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Sample records for spatio-temporal point process

  1. Functional Principal Component Analysis of Spatio-Temporal Point Processes with Applications in Disease Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yehua; Guan, Yongtao

    2014-01-01

    In disease surveillance applications, the disease events are modeled by spatio-temporal point processes. We propose a new class of semiparametric generalized linear mixed model for such data, where the event rate is related to some known risk factors and some unknown latent random effects. We model the latent spatio-temporal process as spatially correlated functional data, and propose Poisson maximum likelihood and composite likelihood methods based on spline approximations to estimate the mean and covariance functions of the latent process. By performing functional principal component analysis to the latent process, we can better understand the correlation structure in the point process. We also propose an empirical Bayes method to predict the latent spatial random effects, which can help highlight hot areas with unusually high event rates. Under an increasing domain and increasing knots asymptotic framework, we establish the asymptotic distribution for the parametric components in the model and the asymptotic convergence rates for the functional principal component estimators. We illustrate the methodology through a simulation study and an application to the Connecticut Tumor Registry data. PMID:25368436

  2. Functional Principal Component Analysis of Spatio-Temporal Point Processes with Applications in Disease Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Li, Yehua; Guan, Yongtao

    2014-08-01

    In disease surveillance applications, the disease events are modeled by spatio-temporal point processes. We propose a new class of semiparametric generalized linear mixed model for such data, where the event rate is related to some known risk factors and some unknown latent random effects. We model the latent spatio-temporal process as spatially correlated functional data, and propose Poisson maximum likelihood and composite likelihood methods based on spline approximations to estimate the mean and covariance functions of the latent process. By performing functional principal component analysis to the latent process, we can better understand the correlation structure in the point process. We also propose an empirical Bayes method to predict the latent spatial random effects, which can help highlight hot areas with unusually high event rates. Under an increasing domain and increasing knots asymptotic framework, we establish the asymptotic distribution for the parametric components in the model and the asymptotic convergence rates for the functional principal component estimators. We illustrate the methodology through a simulation study and an application to the Connecticut Tumor Registry data. PMID:25368436

  3. Spatio-Temporal Statistical Models with Application to Atmospheric Processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wikle, Christopher Kim

    This dissertation is concerned with spatio-temporal processes in the atmospheric sciences. In the first chapter, a comprehensive overview of spatio-temporal methods from the atmospheric science literature is presented. Focus is on Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF), Principal Interaction Pattern (PIP), Principal Oscillation Pattern (POP), and spatio-temporal Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) methods. Previously unexamined issues related to measurement error, continuous space, and Bayesian ideas are considered. In the second chapter, harmonic analysis is used to make diagnostic inference about the spatial variation of the semiannual oscillation (SAO) in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) 500-hPa height field. The SAO is explained by the spatial and temporal asymmetries in the annual variation of stationary eddies. The SAO in the NH extratropics is a result of east-west land-sea contrasts, analogous to the well-known Southern Hemisphere (SH) SAO, which is explained by north-south land-sea contrasts. The third chapter examines the seasonal variability of mixed Rossby-gravity waves (MRGWs) in the lower stratosphere over the tropical western Pacific. Thirty-one years of lower stratospheric wind observations from four tropical Pacific stations are examined with seasonally varying cross -spectral analysis, which suggests significant twice-yearly peaks in the v-wind power and the mean squared coherence between the u- and v-winds, with peaks occurring in the winter-early spring and in summer-early fall. Horizontal momentum flux convergence is found with these waves, with the sign of the convergence opposite during the two seasonal maxima. Cyclic spectral analyses show that the frequency of the maximum v-wind power in the MRGW frequency band shifts seasonally. In the fourth chapter, a spatio-temporal statistical model is proposed that assumes a first-order Markov dynamic process combined with a spatially descriptive colored noise process. With a measurement error equation, a spatio-temporal Kalman filter gives predictions in time and at any spatial location. The model prediction equation includes a simple kriging analog as a special case. The model predicts well with simulated spatio-temporal data, and is superior to simple kriging applied independently at each time. Predictions of precipitation over the data-sparse South China Sea captures the dynamic variation of the spatial precipitation.

  4. Modeling directional spatio-temporal processes in island biogeography.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, José C; Cardoso, Pedro; Rigal, François; Triantis, Kostas A; Borges, Paulo A V

    2015-10-01

    A key challenge in island biogeography is to quantity the role of dispersal in shaping biodiversity patterns among the islands of a given archipelago. Here, we propose such a framework. Dispersal within oceanic archipelagos may be conceptualized as a spatio-temporal process dependent on: (1) the spatial distribution of islands, because the probability of successful dispersal is inversely related to the spatial distance between islands and (2) the chronological sequence of island formation that determines the directional asymmetry of dispersal (hypothesized to be predominantly from older to younger islands). From these premises, directional network models may be constructed, representing putative connections among islands. These models may be translated to eigenfunctions in order to be incorporated into statistical analysis. The framework was tested with 12 datasets from the Hawaii, Azores, and Canaries. The explanatory power of directional network models for explaining species composition patterns, assessed by the Jaccard dissimilarity index, was compared with simpler time-isolation models. The amount of variation explained by the network models ranged from 5.5% (for Coleoptera in Hawaii) to 60.2% (for Pteridophytes in Canary Islands). In relation to the four studied taxa, the variation explained by network models was higher for Pteridophytes in the three archipelagos. By the contrary, small fractions of explained variation were observed for Coleoptera (5.5%) and Araneae (8.6%) in Hawaii. Time-isolation models were, in general, not statistical significant and explained less variation than the equivalent directional network models for all the datasets. Directional network models provide a way for evaluating the spatio-temporal signature of species dispersal. The method allows building scenarios against which hypotheses about dispersal within archipelagos may be tested. The new framework may help to uncover the pathways via which species have colonized the islands of a given archipelago and to understand the origins of insular biodiversity. PMID:26668731

  5. FROM SINGLE POINT GAUGE TO SPATIO-TEMPORAL MEASUREMENT OF OCEAN WAVES PROSPECTS AND PERSPECTIVES

    E-print Network

    of a wave height as the difference between a crest and trough in the open ocean. Efforts to go beyond visualFROM SINGLE POINT GAUGE TO SPATIO-TEMPORAL MEASUREMENT OF OCEAN WAVES ­ PROSPECTS AND PERSPECTIVES With the recent advancement of spatial measurements of ocean waves, we are clearly facing new challenges regarding

  6. Modeling sediment transport as a spatio-temporal Markov process.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyman, Joris; Ancey, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    Despite a century of research about sediment transport by bedload occuring in rivers, its constitutive laws remain largely unknown. The proof being that our ability to predict mid-to-long term transported volumes within reasonable confidence interval is almost null. The intrinsic fluctuating nature of bedload transport may be one of the most important reasons why classical approaches fail. Microscopic probabilistic framework has the advantage of taking into account these fluctuations at the particle scale, to understand their effect on the macroscopic variables such as sediment flux. In this framework, bedload transport is seen as the random motion of particles (sand, gravel, pebbles...) over a two-dimensional surface (the river bed). The number of particles in motion, as well as their velocities, are random variables. In this talk, we show how a simple birth-death Markov model governing particle motion on a regular lattice accurately reproduces the spatio-temporal correlations observed at the macroscopic level. Entrainment, deposition and transport of particles by the turbulent fluid (air or water) are supposed to be independent and memoryless processes that modify the number of particles in motion. By means of the Poisson representation, we obtained a Fokker-Planck equation that is exactly equivalent to the master equation and thus valid for all cell sizes. The analysis shows that the number of moving particles evolves locally far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Several analytical results are presented and compared to experimental data. The index of dispersion (or variance over mean ratio) is proved to grow from unity at small scales to larger values at larger scales confirming the non Poisonnian behavior of bedload transport. Also, we study the one and two dimensional K-function, which gives the average number of moving particles located in a ball centered at a particle centroid function of the ball's radius.

  7. Spatio-Temporal Low Count Processes with Application to Violent Crime Events

    E-print Network

    Brown, Lawrence D.

    Spatio-Temporal Low Count Processes with Application to Violent Crime Events Sivan Aldor in which crimes are likely to occur. Violent crimes often exhibit both temporal and spatial characteristics areas that exhibit similar crime behaviors. It is this in- determinate inter-region correlation

  8. Characteristics, processes, and causes of the spatio-temporal variabilities of the East Asian monsoon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ronghui; Chen, Jilong; Wang, Lin; Lin, Zhongda

    2012-09-01

    Recent advances in the study of the characteristics, processes, and causes of spatio-temporal variabilities of the East Asian monsoon (EAM) system are reviewed in this paper. The understanding of the EAM system has improved in many aspects: the basic characteristics of horizontal and vertical structures, the annual cycle of the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) system and the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM) system, the characteristics of the spatio-temporal variabilities of the EASM system and the EAWM system, and especially the multiple modes of the EAM system and their spatio-temporal variabilities. Some new results have also been achieved in understanding the atmosphere-ocean interaction and atmosphere-land interaction processes that affect the variability of the EAM system. Based on recent studies, the EAM system can be seen as more than a circulation system, it can be viewed as an atmosphere-ocean-land coupled system, namely, the EAM climate system. In addition, further progress has been made in diagnosing the internal physical mechanisms of EAM climate system variability, especially regarding the characteristics and properties of the East Asia-Pacific (EAP) teleconnection over East Asia and the North Pacific, the "Silk Road" teleconnection along the westerly jet stream in the upper troposphere over the Asian continent, and the dynamical effects of quasi-stationary planetary wave activity on EAM system variability. At the end of the paper, some scientific problems regarding understanding the EAM system variability are proposed for further study.

  9. Spatio-Temporal Process Variability in Watershed Scale Wetland Restoration Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evenson, G. R.

    2012-12-01

    Watershed scale restoration decision making processes are increasingly informed by quantitative methodologies providing site-specific restoration recommendations - sometimes referred to as "systematic planning." The more advanced of these methodologies are characterized by a coupling of search algorithms and ecological models to discover restoration plans that optimize environmental outcomes. Yet while these methods have exhibited clear utility as decision support toolsets, they may be critiqued for flawed evaluations of spatio-temporally variable processes fundamental to watershed scale restoration. Hydrologic and non-hydrologic mediated process connectivity along with post-restoration habitat dynamics, for example, are commonly ignored yet known to appreciably affect restoration outcomes. This talk will present a methodology to evaluate such spatio-temporally complex processes in the production of watershed scale wetland restoration plans. Using the Tuscarawas Watershed in Eastern Ohio as a case study, a genetic algorithm will be coupled with the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to reveal optimal wetland restoration plans as measured by their capacity to maximize nutrient reductions. Then, a so-called "graphical" representation of the optimization problem will be implemented in-parallel to promote hydrologic and non-hydrologic mediated connectivity amongst existing wetlands and sites selected for restoration. Further, various search algorithm mechanisms will be discussed as a means of accounting for temporal complexities such as post-restoration habitat dynamics. Finally, generalized patterns of restoration plan optimality will be discussed as an alternative and possibly superior decision support toolset given the complexity and stochastic nature of spatio-temporal process variability.

  10. OFDM Radar Space-Time Adaptive Processing by Exploiting Spatio-Temporal Sparsity

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Satyabrata

    2013-01-01

    We propose a sparsity-based space-time adaptive processing (STAP) algorithm to detect a slowly-moving target using an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) radar. We observe that the target and interference spectra are inherently sparse in the spatio-temporal domain. Hence, we exploit that sparsity to develop an efficient STAP technique that utilizes considerably lesser number of secondary data and produces an equivalent performance as the other existing STAP techniques. In addition, the use of an OFDM signal increases the frequency diversity of our system, as different scattering centers of a target resonate at different frequencies, and thus improves the target detectability. First, we formulate a realistic sparse-measurement model for an OFDM radar considering both the clutter and jammer as the interfering sources. Then, we apply a residual sparse-recovery technique based on the LASSO estimator to estimate the target and interference covariance matrices, and subsequently compute the optimal STAP-filter weights. Our numerical results demonstrate a comparative performance analysis of the proposed sparse-STAP algorithm with four other existing STAP methods. Furthermore, we discover that the OFDM-STAP filter-weights are adaptable to the frequency-variabilities of the target and interference responses, in addition to the spatio-temporal variabilities. Hence, by better utilizing the frequency variabilities, we propose an adaptive OFDM-waveform design technique, and consequently gain a significant amount of STAP-performance improvement.

  11. Evaluation of color spatio-temporal interest points for human action recognition.

    PubMed

    Everts, Ivo; van Gemert, Jan C; Gevers, Theo

    2014-04-01

    This paper considers the recognition of realistic human actions in videos based on spatio-temporal interest points (STIPs). Existing STIP-based action recognition approaches operate on intensity representations of the image data. Because of this, these approaches are sensitive to disturbing photometric phenomena, such as shadows and highlights. In addition, valuable information is neglected by discarding chromaticity from the photometric representation. These issues are addressed by color STIPs. Color STIPs are multichannel reformulations of STIP detectors and descriptors, for which we consider a number of chromatic and invariant representations derived from the opponent color space. Color STIPs are shown to outperform their intensity-based counterparts on the challenging UCF sports, UCF11 and UCF50 action recognition benchmarks by more than 5% on average, where most of the gain is due to the multichannel descriptors. In addition, the results show that color STIPs are currently the single best low-level feature choice for STIP-based approaches to human action recognition. PMID:24577192

  12. SEA-CNN: Scalable Processing of Continuous K-Nearest Neighbor Queries in Spatio-temporal Databases

    E-print Network

    Mokbel, Mohamed F.

    SEA-CNN: Scalable Processing of Continuous K-Nearest Neighbor Queries in Spatio-temporal Databases-nearest neighbor queries (CKNN, for short). We present a new algorithm, termed SEA-CNN, for answer- ing continuously a collection of concurrent CKNN queries. SEA-CNN has two important features: incremental evalu

  13. Evaluating Projected Changes in Mean Processes, Extreme Events, and their Spatio-Temporal Dependence Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, A. R.; Steinhaeuser, K.; Kodra, E. A.; Kao, S.

    2010-12-01

    Observational datasets - both raw measurements and derived data products such as reanalysis data - are used to evaluate climate simulations run in forecast and hindcast modes. Bias and uncertainty in mean processes is quantified using statistical comparisons between observations and model-generated outputs. Weather and hydrological extremes under climate change are characterized using both event definitions and extreme value theory (EVT), and their aggregate statistics (intensity, duration and frequency) are likewise compared. The geographic variability and topographical biases are examined at continental to regional scales, and dependence structures (both spatio-temporal autocorrelation and long-range dependence) are assessed using statistical and nonlinear dynamical methods. These tools were developed primarily using the CMIP3/IPCC-AR4 archived model outputs, and are being additional tested with simulations from regional climate models which dynamically downscale the AR4 archives. This combination of traditional and novel tools is thus geared towards evaluation of multiple climate models which may handle processes or generate outputs at different spatial and temporal scales. The tools are expected to be immediately applicable to the CMIP5 data when it becomes available. The anticipated space-time resolutions will pose algorithmic challenges and computational demands, which will be addressed using analytic solutions and implementations thereof on high-performance scientific computing platforms.

  14. Spatio-temporal change modeling with array data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Meng; Pebesma, Edzer

    2015-04-01

    Spatio-temporal change modeling of our ecosystems is critical for environmental conservation. Open access to remote sensing satellite image archives provides new opportunities for change modeling, such as near real-time change monitoring with long term image time series. Newly developed time series analysis methods allow the detection of quantitative changes in trend and seasonality for each pixel of the image. A drawback of pure time series analysis is that spatial dependence is neglected. There are several spatio-temporal statistical approaches to incorporate spatial context. One method is to build hierarchical models with spatial effects for time series parameters. Other methods include representing regression parameters as spatially correlated random fields, or integrating spatial autoregressive models to time series analysis. Apart from spatio-temporal statistical modeling, the results can be further improved by qualification of detected change points with their spatio-temporal neighbors. Spatio-temporal modeling approaches are typically complex and large in scale, and call for new data management and analysis tools. Remote sensing satellite images, which are continuous and regular in space and time, can naturally be represented as three- or four-dimensional arrays for spatio-temporal data management and analysis. The developed spatio-temporal statistical algorithms can be flexibly applied within array partitions that span the relevant array-based dimensions. This study investigates the potential of array-based Data Data Management and Analytic Software (DMAS) for fast data access, data integration and large-scale complex spatio-temporal analysis. A study case is developed in near-real time deforestation monitoring in Amazonian rainforest with long-term 250 m, 8-day resolution MODIS image time series. A novel spatio-temporal change modeling process is being developed and implemented in DMAS to realize rapid and automated analysis of satellite image time series for forest disturbance detection. The study expects results that improve over a pure time series analysis approach, and that is practically applicable to massive complex spatio-temporal data.

  15. Time-Resolved and Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Complex Cognitive Processes and their Role in Disorders like Developmental Dyscalculia

    PubMed Central

    Mórocz, István Akos; Janoos, Firdaus; van Gelderen, Peter; Manor, David; Karni, Avi; Breznitz, Zvia; von Aster, Michael; Kushnir, Tammar; Shalev, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is to report on the importance and challenges of a time-resolved and spatio-temporal analysis of fMRI data from complex cognitive processes and associated disorders using a study on developmental dyscalculia (DD). Participants underwent fMRI while judging the incorrectness of multiplication results, and the data were analyzed using a sequence of methods, each of which progressively provided more a detailed picture of the spatio-temporal aspect of this disease. Healthy subjects and subjects with DD performed alike behaviorally though they exhibited parietal disparities using traditional voxel-based group analyses. Further and more detailed differences, however, surfaced with a time-resolved examination of the neural responses during the experiment. While performing inter-group comparisons, a third group of subjects with dyslexia (DL) but with no arithmetic difficulties was included to test the specificity of the analysis and strengthen the statistical base with overall fifty-eight subjects. Surprisingly, the analysis showed a functional dissimilarity during an initial reading phase for the group of dyslexic but otherwise normal subjects, with respect to controls, even though only numerical digits and no alphabetic characters were presented. Thus our results suggest that time-resolved multi-variate analysis of complex experimental paradigms has the ability to yield powerful new clinical insights about abnormal brain function. Similarly, a detailed compilation of aberrations in the functional cascade may have much greater potential to delineate the core processing problems in mental disorders. PMID:22368322

  16. Development of Spatio-Temporal Wavelet Post Processing Techniques for Application to Thermal Hydraulic Experiments and Numerical Simulations 

    E-print Network

    Salpeter, Nathaniel

    2012-07-16

    This work focuses on both high fidelity experimental and numerical thermal hydraulic studies and advanced frequency decomposition methods. The major contribution of this work is a proposed method for spatio-temporal decomposition of frequencies...

  17. Spatio-temporal in vivo recording of dCREB2 dynamics in Drosophila long-term memory processing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiabin; Tanenhaus, Anne K; Davis, John C; Hanlon, Bret M; Yin, Jerry C P

    2015-02-01

    CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) is an evolutionarily conserved transcription factor, playing key roles in synaptic plasticity, intrinsic excitability and long-term memory (LTM) formation. The Drosophila homologue of mammalian CREB, dCREB2, is also important for LTM. However, the spatio-temporal nature of dCREB2 activity during memory consolidation is poorly understood. Using an in vivo reporter system, we examined dCREB2 activity continuously in specific brain regions during LTM processing. Two brain regions that have been shown to be important for Drosophila LTM are the ellipsoid body (EB) and the mushroom body (MB). We found that dCREB2 reporter activity is persistently elevated in EB R2/R4m neurons, but not neighboring R3/R4d neurons, following LTM-inducing training. In multiple subsets of MB neurons, dCREB2 reporter activity is suppressed immediately following LTM-specific training, and elevated during late windows. In addition, we observed heterogeneous responses across different subsets of neurons in MB ?? lobe during LTM processing. All of these changes suggest that dCREB2 functions in both the EB and MB for LTM formation, and that this activity contributes to the process of systems consolidation. PMID:25460038

  18. Multiple-Parameter Estimation Method Based on Spatio-Temporal 2-D Processing for Bistatic MIMO Radar.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shouguo; Li, Yong; Zhang, Kunhui; Tang, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    A novel spatio-temporal 2-dimensional (2-D) processing method that can jointly estimate the transmitting-receiving azimuth and Doppler frequency for bistatic multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar in the presence of spatial colored noise and an unknown number of targets is proposed. In the temporal domain, the cross-correlation of the matched filters' outputs for different time-delay sampling is used to eliminate the spatial colored noise. In the spatial domain, the proposed method uses a diagonal loading method and subspace theory to estimate the direction of departure (DOD) and direction of arrival (DOA), and the Doppler frequency can then be accurately estimated through the estimation of the DOD and DOA. By skipping target number estimation and the eigenvalue decomposition (EVD) of the data covariance matrix estimation and only requiring a one-dimensional search, the proposed method achieves low computational complexity. Furthermore, the proposed method is suitable for bistatic MIMO radar with an arbitrary transmitted and received geometrical configuration. The correction and efficiency of the proposed method are verified by computer simulation results. PMID:26694385

  19. A Validation Framework for Non-Point Source Simulation Models: Application to the Southern California Central Valley with Spatio-Temporally Heterogenous Source Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourakos, G.; Harter, T.

    2013-12-01

    Non-point source pollution on groundwater of agricultural regions is an alarming issue of global importance. The very large response times of contaminants which may vary from decades to centuries, require mitigation measures to be based on reliable modeling. Here we present a novel computational framework to assess and evaluate the dynamic, spatio-temporally distributed linkages between non-point sources above a groundwater basin and groundwater discharges to wells, streams, or other compliance discharge surfaces (CDSs) within a groundwater basin. The modeling framework allows for efficient evaluation of NPS pollution scenarios and of their short- and long-term effects on pollutant exceedance probabilities in CDSs. We apply the model to simulate 100 years of nitrate pollution at high resolution in a 2 million hectare semi-arid, irrigated agricultural region with a large diversity of crops, but also natural lands and urban areas, and highly heterogeneous, temporally variable loading landscape in the Southern California Central Valley. Results show that the timing of nitrate breakthrough in wells is significantly controlled by aquifer recharge and pumping rates in NPS areas and by the effective porosity of the aquifer system. MLast the model predictions are compared against a highly heterogeneous, spatio-temporally varying in space and time database of historic nitrate records and an attempt is made to compute the spatial distribution of nitrate half-life due to denitrification.

  20. GeoDec : A Multi-Layered Query Processing Framework for Spatio-Temporal Data (Demo Paper)

    E-print Network

    Shahabi, Cyrus

    the creation, formulation and execution of queries on currently available spatio-temporal data. It further. 2. RELATED WORK Current geospatial visualization systems fall in three main categories: i) Earth visualization (EV) platforms, as first envisioned by Al Gore [3], like Microsoft Virtual Earth or Google Earth

  1. Spatio-temporal distribution of stored-product inects around food processing and storage facilities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grain storage and processing facilities consist of a landscape of indoor and outdoor habitats that can potentially support stored-product insect pests, and understanding patterns of species diversity and spatial distribution in the landscape surrounding structures can provide insight into how the ou...

  2. Synthesis of neural networks for spatio-temporal spike pattern recognition and processing

    PubMed Central

    Tapson, Jonathan C.; Cohen, Greg K.; Afshar, Saeed; Stiefel, Klaus M.; Buskila, Yossi; Wang, Runchun Mark; Hamilton, Tara J.; van Schaik, André

    2013-01-01

    The advent of large scale neural computational platforms has highlighted the lack of algorithms for synthesis of neural structures to perform predefined cognitive tasks. The Neural Engineering Framework (NEF) offers one such synthesis, but it is most effective for a spike rate representation of neural information, and it requires a large number of neurons to implement simple functions. We describe a neural network synthesis method that generates synaptic connectivity for neurons which process time-encoded neural signals, and which makes very sparse use of neurons. The method allows the user to specify—arbitrarily—neuronal characteristics such as axonal and dendritic delays, and synaptic transfer functions, and then solves for the optimal input-output relationship using computed dendritic weights. The method may be used for batch or online learning and has an extremely fast optimization process. We demonstrate its use in generating a network to recognize speech which is sparsely encoded as spike times. PMID:24009550

  3. A stochastic framework for downscaling processes of spatial averages based on the property of spectral multiscaling and its statistical diagnosis on spatio-temporal rainfall fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlopoulos, Harry

    2011-08-01

    Spectral multi-scaling postulates a power-law type of scaling of spectral distribution functions of stationary processes of spatial averages, over nested and geometrically similar sub-regions of the spatial parameter space of a given spatio-temporal random field. Presently a new framework is formulated for down-scaling processes of spatial averages, following naturally from the postulate of spectral multi-scaling, and key ingredients required for its implementation are described. Moreover, results from an extensive diagnostic study are presented, seeking statistical evidence supportive of spectral multi-scaling. Such evidence emerges from two sources of data. One is a 13 year long historical record of radar observations of rainfall in southeastern UK (Chenies radar), with high spatial (2 km) and temporal (5 min) resolution. The other is an ensemble of rain rate fields simulated by a spatio-temporal random pulse model fitted to the historical data. The results are consistent between historical and simulated rainfall data, indicating frequency-dependent scaling relationships interpreted as evidence of spectral multi-scaling across a range of spatial scales.

  4. Spatio-temporal modulated polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaCasse, Charles F.; Ririe, Tyson; Chipman, Russell A.; Tyo, J. Scott

    2011-10-01

    Recently, a polarimetric data reduction technique has been developed that in the presence of a time varying signals and noise free measurement process can achieve an error free reconstruction provided that the signal was band limited. Error free reconstruction for such a signal is not possible using conventional data reduction methods. The new approach provides insight for processing arbitrary modulation schemes in space, time, and wavelength. Theory predicts that a polarimeter that employs a spatio-temporal modulation scheme may be able to use the high temporal resolution of a spatially modulated device combined with the high spatial resolution of a temporally modulated system to attain greater combined resolution capabilities than either modulation on scheme can produce alone. A polarimeter that contains both spatial and temporal modulation can be constructed (for example) by placing a rotating retarder in front of a micropolarizer array (microgrid). This study develops theory and analysis for the rotating retarder microgrid polarimeter to show how the available bandwidth for each channel is affected by additional dimensions of modulation and demonstrates a working polarimeter with a simulation of Stokes parameters that are band limited in both space and time with a noisy measurement process.

  5. Environmental surveillance of norovirus in Argentina revealed distinct viral diversity patterns, seasonality and spatio-temporal diffusion processes.

    PubMed

    Fernández, María D Blanco; Torres, Carolina; Poma, Hugo R; Riviello-López, Gabriela; Martínez, Laura C; Cisterna, Daniel M; Rajal, Verónica B; Nates, Silvia V; Mbayed, Viviana A

    2012-10-15

    Norovirus (NoV) contamination was evaluated in five rivers of Argentina between 2005 and 2011. NoV was present in all sampled rivers, with distinct NoV patterns in waters impacted by different-sized communities. In rivers affected by medium-sized populations (Salta and Córdoba cities) only one or two genotypes were present, GII.4 being the main one, with winter seasonality. In contrast, in the much more heavily populated area of Buenos Aires city the prevalent GII.4 was accompanied by several additional genotypes (GII.4, GII.b, GII.2, GII.7, GII.17, GII.e and GII.g) and one ungenotyped GII NoV, with no clear seasonality. GII.4 2006b was the main variant detected (60.9%). Phylogeographic and phylodynamic analyses performed in region D of the VP1 gene showed a most recent common ancestor in 2002 and a substitution rate of 3.7×10(-3) substitutions per site per year (HPD95%=2.3×10(-3)-5.2×10(-3)) for this variant still involving a significant population size with a slight decrease since 2008. The spatio-temporal diffusion analysis proposed Europe as an intermediate path between the American Continent and the rest of the World for NoV dissemination. Given the importance of NoV as a cause of epidemic gastroenteritis and the likelihood of its environmental transmission, the results of this work should increase public and institutional awareness of the health risk involved in sewage discharges into the environment. Environmental surveillance of enteric viruses could be a very useful tool not only to prevent waterborne outbreaks, but also to describe the epidemiology of the viruses. The detailed analysis of the viral genomes disposed into the environment contributed to the characterization of the dissemination, diversity and seasonality of NoV in its natural host population. In future studies, environmental surveillance and molecular analysis should be complemented with a quantitative viral risk assessment for estimating the disease burden from viruses in the environment. PMID:22944218

  6. Spatio-temporal action localization for human action recognition in large dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megrhi, Sameh; Jmal, Marwa; Beghdadi, Azeddine; Mseddi, Wided

    2015-03-01

    Human action recognition has drawn much attention in the field of video analysis. In this paper, we develop a human action detection and recognition process based on the tracking of Interest Points (IP) trajectory. A pre-processing step that performs spatio-temporal action detection is proposed. This step uses optical flow along with dense speed-up-robust-features (SURF) in order to detect and track moving humans in moving fields of view. The video description step is based on a fusion process that combines displacement and spatio-temporal descriptors. Experiments are carried out on the big data-set UCF-101. Experimental results reveal that the proposed techniques achieve better performances compared to many existing state-of-the-art action recognition approaches.

  7. INCORPORATING THE SPATIO-TEMPORAL DISTRIBUTION OF RAINFALL AND BASIN GEOMORPHOLOGY INTO NONLINEAR

    E-print Network

    Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    1 INCORPORATING THE SPATIO-TEMPORAL DISTRIBUTION OF RAINFALL AND BASIN GEOMORPHOLOGY INTO NONLINEAR streamflow series, spatio-temporal structure of precipitation and catchment geomorphology into a nonlinear of incorporating process-specific information (in terms of catchment geomorphology and an a-priori chosen

  8. A hybrid spatio-temporal data indexing method for trajectory databases.

    PubMed

    Ke, Shengnan; Gong, Jun; Li, Songnian; Zhu, Qing; Liu, Xintao; Zhang, Yeting

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been tremendous growth in the field of indoor and outdoor positioning sensors continuously producing huge volumes of trajectory data that has been used in many fields such as location-based services or location intelligence. Trajectory data is massively increased and semantically complicated, which poses a great challenge on spatio-temporal data indexing. This paper proposes a spatio-temporal data indexing method, named HBSTR-tree, which is a hybrid index structure comprising spatio-temporal R-tree, B*-tree and Hash table. To improve the index generation efficiency, rather than directly inserting trajectory points, we group consecutive trajectory points as nodes according to their spatio-temporal semantics and then insert them into spatio-temporal R-tree as leaf nodes. Hash table is used to manage the latest leaf nodes to reduce the frequency of insertion. A new spatio-temporal interval criterion and a new node-choosing sub-algorithm are also proposed to optimize spatio-temporal R-tree structures. In addition, a B*-tree sub-index of leaf nodes is built to query the trajectories of targeted objects efficiently. Furthermore, a database storage scheme based on a NoSQL-type DBMS is also proposed for the purpose of cloud storage. Experimental results prove that HBSTR-tree outperforms TB*-tree in some aspects such as generation efficiency, query performance and query type. PMID:25051028

  9. A Hybrid Spatio-Temporal Data Indexing Method for Trajectory Databases

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Shengnan; Gong, Jun; Li, Songnian; Zhu, Qing; Liu, Xintao; Zhang, Yeting

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been tremendous growth in the field of indoor and outdoor positioning sensors continuously producing huge volumes of trajectory data that has been used in many fields such as location-based services or location intelligence. Trajectory data is massively increased and semantically complicated, which poses a great challenge on spatio-temporal data indexing. This paper proposes a spatio-temporal data indexing method, named HBSTR-tree, which is a hybrid index structure comprising spatio-temporal R-tree, B*-tree and Hash table. To improve the index generation efficiency, rather than directly inserting trajectory points, we group consecutive trajectory points as nodes according to their spatio-temporal semantics and then insert them into spatio-temporal R-tree as leaf nodes. Hash table is used to manage the latest leaf nodes to reduce the frequency of insertion. A new spatio-temporal interval criterion and a new node-choosing sub-algorithm are also proposed to optimize spatio-temporal R-tree structures. In addition, a B*-tree sub-index of leaf nodes is built to query the trajectories of targeted objects efficiently. Furthermore, a database storage scheme based on a NoSQL-type DBMS is also proposed for the purpose of cloud storage. Experimental results prove that HBSTR-tree outperforms TB*-tree in some aspects such as generation efficiency, query performance and query type. PMID:25051028

  10. Art, Science and Architecture: Architecture as a Dynamic Process of Structuring Matter-Energy in the Spatio-Temporal World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minai, Asghar Talaye

    Developed were methods of coordinating art and science in relation to the creation of the physical form of the environment. Such an approach has been directed towards a theory of form based on point theory or field theory in architecture and deals with the problem of potentiality or dispositional properties. Part I, Towards a Sociology of…

  11. Post-Processing Free Spatio-Temporal Optical Random Number Generator Resilient to Hardware Failure and Signal Injection Attacks

    E-print Network

    Mario Stip?evi?; John Bowers

    2014-10-09

    We present a random number generator based on quantum effects in photonic emission and detection. It is unique in simultaneous use of both spatial and temporal quantum information contained in the system which makes it resilient to hardware failure and signal injection attacks. We show that its deviation from randomness cam be estimated based on simple measurements. Generated numbers pass NIST Statistical test suite without post-processing.

  12. The effect of spatio-temporal distance between visual stimuli on information processing in children with Specific Language Impairment.

    PubMed

    Dispaldro, Marco; Corradi, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI) have a deficit in processing a sequence of two visual stimuli (S1 and S2) presented at different inter-stimulus intervals and in different spatial locations. In particular, the core of this study is to investigate whether S1 identification is disrupted due to a retroactive interference of S2. To this aim, two experiments were planned in which children with SLI and children with typical development (TD), matched by age and non-verbal IQ, were compared (Experiment 1: SLI n=19; TD n=19; Experiment 2: SLI n=16; TD n=16). Results show group differences in the ability to identify a single stimulus surrounded by flankers (Baseline level). Moreover, children with SLI show a stronger negative interference of S2, both for temporal and spatial modulation. These results are discussed in the light of an attentional processing limitation in children with SLI. PMID:26277740

  13. A multivariate statistical approach to identify the spatio-temporal variation of geochemical process in a hard rock aquifer.

    PubMed

    Thivya, C; Chidambaram, S; Thilagavathi, R; Prasanna, M V; Singaraja, C; Adithya, V S; Nepolian, M

    2015-09-01

    A study has been carried out in crystalline hard rock aquifers of Madurai district, Tamil Nadu, to identify the spatial and temporal variations and to understand sources responsible for hydrogeochemical processes in the region. Totally, 216 samples were collected for four seasons [premonsoon (PRM), southwest monsoon (SWM), northeast monsoon (NWM), and postmonsoon (POM)]. The Na and K ions are attributed from weathering of feldspars in charnockite and fissile hornblende gneiss. The results also indicate that monsoon leaches the U ions in the groundwater and later it is reflected in the (222)Rn levels also. The statistical relationship on the temporal data reflects the fact that Ca, Mg, Na, Cl, HCO3, and SO4 form the spinal species, which are the chief ions playing the significant role in the geochemistry of the region. The factor loadings of the temporal data reveal the fact that the predominant factor is anthropogenic process and followed by natural weathering and U dissolution. The spatial analysis of the temporal data reveals that weathering is prominent in the NW part and that of distribution of U and (222)Rn along the NE part of the study area. This is also reflected in the cluster analysis, and it is understood that lithology, land use pattern, lineaments, and groundwater flow direction determine the spatial variation of these ions with respect to season. PMID:26239570

  14. a Spatio-Temporal Framework for Modeling Active Layer Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touyz, J.; Streletskiy, D. A.; Nelson, F. E.; Apanasovich, T. V.

    2015-07-01

    The Arctic is experiencing an unprecedented rate of environmental and climate change. The active layer (the uppermost layer of soil between the atmosphere and permafrost that freezes in winter and thaws in summer) is sensitive to both climatic and environmental changes, and plays an important role in the functioning, planning, and economic activities of Arctic human and natural ecosystems. This study develops a methodology for modeling and estimating spatial-temporal variations in active layer thickness (ALT) using data from several sites of the Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring network, and demonstrates its use in spatial-temporal interpolation. The simplest model's stochastic component exhibits no spatial or spatio-temporal dependency and is referred to as the naïve model, against which we evaluate the performance of the other models, which assume that the stochastic component exhibits either spatial or spatio-temporal dependency. The methods used to fit the models are then discussed, along with point forecasting. We compare the predicted fit of the various models at key study sites located in the North Slope of Alaska and demonstrate the advantages of space-time models through a series of error statistics such as mean squared error, mean absolute and percent deviance from observed data. We find the difference in performance between the spatio-temporal and remaining models is significant for all three error statistics. The best stochastic spatio-temporal model increases predictive accuracy, compared to the naïve model, of 33.3%, 36.2% and 32.5% on average across the three error metrics at the key sites for a one-year hold out period.

  15. Spatio-temporal Feature Recogntion using Randomised Ferns

    E-print Network

    Bowden, Richard

    Spatio-temporal Feature Recogntion using Randomised Ferns Olusegun Oshin, Andrew Gilbert, John Bayesian classifier of Ferns to the spatio-temporal domain and learn clas- sifiers that duplicate video sequence. We extend a Naive Bayesian classifier called Ferns [1] to the spatio-temporal domain

  16. Mapping spatio-temporal filtering algorithms used in fluoroscopy to single core and multicore DSP architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Udayan; Ali, Murtaza

    2011-03-01

    Low dose X-ray image sequences, as obtained in fluoroscopy, exhibit high levels of noise that must be suppressed in real-time, while preserving diagnostic structures. Multi-step adaptive filtering approaches, often involving spatio-temporal filters, are typically used to achieve this goal. In this work typical fluoroscopic image sequences, corrupted with Poisson noise, were processed using various filtering schemes. The noise suppression of the schemes was evaluated using objective image quality measures. Two adaptive spatio-temporal schemes, the first one using object detection and the second one using unsharp masking, were chosen as representative approaches for different fluoroscopy procedures and mapped on to Texas Instrument's (TI) high performance digital signal processors (DSP). The paper explains the fixed point design of these algorithms and evaluates its impact on overall system performance. The fixed point versions of these algorithms are mapped onto the C64x+TM core using instruction-level parallelism to effectively use its VLIW architecture. The overall data flow was carefully planned to reduce cache and data movement overhead, while working with large medical data sets. Apart from mapping these algorithms on to TI's single core DSP architecture, this work also distributes the operations to leverage multi-core DSP architectures. The data arrangement and flow were optimized to minimize inter-processor messaging and data movement overhead.

  17. Spatio-temporal dynamics induced by competing instabilities in two asymmetrically coupled nonlinear evolution equations

    SciTech Connect

    Schüler, D.; Alonso, S.; Bär, M.; Torcini, A.

    2014-12-15

    Pattern formation often occurs in spatially extended physical, biological, and chemical systems due to an instability of the homogeneous steady state. The type of the instability usually prescribes the resulting spatio-temporal patterns and their characteristic length scales. However, patterns resulting from the simultaneous occurrence of instabilities cannot be expected to be simple superposition of the patterns associated with the considered instabilities. To address this issue, we design two simple models composed by two asymmetrically coupled equations of non-conserved (Swift-Hohenberg equations) or conserved (Cahn-Hilliard equations) order parameters with different characteristic wave lengths. The patterns arising in these systems range from coexisting static patterns of different wavelengths to traveling waves. A linear stability analysis allows to derive a two parameter phase diagram for the studied models, in particular, revealing for the Swift-Hohenberg equations, a co-dimension two bifurcation point of Turing and wave instability and a region of coexistence of stationary and traveling patterns. The nonlinear dynamics of the coupled evolution equations is investigated by performing accurate numerical simulations. These reveal more complex patterns, ranging from traveling waves with embedded Turing patterns domains to spatio-temporal chaos, and a wide hysteretic region, where waves or Turing patterns coexist. For the coupled Cahn-Hilliard equations the presence of a weak coupling is sufficient to arrest the coarsening process and to lead to the emergence of purely periodic patterns. The final states are characterized by domains with a characteristic length, which diverges logarithmically with the coupling amplitude.

  18. Spatio-temporal dynamics in the origin of genetic information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pan-Jun; Jeong, Hawoong

    2005-04-01

    We study evolutionary processes induced by spatio-temporal dynamics in prebiotic evolution. Using numerical simulations, we demonstrate that hypercycles emerge from complex interaction structures in multispecies systems. In this work, we also find that ‘hypercycle hybrid’ protects the hypercycle from its environment during the growth process. There is little selective advantage for one hypercycle to maintain coexistence with others. This brings the possibility of the outcompetition between hypercycles resulting in the negative effect on information diversity. To enrich the information in hypercycles, symbiosis with parasites is suggested. It is shown that symbiosis with parasites can play an important role in the prebiotic immunology.

  19. Spatio-temporal Hotelling observer for signal detection from image sequences

    PubMed Central

    Caucci, Luca; Barrett, Harrison H.; Rodríguez, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    Detection of signals in noisy images is necessary in many applications, including astronomy and medical imaging. The optimal linear observer for performing a detection task, called the Hotelling observer in the medical literature, can be regarded as a generalization of the familiar prewhitening matched filter. Performance on the detection task is limited by randomness in the image data, which stems from randomness in the object, randomness in the imaging system, and randomness in the detector outputs due to photon and readout noise, and the Hotelling observer accounts for all of these effects in an optimal way. If multiple temporal frames of images are acquired, the resulting data set is a spatio-temporal random process, and the Hotelling observer becomes a spatio-temporal linear operator. This paper discusses the theory of the spatio-temporal Hotelling observer and estimation of the required spatio-temporal covariance matrices. It also presents a parallel implementation of the observer on a cluster of Sony PLAYSTATION 3 gaming consoles. As an example, we consider the use of the spatio-temporal Hotelling observer for exoplanet detection. PMID:19550494

  20. Spatio-temporal Hotelling observer for signal detection from image sequences.

    PubMed

    Caucci, Luca; Barrett, Harrison H; Rodriguez, Jeffrey J

    2009-06-22

    Detection of signals in noisy images is necessary in many applications, including astronomy and medical imaging. The optimal linear observer for performing a detection task, called the Hotelling observer in the medical literature, can be regarded as a generalization of the familiar prewhitening matched filter. Performance on the detection task is limited by randomness in the image data, which stems from randomness in the object, randomness in the imaging system, and randomness in the detector outputs due to photon and readout noise, and the Hotelling observer accounts for all of these effects in an optimal way. If multiple temporal frames of images are acquired, the resulting data set is a spatio-temporal random process, and the Hotelling observer becomes a spatio-temporal linear operator. This paper discusses the theory of the spatio-temporal Hotelling observer and estimation of the required spatio-temporal covariance matrices. It also presents a parallel implementation of the observer on a cluster of Sony PLAYSTATION 3 gaming consoles. As an example, we consider the use of the spatio-temporal Hotelling observer for exoplanet detection. PMID:19550494

  1. Integrating satellite imagery and geostatistics of point samples for monitoring spatio-temporal changes of total suspended solids in bay waters: application to Tien Yen Bay (Northern Vietnam)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Nguyen Thi Thu; Koike, Katsuaki

    2011-09-01

    High concentrations of total suspended solids (TSS) in coastal and bay areas strongly affect water quality and aquatic ecosystems. Frequent monitoring of spatiotemporal changes of TSS distribution in such areas is indispensable for understanding sediment fluxes and water cycles, and to preserve ecosystem health. This study aimed to identify appropriate and sufficient tools for assessing changes in TSS distribution in Tien Yen Bay in Northern Vietnam, a typical closed bay, which was selected as the study area because of its rich biodiversity. Initially, a physical based model using the reflectance at the sea surface was developed for estimating TSS concentrations from satellite image data, and a model with an exponential function was identified as suitable for the estimation. This model was fitted appropriately to provide a relationship between reflectance from the MODIS/Terra band 1 (visible red) after the atmospheric correction and the in situ TSS concentrations at 40 points. Ordinary kriging was then shown to be effective in improving the spatial resolution of the MODIS/Terra image-based estimation of the TSS concentration at a 250 m interval, because it could detect TSS variation in detail, in particular in the local estuaries. TSS distributions derived from 12 MODIS/Terra images from November 2009 to October 2010 clarified seasonal changes in TSS during one year. TSS concentrations were high during summer and lower during fall and winter. Such trends were conformable with the hydrodynamics in Tien Yen Bay. Consequently, the proposed method was more effective for TSS estimation than traditional methods using satellite image data only.

  2. Risk management in spatio-temporally varying field by true slime mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Kentaro; Sumpter, David; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    Revealing how lower organisms solve complicated problems is a challenging research area, which could reveal the evolutionary origin of biological information processing. Here we report on the ability of a single-celled organism, true slime mold, to find a smart solution of risk management under spatio-temporally varying conditions. We designed test conditions under which there were three food-locations at vertices of equilateral triangle and a toxic light illuminated the organism on alternating halves of the triangle. We found that the organism behavior depended on the period of the repeated illumination, even though the total exposure time was kept the same . A simple mathematical model for the experimental results is proposed from a dynamical system point of view. We discuss our results in the context of a strategy of risk management by Physarum.

  3. Spatio-Temporal Wafer-Level Correlation Modeling with Progressive Sampling: A Pathway to HVM

    E-print Network

    Makris, Yiorgos

    Spatio-Temporal Wafer-Level Correlation Modeling with Progressive Sampling: A Pathway to HVM Yield Abstract--Wafer-level spatial correlation modeling of probe- test measurements has been explored of a popular Gaussian process-based wafer-level spatial correlation method through two key enhancements: (i

  4. A Generalized Low-Rank Appearance Model for Spatio-Temporally Correlated Rain Streaks

    E-print Network

    Hsu, Chiou-Ting Candy

    A Generalized Low-Rank Appearance Model for Spatio-Temporally Correlated Rain Streaks Yi-Lei Chen rain streaks, just exploit the repeatability/similarity of rain steaks taken in the same scene! Our advantages:(1) no pre-processing (e.g., rain detection); (2) training-free (e.g., dictionary learning

  5. Spatio-temporal analysis of eukaryotic cell motility by improved force cytometry

    E-print Network

    Firtel, Richard A.

    Spatio-temporal analysis of eukaryotic cell motility by improved force cytometry Juan C. del A myosin traction forces cytoskeleton chemotaxis Motility of eukaryotic cells is essential for many, and mechanical processes involved in eukaryotic cell motility, it has been suggested that cells perform a limited

  6. BLIND EQUALIZATION OF SIMO CHANNELS VIA SPATIO-TEMPORAL ANTI-HEBBIAN

    E-print Network

    Cichocki, Andrzej

    BLIND EQUALIZATION OF SIMO CHANNELS VIA SPATIO-TEMPORAL ANTI-HEBBIAN LEARNING RULE Seungjin CHOIy distributed processing ap- proach to \\direct" blind equalization of Single Input Multiple Out- put (SIMO Blind equalization is an emerging eld of fundamental research for numer- ous applications in digital

  7. I want my coffee hot! Learning to find people under spatio-temporal constraints

    E-print Network

    Arras, Kai O.

    I want my coffee hot! Learning to find people under spatio-temporal constraints Gian Diego Tipaldi of people. The model, called spatial affordance map, is a non-homogeneous spatial Poisson process time estimation. They further show that the proposed algorithm is able to find optimal paths. I

  8. On fitting spatio-temporal disease mapping models using approximate Bayesian inference.

    PubMed

    Ugarte, María Dolores; Adin, Aritz; Goicoa, Tomas; Militino, Ana Fernandez

    2014-12-01

    Spatio-temporal disease mapping comprises a wide range of models used to describe the distribution of a disease in space and its evolution in time. These models have been commonly formulated within a hierarchical Bayesian framework with two main approaches: an empirical Bayes (EB) and a fully Bayes (FB) approach. The EB approach provides point estimates of the parameters relying on the well-known penalized quasi-likelihood (PQL) technique. The FB approach provides the posterior distribution of the target parameters. These marginal distributions are not usually available in closed form and common estimation procedures are based on Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods. However, the spatio-temporal models used in disease mapping are often very complex and MCMC methods may lead to large Monte Carlo errors and a huge computation time if the dimension of the data at hand is large. To circumvent these potential inconveniences, a new technique called integrated nested Laplace approximations (INLA), based on nested Laplace approximations, has been proposed for Bayesian inference in latent Gaussian models. In this paper, we show how to fit different spatio-temporal models for disease mapping with INLA using the Leroux CAR prior for the spatial component, and we compare it with PQL via a simulation study. The spatio-temporal distribution of male brain cancer mortality in Spain during the period 1986-2010 is also analysed. PMID:24713158

  9. Spatio-temporal autocorrelation measures for nonstationary series: A new temporally detrended spatio-temporal Moran's index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chenhua; Li, Chaoling; Si, Yali

    2016-01-01

    In order to measure the spatio-temporal autocorrelation's degree for spatio-temporal nonstationary series, the new temporally detrended global and local spatio-temporal Moran's indexes (TDGSTI and TDLSTI) are proposed. The implementation of the new Moran's indexes is illustrated through artificial and real examples. Analyses of the influencing factors on TDGSTI are performed. A statistical test of TDGSTI is taken. The Moran's scatter plot, which discloses the spatio-temporal cluster pattern's characteristics and pattern's change, is extended. TDGSTI is found to reveal the autocorrelation level of spatio-temporal objects. For a positive TDGSTI, the higher the TDGSTI, the higher the autocorrelation level, and vice versa. TDGSTI is closely related to time-scale s, time-lag h and spatio-temporal weight matrix. For s ? h, TDGSTI is significant, while for s ? h and s < h, TDGSTI is insignificant. TDGSTI has clear potential to test the spatio-temporal autocorrelation's degree for spatio-temporal nonstationary series in other research fields.

  10. The spatio-temporal signatures of category-selective responses to natural images as evidenced with fast periodic visual stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Corentin; Retter, Talia; Rossion, Bruno

    2015-09-01

    Humans are extremely rapid at categorizing visual inputs, an ability which relies on occipito-temporal brain processes. Functional neuroimaging studies have identified the spatial organization of neural responses in these regions to ecologically-relevant categories such as faces, bodyparts or houses. However, much less is known about the spatio-temporal dynamics of these category-selective responses at the system level of organization. Here we investigate this issue by recording scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) during fast periodic visual stimulation (FPVS) with natural images (Rossion et al., 2015). Eleven subjects viewed 60 seconds sequences of natural images of various object categories displayed at a base frequency of 6 Hz (6 images/second), in which images of either faces, bodyparts or houses appeared every 5 images (oddball frequency =6Hz/5 =1.2Hz). Category-selective oddball responses manifest at the 1.2Hz oddball frequency and harmonics (2.4Hz, 3.6Hz, etc.). While significant oddball responses were observed for all categories over occipito-temporal regions, responses were much stronger for faces than for limbs and houses. Further, scalp topography pattern analyses point to distinct neural sources across category-selective responses, with responses to faces, bodyparts and houses respectively maximal at ventral occipito-temporal, lateral occipito-temporal, and dorso-medial occipital channels. Time-domain analyses indicate that EEG responses are dissociable across categories at multiple spatio-temporal windows from around 110ms to 500ms post-stimulus onset, with faces eliciting up to five distinct selective responses. These observations go well beyond traditional face-selective EEG responses as identified using transient stimulus presentation (i.e., N170) by indicating that multiple ecologically-relevant categories generate unique spatio-temporal signatures over posterior scalp regions. Finally, these findings highlight the power of the FPVS approach to reveal the spatio-temporal signatures of high-level visual processing at the system level. Rossion, B., et al. (2015). Fast periodic presentation of natural images reveals a robust face-selective electrophysiological response in the human brain. Journal of Vision. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326380

  11. Design and implementation of spatio-temporal database of water and soil loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, XinHai; Bian, Fulin; Tan, Xiaojun

    2008-12-01

    This paper analyzed the features and limitations of several typical spatio-temporal data models. "spatio-temporal cube": the main disadvantage is that the target change will produce great data redundancy when under non-consecutive circumstances. "Snapshots": it repeatedly saves graphics and attribute of no changes which resulted in waste of storage spaces, and it is impossible to reflect space objects under the same domain and the relationship between the attributes. "Base State with Amendments": merely modify changing object, but it's not suitable for continuous variation space object. "space-frame composite": currently, the model is lacking of sound framework structure and application model. "Object-oriented spatio-temporal model": The modeling concept, theoretical foundation and technical realization has not yet reached a consensus, it's not mature enough. In allusion to the features of the spatial database of water and soil loss, this essay expounded the characteristics of spatiotemporal databases. Spatial features in many practical circumstances ( such as thematic maps in soil and water conservation projects and space elements of soil erosion distribution map) have spatial data features, and also change with time, consequently, required us to establish spatio-temporal database, STDB, which can capture time data and space data at the same time. This analysis based on "ArcSDE versioning mechanisms" temporal and spatial database implement technologies, discussed the construction methods, process and data features of the database, and introduced the implementation of historical data rebuilding and version merging.

  12. Spatio-Temporal Clustering of Monitoring Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, I.; Pilz, J.

    2009-04-01

    Pakistan has much diversity in seasonal variation of different locations. Some areas are in desserts and remain very hot and waterless, for example coastal areas are situated along the Arabian Sea and have very warm season and a little rainfall. Some areas are covered with mountains, have very low temperature and heavy rainfall; for instance Karakoram ranges. The most important variables that have an impact on the climate are temperature, precipitation, humidity, wind speed and elevation. Furthermore, it is hard to find homogeneous regions in Pakistan with respect to climate variation. Identification of homogeneous regions in Pakistan can be useful in many aspects. It can be helpful for prediction of the climate in the sub-regions and for optimizing the number of monitoring sites. In the earlier literature no one tried to identify homogeneous regions of Pakistan with respect to climate variation. There are only a few papers about spatio-temporal clustering of monitoring network. Steinhaus (1956) presented the well-known K-means clustering method. It can identify a predefined number of clusters by iteratively assigning centriods to clusters based. Castro et al. (1997) developed a genetic heuristic algorithm to solve medoids based clustering. Their method is based on genetic recombination upon random assorting recombination. The suggested method is appropriate for clustering the attributes which have genetic characteristics. Sap and Awan (2005) presented a robust weighted kernel K-means algorithm incorporating spatial constraints for clustering climate data. The proposed algorithm can effectively handle noise, outliers and auto-correlation in the spatial data, for effective and efficient data analysis by exploring patterns and structures in the data. Soltani and Modarres (2006) used hierarchical and divisive cluster analysis to categorize patterns of rainfall in Iran. They only considered rainfall at twenty-eight monitoring sites and concluded that eight clusters existed. Soltani and Modarres (2006) classified the sites by using only average rainfall of sites, they did not consider time replications and spatial coordinates. Kerby et.al (2007) purposed spatial clustering method based on likelihood. They took account of the geographic locations through the variance covariance matrix. Their purposed method works like hierarchical clustering methods. Moreovere, it is inappropiriate for time replication data and could not perform well for large number of sites. Tuia.et.al (2008) used scan statistics for identifying spatio-temporal clusters for fire sequences in the Tuscany region in Italy. The scan statistics clustering method was developed by Kulldorff et al. (1997) to detect spatio-temporal clusters in epidemiology and assessing their significance. The purposed scan statistics method is used only for univariate discrete stochastic random variables. In this paper we make use of a very simple approach for spatio-temporal clustering which can create separable and homogeneous clusters. Most of the clustering methods are based on Euclidean distances. It is well known that geographic coordinates are spherical coordinates and estimating Euclidean distances from spherical coordinates is inappropriate. As a transformation from geographic coordinates to rectangular (D-plane) coordinates we use the Lambert projection method. The partition around medoids clustering method is incorporated on the data including D-plane coordinates. Ordinary kriging is taken as validity measure for the precipitation data. The kriging results for clusters are more accurate and have less variation compared to complete monitoring network precipitation data. References Casto.V.E and Murray.A.T (1997). Spatial Clustering with Data Mining with Genetic Algorithms. http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.56.8573 Kaufman.L and Rousseeuw.P.J (1990). Finding Groups in Data: An Introduction to Cluster Analysis. Wiley series of Probability and Mathematical Statistics, New York. Kulldorf.M (1997). A spatial scan statistic. Commun. Stat.-Theor. Math. 26(6)

  13. Sensor Web for Spatio-Temporal Monitoring of a Hydrological Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delin, K. A.; Jackson, S. P.; Johnson, D. W.; Burleigh, S. C.; Woodrow, R. R.; McAuley, M.; Britton, J. T.; Dohm, J. M.; Ferre, T. P. A.; Ip, Felipe

    2004-01-01

    The Sensor Web is a macroinstrument concept that allows for the spatio-temporal understanding of an environment through coordinated efforts between multiple numbers and types of sensing platforms, including, in its most general form, both orbital and terrestrial and both fixed and mobile. Each of these platforms, or pods, communicates within its local neighborhood and thus distributes information to the instrument as a whole. The result of sharing and continual processing of this information among all the Sensor Web elements will result in an information flow and a global perception of and reactive capability to the environment. As illustrated, the Sensor Web concept also allows for the recursive notion of a web of webs with individual distributed instruments possibly playing the role of a single node point on a larger Sensor Web instrument. In particular, the fusion of inexpensive, yet sophisticated, commercial technology from both the computation and telecommunication revolutions has enabled the development of practical, fielded, and embedded in situ systems that have been the focus of the NASA/JPL Sensor Webs Project (http://sensorwebs.jpl.nasa.gov/). These Sensor Webs are complete systems consisting of not only the pod elements that wirelessly communicate among themselves, but also interfacing and archiving software that allows for easy use by the end-user. Previous successful deployments have included environments as diverse as coastal regions, Antarctica, and desert areas. The Sensor Web has broad implications for Earth and planetary science and will revolutionize the way experiments and missions are conceived and performed. As part of our current efforts to develop a macrointelligence within the system, we have deployed a Sensor Web at the Central Avra Valley Storage and Recovery Project (CAVSARP) facility located west of Tucson, AZ. This particular site was selected because it is ideal for studying spatio-temporal phenomena and for providing a test site for more sophisticated hydrological studies in the future.

  14. SuperFly: a comparative database for quantified spatio-temporal gene expression patterns in early dipteran embryos.

    PubMed

    Cicin-Sain, Damjan; Pulido, Antonio Hermoso; Crombach, Anton; Wotton, Karl R; Jiménez-Guri, Eva; Taly, Jean-François; Roma, Guglielmo; Jaeger, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    We present SuperFly (http://superfly.crg.eu), a relational database for quantified spatio-temporal expression data of segmentation genes during early development in different species of dipteran insects (flies, midges and mosquitoes). SuperFly has a special focus on emerging non-drosophilid model systems. The database currently includes data of high spatio-temporal resolution for three species: the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster, the scuttle fly Megaselia abdita and the moth midge Clogmia albipunctata. At this point, SuperFly covers up to 9 genes and 16 time points per species, with a total of 1823 individual embryos. It provides an intuitive web interface, enabling the user to query and access original embryo images, quantified expression profiles, extracted positions of expression boundaries and integrated datasets, plus metadata and intermediate processing steps. SuperFly is a valuable new resource for the quantitative comparative study of gene expression patterns across dipteran species. Moreover, it provides an interesting test set for systems biologists interested in fitting mathematical gene network models to data. Both of these aspects are essential ingredients for progress toward a more quantitative and mechanistic understanding of developmental evolution. PMID:25404137

  15. Spatio-temporal characteristics of Trichel pulse at low pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shoujie; Jing, Ha

    2014-01-01

    Trichel pulses are investigated using a needle-to-plane electrode geometry at low pressure. The evolution of current and voltage, the spatio-temporal discharge images of Trichel pulse are measured. The rising time and duration time in a pulse are about 10 ?s and several tens of microseconds, respectively. One period of pulse can be divided into three stages: the stage preceding cathode breakdown, cathode glow formation, and discharge decaying process. Besides a cathode glow and a dark space, an anode glow is also observed. The emission spectra mainly originate from the C3?u ? B3?g transition for nitrogen. In addition, the capacitances in parallel connected with the discharge cell have important influence on the pulsing frequency.

  16. A spatio-temporal extension to the map cube operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzate, Juan C.; Moreno, Francisco J.; Echeverri, Jaime

    2012-09-01

    OLAP (On Line Analytical Processing) is a set of techniques and operators to facilitate the data analysis usually stored in a data warehouse. In this paper, we extend the functionality of an OLAP operator known as Map Cube with the definition and incorporation of a function that allows the formulation of spatio-temporal queries. For example, consider a data warehouse about crimes that includes data about the places where the crimes were committed. Suppose we want to find and visualize the trajectory (a trajectory is just the path that an object follows through space as a function of time) of the crimes of a suspect beginning with his oldest crime and ending with his most recent one. In order to meet this requirement, we extend the Map Cube operator.

  17. Spatio-temporal characteristics of Trichel pulse at low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    He, Shoujie; Jing, Ha

    2014-01-15

    Trichel pulses are investigated using a needle-to-plane electrode geometry at low pressure. The evolution of current and voltage, the spatio-temporal discharge images of Trichel pulse are measured. The rising time and duration time in a pulse are about 10??s and several tens of microseconds, respectively. One period of pulse can be divided into three stages: the stage preceding cathode breakdown, cathode glow formation, and discharge decaying process. Besides a cathode glow and a dark space, an anode glow is also observed. The emission spectra mainly originate from the C{sup 3}?{sub u} ? B{sup 3}?{sub g} transition for nitrogen. In addition, the capacitances in parallel connected with the discharge cell have important influence on the pulsing frequency.

  18. Spatio-temporal population estimates for risk management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockings, Samantha; Martin, David; Smith, Alan; Martin, Rebecca

    2013-04-01

    Accurate estimation of population at risk from hazards and effective emergency management of events require not just appropriate spatio-temporal modelling of hazards but also of population. While much recent effort has been focused on improving the modelling and predictions of hazards (both natural and anthropogenic), there has been little parallel advance in the measurement or modelling of population statistics. Different hazard types occur over diverse temporal cycles, are of varying duration and differ significantly in their spatial extent. Even events of the same hazard type, such as flood events, vary markedly in their spatial and temporal characteristics. Conceptually and pragmatically then, population estimates should also be available for similarly varying spatio-temporal scales. Routine population statistics derived from traditional censuses or surveys are usually static representations in both space and time, recording people at their place of usual residence on census/survey night and presenting data for administratively defined areas. Such representations effectively fix the scale of population estimates in both space and time, which is unhelpful for meaningful risk management. Over recent years, the Pop24/7 programme of research, based at the University of Southampton (UK), has developed a framework for spatio-temporal modelling of population, based on gridded population surfaces. Based on a data model which is fully flexible in terms of space and time, the framework allows population estimates to be produced for any time slice relevant to the data contained in the model. It is based around a set of origin and destination centroids, which have capacities, spatial extents and catchment areas, all of which can vary temporally, such as by time of day, day of week, season. A background layer, containing information on features such as transport networks and landuse, provides information on the likelihood of people being in certain places at specific times. Unusual patterns associated with special events can also be modelled and the framework is fully volume preserving. Outputs from the model are gridded population surfaces for the specified time slice, either for total population or by sub-groups (e.g. age). Software to implement the models (SurfaceBuilder247) has been developed and pre-processed layers for typical time slices for England and Wales in 2001 and 2006 are available for UK academic purposes. The outputs and modelling framework from the Pop24/7 programme provide significant opportunities for risk management applications. For estimates of mid- to long-term cumulative population exposure to hazards, such as in flood risk mapping, populations can be produced for numerous time slices and integrated with flood models. For applications in emergency response/ management, time-specific population models can be used as seeds for agent-based models or other response/behaviour models. Estimates for sub-groups of the population also permit exploration of vulnerability through space and time. This paper outlines the requirements for effective spatio-temporal population models for risk management. It then describes the Pop24/7 framework and illustrates its potential for risk management through presentation of examples from natural and anthropogenic hazard applications. The paper concludes by highlighting key challenges for future research in this area.

  19. A LANGUAGE FOR MODULAR SPATIO-TEMPORAL SIMULATION (R824766)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Creating an effective environment for collaborative spatio-temporal model development will require computational systems that provide support for the user in three key areas: (1) Support for modular, hierarchical model construction and archiving/linking of simulation modules; (2)...

  20. Spatio-temporal registration of multiple trajectories.

    PubMed

    Padoy, Nicolas; Hager, Gregory D

    2011-01-01

    A growing number of medical datasets now contain both a spatial and a temporal dimension. Trajectories, from tools or body features, are thus becoming increasingly important for their analysis. In this paper, we are interested in recovering the spatial and temporal differences between trajectories coming from different datasets. In particular, we address the case of surgical gestures, where trajectories contain both spatial transformations and speed differences in the execution. We first define the spatio-temporal registration problem between multiple trajectories. We then propose an optimization method to jointly recover both the rigid spatial motions and the non-linear time warpings. The optimization generates also a generic trajectory template, in which spatial and temporal differences have been factored out. This approach can be potentially used to register and compare gestures side-by-side for training sessions, to build gesture trajectory models for automation by a robot, or to register the trajectories of natural or artificial markers which follow similar motions. We demonstrate its usefulness with synthetic and real experiments. In particular, we register and analyze complex surgical gestures performed by tele-manipulation using the da Vinci robot. PMID:22003611

  1. Unavoidable Errors: A Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Time-Course and Neural Sources of Evoked Potentials Associated with Error Processing in a Speeded Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vocat, Roland; Pourtois, Gilles; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2008-01-01

    The detection of errors is known to be associated with two successive neurophysiological components in EEG, with an early time-course following motor execution: the error-related negativity (ERN/Ne) and late positivity (Pe). The exact cognitive and physiological processes contributing to these two EEG components, as well as their functional…

  2. 1696 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUDIO, SPEECH, AND LANGUAGE PROCESSING, VOL. 15, NO. 5, JULY 2007 Short-Term SpatioTemporal Clustering Applied

    E-print Network

    Odobez, Jean-Marc

    and browsing, surveillance, hearing aids, and more natural human­machine interaction. Such applications-Marc Odobez, Member, IEEE Abstract--Distant microphones permit to process spontaneous multiparty speech with very little constraints on speakers, as opposed to close-talking microphones. Minimizing

  3. Dynamic design of ecological monitoring networks for non-Gaussian spatio-temporal data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wikle, C.K.; Royle, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Many ecological processes exhibit spatial structure that changes over time in a coherent, dynamical fashion. This dynamical component is often ignored in the design of spatial monitoring networks. Furthermore, ecological variables related to processes such as habitat are often non-Gaussian (e.g. Poisson or log-normal). We demonstrate that a simulation-based design approach can be used in settings where the data distribution is from a spatio-temporal exponential family. The key random component in the conditional mean function from this distribution is then a spatio-temporal dynamic process. Given the computational burden of estimating the expected utility of various designs in this setting, we utilize an extended Kalman filter approximation to facilitate implementation. The approach is motivated by, and demonstrated on, the problem of selecting sampling locations to estimate July brood counts in the prairie pothole region of the U.S.

  4. Spatio-temporal dynamics of biogeochemical processes and air-sea CO2 fluxes in the Western English Channel based on two years of FerryBox deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrec, P.; Cariou, T.; Latimier, M.; Macé, E.; Morin, P.; Vernet, M.; Bozec, Y.

    2014-12-01

    From January 2011 to January 2013, a FerryBox system was installed on a Voluntary Observing Ship (VOS), which crossed the Western English Channel (WEC) between Roscoff (France) and Plymouth (UK) up to 3 times a day. The FerryBox continuously measured sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface salinity (SSS), dissolved oxygen (DO), fluorescence and partial pressure of CO2 (from April 2012) along the ferry track. Sensors were calibrated based on 714 bimonthly surface samplings with precisions of 0.016 for SSS, 3.3 ?M for DO, 0.40 ?g L- 1 for Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) (based on fluorescence measurements) and 5.2 ?atm for pCO2. Over the 2 years of deployment (900 crossings), we reported 9% of data lost due to technical issues and quality checked data was obtained to allow investigation of the dynamics of biogeochemical processes related to air-sea CO2 fluxes in the WEC. Based on this unprecedented high-frequency dataset, the physical structure of the WEC was assessed using SST anomalies and the presence of a thermal front was observed around the latitude 49.5°N, which divided the WEC in two main provinces: the seasonally stratified northern WEC (nWEC) and the all-year well-mixed southern WEC (sWEC). These hydrographical properties strongly influenced the spatial and inter-annual distributions of phytoplankton blooms, which were mainly limited by nutrients and light availability in the nWEC and the sWEC, respectively. Air-sea CO2 fluxes were also highly related to hydrographical properties of the WEC between late April and early September 2012, with the sWEC a weak source of CO2 to the atmosphere of 0.9 mmol m- 2 d- 1, whereas the nWEC acted as a sink for atmospheric CO2 of 6.9 mmol m- 2 d- 1. The study of short time-scale dynamics of air-sea CO2 fluxes revealed that an intense and short (less than 10 days) summer bloom in the nWEC contributed to 29% of the CO2 sink during the productive period, highlighting the necessity for high frequency observations in coastal ecosystems. During the same period in the sWEC, the tidal cycle was the main driver of air-sea CO2 fluxes with a mean difference in pCO2 values between spring and neap tides of + 50 ?atm. An extraction of day/night data at 49.90°N showed that the mean day-night differences accounted for 16% of the mean CO2 sink during the 5 months of the study period implying that the diel biological cycle was also significant for air-sea CO2 flux computations. The 2 years of deployment of our FerryBox allowed an excellent survey of the variability of biogeochemical parameters from inter-annual to diurnal time scales and provided new insights into the dynamics of air-sea CO2 fluxes in the contrasted ecosystems of the WEC.

  5. Decomposition of the complex system into nonlinear spatio-temporal modes: algorithm and application to climate data mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigin, Alexander; Gavrilov, Andrey; Loskutov, Evgeny; Mukhin, Dmitry

    2015-04-01

    Proper decomposition of the complex system into well separated "modes" is a way to reveal and understand the mechanisms governing the system behaviour as well as discover essential feedbacks and nonlinearities. The decomposition is also natural procedure that provides to construct adequate and concurrently simplest models of both corresponding sub-systems, and of the system in whole. In recent works two new methods of decomposition of the Earth's climate system into well separated modes were discussed. The first method [1-3] is based on the MSSA (Multichannel Singular Spectral Analysis) [4] for linear expanding vector (space-distributed) time series and makes allowance delayed correlations of the processes recorded in spatially separated points. The second one [5-7] allows to construct nonlinear dynamic modes, but neglects delay of correlations. It was demonstrated [1-3] that first method provides effective separation of different time scales, but prevent from correct reduction of data dimension: slope of variance spectrum of spatio-temporal empirical orthogonal functions that are "structural material" for linear spatio-temporal modes, is too flat. The second method overcomes this problem: variance spectrum of nonlinear modes falls essentially sharply [5-7]. However neglecting time-lag correlations brings error of mode selection that is uncontrolled and increases with growth of mode time scale. In the report we combine these two methods in such a way that the developed algorithm allows constructing nonlinear spatio-temporal modes. The algorithm is applied for decomposition of (i) multi hundreds years globally distributed data generated by the INM RAS Coupled Climate Model [8], and (ii) 156 years time series of SST anomalies distributed over the globe [9]. We compare efficiency of different methods of decomposition and discuss the abilities of nonlinear spatio-temporal modes for construction of adequate and concurrently simplest ("optimal") models of climate systems. 1. Feigin A.M., Mukhin D., Gavrilov A., Volodin E.M., and Loskutov E.M. (2013) "Separation of spatial-temporal patterns ("climatic modes") by combined analysis of really measured and generated numerically vector time series", AGU 2013 Fall Meeting, Abstract NG33A-1574. 2. Alexander Feigin, Dmitry Mukhin, Andrey Gavrilov, Evgeny Volodin, and Evgeny Loskutov (2014) "Approach to analysis of multiscale space-distributed time series: separation of spatio-temporal modes with essentially different time scales", Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 16, EGU2014-6877. 3. Dmitry Mukhin, Dmitri Kondrashov, Evgeny Loskutov, Andrey Gavrilov, Alexander Feigin, and Michael Ghil (2014) "Predicting critical transitions in ENSO models, Part II: Spatially dependent models", Journal of Climate (accepted, doi: 10.1175/JCLI-D-14-00240.1). 4. Ghil, M., R. M. Allen, M. D. Dettinger, K. Ide, D. Kondrashov, et al. (2002) "Advanced spectral methods for climatic time series", Rev. Geophys. 40(1), 3.1-3.41. 5. Dmitry Mukhin, Andrey Gavrilov, Evgeny M Loskutov and Alexander M Feigin (2014) "Nonlinear Decomposition of Climate Data: a New Method for Reconstruction of Dynamical Modes", AGU 2014 Fall Meeting, Abstract NG43A-3752. 6. Andrey Gavrilov, Dmitry Mukhin, Evgeny Loskutov, and Alexander Feigin (2015) "Empirical decomposition of climate data into nonlinear dynamic modes", Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 17, EGU2015-627. 7. Dmitry Mukhin, Andrey Gavrilov, Evgeny Loskutov, Alexander Feigin, and Juergen Kurths (2015) "Reconstruction of principal dynamical modes from climatic variability: nonlinear approach", Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 17, EGU2015-5729. 8. http://83.149.207.89/GCM_DATA_PLOTTING/GCM_INM_DATA_XY_en.htm. 9. http://iridl.ldeo.columbia.edu/SOURCES/.KAPLAN/.EXTENDED/.v2/.ssta/.

  6. A spatio-temporal model of housing prices based on individual sales transactions over time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Tony E.; Wu, Peggy

    2009-12-01

    A spatio-temporal model of housing price trends is developed that focuses on individual housing sales over time. The model allows for both the spatio-temporal lag effects of previous sales in the vicinity of each housing sale, and for general autocorrelation effects over time. A key feature of this model is the recognition of the unequal spacing between individual housing sales over time. Hence the residuals are modeled as a first-order autoregressive process with unequally spaced events. The maximum-likelihood estimation of this model is developed in detail, and tested in terms of simulations based on selected data. In addition, the model is applied to a small data set in the Philadelphia area.

  7. Activity Changes Induced by Spatio-Temporally Correlated Stimuli in Cultured Cortical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, Yuzo; Moriguchi, Hiroyuki; Jimbo, Yasuhiko

    Activity-dependent plasticity probably plays a key role in learning and memory in biological information processing systems. Though long-term potentiation and depression have been extensively studied in the filed of neuroscience, little is known on the mechanisms for integrating these modifications on network-wide activity changes. In this report, we studied effects of spatio-temporally correlated stimuli on the neuronal network activity. Rat cortical neurons were cultured on substrates with 64 embedded micro-electrodes and the evoked responses were extracellularly recorded and analyzed. We compared spatio-temporal patterns of the responses between before and after repetitive application of correlated stimuli. After the correlated stimuli, the networks showed significantly different responses from those in the initial states. The modified activity reflected structures of the repeatedly applied correlated stimuli. The results suggested that spatiotemporally correlated inputs systematically induced modification of synaptic strengths in neuronal networks, which could serve as an underlying mechanism of associative memory.

