers were assessed using the same non-linear spatial normalization of the subjects' MRI to a common template, derivation of the Jacobian determinant maps from the warping fields, and a TBM analysis. Results demonstrated robust WM/GM automated segmentation, with mean DICE values greater than 0.8. Concerning the TBM analysis, an anterior GM atrophy was highlighted in elderly volunteers, demonstrating thereby, for the first time, the feasibility of studying local structural alterations in the SC using tensor-based morphometry. This holds great promise for studies of morphological impairment occurring in several central nervous system pathologies. PMID:26003856

  3. Report on the Center for Spatial Studies

    E-print Network

    Hegarty, Mary; Goodchild, Michael; Janelle, Donald; Doehner, Karen

    2013-01-01

    the study of spatial perception, thinking, reasoning, andof human perception and cognition of spatial and multidimen-Spatial Abilities and STEM Education: When, Why, and How Presentation in (co-sponsored by UCSB Psychological & Brain Sciences; Cognition, Perception

  4. Unified error model based spatial error compensation for four types of CNC machining center: Part II-unified model based spatial error compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Kaiguo; Yang, Jianguo; Yang, Liyan

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a spatial error compensation method was proposed for CNC machining center based on the unified error model. The spatial error distribution was analyzed in this research. The result shows that the spatial error is relative to each axis of a CNC machine tool. Moreover, the spatial error distribution is non-linear and there is no regularity. In order to improve the modeling accuracy and efficiency, an automatic error modeling application was designed based on the orthogonal polynomials. To realize the spatial error compensation, a multi-thread parallel processing mode based error compensation controller was designed. Using the spatial error compensation method, the machine tools' accuracy is greatly improved compared to that with no compensation.

  5. The effect of spatial aggregation on performance when mapping a risk of disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Spatial data on cases are available either in point form (e.g. longitude/latitude), or aggregated by an administrative region (e.g. zip code or census tract). Statistical methods for spatial data may accommodate either form of data, however the spatial aggregation can affect their performance. Previous work has studied the effect of spatial aggregation on cluster detection methods. Here we consider geographic health data at different levels of spatial resolution, to study the effect of spatial aggregation on disease mapping performance in locating subregions of increased disease risk. Methods We implemented a non-parametric disease distance-based mapping (DBM) method to produce a smooth map from spatially aggregated childhood leukaemia data. We then simulated spatial data under controlled conditions to study the effect of spatial aggregation on its performance. We used an evaluation method based on ROC curves to compare performance of DBM across different geographic scales. Results Application of DBM to the leukaemia data illustrates the method as a useful visualization tool. Spatial aggregation produced expected degradation of disease mapping performance. Characteristics of this degradation, however, varied depending on the interaction between the geographic extent of the higher risk area and the level of aggregation. For example, higher risk areas dispersed across several units did not suffer as greatly from aggregation. The choice of centroids also had an impact on the resulting mapping. Conclusions DBM can be implemented for continuous and discrete spatial data, but the resulting mapping can lose accuracy in the second setting. Investigation of the simulations suggests a complex relationship between performance loss, geographic extent of spatial disturbances and centroid locations. Aggregation of spatial data destroys information and thus impedes efforts to monitor these data for spatial disturbances. The effect of spatial aggregation on cluster detection, disease mapping, and other useful methods in spatial epidemiology is complex and deserves further study. PMID:24625068

  6. Application of Spectral Analysis Techniques in the Intercomparison of Aerosol Data: 1. an EOF Approach to the Spatial-Temporal Variability of Aerosol Optical Depth Using Multiple Remote Sensing Data Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Carlson, Barbara E.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2013-01-01

    Many remote sensing techniques and passive sensors have been developed to measure global aerosol properties. While instantaneous comparisons between pixel-level data often reveal quantitative differences, here we use Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis, also known as Principal Component Analysis, to demonstrate that satellite-derived aerosol optical depth (AOD) data sets exhibit essentially the same spatial and temporal variability and are thus suitable for large-scale studies. Analysis results show that the first four EOF modes of AOD account for the bulk of the variance and agree well across the four data sets used in this study (i.e., Aqua MODIS, Terra MODIS, MISR, and SeaWiFS). Only SeaWiFS data over land have slightly different EOF patterns. Globally, the first two EOF modes show annual cycles and are mainly related to Sahara dust in the northern hemisphere and biomass burning in the southern hemisphere, respectively. After removing the mean seasonal cycle from the data, major aerosol sources, including biomass burning in South America and dust in West Africa, are revealed in the dominant modes due to the different interannual variability of aerosol emissions. The enhancement of biomass burning associated with El Niño over Indonesia and central South America is also captured with the EOF technique.

  7. Generalized index for spatial data sets as a measure of complete spatial randomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackett-Jones, Emily J.; Davies, Kale J.; Binder, Benjamin J.; Landman, Kerry A.

    2012-06-01

    Spatial data sets, generated from a wide range of physical systems can be analyzed by counting the number of objects in a set of bins. Previous work has been limited to equal-sized bins, which are inappropriate for some domains (e.g., circular). We consider a nonequal size bin configuration whereby overlapping or nonoverlapping bins cover the domain. A generalized index, defined in terms of a variance between bin counts, is developed to indicate whether or not a spatial data set, generated from exclusion or nonexclusion processes, is at the complete spatial randomness (CSR) state. Limiting values of the index are determined. Using examples, we investigate trends in the generalized index as a function of density and compare the results with those using equal size bins. The smallest bin size must be much larger than the mean size of the objects. We can determine whether a spatial data set is at the CSR state or not by comparing the values of a generalized index for different bin configurations—the values will be approximately the same if the data is at the CSR state, while the values will differ if the data set is not at the CSR state. In general, the generalized index is lower than the limiting value of the index, since objects do not have access to the entire region due to blocking by other objects. These methods are applied to two applications: (i) spatial data sets generated from a cellular automata model of cell aggregation in the enteric nervous system and (ii) a known plant data distribution.

  8. Generalized index for spatial data sets as a measure of complete spatial randomness.

    PubMed

    Hackett-Jones, Emily J; Davies, Kale J; Binder, Benjamin J; Landman, Kerry A

    2012-06-01

    Spatial data sets, generated from a wide range of physical systems can be analyzed by counting the number of objects in a set of bins. Previous work has been limited to equal-sized bins, which are inappropriate for some domains (e.g., circular). We consider a nonequal size bin configuration whereby overlapping or nonoverlapping bins cover the domain. A generalized index, defined in terms of a variance between bin counts, is developed to indicate whether or not a spatial data set, generated from exclusion or nonexclusion processes, is at the complete spatial randomness (CSR) state. Limiting values of the index are determined. Using examples, we investigate trends in the generalized index as a function of density and compare the results with those using equal size bins. The smallest bin size must be much larger than the mean size of the objects. We can determine whether a spatial data set is at the CSR state or not by comparing the values of a generalized index for different bin configurations-the values will be approximately the same if the data is at the CSR state, while the values will differ if the data set is not at the CSR state. In general, the generalized index is lower than the limiting value of the index, since objects do not have access to the entire region due to blocking by other objects. These methods are applied to two applications: (i) spatial data sets generated from a cellular automata model of cell aggregation in the enteric nervous system and (ii) a known plant data distribution. PMID:23005128

  9. Working Memory in Developing and Applying Mental Models from Spatial Descriptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunye, Tad T.; Taylor, Holly A.

    2008-01-01

    Four dual-task experiments examined visuospatial, articulatory, and central executive working memory involvement during the development and application of spatial mental models. In Experiments 1 and 2 participants read route and survey spatial descriptions while undertaking one of four secondary tasks targeting working memory components.…

  10. Adaptive dynamics on a lattice: role of spatiality in competition, co-existence

    E-print Network

    Meszéna, Géza

    Adaptive dynamics on a lattice: role of spatiality in competition, co-existence and evolutionary of spatial evolutionary problems by testing the applicability of the concepts and methods of adaptive of limited dispersal on co-existence and evolutionary branching on a lattice. The `contact process', which

  11. Robot Manipulations: A Synergy of Visualization, Computation and Action for Spatial Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verner, Igor M.

    2004-01-01

    This article considers the use of a learning environment, RoboCell, where manipulations of objects are performed by robot operations specified through the learner's application of mathematical and spatial reasoning. A curriculum is proposed relating to robot kinematics and point-to-point motion, rotation of objects, and robotic assembly of spatial

  12. Modeling Urbanization Using Spatial Building Patterns Selim Aksoy and Emel Dogrusoz

    E-print Network

    Aksoy, Selim

    Modeling Urbanization Using Spatial Building Patterns Selim Aksoy and Emel Dogrus¨oz Department information for ur- ban applications. This paper describes our work on mod- eling urbanization using spatial that the proposed technique can be used for automatic segmentation of urban scenes and ex- traction of valuable

  13. NON-SPATIAL CALIBRATIONS OF A GENERAL UNIT MODEL FOR ECOSYSTEM SIMULATIONS. (R825792)

    EPA Science Inventory

    General Unit Models simulate system interactions aggregated within one spatial unit of resolution. For unit models to be applicable to spatial computer simulations, they must be formulated generally enough to simulate all habitat elements within the landscape. We present the d...

  14. NON-SPATIAL CALIBRATIONS OF A GENERAL UNIT MODEL FOR ECOSYSTEM SIMULATIONS. (R827169)

    EPA Science Inventory

    General Unit Models simulate system interactions aggregated within one spatial unit of resolution. For unit models to be applicable to spatial computer simulations, they must be formulated generally enough to simulate all habitat elements within the landscape. We present the d...

  15. Spatial and Spatiotemporal Data Mining: Recent Advances

    SciTech Connect

    Shekhar, Shashi; Vatsavai, Raju; Celik, Mete

    2008-01-01

    Explosive growth in geospatial data and the emergence of new spatial technologies emphasize the need for automated discovery of spatial knowledge. Spatial data mining is the process of discovering interesting and previously unknown, but potentially useful patterns from large spatial databases. The complexity of spatial data and intrinsic spatial relationships limits the usefulness of conventional data mining techniques for extracting spatial patterns. In this chapter we explore the emerging field of spatial data mining, focusing on four major topics: prediction and classification, outlier detection, co-location mining, and clustering. Spatiotemporal data mining is also briefly discussed.

