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Sample records for spe b-induced apoptosis

  1. The hepatitis C virus NS2 protein is an inhibitor of CIDE-B-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Erdtmann, Lars; Franck, Nathalie; Lerat, Herv; Le Seyec, Jacques; Gilot, David; Cannie, Isabelle; Gripon, Philippe; Hibner, Urszula; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane

    2003-05-16

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection frequently leads to liver cancer. To determine the viral factor(s) potentially involved in viral persistence, we focused our work on NS2, a viral protein of unknown function. To assign a role for NS2, we searched for cellular proteins that interact with NS2. Performing a two-hybrid screen on a human liver cDNA library, we found that NS2 interacted with the liver-specific pro-apoptotic CIDE-B protein. Binding specificity of NS2 for CIDE-B was confirmed by cell-free assays associated with colocalization studies and coprecipitation experiments on human endogenous CIDE-B. CIDE-B, a member of the novel CIDE family of apoptosis-inducing factors, has been reported to show strong cell death-inducing activity in its C-terminal domain. We show that this CIDE-B killing domain is involved in the NS2 interaction. NS2 binding was sufficient to inhibit CIDE-B-induced apoptosis because an NS2 deletion mutant unable to interact with CIDE-B in vitro lost its capacity to interfere with CIDE-B cell death activity. Although it has been reported that CIDE-B-induced apoptosis is characterized by mitochondrial localization, the precise apoptotic mechanism remained unknown. Here, we show that CIDE-B induced cell death in a caspase-dependent manner through cytochrome c release from mitochondria. Furthermore, we found that NS2 counteracted the cytochrome c release induced by CIDE-B. In vivo, the CIDE-B protein level was extremely low in adenovirus-infected transgenic mice expressing the HCV polyprotein compared with that in wild-type mice. We suggest that NS2 interferes with the CIDE-B-induced death pathway and participates in HCV strategies to subvert host cell defense. PMID:12595532

  2. Epothilone B induces extrinsic pathway of apoptosis in human SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rogalska, Aneta; Gajek, Arkadiusz; Marczak, Agnieszka

    2014-06-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying epothilone B (EpoB) induced apoptosis were investigated in SKOV-3 human ovarian cancer cells. The aim of this research was to compare EpoB's, which belongs to the new class of anticancer drugs, with paclitaxel's (PTX) ability to induce apoptosis. The mode of cell death was assessed colorimetrically, fluorimetrically and by immunoblot analyses through measuring DNA fragmentation, the level of intracellular calcium, the level of cytochrome c, TRAIL, the cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and the activation of caspase-9, -8 and -3. EpoB leads to an increase of the cytosolic level of cytochrome c after 4 h of cell treatment. After 24 and 48 h of cell treatment the level of intracellular calcium also increased by about 21% and 24% respectively. Moreover, EpoB, similarly to PTX, promoted the expression of TRAIL in lymphocytes, although high TRAIL expression on tumor cells was detected only after adding EpoB to SKOV-3 cells. EpoB mediates caspases-8 and -3 activation, which is independent of the reduction in the amount of caspase-9. Epitope-specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies revealed characteristic apoptotic changes that included cleavage of the 116 kDa PARP polypeptide to 25 kDa fragments. The results of our study show that EpoB induces mainly the extrinsic pathway. PMID:24583341

  3. Schisandrin B induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of gallbladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Shan-Shan; Wang, Xu-An; Li, Huai-Feng; Shu, Yi-Jun; Bao, Run-Fa; Zhang, Fei; Cao, Yang; Ye, Yuan-Yuan; Weng, Hao; Wu, Wen-Guang; Mu, Jia-Sheng; Wu, Xiang-Song; Li, Mao-Lan; Hu, Yun-Ping; Jiang, Lin; Tan, Zhu-Jun; Lu, Wei; Liu, Feng; Liu, Ying-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Gallbladder cancer, with high aggressivity and extremely poor prognosis, is the most common malignancy of the bile duct. The main objective of the paper was to investigate the effects of schisandrin B (Sch B) on gallbladder cancer cells and identify the mechanisms underlying its potential anticancer effects. We showed that Sch B inhibited the viability and proliferation of human gallbladder cancer cells in a dose-, time -dependent manner through MTT and colony formation assays, and decrease mitochondrial membrane potential (??m) at a dose-dependent manner through flow cytometry. Flow cytometry assays also revealed G0/G1 phase arrest and apoptosis in GBC-SD and NOZ cells. Western blot analysis of Sch B-treated cells revealed the upregulation of Bax, cleaved caspase-9, cleaved caspase-3, cleaved PARP and downregulation of Bcl-2, NF-?B, cyclin D1 and CDK-4. Moreover, this drug also inhibited the tumor growth in nude mice carrying subcutaneous NOZ tumor xenografts. These data demonstrated that Sch B induced apoptosis in gallbladder cancer cells by regulating apoptosis-related protein expression, and suggests that Sch B may be a promising drug for the treatment of gallbladder cancer. PMID:25165862

  4. Heparin Interaction with the Primed Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte CD11b Induces Apoptosis and Prevents Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Mazor, Meital; Mazor, Rafi; Kristal, Batya; Kistler, Erik B.; Ziv, Inbal; Chezar, Judith; Sela, Shifra

    2015-01-01

    Heparin is known to have anti-inflammatory effects, yet the mechanisms are not completely understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that heparin has a direct effect on activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs), changing their activation state, and can explain its anti-inflammatory effect. To test our hypothesis, we designed both in vitro and ex vivo studies to elucidate the mechanism by which heparin modulates PMNL functions and therefore the inflammatory response. We specifically tested the hypothesis that priming of PMNLs renders them more susceptible to heparin. Amplified levels of CD11b and increased rate of superoxide release manifested PMNL priming. Increase in cell priming resulted in a dose-dependent increase in heparin binding to PMNLs followed by augmented apoptosis. Blocking antibodies to CD11b inhibited heparin binding and abolished the apoptotic response. Moreover, heparin caused a significant dose-dependent decrease in the rate of superoxide release from PMNLs, which was blunted by blocking antibodies to CD11b. Altogether, this study shows that the interaction of heparin with the PMNL CD11b results in cell apoptosis and explains heparin's anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:26819958

  5. Eriocalyxin B-induced apoptosis in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells through thiol-containing antioxidant systems and downstream signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Yue, G G L; Pu, J X; Sun, H D; Fung, K P; Leung, P C; Han, Q B; Lau, C B S; Leung, P S

    2014-01-01

    Thiol-containing antioxidant systems play an important role in regulating cellular redox homeostasis. Several anti-cancer agents act by targeting these systems by inducing the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Our earlier studies have shown that Eriocalyxin B (EriB), a diterpenoid isolated from Isodon eriocalyx, possesses anti-pancreatic tumour activities in vitro and in vivo. The present study further demonstrated that only thiol-containing antioxidants, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or dithiothreitol (DTT), inhibited EriB-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis. EriB suppressed the glutathione and thioredoxin antioxidant systems, thus increasing the intracellular ROS levels and regulating the MAPK, NF?B pathways. Treatment with EriB depleted the intracellular thiol-containing proteins in CAPAN-2 cells. In vivo studies also showed that EriB treatment (2.5 mg/kg) reduced the pancreatic tumour weights significantly in nude mice with increased superoxide levels. Taken together, our results shed important new light on the molecular mechanisms of EriB acting as an apoptogenic agent and its therapeutic potential for pancreatic cancer. PMID:24894173

  6. Eosinophil-specific deletion of I?B? in mice reveals a critical role of NF-?Binduced Bcl-xL for inhibition of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Christian; Willebrand, Ralf; Huber, Silke; Rupec, Rudolf A.; Wu, Davina; Locksley, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils are associated with type 2 immune responses to allergens and helminths. They release various proinflammatory mediators and toxic proteins on activation and are therefore considered proinflammatory effector cells. Eosinophilia is promoted by the cytokines interleukin (IL)-3, IL-5, and granulocyte macrophagecolony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and can result from enhanced de novo production or reduced apoptosis. In this study, we show that only IL-5 induces differentiation of eosinophils from bone marrow precursors, whereas IL-5, GM-CSF, and to a lesser extent IL-3 promote survival of mature eosinophils. The receptors for these cytokines use the common ? chain, which serves as the main signaling unit linked to signal transducer and activator of transcription 5, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and nuclear factor (NF)-?B pathways. Inhibition of NF-?B induced apoptosis of in vitro cultured eosinophils. Selective deletion of I?B? in vivo resulted in enhanced expression of Bcl-xL and reduced apoptosis during helminth infection. Retroviral overexpression of Bcl-xL promoted survival, whereas pharmacologic inhibition of Bcl-xL in murine or human eosinophils induced rapid apoptosis. These results suggest that therapeutic strategies targeting Bcl-xL in eosinophils could improve health conditions in allergic inflammatory diseases. PMID:25862560

  7. TNF Apoptosis Protection Fraction (TAPF) prevents apoptosis induced by TNF, but not by Fas or TRAIL, via NF-?B-induced increase in cFLIP.

    PubMed

    Seol, Ji-Yeon; Mihich, Enrico; Berleth, Erica S

    2015-10-01

    Tumor Necrosis Factor ? (TNF?) induces both the apoptotic pathway and anti-apoptotic factors. Incubation of human dermal fibroblasts with TAPF (TNF Apoptosis Protection Fraction) protects them from apoptosis induced by the subsequent addition of TNF and cycloheximide (CHX). TAPF does not protect against apoptosis induced by CHX in combination with either TRAIL (TNF related apoptosis inducing ligand) or an agonistic Fas antibody, or against apoptosis induced by the chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin. Incubation with TAPF does not affect the quantity of TNF that binds to the cell. TAPF prevents TNF-induced cleavage of caspases 8, 9, 3 and 7 and the apoptotic substrate PARP (poly-ADP ribose polymerase), but has no effect when these molecules are induced by an agonistic Fas antibody. TAPF induces rapid phosphorylation of the NF-?B/p65 (nuclear factor-?B) transcription factor at serine 536 which is indicative of its activation. TAPF increases the expression of cFLIP (cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein) which is a potent inhibitor of apoptosis that acts by preventing the cleavage of caspase 8. This increase in cFLIP is coincident with protection from TNF-induced apoptosis. Decreasing cFLIP levels using shRNA (short hairpin RNA) decreases protection by TAPF. TAPF also induced the anti-apoptotic A20 protein. These data indicate that TAPF protects human dermal fibroblasts from TNF-induced apoptosis by induction of cFLIP and subsequent inhibition of caspase 8 cleavage. PMID:26198031

  8. Eriocalyxin B induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells through caspase- and p53-dependent pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lin; Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong ; Yue, Grace G.L.; State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong ; Lau, Clara B.S.; Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong ; Sun, Handong; Fung, Kwok Pui; Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong ; Leung, Ping Chung; State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong ; Han, Quanbin; State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; School of Chinese Medicine, The Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong ; Leung, Po Sing

    2012-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is difficult to detect early and responds poorly to chemotherapy. A breakthrough in the development of new therapeutic agents is urgently needed. Eriocalyxin B (EriB), isolated from the Isodon eriocalyx plant, is an ent-kaurane diterpenoid with promise as a broad-spectrum anti-cancer agent. The anti-leukemic activity of EriB, including the underlying mechanisms involved, has been particularly well documented. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time EriB's potent cytotoxicity against four pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines, namely PANC-1, SW1990, CAPAN-1, and CAPAN-2. The effects were comparable to that of the chemotherapeutic camptothecin (CAM), but with much lower toxicity against normal human liver WRL68 cells. EriB's cytoxicity against CAPAN-2 cells was found to involve caspase-dependent apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. Moreover, the p53 pathway was found to be activated by EriB in these cells. Furthermore, in vivo studies showed that EriB inhibited the growth of human pancreatic tumor xenografts in BALB/c nude mice without significant secondary adverse effects. These results suggest that EriB should be considered a candidate for pancreatic cancer treatment. -- Highlights: ► We study Eriocalyxin B (EriB)'s cytotoxic effects on pancreatic cancer cell lines. ► EriB inhibits cell proliferation via mediation of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. ► The effects are involved in caspase-dependent apoptosis and p53 pathway. ► In vivo study also shows EriB inhibits the growth of human pancreatic tumor. ► EriB can be a good candidate for chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer.

  9. Hemoglobin interaction with GP1b? induces platelet activation and apoptosis: a novel mechanism associated with intravascular hemolysis

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Rashi; Annarapu, Gowtham K.; Pandey, Ankita; Chawla, Sheetal; Ojha, Amrita; Gupta, Avinash; Cruz, Miguel A.; Seth, Tulika; Guchhait, Prasenjit

    2015-01-01

    Intravascular hemolysis increases the risk of hypercoagulation and thrombosis in hemolytic disorders. Our study shows a novel mechanism by which extracellular hemoglobin directly affects platelet activation. The binding of Hb to glycoprotein1b? activates platelets. Lower concentrations of Hb (0.373 ?M) significantly increase the phosphorylation of signaling adapter proteins, such as Lyn, PI3K, AKT, and ERK, and promote platelet aggregation in vitro. Higher concentrations of Hb (36 ?M) activate the pro-apoptotic proteins Bak, Bax, cytochrome c, caspase-9 and caspase-3, and increase platelet clot formation. Increased plasma Hb activates platelets and promotes their apoptosis, and plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of aggregation and development of the procoagulant state in hemolytic disorders. Furthermore, we show that in patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, a chronic hemolytic disease characterized by recurrent events of intravascular thrombosis and thromboembolism, it is the elevated plasma Hb or platelet surface bound Hb that positively correlates with platelet activation. PMID:26341739

  10. Hemoglobin interaction with GP1b? induces platelet activation and apoptosis: a novel mechanism associated with intravascular hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Rashi; Annarapu, Gowtham K; Pandey, Ankita; Chawla, Sheetal; Ojha, Amrita; Gupta, Avinash; Cruz, Miguel A; Seth, Tulika; Guchhait, Prasenjit

    2015-12-01

    Intravascular hemolysis increases the risk of hypercoagulation and thrombosis in hemolytic disorders. Our study shows a novel mechanism by which extracellular hemoglobin directly affects platelet activation. The binding of Hb to glycoprotein1b? activates platelets. Lower concentrations of Hb (0.37-3 ?M) significantly increase the phosphorylation of signaling adapter proteins, such as Lyn, PI3K, AKT, and ERK, and promote platelet aggregation in vitro. Higher concentrations of Hb (3-6 ?M) activate the pro-apoptotic proteins Bak, Bax, cytochrome c, caspase-9 and caspase-3, and increase platelet clot formation. Increased plasma Hb activates platelets and promotes their apoptosis, and plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of aggregation and development of the procoagulant state in hemolytic disorders. Furthermore, we show that in patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, a chronic hemolytic disease characterized by recurrent events of intravascular thrombosis and thromboembolism, it is the elevated plasma Hb or platelet surface bound Hb that positively correlates with platelet activation. PMID:26341739

  11. Photoprotective effects of two natural products on ultraviolet B-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in SKH-1 mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Filip, Adriana; Daicoviciu, Doina; Clichici, Simona; Mocan, Teodora; Muresan, Adriana; Postescu, Ion Dan

    2011-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation (UV) is the major cause of nonmelanoma skin cancer in humans. Photochemoprevention with natural products represents a simple but very effective strategy for the management of cutaneous neoplasia. We studied the photoprotective activity of Calluna vulgaris and red grape seed (Vitis vinifera L, Burgund Mare variety [BM]) extracts in vivo in an SKH-1 hairless mice skin model. Fifty 8-week-old female SKH-1 hairless mice were randomly divided into 5 groups (n?=?10 each): controls, UVB-irradiated, C. vulgaris plus UVB-irradiated, BM plus UVB-irradiated, and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) plus UVB-irradiated. A dose of 4 mg/mouse per cm of skin area for both extracts was topically applied to the mice 30 minutes before a single-dose (240 mJ/cm) UVB exposure. EGCG dissolved in phosphate-buffered saline (pH 6.6; 0.067 M) was administered at 2 mg/mouse per cm. Glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities, reduced glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde, nitric oxide, and caspase 3 activity were determined in skin homogenates 24 hours after irradiation. A single dose of UVB increased GSH levels and glutathione peroxidase activity in the exposed skin. C. vulgaris and BM pretreatment significantly decreased GSH formation and glutathione peroxidase activity (P?apoptosis. These results suggest that C. vulgaris and BM extracts might be chemopreventive candidates for reducing UV-induced risk for skin cancer. PMID:21470043

  12. The Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Latency-Associated Transcript Can Protect Neuron-Derived C1300 and Neuro2A Cells from Granzyme B-Induced Apoptosis and CD8 T-Cell Killing?

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xianzhi; Alami Chentoufi, Aziz; Hsiang, Chinhui; Carpenter, Dale; Osorio, Nelson; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Fraser, Nigel W.; Jones, Clinton; Wechsler, Steven L.

    2011-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency-associated transcript (LAT) is the only HSV-1 gene transcript abundantly expressed throughout latency. LAT null mutants have a significantly reduced reactivation phenotype. LAT's antiapoptosis activity is the major LAT factor involved in supporting the wild-type reactivation phenotype. During HSV-1 latency, some ganglionic neurons are surrounded by CD8 T cells, and it has been proposed that these CD8 T cells help maintain HSV-1 latency by suppressing viral reactivations. Surprisingly, despite injection of cytotoxic lytic granules by these CD8 T cells into latently infected neurons, neither apoptosis nor neuronal cell death appears to occur. We hypothesized that protection of latently infected neurons against cytotoxic CD8 T-cell killing is due to LAT's antiapoptosis activity. Since CD8 T-cell cytotoxic lytic granule-mediated apoptosis is critically dependent on granzyme B (GrB), we examined LAT's ability to block GrB-induced apoptosis. We report here that (i) LAT can interfere with GrB-induced apoptosis in cell cultures, (ii) LAT can block GrB-induced cleavage (activation) of caspase-3 both in cell culture and in a cell-free in vitro cell extract assay, and (iii) LAT can protect C1300 and Neuro2A cells from cytotoxic CD8 T-cell killing in vitro. These findings support the hypothesis that LAT's antiapoptosis activity can protect latently infected neurons from being killed by CD8 T-cell lytic granules in vivo. PMID:21177822

  13. FAP-1-mediated activation of NF-kappaB induces resistance of head and neck cancer to Fas-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wieckowski, Eva; Atarashi, Yoshinari; Stanson, Joanna; Sato, Taka-Aki; Whiteside, Theresa L

    2007-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms responsible for tumor resistance to apoptosis often involve the Fas/FasL pathway. While squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN) express both Fas and FasL, their resistance to self-induced apoptosis or apoptosis mediated by Fas agonistic antibody (CH-11Ab) was independent of the level of Fas surface expression or the presence of soluble Fas in supernatants of primary or metastatic SCCHN cell lines. By in vitro immunoselection, using PCI-15A cell line treated with successive cycles of CH-11 Ab, Fas-resistant sublines with the parental genotype were selected. Such sublines failed to cleave caspase-8 upon Fas engagement and were resistant to CH-11 Ab, although they remained sensitive to VP-16 or staurosporin. In the presence of cycloheximide, the selected SCCHN sublines become susceptible to CH-11 Ab, and showed cleavage of caspase-8, suggesting that apoptosis resistance was mediated by an inhibitory protein(s) acting upstream of caspase-8. Overexpression of Fas-associated phosphatase 1 (FAP-1), but not cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (cFLIP) in SCCHN sublines was documented by Western blots and RT-PCR analyses. The FAP-1+ selected sublines also downregulated cell surface Fas. A high phosphorylation level of IkappaB kappa, NFkappaB activation and upregulation of Bcl-2 expression were observed in the FAP-1+ sublines. Treatment with the phosphatase inhibitor, orthovanadate, or silencing of FAP-1 with siRNA abolished their resistance to apoptosis, suggesting that FAP-1 phosphatase activity could be responsible for NF-kappaB activation and resistance of SCCHN cells to Fas-mediated apoptosis. PMID:16888780

  14. ARID3B Induces Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Mediated Apoptosis While a Novel ARID3B Splice Form Does Not Induce Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Stancy; Deneke, Victoria E.; Cowden Dahl, Karen D.

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a common occurrence in many cancers. Alternative splicing is linked with decreased apoptosis and chemoresistance in cancer cells. We previously demonstrated that ARID3B, a member of the AT-rich interactive domain (ARID) family of DNA binding proteins, is overexpressed in ovarian cancer. Therefore we wanted to assess the effect of ARID3B splice forms on cell viability. We identified a novel splice form of the ARID3B gene (designated as ARID3B Sh), which lacks the C-terminal exons 5–9 present in the full-length isoform (ARID3B Fl). ARID3B Fl is expressed in a variety of cancer cell lines. Expression of ARID3B Sh varied by cell type, but was highly expressed in most ovarian cancer lines. ARID3B is modestly transcriptionally activated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling through the PEA3 transcription factor. We further found that ARID3B Fl is predominantly nuclear but is also present at the plasma membrane and in the cytosol. Endogenous ARID3B Sh is present in nuclear fractions, yet, when overexpressed ARID3B Sh accumulates in the cytosol and membrane fractions. The differential localization of these isoforms suggests they have different functions. Importantly, ARID3B Fl overexpression results in upregulation of pro-apoptotic BIM and induces Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFα) and TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) induced cell death. The ARID3B Fl-induced genes include TNFα, TRAIL, TRADD, TNF-R2, Caspase 10 and Caspase 7. Interestingly, ARID3B Sh does not induce apoptosis or expression of these genes. ARID3B Fl induces death receptor mediated apoptosis while the novel splice form ARID3B Sh does not induce cell death. Therefore alternative splice forms of ARID3B may play different roles in ovarian cancer progression. PMID:22860069

  15. Xerophilusin B induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells and does not cause toxicity in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Yao, Ran; Chen, Zhaoli; Zhou, Chengcheng; Luo, Mei; Shi, Xuejiao; Li, Jiagen; Gao, Yibo; Zhou, Fang; Pu, Jianxin; Sun, Handong; He, Jie

    2015-01-23

    Esophageal cancer is the eighth most common cancer in the world and ranks as the sixth leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Esophageal cancer has a poor prognosis partially due to its low sensitivity to chemotherapy agents, and the development of new therapeutic agents is urgently needed. Here, the antitumor activity of a natural ent-kaurane diterpenoid, xerophilusin B (1), which was isolated from Isodon xerophilus, a perennial herb frequently used in Chinese folk medicine for tumor treatment, was investigated. Compound 1 exhibited antiproliferative effects against esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cell lines in a time- and dose-dependent manner with lower toxicity against normal human and murine cell lines. In vivo studies demonstrated that 1 inhibited tumor growth of a human esophageal tumor xenograft in BALB/c nude mice without significant secondary adverse effects, indicating its safety in treating ESCC. Furthermore, 1 induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and promoted apoptosis through mitochondrial cytochrome c-dependent activation of the caspase-9 and caspase-3 cascade pathway in ESCC cell lines. In conclusion, the observations herein reported showed that 1 is a potential chemotherapeutic agent for ESCC and merits further preclinical and clinical investigation for cancer drug development. PMID:25555195

  16. PEM/SPE fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Grot, Stephen Andreas (Henrietta, NY)

    1998-01-01

    A PEM/SPE fuel cell including a membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) having a plurality of oriented filament embedded the face thereof for supporting the MEA and conducting current therefrom to contiguous electrode plates.