  8. Nonparametric Evaluation of Dynamic Disease Risk: A Spatio-Temporal Kernel Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dongmei; Racine, Jeffrey S.; Ong, SengHuat; Chen, Yue; Zhao, Genming; Jiang, Qingwu

    2011-01-01

    Quantifying the distributions of disease risk in space and time jointly is a key element for understanding spatio-temporal phenomena while also having the potential to enhance our understanding of epidemiologic trajectories. However, most studies to date have neglected time dimension and focus instead on the “average” spatial pattern of disease risk, thereby masking time trajectories of disease risk. In this study we propose a new idea titled “spatio-temporal kernel density estimation (stKDE)” that employs hybrid kernel (i.e., weight) functions to evaluate the spatio-temporal disease risks. This approach not only can make full use of sample data but also “borrows” information in a particular manner from neighboring points both in space and time via appropriate choice of kernel functions. Monte Carlo simulations show that the proposed method performs substantially better than the traditional (i.e., frequency-based) kernel density estimation (trKDE) which has been used in applied settings while two illustrative examples demonstrate that the proposed approach can yield superior results compared to the popular trKDE approach. In addition, there exist various possibilities for improving and extending this method. PMID:21423612

  9. A spatio-temporal nonparametric Bayesian variable selection model of fMRI data for clustering correlated time courses

    E-print Network

    Vannucci, Marina

    . Furthermore, we achieve clustering of the voxels by imposing a Dirichlet process (DP) prior on the parametersA spatio-temporal nonparametric Bayesian variable selection model of fMRI data for clustering: Accepted 10 March 2014 Available online 18 March 2014 Keywords: Bayesian nonparametric Dirichlet process

  10. A full time-domain approach to spatio-temporal dynamics of semiconductor lasers. II. Spatio-temporal dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhringer, Klaus; Hess, Ortwin

    The spatio-temporal dynamics of novel semiconductor lasers is discussed on the basis of a space- and momentum-dependent full time-domain approach. To this means the space-, time-, and momentum-dependent Full-Time Domain Maxwell Semiconductor Bloch equations, derived and discussed in our preceding paper I [K. Böhringer, O. Hess, A full time-domain approach to spatio-temporal dynamics of semiconductor lasers. I. Theoretical formulation], are solved by direct numerical integration. Focussing on the device physics of novel semiconductor lasers that profit, in particular, from recent advances in nanoscience and nanotechnology, we discuss the examples of photonic band edge surface emitting lasers (PBE-SEL) and semiconductor disc lasers (SDLs). It is demonstrated that photonic crystal effects can be obtained for finite crystal structures, and leading to a significant improvement in laser performance such as reduced lasing thresholds. In SDLs, a modern device concept designed to increase the power output of surface-emitters in combination with near-diffraction-limited beam quality, we explore the complex interplay between the intracavity optical fields and the quantum well gain material in SDL structures. Our simulations reveal the dynamical balance between carrier generation due to pumping into high energy states, momentum relaxation of carriers, and stimulated recombination from states near the band edge. Our full time-domain approach is shown to also be an excellent framework for the modelling of the interaction of high-intensity femtosecond and picosecond pulses with semiconductor nanostructures. It is demonstrated that group velocity dispersion, dynamical gain saturation and fast self-phase modulation (SPM) are the main causes for the induced changes and asymmetries in the amplified pulse shape and spectrum of an ultrashort high-intensity pulse. We attest that the time constants of the intraband scattering processes are critical to gain recovery. Moreover, we present new insight into the physics of nonlinear coherent pulse propagation phenomena in active (semiconductor) gain media. Our numerical full time-domain simulations are shown to generally agree well with analytical predictions, while in the case of optical pulses with large pulse areas or few-cycle pulses they reveal the limits of analytic approaches. Finally, it is demonstrated that coherent ultrafast nonlinear propagation effects become less distinctive if we apply a realistic model of the quantum well semiconductor gain material, consider characteristic loss channels and take into account de-phasing processes and homogeneous broadening.

  11. Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Early Brain Development.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Neda; Prastawa, Marcel; Gilmore, John H; Lin, Weili; Gerig, Guido

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of human brain development is a crucial step for improved understanding of neurodevelopmental disorders. We focus on normal brain development as is observed in the multimodal longitudinal MRI/DTI data of neonates to two years of age. We present a spatio-temporal analysis framework using Gompertz function as a population growth model with three different spatial localization strategies: voxel-based, data driven clustering and atlas driven regional analysis. Growth models from multimodal imaging channels collected at each voxel form feature vectors which are clustered using the Dirichlet Process Mixture Models (DPMM). Clustering thus combines growth information from different modalities to subdivide the image into voxel groups with similar properties. The processing generates spatial maps that highlight the dynamic progression of white matter development. These maps show progression of white matter maturation where primarily, central regions mature earlier compared to the periphery, but where more subtle regional differences in growth can be observed. Atlas based analysis allows a quantitative analysis of a specific anatomical region, whereas data driven clustering identifies regions of similar growth patterns. The combination of these two allows us to investigate growth patterns within an anatomical region. Specifically, analysis of anterior and posterior limb of internal capsule show that there are different growth trajectories within these anatomies, and that it may be useful to divide certain anatomies into subregions with distinctive growth patterns. PMID:25328368

  12. Spatio-Temporal Change Modeling of Lulc: a Semantic Kriging Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, S.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2015-07-01

    Spatio-temporal land-use/ land-cover (LULC) change modeling is important to forecast the future LULC distribution, which may facilitate natural resource management, urban planning, etc. The spatio-temporal change in LULC trend often exhibits non-linear behavior, due to various dynamic factors, such as, human intervention (e.g., urbanization), environmental factors, etc. Hence, proper forecasting of LULC distribution should involve the study and trend modeling of historical data. Existing literatures have reported that the meteorological attributes (e.g., NDVI, LST, MSI), are semantically related to the terrain. Being influenced by the terrestrial dynamics, the temporal changes of these attributes depend on the LULC properties. Hence, incorporating meteorological knowledge into the temporal prediction process may help in developing an accurate forecasting model. This work attempts to study the change in inter-annual LULC pattern and the distribution of different meteorological attributes of a region in Kolkata (a metropolitan city in India) during the years 2000-2010 and forecast the future spread of LULC using semantic kriging (SemK) approach. A new variant of time-series SemK is proposed, namely Rev-SemKts to capture the multivariate semantic associations between different attributes. From empirical analysis, it may be observed that the augmentation of semantic knowledge in spatio-temporal modeling of meteorological attributes facilitate more precise forecasting of LULC pattern.

  13. Time reversal and the spatio-temporal matched filter

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K; Poggio, A J; Kallman, J S; Meyer, A W; Candy, J V

    2004-03-08

    It is known that focusing of an acoustic field by a time-reversal mirror (TRM) is equivalent to a spatio-temporal matched filter under conditions where the Green's function of the field satisfies reciprocity and is time invariant, i.e. the Green's function is independent of the choice of time origin. In this letter, it is shown that both reciprocity and time invariance can be replaced by a more general constraint on the Green's function that allows a TRM to implement the spatio-temporal matched filter even when conditions are time varying.

  14. Studies on spatio-temporal filtering of GNSS-derived coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruszczynski, Maciej; Bogusz, Janusz; K?os, Anna; Figurski, Mariusz

    2015-04-01

    The information about lithospheric deformations may be obtained nowadays by analysis of velocity field derived from permanent GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) observations. Despite developing more and more reliable models, the permanent stations residuals must still be considered as coloured noise. Meeting the GGOS (Global Geodetic Observing System) requirements, we are obliged to investigate the correlations between residuals, which are the result of common mode error (CME). This type of error may arise from mismodelling of: satellite orbits, the Earth Orientation Parameters, satellite antenna phase centre variations or unmodelling of large scale atmospheric effects. The above described together cause correlations between stochastic parts of coordinate time series obtained at stations located of even few thousands kilometres from each other. Permanent stations that meet the aforementioned terms form the regional (EPN - EUREF Permanent Network) or local sub-networks of global (IGS - International GNSS Service) network. Other authors (Wdowinski et al., 1997; Dong et al., 2006) dealt with spatio-temporal filtering and indicated three major regional filtering approaches: the stacking, the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) based on the empirical orthogonal function and the Karhunen-Loeve expansion. The need for spatio-temporal filtering is evident today, but the question whether the size of the network affects the accuracy of station's position and its velocity still remains unanswered. With the aim to determine the network's size, for which the assumption of spatial uniform distribution of CME is retained, we used stacking approach. We analyzed time series of IGS stations with daily network solutions processed by the Military University of Technology EPN Local Analysis Centre in Bernese 5.0 software and compared it with the JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) PPP (Precice Point Positioning). The method we propose is based on the division of local GNSS networks into concentric ring-shaped areas. Such an approach allows us to specify the maximum size of the network, where the evident uniform spatial response can be still noticed. In terms of reliable CMEs extraction, the local networks have to be up to 500-600 kilometres extent depending on its character (location). In this study we examined three approaches of spatio-temporal filtering based on stacking procedure. First was based on non-weighted (Wdowinski et. al., 1997) and second on weighted average formula, where the weights are formed by the RMS of individual station position in the corresponding epoch (Nikolaidis, 2002). The third stacking approach, proposed here, was previously unused. It combines the weighted stacking together with the distance between the station and network barycentre into one approach. The analysis allowed to determine the optimal size of local GNSS network and to select the appropriate stacking method for obtaining the most stable solutions for e.g. geodynamical studies. The values of L1 and L2 norms, RMS values of time series (describing stability of the time series) and Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated for the North, East and Up components from more than 200 permanent stations twice: before performing the filtration and after weighted stacking approach. We showed the improvement in the quality of time series analysis using MLE (Maximum Likelihood Estimation) to estimate noise parameters. We demonstrated that the relative RMS improvement of 10, 20 and 30% reduces the noise amplitudes of about 20, 35 and 45%, respectively, what causes the velocity uncertainty to be reduced of 0.3 mm/yr (for the assumption of 7-years of data and flicker noise). The relative decrement of spectral index kappa is 25, 35 and 45%, what means lower velocity uncertainty of even 0.2 mm/yr (when assuming 7 years of data and noise amplitude of 15 mm/yr^-kappa/4) . These results refer to the growing demands on the stability of the series due to their use to realize the kinematic reference frames and for geodynamical studies.

  15. Mining Association Rules in Spatio-Temporal Data J. Mennis and J.W. Liu

    E-print Network

    Mennis, Jeremy

    Mining Association Rules in Spatio-Temporal Data J. Mennis and J.W. Liu Department of Geography mining to spatio- temporal data. Association rule mining seeks to discover associations among of a certain type of data mining technique, association rule mining, to spatio-temporal data. As a case study

  16. ECEM/EAML 2004 Segmentation of paleoecological spatio-temporal count data

    E-print Network

    Toivonen, Hannu

    ECEM/EAML 2004 Segmentation of paleoecological spatio-temporal count data Kari Vasko1 , Hannu will consider applications of segmentation analysis towards analysis of paleoecological spatio-temporal time framework for the spatio-temporal segmentation problems that occurs in paleoecology and discuss

  17. An Accessible Method for Implementing Hierarchical Models with Spatio-Temporal Abundance Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, Beth E.; Hooten, Melvin B.; Koons, David N.

    2012-01-01

    A common goal in ecology and wildlife management is to determine the causes of variation in population dynamics over long periods of time and across large spatial scales. Many assumptions must nevertheless be overcome to make appropriate inference about spatio-temporal variation in population dynamics, such as autocorrelation among data points, excess zeros, and observation error in count data. To address these issues, many scientists and statisticians have recommended the use of Bayesian hierarchical models. Unfortunately, hierarchical statistical models remain somewhat difficult to use because of the necessary quantitative background needed to implement them, or because of the computational demands of using Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithms to estimate parameters. Fortunately, new tools have recently been developed that make it more feasible for wildlife biologists to fit sophisticated hierarchical Bayesian models (i.e., Integrated Nested Laplace Approximation, ‘INLA’). We present a case study using two important game species in North America, the lesser and greater scaup, to demonstrate how INLA can be used to estimate the parameters in a hierarchical model that decouples observation error from process variation, and accounts for unknown sources of excess zeros as well as spatial and temporal dependence in the data. Ultimately, our goal was to make unbiased inference about spatial variation in population trends over time.

  18. The GLIMS Glacier Database: a spatio-temporal database

    E-print Network

    Raup, Bruce H.

    The GLIMS Glacier Database: a spatio-temporal database implemented using Open Source tools Bruce countries #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;System components PostgreSQL (relational database) PostGIS (geospatial) GDAL (Geospatial Data Abstraction Library) Perl, PHP, Shapelib, ... #12;GLIMS Glacier Database System

  19. Finding Spatio-Temporal Patterns in Large Sensor Datasets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Michael Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Spatial or temporal data mining tasks are performed in the context of the relevant space, defined by a spatial neighborhood, and the relevant time period, defined by a specific time interval. Furthermore, when mining large spatio-temporal datasets, interesting patterns typically emerge where the dataset is most dynamic. This dissertation is…

  20. Fast Spatio-Temporal Data Mining from Large Geophysical Datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolorz, P.; Mesrobian, E.; Muntz, R.; Santos, J. R.; Shek, E.; Yi, J.; Mechoso, C.; Farrara, J.

    1995-01-01

    Use of the UCLA CONQUEST (CONtent-based Querying in Space and Time) is reviewed for performance of automatic cyclone extraction and detection of spatio-temporal blocking conditions on MPP. CONQUEST is a data analysis environment for knowledge and data mining to aid in high-resolution modeling of climate modeling.

  1. Spatio-temporal evaluation matrices for geospatial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triglav, Joc; Petrovi?, Dušan; Stopar, Bojan

    2011-02-01

    The global geospatial community is investing substantial effort in providing tools for geospatial data-quality information analysis and systematizing the criteria for geospatial data quality. The importance of these activities is increasing, especially in the last decade, which has witnessed an enormous expansion of geospatial data use in general and especially among mass users. Although geospatial data producers are striving to define and present data-quality standards to users and users increasingly need to assess the fitness for use of the data, the success of these activities is still far from what is expected or required. As a consequence, neglect or misunderstanding of data quality among users results in misuse or risks. This paper presents an aid in spatio-temporal quality evaluation through the use of spatio-temporal evaluation matrices (STEM) and the index of spatio-temporal anticipations (INSTANT) matrices. With the help of these two simple tools, geospatial data producers can systematically categorize and visualize the granularity of their spatio-temporal data, and users can present their requirements in the same way using business intelligence principles and a Web 2.0 approach. The basic principles and some examples are presented in the paper, and potential further applied research activities are briefly described.

  2. Hierarchical Bayesian Spatio-Temporal Models for Population Spread

    E-print Network

    is a serious concern. Given the increasing economic, environmental, and human health impact of such invasionsHierarchical Bayesian Spatio-Temporal Models for Population Spread Christopher K. Wikle and Mevin, Columbia, MO 65211; wikle@stat.missouri.edu 1 #12;1 Introduction The spread of populations has long been

  3. BLIND SIGNAL DECONVOLUTION BY SPATIO-TEMPORAL DECORRELATION AND

    E-print Network

    Cichocki, Andrzej

    BLIND SIGNAL DECONVOLUTION BY SPATIO-TEMPORAL DECORRELATION AND DEMIXING Seungjin CHOI and Andrzej-line adaptive multichannel blind deconvolution and sepa- ration of i.i.d. sources. Under mild conditions which consists of blind equalization and source separation. In blind equalization stage, we employ anti

  4. Submission PDF Spatio-Temporal Distribution of Holocene Populations

    E-print Network

    Schmidt, Volker

    these methods and documented the impact of human activities on the vegetation (1, 6-10). Although some studiesSubmission PDF Spatio-Temporal Distribution of Holocene Populations in North America Michelle A As the Cordilleran and Laurentide Ice Sheets retreated, North America was colonized by human populations; however

  5. Football analysis using spatio-temporal tools Joachim Gudmundsson

    E-print Network

    Wolle, Thomas

    Football analysis using spatio-temporal tools Joachim Gudmundsson University of Sydney and NICTA, Australia thomas.wolle@gmail.com ABSTRACT Analysing a football match is without doubt an important task specifically for analysing the performance of football players and teams. The aim, functionality

  6. Crime Forecasting Using Spatio-Temporal Pattern with Ensemble Learning

    E-print Network

    Ding, Wei

    Crime Forecasting Using Spatio-Temporal Pattern with Ensemble Learning Chung-Hsien Yu1 , Wei Ding1 University Avenue, Lowell, MA 01854, USA Melissa_Morabito@uml.edu Abstract. Crime forecasting is notoriously difficult. A crime incident is a multi-dimensional complex phenomenon that is closely associated

  7. Spatio-temporal analysis of environmental radiation in Korea

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.Y.; Lee, B.C.; Shin, H.K.

    2007-07-01

    Geostatistical visualization of environmental radiation is a very powerful approach to explore and understand spatio-temporal variabilities of environmental radiation data. Spatial patterns of environmental radiation can be described quantitatively in terms of variogram and kriging, which are based on the idea that statistical variation of data are functions of distance. (authors)

  8. Spatio-Temporal Signal Recovery from Political Tweets in Indonesia

    E-print Network

    Davulcu, Hasan

    Spatio-Temporal Signal Recovery from Political Tweets in Indonesia Anisha Mazumder, Arun Das activity in the provinces of Indonesia. Based on analysis of radical/counter radical sentiments expressed in tweets by Twitter users, we create a Heat Map of Indonesia which visually demonstrates the degree

  9. Cubic map algebra functions for spatio-temporal analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mennis, J.; Viger, R.; Tomlin, C.D.

    2005-01-01

    We propose an extension of map algebra to three dimensions for spatio-temporal data handling. This approach yields a new class of map algebra functions that we call "cube functions." Whereas conventional map algebra functions operate on data layers representing two-dimensional space, cube functions operate on data cubes representing two-dimensional space over a third-dimensional period of time. We describe the prototype implementation of a spatio-temporal data structure and selected cube function versions of conventional local, focal, and zonal map algebra functions. The utility of cube functions is demonstrated through a case study analyzing the spatio-temporal variability of remotely sensed, southeastern U.S. vegetation character over various land covers and during different El Nin??o/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phases. Like conventional map algebra, the application of cube functions may demand significant data preprocessing when integrating diverse data sets, and are subject to limitations related to data storage and algorithm performance. Solutions to these issues include extending data compression and computing strategies for calculations on very large data volumes to spatio-temporal data handling.

  10. The spatio-temporal spectrum of turbulent flows

    E-print Network

    di Leoni, P Clark; Mininni, P D

    2015-01-01

    Identification and extraction of vortical structures and of waves in a disorganized flow is a mayor challegen in the study of turbulence. We present a study of the spatio-temporal behavior of turbulent flows in the presence of different restitutive forces. We show how to compute and analyze the spatio-temporal spectrum from data stemming from numerical simulations and from laboratory experiments. Four cases are considered: homogeneous and isotropic turbulence, rotating turbulence, stratified turbulence, and water wave turbulence. For homogeneous and isotropic turbulence, the spectrum allows identification of random sweeping. For rotating and for stratified turbulence, the spectrum allows identification of the waves, quantification of the energy in the waves and in the turbulent eddies, and identification of physical mechanisms such as Doppler shift and wave absorption in critical layers. Finally, in water wave turbulence the spectrum shows a transition from gravity-capillary waves to bound waves as the amplit...

  11. A Hierarchical Bayesian Approach for Learning Sparse Spatio-Temporal Decomposition of Multichannel EEG

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Chen, Zhe; Gao, Shangkai; Brown, Emery N.

    2011-01-01

    Multichannel electroencephalography (EEG) offers a non-invasive tool to explore spatio-temporal dynamics of brain activity. With EEG recordings consisting of multiple trials, traditional signal processing approaches that ignore inter-trial variability in the data may fail to accurately estimate the underlying spatio-temporal brain patterns. Moreover, precise characterization of such inter-trial variability per se can be of high scientific value in establishing the relationship between brain activity and behavior. In this paper, a statistical modeling framework is introduced for learning spatiotemporal decomposition of multiple-trial EEG data recorded under two contrasting experimental conditions. By modeling the variance of source signals as random variables varying across trials, the proposed two-stage hierarchical Bayesian model is able to capture inter-trial amplitude variability in the data in a sparse way where a parsimonious representation of the data can be obtained. A variational Bayesian (VB) algorithm is developed for statistical inference of the hierarchical model. The efficacy of the proposed modeling framework is validated with the analysis of both synthetic and real EEG data. In the simulation study we show that even at low signal-to-noise ratios our approach is able to recover with high precision the underlying spatiotemporal patterns and the evolution of source amplitude across trials; on two brain-computer interface (BCI) data sets we show that our VB algorithm can extract physiologically meaningful spatio-temporal patterns and make more accurate predictions than other two widely used algorithms: the common spatial patterns (CSP) algorithm and the Infomax algorithm for independent component analysis (ICA). The results demonstrate that our statistical modeling framework can serve as a powerful tool for extracting brain patterns, characterizing trial-to-trial brain dynamics, and decoding brain states by exploiting useful structures in the data. PMID:21420499

  12. Sensitivity of cochlear nucleus neurons to spatio-temporal changes in auditory nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Grace I.

    2012-01-01

    The spatio-temporal pattern of auditory nerve (AN) activity, representing the relative timing of spikes across the tonotopic axis, contains cues to perceptual features of sounds such as pitch, loudness, timbre, and spatial location. These spatio-temporal cues may be extracted by neurons in the cochlear nucleus (CN) that are sensitive to relative timing of inputs from AN fibers innervating different cochlear regions. One possible mechanism for this extraction is “cross-frequency” coincidence detection (CD), in which a central neuron converts the degree of coincidence across the tonotopic axis into a rate code by preferentially firing when its AN inputs discharge in synchrony. We used Huffman stimuli (Carney LH. J Neurophysiol 64: 437–456, 1990), which have a flat power spectrum but differ in their phase spectra, to systematically manipulate relative timing of spikes across tonotopically neighboring AN fibers without changing overall firing rates. We compared responses of CN units to Huffman stimuli with responses of model CD cells operating on spatio-temporal patterns of AN activity derived from measured responses of AN fibers with the principle of cochlear scaling invariance. We used the maximum likelihood method to determine the CD model cell parameters most likely to produce the measured CN unit responses, and thereby could distinguish units behaving like cross-frequency CD cells from those consistent with same-frequency CD (in which all inputs would originate from the same tonotopic location). We find that certain CN unit types, especially those associated with globular bushy cells, have responses consistent with cross-frequency CD cells. A possible functional role of a cross-frequency CD mechanism in these CN units is to increase the dynamic range of binaural neurons that process cues for sound localization. PMID:22972956

  13. A general science-based framework for dynamical spatio-temporal models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wikle, C.K.; Hooten, M.B.

    2010-01-01

    Spatio-temporal statistical models are increasingly being used across a wide variety of scientific disciplines to describe and predict spatially-explicit processes that evolve over time. Correspondingly, in recent years there has been a significant amount of research on new statistical methodology for such models. Although descriptive models that approach the problem from the second-order (covariance) perspective are important, and innovative work is being done in this regard, many real-world processes are dynamic, and it can be more efficient in some cases to characterize the associated spatio-temporal dependence by the use of dynamical models. The chief challenge with the specification of such dynamical models has been related to the curse of dimensionality. Even in fairly simple linear, first-order Markovian, Gaussian error settings, statistical models are often over parameterized. Hierarchical models have proven invaluable in their ability to deal to some extent with this issue by allowing dependency among groups of parameters. In addition, this framework has allowed for the specification of science based parameterizations (and associated prior distributions) in which classes of deterministic dynamical models (e. g., partial differential equations (PDEs), integro-difference equations (IDEs), matrix models, and agent-based models) are used to guide specific parameterizations. Most of the focus for the application of such models in statistics has been in the linear case. The problems mentioned above with linear dynamic models are compounded in the case of nonlinear models. In this sense, the need for coherent and sensible model parameterizations is not only helpful, it is essential. Here, we present an overview of a framework for incorporating scientific information to motivate dynamical spatio-temporal models. First, we illustrate the methodology with the linear case. We then develop a general nonlinear spatio-temporal framework that we call general quadratic nonlinearity and demonstrate that it accommodates many different classes of scientific-based parameterizations as special cases. The model is presented in a hierarchical Bayesian framework and is illustrated with examples from ecology and oceanography. ?? 2010 Sociedad de Estad??stica e Investigaci??n Operativa.

  14. Interesting Spatio-Temporal Region Discovery Computations Over Gpu and Mapreduce Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, M.; Prasad, S. K.; Shekhar, S.; Zhou, X.

    2015-07-01

    Discovery of interesting paths and regions in spatio-temporal data sets is important to many fields such as the earth and atmospheric sciences, GIS, public safety and public health both as a goal and as a preliminary step in a larger series of computations. This discovery is usually an exhaustive procedure that quickly becomes extremely time consuming to perform using traditional paradigms and hardware and given the rapidly growing sizes of today's data sets is quickly outpacing the speed at which computational capacity is growing. In our previous work (Prasad et al., 2013a) we achieved a 50 times speedup over sequential using a single GPU. We were able to achieve near linear speedup over this result on interesting path discovery by using Apache Hadoop to distribute the workload across multiple GPU nodes. Leveraging the parallel architecture of GPUs we were able to drastically reduce the computation time of a 3-dimensional spatio-temporal interest region search on a single tile of normalized difference vegetative index for Saudi Arabia. We were further able to see an almost linear speedup in compute performance by distributing this workload across several GPUs with a simple MapReduce model. This increases the speed of processing 10 fold over the comparable sequential while simultaneously increasing the amount of data being processed by 384 fold. This allowed us to process the entirety of the selected data set instead of a constrained window.

  15. Spatio-Temporal Regularization for Longitudinal Registration to Subject-Specific 3d Template.

    PubMed

    Guizard, Nicolas; Fonov, Vladimir S; García-Lorenzo, Daniel; Nakamura, Kunio; Aubert-Broche, Bérengère; Collins, D Louis

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease present subtle anatomical brain changes before the appearance of clinical symptoms. Manual structure segmentation is long and tedious and although automatic methods exist, they are often performed in a cross-sectional manner where each time-point is analyzed independently. With such analysis methods, bias, error and longitudinal noise may be introduced. Noise due to MR scanners and other physiological effects may also introduce variability in the measurement. We propose to use 4D non-linear registration with spatio-temporal regularization to correct for potential longitudinal inconsistencies in the context of structure segmentation. The major contribution of this article is the use of individual template creation with spatio-temporal regularization of the deformation fields for each subject. We validate our method with different sets of real MRI data, compare it to available longitudinal methods such as FreeSurfer, SPM12, QUARC, TBM, and KNBSI, and demonstrate that spatially local temporal regularization yields more consistent rates of change of global structures resulting in better statistical power to detect significant changes over time and between populations. PMID:26301716

  16. Spatio-Temporal Regularization for Longitudinal Registration to Subject-Specific 3d Template

    PubMed Central

    Guizard, Nicolas; Fonov, Vladimir S.; García-Lorenzo, Daniel; Nakamura, Kunio; Aubert-Broche, Bérengère; Collins, D. Louis

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease present subtle anatomical brain changes before the appearance of clinical symptoms. Manual structure segmentation is long and tedious and although automatic methods exist, they are often performed in a cross-sectional manner where each time-point is analyzed independently. With such analysis methods, bias, error and longitudinal noise may be introduced. Noise due to MR scanners and other physiological effects may also introduce variability in the measurement. We propose to use 4D non-linear registration with spatio-temporal regularization to correct for potential longitudinal inconsistencies in the context of structure segmentation. The major contribution of this article is the use of individual template creation with spatio-temporal regularization of the deformation fields for each subject. We validate our method with different sets of real MRI data, compare it to available longitudinal methods such as FreeSurfer, SPM12, QUARC, TBM, and KNBSI, and demonstrate that spatially local temporal regularization yields more consistent rates of change of global structures resulting in better statistical power to detect significant changes over time and between populations. PMID:26301716

  17. Spatio-Temporal Equalizer for a Receiving-Antenna Feed Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukai, Ryan; Lee, Dennis; Vilnrotter, Victor

    2010-01-01

    A spatio-temporal equalizer has been conceived as an improved means of suppressing multipath effects in the reception of aeronautical telemetry signals, and may be adaptable to radar and aeronautical communication applications as well. This equalizer would be an integral part of a system that would also include a seven-element planar array of receiving feed horns centered at the focal point of a paraboloidal antenna that would be nominally aimed at or near the aircraft that would be the source of the signal that one seeks to receive (see Figure 1). This spatio-temporal equalizer would consist mostly of a bank of seven adaptive finite-impulse-response (FIR) filters one for each element in the array - and the outputs of the filters would be summed (see Figure 2). The combination of the spatial diversity of the feedhorn array and the temporal diversity of the filter bank would afford better multipath-suppression performance than is achievable by means of temporal equalization alone. The seven-element feed array would supplant the single feed horn used in a conventional paraboloidal ground telemetry-receiving antenna. The radio-frequency telemetry signals re ceiv ed by the seven elements of the array would be digitized, converted to complex baseband form, and sent to the FIR filter bank, which would adapt itself in real time to enable reception of telemetry at a low bit error rate, even in the presence of multipath of the type found at many flight test ranges.

  18. Spatio-temporal topological relationships between land parcels in cadastral database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, W.; Zhang, F.

    2014-04-01

    There are complex spatio-temporal relationships among cadastral entities. Cadastral spatio-temporal data model should not only describe the data structure of cadastral objects, but also express cadastral spatio-temporal relationships between cadastral objects. In the past, many experts and scholars have proposed a variety of cadastral spatio-temporal data models, but few of them concentrated on the representation of spatiotemporal relationships and few of them make systematic studies on spatiotemporal relationships between cadastral objects. The studies on spatio-temporal topological relationships are not abundant. In the paper, we initially review current approaches to the studies of spatio-temporal topological relationships, and argue that spatio-temporal topological relation is the combination of temporal topology on the time dimension and spatial topology on the spatial dimension. Subsequently, we discuss and develop an integrated representation of spatio-temporal topological relationships within a 3-dimensional temporal space. In the end, based on the semantics of spatiotemporal changes between land parcels, we conclude the possible spatio-temporal topological relations between land parcels, which provide the theoretical basis for creating, updating and maintaining of land parcels in the cadastral database.

  19. A GRASS GIS based Spatio-Temporal Algebra for Raster-, 3D Raster- and Vector Time Series Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppelt, Thomas; Gebbert, Sören

    2015-04-01

    Enhancing the well known and widely used map algebra proposed by Dr. Charles Dana Tomlin [1] with the time dimension is an ongoing research topic. The efficient processing of large time series of raster, 3D raster and vector datasets, e. g. raster datasets for temperature or precipitations on continental scale, requires a sophisticated spatio-temporal algebra that is capable of handling datasets with different temporal granularities and spatio-temporal extents. With the temporal enabled GRASS GIS [2] and the GRASS GIS Temporal Framework new spatio-temporal data types are available in GRASS GIS 7, called space time datasets. These space time datasets represent time series of raster, 3D raster and vector map layers. Furthermore the temporal framework provides a wide range of functionalities to support the implementation of a temporal algebra. While spatial capabilities of GRASS GIS are used to perform the spatial processing of the time stamped map layers that are registered in a space time dataset, the temporal processing is provided by the GRASS GIS temporal framework that supports time intervals and time instances. Mixing time instance and time intervals as well as gaps, overlapping or inclusion of intervals and instances is possible. Hence this framework allows an arbitrary layout of the time dimension. We implemented two ways to process space time datasets with arbitrary temporal layout, the temporal topology and the granularity based spatio-temporal algebra. The algebra provides the functionality to define complex spatio-temporal topological operators that process time and space in a single expression. The algebra includes methods to select map layers from space time datasets based on their temporal relations, to temporally shift time stamped map layers, to create temporal buffer and to snap time instances of time stamped map layers to create a valid temporal topology. In addition spatio-temporal operations can be evaluated within conditional statements. These operations can be assigned to space time datasets or to the results of operations between space time datasets. The temporal vector algebra adds spatial overlay and buffer operations that can be performed on temporal related vector map layers that are registered in space time vector datasets. Whereas the temporal raster and 3D raster algebra uses a subset of the arithmetic operators and spatial functions from the raster algebra in GRASS GIS. It provides in addition spatio-temporal neighborhood operators and spatio-temporal functions. All operations between multiple space time datasets can be combined in nested expressions and are preprocessed by meta data topology analysis before the relevant expressions are computed with parallel processing. [1] Tomlin, C. Dana., 1990. Geographic Information Systems and Cartographic Modeling. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall. [2] Gebbert, S., Pebesma, E., 2014. A temporal GIS for field based environmental modeling. Environ. Model. Softw. 53, 1-12.

  20. Mapping Spatio-Temporal Diffusion inside the Human Brain Using a Numerical Solution of the Diffusion Equation

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Wang; Jiang, Li; Loew, Murray; Yang, Yihong

    2008-01-01

    Diffusion is an important mechanism for molecular transport in living biological tissues. Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) provides a unique probe to examine microscopic structures of the tissues in vivo, but current dMRI techniques usually ignore the spatio-temporal evolution process of the diffusive medium. In the present study, we demonstrate the feasibility to reveal the spatio-temporal diffusion process inside the human brain based on a numerical solution of the diffusion equation. Normal human subjects were scanned with a diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) technique on a 3-Tesla MRI scanner, and the diffusion tensor in each voxel was calculated from the DTI data. The diffusion equation, a partial-derivative description of Fick’s Law for the diffusion process, was discretized into equivalent algebraic equations. A finite-difference method was employed to obtain the numerical solution of the diffusion equation with a Crank-Nicholson iteration scheme to enhance the numerical stability. By specifying boundary and initial conditions, the spatio-temporal evolution of the diffusion process inside the brain can be virtually reconstructed. Our results exhibit similar medium profiles and diffusion coefficients as those of light fluorescence dextrans measured in integrative optical imaging experiments. The proposed method highlights the feasibility to non-invasively estimate the macroscopic diffusive transport time for a molecule in a given region of the brain. PMID:18440744

  1. Resolving Trends in Antarctic Ice Sheet Mass Loss and Glacio-isostatic Adjustment Through Spatio-temporal Source-separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamber, J. L.; Schoen, N.; Zammit-Mangion, A.; Rougier, J.; Flament, T.; Luthcke, S. B.; Petrie, E. J.; Rémy, F.

    2013-12-01

    There remains considerable inconsistency between different methods and approaches for determining ice mass trends for Antarctica from satellite observations. There are three approaches that can provide near global coverage for mass trends: altimetry, gravimetry and mass budget calculations. All three approaches suffer from a source separation problem where other geophysical processes limit the capability of the method to resolve the origin and magnitude of a mass change. A fourth approach, GPS vertical motion, provides localised estimates of mass change due to elastic uplift and an indirect estimate of GIA. Each approach has different source separation issues and different spatio-temporal error characteristics. In principle, it should be possible to combine the data and process covariances to minimize the uncertainty in the solution and to produce robust, posterior errors for the trends. In practice, this is a challenging problem in statistics because of the large number of degrees of freedom, the variable spatial and temporal sampling between the different observations and the fact that some processes remain under-sampled, such as firn compaction. Here, we present a novel solution to this problem using the latest methods in statistical modelling of spatio-temporal processes. We use Bayesian hierarchical modelling and employ stochastic partial differential equations to capture our physical understanding of the key processes that influence our observations. Due to the huge number of observations involved (> 10^8) methods are required to reduce the dimensionality of the problem and care is required in treatment of the observations as they are not independent. Here, we focus mainly on the results rather than the full suite of methods and we present time evolving fields of surface mass balance, ice dynamic-driven mass loss, and firn compaction for the period 2003-2009, derived from a combination of ICESat, ENVISAT, GRACE, InSAR, GPS and regional climate model output data. We also present a time-invariant GIA field and an elastic vertical motion field for the bedrock. All fields are solved for simultaneously alongside posterior errors that are consistent with the full suite of observations and priors. The framework we have developed can incorporate other data, such as shallow/deep ice core records of accumulation, coffee-can point measurements of mass balance, and snow radar data. The framework can also be applied to other ice masses and components of the climate system that suffer similar source separation issues: for example, solving the sea level budget.

  2. Spatio-temporal skin strain distributions evoke low variability spike responses in cuneate neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Vincent; Terekhov, Alexander V.; Wong, Sheng-Chao; Geborek, Pontus; Bengtsson, Fredrik; Jörntell, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    A common method to explore the somatosensory function of the brain is to relate skin stimuli to neurophysiological recordings. However, interaction with the skin involves complex mechanical effects. Variability in mechanically induced spike responses is likely to be due in part to mechanical variability of the transformation of stimuli into spiking patterns in the primary sensors located in the skin. This source of variability greatly hampers detailed investigations of the response of the brain to different types of mechanical stimuli. A novel stimulation technique designed to minimize the uncertainty in the strain distributions induced in the skin was applied to evoke responses in single neurons in the cat. We show that exposure to specific spatio-temporal stimuli induced highly reproducible spike responses in the cells of the cuneate nucleus, which represents the first stage of integration of peripheral inputs to the brain. Using precisely controlled spatio-temporal stimuli, we also show that cuneate neurons, as a whole, were selectively sensitive to the spatial and to the temporal aspects of the stimuli. We conclude that the present skin stimulation technique based on localized differential tractions greatly reduces response variability that is exogenous to the information processing of the brain and hence paves the way for substantially more detailed investigations of the brain's somatosensory system. PMID:24451390

  3. Working with Spatio-Temporal Data Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, A.

    2012-07-01

    Several aspects of spatiotemporal databases have been explored in past decades, ranging from basic data structure to query processing and indexing. But today, operational temporal GIS does not exist. The key impediments have been the complexity of integrating space and time and the lack of standards. OpenGIS standards for simple feature access (spatial type) do exist, but unlike the spatial type, standards for spatiotemporal data type do not exist. This paper explores a new approach to modeling space and time to provide the basis for implementing a temporal GIS. This approach is based on the concept of data types in databases. A data type provides constructors, accessors, and operators. Most commercial and open source databases provide data types to deal with the spatial component of a GIS, called spatial type. Oracle Spatial, DB2 Spatial Extender and Informix Spatial DataBlade, ST_Geometry for PostgreSQL and Oracle from Esri, PostGIS for PostgreSQL, etc., are some examples. This new spatiotemporal data type is called spatiotemporal type (STT). This STT is implemented in PostgreSQL, an open source relational database management system. The STT is an extension of Esri's ST_Geometry type for PostgreSQL, in which each spatial object has a life span. Constructors, accessors, and relational functions are provided to create STT and support spatial, spatiotemporal, and temporal queries. Some functions are extended based on OpenGIS standards for the spatial type. Examples are provided to demonstrate the application of these functions. The paper concludes with limitations and challenges of implementing STT.

  4. Multilevel Methodology for Simulation of Spatio-Temporal Systems with Heterogeneous Activity; Application to Spread of Valley Fever Fungus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jammalamadaka, Rajanikanth

    2009-01-01

    This report consists of a dissertation submitted to the faculty of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, Graduate College, The University of Arizona, 2008. Spatio-temporal systems with heterogeneity in their structure and behavior have two major problems associated with them. The first one is that such complex real world systems extend over very large spatial and temporal domains and consume so many computational resources to simulate that they are infeasible to study with current computational platforms. The second one is that the data available for understanding such systems is limited because they are spread over space and time making it hard to obtain micro and macro measurements. This also makes it difficult to get the data for validation of their constituent processes while simultaneously considering their global behavior. For example, the valley fever fungus considered in this dissertation is spread over a large spatial grid in the arid Southwest and typically needs to be simulated over several decades of time to obtain useful information. It is also hard to get the temperature and moisture data (which are two critical factors on which the survival of the valley fever fungus depends) at every grid point of the spatial domain over the region of study. In order to address the first problem, we develop a method based on the discrete event system specification which exploits the heterogeneity in the activity of the spatio-temporal system and which has been shown to be effective in solving relatively simple partial differential equation systems. The benefit of addressing the first problem is that it now makes it feasible to address the second problem. We address the second problem by making use of a multilevel methodology based on modeling and simulation and systems theory. This methodology helps us in the construction of models with different resolutions (base and lumped models). This allows us to refine an initially constructed lumped model with detailed physics-based process models and assess whether they improve on the original lumped models. For that assessment, we use the concept of experimental frame to delimit where the improvement is needed. This allows us to work with the available data, improve the component models in their own experimental frame and then move them to the overall frame. In this dissertation, we develop a multilevel methodology and apply it to a valley fever model. Moreover, we study the model's behavior in a particular experimental frame of interest, namely the formation of new sporing sites.

  5. The spatio-temporal spectrum of turbulent flows.

    PubMed

    Clark di Leoni, P; Cobelli, P J; Mininni, P D

    2015-12-01

    Identification and extraction of vortical structures and of waves in a disorganised flow is a mayor challenge in the study of turbulence. We present a study of the spatio-temporal behavior of turbulent flows in the presence of different restitutive forces. We show how to compute and analyse the spatio-temporal spectrum from data stemming from numerical simulations and from laboratory experiments. Four cases are considered: homogeneous and isotropic turbulence, rotating turbulence, stratified turbulence, and water wave turbulence. For homogeneous and isotropic turbulence, the spectrum allows identification of sweeping by the large-scale flow. For rotating and for stratified turbulence, the spectrum allows identification of the waves, precise quantification of the energy in the waves and in the turbulent eddies, and identification of physical mechanisms such as Doppler shift and wave absorption in critical layers. Finally, in water wave turbulence the spectrum shows a transition from gravity-capillary waves to bound waves as the amplitude of the forcing is increased. PMID:26701711

  6. Perception of oppositely moving verniers and spatio-temporal interpolation.

    PubMed

    Fahle, M

    1995-04-01

    Even at moderate speeds, moving objects stimulate many retinal photoreceptors within the integration time of the receptors, yet usually no motion blur is experienced. An elegant model for the elimination of motion blur was proposed by Anderson and van Essen [(1987) Proceedings of the National Academy of Science U.S.A., 84, 6297-6301]. These authors suggested that so-called shifter circuits shift the neuronal representation of retinal images on their way to the cortex. The retinal image of an object moving in the outer world is thus shifted in the opposite direction to the object motion, and the cortical representation of objects would be stable at least during short periods of time. To test the hypothesis of "shifter circuits", I measured thresholds for two vernier stimuli, moving simultaneously into opposite directions over identical parts of the retina. Motion blur for these stimuli was not stronger than with a single moving stimulus, and thresholds for the detection of vernier offsets could be below a photoreceptor diameter. This finding poses serious problems for the hypothesis of shifter circuits, since shifter circuits would be able to stabilize only one of the stimuli. In additional experiments, stimuli moved discontinuously, requiring spatio-temporal interpolation for the perception of smooth motion. The results are consistent with those obtained with continuous motion. Precision of spatio-temporal interpolation is in the hyperacuity range even for stimuli moving in opposite directions over the same small part of the visual field. PMID:7762150

  7. Spatio-temporal Characterization of the Motion of Beating and Fibrillating Myocardial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koss, Jordan; Coppersmith, Susan

    2000-03-01

    We discuss our spatio-temporal analysis of video images of the motion of chicken myocyte tissue cultures. These chicken myocardial cells form a standard biological model for testing the efficacy of drugs and other clinical techniques in restoring organized contraction after a simulated event of cardiac arrest. Our analysis provides a novel means for measuring the strength of regenerated contractions. Additionally, under certain circumstances, the culture of myocardial cells can be driven into a state of fibrillation. We can quantify the visually obvious fact that both the time sequence at individual points as well as the degree of synchronization of the motion at spatially separated points in normally beating tissue are quite different than those in fibrillatory tissue. We compare our work to the results of analyzing electrocardiogram (EKG) traces of fibrillations.

  8. Finding Spatio-Temporal Patterns in Earth Science Data * Pang-Ning Tan+

    E-print Network

    Kumar, Vipin

    1 Finding Spatio-Temporal Patterns in Earth Science Data * Pang-Ning Tan+ Michael Steinbach+ Vipin-temporal patterns from Earth Science data. The data consists of time series measurements for various Earth science of the spatio-temporal issues. Earth Science data has strong seasonal components that need to be removed prior

  9. Towards a Predictive Model for Opal Exploration using a Spatio-temporal Data Mining Approach

    E-print Network

    Müller, Dietmar

    Towards a Predictive Model for Opal Exploration using a Spatio-temporal Data Mining Approach Andrew exploration using a powerful data mining ap- proach, which considers almost the entire Great Artesian Basin-f). By combining these data sets as layers enabling spatio-temporal data mining using the GPlates PaleoGIS software

  10. Spatio-Temporal Sequence Learning of Visual Place Cells for Robotic Navigation

    E-print Network

    Starzyk, Janusz A.

    Spatio-Temporal Sequence Learning of Visual Place Cells for Robotic Navigation Vu Anh Nguyen-temporal sequence learning architecture of visual place cells to leverage autonomous navigation. The construction the efficiency and efficacy of a hippocampal-inspired visual place cell model and its spatio-temporal sequence

  11. Spatio-Temporal Data Warehouses and Mobility Data: Current Status and Research Issues

    E-print Network

    Libre de Bruxelles, Université

    Spatio-Temporal Data Warehouses and Mobility Data: Current Status and Research Issues Esteban Zim in this respect concerns mobility data management, i.e., storing mobility data in a data warehouse for their subsuquent analysis. This paper introduces the notion of spatio-temporal data warehouses and shows how

  12. The emerging role and benefits of boundary analysis in spatio-temporal epidemiology and public health

    E-print Network

    The emerging role and benefits of boundary analysis in spatio- temporal epidemiology and public This special issue on geographic boundary analysis in spatio-temporal epidemiology and public health seeks to study human health outcomes, correlates and determinants. Epidemiology has a strong clinical tradition

  13. Scale-free model for spatio-temporal distribution of outbreaks of avian influenza

    E-print Network

    Tse, Chi K. "Michael"

    Scale-free model for spatio-temporal distribution of outbreaks of avian influenza Michael Small influenza outbreaks among wild and domestic birds, we show that this model is not appropriate. We find the global spatio-temporal distribution of avian influenza cases in both wild and domestic birds and find

  14. ClusterSheddy: Load Shedding Using Moving Clusters over Spatio-Temporal Data Streams

    E-print Network

    ClusterSheddy: Load Shedding Using Moving Clusters over Spatio-Temporal Data Streams Rimma V. Nehme randomly, the most fre- quently used approach in the literature for load shedding, may adversely affect the accuracy of the results. We thus propose a load shedding tech- nique customized for spatio-temporal stream

  15. Mercury: A Memory-Constrained Spatio-temporal Real-time Search on Microblogs

    E-print Network

    Mokbel, Mohamed F.

    Mercury: A Memory-Constrained Spatio-temporal Real-time Search on Microblogs Amr Magdy1§ , Mohamed Mercury; a system for real-time support of top-k spatio-temporal queries on microblogs, where users are able to browse recent microblogs near their locations. With high arrival rates of microblogs, Mercury

  16. Virtualized Traffic: Reconstructing Traffic Flows from Discrete Spatio-Temporal Data

    E-print Network

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    Virtualized Traffic: Reconstructing Traffic Flows from Discrete Spatio-Temporal Data Jur van den continuous traffic flows from discrete spatio-temporal data provided by traffic sensors or generated artificially to enhance a sense of immersion in a dynamic virtual world. Given the po- sitions of each car

  17. Remote sensing of spatio-temporal relationships between the partitioned absorption coefficients of phytoplankton cells and mineral

    E-print Network

    Strathclyde, University of

    Remote sensing of spatio-temporal relationships between the partitioned absorption coefficients and phytoplankton absorption Euphotic depth Irish Sea Mixing and primary production Absorption coefficients of spatio- temporal patterns in phytoplankton and mineral particle absorption coefficients and euphotic

  18. Spatio-temporal Averaging of Removal Rate constants in River Networks: Is there an Emergent Pattern?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, N. B.; Rao, P. C.; Zanardo, S.; Donner, S. D.; Ye, S.; Sivapalan, M.

    2009-12-01

    Scaling of nutrient loads across river networks is a function of complex interactions between hydrologic and biogeochemical processes that modulate the contaminant input signals from the hillslope via aggregation and attenuation in a converging network. We examined the inter-annual variability in stream nutrient delivery ratio (NDR) as moderated by the coupling between hydrologic and biogeochemical processes across the climate-landscape continuum. Experimental and modeling studies at the reach scale suggest an inverse dependence of the biogeochemical cycling rate constant (k; T-1) on the stream stage (h, L). This inverse function was implemented in the THMB large-scale hydrology and biogeochemistry model to describe nutrient processing at the reach scale, and simulate nitrogen export across Mississippi Basin. The spatio-temporally averaged reaction rate (kavg) constant from THMB exhibited similar inverse dependence on the stage at the outlet of large basins (~50,000 km2). Such emergent k-h dependence is hypothesized to be indicative of fractal scaling behavior of in-stream biogeochemical processing. Two parsimonious models were developed to scale up from the reach-scale to watershed scale, and explore the spatio-temporal averaging within the network under diverse climate forcing conditions. The first model was derived from THREW, and was enhanced by adding a two-compartment biogeochemical reaction module. The second model used the inverse k-h dependence at the daily time scale, without invoking the two-compartment model, similar to that used in the basin-scale model. Preliminary analyses indicated that temporal averaging decreased the exponent of the k-h relationship at smaller spatial scales (e.g., first- or second- order watersheds); however, the relationship converged towards the reach-scale dependence function at larger scales. The average k value at the smaller scales, and the trajectory of convergence, is a function of climatic (e.g., rainfall frequency,depth) and geomorphic (e.g., network structure, channel dimensions) controls. The reach-scale k-h relationship thus acts as an “attractor” for the entire system, such that at larger spatial scales an effective k, derived solely from the mean stage at the watershed outlet, is adequate to describe nutrient processing within the entire network. Implications of this unique spatio-temporal averaging behavior on the development of predictive models that describe nutrient loads in catchments across scales are discussed.

  19. Approach to analysis of multiscale space-distributed time series: separation of spatio-temporal modes with essentially different time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigin, Alexander; Mukhin, Dmitry; Gavrilov, Andrey; Volodin, Evgeny; Loskutov, Evgeny

    2014-05-01

    Natural systems are in general space-distributed, and their evolution represents a broad spectrum of temporal scales. The multiscale nature may be resulted from multiplicity of mechanisms governing the system behaviour, and a large number of feedbacks and nonlinearities. A way to reveal and understand the underlying mechanisms as well as to model corresponding sub-systems is decomposition of the full (complex) system into well separated spatio-temporal patterns ("modes") that evolve with essentially different time scales. In the report a new method of a similar decomposition is discussed. The method is based on generalization of the MSSA (Multichannel Singular Spectral Analysis) [1] for expanding space-distributed time series in basis of spatio-temporal empirical orthogonal functions (STEOF), which makes allowance delayed correlations of the processes recorded in spatially separated points. The method is applied to decomposition of the Earth's climate system: on the base of 156 years time series of SST anomalies distributed over the globe [2] two climatic modes possessing by noticeably different time scales (3-5 and 9-11 years) are separated. For more accurate exclusion of "too slow" (and thus not represented correctly) processes from real data the numerically produced STEOF basis is used. For doing this the time series generated by the INM RAS Coupled Climate Model [3] is utilized. Relations of separated modes to ENSO and PDO are investigated. Possible development of the suggested approach in order to the separation of the modes that are nonlinearly uncorrelated is discussed. 1. Ghil, M., R. M. Allen, M. D. Dettinger, K. Ide, D. Kondrashov, et al. (2002) "Advanced spectral methods for climatic time series", Rev. Geophys. 40(1), 3.1-3.41. 2. http://iridl.ldeo.columbia.edu/SOURCES/.KAPLAN/.EXTENDED/.v2/.ssta/ 3. http://83.149.207.89/GCM_DATA_PLOTTING/GCM_INM_DATA_XY_en.htm

  20. Spatio-temporal interpolation of soil moisture in 3D+T using automated sensor network data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasch, C.; Hengl, T.; Magney, T. S.; Brown, D. J.; Gräler, B.

    2014-12-01

    Soil sensor networks provide frequent in situ measurements of dynamic soil properties at fixed locations, producing data in 2- or 3-dimensions and through time (2D+T and 3D+T). Spatio-temporal interpolation of 3D+T point data produces continuous estimates that can then be used for prediction at unsampled times and locations, as input for process models, and can simply aid in visualization of properties through space and time. Regression-kriging with 3D and 2D+T data has successfully been implemented, but currently the field of geostatistics lacks an analytical framework for modeling 3D+T data. Our objective is to develop robust 3D+T models for mapping dynamic soil data that has been collected with high spatial and temporal resolution. For this analysis, we use data collected from a sensor network installed on the R.J. Cook Agronomy Farm (CAF), a 37-ha Long-Term Agro-Ecosystem Research (LTAR) site in Pullman, WA. For five years, the sensors have collected hourly measurements of soil volumetric water content at 42 locations and five depths. The CAF dataset also includes a digital elevation model and derivatives, a soil unit description map, crop rotations, electromagnetic induction surveys, daily meteorological data, and seasonal satellite imagery. The soil-water sensor data, combined with the spatial and temporal covariates, provide an ideal dataset for developing 3D+T models. The presentation will include preliminary results and address main implementation strategies.

  1. Correlation analysis of spatio-temporal images for estimating two-dimensional flow velocity field in a rotating flow condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kwonkyu; Kim, Seojun; Kim, Dongsu

    2015-10-01

    Flow velocity estimation in actual rivers using image processing technique has been highlighted for hydrometric communities in the last decades, and this technique is called Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry (LSPIV). Although LSPIV has been successfully tested in many flow conditions, it has addressed several limitations estimating mean flow field because of difficult flow conditions such as rotating, lack of light and seeds, and noisy flow conditions. Recently, an alternative technique named STIV to use spatio-temporal images based on successively recorded images has been introduced to overcome the limitations of LSPIV. The STIV was successfully applied to obtain one-dimensional flow component in the river for estimating streamflow discharge, where the main flow direction is known. Using the 5th order of central difference scheme, the STIV directly calculated the mean angle of slopes which appeared as strips in the spatio-temporal images and has been proved to be more reliable and efficient for the discharge estimation as compared with the conventional LSPIV. However, yet it has not been sufficiently qualified to derive two-dimensional flow field in the complex flow, such as rotating or locally unsteady flow conditions. We deemed that it was because the strips in the given spatio-temporal images from not properly oriented for main flow direction are not narrow enough or clearly visible, thus the direct estimating strip slope could give erroneous results. Thereby, the STIV has been mainly applied for obtaining one-dimensional flow component. In this regard, we proposed an alternative algorithm to estimate the mean slope angle for enhancing the capability of the STIV, which used correlation coefficient between odd and even image splits from the given spatio-temporal image. This method was named CASTI (Correlation Analysis of Spatio-Temporal Image). This paper described the step-by-step procedure of the CASTI and validated its capability for estimating two-dimensional flow field in the rotating flow. For this purpose, we generated artificial images for lid-driven cavity flow where true velocity field can be manipulated and validated with respect to the proposed CASTI algorithm. As a result, the CASTI was successfully performed to capture two-dimensional velocity vector in the given cavity flow.

  2. Spatio-temporal characteristics of self-pulse in hollow cathode discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ha; He, Shoujie

    2015-02-01

    The characteristics of self-pulse in hollow cathode discharge at low pressure have been investigated. The voltage-current (V-I) curves, the influence of ballast resistor on the self-pulses, and the evolution of current and voltage are measured. Both the axial and radial spatio-temporal discharge images of self-pulse are recorded. The results show that there exists the hysteresis effect in the present hollow cathode discharge. The high value of ballast resistors is favourable for the observation of self-pulses. The process of the self-pulse can be divided into three stages from the temporal discharge images, i.e., the pre-discharge, the transition from mainly axial electric field to mainly radial electric field, and the decaying process. The self-pulse is suggested to originate from the mode transition of the discharge in essence.

  3. Spatio-temporal characteristics of self-pulse in hollow cathode discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, Ha; He, Shoujie

    2015-02-15

    The characteristics of self-pulse in hollow cathode discharge at low pressure have been investigated. The voltage-current (V-I) curves, the influence of ballast resistor on the self-pulses, and the evolution of current and voltage are measured. Both the axial and radial spatio-temporal discharge images of self-pulse are recorded. The results show that there exists the hysteresis effect in the present hollow cathode discharge. The high value of ballast resistors is favourable for the observation of self-pulses. The process of the self-pulse can be divided into three stages from the temporal discharge images, i.e., the pre-discharge, the transition from mainly axial electric field to mainly radial electric field, and the decaying process. The self-pulse is suggested to originate from the mode transition of the discharge in essence.

  4. H.264/AVC digital fingerprinting based on spatio-temporal just noticeable distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ait Saadi, Karima; Bouridane, Ahmed; Guessoum, Abderrezak

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a robust adaptive embedding scheme using a modified Spatio-Temporal noticeable distortion (JND) model that is designed for tracing the distribution of the H.264/AVC video content and protecting them from unauthorized redistribution. The Embedding process is performed during coding process in selected macroblocks type Intra 4x4 within I-Frame. The method uses spread-spectrum technique in order to obtain robustness against collusion attacks and the JND model to dynamically adjust the embedding strength and control the energy of the embedded fingerprints so as to ensure their imperceptibility. Linear and non linear collusion attacks are performed to show the robustness of the proposed technique against collusion attacks while maintaining visual quality unchanged.

  5. Spatial distribution of tree species governs the spatio-temporal interaction of leaf area index and soil moisture across a forested landscape.

    PubMed

    Naithani, Kusum J; Baldwin, Doug C; Gaines, Katie P; Lin, Henry; Eissenstat, David M

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying coupled spatio-temporal dynamics of phenology and hydrology and understanding underlying processes is a fundamental challenge in ecohydrology. While variation in phenology and factors influencing it have attracted the attention of ecologists for a long time, the influence of biodiversity on coupled dynamics of phenology and hydrology across a landscape is largely untested. We measured leaf area index (L) and volumetric soil water content (?) on a co-located spatial grid to characterize forest phenology and hydrology across a forested catchment in central Pennsylvania during 2010. We used hierarchical Bayesian modeling to quantify spatio-temporal patterns of L and ?. Our results suggest that the spatial distribution of tree species across the landscape created unique spatio-temporal patterns of L, which created patterns of water demand reflected in variable soil moisture across space and time. We found a lag of about 11 days between increase in L and decline in ?. Vegetation and soil moisture become increasingly homogenized and coupled from leaf-onset to maturity but heterogeneous and uncoupled from leaf maturity to senescence. Our results provide insight into spatio-temporal coupling between biodiversity and soil hydrology that is useful to enhance ecohydrological modeling in humid temperate forests. PMID:23554915

  6. Predicting gross primary production with high spatio-temporal resolution remote sensing datasets at regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, D.; Chen, B.

    2012-04-01

    Remote sensing has great potential for estimating gross primary production (GPP) without resorting to interpolation of many surface observations. Meanwhile, it can be applied to analyzing the variation of GPP at different ecosystems across a wide range of spatial, temporal, and spectral resolutions. However, the availability of input data for remote-sensing-based GPP models is the bottleneck. The input data of remote-sensing-based greenness and radiation (GR) model is more independent on climate or ground-based observations, and the result is promising. Previous work using this modeling approach only used coarse spatial resolution data (e.g. MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, MODIS), the estimated spatio-temporal distributions of GPP with higher resolution remains unclear. To overcome this limitation, a modified image fusion method was developed based on Enhanced Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (mESTARFM), producing images with high spatial and temporal resolutions based on Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) / Enhanced TM Plus (ETM+) (high spatial resolution, low temporal resolution) and MODIS (low spatial resolution, high temporal resolution). Meanwhile, the Simple Analytical Footprint model on Eulerian coordinates (SAFE) model to estimate the flux tower's footprint, which will be helpful for GR model's calibration, and improve the accuracy of GPP estimate. In the study, twelve flux sites belonging to Fluxnet-Canada Research Network (FCRN)/Canadian Carbon Program (CCP) were selected, covering grassland, forest, and wetland biomes. The remote sensing dataset acquired in this study for each site include MODIS reflectance product (MOD09A1, 500 m), Landsat TM /ETM+ (30 m), MODIS BRDF/ Albedo model parameter product (MCD43A1, 500 m), MODIS BRDF/ Albedo quality product (MCD43A2, 500 m). The steps are as follows:: (i) Landsat TM /ETM+ and MODIS data were used as mESTARFM inputs to produce reflectance datasets with high spatio-temporal resolution; (ii) the estimated GPP is produced by GR model using available reflectance data with high spatial resolution; (iii) the GR model's calibration process is done combined with SAFE model's pure footprint result and the observations of flux sites; (iv) the spatio-temporal distribution of GPP values at regional scale are predicted with specific parameters correspond to different ecosystem.

  7. Spatio-Temporal Variability in Marine Ecosystem Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meacham, S. P.

    2011-12-01

    In upper ocean marine ecosystems, phytoplankton blooms and associated peaks in zooplankton grazing are relatively frequent and the biological pump constitutes one component of the global carbon cycle. When represented with simple mathematical ecosystem models (such as the multi-compartment models used in some climate models), in a system containing a background flow-field, the nonlinear dynamics of the ecosystem model can give rise to spatio-temporal structure that, although appearing biological, is a consequence of the numerical implementation of advection and mixing. Effects can include plankton blooms that are spatially coherent over a variety of mesoscale and larger scales, apparent propagation of transient biological activity at rates that are significantly different from the local flow speed, and biases in the basin-integrated flux of carbon to the sub-surface. These effects are analyzed in a purely mathematical model and demonstrated in numerical simulations in idealized basins.

  8. Spatio-Temporal Structure of Hooded Gull Flocks

    PubMed Central

    Yomosa, Makoto; Mizuguchi, Tsuyoshi; Hayakawa, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    We analyzed the spatio-temporal structure of hooded gull flocks with a portable stereo camera system. The 3-dimensional positions of individuals were reconstructed from pairs of videos. The motions of each individual were analyzed, and both gliding and flapping motions were quantified based on the velocity time series. We analyzed the distributions of the nearest neighbor’s position in terms of coordinates based on each individual’s motion. The obtained results were consistent with the aerodynamic interaction between individuals. We characterized the leader-follower relationship between individuals by a delay time to mimic the direction of a motion. A relation between the delay time and a relative position was analyzed quantitatively, which suggested the basic properties of the formation flight that maintains order in the flock. PMID:24339960

  9. Resonant spatio-temporal forcing of oscillatory media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utzny, C.; Zimmermann, W.; Bär, M.

    2002-01-01

    An extension of the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation describing resonant spatio-temporal forcing of oscillatory media is investigated. Periodic forcing in space and time leads to spatial structures with two different symmetries: harmonic patterns with the same and subharmonic patterns with twice the wavelength of the external forcing. A linear stability analysis of the homogeneous state carried out analytically leads to subharmonic patterns for intermediate forcing strength, while harmonic modes prevail for very weak and strong forcing amplitudes. Numerical simulations confirm the analytical predictions for weak forcing and show coexistence between the two types of patterns beyond threshold. In addition, traveling localized patterns such as phase flips in subharmonic patterns and traveling patches of subharmonic patterns in a harmonic background have been discovered. In the parameter range of Benjamin-Feir turbulence, stable subharmonic patterns occur upon forcing, which undergo a transition scenario back to irregular dynamics for increasing values of the control parameter.

  10. Spontaneous switching among multiple spatio-temporal patterns in three-oscillator systems constructed with oscillatory cells of true slime mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamatsu, Atsuko

    2006-11-01

    Three-oscillator systems with plasmodia of true slime mold, Physarum polycephalum, which is an oscillatory amoeba-like unicellular organism, were experimentally constructed and their spatio-temporal patterns were investigated. Three typical spatio-temporal patterns were found: rotation ( R), partial in-phase ( PI), and partial anti-phase with double frequency ( PA). In pattern R, phase differences between adjacent oscillators were almost 120 ?. In pattern PI, two oscillators were in-phase and the third oscillator showed anti-phase against the two oscillators. In pattern PA, two oscillators showed anti-phase and the third oscillator showed frequency doubling oscillation with small amplitude. Actually each pattern is not perfectly stable but quasi-stable. Interestingly, the system shows spontaneous switching among the multiple quasi-stable patterns. Statistical analyses revealed a characteristic in the residence time of each pattern: the histograms seem to have Gamma-like distribution form but with a sharp peak and a tail on the side of long period. That suggests the attractor of this system has complex structure composed of at least three types of sub-attractors: a “Gamma attractor”-involved with several Poisson processes, a “deterministic attractor”-the residence time is deterministic, and a “stable attractor”-each pattern is stable. When the coupling strength was small, only the Gamma attractor was observed and switching behavior among patterns R, PI, and PA almost always via an asynchronous pattern named O. A conjecture is as follows: Internal/external noise exposes each pattern of R, PI, and PA coexisting around bifurcation points: That is observed as the Gamma attractor. As coupling strength increases, the deterministic attractor appears then followed by the stable attractor, always accompanied with the Gamma attractor. Switching behavior could be caused by regular existence of the Gamma attractor.

  11. Spatio-temporal activity of lightnings over Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastos, P. T.; Matsangouras, I. T.; Chronis, T. G.

    2012-04-01

    Extreme precipitation events are always associated with convective weather conditions driving to intense lightning activity: Cloud to Ground (CG), Ground to Cloud (GC) and Cloud to Cloud (CC). Thus, the study of lightnings, which typically occur during thunderstorms, gives evidence of the spatio-temporal variability of intense precipitation. Lightning is a natural phenomenon in the atmosphere, being a major cause of storm related with deaths and main trigger of forest fires during dry season. Lightning affects the many electrochemical systems of the body causing nerve damage, memory loss, personality change, and emotional problems. Besides, among the various nitrogen oxides sources, the contribution from lightning likely represents the largest uncertainty. An operational lightning detection network (LDN) has been established since 2007 by HNMS, consisting of eight time-of-arrival sensors (TOA), spatially distributed across Greek territory. In this study, the spatial and temporal variability of recorded lightnings (CG, GC and CC) are analyzed over Greece, during the period from January 14, 2008 to December 31, 2009, for the first time. The data for retrieving the location and time-of-occurrence of lightning were acquired from Hellenic National Meteorological Service (HNMS). In addition to the analysis of spatio-temporal activity over Greece, the HNMS-LDN characteristics are also presented. The results of the performed analysis reveal the specific geographical sub-regions associated with lightnings incidence. Lightning activity occurs mainly during the autumn season, followed by summer and spring. Higher frequencies of flashes appear over Ionian and Aegean Sea than over land during winter period against continental mountainous regions during summer period.

  12. Spatio-temporal clustering of wildfires in Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, R.; Pereira, M. G.; Caramelo, L.; Vega Orozco, C.; Kanevski, M.

    2012-04-01

    Several studies have shown that wildfires in Portugal presenthigh temporal as well as high spatial variability (Pereira et al., 2005, 2011). The identification and characterization of spatio-temporal clusters contributes to a comprehensivecharacterization of the fire regime and to improve the efficiency of fire prevention and combat activities. The main goalsin this studyare: (i) to detect the spatio-temporal clusters of burned area; and, (ii) to characterize these clusters along with the role of human and environmental factors. The data were supplied by the National Forest Authority(AFN, 2011) and comprises: (a)the Portuguese Rural Fire Database, PRFD, (Pereira et al., 2011) for the 1980-2007period; and, (b) the national mapping burned areas between 1990 and 2009. In this work, in order to complement the more common cluster analysis algorithms, an alternative approach based onscan statistics and on the permutation modelwas used. This statistical methodallows the detection of local excess events and to test if such an excess can reasonably have occurred by chance.Results obtained for different simulations performed for different spatial and temporal windows are presented, compared and interpreted.The influence of several fire factors such as (climate, vegetation type, etc.) is also assessed. Pereira, M.G., Trigo, R.M., DaCamara, C.C., Pereira, J.M.C., Leite, S.M., 2005:"Synoptic patterns associated with large summer forest fires in Portugal".Agricultural and Forest Meteorology. 129, 11-25. Pereira, M. G., Malamud, B. D., Trigo, R. M., and Alves, P. I.: The history and characteristics of the 1980-2005 Portuguese rural fire database, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 3343-3358, doi:10.5194/nhess-11-3343-2011, 2011 AFN, 2011: AutoridadeFlorestalNacional (National Forest Authority). Available at http://www.afn.min-agricultura.pt/portal.

  13. SPATIO-TEMPORAL COMPLEXITY OF THE AORTIC SINUS VORTEX

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Brandon; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2014-01-01

    The aortic sinus vortex is a classical flow structure of significant importance to aortic valve dynamics and the initiation and progression of calific aortic valve disease. We characterize the spatio-temporal characteristics of aortic sinus voxtex dynamics in relation to the viscosity of blood analog solution as well as heart rate. High resolution time-resolved (2KHz) particle image velocimetry was conducted to capture 2D particle streak videos and 2D instantaneous velocity and streamlines along the sinus midplane using a physiological but rigid aorta model fitted with a porcine bioprosthetic heart valve. Blood analog fluids used include a water-glycerin mixture and saline to elucidate the sensitivity of vortex dynamics to viscosity. Experiments were conducted to record 10 heart beats for each combination of blood analog and heart rate condition. Results show that the topological characteristics of the velocity field vary in time-scales as revealed using time bin averaged vectors and corresponding instantaneous streamlines. There exist small time-scale vortices and a large time-scale main vortex. A key flow structure observed is the counter vortex at the upstream end of the sinus adjacent to the base (lower half) of the leaflet. The spatio-temporal complexity of vortex dynamics is shown to be profoundly influenced by strong leaflet flutter during systole with a peak frequency of 200Hz and peak amplitude of 4 mm observed in the saline case. While fluid viscosity influences the length and time-scales as well as the introduction of leaflet flutter, heart rate influences the formation of counter vortex at the upstream end of the sinus. Higher heart rates are shown to reduce the strength of the counter vortex that can greatly influence the directionality and strength of shear stresses along the base of the leaflet. This study demonstrates the impact of heart rate and blood analog viscosity on aortic sinus hemodynamics. PMID:25067881

  14. A Spatio-temporal Model of African Animal Trypanosomosis Risk

    PubMed Central

    Dicko, Ahmadou H.; Percoma, Lassane; Sow, Adama; Adam, Yahaya; Mahama, Charles; Sidibé, Issa; Dayo, Guiguigbaza-Kossigan; Thévenon, Sophie; Fonta, William; Sanfo, Safietou; Djiteye, Aligui; Salou, Ernest; Djohan, Vincent; Cecchi, Giuliano; Bouyer, Jérémy

    2015-01-01

    Background African animal trypanosomosis (AAT) is a major constraint to sustainable development of cattle farming in sub-Saharan Africa. The habitat of the tsetse fly vector is increasingly fragmented owing to demographic pressure and shifts in climate, which leads to heterogeneous risk of cyclical transmission both in space and time. In Burkina Faso and Ghana, the most important vectors are riverine species, namely Glossina palpalis gambiensis and G. tachinoides, which are more resilient to human-induced changes than the savannah and forest species. Although many authors studied the distribution of AAT risk both in space and time, spatio-temporal models allowing predictions of it are lacking. Methodology/Principal Findings We used datasets generated by various projects, including two baseline surveys conducted in Burkina Faso and Ghana within PATTEC (Pan African Tsetse and Trypanosomosis Eradication Campaign) national initiatives. We computed the entomological inoculation rate (EIR) or tsetse challenge using a range of environmental data. The tsetse apparent density and their infection rate were separately estimated and subsequently combined to derive the EIR using a “one layer-one model” approach. The estimated EIR was then projected into suitable habitat. This risk index was finally validated against data on bovine trypanosomosis. It allowed a good prediction of the parasitological status (r2 = 67%), showed a positive correlation but less predictive power with serological status (r2 = 22%) aggregated at the village level but was not related to the illness status (r2 = 2%). Conclusions/Significance The presented spatio-temporal model provides a fine-scale picture of the dynamics of AAT risk in sub-humid areas of West Africa. The estimated EIR was high in the proximity of rivers during the dry season and more widespread during the rainy season. The present analysis is a first step in a broader framework for an efficient risk management of climate-sensitive vector-borne diseases. PMID:26154506

  15. Impact of spatio-temporal sampling on the evaluation of models with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutgens, Nick; Gryspeerdt, Edward; Weigum, Natalie; Tsyro, Svetlana; Schulz, Michael; Stier, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Global models and observations differ strongly in their spatio-temporal sampling. First, Model results are typical of large gridboxes (100 km), while observations are made over much smaller areas (1 to 10 km). Second, model results are always available in contrast to observations that are intermittent due to sampling strategies, retrieval limitations and instrument failure/maintenance. We investigate the consequences of spatio-temporal sampling for the evaluation of models with observations and find them to be significant (differences up to 100% in monthly or yearly averages due to sampling alone). Using high resolution WRF-Chem and EMEP simulations, we study the impact of evaluating low resolution global models with highly localised observations. Results suggest that significant differences due to the spatial aggregation alone will exist between models and observations, even after averaging data over e.g. a month. When using realistic observational sampling, these differences will be even bigger. Results depend on the concerned observable: a column-integrated property like AOT, easily advected by the flow, will exhibit smaller differences than a surface property like PM2.5, especially if that surface property shows little advection (e.g. number density). We explain these results qualitatively as a consequence of flow structure and aerosol source length-scales. Furthermore, we show that proper temporal collocation of model data with the observations and further spatial aggregation of the observations can reduce (but not entirely remove!) these sampling-induced differences. We point out that even temporal collocation is by no means a standard procedure for researchers and often it is simply assumed that 'over time' issues due to sampling will average out (we show they will not).

  16. Extensive spatio-temporal assessment of flood events by application of pair-copulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, M.; Schumann, A. H.

    2015-06-01

    Although the consequences of floods are strongly related to their peak discharges, a statistical classification of flood events that only depends on these peaks may not be sufficient for flood risk assessments. In many cases, the flood risk depends on a number of event characteristics. In case of an extreme flood, the whole river basin may be affected instead of a single watershed, and there will be superposition of peak discharges from adjoining catchments. These peaks differ in size and timing according to the spatial distribution of precipitation and watershed-specific processes of flood formation. Thus, the spatial characteristics of flood events should be considered as stochastic processes. Hence, there is a need for a multivariate statistical approach that represents the spatial interdependencies between floods from different watersheds and their coincidences. This paper addresses the question how these spatial interdependencies can be quantified. Each flood event is not only assessed with regard to its local conditions but also according to its spatio-temporal pattern within the river basin. In this paper we characterise the coincidence of floods by trivariate Joe-copula and pair-copulas. Their ability to link the marginal distributions of the variates while maintaining their dependence structure characterizes them as an adequate method. The results indicate that the trivariate copula model is able to represent the multivariate probabilities of the occurrence of simultaneous flood peaks well. It is suggested that the approach of this paper is very useful for the risk-based design of retention basins as it accounts for the complex spatio-temporal interactions of floods.