  16. Spatial Statistical Data Fusion (SSDF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braverman, Amy J.; Nguyen, Hai M.; Cressie, Noel

    2013-01-01

    As remote sensing for scientific purposes has transitioned from an experimental technology to an operational one, the selection of instruments has become more coordinated, so that the scientific community can exploit complementary measurements. However, tech nological and scientific heterogeneity across devices means that the statistical characteristics of the data they collect are different. The challenge addressed here is how to combine heterogeneous remote sensing data sets in a way that yields optimal statistical estimates of the underlying geophysical field, and provides rigorous uncertainty measures for those estimates. Different remote sensing data sets may have different spatial resolutions, different measurement error biases and variances, and other disparate characteristics. A state-of-the-art spatial statistical model was used to relate the true, but not directly observed, geophysical field to noisy, spatial aggregates observed by remote sensing instruments. The spatial covariances of the true field and the covariances of the true field with the observations were modeled. The observations are spatial averages of the true field values, over pixels, with different measurement noise superimposed. A kriging framework is used to infer optimal (minimum mean squared error and unbiased) estimates of the true field at point locations from pixel-level, noisy observations. A key feature of the spatial statistical model is the spatial mixed effects model that underlies it. The approach models the spatial covariance function of the underlying field using linear combinations of basis functions of fixed size. Approaches based on kriging require the inversion of very large spatial covariance matrices, and this is usually done by making simplifying assumptions about spatial covariance structure that simply do not hold for geophysical variables. In contrast, this method does not require these assumptions, and is also computationally much faster. This method is fundamentally different than other approaches to data fusion for remote sensing data because it is inferential rather than merely descriptive. All approaches combine data in a way that minimizes some specified loss function. Most of these are more or less ad hoc criteria based on what looks good to the eye, or some criteria that relate only to the data at hand.

  17. Virtual collaboration: effect of spatial configuration on spatial statements production.

    PubMed

    Pouliquen-Lardy, Lauriane; Mars, Franck; Guillaume, François; Milleville-Pennel, Isabelle

    2015-09-01

    When guiding a remote collaborator in a virtual environment, people often take an addressee-perspective, which may have a high cognitive cost. In order to improve collaborative virtual environments, a better understanding of how operators share spatial information is needed. This work aimed to study the cognitive workload linked to spatial statements production in situations in which the relative positions of speaker, addressee and target were varied. Twenty-two participants were asked to give--in one go--instructions to a virtual collaborator on how to find a target in a 3D environment. The scene showed an avatar in the center of eight tables. Sixty-four configurations of avatar orientation (eight possibilities) and target location (on the eight tables) were tested. We measured the delay in starting the instruction once the target appeared, the instruction duration and the subjective evaluation of mental demand. Each instruction was classified according to the spatial reference frame used. The delay was influenced by the processing of spatial information in ego-centered and addressee-centered reference frames. All subsequent measures were determined by mental transformations in addressee-centered coordinates. One condition in particular, when the target was situated diagonally behind the addressee, gave rise to a higher mental demand for the speaker, which points to the investment made by the speaker in achieving the least collaborative effort. Further work should seek to develop efficient tools to facilitate spatial communication in situations that induce the most mental workload. PMID:26209301

  18. Photoemitter Membrane Spatial Light Modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Lai-Chang

    Advantages of optics over electronics in signal processing derive from the fact that many operations, such as addition, multiplication, correlation, and filtering, can be performed in parallel on two-dimensional data samples. However, this advantage is attainable only if information can be input/output or processed at sufficient speed and space bandwidth. Although acousto-optic devices have been used to provide impressive throughput, they are inherently one -dimensional and do not possess any information-storage capability beyond the acoustic transit time ((LESSTHEQ)50 (mu)s). Hence, a high-resolution high-speed two-dimensional transducer (or spatial light modulator, SLM) with real -time update capability is required. Unfortunately, none of the existing SLMs perform well enough to fully utilize the inherent speed and parallelism of the optics. This dissertation addresses the development of an SLM that has the potential to meet most of the performance requirements of advanced optical information-processing applications--the photoemitter membrane light modulator (PEMLM). At the heart of the PEMLM is a microchannel plate (MCP) with a flexible membrane covering each pore. In operation, the write image incident on a photocathode, which is placed on the input side of the MCP, creates an electron image. This electron image is then amplified by the MCP and deposited onto the membrane array. The membrane elements, which are electrically and mechanically isolated from each other, are deflected by the induced electrostatic forces. These deflections represent the stored information. Readout of stored information is accomplished by sensing the phase changes induced in an optical-readout beam reflected from the deformed membrane array. A sandwich -type electrostatic grid structure positioned between the MCP and membrane greatly enhances the versatility of the PEMLM by facilitating the use of secondary emission for active electron removal and various intrinsic operations. The theoretical analysis and experimental characterizations performed on prototype devices indicates that PEMLM is capable of higher throughput than most other SLMs, with expected resolutions approaching 50 lp/mm over 10('7) resolution elements and framing rates greater than 1 KHz. MCP gains provides quantum-limited sensitivity. The PEMLM also promises information-storage times of minutes to hours, greater than 2(pi) phase modulation, good image quality, and an option for serial addressing. In addition, the PEMLM can intrinsically perform operations such as intensity thresholding, contrast modification, edge enhancement, binary logic, synchronous detection, and image addition/subtraction.

  19. Spatial Models for Architectural Heritage in Urban Database Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costamagna, E.; Spanò, A.

    2011-08-01

    Despite the GIS (Geographic Information Systems/Geospatial Information Systems) have been provided with several applications to manage the two-dimensional geometric information and arrange the topological relations among different spatial primitives, most of these systems have limited capabilities to manage the three-dimensional space. Other tools, such as CAD systems, have already achieved a full capability of representing 3D data. Most of the researches in the field of GIS have underlined the necessity of a full 3D management capability which is not yet achieved by the available systems (Rahman, Pilouk 2008) (Zlatanova 2002). First of all to reach this goal is important to define the spatial data model, which is at the same time a geometric and topological model and so integrating these two aspects in relation to the database management efficiency and documentation purposes. The application field on which these model can be tested is the spatial data managing of Architectural Heritage documentation, to evaluate the pertinence of these spatial models to the requested scale for the needs of such a documentation. Most of the important aspects are the integration of metric data originated from different sources and the representation and management of multiscale data. The issues connected with the representation of objects at higher LOD than the ones defined by the CityGML will be taken into account. The aim of this paper is then to investigate which are the favorable application of a framework in order to integrate two different approaches: architectural heritage spatial documentation and urban scale spatial data management.

  20. Maximizing the Number of Worker's Self-Selected Tasks in Spatial Crowdsourcing

    E-print Network

    Shahabi, Cyrus

    . Categories and Subject Descriptors H.2.8 [Database Management]: Database Applications--Spatial databases of ultra-broadband wireless networks (e.g., 4G) enable mobile users to easily sense, collect and transmit

  1. COMPARISON OF GEOSTATISTICAL PROCEDURES FOR SPATIAL ANALYSIS OF PRECIPITATION IN MOUTAINOUS TERRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Application of simulation models to assessment of global climate change effects often requires spatially distributed estimates of precipitation, both under current and future climate scenarios. imple interpolation methods fail to consider the effects of topography on precipitatio...

  2. Effect of Temporal and Spatial Rainfall Resolution on HSPF Predictive Performance and Parameter Estimation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Watershed scale rainfall?runoff models are used for environmental management and regulatory modeling applications, but their effectiveness are limited by predictive uncertainties associated with model input data. This study evaluated the effect of temporal and spatial rainfall re...

  3. SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIABILITY OF FECAL COLIFORM AT AND NEAR A MANURED FIELD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evaluating the effect of field manure application on bacterial concentrations in creeks requires developing microbial transport models. Testing such models against bacterial monitoring data requires estimating the uncertainty in the data caused by spatial and temporal variability of bacterial concen...

  4. Spatially: resolved heterogeneous dynamics in a strong colloidal gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzaccaro, Stefano; Alaimo, Matteo David; Secchi, Eleonora; Piazza, Roberto

    2015-05-01

    We re-examine the classical problem of irreversible colloid aggregation, showing that the application of Digital Fourier Imaging (DFI), a class of optical correlation methods that combine the power of light scattering and imaging, allows one to pick out novel useful evidence concerning the restructuring processes taking place in a strong colloidal gel. In particular, the spatially-resolved displacement fields provided by DFI strongly suggest that the temporally-intermittent local rearrangements taking place in the course of gel ageing are characterized by very long-ranged spatial correlations.

  5. Graph Theory Roots of Spatial Operators for Kinematics and Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Abhinandan

    2011-01-01

    Spatial operators have been used to analyze the dynamics of robotic multibody systems and to develop novel computational dynamics algorithms. Mass matrix factorization, inversion, diagonalization, and linearization are among several new insights obtained using such operators. While initially developed for serial rigid body manipulators, the spatial operators and the related mathematical analysis have been shown to extend very broadly including to tree and closed topology systems, to systems with flexible joints, links, etc. This work uses concepts from graph theory to explore the mathematical foundations of spatial operators. The goal is to study and characterize the properties of the spatial operators at an abstract level so that they can be applied to a broader range of dynamics problems. The rich mathematical properties of the kinematics and dynamics of robotic multibody systems has been an area of strong research interest for several decades. These properties are important to understand the inherent physical behavior of systems, for stability and control analysis, for the development of computational algorithms, and for model development of faithful models. Recurring patterns in spatial operators leads one to ask the more abstract question about the properties and characteristics of spatial operators that make them so broadly applicable. The idea is to step back from the specific application systems, and understand more deeply the generic requirements and properties of spatial operators, so that the insights and techniques are readily available across different kinematics and dynamics problems. In this work, techniques from graph theory were used to explore the abstract basis for the spatial operators. The close relationship between the mathematical properties of adjacency matrices for graphs and those of spatial operators and their kernels were established. The connections hold across very basic requirements on the system topology, the nature of the component bodies, the indexing schemes, etc. The relationship of the underlying structure is intimately connected with efficient, recursive computational algorithms. The results provide the foundational groundwork for a much broader look at the key problems in kinematics and dynamics. The properties of general graphs and trees of nodes and edge were examined, as well as the properties of adjacency matrices that are used to describe graph connectivity. The nilpotency property of such matrices for directed trees was reviewed, and the adjacency matrices were generalized to the notion of block weighted adjacency matrices that support block matrix elements. This leads us to the development of the notion of Spatial Kernel Operator SKO kernels. These kernels provide the basis for the development of SKO resolvent operators.