  17. A combination of STI571 and BCR-ABL1 siRNA with overexpressed p15INK4B induced enhanced proliferation inhibition and apoptosis in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Xia, D Y; Liu, L; Hao, M W; Liu, Q; Chen, R A; Liang, Y M

    2014-12-01

    p15INK4B, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, has been recognized as a tumor suppressor. Loss of or methylation of the p15INK4B gene in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells enhances myeloid progenitor formation from common myeloid progenitors. Therefore, we examined the effects of overexpressed p15INK4B on proliferation and apoptosis of CML cells. Overexpression of p15INK4B inhibited the growth of K562 cells by downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and cyclin D1 expression. Overexpression of p15INK4B also induced apoptosis of K562 cells by upregulating Bax expression and downregulating Bcl-2 expression. Overexpression of p15INK4B together with STI571 (imatinib) or BCR-ABL1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) also enhanced growth inhibition and apoptosis induction of K562 cells. The enhanced effect was also mediated by reduction of cyclin D1 and CDK4 and regulation of Bax and Bcl-2. In conclusion, our study may provide new insights into the role of p15INK4B in CML and a potential therapeutic target for overcoming tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance in CML. PMID:25387678

  18. Role of CD44 and Its v7 Isoform in Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B-Induced Toxic Shock: CD44 Deficiency on Hepatic Mononuclear Cells Leads to Reduced Activation-Induced Apoptosis That Results in Increased Liver Damage

    PubMed Central

    McKallip, Robert J.; Fisher, Michael; Gunthert, Ursula; Szakal, Andras K.; Nagarkatti, Prakash S.; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to bacterial superantigens such as staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) leads to the induction of toxic shock syndrome which results in multiorgan failure, including liver damage. In the present study, we investigated the role of CD44 in SEB-induced liver injury. Injection of SEB into d-galactosamine-sensitized CD44 wild-type (WT) mice led to a significant increase in CD44 expression on liver T cells, NK cells, and NKT cells. Administration of SEB to CD44 knockout (KO) mice caused significantly enhanced liver damage which correlated with elevated numbers of T cells, NK cells, NKT cells, and macrophages in the liver and increased production of tumor necrosis factor alpha and gamma interferon compared to CD44 WT mice. Furthermore, liver mononuclear cells from CD44 KO mice were resistant to SEB-induced apoptosis, and cDNA microarray analysis revealed that SEB activation of such cells led to the induction of several antiapoptotic genes and repression of proapoptotic genes. Examination of CD44 isoforms revealed that SEB exposure altered CD44 variant 7 (v7) isoform expression. Interestingly, mice bearing a specific deletion of the CD44v7 exon exhibited increased susceptibility to SEB-induced hepatitis. Finally, treatment of CD44 WT mice with anti-CD44 monoclonal antibodies reduced expression of CD44 in liver mononuclear cells and caused increased susceptibility to SEB-induced liver injury. Together, these data demonstrate that the expression of CD44 and/or CD44v7 on SEB-activated liver mononuclear cells facilitates their rapid apoptosis, thereby preventing severe liver injury in wild-type mice, and suggest that CD44 plays an important role in the regulation and elimination of immune cells in the liver. PMID:15618140

  19. Human papillomavirus type 16 E6 activates NF-kappaB, induces cIAP-2 expression, and protects against apoptosis in a PDZ binding motif-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    James, Michael A; Lee, John H; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J

    2006-06-01

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is a critical factor in the pathogenesis of most cervical cancers and some aerodigestive cancers. The HPV E6 oncoprotein from high-risk HPV types contributes to the immortalization and transformation of cells by multiple mechanisms, including degradation of p53, transcriptional activation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), and degradation of several proteins containing PDZ domains. The ability of E6 to bind PDZ domain-containing proteins is independent of p53 degradation or hTERT activation but does correlate with oncogenic potential (R. A. Watson, M. Thomas, L. Banks, and S. Roberts, J. Cell Sci. 116:4925-4934, 2003) and is essential for induction of epithelial hyperplasia in vivo (M. L. Nguyen, M. M. Nguyen, D. Lee, A. E. Griep, and P. F. Lambert, J. Virol. 77:6957-6964, 2003). In this study, we found that HPV type 16 E6 was able to activate NF-kappaB in airway epithelial cells through the induction of nuclear binding activity of p52-containing NF-kappaB complexes in a PDZ binding motif-dependent manner. Transcript accumulation for the NF-kappaB-responsive antiapoptotic gene encoding cIAP-2 and binding of nuclear factors to the proximal NF-kappaB binding site of the cIAP-2 gene promoter are induced by E6 expression. Furthermore, E6 is able to protect cells from TNF-induced apoptosis. All of these E6-dependent phenotypes are dependent on the presence of the PDZ binding motif of E6. Our results imply a role for targeting of PDZ proteins by E6 in NF-kappaB activation and protection from apoptosis in airway epithelial cells. PMID:16699010

  20. Biological Response to SPE Exposures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Kim, M.; Shinn, J. L.; Jones, T. D.; Chang, C. K.

    2004-01-01

    It has long been recognized that a single solar particle event (SPE) can produce, over a short period of time, exposures on the order of LD50 for humans under normal physiological conditions. It is further recognized that recovery from injury over the period of exposure would greatly increase the chances of survival (dose rate effects) although such effects were left unquantified. In the present report we use the bioresponse model derived from a broad range of animal and human exposure data for evaluation of troop readiness in tactical nuclear warfare to evaluate the biological risk posed by the solar event of 4 August 1972. The astronaut blood forming organ (BFO) exposure in deep space would have been 2.2 Sv (1.6 Gy) in a space suit, 1.8 Sv (1.3 Gy) in an aluminum pressure vessel, and 0.7 Sv (0.5 Gy) in an equipment room compared to an X-ray mortality threshold of 1.5 Gy (assuming high dose rate). We find BFO dose rate effectiveness factors for this SPE on the order of 3 to 4, greatly reducing the mortality risks for this event. There is an approximate 3 percent chance that an even larger event may occur for which exposures could be 2-4 times higher. Assured survival of the astronaut requires added shelter shielding and a warning system for this event. The required mass of the shelter shield can be greatly reduced by using hydrogenous materials such as polymers, water, food, and other biological materials in its construction. Limitations of the current bioresponse model arise from the exposures taking place in the microgravity environment wherein the immune system is already challenged and the effective mortality threshold may be reduced by a factor of two. Such microgravity effects could greatly affect astronaut risks.

  1. Current SPE Hydrodynamic Modeling and Path Forward

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban

    2012-08-14

    Extensive work has been conducted on SPE analysis efforts: Fault effects Non-uniform weathered layer analysis MUNROU: material library incorporation, parallelization, and development of non-locking tets Development of a unique continuum-based-visco-plastic strain-rate-dependent material model With corrected SPE data path is now set for a multipronged approach to fully understand experimental series shot effects.

  2. Recent advances in SPE (tm) water electrolyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, James F.

    1993-01-01

    A new cell structure has been introduced into the SPE Water Electrolyzer which has improved overall characteristics significantly. Weight, reliability, and efficiency are the characteristics that are improved the most, with volume having a second order improvement. This paper discusses the capabilities of the new cell structure and the impact it would have in various space applications.

  3. Proceedings of the 1992 SPE drilling conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 1992 IADC/SPE Drilling Conference. Topics covered include: drillstring fatigue/failure, drilling platform designs, horizontal well drilling, design and testing of deepwater risers, service contracts and contractor selection, drill bit performance, drilling fluids, borehole stability, and well cementing.

  4. SPE water electrolyzers in support of the lunar outpost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, J. F.

    1992-01-01

    During the 1970s, the SPE water electrolyzer, which uses ion exchange membranes as its sole electrolyte, was developed for nuclear submarine metabolic oxygen production. These developments included SPE water electrolyzer operation at up to 3,000 psia and at current densities in excess of 1,000 amps per square foot. The SPE water electrolyzer system is now fully qualified for both the U.S. and U.K. Navies with tens of thousands of system hours accumulated at sea. During the 1980s, the basic SPE water electrolyzer cell structure developed for the Navies was incorporated into several demonstrations for NASA's Space Station Program. Among these were: the SPE regenerative fuel cell for electrical energy storage; the SPE water electrolyzer for metabolic oxygen production; and the high pressure SPE water electrolyzer for reboost propulsion reactant production. In the 1990s, one emphasis will be the development of SPE water electrolyzers for the Lunar Outposts Currently defined potential Lunar Outpost applications for the SPE water electrolyzer include: SPE water electrolyzers for metabolic oxygen and potable water production from reclaimed water; and SPE water electrolyzers operating at high pressure as part of stationary and mobile surface energy storage systems.

  5. The sperm surface localization of the TRP-3/SPE-41 Ca2+ -permeable channel depends on SPE-38 function in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Singaravelu, Gunasekaran; Chatterjee, Indrani; Rahimi, Sina; Druzhinina, Marina K; Kang, Lijun; Xu, X Z Shawn; Singson, Andrew

    2012-05-15

    Despite undergoing normal development and acquiring normal morphology and motility, mutations in spe-38 or trp-3/spe-41 cause identical phenotypes in Caenorhabditis elegans-mutant sperm fail to fertilize oocytes despite direct contact. SPE-38 is a novel, four-pass transmembrane protein and TRP-3/SPE-41 is a Ca(2+)-permeable channel. Localization of both of these proteins is confined to the membranous organelles (MOs) in undifferentiated spermatids. In mature spermatozoa, SPE-38 is localized to the pseudopod and TRP-3/SPE-41 is localized to the whole plasma membrane. Here we show that the dynamic redistribution of TRP-3/SPE-41 from MOs to the plasma membrane is dependent on SPE-38. In spe-38 mutant spermatozoa, TRP-3/SPE-41 is trapped within the MOs and fails to reach the cell surface despite MO fusion with the plasma membrane. Split-ubiquitin yeast-two-hybrid analyses revealed that the cell surface localization of TRP-3/SPE-41 is likely regulated by SPE-38 through a direct protein-protein interaction mechanism. We have identified sequences that influence the physical interaction between SPE-38 and TRP-3/SPE-41, and show that these sequences in SPE-38 are required for fertility in transgenic animals. Despite the mislocalization of TRP-3/SPE-41 in spe-38 mutant spermatozoa, ionomycin or thapsigargin induced influx of Ca(2+) remains unperturbed. This work reveals a new paradigm for the regulated surface localization of a Ca(2+)-permeable channel. PMID:22425620

  6. SPE propulsion electrolyzer for NASA's integrated propulsion test article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Hamilton Standard has delivered a 3000 PSI SPE Propulsion Electrolyzer Stack and Special Test Fixture to the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) Integrated Propulsion Test Article (IPTA) program in June 1990, per contract NAS9-18030. This prototype unit demonstrates the feasibility of SPE-high pressure water electrolysis for future space applications such as Space Station propulsion and Lunar/Mars energy storage. The SPE-Propulsion Electrolyzer has met or exceeded all IPTA program goals. It continues to function as the primary hydrogen and oxygen source for the IPTA test bed at the NASA/JSC Propulsion and Power Division Thermochemical Test Branch.

  7. SPE (tm) regenerative hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells for extraterrestrial surface and microgravity applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, J. F.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on SPE regenerative hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells for extraterrestrial surface and microgravity applications are presented. Topics covered include: hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell energy storage system; electrochemical cell reactions; SPE cell voltage stability; passive water removal SPE fuel cell; fuel cell performance; SPE water electrolyzers; hydrophobic oxygen phase separator; hydrophilic/electrochemical hydrogen phase separator; and unitized regenerative fuel cell.

  8. Theoretical performance of hydrogen-bromine rechargeable SPE fuel cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savinell, Robert F.; Fritts, S. D.

    1987-01-01

    A mathematical model was formulated to describe the performance of a hydrogen-bromine fuel cell. Porous electrode theory was applied to the carbon felt flow-by electrode and was coupled to theory describing the solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) system. Parametric studies using the numerical solution to this model were performed to determine the effect of kinetic, mass transfer, and design parameters on the performance of the fuel cell. The results indicate that the cell performance is most sensitive to the transport properties of the SPE membrane. The model was also shown to be a useful tool for scale-up studies.

  9. Spermiogenesis initiation in Caenorhabditis elegans involves a casein kinase 1 encoded by the spe-6 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Muhlrad, Paul J; Ward, Samuel

    2002-01-01

    Immature spermatids from Caenorhabditis elegans are stimulated by an external activation signal to reorganize their membranes and cytoskeleton to form crawling spermatozoa. This rapid maturation, termed spermiogenesis, occurs without any new gene expression. To better understand this signal transduction pathway, we isolated suppressors of a mutation in the spe-27 gene, which is part of the pathway. The suppressors bypass the requirement for spe-27, as well as three other genes that act in this pathway, spe-8, spe-12, and spe-29. Eighteen of the suppressor mutations are new alleles of spe-6, a previously identified gene required for an early stage of spermatogenesis. The original spe-6 mutations are loss-of-function alleles that prevent major sperm protein (MSP) assembly in the fibrous bodies of spermatocytes and arrest development in meiosis. We have isolated the spe-6 gene and find that it encodes a predicted protein-serine/threonine kinase in the casein kinase 1 family. The suppressor mutations appear to be reduction-of-function alleles. We propose a model whereby SPE-6, in addition to its early role in spermatocyte development, inhibits spermiogenesis until the activation signal is received. The activation signal is transduced through SPE-8, SPE-12, SPE-27, and SPE-29 to relieve SPE-6 repression, thus triggering the formation of crawling spermatozoa. PMID:12019230

  10. Proceedings of the 1990 SPE annual technical conference and exhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the 1990 SPE Annual Technical Conference. Included in this volume are the following papers: Testing and interpretation of injection wells using rate and pressure data, Fractured reservoir characterization through injection falloff and flowback tests, Advances in practical well test analysis.

  11. Proceedings of the 1991 SPE gas technology symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the 1991 SPE Gas Technology Symposium. Included are the following papers: Maximizing gas recovery from strong water-drive reservoirs, Measurement of coal cleat porosity and relative permeability characteristics, recent developments in gas dehydration and hydrate inhibition.

  12. Enniatin B-induced cell death and inflammatory responses in RAW 267.4 murine macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Gammelsrud, A.; Department of Air Pollution and Noise, Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, N-0403 Oslo ; Solhaug, A.; Dendelé, B.; Sandberg, W.J.; Ivanova, L.; Kocbach Bølling, A.; Lagadic-Gossmann, D.; Refsnes, M.; Becher, R.; Eriksen, G.; Holme, J.A.

    2012-05-15

    The mycotoxin enniatin B (EnnB) is predominantly produced by species of the Fusarium genera, and often found in grain. The cytotoxic effect of EnnB has been suggested to be related to its ability to form ionophores in cell membranes. The present study examines the effects of EnnB on cell death, differentiation, proliferation and pro-inflammatory responses in the murine monocyte–macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. Exposure to EnnB for 24 h caused an accumulation of cells in the G0/G1-phase with a corresponding decrease in cyclin D1. This cell cycle-arrest was possibly also linked to the reduced cellular ability to capture and internalize receptors as illustrated by the lipid marker ganglioside GM1. EnnB also increased the number of apoptotic, early apoptotic and necrotic cells, as well as cells with elongated spindle-like morphology. The Neutral Red assay indicated that EnnB induced lysosomal damage; supported by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showing accumulation of lipids inside the lysosomes forming lamellar structures/myelin bodies. Enhanced levels of activated caspase-1 were observed after EnnB exposure and the caspase-1 specific inhibitor ZYVAD-FMK reduced EnnB-induced apoptosis. Moreover, EnnB increased the release of interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) in cells primed with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and this response was reduced by both ZYVAD-FMK and the cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074Me. In conclusion, EnnB was found to induce cell cycle arrest, cell death and inflammation. Caspase-1 appeared to be involved in the apoptosis and release of IL-1β and possibly activation of the inflammasome through lysosomal damage and leakage of cathepsin B. -- Highlights: ► The mycotoxin EnnB induced cell cycle arrest, cell death and inflammation. ► The G0/G1-arrest was linked to a reduced ability to internalize receptors. ► EnnB caused lysosomal damage, leakage of cathepsin B and caspase-1 cleavage. ► Caspase-1 was partly involved in both apoptosis and release of IL-1β. ► There was a synergistic action between EnnB and bacterial LPS.

  13. SPE (tm) water electrolyzers in support of mission from planet Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    During the 1970's, the Solid Polymer Electrolyte (SPE) water electrolyzer, which uses ion exchange membranes as its sole electrolyte, was developed for nuclear submarine metabolic oxygen production. SPE water electrolyzer developments included operation at up to 3,000 psia and at current densities in excess of 1,000 amps per square foot. The SPE water electrolyzer system has accumulated tens of thousands of system hours with the Navies of both the United States and the United Kingdom. During the 1980's, the basic SPE water electrolyzer cell structure developed for the Navies was incorporated into several demonstrators for NASA's Space Station Program. Among these were: (1) the SPE regenerative fuel cell for electrical energy storage; (2) the SPE water electrolyzer for metabolic oxygen production; and (3) the high pressure SPE water electrolyzer for reboost propellant production. In the 1990's, emphasis will be the development of SPE water electrolyzers for Mission from Planet Earth. Currently defined potential applications for the SPE water electrolyzer include: (1) SPE water electrolyzers operating at high pressure as part of a regenerative fuel cell extraterrestrial surface energy storage system; (2) SPE water electrolyzers for propellant production from extraterrestrial indigenous materials; and (3) SPE water electrolyzers for metabolic oxygen and potable water production from reclaimed water.

  14. Lack of mitogenic activity of speG- and speG(dys)-positive Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis isolates from patients with invasive infections.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Claudia M; Schweizer, Klaus G; Holland, Regina; Ltticken, Rudolf; Freyaldenhoven, Bettina S

    2005-12-01

    In recent years, Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis has been isolated with an increasing frequency as the cause of invasive streptococcal diseases. For 46 S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis isolates from invasive infections and four isolates from superficial infections, the presence of emm/emmL genes and of genes encoding various different streptococcal superantigens was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Subsequently, PCR products were identified by DNA sequencing, and the expression of mRNA from superantigen genes was assessed by reverse transcriptase-PCR. The mitogenic activity of S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis was assessed by [3H]thymidine incorporation into human lymphocytes and compared with that of Streptococcus agalactiae and Streptococcus pyogenes. All S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis isolates studied harbored an emm/emmL gene. Only in six of the S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis isolates from invasive infections, speG was detected by PCR, two of which were further identified as speGdys by sequencing of the PCR product. None of the S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis isolates harbored any of the genes speA, speB, speC, speF, speH, speI, speJ, speK, speL, speM, smeZ, or ssa of S. pyogenes. In contrast to S. pyogenes, no expression of speG or speGdys mRNA, respectively, was detected in the reverse transcriptase-PCR assay for any of the speG- or speGdys-positive S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis isolates. Moreover, S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis and S. agalactiae revealed no or very low mitogenic activity, while S. pyogenes was a very powerful inducer of proliferative responses. These findings support the hypothesis that the pathogenicity of S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis may be associated in part with the presence of emm/emmL genes, and suggest that the severity of S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis invasive infections is not mediated by superantigen-induced mitogenicity. PMID:16325550

  15. Assay Development for the Discovery of Semaphorin 3B Inducing Agents from Natural Product Sources

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Yeonjoong; Pan, Li; Ren, Yulin; Fatima, Nighat; Ahmed, Safia; Chang, Leng Chee; Zhang, Xiaoli; Kinghorn, A. Douglas; Swanson, Steven M.; Carcache de Blanco, Esperanza J.

    2014-01-01

    Semaphorins are a class of membrane-bound and secreted proteins. They have been found to regulate basic cell functions such as axonal growth cone guidance and recent studies have focused on their effect on tumor progression. Semaphorin 3B (Sema 3B) particularly is a secreted protein that has been known to modulate proliferation and apoptosis, processes that are critical for tumor progression and development. In spite of its importance, there is yet no high-throughput screening assay available to detect or quantify the expression of Sema 3B for natural product anticancer drug discovery purposes. Therefore, the development of a new high-throughput bioassay for the discovery of Sema 3B inducing agents from natural product sources is described herein. A wide variety of pure compounds and extracts from plants and microorganisms has been found suitable for screening using this Sema 3B assay to detect and quantify the effect of Sema 3B inducing agents and thereby identify new selective bioactive Sema 3B lead compounds for anticancer drug discovery and development. Also, this new bioassay procedure is based on a high-throughput platform using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that involves the optimization of sensitivity and selectivity levels as well as accuracy, reproducibility, robustness, and cost effectiveness. PMID:25016954

  16. Analysis and Simulations of Near-Field Ground Motion from Source Physics Experiments (spe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobiev, O.; Xu, H.; Lomov, I.; Herbold, E. B.; Glenn, L. A.; Antoun, T.

    2012-12-01

    This work is focused on analysis of near-field measurements (up to 50-70 m from the source) recorded during Source Physics Experiments SPE1, SPE2 and SPE3 in a granitic formation (the Climax Stock) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The explosive source used in these experiments is a sensitized heavy ANFO (SHANFO) with a well characterized equation of state. The first event, SPE1, had a yield of 0.1 ton, and was detonated at a 55 m depth of burial in a spherical cavity of about 0.3 m radius. SPE2 and SPE3 had an explosive yield of 1 ton, and they were both detonated in the same cavity at a depth of burial of 45 meters. One of the main goals of these experiments was to investigate the possible mechanisms of shear wave generation in the nonlinear source region. Another objective, relating specifically to the SPE2-SPE3 sequence, was to investigate the effect of damage from one explosion on the response of the medium to a second explosion of the same yield and at the same location as the first explosion. Comparison of the results from SPE2 and SPE3 show some interesting trends. . At the shot level, and at deeper locations, the data from SPE3 seem to agree quite well with SPE2 data, indicating that damage from SPE2 had little to no effect on the response of the medium at these locations. On the other hand, SPE3 data consistently show delay in arrival times as well as reduced wave amplitudes both at 50 ft (16 m) depth and at the ground surface, indicating that above the shot horizon damage from SPE2 had a perceptible effect on the SPE3 near field motions. The quality of the near field data at some gages from the SPE1 and SPE2 events is somewhat questionable, with orientation uncertainties making it difficult to ascertain with confidence the extent to which shear wave generation in the source region affected near field motions. New gages were strategically added to the SPE3 test bed to provide the data needed to address this issue and verify previous measurements. The new measurements for SPE 3 show significant tangential motion (up to 30 % of the radial) at many locations as well as azimuthal variations in radial velocities which cannot be predicted by continuum simulations using isotropic plasticity models. Both continuum and discrete 2D/3D simulations are currently being performed to better understand the experimental results, correlate observed motions with heterogeneities in the rock, and aid in assessing the origin of shear waves observed in the seismic frequency band.

  17. Data Release Report for Source Physics Experiments 2 and 3 (SPE-2 and SPE-3) Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, Margaret; Obi, Curtis

    2015-04-30

    The second Source Physics Experiment shot (SPE-2) was conducted in Nevada on October 25, 2011, at 1900:00.011623 Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). The explosive source was 997 kilograms (kg) trinitrotoluene (TNT) equivalent of sensitized heavy ammonium fuel oil (SHANFO) detonated at a depth of 45.7 meters (m). The third Source Physics Experiment shot (SPE-3) was conducted in Nevada on July 24, 2012, at 1800:00.44835 GMT. The explosive source was 905 kg TNT equivalent of SHANFO detonated at a depth of 45.8 m. Both shots were recorded by an extensive set of instrumentation that includes sensors both at near-field (less than 100 m) and far-field (100 m or greater) distances. The near-field instruments consisted of three-component accelerometers deployed in boreholes at 15, 46, and 55 m depths around the shot and a set of single-component vertical accelerometers on the surface. The far-field network was composed of a variety of seismic and acoustic sensors, including short-period geophones, broadband seismometers, three-component accelerometers, and rotational seismometers at distances of 100 m to 25 kilometers. This report coincides with the release of these data for analysts and organizations that are not participants in this program. This report describes the second and third Source Physics Experiment shots and the various types of near-field and farfield data that are available.This revised document includes reports on baseline shift corrections for the SPE-2 and SPE-3 shots that were missing from the original January 2015 version.