  17. Adaptive OFDM waveform design for spatio-temporal-sparsity exploited STAP radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Satyabrata; Barhen, Jacob

    2015-05-01

    We propose a sparsity-based space-time adaptive processing (STAP) algorithm to detect a slowly-moving target using an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) radar. The motivation of employing an OFDM signal is that it improves the target-detectability from the interfering signals by increasing the frequency diversity of the system. However, due to the addition of one extra dimension in terms of frequency, the adaptive degrees-of- freedom in an OFDM-STAP also increases. Therefore, to avoid the construction a fully-adaptive OFDM-STAP, we propose a sparsity-based STAP algorithm. We observe that the interference spectrum is inherently sparse in the spatio-temporal domain, as the clutter responses occupy only a diagonal ridge on the spatio-temporal plane and the jammer signals interfere only from a few spatial directions. Hence, we exploit that sparsity to develop an efficient STAP technique that utilizes considerably lesser number of secondary data compared to the other existing STAP techniques, and produces nearly optimum STAP performance. In addition to designing the STAP filter, we propose to optimally design the transmit OFDM signals by maximizing the output signal- to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) in order to improve the STAP-performance. The computation of output SINR depends on the estimated value of the interference covariance matrix, which we obtain by applying the sparse recovery algorithm. Therefore, we analytically assess the effects of the synthesized OFDM coefficients on the sparse recovery of the interference covariance matrix by computing the coherence measure of the sparse measurement matrix. Our numerical examples demonstrate the achieved STAP-performance due to sparsity- based technique and adaptive waveform design.

  18. Quantifying Uncertainty in Spatio-temporal Forest Composition Changes Inferred from Fossil Pollen Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, A.; Paciorek, C. J.; McLachlan, J. S.; Goring, S. J.; Williams, J. W.; Jackson, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding past compositional changes in vegetation provides insight about ecosystem dynamics in response to changing environments. Past vegetation reconstructions rely predominantly on fossil pollen data from sedimentary lake cores, which acts as a proxy record for the surrounding vegetation. Stratigraphic changes in these pollen records allow us to infer changes in composition and species distributions. Pollen records collected from a network of sites allow us to make inference about the spatio-temporal changes in vegetation over thousands of years. However, the complexity of the relationship between pollen deposits and surrounding vegetation, as well as the spatially sparse set of fossil pollen sites are important sources of uncertainty. In addition, uncertainty arises from the carbon dating and age-depth modelling processes. To reconstruct vegetation composition including uncertainty for the Upper Midwestern USA, we build a Bayesian hierarchical model that links vegetation composition to fossil pollen data via a dispersal model. In the calibration phase, we estimate the relationship between vegetation and pollen for the settlement era using Public Land Survey data and a network of pollen records. In the prediction phase, parameter estimates obtained during the calibration phase are used to estimate latent species distributions and relative abundances over the last 2500 years. We account for additional uncertainty in the pollen records by: allowing expert palynologists to identify pre-settlement pollen samples to be included in our calibration data, and through the incorporation of age uncertainty obtained from the Bayesian age-depth model BACON in our prediction data. Resulting spatio-temporal composition and abundance estimates will be used to improve forecasting capabilities of ecosystem models.

  19. Behavior Recognition via Sparse Spatio-Temporal Features Piotr Dollar Vincent Rabaud Garrison Cottrell Serge Belongie

    E-print Network

    Cottrell, Garrison W.

    Behavior Recognition via Sparse Spatio-Temporal Features Piotr Doll´ar Vincent Rabaud Garrison-temporally windowed data. We present recognition results on a variety of datasets in- cluding both human and rodent

  20. Spatio-temporal distribution of human lifespan in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaobin; Luo, Kunli; Liu, Yonglin

    2015-01-01

    Based on the data of latest three Chinese population censuses (1990-2010), four lifespan indicators were calculated: centenarians per one hundred thousand inhabitants (CH); longevity index (LI); the percentage of the population aged at least 80 years (ultra-octogenarian index, UOI) and life expectancy at birth (LEB). The spatio-temporal distributions of data at Chinese county level show that high-longevity areas (high values of CH and LI) and low-longevity areas (low CH and LI values) both exhibit clear non-uniformity of spatial distribution and relative immobility through time. Contrarily, the distribution of UOI and LEB shows a decline from the east to the west. The spatial autocorrelation analyses indicate less spatial dependency and several discontinuous clusters regions of high-CH and LI areas. The factors of temperature, topography and wet/dry climate lack of significant influence on CH and LI. It can be inferred that, in addition to genetic factor and living custom, some unique and long-term environmental effects may be related with high or low values of CH and LI. PMID:26346713

  1. How spatio-temporal habitat connectivity affects amphibian genetic structure

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Alexander G.; Schlichting, Peter E.; Billerman, Shawn M.; Jesmer, Brett R.; Micheletti, Steven; Fortin, Marie-Josée; Funk, W. Chris; Hapeman, Paul; Muths, Erin; Murphy, Melanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous landscapes and fluctuating environmental conditions can affect species dispersal, population genetics, and genetic structure, yet understanding how biotic and abiotic factors affect population dynamics in a fluctuating environment is critical for species management. We evaluated how spatio-temporal habitat connectivity influences dispersal and genetic structure in a population of boreal chorus frogs (Pseudacris maculata) using a landscape genetics approach. We developed gravity models to assess the contribution of various factors to the observed genetic distance as a measure of functional connectivity. We selected (a) wetland (within-site) and (b) landscape matrix (between-site) characteristics; and (c) wetland connectivity metrics using a unique methodology. Specifically, we developed three networks that quantify wetland connectivity based on: (i) P. maculata dispersal ability, (ii) temporal variation in wetland quality, and (iii) contribution of wetland stepping-stones to frog dispersal. We examined 18 wetlands in Colorado, and quantified 12 microsatellite loci from 322 individual frogs. We found that genetic connectivity was related to topographic complexity, within- and between-wetland differences in moisture, and wetland functional connectivity as contributed by stepping-stone wetlands. Our results highlight the role that dynamic environmental factors have on dispersal-limited species and illustrate how complex asynchronous interactions contribute to the structure of spatially-explicit metapopulations. PMID:26442094

  2. Workload induced spatio-temporal distortions and safety of flight

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, C.L.; Weisgerber, S.A.; Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, CA )

    1989-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the relationship between cognitive complexity and the perception of time and distance is presented and experimentally verified. Complex tasks produce high rates of mental representation which affect the subjective sense of duration and, through the subjective time scale, the percept of distance derived from dynamic visual cues (i.e., visual cues requiring rate integration). The analysis of the interrelationship of subjective time and subjective distance yields the prediction that, as a function of cognitive complexity, distance estimates derived from dynamic visual cues will be longer than the actual distance whereas estimates based on perceived temporal duration will be shorter than the actual distance. This prediction was confirmed in an experiment in which subjects (both pilots and non-pilots) estimated distances using either temporal cues or dynamic visual cues. The distance estimation task was also combined with secondary loading tasks in order to vary the overall task complexity. The results indicated that distance estimates based on temporal cues were underestimated while estimates based on visual cues were overestimated. This spatio-temporal distortion effect increased with increases in overall task complexity. 30 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Spatio-temporal distribution of human lifespan in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaobin; Luo, Kunli; Liu, Yonglin

    2015-01-01

    Based on the data of latest three Chinese population censuses (1990–2010), four lifespan indicators were calculated: centenarians per one hundred thousand inhabitants (CH); longevity index (LI); the percentage of the population aged at least 80 years (ultra-octogenarian index, UOI) and life expectancy at birth (LEB). The spatio-temporal distributions of data at Chinese county level show that high-longevity areas (high values of CH and LI) and low-longevity areas (low CH and LI values) both exhibit clear non-uniformity of spatial distribution and relative immobility through time. Contrarily, the distribution of UOI and LEB shows a decline from the east to the west. The spatial autocorrelation analyses indicate less spatial dependency and several discontinuous clusters regions of high-CH and LI areas. The factors of temperature, topography and wet/dry climate lack of significant influence on CH and LI. It can be inferred that, in addition to genetic factor and living custom, some unique and long-term environmental effects may be related with high or low values of CH and LI. PMID:26346713

  4. Spatio-temporal self-organization in mudstones.

    SciTech Connect

    Dewers, Thomas A.

    2010-12-01

    Shales and other mudstones are the most abundant rock types in sedimentary basins, yet have received comparatively little attention. Common as hydrocarbon seals, these are increasingly being targeted as unconventional gas reservoirs, caprocks for CO2 sequestration, and storage repositories for waste. The small pore and grain size, large specific surface areas, and clay mineral structures lend themselves to rapid reaction rates, high capillary pressures, and semi-permeable membrane behavior accompanying changes in stress, pressure, temperature and chemical conditions. Under far from equilibrium conditions, mudrocks display a variety of spatio-temporal self-organized phenomena arising from nonlinear thermo-mechano-chemo-hydro coupling. Beginning with a detailed examination of nano-scale pore network structures in mudstones, we discuss the dynamics behind such self-organized phenomena as pressure solitons in unconsolidated muds, chemically-induced flow self focusing and permeability transients, localized compaction, time dependent well-bore failure, and oscillatory osmotic fluxes as they occur in clay-bearing sediments. Examples are draw from experiments, numerical simulation, and the field. These phenomena bear on the ability of these rocks to serve as containment barriers.

  5. Spatio-temporal distribution of human lifespan in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shaobin; Luo, Kunli; Liu, Yonglin

    2015-09-01

    Based on the data of latest three Chinese population censuses (1990-2010), four lifespan indicators were calculated: centenarians per one hundred thousand inhabitants (CH); longevity index (LI); the percentage of the population aged at least 80 years (ultra-octogenarian index, UOI) and life expectancy at birth (LEB). The spatio-temporal distributions of data at Chinese county level show that high-longevity areas (high values of CH and LI) and low-longevity areas (low CH and LI values) both exhibit clear non-uniformity of spatial distribution and relative immobility through time. Contrarily, the distribution of UOI and LEB shows a decline from the east to the west. The spatial autocorrelation analyses indicate less spatial dependency and several discontinuous clusters regions of high-CH and LI areas. The factors of temperature, topography and wet/dry climate lack of significant influence on CH and LI. It can be inferred that, in addition to genetic factor and living custom, some unique and long-term environmental effects may be related with high or low values of CH and LI.

  6. Mapping the spatio-temporal structure of motor cortical LFP and spiking activities during reach-to-grasp movements

    PubMed Central

    Riehle, Alexa; Wirtssohn, Sarah; Grün, Sonja; Brochier, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Grasping an object involves shaping the hand and fingers in relation to the object’s physical properties. Following object contact, it also requires a fine adjustment of grasp forces for secure manipulation. Earlier studies suggest that the control of hand shaping and grasp force involve partially segregated motor cortical networks. However, it is still unclear how information originating from these networks is processed and integrated. We addressed this issue by analyzing massively parallel signals from population measures (local field potentials, LFPs) and single neuron spiking activities recorded simultaneously during a delayed reach-to-grasp task, by using a 100-electrode array chronically implanted in monkey motor cortex. Motor cortical LFPs exhibit a large multi-component movement-related potential (MRP) around movement onset. Here, we show that the peak amplitude of each MRP component and its latency with respect to movement onset vary along the cortical surface covered by the array. Using a comparative mapping approach, we suggest that the spatio-temporal structure of the MRP reflects the complex physical properties of the reach-to-grasp movement. In addition, we explored how the spatio-temporal structure of the MRP relates to two other measures of neuronal activity: the temporal profile of single neuron spiking activity at each electrode site and the somatosensory receptive field properties of single neuron activities. We observe that the spatial representations of LFP and spiking activities overlap extensively and relate to the spatial distribution of proximal and distal representations of the upper limb. Altogether, these data show that, in motor cortex, a precise spatio-temporal pattern of activation is involved for the control of reach-to-grasp movements and provide some new insight about the functional organization of motor cortex during reaching and object manipulation. PMID:23543888

  7. A generic regional spatio-temporal co-occurrence pattern mining model: a case study for air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Mohammad; Samadzadegan, Farhad; Weibel, Robert

    2015-07-01

    Spatio-temporal co-occurrence patterns represent subsets of object types which are located together in both space and time. Existing algorithms for co-occurrence pattern mining cannot handle complex applications such as air pollution in several ways. First, the existing models assume that spatial relationships between objects are explicitly represented in the input data, while the new method allows extracting implicitly contained spatial relationships algorithmically. Second, instead of extracting co-occurrence patterns of only point data, the proposed method deals with different feature types that is with point, line and polygon data. Thus, it becomes relevant for a wider range of real applications. Third, it also allows mining a spatio-temporal co-occurrence pattern simultaneously in space and time so that it illustrates the evolution of patterns over space and time. Furthermore, the proposed algorithm uses a Voronoi tessellation to improve efficiency. To evaluate the proposed method, it was applied on a real case study for air pollution where the objective is to find correspondences of air pollution with other parameters which affect this phenomenon. The results of evaluation confirm not only the capability of this method for co-occurrence pattern mining of complex applications, but also it exhibits an efficient computational performance.

  8. Spatio-Temporal Measurements of Short Wind Water Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocholz, Roland; Jähne, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Spatio-temporal measurements of wind-driven short-gravity capillary waves are reported for a wide range of experimental conditions, including wind, rain and surface slicks. The experiments were conducted in the Hamburg linear wind/wave flume in cooperation with the Institute of Oceanography at the University of Hamburg, Germany. Both components of the slope field were measured optically at a fetch of 14.4 m using a color imaging slope gauge (CISG) with a footprint of 223 x 104 mm and a resolution of 0.7 mm. The instrument was improved versus earlier versions (Jähne and Riemer (1990), Klinke (1992)) to achieve a sampling rate of 312.5 Hz, which now allows for the computation of 3D wavenumber-frequency spectra (see Rocholz (2008)). This made it possible to distinguish waves traveling in and against wind direction, which proved useful to distinguish wind waves from ring waves caused by rain drop impacts. Using a new calibration method it was possible to correct for the intrinsic nonlinearities of the instrument in the slope range up to ±1. In addition, the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) was measured and employed for the restoration of the spectral amplitudes for wavenumbers in the range from 60 to 2300 rad/m. The spectra for pure wind conditions are generally consistent with previous measurements. But, the shape of the saturation spectra in the vicinity of k~1000 rad/m (i.e. pure capillary waves) stands in contradiction to former investigations where a sharp spectral cutoff (k^(-2) or k^(-3)) is commonly reported (e.g. Jähne and Riemer (1990)). This cutoff is reproduced by almost all semi-empirical models of the energy flux in the capillary range (e.g. Kudryavtsev et al. (1999), Apel (1994)). However, the new MTF corrected spectra show only a gentle decrease (between k^(-0.5) and k^(-1)) for k > 1000 rad/m. Therefore the question for the relative importance of different dissipation mechanisms might need a new assessment. References: J. R. Apel. An improved model of the ocean surface wave vector spectrum and its effects on radar backscatter. J. Geophys. Res., 99:16269-16292, Aug. 1994. B. Jähne and K. Riemer. Two-dimensional wave number spectra of small-scale water surface waves. Geophys.Res., 95(C7):11531-11646, 1990 J. Klinke. 2D wave number spectra of short wind waves - results from wind wave facilities and extrapolation to the ocean. Optics of the Air-Sea Interface: Theory and Measurement, Proc. SPIE - Int. Soc. Opt. Eng., 1749:1-13, July 1992 V. N. Kudryavtsev, V. K. Makin, and B. Chapron. Coupled sea surface atmosphere model. 2. Spectrum of short wind waves. J. Geophys. Res., 104:7625-7640, 1999. R. Rocholz, Spatio-Temporal Measurement of Short Wind-Driven Water Wave, Dissertation, University of Heidelberg, 2008, http://hci.iwr.uni-heidelberg.de/publications/dip/2008/Rocholz_2008_Diss.pdf

  9. Predicting BCI Subject Performance Using Probabilistic Spatio-Temporal Filters

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Heung-Il; Fazli, Siamac; Mehnert, Jan; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Lee, Seong-Whan

    2014-01-01

    Recently, spatio-temporal filtering to enhance decoding for Brain-Computer-Interfacing (BCI) has become increasingly popular. In this work, we discuss a novel, fully Bayesian–and thereby probabilistic–framework, called Bayesian Spatio-Spectral Filter Optimization (BSSFO) and apply it to a large data set of 80 non-invasive EEG-based BCI experiments. Across the full frequency range, the BSSFO framework allows to analyze which spatio-spectral parameters are common and which ones differ across the subject population. As expected, large variability of brain rhythms is observed between subjects. We have clustered subjects according to similarities in their corresponding spectral characteristics from the BSSFO model, which is found to reflect their BCI performances well. In BCI, a considerable percentage of subjects is unable to use a BCI for communication, due to their missing ability to modulate their brain rhythms–a phenomenon sometimes denoted as BCI-illiteracy or inability. Predicting individual subjects’ performance preceding the actual, time-consuming BCI-experiment enhances the usage of BCIs, e.g., by detecting users with BCI inability. This work additionally contributes by using the novel BSSFO method to predict the BCI-performance using only 2 minutes and 3 channels of resting-state EEG data recorded before the actual BCI-experiment. Specifically, by grouping the individual frequency characteristics we have nicely classified them into the subject ‘prototypes’ (like ? - or ? -rhythm type subjects) or users without ability to communicate with a BCI, and then by further building a linear regression model based on the grouping we could predict subjects' performance with the maximum correlation coefficient of 0.581 with the performance later seen in the actual BCI session. PMID:24551050

  10. Ultrashort relativistic electron bunches and spatio-temporal radiation biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauduel, Y. A.; Faure, J.; Malka, V.

    2008-08-01

    The intensive developments of terawatt Ti:Sa lasers permit to extend laser-plasma interactions into the relativistic regime, providing very-short electron or proton bunches. Experimental researches developed at the interface of laser physics and radiation biology, using the combination of sub-picosecond electron beams in the energy range 2-15 MeV with femtosecond near-IR optical pulses might conjecture the real-time investigation of penetrating radiation effects. A perfect synchronization between the particle beam (pump) and optical beam at 820 nm (probe) allows subpicosecond time resolution. This emerging domain involves high-energy radiation femtochemistry (HERF) for which the early spatial energy deposition is decisive for the prediction of cellular and tissular radiation damages. With vacuum-focused intensities of 2.7 x 1019 W cm-2 and a high energy electron total charge of 2.5 nC, radiation events have been investigated in the temporal range 10-13 - 10-10s. The early radiation effects of secondary electron on biomolecular sensors may be investigated inside sub-micrometric ionisation, considering the radial direction of Gaussian electron bunches. It is shown that short range electron-biosensor interactions lower than 10 A take place in nascent track structures triggered by penetrating radiation bunches. The very high dose delivery 1013 Gy s-1 performed with laser plasma accelerator may challenge our understanding of nanodosimetry on the time scale of molecular target motions. High-quality ultrashort penetrating radiation beams open promising opportunities for the development of spatio-temporal radiation biology, a crucial domain of cancer therapy, and would favor novating applications in nanomedicine such as highly-selective shortrange pro-drug activation.

  11. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Hypoxia during Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Harald; Bleicher, Marcus; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Tumour hypoxia plays a pivotal role in cancer therapy for most therapeutic approaches from radiotherapy to immunotherapy. The detailed and accurate knowledge of the oxygen distribution in a tumour is necessary in order to determine the right treatment strategy. Still, due to the limited spatial and temporal resolution of imaging methods as well as lacking fundamental understanding of internal oxygenation dynamics in tumours, the precise oxygen distribution map is rarely available for treatment planing. We employ an agent-based in silico tumour spheroid model in order to study the complex, localized and fast oxygen dynamics in tumour micro-regions which are induced by radiotherapy. A lattice-free, 3D, agent-based approach for cell representation is coupled with a high-resolution diffusion solver that includes a tissue density-dependent diffusion coefficient. This allows us to assess the space- and time-resolved reoxygenation response of a small subvolume of tumour tissue in response to radiotherapy. In response to irradiation the tumour nodule exhibits characteristic reoxygenation and re-depletion dynamics which we resolve with high spatio-temporal resolution. The reoxygenation follows specific timings, which should be respected in treatment in order to maximise the use of the oxygen enhancement effects. Oxygen dynamics within the tumour create windows of opportunity for the use of adjuvant chemotherapeutica and hypoxia-activated drugs. Overall, we show that by using modelling it is possible to follow the oxygenation dynamics beyond common resolution limits and predict beneficial strategies for therapy and in vitro verification. Models of cell cycle and oxygen dynamics in tumours should in the future be combined with imaging techniques, to allow for a systematic experimental study of possible improved schedules and to ultimately extend the reach of oxygenation monitoring available in clinical treatment. PMID:26273841

  12. Spatio-temporal coupling of EEG signals in epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senger, Vanessa; Müller, Jens; Tetzlaff, Ronald

    2011-05-01

    Approximately 1% of the world's population suffer from epileptic seizures throughout their lives that mostly come without sign or warning. Thus, epilepsy is the most common chronical disorder of the neurological system. In the past decades, the problem of detecting a pre-seizure state in epilepsy using EEG signals has been addressed in many contributions by various authors over the past two decades. Up to now, the goal of identifying an impending epileptic seizure with sufficient specificity and reliability has not yet been achieved. Cellular Nonlinear Networks (CNN) are characterized by local couplings of dynamical systems of comparably low complexity. Thus, they are well suited for an implementation as highly parallel analogue processors. Programmable sensor-processor realizations of CNN combine high computational power comparable to tera ops of digital processors with low power consumption. An algorithm allowing an automated and reliable detection of epileptic seizure precursors would be a"huge step" towards the vision of an implantable seizure warning device that could provide information to patients and for a time/event specific treatment directly in the brain. Recent contributions have shown that modeling of brain electrical activity by solutions of Reaction-Diffusion-CNN as well as the application of a CNN predictor taking into account values of neighboring electrodes may contribute to the realization of a seizure warning device. In this paper, a CNN based predictor corresponding to a spatio-temporal filter is applied to multi channel EEG data in order to identify mutual couplings for different channels which lead to a enhanced prediction quality. Long term EEG recordings of different patients are considered. Results calculated for these recordings with inter-ictal phases as well as phases with seizures will be discussed in detail.

  13. Brazilian Amazonia Deforestation Detection Using Spatio-Temporal Scan Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, C. A. O.; Santos, N. T.; Carneiro, A. P. S.; Balieiro, A. A. S.

    2012-07-01

    The spatio-temporal models, developed for analyses of diseases, can also be used for others fields of study, including concerns about forest and deforestation. The aim of this paper is to quantitatively check priority areas in order to combat deforestation on the Amazon forest, using the space-time scan statistic. The study area location is at the south of the Amazonas State and cover around 297.183 kilometre squares, including the municipality of Boca do Acre, Labrea, Canutama, Humaita, Manicore, Novo Aripuana e Apui County on the north region of Brazil. This area has showed a significant change for land cover, which has increased the number of deforestation's alerts. Therefore this situation becomes a concern and gets more investigation, trying to stop factors that increase the number of cases in the area. The methodology includes the location and year that deforestation's alert occurred. These deforestation's alerts are mapped by the DETER (Detection System of Deforestation in Real Time in Amazonia), which is carry out by the Brazilian Space Agency (INPE). The software SatScanTM v7.0 was used in order to define space-time permutation scan statistic for detection of deforestation cases. The outcome of this experiment shows an efficient model to detect space-time clusters of deforestation's alerts. The model was efficient to detect the location, the size, the order and characteristics about activities at the end of the experiments. Two clusters were considered actives and kept actives up to the end of the study. These clusters are located in Canutama and Lábrea County. This quantitative spatial modelling of deforestation warnings allowed: firstly, identifying actives clustering of deforestation, in which the environment government official are able to concentrate their actions; secondly, identifying historic clustering of deforestation, in which the environment government official are able to monitoring in order to avoid them to became actives again; and finally, verify that distances between the deforestation warning and the roads explain part of the significant clustering.

  14. Quantifying spatio-temporal variability of soil water storage and their controls at multiple scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Asim

    2014-05-01

    Soil water is the primary limiting factor in semiarid ecosystems and determinant of environmental health. The distribution of soil water in space and time has important hydrologic applications. However, the spatio-temporal variability of soil water is a major challenge in hydrology as their distribution in the landscape is controlled many factors and processes acting in different intensities over a variety of scales. Quantification of these variability and their dominant controls at multiple scales can only lead to a better understanding on the soil water dynamics in space and time and on the underlying processes causing the variability. In order to quantify spatio-temporal variability, soil water content (later converted to soil water storage, SWS) was measured down to 1.4 m (0.2 m depth interval) at 128 regularly spaced locations along a transect of 576 m over a five-year period from the Hummocky landscape of central Canada. The spatial pattern of SWS was very similar (large values of Spearman's rank correlation coefficient) over the entire study period and was almost a mirror image of the spatial pattern of the relative elevation. The similarity was stronger within a season (intra-season) than the same season from different years (inter-annual) and between seasons (inter-season). The variability at multiple scales was quantified using the wavelet transform. The strongest large scale (>72 m) variability contributed from the macro-topography and a moderate medium scale (18-72 m) variability contributed from the landform elements were persistent over the entire measurement period (time stability). The locations and the scales of the most persistent spatial patterns over time and depth were quantified using the wavelet coherency. The changes in the persistent patterns indicated the changes in the scales and locations of underlying hydrological processes, which can be used to identify change in sampling domain. The similarities/dissimilarities in the spatial pattern between the surface and sub-surface measurements at different scales and locations were used to infer the whole profile hydrological dynamics (depth persistence). The variability in SWS spatial patterns was controlled by different factors at different scales. Scale specific dominant controls were identified after separating the variance contribution of each scale towards the overall variance using the Hilbert-Huang transform. The large scale macro-topographical control and medium scale landform control were much stronger than very large scale soil textural control on SWS. The scale-specific relationship with controlling factors improved the prediction of SWS.

  15. On the angle between the first and second Lyapunov vectors in spatio-temporal chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazó, D.; López, J. M.; Rodríguez, M. A.

    2013-06-01

    In a dynamical system the first Lyapunov vector (LV) is associated with the largest Lyapunov exponent and indicates—at any point on the attractor—the direction of maximal growth in tangent space. The LV corresponding to the second largest Lyapunov exponent generally points in a different direction, but tangencies between both vectors can in principle occur. Here we find that the probability density function (PDF) of the angle ? spanned by the first and second LVs should be expected to be approximately symmetric around ?/4 and to peak at 0 and ?/2. Moreover, for small angles we uncover a scaling law for the PDF Q of ?l = ln?? with the system size L: Q(?l) = L-1/2f(?lL-1/2). We give a theoretical argument that justifies this scaling form and also explains why it should be universal (irrespective of the system details) for spatio-temporal chaos in one spatial dimension. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Lyapunov analysis: from dynamical systems theory to applications’.

  16. A spatio-temporal detective quantum efficiency and its application to fluoroscopic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, S. N.; Cunningham, I. A.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Fluoroscopic x-ray imaging systems are used extensively in spatio-temporal detection tasks and require a spatio-temporal description of system performance. No accepted metric exists that describes spatio-temporal fluoroscopic performance. The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is a metric widely used in radiography to quantify system performance and as a surrogate measure of patient ''dose efficiency.'' It has been applied previously to fluoroscopic systems with the introduction of a temporal correction factor. However, the use of a temporally-corrected DQE does not provide system temporal information and it is only valid under specific conditions, many of which are not likely to be satisfied by suboptimal systems. The authors propose a spatio-temporal DQE that describes performance in both space and time and is applicable to all spatio-temporal quantum-based imaging systems. Methods: The authors define a spatio-temporal DQE (two spatial-frequency axes and one temporal-frequency axis) in terms of a small-signal spatio-temporal modulation transfer function (MTF) and spatio-temporal noise power spectrum (NPS). Measurements were made on an x-ray image intensifier-based bench-top system using continuous fluoroscopy with an RQA-5 beam at 3.9 {mu}R/frame and hardened 50 kVp beam (0.8 mm Cu filtration added) at 1.9 {mu}R/frame. Results: A zero-frequency DQE value of 0.64 was measured under both conditions. Nonideal performance was noted at both larger spatial and temporal frequencies; DQE values decreased by {approx}50% at the cutoff temporal frequency of 15 Hz. Conclusions: The spatio-temporal DQE enables measurements of decreased temporal system performance at larger temporal frequencies analogous to previous measurements of decreased (spatial) performance. This marks the first time that system performance and dose efficiency in both space and time have been measured on a fluoroscopic system using DQE and is the first step toward the generalized use of DQE on clinical fluoroscopic systems.

  17. Transfer of spatio-temporal multifractal properties of rainfall to simulated surface runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gires, Auguste; Giangola-Murzyn, Agathe; Richard, Julien; Abbes, Jean-Baptiste; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel; Willinger, Bernard; Cardinal, Hervé; Thouvenot, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we suggest to use scaling laws and more specifically Universal Multifractals (UM) to analyse in a spatio-temporal framework both the radar rainfall and the simulated surface runoff. Such tools have been extensively used to analyse and simulate geophysical fields extremely variable over wide range of spatio-temporal scales such as rainfall, but have not often if ever been applied to surface runoff. Such novel combined analysis helps to improve the understanding of the rainfall-runoff relationship. Two catchments of the chair "Hydrology for resilient cities" sponsored by Véolia, and of the European Interreg IV RainGain project are used. They are both located in the Paris area: a 144 ha flat urban area in the Seine-Saint-Denis County, and a 250 ha urban area with a significant portion of forest located on a steep hillside of the Bièvre River. A fully distributed urban hydrological model currently under development called Multi-Hydro is implemented to represent the catchments response. It consists in an interacting core between open source software packages, each of them representing a portion of the water cycle in urban environment. The fully distributed model is tested with pixels of size 5, 10 and 20 m. In a first step the model is validated for three rainfall events that occurred in 2010 and 2011, for which the Météo-France radar mosaic with a resolution of 1 km in space and 5 min in time is available. These events generated significant surface runoff and some local flooding. The sensitivity of the model to the rainfall resolution is briefly checked by stochastically generating an ensemble of realistic downscaled rainfall fields (obtained by continuing the underlying cascade process which is observed on the available range of scales) and inputting them into the model. The impact is significant on both the simulated sewer flow and surface runoff. Then rainfall fields are generated with the help of discrete multifractal cascades and inputted in the numerical hydrological model. It appears that the outputs (maps of water depth and velocity) of the hydrological model exhibit a scaling behaviour both in space and time. Various sets of UM parameters are tested. The three UM parameters of the various processes at stake are then compared which enables to analyse how the extremes are either dampened or enhanced. This hints at innovative techniques to quantify the extremes at very high resolution (typically 1 m) without having to run the model at these resolutions which would require too much time especially for real time applications.

  18. Spatio-Temporal Evolution and Scaling Properties of Human Settlements (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, C.; Milesi, C.; Elvidge, C.; Baugh, K.; Henebry, G. M.; Nghiem, S. V.

    2013-12-01

    Growth and evolution of cities and smaller settlements is usually studied in the context of population and other socioeconomic variables. While this is logical in the sense that settlements are groups of humans engaged in socioeconomic processes, our means of collecting information about spatio-temporal distributions of population and socioeconomic variables often lack the spatial and temporal resolution to represent the processes at scales which they are known to occur. Furthermore, metrics and definitions often vary with country and through time. However, remote sensing provides globally consistent, synoptic observations of several proxies for human settlement at spatial and temporal resolutions sufficient to represent the evolution of settlements over the past 40 years. We use several independent but complementary proxies for anthropogenic land cover to quantify spatio-temporal (ST) evolution and scaling properties of human settlements globally. In this study we begin by comparing land cover and night lights in 8 diverse settings - each spanning gradients of population density and degree of land surface modification. Stable anthropogenic night light is derived from multi-temporal composites of emitted luminance measured by the VIIRS and DMSP-OLS sensors. Land cover is represented as mixtures of sub-pixel fractions of rock, soil and impervious Substrates, Vegetation and Dark surfaces (shadow, water and absorptive materials) estimated from Landsat imagery with > 94% accuracy. Multi-season stability and variability of land cover fractions effectively distinguishes between spectrally similar land covers that corrupt thematic classifications based on single images. We find that temporal stability of impervious substrates combined with persistent shadow cast between buildings results in temporally stable aggregate reflectance across seasons at the 30 m scale of a Landsat pixel. Comparison of night light brightness with land cover composition, stability and variability yields several consistent relationships that persist across a variety of settlement types and physical environments. We use the multiple threshold method of Small et al (2011) to represent a continuum of settlement density by segmenting both night light brightness and multi-season land cover characteristics. Rank-size distributions of spatially contiguous segments quantify scaling and connectivity of land cover. Spatial and temporal evolution of rank-size distributions is consistent with power laws as suggested by Zipf's Law for city size based on population. However, unlike Zipf's Law, the observed distributions persist to global scales in which the larger agglomerations are much larger than individual cities. The scaling relations observed extend from the scale of cities and smaller settlements up to vast spatial networks of interconnected settlements.

  19. RSTFC: A Novel Algorithm for Spatio-Temporal Filtering and Classification of Single-Trial EEG.

    PubMed

    Qi, Feifei; Li, Yuanqing; Wu, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Learning optimal spatio-temporal filters is a key to feature extraction for single-trial electroencephalogram (EEG) classification. The challenges are controlling the complexity of the learning algorithm so as to alleviate the curse of dimensionality and attaining computational efficiency to facilitate online applications, e.g., brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). To tackle these barriers, this paper presents a novel algorithm, termed regularized spatio-temporal filtering and classification (RSTFC), for single-trial EEG classification. RSTFC consists of two modules. In the feature extraction module, an l2 -regularized algorithm is developed for supervised spatio-temporal filtering of the EEG signals. Unlike the existing supervised spatio-temporal filter optimization algorithms, the developed algorithm can simultaneously optimize spatial and high-order temporal filters in an eigenvalue decomposition framework and thus be implemented highly efficiently. In the classification module, a convex optimization algorithm for sparse Fisher linear discriminant analysis is proposed for simultaneous feature selection and classification of the typically high-dimensional spatio-temporally filtered signals. The effectiveness of RSTFC is demonstrated by comparing it with several state-of-the-arts methods on three brain-computer interface (BCI) competition data sets collected from 17 subjects. Results indicate that RSTFC yields significantly higher classification accuracies than the competing methods. This paper also discusses the advantage of optimizing channel-specific temporal filters over optimizing a temporal filter common to all channels. PMID:25730834

  20. An Adaptive Organization Method of Geovideo Data for Spatio-Temporal Association Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Zhu, Q.; Zhang, Y. T.; Du, Z. Q.; Zhou, Y.; Xie, X.; He, F.

    2015-07-01

    Public security incidents have been increasingly challenging to address with their new features, including large-scale mobility, multi-stage dynamic evolution, spatio-temporal concurrency and uncertainty in the complex urban environment, which require spatio-temporal association analysis among multiple regional video data for global cognition. However, the existing video data organizational methods that view video as a property of the spatial object or position in space dissever the spatio-temporal relationship of scattered video shots captured from multiple video channels, limit the query functions on interactive retrieval between a camera and its video clips and hinder the comprehensive management of event-related scattered video shots. GeoVideo, which maps video frames onto a geographic space, is a new approach to represent the geographic world, promote security monitoring in a spatial perspective and provide a highly feasible solution to this problem. This paper analyzes the large-scale personnel mobility in public safety events and proposes a multi-level, event-related organization method with massive GeoVideo data by spatio-temporal trajectory. This paper designs a unified object identify(ID) structure to implicitly store the spatio-temporal relationship of scattered video clips and support the distributed storage management of massive cases. Finally, the validity and feasibility of this method are demonstrated through suspect tracking experiments.

  1. Bayesian spatio-temporal analysis and geospatial risk factors of human monocytic ehrlichiosis.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Ram K; Neises, Daniel; Goodin, Douglas G; Andresen, Daniel A; Ganta, Roman R

    2014-01-01

    Variations in spatio-temporal patterns of Human Monocytic Ehrlichiosis (HME) infection in the state of Kansas, USA were examined and the relationship between HME relative risk and various environmental, climatic and socio-economic variables were evaluated. HME data used in the study was reported to the Kansas Department of Health and Environment between years 2005-2012, and geospatial variables representing the physical environment [National Land cover/Land use, NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)], climate [NASA MODIS, Prediction of Worldwide Renewable Energy (POWER)], and socio-economic conditions (US Census Bureau) were derived from publicly available sources. Following univariate screening of candidate variables using logistic regressions, two Bayesian hierarchical models were fit; a partial spatio-temporal model with random effects and a spatio-temporal interaction term, and a second model that included additional covariate terms. The best fitting model revealed that spatio-temporal autocorrelation in Kansas increased steadily from 2005-2012, and identified poverty status, relative humidity, and an interactive factor, 'diurnal temperature range x mixed forest area' as significant county-level risk factors for HME. The identification of significant spatio-temporal pattern and new risk factors are important in the context of HME prevention, for future research in the areas of ecology and evolution of HME, and as well as climate change impacts on tick-borne diseases. PMID:24992684

  2. New Fast Fall Detection Method Based on Spatio-Temporal Context Tracking of Head by Using Depth Images

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lei; Ren, Yanyun; Hu, Huosheng; Tian, Bo

    2015-01-01

    In order to deal with the problem of projection occurring in fall detection with two-dimensional (2D) grey or color images, this paper proposed a robust fall detection method based on spatio-temporal context tracking over three-dimensional (3D) depth images that are captured by the Kinect sensor. In the pre-processing procedure, the parameters of the Single-Gauss-Model (SGM) are estimated and the coefficients of the floor plane equation are extracted from the background images. Once human subject appears in the scene, the silhouette is extracted by SGM and the foreground coefficient of ellipses is used to determine the head position. The dense spatio-temporal context (STC) algorithm is then applied to track the head position and the distance from the head to floor plane is calculated in every following frame of the depth image. When the distance is lower than an adaptive threshold, the centroid height of the human will be used as the second judgment criteria to decide whether a fall incident happened. Lastly, four groups of experiments with different falling directions are performed. Experimental results show that the proposed method can detect fall incidents that occurred in different orientations, and they only need a low computation complexity. PMID:26378540

  3. New Fast Fall Detection Method Based on Spatio-Temporal Context Tracking of Head by Using Depth Images.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Ren, Yanyun; Hu, Huosheng; Tian, Bo

    2015-01-01

    In order to deal with the problem of projection occurring in fall detection with two-dimensional (2D) grey or color images, this paper proposed a robust fall detection method based on spatio-temporal context tracking over three-dimensional (3D) depth images that are captured by the Kinect sensor. In the pre-processing procedure, the parameters of the Single-Gauss-Model (SGM) are estimated and the coefficients of the floor plane equation are extracted from the background images. Once human subject appears in the scene, the silhouette is extracted by SGM and the foreground coefficient of ellipses is used to determine the head position. The dense spatio-temporal context (STC) algorithm is then applied to track the head position and the distance from the head to floor plane is calculated in every following frame of the depth image. When the distance is lower than an adaptive threshold, the centroid height of the human will be used as the second judgment criteria to decide whether a fall incident happened. Lastly, four groups of experiments with different falling directions are performed. Experimental results show that the proposed method can detect fall incidents that occurred in different orientations, and they only need a low computation complexity. PMID:26378540

  4. Modeling self-organized spatio-temporal patterns of PIP3 and PTEN during spontaneous cell polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoch, Fabian; Tarantola, Marco; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2014-08-01

    During spontaneous cell polarization of Dictyostelium discoideum cells, phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphoshpate (PIP3) and PTEN (phosphatase tensin homolog) have been identified as key signaling molecules which govern the process of polarization in a self-organized manner. Recent experiments have quantified the spatio-temporal dynamics of these signaling components. Surprisingly, it was found that membrane-bound PTEN can be either in a high or low state, that PIP3 waves were initiated in areas lacking PTEN through an excitable mechanism, and that PIP3 was degraded even though the PTEN concentration remained low. Here we develop a reaction-diffusion model that aims to explain these experimental findings. Our model contains bistable dynamics for PTEN, excitable dynamics for PIP3, and postulates the existence of two species of PTEN with different dephosphorylation rates. We show that our model is able to produce results that are in good qualitative agreement with the experiments, suggesting that our reaction-diffusion model underlies the self-organized spatio-temporal patterns observed in experiments.

  5. Spatio-temporal analysis of brain electrical activity in epilepsy based on cellular nonlinear networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gollas, Frank; Tetzlaff, Ronald

    2009-05-01

    Epilepsy is the most common chronic disorder of the nervous system. Generally, epileptic seizures appear without foregoing sign or warning. The problem of detecting a possible pre-seizure state in epilepsy from EEG signals has been addressed by many authors over the past decades. Different approaches of time series analysis of brain electrical activity already are providing valuable insights into the underlying complex dynamics. But the main goal the identification of an impending epileptic seizure with a sufficient specificity and reliability, has not been achieved up to now. An algorithm for a reliable, automated prediction of epileptic seizures would enable the realization of implantable seizure warning devices, which could provide valuable information to the patient and time/event specific drug delivery or possibly a direct electrical nerve stimulation. Cellular Nonlinear Networks (CNN) are promising candidates for future seizure warning devices. CNN are characterized by local couplings of comparatively simple dynamical systems. With this property these networks are well suited to be realized as highly parallel, analog computer chips. Today available CNN hardware realizations exhibit a processing speed in the range of TeraOps combined with low power consumption. In this contribution new algorithms based on the spatio-temporal dynamics of CNN are considered in order to analyze intracranial EEG signals and thus taking into account mutual dependencies between neighboring regions of the brain. In an identification procedure Reaction-Diffusion CNN (RD-CNN) are determined for short segments of brain electrical activity, by means of a supervised parameter optimization. RD-CNN are deduced from Reaction-Diffusion Systems, which usually are applied to investigate complex phenomena like nonlinear wave propagation or pattern formation. The Local Activity Theory provides a necessary condition for emergent behavior in RD-CNN. In comparison linear spatio-temporal autoregressive filter models are considered, for a prediction of EEG signal values. Thus Signal features values for successive, short, quasi stationary segments of brain electrical activity can be obtained, with the objective of detecting distinct changes prior to impending epileptic seizures. Furthermore long term recordings gained during presurgical diagnostics in temporal lobe epilepsy are analyzed and the predictive performance of the extracted features is evaluated statistically. Therefore a Receiver Operating Characteristic analysis is considered, assessing the distinguishability between distributions of supposed preictal and interictal periods.

  6. Spatio-temporal animation of Army logistics, simulations, facilitating analysis of military deployments.

    SciTech Connect

    Love, R. J.; Horsthemke, W.; Macal, C. M.; Van Groningen, C.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2004-01-01

    Visualization techniques for simulations are often limited to statistical reports, graphs, and charts, but simulations can be enhanced through the use of animation. A spatio-temporal animation allows a viewer to observe a simulation operate, rather than deduce it from numerical output. The Route Viewer, developed by Argonne National Laboratory, is a two-dimensional animation model that animates the objects and events produced by a discrete event simulation. It operates in a playback mode, whereby a simulated scenario is animated after the simulation has completed. The Route Viewer is used to verify the simulation's processes and data, but it also benefits the simulation as an analytical tool by facilitating spatial and temporal analysis. By visualizing the events of a simulated scenario in two-dimensional space, it is possible to determine whether the scenario, or simulation model, is reasonable. Further, the Route Viewer provides an awareness of what happens in a scenario, when it happens, and the completeness and efficiency of the scenario and its processes. For Army deployments, it highlights utilization of resources and where bottlenecks are occurring. This paper discusses how the Route Viewer facilitates the analysis of military deployment simulation model results.

  7. Spatio-temporal evolution of shoreline changes along the coast between sousse- Monastir (Eastearn of Tunisia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathallah, S.; Ben Amor, R.; Gueddari, M.

    2009-04-01

    Spatio-temporal evolution of shoreline Changes along the coast between Sousse-Monastir (Eastern of Tunisia). Safa Fathallah*, Rim Ben Amor and Moncef Gueddari Unit of Research of Geochemistry and Environmental Geology. Faculty of Science of Tunis, University of Tunis El Manar, 2092. (*) Corresponding author: safa_fathallah@yahoo.fr The coast of Sousse-Monastir in eastern of Tunisia, has undergone great changes, due to natural and anthropic factors. Increasing human use, the construction of two ports and coastal urbanization (hotels and industries) has accelerated the erosion process. The coastal defense structures (breakwaters and enrockment), built to protect the most eroded zone are efficient, but eroded zones appeared in the southern part of breakwaters. Recent and historic aerial photography was used to estimate, observe, and analyze past shoreline and bathymetric positions and trends involving shore evolution for Sousse-Monastir coast. All of the photographs were calibrated and mosaicked by Arc Map Gis 9.1, the years used are 1925, 1962, 1988, 1996, and 2001 for shoreline change analysis and 1884 and 2001 for bathymetric changes. The analyze of this photographs show that the zone located at the south of breakwater are mostly eroded with high speed process (2m/year). Another zone appears as eroded at the south part of Hamdoun River, with 1,5m/year erosion speed . Keywords: Shoreline evolution, defense structures, Sousse-Monastir coast, Tunisia.

  8. Spatio-temporal Remodeling of Functional Membrane Microdomains Organizes the Signaling Networks of a Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Johannes; Klein, Teresa; Mielich-Süss, Benjamin; Koch, Gudrun; Franke, Christian; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Kovács, Ákos T.; Sauer, Markus; Lopez, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains specialized in the regulation of numerous cellular processes related to membrane organization, as diverse as signal transduction, protein sorting, membrane trafficking or pathogen invasion. It has been proposed that this functional diversity would require a heterogeneous population of raft domains with varying compositions. However, a mechanism for such diversification is not known. We recently discovered that bacterial membranes organize their signal transduction pathways in functional membrane microdomains (FMMs) that are structurally and functionally similar to the eukaryotic lipid rafts. In this report, we took advantage of the tractability of the prokaryotic model Bacillus subtilis to provide evidence for the coexistence of two distinct families of FMMs in bacterial membranes, displaying a distinctive distribution of proteins specialized in different biological processes. One family of microdomains harbors the scaffolding flotillin protein FloA that selectively tethers proteins specialized in regulating cell envelope turnover and primary metabolism. A second population of microdomains containing the two scaffolding flotillins, FloA and FloT, arises exclusively at later stages of cell growth and specializes in adaptation of cells to stationary phase. Importantly, the diversification of membrane microdomains does not occur arbitrarily. We discovered that bacterial cells control the spatio-temporal remodeling of microdomains by restricting the activation of FloT expression to stationary phase. This regulation ensures a sequential assembly of functionally specialized membrane microdomains to strategically organize signaling networks at the right time during the lifespan of a bacterium. PMID:25909364

  9. Spatio-temporal resolution of primary processes of photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Junge, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Technical progress in laser-sources and detectors has allowed the temporal and spatial resolution of chemical reactions down to femtoseconds and Å-units. In photon-excitable systems the key to chemical kinetics, trajectories across the vibrational saddle landscape, are experimentally accessible. Simple and thus well-defined chemical compounds are preferred objects for calibrating new methodologies and carving out paradigms of chemical dynamics, as shown in several contributions to this Faraday Discussion. Aerobic life on earth is powered by solar energy, which is captured by microorganisms and plants. Oxygenic photosynthesis relies on a three billion year old molecular machinery which is as well defined as simpler chemical constructs. It has been analysed to a very high precision. The transfer of excitation between pigments in antennae proteins, of electrons between redox-cofactors in reaction centres, and the oxidation of water by a Mn4Ca-cluster are solid state reactions. ATP, the general energy currency of the cell, is synthesized by a most agile, rotary molecular machine. While the efficiency of photosynthesis competes well with photovoltaics at the time scale of nanoseconds, it is lower by an order of magnitude for crops and again lower for bio-fuels. The enormous energy demand of mankind calls for engineered (bio-mimetic or bio-inspired) solar-electric and solar-fuel devices. PMID:25824647

  10. Spatio-temporal light springs: extended encoding of orbital angular momentum in ultrashort pulses.

    PubMed

    Pariente, G; Quéré, F

    2015-05-01

    We introduce a new class of spatio-temporally coupled ultrashort laser beams, which are obtained by superimposing Laguerre-Gauss beams whose azimuthal mode index is correlated to their frequency. These beams are characterized by helical structures for their phase and intensity profiles, which both encode the orbital angular momentum carried by the light. They can easily be engineered in the optical range, and are naturally produced at shorter wavelengths when attosecond pulses are generated by intense femtosecond Laguerre-Gauss laser beams. These spatio-temporal "light springs" will allow for the transfer of the orbital angular momentum to matter by stimulated Raman scattering. PMID:25927778

  11. Disentangling Multidimensional Spatio-Temporal Data into Their Common and Aberrant Responses

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Young Hwan; Korkola, James; Amin, Dhara N.; Moasser, Mark M.; Carmena, Jose M.; Gray, Joe W.; Tomlin, Claire J.

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of high-throughput measurement techniques, scientists and engineers are starting to grapple with massive data sets and encountering challenges with how to organize, process and extract information into meaningful structures. Multidimensional spatio-temporal biological data sets such as time series gene expression with various perturbations over different cell lines, or neural spike trains across many experimental trials, have the potential to acquire insight about the dynamic behavior of the system. For this potential to be realized, we need a suitable representation to understand the data. A general question is how to organize the observed data into meaningful structures and how to find an appropriate similarity measure. A natural way of viewing these complex high dimensional data sets is to examine and analyze the large-scale features and then to focus on the interesting details. Since the wide range of experiments and unknown complexity of the underlying system contribute to the heterogeneity of biological data, we develop a new method by proposing an extension of Robust Principal Component Analysis (RPCA), which models common variations across multiple experiments as the lowrank component and anomalies across these experiments as the sparse component. We show that the proposed method is able to find distinct subtypes and classify data sets in a robust way without any prior knowledge by separating these common responses and abnormal responses. Thus, the proposed method provides us a new representation of these data sets which has the potential to help users acquire new insight from data. PMID:25901353

  12. Bayesian spatio-temporal discard model in a demersal trawl fishery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grazia Pennino, M.; Muñoz, Facundo; Conesa, David; López-Quílez, Antonio; Bellido, José M.

    2014-07-01

    Spatial management of discards has recently been proposed as a useful tool for the protection of juveniles, by reducing discard rates and can be used as a buffer against management errors and recruitment failure. In this study Bayesian hierarchical spatial models have been used to analyze about 440 trawl fishing operations of two different metiers, sampled between 2009 and 2012, in order to improve our understanding of factors that influence the quantity of discards and to identify their spatio-temporal distribution in the study area. Our analysis showed that the relative importance of each variable was different for each metier, with a few similarities. In particular, the random vessel effect and seasonal variability were identified as main driving variables for both metiers. Predictive maps of the abundance of discards and maps of the posterior mean of the spatial component show several hot spots with high discard concentration for each metier. We argue how the seasonal/spatial effects, and the knowledge about the factors influential to discarding, could potentially be exploited as potential mitigation measures for future fisheries management strategies. However, misidentification of hotspots and uncertain predictions can culminate in inappropriate mitigation practices which can sometimes be irreversible. The proposed Bayesian spatial method overcomes these issues, since it offers a unified approach which allows the incorporation of spatial random-effect terms, spatial correlation of the variables and the uncertainty of the parameters in the modeling process, resulting in a better quantification of the uncertainty and accurate predictions.

  13. A Kinect based sign language recognition system using spatio-temporal features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memi?, Abbas; Albayrak, Songül

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a sign language recognition system that uses spatio-temporal features on RGB video images and depth maps for dynamic gestures of Turkish Sign Language. Proposed system uses motion differences and accumulation approach for temporal gesture analysis. Motion accumulation method, which is an effective method for temporal domain analysis of gestures, produces an accumulated motion image by combining differences of successive video frames. Then, 2D Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) is applied to accumulated motion images and temporal domain features transformed into spatial domain. These processes are performed on both RGB images and depth maps separately. DCT coefficients that represent sign gestures are picked up via zigzag scanning and feature vectors are generated. In order to recognize sign gestures, K-Nearest Neighbor classifier with Manhattan distance is performed. Performance of the proposed sign language recognition system is evaluated on a sign database that contains 1002 isolated dynamic signs belongs to 111 words of Turkish Sign Language (TSL) in three different categories. Proposed sign language recognition system has promising success rates.

  14. Electrical brain imaging reveals spatio-temporal dynamics of timbre perception in humans.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Martin; Baumann, Simon; Jancke, Lutz

    2006-10-01

    Timbre is a major attribute of sound perception and a key feature for the identification of sound quality. Here, we present event-related brain potentials (ERPs) obtained from sixteen healthy individuals while they discriminated complex instrumental tones (piano, trumpet, and violin) or simple sine wave tones that lack the principal features of timbre. Data analysis yielded enhanced N1 and P2 responses to instrumental tones relative to sine wave tones. Furthermore, we applied an electrical brain imaging approach using low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) to estimate the neural sources of N1/P2 responses. Separate significance tests of instrumental vs. sine wave tones for N1 and P2 revealed distinct regions as principally governing timbre perception. In an initial stage (N1), timbre perception recruits left and right (peri-)auditory fields with an activity maximum over the right posterior Sylvian fissure (SF) and the posterior cingulate (PCC) territory. In the subsequent stage (P2), we uncovered enhanced activity in the vicinity of the entire cingulate gyrus. The involvement of extra-auditory areas in timbre perception may imply the presence of a highly associative processing level which might be generally related to musical sensations and integrates widespread medial areas of the human cortex. In summary, our results demonstrate spatio-temporally distinct stages in timbre perception which not only involve bilateral parts of the peri-auditory cortex but also medially situated regions of the human brain associated with emotional and auditory imagery functions. PMID:16798014

  15. Spatio-temporal behavior of microwave sheath-voltage combination plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Satyananda; Kousaka, Hiroyuki; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2015-05-01

    Microwave sheath-Voltage combination Plasma (MVP) is a high density plasma source and can be used as a suitable plasma processing device (e.g., ionized physical vapor deposition). In the present report, the spatio-temporal behavior of an argon MVP sustained along a direct-current biased Ti rod is investigated. Two plasma modes are observed, one is an "oxidized state" (OS) at the early time of the microwave plasma and the other is "ionized sputter state" (ISS) at the later times. Transition of the plasma from OS to ISS results a prominent change in the visible color of the plasma, resulting from a significant increase in the plasma density, as measured by a Langmuir probe. In the OS, plasma is dominated by Ar ions, and the density is in amplitude order of 1011 cm-3. In the ISS, metal ions from the Ti rod contribute significantly to the ion composition, and higher density plasma (1012 cm-3) is produced. Nearly uniform high density plasma along the length of the Ti rod is produced at very low input microwave powers (around 30 W). Optical emission spectroscopy measurements confirm the presence of sputtered Ti ions and Ti neutrals in the ISS.

  16. Spatio-temporal patterns of stratification on the Northwest Atlantic shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yun; Fratantoni, Paula S.; Chen, Changsheng; Hare, Jonathan A.; Sun, Yunfang; Beardsley, Robert C.; Ji, Rubao

    2015-05-01

    A spatially explicit stratification climatology is constructed for the Northwest Atlantic continental shelf using daily averaged hydrographic fields from a 33-year high-resolution, data-assimilated reanalysis dataset. The high-resolution climatology reveals considerable spatio-temporal heterogeneity in seasonal variability with strong interplay between thermal and haline processes. Regional differences in the magnitude and phasing of the seasonal cycle feature earlier development/breakdown in the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) and larger peaks on the shelf than in the Gulf of Maine (GoM). The relative contribution of the thermal and haline components to the overall stratification is quantified using a novel diagram composed of two key ratios. The first relates the vertical temperature gradient to the vertical salinity gradient, and the second relates the thermal expansion coefficient to the haline contraction coefficient. Two distinct regimes are identified: the MAB region is thermally-dominated through a larger portion of the year, whereas the Nova Scotian Shelf and the eastern GoM have a tendency towards haline control during the year. The timing of peak stratification and the beginning/end of thermally-positive and thermally-dominant states are examined. Their spatial distributions indicate a prominent latitudinal shift and regionality, having implications for the seasonal cycle of ecosystem dynamics and its interannual variability.

  17. Disentangling multidimensional spatio-temporal data into their common and aberrant responses

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Young Hwan; Korkola, James; Amin, Dhara N.; Moasser, Mark M.; Carmena, Jose M.; Gray, Joe W.; Tomlin, Claire J.; Lisacek, Frederique

    2015-04-22

    With the advent of high-throughput measurement techniques, scientists and engineers are starting to grapple with massive data sets and encountering challenges with how to organize, process and extract information into meaningful structures. Multidimensional spatio-temporal biological data sets such as time series gene expression with various perturbations over different cell lines, or neural spike trains across many experimental trials, have the potential to acquire insight about the dynamic behavior of the system. For this potential to be realized, we need a suitable representation to understand the data. A general question is how to organize the observed data into meaningful structures and how to find an appropriate similarity measure. A natural way of viewing these complex high dimensional data sets is to examine and analyze the large-scale features and then to focus on the interesting details. Since the wide range of experiments and unknown complexity of the underlying system contribute to the heterogeneity of biological data, we develop a new method by proposing an extension of Robust Principal Component Analysis (RPCA), which models common variations across multiple experiments as the lowrank component and anomalies across these experiments as the sparse component. We show that the proposed method is able to find distinct subtypes and classify data sets in a robust way without any prior knowledge by separating these common responses and abnormal responses. Thus, the proposed method provides us a new representation of these data sets which has the potential to help users acquire new insight from data.

  18. Insight into others' minds: spatio-temporal representations by intrinsic frame of reference.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanlong; Wang, Hongbin

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has seen a growing interest in connections between domains of spatial and social cognition. Much evidence indicates that processes of representing space in distinct frames of reference (FOR) contribute to basic spatial abilities as well as sophisticated social abilities such as tracking other's intention and belief. Argument remains, however, that belief reasoning in social domain requires an innately dedicated system and cannot be reduced to low-level encoding of spatial relationships. Here we offer an integrated account advocating the critical roles of spatial representations in intrinsic frame of reference. By re-examining the results from a spatial task (Tamborello etal., 2012) and a false-belief task (Onishi and Baillargeon, 2005), we argue that spatial and social abilities share a common origin at the level of spatio-temporal association and predictive learning, where multiple FOR-based representations provide the basic building blocks for efficient and flexible partitioning of the environmental statistics. We also discuss neuroscience evidence supporting these mechanisms. We conclude that FOR-based representations may bridge the conceptual as well as the implementation gaps between the burgeoning fields of social and spatial cognition. PMID:24592226

  19. Spatio-temporal activity in real time (STAR): Optimization of regional fMRI feedback

    PubMed Central

    Magland, Jeremy F.; Tjoa, Christopher W.; Childress, Anna Rose

    2011-01-01

    The use of real-time feedback has expanded fMRI from a brain probe to include potential brain interventions with significant therapeutic promise. However, whereas time-averaged blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal measurement is usually sufficient for probing a brain state, the real-time (frame-to-frame) BOLD signal is noisy, compromising feedback accuracy. We have developed a new real-time processing technique (STAR) that combines noise-reduction properties of multi-voxel (e.g., whole-brain) techniques with the regional specificity critical for therapeutics. Nineteen subjects were given real-time feedback in a cognitive control task (imagining repetitive motor activity vs. spatial navigation), and were all able to control a visual feedback cursor based on whole-brain neural activity. The STAR technique was evaluated, retrospectively, for five a priori regions of interest in these data, and was shown to provide significantly better (frame-by-frame) classification accuracy than a regional BOLD technique. In addition to regional feedback signals, the output of the STAR technique includes spatio-temporal activity maps (movies) providing insight into brain dynamics. The STAR approach offers an appealing optimization for real-time fMRI applications requiring an anatomically-localized feedback signal. PMID:21232612

  20. Disentangling multidimensional spatio-temporal data into their common and aberrant responses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chang, Young Hwan; Korkola, James; Amin, Dhara N.; Moasser, Mark M.; Carmena, Jose M.; Gray, Joe W.; Tomlin, Claire J.; Lisacek, Frederique

    2015-04-22

    With the advent of high-throughput measurement techniques, scientists and engineers are starting to grapple with massive data sets and encountering challenges with how to organize, process and extract information into meaningful structures. Multidimensional spatio-temporal biological data sets such as time series gene expression with various perturbations over different cell lines, or neural spike trains across many experimental trials, have the potential to acquire insight about the dynamic behavior of the system. For this potential to be realized, we need a suitable representation to understand the data. A general question is how to organize the observed data into meaningful structures andmore »how to find an appropriate similarity measure. A natural way of viewing these complex high dimensional data sets is to examine and analyze the large-scale features and then to focus on the interesting details. Since the wide range of experiments and unknown complexity of the underlying system contribute to the heterogeneity of biological data, we develop a new method by proposing an extension of Robust Principal Component Analysis (RPCA), which models common variations across multiple experiments as the lowrank component and anomalies across these experiments as the sparse component. We show that the proposed method is able to find distinct subtypes and classify data sets in a robust way without any prior knowledge by separating these common responses and abnormal responses. Thus, the proposed method provides us a new representation of these data sets which has the potential to help users acquire new insight from data.« less

  1. Spatio-temporal Kinetics of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae(NTHi) Biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanji, Aleya; Rosas, Lucia; Ray, William; Jayaprakash, Ciriyam; Bakaletz, Lauren; Das, Jayajit

    2014-03-01

    Bacteria can form complex spatial structures known as biofilms. Biofilm formation is frequently associated with chronic infections due to the greatly enhanced antibiotic resistance of resident bacteria. However, our understanding of the role of basic processes, such as bacteria replication and resource consumption, in controlling the development and temporal change of the spatial structure remains rudimentary. Here, we examine the growth of cultured biofilms by the opportunistic pathogen NTHi. Through spatial information extracted from confocal microscopy images, we quantitatively characterize the biofilm structure as it evolves over time. We find that the equal-time height-height pair correlation function decreases with distance and scales with time for small length scales. Furthermore, both the surface roughness and the correlation length perpendicular to the surface growth direction increase with time initially and then decrease. We construct a spatially resolved agent based model beginning with the simplest possible case of a single bacteria species Fisher-Kolmogorov-Petrovsky-Piscounov equation. We show that it cannot describe the observed spatio-temporal behavior and suggest an improved two-species model that better captures the dynamics of the NTHi system. Supported by The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital.

  2. Spatio-temporal variation in the pollination mode of Buxus balearica (Buxaceae), an ambophilous and selfing species: mainland-island

    E-print Network

    Traveset, Anna

    Spatio-temporal variation in the pollination mode of Buxus balearica (Buxaceae), an ambophilous. 2005. Spatio-temporal variation in the pollination mode of Buxus balearica (Buxaceae), an ambophilous and selfing species: mainland-island comparison. Á/ Ecography 28: 640Á/652. Mixed-pollination systems may

  3. Analysis and Modeling of spatio-temporal Patterns of Carbon and Water Fluxes in Production Fields of Winter Wheat and Sugar Beet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupisch, M.; Langensiepen, M.; van Wijk, M.; Stadler, A.; Ewert, F.

    2011-12-01

    Gas exchange of CO2 and water vapour are important processes that determine crop growth and yield. Understanding their spatio-temporal variability at field level is necessary for accurate simulation of crop growth in fields with heterogeneous growing conditions and for parameterizing soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) models. Accordingly, relationships between the spatio-temporal patterns of assimilation and transpiration rates and environmental (e.g. soil) heterogeneity are of specific interest. A particular challenge refers then to the appropriate method of up-scaling of these relationships from the leaf to the canopy and field level. Therefore, gas-exchange (CO2 and water vapour) was measured at different points in winter wheat and sugar beet fieldsboth at leaf and at canopy level in a nearly biweekly cycle during the growing seasons 2010 and 2011. The measurements comprised also C/N-content of leaf, leaf area index, soil water content and soil nitrogen content. The results revealed a strong spatial heterogeneity of carbon and water canopy fluxes across the fields. While canopy measurements had a temporal variability with distinct diurnal and seasonal patterns, the temporal (and spatial) variability of leaf level photosynthesisand transpirationwas comparably small.Further analysis suggests that the observed spatial and seasonal variability of canopy measurements was mainly caused by field heterogeneity in LAI and less by gas exchange rates per unit leaf area. However, both crops differed in their response to drought stress: while wheat responded mainly through irreversible reduction in green leaf area, the canopy assimilation rate of sugar beets decreases only temporarily with no observed effects in LAI. The obtained datasets from both years are the basis for parameterizing a crop growth model with canopy assimilation and transpiration components and for developing appropriate up-scaling methods from leaf to field. Our results indicate that it is important to consider field heterogeneityfor parameterizing large-scale SVAT models. We will show to which extend the simulation results at field scale are affected by the up-scaling method.

  4. SPATIO-TEMPORAL DISTRIBUTION OF PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM AND P. VIVAX MALARIA IN THAILAND

    E-print Network

    SPATIO-TEMPORAL DISTRIBUTION OF PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM AND P. VIVAX MALARIA IN THAILAND GUOFA ZHOU of Medical Sciences, United States Army Military Component, Bangkok, Thailand Abstract. Malaria incidence data at the district level from 1997 to 2002 and total malaria case data from 1965 to 2002 in Thailand

  5. Tissue Tracking in Thermo-physiological Imagery through Spatio-temporal Smoothing

    E-print Network

    Tissue Tracking in Thermo-physiological Imagery through Spatio-temporal Smoothing Yan Zhou1,ipavlidis}@uh.edu, pt@aueb.gr Abstract. Accurate tracking of facial tissue in thermal infrared imag- ing conditions in 12 thermal clips. It demonstrated robustness and accuracy, outperforming other strategies

  6. Spatio-temporal mapping of ablated species in ultrafast laser-produced graphite plasmas

    E-print Network

    Harilal, S. S.

    Spatio-temporal mapping of ablated species in ultrafast laser-produced graphite plasmas K. F. Al pressures. Plasmas were generated by irradiating planar graphite targets using 40 fs pulses of 800 nm species popu- lations, emission, and kinetics. In recent years, graphite based nanomaterials (graphene

  7. Analyzing the Potential of Microblogs for Spatio-Temporal Popularity Estimation of Music Artists

    E-print Network

    Widmer, Gerhard

    that different kinds of users (in terms of their music un- derstanding and background) require Analyzing the Potential of Microblogs for Spatio-Temporal Popularity Estimation of Music Artists://www.cp.jku.at Abstract This paper looks into the suitability of microblogs for an important task in music information re

  8. Mars: Real-time Spatio-temporal Queries on Amr Magdy1

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    Mars: Real-time Spatio-temporal Queries on Microblogs Amr Magdy1§ , Ahmed M. Aly2 , Mohamed F@cs.purdue.edu {4 samehe,5 yuxhe,6 suman.nath}@microsoft.com Abstract-- Mars demonstration exploits the microblogs. Supported queries include range, nearest-neighbor, and aggregate queries. Mars works under a challenging

  9. Long-Range Spatio-Temporal Modeling of Video with Application to Fire Detection

    E-print Network

    Soatto, Stefano

    Long-Range Spatio-Temporal Modeling of Video with Application to Fire Detection Avinash- mal mode. The motivating application is fire monitoring from remote stations, where illumination and trained operators. 1 Introduction We are motivated by outdoor fire detection from remote video monitoring

  10. On the spatio-temporal dynamics of soil moisture at the field scale

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this paper, we review the state of the art of characterizing and analyzing spatio-temporal dynamics of soil moisture content at the field scale. We discuss measurement techniques that have become available in recent years and that provide unique opportunities to characterize field scale soil mois...

  11. Spatio-temporal patterns in obsidian consumption in the Southern Nasca Region, Peru

    E-print Network

    Spatio-temporal patterns in obsidian consumption in the Southern Nasca Region, Peru Jelmer W Accepted 10 November 2009 Keywords: Obsidian Exchange Mobility Provenance analysis Nasca Peru a b s t r a c t Geochemical data from 426 obsidian artifacts collected from a range of sites in the Southern Nasca Region (SNR

  12. Spatio-TEmporally REsolved Optical Laser Induced Damage (STEREO LID) technique for material characterization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yejia; Emmert, Luke A; Rudolph, Wolfgang

    2015-08-24

    A technique for measuring the ablation and laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) by identifying the temporal onset of damage and location of initiation within the beam profile is demonstrated. This new method, dubbed Spatio-TEmporally REsolved Optical Laser Induced Damage (STEREO LID), is compared to traditional damage tests and its advantages are exemplified. PMID:26368139

  13. Seasonal forcing drives spatio-temporal pattern formation in rabies epidemics

    E-print Network

    Seasonal forcing drives spatio-temporal pattern formation in rabies epidemics Niels v. Festenberg1 of rabies dispersal. We reduce an established individual-based high- detail model down to a deterministic of epidemic wave fronts. Keywords: pattern formation, epidemics, rabies, seasonal forcing AMS classification

  14. The electromagnetic fields and the radiation of a spatio-temporally varying electric current loop

    E-print Network

    Markus Lazar

    2013-04-12

    The electric and magnetic fields of a spatio-temporally varying electric current loop are calculated using the Jefimenko equations. The radiation and the nonradiation parts of the electromagnetic fields are derived in the framework of Maxwell's theory of electromagnetic fields. In this way, a new, exact, analytical solution of the Maxwell equation is found.

  15. MODELING MULTIDIMENSIONAL SPATIO-TEMPORAL DATA WAREHOUSES IN A CONTEXT OF EVOLVING SPECIFICATIONS

    E-print Network

    MODELING MULTIDIMENSIONAL SPATIO-TEMPORAL DATA WAREHOUSES IN A CONTEXT OF EVOLVING SPECIFICATIONS-temporal data warehouse. In many cases, the specifications of the data sets have evolved over time, especially based on a three-tiers architecture including a data warehouse with integrated data, an OLAP server

  16. Indexing Spatio-Temporal Data Warehouses Dimitris Papadias, Yufei Tao, Panos Kalnis, and Jun Zhang

    E-print Network

    Papadias, Dimitris

    Indexing Spatio-Temporal Data Warehouses Dimitris Papadias, Yufei Tao, Panos Kalnis, and Jun Zhang. A vital solution is the construction of a spatiotemporal data warehouse. In this paper, we describe retrieval [GBE+ 00], motion and trajectory preservation [PJT00], future location estimation [SJLL00] etc

  17. A Spatio-Temporal GIS Database for Monitoring Alpine Glacier Change

    E-print Network

    Mennis, Jeremy

    A Spatio-Temporal GIS Database for Monitoring Alpine Glacier Change Jeremy L. Mennis Department Monitoring alpine glacier change has many practical and scientific benefits, including yielding information on glacier-fed water supplies, glacier-associated natural hazards, and climate variability. This paper

  18. a Framework for Online Spatio-Temporal Data Visualization Based on HTML5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, B.; Wu, Z.; Cao, J.

    2012-07-01

    Web is entering a new phase - HTML5. New features of HTML5 should be studied for online spatio-temporal data visualization. In the proposed framework, spatio-temporal data is stored in the data server and is sent to user browsers with WebSocket. Public geo-data such as Internet digital map is integrated into the browsers. Then animation is implemented through the canvas object defined by the HTML5 specification. To simulate the spatio-temporal data source, we collected the daily location of 15 users with GPS tracker. The current positions of the users are collected every minute and are recorded in a file. Based on this file, we generate a real time spatio-temporal data source which sends out current user location every second.By enlarging the real time scales by 60 times, we can observe the movement clearly. The data transmitted with WebSocket is the coordinates of users' current positions, which will can be demonstrated in client browsers.

  19. Water Detection through Spatio-Temporal Invariant Descriptors Pascal Mettesa,1,

    E-print Network

    Veltkamp, Remco

    Water Detection through Spatio-Temporal Invariant Descriptors Pascal Mettesa,1, , Robby T. Tana,2, the Netherlands Abstract In this work, we aim to segment and detect water in videos. Water detection is beneficial recognition. Here, we analyze several motion properties of water. First, we describe a video pre

  20. Impacts of demographic and socioeconomic factors on spatio-temporal dynamics of panda habitat

    E-print Network

    -1 Impacts of demographic and socioeconomic factors on spatio-temporal dynamics of panda habitat LI, Socioeconomics, Spatial dynamics Abstract Demographic and socioeconomic factors of individual people and demographic factors individually, and under a conservation scenario and a development scenario (setting

  1. Neural Networks Letter A computational model of spatio-temporal dynamics in depth filling-in

    E-print Network

    Kawato, Mitsuo

    experiments on depth perception of untextured (uniform-colored) surface moving in depth. The model can also by localized measurement also exists in depth perception based on horizontal disparities. As a typical caseNeural Networks Letter A computational model of spatio-temporal dynamics in depth filling

  2. Spatio-temporal patterns in pelvic reduction in threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus L.)

    E-print Network

    Bernatchez, Louis

    Spatio-temporal patterns in pelvic reduction in threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus L threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus L.). Places and times: Two representative ancestral marine.) in Lake Storvatnet Tom Klepaker 1 , Kjartan Østbye 2,3 , Louis Bernatchez 4 and L. Asbjørn Vøllestad 2 1

  3. Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Forest Fire Risk and Danger Using LANDSAT Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Sa?lam, Bülent; Bilgili, Ertu?rul; Durmaz, Bahar Dinç; Kad?o?ullar?, Ali ?hsan; Küçük, Ömer

    2008-01-01

    Computing fire danger and fire risk on a spatio-temporal scale is of crucial importance in fire management planning, and in the simulation of fire growth and development across a landscape. However, due to the complex nature of forests, fire risk and danger potential maps are considered one of the most difficult thematic layers to build up. Remote sensing and digital terrain data have been introduced for efficient discrete classification of fire risk and fire danger potential. In this study, two time-series data of Landsat imagery were used for determining spatio-temporal change of fire risk and danger potential in Korudag forest planning unit in northwestern Turkey. The method comprised the following two steps: (1) creation of indices of the factors influencing fire risk and danger; (2) evaluation of spatio-temporal changes in fire risk and danger of given areas using remote sensing as a quick and inexpensive means and determining the pace of forest cover change. Fire risk and danger potential indices were based on species composition, stand crown closure, stand development stage, insolation, slope and, proximity of agricultural lands to forest and distance from settlement areas. Using the indices generated, fire risk and danger maps were produced for the years 1987 and 2000. Spatio-temporal analyses were then realized based on the maps produced. Results obtained from the study showed that the use of Landsat imagery provided a valuable characterization and mapping of vegetation structure and type with overall classification accuracy higher than 83%.