  6. Spatial filtering with photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Maigyte, Lina; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2015-03-15

    Photonic crystals are well known for their celebrated photonic band-gaps—the forbidden frequency ranges, for which the light waves cannot propagate through the structure. The frequency (or chromatic) band-gaps of photonic crystals can be utilized for frequency filtering. In analogy to the chromatic band-gaps and the frequency filtering, the angular band-gaps and the angular (spatial) filtering are also possible in photonic crystals. In this article, we review the recent advances of the spatial filtering using the photonic crystals in different propagation regimes and for different geometries. We review the most evident configuration of filtering in Bragg regime (with the back-reflection—i.e., in the configuration with band-gaps) as well as in Laue regime (with forward deflection—i.e., in the configuration without band-gaps). We explore the spatial filtering in crystals with different symmetries, including axisymmetric crystals; we discuss the role of chirping, i.e., the dependence of the longitudinal period along the structure. We also review the experimental techniques to fabricate the photonic crystals and numerical techniques to explore the spatial filtering. Finally, we discuss several implementations of such filters for intracavity spatial filtering.

  7. SPATIAL MISMATCH OR RACIAL MISMATCH?*

    PubMed Central

    Hellerstein, Judith K.; Neumark, David; McInerney, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    We contrast the spatial mismatch hypothesis with what we term the racial mismatch hypothesis – that the problem is not a lack of jobs, per se, where blacks live, but a lack of jobs where blacks live into which blacks are hired. We first report new evidence on the spatial mismatch hypothesis, using data from Census Long-Form respondents. We construct direct measures of the presence of jobs in detailed geographic areas, and find that these job density measures are related to employment of black male residents in ways that would be predicted by the spatial mismatch hypothesis – in particular that spatial mismatch is primarily an issue for low-skilled black male workers. We then look at mismatch along not only spatial lines but racial lines as well, by estimating the effects of job density measures that are disaggregated by race. We find that it is primarily black job density that influences black male employment, whereas white job density has little if any influence on their employment. The evidence implies that space alone plays a relatively minor role in low black male employment rates. PMID:19727422

  8. Spatialization of Time in Mian

    PubMed Central

    Fedden, Sebastian; Boroditsky, Lera

    2012-01-01

    We examine representations of time among the Mianmin of Papua New Guinea. We begin by describing the patterns of spatial and temporal reference in Mian. Mian uses a system of spatial terms that derive from the orientation and direction of the Hak and Sek rivers and the surrounding landscape. We then report results from a temporal arrangement task administered to a group of Mian speakers. The results reveal evidence for a variety of temporal representations. Some participants arranged time with respect to their bodies (left to right or toward the body). Others arranged time as laid out on the landscape, roughly along the east/west axis (either east to west or west to east). This absolute pattern is consistent both with the axis of the motion of the sun and the orientation of the two rivers, which provides the basis for spatial reference in the Mian language. The results also suggest an increase in left to right temporal representations with increasing years of formal education (and the reverse pattern for absolute spatial representations for time). These results extend previous work on spatial representations for time to a new geographical region, physical environment, and linguistic and cultural system. PMID:23181037

  9. Spatial uncertainty and ecological models

    SciTech Connect

    Jager, Yetta; King, Anthony Wayne

    2004-07-01

    Applied ecological models that are used to understand and manage natural systems often rely on spatial data as input. Spatial uncertainty in these data can propagate into model predictions. Uncertainty analysis, sensitivity analysis, error analysis, error budget analysis, spatial decision analysis, and hypothesis testing using neutral models are all techniques designed to explore the relationship between variation in model inputs and variation in model predictions. Although similar methods can be used to answer them, these approaches address different questions. These approaches differ in (a) whether the focus is forward or backward (forward to evaluate the magnitude of variation in model predictions propagated or backward to rank input parameters by their influence); (b) whether the question involves model robustness to large variations in spatial pattern or to small deviations from a reference map; and (c) whether processes that generate input uncertainty (for example, cartographic error) are of interest. In this commentary, we propose a taxonomy of approaches, all of which clarify the relationship between spatial uncertainty and the predictions of ecological models. We describe existing techniques and indicate a few areas where research is needed.

  10. Assessing the performance of the independence method in modeling spatial extreme rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Feifei; Thibaud, Emeric; Leonard, Michael; Westra, Seth

    2015-09-01

    Spatial statistical methods are often employed to improve precision when estimating marginal distributions of extreme rainfall. Methods such as max-stable and copula models parameterize the spatial dependence and provide a continuous spatial representation. Alternatively, the independence method can be used to estimate marginal parameters without the need for parameterizing the spatial dependence, and this method has been under-utilized in hydrologic applications. This paper investigates the effectiveness of the independence method for marginal parameter estimation of spatially dependent extremes. Its performance is compared with three spatial dependence models (max-stable Brown-Resnick, max-stable Schlather, and Gaussian copula) by means of a simulation study. The independence method is statistically robust in estimating parameters and their associated confidence intervals for spatial extremes with various underlying dependence structures. The spatial dependence models perform comparably with the independence method when the spatial dependence structure is correctly specified; otherwise they exhibit considerably worse performance. We conclude that the independence method is more appealing for modeling the marginal distributions of spatial extremes (e.g., regional estimation of trends in rainfall extremes) due to its greater robustness and simplicity. The four statistical methods are illustrated using a spatial data set comprising 69 subdaily rainfall series from the Greater Sydney region, Australia.

  11. Assessing temporal and spatial variability of hypoxia over the inner Louisiana-upper Texas shelf: Application of an unstructured-grid three-dimensional coupled hydrodynamic-water quality model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justi?, Dubravko; Wang, Lixia

    2014-01-01

    Patterns of temporal and spatial variability in hypoxia (<2 mg O2 l-1) on the inner Louisiana-upper Texas (LaTex) shelf were examined using FVCOM LaTex, an unstructured grid, three-dimensional, hydrodynamic-water quality model. Dynamics of dissolved oxygen were modeled using an expanded and revised version of the Water Analysis Simulation Program (WASP) that was fully coupled to a Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM). The coupled model was driven by surface wind forcing, tidal forcing, offshore remote forcing, heat fluxes, oxygen exchanges at the air-sea interface, solar radiation, and freshwater and nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) fluxes from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers. The model simulations were carried out over a 9-month period, from January 1 to October 4, 2002, and the model skill was assessed using multiple sets of observational data that included time series of dissolved oxygen concentrations from a station within the core of the Gulf hypoxic zone (C6), dissolved oxygen measurements collected during the mid-summer shelfwide cruise, and vertical dissolved oxygen profiles through the year. The model results indicate that hypoxia originates in bottom waters on the mid-continental shelf, where isolated pockets of hypoxic water develop during early spring and later join into a larger continuous hypoxic zone. The model accurately described the seasonal cycle of hypoxia at station C6, including the episodes of intermittent hypoxia during May and June, persistent hypoxia during July and August, and dissipation of hypoxia during September. The onset of hypoxia coincided with high stability of the water column (i.e., Richardson number values>1) and the initial transition from normoxia (i.e., 6 mg O2 l-1) to hypoxia lasted about three weeks. The model results point to a significant short-term variability in the extent of hypoxic bottom waters, indicating that the size of the mid-summer hypoxic zone cannot be adequately captured by a single shelfwide cruise. The dynamics of bottom-water hypoxia is clearly influenced by the bathymetric features of the LaTex shelf, namely the presence of three shallow shoals (<5 m) in the Atchafalaya Bay region and several deeper shoals (<10 m) in the northwestern section of the study area. Lastly, the model results support the view that dynamics of hypoxia on the LaTex shelf is strongly modulated by the frequency and intensity of cold fronts and tropical storms. High winds associated with these events disturb stratification, causing partial or complete breakdown of hypoxia. However, cold fronts and tropical storms also cause significant sediment resuspension that fuels respiration in the lower water column, and in this manner promote redevelopment of hypoxia.

  12. Monitoring Method of Cow Anthrax Based on Gis and Spatial Statistical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin; Yang, Yong; Wang, Hongbin; Dong, Jing; Zhao, Yujun; He, Jianbin; Fan, Honggang

    Geographic information system (GIS) is a computer application system, which possesses the ability of manipulating spatial information and has been used in many fields related with the spatial information management. Many methods and models have been established for analyzing animal diseases distribution models and temporal-spatial transmission models. Great benefits have been gained from the application of GIS in animal disease epidemiology. GIS is now a very important tool in animal disease epidemiological research. Spatial analysis function of GIS can be widened and strengthened by using spatial statistical analysis, allowing for the deeper exploration, analysis, manipulation and interpretation of spatial pattern and spatial correlation of the animal disease. In this paper, we analyzed the cow anthrax spatial distribution characteristics in the target district A (due to the secret of epidemic data we call it district A) based on the established GIS of the cow anthrax in this district in combination of spatial statistical analysis and GIS. The Cow anthrax is biogeochemical disease, and its geographical distribution is related closely to the environmental factors of habitats and has some spatial characteristics, and therefore the correct analysis of the spatial distribution of anthrax cow for monitoring and the prevention and control of anthrax has a very important role. However, the application of classic statistical methods in some areas is very difficult because of the pastoral nomadic context. The high mobility of livestock and the lack of enough suitable sampling for the some of the difficulties in monitoring currently make it nearly impossible to apply rigorous random sampling methods. It is thus necessary to develop an alternative sampling method, which could overcome the lack of sampling and meet the requirements for randomness. The GIS computer application software ArcGIS9.1 was used to overcome the lack of data of sampling sites.Using ArcGIS 9.1 and GEODA to analyze the cow anthrax spatial distribution of district A. we gained some conclusions about cow anthrax' density: (1) there is a spatial clustering model. (2) there is an intensely spatial autocorrelation. We established a prediction model to estimate the anthrax distribution based on the spatial characteristic of the density of cow anthrax. Comparing with the true distribution, the prediction model has a well coincidence and is feasible to the application. The method using a GIS tool facilitates can be implemented significantly in the cow anthrax monitoring and investigation, and the space statistics - related prediction model provides a fundamental use for other study on space-related animal diseases.