  18. SPE-NMR metabolite sub-profiling of urine.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Doris M; Spiesser, Laura; Garnier, Maxime; de Roo, Niels; van Dorsten, Ferdi; Hollebrands, Boudewijn; van Velzen, Ewoud; Draijer, Richard; van Duynhoven, John

    2012-11-01

    NMR-based metabolite profiling of urine is a fast and reproducible method for detection of numerous metabolites with diverse chemical properties. However, signal overlap in the (1)H NMR profiles of human urine may hamper quantification and identification of metabolites. Therefore, a new method has been developed using automated solid-phase extraction (SPE) combined with NMR metabolite profiling. SPE-NMR of urine resulted in three fractions with complementary and reproducible sub-profiles. The sub-profile from the wash fraction (100 % water) contained polar metabolites; that from the first eluted fraction (10 % methanol-90 % water) semi-polar metabolites; and that from the second eluted fraction (100 % methanol) aromatic metabolites. The method was validated by analysis of urine samples collected from a crossover human nutritional intervention trial in which healthy volunteers consumed capsules containing a polyphenol-rich mixture of red wine and grape juice extract (WGM), the same polyphenol mixture dissolved in a soy drink (WGM_Soy), or a placebo (PLA), over a period of five days. Consumption of WGM clearly increased urinary excretion of 4-hydroxyhippuric acid, hippuric acid, 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, homovanillic acid, and 3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-3-hydroxypropionic acid. However, there was no difference between the excreted amounts of these metabolites after consumption of WGM or WGM_Soy, indicating that the soy drink is a suitable carrier for WGM polyphenols. Interestingly, WGM_Soy induced a significant increase in excretion of cis-aconitate compared with WGM and PLA, suggesting a higher demand on the tricarboxylic acid cycle. In conclusion, SPE-NMR metabolite sub-profiling is a reliable and improved method for quantification and identification of metabolites in urine to discover dietary effects and markers of phytochemical exposure. PMID:22932811

  19. NEAR FIELD MODELING OF SPE1 EXPERIMENT AND PREDICTION OF THE SECOND SOURCE PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS (SPE2)

    SciTech Connect

    Antoun, T; Xu, H; Vorobiev, O; Lomov, I

    2011-10-20

    Motion along joints and fractures in the rock has been proposed as one of the sources of near-source shear wave generation, and demonstrating the validity of this hypothesis is a focal scientific objective of the source physics experimental campaign in the Climax Stock granitic outcrop. A modeling effort has been undertaken by LLNL to complement the experimental campaign, and over the long term provide a validated computation capability for the nuclear explosion monitoring community. The approach involves performing the near-field nonlinear modeling with hydrodynamic codes (e.g., GEODYN, GEODYN-L), and the far-field seismic propagation with an elastic wave propagation code (e.g., WPP). the codes will be coupled together to provide a comprehensive source-to-sensor modeling capability. The technical approach involves pre-test predictions of each of the SPE experiments using their state of the art modeling capabilities, followed by code improvements to alleviate deficiencies identified in the pre-test predictions. This spiral development cycle wherein simulations are used to guide experimental design and the data from the experiment used to improve the models is the most effective approach to enable a transition from the descriptive phenomenological models in current use to the predictive, hybrid physics models needed for a science-based modeling capability for nuclear explosion monitoring. The objective of this report is to describe initial results of non-linear motion predictions of the first two SPE shots in the Climax Stock: a 220-lb shot at a depth of 180 ft (SPE No.1), and a 2570-lb shot at a depth of 150 ft (SPE No.2). The simulations were performed using the LLNL ensemble granite model, a model developed to match velocity and displacement attenuation from HARDHAT, PILE DRIVER, and SHOAL, as well as Russian and French nuclear test data in granitic rocks. This model represents the state of the art modeling capabilities as they existed when the SPE campaign was launched in 2010, and the simulation results presented here will establish a baseline that will be used for gauging progress as planned modeling improvements are implemented during the remainder of the SPE program. The initial simulations were performed under 2D axisymmetric conditions assuming the geologic medium to be a homogeneous half space. However, logging data obtained from the emplacement hole reveal two major faults that intersect the borehole at two different depth intervals (NSTec report, 2011) and four major joint sets. To evaluate the effect of these discrete structures on the wave forms generated they have performed 2D and 3D analysis with a Lagrangian hydrocode, GEODYN-L that shares the same material models with GEODYN but can explicitly take joints and fault into consideration. They discuss results obtained using these two different approaches in this report.

  20. Data Release Report for Source Physics Experiments 2 and 3 (SPE-2 and SPE-3) Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, Margaret; Obi, Curtis

    2015-01-26

    The second Source Physics Experiment shot (SPE-2) was conducted in Nevada on October 25, 2011, at 1900:00.011623 Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). The explosive source was 997 kilograms (kg) trinitrotoluene (TNT) equivalent of sensitized heavy ammonium fuel oil (SHANFO) detonated at a depth of 45.7 meters (m). The third Source Physics Experiment shot (SPE-3) was conducted in Nevada on July 24, 2012, at 1800:00.44835 GMT. The explosive source was 905 kg TNT equivalent of SHANFO detonated at a depth of 45.8 m. Both shots were recorded by an extensive set of instrumentation that includes sensors both at near-field (less than 100 m) and far-field (100 m or greater) distances. The near-field instruments consisted of three-component accelerometers deployed in boreholes at 15, 46, and 55 m depths around the shot and a set of single-component vertical accelerometers on the surface. The far-field network was composed of a variety of seismic and acoustic sensors, including short-period geophones, broadband seismometers, three-component accelerometers, and rotational seismometers at distances of 100 m to 25 kilometers. This report coincides with the release of these data for analysts and organizations that are not participants in this program. This report describes the second and third Source Physics Experiment shots and the various types of near-field and far-field data that are available.

  1. Apoptosis induced by weisiensin B isolated from Rabdosia weisiensis C.Y. Wu in K562.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-An; Chang, Jin-Chun; Feng, Xiao-Lu; Ding, Lan

    2015-04-01

    The ent-kaurane diterpenoid weisinensis B shows significant cytotoxicity to human chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells. It inhibits cell growth at low concentration and kills cells at high concentration. The compound induced cell apoptosis and necrosis mainly associated with G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and the ROS generation is the early event in weisiensin B induced cell apoptosis. PMID:26012257

  2. Method of making MEA for PEM/SPE fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Hulett, Jay S.

    2000-01-01

    A method of making a membrane-electrode-assembly (MEA) for a PEM/SPE fuel cell comprising applying a slurry of electrode-forming material directly onto a membrane-electrolyte film. The slurry comprises a liquid vehicle carrying catalyst particles and a binder for the catalyst particles. The membrane-electrolyte is preswollen by contact with the vehicle before the electrode-forming slurry is applied to the membrane-electrolyte. The swollen membrane-electrolyte is constrained against shrinking in the "x" and "y" directions during drying. Following assembly of the fuel cell, the MEA is rehydrated inside the fuel cell such that it swells in the "z" direction for enhanced electrical contact with contiguous electrically conductive components of the fuel cell.

  3. Solid Polymer Electrolyte (SPE) fuel cell technology, program review, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of the solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) fuel cell program is to advance the SPE fuel cell technology in four target areas. These areas are: (1) reduced fuel cell costs; (2) reduced fuel cell weight; (3) improved fuel cell efficiency; and (4) increased systems compatibility.

  4. HIV-infected microglia mediate cathepsin B-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zenn, Frances; Cantres-Rosario, Yisel; Adiga, Radhika; Gonzalez, Mariangeline; Rodriguez-Franco, Eillen; Langford, Dianne; Melendez, Loyda M

    2015-10-01

    HIV-1-infected mononuclear phagocytes release soluble factors that affect the homeostasis in tissue. HIV-1 can prompt metabolic encephalopathy with the addition of neuronal dysfunction and apoptosis. Recently, we reported that HIV-1 enhances the expression and secretion of bioactive cathepsin B in monocyte-derived macrophages, ultimately contributing to neuronal apoptosis. In this research, we asked if microglia respond to HIV infection similarly by modifying the expression, secretion, and neurotoxic potential of cathepsin B and determined the in vivo relevance of these findings. HIV-1ADA-infected human primary microglia and CHME-5 microglia cell line were assessed for expression and activity of cathepsin B, its inhibitors, cystatins B and C, and the neurotoxicity associated with these changes. Human primary neurons were exposed to supernatants from HIV-infected and uninfected microglia in the presence of cathepsin B inhibitors and apoptosis was assessed by TUNEL. Microglial expression of cathepsin B was validated in brain tissue from HIV encephalitis (HIVE) patients. HIV-infected microglia secreted significantly greater levels of cathepsin B, cystatin B, and cystatin C compared to uninfected cells. Increased apoptosis was observed in neurons exposed to supernatants from HIV-1 infected microglia at day 12 post-infection. The cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074 and cathepsin B antibody prevented neuronal apoptosis. Increased microglia-derived cathepsin B, cystatin B, and cystatin C and caspase-3+ neurons were detected in HIVE brains compared to controls. Our results suggest that HIV-1-induced cathepsin B production in microglia contributes to neuronal apoptosis and may be an important factor in neuronal death associated with HIVE. PMID:26092112

  5. Linking Spe Body-Wave Amplitudes and Site Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellors, R. J.; Walter, W. R.; Ford, S. R.; Pitarka, A.; Wagoner, J. L.; Matzel, E.; Hauk, T. F.

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of the Source Physics Experiments is to investigate the generation and propagation of seismic waves from buried underground chemical explosions. Here we present results from an analysis of the tests up to date with emphasis on implications for discrimination and yield estimation using seismic data at very local (<20 km) distances. For example, previous work indicates that local (< 100 km) distance recordings of the SPE series do not appear to discriminate well using P/S ratios at some stations. We attempt to correlate variations in body wave amplitudes as a function of azimuth observed at very local ranges (< 20 km) with differences in 1) site effects; 2) path effects; 3) path topography; and 4) near-source (< 200 m) effects using both observations and modeling as a guide. Possible path effects are evaluated using a combination of existing geologic models combined with seismic velocity/attenuation models constructed using ambient noise tomography. Modeling is conducted with a finite-difference code capable of handling topographic effects. Near-source effects will rely on measurements of near-source geology, velocity models, and near-field observations (including spall) with focus on azimuthal variations.

  6. SPE-39 Family Proteins Interact with the HOPS Complex and Function in Lysosomal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guang-dan; Salazar, Gloria; Zlatic, Stephanie A.; Fiza, Babar; Doucette, Michele M.; Heilman, Craig J.; Levey, Allan I.

    2009-01-01

    Yeast and animal homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting (HOPS) complexes contain conserved subunits, but HOPS-mediated traffic in animals might require additional proteins. Here, we demonstrate that SPE-39 homologues, which are found only in animals, are present in RAB5-, RAB7-, and RAB11-positive endosomes where they play a conserved role in lysosomal delivery and probably function via their interaction with the core HOPS complex. Although Caenorhabditis elegans spe-39 mutants were initially identified as having abnormal vesicular biogenesis during spermatogenesis, we show that these mutants also have disrupted processing of endocytosed proteins in oocytes and coelomocytes. C. elegans SPE-39 interacts in vitro with both VPS33A and VPS33B, whereas RNA interference of VPS33B causes spe-39like spermatogenesis defects. The human SPE-39 orthologue C14orf133 also interacts with VPS33 homologues and both coimmunoprecipitates and cosediments with other HOPS subunits. SPE-39 knockdown in cultured human cells altered the morphology of syntaxin 7-, syntaxin 8-, and syntaxin 13-positive endosomes. These effects occurred concomitantly with delayed mannose 6-phosphate receptor-mediated cathepsin D delivery and degradation of internalized epidermal growth factor receptors. Our findings establish that SPE-39 proteins are a previously unrecognized regulator of lysosomal delivery and that C. elegans spermatogenesis is an experimental system useful for identifying conserved regulators of metazoan lysosomal biogenesis. PMID:19109425

  7. Osteopontin Facilitates Ultraviolet B-induced Squamous Cell Carcinoma Development

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pi-Ling; Hsieh, Yu-Hua; Wang, Chao-Cheng; Juliana, M. Margaret; Tsuruta, Yuko; Timares, Laura; Elmets, Craig; Ho, Kang-Jey

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteopontin (OPN) is a matricellular glycoprotein that is markedly expressed in cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (cSCCs) and in actinic keratoses implicating its role in photocarcinogenesis. Objective To determine whether OPN facilitates the development of cSCC and its function. Methods cSCCs development was compared between wild-type (WT) and OPN-null mice subjected to UVB irradiation for 43 weeks. UVB-induced OPN expression was determined by Western blot, immunoprecipitation, ELISA, and semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Epidermal layer and TUNEL analyses assessed if OPN mediates UVB-induced epidermal hyperplasia or suppresses UVB-induced apoptosis of basal keratinocytes, respectively. In vitro experiments determined whether OPN enhances cell survival of UVB-induced apoptosis and its potential mechanisms. Immunohistochemical analyses of epidermis assessed the expression of CD44 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK), molecules that mediate OPN survival function. Results Compared to female WT mice, OPN-null mice did not develop cSCCs. UVB irradiation stimulated OPN protein expression in the dorsal skin by 11 h and remains high at 24 to 48h.OPN did not mediate UVB-induced epidermal hyperplasia; instead, it protected basal keratinocytes from undergoing apoptosis upon UVB exposure. Likewise, the addition of OPN suppressed UVB-induced OPN-null cSCC cell apoptosis, the activation of caspase-9 activity, and increased phosphorylation of FAK at Y397. Furthermore, the expression of CD44 and FAK in WT mice epidermis was greater than that of OPN-null mice prior to and during early acute UVB exposure. Conclusion These data support the hypothesis that chronic UVB-induced OPN expression protects the survival of initiated basal keratinocytes and, consequently, facilitates cSCC develop. PMID:24888687

  8. OSTEOCYTE APOPTOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Jilka, Robert L.; Noble, Brendon; Weinstein, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Apoptotic death of osteocytes was recognized over 15 years ago, but its significance for bone homeostasis has remained elusive. A new paradigm has emerged that invokes osteocyte apoptosis as a critical event in the recruitment of osteoclasts to a specific site in response to skeletal unloading, fatigue damage, estrogen deficiency and perhaps in other states where bone must be removed. This is accomplished by yet to be defined signals emanating from dying osteocytes, which stimulate neighboring viable osteocytes to produce osteoclastogenic cytokines. The osteocyte apoptosis caused by chronic glucocorticoid administration does not increase osteoclasts; however, it does negatively impact maintenance of bone hydration, vascularity, and strength. PMID:23238124

  9. IRTF SpeX Observations of Orbital Object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckalew, B.; Abercromby, K.; Cowardin, H.

    Presented herein are the results of the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) spectral observations of orbiting objects taken between 2006-2008. The data collected using the SpeX infrared spectrograph cover the wavelength range 1-8 ?m. Overall, data were collected on twenty different orbiting objects at or near the geosynchronous (GEO) regime. Four of the objects were controlled spacecraft, seven were non-controlled spacecraft, five were rocket bodies, and the final four were cataloged as debris pieces. The remotely collected data are compared to the laboratory-collected reflectance data on typical spacecraft materials thereby general materials are identified but not specific types. These results highlight the usefulness of observations in the infrared focusing on features from hydrocarbons due to paint, silicon, and the beginning of thermal emission from the debris itself. The spacecraft, both the controlled and non-controlled, show distinct features due to solar panels while the rocket bodies do not. The variations in signature between the types of rocket bodies show a presence of metals instead of solar panels showing that one can distinguish most spacecraft from rocket bodies through the infrared spectrum analysis. Finally, the debris pieces tend to show featureless, dark spectra. These results show that the laboratory data in its current state give an excellent idea as to the materials on the surface of the objects. Further remote data collection as well as updating the models to include noise, surface roughness, and material degradation is necessary to make a better assessment of material types. However, based on the current state of the comparison between the observations and the laboratory data, infrared spectroscopic data are adequate to classify objects in GEO as spacecraft, rocket bodies, or debris.

  10. Pre-shot simulations of far-field ground motion for the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) Explosions at the Climax Stock, Nevada National Security Site: SPE2

    SciTech Connect

    Mellors, R J; Rodgers, A; Walter, W; Ford, S; Xu, H; Matzel, E; Myers, S; Petersson, N A; Sjogreen, B; Hauk, T; Wagoner, J

    2011-10-18

    The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is planning a 1000 kg (TNT equivalent) shot (SPE2) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) in a granite borehole at a depth (canister centroid) of 45 meters. This shot follows an earlier shot of 100 kg in the same borehole at a depth 60 m. Surrounding the shotpoint is an extensive array of seismic sensors arrayed in 5 radial lines extending out 2 km to the north and east and approximately 10-15 to the south and west. Prior to SPE1, simulations using a finite difference code and a 3D numerical model based on the geologic setting were conducted, which predicted higher amplitudes to the south and east in the alluvium of Yucca Flat along with significant energy on the transverse components caused by scattering within the 3D volume along with some contribution by topographic scattering. Observations from the SPE1 shot largely confirmed these predictions although the ratio of transverse energy relative to the vertical and radial components was in general larger than predicted. A new set of simulations has been conducted for the upcoming SPE2 shot. These include improvements to the velocity model based on SPE1 observations as well as new capabilities added to the simulation code. The most significant is the addition of a new source model within the finite difference code by using the predicted ground velocities from a hydrodynamic code (GEODYN) as driving condition on the boundaries of a cube embedded within WPP which provides a more sophisticated source modeling capability linked directly to source site materials (e.g. granite) and type and size of source. Two sets of SPE2 simulations are conducted, one with a GEODYN source and 3D complex media (no topography node spacing of 5 m) and one with a standard isotropic pre-defined time function (3D complex media with topography, node spacing of 5 m). Results were provided as time series at specific points corresponding to sensor locations for both translational (x,y,z) and rotational components. Estimates of spectral scaling for SPE2 are provided using a modified version of the Mueller-Murphy model. An estimate of expected aftershock probabilities were also provided, based on the methodology of Ford and Walter, [2010].

  11. SPE (trademark) Oxygen Generator Assembly (OGA). (Refurbishment of the technology demonstrator LFSPE oxygen generation subsystem)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    The SPE Oxygen Generator Assembly (OGA) has been modified to correct operational deficiencies present in the original system, and to effect changes to the system hardware and software such that its operating conditions are consistent with the latest configuration requirements for the International Space Station Alpha (ISSA). The effectiveness of these changes has recently been verified through a comprehensive test program which saw the SPE OGA operate for over 740 hours at various test conditions, including over 690 hours, or approximately 460 cycles, simulating the orbit of the space station. This report documents the changes made to the SPE OGA, presents and discusses the test results from the acceptance test program, and provides recommendations for additional development activities pertinent to evolution of the SPE OGA to a flight configuration. Copies of the test data from the acceptance test program are provided with this report on 3.5 inch diskettes in self-extracting archive files.

  12. SPE/DOE fourth symposium on enhanced oil recovery: proceedings. Volume 1. 12630 thru 12678

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Volume I contains 42 papers that were presented at the SPE/DOE Symposium on Enhanced Oil Recovery held in Tulsa, Oklahoma, April 16-18, 1984. All papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  13. Characterization of plasma protein binding dissociation with online SPE-HPLC

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Fan, Yiran; Wang, Yunlong; Lu, Yaxin; Yin, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    A novel parameter of relative recovery (Rre) was defined and determined by online SPE-HPLC to characterize plasma protein binding (PPB) kinetics of highly plasma binding drugs. The proportional relationship of Rre with koff of PPB has been established with a new SPE model. A rapid, easy to use method could potentially be used to categorize PK properties of the drug candidates in the decision process of drug discovery and development. PMID:26460813

  14. Characterization of plasma protein binding dissociation with online SPE-HPLC.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Fan, Yiran; Wang, Yunlong; Lu, Yaxin; Yin, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    A novel parameter of relative recovery (R re) was defined and determined by online SPE-HPLC to characterize plasma protein binding (PPB) kinetics of highly plasma binding drugs. The proportional relationship of R re with k off of PPB has been established with a new SPE model. A rapid, easy to use method could potentially be used to categorize PK properties of the drug candidates in the decision process of drug discovery and development. PMID:26460813

  15. Using Spectral Losses to Map a Damage Zone for the Source Physics Experiments (SPE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, H. A.; Abbott, R. E.; Bonal, N.; Preston, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    We performed a series of cross-borehole seismic experiments in support of the Source Physics Experiments (SPE). These surveys, which were conducted in a granitic body using a sparker source and hydrophone string, were designed to image the damage zone from two underground explosions (SPE2 and SPE3). We present results here from a total of six boreholes (the explosive shot emplacement hole and 5 satellite holes, 20-35 meters away) where we found a marked loss of high frequency energy in ray paths traversing the region near the SPE explosions. Specifically, the frequencies above ~400 Hz were lost in a region centered around 45 meters depth, coincident with SPE2 and SPE3 shots. We further quantified these spectral losses, developed a map of where they occur, and evaluated the attenuation effects of raypath length (i.e. source-receiver offset). We attribute this severe attenuation to the inelastic damage (i.e. cracking and pulverizing) caused by the large chemical explosions and propose that frequency attenuation of this magnitude provides yet another tool for detecting the damage due to large underground explosions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. NF?B induces overexpression of bovine FcRn

    PubMed Central

    Cervenak, Judit; Doleschall, Mrton; Bender, Balzs; Mayer, Balzs; Schneider, Zita; Doleschall, Zoltn; Zhao, Yaofeng; B?sze, Zsuzsanna; Hammarstrm, Lennart; Oster, Wolfgang; Kacskovics, Imre

    2013-01-01

    Among the many functions of the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) for IgG, it binds to IgG-opsonized antigen complexes and propagates their traffic into lysosomes where antigen processing occurs. We previously reported that transgenic (Tg) mice and rabbits that carry multiple copies and overexpress FcRn have augmented humoral immune responses. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF?B) is a critical molecule in the signaling cascade in the immune response. NF?B induces human FcRn expression and our previous in silico analysis suggested NF?B binding sites in the promoter region of the bovine (b) FcRn ?-chain gene (FCGRT). Here, we report the identification of three NF?B transcription binding sites in the promoter region of this gene using luciferase reporter gene technology, electromobility shift assay and supershift analysis. Stimulation of primary bovine endothelial cells with the Toll-like receptor-4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which mediates its effect via NF?B, resulted in rapid upregulation of the bFcRn expression and a control gene, bovine E-selectin. This rapid bFcRn gene induction was also observed in the spleen of bFcRn Tg mice treated with intraperitoneally injected LPS, analyzed by northern blot analysis. Finally, NF?B-mediated bFcRn upregulation was confirmed at the protein level in macrophages isolated from the bFcRn Tg mice using flow cytometry with a newly developed FcRn specific monoclonal antibody that does not cross-react with the mouse FcRn. We conclude that NF?B regulates bFcRn expression and thus optimizes its functions, e.g., in the professional antigen presenting cells, and contributes to the much augmented humoral immune response in the bFcRn Tg mice. PMID:24492342