  4. Multi-camera Spatio-temporal Fusion and Biased Sequence-data Learning for Security Surveillance

    E-print Network

    Wang, Yuan-Fang

    -alignment kernel. Through empirical study in a parking-lot surveillance setting, we show that our spatio characterization and detection. Spatio-temporal data fusion. Objects observed from multiple cam- eras should shift (e.g., cam- era recording without precise timing information and with different frame rates

  5. Multi-View 3D Shape and Motion Recovery on the Spatio-Temporal Curve Manifold

    E-print Network

    Toronto, University of

    -Temporal Curve Manifold that describes the curve's trace in space-time, and (2) a local analytical description-Temporal Curve Manifold, which is the trace of a moving 3D curve in space-time. We show that com- putingMulti-View 3D Shape and Motion Recovery on the Spatio-Temporal Curve Manifold Rodrigo L. Carceroni

  6. The spatio-temporal dynamics of neutral genetic diversity O. Bonnefon1

    E-print Network

    Hamel, François

    The spatio-temporal dynamics of neutral genetic diversity O. Bonnefon1 , J. Coville1 , J. Garnier2-expanding population. Keywords. reaction-diffusion; genetic diversity; pushed and pulled solutions; traveling waves of the genetic structure of a population. The pulled solutions describe a rapid erosion of neutral genetic

  7. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Online Memes: A Study of Geo-Tagged Tweets

    E-print Network

    Caverlee, James

    Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Online Memes: A Study of Geo-Tagged Tweets Krishna Y. Kamath, James of hashtags, which is important for understanding meme diffusion and infor- mation propagation; (ii) examine this content, some content may gain traction and be- come popular resulting in viral videos and popular memes

  8. Spatio-Temporal Meme Prediction: Learning What Hashtags Will Be Popular Where

    E-print Network

    Caverlee, James

    Spatio-Temporal Meme Prediction: Learning What Hashtags Will Be Popular Where Krishna Y. Kamath of predicting what online memes will be popular in what locations. Specif- ically, we develop data on the problem of predicting what online memes will be popular in what locations, which has Permission to make

  9. LEFT ENDOCARDIUM SEGMENTATION USING SPATIO-TEMPORAL METAMORPHS , Shaoting Zhang1

    E-print Network

    Huang, Junzhou

    LEFT ENDOCARDIUM SEGMENTATION USING SPATIO-TEMPORAL METAMORPHS Xinyi Cui1 , Shaoting Zhang1, Bethlehem, PA, USA 4 Radiology Department, New York University, New York, NY, USA ABSTRACT The Metamorphs. The standard Metamorphs model does not encode temporal information. Thus it is not effective in segmenting time

  10. Ocean Wave Reconstruction Algorithms Based on Spatio-temporal Data Acquired by a Flash LIDAR Camera

    E-print Network

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    Ocean Wave Reconstruction Algorithms Based on Spatio-temporal Data Acquired by a Flash LIDAR Camera St´ephan T. Grilli , Charles-Antoine Gu´erin and Bart Goldstein (1) Department of Ocean Engineering on the development of free surface reconstruction algorithms to predict ocean waves, based on spatial observations

  11. Where is your dive buddy: tracking humans underwater using spatio-temporal features

    E-print Network

    Dudek, Gregory

    Where is your dive buddy: tracking humans underwater using spatio-temporal features Junaed Sattar to track mobile targets, and specifically human divers, by detecting periodic motion. Periodic motion is typically associated with propulsion underwater and specifically with the kicking of human swimmers

  12. Panda: A Predictive Spatio-Temporal Query Processor Abdeltawab M. Hendawi Mohamed F. Mokbel

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    Panda: A Predictive Spatio-Temporal Query Processor Abdeltawab M. Hendawi Mohamed F. Mokbel, mokbel}@cs.umn.edu ABSTRACT This paper presents the Panda system for efficient support of a wide variety, Panda targets long-term query prediction as it relies on adapting a well-designed long-term prediction

  13. Generating Spatio-Temporal Descriptions in Pollen Forecasts Ross Turner, Somayajulu Sripada and Ehud Reiter

    E-print Network

    Generating Spatio-Temporal Descriptions in Pollen Forecasts Ross Turner, Somayajulu Sripada with the help of a prototype Natural Language Generation (NLG) system that produces pollen forecasts a prototype NLG system which produces textual pollen forecasts for the general public. Pollen forecast texts

  14. An Integrated Framework for Spatio-Temporal-Textual Search and Mining

    E-print Network

    Cortes, Corinna

    An Integrated Framework for Spatio-Temporal-Textual Search and Mining Bingsheng Wang1 , Haili Dong1 and implement a search and mining system that adapts to the needs of both desktop and mobile users. Although there exist search engines [2] and pattern mining techniques [3] for crime incidents and terrorism threats

  15. Bayesian Spatio-Temporal Modelling to Deliver More Accurate and Instantaneous Air Pollution

    E-print Network

    Sahu, Sujit K

    Bayesian Spatio-Temporal Modelling to Deliver More Accurate and Instantaneous Air Pollution Forecasts Sujit K Sahu Abstract Air pollution is known to have a significant health impact particularly air pollution by reducing their outdoor activity when levels are high. 1 Introduction Air quality

  16. Spatio-temporal community structure of peat bog benthic desmids on a microscale

    E-print Network

    Spatio-temporal community structure of peat bog benthic desmids on a microscale Jiri´ Neustupa- scale transects were delimited at 4 temperate lowland peat bog localities to investigate spatial bogs Á Spatial structure Introduction Microscale spatial variation has recently been recog- nised

  17. Multivariate spatio-temporal modelling for assessing Antarctica's present-day contribution to sea-level rise

    PubMed Central

    Zammit-Mangion, Andrew; Rougier, Jonathan; Schön, Nana; Lindgren, Finn; Bamber, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Antarctica is the world's largest fresh-water reservoir, with the potential to raise sea levels by about 60 m. An ice sheet contributes to sea-level rise (SLR) when its rate of ice discharge and/or surface melting exceeds accumulation through snowfall. Constraining the contribution of the ice sheets to present-day SLR is vital both for coastal development and planning, and climate projections. Information on various ice sheet processes is available from several remote sensing data sets, as well as in situ data such as global positioning system data. These data have differing coverage, spatial support, temporal sampling and sensing characteristics, and thus, it is advantageous to combine them all in a single framework for estimation of the SLR contribution and the assessment of processes controlling mass exchange with the ocean. In this paper, we predict the rate of height change due to salient geophysical processes in Antarctica and use these to provide estimates of SLR contribution with associated uncertainties. We employ a multivariate spatio-temporal model, approximated as a Gaussian Markov random field, to take advantage of differing spatio-temporal properties of the processes to separate the causes of the observed change. The process parameters are estimated from geophysical models, while the remaining parameters are estimated using a Markov chain Monte Carlo scheme, designed to operate in a high-performance computing environment across multiple nodes. We validate our methods against a separate data set and compare the results to those from studies that invariably employ numerical model outputs directly. We conclude that it is possible, and insightful, to assess Antarctica's contribution without explicit use of numerical models. Further, the results obtained here can be used to test the geophysical numerical models for which in situ data are hard to obtain. © 2015 The Authors. Environmetrics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25937792

  18. Spectral element methods for nonlinear spatio-temporal dynamics of an Euler-Bernoulli beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Yoseph, P. Z.; Fisher, D.; Gottlieb, O.

    1996-11-01

    Spectral element methods are high order accurate methods which have been successfully utilized for solving ordinary and partial differential equations. In this paper the space-time spectral element (STSE) method is employed to solve a simply supported modified Euler-Bernoulli nonlinear beam undergoing forced lateral vibrations. This system was chosen for analysis due to the availability of a reference solution of the form of a forced Duffing's equation. Two formulations were examined: i) a generalized Galerkin method with Hermitian polynomials as interpolants both in spatial and temporal discretization (HHSE), ii) a mixed discontinuous Galerkin formulation with Hermitian cubic polynomials as interpolants for spatial discretization and Lagrangian spectral polynomials as interpolants for temporal discretization (HLSE). The first method revealed severe stability problems while the second method exhibited unconditional stability and was selected for detailed analysis. The spatial h-convergence rate of the HLSE method is of order ?= p s+1 (where p s is the spatial polynomial order). Temporal p-convergence of the HLSE method is exponential and the h-convergence rate based on the end points (the points corresponding to the final time of each element) is of order 2 p T-1 ???2 p T+1 (where p T is the temporal polynomial order). Due to the high accuracy of the HLSE method, good results were achieved for the cases considered using a relatively large spatial grid size (4 elements for first mode solutions) and a large integration time step (1/4 of the system period for first mode solutions, with p T=3). All the first mode solution features were detected including the onset of the first period doubling bifurcation, the onset of chaos and the return to periodic motion. Two examples of second mode excitation produced homogeneous second mode and coupled first and second mode periodic solutions. Consequently, the STSE method is shown to be an accurate numerical method for simulation of nonlinear spatio-temporal dynamical systems exhibiting chaotic response.

  19. Spatio-temporal variability of ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) over the Indian subcontinent derived from geodetic GPS network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayan, M.; Kannoth, S.; Varghese, G.; Earnest, A.; Jade, S.; Bhatt, B. C.; Gupta, S. S.

    2013-12-01

    We present, for the first time, Ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) computed from dual frequency GPS data observed by Indian geodetic GPS network and neighboring IGS stations for more than a decade (2001-2012) (figure 1). Indian geodetic GPS network has more than 30 stations well spread across the Indian subcontinent, primarily, to study the tectonics of the Indian plate. Each station has geodetic grade dual frequency GPS receiver which are operated in continuous mode by making observations at every 30s since 2001. The ionospheric TEC presented here is computed from the code and phase GPS measurements using the software IONODETECT developed at CSIR 4PI. This decadal scale ionospheric data set covers from maxima of 23rd to maxima of 24th solar cycle with a broad spatial coverage from 35S to 56N and 38E to 134E (figure1). The GPS TEC computed at every 30 seconds over each sub-ionospheric point correlates well with International Reference Ionosphere(IRI) 2012 model in longer time scale, however, a strong spatio-temporal dependence in correlation is clearly observed. In addition a site specific, nearly systematic night time bias between GPS TEC and IRI-12 is noted. The advantage of using the systematic bias for correcting Differential Code Bias (DCB) in computing GPS TEC is discussed. We also discuss in detail the equatorial ionospheric processes and regional characteristics of Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA) through latitudinal, diurnal, seasonal, and inter-annual variability of decadal scale GPS TEC computed over Indian subcontinent. EIA anomaly crust maxima during local noon on 30th November 2004 is clearly visible in the figure 1. The TEC variations associated with solar flares and solar maxima and minima during the solar cycles are also discussed to understand the impact of space weather on equatorial and mid latitude ionosphere as well as on navigation. Vertical TEC (VTEC) at each sub ionospheric pierce points (SIP) on 30th November 2004 from 0UTC to 2359UTC. The red triangles are GPS stations.

  20. Nitrate sinks and sources as controls of spatio-temporal water quality dynamics in an agricultural headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetz, T.; Gascuel-Odoux, C.; Durand, P.; Weiler, M.

    2015-08-01

    Several controls are known to affect water quality of stream networks during flow recession periods such as solute leaching processes, surface water - groundwater interactions as well as biogeochemical in-stream retention processes. Throughout the stream network combinations of specific water and solute export rates and local in-stream conditions overlay the biogeochemical signals from upstream sections. Therefore, upstream sections can be considered as functional units which could be distinguished and ordered regarding their relative contribution to nutrient dynamics at the catchment outlet. Based on synoptic sampling of flow and nitrate concentrations along the stream in an agricultural headwater during the summer flow recession period, we determined spatial and temporal patterns of water quality for the whole stream. A data-driven, in-stream-mixing-and-removal model was developed and applied for analyzing the spatio-temporal in-stream retention processes and their effect on the spatio-temporal fluxes of nitrates from sub-catchments. Thereby, we have been able to distinguish between nitrate sinks and sources per stream reaches and sub-catchments. For nitrate sources we have determined their permanent and temporally impact on stream water quality and for nitrate sinks we have found increasing nitrate removal efficiencies from up- to downstream. Our results highlight the importance of distinct nitrate source locations within the watershed for in-stream concentrations and in-stream removal processes, respectively. Thus, our findings contribute to the development of a more dynamic perception of water quality in streams and rivers concerning ecological and sustainable water resources management.

  1. Spatio-temporal variation in European starling reproductive success at multiple small spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Brickhill, Daisy; Evans, Peter Gh; Reid, Jane M

    2015-08-01

    Understanding population dynamics requires spatio-temporal variation in demography to be measured across appropriate spatial and temporal scales. However, the most appropriate spatial scale(s) may not be obvious, few datasets cover sufficient time periods, and key demographic rates are often incompletely measured. Consequently, it is often assumed that demography will be spatially homogeneous within populations that lack obvious subdivision. Here, we quantify small-scale spatial and temporal variation in a key demographic rate, reproductive success (RS), within an apparently contiguous population of European starlings. We used hierarchical cluster analysis to define spatial clusters of nest sites at multiple small spatial scales and long-term data to test the hypothesis that small-scale spatio-temporal variation in RS occurred. RS was measured as the number of chicks alive ca. 12 days posthatch either per first brood or per nest site per breeding season (thereby incorporating multiple breeding attempts). First brood RS varied substantially among spatial clusters and years. Furthermore, the pattern of spatial variation was stable across years; some nest clusters consistently produced more chicks than others. Total seasonal RS also varied substantially among spatial clusters and years. However, the magnitude of variation was much larger and the pattern of spatial variation was no longer temporally consistent. Furthermore, the estimated magnitude of spatial variation in RS was greater at smaller spatial scales. We thereby demonstrate substantial spatial, temporal, and spatio-temporal variation in RS occurring at very small spatial scales. We show that the estimated magnitude of this variation depended on spatial scale and that spatio-temporal variation would not have been detected if season-long RS had not been measured. Such small-scale spatio-temporal variation should be incorporated into empirical and theoretical treatments of population dynamics. PMID:26380670

  2. Spatio-temporal variation in European starling reproductive success at multiple small spatial scales

    PubMed Central

    Brickhill, Daisy; Evans, Peter GH; Reid, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    Understanding population dynamics requires spatio-temporal variation in demography to be measured across appropriate spatial and temporal scales. However, the most appropriate spatial scale(s) may not be obvious, few datasets cover sufficient time periods, and key demographic rates are often incompletely measured. Consequently, it is often assumed that demography will be spatially homogeneous within populations that lack obvious subdivision. Here, we quantify small-scale spatial and temporal variation in a key demographic rate, reproductive success (RS), within an apparently contiguous population of European starlings. We used hierarchical cluster analysis to define spatial clusters of nest sites at multiple small spatial scales and long-term data to test the hypothesis that small-scale spatio-temporal variation in RS occurred. RS was measured as the number of chicks alive ca. 12 days posthatch either per first brood or per nest site per breeding season (thereby incorporating multiple breeding attempts). First brood RS varied substantially among spatial clusters and years. Furthermore, the pattern of spatial variation was stable across years; some nest clusters consistently produced more chicks than others. Total seasonal RS also varied substantially among spatial clusters and years. However, the magnitude of variation was much larger and the pattern of spatial variation was no longer temporally consistent. Furthermore, the estimated magnitude of spatial variation in RS was greater at smaller spatial scales. We thereby demonstrate substantial spatial, temporal, and spatio-temporal variation in RS occurring at very small spatial scales. We show that the estimated magnitude of this variation depended on spatial scale and that spatio-temporal variation would not have been detected if season-long RS had not been measured. Such small-scale spatio-temporal variation should be incorporated into empirical and theoretical treatments of population dynamics. PMID:26380670

  3. Salmonella enterica Serovar Napoli Infection in Italy from 2000 to 2013: Spatial and Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Cases Distribution and the Effect of Human and Animal Density on the Risk of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Graziani, Caterina; Luzzi, Ida; Owczarek, Slawomir; Dionisi, Anna Maria; Busani, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Background Salmonella Napoli is uncommon in Europe. In Italy however, it has been growing in importance since 2000. To date, no risk factors have been identified to account for its rise. This study aims at describing the epidemiology, spatial and spatio-temporal patterns of S. Napoli in Italy from 2000 to 2013, and to explore the role of several environmental correlates, namely urbanization, altitude and number of livestock farms, on the risk of S. Napoli infection among humans. Method Data were obtained from Enter-Net Italy, a network of diagnostic laboratories. The data were aggregated at the municipality level. Descriptive epidemiology, multivariate regression models, spatial and spatio-temporal analyses were performed on the number of cases and incidence rates. Results S. Napoli showed an expanding trend at the national level, and an increasing number of cases. Compared to the other main serovars in Italy, the risk of S. Napoli infection was higher in the age group <1 year, and lower in the other age groups. Although urbanization and the number of farms were associated with the risk of S. Napoli infection to some extent, their role in the epidemiology of the disease remains inconclusive. S. Napoli cases showed a positive global spatial autocorrelation as well as a significant spatio-temporal interaction. Twenty-four spatial and spatio-temporal clusters were identified, seven purely spatial and 17 spatio-temporal, mainly in north-western Italy. Most of the clusters were in areas characterized by urban and industrial settlements surrounded by agricultural land and an abundance of freshwater bodies. Conclusions Our results point to the presence, in a number of areas in Italy, of a Salmonella of public health concern originating in the environment. This highlights the increasing relevance of environmental, non-food-related sources of human exposure to enteric pathogens. PMID:26558381

  4. Spatio-Temporal Variations of Evapotranspiration in the Lake Selin Co Basin (Tibetan Plateau) from 2003 to 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J.; Wang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, X.; Liu, W.

    2014-12-01

    Over the Tibetan Plateau (TP), lake expansion/shrinkage has been found closely correlated to the changing evapotranspiration (ET) patterns. Lake Selin Co is the largest endorheic lake on the TP, but the spatio-temporal changes of ET and its controlling factors in this lake basin are still not well understood. In this study, the Water and Energy Budget-based Distributed Hydrological Model (WEB-DHM, for land area), Penman-Monteith method (unfrozen period of water area) and a simple sublimation estimation approach (frozen period of water area) were used to estimate the spatio-temporal variations of ET in the Lake Selin Co Basin from 2003 to 2012. The causes for the variations are also discussed. By comparing with MODIS land surface temperature (LST) data, WEB-DHM successfully reproduced the spatial pattern and basin-averaged values of nighttime and daytime LST. Compared with the ET reference values estimated from water balance method, our method showed better performance than global ET products in reproducing annual basin-averaged ET. The modeled ET at point scale matches well with in situ daily measurements from 10 October to 10 November 2012 (RMSE = 0.82 mm/day). The increase of precipitation makes ET from the land area an increasing trend, except in winter. ET from the water area is an integrated effect of climate factors on annual and seasonal scales. The decline of wind speed and the increase of vapor pressure deficit may offset the effect of increasing temperature and contribute to an insignificant decreasing trend of annual ET from the water area.

  5. Modeling spatio-temporal variations of seismicity in the San Jacinto Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zöller, G.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2012-04-01

    We investigate spatio-temporal properties of earthquake patterns in the San Jacinto fault zone (SJFZ), California, between Cajon Pass and the Superstition Hill Fault, using long records of simulated seismicity constrained by available data. The model provides an effective realization (e.g. Ben-Zion 1996; Zöller et al. 2007) of a large segmented strike-slip fault zone in 3D elastic half space, with heterogeneous distributions of static/kinetic friction and creep properties, and boundary conditions consisting of constant velocity motion around the fault. The computational section of the fault contains small brittle slip patches which fail during earthquakes and may undergo some creep deformation between events. The creep rates increase to the end points of the computational section and with depth. Two significant offsets of the SJFZ at San Jacinto Valley and Coyote Ridge are modeled by strength heterogeneities. The simulated catalogs are compared to the seismicity recorded at the SJFZ since 1932 and to recently reported results on paleoearthquakes at sites along the SJFZ at Hog Lake (HL) and Mystic Lake (ML) in the last 1500 years (e.g. Onderdonk et al., 2012; Rockwell et al., 2012). We address several questions including the following intriguing issue raised by the available paleoseismological data: are large earthquakes with signatures in ML and HL typically correlated? In particular: is a typical paleoevent in HL an incomplete rupture that is continued later in ML, and vice versa? The simulation results provide insights on the statistical significance of these and other patterns, and the ability of the SJFZ to produce large earthquakes which have not been observed in recent decades.

  6. Homogeneous Geovisualization of Coastal Areas from Heterogeneous Spatio-Temporal Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masse, A.; Christophe, S.

    2015-08-01

    On coastal areas, recent increase in production of open-access high-quality data over large areas reflects high interests in modeling and geovisualization, especially for applications of sea level rise prediction, ship traffic security and ecological protection. Research interests are due to tricky challenges from the intrinsic nature of the coastal area, which is composed of complex geographical objects of which spatial extents vary in time, especially in the intertidal zone (tides, sands, etc.). Another interest is the complex modeling of this area based on imprecise cartographic objects (coastline, highest/lowest water level, etc.). The challenge of visualizing such specific area comes thus from 3D+t information, i.e. spatio-temporal data, and their visual integration. In this paper, we present a methodology for geovisualization issues over coastal areas. The first challenge consists in integrating multi-source heterogeneous data, i.e. raster and vector, terrestrial and hydrographic data often coming from various `paradigms', while providing a homogeneous geovisualization of the coastal area and in particular the phenomenon of the water depth. The second challenge consists in finding various possibilities to geovisualize this dynamic geographical phenomenon in controlling the level of photorealism in hybrid visualizations. Our approach is based on the use of a high-resolution Digital Terrain Model (DTM) coming from high resolution LiDAR data point cloud, tidal and topographic data. We present and discuss homogeneous hybrid visualizations, based on LiDAR and map, and on, LiDAR and orthoimagery, in order to enhance the realism while considering the water depth.

  7. Automated classification of LV regional wall motion based on spatio-temporal profiles from cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantilla, Juan; Garreau, Mireille; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Paredes, José Luis

    2013-11-01

    Assessment of the cardiac Left Ventricle (LV) wall motion is generally based on visual inspection or quantitative analysis of 2D+t sequences acquired in short-axis cardiac cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Most often, cardiac dynamic is globally analized from two particular phases of the cardiac cycle. In this paper, we propose an automated method to classify regional wall motion in LV function based on spatio-temporal pro les and Support Vector Machines (SVM). This approach allows to obtain a binary classi cation between normal and abnormal motion, without the need of pre-processing and by exploiting all the images of the cardiac cycle. In each short- axis MRI slice level (basal, median, and apical), the spatio-temporal pro les are extracted from the selection of a subset of diametrical lines crossing opposites LV segments. Initialized at end-diastole phase, the pro les are concatenated with their corresponding projections into the succesive temporal phases of the cardiac cycle. These pro les are associated to di erent types of information that derive from the image (gray levels), Fourier, Wavelet or Curvelet domains. The approach has been tested on a set of 14 abnormal and 6 healthy patients by using a leave-one-out cross validation and two kernel functions for SVM classi er. The best classi cation performance is yielded by using four-level db4 wavelet transform and SVM with a linear kernel. At each slice level the results provided a classi cation rate of 87.14% in apical level, 95.48% in median level and 93.65% in basal level.

  8. Application of spatio-temporal image correlation technology in the diagnosis of fetal cardiac abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    HE, YIHUA; WANG, JUNLAN; GU, XIAOYAN; ZHANG, YE; HAN, JIANCHENG; LIU, XIAOWEI; LI, ZHIAN

    2013-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is the birth defect with the highest incidence in China. Its timely and accurate prenatal diagnosis is critical for appropriate perinatal and postnatal management and salvage treatment. With improvements in the diagnostic capabilities of ultrasound and clinical manipulation techniques, prenatal diagnosis is conducted increasingly early and with greater accuracy. However, the representations of tiny blood vessels and the determination of abnormal spatial structures in the fetal period continue to cause difficulties in prenatal diagnosis. In theory, spatio-temporal image correlation (STIC) technology is able to compensate for the defects of previous traditional two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound and improve the diagnostic accuracy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical application value of STIC technology combined with traditional 2D ultrasound in the diagnosis of fetal cardiac abnormalities. A total of 1,286 fetuses were subjected to sequential echocardiographic examination, during which STIC technology was used to collect heart volume data and carry out image post-processing and off-line analysis. In addition, the prenatal and postnatal echocardiography results were compared with the pathology results following the induced labor of fetuses with cardiac abnormalities. The sensitivity, specificity, misdiagnosis rate and rate of missed diagnosis for the STIC technology in the diagnosis of prenatal fetal cardiac abnormalities were 97.4, 99.6, 0.4 and 2.6%, respectively. The total coincidence rate was 99.2% and the positive and negative predictive values were 97.9 and 99.4%, respectively; the statistics for the consistency check of the STIC technology in the diagnosis of fetal cardiac abnormalities are ?=0.991, P=0.000. STIC technology combined with fetal echocardiography may be used for the definite diagnosis of fetal heart malformations, with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:23837046

  9. Phlegra Montes - Spatio-Temporal Distribution of Ice and Debris at Martian Mid-Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, J.; van Gasselt, S.; Orgel, C.

    2014-04-01

    Mars hosts an abundance of landforms indicative of near-subsurface ice. Lobate debris aprons belong to a group of well-studied but still enigmatic ice-related landforms which have been identified at mid-latitudes between 30o and 50o in both hemispheres. While nature and origin of ice in these aprons are still controversially debated there is a general consensus that these features are sensitive to climate variability and, consequently, a potential indicator of past climate conditions, and potential water reservoirs today. The northern hemisphere hosts three populations of debris aprons: the Tempe Terra/Mareotis Fossae(TT) region [2, 5], the Deuteronilus/Protonilus Mensae (DPM) [1, 4, 9], and the Phlegra Montes region (PM) [3]. In southern latitudes the impact-basins rims of Argyre (AP) and Hellas Planitiae/Promethei Terra (HP) host a similar, albeit less well-pronounced set of features [1, 2, 6]. While most research is being concentrated on the HP, TT and DPM areas, studies discussing the population of the PM (located at 165o E, 30-50o N, see figure 1) are rather sparse [3, 14, 15, 16] although features are generally well-developed, representative due to their spatial distribution and wellimaged by high-resolution instruments. We performed an integrated spatio-temporal analysis of the PM population and focus on the age distribution of debris aprons in order to constrain their formation age. Our research is motivated by the assumption that if young-Amazonian climate variations have controlled formation and appearance of geomorphic landforms on Mars, we should observe traces of this process in PM as latitudinal trends and variations should provide measurable characteristics. If so, and if surface ages based on crater-frequency analysis are consistent with these assumptions, the exact timing of climate shifts may be assessable.

  10. Spatio-temporal variation of drought in China during 1961-2012: A climatic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kai; Yang, Dawen; Yang, Hanbo; Li, Zhe; Qin, Yue; Shen, Yan

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the spatial and temporal variation of drought is essentially important in drought assessment. In most previous studies, drought event is usually identified in space and time separately, ignoring the nature of the dynamic processes. In order to better understand how drought changes have taken place in China during the past half-century, we carried out a comprehensive analysis of their spatio-temporal variation based on multiple drought indices from a climatic perspective. A 3-dimensional clustering method is developed to identify drought events in China from 1961 to 2012 based on the 0.25° gridded indices of SPI3 (3 months Standardized Precipitation Index), RDI3 (3 months Reconnaissance Drought Index) and SPEI3 (3 months Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index). Drought events are further characterized by five parameters: duration, affected area, severity, intensity, and centroid. Remotely sensed soil moisture data were used to validate the rationality of identified drought events. The results show that the two most severe drought events in the past half century which occurred in the periods 1962-1963 and 2010-2011 swept more than half of the non-arid regions in China. Large magnitude droughts were usually centered in the region from North China Plain to the downstream of Yangtze River. The western part of North China Plain, Loess Plateau, Sichuan Basin and Yunnan-Guizhou Plateau had a significant drying trend, which is mainly caused by the significant decrease of precipitation. The three drought indices have almost the same performance in the humid regions, while SPI and RDI were found to be more appropriate than SPEI in the arid regions.

  11. Spatio-temporal variation in Helicoverpa egg parasitism by Trichogramma in a tropical Bt-transgenic cotton landscape

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the spatio-temporal dynamics of insects in agroecosystems is crucial when developing effective management strategies that emphasise biological control of pests. Wild populations of Trichogramma Westwood egg parasitoids are utilised for biological suppression of the potentially resistan...

  12. Identifying causal gateways and mediators in complex spatio-temporal systems

    PubMed Central

    Runge, Jakob; Petoukhov, Vladimir; Donges, Jonathan F.; Hlinka, Jaroslav; Jajcay, Nikola; Vejmelka, Martin; Hartman, David; Marwan, Norbert; Paluš, Milan; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Identifying regions important for spreading and mediating perturbations is crucial to assess the susceptibilities of spatio-temporal complex systems such as the Earth's climate to volcanic eruptions, extreme events or geoengineering. Here a data-driven approach is introduced based on a dimension reduction, causal reconstruction, and novel network measures based on causal effect theory that go beyond standard complex network tools by distinguishing direct from indirect pathways. Applied to a data set of atmospheric dynamics, the method identifies several strongly uplifting regions acting as major gateways of perturbations spreading in the atmosphere. Additionally, the method provides a stricter statistical approach to pathways of atmospheric teleconnections, yielding insights into the Pacific–Indian Ocean interaction relevant for monsoonal dynamics. Also for neuroscience or power grids, the novel causal interaction perspective provides a complementary approach to simulations or experiments for understanding the functioning of complex spatio-temporal systems with potential applications in increasing their resilience to shocks or extreme events. PMID:26443010

  13. Spatial and Spatio-Temporal Models for Modeling Epidemiological Data with Excess Zeros.

    PubMed

    Arab, Ali

    2015-09-01

    Epidemiological data often include excess zeros. This is particularly the case for data on rare conditions, diseases that are not common in specific areas or specific time periods, and conditions and diseases that are hard to detect or on the rise. In this paper, we provide a review of methods for modeling data with excess zeros with focus on count data, namely hurdle and zero-inflated models, and discuss extensions of these models to data with spatial and spatio-temporal dependence structures. We consider a Bayesian hierarchical framework to implement spatial and spatio-temporal models for data with excess zeros. We further review current implementation methods and computational tools. Finally, we provide a case study on five-year counts of confirmed cases of Lyme disease in Illinois at the county level. PMID:26343696

  14. Sensing Solutions for Collecting Spatio-Temporal Data for Wildlife Monitoring Applications: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Baratchi, Mitra; Meratnia, Nirvana; Havinga, Paul J. M.; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Toxopeus, Bert A. G.

    2013-01-01

    Movement ecology is a field which places movement as a basis for understanding animal behavior. To realize this concept, ecologists rely on data collection technologies providing spatio-temporal data in order to analyze movement. Recently, wireless sensor networks have offered new opportunities for data collection from remote places through multi-hop communication and collaborative capability of the nodes. Several technologies can be used in such networks for sensing purposes and for collecting spatio-temporal data from animals. In this paper, we investigate and review technological solutions which can be used for collecting data for wildlife monitoring. Our aim is to provide an overview of different sensing technologies used for wildlife monitoring and to review their capabilities in terms of data they provide for modeling movement behavior of animals. PMID:23666132

  15. Identifying causal gateways and mediators in complex spatio-temporal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, Jakob; Petoukhov, Vladimir; Donges, Jonathan F.; Hlinka, Jaroslav; Jajcay, Nikola; Vejmelka, Martin; Hartman, David; Marwan, Norbert; Paluš, Milan; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    Identifying regions important for spreading and mediating perturbations is crucial to assess the susceptibilities of spatio-temporal complex systems such as the Earth's climate to volcanic eruptions, extreme events or geoengineering. Here a data-driven approach is introduced based on a dimension reduction, causal reconstruction, and novel network measures based on causal effect theory that go beyond standard complex network tools by distinguishing direct from indirect pathways. Applied to a data set of atmospheric dynamics, the method identifies several strongly uplifting regions acting as major gateways of perturbations spreading in the atmosphere. Additionally, the method provides a stricter statistical approach to pathways of atmospheric teleconnections, yielding insights into the Pacific-Indian Ocean interaction relevant for monsoonal dynamics. Also for neuroscience or power grids, the novel causal interaction perspective provides a complementary approach to simulations or experiments for understanding the functioning of complex spatio-temporal systems with potential applications in increasing their resilience to shocks or extreme events.

  16. Identifying causal gateways and mediators in complex spatio-temporal systems.

    PubMed

    Runge, Jakob; Petoukhov, Vladimir; Donges, Jonathan F; Hlinka, Jaroslav; Jajcay, Nikola; Vejmelka, Martin; Hartman, David; Marwan, Norbert; Paluš, Milan; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Identifying regions important for spreading and mediating perturbations is crucial to assess the susceptibilities of spatio-temporal complex systems such as the Earth's climate to volcanic eruptions, extreme events or geoengineering. Here a data-driven approach is introduced based on a dimension reduction, causal reconstruction, and novel network measures based on causal effect theory that go beyond standard complex network tools by distinguishing direct from indirect pathways. Applied to a data set of atmospheric dynamics, the method identifies several strongly uplifting regions acting as major gateways of perturbations spreading in the atmosphere. Additionally, the method provides a stricter statistical approach to pathways of atmospheric teleconnections, yielding insights into the Pacific-Indian Ocean interaction relevant for monsoonal dynamics. Also for neuroscience or power grids, the novel causal interaction perspective provides a complementary approach to simulations or experiments for understanding the functioning of complex spatio-temporal systems with potential applications in increasing their resilience to shocks or extreme events. PMID:26443010

  17. DSTiPE Algorithm for Fuzzy Spatio-Temporal Risk Calculation in Wireless Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kurt Derr; Milos Manic

    2008-09-01

    Time and location data play a very significant role in a variety of factory automation scenarios, such as automated vehicles and robots, their navigation, tracking, and monitoring, to services of optimization and security. In addition, pervasive wireless capabilities combined with time and location information are enabling new applications in areas such as transportation systems, health care, elder care, military, emergency response, critical infrastructure, and law enforcement. A person/object in proximity to certain areas for specific durations of time may pose a risk hazard either to themselves, others, or the environment. This paper presents a novel fuzzy based spatio-temporal risk calculation DSTiPE method that an object with wireless communications presents to the environment. The presented Matlab based application for fuzzy spatio-temporal risk cluster extraction is verified on a diagonal vehicle movement example.

  18. Spatial and Spatio-Temporal Models for Modeling Epidemiological Data with Excess Zeros

    PubMed Central

    Arab, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological data often include excess zeros. This is particularly the case for data on rare conditions, diseases that are not common in specific areas or specific time periods, and conditions and diseases that are hard to detect or on the rise. In this paper, we provide a review of methods for modeling data with excess zeros with focus on count data, namely hurdle and zero-inflated models, and discuss extensions of these models to data with spatial and spatio-temporal dependence structures. We consider a Bayesian hierarchical framework to implement spatial and spatio-temporal models for data with excess zeros. We further review current implementation methods and computational tools. Finally, we provide a case study on five-year counts of confirmed cases of Lyme disease in Illinois at the county level. PMID:26343696

  19. Spatio-temporal pattern of viral meningitis in Michigan, 1993-2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Sharon K.; Schmidt, Mark A.; Stobierski, Mary Grace; Wilson, Mark L.

    2005-05-01

    To characterize Michigan's high viral meningitis incidence rates, 8,803 cases from 1993-2001 were analyzed for standard epidemiological indices, geographic distribution, and spatio-temporal clusters. Blacks and infants were found to be high-risk groups. Annual seasonality and interannual variability in epidemic magnitude were apparent. Cases were concentrated in southern Michigan, and cumulative incidence was correlated with population density at the county level (r=0.45, p<0.001). Kulldorff's Scan test identified the occurrence of spatio-temporal clusters in Lower Michigan during July-October 1998 and 2001 (p=0.01). More extensive data on cases, laboratory isolates, sociodemographics, and environmental exposures should improve detection and enhance the effectiveness of a Space-Time Information System aimed at prevention.

  20. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics in Collective Frog Choruses Examined by Mathematical Modeling and Field Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aihara, Ikkyu; Mizumoto, Takeshi; Otsuka, Takuma; Awano, Hiromitsu; Nagira, Kohei; Okuno, Hiroshi G.; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports theoretical and experimental studies on spatio-temporal dynamics in the choruses of male Japanese tree frogs. First, we theoretically model their calling times and positions as a system of coupled mobile oscillators. Numerical simulation of the model as well as calculation of the order parameters show that the spatio-temporal dynamics exhibits bistability between two-cluster antisynchronization and wavy antisynchronization, by assuming that the frogs are attracted to the edge of a simple circular breeding site. Second, we change the shape of the breeding site from the circle to rectangles including a straight line, and evaluate the stability of two-cluster and wavy antisynchronization. Numerical simulation shows that two-cluster antisynchronization is more frequently observed than wavy antisynchronization. Finally, we recorded frog choruses at an actual paddy field using our sound-imaging method. Analysis of the video demonstrated a consistent result with the aforementioned simulation: namely, two-cluster antisynchronization was more frequently realized.

  1. A model for optimizing file access patterns using spatio-temporal parallelism

    SciTech Connect

    Boonthanome, Nouanesengsy; Patchett, John; Geveci, Berk; Ahrens, James; Bauer, Andy; Chaudhary, Aashish; Miller, Ross G.; Shipman, Galen M.; Williams, Dean N.

    2013-01-01

    For many years now, I/O read time has been recognized as the primary bottleneck for parallel visualization and analysis of large-scale data. In this paper, we introduce a model that can estimate the read time for a file stored in a parallel filesystem when given the file access pattern. Read times ultimately depend on how the file is stored and the access pattern used to read the file. The file access pattern will be dictated by the type of parallel decomposition used. We employ spatio-temporal parallelism, which combines both spatial and temporal parallelism, to provide greater flexibility to possible file access patterns. Using our model, we were able to configure the spatio-temporal parallelism to design optimized read access patterns that resulted in a speedup factor of approximately 400 over traditional file access patterns.

  2. Geographic information system-based analysis of the spatial and spatio-temporal distribution of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis in Golestan Province, north-east of Iran.

    PubMed

    Mollalo, A; Alimohammadi, A; Shirzadi, M R; Malek, M R

    2015-02-01

    Zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL), a vector-borne disease, poses serious psychological as well as social and economic burden to many rural areas of Iran. The main objectives of this study were to analyse yearly spatial distribution and the possible spatial and spatio-temporal clusters of the disease to better understand spatio-temporal epidemiological aspects of ZCL in rural areas of an endemic province, located in north-east of Iran. Cross-sectional survey was performed on 2983 recorded cases during the period of 2010-2012 at village level throughout the study area. Global clustering methods including the average nearest-neighbour distance, Moran's I, general G indices and Ripley's K-function were applied to investigate the annual spatial distribution of the existing point patterns. Presence of spatial and spatio-temporal clusters was investigated using the spatial and space-time scan statistics. For each year, semivariogram analysis and all global clustering methods indicated meaningful persistent spatial autocorrelation and highly clustered distribution of ZCL, respectively. Eight significant spatial clusters, mainly located in north and northeast of the province, and one space-time cluster, observed in northern part of the province and during the period of September 2010-November 2010, were detected. Comparison of the location of ZCL clusters with environmental conditions of the study area showed that 97.8% of cases in clusters were located at low altitudes below 725 m above sea level with predominantly arid and semi-arid climates and poor socio-economic conditions. The identified clusters highlight high-risk areas requiring special plans and resources for more close monitoring and control of the disease. PMID:24628913

  3. Spatio-temporal Transmission and Environmental Determinants of Schistosomiasis Japonica in Anhui Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yi; Li, Rui; Bergquist, Robert; Lynn, Henry; Gao, Fenghua; Wang, Qizhi; Zhang, Shiqing; Sun, Liqian; Zhang, Zhijie; Jiang, Qingwu

    2015-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis japonica still remains of public health and economic significance in China, especially in the lake and marshland areas along the Yangtze River Basin, where the control of transmission has proven difficult. In the study, we investigated spatio-temporal variations of S. japonicum infection risk in Anhui Province and assessed the associations of the disease with key environmental factors with the aim of understanding the mechanism of the disease and seeking clues to effective and sustainable schistosomiasis control. Methodology/Principal Findings Infection data of schistosomiasis from annual conventional surveys were obtained at the village level in Anhui Province, China, from 2000 to 2010 and used in combination with environmental data. The spatio-temporal kriging model was used to assess how these environmental factors affected the spatio-temporal pattern of schistosomiasis risk. Our results suggested that seasonal variation of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), seasonal variation of land surface temperature at daytime (LSTD), and distance to the Yangtze River were negatively significantly associated with risk of schistosomiasis. Predictive maps showed that schistosomiasis prevalence remained at a low level and schistosomiasis risk mainly evolved along the Yangtze River. Schistosomiasis risk also followed a focal spatial pattern, fluctuating temporally with a peak (the largest spatial extent) in 2005 and then contracting gradually but with a scattered distribution until 2010. Conclusion The fitted spatio-temporal kriging model can capture variations of schistosomiasis risk over space and time. Combined with techniques of geographic information system (GIS) and remote sensing (RS), this approach facilitates and enriches risk modeling of schistosomiasis, which in turn helps to identify prior areas for effective and sustainable control of schistosomiasis in Anhui Province and perhaps elsewhere in China. PMID:25659112

  4. Spatio-temporal modelling of disease incidence with missing covariate values.

    PubMed

    Holland, R C; Jones, G; Benschop, J

    2015-06-01

    The search for an association between disease incidence and possible risk factors using surveillance data needs to account for possible spatial and temporal correlations in underlying risk. This can be especially difficult if there are missing values for some important covariates. We present a case study to show how this problem can be overcome in a Bayesian analysis framework by adding to the usual spatio-temporal model a component for modelling the missing data. PMID:25338646

  5. A spatio-temporal screening tool for outlier detection in long term / large scale air quality observation time series and monitoring networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kracht, Oliver; Reuter, Hannes I.; Gerboles, Michel

    2013-04-01

    We present a consolidated screening tool for the detection of outliers in air quality monitoring data, which considers both attribute values and spatio-temporal relationships. Furthermore, an application example of warnings on abnormal values in time series of PM10 datasets in AirBase is presented. Spatial or temporal outliers in air quality datasets represent stations or individual measurements which differ significantly from other recordings within their spatio-temporal neighbourhood. Such abnormal values can be identified as being extreme compared to their neighbours, even though they do not necessarily require to differ significantly from the statistical distribution of the entire population. The identification of such outliers can be of interest as the basis of data quality control systems when several contributors report their measurements to the collection of larger datasets. Beyond this, it can also provide a simple solution to investigate the accuracy of station classifications. Seen from another viewpoint, it can be used as a tool to detect irregular air pollution emission events (e.g. the influence of fires, wind erosion events, or other accidental situations). The presented procedure for outlier detection was designed based on already existing literature. Specifically, we adapted the "Smooth Spatial Attribute Method" that was first developed for the identification of outlier values in networks of traffic sensors [1]. Since a free and extensible simulation platform was considered important, all codes were prototyped in the R environment which is available under the GNU General Public License [2]. Our algorithms are based on the definition of a neighbourhood for each air quality measurement, corresponding to a spatio-temporal domain limited by time (e.g., +/- 2 days) and distance (e.g., +/- 1 spherical degrees) around the location of ambient air monitoring stations. The objective of the method is that within such a given spatio-temporal domain, in which the attribute values of neighbours have a relationship due to the emission, transport and reaction of air pollutants, abnormal values can be detected by extreme values of their attributes compared to the attribute values of their neighbours. This comparison basically requires a spatio-temporal smoothing, i.e. a specific rule by which data points are averaged within a neighbourhood. The calculation of such reference basis has the effect of a low pass filter, meaning that high frequencies of the signal are removed from the data while preserving low frequencies. In this context, the choice of an appropriate kernel smoother function (e.g., nearest neighbour smoother, weighted kernel average smoother, etc.) is of particular importance. Our presentation will emphasize the effects bound to the selection of the corresponding weighting functions, like inverse squared normalized Euclidean distance or inverse squared Mahalanobis distance etc., and discuss the appropriateness and shortcomings of the different approaches. Corresponding parameter selections related to the extent of the spatio-temporal domain and the final test statistics for outlier thresholding are evaluated by sensitivity analysis. [1] R Development Core Team (2012): R: A language and environment for statistical computing. http://www.R-project.org/ [2] Shekhar S., Lu C. T. and Zhang P. (2003): A Unified Approach to Spatial Outliers Detection. GeoInformatica, 7(2).

  6. Spatio-Temporal Pattern and Socio-Economic Factors of Bacillary Dysentery at County Level in Sichuan Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yue; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Lei; Lv, Qiang; Yin, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Bacillary dysentery (BD) remains a big public health problem in China. Effective spatio-temporal monitoring of BD incidence is important for successful implementation of control and prevention measures. This study aimed to examine the spatio-temporal pattern of BD and analyze socio-economic factors that may affect BD incidence in Sichuan province, China. Firstly, we used space-time scan statistic to detect the high risk spatio-temporal clusters in each year. Then, bivariate spatial correlation and Bayesian spatio-temporal model were utilized to examine the associations between the socio-economic factors and BD incidence. Spatio-temporal clusters of BD were mainly located in the northern-southern belt of the midwest area of Sichuan province. The proportion of primary industry, the proportion of rural population and the rates of BD incidence show statistically significant positive correlation. The proportion of secondary industry, proportion of tertiary Industry, number of beds in hospitals per thousand persons, medical and technical personnel per thousand persons, per capital GDP and the rate of BD incidence show statistically significant negative correlation. The best fitting spatio-temporal model showed that medical and technical personnel per thousand persons and per capital GDP were significantly negative related to the risk of BD. PMID:26469274

  7. Spatio-Temporal Pattern and Socio-Economic Factors of Bacillary Dysentery at County Level in Sichuan Province, China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yue; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Lei; Lv, Qiang; Yin, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Bacillary dysentery (BD) remains a big public health problem in China. Effective spatio-temporal monitoring of BD incidence is important for successful implementation of control and prevention measures. This study aimed to examine the spatio-temporal pattern of BD and analyze socio-economic factors that may affect BD incidence in Sichuan province, China. Firstly, we used space-time scan statistic to detect the high risk spatio-temporal clusters in each year. Then, bivariate spatial correlation and Bayesian spatio-temporal model were utilized to examine the associations between the socio-economic factors and BD incidence. Spatio-temporal clusters of BD were mainly located in the northern-southern belt of the midwest area of Sichuan province. The proportion of primary industry, the proportion of rural population and the rates of BD incidence show statistically significant positive correlation. The proportion of secondary industry, proportion of tertiary Industry, number of beds in hospitals per thousand persons, medical and technical personnel per thousand persons, per capital GDP and the rate of BD incidence show statistically significant negative correlation. The best fitting spatio-temporal model showed that medical and technical personnel per thousand persons and per capital GDP were significantly negative related to the risk of BD. PMID:26469274

  8. Evaluating the Spatio-Temporal Factors that Structure Network Parameters of Plant-Herbivore Interactions

    PubMed Central

    López-Carretero, Antonio; Díaz-Castelazo, Cecilia; Boege, Karina; Rico-Gray, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    Despite the dynamic nature of ecological interactions, most studies on species networks offer static representations of their structure, constraining our understanding of the ecological mechanisms involved in their spatio-temporal stability. This is the first study to evaluate plant-herbivore interaction networks on a small spatio-temporal scale. Specifically, we simultaneously assessed the effect of host plant availability, habitat complexity and seasonality on the structure of plant-herbivore networks in a coastal tropical ecosystem. Our results revealed that changes in the host plant community resulting from seasonality and habitat structure are reflected not only in the herbivore community, but also in the emergent properties (network parameters) of the plant-herbivore interaction network such as connectance, selectiveness and modularity. Habitat conditions and periods that are most stressful favored the presence of less selective and susceptible herbivore species, resulting in increased connectance within networks. In contrast, the high degree of selectivennes (i.e. interaction specialization) and modularity of the networks under less stressful conditions was promoted by the diversification in resource use by herbivores. By analyzing networks at a small spatio-temporal scale we identified the ecological factors structuring this network such as habitat complexity and seasonality. Our research offers new evidence on the role of abiotic and biotic factors in the variation of the properties of species interaction networks. PMID:25340790

  9. Spatio-Temporal Changes in Potential Evaporation Based on Entropy Across the Wei River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.; Wang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The distribution of potential evaporation is highly unstable due to complex human activities and climate changes. Therefore, it is of great significance for further understanding hydrological cycle to estimate potential evaporation distribution. Reasonable regionalization of potential evaporation will help to improve the efficiency of irrigation and increase the ability of drought relief, which is of great importance to irrigation planning and management. Hence, the spatio-temporal changes in potential evaporation distribution at monthly and annual scales are investigated based on the modified Mann-Kendall trend test method and the entropy theory in the Wei River Basin. A nonparametric method as an attractive alternative to empirical and parametric approaches is proposed to calculate the univariate and bivariate probability distribution of potential evaporation. The directional information transfer index (DITI) is employed to estimate the similarity among the meteorological stations, and the k-means cluster analysis is used to classify the meteorological stations into several distribution zones with distinct features. Based on the monthly potential evaporation from 1960 to 2008 at 21 meteorological stations, the basin is ultimately classified into 8 zones with their own distinct spatio-temporal distribution features. In view of the distinct spatio-temporal distribution features, the DITI-based model combined with the nonparametric probability estimation method and the k-means cluster analysis offers a more precise classification of potential evaporation distribution zones.

  10. Integration of spatio-temporal contrast sensitivity with a multi-slice channelized Hotelling observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanaki, Ali N.; Espig, Kathryn S.; Marchessoux, Cedric; Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Bakic, Predrag R.; Kimpe, Tom R. L.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2013-03-01

    Barten's model of spatio-temporal contrast sensitivity function of human visual system is embedded in a multi-slice channelized Hotelling observer. This is done by 3D filtering of the stack of images with the spatio-temporal contrast sensitivity function and feeding the result (i.e., the perceived image stack) to the multi-slice channelized Hotelling observer. The proposed procedure of considering spatio-temporal contrast sensitivity function is generic in the sense that it can be used with observers other than multi-slice channelized Hotelling observer. Detection performance of the new observer in digital breast tomosynthesis is measured in a variety of browsing speeds, at two spatial sampling rates, using computer simulations. Our results show a peak in detection performance in mid browsing speeds. We compare our results to those of a human observer study reported earlier (I. Diaz et al. SPIE MI 2011). The effects of display luminance, contrast and spatial sampling rate, with and without considering foveal vision, are also studied. Reported simulations are conducted with real digital breast tomosynthesis image stacks, as well as stacks from an anthropomorphic software breast phantom (P. Bakic et al. Med Phys. 2011). Lesion cases are simulated by inserting single micro-calcifications or masses. Limitations of our methods and ways to improve them are discussed.

  11. Spatio-temporal characterization techniques of high-power femtosecond laser chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, Valentin; Pariente, Gustave; Kahaly, Subhendu; Gobert, Olivier; Quéré, Fabien

    2014-03-01

    In this letter, we propose two techniques capable of spatio-temporally characterizing high-power femtosecond laser chains. We demonstrate a new implementation of SEA TADPOLE. To avoid the problems induced by the the significant spatial jittering of the focal spot on high-power laser chains, our setup is adapted to collimated beams. In addition, a fibered light source is also used to correct the phase fluctuations. This experimental setup allows identifying any spatiotemporal distortions such as the pulse front tilt for instance. In this paper, to the best of our knowledge, we present the very first spatio-temporal characterization done on a TW laser. However, a SEA TADPOLE measurement is not immediate since it requires scanning the beam over the two transverse dimensions which prevent us from studying the shot-to-shot laser fluctuations. This is why, we developed MUFFIN, a single-shot technique capable of spatio-temporally characterizing a laser pulse along its two transverse dimensions. First experimental results obtained with this technique are presented here.

  12. Transient dynamics and rhythm coordination of inferior olive spatio-temporal patterns.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Roberto; Aguirre, Carlos; Rabinovich, Mikhail I; Varona, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    The inferior olive (IO) is a neural network belonging to the olivo-cerebellar system whose neurons are coupled with electrical synapses and display subthreshold oscillations and spiking activity. The IO is frequently proposed as the generator of timing signals to the cerebellum. Electrophysiological and imaging recordings show that the IO network generates complex spatio-temporal patterns. The generation and modulation of coherent spiking activity in the IO is one key issue in cerebellar research. In this work, we build a large scale IO network model of electrically coupled conductance-based neurons to study the emerging spatio-temporal patterns of its transient neuronal activity. Our modeling reproduces and helps to understand important phenomena observed in IO in vitro and in vivo experiments, and draws new predictions regarding the computational properties of this network and the associated cerebellar circuits. The main factors studied governing the collective dynamics of the IO network were: the degree of electrical coupling, the extent of the electrotonic connections, the presence of stimuli or regions with different excitability levels and the modulatory effect of an inhibitory loop (IL). The spatio-temporal patterns were analyzed using a discrete wavelet transform to provide a quantitative characterization. Our results show that the electrotonic coupling produces quasi-synchronized subthreshold oscillations over a wide dynamical range. The synchronized oscillatory activity plays the role of a timer for a coordinated representation of spiking rhythms with different frequencies. The encoding and coexistence of several coordinated rhythms is related to the different clusterization and coherence of transient spatio-temporal patterns in the network, where the spiking activity is commensurate with the quasi-synchronized subthreshold oscillations. In the presence of stimuli, different rhythms are encoded in the spiking activity of the IO neurons that nevertheless remains constrained to a commensurate value of the subthreshold frequency. The stimuli induced spatio-temporal patterns can reverberate for long periods, which contributes to the computational properties of the IO. We also show that the presence of regions with different excitability levels creates sinks and sources of coordinated activity which shape the propagation of spike wave fronts. These results can be generalized beyond IO studies, as the control of wave pattern propagation is a highly relevant problem in the context of normal and pathological states in neural systems (e.g., related to tremor, migraine, epilepsy) where the study of the modulation of activity sinks and sources can have a potential large impact. PMID:24046731

  13. An interactive spatio-temporal knowledge-discovery environment for solid Earth Science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landgrebe, T. C.; Müller, R. D.; EathByte Group

    2011-12-01

    Geographic information systems form a core part of Earth Science education and teaching, allowing the ever-growing repositories of digital geo-data to be integrated and visualised in a unified fashion. These systems cope with the wide variety of spatial data types, each with their own properties and metadata, allowing for a better understanding of how Earth processes operate. A unique requirement for the Earth Sciences is to take into account plate motion and crustal deformation processes acting through time, thus altering the various spatial relationships. The open-source GPlates software (www.gplates.org) infrastructure has become a standard tool for this type of analysis, providing the ability to reconstruct various datasets through time interactively by attaching arbitrary data to tectonic plates. Combining vast datasets in this manner is increasing the analysis complexity, with traditional visualisation-based approaches becoming ineffective in extracting necessary information and discovering new insights. In addressing this, GPlates has been extended with two key technologies, manifesting itself as a powerful interactive knowledge-discovery platform. The first technology is a "data coregistration" tool, in which desired relationships between various datasets are recursively defined, thus providing the key link between a qualitative visualisation environment and a quantitative multivariate statistical analysis framework. The second technology is a data-mining environment (Orange, http://orange.biolab.si), better suited to coping with complexities due to large datasets, high dimensionality, spatial and temporal dynamics, different data types etc. The data-mining tool has a diverse library of components allowing for interactive filtering, combining, transforming and pattern analysis of incoming data. Attached to the data-mining tool is a visual-programming environment in which underlying software complexities are abstracted from the user, allowing for the rapid prototyping of analysis work-flows without requiring programming expertise. A plug-in framework allows for the construction of new spatio-temporal data processing components, which is seeing the functionality and flexibility of this environment increasing rapidly, aided by an open-source model. The resultant ensemble of technologies lends itself to becoming a frontier teaching and research tool, providing the necessary abstraction of complexity required to better understand how the various complex Earth processes acted through time resulting in the familiar spatial configuration we observe today.

  14. Spatio-temporal Interplay of RWTs and Cyclones in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, M.; Ulbrich, U.

    2014-12-01

    We examine the relation of Rossby-Wave-Trains (RWTs) and cyclones in the North Atlantic. Extra-tropical cyclones are known to have high socioeconomic impacts (high windspeed and large amounts of precipitation). Long lived RWTs have been shown to be precursors for extreme events. Therefore they may impact the predictability of mid-latitude (extreme) weather systems. Current results point at the following relationship: The weakening or dissolving of a long lived RWT that was prevalent over the U.S. and the eastern Pacific for up to 5 days facilitates the genesis of a cyclone downstream - in the whole North Atlantic. In turn, the temporal and spacial coincidence of a newly developing or rather reinforcing RWT off the western coast of Europe and these pre-existing cyclone leads to a strengthening of the cyclone and triggers an explosive development just off the European coast. We apply automated schemes for the identification and tracking of RWTs and cyclones, respectively and relate their characteristics, with a focus on the impact for European climate. By evaluating reanalysis and model data of historical/uninitialized hindcast simulations, we aim to identify spatio-temporal connections between these objectively identified RWTs and cyclones. We then evaluate the interplay of RWT and cyclones in initialized hindcasts and a two way nested (TWN) model simulation. All named simulations are part of the MiKlip project (decadal climate prediction; funded by the German Ministry of Education and Research - BMBF). We also evaluate the decadal variability of cyclones and RWTs in the MiKlip simulations. For our TWN model setup, the regional climate model COSMO-CLM (CCLM) is nested into the atmosphere- ocean general circulation model ECHAM6/MPI-OM (MPI-ESM) in order to investigate the feedback of the meso-scales on the large scales and vice versa. Focus is laid on the development and propagation of synoptic systems (e.g. Rossby Wave Trains and cyclones) that are affecting Europe. The Two-Way-Nested region, thus the CCLM domain, covers Central America and the North Atlantic (CANA) and therefore includes the Gulf stream region, whose prevalent strong meridional SST gradients favor the development of perturbations which then propagate downstream, commonly develop into extra-tropical cyclones and strike Europe.

  15. A SPATIO-TEMPORAL DOWNSCALER FOR OUTPUT FROM NUMERICAL MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Often, in environmental data collection, data arise from two sources: numerical models and monitoring networks. The first source provides predictions at the level of grid cells, while the second source gives measurements at points. The first is characterized by full spatial cove...

  16. Spatio-Temporal Modelling of Dust Transport over Surface Mining Areas and Neighbouring Residential Zones

    PubMed Central

    Matejicek, Lubos; Janour, Zbynek; Benes, Ludek; Bodnar, Tomas; Gulikova, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Projects focusing on spatio-temporal modelling of the living environment need to manage a wide range of terrain measurements, existing spatial data, time series, results of spatial analysis and inputs/outputs from numerical simulations. Thus, GISs are often used to manage data from remote sensors, to provide advanced spatial analysis and to integrate numerical models. In order to demonstrate the integration of spatial data, time series and methods in the framework of the GIS, we present a case study focused on the modelling of dust transport over a surface coal mining area, exploring spatial data from 3D laser scanners, GPS measurements, aerial images, time series of meteorological observations, inputs/outputs form numerical models and existing geographic resources. To achieve this, digital terrain models, layers including GPS thematic mapping, and scenes with simulation of wind flows are created to visualize and interpret coal dust transport over the mine area and a neighbouring residential zone. A temporary coal storage and sorting site, located near the residential zone, is one of the dominant sources of emissions. Using numerical simulations, the possible effects of wind flows are observed over the surface, modified by natural objects and man-made obstacles. The coal dust drifts with the wind in the direction of the residential zone and is partially deposited in this area. The simultaneous display of the digital map layers together with the location of the dominant emission source, wind flows and protected areas enables a risk assessment of the dust deposition in the area of interest to be performed. In order to obtain a more accurate simulation of wind flows over the temporary storage and sorting site, 3D laser scanning and GPS thematic mapping are used to create a more detailed digital terrain model. Thus, visualization of wind flows over the area of interest combined with 3D map layers enables the exploration of the processes of coal dust deposition at a local scale. In general, this project could be used as a template for dust-transport modelling which couples spatial data focused on the construction of digital terrain models and thematic mapping with data generated by numerical simulations based on Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations.

  17. Physical and biogeochemical correlates of spatio-temporal variation in the ?13C of marine macroalgae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Andrew P.; Hyndes, Glenn A.; Carvalho, Matheus C.; Eyre, Bradley D.

    2015-05-01

    Carbon isotope ratios (13C/12C) can be used to trace sources of production supporting food chains, as ?13C undergoes relatively small and predictable increases (?0.5‰) through each trophic level. However, for this technique to be precise, variation in ?13C signatures of different sources of production (baseline sources) must be clearly defined and distinct from each other. Despite this, ?13C in the primary producers of marine systems are highly variable over space and time, due to the complexity of physical and biogeochemical processes that drive ?13C variation at the base of these foodwebs. We measured spatial and temporal variation in the ?13C of two species of macroalgae that are important dietary components of grazers over temperate reefs: the small kelp Ecklonia radiata, and the red alga Plocamium preissianum, and related any variation to a suite of physical and biogeochemical variables. Patterns in ?13C variation, over different spatial (10 s m to 100 km) and temporal scales (weeks to seasons), differed greatly between taxa, but these were partly explained by the ?13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and light. However, while the ?13C in E. radiata was not related to water temperature, a highly significant proportion of the spatio-temporal variation in ?13C of P. preissianum was explained by temperature alone. Accordingly, we applied this relationship to project (across temperate Australasia) and forecast (in time, south-western Australia) patterns in P. preissianum ?13C. The mean projected ?13C for P. preissianum in the study region varied by only ?1‰ over a 12-month period, compared to ?3‰ over 2000 km. This illustrates the potential scale in the shift of ?13C in baseline food sources over broad scales, and its implications to food web studies. While we show that those relationships differ across taxonomic groups, we recommend developing models to explain variability in ?13C of other baseline sources to facilitate the interpretation of variation in ?13C of consumers in food webs, particularly where data for baselines are absent over broad scales.

  18. Study on spatio-temporal properties of rainfall 

    E-print Network

    Choi, Janghwoan

    2007-04-25

    of rainfall over an area, it is necessary to identify and track a storm objectively. Automated algorithms are needed to process a large amount of radar images. A methodology was presented to overcome the identification and tracking difficulties of one...

  19. Associating approximate paths and temporal sequences of noisy detections: Application to the recovery of spatio-temporal cancer cell trajectories.

    PubMed

    Dorfer, Matthias; Kazmar, Tomáš; Šmíd, Mat?j; Sing, Sanchit; Kneißl, Julia; Keller, Simone; Debeir, Olivier; Luber, Birgit; Mattes, Julian

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we address the problem of recovering spatio-temporal trajectories of cancer cells in phase contrast video-microscopy where the user provides the paths on which the cells are moving. The paths are purely spatial, without temporal information. To recover the temporal information associated to a given path we propose an approach based on automatic cell detection and on a graph-based shortest path search. The nodes in the graph consist of the projections of the cell detections onto the geometrical cell path. The edges relate nodes which correspond to different frames of the sequence and potentially to the same cell and trajectory. In this directed graph we search for the shortest path and use it to define a temporal parametrization of the corresponding geometrical cell path. An evaluation based on 286 paths of 7 phase contrast microscopy videos shows that our algorithm allows to recover 92% of trajectory points with respect to the associated ground truth. We compare our method with a state-of-the-art algorithm for semi-automated cell tracking in phase contrast microscopy which requires interactively placed starting points for the cells to track. The comparison shows that supporting geometrical paths in combination with our algorithm allow us to obtain more reliable cell trajectories. PMID:25987193

  20. A Spatio-Temporal Algorithmic Procedure for Environmental Policymaking in the Municipality of Arkalochori in the Greek Island of Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batzias, F. A.; Sidiras, D. K.; Giannopoulos, Ch.; Spetsidis, I.

    2009-08-01

    This work deals with a methodological framework designed/developed under the form of a spatio-temporal algorithmic procedure for environmental policymaking at local level. The procedure includes 25 activity stages and 9 decision nodes, putting emphasis on (i) mapping on GIS layers water supply/demand and modeling of aquatic pollution coming from point and non-point sources, (ii) environmental monitoring by periodically measuring the main pollutants in situ and in the laboratory, (iii) design of environmental projects, decomposition of them into sub-projects and combination of the latter to form attainable alternatives, (iv) multicriteria ranking of alternatives, according to a modified Delphi method, by using as criteria the expected environmental benefit, the attitude of inhabitants, the priority within the programme of regional development, the capital required for the investment and the operating cost, and (v) knowledge Base (KB) operation/enrichment, functioning in combination with a data mining mechanism to extract knowledge/information/data from external Bases. An implementation is presented referring to the Municipality of Arkalochori in the Greek island of Crete.

  1. Spatio-temporal stability of 1D Kerr cavity solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelens, L.; Parra-Rivas, P.; Leo, F.; Gomila, D.; Matias, Manuel A.; Coen, S.

    2014-05-01

    The Lugiato-Lefever equation (LLE) has been extensively studied since its derivation in 1987, when this meanfield model was introduced to describe nonlinear optical cavities. The LLE was originally derived to describe a ring cavity or a Fabry-Perot resonator with a transverse spatial extension and partially filled with a nonlinear medium but it has also been shown to be applicable to other types of cavities, such as fiber resonators and microresonators. Depending on the parameters used, the LLE can present a monostable or bistable input-output response curve. A large number of theoretical studies have been done in the monostable regime, but the bistable regime has remained widely unexplored. One of the reasons for this was that previous experimental setups were not able to works in such regimes of the parameter space. Nowadays the possibility of reaching such parameter regimes experimentally has renewed the interest in the LLE. In this contribution, we present an in-depth theoretical study of the different dynamical regimes that can appear in parameter space, focusing on the dynamics of localized solutions, also known as cavity solitons (CSs). We show that time-periodic oscillations of a 1D CS appear naturally in a broad region of parameter space. More than this oscillatory regime, which has been recently demonstrated experimentally,1 we theoretically report on several kinds of chaotic dynamics. We show that the existence of CSs and their dynamics is related with the spatial dynamics of the system and with the presence of a codimension-2 point known as a Fold-Hopf bifurcation point. These dynamical regimes can become accessible by using devices such as microresonators, for instance widely used for creating optical frequency combs.

  2. Spatio-temporal variability of soil respiration in a spruce-dominated headwater catchment in western Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossa, A. Y.; Diekkrüger, B.

    2014-01-01

    CO2 production and transport from forest floors is an important component of the carbon cycle and is closely related to the global atmosphere CO2 concentration. If we are to understand the feedback between soil processes and atmospheric CO2, we need to know more about the spatio-temporal variability of this soil respiration under different environmental conditions. In this study, long-term measurements were conducted in a spruce-dominated forest ecosystem in western Germany. Multivariate analysis-based similarities between different measurements sites led to the detection of site clusters along two CO2 emission axes: (1) mainly controlled by soil temperature and moisture condition, and (2) mainly controlled by root biomass and the forest floor litter. The combined effects of soil temperature and soil moisture were used as a time-dependent rating factor affecting the optimal CO2 production and transport at cluster level. High/moderate/weak time-dependent rating factors were associated with the different clusters. The process-based most distant clusters were identified using specified pattern characteristics: the reaction rates in the soil layers, the activation energy for bio-chemical reactions, the water sorption and desorption constant, the root biomass factor, the litter layer factor and the organic matter factor. A HYDRUS-1D model system was inversely used to compute soil hydraulic parameters from soil moisture measurements. Heat transport parameters were adjusted based on observed soil temperatures. The results were used to adjust CO2 production and transport characteristics such as the molecular diffusion coefficient of carbon dioxide in air and water and the CO2 production by soil microorganisms and plant roots under optimal conditions for each cluster. Although the uncertainty associated with the HYDRUS-1-D simulations is higher, the results were consistent with both the multivariate clustering and the time-dependent rating of site production/transport. Finally, four clusters with significantly different environmental conditions (i.e., permanent high soil moisture condition, accumulated litter amount, high variability in soil moisture content, dominant temperature-dependence) were found relevant in explaining the spatio-temporal variability of CO2 efflux and providing reference specific characteristic values for the investigated area.

  3. Spatio-temporal variability of soil respiration in a spruce-dominated headwater catchment in western Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossa, A. Y.; Diekkrüger, B.

    2014-08-01

    CO2 production and transport from forest floors is an important component of the carbon cycle and is closely related to the global atmosphere CO2 concentration. If we are to understand the feedback between soil processes and atmospheric CO2, we need to know more about the spatio-temporal variability of this soil respiration under different environmental conditions. In this study, long-term measurements were conducted in a spruce-dominated forest ecosystem in western Germany. Multivariate analysis-based similarities between different measurement sites led to the detection of site clusters along two CO2 emission axes: (1) mainly controlled by soil temperature and moisture condition, and (2) mainly controlled by root biomass and the forest floor litter. The combined effects of soil temperature and soil moisture were used as a time-dependent rating factor affecting the optimal CO2 production and transport at cluster level. High/moderate/weak time-dependent rating factors were associated with the different clusters. The process-based, most distant clusters were identified using specified pattern characteristics: the reaction rates in the soil layers, the activation energy for bio-chemical reactions, the soil moisture dependency parameter, the root biomass factor, the litter layer factor and the organic matter factor. A HYDRUS-1D model system was inversely used to compute soil hydraulic parameters from soil moisture measurements. Heat transport parameters were calibrated based on observed soil temperatures. The results were used to adjust CO2 productions by soil microorganisms and plant roots under optimal conditions for each cluster. Although the uncertainty associated with the HYDRUS-1D simulations is higher, the results were consistent with both the multivariate clustering and the time-dependent rating of site production. Finally, four clusters with significantly different environmental conditions (i.e. permanent high soil moisture condition, accumulated litter amount, high variability in soil moisture content, and dominant temperature dependence) were found to be relevant in explaining the spatio-temporal variability of CO2 efflux and providing reference-specific characteristic values for the investigated area.

  4. Bayesian spatio-temporal modelling of tobacco-related cancer mortality in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Jürgens, Verena; Ess, Silvia; Phuleria, Harish C; Früh, Martin; Schwenkglenks, Matthias; Frick, Harald; Cerny, Thomas; Vounatsou, Penelope

    2013-05-01

    Tobacco smoking is a main cause of disease in Switzerland; lung cancer being the most common cancer mortality in men and the second most common in women. Although disease-specific mortality is decreasing in men, it is steadily increasing in women. The four language regions in this country might play a role in this context as they are influenced in different ways by the cultural and social behaviour of neighbouring countries. Bayesian hierarchical spatio-temporal, negative binomial models were fitted on subgroup-specific death rates indirectly standardized by national references to explore age- and gender-specific spatio-temporal patterns of mortality due to lung cancer and other tobacco-related cancers in Switzerland for the time period 1969-2002. Differences influenced by linguistic region and life in rural or urban areas were also accounted for. Male lung cancer mortality was found to be rather homogeneous in space, whereas women were confirmed to be more affected in urban regions. Compared to the German-speaking part, female mortality was higher in the French-speaking part of the country, a result contradicting other reports of similar comparisons between France and Germany. The spatio-temporal patterns of mortality were similar for lung cancer and other tobacco-related cancers. The estimated mortality maps can support the planning in health care services and evaluation of a national tobacco control programme. Better understanding of spatial and temporal variation of cancer of the lung and other tobacco-related cancers may help in allocating resources for more effective screening, diagnosis and therapy. The methodology can be applied to similar studies in other settings. PMID:23733286

  5. Spatio-Temporal Patterns of Barmah Forest Virus Disease in Queensland, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Naish, Suchithra; Hu, Wenbiao; Mengersen, Kerrie; Tong, Shilu

    2011-01-01

    Background Barmah Forest virus (BFV) disease is a common and wide-spread mosquito-borne disease in Australia. This study investigated the spatio-temporal patterns of BFV disease in Queensland, Australia using geographical information system (GIS) tools and geostatistical analysis. Methods/Principal Findings We calculated the incidence rates and standardised incidence rates of BFV disease. Moran's I statistic was used to assess the spatial autocorrelation of BFV incidences. Spatial dynamics of BFV disease was examined using semi-variogram analysis. Interpolation techniques were applied to visualise and display the spatial distribution of BFV disease in statistical local areas (SLAs) throughout Queensland. Mapping of BFV disease by SLAs reveals the presence of substantial spatio-temporal variation over time. Statistically significant differences in BFV incidence rates were identified among age groups (?2?=?7587, df?=?7327,p<0.01). There was a significant positive spatial autocorrelation of BFV incidence for all four periods, with the Moran's I statistic ranging from 0.1506 to 0.2901 (p<0.01). Semi-variogram analysis and smoothed maps created from interpolation techniques indicate that the pattern of spatial autocorrelation was not homogeneous across the state. Conclusions/Significance This is the first study to examine spatial and temporal variation in the incidence rates of BFV disease across Queensland using GIS and geostatistics. The BFV transmission varied with age and gender, which may be due to exposure rates or behavioural risk factors. There are differences in the spatio-temporal patterns of BFV disease which may be related to local socio-ecological and environmental factors. These research findings may have implications in the BFV disease control and prevention programs in Queensland. PMID:22022430

  6. Spatio-temporal Visualization for Environmental Decision Support

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaduri, Budhendra L.; Shankar, Mallikarjun; Sorokine, Alexandre; Ganguly, Auroop R.

    2009-01-01

    Traditional visualization of earth surface features has been addressed through visual exploration, analysis, synthesis, and presentation of observable geospatial data. However, characterizing the changes in their observable and unobservable properties of geospatial features is critical for planning and policy formulation. Recent approaches are addressing modeling and visualization of the temporal dynamics that describe observed and/or predicted physical and socioeconomic processes using vast volumes of earth observation (imagery and other geophysical) data from remote sensor networks. This paper provides an overview of selected geospatial modeling and simulation, exploratory analysis of earth observation data, and high performance visualization research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for developing novel data driven approaches for geospatial knowledge discovery and visualization relevant to environmental decision support.