  13. Spatial Localization in Dissipative Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, E.

    2015-03-01

    Spatial localization is a common feature of physical systems, occurring in both conservative and dissipative systems. This article reviews the theoretical foundations of our understanding of spatial localization in forced dissipative systems, from both a mathematical point of view and a physics perspective. It explains the origin of the large multiplicity of simultaneously stable spatially localized states present in a parameter region called the pinning region and its relation to the notion of homoclinic snaking. The localized states are described as bound states of fronts, and the notions of front pinning, self-pinning, and depinning are emphasized. Both one-dimensional and two-dimensional systems are discussed, and the reasons behind the differences in behavior between dissipative systems with conserved and nonconserved dynamics are explained. The insights gained are specific to forced dissipative systems and are illustrated here using examples drawn from fluid mechanics (convection and shear flows) and a simple model of crystallization.

  14. How Attention Affects Spatial Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Marisa; Barbot, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    We summarize and discuss a series of psychophysical studies on the effects of spatial covert attention on spatial resolution, our ability to discriminate fine patterns. Heightened resolution is beneficial in most, but not all, visual tasks. We show how endogenous attention (voluntary, goal driven) and exogenous attention (involuntary, stimulus driven) affect performance on a variety of tasks mediated by spatial resolution, such as visual search, crowding, acuity, and texture segmentation. Exogenous attention is an automatic mechanism that increases resolution regardless of whether it helps or hinders performance. In contrast, endogenous attention flexibly adjusts resolution to optimize performance according to task demands. We illustrate how psychophysical studies can reveal the underlying mechanisms of these effects and allow us to draw linking hypotheses with known neurophysiological effects of attention. PMID:25948640

  15. Spatial Process Generation Dirk P. Kroese

    E-print Network

    Kroese, Dirk P.

    Spatial Process Generation Dirk P. Kroese Zdravko I. Botev 1 Introduction Spatial processes of the locations of mete- orite impacts or geological faults, and satellite images or demographic maps the understanding of spatial processes. The aim of this chapter is to give an overview of the main types of spatial

  16. Statistical Exposure Estimation Spatial Confounding Bias

    E-print Network

    Paciorek, Chris

    Statistical Exposure Estimation Spatial Confounding Bias Case Study Exposure Measurement Error.biostat.harvard.edu/~paciorek April 14, 2010 Chris Paciorek Spatial Scales in Environmental Health 1 #12;Statistical Exposure Estimation Spatial Confounding Bias Case Study Exposure Measurement Error Spatial Statistics in Environmental

  17. Photoredox pathways to spatially restricted metallopolymeric films

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, P.; Zhang, Haitao; Hupp, J.T. )

    1992-04-15

    There now exists an extensive body of synthesis and applications-based chemistry for redox-active metallopolymeric films. The applications include electrochemical catalysis, energy conversion, electrochromic displays, analysis, and molecular and ionic sensing. Films for these purposes are most commonly assembled via electrochemically initiated radical polymerization pathways or, less often, by simple spin casting of preformed metallopolymers (or metal-free polymer backbones). Both approaches lead to films of more or less uniform composition, which effectively cover the entire available exposed surface support area. In pursuit of additional applications (remote optical sensing and advanced electrochromics), the authors have devised an additional method for assembling films. The new approach, which is based on simple redox quenching processes following photochemical excitation, was designed to meet three specific requirements: (1) film assembly on transparent surfaces, (2) spatially selective assembly, and (3) assembly, if necessary, on insulating surfaces. While some of these objectives can be achieved with existing synthetic or assembly methods, for any given system it is difficult to achieve all three simultaneously. As indicated below, however, they have been reasonably successful in reaching these goals by employing a straightforward photoredox approach.

  18. Spatial cyberinfrastructures, ontologies, and the humanities

    PubMed Central

    Sieber, Renee E.; Wellen, Christopher C.; Jin, Yuan

    2011-01-01

    We report on research into building a cyberinfrastructure for Chinese biographical and geographic data. Our cyberinfrastructure contains (i) the McGill-Harvard-Yenching Library Ming Qing Women's Writings database (MQWW), the only online database on historical Chinese women's writings, (ii) the China Biographical Database, the authority for Chinese historical people, and (iii) the China Historical Geographical Information System, one of the first historical geographic information systems. Key to this integration is that linked databases retain separate identities as bases of knowledge, while they possess sufficient semantic interoperability to allow for multidatabase concepts and to support cross-database queries on an ad hoc basis. Computational ontologies create underlying semantics for database access. This paper focuses on the spatial component in a humanities cyberinfrastructure, which includes issues of conflicting data, heterogeneous data models, disambiguation, and geographic scale. First, we describe the methodology for integrating the databases. Then we detail the system architecture, which includes a tier of ontologies and schema. We describe the user interface and applications that allow for cross-database queries. For instance, users should be able to analyze the data, examine hypotheses on spatial and temporal relationships, and generate historical maps with datasets from MQWW for research, teaching, and publication on Chinese women writers, their familial relations, publishing venues, and the literary and social communities. Last, we discuss the social side of cyberinfrastructure development, as people are considered to be as critical as the technical components for its success. PMID:21444819

  19. IKONOS Spatial Resolution and Image Interpretability Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert; Baldridge, Braxton; Schowengerdt, Robert A.; Choi, Taeyoung; Helder, Dennis L.; Blonski, Slawomir

    2003-01-01

    This paper contains research from five individual projects to characterize the spatial performance of the IKONOS commercial imaging sensor. The end result of the projects is determination of the spatial image quality of IKONOS data prodicts in terms of the National Imagery Interpretability Rating Scale (NIIRS), the system Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), the system stability over the first year, the characteristics of the Space Imaging MTF Compensation (MTFC) procedure, and the application-specific capabilities of IKONOS imagery. Both panchromatic and multispectral imagery were evaluated. Major conclusions of this work are that the system was stable im imaging performance during the first year of operation, tha its MTF meets the specification for the NASA Scientific Data Purchase program, that the initial MTFC processing appears to be transposed in the in-track and the cross-track directions, that the MTFC results in a noise amplification of 2x to 4x in addition to sharpening the imagery, and that IKONOS panchromatic imagery achieves an average NIIRS rating of 4.5.

  20. Two-dimensional spatial compounding with warping.

    PubMed

    Groves, Adrian R; Rohling, Robert N

    2004-07-01

    Spatial compounding aims to improve image quality through signal averaging, but speed-of-sound (SoS) and refraction errors can misalign the component frames and blur the compound image. A 2-D compounding system is demonstrated that uses a nonrigid registration (warping) to realign the frames before compounding. Block-based estimates of local misalignments are interpolated smoothly to compute the warp vectors. Simulations and a specialized phantom, both with a 9% SoS distortion, were created, and compound images with and without warping were compared to the conventional image. Image sharpness was compared by measuring the diameter of point targets and directional edge sharpness. The average registration accuracy was 0.06 to 0.07 mm (approximately one pixel). The diameter of point targets increased only 2% with warping vs. 32% without warping and directional edge sharpness dropped 3.7% vs. 20.0%. Furthermore, most of the speckle reduction due to compounding is retained when warping is used. The tests on simulated and phantom data demonstrate that the method is capable of making a small, but significant, improvement to image quality. The examinations in vitro and in vivo show the correct operation of the method with real tissue features. Further clinical studies should be performed to compare spatial compounding with and without warping to see which applications would benefit from the small improvement. PMID:15313325

  1. Spatial organization of bacterial chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xindan; Rudner, David Z.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial chromosomes are organized in stereotypical patterns that are faithfully and robustly regenerated in daughter cells. Two distinct spatial patterns were described almost a decade ago in our most tractable model organisms. In recent years, analysis of chromosome organization in a larger and more diverse set of bacteria and a deeper characterization of chromosome dynamics in the original model systems have provided a broader and more complete picture of both chromosome organization and the activities that generate the observed spatial patterns. Here, we summarize these different patterns highlighting similarities and differences and discuss the protein factors that help establish and maintain them. PMID:25460798

  2. Resolving coastal conflicts using marine spatial planning.

    PubMed

    Tuda, Arthur O; Stevens, Tim F; Rodwell, Lynda D

    2014-01-15

    We applied marine spatial planning (MSP) to manage conflicts in a multi-use coastal area of Kenya. MSP involves several steps which were supported by using geographical information systems (GISs), multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) and optimization. GIS was used in identifying overlapping coastal uses and mapping conflict hotspots. MCDA was used to incorporate the preferences of user groups and managers into a formal decision analysis procedure. Optimization was applied in generating optimal allocation alternatives to competing uses. Through this analysis three important objectives that build a foundation for future planning of Kenya's coastal waters were achieved: 1) engaging competing stakeholders; 2) illustrating how MSP can be adapted to aid decision-making in multi-use coastal regions; and 3) developing a draft coastal use allocation plan. The successful application of MSP to resolve conflicts in coastal regions depends on the level of stakeholder involvement, data availability and the existing knowledge base. PMID:24361729

  3. A class of nonseparable and nonstationary spatial temporal covariance functions

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Montserrat; Chen, Li; Davis, Jerry M.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Spectral methods are powerful tools to study and model the dependency structure of spatial temporal processes. However, standard spectral approaches as well as geostatistical methods assume separability and stationarity of the covariance function; these can be very unrealistic assumptions in many settings. In this work, we introduce a general and flexible parametric class of spatial temporal covariance models, that allows for lack of stationarity and separability by using a spectral representation of the process. This new class of covariance models has a unique parameter that indicates the strength of the interaction between the spatial and temporal components; it has the separable covariance model as a particular case. We introduce an application with ambient ozone air pollution data provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). PMID:19829763

  4. Coherence area profiling in multi-spatial-mode squeezed states

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lawrie, Benjamin J.; Pooser, Raphael C.; Otterstrom, Nils T.