  17. Glaucocalyxin A and B-induced cell death is related to GSH perturbation in human leukemia HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen Hua; Zhang, Zhen; Sima, Yang Hu; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Jian Wen

    2013-10-01

    Glaucocalyxin (Gla) A-C are major ent-kauranoid diterpenoids isolated from Rabdosia japonica var. glaucocalyx, a plant used in Chinese traditional medicine as an antitumor and anti-inflammatory agent. The present investigation was carried out to observe whether cellular reduced glutathione (GSH) plays important roles in Gla -induced cytotoxicity. Among major ent-kauranoid diterpenoids isolated, Gla A and B dose-dependently decreased the growth of HL-60 cells with an IC50 of approximately 6.15 and 5.86 M at 24 h, respectively. Both Gla A and B could induce apoptosis, G2/M-phase cycle arrest, DNA damage and the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HL-60 cells. Moreover, Gla A, B caused rapid decrease of the intracellular GSH content, while inhibition of cellular GSH synthesis by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) augmented the induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HL-60 cells. On the other hand, the administration of GSH or GSH precursor N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) could rescue Gla A, B-depleted cellular GSH, and abrogate the induced cytotoxicity, G2/M-phase cycle arrest, DNA damage and ROS accumulation in HL-60 cells. Furthermore, Gla A, B decreased the activity of the GSH-related enzymes including glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX). These data suggest that the intracellular GSH redox system plays important roles in regulating the Gla A, B-induced cytotoxicity on HL-60 cells. PMID:23796245

  18. The majority of 9,729 group A streptococcus strains causing disease secrete SpeB cysteine protease: pathogenesis implications.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Randall J; Raghuram, Anjali; Cantu, Concepcion; Hartman, Meredith H; Jimenez, Francisco E; Lee, Susan; Ngo, Ashley; Rice, Kelsey A; Saddington, Deborah; Spillman, Hannaka; Valson, Chandni; Flores, Anthony R; Beres, Stephen B; Long, S Wesley; Nasser, Waleed; Musser, James M

    2015-12-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS), the causative agent of pharyngitis and necrotizing fasciitis, secretes the potent cysteine protease SpeB. Several lines of evidence suggest that SpeB is an important virulence factor. SpeB is expressed in human infections, protects mice from lethal challenge when used as a vaccine, and contributes significantly to tissue destruction and dissemination in animal models. However, recent descriptions of mutations in genes implicated in SpeB production have led to the idea that GAS may be under selective pressure to decrease secreted SpeB protease activity during infection. Thus, two divergent hypotheses have been proposed. One postulates that SpeB is a key contributor to pathogenesis; the other, that GAS is under selection to decrease SpeB during infection. In order to distinguish between these alternative hypotheses, we performed casein hydrolysis assays to measure the SpeB protease activity secreted by 6,775 GAS strains recovered from infected humans. The results demonstrated that 84.3% of the strains have a wild-type SpeB protease phenotype. The availability of whole-genome sequence data allowed us to determine the relative frequencies of mutations in genes implicated in SpeB production. The most abundantly mutated genes were direct transcription regulators. We also sequenced the genomes of 2,954 GAS isolates recovered from nonhuman primates with experimental necrotizing fasciitis. No mutations that would result in a SpeB-deficient phenotype were identified. Taken together, these data unambiguously demonstrate that the great majority of GAS strains recovered from infected humans secrete wild-type levels of SpeB protease activity. Our data confirm the important role of SpeB in GAS pathogenesis and help end a long-standing controversy. PMID:26416912

  19. Targeting Mitochondria with Avocatin B Induces Selective Leukemia Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eric A; Angka, Leonard; Rota, Sarah-Grace; Hanlon, Thomas; Mitchell, Andrew; Hurren, Rose; Wang, Xiao Ming; Gronda, Marcela; Boyaci, Ezel; Bojko, Barbara; Minden, Mark; Sriskanthadevan, Shrivani; Datti, Alessandro; Wrana, Jeffery L; Edginton, Andrea; Pawliszyn, Janusz; Joseph, Jamie W; Quadrilatero, Joe; Schimmer, Aaron D; Spagnuolo, Paul A

    2015-06-15

    Treatment regimens for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) continue to offer weak clinical outcomes. Through a high-throughput cell-based screen, we identified avocatin B, a lipid derived from avocado fruit, as a novel compound with cytotoxic activity in AML. Avocatin B reduced human primary AML cell viability without effect on normal peripheral blood stem cells. Functional stem cell assays demonstrated selectivity toward AML progenitor and stem cells without effects on normal hematopoietic stem cells. Mechanistic investigations indicated that cytotoxicity relied on mitochondrial localization, as cells lacking functional mitochondria or CPT1, the enzyme that facilitates mitochondria lipid transport, were insensitive to avocatin B. Furthermore, avocatin B inhibited fatty acid oxidation and decreased NADPH levels, resulting in ROS-dependent leukemia cell death characterized by the release of mitochondrial proteins, apoptosis-inducing factor, and cytochrome c. This study reveals a novel strategy for selective leukemia cell eradication based on a specific difference in mitochondrial function. PMID:26077472

  20. Spacecraft Solar Particle Event (SPE) Shielding: Shielding Effectiveness as a Function of SPE model as Determined with the FLUKA Radiation Transport Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steve; Atwell, William; Reddell, Brandon; Rojdev, Kristina

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of both satellite and surface neutron monitor data demonstrate that the widely utilized Exponential model of solar particle event (SPE) proton kinetic energy spectra can seriously underestimate SPE proton flux, especially at the highest kinetic energies. The more recently developed Band model produces better agreement with neutron monitor data ground level events (GLEs) and is believed to be considerably more accurate at high kinetic energies. Here, we report the results of modeling and simulation studies in which the radiation transport code FLUKA (FLUktuierende KAskade) is used to determine the changes in total ionizing dose (TID) and single-event environments (SEE) behind aluminum, polyethylene, carbon, and titanium shielding masses when the assumed form (i. e., Band or Exponential) of the solar particle event (SPE) kinetic energy spectra is changed. FLUKA simulations have fully three dimensions with an isotropic particle flux incident on a concentric spherical shell shielding mass and detector structure. The effects are reported for both energetic primary protons penetrating the shield mass and secondary particle showers caused by energetic primary protons colliding with shielding mass nuclei. Our results, in agreement with previous studies, show that use of the Exponential form of the event

  1. Glufosinate ammonium clean-up procedure from water samples using SPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayeb M., A.; Ismail B., S.; Mardiana-Jansar, K.; Ta, Goh Choo; Agustar, Hani Kartini

    2015-09-01

    For the determination of glufosinate ammonium residue in soil and water samples, different solid phase extraction (SPE) sorbent efficiency was studied. Four different SPE sorbents i.e.: CROMABOND PS-H+, CROMABOND PS-OH-, ISOLUTE ENV+, Water Sep-Pak and OASIS HLB were used. Sample clean-up performance was evaluated using high performance liquid chromatography (Agilent 1220 infinity LC) with fluorescence detector. Detection of FMO-derivatives was done at λ ex = 260 nm and λ em= 310 nm. OASIS HLB column was the most suitable for the clean-up in view of the overall feasibility of the analysis.

  2. Theoretical performance of hydrogen-bromine rechargeable SPE fuel cell. [Solid Polymer Electrolyte

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savinell, R. F.; Fritts, S. D.

    1988-01-01

    A mathematical model was formulated to describe the performance of a hydrogen-bromine fuel cell. Porous electrode theory was applied to the carbon felt flow-by electrode and was coupled to theory describing the solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) system. Parametric studies using the numerical solution to this model were performed to determine the effect of kinetic, mass transfer, and design parameters on the performance of the fuel cell. The results indicate that the cell performance is most sensitive to the transport properties of the SPE membrane. The model was also shown to be a useful tool for scale-up studies.

  3. Spacecraft Solar Particle Event (SPE) Shielding: Shielding Effectiveness as a Function of SPE Model as Determined with the FLUKA Radiation Transport Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koontz, S. L.; Atwell, W. A.; Reddell, B.; Rojdev, K.

    2010-12-01

    In the this paper, we report the results of modeling and simulation studies in which the radiation transport code FLUKA (FLUktuierende KAskade) is used to determine the changes in total ionizing dose (TID) and single-event effect (SEE) environments behind aluminum, polyethylene, carbon, and titanium shielding masses when the assumed form (i.e., Band or Exponential) of the solar particle event (SPE) kinetic energy spectra is changed. FLUKA simulations are fully three dimensional with an isotropic particle flux incident on a concentric spherical shell shielding mass and detector structure. FLUKA is a fully integrated and extensively verified Monte Carlo simulation package for the interaction and transport of high-energy particles and nuclei in matter. The effects are reported of both energetic primary protons penetrating the shield mass and secondary particle showers caused by energetic primary protons colliding with shielding mass nuclei. SPE heavy ion spectra are not addressed. Our results, in agreement with previous studies, show that use of the Exponential form of the event spectra can seriously underestimate spacecraft SPE TID and SEE environments in some, but not all, shielding mass cases. The SPE spectra investigated are taken from four specific SPEs that produced ground-level events (GLEs) during solar cycle 23 (1997-2008). GLEs are produced by highly energetic solar particle events (ESP), i.e., those that contain significant fluences of 700 MeV to 10 GeV protons. Highly energetic SPEs are implicated in increased rates of spacecraft anomalies and spacecraft failures. High-energy protons interact with Earth’s atmosphere via nuclear reaction to produce secondary particles, some of which are neutrons that can be detected at the Earth’s surface by the global neutron monitor network. GLEs are one part of the overall SPE resulting from a particular solar flare or coronal mass ejection event on the sun. The ESP part of the particle event, detected by spacecraft, is often associated with the arrival of a “shock front” at Earth some hours after the arrival of the GLE. The specific SPEs used in this analysis are those of: 1) November 6, 1997 - GLE only; 2) July 14-15, 2000 - GLE from the 14th plus ESP from the 15th; 3) November 4-6, 2001 - GLE and ESP from the 4th; and 4) October 28-29, 2003 - GLE and ESP from the 28th plus GLE from the 29th. The corresponding Band and Exponential spectra used in this paper are like those previously reported.

  4. Surface Signature Characterization at SPE through Ground-Proximal Methods: Methodology Change and Technical Justification

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.

    2015-09-09

    A portion of LANL’s FY15 SPE objectives includes initial ground-based or ground-proximal investigations at the SPE Phase 2 site. The area of interest is the U2ez location in Yucca Flat. This collection serves as a baseline for discrimination of surface features and acquisition of topographic signatures prior to any development or pre-shot activities associated with SPE Phase 2. Our team originally intended to perform our field investigations using previously vetted ground-based (GB) LIDAR methodologies. However, the extended proposed time frame of the GB LIDAR data collection, and associated data processing time and delivery date, were unacceptable. After technical consultation and careful literature research, LANL identified an alternative methodology to achieve our technical objectives and fully support critical model parameterization. Very-low-altitude unmanned aerial systems (UAS) photogrammetry appeared to satisfy our objectives in lieu of GB LIDAR. The SPE Phase 2 baseline collection was used as a test of this UAS photogrammetric methodology.

  5. cDNA cloning, functional expression and antifungal activities of a dimeric plant defensin SPE10 from Pachyrrhizus erosus seeds.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaomin; Wang, Jing; Wu, Fang; Li, Xu; Teng, Maikun; Gong, Weimin

    2005-01-01

    SPE10 is an antifungal protein isolated from the seeds of Pachyrrhizus erosus. cDNA encoding a 47 amino acid peptide was cloned by RT-PCR and the gene sequence proved SPE10 to be a new member of plant defensin family. The synthetic cDNA with codons preferred in yeast was cloned into the pPIC9 plasmid directly in-frame with the secretion signal alpha-mating factor, and highly expressed in methylotrophic Pichia pastoris. Activity assays showed the recombinant SPE10 inhibited specifically the growth of several pathogenic fungi as native SPE10. Circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy analysis indicated that the native and recombinant protein should have same folding, though there are eight cystein residues in the sequence. Several evidence suggested SPE10 should be the first dimeric plant defensin reported so far. PMID:15821865

  6. Effect of selenium supplementation on aflatoxin B?-induced histopathological lesions and apoptosis in bursa of Fabricius in broilers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kejie; Fang, Jing; Peng, Xi; Cui, Hengmin; Chen, Jin; Wang, Fengyuan; Chen, Zhengli; Zuo, Zhicai; Deng, Junliang; Lai, Weimin; Zhou, Yi

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the effects of sodium selenite against aflatoxin B1 (AFB 1), 200 male Avian broilers, divided into five groups, were fed with basal diet (control group), 0.3?mg/kg AFB1 (AFB1 group), 0.3?mg/kg AFB1?+?0.2?mg/kg Se (+Se group I), 0.3?mg/kg AFB1?+?0.4?mg/kg Se (+Se group II) and 0.3?mg/kg AFB1?+?0.6?mg/kg Se (+Se group III), respectively. Compared with the control group, decreased relative weight of bursa of Fabricius and contents of serum immunoglobulin, more vacuoles and debris in the bursal lymphoid follicle, and increased percentage of apoptotic bursal cells were observed in the AFB1 group. Sodium selenite, however, could increase the relative weight of bursa of Fabricius and contents of serum immunoglobulin, and ameliorate histopathological lesions. The percentages of apoptotic bursal cells, through flow cytometry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling method, in the three +Se groups were lower than those in the AFB 1 group. Compared with the AFB 1 group, moreover, the mRNA expressions of Bax and Caspase-3 by qRT-PCR in the three +Se groups were decreased, while the expression of Bcl-2 was increased. The results indicate that sodium selenite in diet can protect chicken from AFB 1-induced impairment of humoral immune function by reducing bursal histopathological lesions and percentages of apoptotic bursal cells. PMID:25261862

  7. Pax3 expression enhances PDGF-B-induced brainstem gliomagenesis and characterizes a subset of brainstem glioma.

    PubMed

    Misuraca, Katherine L; Barton, Kelly L; Chung, Alexander; Diaz, Alexander K; Conway, Simon J; Corcoran, David L; Baker, Suzanne J; Becher, Oren J

    2014-01-01

    High-grade Brainstem Glioma (BSG), also known as Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG), is an incurable pediatric brain cancer. Increasing evidence supports the existence of regional differences in gliomagenesis such that BSG is considered a distinct disease from glioma of the cerebral cortex (CG). In an effort to elucidate unique characteristics of BSG, we conducted expression analysis of mouse PDGF-B-driven BSG and CG initiated in Nestin progenitor cells and identified a short list of expression changes specific to the brainstem gliomagenesis process, including abnormal upregulation of paired box 3 (Pax3). In the neonatal mouse brain, Pax3 expression marks a subset of brainstem progenitor cells, while it is absent from the cerebral cortex, mirroring its regional expression in glioma. Ectopic expression of Pax3 in normal brainstem progenitors in vitro shows that Pax3 inhibits apoptosis. Pax3-induced inhibition of apoptosis is p53-dependent, however, and in the absence of p53, Pax3 promotes proliferation of brainstem progenitors. In vivo, Pax3 enhances PDGF-B-driven gliomagenesis by shortening tumor latency and increasing tumor penetrance and grade, in a region-specific manner, while loss of Pax3 function extends survival of PDGF-B-driven;p53-deficient BSG-bearing mice by 33%. Importantly, Pax3 is regionally expressed in human glioma as well, with high PAX3 mRNA characterizing 40% of human BSG, revealing a subset of tumors that significantly associates with PDGFRA alterations, amplifications of cell cycle regulatory genes, and is exclusive of ACVR1 mutations. Collectively, these data suggest that regional Pax3 expression not only marks a novel subset of BSG but also contributes to PDGF-B-induced brainstem gliomagenesis. PMID:25330836

  8. The Immunoglobulin-like Gene spe-45 Acts during Fertilization in Caenorhabditis elegans like the Mouse Izumo1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Hitoshi; Tajima, Tatsuya; Comstra, Heather Skye; Gleason, Elizabeth J; L'Hernault, Steven W

    2015-12-21

    The Caenorhabditis elegans spe-9 class genes, which show specific or predominant expression in the male germline, are indispensable for fertilization [1, 2]. However, due to the rapid evolution of genes involved in reproduction, we do not currently know if there are spe-9 class genes in mammals that play similar roles during fertilization to those found in C.elegans. In mice, the Izumo1 gene encodes a sperm-specific transmembrane (TM) protein with a single immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domain that is absolutely required for gamete fusion [3, 4]. In this study, we hypothesized that C.elegans has a new member of the spe-9 class genes coding for an IZUMO1-like protein. We screened C.elegans microarray data [5, 6] to identify male germline-enriched genes that encode membrane proteins with Ig-like domains. Adeletion (tm3715) in one such gene (F28D1.8) caused hermaphrodites to show a male germline-dependent self-sterility, so we have named it spe-45. Mutant spe-45 worms seemed to normally undergo spermatogenesis (spermatid production by meiosis) and spermiogenesis (spermatid activation into actively motile spermatozoa). spe-45 mutant spermatozoa, however, could not complete gamete fusion, which is a characteristic of all spe-9 class mutants [1, 2]. Moreover, spe-45 self-sterile worms were rescued by a transgene expressing chimeric SPE-45 protein in which its Ig-like domain was replaced by the Ig-like domain from mouse IZUMO1. Hence, C.elegans SPE-45 and mouse IZUMO1 appear to have retained a common function(s) that is required during fertilization. PMID:26671669

  9. Solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography (SPE-LC) interface for automated peptide separation and identification by tandem mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hørning, Ole Bjeld; Theodorsen, Søren; Vorm, Ole; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2007-12-01

    Reversed-phase solid phase extraction (SPE) is a simple and widely used technique for desalting and concentration of peptide and protein samples prior to mass spectrometry analysis. Often, SPE sample preparation is done manually and the samples eluted, dried and reconstituted into 96-well titer plates for subsequent LC-MS/MS analysis. To reduce the number of sample handling stages and increase throughput, we developed a robotic system to interface off-line SPE to LC-ESI-MS/MS. Samples were manually loaded onto disposable SPE tips that subsequently were connected in-line with a capillary chromatography column. Peptides were recovered from the SPE column and separated on the RP-LC column using isocratic elution conditions and analysed by electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. Peptide mixtures eluted within approximately 5 min, with individual peptide peak resolution of ~7 s (FWHM), making the SPE-LC suited for analysis of medium complex samples (3-12 protein components). For optimum performance, the isocratic flow rate was reduced to 30 nL/min, producing nanoelectrospray like conditions which ensure high ionisation efficiency and sensitivity. Using a modified autosampler for mounting and disposing of the SPE tips, the SPE-LC-MS/MS system could analyse six samples per hour, and up to 192 SPE tips in one batch. The relatively high sample throughput, medium separation power and high sensitivity makes the automated SPE-LC-MS/MS setup attractive for proteomics experiments as demonstrated by the identification of the components of simple protein mixtures and of proteins recovered from 2DE gels.

  10. Germline survival and apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gartner, Anton; Boag, Peter R; Blackwell, T Keith

    2008-01-01

    Germline apoptosis shares with somatic apoptosis a reliance on key components of the core apoptotic machinery, including CED-3 and CED-4. However, germline apoptosis differs from somatic apoptosis in its regulation. Whereas somatic apoptosis is developmentally programmed by cell lineage, germline apoptosis occurs as part of an oogenesis program. One category of germline apoptosis, dubbed "physiological" germline apoptosis, reduces the number of cells that complete oogenesis, and is independent of the BH3-only apoptosis effecter EGL-1. A second category, termed "stress-induced" germline apoptosis, is triggered by a genomic integrity checkpoint. Some mechanisms that are monitored by this DNA-damage checkpoint are also involved in germ cell "immortality," or preservation of a continuous germ cell lineage over successive generations. In addition, exposure to certain environmental insults or pathogens induces germ cell apoptosis. Here we will review the mechanisms that control each of the pathways leading to germ cell apoptosis and discuss their functional significance. Germline apoptosis is an integral part of oogenesis in many animals, including humans. Because many of the regulators of C. elegans germline apoptosis are conserved, we suggest that this nematode provides a valuable model for understanding controls of germline apoptosis more broadly. PMID:18781708

  11. An Overview of the Source Physics Experiments (SPE) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snelson, C. M.; Barker, D. L.; White, R. L.; Emmitt, R. F.; Townsend, M. J.; Graves, T. E.; Becker, S. A.; Teel, M. G.; Lee, P.; Antoun, T. H.; Rodgers, A.; Walter, W. R.; Mellors, R. J.; Brunish, W. M.; Bradley, C. R.; Patton, H. J.; Hawkins, W. L.; Corbell, B. H.; Abbott, R. E.; SPE Working Group

    2011-12-01

    Modeling of explosion phenomenology has been primarily empirically based when looking at the seismic, infrasound, and acoustic signals. In order to detect low-yield nuclear explosions under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), we must be able to understand and model the explosive source in settings beyond where we have empirical data. The Source Physics Experiments (SPE) at the Nevada National Security Site are the first step in this endeavor to link the empirically based with the physics-based modeling to develop this predictive capability. The current series of tests is being conducted in a granite body called the Climax Stock. This location was chosen for several reasons, including the site's expected "simple geology"-the granite is a fairly homogeneous body. In addition, data are available from underground nuclear tests that were conducted in the same rock body, and the nature of the geology has been well-documented. Among the project goals for the SPE is to provide fully coupled seismic energy to the seismic and acoustic seismic arrays so that the transition between the near and far-field data can be modeled and our scientists can begin to understand how non-linear effects and anisotropy control seismic energy transmission and partitioning. The first shot for the SPE was conducted in May 2011 as a calibration shot (SPE1) with 220 lb (100 kg) of chemical explosives set at a depth of 180 ft (55 m). An array of sensors and diagnostics recorded the shot data, including accelerometers, geophones, rotational sensors, short-period and broadband seismic sensors, Continuous Reflectometry for Radius vs. Time Experiment (CORRTEX), Time of Arrival (TOA), Velocity of Detonation (VOD) as well as infrasound sensors. The three-component accelerometer packages were set at depths of 180 ft (55 m), 150 ft (46 m), and 50 ft (15 m) in two rings around ground zero (GZ); the inner ring was at 10 m and the outer ring was 20 m from GZ. Six sets of surface accelerometers (100 and 500 g) were placed along in an azimuth of SW from GZ every 10 m. Seven infrasound sensors were placed in an array around the GZ, extending from tens of meters to kilometers. Over 100 seismic stations were positioned, most of which were in five radial lines from GZ out to 2 km. Over 400 data channels were recorded for SPE1, and data recovery was about 95% with high signal to noise ratio. Future tests will be conducted in the same shot hole as SPE1. The SPE2 experiment will consist of 2200 lb (1000 kg) of chemical explosives shot at 150 ft (46 m) depth utilizing the above-described instrumentation. Subsequent SPE shots will be the same size, within the same shot hole, and within the damage zone. The ultimate goal of the SPE Project is to develop predictive capability for using seismic energy as a tool for CTBT issues. This work was done by National Security Technologies, LLC, under Contract No. DE AC52 06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  12. Identification and Co-complex Structure of a New S. pyogenes SpeB Small Molecule Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ana Y; Gonzlez-Pez, Gonzalo E; Wolan, Dennis W