  7. Spatio-temporal Dynamics and Mechanisms of Stress Granule Assembly.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Daisuke; Arimoto-Matsuzaki, Kyoko; Tomida, Taichiro; Takekawa, Mutsuhiro; Ichikawa, Kazuhisa

    2015-06-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are non-membranous cytoplasmic aggregates of mRNAs and related proteins, assembled in response to environmental stresses such as heat shock, hypoxia, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, chemicals (e.g. arsenite), and viral infections. SGs are hypothesized as a loci of mRNA triage and/or maintenance of proper translation capacity ratio to the pool of mRNAs. In brain ischemia, hippocampal CA3 neurons, which are resilient to ischemia, assemble SGs. In contrast, CA1 neurons, which are vulnerable to ischemia, do not assemble SGs. These results suggest a critical role SG plays in regards to cell fate decisions. Thus SG assembly along with its dynamics should determine the cell fate. However, the process that exactly determines the SG assembly dynamics is largely unknown. In this paper, analyses of experimental data and computer simulations were used to approach this problem. SGs were assembled as a result of applying arsenite to HeLa cells. The number of SGs increased after a short latent period, reached a maximum, then decreased during the application of arsenite. At the same time, the size of SGs grew larger and became localized at the perinuclear region. A minimal mathematical model was constructed, and stochastic simulations were run to test the modeling. Since SGs are discrete entities as there are only several tens of them in a cell, commonly used deterministic simulations could not be employed. The stochastic simulations replicated observed dynamics of SG assembly. In addition, these stochastic simulations predicted a gamma distribution relative to the size of SGs. This same distribution was also found in our experimental data suggesting the existence of multiple fusion steps in the SG assembly. Furthermore, we found that the initial steps in the SG assembly process and microtubules were critical to the dynamics. Thus our experiments and stochastic simulations presented a possible mechanism regulating SG assembly. PMID:26115353

  8. Spatio-temporal Dynamics and Mechanisms of Stress Granule Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Ohshima, Daisuke; Arimoto-Matsuzaki, Kyoko; Tomida, Taichiro; Takekawa, Mutsuhiro; Ichikawa, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are non-membranous cytoplasmic aggregates of mRNAs and related proteins, assembled in response to environmental stresses such as heat shock, hypoxia, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, chemicals (e.g. arsenite), and viral infections. SGs are hypothesized as a loci of mRNA triage and/or maintenance of proper translation capacity ratio to the pool of mRNAs. In brain ischemia, hippocampal CA3 neurons, which are resilient to ischemia, assemble SGs. In contrast, CA1 neurons, which are vulnerable to ischemia, do not assemble SGs. These results suggest a critical role SG plays in regards to cell fate decisions. Thus SG assembly along with its dynamics should determine the cell fate. However, the process that exactly determines the SG assembly dynamics is largely unknown. In this paper, analyses of experimental data and computer simulations were used to approach this problem. SGs were assembled as a result of applying arsenite to HeLa cells. The number of SGs increased after a short latent period, reached a maximum, then decreased during the application of arsenite. At the same time, the size of SGs grew larger and became localized at the perinuclear region. A minimal mathematical model was constructed, and stochastic simulations were run to test the modeling. Since SGs are discrete entities as there are only several tens of them in a cell, commonly used deterministic simulations could not be employed. The stochastic simulations replicated observed dynamics of SG assembly. In addition, these stochastic simulations predicted a gamma distribution relative to the size of SGs. This same distribution was also found in our experimental data suggesting the existence of multiple fusion steps in the SG assembly. Furthermore, we found that the initial steps in the SG assembly process and microtubules were critical to the dynamics. Thus our experiments and stochastic simulations presented a possible mechanism regulating SG assembly. PMID:26115353

  9. Population dynamics of wetland fishes: Spatio-temporal patterns synchronized by hydrological disturbance?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruetz, C. R., III; Trexler, J.C.; Jordan, F.; Loftus, W.F.; Perry, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    1. Drought is a natural disturbance that can cause widespread mortality of aquatic organisms in wetlands. We hypothesized that seasonal drying of marsh surfaces (i.e. hydrological disturbance) shapes spatio-temporal patterns of fish populations. 2. We tested whether population dynamics of fishes were synchronized by hydrological disturbance (Moran effect) or distance separating study sites (dispersal). Spatio-temporal patterns were examined in local populations of five abundant species at 17 sites (sampled five times per year from 1996 to 2001) in a large oligotrophic wetland. 3. Fish densities differed significantly across spatio-temporal scales for all species. For all species except eastern mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki), a significant portion of spatio-temporal variation in density was attributed to drying events (used as a covariate). 4. We observed three patterns of response to hydrological disturbance. Densities of bluefin killifish (Lucania goodei), least killifish (Heterandria formosa), and golden top-minnow (Fundulus chrysotus) were usually lowest after a dry down and recovered slowly. Eastern mosquitofish showed no distinct response to marsh drying (i.e. they recovered quickly). Flagfish (Jordanella floridae) density was often highest after a dry down and then declined. Population growth after a dry down was often asymptotic for bluefin killifish and golden topminnow, with greatest asymptotic density and longest time to recovery at sites that dried infrequently. 5. Fish population dynamics were synchronized by hydrological disturbance (independent of distance) and distance separating study sites (independent of hydrological disturbance). Our ability to separate the relative importance of the Moran effect from dispersal was strengthened by a weak association between hydrological synchrony and distance among study sites. Dispersal was the primary mechanism for synchronous population dynamics of flagfish, whereas hydrological disturbance was the primary mechanism for synchronous population dynamics of the other species examined. 6. Species varied in the relative role of the Moran effect and dispersal in homogenizing their population dynamics, probably as a function of life history and ability to exploit dry-season refugia. ?? 2005 British Ecological Society.

  10. Spatio-Temporal Variation and Prediction of Ischemic Heart Disease Hospitalizations in Shenzhen, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanxia; Du, Qingyun; Ren, Fu; Liang, Shi; Lin, De-nan; Tian, Qin; Chen, Yan; Li, Jia-jia

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease (IHD) is a leading cause of death worldwide. Urban public health and medical management in Shenzhen, an international city in the developing country of China, is challenged by an increasing burden of IHD. This study analyzed the spatio-temporal variation of IHD hospital admissions from 2003 to 2012 utilizing spatial statistics, spatial analysis, and space-time scan statistics. The spatial statistics and spatial analysis measured the incidence rate (hospital admissions per 1,000 residents) and the standardized rate (the observed cases standardized by the expected cases) of IHD at the district level to determine the spatio-temporal distribution and identify patterns of change. The space-time scan statistics was used to identify spatio-temporal clusters of IHD hospital admissions at the district level. The other objective of this study was to forecast the IHD hospital admissions over the next three years (2013–2015) to predict the IHD incidence rates and the varying burdens of IHD-related medical services among the districts in Shenzhen. The results show that the highest hospital admissions, incidence rates, and standardized rates of IHD are in Futian. From 2003 to 2012, the IHD hospital admissions exhibited similar mean centers and directional distributions, with a slight increase in admissions toward the north in accordance with the movement of the total population. The incidence rates of IHD exhibited a gradual increase from 2003 to 2012 for all districts in Shenzhen, which may be the result of the rapid development of the economy and the increasing traffic pollution. In addition, some neighboring areas exhibited similar temporal change patterns, which were also detected by the spatio-temporal cluster analysis. Futian and Dapeng would have the highest and the lowest hospital admissions, respectively, although these districts have the highest incidence rates among all of the districts from 2013 to 2015 based on the prediction using the GM (1,1). In addition, the combined analysis of the prediction of IHD hospital admissions and the general hospital distributions shows that Pingshan and Longgang might experience the most serious burden of IHD hospital services in the near future, although Futian would still have the greatest number and the highest incidence rate of hospital admissions for IHD. PMID:24806191

  11. Compound decision in the presence of proxies with an application to spatio-temporal data

    E-print Network

    Cohen, N; Ritov, Y

    2010-01-01

    We study the problem of incorporating covariates in a compound decision setup. It is desired to estimate the means of $n$ response variables, which are independent and normally distributed, and each is accompanied by a vector of covariates. We suggest a method that involves non-parametric empirical Bayes techniques and may be viewed as a generalization of the celebrated Fay-Herriot (1979) method. Some optimality properties of our method are proved. We also compare it numerically with Fay-Herriot and other methods, using a `semi-real' data set that involves spatio-temporal covariates, where the goal is to estimate certain proportions in many small areas (Statistical-Areas)

  12. Spatio-temporal Dynamics of Pond Use and Recruitment in Florida Gopher Frogs (Rana Capito aesopus)

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, C.H.

    2000-05-16

    We examined spatio-temporal dynamics of the Florida Gopher frog breeding and juvenile recruitment. Ponds were situated in a hardwood or pine-savanna matrix of upland forest. Movement was monitored from 1994-1999. Adult pond use was low but relatively constant. Juvenile recruitment was higher in the upland savanna matrix. Body size was negatively correlated with the number of juveniles exiting the pond in only one year suggesting intraspecific competition is one of many factors. Most immigration occurred in May through August and was unrelated to rainfall.

  13. Spatio-temporal dynamics of pneumonia in bighorn sheep

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cassirer, E. Frances; Plowright, Raina K.; Manlove, Kezia R.; Cross, Paul C.; Dobson, Andrew P.; Potter, Kathleen A.; Hudson, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Bighorn sheep mortality related to pneumonia is a primary factor limiting population recovery across western North America, but management has been constrained by an incomplete understanding of the disease. We analysed patterns of pneumonia-caused mortality over 14 years in 16 interconnected bighorn sheep populations to gain insights into underlying disease processes. 2. We observed four age-structured classes of annual pneumonia mortality patterns: all-age, lamb-only, secondary all-age and adult-only. Although there was considerable variability within classes, overall they differed in persistence within and impact on populations. Years with pneumonia-induced mortality occurring simultaneously across age classes (i.e. all-age) appeared to be a consequence of pathogen invasion into a naïve population and resulted in immediate population declines. Subsequently, low recruitment due to frequent high mortality outbreaks in lambs, probably due to association with chronically infected ewes, posed a significant obstacle to population recovery. Secondary all-age events occurred in previously exposed populations when outbreaks in lambs were followed by lower rates of pneumonia-induced mortality in adults. Infrequent pneumonia events restricted to adults were usually of short duration with low mortality. 3. Acute pneumonia-induced mortality in adults was concentrated in fall and early winter around the breeding season when rams are more mobile and the sexes commingle. In contrast, mortality restricted to lambs peaked in summer when ewes and lambs were concentrated in nursery groups. 4. We detected weak synchrony in adult pneumonia between adjacent populations, but found no evidence for landscape-scale extrinsic variables as drivers of disease. 5. We demonstrate that there was a >60% probability of a disease event each year following pneumonia invasion into bighorn sheep populations. Healthy years also occurred periodically, and understanding the factors driving these apparent fade-out events may be the key to managing this disease. Our data and modelling indicate that pneumonia can have greater impacts on bighorn sheep populations than previously reported, and we present hypotheses about processes involved for testing in future investigations and management.

  14. Spatio-temporal evolution of the H ? L back transition

    SciTech Connect

    Miki, K.; Center for Computational Science and e-Systems, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Chiba 277-8587 ; Diamond, P. H.; Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 ; Schmitz, L.; McDonald, D. C.; Estrada, T.; Gürcan, Ö. D.; Tynan, G. R.

    2013-06-15

    Since ITER will operate close to threshold and with limited control, the H ? L back transition is a topic important for machine operations as well as physics. Using a reduced mesoscale model [Miki et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 092306 (2012)], we investigate ELM-free H ? L back transition dynamics in order to isolate transport physics effects. Model studies indicate that turbulence spreading is the key process which triggers the back transition. The transition involves a feedback loop linking turbulence and profiles. The I-phase appears during the back transition following a slow power ramp down, while fast ramp-downs reveal a single burst of zonal flow during the back transition. The I-phase nucleates at the pedestal shoulder, as this is the site of the residual turbulence in H-mode. Hysteresis in the profile gradient scale length is characterized by the Nusselt number, where Nu=?{sub i,turb}/?{sub i,neo}. Relative hysteresis of temperature gradient vs density gradient is sensitive to the pedestal Prandtl number, where Pr{sub ped}=D{sub ped}/?{sub i,neo}. We expect the H-mode to be somewhat more resilient in density than in temperature.

  15. Self-Organization of Spatio-Temporal Hierarchy via Learning of Dynamic Visual Image Patterns on Action Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Minju; Hwang, Jungsik; Tani, Jun

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that the visual cortex efficiently processes high-dimensional spatial information by using a hierarchical structure. Recently, computational models that were inspired by the spatial hierarchy of the visual cortex have shown remarkable performance in image recognition. Up to now, however, most biological and computational modeling studies have mainly focused on the spatial domain and do not discuss temporal domain processing of the visual cortex. Several studies on the visual cortex and other brain areas associated with motor control support that the brain also uses its hierarchical structure as a processing mechanism for temporal information. Based on the success of previous computational models using spatial hierarchy and temporal hierarchy observed in the brain, the current report introduces a novel neural network model for the recognition of dynamic visual image patterns based solely on the learning of exemplars. This model is characterized by the application of both spatial and temporal constraints on local neural activities, resulting in the self-organization of a spatio-temporal hierarchy necessary for the recognition of complex dynamic visual image patterns. The evaluation with the Weizmann dataset in recognition of a set of prototypical human movement patterns showed that the proposed model is significantly robust in recognizing dynamically occluded visual patterns compared to other baseline models. Furthermore, an evaluation test for the recognition of concatenated sequences of those prototypical movement patterns indicated that the model is endowed with a remarkable capability for the contextual recognition of long-range dynamic visual image patterns. PMID:26147887

  16. Spatio-temporal mapping cortical neuroplasticity in carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ruzich, Emily; Witzel, Thomas; Maeda, Yumi; Malatesta, Cristina; Morse, Leslie R.; Audette, Joseph; Hämäläinen, Matti; Kettner, Norman; Napadow, Vitaly

    2012-01-01

    Neuroimaging data demonstrate that carpal tunnel syndrome, a peripheral neuropathy, is accompanied by maladaptive central neuroplasticity. To further investigate this phenomenon, we collected magnetoencephalography data from 12 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and 12 healthy control subjects undergoing somatosensory stimulation of the median nerve-innervated Digits 2 and 3, as well as Digit 5, which is innervated by the ulnar nerve. Nerve conduction velocity and psychophysical data were acquired to determine whether standard clinical measures correlated with brain response. In subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome, but not healthy controls, sensory nerve conduction velocity for Digits 2 and 3 was slower than Digit 5. However, somatosensory M20 latencies for Digits 2 and 3 were significantly longer than those of Digit 5. The extent of the M20 delay for median nerve-innervated Digit 2 was positively correlated with decreasing nerve conduction velocity and increasing pain severity. Thus, slower peripheral nerve conduction in carpal tunnel syndrome corresponds to greater delays in the first somatosensory cortical response. Furthermore, spectral analysis demonstrated weaker post-stimulus beta event-related desynchronization and earlier and shorter event-related synchronization in subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome. The extent of the decreased event-related desynchronization for median nerve-innervated digits was positively correlated with paraesthesia severity. We propose that ongoing paraesthesias in median nerve-innervated digits render their corresponding sensorimotor cortical areas ‘busy’, thus reducing their capacity to process external stimulation. Finally, subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome demonstrated a smaller cortical source separation for Digits 2 and 3 compared with healthy controls. This supports our hypothesis that ongoing paraesthesias promote blurring of median nerve-innervated digit representations through Hebbian plasticity mechanisms. In summary, this study reveals significant correlation between the clinical severity of carpal tunnel syndrome and the latency of the early M20, as well as the strength of long latency beta oscillations. These temporal magnetoencephalography measures are novel markers of neuroplasticity in carpal tunnel syndrome and could be used to study central changes that may occur following clinical intervention. PMID:23043143

  17. Spatio-Temporal Patterns of Schistosomiasis Japonica in Lake and Marshland Areas in China: The Effect of Snail Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yi; Gao, Jie; Chi, Meina; Luo, Can; Lynn, Henry; Sun, Liqian; Tao, Bo; Wang, Decheng; Zhang, Zhijie; Jiang, Qingwu

    2014-01-01

    The progress of the integrated control policy for schistosomiasis implemented since 2005 in China, which is aiming at reducing the roles of bovines and humans as infection sources, may be challenged by persistent presence of infected snails in lake and marshland areas. Based on annual parasitologic data for schistosomiasis during 2004–2011 in Xingzi County, a spatio-temporal kriging model was used to investigate the spatio-temporal pattern of schistosomiasis risk. Results showed that environmental factors related to snail habitats can explain the spatio-temporal variation of schistosomiasis. Predictive maps of schistosomiasis risk illustrated that clusters of the disease fluctuated during 2004–2008; there was an extensive outbreak in 2008 and attenuated disease occurrences afterwards. An area with an annually constant cluster of schistosomiasis was identified. Our study suggests that targeting snail habitats located within high-risk areas for schistosomiasis would be an economic and sustainable way of schistosomiasis control in the future. PMID:24980498

  18. Spatio-temporal modeling and optimization of a deformable-grating compressor for short high-energy laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Qiao, J; Papa, J; Liu, X

    2015-10-01

    Monolithic large-scale diffraction gratings are desired to improve the performance of high-energy laser systems and scale them to higher energy, but the surface deformation of these diffraction gratings induce spatio-temporal coupling that is detrimental to the focusability and compressibility of the output pulse. A new deformable-grating-based pulse compressor architecture with optimized actuator positions has been designed to correct the spatial and temporal aberrations induced by grating wavefront errors. An integrated optical model has been built to analyze the effect of grating wavefront errors on the spatio-temporal performance of a compressor based on four deformable gratings. A 1.5-meter deformable grating has been optimized using an integrated finite-element-analysis and genetic-optimization model, leading to spatio-temporal performance similar to the baseline design with ideal gratings. PMID:26480107

  19. Whole-community DNA barcoding reveals a spatio-temporal continuum of biodiversity at species and genetic levels.

    PubMed

    Baselga, Andrés; Fujisawa, Tomochika; Crampton-Platt, Alexandra; Bergsten, Johannes; Foster, Peter G; Monaghan, Michael T; Vogler, Alfried P

    2013-01-01

    A correlation of species and genetic diversity has been proposed but not uniformly supported. Large-scale DNA barcoding provides qualitatively novel data to test for correlations across hierarchical levels (genes, genealogies and species), and may help to unveil the underlying processes. Here we analyse sequence variation in communities of aquatic beetles across Europe (>5,000 individuals) to test for self-similarity of beta diversity patterns at multiple hierarchical levels. We show that community similarity at all levels decreases exponentially with geographic distance, and initial similarity is correlated with the lineage age, consistent with a molecular clock. Log-log correlations between lineage age, number of lineages, and range sizes, reveal a fractal geometry in time and space, indicating a spatio-temporal continuum of biodiversity across scales. Simulations show that these findings mirror dispersal-constrained models of haplotype distributions. These novel macroecological patterns may be explained by neutral evolutionary processes, acting continuously over time to produce multi-scale regularities of biodiversity. PMID:23695686

  20. Complex network based techniques to identify extreme events and (sudden) transitions in spatio-temporal systems.

    PubMed

    Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-09-01

    We present here two promising techniques for the application of the complex network approach to continuous spatio-temporal systems that have been developed in the last decade and show large potential for future application and development of complex systems analysis. First, we discuss the transforming of a time series from such systems to a complex network. The natural approach is to calculate the recurrence matrix and interpret such as the adjacency matrix of an associated complex network, called recurrence network. Using complex network measures, such as transitivity coefficient, we demonstrate that this approach is very efficient for identifying qualitative transitions in observational data, e.g., when analyzing paleoclimate regime transitions. Second, we demonstrate the use of directed spatial networks constructed from spatio-temporal measurements of such systems that can be derived from the synchronized-in-time occurrence of extreme events in different spatial regions. Although there are many possibilities to investigate such spatial networks, we present here the new measure of network divergence and how it can be used to develop a prediction scheme of extreme rainfall events. PMID:26428562

  1. Complex network based techniques to identify extreme events and (sudden) transitions in spatio-temporal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-09-01

    We present here two promising techniques for the application of the complex network approach to continuous spatio-temporal systems that have been developed in the last decade and show large potential for future application and development of complex systems analysis. First, we discuss the transforming of a time series from such systems to a complex network. The natural approach is to calculate the recurrence matrix and interpret such as the adjacency matrix of an associated complex network, called recurrence network. Using complex network measures, such as transitivity coefficient, we demonstrate that this approach is very efficient for identifying qualitative transitions in observational data, e.g., when analyzing paleoclimate regime transitions. Second, we demonstrate the use of directed spatial networks constructed from spatio-temporal measurements of such systems that can be derived from the synchronized-in-time occurrence of extreme events in different spatial regions. Although there are many possibilities to investigate such spatial networks, we present here the new measure of network divergence and how it can be used to develop a prediction scheme of extreme rainfall events.

  2. A geomatic methodology for spatio-temporal analysis of climatologic variables and water related diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quentin, E.; Gómez Albores, M. A.; Díaz Delgado, C.

    2009-04-01

    The main objective of this research is to propose, by the way of geomatic developments, an integrated tool to analyze and model the spatio-temporal pattern of human diseases related to environmental conditions, in particular the ones that are linked to water resources. The geomatic developments follows four generic steps : requirement analysis, conceptual modeling, geomatic modeling and implementation (in Idrisi GIS software). A first development consists of the preprocessing of water, population and health data in order to facilitate the conversion and validation of tabular data into the required structure for spatio-temporal analysis. Three parallel developments follow : water balance, demographic state and evolution, epidemiological measures (morbidity and mortality rates, diseases burden). The new geomatic modules in their actual state have been tested on various regions of Mexico Republic (Lerma watershed, Chiapas state) focusing on diarrhea and vector borne diseases (dengue and malaria) and considering records over the last decade : a yearly as well as seasonal spreading trend can be observed in correlation with precipitation and temperature data. In an ecohealth perspective, the geomatic approach results particularly appropriate since one of its purposes is the integration of the various spatial themes implied in the study problem, environmental as anthropogenic. By the use of powerful spatial analysis functions, it permits the detection of spatial trends which, combined to the temporal evolution, can be of particularly use for example in climate change context, if sufficiently valid historical data can be obtain.

  3. Spatio-Temporal Pattern Analysis for Regional Climate Change Using Mathematical Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, M.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2015-07-01

    Of late, significant changes in climate with their grave consequences have posed great challenges on humankind. Thus, the detection and assessment of climatic changes on a regional scale is gaining importance, since it helps to adopt adequate mitigation and adaptation measures. In this paper, we have presented a novel approach for detecting spatio-temporal pattern of regional climate change by exploiting the theory of mathematical morphology. At first, the various climatic zones in the region have been identified by using multifractal cross-correlation analysis (MF-DXA) of different climate variables of interest. Then, the directional granulometry with four different structuring elements has been studied to detect the temporal changes in spatial distribution of the identified climatic zones in the region and further insights have been drawn with respect to morphological uncertainty index and Hurst exponent. The approach has been evaluated with the daily time series data of land surface temperature (LST) and precipitation rate, collected from Microsoft Research - Fetch Climate Explorer, to analyze the spatio-temporal climatic pattern-change in the Eastern and North-Eastern regions of India throughout four quarters of the 20th century.

  4. GeoMesa: a distributed architecture for spatio-temporal fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, James N.; Annex, Andrew; Eichelberger, Christopher N.; Fox, Anthony; Hulbert, Andrew; Ronquest, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances in distributed databases and computing have transformed the landscape of spatio-temporal machine learning. This paper presents GeoMesa, a distributed spatio-temporal database built on top of Hadoop and column-family databases such as Accumulo and HBase, that includes a suite of tools for indexing, managing and analyzing both vector and raster data. The indexing techniques use space filling curves to map multi-dimensional data to the single lexicographic list managed by the underlying distributed database. In contrast to traditional non-distributed RDBMS, GeoMesa is capable of scaling horizontally by adding more resources at runtime; the index rebalances across the additional resources. In the raster domain, GeoMesa leverages Accumulo's server-side iterators and aggregators to perform raster interpolation and associative map algebra operations in parallel at query time. The paper concludes with two geo-time data fusion examples: using GeoMesa to aggregate Twitter data by keywords; and georegistration to drape full-motion video (FMV) over terrain.

  5. Spatio-temporal dynamics of security investments in an interdependent risk environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafi, Kamran; Bender, Axel; Zhong, Weicai; Abbass, Hussein A.

    2012-10-01

    In a globalised world where risks spread through contagion, the decision of an entity to invest in securing its premises from stochastic risks no longer depends solely on its own actions but also on the actions of other interacting entities in the system. This phenomenon is commonly seen in many domains including airline, logistics and computer security and is referred to as Interdependent Security (IDS). An IDS game models this decision problem from a game-theoretic perspective and deals with the behavioural dynamics of risk-reduction investments in such settings. This paper enhances this model and investigates the spatio-temporal aspects of the IDS games. The spatio-temporal dynamics are studied using simple replicator dynamics on a variety of network structures and for various security cost tradeoffs that lead to different Nash equilibria in an IDS game. The simulation results show that the neighbourhood configuration has a greater effect on the IDS game dynamics than network structure. An in-depth empirical analysis of game dynamics is carried out on regular graphs, which leads to the articulation of necessary and sufficient conditions for dominance in IDS games under spatial constraints.

  6. Evaluation of spatio-temporal variability in Land Surface Temperature: A case study of Zonguldak, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sekertekin, Aliihsan; Kutoglu, Senol Hakan; Kaya, Sinasi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze spatio-temporal variability in Land Surface Temperature (LST) in and around the city of Zonguldak as a result of the growing urbanization and industrialization during the last decade. Three Landsat 5 data and one Landsat 8 data acquired on different dates were exploited in acquiring LST maps utilizing mono-window algorithm. The outcomes obtained from this study indicate that there exists a significant temperature rise in the region for the time period between 1986 and 2015. Some cross sections were selected in order to examine the relationship between the land use and LST changes in more detail. The mean LST difference between 1986 and 2015 in ERDEMIR iron and steel plant (6.8 °C), forestland (3 °C), city and town centers (4.2 °C), municipal rubbish tip (-3.9 °C), coal dump site (12.2 °C), and power plants' region (7 °C) were presented. In addition, the results indicated that the mean LST difference between forestland and city centers was approximately 5 °C, and the difference between forestland and industrial enterprises was almost 8 °C for all years. Spatio-temporal variability in LST in Zonguldak was examined in that study and due to the increase in LST, policy makers and urban planners should consider LST and urban heat island parameters for sustainable development. PMID:26666659

  7. Automatic identification of seismic swarms and other spatio-temporal clustering from catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, F. Alejandro; Glowacka, Ewa

    1994-06-01

    Statistical analysis of seismic catalogs usually requires identification of swarms and foreshocks-main event-aftershocks sequences-a tedious and time-consuming chore. SWaRMSHoW, a simple but versatile QBASIC program for PC, graphically displays on screen catalog epicentral activity, with optional temporal distribution scaling; identifies spatio-temporal hypocentral clusters (SwrSeq) which may be swarms or foreshocks-main event-aftershocks sequences and discriminates between these; and displays SwrSeq locations and limits, and assigns them equivalent magnitudes corresponding to those of single events having seismic energy equal to that of the whole SwrSeq. SWaRMSHoW features optional detailed disk output of swarms and clusters, including origin time, location, constituent events, equivalent magnitudes, and current parameters, that allows easy application of results. Graphic screen display includes optional maps and drawings. Operation can be completely automatic or interactive. Working parameters can be reset at any time during operation. Besides swarm and sequence identification, this program's modeling of the seismicity, scaled in both space and time, is useful for studying many aspects of spatio-temporal seismicity, such as fault activation, migration of activity, quiescence, etc.

  8. A dense array stimulator to generate arbitrary spatio-temporal tactile stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Killebrew, Justin H.; Bensmaïa, Sliman J.; Dammann, John F.; Denchev, Peter; Hsiao, Steven S.; Craig, James C.

    2007-01-01

    The generation and presentation of tactile stimuli presents a unique challenge. Unlike vision and audition, in which standard equipment such as monitors and audio systems can be used for most experiments, tactile stimuli and/or stimulators often have to be tailor-made for a given study. Here, we present a novel tactile stimulator designed to present arbitrary spatio-temporal stimuli to the skin. The stimulator consists of 400 pins, arrayed over a 1 cm2 area, each under independent computer control. The dense array allows for an unprecedented number of stimuli to be presented within an experimental session (e.g., up to 1200 stimuli per minute) and for stimuli to be generated adaptively. The stimulator can be used in a variety of modes and can deliver indented and scanned patterns as well as stimuli defined by mathematical spatio-temporal functions (e.g., drifting sinusoids). We describe the hardware and software of the system, and discuss previous and prospective applications. PMID:17134760

  9. Spatio-temporal coherence of free-electron laser radiation in the extreme ultraviolet determined by a Michelson interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hilbert, V.; Rödel, C.; Zastrau, U.; Brenner, G.; Düsterer, S.; Dziarzhytski, S.; Harmand, M.; Przystawik, A.; Redlin, H.; Toleikis, S.; Döppner, T.; Ma, T.; Fletcher, L.; Förster, E.; Glenzer, S. H.; Lee, H. J.; Hartley, N. J.; Kazak, L.; Komar, D.; Skruszewicz, S.; and others

    2014-09-08

    A key feature of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from free-electron lasers (FELs) is its spatial and temporal coherence. We measured the spatio-temporal coherence properties of monochromatized FEL pulses at 13.5?nm using a Michelson interferometer. A temporal coherence time of (59±8) fs has been determined, which is in good agreement with the spectral bandwidth given by the monochromator. Moreover, the spatial coherence in vertical direction amounts to about 15% of the beam diameter and about 12% in horizontal direction. The feasibility of measuring spatio-temporal coherence properties of XUV FEL radiation using interferometric techniques advances machine operation and experimental studies significantly.

  10. Spatio-temporal changes of photosynthesis in carnivorous plants in response to prey capture, retention and digestion

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Carnivorous plants have evolved modified leaves into the traps that assist in nutrient uptake from captured prey. It is known that the traps of carnivorous plants usually have lower photosynthetic rates than assimilation leaves as a result of adaptation to carnivory. However, a few recent studies have indicated that photosynthesis and respiration undergo spatio-temporal changes during prey capture and retention, especially in the genera with active trapping mechanisms. This study describes the spatio-temporal changes of effective quantum yield of photochemical energy conversion in photosystem II (?PSII) in response to ant-derived formic acid during its capture and digestion. PMID:20523127

  11. Cortical Actin Flow in T Cells Quantified by Spatio-temporal Image Correlation Spectroscopy of Structured Illumination Microscopy Data.

    PubMed

    Ashdown, George; Pandži?, Elvis; Cope, Andrew; Wiseman, Paul; Owen, Dylan

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous-actin plays a crucial role in a majority of cell processes including motility and, in immune cells, the formation of a key cell-cell interaction known as the immunological synapse. F-actin is also speculated to play a role in regulating molecular distributions at the membrane of cells including sub-membranous vesicle dynamics and protein clustering. While standard light microscope techniques allow generalized and diffraction-limited observations to be made, many cellular and molecular events including clustering and molecular flow occur in populations at length-scales far below the resolving power of standard light microscopy. By combining total internal reflection fluorescence with the super resolution imaging method structured illumination microscopy, the two-dimensional molecular flow of F-actin at the immune synapse of T cells was recorded. Spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy (STICS) was then applied, which generates quantifiable results in the form of velocity histograms and vector maps representing flow directionality and magnitude. This protocol describes the combination of super-resolution imaging and STICS techniques to generate flow vectors at sub-diffraction levels of detail. This technique was used to confirm an actin flow that is symmetrically retrograde and centripetal throughout the periphery of T cells upon synapse formation. PMID:26709554

  12. A novel spatio-temporal scale based on ocean currents unravels environmental drivers of reproductive timing in a marine predator.

    PubMed

    Afán, Isabel; Chiaradia, André; Forero, Manuela G; Dann, Peter; Ramírez, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Life-history strategies have evolved in response to predictable patterns of environmental features. In practice, linking life-history strategies and changes in environmental conditions requires comparable space-time scales between both processes, a difficult match in most marine system studies. We propose a novel spatio-temporal and dynamic scale to explore marine productivity patterns probably driving reproductive timing in the inshore little penguin (Eudyptula minor), based on monthly data on ocean circulation in the Southern Ocean, Australia. In contrast to what occurred when considering any other fixed scales, little penguin's highly variable laying date always occurred within the annual peak of ocean productivity that emerged from our newly defined dynamic scale. Additionally, local sea surface temperature seems to have triggered the onset of reproduction, acting as an environmental cue informing on marine productivity patterns at our dynamic scale. Chlorophyll-a patterns extracted from this scale revealed that environment factors in marine ecosystems affecting breeding decisions are related to a much wider region than foraging areas that are commonly used in current studies investigating the link between animals' life history and their environment. We suggest that marine productivity patterns may be more predictable than previously thought when environmental and biological data are examined at appropriate scales. PMID:26063848

  13. -Spatio-temporal variation of salt marsh seedling establishment in relation to the environment -61 Journal of Vegetation Science 12: 61-74, 2001

    E-print Network

    - Spatio-temporal variation of salt marsh seedling establishment in relation to the environment Datum. Nomenclature: Hickman (1993). Spatio-temporal variation of salt marsh seedling establishment variation in plant establishment in the upper intertidal marsh of three southern California wet- lands

  14. Challenges for modelling spatio-temporal variations of malaria risk in Malawi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, R.; Chirombo, J.; Tompkins, A. M.

    2012-04-01

    Malaria is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Malawi with more than 6 million episodes reported each year. Malaria poses a huge economic burden to Malawi in terms of the direct cost of treating malaria patients and also indirect costs resulting from workdays lost in agriculture and industry and absenteeism from school. Malawi implements malaria control activities within the Roll Back Malaria framework, with the objective to provide those most at risk (i.e. children under five years, pregnant woman and individuals with suppressed immune systems) access to personal and community protective measures. However, at present there is no mechanism by which to target the most 'at risk' populations ahead of an impending epidemic. Malaria transmission is influenced by variations in meteorological conditions, which impact the biology of the mosquito and the availability of breeding sites, but also socio-economic conditions such as levels of urbanisation, poverty and education, which influence human vulnerability and vector habitat. The many potential drivers of malaria, both extrinsic, such as climate, and intrinsic, such as population immunity are often difficult to disentangle. This presents a challenge for modelling of malaria risk in space and time. Using an age-stratified spatio-temporal dataset of malaria cases at the district level from July 2004 - June 2011, we use a spatio-temporal modelling framework to model variations in malaria risk in Malawi. Climatic and topographic variations are accounted for using an interpolation method to relate gridded products to administrative districts. District level data is tested in the model to account for confounding factors, including the proportion of the population living in urban areas; residing in traditional housing; with no toilet facilities; who do not attend school, etc, the number of health facilities per population and yearly estimates of insecticide-treated mosquito net distribution. In order to account for the unobserved confounding factors that influence malaria, which are not accounted for using measured covariates, a negative binomial generalised linear mixed model (GLMM) is adopted, which includes structured and unstructured spatial and temporal random effects. The parameters in this spatio-temporal Bayesian hierarchical model are estimated using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). This allows posterior predictive distributions for disease risk to be derived for each spatial location and time period. A novel visualisation technique is then used to display seasonal probabilistic forecasts of malaria risk, derived from the developed model using pre-defined risk category thresholds, on a map. This technique allows decision makers to identify areas where the model predicts with certainty a particular malaria risk category (high, medium or low); in order to effectively target limited resources to those districts most at risk for a given season.

  15. Spatio-temporal analysis of remotely-sensed forest mortality associated with road de-icing salts

    E-print Network

    Weisberg, Peter J.

    Spatio-temporal analysis of remotely-sensed forest mortality associated with road de-icing salts H T S · We investigated subtle forest mortality patterns caused by road de-icing salts. · Multi-source imagery helped integrate spatial and temporal patterns of mortality. · Road salt effects were significant

  16. Spatio-temporal trend analysis of air temperature in Europe and Western Asia using data-coupled clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidean, Mihaela I.; Muñoz-Bulnes, Jesús; Ramiro-Bargueño, Julio; Caamaño, Antonio J.; Salcedo-Sanz, Sancho

    2015-06-01

    Over the last decades, different machine learning techniques have been used to detect climate change patterns, mostly using data from measuring stations located in different parts of the world. Some previous studies focus on temperature as primary variable of study, though there have been other works focused on precipitation or even wind speed as objective variable. In this paper, we use the self-organized Second Order Data Coupled Clustering (SODCC) algorithm to carry out a spatio-temporal analysis of temperature patterns in Europe. By applying the SODCC we identify three different regimes of spatio-temporal correlations based on their geographical extent: small, medium, and large-scale regimes. Based on these regimes, it is possible to detect a change in the spatio-temporal trend of air temperature, reflecting a shift in the extent of the correlations in stations in the Iberian Peninsula and Southern France. We also identify an oscillating spatio-temporal trend in the Western Asia region and a stable medium-scale regime affecting the British Isles. These results are found to be consistent with previous studies in climate change. The patterns obtained with the SODCC algorithm may represent a signal of climate change to be taken into account, and so the SODCC could be used as detection method.

  17. Multi-Sensor Spatio-Temporal Vector Prediction History Tree (V-PHT) Model for Error Correction

    E-print Network

    Jagannatham, Aditya K.

    correlation in sensor data arising out of geographical proximity of the sensor nodes. Towards this endMulti-Sensor Spatio-Temporal Vector Prediction History Tree (V-PHT) Model for Error Correction in Wireless Sensor Networks Aman Jaiswal Electrical Engineering Department Indian Institute of Technology

  18. Hierarchical Bayesian modeling of spatio-temporal patterns of lung cancer incidence risk in Georgia, USA: 2000-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Ping; Mu, Lan; Madden, Marguerite; Vena, John E.

    2014-10-01

    Lung cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in both men and women in Georgia, USA. However, the spatio-temporal patterns of lung cancer risk in Georgia have not been fully studied. Hierarchical Bayesian models are used here to explore the spatio-temporal patterns of lung cancer incidence risk by race and gender in Georgia for the period of 2000-2007. With the census tract level as the spatial scale and the 2-year period aggregation as the temporal scale, we compare a total of seven Bayesian spatio-temporal models including two under a separate modeling framework and five under a joint modeling framework. One joint model outperforms others based on the deviance information criterion. Results show that the northwest region of Georgia has consistently high lung cancer incidence risk for all population groups during the study period. In addition, there are inverse relationships between the socioeconomic status and the lung cancer incidence risk among all Georgian population groups, and the relationships in males are stronger than those in females. By mapping more reliable variations in lung cancer incidence risk at a relatively fine spatio-temporal scale for different Georgian population groups, our study aims to better support healthcare performance assessment, etiological hypothesis generation, and health policy making.

  19. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Resident and Immigrating Populations of Carcinops pumilio (Coleoptera: Histeridae) in High-Rise

    E-print Network

    : Histeridae) in High-Rise Poultry Facilities PATRICK C. TOBIN, SHELBY J. FLEISCHER, AND CHARLES W. PITTS., in accumulated poultry house manure. We examined the spatio- temporal dynamics of establishing adult C. pumilio in high-rise poultry facilities using conventional and geostatistical approaches. The growth curves

  20. Spatio-Temporal Asynchronous Co-Occurrence Pattern for Big Climate Data towards Long-Lead Flood Prediction

    E-print Network

    Ding, Wei

    Spatio-Temporal Asynchronous Co-Occurrence Pattern for Big Climate Data towards Long-Lead Flood floods 5 to 15 days in advance. Current simulation models forecasting heavy precipitation, a major factor related with flood occurrences, are computationally ex- pensive and limited by their error amplification

  1. 768 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NEURAL NETWORKS, VOL. 20, NO. 5, MAY 2009 SpatioTemporal Memories for Machine Learning

    E-print Network

    He, Haibo

    a novel, biologically inspired, long-term memory (LTM) architecture. We intend to use it as a building, long-term memory (LTM), memory robustness, spatio­temporal memory. I. INTRODUCTION SPATIO of human brain--the short-term memory (STM) and the long-term memory (LTM). It is believed that they have

  2. Spatio-temporal urban landscape change analysis using the Markov chain model and a modified genetic algorithm

    E-print Network

    Wang, Le

    from a modified genetic algorithm (GA). Model performance was evaluated between the empirical landscapeSpatio-temporal urban landscape change analysis using the Markov chain model and a modified genetic algorithm J. TANG, L. WANG* and Z. YAO Texas Center for Geographic Information Science, Department

  3. Spatio-temporal Analysis of the Effects of Hurricane Ivan on Two Contrasting Epiphytic Orchid Species in Guanahacabibes, Cuba

    E-print Network

    Escolano, Francisco

    Spatio-temporal Analysis of the Effects of Hurricane Ivan on Two Contrasting Epiphytic Orchid of disturbance in many tropical coastal forests. Here, we focus on mortality of epiphytic orchids caused different aspects of hurricane damage on two contrasting epiphytic orchids, Broughtonia cubensis

  4. A flood risk curve development for inundation disaster considering spatio-temporal rainfall distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.; Tachikawa, Y.; Yorozu, K.

    2015-06-01

    To manage flood disaster with an exceeding designed level, flood risk control based on appropriate risk assessment is essential. To make an integrated economic risk assessment by flood disaster, a flood risk curve, which is a relation between flood inundation damage and its exceedance probability, plays an important role. This research purposes a method to develop a flood risk curve by utilizing a probability distribution function of annual maximum rainfall through rainfall-runoff and inundation simulations so that risk assessment can consider climate and socio-economic changes. Among a variety of uncertainties, the method proposed in this study considered spatio-temporal rainfall distributions that have high uncertainty for damage estimation. The method was applied to the Yura-gawa river basin (1882 km2) in Japan; and the annual economic benefit of an existing dam in the basin was successfully quantified by comparing flood risk curves with/without the dam.

  5. Spatio-temporal video segmentation with shape growth or shrinkage constraint.

    PubMed

    Tarabalka, Yuliya; Charpiat, Guillaume; Brucker, Ludovic; Menze, Bjoern H

    2014-09-01

    We propose a new method for joint segmentation of monotonously growing or shrinking shapes in a time sequence of noisy images. The task of segmenting the image time series is expressed as an optimization problem using the spatio-temporal graph of pixels, in which we are able to impose the constraint of shape growth or of shrinkage by introducing monodirectional infinite links connecting pixels at the same spatial locations in successive image frames. The globally optimal solution is computed with a graph cut. The performance of the proposed method is validated on three applications: segmentation of melting sea ice floes and of growing burned areas from time series of 2D satellite images, and segmentation of a growing brain tumor from sequences of 3D medical scans. In the latter application, we impose an additional intersequences inclusion constraint by adding directed infinite links between pixels of dependent image structures. PMID:25020092

  6. Spatio-temporal distribution of VOC emissions in urban area based on receptor modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoji?, A.; Staniši? Stoji?, S.; Miji?, Z.; Šoštari?, A.; Rajši?, S.

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, the concentrations of VOC were measured using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer, together with NOx, NO2, NO, SO2, CO, and PM10 during winter 2014 in Belgrade, Serbia. For the purpose of source apportionment, receptor models Positive Matrix Factorization and Unmix were applied to the obtained dataset, both resolving six profiles. The reliable identification of pollutant sources, description of their characteristics, and estimation of their spatio-temporal distribution are presented through comprehensive analysis and comparison of receptor model solutions, with respect to meteorological data, planetary boundary layer height, and regional and long-range transport. For emissions from petrochemical industry and oil refinery a significant contribution of transport is observed, and hybrid receptor models were applied for identification of potential non-local source regions.

  7. Spatio-temporal variations of black carbon concentrations in the Megacity Beijing.

    PubMed

    Schleicher, Nina; Norra, Stefan; Fricker, Mathieu; Kaminski, Uwe; Chen, Yizhen; Chai, Fahe; Wang, Shulan; Yu, Yang; Cen, Kuang

    2013-11-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution and the flux of black carbon (BC) concentration in Beijing were continuously investigated over a two-year period at five sites to highlight the relative influence of contributing sources. The results demonstrate firstly that there is significant spatio-temporal variability of BC in Beijing. Highest concentrations occurred during winter primarily due to stagnant meteorological conditions, and seasonal BC sources, such as coal combustion for heating purposes. Biomass burning was identified as a minor seasonal source during the summer months. BC also varied spatially with higher concentrations in the SE of Beijing and lower concentrations in the NW, due to the differing emission intensity of various local BC sources such as traffic and industry. Frequently, overnight BC concentrations were higher due to specific meteorological conditions, such as the lower urban mixing layer height and various anthropogenic activities, such as exclusive night-time heavy duty vehicle traffic in the inner-city. PMID:23978522

  8. Spatio-Temporal Video Segmentation with Shape Growth or Shrinkage Constraint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarabalka, Yuliya; Charpiat, Guillaume; Brucker, Ludovic; Menze, Bjoern H.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new method for joint segmentation of monotonously growing or shrinking shapes in a time sequence of noisy images. The task of segmenting the image time series is expressed as an optimization problem using the spatio-temporal graph of pixels, in which we are able to impose the constraint of shape growth or of shrinkage by introducing monodirectional infinite links connecting pixels at the same spatial locations in successive image frames. The globally optimal solution is computed with a graph cut. The performance of the proposed method is validated on three applications: segmentation of melting sea ice floes and of growing burned areas from time series of 2D satellite images, and segmentation of a growing brain tumor from sequences of 3D medical scans. In the latter application, we impose an additional intersequences inclusion constraint by adding directed infinite links between pixels of dependent image structures.

  9. Spatio-temporal distribution of global solar radiation for Mexico using GOES data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifaz, R.; Cuahutle, M.; Valdes, M.; Riveros, D.

    2013-05-01

    Increased need of sustainable and renewable energies around the world requires studies about the amount and distribution of such types of energies. Global solar radiation distribution in space and time is a key component on order to know the availability of the energy for different applications. Using GOES hourly data, the heliosat model was implemented for Mexico. Details about the model and its components are discussed step by stem an once obtained the global solar radiation images, different time datasets (hourly, daily, monthly and seasonal) were built in order to know the spatio-temporal behavior of this type of energy. Preliminary maps of the available solar global radiation energy for Mexico are presented, the amount and variation of the solar radiation by regions are analyzed and discussed. Future work includes a better parametrization of the model using calibrated ground stations data and more use of more complex models for better results.

  10. MobilityGraphs: Visual Analysis of Mass Mobility Dynamics via Spatio-Temporal Graphs and Clustering.

    PubMed

    von Landesberger, Tatiana; Brodkorb, Felix; Roskosch, Philipp; Andrienko, Natalia; Andrienko, Gennady; Kerren, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Learning more about people mobility is an important task for official decision makers and urban planners. Mobility data sets characterize the variation of the presence of people in different places over time as well as movements (or flows) of people between the places. The analysis of mobility data is challenging due to the need to analyze and compare spatial situations (i.e., presence and flows of people at certain time moments) and to gain an understanding of the spatio-temporal changes (variations of situations over time). Traditional flow visualizations usually fail due to massive clutter. Modern approaches offer limited support for investigating the complex variation of the movements over longer time periods. PMID:26529684

  11. Neural field simulator: two-dimensional spatio-temporal dynamics involving finite transmission speed

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Eric J.; Hutt, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Neural Field models (NFM) play an important role in the understanding of neural population dynamics on a mesoscopic spatial and temporal scale. Their numerical simulation is an essential element in the analysis of their spatio-temporal dynamics. The simulation tool described in this work considers scalar spatially homogeneous neural fields taking into account a finite axonal transmission speed and synaptic temporal derivatives of first and second order. A text-based interface offers complete control of field parameters and several approaches are used to accelerate simulations. A graphical output utilizes video hardware acceleration to display running output with reduced computational hindrance compared to simulators that are exclusively software-based. Diverse applications of the tool demonstrate breather oscillations, static and dynamic Turing patterns and activity spreading with finite propagation speed. The simulator is open source to allow tailoring of code and this is presented with an extension use case. PMID:26539105

  12. Predicted spatio-temporal dynamics of radiocesium deposited onto forests following the Fukushima nuclear accident

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Shoji; Matsuura, Toshiya; Nanko, Kazuki; Linkov, Igor; Shaw, George; Kaneko, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    The majority of the area contaminated by the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident is covered by forest. To facilitate effective countermeasure strategies to mitigate forest contamination, we simulated the spatio-temporal dynamics of radiocesium deposited into Japanese forest ecosystems in 2011 using a model that was developed after the Chernobyl accident in 1986. The simulation revealed that the radiocesium inventories in tree and soil surface organic layer components drop rapidly during the first two years after the fallout. Over a period of one to two years, the radiocesium is predicted to move from the tree and surface organic soil to the mineral soil, which eventually becomes the largest radiocesium reservoir within forest ecosystems. Although the uncertainty of our simulations should be considered, the results provide a basis for understanding and anticipating the future dynamics of radiocesium in Japanese forests following the Fukushima accident. PMID:23995073

  13. A Customized Light Sheet Microscope to Measure Spatio-Temporal Protein Dynamics in Small Model Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Rieckher, Matthias; Kourmoulakis, Georgios; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Ripoll, Jorge; Zacharakis, Giannis

    2015-01-01

    We describe a customizable and cost-effective light sheet microscopy (LSM) platform for rapid three-dimensional imaging of protein dynamics in small model organisms. The system is designed for high acquisition speeds and enables extended time-lapse in vivo experiments when using fluorescently labeled specimens. We demonstrate the capability of the setup to monitor gene expression and protein localization during ageing and upon starvation stress in longitudinal studies in individual or small groups of adult Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes. The system is equipped to readily perform fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), which allows monitoring protein recovery and distribution under low photobleaching conditions. Our imaging platform is designed to easily switch between light sheet microscopy and optical projection tomography (OPT) modalities. The setup permits monitoring of spatio-temporal expression and localization of ageing biomarkers of subcellular size and can be conveniently adapted to image a wide range of small model organisms and tissue samples. PMID:26000610

  14. Predicted spatio-temporal dynamics of radiocesium deposited onto forests following the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Shoji; Matsuura, Toshiya; Nanko, Kazuki; Linkov, Igor; Shaw, George; Kaneko, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    The majority of the area contaminated by the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident is covered by forest. To facilitate effective countermeasure strategies to mitigate forest contamination, we simulated the spatio-temporal dynamics of radiocesium deposited into Japanese forest ecosystems in 2011 using a model that was developed after the Chernobyl accident in 1986. The simulation revealed that the radiocesium inventories in tree and soil surface organic layer components drop rapidly during the first two years after the fallout. Over a period of one to two years, the radiocesium is predicted to move from the tree and surface organic soil to the mineral soil, which eventually becomes the largest radiocesium reservoir within forest ecosystems. Although the uncertainty of our simulations should be considered, the results provide a basis for understanding and anticipating the future dynamics of radiocesium in Japanese forests following the Fukushima accident. PMID:23995073

  15. Assessing the spatio-temporal variations of the completeness magnitude for seismic events in Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, R.; Bravo, L.

    2013-05-01

    We investigate the spatio temporal variation of the completeness magnitude Mc, for a set of 18774 well localized earthquakes registered by the Venezuelan Seismological Network over the period 2000-2010. In the entire seismicity region we defined two-dimensional grids of different sizes in order to map the Mc: 11 km, 22 km, 55 km and 111 km. We calculated the completeness magnitude using the Maximum Curvature method (MAXC) for every particular cell taking at least 15 earthquakes to perform computations. The results show an overall variation from 2.0 to 3.6. We found different thresholds and ranges of Mc depending on the dimension of the seismicity zone: western region from 2.2 to 2.8, north central from 2.0 to 3.2 and eastern region from 2.2 to 3.2. We also include remarks in border seismicity, close to Colombia and Trinidad, where the largest Mc values are estimated.

  16. Holographic frequency resolved optical gating for spatio-temporal characterization of ultrashort optical pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Nikhil; Yang, Chuan; Xu, Yong; Liu, Zhiwen

    2014-09-01

    We introduce a novel method for characterizing the spatio-temporal evolution of ultrashort optical field by recording the spectral hologram of frequency resolved optical gating (FROG) trace. We show that FROG holography enables the measurement of phase (up to an overall constant) and group delay of the pulse which cannot be measured by conventional FROG method. To illustrate our method, we perform numerical simulation to generate holographic collinear FROG (cFROG) trace of a chirped optical pulse and retrieve its complex profile at multiple locations as it propagates through a hypothetical dispersive medium. Further, we experimentally demonstrate our method by retrieving a 67 fs pulse at three axial locations in the vicinity of focus of an objective lens and compute its group delay.

  17. Transition to Spatio-Temporal Chaos with Increasing Length in the Reaction-Diffusion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trail, Collin; Tomlin, Brett; Olsen, Thomas; Wiener, Richard J.

    2003-11-01

    Calculations based up the Reaction-Diffusion model (H. Riecke and H.-G. Paap, Europhys. Lett. 14), 1235 (1991).have proven to be suggestive for a wide variety of pattern forming systems, including Taylor-Couette flow with hourglass geometry(Richard J. Wiener et al), Phys. Rev. E 55, 5489 (1997).. Seeking insight to guide experimental investigations, we extend these calculations. Previous calculations indicated that in smaller systems, only temporal chaos, located in a small region, would be observed, while in longer systems instabilities would form over a wide region. Our simulations explore this transition from purely temporal chaos to spatio-temporal chaos as the length of the system is increased.

  18. Heterogeneity in hotspots: spatio-temporal patterns in neglected parasitic diseases.

    PubMed

    Lal, A; Hales, S

    2015-02-01

    Cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis have been recognized by the WHO as 'Neglected Diseases'. Minimal attention has been paid to the spatial and temporal distribution of disease incidence patterns. Using disease notification data, we detected spatio-temporal clusters of cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis across three time periods: (i) 1997-2000, (ii) 2001-2004, (iii) 2005-2008. There was substantial variation in the geographical location and timing of recurrent cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis clusters. Statistically significant (P < 0·05) giardiasis clusters tended to occur in predominantly urban areas with little apparent seasonal influence, while statistically significant cryptosporidiosis clusters were detected in spring, in areas with high livestock land use. The location and timing of cryptosporidiosis clusters suggest an influence of livestock production practices, while urban exposures and host behaviour are likely to influence giardiasis clusters. This approach provides a resource-efficient method for public health authorities to prioritize future research needs and areas for intervention. PMID:24819745

  19. Incorporating social contact data in spatio-temporal models for infectious disease spread

    E-print Network

    Meyer, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Routine public health surveillance of notifiable infectious diseases gives rise to weekly counts of reported cases - possibly stratified by region and/or age group. A well-established approach to the statistical analysis of such surveillance data are endemic-epidemic time-series models. The temporal dependence inherent to communicable diseases is thereby taken into account by an observation-driven formulation conditioning on past counts. Additional spatial dynamics in areal-level counts are largely driven by human travel and can be captured by power-law weights based on the order of adjacency. However, social contacts are highly assortative also with respect to age. For example, characteristic pathways of directly transmitted pathogens are linked to childcare facilities, schools and nursing homes. We therefore investigate how a spatio-temporal endemic-epidemic model can be extended to take social contact data into account. The approach is illustrated in a case study on norovirus gastroenteritis in Berlin, 201...

  20. Multiblock copolymers exhibiting spatio-temporal structure with autonomous viscosity oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoda, Michika; Ueki, Takeshi; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro; Yoshida, Ryo

    2015-10-01

    Here we report an ABA triblock copolymer that can express microscopic autonomous formation and break-up of aggregates under constant condition to generate macroscopic viscoelastic self-oscillation of the solution. The ABA triblock copolymer is designed to have hydrophilic B segment and self-oscillating A segment at the both sides by RAFT copolymerization. In the A segment, a metal catalyst of chemical oscillatory reaction, i.e., the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction, is introduced as a chemomechanical transducer to change the aggregation state of the polymer depending on the redox states. Time-resolved DLS measurements of the ABA triblock copolymer confirm the presence of a transitional network structure of micelle aggregations in the reduced state and a unimer structure in the oxidized state. This autonomous oscillation of a well-designed triblock copolymer enables dynamic biomimetic softmaterials with spatio-temporal structure.

  1. Spatio-temporal EEG power spectral patterns during a short daytime nap.

    PubMed

    Luo, Z; Honda, K; Inoué, S

    2001-06-01

    This is an approach to investigate topographic changes in electroencephalographic (EEG) spectral power during pre- and post-nap wakefulness as well as stages 1 (S1) and 2 (S2) NREM sleep in 12 subjects. Delta- and theta-band power significantly increased in the frontal and central regions during S1 and S2 with an increase in inter- and intra-hemispheric correlations. Beta-band power significantly increased in the frontal, central and parietal regions during S2 with an increase in interhemispheric correlation. In contrast, alpha-band power significantly decreased in the parietal-occipital regions during S1 and S2 with a decrease in interhemispheric correlation. Thus, daytime nap modulated spatio-temporal patterns of EEG power spectral patterns in wide scalp regions. PMID:11422838

  2. Geographic boundary analysis in spatial and spatio-temporal epidemiology: Perspective and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Jacquez, Geoffrey M.

    2010-01-01

    Geographic boundary analysis is a relatively new approach that is just beginning to be applied in spatial and spatio-temporal epidemiology to quantify spatial variation in health outcomes, predictors and correlates; generate and test epidemiologic hypotheses; to evaluate health-environment relationships; and to guide sampling design. Geographic boundaries are zones of rapid change in the value of a spatially distributed variable, and mathematically may be defined as those locations with a large second derivative of the spatial response surface. Here we introduce a pattern analysis framework based on Value, Change and Association questions, and boundary analysis is shown to fit logically into Change and Association paradigms. This article addresses fundamental questions regarding what boundary analysis can tell us in public health and epidemiology. It explains why boundaries are of interest, illustrates analysis approaches and limitations, and concludes with prospects and future research directions. PMID:21218153

  3. Effects of Spatio-Temporal Aliasing on Out-the-Window Visual Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, Barbara T.; Stone, Leland S.; Liston, Dorion B.; Hebert, Tim M.

    2014-01-01

    Designers of out-the-window visual systems face a challenge when attempting to simulate the outside world as viewed from a cockpit. Many methodologies have been developed and adopted to aid in the depiction of particular scene features, or levels of static image detail. However, because aircraft move, it is necessary to also consider the quality of the motion in the simulated visual scene. When motion is introduced in the simulated visual scene, perceptual artifacts can become apparent. A particular artifact related to image motion, spatiotemporal aliasing, will be addressed. The causes of spatio-temporal aliasing will be discussed, and current knowledge regarding the impact of these artifacts on both motion perception and simulator task performance will be reviewed. Methods of reducing the impact of this artifact are also addressed

  4. Spatio-temporal registration of cardiac perfusion MRI exams using high-dimensional mutual information.

    PubMed

    Hamrouni, Sameh; Rougon, Nicolas; Preteux, Francoise

    2010-01-01

    Compensating for cardio-thoracic motion artifacts in contrast-enhanced cardiac perfusion MRI (p-MRI) sequences is a key issue for the quantitative assessment of myocardial iscæmia. The classical paradigm consists of registering each sequence frame on some reference using an intensity-based matching criterion. In this paper, we present a novel unsupervised method for the groupwise registration of cardiac p-MRI exams based on mutual information between high-dimensional feature distributions. Specifically, local contrast enhancement curves are used as a dense set of spatio-temporal features, and statistically matched to a target feature distribution derived from a registered reference template. Using consistent kth nearest neighbors entropy estimators further enables the variational optimization of the model over finite- and infinite-dimensional transform spaces. Experiments on simulated and natural datasets demonstrate its accuracy and relevance for the reliable assessment of regional perfusion. PMID:21096947

  5. Characterization of spatio-temporal epidural event-related potentials for mouse models of psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Pinto-Duarte, António; Margarita Behrens, M.; Zhou, Xianjin; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2015-01-01

    Distinctive features in sensory event-related potentials (ERPs) are endophenotypic biomarkers of psychiatric disorders, widely studied using electroencephalographic (EEG) methods in humans and model animals. Despite the popularity and unique significance of the mouse as a model species in basic research, existing EEG methods applicable to mice are far less powerful than those available for humans and large animals. We developed a new method for multi-channel epidural ERP characterization in behaving mice with high precision, reliability and convenience and report an application to time-domain ERP feature characterization of the Sp4 hypomorphic mouse model for schizophrenia. Compared to previous methods, our spatio-temporal ERP measurement robustly improved the resolving power of key signatures characteristic of the disease model. The high performance and low cost of this technique makes it suitable for high-throughput behavioral and pharmacological studies. PMID:26459883

  6. Spatio-Temporal Structuring of Brain Activity - Description of Interictal EEG in Paediatric Frontal Lobe Epilepsy

    E-print Network

    Bunk, W; Kluger, G; Springer, S

    2009-01-01

    A method for the quantitative assessment of spatio-temporal structuring of brain activity is presented. This approach is employed in a longitudinal case study of a child with frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE) and tested against an age-matched control group. Several correlation measures that are sensitive to linear and/or non-linear relations in multichannel scalp EEG are combined with an hierarchical cluster algorithm. Beside a quantitative description of the overall degree of synchronization the spatial relations are investigated by means of the cluster characteristics. The chosen information measures not only demonstrate their suitability in the characterization of the ictal and interictal phases but they also follow the course of delayed recovery of the psychiatric symptomatology during successful medication. The results based on this single case study suggest testing this approach for quantitative control of therapy in an extended clinical trial.

  7. Multiblock copolymers exhibiting spatio-temporal structure with autonomous viscosity oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Onoda, Michika; Ueki, Takeshi; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro; Yoshida, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    Here we report an ABA triblock copolymer that can express microscopic autonomous formation and break-up of aggregates under constant condition to generate macroscopic viscoelastic self-oscillation of the solution. The ABA triblock copolymer is designed to have hydrophilic B segment and self-oscillating A segment at the both sides by RAFT copolymerization. In the A segment, a metal catalyst of chemical oscillatory reaction, i.e., the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction, is introduced as a chemomechanical transducer to change the aggregation state of the polymer depending on the redox states. Time-resolved DLS measurements of the ABA triblock copolymer confirm the presence of a transitional network structure of micelle aggregations in the reduced state and a unimer structure in the oxidized state. This autonomous oscillation of a well-designed triblock copolymer enables dynamic biomimetic softmaterials with spatio-temporal structure. PMID:26511660

  8. Spatio-temporal dynamics in fMRI recordings revealed with complex independent component analysis

    PubMed Central

    Anemüller, Jörn; Duann, Jeng-Ren; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Makeig, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data is commonly carried out under the assumption that each source may be represented as a spatially fixed pattern of activation, which leads to the instantaneous mixing model. To allow modeling patterns of spatio-temporal dynamics, in particular, the flow of oxygenated blood, we have developed a convolutive ICA approach: spatial complex ICA applied to frequency-domain fMRI data. In several frequency-bands, we identify components pertaining to activity in primary visual cortex (V1) and blood supply vessels. One such component, obtained in the 0.10 Hz band, is analyzed in detail and found to likely reflect flow of oxygenated blood in V1. PMID:20689619

  9. Spatio-temporal dynamics in fMRI recordings revealed with complex independent component analysis.

    PubMed

    Anemüller, Jörn; Duann, Jeng-Ren; Sejnowski, Terrence J; Makeig, Scott

    2006-08-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data is commonly carried out under the assumption that each source may be represented as a spatially fixed pattern of activation, which leads to the instantaneous mixing model. To allow modeling patterns of spatio-temporal dynamics, in particular, the flow of oxygenated blood, we have developed a convolutive ICA approach: spatial complex ICA applied to frequency-domain fMRI data. In several frequency-bands, we identify components pertaining to activity in primary visual cortex (V1) and blood supply vessels. One such component, obtained in the 0.10 Hz band, is analyzed in detail and found to likely reflect flow of oxygenated blood in V1. PMID:20689619

  10. Measures of spatio-temporal accuracy for time series land cover data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsumida, Narumasa; Comber, Alexis J.

    2015-09-01

    Remote sensing is a useful tool for monitoring changes in land cover over time. The accuracy of such time-series analyses has hitherto only been assessed using confusion matrices. The matrix allows global measures of user, producer and overall accuracies to be generated, but lacks consideration of any spatial aspects of accuracy. It is well known that land cover errors are typically spatially auto-correlated and can have a distinct spatial distribution. As yet little work has considered the temporal dimension and investigated the persistence or errors in both geographic and temporal dimensions. Spatio-temporal errors can have a profound impact on both change detection and on environmental monitoring and modelling activities using land cover data. This study investigated methods for describing the spatio-temporal characteristics of classification accuracy. Annual thematic maps were created using a random forest classification of MODIS data over the Jakarta metropolitan areas for the period of 2001-2013. A logistic geographically weighted model was used to estimate annual spatial measures of user, producer and overall accuracies. A principal component analysis was then used to extract summaries of the multi-temporal accuracy. The results showed how the spatial distribution of user and producer accuracy varied over space and time, and overall spatial variance was confirmed by the principal component analysis. The results indicated that areas of homogeneous land cover were mapped with relatively high accuracy and low variability, and areas of mixed land cover with the opposite characteristics. A multi-temporal spatial approach to accuracy is shown to provide more informative measures of accuracy, allowing map producers and users to evaluate time series thematic maps more comprehensively than a standard confusion matrix approach. The need to identify suitable properties for a temporal kernel are discussed.

  11. Spatio-Temporal Simulation of First Pass Drug Perfusion in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Schwen, Lars Ole; Krauss, Markus; Niederalt, Christoph; Gremse, Felix; Kiessling, Fabian; Schenk, Andrea; Preusser, Tobias; Kuepfer, Lars

    2014-01-01

    The liver is the central organ for detoxification of xenobiotics in the body. In pharmacokinetic modeling, hepatic metabolization capacity is typically quantified as hepatic clearance computed as degradation in well-stirred compartments. This is an accurate mechanistic description once a quasi-equilibrium between blood and surrounding tissue is established. However, this model structure cannot be used to simulate spatio-temporal distribution during the first instants after drug injection. In this paper, we introduce a new spatially resolved model to simulate first pass perfusion of compounds within the naive liver. The model is based on vascular structures obtained from computed tomography as well as physiologically based mass transfer descriptions obtained from pharmacokinetic modeling. The physiological architecture of hepatic tissue in our model is governed by both vascular geometry and the composition of the connecting hepatic tissue. In particular, we here consider locally distributed mass flow in liver tissue instead of considering well-stirred compartments. Experimentally, the model structure corresponds to an isolated perfused liver and provides an ideal platform to address first pass effects and questions of hepatic heterogeneity. The model was evaluated for three exemplary compounds covering key aspects of perfusion, distribution and metabolization within the liver. As pathophysiological states we considered the influence of steatosis and carbon tetrachloride-induced liver necrosis on total hepatic distribution and metabolic capacity. Notably, we found that our computational predictions are in qualitative agreement with previously published experimental data. The simulation results provide an unprecedented level of detail in compound concentration profiles during first pass perfusion, both spatio-temporally in liver tissue itself and temporally in the outflowing blood. We expect our model to be the foundation of further spatially resolved models of the liver in the future. PMID:24625393

  12. Spatio-Temporal Variability of Aquatic Vegetation in Taihu Lake over the Past 30 Years.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dehua; Lv, Meiting; Jiang, Hao; Cai, Ying; Xu, Delin; An, Shuqing

    2013-01-01

    It is often difficult to track the spatio-temporal variability of vegetation distribution in lakes because of the technological limitations associated with mapping using traditional field surveys as well as the lack of a unified field survey protocol. Using a series of Landsat remote sensing images (i.e. MSS, TM and ETM+), we mapped the composition and distribution area of emergent, floating-leaf and submerged macrophytes in Taihu Lake, China, at approximate five-year intervals over the past 30 years in order to quantify the spatio-temporal dynamics of the aquatic vegetation. Our results indicated that the total area of aquatic vegetation increased from 187.5 km(2) in 1981 to 485.0 km(2) in 2005 and then suddenly decreased to 341.3 km(2) in 2010. Similarly, submerged vegetation increased from 127.0 km(2) in 1981 to 366.5 km(2) in 2005, and then decreased to 163.3 km(2). Floating-leaf vegetation increased continuously through the study period in both area occupied (12.9 km(2) in 1981 to 146.2 km(2) in 2010) and percentage of the total vegetation (6.88% in 1981 to 42.8% in 2010). In terms of spatial distribution, the aquatic vegetation in Taihu Lake has spread gradually from the East Bay to the surrounding areas. The proportion of vegetation in the East Bay relative to that in the entire lake has decreased continuously from 62.3% in 1981, to 31.1% in 2005 and then to 21.8% in 2010. Our findings have suggested that drastic changes have taken place over the past 30 years in the spatial pattern of aquatic vegetation as well as both its relative composition and the amount of area it occupies. PMID:23823189

  13. Elucidating the spatio-temporal dynamics of an emerging wildlife pathogen using approximate Bayesian computation.

    PubMed

    Rey, Olivier; Fourtune, Lisa; Paz-Vinas, Ivan; Loot, Géraldine; Veyssière, Charlotte; Roche, Benjamin; Blanchet, Simon

    2015-11-01

    Emerging pathogens constitute a severe threat for human health and biodiversity. Determining the status (native or non-native) of emerging pathogens, and tracing back their spatio-temporal dynamics, is crucial to understand the eco-evolutionary factors promoting their emergence, to control their spread and mitigate their impacts. However, tracing back the spatio-temporal dynamics of emerging wildlife pathogens is challenging because (i) they are often neglected until they become sufficiently abundant and pose socio-economical concerns and (ii) their geographical range is often little known. Here, we combined classical population genetics tools and approximate Bayesian computation (i.e. ABC) to retrace the dynamics of Tracheliastes polycolpus, a poorly documented pathogenic ectoparasite emerging in Western Europe that threatens several freshwater fish species. Our results strongly suggest that populations of T. polycolpus in France emerged from individuals originating from a unique genetic pool that were most likely introduced in the 1920s in central France. From this initial population, three waves of colonization occurred into peripheral watersheds within the next two decades. We further demonstrated that populations remained at low densities, and hence undetectable, during 10 years before a major demographic expansion occurred, and before its official detection in France. These findings corroborate and expand the few historical records available for this emerging pathogen. More generally, our study demonstrates how ABC can be used to determine the status, reconstruct the colonization history and infer key evolutionary parameters of emerging wildlife pathogens with low data availability, and for which samples from the putative native area are inaccessible. PMID:26416083

  14. Spatio-temporal analysis of SAR based time series for slope instability characterization: the Corvara in Badia landslide (Dolomites, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulas, M.; Petitta, M.; Brazanti, M.; Benedetti, E.; Corsini, A.; Iasio, C.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the influence of different forcing factors acting on instability phases of a slow alpine earthslide-earthflow, by means of the characteristics of decomposed deformations signals derived by displacement rates measured in its different sectors. In this work we analyze a slow landslide located ESE from Corvara in Badia, a famous tourist area in the Dolomites (NE Italy). Road, infrastructure, ski and other recreational facilities, isolated buildings close to the town of Corvara and finally an artificial reservoir for snow production are threatened and occasionally damaged by this mass movement. It flows from 2000m s.l. to 1500m s.l. where a paleo-landslide deposit is partially covered and re-activated. In the last 10 years the Province of Bolzano carried out discontinuous GPS surveys between 5 and 1 times per year to define the landslide's level of hazard. The landslide volume is resulted to be 30Mm3, extending downslope for approx. 3km, with displacement rates between few centimeters and slightly less than 10m per year. To analyze this area we used data from active radar sensors (SAR - Synthetic Aperture Radar). The SAR-based dataset consists in high resolution X-band SAR data from the Cosmo SkyMed (CSK) mission acquired every 8 days from August 2010 to September 2011. Part of the 38 CSK scenes contain the back-scattering signal from 17 artificial reflectors (AR) installed along the AOI and partially on existing GPS benchmarks for data validation and integration. The ARs back scattering signal has been elaborated in order to track their displacement from August 2010 to September 2011, in the lower zone of the landslide, as well as from March 2011 to September 2011 in the higher part, excluding the period when the snow was covering the surface. The signals have been analyzed with Fourier and wavelet methods to identify the different frequencies and nature of the components. T and Mann-Kendall tests have been used to assess the presence of trends. Fits with exponential functions of the de-trended and de-seasonalized signal have been performed to identify the presence of dissipating deformations. We observed that the signal of velocity and acceleration is characterized by the coexistence of different factors: first, periodic signals associated to seasonal and gravitational kinematic behavior; second, decay effects due to instability events. Moreover, using different points is possible to observe the signal propagation both in time and space. This analysis allow us to determine the spatio-temporal scale of different forcing events and their effect on the total landslide area. Finally, this study represent a new approach for identify the spatio-temporal nature of different factors in the evolution of the landslide for setting-up a system of conscious prediction of maintenance tasks of the exposed structures. The use of the SAR data demonstrated to be an innovative tool for high temporal resolution surveys with a big amount of points that in comparison with GPS surveys results to be economically convenient in wide AOI.

  15. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Exploited Groundfish Species Assemblages Faced to Environmental and Fishing Forcings: Insights from the Mauritanian Exclusive Economic Zone

    PubMed Central

    Kidé, Saïkou Oumar; Manté, Claude; Dubroca, Laurent; Demarcq, Hervé; Mérigot, Bastien

    2015-01-01

    Environmental changes and human activities can have strong impacts on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. This study investigates how, from a quantitative point of view, simultaneously both environmental and anthropogenic factors affect species composition and abundance of exploited groundfish assemblages (i.e. target and non-target species) at large spatio-temporal scales. We aim to investigate (1) the spatial and annual stability of groundfish assemblages, (2) relationships between these assemblages and structuring factors in order to better explain the dynamic of the assemblages’ structure. The Mauritanian Exclusive Economic Zone (MEEZ) is of particular interest as it embeds a productive ecosystem due to upwelling, producing abundant and diverse resources which constitute an attractive socio-economic development. We applied the multi-variate and multi-table STATICO method on a data set consisting of 854 hauls collected during 14-years (1997–2010) from scientific trawl surveys (species abundance), logbooks of industrial fishery (fishing effort), sea surface temperature and chlorophyll a concentration as environmental variables. Our results showed that abiotic factors drove four main persistent fish assemblages. Overall, chlorophyll a concentration and sea surface temperature mainly influenced the structure of assemblages of coastal soft bottoms and those of the offshore near rocky bottoms where upwellings held. While highest levels of fishing effort were located in the northern permanent upwelling zone, effects of this variable on species composition and abundances of assemblages were relatively low, even if not negligible in some years and areas. The temporal trajectories between environmental and fishing conditions and assemblages did not match for all the entire time series analyzed in the MEEZ, but interestingly for some specific years and areas. The quantitative approach used in this work may provide to stakeholders, scientists and fishers a useful assessment for the spatio-temporal dynamics of exploited assemblages under stable or changing conditions in fishing and environment. PMID:26505198

  16. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Exploited Groundfish Species Assemblages Faced to Environmental and Fishing Forcings: Insights from the Mauritanian Exclusive Economic Zone.