    2015-09-12

    The presence of multiple bipartite entangled modes in squeezed states generated by four-wave mixing enables ultra-trace sensing, imaging, and metrology applications that are impossible to achieve with single-spatial-mode squeezed states. For Gaussian seed beams, the spatial distribution of these bipartite entangled modes, or coherence areas, across each beam is largely dependent on the spatial modes present in the pump beam, but it has proven difficult to map the distribution of these coherence areas in frequency and space. We demonstrate an accessible method to map the distribution of the coherence areas within these twin beams. In addition, we also show thatmore »the pump shape can impart different noise properties to each coherence area, and that it is possible to select and detect coherence areas with optimal squeezing with this approach.« less

  5. Coherence area profiling in multi-spatial-mode squeezed states

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrie, Benjamin J.; Pooser, Raphael C.; Otterstrom, Nils T.

    2015-09-12

    The presence of multiple bipartite entangled modes in squeezed states generated by four-wave mixing enables ultra-trace sensing, imaging, and metrology applications that are impossible to achieve with single-spatial-mode squeezed states. For Gaussian seed beams, the spatial distribution of these bipartite entangled modes, or coherence areas, across each beam is largely dependent on the spatial modes present in the pump beam, but it has proven difficult to map the distribution of these coherence areas in frequency and space. We demonstrate an accessible method to map the distribution of the coherence areas within these twin beams. In addition, we also show that the pump shape can impart different noise properties to each coherence area, and that it is possible to select and detect coherence areas with optimal squeezing with this approach.

  6. A versatile spatial resolution enhancement method for data acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, M. H.; Flores De Jesus, K.; Cronin, S. D.; Sierros, K. A.; Bakhoum, E.

    2015-04-01

    While acquiring specific physical properties within a targeted area, spatial resolution of hardware is usually one of the major limitations that affects the precision of data acquisition. Though measured results with higher spatial resolution are always desired, adequate configuration of hardware setups sometimes implies higher cost or longer acquisition time. In this study, a versatile resolution enhancement method is proposed to improve the sampling resolution. An efficient algorithm is used to convert the lower-resolution data into higher-resolution approximation. Three different engineering applications are used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method. From the arithmetic results, the spatial sampling resolution can be greatly improved without trading-off the operating time.

  7. Coherence area profiling in multi-spatial-mode squeezed states

    E-print Network

    Lawrie, B J; Otterstrom, N

    2014-01-01

    The presence of multiple bipartite entangled modes in squeezed states generated by four wave mixing in atomic vapors enables ultra-trace sensing, imaging, and metrology applications that are impossible to achieve with single-spatial-mode squeezed states. For Gaussian seed beams, the spatial distribution of bipartite entangled modes, or coherence areas, across each beam is largely dependent on the spatial modes present in the pump beam, but it has proven difficult to map the distribution of these coherence areas in frequency and space. We demonstrate an accessible method to map the distribution of the coherence areas within these twin beams. We also show that the pump shape can impart different noise properties to each coherence area, and that it is possible to select and detect coherence areas with optimal squeezing with this approach.

  8. New phenomenons in the spatial isosceles three-body problem

    E-print Network

    Duokui Yan; Tiancheng Ouyang

    2014-04-18

    In this work, we study the periodic orbits in the spatial isosceles three-body problem. These periodic orbits form a one-parameter set with a rotation angle $\\theta$ as the parameter. Some new phenomenons are discovered by applying our numerical method. The periodic orbit coincides with the planar Euler orbit when $0 < \\theta \\leq 0.32 \\pi$ and it changes to a spatial orbit when $0.33 \\pi \\leq \\theta < \\pi$. Eventually, the spatial orbit becomes a planar collision orbit when $\\theta=\\pi$. Furthermore, an oscillated behavior is found when $\\theta=\\pi/2$, which is chaotic but bounded under a small perturbation. As another application of our numerical method, 7 new periodic orbits are presented in the end.

  9. Mining Spatial Gene Expression Data Using Negative Association Rules

    E-print Network

    Anandhavalli, M; Gauthaman, K

    2010-01-01

    Over the years, data mining has attracted most of the attention from the research community. The researchers attempt to develop faster, more scalable algorithms to navigate over the ever increasing volumes of spatial gene expression data in search of meaningful patterns. Association rules are a data mining technique that tries to identify intrinsic patterns in spatial gene expression data. It has been widely used in different applications, a lot of algorithms introduced to discover these rules. However Priori like algorithms has been used to find positive association rules. In contrast to positive rules, negative rules encapsulate relationship between the occurrences of one set of items with absence of the other set of items. In this paper, an algorithm for mining negative association rules from spatial gene expression data is introduced. The algorithm intends to discover the negative association rules which are complementary to the association rules often generated by Priori like algorithm. Our study shows t...

  10. Optimizing information flow in small genetic networks. IV. Spatial coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolowski, Thomas R.; Tka?ik, Gašper

    2015-06-01

    We typically think of cells as responding to external signals independently by regulating their gene expression levels, yet they often locally exchange information and coordinate. Can such spatial coupling be of benefit for conveying signals subject to gene regulatory noise? Here we extend our information-theoretic framework for gene regulation to spatially extended systems. As an example, we consider a lattice of nuclei responding to a concentration field of a transcriptional regulator (the input) by expressing a single diffusible target gene. When input concentrations are low, diffusive coupling markedly improves information transmission; optimal gene activation functions also systematically change. A qualitatively different regulatory strategy emerges where individual cells respond to the input in a nearly steplike fashion that is subsequently averaged out by strong diffusion. While motivated by early patterning events in the Drosophila embryo, our framework is generically applicable to spatially coupled stochastic gene expression models.

  11. Parallelization of PANDA discrete ordinates code using spatial decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Humbert, P.

    2006-07-01

    We present the parallel method, based on spatial domain decomposition, implemented in the 2D and 3D versions of the discrete Ordinates code PANDA. The spatial mesh is orthogonal and the spatial domain decomposition is Cartesian. For 3D problems a 3D Cartesian domain topology is created and the parallel method is based on a domain diagonal plane ordered sweep algorithm. The parallel efficiency of the method is improved by directions and octants pipelining. The implementation of the algorithm is straightforward using MPI blocking point to point communications. The efficiency of the method is illustrated by an application to the 3D-Ext C5G7 benchmark of the OECD/NEA. (authors)

  12. Detecting the Land-Cover Changes Induced by Large-Physical Disturbances Using Landscape Metrics, Spatial Sampling, Simulation and Spatial Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Hone-Jay; Lin, Yu-Pin; Huang, Yu-Long; Wang, Yung-Chieh

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of the study are to integrate the conditional Latin Hypercube Sampling (cLHS), sequential Gaussian simulation (SGS) and spatial analysis in remotely sensed images, to monitor the effects of large chronological disturbances on spatial characteristics of landscape changes including spatial heterogeneity and variability. The multiple NDVI images demonstrate that spatial patterns of disturbed landscapes were successfully delineated by spatial analysis such as variogram, Moran’I and landscape metrics in the study area. The hybrid method delineates the spatial patterns and spatial variability of landscapes caused by these large disturbances. The cLHS approach is applied to select samples from Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) images from SPOT HRV images in the Chenyulan watershed of Taiwan, and then SGS with sufficient samples is used to generate maps of NDVI images. In final, the NDVI simulated maps are verified using indexes such as the correlation coefficient and mean absolute error (MAE). Therefore, the statistics and spatial structures of multiple NDVI images present a very robust behavior, which advocates the use of the index for the quantification of the landscape spatial patterns and land cover change. In addition, the results transferred by Open Geospatial techniques can be accessed from web-based and end-user applications of the watershed management. PMID:22399972

  13. Taxonomy for spatial domain LSB steganography techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, James C.; Agaian, Sos S.

    2014-05-01

    The Least Significant Bit (LSB) embedding technique is a well-known and broadly employed method in multimedia steganography, used mainly in applications involving single bit-plane manipulations in the spatial domain [1]. The key advantages of LSB procedures are they are simple to understand, easy to implement, have high embedding capacity, and can be resistant to steganalysis attacks. Additionally, the LSB approach has spawned numerous applications and can be used as the basis of more complex techniques for multimedia data embedding. In the last several decades, hundreds of new LSB or LSB variant methods have been developed in an effort to optimize capacity while minimizing detectability, taking advantage of the overall simplicity of this method. LSB-steganalysis research has also intensified in an effort to find new or improved ways to evaluate the performance of this widely used steganographic system. This paper reviews and categorizes some of these major techniques of LSB embedding, focusing specifically on the spatial domain. Some justification for establishing and identifying promising uses of a proposed SD-LSB centric taxonomy are discussed. Specifically, we define a new taxonomy for SD-LSB embedding techniques with the goal of aiding researchers in tool classification methodologies that can lead to advances in the state-of-the-art in steganography. With a common framework to work with, researchers can begin to more concretely identify core tools and common techniques to establish common standards of practice for steganography in general. Finally, we provide a summary on some of the most common LSB embedding techniques followed by a proposed taxonomy standard for steganalysis.

  14. Proposal for a Web Encoding Service (wes) for Spatial Data Transactio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siew, C. B.; Peters, S.; Rahman, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Web services utilizations in Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI) have been well established and standardized by Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). Similar web services for 3D SDI are also being established in recent years, with extended capabilities to handle 3D spatial data. The increasing popularity of using City Geographic Markup Language (CityGML) for 3D city modelling applications leads to the needs for large spatial data handling for data delivery. This paper revisits the available web services in OGC Web Services (OWS), and propose the background concepts and requirements for encoding spatial data via Web Encoding Service (WES). Furthermore, the paper discusses the data flow of the encoder within web service, e.g. possible integration with Web Processing Service (WPS) or Web 3D Services (W3DS). The integration with available web service could be extended to other available web services for efficient handling of spatial data, especially 3D spatial data.