    2015-07-21

    The secreted Streptococcus pyogenes cysteine protease SpeB is implicated in host immune system evasion and bacterial virulence. We present a small molecule inhibitor of SpeB 2477 identified from a high-throughput screen based on the hydrolysis of a fluorogenic peptide substrate Ac-AIK-AMC. 2477 inhibits other SpeB-related proteases but not human caspase-3, suggesting that the molecule targets proteases with the papain-like structural fold. A 1.59 X-ray crystal structure of 2477 bound to the SpeB active site reveals the mechanism of inhibition and the essential constituents of 2477 necessary for binding. An assessment against a panel of 2477 derivatives confirms our structural findings and shows that a carbamate and nitrile on 2477 are required for SpeB inhibition, as these moieties provide an extensive network of electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding interactions with SpeB active site residues. Surprisingly, despite 2477 having a reduced inhibitory potential against papain, the majority of 2477-related compounds inhibit papain to a much greater and broader extent than SpeB. These findings indicate that SpeB is more stringently selective than papain for this panel of small molecule inhibitors. On the basis of our structural and biochemical characterization, we propose modifications to 2477 for subsequent rounds of inhibitor design that will impart specificity to SpeB over other papain-like proteases, including alterations of the compound to exploit the differences in CA protease active site pocket sizes and electrostatics. PMID:26132413

  13. SPE-HPTLC of procyanidins from the barks of different species and clones of Salix.

    PubMed

    Pob?ocka-Olech, Loretta; Krauze-Baranowska, Miros?awa

    2008-11-01

    A SPE-HPTLC method was developed for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of procyanidin B(1) in willow barks. The chromatography was performed on HPTLC silica gel layer with the mobile phase chloroform-ethanol-formic acid (50:40:6 v/v/v), in the Automatic Developing Chamber-ADC 2. The methanol extracts from willow barks were purified by SPE method on RP-18 silica gel columns with methanol-water (7:93 v/v) as the eluent. The presence of procyanidin B(1) was revealed in the majority of investigated willow barks. The content of procyanidin B(1) varied from 0.26 mg/g in the extract of Salix purpurea clone 1067-2.24 mg/g in the extract of Salix alba clone 1100. The method was validated for linearity, precision, LOD, LOQ and repeatability. PMID:18639405

  14. Hindlimb suspension and SPE-like radiation impairs clearance of bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Li, Minghong; Holmes, Veronica; Zhou, Yu; Ni, Houping; Sanzari, Jenine K; Kennedy, Ann R; Weissman, Drew

    2014-01-01

    A major risk of extended space travel is the combined effects of weightlessness and radiation exposure on the immune system. In this study, we used the hindlimb suspension model of microgravity that includes the other space stressors, situational and confinement stress and alterations in food intake, and solar particle event (SPE)-like radiation to measure the combined effects on the ability to control bacterial infections. A massive increase in morbidity and decrease in the ability to control bacterial growth was observed using 2 different types of bacteria delivered by systemic and pulmonary routes in 3 different strains of mice. These data suggest that an astronaut exposed to a strong SPE during extended space travel is at increased risk for the development of infections that could potentially be severe and interfere with mission success and astronaut health. PMID:24454913

  15. First Results From an IRTF Near-Infrared SPeX Debris Disk Spectral Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisse, Carey M.; Sitko, M. L.; Christian, D. J.; Melis, C.; Chen, C.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last 3 years we have conducted a focused SPeX study of nearby AFGK exosystems with strong IRAS/Spitzer mid-IR fluxes and < 1 Gyr ages. Objects were observed from 0.8 - 5.2 um using R=1000 to 2000 spectroscopy. Our observational goal is to characterize the primary star and determine the amount of scattered light, thermal emission, and line emission due to orbiting circumstellar material. The ultimate scientific goal is to characterize the circumstellar material and find evidence for material created by impacts, collisional grinding, and/or sublimation of bodies in these planet building systems. Our observations take advantage of and add to the SPeX spectral library of ~200 cool FGKM stars (Rayner et al. 2009). In this talk we report the preliminary findings of our survey of 20+ systems.

  16. Hindlimb Suspension and SPE-Like Radiation Impairs Clearance of Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minghong; Holmes, Veronica; Zhou, Yu; Ni, Houping; Sanzari, Jenine K.; Kennedy, Ann R.; Weissman, Drew

    2014-01-01

    A major risk of extended space travel is the combined effects of weightlessness and radiation exposure on the immune system. In this study, we used the hindlimb suspension model of microgravity that includes the other space stressors, situational and confinement stress and alterations in food intake, and solar particle event (SPE)-like radiation to measure the combined effects on the ability to control bacterial infections. A massive increase in morbidity and decrease in the ability to control bacterial growth was observed using 2 different types of bacteria delivered by systemic and pulmonary routes in 3 different strains of mice. These data suggest that an astronaut exposed to a strong SPE during extended space travel is at increased risk for the development of infections that could potentially be severe and interfere with mission success and astronaut health. PMID:24454913

  17. Modeling Saturn's 5-micron IRTF/SpeX and Cassini/VIMS Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Randall E.; Chanover, N.; Bjoraker, G.; Momary, T.; Baines, K. H.; Hewagama, T.; Glenar, D.

    2008-09-01

    Cassini's Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) is revealing dramatic structure in the clouds of Saturn's atmosphere. We complement VIMS observations by simultaneously making ground-based observations around 5 microns using the SpeX spectrograph on NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF). Compared to VIMS, SpeX has higher spectral resolution but lower spatial resolution. Saturn's 5-micron flux from the day side is divided into two roughly equal components: reflected sunlight and thermal emission from the deep atmosphere. The exact ratio of these components varies spatially on Saturn due to its cloud structure. VIMS can separate the components by observing not only Saturn's day side, but also its night side, where by definition the reflected sunlight component is zero. Near 5 microns, we specifically concentrate on phosphine and ammonia absorption. We model Saturn's spectra using the SSP code at NASA/GSFC, which accounts for volume mixing ratio vs pressure profiles of atmospheric species and cloud height and thickness. We start by modeling the thermal component of VIMS night-side data at various northern and southern latitudes and then model VIMS day-side data and SpeX data by adding the reflected sunlight component, also at various latitudes. Observing Saturn's northern hemisphere from the IRTF is becoming easier as Saturn approaches its equinox in 2009. Our modeling efforts will enable us to characterize latitudinal variations in the spectra around 5 microns. The rich data sets provided by Cassini/VIMS and IRTF/SpeX can provide us with many insights into atmospheric abundances, chemistry, transport, and energy balance. This project is supported by a scholarship from the U.S. Air Force and grants from the National Science Foundation (AST-0507558) and NASA (NNG06G126G).

  18. A New Method of Facial Expression Recognition Based on SPE Plus SVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Zilu; Huang, Mingwei; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Zhewei

    A novel method of facial expression recognition (FER) is presented, which uses stochastic proximity embedding (SPE) for data dimension reduction, and support vector machine (SVM) for expression classification. The proposed algorithm is applied to Japanese Female Facial Expression (JAFFE) database for FER, better performance is obtained compared with some traditional algorithms, such as PCA and LDA etc.. The result have further proved the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  19. In-line coupling SPE and CE for DNA preconcentration and separation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Airong; Tran, Nguyet Thuy; Chen, Chen; Hu, Jiming; Taverna, Myriam; Zhou, Ping

    2011-06-01

    An in-line SPE method coupled to CE was developed for the analysis of DNA. The amino silica monolith was prepared in situ by polymerization of tetraethoxysilane and N-(?-aminoethyl)-?-aminopropyltriethoxysilane in ethanol aqueous solution at the inlet end of a 100??m id fused-silica capillary, and the remaining part of the capillary was used as separation channel. The procedure for this in-line SPE-CE method was constructed on the basis of investigation on operational conditions such as the introduction mode of sieving matrix, the composition of elution solvent and the elution time. Twenty millimolar ammonium hydroxide was demonstrated to be effective for DNA desorption from the monolith, and linear poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) was used as the separation matrix. The proposed method could achieve limits of detection of 0.065-0.123?ng/mL for six DNA fragments ranging 100-2000?bp. Compared with conventional CE, preconcentration factors of over 100 times were obtained. The applicability of the in-line SPE-CE method was further demonstrated by analyzing plasmid DNA from Escherichia coli crude lysate. PMID:21626518

  20. Ultra preconcentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in smoked bacon by a combination of SPE and DLLME.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaofang; Zhou, Shu; Zhu, Quanfei; Ye, Yong; Chen, Huaixia

    2014-09-01

    A sample pretreatment method, solid-phase extraction combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (SPE-DLLME), was established for the sensitive determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in smoked bacon samples. In the SPE-DLLME process, three PAHs including naphthalene (Naph), phenanthrene (Phen) and pyrene (Pyr) were extracted from samples and transferred into C18 SPE cartridge. The target analytes were subsequently eluted with 1.2 ml of acetonitrile-dichloromethane (5:1, v/v) mixture solution. The eluent was injected directly into the 5.0 ml ultrapure water in the subsequent DLLME procedure. The sedimented phase was concentrated under a gentle nitrogen flow to 120.0 l. Finally, the analytes in the extraction solvent were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with a ultra-violet detector. Some important extraction parameters affecting the performance, such as the sample solution flow rate, breakthrough volume, salt addition as well as the type and volume of the elution solvent were optimized. The developed method provided an ultra enrichment factors for PAHs ranged from 3478 to 3824. The method was applied for the selective extraction and sensitive determination of PAHs in smoked bacon samples. The limits of detection (S/N = 3) were 0.05, 0.01, 0.02 ?g kg(-1) for Naph, Phen, Pyr, respectively. PMID:23917516

  1. Comparison of Radiation Transport Codes, HZETRN, HETC and FLUKA, Using the 1956 Webber SPE Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, John H.; Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Handler, Thomas; Gabriel, Tony A.; Pinsky, Lawrence S.; Reddell, Brandon; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Singleterry, Robert C.; Norbury, John W.; Badavi, Francis F.; Aghara, Sukesh K.

    2009-01-01

    Protection of astronauts and instrumentation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) in the harsh environment of space is of prime importance in the design of personal shielding, spacec raft, and mission planning. Early entry of radiation constraints into the design process enables optimal shielding strategies, but demands efficient and accurate tools that can be used by design engineers in every phase of an evolving space project. The radiation transport code , HZETRN, is an efficient tool for analyzing the shielding effectiveness of materials exposed to space radiation. In this paper, HZETRN is compared to the Monte Carlo codes HETC-HEDS and FLUKA, for a shield/target configuration comprised of a 20 g/sq cm Aluminum slab in front of a 30 g/cm^2 slab of water exposed to the February 1956 SPE, as mode led by the Webber spectrum. Neutron and proton fluence spectra, as well as dose and dose equivalent values, are compared at various depths in the water target. This study shows that there are many regions where HZETRN agrees with both HETC-HEDS and FLUKA for this shield/target configuration and the SPE environment. However, there are also regions where there are appreciable differences between the three computer c odes.

  2. The Crystal Structure of Escherichia coli Spermidine Synthase SpeE Reveals a Unique Substrate-binding Pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.; Chua, T; Tkaczuk, K; Bujnicki, J; Sivaraman, J

    2010-01-01

    Polyamines are essential in all branches of life. Biosynthesis of spermidine, one of the most ubiquitous polyamines, is catalyzed by spermidine synthase (SpeE). Although the function of this enzyme from Escherichia coli has been thoroughly characterized, its structural details remain unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of E. coli SpeE and study its interaction with the ligands by isothermal titration calorimetry and computational modelling. SpeE consists of two domains - a small N-terminal {beta}-strand domain, and a C-terminal catalytic domain that adopts a canonical methyltransferase (MTase) Rossmann fold. The protein forms a dimer in the crystal and in solution. Structural comparison of E. coli SpeE to its homologs reveals that it has a large and unique substrate-binding cleft that may account for its lower amine substrate specificity.

  3. PHARMACOLOGIC PROBING OF AMPHOTERICIN B-INDUCED RENAL DYSFUNCTION IN THE NEONATAL RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pharmacologic Probing of Amphotericin B-Induced Renal Dysfunction in the Neonatal Rat. Gray, J.A., and Kavlock, R.J. (1988). Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 93, 360-368. Acetazolamide, furosemide, chlorothiazide, and amiloride pharmacologic agents that act primarily in the proximal tub...

  4. Substrate-Induced Allosteric Change in the Quaternary Structure of the Spermidine N-Acetyltransferase SpeG.

    PubMed

    Filippova, Ekaterina V; Weigand, Steven; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Kiryukhina, Olga; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Anderson, Wayne F

    2015-11-01

    The spermidine N-acetyltransferase SpeG is a dodecameric enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl coenzyme A to polyamines such as spermidine and spermine. SpeG has an allosteric polyamine-binding site and acetylating polyamines regulate their intracellular concentrations. The structures of SpeG from Vibrio cholerae in complexes with polyamines and cofactor have been characterized earlier. Here, we present the dodecameric structure of SpeG from V. cholerae in a ligand-free form in three different conformational states: open, intermediate and closed. All structures were crystallized in C2 space group symmetry and contain six monomers in the asymmetric unit cell. Two hexamers related by crystallographic 2-fold symmetry form the SpeG dodecamer. The open and intermediate states have a unique open dodecameric ring. This SpeG dodecamer is asymmetric except for the one 2-fold axis and is unlike any known dodecameric structure. Using a fluorescence thermal shift assay, size-exclusion chromatography with multi-angle light scattering, small-angle X-ray scattering analysis, negative-stain electron microscopy and structural analysis, we demonstrate that this unique open dodecameric state exists in solution. Our combined results indicate that polyamines trigger conformational changes and induce the symmetric closed dodecameric state of the protein when they bind to their allosteric sites. PMID:26410587

  5. Trypanosomatid apoptosis: 'Apoptosis' without the canonical regulators.

    PubMed

    Smirlis, Despina; Soteriadou, Ketty

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis is a regulated process of cell death originally described in multicelullar organisms contributing to their development and functionality. There is now increasing experimental evidence that a similar form of cell death is operative in unicellular eukaryotes, including trypanosomatids of the genera Trypanosoma and Leishmania. The determination of ancestral executors and regulators of 'apoptosis' in these protozoa belonging to the most primitive eukaryotes that appeared on earth 1.5 billion years ago, provide an exciting challenge in the understanding of the evolution of apoptosis-regulating processes. A review of the present knowledge of trypanosomatid apoptosis points to the fact that these dying protozoa acquire common apoptotic morphological features as metazoan cells, although they lack many of the molecules accepted today as canonical apoptosis mediators (Bcl-2 family members, caspases, TNF related family of receptors). Herein, we discuss how the knowledge of regulators and executors of trypanosomatid apoptosis may provide answers to the gaps concerning the origin of apoptosis. The aim of this addendum is to emphasize the need for classifying the ancestral death program and to discuss how this relates to the complex death programs in multicellular lineages, with the hope to stimulate further enquiry and research into this area. PMID:21566464

  6. Antimicrobial Peptide Lactoferricin B-Induced Rapid Leakage of Internal Contents from Single Giant Unilamellar Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Moniruzzaman, Md; Alam, Jahangir Md; Dohra, Hideo; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2015-09-29

    Enzymatic digestion of bovine lactoferrin generates lactoferricin B (Lfcin B), a 25-mer peptide with strong antimicrobial activity of unknown mechanism. To elucidate the mechanistic basis of Lfcin B bactericidal activity, we investigated the interaction of Lfcin B with Escherichia coli and liposomes of lipid membranes. Lfcin B induced the influx of a membrane-impermeant fluorescent probe, SYTOX green, from the outside of E. coli into its cytoplasm. Lfcin B induced gradual leakage of calcein from large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) of dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (DOPG)/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) membranes. To clarify the cause of Lfcin B-induced leakage of calcein from the LUVs, we used the single giant unilamellar vesicle (GUV) method to investigate the interaction of Lfcin B with calcein-containing DOPG/DOPC-GUVs. We observed that a rapid leakage of calcein from a GUV started stochastically; statistical analysis provided a rate constant for Lfcin B-induced pore formation, kp. On the other hand, phase-contrast microscopic images revealed that Lfcin B induced a rapid leakage of sucrose from the single GUVs with concomitant appearance of a spherical GUV of smaller diameter. Because of the very fast leakage, and at the present time resolution of the experiments (33 ms), we could not follow the evolution of pore nor the process of the structural changes of the GUV. Here we used the term "local rupture" to express the rapid leakage of sucrose and determined the rate constant of local rupture, kL. On the basis of the comparison between kp and kL, we concluded that the leakage of calcein from single GUVs occurred as a result of a local rupture in the GUVs and that smaller pores inducing leakage of calcein were not formed before the local rupture. The results of the effect of the surface charge density of lipid membranes and that of salt concentration in buffer on kp clearly show that kp increases with an increase in the extent of electrostatic interactions due to the surface charges. Analysis of Lfcin B-induced shape changes indicated that the binding of Lfcin B increased the area of the outer monolayer of GUVs. These results indicate that Lfcin B-induced damage of the plasma membrane of E. coli with its concomitant rapid leakage of internal contents is a key factor for the bactericidal activity of LfcinB. PMID:26368853

  7. Anion exchange SPE and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in GHB analysis.

    PubMed

    Elian, Albert A; Hackett, Jeffery

    2011-12-01

    In this study, the extraction of ?-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) from urine using solid-phase extraction (SPE) is described. SPE was performed on anion exchange columns after samples of urine had been diluted with de-ionized water. After application of the diluted samples containing GHB-d(6) as an internal standard, the sorbent was washed with deionized water and methanol and dried. The GHB was eluted from the SPE column with a solvent consisting of methanol containing 6% glacial acetic acid. The eluent was collected, evaporated to dryness, and dissolved in mobile phase (100 ?L) for analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in negative multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. Liquid chromatography was performed in gradient mode employing a biphenyl column and a mobile phase consisting of acetontitrile (containing 0.1% formic acid) and 0.1% aqueous formic acid. The total run time for each analysis was less than 5 min. The limits of detection/quantification for this method were determined to be 50 and 100 ng/mL, respectively. The method was found to be linear from 500 ng/mL to 10,000 ng/mL (r(2)>0.995). The recovery of GHB was found to be greater than 75%. In this report, results of authentic urine samples analyzed for GHB by this method are presented. GHB concentrations in these samples were found to be range from less than 500 ng/mL to 5110 ng/mL. PMID:22055831

  8. Large-N Over the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) Phase I and Phase II Test Beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snelson, C. M.; Carmichael, J. D.; Mellors, R. J.; Abbott, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    One of the current challenges in the field of monitoring and verification is source discrimination of low-yield nuclear explosions from background seismicity, both natural and anthropogenic. Work is underway at the Nevada National Security Site to conduct a series of chemical explosion experiments using a multi-institutional, multi-disciplinary approach. The goal of this series of experiments, called the Source Physics Experiments (SPE), is to refine the understanding of the effect of earth structures on source phenomenology and energy partitioning in the source region, the transition of seismic energy from the near field to the far field, and the development of S waves observed in the far field. To fully explore these problems, the SPE series includes tests in both hard and soft rock geologic environments. The project comprises a number of activities, which range from characterizing the shallow subsurface to acquiring new explosion data from both the near field (<100 m) and the far field (>100 m). SPE includes a series of planned explosions (with different yields and depths of burials), which are conducted in the same hole and monitored by a diverse set of sensors recording characteristics of the explosions, ground-shock, seismo-acoustic energy propagation. This presentation focuses on imaging the full 3D wavefield over hard rock and soft rock test beds using a large number of seismic sensors. This overview presents statistical analyses of optimal sensor layout required to estimate wavefield discriminants and the planned deployment for the upcoming experiments. This work was conducted under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. yApoptosis: yeast apoptosis database

    PubMed Central

    Wanichthanarak, Kwanjeera; Cvijovic, Marija; Molt, Andrea; Petranovic, Dina

    2013-01-01

    In the past few years, programmed cell death (PCD) has become a popular research area due to its fundamental aspects and its links to human diseases. Yeast has been used as a model for studying PCD, since the discovery of morphological markers of apoptotic cell death in yeast in 1997. Increasing knowledge in identification of components and molecular pathways created a need for organization of information. To meet the demands from the research community, we have developed a curated yeast apoptosis database, yApoptosis. The database structurally collects an extensively curated set of apoptosis, PCD and related genes, their genomic information, supporting literature and relevant external links. A web interface including necessary functions is provided to access and download the data. In addition, we included several networks where the apoptosis genes or proteins are involved, and present them graphically and interactively to facilitate rapid visualization. We also promote continuous inputs and curation by experts. yApoptosis is a highly specific resource for sharing information online, which supports researches and studies in the field of yeast apoptosis and cell death. Database URL: http://www.ycelldeath.com/yapoptosis/ PMID:24082050

  10. Srv Mediated Dispersal of Streptococcal Biofilms Through SpeB Is Observed in CovRS+ Strains

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Kristie L.; Braden, Amy K.; Holder, Robert C.; Reid, Sean D.

    2011-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a human specific pathogen capable of causing both mild infections and severe invasive disease. We and others have shown that GAS is able to form biofilms during infection. That is to say, they form a three-dimensional, surface attached structure consisting of bacteria and a multi-component extracellular matrix. The mechanisms involved in regulation and dispersal of these GAS structures are still unclear. Recently we have reported that in the absence of the transcriptional regulator Srv in the MGAS5005 background, the cysteine protease SpeB is constitutively produced, leading to increased tissue damage and decreased biofilm formation during a subcutaneous infection in a mouse model. This was interesting because MGAS5005 has a naturally occurring mutation that inactivates the sensor kinase domain of the two component regulatory system CovRS. Others have previously shown that strains lacking covS are associated with decreased SpeB production due to CovR repression of speB expression. Thus, our results suggest the inactivation of srv can bypass CovR repression and lead to constitutive SpeB production. We hypothesized that Srv control of SpeB production may be a mechanism to regulate biofilm dispersal and provide a mechanism by which mild infection can transition to severe disease through biofilm dispersal. The question remained however, is this mechanism conserved among GAS strains or restricted to the unique genetic makeup of MGAS5005. Here we show that Srv mediated control of SpeB and biofilm dispersal is conserved in the invasive clinical isolates RGAS053 (serotype M1) and MGAS315 (serotype M3), both of which have covS intact. This work provides additional evidence that Srv regulated control of SpeB may mediate biofilm formation and dispersal in diverse strain backgrounds. PMID:22163320

  11. Geologic Assessment of the Damage Zone from the Second Test at Source Physics Experiment-Nevada (SPE-N)

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, M. J.; Huckins-Gang, H. E.; Prothro, L. B.; Reed, D. N.