    PubMed

    Kidé, Saïkou Oumar; Manté, Claude; Dubroca, Laurent; Demarcq, Hervé; Mérigot, Bastien

    2015-01-01

    Environmental changes and human activities can have strong impacts on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. This study investigates how, from a quantitative point of view, simultaneously both environmental and anthropogenic factors affect species composition and abundance of exploited groundfish assemblages (i.e. target and non-target species) at large spatio-temporal scales. We aim to investigate (1) the spatial and annual stability of groundfish assemblages, (2) relationships between these assemblages and structuring factors in order to better explain the dynamic of the assemblages' structure. The Mauritanian Exclusive Economic Zone (MEEZ) is of particular interest as it embeds a productive ecosystem due to upwelling, producing abundant and diverse resources which constitute an attractive socio-economic development. We applied the multi-variate and multi-table STATICO method on a data set consisting of 854 hauls collected during 14-years (1997-2010) from scientific trawl surveys (species abundance), logbooks of industrial fishery (fishing effort), sea surface temperature and chlorophyll a concentration as environmental variables. Our results showed that abiotic factors drove four main persistent fish assemblages. Overall, chlorophyll a concentration and sea surface temperature mainly influenced the structure of assemblages of coastal soft bottoms and those of the offshore near rocky bottoms where upwellings held. While highest levels of fishing effort were located in the northern permanent upwelling zone, effects of this variable on species composition and abundances of assemblages were relatively low, even if not negligible in some years and areas. The temporal trajectories between environmental and fishing conditions and assemblages did not match for all the entire time series analyzed in the MEEZ, but interestingly for some specific years and areas. The quantitative approach used in this work may provide to stakeholders, scientists and fishers a useful assessment for the spatio-temporal dynamics of exploited assemblages under stable or changing conditions in fishing and environment. PMID:26505198

  17. DynaPop-X: A population dynamics model applied to spatio-temporal exposure assessment - Implementation aspects from the CRISMA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrecht, Christoph; Steinnocher, Klaus; Humer, Heinrich; Huber, Hermann

    2014-05-01

    In the context of proactive disaster risk as well as immediate situational crisis management knowledge of locational social aspects in terms of spatio-temporal population distribution dynamics is considered among the most important factors for disaster impact minimization (Aubrecht et al., 2013a). This applies to both the pre-event stage for designing appropriate preparedness measures and to acute crisis situations when an event chain actually unfolds for efficient situation-aware response. The presented DynaPop population dynamics model is developed at the interface of those interlinked crisis stages and aims at providing basic input for social impact evaluation and decision support in crisis management. The model provides the starting point for assessing population exposure dynamics - thus here labeled as DynaPop-X - which can either be applied in a sense of illustrating the changing locations and numbers of affected people at different stages during an event or as ex-ante estimations of probable and maximum expected clusters of affected population (Aubrecht et al., 2013b; Freire & Aubrecht, 2012). DynaPop is implemented via a gridded spatial disaggregation approach and integrates previous efforts on spatio-temporal modeling that account for various aspects of population dynamics such as human mobility and activity patterns that are particularly relevant in picturing the highly dynamic daytime situation (Ahola et al., 2007; Bhaduri, 2008; Cockings et al., 2010). We will present ongoing developments particularly focusing on the implementation logic of the model using the emikat software tool, a data management system initially designed for inventorying and analysis of spatially resolved regional air pollutant emission scenarios. This study was performed in the framework of the EU CRISMA project. CRISMA is funded from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme FP7/2007-2013 under grant agreement no. 284552. REFERENCES Ahola, T., Virrantaus, K., Krisp, J.K., Hunter, G.J. (2007) A spatio-temporal population model to support risk assessment and damage analysis for decision-making. International Journal of Geographical Information Science, 21(8), 935-953. Aubrecht, C., Fuchs, S., Neuhold, C. (2013a) Spatio-temporal aspects and dimensions in integrated disaster risk management. Natural Hazards, 68(3), 1205-1216. Aubrecht, C., Özceylan, D., Steinnocher, K., Freire, S. (2013b) Multi-level geospatial modeling of human exposure patterns and vulnerability indicators. Natural Hazards, 68(1), 147-163. Bhaduri, B. (2008) Population distribution during the day. In S. Shekhar & X. Hui, eds., Encyclopedia of GIS. Springer US, 880-885. Cockings, S., Martin, D. & Leung, S. (2010) Population 24/7: building space-time specific population surface models. In M. Haklay, J. Morley, & H. Rahemtulla, eds., Proceedings of the GIS Research UK 18th Annual conference. GISRUK 2010. London, UK, 41-47. Freire, S., Aubrecht, C. (2012) Integrating population dynamics into mapping human exposure to seismic hazard. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, 12(11), 3533-3543.

  18. Individual and spatio-temporal variations in the home range behaviour of a long-lived, territorial species.

    PubMed

    Campioni, Letizia; Delgado, María del Mar; Lourenço, Rui; Bastianelli, Giulia; Fernández, Nestor; Penteriani, Vincenzo

    2013-06-01

    Despite the fact that investigations of home range behaviour have exponentially evolved on theoretical, analytical and technological grounds, the factors that shape animal home range behaviour still represent an unsolved question and a challenging field of research. However, home range studies have recently begun to be approached under a new integrated conceptual framework, considering home range behaviour as the result of the simultaneous influences of temporal, spatial and individual-level processes, with potential consequences at the population level. Following an integrated approach, we studied the influence of both external and internal factors on variations in the home range behaviour of 34 radiotagged eagle owl (Bubo bubo) breeders. Home range behaviour was characterised through complementary analysis of space use, movement patterns and rhythms of activity at multiple spatio-temporal scales. The effects of the different phases of the biological cycle became considerably evident at the level of movement patterns, with males travelling longer distances than females during incubation and nestling periods. Both external (i.e. habitat structure and composition) and internal (i.e. sex and health state) factors explained a substantial amount of the variation in home range behaviour. At the broader temporal scale, home range and core area size were negatively correlated with landscape heterogeneity. Males showed (1) smaller home range and core area sizes, (2) more complex home range internal structure and (3) higher rates of movement. The better the physiological condition of the individuals, the simpler the internal home range structure. Finally, inter- and intra-individual effects contributed to shaping space use and movement patterns during the biological cycle. Because of the plurality of behavioural and ecological processes simultaneously involved in home range behaviour, we claim that an integrative approach is required for adequate investigation of its temporal and spatial variation. PMID:23086505

  19. Spatio-temporal expression and functional involvement of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 in diabetic mechanical allodynia in rats.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yuan-Yuan; Xu, Hao; Wu, Huang-Hui; Qi, Jian; Shi, Juan; Li, Yun-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathic pain (DNP) is one of the most common clinical manifestations of diabetes mellitus (DM), which is characterized by prominent mechanical allodynia (DMA). However, the molecular mechanism underlying it has not fully been elucidated. In this study, we examined the spatio-temporal expression of a major nociceptive channel protein transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and analyzed its functional involvement by intrathecal (i.t.) application of TRPV1 antagonists in streptozocin (STZ)-induced DMA rat models. Western blot and immunofluorescent staining results showed that TRPV1 protein level was significantly increased in the soma of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons on 14 days after STZ treatment (DMA 14 d), whereas those in spinal cord and skin (mainly from the central and peripheral processes of DRG neurons) had already been enhanced on DMA 7 d to peak on DMA 14 d. qRT-PCR experiments confirmed that TRPV1 mRNA level was significantly up-regulated in the DRG on DMA 7 d, indicating a preceding translation of TRPV1 protein in the soma but preferential distribution of this protein to the processes under the DMA conditions. Cell counting assay based on double immunostaining suggested that increased TRPV1-immunoreactive neurons were likely to be small-sized and CGRP-ergic. Finally, single or multiple intrathecal applications of non-specific or specific TRPV1 antagonists, ruthenium red and capsazepine, at varying doses, effectively alleviated DMA, although the effect of the former was more prominent and long-lasting. These results collectively indicate that TRPV1 expression dynamically changes during the development of DMA and this protein may play important roles in mechanical nociception in DRG neurons, presumably through facilitating the release of CGRP. PMID:25020137

  20. NeuCube: a spiking neural network architecture for mapping, learning and understanding of spatio-temporal brain data.

    PubMed

    Kasabov, Nikola K

    2014-04-01

    The brain functions as a spatio-temporal information processing machine. Spatio- and spectro-temporal brain data (STBD) are the most commonly collected data for measuring brain response to external stimuli. An enormous amount of such data has been already collected, including brain structural and functional data under different conditions, molecular and genetic data, in an attempt to make a progress in medicine, health, cognitive science, engineering, education, neuro-economics, Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI), and games. Yet, there is no unifying computational framework to deal with all these types of data in order to better understand this data and the processes that generated it. Standard machine learning techniques only partially succeeded and they were not designed in the first instance to deal with such complex data. Therefore, there is a need for a new paradigm to deal with STBD. This paper reviews some methods of spiking neural networks (SNN) and argues that SNN are suitable for the creation of a unifying computational framework for learning and understanding of various STBD, such as EEG, fMRI, genetic, DTI, MEG, and NIRS, in their integration and interaction. One of the reasons is that SNN use the same computational principle that generates STBD, namely spiking information processing. This paper introduces a new SNN architecture, called NeuCube, for the creation of concrete models to map, learn and understand STBD. A NeuCube model is based on a 3D evolving SNN that is an approximate map of structural and functional areas of interest of the brain related to the modeling STBD. Gene information is included optionally in the form of gene regulatory networks (GRN) if this is relevant to the problem and the data. A NeuCube model learns from STBD and creates connections between clusters of neurons that manifest chains (trajectories) of neuronal activity. Once learning is applied, a NeuCube model can reproduce these trajectories, even if only part of the input STBD or the stimuli data is presented, thus acting as an associative memory. The NeuCube framework can be used not only to discover functional pathways from data, but also as a predictive system of brain activities, to predict and possibly, prevent certain events. Analysis of the internal structure of a model after training can reveal important spatio-temporal relationships 'hidden' in the data. NeuCube will allow the integration in one model of various brain data, information and knowledge, related to a single subject (personalized modeling) or to a population of subjects. The use of NeuCube for classification of STBD is illustrated in a case study problem of EEG data. NeuCube models result in a better accuracy of STBD classification than standard machine learning techniques. They are robust to noise (so typical in brain data) and facilitate a better interpretation of the results and understanding of the STBD and the brain conditions under which data was collected. Future directions for the use of SNN for STBD are discussed. PMID:24508754

  1. Interactions between Inhibitory Interneurons and Excitatory Associational Circuitry in Determining Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Hippocampal Dentate Granule Cells: A Large-Scale Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Phillip J.; Yu, Gene J.; Song, Dong; Berger, Theodore W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on findings from a million-cell granule cell model of the rat dentate gyrus that was used to explore the contributions of local interneuronal and associational circuits to network-level activity. The model contains experimentally derived morphological parameters for granule cells, which each contain approximately 200 compartments, and biophysical parameters for granule cells, basket cells, and mossy cells that were based both on electrophysiological data and previously published models. Synaptic input to cells in the model consisted of glutamatergic AMPA-like EPSPs and GABAergic-like IPSPs from excitatory and inhibitory neurons, respectively. The main source of input to the model was from layer II entorhinal cortical neurons. Network connectivity was constrained by the topography of the system, and was derived from axonal transport studies, which provided details about the spatial spread of axonal terminal fields, as well as how subregions of the medial and lateral entorhinal cortices project to subregions of the dentate gyrus. Results of this study show that strong feedback inhibition from the basket cell population can cause high-frequency rhythmicity in granule cells, while the strength of feedforward inhibition serves to scale the total amount of granule cell activity. Results furthermore show that the topography of local interneuronal circuits can have just as strong an impact on the development of spatio-temporal clusters in the granule cell population as the perforant path topography does, both sharpening existing clusters and introducing new ones with a greater spatial extent. Finally, results show that the interactions between the inhibitory and associational loops can cause high frequency oscillations that are modulated by a low-frequency oscillatory signal. These results serve to further illustrate the importance of topographical constraints on a global signal processing feature of a neural network, while also illustrating how rich spatio-temporal and oscillatory dynamics can evolve from a relatively small number of interacting local circuits. PMID:26635545

  2. Anticipating the spatio-temporal response of plant diversity and vegetation structure to climate and land use change in a protected area

    PubMed Central

    Boulangeat, Isabelle; Georges, Damien; Dentant, Cédric; Bonet, Richard; Van Es, Jérémie; Abdulhak, Sylvain; Zimmermann, Niklaus E.; Thuiller, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    Vegetation is a key driver of ecosystem functioning (e.g. productivity and stability) and of the maintenance of biodiversity (e.g. creating habitats for other species groups). While vegetation sensitivity to climate change has been widely investgated, its spatio-temporally response to the dual efects of land management and climate change has been ignored at landscape scale. Here we use a dynamic vegetation model called FATE-HD, which describes the dominant vegetation dynamics and associated functional diversity, in order to anticipate vegetation response to climate and land-use changes in both short and long-term perspectives. Using three contrasted management scenarios for the Ecrins National Park (French Alps) developed in collaboration with the park managers, and one regional climate change scenario, we tracked the dynamics of vegetation structure (forest expansion) and functional diversity over 100 years of climate change and a further 400 additional years of stabilization. As expected, we observed a slow upward shift in forest cover distribution, which appears to be severely impacted by pasture management (i.e. maintenance or abandonment). The tme lag before observing changes in vegetation cover was the result of demographic and seed dispersal processes. However, plant diversity response to environmental changes was rapid. Afer land abandonment, local diversity increased and spatial turnover was reduced, whereas local diversity decreased following land use intensification. Interestingly, in the long term, as both climate and management scenarios interacted, the regional diversity declined. Our innovative spatio-temporally explicit framework demonstrates that the vegetation may have contrasting responses to changes in the short and the long term. Moreover, climate and land-abandonment interact extensively leading to a decrease in both regional diversity and turnover in the long term. Based on our simulations we therefore suggest a continuing moderate intensity pasturing to maintain high levels of plant diversity in this system. PMID:25722538

  3. Spatio-temporal Trends in Hydrology at the Turkey Lakes Watershed: Insights from 35 Years of Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, K. L.; Beall, F.; Semkin, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Turkey Lake Watershed (TLW) is located on the Precambrian Shield in central Ontario, Canada and has been the site of multi-discipline ecosystem research since 1979. The 10.5 km2 watershed is within the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence forest region with an uneven-aged tolerant hardwood forest having 90% of the basal area as mature to over-mature sugar maple. Podzolic soils and small forested wetlands have developed in the complex topography of the watershed where variable glacial till deposits occur over predominantly metamorphic silicate bedrock. Within the watershed, 13 first-order catchments that vary in size and topography have been monitored to elucidate spatio-temporal processes controlling run-off patterns. Over the 35 year period mean annual air temperatures at the TLW have increased at a rate of 0.75 oC per decade, with large inter-annual climate variability due to the influence of regional climate oscillations. As a result of warmer climate there has been a decline in annual export of water, as well as, changes in the seasonal distribution of runoff, Snowmelt has been occurring earlier and the number of zero-flow days are increasing. Declines in runoff were greater for catchments with steep slopes and less for those with shallow slopes and wetland areas. The large year to year variability in weather conditions made detecting the impacts on runoff from different harvesting treatments in 1997 difficult. These changes and fluctuations in water yields induced by fluctuating and changing climate have been shown to have had large consequences on element (carbon, nitrogen and sulphur) cycling within and export from catchments.

  4. Optimizing Spatio-Temporal Sampling Designs of Synchronous, Static, or Clustered Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helle, Kristina; Pebesma, Edzer

    2010-05-01

    When sampling spatio-temporal random variables, the cost of a measurement may differ according to the setup of the whole sampling design: static measurements, i.e. repeated measurements at the same location, synchronous measurements or clustered measurements may be cheaper per measurement than completely individual sampling. Such "grouped" measurements may however not be as good as individually chosen ones because of redundancy. Often, the overall cost rather than the total number of measurements is fixed. A sampling design with grouped measurements may allow for a larger number of measurements thus outweighing the drawback of redundancy. The focus of this paper is to include the tradeoff between the number of measurements and the freedom of their location in sampling design optimisation. For simple cases, optimal sampling designs may be fully determined. To predict e.g. the mean over a spatio-temporal field having known covariance, the optimal sampling design often is a grid with density determined by the sampling costs [1, Ch. 15]. For arbitrary objective functions sampling designs can be optimised relocating single measurements, e.g. by Spatial Simulated Annealing [2]. However, this does not allow to take advantage of lower costs when using grouped measurements. We introduce a heuristic that optimises an arbitrary objective function of sampling designs, including static, synchronous, or clustered measurements, to obtain better results at a given sampling budget. Given the cost for a measurement, either within a group or individually, the algorithm first computes affordable sampling design configurations. The number of individual measurements as well as kind and number of grouped measurements are determined. Random locations and dates are assigned to the measurements. Spatial Simulated Annealing is used on each of these initial sampling designs (in parallel) to improve them. In grouped measurements either the whole group is moved or single measurements within the group, e.g. static measurements may be moved to another location or the sampling times may be rearranged. After several optimisation steps, the objective functions of the sampling designs are compared. Only for the best ones optimisation is pursued. After several iterations the sampling designs are selected again. Thus more and more of the low performing sampling designs are deleted and computational effort is concentrated on the most promising candidates. The use case is optimisation of a monitoring sampling design for a river. We use a flow model to simulate the spread of a pollutant that enters the system at different locations with known, location-dependent probabilities and at random times. The objective function to be minimised is the amount of pollution that is not detected. Keywords: spatio-temporal sampling design, static sample, synchronous sample, spatial simulated annealing, cost function References [1] Jaap de Gruijter, Dick Brus, Marc Bierkens, and Martin Knotters. Sampling for Natural Ressource Monitoring. Springer, 2006. [2] J. W. van Groenigen. Spatial simulated annealing for optimizing sampling, In: GeoENV I Geostatistics for environmental applications, pages 351 - 361, 1997.

  5. The Spatio-temporal Statistical Structure and Ergodic Behaviour of Scalar Turbulence Within a Rod Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghannam, Khaled; Poggi, Davide; Porporato, Amilcare; Katul, Gabriel G.

    2015-12-01

    Connections between the spatial and temporal statistics of turbulent flow, and their possible convergence to ensemble statistics as assumed by the ergodic hypothesis, are explored for passive scalars within a rod canopy. While complete ergodicity is not expected to apply over all the spatial domain within such heterogeneous flows, the fact that canopy turbulence exhibits self-similar characteristics at a given depth within the canopy encourages a discussion on necessary conditions for an `operational' ergodicity framework. Flows between roughness elements such as within canopies exhibit features that distinguish them from their well-studied classical boundary-layer counterparts. These differences are commonly attributed to short-circuiting of the energy cascade and the prevalence of intermittent von Kármán vortex streets in the deeper layers of the canopy. Using laser-induced fluorescence measurements at two different depths within a rod canopy situated in a large flume, the spatio-temporal statistical properties and concomitant necessary conditions for ergodicity of passive scalar turbulence statistics are evaluated. First, the integral time and length scales are analyzed and their corresponding maximum values are used to guide the construction of an ensemble of independent realizations from repeated spatio-temporal concentration measurements. As a statistical analysis for an operational ergodicity check, a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test on the distributions of temporal and spatial concentration series against the ensemble was conducted. The outcome of this test reveals that ergodicity is reasonably valid over the entire domain except close to the rod elements where wake-induced inhomogeneities and damped turbulence prevail. The spatial concentration statistics within a grid-cell (square domain formed by four corner rods) appear to be less ergodic than their temporal counterparts, which is not surprising given the periodicity and persistence of von Kármán vortices in the flow field. Also, a local advection velocity of dominant eddies is inferred using lagged cross-correlations of scalar concentration time series at different spatial locations. The computed probability density function of this advection velocity agrees well with the laser Doppler anemometry measurements for the same rod canopy.

  6. Spatio-temporal modeling with GIS and remote sensing for schistosomiasis control in Sichuan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bing

    Schistosomiasis is a water-borne parasitic disease endemic in tropical and subtropical areas. Its transmission requires certain kind of snail as the intermediate host. Some efforts have been made to mapping snail habitats with remote sensing and schistosomiasis transmission modeling. However, the modeling is limited to isolated residential groups and does not include spatial interaction among those groups. Remotely sensed data are only used in snail habitat classification, not in estimation of snail abundance that is an important parameter in schistosomiasis transmission modeling. This research overcomes the above two problems using innovative geographic information system (GIS) and remote sensing technology. A mountainous environment near Xichang, China, is chosen as the test site. Environmental and epidemiological data are stored in a GIS to support modeling. Snail abundance is estimated from land-cover and land-use fractions derived from high spatial resolution IKONOS satellite data. Spatial interaction is determined in consideration of neighborhoods, group areas, relative slopes among groups, and natural barriers. Land-cover and land-use information extracted from 4 m high resolution IKONOS data is used as reference in scaling up to the regional level. The scale-up is done with coarser resolution satellite data including Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM), EO-1 Advanced Land Imager (ALI) and Hyperion data all at 30 m resolution. Snail abundance is estimated by regressing snail survey data with land-cover and land-use fractions. An R2 of 0.87 is obtained between the average snail density predicted and that surveyed at the group level. With such a model, a snail density map is generated for all residential groups in the study area. A spatio-temporal model of schistosomiasis transmission is finally built to incorporate the spatial interaction caused by miracidia and cercaria migration. Comparing the model results with and without spatial interaction has revealed a number of advantages of the spatio-temporal model. Particularly, with the inclusion of spatial interaction, more effective control of schistosomiasis transmission over the whole study area can be achieved.

  7. The Spatio-temporal Statistical Structure and Ergodic Behaviour of Scalar Turbulence Within a Rod Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghannam, Khaled; Poggi, Davide; Porporato, Amilcare; Katul, Gabriel G.

    2015-09-01

    Connections between the spatial and temporal statistics of turbulent flow, and their possible convergence to ensemble statistics as assumed by the ergodic hypothesis, are explored for passive scalars within a rod canopy. While complete ergodicity is not expected to apply over all the spatial domain within such heterogeneous flows, the fact that canopy turbulence exhibits self-similar characteristics at a given depth within the canopy encourages a discussion on necessary conditions for an `operational' ergodicity framework. Flows between roughness elements such as within canopies exhibit features that distinguish them from their well-studied classical boundary-layer counterparts. These differences are commonly attributed to short-circuiting of the energy cascade and the prevalence of intermittent von Kármán vortex streets in the deeper layers of the canopy. Using laser-induced fluorescence measurements at two different depths within a rod canopy situated in a large flume, the spatio-temporal statistical properties and concomitant necessary conditions for ergodicity of passive scalar turbulence statistics are evaluated. First, the integral time and length scales are analyzed and their corresponding maximum values are used to guide the construction of an ensemble of independent realizations from repeated spatio-temporal concentration measurements. As a statistical analysis for an operational ergodicity check, a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test on the distributions of temporal and spatial concentration series against the ensemble was conducted. The outcome of this test reveals that ergodicity is reasonably valid over the entire domain except close to the rod elements where wake-induced inhomogeneities and damped turbulence prevail. The spatial concentration statistics within a grid-cell (square domain formed by four corner rods) appear to be less ergodic than their temporal counterparts, which is not surprising given the periodicity and persistence of von Kármán vortices in the flow field. Also, a local advection velocity of dominant eddies is inferred using lagged cross-correlations of scalar concentration time series at different spatial locations. The computed probability density function of this advection velocity agrees well with the laser Doppler anemometry measurements for the same rod canopy.

  8. Spatio-temporal effects of low severity grassland fire on soil colour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Paulo; Cerdà, Artemi; Bolutiene, Violeta; Pranskevicius, Mantas; Úbeda, Xavier; Jordán, Antonio; Zavala, Lorena; Mataix-Solera, Jorge

    2013-04-01

    Fire changes soil properties directly, through temperature, or indirectly with ash deposition and the temporal elimination of vegetal cover. Both influences change soil colour and soil properties. The degree of changes depends on fire severity that has important implications on soil organic matter, texture, mineralogy and hydrological properties and type of ash produced. The ash colour is different according to the temperature of combustion and burned specie and this property will have implications on soil colour. In addition, ash properties have a strong spatial variability. The aim of this work is to study the spatio-temporal effects of a low severity grassland fire on soil colour occurred in Lithuania, near Vilnius city (54° 42' N, 25° 08' E, 158 m.a.s.l.). After the fire it was designed a plot of 20x20m in a burned and unburned flat area. Soil colour was analysed immediately after the fire, and 2, 5, 7 and 9 months after the fire. In each sampling 25 soil samples were collected, carried out to the laboratory, dried at room temperature (20-24° C) and sieved with the <2mm mesh. Soil colour was observed with the Munsell colour chart and the soil chroma value (CV) was observed. Since data did not respected the Gaussian distribution a neperian logarithmic (ln) transformation was applied. Differences among time and between plots were observed with the repeated measures ANOVA test, followed by a Tukey HSD test. Differences were significant at a p<0.05. The spatial variability (SV) was assessed with the coefficient of variation using non transformed data. The results showed differences among time at a p<0.001, treatment at a p<0.01 and time x treatment at a p<0.01. This means that fire during the first 9 months changed significantly soil colour. The CV of the burned plot was lower than the control plot (darker colour), that is attributed to the deposition of charred material and charcoal. This ash produced in this fire was mainly black coloured. With the time the soil of the burned plot became lighter, due the movement of charred material and charcoal in depth through soil profile. After the fire SV was higher in the burned plot (13.27%) than in the unburned plot (7.95%). This major variability might be attributed to ash influence, since this fire did nit had direct effects on soil. Despite the reduced CV, some patches burned at higher severity, and ash was dark and light grey and this might had influences on soil colour SV. In the following measurements SV was very similar, but always slightly higher in the control plot than in the burned plot. Two months, unburned 15.52% and burned, 14.70%. Five months, unburned, 14.78% and burned 14.42%, Seven months, unburned, 15.15% and burned, 14.67%. Nine months, unburned, 18.96% and burned 17.84%. After the fire ash can be (re)distributed uncountable times. In the immediate period after the fire, finner ash produced at higher severities is easily transported by wind and can remix (Pereira et al., 2013a, Pereira et al., 2013b) and change soil colour. In this fire, vegetation recovered very fast, thus this process might occurred only in the first weeks after the fire (Pereira et al., 2013c). Since vegetation recovered fast, soil colour SV depended on carbon and charred material movement in depth soil profile. Further studies are needed on the soil colour evolution after the fire, since can be an indicator of soil properties such as temperature reached with implications in other soil properties. Acknowledgements The authors appreciated the support of the project "Litfire", Fire effects in Lithuanian soils and ecosystems (MIP-048/2011) funded by the Lithuanian Research Council, Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation for funding through the HYDFIRE project CGL2010-21670-C02-01, FUEGORED (Spanish Network of Forest Fire Effects on Soils http://grupo.us.es/fuegored/) and to Comissionat per a Universitats i Recerca del DIUE de la Generalitat de Catalunya. References Pereira, P. Cerdà, A., Úbeda, X., Mataix-Solera, J. Arcenegui, V., Zavala, L. (2013a) Mod

  9. QUANTITATIVE MODELING OF SPATIO-TEMPORAL DYNAMICS OF INFERIOR OLIVE NEURONS WITH A SIMPLE CONDUCTANCE-BASED MODEL

    PubMed Central

    KATORI, YUICHI; LANG, ERIC J.; ONIZUKA, MIHO; KAWATO, MITSUO; AIHARA, KAZUYUKI

    2011-01-01

    Inferior olive (IO) neurons project to the cerebellum and contribute to motor control. They can show intriguing spatio-temporal dynamics with rhythmic and synchronized spiking. IO neurons are connected to their neighbors via gap junctions to form an electrically coupled network, and so it is considered that this coupling contributes to the characteristic dynamics of this nucleus. Here, we demonstrate that a gap junction-coupled network composed of simple conductance-based model neurons (a simplified version of a Hodgkin–Huxley type neuron) reproduce important aspects of IO activity. The simplified phenomenological model neuron facilitated the analysis of the single cell and network properties of the IO while still quantitatively reproducing the spiking patterns of complex spike activity observed by simultaneous recording in anesthetized rats. The results imply that both intrinsic bistability of each neuron and gap junction coupling among neurons play key roles in the generation of the spatio-temporal dynamics of IO neurons. PMID:21637736

  10. The Critical Role of Golgi Cells in Regulating Spatio-Temporal Integration and Plasticity at the Cerebellum Input Stage

    PubMed Central

    D'Angelo, Egidio

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of the Golgi cell is bound to the foundation of the Neuron Doctrine. Recently, the excitable mechanisms of this inhibitory interneuron have been investigated with modern experimental and computational techniques raising renewed interest for the implications it might have for cerebellar circuit functions. Golgi cells are pacemakers with preferential response frequency and phase-reset in the theta-frequency band and can therefore impose specific temporal dynamics to granule cell responses. Moreover, through their connectivity, Golgi cells determine the spatio-temporal organization of cerebellar activity. Finally, Golgi cells, by controlling granule cell depolarization and NMDA channel unblock, regulate the induction of long-term synaptic plasticity at the mossy fiber – granule cell synapse. Thus, the Golgi cells can exert an extensive control on spatio-temporal signal organization and information storage in the granular layer playing a critical role for cerebellar computation. PMID:18982105

  11. Spreading speeds and uniqueness of traveling waves for a reaction diffusion equation with spatio-temporal delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhaoquan; Xiao, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    A class of reaction diffusion equation with spatio-temporal delays is systematically investigated. When the reaction function of this equation is nonlinear without monotonicity, it is shown that there exists a spreading speed c* > 0 for this equation such that c* is linearly determinate and coincides with the minimal wave speed of traveling waves, and that this equation admits a unique traveling wave (up to translation) with speed c >c* and no traveling wave with c

  12. Analysing Spatio-Temporal Clustering of Meningococcal Meningitis Outbreaks in Niger Reveals Opportunities for Improved Disease Control

    PubMed Central

    Paireau, Juliette; Girond, Florian; Collard, Jean-Marc; Maïnassara, Halima B.; Jusot, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    Background Meningococcal meningitis is a major health problem in the “African Meningitis Belt” where recurrent epidemics occur during the hot, dry season. In Niger, a central country belonging to the Meningitis Belt, reported meningitis cases varied between 1,000 and 13,000 from 2003 to 2009, with a case-fatality rate of 5–15%. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to gain insight in the epidemiology of meningococcal meningitis in Niger and to improve control strategies, the emergence of the epidemics and their diffusion patterns at a fine spatial scale have been investigated. A statistical analysis of the spatio-temporal distribution of confirmed meningococcal meningitis cases was performed between 2002 and 2009, based on health centre catchment areas (HCCAs) as spatial units. Anselin's local Moran's I test for spatial autocorrelation and Kulldorff's spatial scan statistic were used to identify spatial and spatio-temporal clusters of cases. Spatial clusters were detected every year and most frequently occurred within nine southern districts. Clusters most often encompassed few HCCAs within a district, without expanding to the entire district. Besides, strong intra-district heterogeneity and inter-annual variability in the spatio-temporal epidemic patterns were observed. To further investigate the benefit of using a finer spatial scale for surveillance and disease control, we compared timeliness of epidemic detection at the HCCA level versus district level and showed that a decision based on threshold estimated at the HCCA level may lead to earlier detection of outbreaks. Conclusions/Significance Our findings provide an evidence-based approach to improve control of meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa. First, they can assist public health authorities in Niger to better adjust allocation of resources (antibiotics, rapid diagnostic tests and medical staff). Then, this spatio-temporal analysis showed that surveillance at a finer spatial scale (HCCA) would be more efficient for public health response: outbreaks would be detected earlier and reactive vaccination would be better targeted. PMID:22448297

  13. Spatio-Temporal Trends and Identification of Correlated Variables with Water Quality for Drinking-Water Reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qing; Wang, Ke; Li, Jiadan; Ma, Ligang; Deng, Jinsong; Zheng, Kefeng; Zhang, Xiaobin; Sheng, Li

    2015-10-01

    It is widely accepted that characterizing the spatio-temporal trends of water quality parameters and identifying correlated variables with water quality are indispensable for the management and protection of water resources. In this study, cluster analysis was used to classify 56 typical drinking water reservoirs in Zhejiang Province into three groups representing different water quality levels, using data of four water quality parameters for the period 2006-2010. Then, the spatio-temporal trends in water quality were analyzed, assisted by geographic information systems (GIS) technology and statistical analysis. The results indicated that the water quality showed a trend of degradation from southwest to northeast, and the overall water quality level was exacerbated during the study period. Correlation analysis was used to evaluate the relationships between water quality parameters and ten independent variables grouped into four categories (land use, socio-economic factors, geographical features, and reservoir attributes). According to the correlation coefficients, land use and socio-economic indicators were identified as the most significant factors related to reservoir water quality. The results offer insights into the spatio-temporal variations of water quality parameters and factors impacting the water quality of drinking water reservoirs in Zhejiang Province, and they could assist managers in making effective strategies to better protect water resources. PMID:26492263

  14. Spatio-Temporal Trends and Identification of Correlated Variables with Water Quality for Drinking-Water Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Qing; Wang, Ke; Li, Jiadan; Ma, Ligang; Deng, Jinsong; Zheng, Kefeng; Zhang, Xiaobin; Sheng, Li

    2015-01-01

    It is widely accepted that characterizing the spatio-temporal trends of water quality parameters and identifying correlated variables with water quality are indispensable for the management and protection of water resources. In this study, cluster analysis was used to classify 56 typical drinking water reservoirs in Zhejiang Province into three groups representing different water quality levels, using data of four water quality parameters for the period 2006–2010. Then, the spatio-temporal trends in water quality were analyzed, assisted by geographic information systems (GIS) technology and statistical analysis. The results indicated that the water quality showed a trend of degradation from southwest to northeast, and the overall water quality level was exacerbated during the study period. Correlation analysis was used to evaluate the relationships between water quality parameters and ten independent variables grouped into four categories (land use, socio-economic factors, geographical features, and reservoir attributes). According to the correlation coefficients, land use and socio-economic indicators were identified as the most significant factors related to reservoir water quality. The results offer insights into the spatio-temporal variations of water quality parameters and factors impacting the water quality of drinking water reservoirs in Zhejiang Province, and they could assist managers in making effective strategies to better protect water resources. PMID:26492263

  15. Adaptive spatio-temporal filtering of disturbed ECGs: a multi-channel approach to heartbeat detection in smart clothing.

    PubMed

    Wiklund, Urban; Karlsson, Marcus; Ostlund, Nils; Berglin, Lena; Lindecrantz, Kaj; Karlsson, Stefan; Sandsjö, Leif

    2007-06-01

    Intermittent disturbances are common in ECG signals recorded with smart clothing: this is mainly because of displacement of the electrodes over the skin. We evaluated a novel adaptive method for spatio-temporal filtering for heartbeat detection in noisy multi-channel ECGs including short signal interruptions in single channels. Using multi-channel database recordings (12-channel ECGs from 10 healthy subjects), the results showed that multi-channel spatio-temporal filtering outperformed regular independent component analysis. We also recorded seven channels of ECG using a T-shirt with textile electrodes. Ten healthy subjects performed different sequences during a 10-min recording: resting, standing, flexing breast muscles, walking and pushups. Using adaptive multi-channel filtering, the sensitivity and precision was above 97% in nine subjects. Adaptive multi-channel spatio-temporal filtering can be used to detect heartbeats in ECGs with high noise levels. One application is heartbeat detection in noisy ECG recordings obtained by integrated textile electrodes in smart clothing. PMID:17440762

  16. Coexistence of productive and non-productive populations by fluctuation-driven spatio-temporal patterns.

    PubMed

    Behar, Hilla; Brenner, Naama; Louzoun, Yoram

    2014-09-01

    Cooperative interactions, their stability and evolution, provide an interesting context in which to study the interface between cellular and population levels of organization. Here we study a public goods model relevant to microorganism populations actively extracting a growth resource from their environment. Cells can display one of two phenotypes - a productive phenotype that extracts the resources at a cost, and a non-productive phenotype that only consumes the same resource. Both proliferate and are free to move by diffusion; growth rate and diffusion coefficient depend only weakly phenotype. We analyze the continuous differential equation model as well as simulate stochastically the full dynamics. We find that the two sub-populations, which cannot coexist in a well-mixed environment, develop spatio-temporal patterns that enable long-term coexistence in the shared environment. These patterns are purely fluctuation-driven, as the corresponding continuous spatial system does not display Turing instability. The average stability of coexistence patterns derives from a dynamic mechanism in which the producing sub-population equilibrates with the environmental resource and holds it close to an extinction transition of the other sub-population, causing it to constantly hover around this transition. Thus the ecological interactions support a mechanism reminiscent of self-organized criticality; power-law distributions and long-range correlations are found. The results are discussed in the context of general pattern formation and critical behavior in ecology as well as in an experimental context. PMID:25058368

  17. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Impulse Responses to Figure Motion in Optic Flow Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu-Jen; Jönsson, H. Olof; Nordström, Karin

    2015-01-01

    White noise techniques have been used widely to investigate sensory systems in both vertebrates and invertebrates. White noise stimuli are powerful in their ability to rapidly generate data that help the experimenter decipher the spatio-temporal dynamics of neural and behavioral responses. One type of white noise stimuli, maximal length shift register sequences (m-sequences), have recently become particularly popular for extracting response kernels in insect motion vision. We here use such m-sequences to extract the impulse responses to figure motion in hoverfly lobula plate tangential cells (LPTCs). Figure motion is behaviorally important and many visually guided animals orient towards salient features in the surround. We show that LPTCs respond robustly to figure motion in the receptive field. The impulse response is scaled down in amplitude when the figure size is reduced, but its time course remains unaltered. However, a low contrast stimulus generates a slower response with a significantly longer time-to-peak and half-width. Impulse responses in females have a slower time-to-peak than males, but are otherwise similar. Finally we show that the shapes of the impulse response to a figure and a widefield stimulus are very similar, suggesting that the figure response could be coded by the same input as the widefield response. PMID:25955416

  18. Quantitative measurement of intracellular transport of nanocarriers by spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, S.; Pozzi, D.; Candeloro De Sanctis, S.; Digman, M. A.; Gratton, E.; Caracciolo, G.

    2013-03-01

    Spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy (STICS) is a powerful technique for assessing the nature of particle motion in complex systems although it has been rarely used to investigate the intracellular dynamics of nanocarriers so far. Here we introduce a method for characterizing the mode of motion of nanocarriers and for quantifying their transport parameters on different length scales from single-cell to subcellular level. Using this strategy we were able to study the mechanisms responsible for the intracellular transport of DOTAP-DOPC/DNA (DOTAP: 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane; DOPC: dioleoylphosphocholine) and DC-Chol-DOPE/DNA (DC-Chol: 3?-[N-(N,N-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl] cholesterol; DOPE: dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine) lipoplexes in CHO-K1 (CHO: Chinese hamster ovary) live cells. Measurement of both diffusion coefficients and velocity vectors (magnitude and direction) averaged over regions of the cell revealed the presence of distinct modes of motion. Lipoplexes diffused slowly on the cell surface (diffusion coefficient: D ? 0.003 ?m2 s-1). In the cytosol, the lipoplexes’ motion was characterized by active transport with average velocity v ? 0.03 ?m2 s-1 and random motion. The method permitted us to generate an intracellular transport map showing several regions of concerted motion of lipoplexes.

  19. Global Spatio-temporal Patterns of Influenza in the Post-pandemic Era

    PubMed Central

    He, Daihai; Lui, Roger; Wang, Lin; Tse, Chi Kong; Yang, Lin; Stone, Lewi

    2015-01-01

    We study the global spatio-temporal patterns of influenza dynamics. This is achieved by analysing and modelling weekly laboratory confirmed cases of influenza A and B from 138 countries between January 2006 and January 2015. The data were obtained from FluNet, the surveillance network compiled by the the World Health Organization. We report a pattern of skip-and-resurgence behavior between the years 2011 and 2013 for influenza H1N1pdm, the strain responsible for the 2009 pandemic, in Europe and Eastern Asia. In particular, the expected H1N1pdm epidemic outbreak in 2011/12 failed to occur (or “skipped”) in many countries across the globe, although an outbreak occurred in the following year. We also report a pattern of well-synchronized wave of H1N1pdm in early 2011 in the Northern Hemisphere countries, and a pattern of replacement of strain H1N1pre by H1N1pdm between the 2009 and 2012 influenza seasons. Using both a statistical and a mechanistic mathematical model, and through fitting the data of 108 countries, we discuss the mechanisms that are likely to generate these events taking into account the role of multi-strain dynamics. A basic understanding of these patterns has important public health implications and scientific significance. PMID:26046930

  20. Spatio-Temporal Variability of Saturated Crevasses Along the Margins of Jakobshavn ISBRÆ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ring, A.; Lampkin, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Jakobshavn Isbræ is the fastest marine-terminating outlet glacier on the Greenland Ice Sheet and has experienced speed up, thinning and increased mass discharge primarily due to ocean-ice interactions at the terminus, over the last two decades. Approximately 60% of the total driving stress within the main ice stream is compensated by resistance due to lateral shear. We have observed the presence of water-filled crevasses, which fill in local depressions and drain seasonally, resulting in meltwater filtration directly into the shear margins. Injection of meltwater into the shear margins can result in shear weakening with implications for observed changes within the ice stream, in addition to, potentially enhancing mass flux into the main trough. Shear weakening, due to infiltrated meltwater, can increase sliding due to basal lubrication or reduce ice stiffness due to cryo-hydrologic warming. In this study, LandSat-7 ETM+ and LandSat-8 OLI images at 15m spatial resolutions are used to characterize the spatio-temporal variability of saturated crevasses during the ablation seasons from 2000 through 2013. Changes in the delineated area of water-filled crevasses are compared to variability in ice surface velocity fields during the analysis period as a first-order assessment on the potential impact these features may have on marginal ice dynamics.

  1. Taming of Modulation Instability by Spatio-Temporal Modulation of the Potential

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S.; Herrero, R.; Botey, M.; Staliunas, K.

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous pattern formation in a variety of spatially extended nonlinear systems always occurs through a modulation instability, sometimes called Turing instability: the homogeneous state of the system becomes unstable with respect to growing modulation modes. Therefore, the manipulation of the modulation instability is of primary importance in controlling and manipulating the character of spatial patterns initiated by that instability. We show that a spatio-temporal periodic modulation of the potential of spatially extended systems results in a modification of its pattern forming instability. Depending on the modulation character the instability can be partially suppressed, can change its spectrum (for instance the long wave instability can transform into short wave instability), can split into two, or can be completely eliminated. The latter result is of special practical interest, as it can be used to stabilize the intrinsically unstable system. The result bears general character, as it is shown here on a universal model of the Complex Ginzburg-Landau equation in one and two spatial dimensions (and time). The physical mechanism of the instability suppression can be applied to a variety of intrinsically unstable dissipative systems, like self-focusing lasers, reaction-diffusion systems, as well as in unstable conservative systems, like attractive Bose Einstein condensates. PMID:26286250

  2. An integrated framework for spatio-temporal registration of intravascular ultrasound pullbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ling; Wahle, Andreas; Chen, Zhi; Downe, Richard; Lopez, John; Kovarnik, Tomas; Sonka, Milan

    2015-03-01

    Spatio-temporal registration of baseline and follow-up intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) pullbacks is of paramount importance in studying the progression/regression of coronary artery disease. Automating these two tasks has the potential to increase productivity when studying large patient populations. Current automated methods are often designed for only one of the two tasks - spatial or temporal. In this paper, we propose an integrated framework which combines the two tasks and employs side-branches to constrain the IVUS pullback registration tasks. For temporal registration, canonical time warping technique optimizes extracted features and weighs cumulative distances. For spatial registration, the search range of cross-correlation based method is constrained by utilizing the angular differences between side-branches. Pilot validation is currently available for ten pairs of IVUS pullback sub-sequences. Results show average spatial and temporal registration errors of 0.49 mm +/- 0.51 mm and 5.56° +/- 3.35°, respectively, a notable improvement over our previous approach (p < 0.001) in temporal registration. Our method has the potential to improve spatial and temporal correspondence in studies of atherosclerotic vascular disease development using IVUS.

  3. [Spatio-temporal variation of subtidal meiofauna in a sandy beach from Northeastern Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Arana, Ildefonso Liñero; Ojeda, Sol; Amaro, María Elena

    2013-03-01

    Meiofauna organisms that play an important role in the trophic ecology of soft bottom benthos, have short life cycles and they respond quickly to disturbance and pollution. The present study shows the spatio-temporal variation ofsubtidal meiofauna (metazoans passing a 500im sieve but retained on meshes of 40-63micro m) in four shallow subtidal stations. Samples were taken in the sandy beach of San Luis, in the Northeastern coast of Venezuela, from October 2005 until September 2006. For this, three replicate sediment core samples (4.91cm2), were collected monthly to a depth of 10cm into the sediment, and preserved in 6% formalin stained with rose Bengal. Specimens of 14 meiofaunal groups (Foraminifera excluded) were collected, being the nematodes, ostracods and harpacticoid copepods the most abundant. Monthly density was comprised between 64 and 503ind./10cm2, and mean density of stations between 173 and 449ind./10cm2. There is a trend of low densities from October to February (end of the rainy season until the middle of the dry season). The San Luis beach control of the meiofaunal community is shared by climatic conditions and by the biology of the species found. The meiofauna mean density in San Luis beach (263ind./10cm2) was low when compared to other studies in tropical areas. PMID:23894963

  4. Spatio-temporal contextual approaches to mapping land cover change based on remote sensing imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingxiong; Zhang, Jinping; Tang, Yunwei; You, Jiong

    2009-10-01

    This paper explores data-driven methods for quantifying and incorporating spatio-temporal contextual information in the mapping of land cover change. In remote sensing, area classes of land cover are typically mapped via statistical manipulation of feature-space measurement, e.g., reflectance data, and other ancillary data. Contextual information has been known to have the potential of increasing the accuracy of land cover classification and change detection, on the ground that land cover often exhibits spatial and temporal correlations and, as such, should be properly accommodated. In Bayesian methods, a priori probabilities of class occurrences can be considered as contextual information, which are combined with class-conditional probability densities to arrive at discriminant decisions with minimized misclassification. These prior probabilities may be made to vary locally to honor variability in the strengths of spatial dependence in class occurrences. For deriving local prior joint probabilities in land cover co-occurrences over time, a modified Expectation and Maximization (EM) algorithm was developed, in which a local window size can be adjusted in the light of spatial dependences inferred from class probability densities computed from spectral data. Empirical studies were performed using bi-temporal Landsat TM image subsets in Wuhan, which confirmed the comparative benefits of incorporating localized prior probabilities in land cover change detection.

  5. Spatio-temporal hierarchy in the dynamics of a minimalist protein model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Yasuhiro; Baba, Akinori; Li, Chun-Biu; Straub, John E.; Toda, Mikito; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki; Berry, R. Stephen

    2013-12-01

    A method for time series analysis of molecular dynamics simulation of a protein is presented. In this approach, wavelet analysis and principal component analysis are combined to decompose the spatio-temporal protein dynamics into contributions from a hierarchy of different time and space scales. Unlike the conventional Fourier-based approaches, the time-localized wavelet basis captures the vibrational energy transfers among the collective motions of proteins. As an illustrative vehicle, we have applied our method to a coarse-grained minimalist protein model. During the folding and unfolding transitions of the protein, vibrational energy transfers between the fast and slow time scales were observed among the large-amplitude collective coordinates while the other small-amplitude motions are regarded as thermal noise. Analysis employing a Gaussian-based measure revealed that the time scales of the energy redistribution in the subspace spanned by such large-amplitude collective coordinates are slow compared to the other small-amplitude coordinates. Future prospects of the method are discussed in detail.

  6. Spatio-temporal distribution of dengue fever under scenarios of climate change in the southern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chieh-Han; Yu, Hwa-Lung

    2014-05-01

    Dengue fever has been recognized as the most important widespread vector-borne infectious disease in recent decades. Over 40% of the world's population is risk from dengue and about 50-100 million people are infected world wide annually. Previous studies have found that dengue fever is highly correlated with climate covariates. Thus, the potential effects of global climate change on dengue fever are crucial to epidemic concern, in particular, the transmission of the disease. This present study investigated the nonlinearity of time-delayed impact of climate on spatio-temporal variations of dengue fever in the southern Taiwan during 1998 to 2011. A distributed lag nonlinear model (DLNM) is used to assess the nonlinear lagged effects of meteorology. The statistically significant meteorological factors are considered, including weekly minimum temperature and maximum 24-hour rainfall. The relative risk and the distribution of dengue fever then predict under various climate change scenarios. The result shows that the relative risk is similar for different scenarios. In addition, the impact of rainfall on the incidence risk is higher than temperature. Moreover, the incidence risk is associated to spatially population distribution. The results can be served as practical reference for environmental regulators for the epidemic prevention under climate change scenarios.

  7. Hot spot detection and spatio-temporal dynamics of dengue in Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naish, S.; Tong, S.

    2014-11-01

    Dengue has been a major public health concern in Australia since it re-emerged in Queensland in 1992-1993. This study explored spatio-temporal distribution and clustering of locally-acquired dengue cases in Queensland State, Australia and identified target areas for effective interventions. A computerised locally-acquired dengue case dataset was collected from Queensland Health for Queensland from 1993 to 2012. Descriptive spatial and temporal analyses were conducted using geographic information system tools and geostatistical techniques. Dengue hot spots were detected using SatScan method. Descriptive spatial analysis showed that a total of 2,398 locally-acquired dengue cases were recorded in central and northern regions of tropical Queensland. A seasonal pattern was observed with most of the cases occurring in autumn. Spatial and temporal variation of dengue cases was observed in the geographic areas affected by dengue over time. Tropical areas are potential high-risk areas for mosquito-borne diseases such as dengue. This study demonstrated that the locally-acquired dengue cases have exhibited a spatial and temporal variation over the past twenty years in tropical Queensland, Australia. There is a clear evidence for the existence of statistically significant clusters of dengue and these clusters varied over time. These findings enabled us to detect and target dengue clusters suggesting that the use of geospatial information can assist the health authority in planning dengue control activities and it would allow for better design and implementation of dengue management programs.

  8. Spatio-temporal patterns of leptospirosis in Thailand: is flooding a risk factor?

    PubMed

    Suwanpakdee, S; Kaewkungwal, J; White, L J; Asensio, N; Ratanakorn, P; Singhasivanon, P; Day, N P J; Pan-Ngum, W

    2015-07-01

    We studied the temporal and spatial patterns of leptospirosis, its association with flooding and animal census data in Thailand. Flood data from 2010 to 2012 were extracted from spatial information taken from satellite images. The incidence rate ratio (IRR) was used to determine the relationship between spatio-temporal flooding patterns and the number of human leptospirosis cases. In addition, the area of flood coverage, duration of waterlogging, time lags between flood events, and a number of potential animal reservoirs were considered in a sub-analysis. There was no significant temporal trend of leptospirosis over the study period. Statistical analysis showed an inconsistent relationship between IRR and flooding across years and regions. Spatially, leptospirosis occurred repeatedly and predominantly in northeastern Thailand. Our findings suggest that flooding is less influential in leptospirosis transmission than previously assumed. High incidence of the disease in the northeastern region is explained by the fact that agriculture and animal farming are important economic activities in this area. The periodic rise and fall of reported leptospirosis cases over time might be explained by seasonal exposure from rice farming activities performed during the rainy season when flood events often occur. We conclude that leptospirosis remains an occupational disease in Thailand. PMID:25778527

  9. Improving exposure assessment in environmental epidemiology: Application of spatio-temporal visualization tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meliker, Jaymie R.; Slotnick, Melissa J.; Avruskin, Gillian A.; Kaufmann, Andrew; Jacquez, Geoffrey M.; Nriagu, Jerome O.

    2005-05-01

    A thorough assessment of human exposure to environmental agents should incorporate mobility patterns and temporal changes in human behaviors and concentrations of contaminants; yet the temporal dimension is often under-emphasized in exposure assessment endeavors, due in part to insufficient tools for visualizing and examining temporal datasets. Spatio-temporal visualization tools are valuable for integrating a temporal component, thus allowing for examination of continuous exposure histories in environmental epidemiologic investigations. An application of these tools to a bladder cancer case-control study in Michigan illustrates continuous exposure life-lines and maps that display smooth, continuous changes over time. Preliminary results suggest increased risk of bladder cancer from combined exposure to arsenic in drinking water (>25 ?g/day) and heavy smoking (>30 cigarettes/day) in the 1970s and 1980s, and a possible cancer cluster around automotive, paint, and organic chemical industries in the early 1970s. These tools have broad application for examining spatially- and temporally-specific relationships between exposures to environmental risk factors and disease.

  10. Global Spatio-temporal Patterns of Influenza in the Post-pandemic Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Daihai; Lui, Roger; Wang, Lin; Tse, Chi Kong; Yang, Lin; Stone, Lewi

    2015-06-01

    We study the global spatio-temporal patterns of influenza dynamics. This is achieved by analysing and modelling weekly laboratory confirmed cases of influenza A and B from 138 countries between January 2006 and January 2015. The data were obtained from FluNet, the surveillance network compiled by the the World Health Organization. We report a pattern of skip-and-resurgence behavior between the years 2011 and 2013 for influenza H1N1pdm, the strain responsible for the 2009 pandemic, in Europe and Eastern Asia. In particular, the expected H1N1pdm epidemic outbreak in 2011/12 failed to occur (or “skipped”) in many countries across the globe, although an outbreak occurred in the following year. We also report a pattern of well-synchronized wave of H1N1pdm in early 2011 in the Northern Hemisphere countries, and a pattern of replacement of strain H1N1pre by H1N1pdm between the 2009 and 2012 influenza seasons. Using both a statistical and a mechanistic mathematical model, and through fitting the data of 108 countries, we discuss the mechanisms that are likely to generate these events taking into account the role of multi-strain dynamics. A basic understanding of these patterns has important public health implications and scientific significance.

  11. A model for spatio-temporal dynamics in a regulatory network for cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Rashkov, Peter; Schmitt, Bernhard A; Keilberg, Daniela; Beck, Kristof; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Dahlke, Stephan

    2014-12-01

    Cell polarity in Myxococcus xanthus is crucial for the directed motility of individual cells. The polarity system is characterised by a dynamic spatio-temporal localisation of the regulatory proteins MglA and MglB at opposite cell poles. In response to signalling by the Frz chemosensory system, MglA and MglB are released from the poles and then rebind at the opposite poles. Thus, over time MglA and MglB oscillate irregularly between the poles in synchrony but out of phase. A minimal macroscopic model of the Mgl/Frz regulatory system based on a reaction-diffusion PDE system is presented. Mathematical analysis of the steady states derives conditions on the reaction terms for formation of dynamic localisation patterns of the regulatory proteins under different biologically-relevant regimes, i.e. with and without Frz signalling. Numerical simulations of the model system produce either a stationary pattern in time (fixed polarity), periodic solutions in time (oscillating polarity), or excitable behaviour (irregular switching of polarity). PMID:25445576

  12. Spatio-temporal expression patterns of anterior Hox genes during Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Lyon, R Stewart; Davis, Adam; Scemama, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    Hox genes encode transcription factors that function to pattern regional tissue identities along the anterior-posterior axis during animal embryonic development. Divergent nested Hox gene expression patterns within the posterior pharyngeal arches may play an important role in patterning morphological variation in the pharyngeal jaw apparatus (PJA) between evolutionarily divergent teleost fishes. Recent gene expression studies have shown the expression patterns from all Hox paralog group (PG) 2-6 genes in the posterior pharyngeal arches (PAs) for the Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) and from most genes of these PGs for the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). While several orthologous Hox genes exhibit divergent spatial and temporal expression patterns between these two teleost species in the posterior PAs, several tilapia Hox gene expression patterns from PG3-6 must be documented for a full comparative study. Here we present the spatio-temporal expression patterns of hoxb3b, c3a, b4a, a5a, b5a, b5b, b6a and b6b in the neural tube and posterior PAs of the Nile tilapia. We show that several of these tilapia Hox genes exhibit divergent expression patterns in the posterior PAs from their medaka orthologs. We also compare these gene expression patterns to orthologs in other gnathostome vertebrates, including the dogfish shark. PMID:23376031

  13. Spatio-temporal variation of the diterpene steviol in Stevia rebaudiana grown under different photoperiods.

    PubMed

    Ceunen, Stijn; Geuns, Jan M C

    2013-05-01

    As part of an ongoing study on the effects of photoperiodism on the metabolism of steviol glycosides (SVglys) in Stevia rebaudiana, the spatio-temporal variations of free steviol (SV) have now been evaluated. For its quantitation, an internal standard method was used, based upon a specific fluorometric detection of SV as its methoxycoumarinyl derivative. The level of free SV in leaves did not exceed 30 ?g/g dry wt and was at least 1000-fold smaller than that of its glycosidic conjugates. In other organs, free SV was mainly measured in stem tissue and apices, with relatively large amounts measured in the latter. Similarly to SVglys, the content of free SV was influenced by photoperiod and genotype. In plants grown under long-days (LD) of 16 h, more spatial variations were seen compared to those under short-days (SD) of 8h. In the former, upper leaves contained almost four times more free SV compared to lower ones near the end of vegetative growth. In addition, the correlation between SV and its glycosidic conjugates was more linear under SD. Despite the variability of SV levels, a decrease was noted in all conditions after flower opening, which can be related a decreased transcription of the biosynthetic genes involved. PMID:23402803

  14. Learning Spatio-Temporal Representations for Action Recognition: A Genetic Programming Approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Shao, Ling; Li, Xuelong; Lu, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Extracting discriminative and robust features from video sequences is the first and most critical step in human action recognition. In this paper, instead of using handcrafted features, we automatically learn spatio-temporal motion features for action recognition. This is achieved via an evolutionary method, i.e., genetic programming (GP), which evolves the motion feature descriptor on a population of primitive 3D operators (e.g., 3D-Gabor and wavelet). In this way, the scale and shift invariant features can be effectively extracted from both color and optical flow sequences. We intend to learn data adaptive descriptors for different datasets with multiple layers, which makes fully use of the knowledge to mimic the physical structure of the human visual cortex for action recognition and simultaneously reduce the GP searching space to effectively accelerate the convergence of optimal solutions. In our evolutionary architecture, the average cross-validation classification error, which is calculated by an support-vector-machine classifier on the training set, is adopted as the evaluation criterion for the GP fitness function. After the entire evolution procedure finishes, the best-so-far solution selected by GP is regarded as the (near-)optimal action descriptor obtained. The GP-evolving feature extraction method is evaluated on four popular action datasets, namely KTH, HMDB51, UCF YouTube, and Hollywood2. Experimental results show that our method significantly outperforms other types of features, either hand-designed or machine-learned. PMID:25700480

  15. Spatio-temporal coherence mapping of few-cycle vortex pulses.

    PubMed

    Grunwald, R; Elsaesser, T; Bock, M

    2014-01-01

    Light carrying an orbital angular momentum (OAM) displays an optical phase front rotating in space and time and a vanishing intensity, a so-called vortex, in the center. Beyond continuous-wave vortex beams, optical pulses with a finite OAM are important for many areas of science and technology, ranging from the selective manipulation and excitation of matter to telecommunications. Generation of vortex pulses with a duration of few optical cycles requires new methods for characterising their coherence properties in space and time. Here we report a novel approach for flexibly shaping and characterising few-cycle vortex pulses of tunable topological charge with two sequentially arranged spatial light modulators. The reconfigurable optical arrangement combines interferometry, wavefront sensing, time-of-flight and nonlinear correlation techniques in a very compact setup, providing complete spatio-temporal coherence maps at minimum pulse distortions. Sub-7 fs pulses carrying different optical angular momenta are generated in single and multichannel geometries and characterised in comparison to zero-order Laguerre-Gaussian beams. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the shortest pulse durations reported for direct vortex shaping and detection with spatial light modulators. This access to space-time coupling effects with sub-femtosecond time resolution opens new prospects for tailored twisted light transients of extremely short duration. PMID:25413789

  16. A novel sensor to map auxin response and distribution at high spatio-temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Brunoud, Géraldine; Wells, Darren M; Oliva, Marina; Larrieu, Antoine; Mirabet, Vincent; Burrow, Amy H; Beeckman, Tom; Kepinski, Stefan; Traas, Jan; Bennett, Malcolm J; Vernoux, Teva

    2012-02-01

    Auxin is a key plant morphogenetic signal but tools to analyse dynamically its distribution and signalling during development are still limited. Auxin perception directly triggers the degradation of Aux/IAA repressor proteins. Here we describe a novel Aux/IAA-based auxin signalling sensor termed DII-VENUS that was engineered in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The VENUS fast maturing form of yellow fluorescent protein was fused in-frame to the Aux/IAA auxin-interaction domain (termed domain II; DII) and expressed under a constitutive promoter. We initially show that DII-VENUS abundance is dependent on auxin, its TIR1/AFBs co-receptors and proteasome activities. Next, we demonstrate that DII-VENUS provides a map of relative auxin distribution at cellular resolution in different tissues. DII-VENUS is also rapidly degraded in response to auxin and we used it to visualize dynamic changes in cellular auxin distribution successfully during two developmental responses, the root gravitropic response and lateral organ production at the shoot apex. Our results illustrate the value of developing response input sensors such as DII-VENUS to provide high-resolution spatio-temporal information about hormone distribution and response during plant growth and development. PMID:22246322

  17. A Four Dimensional Spatio-Temporal Analysis of an Agricultural Dataset

    PubMed Central

    Donald, Margaret R.; Mengersen, Kerrie L.; Young, Rick R.

    2015-01-01

    While a variety of statistical models now exist for the spatio-temporal analysis of two-dimensional (surface) data collected over time, there are few published examples of analogous models for the spatial analysis of data taken over four dimensions: latitude, longitude, height or depth, and time. When taking account of the autocorrelation of data within and between dimensions, the notion of closeness often differs for each of the dimensions. Here, we consider a number of approaches to the analysis of such a dataset, which arises from an agricultural experiment exploring the impact of different cropping systems on soil moisture. The proposed models vary in their representation of the spatial correlation in the data, the assumed temporal pattern and choice of conditional autoregressive (CAR) and other priors. In terms of the substantive question, we find that response cropping is generally more effective than long fallow cropping in reducing soil moisture at the depths considered (100 cm to 220 cm). Thus, if we wish to reduce the possibility of deep drainage and increased groundwater salinity, the recommended cropping system is response cropping. PMID:26513746

  18. Spatio-temporal coherence mapping of few-cycle vortex pulses

    PubMed Central

    Grunwald, R.; Elsaesser, T.; Bock, M.

    2014-01-01

    Light carrying an orbital angular momentum (OAM) displays an optical phase front rotating in space and time and a vanishing intensity, a so-called vortex, in the center. Beyond continuous-wave vortex beams, optical pulses with a finite OAM are important for many areas of science and technology, ranging from the selective manipulation and excitation of matter to telecommunications. Generation of vortex pulses with a duration of few optical cycles requires new methods for characterising their coherence properties in space and time. Here we report a novel approach for flexibly shaping and characterising few-cycle vortex pulses of tunable topological charge with two sequentially arranged spatial light modulators. The reconfigurable optical arrangement combines interferometry, wavefront sensing, time-of-flight and nonlinear correlation techniques in a very compact setup, providing complete spatio-temporal coherence maps at minimum pulse distortions. Sub-7?fs pulses carrying different optical angular momenta are generated in single and multichannel geometries and characterised in comparison to zero-order Laguerre-Gaussian beams. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the shortest pulse durations reported for direct vortex shaping and detection with spatial light modulators. This access to space-time coupling effects with sub-femtosecond time resolution opens new prospects for tailored twisted light transients of extremely short duration. PMID:25413789

  19. Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Cell-Cell Signaling in a Living Cell Microarray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirsaidov, Utkur; Timp, Winston; Timp, Kaethe; Matsudaira, Paul; Timp, Greg

    2007-03-01

    Cell-cell signaling plays a central role in biology, enabling individual cells to coordinate their activities. For example, bacteria show evidence of intercellular signaling through quorum sensing, a regulatory mechanism that launches a coordinated response, depending on the population density. To explore the spatio-temporal development of cell-to-cell signaling, we have created regular, heterotypic microarrays of living cells in hydrogel using time-multiplexed optical traps for submicron positional control of the cell orientation and location without loss of viability. We studied the Lux system for quorum sensing; splitting it into sender and receiver plasmids, which were subsequently introduced into E. Coli. Induced by IPTG, the sender cells express a fluorescent reporter (mRFP1) and the LuxI enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of a molecular signal AHL that diffuses through the cell membrane and the extra-cellular scaffold. The receiver cells collect the AHL signal that binds to the LuxR regulator and reports it through GFP production. We have measured the time-delay between the onset of mRFP1 and GFP dependence on intercellular spacing in the array.

  20. Sedimentological constraints to the spatio-temporal evolution of the first Cenozoic Antarctic glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocchi, P.; Galeotti, S.; De Boer, B.; Escutia, C.; DeConto, R.; Houben, A. J.; Passchier, S.; Vermeersen, B. L.; Van de Wal, R.; Brinkhuis, H.

    2012-12-01

    Glacial Isostatic Adjustement (GIA) modeling of solid Earth and gravitational perturbations induced by the Antarctic glaciation across the Eocene/Oligocene transition (EOT; ~34 Ma) predicts a relative sea level (rsl) rise over-ice proximal marine marginal settings. Accordingly, available sedimentary records from the Ross Sea (CIROS1, CRP-3), Prydz Bay (ODP 739, 1166) and Wilkes Land (IOPD U1356, U1360) provide evidence for progressively deeper depositional environments across the late Eocene towards the Oligocene isotope event-1 (Oi-1; 33.7 Ma, which marks a major glacial advancement episode. Since bathymetric changes at these near-field sites are controlled by GIA, the analysis and inter-site comparison of their sedimentary records provide insights into the spatio-temporal evolution of the nascent Antarctic Ice Sheet. In this work we simulate the inception of the Antarctic glaciation by means of a thermomechanical ice sheet-shelf model dynamically coupled to a sea level model based on the gravitationally self-consistent Sea Level Equation (SLE). We generate a set of ice-sheet and rsl scenarios according to (i) different values for the Earth rheological parameters, (ii) initial topographic/bathymetric conditions and (iii) precipitation/temperature patterns. By comparing the observations with the modeling solutions we find that the initial undeformed topography/bathymetry, and consequently its deformations driven by the GIA described by the SLE, are important conditions for a realistic development of the Antarctic ice-sheet.

  1. Spatial, temporal, and spatio-temporal modulational instabilities in a planar dual-core waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vivek Kumar; Goyal, Amit; Raju, Thokala Soloman; Kumar, C. N.; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate modulational instability (MI) in a planar dual-core waveguide (DWG), with a Kerr and non-Kerr polarizations based on coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations in the presence of linear coupling term, coupling coefficient dispersion (CCD) and other higher order effects such as third order dispersion (TOD), fourth order dispersion (FOD), and self-steepening (ss). By employing a standard linear stability analysis, we obtain analytically, an explicit expression for the MI growth rate as a function of spatial and temporal frequencies of the perturbation and the material response time. Pertinently, we explicate three different types of MI-spatial, temporal, and spatio-temporal MI for symmetric/antisymmetric continuous wave (cw), and spatial MI for asymmetric cw, and emphasize that the earlier studies on MI in DWG do not account for this physics. Essentially, we discuss two cases: (i) the case for which the two waveguides are linearly coupled and the CCD term plays no role and (ii) the case for which the linear coupling term is zero and the CCD term is nonzero. In the former case, we find that the MI growth rate in the three different types of MI, seriously depends on the coupling term, quintic nonlinearity, FOD, and ss. In the later case, the presence of quintic nonlinearity, CCD, FOD, and ss seriously enhances the formation of MI sidebands, both in normal as well as anomalous dispersion regimes. For asymmetric cw, spatial MI is dependent on linear coupling term and quintic nonlinearity.

  2. Geomagnetic imprinting predicts spatio-temporal variation in homing migration of pink and sockeye salmon

    PubMed Central

    Putman, Nathan F.; Jenkins, Erica S.; Michielsens, Catherine G. J.; Noakes, David L. G.

    2014-01-01

    Animals navigate using a variety of sensory cues, but how each is weighted during different phases of movement (e.g. dispersal, foraging, homing) is controversial. Here, we examine the geomagnetic and olfactory imprinting hypotheses of natal homing with datasets that recorded variation in the migratory routes of sockeye (Oncorhynchus nerka) and pink (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) salmon returning from the Pacific Ocean to the Fraser River, British Columbia. Drift of the magnetic field (i.e. geomagnetic imprinting) uniquely accounted for 23.2% and 44.0% of the variation in migration routes for sockeye and pink salmon, respectively. Ocean circulation (i.e. olfactory imprinting) predicted 6.1% and 0.1% of the variation in sockeye and pink migration routes, respectively. Sea surface temperature (a variable influencing salmon distribution but not navigation, directly) accounted for 13.0% of the variation in sockeye migration but was unrelated to pink migration. These findings suggest that geomagnetic navigation plays an important role in long-distance homing in salmon and that consideration of navigation mechanisms can aid in the management of migratory fishes by better predicting movement patterns. Finally, given the diversity of animals that use the Earth's magnetic field for navigation, geomagnetic drift may provide a unifying explanation for spatio-temporal variation in the movement patterns of many species. PMID:25056214

  3. Scaling Issues and Spatio-Temporal Variability in Ecohydrological Modeling on Mountain Topography: Methods and Future of the VELMA Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, K.; Bond, B. J.; McKane, R.; Abdelnour, A. G.; Stieglitz, M.

    2010-12-01

    The interactions between vegetation and hydrology in mountainous terrain are difficult to represent in mathematical models. There are at least three primary reasons for this difficulty. First, expanding plot-scale measurements to the watershed scale requires finding the balance between computational intensity and physical significance. Second, parameters that affect soil, plant and hydrologic processes are distributed heterogeneously across mountain landscapes, and these patterns and processes may be spatially connected. Third, temporal variation in water availability (particularly in seasonal rainfall climates) may involve a “topographical memory” that may be expressed as “lags” between biological and hydrological processes. A unique opportunity for examining the implications of scaling and spatio-temporal variability on ecohydrological models exists at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest (HJA) in Blue River, Oregon. HJA is a National Science Foundation Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site, and has been monitoring climate, stream, and vegetation characteristics of small watersheds for more than 50 years. A recent LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) reconnaissance has produced watershed scale estimations of vegetation and soil surface parameters at a very high spatial resolution, allowing spatially-explicit expansion of long-term data. An ecohydrological model, Visualizing Ecosystems for Land Management Assessments (VELMA) developed by the Stieglitz lab at Georgia Tech in collaboration with EPA has also been calibrated specifically for watershed topographies in HJA. VELMA is a coupled ecohydrological model that simulates the cycling and transport of water and nutrients in three dimensions by specific parameterization of hydrological and biogeochemical functions. It contains submodels for plant, soil, and water processes including surface and sub-surface flow on a daily time step. We are using the VELMA model to explore three sequential and fundamental questions in ecohydrological modeling in mountainous terrain. 1) How does the topographical structure of mountains (elevation, slope, and aspect) impact hydrological parameters such as temperature, rainfall, soil depth, canopy structure, and airflow? 2) To what degree are the model results from high-resolution, spatially-explicit parameterization different from results based on broadly distributed means, and when different, on what scale(s) are the discrepancies most pronounced? 3) Is there an optimal scale for the process-based ecohydrological modeling, and if so, what are the computational limits at this scale? This poster will present our overall experimental plan and initial findings. Experimentation on and establishment of a standard procedure for spatial and temporal partitioning in ecohydrological models is a fundamental step from which advancement towards more comprehensive, dynamic models can be developed.

  4. Vasyl Mykhalchuk Hyewon Seo Frederic Cordier On Spatio-Temporal Feature Point Detection for Animated Meshes

    E-print Network

    Cordier, Frederic

    in computer graphics and computer vision, feature extraction on deforming models remains as relatively as follows. In Section 2, we survey related works on local feature extraction in videos and (static) meshes. After recapitulating some basic terminologies and notions in Section 3, we present an overview

  5. Spatio-temporal patterns in vegetation start of season across the island of Ireland using the MERIS Global Vegetation Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Brian; Dwyer, Edward; Cawkwell, Fiona; Eklundh, Lars

    2012-03-01

    Spring phenophases such as the beginning of leaf unfolding, measured in the Irish gardens of the International Phenological Garden (IPG) network, indicate an earlier spring occurrence hence a longer growing season. However, these measurements are limited to selected species of trees at a few point locations in the southern half of the country. The aim of this study was to develop a methodology, based on satellite remote sensing, to measure the vegetation start of season (SOS) across the whole island of Ireland on an annual basis, complementary to existing ground-based methods. The SOS metric was extracted for each year in a 7-year time series of 10-day composited, 1.2 km reduced resolution MERIS Global Vegetation Index (MGVI) data from 2003 to 2009, based on curve fitting, using the time series analysis software, TIMESAT. Spatio-temporal variability in the SOS was detected across the island on an annual basis and highlighted in a series of anomaly images showing variation from the 7-year mean SOS. The 2006 SOS was late across the island while there were strong geographical gradients to the SOS anomalies in 2009 when it occurred later in the south and earlier in the north. There was a mix of early and late anomaly values throughout the country in the other years. Qualitatively, the spatial patterns in the timing of the SOS were related to the distribution of landcover types as indicated by the CORINE Land Cover map (CLC). Three statistically separable groups of CLC classes were derived from differences in the SOS, namely agricultural and forest land cover types, peat bogs, and natural and semi-natural vegetation types. These groups demonstrated that vegetation in cultivated areas like pastures has a significantly earlier SOS than in areas of unmanaged vegetation such as peat bogs. An initial climate analysis indicated that an anomalously cold winter and spring in 2005/2006 delayed the 2006 SOS countrywide; while a cold winter followed by a mild spring in 2009 caused considerable spatial variability in the 2009 SOS across the country, ranging from later SOS in the south to early SOS in the north. This study has demonstrated the utility of 10-day MGVI composites for derivation of an SOS metric which can be used as an indicator of spatial variability in vegetation seasonality and has highlighted how SOS varies according to landcover type. The availability of longer time series in the future will allow more focused studies on the sensitivity of the SOS metric to changes in climate as well as short term weather events.

  6. Monitoring Spatio-temporal Dielectric Permittivity Variation in the Shallow Subsurface through Bayesian Inversion of GPR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, N.; Hou, Z.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2010-12-01

    A minimum-relative-entropy (MRE) based Bayesian inversion framework is applied to monitor spatio-temporal distribution of dielectric permittivity using tomographic radar first arrival time data from a synthetic, transient infiltration experiment in the shallow subsurface. In this experiment, a spatially correlated random saturated hydraulic conductivity field is generated and used as input to the TOUGH2 flow simulator, which provides realistic distributions of water and dielectric permittivity on a fine grid at several temporal snapshots. For each snapshot, a tomographic GPR simulator is utilized to produce first arrival travel times. In this study, we test the performance of our inverse modeling framework by inverting and monitoring dielectric permittivity variations using these traveltime data. The inverse modeling domain is divided into coarse grid blocks compared to flow simulation grid, in order to reduce the dimension of unknowns. Each unknown parameter is first assigned a minimally subjective probability distribution function (pdf) using the MRE method, then pseudorandom dielectric constant parameter sets are drawn from these pdfs using a quasi-Monte Carlo sampling technique. We then compute first arrival GPR travel times for each parameter set and the corresponding weight based upon the misfit between the calculated model responses and observations. This inversion approach can deal with nonlinearity and nonuniqueness between data and model parameters by incorporating a numerical modeling technique and it can quantify uncertainty in the parameter estimates by treating those estimates as probability distributions rather than deterministic estimates. Moreover, the intermediate inversion results can be used as “memory functions” in the form of MRE pdfs for step-wise inversion. Testing results show that this framework is capable of reproducing estimates of saturation at grid blocks throughout the study area, and that accuracy and precision are improved as more data become available. These outcomes spur ongoing efforts to improve upon this framework including implementing a means of parameter reduction (for example, through use of a pilot point method) and validating the approach using field data from the Chromium-contaminated Hanford 100-D biostimulation study site.