  15. Microfluidics Using Spatially Defined Arrays

    E-print Network

    Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    be indexed on the basis of one or more spatial variables to enable identification, monitoring opportunities in chem- ical, biological, and engineering sciences, including perturbation/response experiments and personal and point-of-care diagnostics. 59 AnnualReviewofAnalyticalChemistry2011.4:59-81.Downloadedfromwww

  16. Characterization of Spatial Memory Reconsolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Jaeger, Xavier; Courtey, Julie; Brus, Maïna; Artinian, Julien; Villain, Hélène; Bacquié, Elodie; Roullet, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Reconsolidation is necessary for the restabilization of reactivated memory traces. However, experimental parameters have been suggested as boundary conditions for this process. Here we investigated the role of a spatial memory trace's age, strength, and update on the reconsolidation process in mice. We first found that protein synthesis is…

  17. Spatial Visualization by Isometric View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yue, Jianping

    2007-01-01

    Spatial visualization is a fundamental skill in technical graphics and engineering designs. From conventional multiview drawing to modern solid modeling using computer-aided design, visualization skills have always been essential for representing three-dimensional objects and assemblies. Researchers have developed various types of tests to measure…

  18. Spatial Clustering during Memory Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jonathan F.; Lazarus, Eben M.; Polyn, Sean M.; Kahana, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    In recalling a list of previously experienced items, participants are known to organize their responses on the basis of the items' semantic and temporal similarities. Here, we examine how spatial information influences the organization of responses in free recall. In Experiment 1, participants studied and subsequently recalled lists of landmarks.…

  19. Learning Anatomy Enhances Spatial Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorstenbosch, Marc A. T. M.; Klaassen, Tim P. F. M.; Donders, A. R. T.; Kooloos, Jan G. M.; Bolhuis, Sanneke M.; Laan, Roland F. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial ability is an important factor in learning anatomy. Students with high scores on a mental rotation test (MRT) systematically score higher on anatomy examinations. This study aims to investigate if learning anatomy also oppositely improves the MRT-score. Five hundred first year students of medicine ("n" = 242, intervention) and…

  20. Spatial interferometry in optical astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.; Roddier, Francois; Roddier, Claude

    1990-01-01

    A bibliographic guide is presented to publications of spatial interferometry techniques applied to optical astronomy. Listings appear in alphabetical order, by first author, as well as in specific subject categories listed in chronological order, including imaging theory and speckle interferometry, experimental techniques, and observational results of astronomical studies of stars, the Sun, and the solar system.

  1. Neurophysiological Factors in Spatial Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Lauren Jay

    Some of the major lines of investigation that point to neurophysiological factors in spatial skill are presented. These lines include: the two hemispheres of the brain, recent studies, tachistoscopic studies, morphological differences between the cerebral hemispheres, Geschwind and Levitsky's discovery, cerebral dominance re-examined, sex…

  2. Spatial synchrony in cisco recruitment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, Jared T.; Yule, Daniel L.; Jones, Michael L.; Ahrenstorff, Tyler D.; Hrabik, Thomas R.; Claramunt, Randall M.; Ebener, Mark P.; Berglund, Eric K.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the spatial scale of recruitment variability for disparate cisco (Coregonus artedi) populations in the Great Lakes (n = 8) and Minnesota inland lakes (n = 4). We found that the scale of synchrony was approximately 400 km when all available data were utilized; much greater than the 50-km scale suggested for freshwater fish populations in an earlier global analysis. The presence of recruitment synchrony between Great Lakes and inland lake cisco populations supports the hypothesis that synchronicity is driven by climate and not dispersal. We also found synchrony in larval densities among three Lake Superior populations separated by 25–275 km, which further supports the hypothesis that broad-scale climatic factors are the cause of spatial synchrony. Among several candidate climate variables measured during the period of larval cisco emergence, maximum wind speeds exhibited the most similar spatial scale of synchrony to that observed for cisco. Other factors, such as average water temperatures, exhibited synchrony on broader spatial scales, which suggests they could also be contributing to recruitment synchrony. Our results provide evidence that abiotic factors can induce synchronous patterns of recruitment for populations of cisco inhabiting waters across a broad geographic range, and show that broad-scale synchrony of recruitment can occur in freshwater fish populations as well as those from marine systems.

  3. Building Bridges to Spatial Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shumway, Jessica F.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial reasoning, which involves "building and manipulating mental representations of two-and three-dimensional objects and perceiving an object from different perspectives" is a critical aspect of geometric thinking and reasoning. Through building, drawing, and analyzing two-and three-dimensional shapes, students develop a foundation…

  4. Spatial Grouping Determines Temporal Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermens, Frouke; Scharnowski, Frank; Herzog, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    To make sense out of a continuously changing visual world, people need to integrate features across space and time. Despite more than a century of research, the mechanisms of features integration are still a matter of debate. To examine how temporal and spatial integration interact, the authors measured the amount of temporal fusion (a measure of…

  5. BIODIVERSITY Spatial incongruence among hotspots

    E-print Network

    Davies, Jonathan

    BIODIVERSITY RESEARCH Spatial incongruence among hotspots and complementary areas of tree diversity@gmail.com ABSTRACT Aim Biodiversity hotspots have important roles in conservation prioritisation, but efficient by the hotspot approach. Main conclusions An integrative approach that considers multiple facets of biodiversity

  6. Children's Expressions of Spatial Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Gary L.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined expressions of spatial knowledge of first-, fourth-, and sixth-grade children who performed model construction, verbal description, and route reversal tasks after mastering a pedestrian maze. Age-related differences were found in rate of learning the maze, and equivalent abilities in sequencing intersections and route reversal. (SAK)

  7. The Role of Spatial Ability and Strategy Preference for Spatial Problem Solving in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stieff, Mike; Ryu, Minjung; Dixon, Bonnie; Hegarty, Mary

    2012-01-01

    In organic chemistry, spatial reasoning is critical for reasoning about spatial relationships in three dimensions and representing spatial information in diagrams. Despite its importance, little is known about the underlying cognitive components of spatial reasoning and the strategies that students employ to solve spatial problems in organic…

  8. Help file for R function SpatialClust(), which implements the spatial clustering algorithm in

    E-print Network

    Reich, Brian J.

    : Reich BJ, Bondell HD. A spatial Dirichlet process mixture model for clustering population genetic data of clusters. m2 (25) The number of mixture components in each spatial distribution. spatial (TRUE) TRUEHelp file for R function SpatialClust(), which implements the spatial clustering algorithm in

  9. Modeling longitudinal spatial periodontal data: A spatially-adaptive model with tools for specifying

    E-print Network

    Reich, Brian J.

    Modeling longitudinal spatial periodontal data: A spatially-adaptive model with tools spatial periodontal data: A spatially-adaptive model with tools for specifying priors and checking fit (CAR) prior, which spatially smooths estimates towards their neighbors. However, since AL often

  10. Spatial auditory processing in pinnipeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Marla M.

    Given the biological importance of sound for a variety of activities, pinnipeds must be able to obtain spatial information about their surroundings thorough acoustic input in the absence of other sensory cues. The three chapters of this dissertation address spatial auditory processing capabilities of pinnipeds in air given that these amphibious animals use acoustic signals for reproduction and survival on land. Two chapters are comparative lab-based studies that utilized psychophysical approaches conducted in an acoustic chamber. Chapter 1 addressed the frequency-dependent sound localization abilities at azimuth of three pinniped species (the harbor seal, Phoca vitulina, the California sea lion, Zalophus californianus, and the northern elephant seal, Mirounga angustirostris). While performances of the sea lion and harbor seal were consistent with the duplex theory of sound localization, the elephant seal, a low-frequency hearing specialist, showed a decreased ability to localize the highest frequencies tested. In Chapter 2 spatial release from masking (SRM), which occurs when a signal and masker are spatially separated resulting in improvement in signal detectability relative to conditions in which they are co-located, was determined in a harbor seal and sea lion. Absolute and masked thresholds were measured at three frequencies and azimuths to determine the detection advantages afforded by this type of spatial auditory processing. Results showed that hearing sensitivity was enhanced by up to 19 and 12 dB in the harbor seal and sea lion, respectively, when the signal and masker were spatially separated. Chapter 3 was a field-based study that quantified both sender and receiver variables of the directional properties of male northern elephant seal calls produce within communication system that serves to delineate dominance status. This included measuring call directivity patterns, observing male-male vocally-mediated interactions, and an acoustic playback study. Results showed that males produce calls that were highly directional that together with social status influenced the response of receivers. Results from the playback study were able to confirm that the isolated acoustic components of this display resulted in similar responses among males. These three chapters provide further information about comparative aspects of spatial auditory processing in pinnipeds.

  11. Solutions for medical databases optimal exploitation

    PubMed Central

    Branescu, I; Purcarea, VL; Dobrescu, R

    2014-01-01

    The paper discusses the methods to apply OLAP techniques for multidimensional databases that leverage the existing, performance-enhancing technique, known as practical pre-aggregation, by making this technique relevant to a much wider range of medical applications, as a logistic support to the data warehousing techniques. The transformations have practically low computational complexity and they may be implemented using standard relational database technology. The paper also describes how to integrate the transformed hierarchies in current OLAP systems, transparently to the user and proposes a flexible, “multimodel" federated system for extending OLAP querying to external object databases. PMID:24653769

  12. Spatial risk assessment for critical network infrastructure using sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möderl, Michael; Rauch, Wolfgang

    2011-12-01

    The presented spatial risk assessment method allows for managing critical network infrastructure in urban areas under abnormal and future conditions caused e.g., by terrorist attacks, infrastructure deterioration or climate change. For the spatial risk assessment, vulnerability maps for critical network infrastructure are merged with hazard maps for an interfering process. Vulnerability maps are generated using a spatial sensitivity analysis of network transport models to evaluate performance decrease under investigated thread scenarios. Thereby parameters are varied according to the specific impact of a particular threat scenario. Hazard maps are generated with a geographical information system using raster data of the same threat scenario derived from structured interviews and cluster analysis of events in the past. The application of the spatial risk assessment is exemplified by means of a case study for a water supply system, but the principal concept is applicable likewise to other critical network infrastructure. The aim of the approach is to help decision makers in choosing zones for preventive measures.

  13. Probabilistic non-linear registration with spatially adaptive regularisation.

    PubMed

    Simpson, I J A; Cardoso, M J; Modat, M; Cash, D M; Woolrich, M W; Andersson, J L R; Schnabel, J A; Ourselin, S

    2015-12-01

    This paper introduces a novel method for inferring spatially varying regularisation in non-linear registration. This is achieved through full Bayesian inference on a probabilistic registration model, where the prior on the transformation parameters is parameterised as a weighted mixture of spatially localised components. Such an approach has the advantage of allowing the registration to be more flexibly driven by the data than a traditional globally defined regularisation penalty, such as bending energy. The proposed method adaptively determines the influence of the prior in a local region. The strength of the prior may be reduced in areas where the data better support deformations, or can enforce a stronger constraint in less informative areas. Consequently, the use of such a spatially adaptive prior may reduce unwanted impacts of regularisation on the inferred transformation. This is especially important for applications where the deformation field itself is of interest, such as tensor based morphometry. The proposed approach is demonstrated using synthetic images, and with application to tensor based morphometry analysis of subjects with Alzheimer's disease and healthy controls. The results indicate that using the proposed spatially adaptive prior leads to sparser deformations, which provide better localisation of regional volume change. Additionally, the proposed regularisation model leads to more data driven and localised maps of registration uncertainty. This paper also demonstrates for the first time the use of Bayesian model comparison for selecting different types of regularisation. PMID:26462231

  14. Toward critical spatial thinking in the social sciences and humanities

    PubMed Central

    Goodchild, Michael F.; Janelle, Donald G.