    2012-12-01

    The National Center for Nuclear Security, established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), is conducting a series of explosive tests at the Nevada National Security Site that are designed to increase the understanding of certain basic physical phenomena associated with underground explosions. These tests will aid in developing technologies that might be used to detect underground nuclear explosions in support of verification activities for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. The initial project is a series of explosive tests, known collectively as the Source Physics Experiment-Nevada (SPE-N), being conducted in granitic rocks. The SPE-N test series is designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves. The results will help advance the seismic monitoring capability of the United States by improving the predictive capability of physics-based modeling of explosive phenomena. The first SPE N (SPE-N-1) test was conducted in May 2011, using 100 kg of explosives at the depth of 54.9 m in the U 15n source hole. SPE-N-2 was conducted in October 2011, using 1,000 kg of explosives at the depth of 45.7 m in the same source hole. The SPE-N-3 test was conducted in the same source hole in July 2012, using the same amount and type of explosive as for SPE-N-2, and at the same depth as SPE-N-2, within the damage zone created by the SPE-N-2 explosion to investigate damage effects on seismic wave propagation. Following the SPE-N-2 shot and prior to the SPE-N-3 shot, the core hole U-15n#10 was drilled at an angle from the surface to intercept the SPE-N-2 shot point location to obtain information necessary to characterize the damage zone. The objective was to determine the position of the damage zone near the shot point, at least on the northeast, where the core hole penetrated it, and obtain information on the properties of the damaged medium. Geologic characterization of the post-SPE-N-2 core hole included geophysical logging, a directional survey, and geologic description of the core to document visual evidence of damage. Selected core samples were provided to Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for measurement of physical and mechanical properties. A video was also run in the source hole after it was cleaned out. A significant natural fault zone was encountered in the angle core hole between 5.7 and 7.5 m from the shot point. However, several of the fractures observed in the core hole are interpreted as having been caused by the explosion. The fractures are characterized by a “fresh,” mechanically broken look, with uncoated and very irregular surfaces. They tend to terminate against natural fractures and have orientations that differ from the previously defined natural fracture sets; they are common starting at about 5.4 m from the shot point. Within about 3.3 m of the shot point to the end of the recovered core at 1.6 m from the shot point, some of the core samples are softer and lighter in color, but do not appear to be weathered. It is thought this could be indicative of the presence of distributed microfracturing.

  12. Development of colorimetric solid phase extraction (C-SPE) for in-flight monitoring of spacecraft water supplies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazda, Daniel Bryan

    2004-12-01

    Colorimetric solid phase extraction (C-SPE) is a sorption-spectrophotometric technique that combines colorimetric reagents, solid phase extraction, and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to quantify trace analytes in water samples. In C-SPE, a syringe is used to meter a known volume of sample through a membrane impregnated with a selective colorimetric reagent along with any additives required to optimize the complexation of the reagent and analyte. As the sample is passed through the membrane, analytes are extracted and complexed, leading to a detectable change in the optical characteristics of the membrane. The analyte-reagent complex is then quantified directly on the membrane, using a hand-held diffuse reflectance spectrophotometer. This dissertation focuses on the development, ground testing, and microgravity flight demonstration of C-SPE methods to meet the near- and long-term water quality monitoring needs of NASA. To this end, the ability of C-SPE to function in a microgravity environment was tested through performance evaluations of methods for the determination of the biocidal agents silver(I) and iodine on the KC-135 microgravity simulator. The biocidal iodine platform was investigated further to determine which iodine species is responsible for the C-SPE signal. Through systematic comparisons of C-SPE results and UV-Visible absorbance studies it was determined that biocidally active I2 is the iodine species complexed by poly(vinylpyrrolidone). The application of C-SPE to additional target water quality parameters is demonstrated through the determination of nickel(II), a metal leachate found in archived water samples from the International Space Station, using dimethylglyoxime. This method introduced a new variation of C-SPE, the quantification of trace analytes based on the collection of an insoluble, colored precipitate. The nickel(II) method was then combined with the method for biocidal silver(I) and a new method to measure sample pH to create a multiplexed C-SPE platform. This invention is presented as an approach to increase the collection of on-orbit water quality data collected without requiring additional crew time. The dissertation is concluded with a summation of the current work and a look at future directions.

  13. Recent improvements in SPE3D: a VR-based surgery planning environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkowski, Marcin; Sitnik, Robert; Verdonschot, Nico

    2014-02-01

    SPE3D is a surgery planning environment developed within TLEMsafe project [1] (funded by the European Commission FP7). It enables the operator to plan a surgical procedure on the customized musculoskeletal (MS) model of the patient's lower limbs, send the modified model to the biomechanical analysis module, and export the scenario's parameters to the surgical navigation system. The personalized patient-specific three-dimensional (3-D) MS model is registered with 3-D MRI dataset of lower limbs and the two modalities may be visualized simultaneously. Apart from main planes, any arbitrary MRI cross-section can be rendered on the 3-D MS model in real time. The interface provides tools for: bone cutting, manipulating and removal, repositioning muscle insertion points, modifying muscle force, removing muscles and placing implants stored in the implant library. SPE3D supports stereoscopic viewing as well as natural inspection/manipulation with use of haptic devices. Alternatively, it may be controlled with use of a standard computer keyboard, mouse and 2D display or a touch screen (e.g. in an operating room). The interface may be utilized in two main fields. Experienced surgeons may use it to simulate their operative plans and prepare input data for a surgical navigation system while student or novice surgeons can use it for training.

  14. Design and test status for life support applications of SPE oxygen generation systems. [Solid Polymer Electrolyte

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titterington, W. A.; Erickson, A. C.

    1975-01-01

    An advanced six-man rated oxygen generation system has been fabricated and tested as part of a NASA/JSC technology development program for a long lived, manned spacecraft life support system. Details of the design and tests results are presented. The system is based on the Solid Polymer Electrolyte (SPE) water electrolysis technology and its nominal operating conditions are 2760 kN/sq m (400 psia) and 355 K (180 F) with an electrolysis module current density capability up to 350 mA/sq cm (326 ASF). The system is centered on a 13-cell SPE water electrolysis module having a single cell active area of 214 sq cm (33 sq in) and it incorporates instrumentation and controls for single pushbutton automatic startup/shutdown, component fault detection and isolation, and self-contained sensors and controls for automatic safe emergency shutdown. The system has been tested in both the orbital cyclic and continuous mode of operation. Various parametric tests have been completed to define the system capability for potential application in spacecraft environmental systems.

  15. IRTF/SPeX Observations of the Unusual Kepler Light Curve System KIC8462852

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisse, C. M.; Sitko, M. L.; Marengo, M.

    2015-12-01

    We have utilized the NASA/IRTF 3 m SpeX instrument's high-resolution spectral mode to observe and characterize the near-infrared flux emanating from the unusual Kepler light curve system KIC 8462852. By comparing the resulting 0.8-4.2 ?m spectrum to a mesh of model photospheric spectra, the 6 emission line analyses of the Rayner et al. catalog, and the 25 system collections of debris disks we have observed to date using SpeX under the Near InfraRed Debris disk Survey, we have been able to additionally characterize the system. Within the errors of our measurements, this star looks like a normal solar abundance main-sequence F1V to F3V dwarf star without any obvious traces of significant circumstellar dust or gas. Using Connelley & Greene's emission measures, we also see no evidence of significant ongoing accretion onto the star nor any stellar outflow away from it. Our results are inconsistent with large amounts of static close-in obscuring material or the unusual behavior of a YSO system, but are consistent with the favored episodic giant comet models of a Gyr old stellar system favored by Boyajian et al. We speculate that KIC 8462852, like the 1.4 Gyr old F2V system ? Corvi, is undergoing a late heavy bombardment, but is only in its very early stages.

  16. Rapid recovery of DNA from agarose gel slices by coupling electroelution with monolithic SPE.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shengbing; Yang, Shuixian; Zhou, Ping; Zhou, Ke; Wang, Jing; Chen, Xiangdong

    2009-06-01

    An amino silica monolithic column prepared by in situ polymerization of tetraethoxysilane and N-(beta-aminoethyl)-gamma-aminopropyltriethoxysilane was firstly applied to recover DNA from agarose gel slices by coupling electroelution with monolithic SPE. DNA was electroeluted from the agarose gel slices onto the amino silica monolithic column. The DNA adsorbed on this monolithic column was then recovered using sodium phosphate solution at pH 10. The whole recovery procedure could be completed within 10 min because the use of amino silica monolithic column accelerated the DNA capture and facilitated the DNA release. Electroelution conditions, such as buffer pH, buffer concentration and applied voltage, were online optimized. The average yield for herring sperm DNA, pBR 322 DNA and lambda DNA recovered from 1.0% w/v agarose gel slices were 55+/-4, 50+/-6 and 42+/-7% (n=3), respectively. The polymerase chain reaction performance of pGM plasmid recovered from agarose gel slices demonstrated that the method could provide high-quality DNA for downstream processes. The combination of electroelution with monolithic SPE allows a rapid, simple and efficient DNA recovery method. This technique is especially useful for applications that need to purify small starting amounts of DNA. PMID:19582711

  17. cDNA cloning, expression, and mutagenesis of a PR-10 protein SPE-16 from the seeds of Pachyrrhizus erosus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fang; Yan, Ming; Li, Yikun; Chang, Shaojie; Song, Xiaomin; Zhou, Zhaocai; Gong, Weimin

    2003-12-19

    SPE-16 is a new 16kDa protein that has been purified from the seeds of Pachyrrhizus erosus. It's N-terminal amino acid sequence shows significant sequence homology to pathogenesis-related class 10 proteins. cDNA encoding 150 amino acids was cloned by RT-PCR and the gene sequence proved SPE-16 to be a new member of PR-10 family. The cDNA was cloned into pET15b plasmid and expressed in Escherichia coli. The bacterially expressed SPE-16 also demonstrated ribonuclease-like activity in vitro. Site-directed mutation of three conserved amino acids E95A, E147A, Y150A, and a P-loop truncated form were constructed and their different effects on ribonuclease activities were observed. SPE-16 is also able to bind the fluorescent probe 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonate (ANS) in the native state. The ANS anion is a much-utilized "hydrophobic probe" for proteins. This binding activity indicated another biological function of SPE-16. PMID:14680830

  18. Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription-5 Mediates Neuronal Apoptosis Induced by Inhibition of Rac GTPase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Trisha R.; Loucks, F. Alexandra; Schroeder, Emily K.; Nevalainen, Marja T.; Tyler, Kenneth L.; Aktories, Klaus; Bouchard, Ron J.; Linseman, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    In several neuronal cell types, the small GTPase Rac is essential for survival. We have shown previously that the Rho family GTPase inhibitor Clostridium difficile toxin B (ToxB) induces apoptosis in primary rat cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) principally via inhibition of Rac GTPase function. In the present study, incubation with ToxB activated a proapoptotic Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway, and a pan-JAK inhibitor protected CGNs from Rac inhibition. STAT1 expression was induced by ToxB; however, CGNs from STAT1 knock-out mice succumbed to ToxB-induced apoptosis as readily as wild-type CGNs. STAT3 displayed enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation following treatment with ToxB, and a reputed inhibitor of STAT3, cucurbitacin (JSI-124), reduced CGN apoptosis. Unexpectedly, JSI-124 failed to block STAT3 phosphorylation, and CGNs were not protected from ToxB by other known STAT3 inhibitors. In contrast, STAT5A tyrosine phosphorylation induced by ToxB was suppressed by JSI-124. In addition, roscovitine similarly inhibited STAT5A phosphorylation and protected CGNs from ToxB-induced apoptosis. Consistent with these results, adenoviral infection with a dominant negative STAT5 mutant, but not wild-type STAT5, significantly decreased ToxB-induced apoptosis of CGNs. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation with a STAT5 antibody revealed increased STAT5 binding to the promoter region of prosurvival Bcl-xL. STAT5 was recruited to the Bcl-xL promoter region in a ToxB-dependent manner, and this DNA binding preceded Bcl-xL down-regulation, suggesting transcriptional repression. These data indicate that a novel JAK/STAT5 proapoptotic pathway significantly contributes to neuronal apoptosis induced by the inhibition of Rac GTPase. PMID:22378792

  19. Possible involvement of a tetrahydrobiopterin in photoreception for UV-B-induced anthocyanin synthesis in carrot.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Junko; Nakata, Rieko; Ueno, Hiroshi; Murakami, Akio; Iseki, Mineo; Watanabe, Masakatsu

    2014-01-01

    Our previous studies of action spectra for UV-B-induced anthocyanin accumulation in cultured carrot cells indicated that a reduced form of pterin, possibly tetrahydrobiopterin, contributes to UV-B photoreception. In this report, we provide additional evidence for the involvement of pterin in UV-B light sensing. UV-B-induced phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity was considerably suppressed by N-acetylserotonin (an inhibitor of tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis), and this suppression was partially recovered by adding biopterin or tetrahydrobiobiopterin. In addition, protein(s) specifically bound to biopterin were detected by radiolabeling experiments in N-acetylserotonin-treated cells. Furthermore, diphenyleneiodonium, a potent inhibitor of electron transfer, completely suppressed UV-B-induced PAL activity. These results suggest the occurrence of an unidentified UV-B photoreceptor (other than UVR8, the tryptophan-based UV-B sensor originally identified in Arabidopsis) with reduced pterin in carrot cells. After reexamining published action spectra, we suggest that anthocyanin synthesis is coordinately regulated by these two UV-B sensors. PMID:24943195

  20. Calpains, mitochondria, and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Matthew A.; Schnellmann, Rick G.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial activity is critical for efficient function of the cardiovascular system. In response to cardiovascular injury, mitochondrial dysfunction occurs and can lead to apoptosis and necrosis. Calpains are a 15-member family of Ca2+-activated cysteine proteases localized to the cytosol and mitochondria, and several have been shown to regulate apoptosis and necrosis. For example, in endothelial cells, Ca2+ overload causes mitochondrial calpain 1 cleavage of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger leading to mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation. Also, activated calpain 1 cleaves Bid, inducing cytochrome c release and apoptosis. In renal cells, calpains 1 and 2 promote apoptosis and necrosis by cleaving cytoskeletal proteins, which increases plasma membrane permeability and cleavage of caspases. Calpain 10 cleaves electron transport chain proteins, causing decreased mitochondrial respiration and excessive activation, or inhibition of calpain 10 activity induces mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. In cardiomyocytes, calpain 1 activates caspase 3 and poly-ADP ribose polymerase during tumour necrosis factor-α-induced apoptosis, and calpain 1 cleaves apoptosis-inducing factor after Ca2+ overload. Many of these observations have been elucidated with calpain inhibitors, but most calpain inhibitors are not specific for calpains or a specific calpain family member, creating more questions. The following review will discuss how calpains affect mitochondrial function and apoptosis within the cardiovascular system. PMID:22581845

  1. The Source Physics Experiments (SPE) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS): An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snelson, C. M.; Chipman, V.; White, R. L.; Emmitt, R.; Townsend, M.; Barker, D.; Lee, P.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the changes in seismic energy as it travels from the near field to the far field is the ultimate goal in monitoring for explosive events of interest. This requires a clear understanding of explosion phenomenology as it relates to seismic, infrasound, and acoustic signals. Although there has been much progress in modeling these phenomena, this has been primarily based in the empirical realm. As a result, the logical next step in advancing the seismic monitoring capability of the United States is to conduct field tests that can expand the predictive capability of the physics-based modeling currently under development. The Source Physics Experiment at the Nevada National Security Site (SPE) is the first step in this endeavor to link the empirically based with the physics-based modeling. This is a collaborative project between National Security Technologies (NSTec), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), and the Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC). The test series require both the simple and complex cases to fully characterize the problem, which is to understand the transition of seismic energy from the near field to the far field; to understand the development of S-waves in explosives sources; and how anisotropy controls seismic energy transmission and partitioning. The current series is being conducted in a granite body called the Climax Stock. This location was chosen for several reasons, including the fairly homogenous granite; the location of previous nuclear tests in the same rock body; and generally the geology has been well characterized. The simple geology series is planned for 7 shots using conventional explosives in the same shot hole surrounded by Continuous Reflectometry for Radius vs. Time Experiment (CORRTEX), Time of Arrival (TOA), Velocity of Detonation (VOD), down-hole accelerometers, surface accelerometers, infrasound, and a suite of seismic sensors of various frequency bands from the near field to the far field. This allows for the use of a single test bed in the simple geology case instead of multiple tests beds to obtain the same results. The shots are planned at various depths to obtain a Green's function, scaled-depth of burial data, nominal depth of burial data and damage zone data. SPE1 was conducted in May 2011 as a 220 lb (100 kg) TNT equivalent calibration shot at a depth of 180 ft (55 m). SPE2 was conducted in October 2011 as a 2200 lb (1000 kg) TNT equivalent calibration shot at a depth of 150 ft (46 m). SPE3 was conducted in July 2012 as a 2200 lb (1000 kg) TNT equivalent calibration shot at a depth of 150 ft (46 m) in the damaged zone. Over 400 data channels were recorded for each of these shots and data recovery was about 95% with high signal to noise ratio. Once the simple geology site data has been utilized, a new test bed will be developed in a complex geology site to test these physics based models. Ultimately, the results from this project will provide the next advances in the science of monitoring to enable a physics-based predicative capability. This work was done by National Security Technologies, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy. DOE/NV/25946--1584

  2. An Overview of the Source Physics Experiment at the Nevada National Security Site (SPE-N)

    SciTech Connect

    Snelson, C. M., Chipman, V. D., White, R. L., Emmitt, R. F., Townsend, M. J., Barker, D., Lee, P.

    2012-07-11

    Understanding the changes in seismic energy as it travels from the near field to the far field is the ultimate goal in monitoring for explosive events of interest. This requires a clear understanding of explosion phenomenology as it relates to seismic, infrasound, and acoustic signals. Although there has been much progress in modeling these phenomena, this has been primarily based in the empirical realm. As a result, the logical next step in advancing the seismic monitoring capability of the United States is to conduct field tests that can expand the predictive capability of the physics-based modeling currently under development. The Source Physics Experiment at the Nevada National Security Site (SPE-N) is the first step in this endeavor to link the empirically based with the physics-based modeling. This is a collaborative project between National Security Technologies (NSTec), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), and the Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC). The test series require both the simple and complex cases to fully characterize the problem, which is to understand the transition of seismic energy from the near field to the far field; to understand the development of S-waves in explosives sources; and how anisotropy controls seismic energy transmission and partitioning. The current series is being conducted in a granite body called the Climax Stock. This location was chosen for several reasons, including the fairly homogenous granite; the location of previous nuclear tests in the same rock body; and generally the geology has been well characterized. The simple geology series is planned for 7 shots using conventional explosives in the same shot hole surrounded by Continuous Reflectometry for Radius vs. Time Experiment (CORRTEX), Time of Arrival (TOA), Velocity of Detonation (VOD), down-hole accelerometers, surface accelerometers, infrasound, and a suite of seismic sensors of various frequency bands from the near field to the far field. This allows for the use of a single test bed in the simple geology case instead of multiple tests beds to obtain the same results. The shots are planned at various depths to obtain a Green’s function, scaled-depth of burial data, nominal depth of burial data and damage zone data. SPE1-N was conducted in May 2011 as a 220 lb (100 kg) TNT equivalent calibration shot at a depth of 180 ft (55 m). SPE2-N was conducted in October 2011 as a 2200 lb (1000 kg) TNT equivalent calibration shot at a depth of 150 ft (46 m). SPE3-N was conducted in July 2012 as a 2200 lb (1000 kg) TNT equivalent calibration shot at a depth of 150 ft (46 m) in the damaged zone. Over 400 data channels were recorded for each of these shots and data recovery was about 95% with high signal to noise ratio. Once the simple geology site data has been utilized, a new test bed will be developed in a complex geology site to test these physics based models. Ultimately, the results from this project will provide the next advances in the science of monitoring to enable a physics-based predicative capability.

  3. Determination of gadolinium in river water by SPE preconcentration and ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Hennebrder, Kristina; Wennrich, Rainer; Mattusch, Jrgen; Strk, Hans-Joachim; Engewald, Werner

    2004-05-28

    An analytical scheme was developed for the determination of Gd-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (Gd-DTPA), Gd and the other rare earth elements (REE) in river water by inductively coupled plasma (quadrupole) mass spectrometry (ICP-Q-MS). The preconcentration step was essential, since the limits of detection of this multielemental analytical technique are higher than the trace concentrations of the interesting elements in river water. Solid phase extraction (SPE) with different commercially available complexing agents (Chelex 100, Toyopearl and ethylhexylphosphates) was employed for the preconcentration of REE. The investigations revealed that complex stability (varying in dependence of the pH value) has a strong influence on the degree of the enrichment of Gd-DTPA. Based on acidified water samples (pH<3) a procedure using ethylhexylphosphates was proposed for the preconcentration of Gd and REE from surface water samples. For this purpose C(18)-cartridges loaded with ethylhexylphosphates were used, resulting in an enrichment factor of 40. PMID:18969433

  4. Utilising copper screen-printed electrodes (CuSPE) for the electroanalytical sensing of sulfide.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Bhawana; Bernalte, Elena; Smith, Jamie P; Foster, Christopher W; Linton, Patricia E; Sawant, Shilpa N; Banks, Craig E

    2016-02-01

    A mediatorless sulfide electrochemical sensing platform utilising a novel nanocopper-oxide screen-printed electrodes (CuSPE) is reported for the first time. The state-of-the-art screen-printed electrochemical sensors demonstrate their capability to quantify sulfide within both the presence and absence of an array of interferents with good levels of sensitivity and repeatability. The direct sensing (using linear sweep voltammetry) of sulfide utilising the CuSPEs provides a mediatorless approach for the detection of sulfide, yielding useful analytical signatures that can be successfully quantified. The proposed novel protocol using the CuSPEs is successfully applied to the sensing of sulfide within drinking water exhibiting a high level of recovery. PMID:26815001

  5. Signal processing to evaluate parameters affecting SPE for multi-residue analysis of personal care products.

    PubMed

    Pietrogrande, Maria Chiara; Basaglia, Giulia; Dondi, Francesco

    2009-05-01

    This paper discusses the development of a comprehensive method for the simultaneous analysis of personal care products (PCPs) based on SPE and GC-MS. The method was developed on 29 target compounds to represent PCPs belonging to different chemical classes: surfactants in detergents (alkyl benzenes), fragrances in cosmetics (nitro and polycyclic musks), antioxidants and preservatives (phenols), plasticizers (phthalates) displaying a wide range of volatility, polarity, water solubility. In addition to the conventional C(18) stationary phase, a surface modified styrene divinylbenzene polymeric phase (Strata X SPE cartridge) has been investigated as suitable for the simultaneous extraction of several PCPs with polar and non-polar characteristics. For both sorbents different solvent compositions and eluting conditions were tested and compared in order to achieve high extraction efficiency for as many sample components as possible. Comparison of the behavior of the two cartridges reveals that, overall, Strata-X provides better efficiency with extraction recovery higher than 70% for most of the PCPs investigated. The best results were obtained under the following operative conditions: an evaporation temperature of 40 degrees C, elution on Strata-X cartridge using a volume of 15 mL of ethyl acetate (EA) as solvent and operating with slow flow rate (-10 KPa). In addition to the conventional method based on peak integration, a chemometric approach based on the computation of the experimental autocovariance function (EACVF(tot)) was applied to the complex GC-MS signal: the percentage recovery and information on peak abundance distribution can be evaluated for each procedure step. The PC-based signal processing proved very helpful in assisting the development of the analytical procedure, since it saves labor and time and increases result reliability in handling GC complex signals. PMID:19399858

  6. Optimization of an SPE and GC/MS Method for Analyzing Endocrine Disrupting Compounds in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S. M.; Bodour, A.; Murray, K. E.

    2006-12-01

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) are compounds that interrupt hormonal functions in the body. The literature reports the presence of EDCs in all environmental matrices (air, water and soil) at concentrations of at least 1 nanogram/liter (ng/l), which may be high enough to induce adverse health effects. Therefore, reliable analytical methods for detecting trace amounts of EDCs in water is very important for investigating and controlling their concentrations in the environment. This study investigated a method for analyzing four known or suspected EDCs (chlorpyrifos, musk HHCB, diethyl phthalate, and butylated hydroxyanisole) in water samples. The analytical method was based on the USGS wastewater method developed by Zaugg et al. (2001), but modified, using solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. The EDCs were extracted using 60mg Water Oasis hydrophilic-lipophillic balance (HLB) extraction cartridges. The SPE efficiency was investigated by using different initial extraction volumes and different EDC concentrations. The lowest concentration was 1ng/l and the lowest extraction volume was 100mL. Results of the study indicate that the initial oven temperature conditions and rate of temperature increases affects the peak signal to noise ratio and the sample run-time in the GC/MS. An increase in gas flow rate did not show any significant changes and hence was maintained at 1ml/min. Preliminary data suggests that the percent recovery of the compounds obtained using this method either met or exceeded those presented by Zaugg et al. (2001) as the USGS wastewater method.