  7. Mathematical modeling of spatio-temporal dynamics of a single bone multicellular unit.

    PubMed

    Ryser, Marc D; Nigam, Nilima; Komarova, Svetlana V

    2009-05-01

    During bone remodeling, bone-resorbing osteoclasts and bone-forming osteoblasts are organized in bone multicellular units (BMUs), which travel at a rate of 20-40 mum/d for 6-12 mo, maintaining a cylindrical structure. However, the interplay of local BMU geometry with biochemical regulation is poorly understood. We developed a mathematical model of BMU describing changes in time and space of the concentrations of proresorptive cytokine RANKL and its inhibitor osteoprotegerin (OPG), in osteoclast and osteoblast numbers, and in bone mass. We assumed that osteocytes surrounding a microfracture produce RANKL, which attracted osteoclasts. OPG and RANKL were produced by osteoblasts and diffused through bone, RANKL was eliminated by binding to OPG and RANK. Osteoblasts were coupled to osteoclasts through paracrine factors. The evolution of the BMU arising from this model was studied using numerical simulations. Our model recapitulated the spatio-temporal dynamics observed in vivo in a cross-section of bone. In response to a RANKL field, osteoclasts moved as a well-confined cutting cone. The coupling of osteoclasts to osteoblasts allowed for sufficient recruitment of osteoblasts to the resorbed surfaces. The RANKL field was the highest at the microfracture in front of the BMU, whereas the OPG field peaked at the back of the BMU, resulting in the formation of a RANKL/OPG gradient, which strongly affected the rate of BMU progression and its size. Thus, the spatial organization of a BMU provides important constraints on the roles of RANKL and OPG as well as possibly other regulators in determining the outcome of remodeling in the BMU. PMID:19063683

  8. Spatio-temporal modelling and assessment of within-species phenological variability using thermal time methods.

    PubMed

    Thompson, R; Clark, R M

    2006-05-01

    Phenological observations of flowering date, budding date or senescence provide very valuable time series. They hold out the prospect for relating plant growth to environmental and climatic factors and hence for engendering a better understanding of plant physiology under natural conditions. The statistical establishment of associations between time series of phenological data and climatic factors provides a means of aiding forecasts of the biological impacts of future climatic change. However, it must be kept in mind that plant growth and behaviour vary spatially as well as temporally. Environmental, climatic and genetic diversity can give rise to spatially structured variation on a range of scales. The variations extend from large-scale geographical (clinal) trends, through medium-scale population and sub-population fluctuations, to micro-scale differentiation among neighbouring plants, where spatially close individuals are found to be genetically more alike than those some distance apart. We developed spatio-temporal phenological models that allow observations from multiple locations to be analysed simultaneously. We applied the models to the first-flowering dates of Prunus padus and Tilia cordata from localities as far apart as Norway and the Caucasus. Our growing-degree-day approach yielded a good fit to the available phenological data and yet involved only a small number of model parameters. It indicated that plants should display different sensitivities to temperature change according to their geographical location and the time of year at which they flower. For spring-flowering plants, we found strong temperature sensitivities for islands and archipelagos with oceanic climates, and low sensitivities in the interiors of continents. PMID:16506032

  9. Modeling and Statistical Analysis of the Spatio-Temporal Patterns of Seasonal Influenza in Israel

    PubMed Central

    Katriel, Guy; Yaari, Rami; Roll, Uri; Stone, Lewi

    2012-01-01

    Background Seasonal influenza outbreaks are a serious burden for public health worldwide and cause morbidity to millions of people each year. In the temperate zone influenza is predominantly seasonal, with epidemics occurring every winter, but the severity of the outbreaks vary substantially between years. In this study we used a highly detailed database, which gave us both temporal and spatial information of influenza dynamics in Israel in the years 1998–2009. We use a discrete-time stochastic epidemic SIR model to find estimates and credible confidence intervals of key epidemiological parameters. Findings Despite the biological complexity of the disease we found that a simple SIR-type model can be fitted successfully to the seasonal influenza data. This was true at both the national levels and at the scale of single cities.The effective reproductive number Re varies between the different years both nationally and among Israeli cities. However, we did not find differences in Re between different Israeli cities within a year. Re was positively correlated to the strength of the spatial synchronization in Israel. For those years in which the disease was more “infectious”, then outbreaks in different cities tended to occur with smaller time lags. Our spatial analysis demonstrates that both the timing and the strength of the outbreak within a year are highly synchronized between the Israeli cities. We extend the spatial analysis to demonstrate the existence of high synchrony between Israeli and French influenza outbreaks. Conclusions The data analysis combined with mathematical modeling provided a better understanding of the spatio-temporal and synchronization dynamics of influenza in Israel and between Israel and France. Altogether, we show that despite major differences in demography and weather conditions intra-annual influenza epidemics are tightly synchronized in both their timing and magnitude, while they may vary greatly between years. The predominance of a similar main strain of influenza, combined with population mixing serve to enhance local and global influenza synchronization within an influenza season. PMID:23056192

  10. Wildlife in the Matrix: Spatio-Temporal Patterns of Herbivore Occurrence in Karnataka, India.

    PubMed

    Karanth, Krithi K

    2016-01-01

    Wildlife reserves are becoming increasingly isolated from the surrounding human-dominated landscapes particularly in Asia. It is imperative to understand how species are distributed spatially and temporally in and outside reserves, and what factors influence their occurrence. This study surveyed 7500 km(2) landscape surrounding five reserves in the Western Ghats to examine patterns of occurrence of five herbivores: elephant, gaur, sambar, chital, and pig. Species distributions are modeled spatio-temporally using an occupancy approach. Trained field teams conducted 3860 interview-based occupancy surveys in a 10-km buffer surrounding these five reserves in 2012. I found gaur and wild pig to be the least and most wide-ranging species, respectively. Elephant and chital exhibit seasonal differences in spatial distribution unlike the other three species. As predicted, distance to reserve, the reserve itself, and forest cover were associated with higher occupancy of all species, and higher densities of people negatively influenced occurrence of all species. Park management, species protection, and conflict mitigation efforts in this landscape need to incorporate temporal and spatial understanding of species distributions. All species are known crop raiders and conflict prone locations with resources (such as water and forage) have to be monitored and managed carefully. Wildlife reserves and adjacent areas are critical for long-term persistence and habitat use for all five herbivores and must be monitored to ensure wildlife can move freely. Such a large-scale approach to map and monitor species distributions can be adapted to other landscapes to identify and monitor critical habitats shared by people and wildlife. PMID:26319143

  11. Long-term spatio-temporal changes in a West African bushmeat trade system.

    PubMed

    McNamara, J; Kusimi, J M; Rowcliffe, J M; Cowlishaw, G; Brenyah, A; Milner-Gulland, E J

    2015-10-01

    Landscapes in many developing countries consist of a heterogeneous matrix of mixed agriculture and forest. Many of the generalist species in this matrix are increasingly traded in the bushmeat markets of West and Central Africa. However, to date there has been little quantification of how the spatial configuration of the landscape influences the urban bushmeat trade over time. As anthropogenic landscapes become the face of rural West Africa, understanding the dynamics of these systems has important implications for conservation and landscape management. The bushmeat production of an area is likely to be defined by landscape characteristics such as habitat disturbance, hunting pressure, level of protection, and distance to market. We explored (SSG, tense) the role of these four characteristics in the spatio-temporal dynamics of the commercial bushmeat trade around the city of Kumasi, Ghana, over 27 years (1978 to 2004). We used geographic information system methods to generate maps delineating the spatial characteristics of the landscapes. These data were combined with spatially explicit market data collected in the main fresh bushmeat market in Kumasi to explore the relationship between trade volume (measured in terms of number of carcasses) and landscape characteristics. Over time, rodents, specifically cane rats (Thryonomys swinderianus), became more abundant in the trade relative to ungulates and the catchment area of the bushmeat market expanded. Areas of intermediate disturbance supplied more bushmeat, but protected areas had no effect. Heavily hunted areas showed significant declines in bushmeat supply over time. Our results highlight the role that low intensity, heterogeneous agricultural landscapes can play in providing ecosystem services, such as bushmeat, and therefore the importance of incorporating bushmeat into ecosystem service mapping exercises. Our results also indicate that even where high bushmeat production is possible, current harvest levels may cause wildlife depletion. PMID:26104770

  12. Spatio-temporal features of vegetation restoration and variation after the Wenchuan earthquake with satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hou; Qiao, Wang; Yipeng, Yang; Weiguo, Jiang; Bingfeng, Yang; Qiang, Chen; Lihua, Yuan; Fanming, Kong; Xi, Chen; Guanjie, Wang

    2014-01-01

    The Wenchuan earthquake was a deadly earthquake that occurred on May 12, 2008, in Sichuan province of China. With the help of classic statistic methods, including arithmetic mean, standard deviation and linear trend estimation, vegetation restoration was recognized by analyzing spatio-temporal features of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) before and after this earthquake. Results indicate: (1) spatial distribution of NDVI mean values remains similar from 1998 to 2011. Higher values are mainly found in north, whereas lower values are mainly distributed over southeast, which is in good correlation with elevation and landform. Vegetation damage is at different levels in different seismic intensity (SI) regions: the higher SI is, the worse vegetation damage is. (2) Over the whole region, standard deviation is bigger after earthquake than before. Both absolute and relative changes in ecosystem stability increase with increasing SI. In different counties, variation of ecosystem stability is more obvious after earthquake, increase of standard deviation is approximately 6.5 times. Relatively, vegetation regionalization is the smallest analysis unit. Consequently, changes resulting from earthquake are unobvious. (3) Linear trend estimation coefficient increases from 0.0079 before the earthquake to 0.0359 after the earthquake in this whole region. This indicates that the plant ecosystem is rapidly restored between 2009 and 2011. The biggest linear trend is for the hill region, indicating good plant restoration and increase after earthquake. Fluctuation of linear trend estimation coefficient in different counties is more obvious after earthquake. Vegetation restoration after earthquake is most obvious in the regions that suffered the greatest SI (SI10 and SI11). In contrast, fluctuation in linear trend estimation coefficient of annual NDVI mean value for different classes of vegetation is more obvious before earthquake.

  13. Spatio-temporal footprints of urbanisation in Surat, the Diamond City of India (1990-2009).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Richa; Ghosh, Aniruddha; Joshi, Pawan Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Urbanisation is a ubiquitous phenomenon with greater prominence in developing nations. Urban expansion involves land conversions from vegetated moisture-rich to impervious moisture-deficient land surfaces. The urban land transformations alter biophysical parameters in a mode that promotes development of heat islands and degrades environmental health. This study elaborates relationships among various environmental variables using remote sensing dataset to study spatio-temporal footprint of urbanisation in Surat city. Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite data were used in conjugation with geo-spatial techniques to study urbanisation and correlation among various satellite-derived biophysical parameters, [Normalised Difference Vegetation Index, Normalised Difference Built-up Index, Normalised Difference Water Index, Normalised Difference Bareness Index, Modified NDWI and land surface temperature (LST)]. Land use land cover was prepared using hierarchical decision tree classification with an accuracy of 90.4 % (kappa?=?0.88) for 1990 and 85 % (kappa?=?0.81) for 2009. It was found that the city has expanded over 42.75 km(2) within a decade, and these changes resulted in elevated surface temperatures. For example, transformation from vegetation to built-up has resulted in 5.5?±?2.6 °C increase in land surface temperature, vegetation to fallow 6.7?±?3 °C, fallow to built-up is 3.5?±?2.9 °C and built-up to dense built-up is 5.3?±?2.8 °C. Directional profiling for LST was done to study spatial patterns of LST in and around Surat city. Emergence of two new LST peaks for 2009 was observed in N-S and NE-SW profiles. PMID:22828979

  14. The Ecuadorian Artisanal Fishery for Large Pelagics: Species Composition and Spatio-Temporal Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Ortiz, Jimmy; Aires-da-Silva, Alexandre M.; Lennert-Cody, Cleridy E.; Maunder, Mark N.

    2015-01-01

    The artisanal fisheries of Ecuador operate within one of the most dynamic and productive marine ecosystems of the world. This study investigates the catch composition of the Ecuadorian artisanal fishery for large pelagic fishes, including aspects of its spatio-temporal dynamics. The analyses of this study are based on the most extensive dataset available to date for this fishery: a total of 106,963 trip-landing inspection records collected at its five principal ports during 2008 ? 2012. Ecuadorian artisanal fisheries remove a substantial amount of biomass from the upper trophic-level predatory fish community of the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. It is estimated that at least 135 thousand metric tons (mt) (about 15.5 million fish) were landed in the five principal ports during the study period. The great novelty of Ecuadorian artisanal fisheries is the “oceanic-artisanal” fleet component, which consists of mother-ship (nodriza) boats with their towed fiber-glass skiffs (fibras) operating with pelagic longlines. This fleet has fully expanded into oceanic waters as far offshore as 100°W, west of the Galapagos Archipelago. It is estimated that nodriza operations produce as much as 80% of the total catches of the artisanal fishery. The remainder is produced by independent fibras operating in inshore waters with pelagic longlines and/or surface gillnets. A multivariate regression tree analysis was used to investigate spatio-environmental effects on the nodriza fleet (n = 6,821 trips). The catch species composition of the nodriza fleet is strongly influenced by the northwesterly circulation of the Humboldt Current along the coast of Peru and its associated cold waters masses. The target species and longline gear-type used by nodrizas change seasonally with the incursion of cool waters (< 25°C) from the south and offshore. During this season, dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus) dominates the catches. However, in warmer waters, the fishery changes to tuna-billfish-shark longline gear and the catch composition becomes much more diverse. PMID:26317751

  15. Spatio-temporal radiation biology with conventionally or laser-accelerated particles for ELIMED

    SciTech Connect

    Risti?-Fira, A.; Bulat, T.; Keta, O.; Petrovi?, I.; Romano, F.; Cirrone, P.; Cuttone, G.

    2013-07-26

    The aim of this study is to investigate the behavior of radio-resistant human malignant cells, thus enabling better understanding of radiobiological effects of ions in such a case. Radiation sources such as accelerated continuous ion beams and laser technology-based ultra short radiation sources with energy of around 10 MeV will be used. The HTB140 melanoma cells are chosen since it has been shown that they represent the limit case of cellular radio-resistance among the studied tumor cell lines. These cells are particularly interesting as they provide data on the very edge of inactivation capacity of each beam line that is tested. After exposing the cell monolayers to continuous radiations of low (?-rays) and high (protons) linear energy transfer, the kinetics of disappearance of the phosphorylated histone H2AX (?-H2AX) foci per cell will be determined. The same procedure will be performed with the pulsed high dose rate protons. Detection and quantification of ?-H2AX foci will be performed by immunohistochemical 3D time-dependent imaging analyses using laser scanning confocal microscopy. Immunoblotting will enable the follow-up of the relation between ?-H2AX and cell cycle arrest via the p53/p21 pathway. In such a way the spatio-temporal changes on sub-cellular level will be visualized, quantified and compared. These results will show whether there is a difference in the effects on cells between continuous and pulsed irradiation mode. Therefore, they will contribute to the data base that might promote pulsed sources for medical treatments of malignant growths.

  16. Spatio-temporal variability of groundwater nitrate concentration in Texas: 1960 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Sriroop; Ale, Srinivasulu; Delaune, Paul; Rajan, Nithya

    2012-01-01

    Nitrate (NO) is a major contaminant and threat to groundwater quality in Texas. High-NO groundwater used for irrigation and domestic purposes has serious environmental and health implications. The objective of this study was to evaluate spatio-temporal trends in groundwater NO concentrations in Texas on a county basis from 1960 to 2010 with special emphasis on the Texas Rolling Plains (TRP) using the Texas Water Development Board's groundwater quality database. Results indicated that groundwater NO concentrations have significantly increased in several counties since the 1960s. In 25 counties, >30% of the observations exceeded the maximum contamination level (MCL) for NO (44 mg L NO) in the 2000s as compared with eight counties in the 1960s. In Haskell and Knox Counties of the TRP, all observations exceeded the NO MCL in the 2000s. A distinct spatial clustering of high-NO counties has become increasingly apparent with time in the TRP, as indicated by different spatial indices. County median NO concentrations in the TRP region were positively correlated with county-based area estimates of crop lands, fertilized croplands, and irrigated croplands, suggesting a negative impact of agricultural practices on groundwater NO concentrations. The highly transmissive geologic and soil media in the TRP have likely facilitated NO movement and groundwater contamination in this region. A major hindrance in evaluating groundwater NO concentrations was the lack of adequate recent observations. Overall, the results indicated a substantial deterioration of groundwater quality by NO across the state due to agricultural activities, emphasizing the need for a more frequent and spatially intensive groundwater sampling. PMID:23128738

  17. PROPAGATION OF SEISMIC WAVES THROUGH A SPATIO-TEMPORALLY FLUCTUATING MEDIUM: HOMOGENIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Gizon, Laurent; Bal, Guillaume

    2013-08-20

    Measurements of seismic wave travel times at the photosphere of the Sun have enabled inferences of its interior structure and dynamics. In interpreting these measurements, the simplifying assumption that waves propagate through a temporally stationary medium is almost universally invoked. However, the Sun is in a constant state of evolution, on a broad range of spatio-temporal scales. At the zero-wavelength limit, i.e., when the wavelength is much shorter than the scale over which the medium varies, the WKBJ (ray) approximation may be applied. Here, we address the other asymptotic end of the spectrum, the infinite-wavelength limit, using the technique of homogenization. We apply homogenization to scenarios where waves are propagating through rapidly varying media (spatially and temporally), and derive effective models for the media. One consequence is that a scalar sound speed becomes a tensorial wave speed in the effective model and anisotropies can be induced depending on the nature of the perturbation. The second term in this asymptotic two-scale expansion, the so-called corrector, contains contributions due to higher-order scattering, leading to the decoherence of the wave field. This decoherence may be causally linked to the observed wave attenuation in the Sun. Although the examples we consider here consist of periodic arrays of perturbations to the background, homogenization may be extended to ergodic and stationary random media. This method may have broad implications for the manner in which we interpret seismic measurements in the Sun and for modeling the effects of granulation on the scattering of waves and distortion of normal-mode eigenfunctions.

  18. Spatio-temporal attributes of left ventricular pressure decay rate during isovolumic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Erina; Kovács, Sándor J

    2012-03-01

    Global left ventricular (LV) isovolumic relaxation rate has been characterized: 1) via the time constant of isovolumic relaxation ? or 2) via the logistic time constant ?(L). An alternate kinematic method, characterizes isovolumic relaxation (IVR) in accordance with Newton's Second Law. The model's parameters, stiffness E(k), and damping/relaxation ? result from best fit of model-predicted pressure to in vivo data. All three models (exponential, logistic, and kinematic) characterize global relaxation in terms of pressure decay rates. However, IVR is inhomogeneous and anisotropic. Apical and basal LV wall segments untwist at different times and rates, and transmural strain and strain rates differ due to the helically variable pitch of myocytes and sheets. Accordingly, we hypothesized that the exponential model (?) or kinematic model (? and E(k)) parameters will elucidate the spatiotemporal variation of IVR rate. Left ventricular pressures in 20 subjects were recorded using a high-fidelity, multipressure transducer (3 cm apart) catheter. Simultaneous, dual-channel pressure data was plotted in the pressure phase-plane (dP/dt vs. P) and ?, ?, and E(k) were computed in 1631 beats (average: 82 beats per subject). Tau differed significantly between the two channels (P < 0.05) in 16 of 20 subjects, whereas ? and E(k) differed significantly (P < 0.05) in all 20 subjects. These results show that quantifying the relaxation rate from data recorded at a single location has limitations. Moreover, kinematic model based analysis allows characterization of restoring (recoil) forces and resistive (crossbridge uncoupling) forces during IVR and their spatio-temporal dependence, thereby elucidating the relative roles of stiffness vs. relaxation as IVR rate determinants. PMID:22210748

  19. The spatio-temporal distribution of attention within a face during identification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Gaspar, Carl

    2015-09-01

    Whole objects, like faces, can strongly attract visual attention. However, little is known about how spatial attention is distributed across the face. During 10AFC identification, we presented a small probe pattern at random locations 106ms after each target-face display. Probe patterns were small squares consisting of high-contrast black and white strips. On the premise that detection speed for probes is enhanced by local attention on the face, probe reaction times should reveal how attention is distributed across the face, in both space and time. We used 3 target-face durations. Face identification accuracy, above-chance for the lowest duration, improved with duration for all 4 subjects. The main data are maps of speed, 1/log(RT), across 3 face durations, for 4 subjects. Each map is based on 60 locations, arranged in an elliptical fashion around fixation (the average center of contrast energy across all faces). Using bootstrap percentile tests, we identified probe locations whose speed was significantly above the spatio-temporal average; these locations show us where attention is. At 12ms, attention is weak and spatially uniform; while at 106ms and 200ms, attention is biased to bottom and right parts of the face from the viewers' perspective. Our results seem surprising given that eye movements (Butler et al, 2005; Peterson & Eckstein, 2012) and classification images (Sekuler et al, 2004) suggest biases toward the top and left. However, the distribution of attention across the face does not necessarily have to match the distribution of extracted information, or fixations. For example, attention might be required to use weak information, less visible regions of the face, or to plan the next fixation. We are currently exploring these possibilities. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326751

  20. Spatio-Temporal Drought Analysis on Example of the Central European Gridded Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanek, P.; Trnka, M.; Zahradní?ek, P.; Semerádová, D.; Hlavinka, P.

    2014-12-01

    Drought may have severe impacts on many human activities. Understanding its spatio-temporal variations is thus very important in many research fields. On example of the Central Europe dataset we analyzed and compared some products based on drought analyses, which may help to answer important questions for impact studies: 1) evaluation of the added value coming from inclusion of spatial aspect (not only temporal one) in the drought analysis; 2) comparison of drought indices calculated from various number of available input meteorological elements (backwards into history less and less meteorological elements are available); 3) linking together meteorological drought with agriculture one. Basis for the study was production of gridded dataset of basic meteorological elements (daily minimum and maximum temperature, precipitation, sunshine duration, relative humidity and wind speed). From the station location time series in the period 1961-2013, gridded dataset was created applying geostatistical methods using both spatial and temporal aspects of the data (spacetime package under R). From such gridded dataset, SPEI (standardized precipitation evaporation index) was calculated using various approaches: Thornthwaite (potential evapotranspiration), Hargreaves and Penman-Monteith (reference evapotranspiration). The outputs were gridded datasets of the SPEIs that were then analyzed for the Central Europe both from temporal (based on station data) and spatial aspects. In order to estimate how this meteorological drought analysis may contribute to drought impact analysis (in our case we chose agriculture), we compared the results with the analysis coming from the agrometeorological drought monitoring system (based on SoilClim - dynamical model of soil water content) which is now used for drought monitoring and analysis in the Central Europe. Such comparison is important either for drought analysis in the past (when soil observations are not available) or also for future climate projections (is it sufficient to use only meteorological information if soil information are not available?).

  1. Assessing parasite community structure in cockles Cerastoderma edule at various spatio-temporal scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Montaudouin, Xavier; Binias, Cindy; Lassalle, Géraldine

    2012-09-01

    Cockles (Cerastoderma edule) are among the most exploited bivalves in Europe. They live in lagoons and estuaries where they undergo many stressors including parasites. Trematodes are the most prevalent macroparasites of cockles and can exert a significant impact on their host populations depending on parasite species and infection intensity. Monitoring these parasite-host systems in order to predict potential host mortalities require a correct knowledge of the spatio-temporal variation of infection. A yearly monitoring of cockles from six stations around Ile aux Oiseaux, Arcachon Bay (France) was conducted between 1998 and 2005. Distance between two stations was ca. 1 km. Nine trematode species were identified. Despite a relative homogeneity of the parasite community structure in cockles, between three and six clusters were identified by Hierarchical Ascendant Classification showing that among-sites heterogeneity of trematode communities in cockles was higher than within-site heterogeneity. At the scale of 8 years, and for 2-year old cockles, these patterns remained stable in four out of six stations. Spatial aggregation disappeared with cockle age, since parasite communities in 3-year cockles did not reflect any particular station(s): with age, cockles eventually accumulated most trematode species and lost the site signature. On the other hand, we demonstrated that the commonly accepted theory stating that older/larger cockles accumulate more trematode larvae was not verified and that there could exist a vulnerable age/size that doesn't correspond to largest values. This study provided a new insight in the parasite community heterogeneity in their host, and in the significance of samples in relation with space and time.

  2. Spatio-temporal variations in deep-sea demersal communities off the Balearic Islands (western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moranta, Joan; Quetglas, Antoni; Massutí, Enric; Guijarro, Beatriz; Hidalgo, Manuel; Diaz, Paz

    2008-06-01

    The spatial and temporal variations of deep-sea megafaunal assemblages from the western Mediterranean are analysed in the present paper. The assemblages from two locations of the Balearic Islands situated 120 km apart were compared using data collected seasonally on a bathymetric stratum covering the 150-750 m depth range during six bottom-trawl surveys. The assemblage structure, in terms of species composition, species dominance and population sizes, was differentially affected by the spatio-temporal variables analysed (depth, location and fishing period). Although depth was the main factor determining the assemblage composition, the differences obtained between the two locations were also relevant. On the upper slope these between-location differences in the dynamics of megafaunal assemblages were found to be related to the effect of fishing exploitation. Population size-based metrics and biomass spectra were good predictors of meso-scale fishing effects, and were mainly reflected by elasmobranchs and demersal teleosts. Nevertheless, the effects of fishing depended on the species considered. Two dominant large-sized fish species found on the upper slope in both localities, Galeus melastomus and Phycis blennoides, had higher biomass values associated with lower fishing effort. Although the mean body weight (MBW) of both species and also the mean maximum body weight (MMBW) of G. melastomus agreed with this pattern, the P. blennoides MMBW did not. This last case could be indicative of natural size-trends such as the bigger-deeper phenomenon which refers to the displacement of large individuals towards the deeper limit of their bathymetric distribution, beyond the maximum depth sampled in this study for this species. By contrast, the target species of the upper slope fishery, the red shrimp Aristeus antennatus, was not negatively affected by the direct impact of fishing activity and other environmental factors, such as the presence of specific water masses could also be important.

  3. The Ecuadorian Artisanal Fishery for Large Pelagics: Species Composition and Spatio-Temporal Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ortiz, Jimmy; Aires-da-Silva, Alexandre M; Lennert-Cody, Cleridy E; Maunder, Mark N

    2015-01-01

    The artisanal fisheries of Ecuador operate within one of the most dynamic and productive marine ecosystems of the world. This study investigates the catch composition of the Ecuadorian artisanal fishery for large pelagic fishes, including aspects of its spatio-temporal dynamics. The analyses of this study are based on the most extensive dataset available to date for this fishery: a total of 106,963 trip-landing inspection records collected at its five principal ports during 2008 ? 2012. Ecuadorian artisanal fisheries remove a substantial amount of biomass from the upper trophic-level predatory fish community of the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. It is estimated that at least 135 thousand metric tons (mt) (about 15.5 million fish) were landed in the five principal ports during the study period. The great novelty of Ecuadorian artisanal fisheries is the "oceanic-artisanal" fleet component, which consists of mother-ship (nodriza) boats with their towed fiber-glass skiffs (fibras) operating with pelagic longlines. This fleet has fully expanded into oceanic waters as far offshore as 100°W, west of the Galapagos Archipelago. It is estimated that nodriza operations produce as much as 80% of the total catches of the artisanal fishery. The remainder is produced by independent fibras operating in inshore waters with pelagic longlines and/or surface gillnets. A multivariate regression tree analysis was used to investigate spatio-environmental effects on the nodriza fleet (n = 6,821 trips). The catch species composition of the nodriza fleet is strongly influenced by the northwesterly circulation of the Humboldt Current along the coast of Peru and its associated cold waters masses. The target species and longline gear-type used by nodrizas change seasonally with the incursion of cool waters (< 25°C) from the south and offshore. During this season, dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus) dominates the catches. However, in warmer waters, the fishery changes to tuna-billfish-shark longline gear and the catch composition becomes much more diverse. PMID:26317751

  4. Adapting livestock management to spatio-temporal heterogeneity in semi-arid rangelands.

    PubMed

    Jakoby, O; Quaas, M F; Baumgärtner, S; Frank, K

    2015-10-01

    Management strategies in rotational grazing systems differ in their level of complexity and adaptivity. Different components of such grazing strategies are expected to allow for adaptation to environmental heterogeneities in space and time. However, most models investigating general principles of rangeland management strategies neglect spatio-temporal system properties including seasonality and spatial heterogeneity of environmental variables. We developed an ecological-economic rangeland model that combines a spatially explicit farm structure with intra-annual time steps. This allows investigating different management components in rotational grazing systems (including stocking and rotation rules) and evaluating their effect on the ecological and economic states of semi-arid grazing systems. Our results show that adaptive stocking is less sensitive to overstocking compared to a constant stocking strategy. Furthermore, the rotation rule becomes important only at stocking numbers that maximize expected income. Altogether, the best of the tested strategies is adaptive stocking combined with a rotation that adapts to both spatial forage availability and seasonality. This management strategy maximises mean income and at the same time maintains the rangeland in a viable condition. However, we could also show that inappropriate adaptation that neglects seasonality even leads to deterioration. Rangelands characterised by higher inter-annual climate variability show a higher risk of income losses under a non-adaptive stocking rule, and non-adaptive rotation is least able to buffer increasing climate variability. Overall, all important system properties including seasonality and spatial heterogeneity of available resources need to be considered when designing an appropriate rangeland management system. Resulting adaptive rotational grazing strategies can be valuable for improving management and mitigating income risks. PMID:26241933

  5. Spatio-temporal radiation biology with conventionally or laser-accelerated particles for ELIMED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risti?-Fira, A.; Bulat, T.; Keta, O.; Romano, F.; Cirrone, P.; Cuttone, G.; Petrovi?, I.

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the behavior of radio-resistant human malignant cells, thus enabling better understanding of radiobiological effects of ions in such a case. Radiation sources such as accelerated continuous ion beams and laser technology-based ultra short radiation sources with energy of around 10 MeV will be used. The HTB140 melanoma cells are chosen since it has been shown that they represent the limit case of cellular radio-resistance among the studied tumor cell lines. These cells are particularly interesting as they provide data on the very edge of inactivation capacity of each beam line that is tested. After exposing the cell monolayers to continuous radiations of low (?-rays) and high (protons) linear energy transfer, the kinetics of disappearance of the phosphorylated histone H2AX (?-H2AX) foci per cell will be determined. The same procedure will be performed with the pulsed high dose rate protons. Detection and quantification of ?-H2AX foci will be performed by immunohistochemical 3D time-dependent imaging analyses using laser scanning confocal microscopy. Immunoblotting will enable the follow-up of the relation between ?-H2AX and cell cycle arrest via the p53/p21 pathway. In such a way the spatio-temporal changes on sub-cellular level will be visualized, quantified and compared. These results will show whether there is a difference in the effects on cells between continuous and pulsed irradiation mode. Therefore, they will contribute to the data base that might promote pulsed sources for medical treatments of malignant growths.

  6. Spatio-temporal variability of NDVI-precipitation over southernmost South America: possible linkages between climate signals and epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourre, Y. M.; Jarlan, L.; Lacaux, J.-P.; Rotela, C. H.; Lafaye, M.

    2008-10-01

    Climate-environment variability affects the rates of incidence of vector-borne and zoonotic diseases and is possibly associated with epidemics outbreaks. Over southernmost South America the joint spatio-temporal evolution of climate-environment is analyzed for the 1982-2004 period. Detailed mapping of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and rainfall variability are then compared to zones with preliminary epidemiological reports. A significant quasi-biennial signal (2.2- to 2.4-year periods, or QB) for joint NDVI-rainfall variability is revealed. From rotated EOFs, dominant NDVI patterns are partitioned according to their lead frequencies: (1) the 'QB group' (2.1-to 3-year periods) includes six modes over southern Brazil, Uruguay, northern-central Argentina (two modes), the southern Paraguay-northern Argentina border, and the Santa Cruz Province; (2) the QB1 (2.4- to 3-year periods) + quasi-quadrennial (QQ) mode over the Misiones Province; and (3) the QB2 (2.1- to 2.5-year periods) + QQ + inter-annual (IA) (3- to 7-year periods) two modes over south-eastern Argentina. Modes within the 'QB group' are positively correlated with global climate signals and SST. The Uruguayan mode is correlated with global ENSO (8-month lag) whilst the southern Entre-Rios/northern Buenos Aires provinces are correlated with central equatorial Pacific SSTs (3-month lag). The Santa Cruz (Patagonia) Province is most correlated with the Pacific South America (PSA) index and SST patterns (3-month lag) along the Antarctica circumpolar current. The spatial distribution of lead NDVI modes includes the Formosa, Misiones, Chaco and Buenos Aires provinces among others, known for being prone to vector-borne epidemics such as dengue fever, malaria, leishmaniasis (American cutaneous leishmaniasis or ACL), hantivirus, chagas and Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF). Some provinces also correspond to regions where lead NDVI PCs' modes are associated with high-frequency climate signals such as the quasi-biennial oscillation in northwest Argentina. The joint preliminary results (climate-environment-public health reports) presented here for the first time are meant: (1) to contribute to a better understanding of climate-environment-epidemics process-based and modeling studies and (2) to facilitate, in the long run, the implementation of local and regional health early warning systems (HEWS) over southernmost South America. The latter is becoming crucial with ever-increasing migration, urban sprawl (re-emergence of dengue fever epidemics since the late 1990s), all embedded in a climate change context.

  7. Spatio-temporal Estimates of CO2 Emissions in the Los Angeles Basin from On-road and Airport Traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, P.; Song, Y.; Patarasuk, R.; Gurney, K. R.; Eldering, A.; O'Keeffe, D.; Miller, C. E.; Duren, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Characterizing the spatio-temporal distribution of fossil fuel CO2 (FFCO2) emissions in urban landscapes is challenging. We use Hestia, an innovative "bottom up" approach for estimating FFCO2 emissions in the Los Angeles (LA) megacity and Southern California Air Basin (SCAB) which account for ~53% of the FFCO2 emissions in California. Hestia-LA, in coordination with "top down" atmospheric CO2 measurements, will provide baseline FFCO2 emissions, help monitor changes in emissions, and develop emissions mitigation policies. Hestia-LA characterizes FFCO2 emissions at the building/street spatial scale (10-100 m) and at hourly time steps in the basin by combining data on residential and commercial building emissions, industrial processes, electricity production, and different transportation sectors. We report here on the construction of the spatial and temporal structure in two key transportation sectors within the SCAB: on-road vehicle (46%) and aircraft (2%) emissions. We quantified on-road traffic emissions by merging traffic data from Southern California Association of Governments, California Freeway Performance Measurement System and modeled motor vehicle emissions from EPA's NMIM model. Preliminary analysis shows that (1) LA and Orange counties dominate the annual FFCO2 emissions from urban freeways and arterials, and (2) LA county has a wider peak traffic period during weekdays (2-6pm) than the other four counties (4-5pm). We characterized airport emissions by integrating information from Federal Aviation Administration, Los Angeles World Airports, and Airnav LLC for the temporal structure of aircraft arrivals and departures, and the National Emissions Inventory for total annual aircraft emissions. We categorized the 47 airports in LA basin based on the volume and type (commercial, general aviation and military) of aircraft traffic, and then assigned appropriate hour-of-day and day-of-week traffic volume-specific CO2 emission patterns to each airport. We found that Los Angeles international airport has a unique diurnal traffic pattern with a broad peak during 6am-9pm and differs from the more prevalent general aviation airports which peak in traffic during 10am-4pm.

  8. High-resolution spatio-temporal source inversion of a long-period (LP) sequence recorded by a dense broadband network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokmer, Ivan; O'Brien, Gareth; de Barros, Louis; Bean, Christopher

    2010-05-01

    Since physical processes within a volcano generate seismological signals on its surface, seismology plays an important role in determining the internal volcano dynamics. Long period (LP) events (f=0.2 - 2 Hz), often occurring in swarms, are of particular interest to achieve this task as their repetitive nature provides a good basis for monitoring the temporal changes of the upper part of a volcano on different time scales (from days to years). The similarity of the waveforms within a swarm suggests that they are generated by non-destructive repetitive or slowly changing source process. Although the proposed LP source models relate this type of events to resonance of fluid-filled cracks, dykes and conduits, their exact origin is still under debate. Consequently, in an effort to better understand the exact origin of LP seismicity, inverting seismic waveform for LP source mechanisms is becoming increasingly common. The most critical aspect in such modelling procedures lies in the accurate calculation of the Green's functions. It was shown in the recent literature that a fine scale shallow structure (hundred metres) which lies below the resolution limits commonly exhibited by 3D velocity models of volcanic interiors can lead to apparently stable, but erroneous source models. In addition, the simultaneous search for a source location may also converge in a considerably wrong solution (~ 1 km). Such unreliable (and possibly misleading) solutions are particularly pronounced when a dataset is limited to the records obtained from a sparse network placed in the far-field of the source (~ 5-10 km). Our recent results suggested that this issue can be overcome by using a dense broadband network, placed directly above the source. Therefore, in this study we use 30 broadband stations placed within 2 km from the Etna summit. The LP activity recorded by this network in June 2008 was located using the relative time delays between all station pairs, obtained by the cross-correlation of similar waveforms across the network. This lead to an unprecedented high-resolution short-term spatio-temporal image of the LP source zone. In this study we perform a simultaneous inversion for source mechanism and locations, using the same high resolution near-field dataset. The aims of this exercise are (i) to test our ability to reconstruct a consistent image of the source zone by using different methods (source inversion vs. cross-correlation location technique), and (ii) to constrain the source mechanisms of the recorded LP sequence. This may lead to an improved spatio-temporal image of the shallow internal dynamic of Etna volcano.

  9. Spatio-temporal Model of Endogenous ROS and Raft-Dependent WNT/Beta-Catenin Signaling Driving Cell Fate Commitment in Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Haack, Fiete; Lemcke, Heiko; Ewald, Roland; Rharass, Tareck; Uhrmacher, Adelinde M.

    2015-01-01

    Canonical WNT/?-catenin signaling is a central pathway in embryonic development, but it is also connected to a number of cancers and developmental disorders. Here we apply a combined in-vitro and in-silico approach to investigate the spatio-temporal regulation of WNT/?-catenin signaling during the early neural differentiation process of human neural progenitors cells (hNPCs), which form a new prospect for replacement therapies in the context of neurodegenerative diseases. Experimental measurements indicate a second signal mechanism, in addition to canonical WNT signaling, being involved in the regulation of nuclear ?-catenin levels during the cell fate commitment phase of neural differentiation. We find that the biphasic activation of ?-catenin signaling observed experimentally can only be explained through a model that combines Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and raft dependent WNT/?-catenin signaling. Accordingly after initiation of differentiation endogenous ROS activates DVL in a redox-dependent manner leading to a transient activation of down-stream ?-catenin signaling, followed by continuous auto/paracrine WNT signaling, which crucially depends on lipid rafts. Our simulation studies further illustrate the elaborate spatio-temporal regulation of DVL, which, depending on its concentration and localization, may either act as direct inducer of the transient ROS/?-catenin signal or as amplifier during continuous auto-/parcrine WNT/?-catenin signaling. In addition we provide the first stochastic computational model of WNT/?-catenin signaling that combines membrane-related and intracellular processes, including lipid rafts/receptor dynamics as well as WNT- and ROS-dependent ?-catenin activation. The model’s predictive ability is demonstrated under a wide range of varying conditions for in-vitro and in-silico reference data sets. Our in-silico approach is realized in a multi-level rule-based language, that facilitates the extension and modification of the model. Thus, our results provide both new insights and means to further our understanding of canonical WNT/?-catenin signaling and the role of ROS as intracellular signaling mediator. PMID:25793621

  10. Spatio-temporal model of endogenous ROS and raft-dependent WNT/beta-catenin signaling driving cell fate commitment in human neural progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Haack, Fiete; Lemcke, Heiko; Ewald, Roland; Rharass, Tareck; Uhrmacher, Adelinde M

    2015-03-01

    Canonical WNT/?-catenin signaling is a central pathway in embryonic development, but it is also connected to a number of cancers and developmental disorders. Here we apply a combined in-vitro and in-silico approach to investigate the spatio-temporal regulation of WNT/?-catenin signaling during the early neural differentiation process of human neural progenitors cells (hNPCs), which form a new prospect for replacement therapies in the context of neurodegenerative diseases. Experimental measurements indicate a second signal mechanism, in addition to canonical WNT signaling, being involved in the regulation of nuclear ?-catenin levels during the cell fate commitment phase of neural differentiation. We find that the biphasic activation of ?-catenin signaling observed experimentally can only be explained through a model that combines Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and raft dependent WNT/?-catenin signaling. Accordingly after initiation of differentiation endogenous ROS activates DVL in a redox-dependent manner leading to a transient activation of down-stream ?-catenin signaling, followed by continuous auto/paracrine WNT signaling, which crucially depends on lipid rafts. Our simulation studies further illustrate the elaborate spatio-temporal regulation of DVL, which, depending on its concentration and localization, may either act as direct inducer of the transient ROS/?-catenin signal or as amplifier during continuous auto-/parcrine WNT/?-catenin signaling. In addition we provide the first stochastic computational model of WNT/?-catenin signaling that combines membrane-related and intracellular processes, including lipid rafts/receptor dynamics as well as WNT- and ROS-dependent ?-catenin activation. The model's predictive ability is demonstrated under a wide range of varying conditions for in-vitro and in-silico reference data sets. Our in-silico approach is realized in a multi-level rule-based language, that facilitates the extension and modification of the model. Thus, our results provide both new insights and means to further our understanding of canonical WNT/?-catenin signaling and the role of ROS as intracellular signaling mediator. PMID:25793621

  11. Demand-supply dynamics in tourism systems: A spatio-temporal GIS analysis. The Alberta ski industry case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertazzon, Stefania

    The present research focuses on the interaction of supply and demand of down-hill ski tourism in the province of Alberta. The main hypothesis is that the demand for skiing depends on the socio-economic and demographic characteristics of the population living in the province and outside it. A second, consequent hypothesis is that the development of ski resorts (supply) is a response to the demand for skiing. From the latter derives the hypothesis of a dynamic interaction between supply (ski resorts) and demand (skiers). Such interaction occurs in space, within a range determined by physical distance and the means available to overcome it. The above hypotheses implicitly define interactions that take place in space and evolve over time. The hypotheses are tested by temporal, spatial, and spatio-temporal regression models, using the best available data and the latest commercially available software. The main purpose of this research is to explore analytical techniques to model spatial, temporal, and spatio-temporal dynamics in the context of regional science. The completion of the present research has produced more significant contributions than was originally expected. Many of the unexpected contributions resulted from theoretical and applied needs arising from the application of spatial regression models. Spatial regression models are a new and largely under-applied technique. The models are fairly complex and a considerable amount of preparatory work is needed, prior to their specification and estimation. Most of this work is specific to the field of application. The originality of the solutions devised is increased by the lack of applications in the field of tourism. The scarcity of applications in other fields adds to their value for other applications. The estimation of spatio-temporal models has been only partially attained in the present research. This apparent limitation is due to the novelty and complexity of the analytical methods applied. This opens new directions for further work in the field of spatial analysis, in conjunction with the development of specific software.

  12. TU-F-BRF-08: Intensity Modulation Expanded to Spatio-Temporal Space; IMRT Combined with Optimal Fractionation Schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M; Saberian, F; Ghate, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Past efforts to improve the therapeutic ratio have focused on a spatial approach where highly conformal radiation dose is given to tumors while minimizing dose to normal tissues, e.g., IMRT, VMAT, and IGRT. However, the fractionation schedule, i.e., a temporal approach to radiotherapy, has been largely overlooked so far in maximizing the therapeutic ratio. We establish a rigorous mathematical spatio-temporal approach to systematically investigate the feasibility and potential benefits of simultaneously optimizing radiation dose distribution in space and time. Methods: Stochastic control formalism is constructed to maximize the average tumor BED by choosing an optimal radiation dose distribution for an optimal number of fractions subject to normal tissue BED constraints. Three separate simulations are run on two groups of phantom cases; 5 cases with prostate cancer and 5 cases with head-and-neck cancer. (1) Conventional IMRT with 70Gy/35fx for head-and-neck, and 81Gy/45fx for prostate, (2) IMRT is done independently from the fractionation schedule optimization (S-model), (3) integrated spatio-temporal approach (I-model) where radiation intensities are simultaneously optimized for the first time ever in space and time. Final tumor BEDs from the three trials are compared in prostate and head-and-neck cases. Results: Numerical simulations show that final tumor BED from I-model is 20–90% larger than conventional IMRT, and 20-50% larger than S-model for head-and-neck cancer with ?/?=10 and Tdouble=2–50 days. Final tumor BED from I-model is also 90–140% larger than conventional IMRT, and 20–30% larger than S-model for prostate cancer with ?/?=2 and Tdouble=5–80 days. Conclusion: Our spatio-temporal optimization of radiotherapy allows an expansion of search space for the optimal treatment plans to include the temporal distribution of radiation dose in addition to the spatial distribution. Such spatio-temporal approach shows great potential to improve the therapeutic ratio, particularly with fast growing, aggressive tumors with short doubling time and/or low ?/?.

  13. Nonlinear spatio-temporal interactions and neural connections in human vision using transient and M-sequence stimuli

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.W.; Aine, C.J.; Flynn, E.R.; Wood, C.C.

    1996-02-01

    Reciprocal connections, in essence, are the dynamic wiring (connections) of the neural network circuitry. Given the high complexity of the neural circuitry in the human brain, it is quite a challenge to study the dynamic wiring of highly parallel and widely distributed neural networks. The measurements of stimulus evoked coherent oscillations provide indirect evidence of dynamic wiring. In this study, in addition to the coherent oscillation measurements, two more techniques are discussed for testing possible dynamic wiring: measurements of spatio-temporal interactions beyond the classical receptive fields, and neural structural testing using nonlinear systems analysis.

  14. Spatio-temporal distribution patterns of the epibenthic community in the coastal waters of Suriname

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willems, Tomas; De Backer, Annelies; Wan Tong You, Kenneth; Vincx, Magda; Hostens, Kris

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to characterize the spatio-temporal patterns of the epibenthic community in the coastal waters of Suriname. Data were collected on a (bi)monthly basis in 2012-2013 at 15 locations in the shallow (<40 m) coastal area, revealing three spatially distinct species assemblages, related to clear gradients in some environmental parameters. A species-poor coastal assemblage was discerned within the muddy, turbid-water zone (6-20 m depth), dominated by Atlantic seabob shrimp Xiphopenaeus kroyeri (Crustacea: Penaeoidea). Near the 30 m isobath, sediments were much coarser (median grain size on average 345±103 ?m vs. 128±53 ?m in the coastal assemblage) and water transparency was much higher (on average 7.6±3.5 m vs. 2.4±2.1 m in the coastal assemblage). In this zone, a diverse offshore assemblage was found, characterized by brittle stars (mainly Ophioderma brevispina and Ophiolepis elegans) and a variety of crabs, sea stars and hermit crabs. In between both zones, a transition assemblage was noted, with epibenthic species typically found in either the coastal or offshore assemblages, but mainly characterized by the absence of X. kroyeri. Although the epibenthic community was primarily structured in an on-offshore gradient related to depth, sediment grain size and sediment total organic carbon content, a longitudinal (west-east) gradient was apparent as well. The zones in the eastern part of the Suriname coastal shelf seemed to be more widely stretched along the on-offshore gradient. Although clear seasonal differences were noted in the environmental characteristics (e.g. dry vs. rainy season), this was not reflected in the epibenthic community structure. X. kroyeri reached very high densities (up to 1383 ind 1000 m-²) in the shallow coastal waters of Suriname. As X. kroyeri is increasingly exploited throughout its range, the current study provides the ecological context for its presence and abundance, which is crucial for an ecosystem approach and the sustainable management of this commercially important species and its habitat.

  15. Spatio-temporal Patterns and Landscape-Associated Risk of Buruli Ulcer in Akonolinga, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Landier, Jordi; Gaudart, Jean; Carolan, Kevin; Lo Seen, Danny; Guégan, Jean-François; Eyangoh, Sara; Fontanet, Arnaud; Texier, Gaëtan

    2014-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is an extensively damaging skin infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, whose transmission mode is still unknown. The focal distribution of BU and the absence of interpersonal transmission suggest a major role of environmental factors, which remain unidentified. This study provides the first description of the spatio-temporal variations of BU in an endemic African region, in Akonolinga, Cameroon. We quantify landscape-associated risk of BU, and reveal local patterns of endemicity. Methodology/Principal Findings From January 2002 to May 2012, 787 new BU cases were recorded in 154 villages of the district of Akonolinga. Incidence per village ranged from 0 (n?=?59 villages) to 10.4 cases/1000 person.years (py); median incidence was 0.4 cases/1,000py. Villages neighbouring the Nyong River flood plain near Akonolinga town were identified as the highest risk zone using the SPODT algorithm. We found a decreasing risk with increasing distance to the Nyong and identified 4 time phases with changes in spatial distribution. We classified the villages into 8 groups according to landscape characteristics using principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering. We estimated the incidence ratio (IR) associated with each landscape using a generalised linear model. BU risk was highest in landscapes with abundant wetlands, especially cultivated ones (IR?=?15.7, 95% confidence interval [95%CI]?=?15.7[4.2–59.2]), and lowest in reference landscape where primary and secondary forest cover was abundant. In intermediate-risk landscapes, risk decreased with agriculture pressure (from IR[95%CI]?=?7.9[2.2–28.8] to 2.0[0.6–6.6]). We identified landscapes where endemicity was stable and landscapes where incidence increased with time. Conclusion/Significance Our study on the largest series of BU cases recorded in a single endemic region illustrates the local evolution of BU and identifies the Nyong River as the major driver of BU incidence. Local differences along the river are explained by wetland abundance and human modification of the environment. PMID:25188464

  16. Spatio-temporal Trends in Seasonal Vegetation Photosynthetic Activity Across Uttarakhand Himalayas, 2000-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, N. B.; Chaudhuri, G.

    2014-12-01

    Himalayan mountain system in the Indian sub-continent are among the most ecologically sensitive environments and are also a repository of biodiversity and ecosystem services. Over the last few decades, land transformation related to exploitative land uses is among the main drivers of changing vegetation cover and productivity in western Himalayas. In a region where field based research is challenging due to heterogeneous relief and high altitude, quantifying changes in vegetation productivity using remote sensing can provide essential information regarding trends in vegetation cover and its linkages with Land Use Land Cover (LULC) dynamics. We conducted seasonal trend analysis (STA) on MODIS NDVI time-series data (2000-2014) over Uttarakhand Himalayas and examined spatio-temporal patterns in vegetation trend and its association with altitudinal gradient and LULC dynamics. In STA the first step determines the annual mean and seasonal NDVI patterns and the second step analyzes the non-parametric trend in magnitude and timing of the annual mean and seasonal NDVI cycle. In total 3286.82 km2 (6.9% vegetated area of Uttarakhand) showed significant trend (p<0.01) in mean annual greenness. While areas <800 m elevation showed dominant negative trend in mean annual greenness, area between 800-1600m showed mostly positive trend and majority of areas >1600 m were characterized by negative trend in mean annual greenness. Considering LULC characteristics, majority of intensively cultivated irrigated croplands in the Himalayan foothills as well as areas around growing urban centers showed widespread negative trend in mean annual greenness, which was contrastingly different from rainfed cultivation areas that showed dominant positive trend. Negative trend in mean annual greenness was observed to be consistent with increasing altitude and particularly in closed needle leaf forests and alpine shrublands except areas where human impacts has led to mixed patterns. Trends in the annual seasonal timing of NDVI indicated an earlier green-up for most parts of the Uttarakhand Himalayas. These results are somewhat surprising and are partially in agreement with previous studies that suggest increasing brownness in Himalayan vegetation based on analyses of comparatively much coarser spatial resolution NDVI time-series.

  17. Spatio-temporal variations of Planetary Boundary Layer characteristics over Indian subcontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karipot, Anandakumar; Prabha, Thara; Maheshkumar R., S.

    2010-05-01

    The Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) characteristics play an important role in mixing, cloud formation and pollutant transport, but their diurnal, seasonal and inter-annual variations on a regional scale over the Indian subcontinent is not well-understood. Proper PBL characterization requires measurements with adequate spatial and temporal resolution, whereas methods using traditional radiosonde observations are limited in spatial and temporal coverage and observations are lacking over oceanic regions. Again, the available twice daily observations over the Indian region are in the local morning and evening hours (corresponding to 0000 and 1200 UTC), which completely excludes information on daytime and nocturnal boundary layer. Atmospheric profiling with the satellite based Global Positioning System (GPS) Radio Occultation (RO) is a relatively new technique that provides air temperature and water vapor profiles with an almost uniform global coverage at sufficiently large vertical resolution (100 - 200 m in the troposphere to 1 km in the stratosphere). The RO technique utilizes the information on bending and time delay of GPS signals for the estimation of atmospheric refractivity and thus the air temperature and water vapor profiles. The GPS RO atmospheric profiles can fill in the temporal and spatial voids in radiosonde data and be used for the estimation of PBL parameters. The Indian subcontinent characterized by two monsoon regimes and several different climate zones with humid and arid regions, is an ideal test bed for evaluating the GPS RO data. However, evaluation and use of these datasets over the Indian subcontinent have been limited. The present study focuses on the estimation of PBL height and other important boundary-layer parameters from GPS RO data and validating them by comparing with those derived from radiosonde measurements over different geographical locations on Indian subcontinent. The COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology Ionosphere & Climate) RO atmospheric profiles over the Indian region during 2007-2009 are used for the analysis. The radiosonde data used are from two sources: (i) routine radiosonde observations conducted by India Meteorological Department over the Indian subcontinent and (ii) additional radiosonde observations conducted by the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology as a part of the Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX) during the southwest monsoon season May-September, 2009. In order to extrapolate the information on a spatio-temporal scale, comparison of PBL parameters from the observational methods and high-resolution WRF model simulations over selected regions is also conducted. The variation in PBL characteristics over the Indian subcontinent are depicted using parameters calculated from observations and WRF model simulations.

  18. Modelling natural grass production and its spatio-temporal variations in a semiarid Mediterranean watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnabel, Susanne; Lozano-Parra, Javier; Maneta-López, Marco

    2014-05-01

    Natural grasses are found in semiarid rangelands with disperse tree cover of part of the Iberian Peninsula and constitute a resource with high ecologic and economic value worth, being an important source of food for livestock, playing a significant role in the hydrologic cycle, controlling the soil thermal regime, and are a key factor in reducing soil erosion and degradation. However, increasing pressure on the resources, changes in land use as well as possible climate variations threaten the sustainability of natural grasses. Despite of their importance, the spatio-temporal variations of pasture production over whole watersheds are poorly known. In this sense, previous studies by other authors have indicated its dependence on a balance of positive and negative effects brought about by the main limiting factors: water, light, nutrients and space. Nevertheless, the specific weight of each factor is not clear because they are highly variable due to climate characteristics and the structure of these agroforestry systems. We have used a physical spatially-distributed ecohydrologic model to investigate the specific weight of factors that contribute to pasture production in a semiarid watershed of 99.5 ha in western Spain. This model couples a two layer (canopy and understory) vertical local closure energy balance scheme, a hydrologic model and a carbon uptake and vegetation growth component, and it was run using a synthetic daily climate dataset generated by a stochastic weather generator, which reproduced the range of climatic variations observed under mediterranean current climate. The modelling results reproduced satisfactorily the seasonality effects of climate as precipitation and temperatures, as well as annual and inter-annual variations of pasture production. Spatial variations of pasture production were largely controlled by topographic and tree effects, showing medium-low values depending of considered areas. These low values require introduction of feed to livestock. Valley bottoms, areas with low slopes, and spaces with low tree density are characterized by higher pasture production. Temporal variations of pasture production largely depended on the availability of soil moisture, which in turn depended on the temporal distribution of rainfall. This ecohydrologic model constitutes a valuable tool to investigate water and energy fluxes, as well as vegetation dynamics in semiarid rangelands, as was proved by a quantitative assessment of the quality of the simulations. The range of applications and possibilities contained in the model opens a wide field for future research.

  19. Processes and Events in Dynamic Geo-Networks Antony Galton1

    E-print Network

    Worboys, Mike

    of data in a spatio-temporal GIS. These issues are addressed in this paper with reference to dynamic geo, socioeconomic and demographic applications, health and epidemiology, multimedia, governance and administration in a spatio-temporal GIS. There is a parallel here with the early days of static GIS, and the process

  20. Spatio-temporal mapping of variation potentials in leaves of Helianthus annuus L. seedlings in situ using multi-electrode array.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dong-Jie; Wang, Zhong-Yi; Huang, Lan; Jia, Yong-Peng; Leng, John Q

    2014-01-01

    Damaging thermal stimuli trigger long-lasting variation potentials (VPs) in higher plants. Owing to limitations in conventional plant electrophysiological recording techniques, recorded signals are composed of signals originating from all of the cells that are connected to an electrode. This limitation does not enable detailed spatio-temporal distributions of transmission and electrical activities in plants to be visualised. Multi-electrode array (MEA) enables the recording and imaging of dynamic spatio-temporal electrical activities in higher plants. Here, we used an 8 × 8 MEA with a polar distance of 450??m to measure electrical activities from numerous cells simultaneously. The mapping of the data that were recorded from the MEA revealed the transfer mode of the thermally induced VPs in the leaves of Helianthus annuus L. seedlings in situ. These results suggest that MEA can enable recordings with high spatio-temporal resolution that facilitate the determination of the bioelectrical response mode of higher plants under stress. PMID:24961469

  1. Spatio-temporal patterns of hazards and their use in risk assessment and mitigation. Case study of road accidents in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalin Stanga, Iulian

    2013-04-01

    Road accidents are among the leading causes of death in many world countries, partly as an inherent consequence of the increasing mobility of today society. The World Health Organization estimates that 1.3 million people died in road accidents in 2011, which means 186 deaths per million. The tragic picture is completed by millions of peoples experiencing different physical injuries or by the enormous social and economic costs that these events imply. Romania has one of the most unsafe road networks within the European Union, with annual averages of 9400 accidents, 8300 injuries and almost 2680 fatalities (2007-2012). An average of 141 death per million is more than twice the average fatality rate in European Union (about 60 death per million). Other specific indicators (accidents or fatalities reported to the road length, vehicle fleet size, driving license owners or adult population etc.) are even worst in the same European context. Road accidents are caused by a complex series of factors, some of them being a relatively constant premise, while others act as catalyzing factors or triggering agent: road features and quality, vehicle technical state, weather conditions, human related factors etc. All these lead to a complex equation with too many unknown variables, making almost impossible a probabilistic approach. However, the high concentration of accidents in a region or in some road sectors is caused by the existence of a specific context, created by factors with permanent or repetitive character, and leads to the idea of a spatial autocorrelation between locations of different adjoining accident. In the same way, the increasing frequency of road accidents and of their causes repeatability in different periods of the year would allow to identify those black timeframes with higher incidence of road accidents. Identifying and analyzing the road blackspots (hotspots) and black zones would help to improve road safety by acting against the common causes that create the spatial or temporal clustering of crash accidents. Since the 1990's, Geographical Informational Systems (GIS) became a very important tool for traffic and road safety management, allowing not only the spatial and multifactorial analysis, but also graphical and non-graphical outputs. The current paper presents an accessible GIS methodology to study the spatio-temporal pattern of injury related road accidents, to identify the high density accidents zones, to make a cluster analysis, to create multicriterial typologies, to identify spatial and temporal similarities and to explain them. In this purpose, a Geographical Information System was created, allowing a complex analysis that involves not only the events, but also a large set of interrelated and spatially linked attributes. The GIS includes the accidents as georeferenced point elements with a spatially linked attribute database: identification information (date, location details); accident type; main, secondary and aggravating causes; data about driver; vehicle information; consequences (damages, injured peoples and fatalities). Each attribute has its own number code that allows both the statistical analysis and the spatial interrogation. The database includes those road accidents that led to physical injuries and loss of human lives between 2007 and 2012 and the spatial analysis was realized using TNTmips 7.3 software facilities. Data aggregation and processing allowed creating the spatial pattern of injury related road accidents through Kernel density estimation at three different levels (national - Romania; county level - Iasi County; local level - Iasi town). Spider graphs were used to create the temporal pattern or road accidents at three levels (daily, weekly and monthly) directly related to their causes. Moreover the spatial and temporal database relates the natural hazards (glazed frost, fog, and blizzard) with the human made ones, giving the opportunity to evaluate the nature of uncertainties in risk assessment. At the end, this paper provides a clustering methodology based on several environmenta

  2. Advanced spatio-temporal modelling in long-term radiological assessment models--radionuclides in the soil column.

    PubMed

    K?os, R A; Limer, L; Shaw, G; Pérez-Sánchez, D; Xu, S

    2014-03-01

    Recent developments in the modelling of key radionuclides in long-timescale assessments of the safety of geological disposal of spent fuel and other radioactive wastes emphasise the influence of the redox conditions of the soil column. Models with higher spatial resolution than typically employed in standard modelling approaches have been shown to capture important features of experimental observations that are not otherwise manifested. Furthermore, models with monthly, rather than annually, averaged parameters and with dynamic transfers between soil and plant have been shown to lead to key differences compared with standard models employing soil-plant concentration ratios. This paper looks at the potential for the inclusion of a higher spatio-temporal resolution in models for long-timescale dose assessments and includes representations of measured plant-root distributions as well as the effects of bioturbation. Focusing here on the distribution and dynamics of radionuclides in the soil column, the effects of different spatial and temporal resolution are compared, together with an investigation of the way in which the hydrology of the soil column is represented. The approach has been successfully incorporated into a practical assessment-level model. Results indicate the potential importance of higher spatio-temporal resolution in modelling soil column dynamics, particularly of weakly sorbing radionuclides in long-timescale assessments featuring sudden transitions between ecosystem types. PMID:24270190

  3. The Homeobox Genes of Caenorhabditis elegans and Insights into Their Spatio-Temporal Expression Dynamics during Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Zied, Akram M.; Lüppert, Martin; Dethlefsen, Johan; Mukherjee, Krishanu; Tong, Yong Guang; Tang, Lois; Gangishetti, Umesh; Baillie, David L.; Bürglin, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Homeobox genes play crucial roles for the development of multicellular eukaryotes. We have generated a revised list of all homeobox genes for Caenorhabditis elegans and provide a nomenclature for the previously unnamed ones. We show that, out of 103 homeobox genes, 70 are co-orthologous to human homeobox genes. 14 are highly divergent, lacking an obvious ortholog even in other Caenorhabditis species. One of these homeobox genes encodes 12 homeodomains, while three other highly divergent homeobox genes encode a novel type of double homeodomain, termed HOCHOB. To understand how transcription factors regulate cell fate during development, precise spatio-temporal expression data need to be obtained. Using a new imaging framework that we developed, Endrov, we have generated spatio-temporal expression profiles during embryogenesis of over 60 homeobox genes, as well as a number of other developmental control genes using GFP reporters. We used dynamic feedback during recording to automatically adjust the camera exposure time in order to increase the dynamic range beyond the limitations of the camera. We have applied the new framework to examine homeobox gene expression patterns and provide an analysis of these patterns. The methods we developed to analyze and quantify expression data are not only suitable for C. elegans, but can be applied to other model systems or even to tissue culture systems. PMID:26024448

  4. Spatio-temporal variability of SST and Chlorophyll-a from MODIS data in the Persian Gulf.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Masoud; Kabiri, Keivan

    2015-09-15

    Spatio-temporal variability of SST and Chl-a evaluated using MODIS products from 2002 to 2013 in the Persian Gulf. Wavelet Transform was utilized to analyze the spatio-temporal stability and abnormality of MODIS SST and Chl-a. The stationary level of SST decreases from west to the east during summer to early autumn, and increases from late autumn to spring. The stationary level of Chl-a is higher in the coastal areas, while its average ranged from 0.1 to 0.5mgm(-3). No meaningful major oscillating period observed in the abnormal variability of SST and Chl-a. The winter and summer peaks of SST and Chl-a were observed in the central parts and north-west regions. The timing of maximum SST was observed in August, which is not correlated with Chl-a maxima. The variability of SST and Chl-a in the whole Persian Gulf is seasonal, and related to river outflows, water circulation and climate regimes. PMID:26187398

  5. Downscaling future precipitation extremes to urban hydrology scales using a spatio-temporal Neyman-Scott weather generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sørup, H. J. D.; Christensen, O. B.; Arnbjerg-Nielsen, K.; Mikkelsen, P. S.

    2015-02-01

    Spatio-temporal precipitation is modelled for urban application at 1 h temporal resolution on a 2 km grid using a Spatio-Temporal Neyman-Scott Rectangular Pulses weather generator (WG). Precipitation time series for fitting the model are obtained from a network of 60 tipping-bucket rain gauges irregularly placed in a 40 by 60 km model domain. The model simulates precipitation time series that are comparable to the observations with respect to extreme precipitation statistics. The WG is used for downscaling climate change signals from Regional Climate Models (RCMs) with spatial resolutions of 25 and 8 km respectively. Six different RCM simulations are used to perturb the WG with climate change signals resulting in six very different perturbation schemes. All perturbed WGs result in more extreme precipitation at the sub-daily to multi-daily level and these extremes exhibit a much more realistic spatial pattern than what is observed in RCM precipitation output. The WG seems to correlate increased extreme intensities with an increased spatial extent of the extremes meaning that the climate-change-perturbed extremes have a larger spatial extent than those of the present climate. Overall, the WG produces robust results and is seen as a reliable procedure for downscaling RCM precipitation output for use in urban hydrology.

  6. Spatio-temporal variations in the diversity and abundance of commercially important Decapoda and Stomatopoda in subtropical Hong Kong waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lui, Karen K. Y.; Ng, Jasmine S. S.; Leung, Kenneth M. Y.

    2007-05-01

    In subtropical Hong Kong, western waters (WW) are strongly influenced by the freshwater input from the Pearl River estuary, especially during summer monsoon, whereas eastern waters (EW) are predominantly influenced by oceanic currents throughout the year. Such hydrographical differences may lead to spatio-temporal differences in biodiversity of benthic communities. This study investigated the diversity and abundance of commercially important decapods and stomatopods in EW (i.e. Tolo Harbour and Channel) and WW (i.e. Tuen Mun and Lantau Island) of Hong Kong using monthly trawl surveys (August 2003-May 2005). In total, 22 decapod and nine stomatopod species were recorded. The penaeid Metapenaeopsis sp. and stomatopod Oratosquillina interrupta were the most abundant and dominant crustaceans in EW and WW, respectively. Both univariate and multivariate analyses showed that WW supported significantly higher abundance, biomass and diversity of crustaceans than EW, although there were significant between-site and within-site variations in community structure. Higher abundance and biomass of crustaceans were recorded in summer than winter. Such spatio-temporal variations could be explained by differences in the hydrography, environmental conditions and anthropogenic impacts between the two areas. Temporal patterns in the abundance-biomass comparison curves and negative W-statistics suggest that the communities have been highly disturbed in both areas, probably due to anthropogenic activities such as bottom trawling and marine pollution.

  7. Spatio-temporal dynamics of a fish spawning aggregation and its fishery in the Gulf of California

    PubMed Central

    Erisman, Brad; Aburto-Oropeza, Octavio; Gonzalez-Abraham, Charlotte; Mascareñas-Osorio, Ismael; Moreno-Báez, Marcia; Hastings, Philip A.

    2012-01-01

    We engaged in cooperative research with fishers and stakeholders to characterize the fine-scale, spatio-temporal characteristics of spawning behavior in an aggregating marine fish (Cynoscion othonopterus: Sciaenidae) and coincident activities of its commercial fishery in the Upper Gulf of California. Approximately 1.5–1.8 million fish are harvested annually from spawning aggregations of C. othonopterus during 21–25 days of fishing and within an area of 1,149?km2 of a biosphere reserve. Spawning and fishing are synchronized on a semi-lunar cycle, with peaks in both occurring 5 to 2 days before the new and full moon, and fishing intensity and catch are highest at the spawning grounds within a no-take reserve. Results of this study demonstrate the benefits of combining GPS data loggers, fisheries data, biological surveys, and cooperative research with fishers to produce spatio-temporally explicit information relevant to the science and management of fish spawning aggregations and the spatial planning of marine reserves. PMID:22359736

  8. Spatio-Temporal Variability of Atmospheric CO2 as Observed from In-Situ Measurements over North America during NASA Field Campaigns (2004-2008)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Yonghoon; Vay, Stephanie A.; Woo, Jung-Hun; Choi, Kichul; Diskin, Glenn S.; Sachse, G. W.; Vadrevu, Krishna P.; Czech, E.

    2009-01-01

    Regional-scale measurements were made over the eastern United States (Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment - North America (INTEX-NA), summer 2004); Mexico (Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO), March 2006); the eastern North Pacific and Alaska (INTEX-B May 2006); and the Canadian Arctic (Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS), spring and summer 2008). For these field campaigns, instrumentation for the in situ measurement of CO2 was integrated on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft providing high-resolution (1 second) data traceable to the WMO CO2 mole fraction scale. These observations provide unique and definitive data sets via their intermediate-scale coverage and frequent vertical profiles (0.1 - 12 km) for examining the variability CO2 exhibits above the Earth s surface. A bottom-up anthropogenic CO2 emissions inventory (1deg 1deg) and processing methodology has also been developed for North America in support of these airborne science missions. In this presentation, the spatio-temporal distributions of CO2 and CO column values derived from the campaign measurements will be examined in conjunction with the emissions inventory and transport histories to aid in the interpretation of the CO2 observations.

  9. On the Order of the Fractional Laplacian in Determining the Spatio-Temporal Evolution of a Space-Fractional Model of Cardiac Electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Cusimano, Nicole; Bueno-Orovio, Alfonso; Turner, Ian; Burrage, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Space-fractional operators have been used with success in a variety of practical applications to describe transport processes in media characterised by spatial connectivity properties and high structural heterogeneity altering the classical laws of diffusion. This study provides a systematic investigation of the spatio-temporal effects of a space-fractional model in cardiac electrophysiology. We consider a simplified model of electrical pulse propagation through cardiac tissue, namely the monodomain formulation of the Beeler-Reuter cell model on insulated tissue fibres, and obtain a space-fractional modification of the model by using the spectral definition of the one-dimensional continuous fractional Laplacian. The spectral decomposition of the fractional operator allows us to develop an efficient numerical method for the space-fractional problem. Particular attention is paid to the role played by the fractional operator in determining the solution behaviour and to the identification of crucial differences between the non-fractional and the fractional cases. We find a positive linear dependence of the depolarization peak height and a power law decay of notch and dome peak amplitudes for decreasing orders of the fractional operator. Furthermore, we establish a quadratic relationship in conduction velocity, and quantify the increasingly wider action potential foot and more pronounced dispersion of action potential duration, as the fractional order is decreased. A discussion of the physiological interpretation of the presented findings is made. PMID:26629898

  10. A Dynamic Spatio-Temporal Model to Investigate the Effect of Cattle Movements on the Spread of Bluetongue BTV-8 in Belgium

    PubMed Central

    Ensoy, Chellafe; Aerts, Marc; Welby, Sarah; Van der Stede, Yves; Faes, Christel

    2013-01-01

    When Bluetongue Virus Serotype 8 (BTV-8) was first detected in Northern Europe in 2006, several guidelines were immediately put into place with the goal to protect farms and stop the spreading of the disease. This however did not prevent further rapid spread of BTV-8 across Northern Europe. Using information on the 2006 Bluetongue outbreak in cattle farms in Belgium, a spatio-temporal transmission model was formulated. The model quantifies the local transmission of the disease between farms within a municipality, the short-distance transmission between farms across neighbouring municipalities and the transmission as a result of cattle movement. Different municipality-level covariates such as farm density, land composition variables, temperature and precipitation, were assessed as possibly influencing each component of the transmission process. Results showed a significant influence of the different covariates in each model component, particularly the significant effect of temperature and precipitation values in the number of infected farms. The model which allowed us to predict the dynamic spreading of BTV for different movement restriction scenarios, also affirmed the significant impact of cattle movement in the 2006 BTV outbreak pattern. Simulation results further showed the importance of considering the size of restriction zones in the formulation of guidelines for animal infectious diseases. PMID:24244324

  11. Monitoring the spatio-temporal evolution of the snow cover in the eastern Alps from MODIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianfarra, P.; Salvini, F.; Valt, M.

    2009-04-01

    Estimating the snow cover extent in mountain ranges is important for a wide variety purposes including of scientific studies, environmental and meteo-climatic applications, as well as predicting water availability for energy resource and agriculture. Moreover, the monitoring of the spatio-temporal variation of the snow cover thickness, coupled with ground data from weather stations, allows to identify avalanche risk areas after heavy snowfall. The aim of this study is to test an automatic procedure to identify and map the snow coverage for different altitude interval in the eastern part of the Alpine range. There has been much progress since 1966 when the first operational snow mapping was done by NOAA with spaceborne sensors that provide daily, global observations to monitor the variability in space and time in the extent of snow cover. MODIS sensors offer increased improvements relative to the AVHRR that has been operational for many years on the NOAA Polar Operational Environmental Satellite System. In this context the MODIS provides observations at a nominal spatial resolution of 500 m versus the 1.1 km spatial resolution of the AVHRR and continuously available (spatially and temporally), spectral band observation that span the visible and short-wave infrared wavelengths, including those useful for recognize snow cover. The other advantage of using MODIS data is its availability and cost by the NASA's server. In this work we used MOD02 (L1B) data providing calibrated radiance values at the sensor (without atmospheric correction). Snow cover map production included the following steps: selection of the images with clear sky conditions, geometric correction and georeferencing to UTM zone 32 ,WSG 84 ellipsoid, to eliminate the distortion of and the typical bow-tie effect that produces the observed not alignment of the scan lines in the row image; spatial sub setting to produce an image covering an area of about 200 x 120 km; identification of the snow cover was done by computing the Normalised Difference Snow Index (NDSI) knowing that snow reflectance is higher in the visible (0.5-0.7 mm) wavelengths and has lower reflectance in the short wave infrared (1-4 mm) wavelengths. This allowed to separate snow from clouds and other non-snow-covered pixels. The NDSI for MODIS images is defined as the difference of reflectances observed in the visible band 4 (0.555 mm) and the short wave infrared band 6 (1.640 mm) divided by the sum of the two reflectances: NDSI=(B4 - B6)/ (B4 + B6) This approach allowed to reduce (yet not totally eliminate) the influence of the atmospheric effects and lighting conditions. A series of thresholds were tested to the ratio image to establish the best value for snow cover identification. Eventually, the snow cover extent was computed for 6 altitude intervals. Results from the different processed images were compared and statistically analysed. A complete set of ground truth of these preliminary results is still missing; yet we are confident that once the tuning of the processing will be completed, the automated processing of MODIS data will provide low cost, near real-time estimates of the snow cover distribution over the eastern Alps. This product would be a valuable tool for public administrations and authorities for environmental protection, control and risk management.