    2010-01-01

    The integration of geographically referenced information into the conceptual frameworks and applied uses of the social sciences and humanities has been an ongoing process over the past few centuries. It has gained momentum in recent decades with advances in technologies for computation and visualization and with the arrival of new data sources. This article begins with an overview of this transition, and argues that the spatial integration of information resources and the cross-disciplinary sharing of analysis and representation methodologies are important forces for the integration of scientific and artistic expression, and that they draw on core concepts in spatial (and spatio-temporal) thinking. We do not suggest that this is akin to prior concepts of unified knowledge systems, but we do maintain that the boundaries to knowledge transfer are disintegrating and that our abilities in problem solving for purposes of artistic expression and scientific development are enhanced through spatial perspectives. Moreover, approaches to education at all levels must recognize the need to impart proficiency in the critical and efficient application of these fundamental spatial concepts, if students and researchers are to make use of expanding access to a broadening range of spatialized information and data processing technologies. PMID:20454588

  15. Subcell resolution in simplex stochastic collocation for spatial discontinuities

    SciTech Connect

    Witteveen, Jeroen A.S.; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2013-10-15

    Subcell resolution has been used in the Finite Volume Method (FVM) to obtain accurate approximations of discontinuities in the physical space. Stochastic methods are usually based on local adaptivity for resolving discontinuities in the stochastic dimensions. However, the adaptive refinement in the probability space is ineffective in the non-intrusive uncertainty quantification framework, if the stochastic discontinuity is caused by a discontinuity in the physical space with a random location. The dependence of the discontinuity location in the probability space on the spatial coordinates then results in a staircase approximation of the statistics, which leads to first-order error convergence and an underprediction of the maximum standard deviation. To avoid these problems, we introduce subcell resolution into the Simplex Stochastic Collocation (SSC) method for obtaining a truly discontinuous representation of random spatial discontinuities in the interior of the cells discretizing the probability space. The presented SSC–SR method is based on resolving the discontinuity location in the probability space explicitly as function of the spatial coordinates and extending the stochastic response surface approximations up to the predicted discontinuity location. The applications to a linear advection problem, the inviscid Burgers’ equation, a shock tube problem, and the transonic flow over the RAE 2822 airfoil show that SSC–SR resolves random spatial discontinuities with multiple stochastic and spatial dimensions accurately using a minimal number of samples.

  16. Validating a spatially distributed hydrological model with soil morphology data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doppler, T.; Honti, M.; Zihlmann, U.; Weisskopf, P.; Stamm, C.

    2013-10-01

    Spatially distributed hydrological models are popular tools in hydrology and they are claimed to be useful to support management decisions. Despite the high spatial resolution of the computed variables, calibration and validation is often carried out only on discharge time-series at specific locations due to the lack of spatially distributed reference data. Because of this restriction, the predictive power of these models, with regard to predicted spatial patterns, can usually not be judged. An example of spatial predictions in hydrology is the prediction of saturated areas in agricultural catchments. These areas can be important source areas for the transport of agrochemicals to the stream. We set up a spatially distributed model to predict saturated areas in a 1.2 km2 catchment in Switzerland with moderate topography. Around 40% of the catchment area are artificially drained. We measured weather data, discharge and groundwater levels in 11 piezometers for 1.5 yr. For broadening the spatially distributed data sets that can be used for model calibration and validation, we translated soil morphological data available from soil maps into an estimate of the duration of soil saturation in the soil horizons. We used redox-morphology signs for these estimates. This resulted in a data set with high spatial coverage on which the model predictions were validated. In general, these saturation estimates corresponded well to the measured groundwater levels. We worked with a model that would be applicable for management decisions because of its fast calculation speed and rather low data requirements. We simultaneously calibrated the model to the groundwater levels in the piezometers and discharge. The model was able to reproduce the general hydrological behavior of the catchment in terms of discharge and absolute groundwater levels. However, the accuracy of the groundwater level predictions was not high enough to be used for the prediction of saturated areas. The groundwater level dynamics were not adequately reproduced and the predicted spatial patterns of soil saturation did not correspond to the patterns estimated from the soil map. Our results indicate that an accurate prediction of the groundwater level dynamics of the shallow groundwater in our catchment that is subject to artificial drainage would require a more complex model. Especially high spatial resolution and very detailed process representations at the boundary between the unsaturated and the saturated zone are expected to be crucial. The data needed for such a detailed model are not generally available. The high computational demand and the complex model setup would require more resources than the direct identification of saturated areas in the field. This severely hampers the practical use of such models despite their usefulness for scientific purposes.

  17. Allocentric and Egocentric Spatial Representations: Definitions, Distinctions, and Interconnections

    E-print Network

    Klatzky, Roberta

    abounds in discussions of spatial perception, spatial cognition, and spatially directed actionAllocentric and Egocentric Spatial Representations: Definitions, Distinctions, and Interconnections spatial cognition and animal navigation often make distinctions between egocentric and allocentric (also

  18. A local distribution based spatial clustering algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Min; Liu, Qiliang; Li, Guangqiang; Cheng, Tao

    2009-10-01

    Spatial clustering is an important means for spatial data mining and spatial analysis, and it can be used to discover the potential spatial association rules and outliers among the spatial data. Most existing spatial clustering algorithms only utilize the spatial distance or local density to find the spatial clusters in a spatial database, without taking the spatial local distribution characters into account, so that the clustered results are unreasonable in many cases. To overcome such limitations, this paper develops a new indicator (i.e. local median angle) to measure the local distribution at first, and further proposes a new algorithm, called local distribution based spatial clustering algorithm (LDBSC in abbreviation). In the process of spatial clustering, a series of recursive search are implemented for all the entities so that those entities with its local median angle being very close or equal are clustered. In this way, all the spatial entities in the spatial database can be automatically divided into some clusters. Finally, two tests are implemented to demonstrate that the method proposed in this paper is more prominent than DBSCAN, as well as that it is very robust and feasible, and can be used to find the clusters with different shapes.

  19. Purification of Spatial Tests: An IRT Analysis of Spatial and Reasoning Components in "Spatial" Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimowski, Michele F.; Wothke, Werner

    Tests of spatial ability were analyzed for their analog (visuospatial) and nonanalog (verbal reasoning) components, using factor analyses of items and test scores. The self-selected sample consisted of over 2000 clients (average age about 26 or 27) employing the Johnson O'Connor Research Foundation's aptitude evaluation services in 12 metropolitan…

  20. IBM China Research Lab Nov 7, 2003 | DOLAP 2003 2003 IBM Corporation

    E-print Network

    Song, Il-Yeol

    Schema of a Spatial Data Warehouse Station_ID Station_Name Address Location 77 Beiti Gas Station 2th-Favored Search in Spatial Data Warehouse Fangyan Rao IBM China Research Lab #12;IBM China Research Lab Spatial Hierarchy and OLAP-favored Search in Spatial Data Warehouse © 2003 IBM Corporation Outline § Motivation

  1. Spatially constrained clustering over GIS generated suitability maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partsinevelos, Panagiotis; Papadakis, Kostas

    2015-06-01

    An abundance of GIS and Remote Sensing based spatial analysis studies result in various types of suitability maps, where selected regions are classified according to application driven qualitative or quantitative rules. Often, upon the resulting classified regions which define spatially constrained classes, users intent to position facilities in order to satisfy a series of demand sites spread throughout the study area. This fine tuning procedure, not tackled under classic clustering and location analysis algorithms, is addressed through the extension of k-means algorithm, by restricting cluster centers inside a priori outlined regions, while minimizing distance metrics towards demand locations. Experimentation in both synthetic and real based datasets shows the applicability of the approach and demonstrates the overall performance of the algorithm.

  2. Spatial-temporal event detection in climate parameter imagery.

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, Sean Andrew; Gutierrez, Karen A.

    2011-10-01

    Previously developed techniques that comprise statistical parametric mapping, with applications focused on human brain imaging, are examined and tested here for new applications in anomaly detection within remotely-sensed imagery. Two approaches to analysis are developed: online, regression-based anomaly detection and conditional differences. These approaches are applied to two example spatial-temporal data sets: data simulated with a Gaussian field deformation approach and weekly NDVI images derived from global satellite coverage. Results indicate that anomalies can be identified in spatial temporal data with the regression-based approach. Additionally, la Nina and el Nino climatic conditions are used as different stimuli applied to the earth and this comparison shows that el Nino conditions lead to significant decreases in NDVI in both the Amazon Basin and in Southern India.

  3. Spatial estimation from remotely sensed data via empirical Bayes models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. R.; Hinkley, D. V.; Kostal, H.; Morris, C. N.

    1984-01-01

    Multichannel satellite image data, available as LANDSAT imagery, are recorded as a multivariate time series (four channels, multiple passovers) in two spatial dimensions. The application of parametric empirical Bayes theory to classification of, and estimating the probability of, each crop type at each of a large number of pixels is considered. This theory involves both the probability distribution of imagery data, conditional on crop types, and the prior spatial distribution of crop types. For the latter Markov models indexed by estimable parameters are used. A broad outline of the general theory reveals several questions for further research. Some detailed results are given for the special case of two crop types when only a line transect is analyzed. Finally, the estimation of an underlying continuous process on the lattice is discussed which would be applicable to such quantities as crop yield.