  7. Characteristics of Four SPE Classes According to Onset Timing and Proton Acceleration Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Roksoon

    2015-04-01

    In our previous work (Kim et al., 2015), we suggested a new classification scheme, which categorizes the SPEs into four groups based on association with flare or CME inferred from onset timings as well as proton acceleration patterns using multienergy observations. In this study, we have tried to find whether there are any typical characteristics of associated events and acceleration sites in each group using 42 SPEs from 1997 to 2012. We find: (i) if the proton acceleration starts from a lower energy, a SPE has a higher chance to be a strong event (> 5000 pfu) even if the associated flare and CME are not so strong. The only difference between the SPEs associated with flare and CME is the location of the acceleration site. For the former, the sites are very low ( ~1 Rs) and close to the western limb, while the latter has a relatively higher (mean=6.05 Rs) and wider acceleration sites. (ii) When the proton acceleration starts from the higher energy, a SPE tends to be a relatively weak event (< 1000 pfu), in spite of its associated CME is relatively stronger than previous group. (iii) The SPEs categorized by the simultaneous proton acceleration in whole energy range within 10 minutes, tend to show the weakest proton flux (mean=327 pfu) in spite of strong related eruptions. Their acceleration heights are very close to the locations of type II radio bursts. Based on those results, we suggest that the different characteristics of the four groups are mainly due to the different mechanisms governing the acceleration pattern and interval, and different condition such as the acceleration location.

  8. Application of Nanofiber-packed SPE for Determination of Urinary 1-Hydroxypyrene Level Using HPLC

    PubMed Central

    Ifegwu, Okechukwu Clinton; Anyakora, Chimezie; Chigome, Samuel; Torto, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    It is always desirable to achieve maximum sample clean-up, extraction, and pre-concentration with the minimum possible organic solvent. The miniaturization of sample preparation devices was successfully demonstrated by packing 10 mg of 11 electrospun polymer nanofibers into pipette tip micro column and mini disc cartridges for efficient pre-concentration of 1-hydroxypyrene in urine samples. 1-hydroxypyrene is an extensively studied biomarker of the largest class of chemical carcinogens. Excretory 1-hydroxypyrene was monitored with HPLC/fluorescence detector. Important parameters influencing the percentage recovery such as fiber diameter, fiber packing amount, eluent, fiber packing format, eluent volume, surface area, porosity, and breakthrough parameters were thoroughly studied and optimized. Under optimized condition, there was a near perfect linearity of response in the range of 1–1000 μg/L with a coefficient of determination (r2) between 0.9992 and 0.9999 and precision (% RSD) ≤7.64% (n = 6) for all the analysis (10, 25, and 50 μg/L). The Limit of detection (LOD) was between 0.022 and 0.15 μg/L. When compared to the batch studies, both disc packed nanofiber sorbents and pipette tip packed sorbents exhibited evident dominance based on their efficiencies. The experimental results showed comparable absolute recoveries for the mini disc packed fibers (84% for Nylon 6) and micro columns (80% for Nylon 6), although the disc displayed slightly higher recoveries possibly due to the exposure of the analyte to a larger reacting surface. The results also showed highly comparative extraction efficiencies between the nanofibers and conventional C-18 SPE sorbent. Nevertheless, miniaturized SPE devices simplified sample preparation, reducing back pressure, time of the analysis with acceptable reliability, selectivity, detection levels, and environmental friendliness, hence promoting green chemistry. PMID:24812483

  9. Application of Nanofiber-packed SPE for Determination of Urinary 1-Hydroxypyrene Level Using HPLC.

    PubMed

    Ifegwu, Okechukwu Clinton; Anyakora, Chimezie; Chigome, Samuel; Torto, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    It is always desirable to achieve maximum sample clean-up, extraction, and pre-concentration with the minimum possible organic solvent. The miniaturization of sample preparation devices was successfully demonstrated by packing 10 mg of 11 electrospun polymer nanofibers into pipette tip micro column and mini disc cartridges for efficient pre-concentration of 1-hydroxypyrene in urine samples. 1-hydroxypyrene is an extensively studied biomarker of the largest class of chemical carcinogens. Excretory 1-hydroxypyrene was monitored with HPLC/fluorescence detector. Important parameters influencing the percentage recovery such as fiber diameter, fiber packing amount, eluent, fiber packing format, eluent volume, surface area, porosity, and breakthrough parameters were thoroughly studied and optimized. Under optimized condition, there was a near perfect linearity of response in the range of 1-1000 μg/L with a coefficient of determination (r (2)) between 0.9992 and 0.9999 and precision (% RSD) ≤7.64% (n = 6) for all the analysis (10, 25, and 50 μg/L). The Limit of detection (LOD) was between 0.022 and 0.15 μg/L. When compared to the batch studies, both disc packed nanofiber sorbents and pipette tip packed sorbents exhibited evident dominance based on their efficiencies. The experimental results showed comparable absolute recoveries for the mini disc packed fibers (84% for Nylon 6) and micro columns (80% for Nylon 6), although the disc displayed slightly higher recoveries possibly due to the exposure of the analyte to a larger reacting surface. The results also showed highly comparative extraction efficiencies between the nanofibers and conventional C-18 SPE sorbent. Nevertheless, miniaturized SPE devices simplified sample preparation, reducing back pressure, time of the analysis with acceptable reliability, selectivity, detection levels, and environmental friendliness, hence promoting green chemistry. PMID:24812483

  10. In-line SPE-CE using a fritless bead string design--application for the analysis of organic sulfonates including inline SPE-CE-MS for APTS-labeled glycans.

    PubMed

    Joo, Kevin; Sommer, Johannes; Bunz, Svenja-Catharina; Neus, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Despite many advantages like high separation efficiency CE comprises the main limitation of low concentration sensitivity, when compared to HPLC. In-line SPE is an efficient way to increase concentration sensitivity. Here, a fritless in-line-SPE-CE-MS method was developed in order to analyze anions of strong acids. Mixed-mode (weak anion exchange and RP) particles were used for enrichment and an acidic BGE was applied for separation. Different particle and capillary sizes were tested. A novel bead string design with a 100 ?m id column filled with particles of 90 ?m followed by a separation capillary with 50 ?m id was easy to prepare and showed the best performance with respect to separation efficiency and reproducibility. Three aromatic sulfonic acids were employed in an in-line SPE-CE-UV approach for method development. Method validation was performed with respect to reproducibility, robustness, and linearity. Thereafter the method was transferred to SPE-CE-MS and applied to the analysis of glycans labeled with 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid. Lower limits of detection in the low nM range were achieved injecting about 10 ?L of sample. This corresponds to an enrichment factor of more than 800 compared to the corresponding CE-MS method without preconcentration. PMID:24170563

  11. Diabetic myonecrosis in a patient with hepatitis B-induced liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Su Min; Kim, You Jeong; Kim, Seung Man; Han, Na; Lee, Eun Ju; Kim, Tae Kyoon; Kim, Tae Nyun; Kwon, Min Jeong; Kim, Mi Kyung; Lee, Soon Hee; Park, Jeong Hyun; Rhee, Byung Doo; Kim, Bo Mi; Lee, Sun Joo

    2015-02-01

    Diabetic myonecrosis-a rare complication of long-standing, poorly controlled diabetes mellitus-typically presents with acute-onset muscle pain, is self-limiting, and responds well to conservative management. We report a case of diabetic myonecrosis in a 33-year-old man with hepatitis B-induced liver cirrhosis and type 2 diabetes who presented with abdominal distension and pain in the left thigh. Diabetic myonecrosis was diagnosed based on clinical presentation, radiological findings, magnetic resonance imaging and histopathological investigations; he was successfully treated conservatively with insulin and analgesics. Diabetic myonecrosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of muscle pain in patients with diabetes. PMID:25305801

  12. HybridSPE: A novel technique to reduce phospholipid-based matrix effect in LCESI-MS Bioanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Shafeeque; Kalra, Harsh; Gupta, Amit; Raut, Bharat; Hussain, Arshad; Rahman, Md. Akhlaquer

    2012-01-01

    When complex biological materials are analyzed without an adequate sample preparation technique, MS signal and response undergo significant alteration and result in poor quantification and assay. This problem generally takes place due to the presence of several endogenous materials component in samples. One of the major causes of ion suppression in bioanalysis is the presence of phospholipids during LC-MS analysis. The phospholipid-based matrix effect was investigated with a commercially available electro spray ionization (ESI) source coupled with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. HybridSPE dramatically reduced the levels of residual phospholipids in biological samples, leading to significant reduction in matrix effects. This new procedure that combines the simplicity of precipitation with the selectivity of SPE allows obtaining much cleaner extracts than with conventional procedures. HybridSPE-precipitation procedure provides significant improvement in bioanalysis and a practical and fast way to ensure the avoidance of phospholipids-based matrix effects. The present review outlines the HybridSPE technique to minimize phospholipids-based matrix effects on LCESI-MS bioanalysis. PMID:23248558

  13. Apoptosis in yeast.

    PubMed

    Madeo, Frank; Herker, Eva; Wissing, Silke; Jungwirth, Helmut; Eisenberg, Tobias; Frhlich, Kai-Uwe

    2004-12-01

    Apoptosis is a highly regulated cellular suicide program crucial for metazoan development. However, dysfunction of apoptosis also leads to several diseases. Yeast undergoes apoptosis after application of acetic acid, sugar- or salt-stress, plant antifungal peptides, or hydrogen peroxide. Oxygen radicals seem to be key elements of apoptotic execution, conserved during evolution. Furthermore, several yeast orthologues of central metazoan apoptotic regulators have been identified, such as a caspase and a caspase-regulating serine protease. In addition, physiological occurrence of cell death has been detected during aging and mating in yeast. The finding of apoptosis in yeast, other fungi and parasites is not only of great medical relevance but will also help to understand some of the still unknown molecular mechanisms at the core of apoptotic execution. PMID:15556039

  14. c-Abl mediates endothelial apoptosis induced by inhibition of integrins alphavbeta3 and alphavbeta5 and by disruption of actin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingying; Millard, Melissa; Ren, Xiuhai; Cox, Orla T; Erdreich-Epstein, Anat

    2010-04-01

    Inhibition of integrins alphavbeta3 and alphavbeta5 in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) by the function-blocking peptide RGDfV induces loss of spreading on vitronectin, cell detachment, and apoptosis. We demonstrate that cell detachment is not required for apoptosis because plating on bovine serum albumin-blocked poly-L-lysine (allows attachment, but not integrin ligation and cell spreading) also induced apoptosis. Latrunculin B (LatB), which inhibits F-actin polymerization, induced transient loss of HBMEC spreading on vitronectin, but not their detachment, and induced apoptosis despite recovery of cell spreading. However, LatB did not cause apoptosis in 5 tumor cell lines. In HBMECs, both LatB and RGDfV induced transient Y412 and Y245 phosphorylation of endogenous c-Abl, a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase that reciprocally regulates F-actin. LatB also induced nuclear translocation of c-Abl in HBMECs. STI-571 (imatinib), a targeted therapy for BCR-ABL1(+) leukemias and inhibitor of c-Abl, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and c-Kit, decreased endothelial apoptosis. LatB-induced HBMEC apoptosis, and its inhibition by STI-571 also occurred in a 3-dimensional collagen model, supporting physiologic relevance. Last, siRNA to c-Abl (but not nonspecific siRNA) also inhibited RGDfV- and LatB-induced apoptosis. Thus, endogenous c-Abl mediates endothelial apoptosis induced by inhibition of integrins alphavbeta3/alphavbeta5 or by LatB-induced disruption of F-actin. PMID:20124512

  15. Galangin (3,5,7-Trihydroxyflavone) Shields Human Keratinocytes from Ultraviolet B-Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Madduma Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Cha, Ji Won; Han, Xia; Choi, Yung Hyun; Chae, Sungwook; Hyun, Jin Won

    2015-01-01

    Most skin damage caused by ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation is owing to the generation of reactive oxygen species. Phytochemicals can act as antioxidants against UVB-induced oxidative stress. This study investigated the protective effects of the flavone galangin against UVB-induced oxidative damage in human keratinocytes. Galangin efficiently scavenged free radicals and reduced UVB-induced damage to cellular macromolecules, such as DNA, lipids, and proteins. Furthermore, galangin rescued cells undergoing apoptosis induced by UVB radiation via recovering mitochondrial polarization and down-regulating apoptotic proteins. These results showed that galangin protects human keratinocytes against UVB radiation-induced cellular damage and apoptosis via its antioxidant effects. PMID:25767685

  16. Simultaneous determination of most prescribed antibiotics in multiple urban wastewater by SPE-LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Rossmann, Julia; Schubert, Sara; Gurke, Robert; Oertel, Reinhard; Kirch, Wilhelm

    2014-10-15

    A rapid analytical method was developed for the application of a long-term monitoring (>one year) of the most prescribed and often in hospitals used antibiotics in diverse wastewaters of an urban sewage treatment plant (STP). Additionally to the selected multi-class antibiotics amoxicillin, penicillin V and piperacillin (penicillins), cefotaxime and cefuroxime (cephalosporins), azithromycin, clarithromycin and roxithromycin (macrolids), ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin-ofloxacin (fluoroquinolones), clindamycin (lincosamide), doxycycline (tetracycline), sulfamethoxazole (sulfonamide) and trimethoprim (dihydrofolate reductase inhibitor), the bioactive metabolite clindamycin-sulfoxide, the reserve antibiotic vancomycin (glycopeptide) and as tracer of the STP the anticonvulsant carbamazepine and the antifungal fluconazole were involved. The analytical method combines a low-sample-volume solid phase extraction (SPE), followed by a chromatographic separation using a reversed phase (RP) and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) technique, respectively, coupled to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Detection was performed with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) measured with positive electrospray ionization (ESI+). The extraction efficiency of different SPE cartridges and optimized pH-values of the preparation procedure were tested. Finally, the extraction of antibiotics was realized with the Oasis HLB cartridge and a pH adjustment at 3.5. An external calibration curve in diluted blank urine was used for quality control of the sample set of daily composite samples of the STP for the duration of one year monitoring. The squared coefficient of determination (r(2)) in the concentration range (20-20,000ng/L or 100-100,000ng/L) of the calibration curves for the method was higher than 0.99 for all determined substances. The limit of quantification (LoQ) ranged between 0.8ng/L (azithromycin) and 245.1ng/L (vancomycin). Furthermore, a standard addition was used for quantification in wastewater samples. The process efficiencies ranged from 20% (doxycycline) to 134% (cefuroxime) in influent samples and from 31% (doxycycline) to 171% (cefuroxime) in effluent samples of the STP. All selected substances have been found in wastewater samples. Cefuroxime, doxycycline, levofloxacin, piperacillin, sulfamethoxazole and carbamazepine showed highest concentrations up to 6.2μg/L. PMID:25171505

  17. [Estrogens determination of livestock dung based on UE-SPE-HPLC/FLD].

    PubMed

    Fu, Yin-Jie; Ling, Wan-Ting; Dong, Chang-Xun; Liu, Juan; Gao, Yan-Zheng; Pan, Yu-Lan

    2013-11-01

    A method for detecting the estrogens estriol, 17beta-estradiol, ethinyl estradiol, and bisphenol A in livestock dung was established by the combination of ultrasonic extraction (UE), solid phase extraction (SPE) purification, and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detector (FLD). The dung samples were extracted with ethyl acetate ultrasonication for 30 min, and purified with C18 solid phase extraction column and related solvents. The test four estrogens in the dung samples were isolated with Inertsil ODS-SP-C18 reversed-phase columns (150 mm x 4.6 mm, 5 microm), and the isolated estrogens were detected with HPLC/FLD. The mobile phase of HPLC for the detection was methanol/acetonitrile/water (volume ratio of 20:30:50), with a flow rate of 0.8 mL x min(-1). The excitation and emission wavelengths of FLD were 280 and 310 nm, respectively, the HPLC column temperature was 40 degrees C, and the injection volume was 20 microL. Good linearity (correlation coefficient greater than 0.9995) was observed by the HPLC/FLD detection when the test four estrogens concentrations were in the range of 1.00-1000.00 microg x L(-1). The detection limit of estriol, bisphenol A, 17beta-estradiol, and ethinyl estradiol was 3.35, 5.01, 2.13, and 1.12 microg x kg(-1), respectively. When the added estrogens concentrations of pig, cow, and chicken dung samples were 0.05, 0.40, and, 1.00 microg x kg(-1), the average recovery of the four estrogens was 75.1%-91.1%, 78.4%-117.0%, and 78.6%-97.8%, respectively, with the relatively standard deviations (RSD, n = 6) all less than 6%. By adopting the established SPE-HPLC/FLD method to detect the estrogens in real pig, cow, and chicken dung samples from parts of the large-scale livestock raising farms in Nanjing of East China, the detection reproducibility was high, and the detection limit was low, being available and effective for the detection of the estrogens in livestock dung. PMID:24564161

  18. NF-?B inducing kinase: a key regulator in the immune system and in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thu, Yee Mon; Richmond, Ann

    2010-01-01

    NF-?B inducing kinase (NIK) is a kinase that activates the canonical and non-canonical NF-?B pathways to control transcriptional expression of certain proteins such as cytokines, chemokines and NF-?B signaling molecules. Many advances have been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms by which the stability of NIK is regulated to affect downstream signaling. Genetic mouse models suggest that NIK has an essential role in regulation of the immune system as well as in the bone microenvironment. Increasing evidence links NIK to the tumorigenesis of hematological cancers, such as multiple myeloma, and solid tumors, such as pancreatic carcinoma and melanoma. Understanding the mechanism by which NIK is de-regulated will potentially provide therapeutic options for certain diseases such as autoimmunity and cancer. PMID:20685151

  19. NF-?B-inducing kinase is essential for B-cell maintenance in mice.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Matthias; Macht, Anna; Waisman, Ari; Hvelmeyer, Nadine

    2016-03-01

    NF-?B-inducing kinase (NIK) is a key mediator of the noncanonical NF-?B signaling pathway, which is critical for normal B-cell development and function. It is well established that the complete deletion of NIK in mice results in defective B cells and impaired secondary lymphoid organogenesis. To address the role of NIK deficiency specifically in B cells, we generated a new mouse strain for the conditional deletion of this kinase. Deletion of NIK during B-cell development results in a drastic reduction of mature B cells from the transitional 2 stage on, while B-1 B cells are less affected. Moreover, deletion of NIK in the germinal centers decreases the numbers of germinal center B cells and impairs the ability of NIK-deficient B cells to develop into class-switched cells in vivo. This new mouse strain will be helpful for studying the role of NIK in different cell types of the body. PMID:26593098

  20. Screening organic micropollutants in surface waters by SPE extraction and ecotoxicological testing.

    PubMed

    Galassi, Silvana; Guzzella, Licia; Croce, Valeria

    2004-03-01

    Complex mixtures of toxic substances occurring in surface waters are difficult to characterise by chemical analyses because each compound occurs at a very low concentration and requires a specific analytical method to be identified. Ecotoxicological tests on water extracts can be used as a screening tool to evaluate quickly and simply the overall quality of a water body with regard to micropollutant contamination. In this work, a pre-concentration procedure based on solid-phase extraction (SPE), suitable for both biological testing and analytical determination, is proposed. The extraction procedure is an improved version of a methodology used to evaluate the toxicity of organic micropollutants occurring in surface waters. It offers the advantage of using disposable commercial cartridges, which are easier to manage than the columns prepared with macromolecular resins. Water extracts from two representative Italian rivers, characterised by a different gradient of potential contamination and prepared according to the new concentration techniques, are used. The acute toxicity of the water extracts is tested on Daphnia magna and the bioluminescence inhibition in Vibrio fischeri. Criteria based on the concentration factor (CF) are proposed for assessing the hazard to aquatic life due to the exposure to toxic substances in surface waters. The aim of hazard ranking is to focus analytical efforts towards those samples that show the highest toxic potential. PMID:14675841

  1. Characterisation of antimicrobial extracts from dandelion root (Taraxacum officinale) using LC-SPE-NMR.

    PubMed

    Kenny, O; Brunton, N P; Walsh, D; Hewage, C M; McLoughlin, P; Smyth, T J

    2015-04-01

    Plant extracts have traditionally been used as sources of natural antimicrobial compounds, although in many cases, the compounds responsible for their antimicrobial efficacy have not been identified. In this study, crude and dialysed extracts from dandelion root (Taraxacum officinale) were evaluated for their antimicrobial properties against Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial strains. The methanol hydrophobic crude extract (DRE3) demonstrated the strongest inhibition of microbial growth against Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus and Bacillus cereus strains. Normal phase (NP) fractionation of DRE3 resulted in two fractions (NPF4 and NPF5) with enhanced antimicrobial activity. Further NP fractionation of NPF4 resulted in two fractions (NPF403 and NPF406) with increased antimicrobial activity. Further isolation and characterisation of compounds in NPF406 using liquid chromatography solid phase extraction nuclear magnetic resonance LC-SPE-NMR resulted in the identification of 9-hydroxyoctadecatrienoic acid and 9-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid, while the phenolic compounds vanillin, coniferaldehyde and p-methoxyphenylglyoxylic acid were also identified respectively. The molecular mass of these compounds was confirmed by LC mass spectroscopy (MS)/MS. In summary, the antimicrobial efficacy of dandelion root extracts demonstrated in this study support the use of dandelion root as a source of natural antimicrobial compounds. PMID:25644491

  2. An automated high-throughput SPE micro-elution method for perfluoroalkyl substances in human serum.

    PubMed

    Huber, Sandra; Brox, Jan

    2015-05-01

    An automated high-throughput solid phase extraction (SPE) micro-elution method for 8 perfluorosulfonic acids, 11 perfluorocarboxylic acids and fluorooctane sulfonamide in human serum was developed. Importance was attached to the application of small volumes of reagents and solvents in addition to low sample volumes (50 μL) in order to save the highly valuable sample material for follow-up and other studies. Instrumental analysis was performed by ultra high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). The recoveries of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) were satisfactory and between 70 and 120% for most of the compounds at the three investigated spike concentrations. Perfluorobutane sulfonate (PFBS) was slightly underestimated at high concentrations (20 ng/mL; 67%), whereas perfluoropentanoate (PFPA), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) were overestimated with 134, 131 and 133% respectively, at low spike concentrations (0.2 ng/mL). The precision of the method was below 20% coefficient of variation (CV%) for all target compounds with the only exception of PFOS (22%) at low spike concentrations. Method detection limits ranged from 0.006 to 0.34 ng/mL. High sensitivity, accuracy, repeatability and robustness have been demonstrated for an appropriate concentration range. The applicability for real samples was satisfactory demonstrated by analysis of 40 sera samples from the general population from Tromsø, Norway. PMID:25795026

  3. HPLC-F analysis of melatonin and resveratrol isomers in wine using an SPE procedure.

    PubMed

    Mercolini, Laura; Addolorata Saracino, Maria; Bugamelli, Francesca; Ferranti, Anna; Malaguti, Marco; Hrelia, Silvana; Raggi, Maria Augusta

    2008-04-01

    An original analytical method has been developed for the determination of the antioxidants trans-resveratrol (t-RSV) and cis-resveratrol (c-RSV) and of melatonin (MLT) in red and white wine. The method is based on HPLC coupled to fluorescence detection. Separation was obtained by using a RP column (C8, 150 mm x 4.6 mm id, 5 mum) and a mobile phase composed of 79% aqueous phosphate buffer at pH 3.0 and 21% ACN. Fluorescence intensity was monitored at lambda = 386 nm while exciting at lambda = 298 nm, mirtazapine was used as the internal standard. A careful pretreatment of wine samples was developed, using SPE with C18 cartridges (100 mg, 1 mL). The calibration curves were linear over the following concentration ranges: 0.03-5.00 ng/mL for MLT, 3-500 ng/mL for t-RSV and 1-150 ng/mL for c-RSV. The LOD values were 0.01 ng/mL for MLT, 1 ng/mL for t-RSV and 0.3 ng/mL for c-RSV. Precision data, as well as extraction yield and sample purification results, were satisfactory. Thus, the method seems to be suitable for the analysis of MLT and resveratrol isomers in wine samples. Moreover, wine total polyphenol content and antioxidant activity were evaluated. PMID:18338365

  4. Composition and evolution of Triton's icy surface between 2002-2014 from SpeX/IRTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holler, Bryan J.; Young, Leslie A.; Grundy, William M.; Olkin, Cathy B.