  12. Remotely sensed spatio-temporal trends of irrigation agriculture in northwestern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cela Diaz, F.; Siegfried, T. U.; Vasquez, V.; Pollard, B. S.; Temimi, M.; Narula, K. K.; Lall, U.

    2009-12-01

    Irrigated agricultural production plays a key role in covering the world’s food demand. Its importance will grow in the future given increasing population numbers and uncertain climate. Irrigation, however, has also a major impact on water resources, esp. in the drylands on the planet. For example, most of the large-scale problems of aquifer mining can be linked to groundwater-irrigated agriculture. South Asia is one of these regions of concern where roughly 40 percent of the total global groundwater irrigated area is located. In India, almost half of the total agricultural area is irrigated and it is estimated that groundwater irrigation in the country sustains 27 million ha. Esp. in the northwestern part of the country, water tables are falling at increasing rates that give rise to concern about the future viability of irrigation there. Since the majority of food grains in India are produced in that region, this development is a direct threat to the national food security with potentially global implications. We present a novel remote sensing approach to map the temporal development of irrigated agriculture at large spatial scales with high accuracy. We use time series data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NDVI and surface temperature as well as high-resolution precipitation data from the Indian Meteorological Department from 2000 - 2008 and ancillary data for our supervised classification approach. A cascade of classifiers was chosen to deal with the problem of obtaining labeled examples. A first stage classifier uses large regions of known irrigated and non-irrigated areas to learn a rough estimate of the multi-dimensional time series signature on variables of interest in non-irrigated areas. An estimate of the probability of non-irrigation is generated and passed to a second stage classifier along with the variables used to derive it. The second stage classifier is trained with a small dataset of very high quality estimates of irrigated area, and builds on the output of the first stage to produce a final estimate of the percentage of area irrigated at the pixel scale. The choice of first stage classifier is driven by the need of producing reasonable estimates from large datasets of low-quality data with noise on predictors and labels. The second stage one is chosen with generalization capability in mind, even when small samples are used. We apply our method to northwestern India where our results complement, in a temporal sense, information on irrigation obtained from local census. Due to the linkage of groundwater overdraft and irrigation, the accurate determination of the spatio-temporal evolution of irrigated area coverage allows us to assess the impact of groundwater overdraft and anticipate the consequences of inappropriate water management policies in the region.

  13. Trophic ecology of the invasive argentine ant: spatio-temporal variation in resource assimilation and isotopic enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Andy V.; Tillberg, Chadwick V.; Chou, Cheng T.; Holway, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Studies of food webs often employ stable isotopic approaches to infer trophic position and interaction strength without consideration of spatio-temporal variation in resource assimilation by constituent species. Using results from laboratory diet manipulations and monthly sampling of field populations, we illustrate how nitrogen isotopes may be used to quantify spatio-temporal variation in resource assimilation in ants. First, we determined nitrogen enrichment using a controlled laboratory experiment with the invasive Argentine ant (Linepithema humile). After 12 weeks, worker ?15N values from colonies fed an animal-based diet had ?15N values that were 5.51% greater compared to colonies fed a plant-based diet. The shift in ?15N values in response to the experimental diet occurred within 10 weeks. We next reared Argentine ant colonies with or without access to honeydew-producing aphids and found that after 8 weeks workers from colonies without access to aphids had ?15N values that were 6.31% larger compared to colonies with access to honeydew. Second, we sampled field populations over a 1-year period to quantify spatio-temporal variability in isotopic ratios of L. humile and those of a common native ant (Solenopsis xyloni). Samples from free-living colonies revealed that fluctuations in ?15N were 1.6–2.4‰ for L. humile and 1.8–2.9‰ for S. xyloni. Variation was also detected among L. humile castes: time averaged means of ?15N varied from 1.2 to 2.5‰ depending on the site, with ?15N values for queens ? workers > brood. The estimated trophic positions of L. humile and S. xyloni were similar within a site; however, trophic position for each species differed significantly at larger spatial scales. While stable isotopes are clearly useful for examining the trophic ecology of arthropod communities, our results suggest that caution is warranted when making ecological interpretations when stable isotope collections come from single time periods or life stages. PMID:20577762

  14. Sequence-based mapping approach to spatio-temporal snow patterns from MODIS time-series applied to Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poggio, Laura; Gimona, Alessandro

    2015-02-01

    Snow cover and its monitoring are important because of the impact on important environmental variables, hydrological circulation and ecosystem services. For regional snow cover mapping and monitoring, the MODIS satellite sensors are particularly appealing. However cloud presence is an important limiting factor. This study addressed the problem of cloud cover for time-series in a boreal-Atlantic region where melting and re-covering of snow often do not follow the usual alpine-like patterns. A key requirement in this context was to apply improved methods to deal with the high cloud cover and the irregular spatio-temporal snow occurrence, through exploitation of space-time correlation of pixel values. The information contained in snow presence sequences was then used to derive summary indices to describe the time series patterns. Finally it was tested whether the derived indices can be considered an accurate summary of the snow presence data by establishing and evaluating their statistical relations with morphology and the landscape. The proposed cloud filling method had a good agreement (between 80 and 99%) with validation data even with a large number of pixels missing. The sequence analysis algorithm proposed takes into account the position of the states to fully consider the temporal dimension, i.e. the order in which a certain state appears in an image sequence compared to its neighbourhoods. The indices that were derived from the sequence of snow presence proved useful for describing the general spatio-temporal patterns of snow in Scotland as they were well related (more than 60% of explained deviance) with environmental information such as morphology supporting their use as a summary of snow patterns over time. The use of the derived indices is an advantage because of data reduction, easier interpretability and capture of sequence position-wise information (e.g. importance of short term fall/melt cycles). The derived seven clusters took into account the temporal patterns of the snow presence and they were well separated both spatially and according to the snow patterns and the environmental information. In conclusion, the use of sequences proved useful for analysing different spatio-temporal patterns of snow that could be related to other environmental information to characterize snow regimes regions in Scotland and to be integrated with ground measures for further hydrological and climatological analysis as baseline data for climate change models.

  15. Spatio-temporal analyses of simulated biophysical processes in the Chippewa River Watershed-Minnesota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intensive crop production in the Chippewa River Watershed (CRW) in West Central Minnesota has altered the dynamics and nature of water, sediments, and nutrients and resulted in biophysical changes within and beyond the watershed. Opportunities to improve the ecological functioning of managed and nat...

  16. Spatio-temporal aspects of information processing in the cerebellar cortex

    E-print Network

    of adventure, full of knowledge. The Lestrygonians and the Cyclops, the angry Poseidon -- do not fear them: You seconds. And whatever his judgement, he is always willing to enjoy a good glass of single malt with you

  17. METHODS FOR THE ANALYSIS OF SPATIO-TEMPORAL MULTI-STATE PROCESSES

    E-print Network

    Brennand, Tracy

    linked with GIS systems. This has created a need for statistical methods addressing the resulting spatial epidemiology. Motivated by an application in forest ecology studying pine weevil infestations, the second

  18. Spatio-temporal Neuroimaging of Visual Processing of Human and Robot Actions in Humans

    E-print Network

    Urgen, Burcu Aysen

    2015-01-01

    Human Qualities of Social Robots Neuroscience research on human observation of and interactiondesign in social robotics and human-robot interaction suchquestions in social robotics and human-robot interaction. As

  19. Learning large-scale dynamic discrete choice models of spatio-temporal preferences with application to migratory pastoralism in East Africa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding spatio-temporal resource preferences is paramount in the design of policies for sustainable development. Unfortunately, resource preferences are often unknown to policy-makers and have to be inferred from data. In this paper we consider the problem of inferring agents’ preferences fro...

  20. Spatio-temporal variability in debris-flow activity: a tree-ring study at Geisstriftbach (Swiss Alps) extending back to AD 1736

    E-print Network

    Butler, David R. - Department of Geography, Texas State University

    Spatio-temporal variability in debris-flow activity: a tree-ring study at Geisstriftbach (Swiss Received: 22 September 2009 / Accepted: 2 May 2010 / Published online: 10 August 2010 Ó Swiss Geological. Niklaus, Valais, Swiss Alps) was assessed from growth disturbances in old conifer trees, providing a much

  1. P2P Network for Storage and Query of a Spatio-Temporal Flow of Events Ayis Ziotopoulos, Gustavo de Veciana

    E-print Network

    de Veciana, Gustavo

    P2P Network for Storage and Query of a Spatio-Temporal Flow of Events Ayis Ziotopoulos, Gustavo de stations, cameras surveilling the streets or the human drivers who vacate a spot. A fixed peer overlay) in addition to inheriting the advantages of p2p architectures (e.g., distribution, scalability, robustness

  2. On the Characterization of the Spatio-Temporal Profiles of Brain Activity Associated with Face Naming and the Tip-of-the-Tongue State: A Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindin, Monica; Diaz, Fernando; Capilla, Almudena; Ortiz, Tomas; Maestu, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    The tip-of-the-tongue state (TOT) in face naming is a transient state of difficulty in access to a person's name along with the conviction that the name is known. The aim of the present study was to characterize the spatio-temporal course of brain activation in the successful naming and TOT states, by means of magnetoencephalography, during a…

  3. Detecting linkages between human illness and Salmonella isolates in food using a new tool for spatio-temporal analysis of multi-stream data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present a new tool to enable computationally efficient visualization of data and its spatio-temporal analysis by food safety and public health investigators. Its utility is evaluated in two contexts: (1) Investigation of relationships between cases of Salmonella related human illness and Salmonel...

  4. Reconstruction by fluorescence imaging of the spatio-temporal evolution of the viscosity field in Hele-Shaw flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunton, P.; Dice, B.; Pojman, J. A.; De Wit, A.; Brau, F.

    2014-11-01

    We study the spatio-temporal evolution of the viscosity field during stable and unstable radial flows of glycerol-water solutions in a horizontal Hele-Shaw cell where a localized temperature gradient is imposed. The viscosity field is reconstructed from the measurement of the fluorescence emitted by a viscosity-sensitive molecular probe (Auramine O). For an immiscible flow, the viscosity and temperature fields are obtained accurately. For miscible displacements, we show how the interplay between the viscosity changes of both fluids and the variation of the fluid thickness in the gap prevents obtaining strict quantitative reconstruction of the viscosity field. We explain how the reconstructed viscosity field can nevertheless be interpreted to obtain information about the fluid thickness and the local viscosity and temperature.

  5. Spatio-temporal changes in sea star populations of the genus Astropecten inhabiting soft bottoms in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Baeta, Marc; Galimany, Eve; Ramón, Montserrat

    2016-02-01

    Astropecten species inhabit soft-bottom habitats worldwide, from intertidal areas to the deep sea. Sympatric Astropecten species (Astropecten aranciacus, Astropecten irregularis pentacanthus, Astropecten platyacanthus Astropecten jonstoni and Astropecten spinulosus) occur in the shallow coastal area of the Maresme coast (northwestern Mediterranean Sea). This study analyzes spatio-temporal differences in asteroidean population between the periods 2004-2006 and 2010-2011. Our results showed variations in density and spatial distribution in A. aranciacus, and a change in its diet between the two study periods. A. irregularis pentacanthus reduced its spatial distribution, concentrating in smaller areas. A. platyacanthus was absent in the first period but abundant in the second. A. jonstoni and A. spinulosus were scarce in the first period and absent in the second. The results also showed the specific habitat requirements for each sea star species with regard to sediment characteristics, prey availability and depth. PMID:26702944

  6. Simulations of the Reaction-Diffusion System demonstrating the Transition from Purely Temporal to Spatio-Temporal Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Thomas; Hou, Yu; Trail, Collin; Wiener, Richard

    2004-11-01

    The Reaction-Diffusion model (H. Riecke and H.-G. Paap, Europhys. Lett. 14), 1235 (1991).has been applied to a wide variety of pattern forming systems. It correctly predicted a period doubling cascade to chaos in Taylor-Couette flow with hourglass geometry(Richard J. Wiener et al), Phys. Rev. E 55, 5489 (1997).. We have conducted a series of such simulations, varying the length of the system. This has enabled us to study the transition from a purely temporal chaos of the formation of new pairs of Taylor Vortices at a single location, to a spatio-temporal chaos of formation across a range of locations. Application to anticipated experiments will be discussed.

  7. Hydrogeochemistry and spatio-temporal changes of a tropical coastal wetland system: Veli-Akkulam Lake, Thiruvananthapuram, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajinkumar, K. S.; Revathy, A.; Rani, V. R.

    2015-09-01

    The backwater of Veli-Akkulam, adjoining the Arabian Sea in the south-west part of Indian Peninsula, is a coastal wetland system and forms an integral part of the local ecosystem. In addition to the usual marine interactions, this water body is subjected to anthropogenic interference due to their proximity to the Thiruvananthapuram City urban agglomeration. This paper showcases how an urban agglomeration alters wetland system located within a tropical monsoonal environment. Water samples from this lake together with different feeder streams reveal that the lake is under the threat to eutrophication. A spatio-temporal analysis has shown that the lake and adjacent wetlands are shrinking in a fast pace. Over a period of about seven decades, the lake has shrunk by 28.05 % and the wetlands by 37.81 %. And hence, there is a pressing requirement of eco-management practices to be adopted to protect this lake.

  8. Spatio-temporal variability of soil respiration of forest ecosystems in China: influencing factors and evaluation model.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ze-Mei; Yu, Gui-Rui; Sun, Xiao-Min; Li, Sheng-Gong; Wang, Yue-Si; Wang, Ying-Hong; Fu, Yu-Ling; Wang, Qiu-Feng

    2010-10-01

    Understanding the influencing factors of the spatio-temporal variability of soil respiration (R (s)) across different ecosystems as well as the evaluation model of R (s) is critical to the accurate prediction of future changes in carbon exchange between ecosystems and the atmosphere. R (s) data from 50 different forest ecosystems in China were summarized and the influences of environmental variables on the spatio-temporal variability of R (s) were analyzed. The results showed that both the mean annual air temperature and precipitation were weakly correlated with annual R (s), but strongly with soil carbon turnover rate. R (s) at a reference temperature of 0°C was only significantly and positively correlated with soil organic carbon (SOC) density at a depth of 20 cm. We tested a global-scale R (s) model which predicted monthly mean R (s) (R (s,monthly)) from air temperature and precipitation. Both the original model and the reparameterized model poorly explained the monthly variability of R (s) and failed to capture the inter-site variability of R (s). However, the residual of R (s,monthly) was strongly correlated with SOC density. Thus, a modified empirical model (TPS model) was proposed, which included SOC density as an additional predictor of R (s). The TPS model explained monthly and inter-site variability of R (s) for 56% and 25%, respectively. Moreover, the simulated annual R (s) of TPS model was significantly correlated with the measured value. The TPS model driven by three variables easy to be obtained provides a new tool for R (s) prediction, although a site-specific calibration is needed for using at a different region. PMID:20571797

  9. Large-scale spatio-temporal monitoring highlights hotspots of demersal fish diversity in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granger, Victoria; Fromentin, Jean-Marc; Bez, Nicolas; Relini, Giulio; Meynard, Christine N.; Gaertner, Jean-Claude; Maiorano, Porzia; Garcia Ruiz, Cristina; Follesa, Cristina; Gristina, Michele; Peristeraki, Panagiota; Brind'Amour, Anik; Carbonara, Pierluigi; Charilaou, Charis; Esteban, Antonio; Jadaud, Angélique; Joksimovic, Aleksandar; Kallianiotis, Argyris; Kolitari, Jerina; Manfredi, Chiara; Massuti, Enric; Mifsud, Roberta; Quetglas, Antoni; Refes, Wahid; Sbrana, Mario; Vrgoc, Nedo; Spedicato, Maria Teresa; Mérigot, Bastien

    2015-01-01

    Increasing human pressures and global environmental change may severely affect the diversity of species assemblages and associated ecosystem services. Despite the recent interest in phylogenetic and functional diversity, our knowledge on large spatio-temporal patterns of demersal fish diversity sampled by trawling remains still incomplete, notably in the Mediterranean Sea, one of the most threatened marine regions of the world. We investigated large spatio-temporal diversity patterns by analysing a dataset of 19,886 hauls from 10 to 800 m depth performed annually during the last two decades by standardised scientific bottom trawl field surveys across the Mediterranean Sea, within the MEDITS program. A multi-component (eight diversity indices) and multi-scale (local assemblages, biogeographic regions to basins) approach indicates that only the two most traditional components (species richness and evenness) were sufficient to reflect patterns in taxonomic, phylogenetic or functional richness and divergence. We also put into question the use of widely computed indices that allow comparing directly taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional diversity within a unique mathematical framework. In addition, demersal fish assemblages sampled by trawl do not follow a continuous decreasing longitudinal/latitudinal diversity gradients (spatial effects explained up to 70.6% of deviance in regression tree and generalised linear models), for any of the indices and spatial scales analysed. Indeed, at both local and regional scales species richness was relatively high in the Iberian region, Malta, the Eastern Ionian and Aegean seas, meanwhile the Adriatic Sea and Cyprus showed a relatively low level. In contrast, evenness as well as taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional divergences did not show regional hotspots. All studied diversity components remained stable over the last two decades. Overall, our results highlight the need to use complementary diversity indices through different spatial scales when developing conservation strategies and defining delimitations for protected areas.

  10. Spatio-temporal history of the disjunct family Tecophilaeaceae: a tale involving the colonization of three Mediterranean-type ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Buerki, Sven; Manning, John C.; Forest, Félix

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Tecophilaeaceae (27 species distributed in eight genera) have a disjunct distribution in California, Chile and southern and tropical mainland Africa. Moreover, although the family mainly occurs in arid ecosystems, it has colonized three Mediterranean-type ecosystems. In this study, the spatio-temporal history of the family is examined using DNA sequence data from six plastid regions. Methods Modern methods in divergence time estimation (BEAST), diversification (LTT and GeoSSE) and biogeography (LAGRANGE) are applied to infer the evolutionary history of Tecophilaeaceae. To take into account dating and phylogenetic uncertainty, the biogeographical inferences were run over a set of dated Bayesian trees and the analyses were constrained according to palaeogeographical evidence. Key Results The analyses showed that the current distribution and diversification of the family were influenced primarily by the break up of Gondwana, separating the family into two main clades, and the establishment of a Mediterranean climate in Chile, coinciding with the radiation of Conanthera. Finally, unlike many other groups, no shifts in diversification rates were observed associated with the dispersals in the Cape region of South Africa. Conclusions Although modest in size, Tecophilaeaceae have a complex spatio-temporal history. The family is now most diverse in arid ecosystems in southern Africa, but is expected to have originated in sub-tropical Africa. It has subsequently colonized Mediterranean-type ecosystems in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, but well before the onset of the Mediterranean climate in these regions. Only one lineage, genus Conanthera, has apparently diversified to any extent under the impetus of a Mediterranean climate. PMID:23277471

  11. Exploiting spatio-temporal characteristics of human vision for mobile video applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jillani, Rashad; Kalva, Hari

    2008-08-01

    Video applications on handheld devices such as smart phones pose a significant challenge to achieve high quality user experience. Recent advances in processor and wireless networking technology are producing a new class of multimedia applications (e.g. video streaming) for mobile handheld devices. These devices are light weight and have modest sizes, and therefore very limited resources - lower processing power, smaller display resolution, lesser memory, and limited battery life as compared to desktop and laptop systems. Multimedia applications on the other hand have extensive processing requirements which make the mobile devices extremely resource hungry. In addition, the device specific properties (e.g. display screen) significantly influence the human perception of multimedia quality. In this paper we propose a saliency based framework that exploits the structure in content creation as well as the human vision system to find the salient points in the incoming bitstream and adapt it according to the target device, thus improving the quality of new adapted area around salient points. Our experimental results indicate that the adaptation process that is cognizant of video content and user preferences can produce better perceptual quality video for mobile devices. Furthermore, we demonstrated how such a framework can affect user experience on a handheld device.

  12. Imaging and imagining the spatio-temporal variations of photosynthesis - remote sensing of sun-induced fluorescence to understand physiological changes of the photosynthetic apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rascher, Uwe

    2010-05-01

    Light use efficiency of photosynthesis dynamically adapts to environmental factors, which lead to complex spatio-temporal variations of photosynthesis on various scales from the leaf to the canopy level. The need to scale leaf-level physiology to ecosystem responses and climate feedbacks has been emphasized recently in the context of global climate change research. Recently the FLuorescence EXplorer (FLEX) mission that proposed to launch a satellite for the global monitoring of steady-state chlorophyll fluorescence in terrestrial vegetation was selected for pre-phase A by European Space Agency (ESA). This method aims for mapping photosynthetic efficiency by quantifying steady state fluorescence in the so called Fraunhofer lines. In preparation for this satellite mission an extensive field campaign was conducted. The CEFLES2 campaign during the Carbo Europe Regional Experiment Strategy was designed to provide simultaneous airborne measurements of solar induced fluorescence and CO2 fluxes. It was combined with extensive ground-based quantification of leaf- and canopy-level processes. The aim of this campaign was to test if fluorescence signal detected from an airborne platform can be used to improve estimates of plant mediated exchange on the mesoscale. Canopy fluorescence was quantified from four airborne platforms using a combination of novel sensors including a prototype airborne sensor AirFLEX quantifing fluorescence in the oxygen A and B bands, and the first employment of the high performance imaging spectrometer HYPER delivering spatially explicit and multi-temporal transects across the whole region. During three measurement periods in April, June and September 2007 structural, functional and radiometric characteristics of more than 20 different vegetation types in the Les Landes region, Southwest France, were extensively characterized on the ground focussing especially on quantifying plant mediated exchange processes (photosynthetic electron transport, CO2 uptake, evapotranspiration) and fluorescence emission. On the large scale, airborne and ground-level measurements of fluorescence were compared on several vegetation types supporting the scaling of this novel remote sensing signal. The multi-scale design of the four airborne radiometric measurements along with extensive ground activities fosters a nested approach to quantify photosynthetic efficiency and gross primary productivity (GPP) from passive fluorescence. Linking these results with ecosystem flux measurements and regional carbon modeling shows the way how direct quantification of photosynthesis may reduce uncertainties to predict plant mediated exchange processes. Selected Publications [1] Rascher U. & Nedbal L. (2006) Dynamics of plant photosynthesis under fluctuating natural conditions. Current Opinion in Plant Biology, 9, 671-678. [2] Rascher U. & Pieruschka R. (2008) Spatio-temporal variations of photosynthesis ¬ The potential of optical remote sensing to better understand and scale light use efficiency and stresses of plant ecosystems. Precision Agriculture, 9, 355-366. [3] Soukupová J., Cséfalvay L., Urban O., Košvancová M., Marek M., Rascher U. & Nedbal L. (2008) Annual variation of the steady-state chlorophyll fluorescence emission of evergreen plants in temperate zone. Functional Plant Biology, 35, 63-76. [4] Rascher U., and 35 others (2009) CEFLES2: The remote sensing component to quantify photosynthetic efficiency from the leaf to the region by measuring sun-induced fluorescence in the oxygen absorption bands, Biogeosciences, 6, 1181-1198. [5] Damm A., Elbers J., Erler E., Gioli B., Hamdi K., Hutjes R., Kosvancova M., Meroni M., Miglietta F., Moersch A., Moreno J., Schickling A., Sonnenschein R., Udelhoven T., van der Linden S., Hostert P. & Rascher U. (2010) Remote sensing of sun induced fluorescence to improve modeling of diurnal courses of gross primary production (GPP). Global Change Biology, 16, 171-186.

  13. Benchmarking a novel ultrasound-CT fusion system for respiratory motion management in radiotherapy: Assessment of spatio-temporal characteristics and comparison to 4DCT

    SciTech Connect

    Molloy, J. A.; Oldham, S. A.

    2008-01-15

    Management of respiratory motion during radiation therapy requires treatment planning and simulation using imaging modalities that possess sufficient spatio-temporal accuracy and precision. An investigation into the use of a novel ultrasound (United States) imaging system for assessment of respiratory motion is presented, exploiting its good soft tissue contrast and temporal precision. The system dynamically superimposes the appropriate image plane sampled from a reference CT data set with the corresponding US B-mode image. An articulating arm is used for spatial registration. While the focus of the study was to quantify the system's ability to track respiratory motion, certain unique spatial calibration procedures were devised that render the software potentially valuable to the general research community. These include direct access to all transformation matrix elements and image scaling factors, a manual latency correction function, and a three-point spatial registration procedure that allows the system to be used in any room possessing a traditional radiotherapy laser localization system. Counter-intuitively, it was discovered that a manual procedure for calibrating certain transformation matrix elements produced superior accuracy to that of an algorithmic Levenberg-Marquardt optimization method. The absolute spatial accuracy was verified by comparing the physical locations of phantom test objects measured using the spatially registered US system, and using data from a 3DCT scan of the phantom as a reference. The spatial accuracy of the display superposition was also tested in a similar manner. The system's dynamic properties were then assessed using three methods. First, the overall system response time was studied using a programmable motion phantom. This included US video update, articulating arm update, CT data set resampling, and image display. The next investigation verified the system's ability to measure the range of motion of a moving anatomical test phantom that possessed both high and low contrast test objects. Finally, the system's performance was compared to that of a four-dimensional CT (4DCT) data set. The absolute spatial and display superposition accuracy was found to be better than 2 mm and typically 1 mm. Overall dynamic system response was adequate to produce a mean relative positional error of less than 1 mm if an empiric latency correction of 3 video frames was incorporated. The dynamic CT/US display mode was able to assess phantom motion for both high and low contrast test objects to within 1 mm, and compared favorably to the 4DCT data. The 4DCT movie loop accurately assessed the target motion for both of the high and low contrast objects tested, but the minimum intensity and average intensity reconstructions did not. This investigation demonstrated that this US system possesses sufficient spatio-temporal accuracy to properly assess respiratory motion. Future work will seek to demonstrate efficacy in its clinical application to respiratory motion assessment, particularly for sites in the upper abdomen, where low tissue contrast is evident.

  14. Large-Scale Examination of Spatio-Temporal Patterns of Drifting Fish Aggregating Devices (dFADs) from Tropical Tuna Fisheries of the Indian and Atlantic Oceans

    PubMed Central

    Maufroy, Alexandra; Chassot, Emmanuel; Joo, Rocío; Kaplan, David Michael

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1990s, massive use of drifting Fish Aggregating Devices (dFADs) to aggregate tropical tunas has strongly modified global purse-seine fisheries. For the first time, a large data set of GPS positions from buoys deployed by French purse-seiners to monitor dFADs is analysed to provide information on spatio-temporal patterns of dFAD use in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans during 2007-2011. First, we select among four classification methods the model that best separates “at sea” from “on board” buoy positions. A random forest model had the best performance, both in terms of the rate of false “at sea” predictions and the amount of over-segmentation of “at sea” trajectories (i.e., artificial division of trajectories into multiple, shorter pieces due to misclassification). Performance is improved via post-processing removing unrealistically short “at sea” trajectories. Results derived from the selected model enable us to identify the main areas and seasons of dFAD deployment and the spatial extent of their drift. We find that dFADs drift at sea on average for 39.5 days, with time at sea being shorter and distance travelled longer in the Indian than in the Atlantic Ocean. 9.9% of all trajectories end with a beaching event, suggesting that 1,500-2,000 may be lost onshore each year, potentially impacting sensitive habitat areas, such as the coral reefs of the Maldives, the Chagos Archipelago, and the Seychelles. PMID:26010151

  15. Detecting determinism from point processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrzejak, Ralph G.; Mormann, Florian; Kreuz, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    The detection of a nonrandom structure from experimental data can be crucial for the classification, understanding, and interpretation of the generating process. We here introduce a rank-based nonlinear predictability score to detect determinism from point process data. Thanks to its modular nature, this approach can be adapted to whatever signature in the data one considers indicative of deterministic structure. After validating our approach using point process signals from deterministic and stochastic model dynamics, we show an application to neuronal spike trains recorded in the brain of an epilepsy patient. While we illustrate our approach in the context of temporal point processes, it can be readily applied to spatial point processes as well.

  16. Spatio-temporal variability of soil water content on the local scale in a Mediterranean mountain area (Vallcebre, North Eastern Spain). How different spatio-temporal scales reflect mean soil water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, Antonio J.; Latron, Jérôme; Rubio, Carles M.; Gallart, Francesc; Llorens, Pilar

    2014-08-01

    As a result of complex human-land interactions and topographic variability, many Mediterranean mountain catchments are covered by agricultural terraces that have locally modified the soil water content dynamic. Understanding these local-scale dynamics helps us grasp better how hydrology behaves on the catchment scale. Thus, this study examined soil water content variability in the upper 30 cm of the soil on a Mediterranean abandoned terrace in north-east Spain. Using a dataset of high spatial (regular grid of 128 automatic TDR probes at 2.5 m intervals) and temporal (20-min time step) resolution, gathered throughout a 84-day period, the spatio-temporal variability of soil water content at the local scale and the way that different spatio-temporal scales reflect the mean soil water content were investigated. Soil water content spatial variability and its relation to wetness conditions were examined, along with the spatial structuring of the soil water content within the terrace. Then, the ability of single probes and of different combinations of spatial measurements (transects and grids) to provide a good estimate of mean soil water content on the terrace scale was explored by means of temporal stability analyses. Finally, the effect of monitoring frequency on the magnitude of detectable daily soil water content variations was studied. Results showed that soil water content spatial variability followed a bimodal pattern of increasing absolute variability with increasing soil water content. In addition, a linear trend of decreasing soil water content as the distance from the inner part of the terrace increased was identified. Once this trend was subtracted, resulting semi-variograms suggested that the spatial resolution examined was too high to appreciate spatial structuring in the data. Thus, the spatial pattern should be considered as random. Of all the spatial designs tested, the 10 × 10 m mesh grid (9 probes) was considered the most suitable option for a good, time-stable estimate of mean soil water content, as no improvement was obtained with the 5 × 5 m mesh grid (30 probes). Finally, the results of temporal aggregation showed that decreasing the monitoring frequency down to 8 h during wetting-up periods and to 1 day during drying-down ones did not result in a loss of information on daily soil water content variations.

  17. Spatio-temporal soil heat flux estimates from satellite data; results for the AMMA experiment, Fakara supersite.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhoef, Anne; Ottlé, Catherine; Maignan, Fabienne; Murray, Ty; Saux-Picart, Stephane; Cappelaere, Bernard; Boulain, Nicolas; Demarty, J.; Zribi, Mehrez

    2010-05-01

    The soil heat flux, G, is an important component in the energy balance, especially for sparsely vegetated (semi)-arid regions. In order to obtain large-scale estimates of this flux, for example for land surface model (e.g. GCM) verification, scientists have to rely on remote sensing data. Unfortunately, in these cases G is often estimated using highly empirical methods. Examples are relationships between the ratio of G and net radiation, Rn, and surface variables such as leaf area index (LAI). Other approaches use surface temperature observations to get maximum G/Rn values. However, such approaches are not universal. In Murray and Verhoef 2007a&b we proposed to use a standard physical equation, involving a harmonic analysis of surface temperatures for the estimation of G, in combination with a simple, but theoretically derived, equation for soil thermal inertia (TI). This method does not require in situ instrumentation. Moreover, such an approach ensures a more universally applicable method than those derived from purely empirical studies. This method requires knowledge of soil texture, in combination with an estimate of near surface soil moisture content, SM, to obtain spatio-temporal variation in thermal inertia. To get the diurnal and seasonal shape of G we ideally need time series of soil surface temperature, Ts. However, when vegetation obscures the surface these are not available through remote sensing. Therefore, a direct relationship between the harmonic analysis of Ts (Hs) and the harmonic analysis (Hb) of the remotely observed brightness temperature, Tb, obtained from remote sensing equipment was used instead. This relationship was tested for 4 different UK crops in Murray and Verhoef (2007b). Knowledge of LAI, canopy extinction coefficient and IR sensor view angle is required to go from Hb to Hs. To account for phase lag differences between Hs and Hb a time delay of 1.5 hrs was used. Here, the method is used to calculate spatiotemporal soil heat fluxes for the Fakara supersite domain in the framework of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) program. MSG-SEVIRI land surface temperature (spatial resolution at nadir 3 x 3 km, temporal resolution 15 mins, averaged to half-hours, time period 13 July to 31 December 2005) and ENVISAT-ASAR soil moisture products were used to derive Tb and SM. The seasonal evolution of LAI was derived from SPOT-HRV. Soil texture was obtained from existing soil maps. Verification soil heat fluxes were provided by a meteorological station installed at the Fakara experimental site, called Wankama (Ramier et al., 2009). The MSG file contains 266 records (grid points over the super site domain, although only 190 were left once those pixels containing significant water bodies were removed) containing each 16512 values of temperature (172 (days)x 24 x 4 time steps). Soil moisture and LAI images over the same domain were available on 7-8 (non-corresponding) occasions between 13 July and 31 December 2005. Daily estimates of LAI and SM were obtained from interpolation. Results revealed a large spatial variability in soil heat flux, mainly dependent on the relative fraction of surface components at each pixel (e.g. plateaus bare soil, plateaus vegetation, crops, recent and old fallows) and corresponding pixel-averaged LAI. SM affected thermal inertia, but estimates of SM, and hence TI appeared to be on the low side, thereby probably underestimating G, although estimated and measured G compared relatively well. Overall, the method appeared promising and work is underway to determine G over the entire AMMA domain in the context of the ALMIP project. • Murray, T., and A. Verhoef, 2007a. Moving towards a more mechanistic approach in the determination of soil heat flux from remote measurements. I. A universal approach to calculate thermal inertia. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 147: 80-87. • Murray, T., and A. Verhoef, 2007b. Moving towards a more mechanistic approach in the determination of soil heat flux from remote measurements. II. Diurnal shape of soil heat flux. Agri

  18. Cumulants of Hawkes point processes.

    PubMed

    Jovanovi?, Stojan; Hertz, John; Rotter, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    We derive explicit, closed-form expressions for the cumulant densities of a multivariate, self-exciting Hawkes point process, generalizing a result of Hawkes in his earlier work on the covariance density and Bartlett spectrum of such processes. To do this, we represent the Hawkes process in terms of a Poisson cluster process and show how the cumulant density formulas can be derived by enumerating all possible "family trees," representing complex interactions between point events. We also consider the problem of computing the integrated cumulants, characterizing the average measure of correlated activity between events of different types, and derive the relevant equations. PMID:25974542

  19. Environmental and socio-economic change in Thailand: quantifying spatio-temporal risk factors of dengue to inform decision making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodo, X.; Lowe, R.; Karczewska-Gibert, A.; Cazelles, B.

    2013-12-01

    Dengue is a peri-urban mosquito-transmitted disease, ubiquitous in the tropics and the subtropics. The geographic distribution of dengue and its more severe form, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), have expanded dramatically in the last decades and dengue is now considered to be the world's most important arboviral disease. Recent demographic changes have greatly contributed to the acceleration and spread of the disease along with uncontrolled urbanization, population growth and increased air travel, which acts as a mechanism for transporting and exchanging dengue viruses between endemic and epidemic populations. The dengue vector and virus are extremely sensitive to environmental conditions such as temperature, humidity and precipitation that influence mosquito biology, abundance and habitat and the virus replication speed. In order to control the spread of dengue and impede epidemics, decision support systems are required that take into account the multi-faceted array of factors that contribute to increased dengue risk. Due to availability of seasonal climate forecasts, that predict the average climate conditions for forthcoming months/seasons in both time and space, there is an opportunity to incorporate precursory climate information in a dengue decision support system to aid epidemic planning months in advance. Furthermore, oceanic indicators from teleconnected areas in the Pacific and Indian Ocean, that can provide some indication of the likely prevailing climate conditions in certain regions, could potentially extend predictive lead time in a dengue early warning system. In this paper we adopt a spatio-temporal Bayesian modelling framework for dengue in Thailand to support public health decision making. Monthly cases of dengue in the 76 provinces of Thailand for the period 1982-2012 are modelled using a multi-layered approach. Explanatory variables at various spatial and temporal resolutions are incorporated into a hierarchical model in order to make spatio-temporal probabilistic predictions of dengue. Potential risk factors considered include altitude, land cover, proximity to road/rail networks and water bodies, temperature and precipitation, oceanic indicators, intervention activities, air traffic volume, population movement, urbanisation and sanitation indicators. In order to quantify unknown or unmeasured dengue risk factors, we use spatio-temporal random effects in the model framework. This helps identify those available indicators which could significantly contribute to a dengue early warning system. We use this model to quantify the extent to which climate indicators can explain variations in dengue risk. This allows us to assess the potential utility of forecast climate information in a dengue decision support system for Thailand. Taking advantage of lead times of several months provided by climate forecasts, public health officials may be able to more efficiently allocate intervention measures, such as targeted vector control activities and provision of medication to deal with more deadly forms of the disease, well ahead of an imminent dengue epidemic.

  20. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Urban Expansion in Japan Using Gridded Land Use Data, Population Census Data and DMSP Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagan, H.; Yamagata, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Integration of population data, land-use data, and satellite images can be used to identify and characterize the spatio-temporal extent and expansion trends of urban growth. We provided an idea to investigate the spatio-temporal urban growth using satellite images with population data. We analyze the urban expansion in Japan from 1990 to 2005 by using gridded land-use data, population census data, and DMSP satellite images of nighttime lights. First, we mapped the DMSP nighttime lights and land-use data onto a grid based on the standard 1 km2grid cell system of Japan to determine the proportional areas of DMSP nighttime lights and urban land use within each grid cell. Then, we investigated the relationships among population density, DMSP nighttime lights area, and urban area. A rapid expansion of the urban/built-up area around megacities was associated with population increases; in contrast, population density dropped steeply in rural areas and in small towns. Spatial correlation analysis showed a strong positive correlation between population density and urban land use (r= 0.59). In addition, correlation coefficients between population density and DMSP data increased as the DMSP nighttime lights brightness value increased. We then used census population data as the base population input, and performed a linear multiple regression analysis to predict population density from the combination of urban land-use area and DMSP data in Hokkaido, Japan. Visual and numerical evaluation of the results showed that the combination of urban land-use data and DMSP data could be used to predict the spatial distribution of population density. The results from this study indicated the high correlation between these data and suggested the potentials of population density prediction using DMSP data and land use data. References Bagan, H., and Y. Yamagata. Land-cover change analysis in 50 global cities by using a combination of Landsat data and analysis of grid cell. Environmental Research Letters, vol.9, no. 6, 064015. Jun. 2014. Bagan, H., and Y. Yamagata. Landsat analysis of urban growth: How Tokyo became the world's largest megacity during the last 40 years. Remote Sensing of Environment, vol.127, pp. 210-222. Dec. 2012.

  1. Retrieval of Spatio-temporal Distributions of Particle Parameters from Multiwavelength Lidar Measurements Using the Linear Estimation Technique and Comparison with AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veselovskii, I.; Whiteman, D. N.; Korenskiy, M.; Kolgotin, A.; Dubovik, O.; Perez-Ramirez, D.; Suvorina, A.

    2013-01-01

    The results of the application of the linear estimation technique to multiwavelength Raman lidar measurements performed during the summer of 2011 in Greenbelt, MD, USA, are presented. We demonstrate that multiwavelength lidars are capable not only of providing vertical profiles of particle properties but also of revealing the spatio-temporal evolution of aerosol features. The nighttime 3 Beta + 1 alpha lidar measurements on 21 and 22 July were inverted to spatio-temporal distributions of particle microphysical parameters, such as volume, number density, effective radius and the complex refractive index. The particle volume and number density show strong variation during the night, while the effective radius remains approximately constant. The real part of the refractive index demonstrates a slight decreasing tendency in a region of enhanced extinction coefficient. The linear estimation retrievals are stable and provide time series of particle parameters as a function of height at 4 min resolution. AERONET observations are compared with multiwavelength lidar retrievals showing good agreement.

  2. Evolution of Predator Dispersal in Relation to Spatio-Temporal Prey Dynamics: How Not to Get Stuck in the Wrong Place!

    PubMed Central

    Travis, Justin M. J.; Palmer, Stephen C. F.; Coyne, Steven; Millon, Alexandre; Lambin, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    The eco-evolutionary dynamics of dispersal are recognised as key in determining the responses of populations to environmental changes. Here, by developing a novel modelling approach, we show that predators are likely to have evolved to emigrate more often and become more selective over their destination patch when their prey species exhibit spatio-temporally complex dynamics. We additionally demonstrate that the cost of dispersal can vary substantially across space and time. Perhaps as a consequence of current environmental change, many key prey species are currently exhibiting major shifts in their spatio-temporal dynamics. By exploring similar shifts in silico, we predict that predator populations will be most vulnerable when prey dynamics shift from stable to complex. The more sophisticated dispersal rules, and greater variance therein, that evolve under complex dynamics will enable persistence across a broader range of prey dynamics than the rules which evolve under relatively stable prey conditions. PMID:23408940

  3. Exploring the Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Reservoir Hosts, Vectors, and Human Hosts of West Nile Virus: A Review of the Recent Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ozdenerol, Esra; Taff, Gregory N.; Akkus, Cem

    2013-01-01

    Over the last two decades West Nile Virus (WNV) has been responsible for significant disease outbreaks in humans and animals in many parts of the World. Its extremely rapid global diffusion argues for a better understanding of its geographic extent. The purpose of this inquiry was to explore spatio-temporal patterns of WNV using geospatial technologies to study populations of the reservoir hosts, vectors, and human hosts, in addition to the spatio-temporal interactions among these populations. Review of the recent literature on spatial WNV disease risk modeling led to the conclusion that numerous environmental factors might be critical for its dissemination. New Geographic Information Systems (GIS)-based studies are monitoring occurrence at the macro-level, and helping pinpoint areas of occurrence at the micro-level, where geographically-targeted, species-specific control measures are sometimes taken and more sophisticated methods of surveillance have been used. PMID:24284356

  4. Evolution of predator dispersal in relation to spatio-temporal prey dynamics: how not to get stuck in the wrong place!

    PubMed

    Travis, Justin M J; Palmer, Stephen C F; Coyne, Steven; Millon, Alexandre; Lambin, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    The eco-evolutionary dynamics of dispersal are recognised as key in determining the responses of populations to environmental changes. Here, by developing a novel modelling approach, we show that predators are likely to have evolved to emigrate more often and become more selective over their destination patch when their prey species exhibit spatio-temporally complex dynamics. We additionally demonstrate that the cost of dispersal can vary substantially across space and time. Perhaps as a consequence of current environmental change, many key prey species are currently exhibiting major shifts in their spatio-temporal dynamics. By exploring similar shifts in silico, we predict that predator populations will be most vulnerable when prey dynamics shift from stable to complex. The more sophisticated dispersal rules, and greater variance therein, that evolve under complex dynamics will enable persistence across a broader range of prey dynamics than the rules which evolve under relatively stable prey conditions. PMID:23408940

  5. Factors controlling spatio-temporal variation in carbon dioxide efflux from surface litter, roots, and soil organic matter at four rain forest

    E-print Network

    Factors controlling spatio-temporal variation in carbon dioxide efflux from surface litter, roots in soil respiration from surface litter, roots, and soil organic matter over one year at four rain forest from litter, 6­9 t C haÀ1 yrÀ1 from roots, and 5­6 t C haÀ1 yrÀ1 from soil organic matter. Litter

  6. Spatio-temporal clustering of hand, foot and mouth disease at the county level in Sichuan province, China, 2008-2013.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Zhao, X; Yin, F; Lv, Q

    2015-03-01

    China has recently experienced a marked increase in the incidence of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Effective spatio-temporal monitoring of HFMD incidence is important for successful implementation of control and prevention measures. This study monitored county-level HFMD reported incidence rates for Sichuan province, China by examining spatio-temporal patterns. County-level data on HFMD daily cases between January 2008 and December 2013 were obtained from the China Information System for Disease Control and Prevention. We first conducted purely temporal and purely spatial descriptive analyses to characterize the distribution patterns of HFMD. Then, the global Moran's I statistic and space-time scan statistic were used to detect the spatial autocorrelation and identify the high-risk clusters in each year, respectively. A total of 212267 HFMD cases were reported in Sichuan province during the study period (annual average incidence 43·65/100000), and the incidence seasonal peak was between April and July. Relatively high incidence rates appeared in the northeastern-southwestern belt. HFMD had positive spatial autocorrelation at the county level with global Moran's I increasing from 0·27 to 0·52 (P < 0·001). Spatio-temporal cluster analysis detected six most-likely clusters and several secondary clusters from 2008 to 2013. The centres of the six most-likely clusters were all located in the provincial capital city Chengdu. Chengdu and its neighbouring cities had always been spatio-temporal clusters, which indicated the need for further intensive space-time surveillance. Allocating more resources to these areas at suitable times might help to reduce HFMD incidence more effectively. PMID:25703402

  7. Spatio-Temporal Variability in Coastal Upwelling/Downwelling from Scatterometer Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morey, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    The decade-plus near-continuous record from satellite scatterometers provides indirect measurements of vector winds over the global ocean with sampling largely determined by the satellite orbits. This allows investigation of wind-driven ocean processes even at remote locations that are poorly sampled by in situ measurements. Global satellite wind products are used to produce a database of time series of upwelling indices, similar to those typically produced using data from coastal ocean observing systems, at all coastal locations over the Earth. This database is analyzed to study spatial and temporal variability of coastal upwelling and downwelling throughout the world ocean. The upwelling index is typically a proxy for upwelling/downwelling across the slope assuming a simple local mass balance to the offshore surface Ekman transport. However, along-shore variations in winds and shelf geometry perturb this simple local balance via shelf wave dynamics. In particular, cross-slope velocities downcoast (in a shelf wave propagation sense) of changes in the topographic gradient orientation may respond preferentially to a wind direction not oriented along local isobaths. Data from numerical models are analyzed to illustrate this point and to clarify the relation between upwelling/downwelling and local wind direction throughout the global coastal ocean that may allow improvement in wind-derived upwelling indices.

  8. Building long-term and high spatio-temporal resolution precipitation and air temperature reanalyses by mixing local observations and global atmospheric reanalyses: the ANATEM method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuentz, A.; Mathevet, T.; Gailhard, J.; Hingray, B.

    2015-01-01

    Improving the understanding of past climatic or hydrologic variability has received a large attention in different fields of geosciences, such as glaciology, dendrochronology, sedimentology or hydrology. Based on different proxies, each research community produces different kind of climatic or hydrologic reanalyses, at different spatio-temporal scales and resolution. When considering climate or hydrology, numerous studies aim at characterising variability, trends or breaks using observed time-series of different regions or climate of world. However, in hydrology, these studies are usually limited to reduced temporal scale (mainly few decades, seldomly a century) because they are limited to observed time-series, that suffers from a limited spatio-temporal density. This paper introduces a new model, ANATEM, based on a combination of local observations and large scale climatic informations (such as 20CR Reanalysis). This model allow to build long-term air temperature and precipitation time-series, with a high spatio-temporal resolution (daily time-step, few km2). ANATEM was tested on the air temperature and precipitation time-series of 22 watersheds situated on the Durance watershed, in the french Alps. Based on a multi-criteria and multi-scale diagnostic, the results show that ANATEM improves the performances of classical statistical models. ANATEM model have been validated on a regional level, improving spatial homogeneity of performances and on independent long-term time-series, being able to capture the regional low-frequency variabilities over more than a century (1883-2010).

  9. Nano-Biomechanical Study of Spatio-Temporal Cytoskeleton Rearrangements that Determine Subcellular Mechanical Properties and Endothelial Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Bleher, Reiner; Brown, Mary E.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Dudek, Steven M.; Shekhawat, Gajendra S.; Dravid, Vinayak P.

    2015-01-01

    The endothelial cell (EC) lining of the pulmonary vascular system forms a semipermeable barrier between blood and the interstitium and regulates various critical biochemical functions. Collectively, it represents a prototypical biomechanical system, where the complex hierarchical architecture, from the molecular scale to the cellular and tissue level, has an intimate and intricate relationship with its biological functions. We investigated the mechanical properties of human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (ECs) using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Concurrently, the wider distribution and finer details of the cytoskeletal nano-structure were examined using fluorescence microscopy (FM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), respectively. These correlative measurements were conducted in response to the EC barrier-disrupting agent, thrombin, and barrier-enhancing agent, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). Our new findings and analysis directly link the spatio-temporal complexities of cell re-modeling and cytoskeletal mechanical properties alteration. This work provides novel insights into the biomechanical function of the endothelial barrier and suggests similar opportunities for understanding the form-function relationship in other biomechanical subsystems. PMID:26086333

  10. Using spatio-temporal modeling to predict long-term exposure to black smoke at fine spatial and temporal scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadvand, Payam; Rushton, Stephen; Diggle, Peter J.; Goffe, Louis; Rankin, Judith; Pless-Mulloli, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    Whilst exposure to air pollution is linked to a wide range of adverse health outcomes, assessing levels of this exposure has remained a challenge. This study reports a modeling approach for the estimation of weekly levels of ambient black smoke (BS) at residential postcodes across Northeast England (2055 km 2) over a 12 year period (1985-1996). A two-stage modeling strategy was developed using monitoring data on BS together with a range of covariates including data on traffic, population density, industrial activity, land cover (remote sensing), and meteorology. The first stage separates the temporal trend in BS for the region as a whole from within-region spatial variation and the second stage is a linear model which predicts BS levels at all locations in the region using spatially referenced covariate data as predictors and the regional predicted temporal trend as an offset. Traffic and land cover predictors were included in the final model, which predicted 70% of the spatio-temporal variation in BS across the study region over the study period. This modeling approach appears to provide a robust way of estimating exposure to BS at an inter-urban scale.

  11. Cdc42 and RhoA reveal different spatio-temporal dynamics upon local stimulation with Semaphorin-3A

    PubMed Central

    Iseppon, Federico; Napolitano, Luisa M. R.; Torre, Vincent; Cojoc, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Small RhoGTPases, such as Cdc42 and RhoA, are key players in integrating external cues and intracellular signaling pathways that regulate growth cone (GC) motility. Indeed, Cdc42 is involved in actin polymerization and filopodia formation, whereas RhoA induces GC collapse and neurite retraction through actomyosin contraction. In this study we employed Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) microscopy to study the spatio-temporal dynamics of Cdc42 and RhoA in GCs in response to local Semaphorin-3A (Sema3A) stimulation obtained with lipid vesicles filled with Sema3A and positioned near the selected GC using optical tweezers. We found that Cdc42 and RhoA were activated at the leading edge of NG108-15 neuroblastoma cells during spontaneous cycles of protrusion and retraction, respectively. The release of Sema3A brought to a progressive activation of RhoA within 30 s from the stimulus in the central region of the GC that collapsed and retracted. In contrast, the same stimulation evoked waves of Cdc42 activation propagating away from the stimulated region. A more localized stimulation obtained with Sema3A coated beads placed on the GC, led to Cdc42 active waves that propagated in a retrograde manner with a mean period of 70 s, and followed by GC retraction. Therefore, Sema3A activates both Cdc42 and RhoA with a complex and different spatial-temporal dynamics. PMID:26379503

  12. A physiologically plausible spatio-temporal model for EEG signals recorded with intracerebral electrodes in human partial epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Cosandier-Rimélé, Delphine; Badier, Jean-Michel; Chauvel, Patrick; Wendling, Fabrice

    2007-03-01

    Stereoelectroencephalography (depth-EEG signals) is a presurgical investigation technique of drug-resistant partial epilepsy, in which multiple sensor intracerebral electrodes are used to directly record brain electrical activity. In order to interpret depth-EEG signals, we developed an extended source model which connects two levels of representation: (1) a distributed current dipole model which describes the spatial distribution of neuronal sources; (2) a model of coupled neuronal populations which describes their temporal dynamics. From this extended source model, depth-EEG signals were simulated from the forward solution at each electrode sensor located inside the brain. Results showed that realistic transient epileptiform activities (spikes) are obtained under specific conditions in the model in terms of degree of coupling between neuronal populations and spatial extent of the source. In particular, the cortical area involved in the generation of epileptic spikes was estimated to vary from 18 to 25 cm2, for brain conductivity values ranging from 30 to 35 x 10(-5) S/mm, for high coupling degree between neuronal populations and for a volume conductor model that accounts for the three main tissues of the head (brain, skull, and scalp). This study provides insight into the relationship between spatio-temporal properties of cortical neuronal sources and depth-EEG signals. PMID:17355049

  13. Syndromic surveillance of abortions in beef cattle based on the prospective analysis of spatio-temporal variations of calvings

    PubMed Central

    Bronner, A.; Morignat, E.; Fournié, G.; Vergne, T.; Vinard, J-L; Gay, E.; Calavas, D.

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to study the ability of a syndromic surveillance system to identify spatio-temporal clusters of drops in the number of calvings among beef cows during the Bluetongue epizootic of 2007 and 2008, based on calving seasons. France was partitioned into 300 iso-populated units, i.e. units with quite the same number of beef cattle. Only 1% of clusters were unlikely to be related to Bluetongue. Clusters were detected during the calving season of primary infection by Bluetongue in 28% (n?=?23) of the units first infected in 2007, and in 87% (n?=?184) of the units first infected in 2008. In units in which a first cluster was detected over their calving season of primary infection, Bluetongue was detected more rapidly after the start of the calving season and its prevalence was higher than in other units. We believe that this type of syndromic surveillance system could improve the surveillance of abortive events in French cattle. Besides, our approach should be used to develop syndromic surveillance systems for other diseases and purposes, and in other settings, to avoid “false” alarms due to isolated events and homogenize the ability to detect abnormal variations of indicator amongst iso-populated units. PMID:26687099

  14. Spatio-temporal analysis of Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae [corrected] Scolytinae) invasion in eastern U.S. forests.

    PubMed

    Koch, F H; Smith, W D

    2008-04-01

    The non-native redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), has recently emerged as a significant pest of southeastern U.S. coastal forests. Specifically, a fungal symbiont (Raffaelea sp.) of X. glabratus has caused mortality of redbay (Persea borbonia) and sassafras (Sassafras albidum) trees in the region; several other Lauraceae species also seem susceptible. Although the range of X. glabratus continues to expand rapidly, little is known about the species' biology and behavior. In turn, there has been no broad-scale assessment of the threat it poses to eastern U.S. forests. To provide a basic information framework, we performed analyses exploiting relevant spatio-temporal data available for X. glabratus. First, we mapped the densities of redbay and sassafras from forest inventory data. Second, we used climate matching to delineate potential geographic limits for X. glabratus. Third, we used county infestation data to estimate the rate of spread and modeled spread through time, incorporating host density as a weighting factor. Our results suggest that (1) key areas with high concentrations of redbay have yet to be invaded, but some are immediately threatened; (2) climatic conditions may serve to constrain X. glabratus to the southeastern U.S. coastal region; and (3) if unchecked, X. glabratus may spread throughout the range of redbay in <40 yr. Disruption of anthropogenic, long-distance dispersal could reduce the likelihood of this outcome. PMID:18419916

  15. Correlated Spatio-Temporal Data Collection in Wireless Sensor Networks Based on Low Rank Matrix Approximation and Optimized Node Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Xinglin; Hu, Yongli; Sun, Yanfeng; Yin, Baocai; Gao, Junbin

    2014-01-01

    The emerging low rank matrix approximation (LRMA) method provides an energy efficient scheme for data collection in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) by randomly sampling a subset of sensor nodes for data sensing. However, the existing LRMA based methods generally underutilize the spatial or temporal correlation of the sensing data, resulting in uneven energy consumption and thus shortening the network lifetime. In this paper, we propose a correlated spatio-temporal data collection method for WSNs based on LRMA. In the proposed method, both the temporal consistence and the spatial correlation of the sensing data are simultaneously integrated under a new LRMA model. Moreover, the network energy consumption issue is considered in the node sampling procedure. We use Gini index to measure both the spatial distribution of the selected nodes and the evenness of the network energy status, then formulate and resolve an optimization problem to achieve optimized node sampling. The proposed method is evaluated on both the simulated and real wireless networks and compared with state-of-the-art methods. The experimental results show the proposed method efficiently reduces the energy consumption of network and prolongs the network lifetime with high data recovery accuracy and good stability. PMID:25490583

  16. Gene Expression Analyses of the Spatio-Temporal Relationships of Human Medulloblastoma Subgroups during Early Human Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Cornelia M.; Hawes, Susan M.; Kees, Ursula R.; Gottardo, Nicholas G.; Dallas, Peter B.

    2014-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common form of malignant paediatric brain tumour and is the leading cause of childhood cancer related mortality. The four molecular subgroups of medulloblastoma that have been identified – WNT, SHH, Group 3 and Group 4 - have molecular and topographical characteristics suggestive of different cells of origin. Definitive identification of the cell(s) of origin of the medulloblastoma subgroups, particularly the poorer prognosis Group 3 and Group 4 medulloblastoma, is critical to understand the pathogenesis of the disease, and ultimately for the development of more effective treatment options. To address this issue, the gene expression profiles of normal human neural tissues and cell types representing a broad neuro-developmental continuum, were compared to those of two independent cohorts of primary human medulloblastoma specimens. Clustering, co-expression network, and gene expression analyses revealed that WNT and SHH medulloblastoma may be derived from distinct neural stem cell populations during early embryonic development, while the transcriptional profiles of Group 3 and Group 4 medulloblastoma resemble cerebellar granule neuron precursors at weeks 10–15 and 20–30 of embryogenesis, respectively. Our data indicate that Group 3 medulloblastoma may arise through abnormal neuronal differentiation, whereas deregulation of synaptic pruning-associated apoptosis may be driving Group 4 tumorigenesis. Overall, these data provide significant new insight into the spatio-temporal relationships and molecular pathogenesis of the human medulloblastoma subgroups, and provide an important framework for the development of more refined model systems, and ultimately improved therapeutic strategies. PMID:25412507

  17. Heterogeneous dynamics and stretched exponential decay of spatio-temporal correlations for Coulomb-interacting particles in confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosal, Amit; Ash, Biswarup; Chakrabarti, Jaydeb

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the dynamics of Coulomb-interacting confined particles over a range of temperatures capturing the crossover from a Wigner molecule to a liquid-like phase. Dynamical signatures, derived from the Van-Hove correlations, develop pivotal understanding of the phases as well as the intervening crossover, which are inaccessible from the study of static correlations alone. The motion of the particles shows frustrations, produces heterogeneities depending on the observation time-scales and temperatures and results into a non-Gaussian behavior. The extent and nature of the departure of the behavior of spatio-temporal correlations from the conventional wisdom depends crucially on the symmetry of the confinements. In particular, we find that the decay of correlations follow a stretched-exponential form in traps that lack any symmetry. Our data offers a broad support to a theoretical model that integrates the non-Gaussian behavior arising from the convolution of Gaussian fluctuations weighted by appropriate diffusivities, consistent with local dynamics. The richness of information from the dynamic correlation will be shown to improve the understanding of melting in confined systems in a powerful manner.

  18. Spatio-temporal Assessment of Land Use/ Land Cover Dynamics and Urban Heat Island of Jaipur City using Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalan, S.; Sharma, K.

    2014-11-01

    Urban Heat Island (UHI) refers to the phenomena of higher surface temperature occurring in urban areas as compared to the surrounding countryside attributable to urbanization. Spatio-temporal changes in UHI can be quantified through Land Surface Temperature (LST) derived from satellite imageries. Spatial variations in LST occur due to complexity of land surface - combination of impervious surface materials, vegetation, exposed soils as well as water surfaces. Jaipur city has observed rapid urbanization over the last decade. Due to rising population pressure the city has expanded considerably in areal extent and has also observed substantial land use/land cover (LULC) changes. The paper aims to determine changes in the LST and UHI phenomena for Jaipur city over the period from 2000 to 2011 and analyzes the spatial distribution and temporal variation of LST in context of changes in LULC. Landsat 7 ETM+ (2000) and Landsat 5 TM (2011) images of summer season have been used. Results reveal that Jaipur city has witnessed considerable growth in built up area at the cost of greener patches over the last decade, which has had clear impact on variation in LST. There has been an average rise of 2.99 °C in overall summer temperature. New suburbs of the city record 2° to 4 °C increase in LST. LST change is inversely related to change in vegetation cover and positively related to extent of built up area. The study concludes that UHI of Jaipur city has intensified and extended over new areas.

  19. The 2007 flood in sub-Saharan Africa: spatio-temporal characteristics, potential causes, and future perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paeth, H.; Fink, A.; Samimi, C.

    2009-09-01

    We analyse various observational data sets in order to assess and to compare th spatio-temporal characteristics and intensity of the Sahel flood in 2007 and the associated rain events. The return times are estimated from daily precipitation time series at high spatial resolution and the potential causes are disclosed in a global and regional context. Finally, future changes in the occurrence of such heavy rain events are simulated by a regional climate model in order to judge the flood risk potential until the middle of the 21st century. Satellite data reveal that the flood was not large-scale but confined to the main river basins in sub-Saharan West Africa. Nonetheless, abundant rainfall prevailed over large parts of western Africa extending north into the western Sahara, particularly during the second half of August and the beginning of September 2007. In detail, the various precipitation data sets differ considerably in terms of the monthly anomalies, demonstrating the difficulty to delineate meteorological extreme events even at a subcontinental scale and during the most recent past. Return times range between 1 and 50 years with high spatial heterogeneity. Among the potential causes we identify a La Nina event in the tropical Pacific, anomalous heating in the tropical Atlantic coming along with a greater depth of the monsoonal westerlies, and enhanced activity of African easterly waves, both evident in 2-6 day zonal wind and outgoing longwave radiation variance anomalies. The future flood risk may be slightly decreasing (increasing) in tropical West (East) Africa.

  20. Spatio-Temporal Cellular Imaging of Polymer-pDNA Nanocomplexes Affords In Situ Morphology and Trafficking Trends

    PubMed Central

    Ingle, Nilesh P.; Lian, Xue; Reineke, Theresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic polymers are ubiquitous in the development of drug and polynucleotide delivery vehicles, offering promise for personalized medicine. However, the polymer structure plays a central yet elusive role in dictating the efficacy, safety, mechanisms, and kinetics of therapeutic transport in a spatial and temporal manner. Here, we decipher the intracellular evolutionary pathways pertaining to shape, size, location, and mechanism of four structurally-divergent polymer vehicles (Tr455, Tr477, jetPEI™ and Glycofect™) that create colloidal nanoparticles (polyplexes) when complexed with fluorescently-labeled plasmid DNA (pDNA). Multiple high resolution tomographic images of whole HeLa (human cervical adenocarcinoma) cells were captured via confocal microscopy at 4, 8, 12 and 24 hours. The images were reconstructed to visualize and quantify trends in situ in a four-dimensional spatio-temporal manner. The data revealed heretofore-unseen images of polyplexes in situ and structure-function relationships, i.e., Glycofect™ polyplexes are trafficked as the smallest polyplex complexes and Tr455 polyplexes have expedited translocation to the perinuclear region. Also, all of the polyplex types appeared to be preferentially internalized and trafficked via early endosomes affiliated with caveolae, a Rab-5-dependent pathway, actin, and microtubules. PMID:24007201

  1. Understanding spatio-temporal mobility patterns for seniors, child/student and adult using smart card data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.; Tan, J.

    2014-11-01

    Commutes in urban areas create interesting travel patterns that are often stored in regional transportation databases. These patterns can vary based on the day of the week, the time of the day, and commuter type. This study proposes methods to detect underlying spatio-temporal variability among three groups of commuters (senior citizens, child/students, and adults) using data mining and spatial analytics. Data from over 36 million individual trip records collected over one week (March 2012) on the Singapore bus and Mass Rapid Transit (MRT) system by the fare collection system were used. Analyses of such data are important for transportation and landuse designers and contribute to a better understanding of urban dynamics. Specifically, descriptive statistics, network analysis, and spatial analysis methods are presented. Descriptive variables were proposed such as density and duration to detect temporal features of people. A directed weighted graph G ≡ (N , L, W) was defined to analyze the global network properties of every pair of the transportation link in the city during an average workday for all three categories. Besides, spatial interpolation and spatial statistic tools were used to transform the discrete network nodes into structured human movement landscape to understand the role of transportation systems in urban areas. The travel behaviour of the three categories follows a certain degree of temporal and spatial universality but also displays unique patterns within their own specialties. Each category is characterized by their different peak hours, commute distances, and specific locations for travel on weekdays.

  2. Spatio-temporal characteristics of aftershocks and seismogenic structure of the 2011 M W9.0 Tohoku earthquake, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jisheng; Liu, Yanqiong; Zhou, Zhenghua; Lazzali, Farah

    2012-06-01

    The Tohoku megathrust earthquake, which occurred on March 11, 2011 and had an epicenter that was 70 km east of Tohoku, Japan, resulted in an estimated ten's of billions of dollars in damage and a death toll of more than 15 thousand lives, yet few studies have documented key spatio-temporal seismogenic characteristics. Specifically, the temporal decay of aftershock activity, the number of strong aftershocks (with magnitudes greater than or equal to 7.0), the magnitude of the greatest aftershock, and area of possible aftershocks. Forecasted results from this study are based on Gutenberg-Richter's relation, Bath's law, Omori's law, and Well's relation of rupture scale utilizing the magnitude and statistical parameters of earthquakes in USA and China (Landers, Northridge, Hector Mine, San Simeon and Wenchuan earthquakes). The number of strong aftershocks, the parameters of Gutenberg-Richter's relation, and the modified form of Omori's law are confirmed based on the aftershock sequence data from the M W9.0 Tohoku earthquake. Moreover, for a large earthquake, the seismogenic structure could be a fault, a fault system, or an intersection of several faults. The seismogenic structure of the earthquake suggests that the event occurred on a thrust fault near the Japan trench within the overriding plate that subsequently triggered three or more active faults producing large aftershocks.

  3. Enhancing the emergence rate of coherent wavefronts from ocean ambient noise correlations using spatio-temporal filters.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Charlotte; Lani, Shane; Sabra, Karim G; Hodgkiss, William S; Kuperman, W A; Roux, Philippe

    2012-08-01

    Extracting coherent wavefronts between passive receivers using cross-correlations of ambient noise (CAN) provides a means for monitoring the seismoacoustic environment without using active sources. However, using cross-correlations between single receivers can require a long recording time in order to extract stable coherent arrivals from CAN. This becomes an issue if the propagation medium fluctuates significantly during the recording period. To address this issue, this article presents a general spatio-temporal filtering procedure to enhance the emergence rate for coherent wavefronts extracted from time-averaged ambient noise correlations between two spatially separated arrays. The robustness of this array-based CAN technique is investigated using ambient shipping noise recorded over 24 h in the frequency band [250-850 Hz] on two vertical line arrays deployed 143 m apart in shallow water (depth 20 m). Experimental results confirm that the array-based CAN technique can significantly reduce the recording duration (e.g., from 22 h to 30 min) required for extracting coherent wavefronts of sufficient amplitude (e.g., 20 dB over residual temporal fluctations) when compared to conventional CAN implementations between single pairs of hydrophones. These improvements of the CAN technique could benefit the development of noise-based ocean monitoring applications such as passive acoustic tomography. PMID:22894211

  4. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Vegetation and Their Relationships with Climate in Southeast Asia Based on Three Satellite NDVI Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Zeng, Z.; Piao, S.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical vegetation plays an essential role for global biogeochemical cycles. An abundant literature focused on the vegetation dynamics in Amazon. It is shown that the Amazonian rainforest is strongly controlled by radiation, even during dry season. However, only few researches deal with tropical rainforest in Southeast Asia; the vegetation dynamics in Southeast Asia remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the spatio-temporal dynamics of vegetation in Southeast Asia with three independent satellite derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) products (GIMMS AVHRR NDVI3g, SPOT, and MODIS) as well as the recently developed Sun Induced chlorophyll Fluorescence (SIF). We furthermore examined how climate drivers (precipitation, temperature and radiation) exert influences on the vegetation dynamics. We find that the three NDVI datasets are generally consistent with each other. At seasonal scale, NDVI decreases from the beginning to the end of the dry season; at interannual scale, dry season NDVI is positively correlated to precipitation but negatively correlated to radiation, while wet season NDVI is positively correlated to radiation. Compared to evergreen forests, deciduous forests have a larger NDVI decrease rate and more extended area with positive relationships between NDVI and precipitation during the dry season. SIF is lower during dry season than during wet season. Our results indicate that most forests in Southeast Asia, unlike in the Amazonian basin, are water-limited in the dry season but radiation-limited in the wet season. These results imply that droughts may have a stronger impact on forests in Southeast Asia than in Amazon.

  5. PLASIM-ENTSem v1.0: a spatio-temporal emulator of future climate change for impacts assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, P. B.; Edwards, N. R.; Garthwaite, P. H.; Fraedrich, K.; Lunkeit, F.; Kirk, E.; Labriet, M.; Kanudia, A.; Babonneau, F.

    2014-02-01

    Many applications in the evaluation of climate impacts and environmental policy require detailed spatio-temporal projections of future climate. To capture feedbacks from impacted natural or socio-economic systems requires interactive two-way coupling, but this is generally computationally infeasible with even moderately complex general circulation models (GCMs). Dimension reduction using emulation is one solution to this problem, demonstrated here with the GCM PLASIM-ENTS (Planet Simulator coupled with the efficient numerical terrestrial scheme). Our approach generates temporally evolving spatial patterns of climate variables, considering multiple modes of variability in order to capture non-linear feedbacks. The emulator provides a 188-member ensemble of decadally and spatially resolved (~ 5° resolution) seasonal climate data in response to an arbitrary future CO2 concentration and non-CO2 radiative forcing scenario. We present the PLASIM-ENTS coupled model, the construction of its emulator from an ensemble of transient future simulations, an application of the emulator methodology to produce heating and cooling degree-day projections, the validation of the simulator (with respect to empirical data) and the validation of the emulator (with respect to high-complexity models). We also demonstrate the application to estimates of sea-level rise and associated uncertainty.

  6. Spatio-Temporal Gene Expression Profiling during In Vivo Early Ovarian Folliculogenesis: Integrated Transcriptomic Study and Molecular Signature of Early Follicular Growth

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Agnes; Servin, Bertrand; Mulsant, Philippe; Mandon-Pepin, Beatrice

    2015-01-01

    Background The successful achievement of early ovarian folliculogenesis is important for fertility and reproductive life span. This complex biological process requires the appropriate expression of numerous genes at each developmental stage, in each follicular compartment. Relatively little is known at present about the molecular mechanisms that drive this process, and most gene expression studies have been performed in rodents and without considering the different follicular compartments. Results We used RNA-seq technology to explore the sheep transcriptome during early ovarian follicular development in the two main compartments: oocytes and granulosa cells. We documented the differential expression of 3,015 genes during this phase and described the gene expression dynamic specific to these compartments. We showed that important steps occurred during primary/secondary transition in sheep. We also described the in vivo molecular course of a number of pathways. In oocytes, these pathways documented the chronology of the acquisition of meiotic competence, migration and cellular organization, while in granulosa cells they concerned adhesion, the formation of cytoplasmic projections and steroid synthesis. This study proposes the involvement in this process of several members of the integrin and BMP families. The expression of genes such as Kruppel-like factor 9 (KLF9) and BMP binding endothelial regulator (BMPER) was highlighted for the first time during early follicular development, and their proteins were also predicted to be involved in gene regulation. Finally, we selected a data set of 24 biomarkers that enabled the discrimination of early follicular stages and thus offer a molecular signature of early follicular growth. This set of biomarkers includes known genes such as SPO11 meiotic protein covalently bound to DSB (SPO11), bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) and WEE1 homolog 2 (S. pombe)(WEE2) which play critical roles in follicular development but other biomarkers are also likely to play significant roles in this process. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first in vivo spatio-temporal exploration of transcriptomes derived from early follicles in sheep. PMID:26540452

  7. Himalayan glaciers: Combining remote sensing, field techniques and indigenous knowledge to understand spatio-temporal patterns of glacier changes and their impact on water resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racoviteanu, Adina

    With contradictory statements about "disappearing Himalayan glaciers" in the last few years, increasing concerns have been raised about the impact of snow and glacier changes on regional water supplies. Concomitantly, local communities in the western Himalaya report changes in glacier extents, snow cover and weather patterns. In response to perceived water scarcity, indigenous Himalayan cultures have begun a number of adaptive responses such as meltwater harvesting to construct "artificial" glaciers. This research addresses the need for a detailed assessment of glacier and climate parameters in the Himalaya, with the goal of identifying "at risk" glacierized areas and helping these local communities plan future water resources. The objectives of the research are threefold: 1) to review existing knowledge about glacier fluctuations and remote sensing methods for glacier mapping in the Himalaya; 3) to quantify spatio-temporal patterns of glacier changes in the eastern Himalaya in the last decades using remote sensing techniques and field measurements and 3) to quantify the role of glacier melt to streamflow using a combination of remote sensing and isotopic techniques. This thesis focuses on the monsoon-influenced eastern Himalaya (the Langtang and Khumbu regions in the Nepal Himalaya, and Sikkim in the Indian Himalaya). The research is grounded in extensive field surveys conducted from 2006 to 2010 across the Himalaya, including glacier mass balance expeditions, water sampling, ground-control point (GCP) acquisition and GPS-enabled photos. The goal of this research is to understand how topographic and climatic factors influence the rates of glacier change at various spatial scales, and how these changes re likely to affect future water resources. Multi-temporal (decadal) glacier datasets were derived from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) sensor, Landsat ETM+, older topographic maps, declassified Corona imagery and very high-resolution QuickBird and Ikonos imagery. I used a combination of visible, near infrared and thermal multispectral data combined with texture analysis and topography for glacier mapping. The results of this research help fill a gap in the understanding of glacier patterns in the data-scarce eastern Himalaya. The results of this research are useful for assessing vulnerability of the Himalaya to water scarcity due to future glacier or climate changes.

  8. On the Computational Complexity of SpatioTemporal Logics David Gabelaia, Roman Kontchakov, Agi Kurucz,

    E-print Network

    Kurucz, Agi

    is disconnected from the EU until Poland be­ comes a tangential proper part of the EU'), EQ(Russia; T ) ^ 3 F P(T ; EU) ^ 2 F EQ(T ; T ) (2) (`some day in the future the present territory of Russia will be part of the EU'), P(Russia; 3 F EU) (3) (`all points of Russia as it is today will belong to the EU in the future

  9. A Spatio-Temporal Memory Based on SOMs with Activity Diffusion Neil R. Eulianoa

    E-print Network

    Slatton, Clint

    (synchronized movement, robotics, mapping, navigation, etc.), process control (both human and mechanical), time time-varying voronoi regions. 1. INTRODUCTION Sensory processing can be grouped into two domains, static and dynamic problems. Static problems consist of information that is independent of time

  10. Analysis on spatio-temporal trends and drivers in vegetation growth during recent decades in Xinjiang, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jiaqiang; Shu, Jianmin; Yin, Junqi; Yuan, Xinjie; Jiaerheng, Ahati; Xiong, Shanshan; He, Ping; Liu, Weiling

    2015-06-01

    Vegetation plays an i