  4. Giving Spatial Perception Our Full Attention: Are We Reaching Spatial Learners?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lord, Thomas R.; Clausen-May, Tandi

    2002-01-01

    Explains spatial perception and how it is influential on a student's academic abilities. Discusses how spatial thinkers conduct experiments in science learning and how to teach using spatial thinkers' participation. (YDS)

  5. Sexual orientation and spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Cánovas, Ma Rosa; Cimadevilla, José Manuel

    2011-11-01

    The present study aimed at determining the influence of sexual orientation in human spatial learning and memory. Participants performed the Boxes Room, a virtual reality version of the Holeboard. In Experiment I, a reference memory task, the position of the hidden rewards remained constant during the whole experiment. In Experiment II, a working memory task, the position of rewards changed between blocks. Each block consisted of two trials: One trial for acquisition and another for retrieval. The results of Experiment I showed that heterosexual men performed better than homosexual men and heterosexual women. They found the rewarded boxes faster. Moreover, homosexual participants committed more errors than heterosexuals. Experiment II showed that working memory abilities are the same in groups of different sexual orientation. These results suggest that sexual orientation is related to spatial navigation abilities, but mostly in men, and limited to reference memory, which depends more on the function of the hippocampal system. PMID:22047869

  6. Sustainable Development and Spatial Inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbuch, Gérard

    2013-05-01

    Historical data, theory and computer simulations support a connection between growth and economic inequality. Our present world with large regional differences in economic activity is a result of fast economic growth during the last two centuries. Because of limits to growth we might expect a future world to develop differently with far less growth. The question that we here address is: "Would a world with a sustainable economy be less unequal?" We then develop integrated spatial economic models based on limited resources consumption and technical knowledge accumulation and study them by the way of computer simulations. When the only coupling between world regions is diffusion we do not observe any spatial unequality. By contrast, highly localized economic activities are maintained by global market mechanisms. Structures sizes are determined by transportation costs. Wide distributions of capital and production are also predicted in this regime.

  7. An improved pinhole spatial filter

    SciTech Connect

    Estabrook, K.; Celliers, P.; Murray, J.; Wallace, R.; Stone, G.; Van Wonterghem, B.; MacGowan, B.; Da Silva, L.; Hunt, J.; Manes, K.

    1996-08-21

    Lasers generate phase aberrated light that can damage laser glass, frequency conversion crystals, lenses, and mirror coatings and can also reduce extractable energy and power. Spatial pinhole filters can partly eliminate such ``hot spots.`` Problems are that the pinhole closes during the laser pulse and has to be made too large initially. Debris from the pinhole can coat or damage spatial filter lenses. This paper presents a novel design for a more robust pinhole filter. Phase distorted (hot spot) light refracts at grazing incidence by plasma on the wall of a funnel shaped filter resulting in less absorption and debris. Refracted light absorbs at low intensities on the vacuum wall. We present 2D hydrodynamic computer simulations and compare the two types of filters with experiment.

  8. An Evaluation of Database Solutions to Spatial Object Association

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V S; Kurc, T; Saltz, J; Abdulla, G M; Kohn, S; Matarazzo, C

    2008-06-24

    Object association is a common problem encountered in many applications. Spatial object association, also referred to as crossmatch of spatial datasets, is the problem of identifying and comparing objects in two datasets based on their positions in a common spatial coordinate system--one of the datasets may correspond to a catalog of objects observed over time in a multi-dimensional domain; the other dataset may consist of objects observed in a snapshot of the domain at a time point. The use of database management systems to the solve the object association problem provides portability across different platforms and also greater flexibility. Increasing dataset sizes in today's applications, however, have made object association a data/compute-intensive problem that requires targeted optimizations for efficient execution. In this work, we investigate how database-based crossmatch algorithms can be deployed on different database system architectures and evaluate the deployments to understand the impact of architectural choices on crossmatch performance and associated trade-offs. We investigate the execution of two crossmatch algorithms on (1) a parallel database system with active disk style processing capabilities, (2) a high-throughput network database (MySQL Cluster), and (3) shared-nothing databases with replication. We have conducted our study in the context of a large-scale astronomy application with real use-case scenarios.

  9. Spatial Distributions of Young Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Adam L.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.

    2008-10-01

    We analyze the spatial distribution of young stars in Taurus-Auriga and Upper Sco, as determined from the two-point correlation function (i.e., the mean surface density of neighbors). The corresponding power-law fits allow us to determine the fractal dimensions of each association's spatial distribution, measure the stellar velocity dispersions, and distinguish between the bound binary population and chance alignments of members. We find that the fractal dimension of Taurus is D~1.05, consistent with its filamentary structure. The fractal dimension of Upper Sco may be even shallower (D~0.7), but this fit is uncertain due to the limited area and possible spatially variable incompleteness. We also find that random stellar motions have erased all primordial structure on scales of <~0.07° in Taurus and <~1.7° in Upper Sco; given ages of ~1 and ~5 Myr, the corresponding internal velocity dispersions are ~0.2 and ~1.0 km s-1, respectively. Finally, we find that binaries can be distinguished from chance alignments at separations of <~120" (17,000 AU) in Taurus and <~75" (11,000 AU) in Upper Sco. The binary populations in these associations that we previously studied, spanning separations of 3"-30", is dominated by binary systems. However, the few lowest mass pairs (Mprim <~ 0.3 Msolar) might be chance alignments.

  10. Spatial inattention abolishes voice adaptation.

    PubMed

    Zäske, Romi; Fritz, Christiane; Schweinberger, Stefan R

    2013-04-01

    Adaptation to male voices causes a subsequent voice to be perceived as more female, and vice versa. Similar contrastive aftereffects have been reported for phonetic perception, and in vision for face perception. However, while aftereffects in the perception of phonetic features of speech have been reported to persist even when adaptors were processed inattentively, face aftereffects were previously reported to be abolished by inattention to adaptors. Here we demonstrate that auditory aftereffects of adaptation to voice gender are eliminated when the male and female adaptor voices are spatially unattended. Participants simultaneously heard gender-specific male or female adaptor voices in one ear and gender-neutral (androgynous) adaptor voices in the contralateral ear. They selectively attended to the adaptor voices in a designated ear, by either classifying voice gender (Exp. 1) or spoken syllable (Exp. 2). Voice aftereffects were found only if the gender-specific voices were spatially attended, suggesting capacity limits in the processing of voice gender for the unattended ear. Remarkably, gender-specific adaptors in the attended ear elicited comparable aftereffects in test voices, regardless of prior attention to voice gender or phonetic content. Thus, within the attended ear, voice gender was processed even when it was irrelevant for the task at hand, suggesting automatic processing of gender along with linguistic information. Overall, voice gender adaptation requires spatial, but not dimensional, selective attention. PMID:23315486

  11. OPEN PROBLEM: Spatially localized structures in dissipative systems: open problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, E.

    2008-04-01

    Stationary spatially localized structures, sometimes called dissipative solitons, arise in many interesting and important applications, including buckling of slender structures under compression, nonlinear optics, fluid flow, surface catalysis, neurobiology and many more. The recent resurgence in interest in these structures has led to significant advances in our understanding of the origin and properties of these states, and these in turn suggest new questions, both general and system-specific. This paper surveys these results focusing on open problems, both mathematical and computational, as well as on new applications.

  12. Spatial-visual skills and engineering design

    E-print Network

    Tseng, Tiffany

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether students with strong spatial-visual skills tend to design more complex mechanisms for the undergraduate course Design and Manufacturing I. The Purdue Spatial Visualization ...

  13. Biodiversity as spatial insurance in heterogeneous landscapes

    E-print Network

    Gonzalez, Andrew

    Biodiversity as spatial insurance in heterogeneous landscapes Michel Loreau* , Nicolas Mouquet January 15, 2003) The potential consequences of biodiversity loss for ecosystem functioning and services biodiversity affects ecosystem processes and stability at larger spatial scales. We propose that biodiversity

  14. ORIGINAL PAPER Spatial patterns and environmental correlates

    E-print Network

    Slik, Ferry

    suffers from low sampling efforts. Here we try to determine the spatial diversity patterns of liverworts richness. Liverwort richness increased significantly with decreasing latitude, while moss richness showed richness showed strong spatial structuring, indicating dispersal limitation. Environmentally, liverwort

  15. MAPPING SPATIAL THEMATIC ACCURACY WITH FUZZY SETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thematic map accuracy is not spatially homogenous but variable across a landscape. Properly analyzing and representing spatial pattern and degree of thematic map accuracy would provide valuable information for using thematic maps. However, current thematic map accuracy measures (...

  16. Liquid crystal television spatial light modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    1989-01-01

    The spatial light modulation characteristics and capabilities of the liquid crystal television (LCTV) spatial light modulators (SLMs) are discussed. A comparison of Radio Shack, Epson, and Citizen LCTV SLMs is made.

  17. REGULAR ARTICLE Reproductive Numbers for Nonautonomous Spatially

    E-print Network

    Bravo de la Parra, Rafael

    , aggregated, system. We derive global reproduction numbers governing the general spatially distributed through the reproduction numbers of the corresponding averaged systems (the autonomous systems obtainedREGULAR ARTICLE Reproductive Numbers for Nonautonomous Spatially Distributed Periodic SIS Models

  18. Spatial Directions, Anisotropy and Special Relativity

    E-print Network

    Marco Mamone-Capria

    2011-05-20

    The concept of an objective spatial direction in special relativity is investigated and theories assuming light-speed isotropy while accepting the existence of a privileged spatial direction are classified. A natural generalization of the proper time principle is introduced which makes it possible to devise experimental tests of spatial isotropy. Several common misunderstandings in the relativistic literature concerning the role of spatial isotropy are clarified.

  19. Perspective The Cognitive Architecture of Spatial Navigation

    E-print Network

    Burgess, Neil

    Neuron Perspective The Cognitive Architecture of Spatial Navigation: Hippocampal and Striatal.C.), n.burgess@ucl.ac.uk (N.B.) http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2015.09.021 Spatial navigation can for further experiments. Introduction Goal-directed spatial navigation is a good model for general is- sues

  20. Multiple Spatial Mappings in Numerical Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaki, Samuel; Fischer, Martin H.

    2012-01-01

    A recent cross-cultural comparison (Shaki, Fischer, & Petrusic, 2009) suggested that spatially consistent processing habits for words and numbers are a necessary condition for the spatial representation of numbers (Spatial-Numerical Association of Response Codes; SNARC effect). Here we reexamine the SNARC in Israelis who read text from right to…