    2015-11-01

    We observed Triton in the near-infrared (0.7-2.5 ?m) over 63 nights using the SpeX instrument at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) between 2002 and 2014. Tritons spectrum has absorption features due to N2, CO, CH4, CO2, and H2O in this wavelength range. We calculated the equivalent width (or fractional band depth for H2O) of select absorption bands in each of the 63 night-averaged spectra. Longitudinal distributions for the volatile ices (N2, CO, CH4) show large rotational amplitude, while the non-volatile ices (CO2, H2O) show little amplitude over one Triton rotation. Absorption from N2 and CH4 increased over the period of the observations, whereas absorption from the non-volatile ices remained constant. The sub-solar latitude on Triton is currently at -42 degrees south, so some areas of Triton are visible for a full rotation. Combined with our findings, this suggests that the southern latitudes are dominated by non-volatile ices, with larger concentrations of volatile ices found in the observable region north of the equator. Changing viewing geometry over the period of the observations explains the increase in volatile absorption: As the sub-solar point moves northwards, more of the volatile-rich northern regions are coming directly into view. Geological evidence from Voyager 2 pointed to a southern hemisphere dominated by volatile ices; significant changes have occurred over the intervening quarter century.

  5. Speciation of inorganic tellurium from seawater by ICP-MS following magnetic SPE separation and preconcentration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chaozhang; Hu, Bin

    2008-03-01

    A new method was developed for the speciation of inorganic tellurium species in seawater by inductively coupled plasma-MS (ICP-MS) following selective magnetic SPE (MSPE) separation. Within the pH range of 2-9, tellurite (Te(IV)) could be quantitatively adsorbed on gamma-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (gamma-MPTMS) modified silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), while the tellurate (Te(VI)) was not retained and remained in solution. Without filtration or centrifugation, these tellurite-loaded MNPs could be separated easily from the aqueous solution by simply applying external magnetic field. The Te(IV) adsorbed on the MNPs could be recovered quantitatively using a solution containing 2 mol/L HCl and 0.03 mol/L K2Cr2O7. Te(VI) was reduced to Te(IV) by L-cysteine prior to the determination of total tellurium, and its assay was based on subtracting Te(IV) from total tellurium. The parameters affecting the separation were investigated systematically and the optimal separation conditions were established. Under the optimal conditions, the LOD obtained for Te(IV) was 0.079 ng/L, while the precision was 7.0% (C = 10 ng/L, n = 7). The proposed method was successfully applied to the speciation of inorganic tellurium in seawater. PMID:18275103

  6. Data Release Report for Source Physics Experiment 1 (SPE-1), Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, Margaret; Mercadente, Jennifer

    2014-04-28

    The first Source Physics Experiment shot (SPE-1) was conducted in May 2011. The explosive source was a ~100-kilogram TNT-equivalent chemical set at a depth of 60 meters. It was recorded by an extensive set of instrumentation that includes sensors both at near-field (less than 100 meters) and far-field (more than 100 meters) distances. The near-field instruments consisted of three-component accelerometers deployed in boreholes around the shot and a set of singlecomponent vertical accelerometers on the surface. The far-field network comprised a variety of seismic and acoustic sensors, including short-period geophones, broadband seismometers, three-component accelerometers, and rotational seismometers at distances of 100 meters to 25 kilometers. This report coincides with the release of these data for analysts and organizations that are not participants in this program. This report describes the first Source Physics Experiment and the various types of near-field and far-field data that are available.

  7. ACME encoded speG abrogates the unique hypersensitivity of Staphylococcus aureus to exogenous polyamines

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Gauri S.; Spontak, Jeffrey S.; Klapper, David G.; Richardson, Anthony R.

    2011-01-01

    Polyamines, including spermine (Spm) and spermidine (Spd), are aliphatic cations that are reportedly synthesized by all living organisms. They exert pleiotropic effects on cells and are required for efficient nucleic acid and protein synthesis. Here, we report that the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus lacks identifiable polyamine biosynthetic genes, and consequently produces no Spm/Spd or their precursor compounds putrescine and agmatine. Moreover, while supplementing defined medium with polyamines generally enhances bacterial growth, Spm and Spd exert bactericidal effects on S. aureus at physiologic concentrations. Small colony variants specifically lacking menaquinone biosynthesis arose after prolonged Spm exposure and exhibited reduced polyamine-sensitivity. However, other respiratory-defective mutants were no less susceptible to Spm implying menaquinone itself rather than general respiration is required for full Spm-toxicity. Polyamine hypersensitivity distinguishes S. aureus from other bacteria and is exhibited by all tested strains save those belonging to the USA-300 group of Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA). We identified one gene within the USA-300-specific Arginine Catabolic Mobile Element (ACME) encoding a Spm/Spd N-acetyltransferase that is necessary and sufficient for polyamine resistance. S. aureus encounters significant polyamine levels during infection, however the acquisition of ACME encoded speG allows USA-300 clones to circumvent polyamine-hypersensitivity, a peculiar trait of S. aureus. PMID:21902734

  8. Role of AtMSH7 in UV-B-induced DNA damage recognition and recombination.

    PubMed

    Lario, Luciana Daniela; Botta, Pablo; Casati, Paula; Spampinato, Claudia Patricia

    2015-06-01

    The mismatch repair (MMR) system maintains genome integrity by correcting replication-associated errors and inhibiting recombination between divergent DNA sequences. The basic features of the pathway have been highly conserved throughout evolution, although the nature and number of the proteins involved in this DNA repair system vary among organisms. Plants have an extra mismatch recognition protein, MutS?, which is a heterodimer: MSH2-MSH7. To further understand the role of MSH7 in vivo, we present data from this protein in Arabidopsis thaliana. First, we generated transgenic plants that express ?-glucuronidase (GUS) under the control of the MSH7 promoter. Histochemical staining of the transgenic plants indicated that MSH7 is preferentially expressed in proliferating tissues. Then, we identified msh7 T-DNA insertion mutants. Plants deficient in MSH7 show increased levels of UV-B-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers relative to wild-type (WT) plants. Consistent with the patterns of MSH7 expression, we next analysed the role of the protein during somatic and meiotic recombination. The frequency of somatic recombination between homologous or homeologous repeats (divergence level of 1.6%) was monitored using a previously described GUS recombination reporter assay. Disruption of MSH7 has no effect on the rates of somatic homologous or homeologous recombination under control conditions or after UV-B exposure. However, the rate of meiotic recombination between two genetically linked seed-specific fluorescent markers was 97% higher in msh7 than in WT plants. Taken together, these results suggest that MSH7 is involved in UV-B-induced DNA damage recognition and in controlling meiotic recombination. PMID:25465032

  9. The Development and Optimization of Techniques for Monitoring Water Quality on-Board Spacecraft Using Colorimetric Solid-Phase Extraction (C-SPE)

    SciTech Connect

    April Hill

    2007-12-01

    The main focus of this dissertation is the design, development, and ground and microgravity validation of methods for monitoring drinking water quality on-board NASA spacecraft using clorimetric-solid phase extraction (C-SPE). The Introduction will overview the need for in-flight water quality analysis and will detail some of the challenges associated with operations in the absence of gravity. The ability of C-SPE methods to meet these challenges will then be discussed, followed by a literature review on existing applications of C-SPE and similar techniques. Finally, a brief discussion of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy theory, which provides a means for analyte identification and quantification in C-SPE analyses, is presented. Following the Introduction, four research chapters are presented as separate manuscripts. Chapter 1 reports the results from microgravity testing of existing C-SPE methods and procedures aboard NASA's C-9 microgravity simulator. Chapter 2 discusses the development of a C-SPE method for determining the total concentration of biocidal silver (i.e., in both dissolved and colloidal forms) in water samples. Chapter 3 presents the first application of the C-SPE technique to the determination of an organic analyte (i.e., formaldehyde). Chapter 4, which is a departure from the main focus of the thesis, details the results of an investigation into the effect of substrate rotation on the kinetics involved in the antigen and labeling steps in sandwich immunoassays. These research chapters are followed by general conclusions and a prospectus section.

  10. Glutathione and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Circu, Magdalena L; Aw, Tak Yee

    2008-08-01

    Apoptosis or programmed cell death represents a physiologically conserved mechanism of cell death that is pivotal in normal development and tissue homeostasis in all organisms. As a key modulator of cell functions, the most abundant non-protein thiol, glutathione (GSH), has important roles in cellular defense against oxidant aggression, redox regulation of proteins thiols and maintaining redox homeostasis that is critical for proper function of cellular processes, including apoptosis. Thus, a shift in the cellular GSH-to-GSSG redox balance in favour of the oxidized species, GSSG, constitutes an important signal that could decide the fate of a cell. The current review will focus on three main areas: (1) general description of cellular apoptotic pathways, (2) cellular compartmentation of GSH and the contribution of mitochondrial GSH and redox proteins to apoptotic signalling and (3) role of redox mechanisms in the initiation and execution phases of apoptosis. PMID:18671159

  11. Glutathione and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Circu, Magdalena L.; Yee Aw, Tak

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis or programmed cell death represents a physiologically conserved mechanism of cell death that is pivotal in normal development and tissue homeostasis in all organisms. As a key modulator of cell functions, the most abundant non-protein thiol, glutathione (GSH), has important roles in cellular defense against oxidant aggression, redox regulation of proteins thiols and maintaining redox homeostasis that is critical for proper function of cellular processes, including apoptosis. Thus, a shift in the cellular GSH-to-GSSG redox balance in favour of the oxidized species, GSSG, constitutes an important signal that could decide the fate of a cell. The current review will focus on three main areas: (1) general description of cellular apoptotic pathways, (2) cellular compartmentation of GSH and the contribution of mitochondrial GSH and redox proteins to apoptotic signalling and (3) role of redox mechanisms in the initiation and execution phases of apoptosis. PMID:18671159

  12. Spaceflight Associated Apoptosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichiki, Albert T.; Gibson, Linda A.; Allebban, Zuhair

    1996-01-01

    Lymphoid tissues have been shown to atrophy in rats flown on Russian spaceflights. Histological examination indicated evidence for cell degradation. Lymphoid tissues from rats flown on Spacelab Life Sciences-2 mission were analyzed for apoptosis by evidence of fragmented lymphocytes, which could be engulfed by macrophages, or DNA strand breaks using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. Apoptosis was not detected in the thymus and spleen collected inflight or from the synchronous ground rats but was detected in the thymus, spleen and inguinal lymph node of the flight animals on recovery. These results indicate that the apoptosis observed in the lymphatic tissues of the rats on recovery could have been induced by the gravitational stress of reentry, corroborating the findings from the early space-flight observations.

  13. Apoptosis Versus Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Lanneau, David; de Thonel, Aurelie; Maurel, Sebastien; Didelot, Celine

    2007-01-01

    Heat shock proteins HSP27, HSP70 and HSP90 are molecular chaperones whose expression is increased after many different types of stress. They have a protective function helping the cell to cope with lethal conditions. The cytoprotective function of HSPs is largely explained by their anti-apoptotic function. HSPs have been shown to interact with different key apoptotic proteins. As a result, HSPs can block essentially all apoptotic pathways, most of them involving the activation of cystein proteases called caspases. Apoptosis and differentiation are physiological processes that share many common features, for instance, chromatin condensation and the activation of caspases are frequently observed. It is, therefore, not surprising that many recent reports imply HSPs in the differentiation process. This review will comment on the role of HSP90, HSP70 and HSP27 in apoptosis and cell differentiation. HSPs may determine de fate of the cells by orchestrating the decision of apoptosis versus differentiation. PMID:19164900

  14. Effects of schisandrin B pretreatment on tumor necrosis factor-? induced apoptosis and Hsp70 expression in mouse liver

    PubMed Central

    Ip, Siu-Po; Che, Chun-Tao; Kong, Yun-Cheung; Ko, Kam-Ming

    2001-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF?) could cause apoptosis in hepatic tissue of d-galactosamine sensitized mice, as evidenced by the increase in the extent of DNA fragmentation. The hepatic apoptosis induced by TNF? was associated with hepatocellular damage as assessed by plasma alanine aminotransferase activity. Schisandrin B (Sch B) pretreatment at daily doses ranging from 0.5 to 2 mmol/kg for 3 days caused a dose-dependent protection against TNF?-induced apoptosis in mice. The hepatoprotection was accompanied by a parallel reduction in the extent of hepatocellular damage. The same Sch B pretreatment regimens increased hepatic Hsp70 level in a dose-dependent manner. The relevance of Sch Binduced increase in Hsp70 expression to the prevention of TNF?-triggered hepatic apoptosis remains to be elucidated. PMID:11525242

  15. Effects of schisandrin B pretreatment on tumor necrosis factor-alpha induced apoptosis and Hsp70 expression in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Ip, S P; Che, C T; Kong, Y C; Ko, K M

    2001-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) could cause apoptosis in hepatic tissue of D-galactosamine sensitized mice, as evidenced by the increase in the extent of DNA fragmentation. The hepatic apoptosis induced by TNFalpha was associated with hepatocellular damage as assessed by plasma alanine aminotransferase activity. Schisandrin B (Sch B) pretreatment at daily doses ranging from 0.5 to 2 mmol/kg for 3 days caused a dose-dependent protection against TNFalpha-induced apoptosis in mice. The hepatoprotection was accompanied by a parallel reduction in the extent of hepatocellular damage. The same Sch B pretreatment regimens increased hepatic Hsp70 level in a dose-dependent manner. The relevance of Sch B-induced increase in Hsp70 expression to the prevention of TNFalpha-triggered hepatic apoptosis remains to be elucidated. PMID:11525242

  16. CORRTEX Diagnostic Deployment for the SPE-III experiment, 24 July 2012: Fielding Report and Preliminary Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, Thomas D.; Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.

    2012-08-29

    The Continuous Reflectometry for Radius vs Time Experiments (CORRTEX) diagnostic system was deployed for the third explosives test in the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) sequence to monitor and verify several conditions of the experiment including the detonation velocity of the explosive package and functioning of explosive initiators. Six distance-marked coaxial cables were installed on the SPE-III explosives canister, and key locations documented through along-cable length measurements and photography. CORRTEX uses electrical-pulse time-domain reflectometry to continuously record the two-way transit time (TWTT) of the cables. As the shock front of the detonation advances, the coaxial cable is shorted or destroyed, and the resulting TWTT also decreases. Interpretation of these changes as a function of TWTT can be converted to positional measurements using known parameters of the cables.

  17. Unc93b Induces Apoptotic Cell Death and Is Cleaved by Host and Enteroviral Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Katharine G.; Coyne, Carolyn B.

    2015-01-01

    Unc93b is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident transmembrane protein that serves to bind and traffic toll-like receptors (TLRs) from the ER to their appropriate subcellular locations for ligand sensing. Because of its role in TLR trafficking, Unc93b is necessary for an effective innate immune response to coxsackievirus B3 (CVB), a positive-sense single stranded RNA virus belonging to the enterovirus family. Here, we show that Unc93b is cleaved by a CVB-encoded cysteine protease (3Cpro) during viral replication. Further, we define a role for Unc93b in the induction of apoptotic cell death and show that expression of wild-type Unc93b, but not a mutant incapable of binding TLRs or exiting the ER (H412R), induces apoptosis. Furthermore, we show that cellular caspases activated during apoptosis directly cleave Unc93b. Interestingly, we show that the 3Cpro- and caspase-mediated cleavage of Unc93b both occur within ten amino acids in the distal N-terminus of Unc93b. Mechanistically, neither caspase-mediated nor 3Cpro-mediated cleavage of Unc93b altered its trafficking function, inhibited its role in facilitating TLR3 or TLR8 signaling, or altered its apoptosis-inducing effects. Taken together, our studies show that Unc93b is targeted by both viral- and host cell-specific proteases and identify a function of Unc93b in the induction of apoptotic cell death. PMID:26509685

  18. Colorimetric-Solid Phase Extraction Technology for Water Quality Monitoring: Evaluation of C-SPE and Debubbling Methods in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazen-Bosveld, April; Lipert, Robert J.; Nordling, John; Shih, Chien-Ju; Siperko, Lorraine; Porter, Marc D.; Gazda, Daniel B.; Rutz, Jeff A.; Straub, John E.; Schultz, John R.; McCoy, J. Torin

    2007-01-01

    Colorimetric-solid phase extraction (C-SPE) is being developed as a method for in-flight monitoring of spacecraft water quality. C-SPE is based on measuring the change in the diffuse reflectance spectrum of indicator disks following exposure to a water sample. Previous microgravity testing has shown that air bubbles suspended in water samples can cause uncertainty in the volume of liquid passed through the disks, leading to errors in the determination of water quality parameter concentrations. We report here the results of a recent series of C-9 microgravity experiments designed to evaluate manual manipulation as a means to collect bubble-free water samples of specified volumes from water sample bags containing up to 47% air. The effectiveness of manual manipulation was verified by comparing the results from C-SPE analyses of silver(I) and iodine performed in-flight using samples collected and debubbled in microgravity to those performed on-ground using bubble-free samples. The ground and flight results showed excellent agreement, demonstrating that manual manipulation is an effective means for collecting bubble-free water samples in microgravity.

  19. Forward Genetics Identifies a Requirement for the Izumo-like Immunoglobulin Superfamily spe-45 Gene in Caenorhabditis elegans Fertilization.

    PubMed

    Singaravelu, Gunasekaran; Rahimi, Sina; Krauchunas, Amber; Rizvi, Anam; Dharia, Sunny; Shakes, Diane; Smith, Harold; Golden, Andy; Singson, Andrew

    2015-12-21

    Fertilization is a conserved process in all sexually reproducing organisms whereby sperm bind and fuse with oocytes. Despite the importance of sperm-oocyte interactions in fertilization, the molecular underpinnings of this process are still not well understood. The only cognate ligand-receptor pair identified in the context of fertilization is sperm-surface Izumo and egg-surface Juno in the mouse [1]. Here we describe a genetic screening strategy to isolate fertilization mutants in Caenorhabditis elegans in order to generate a more complete inventory of molecules required for gamete interactions. From this screening strategy, we identified, cloned, and characterized spe-45, a gene that encodes an Izumo-like immunoglobulin superfamily protein. Mammalian Izumo is required for male fertility and has the same basic mutant phenotype as spe-45. Worms lacking spe-45 function produce morphologically normal and motile sperm that cannot fuse with oocytes despite direct contact in the reproductive tract. The power of this screen to identify proteins with ancient sperm functions suggests that characterization of additional mutants from our screen may reveal other deeply conserved components in fertility pathways and complement studies in other organisms. PMID:26671668

  20. Solid-phase Extraction and Purification of Membrane Proteins Using a UV-modified PMMA Microfluidic Bioaffinity ?SPE Device

    PubMed Central

    Battle, Katrina N.; Jackson, Joshua M.; Witek, Ma?gorzata A.; Hupert, Mateusz L.; Hunsucker, Sally A.; Armistead, Paul M.; Soper, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel microfluidic solid-phase extraction (?SPE) device for the affinity enrichment of biotinylated membrane proteins from whole cell lysates. The device offers features that address challenges currently associated with the extraction and purification of membrane proteins from whole cell lysates, including the ability to release the enriched membrane protein fraction from the extraction surface so that they are available for downstream processing. The extraction bed was fabricated in PMMA using hot embossing and was comprised of 3,600 micropillars. Activation of the PMMA micropillars by UV/O3 treatment permitted generation of surface-confined carboxylic acid groups and the covalent attachment of NeutrAvidin onto the ?SPE device surfaces, which was used to affinity select biotinylated MCF-7 membrane proteins directly from whole cell lysates. The inclusion of a disulfide linker within the biotin moiety permitted release of the isolated membrane proteins via DTT incubation. Very low levels (~20 fmol) of membrane proteins could be isolated and recovered with ~89% efficiency with a bed capacity of 1.7 pmol. Western blotting indicated no traces of cytosolic proteins in the membrane protein fraction as compared to significant contamination using a commercial detergent-based method. We highlight future avenues for enhanced extraction efficiency and increased dynamic range of the ?SPE device using computational simulations of different micropillar geometries to guide future device designs. PMID:24487280

  1. Analysis of drugs of abuse by online SPE-LC high resolution mass spectrometry: communal assessment of consumption.

    PubMed

    Heuett, Nubia V; Ramirez, Cesar E; Fernandez, Adolfo; Gardinali, Piero R

    2015-04-01

    An online SPE-LC-HRMS method was developed to monitor the consumption of 18 drugs of abuse (DOAs) including amphetamines, opioids, cocainics, cannabinoids, lysergics, and their corresponding metabolites in a well characterized college campus setting via wastewater analysis. Filtered and diluted (10×) sewage water samples (5 mL inj.) were automatically pre-concentrated and analyzed in 15 min using a Thermo EQuan MAX online SPE system equipped with a HyperSep™ Retain PEP (20×2.1 mm×12 μm) SPE column and a Hypersil Gold™ aQ (150×2.1 mm×3 μm) analytical column. A Q Exactive™ Hybrid Quadrupole-Orbitrap HRMS was used in full scan mode (R=140,000) for positive identification, and quantitation of target compounds. Method detection limits for all analytes ranged between 0.6 and 1.7 ng/L in sewage. A total of 14 DOAs were detected from two different locations (dorms and main college campus) within a one-year period. Most frequently detected drugs throughout the entire study were amphetamine (>96%) and THC's metabolite 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ-9-THC (>100%) with maximum concentrations of 5956 and 2413 ng/L respectively. Daily doses per 1000 people were determined in order to assess consumption of THC, amphetamine, heroin and cocaine, in both dorms and main campus. PMID:25553546

  2. Arrestins in Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kook, Seunghyi; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.; Gurevich, Eugenia V.

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death (apoptosis) is a coordinated set of events eventually leading to the massive activation of specialized proteases (caspases) that cleave numerous substrates, orchestrating fairly uniform biochemical changes than culminate in cellular suicide. Apoptosis can be triggered by a variety of stimuli, from external signals or growth factor withdrawal to intracellular conditions, such as DNA damage or ER stress. Arrestins regulate many signaling cascades involved in life-or-death decisions in the cell, so it is hardly surprising that numerous reports document the effects of ubiquitous nonvisual arrestins on apoptosis under various conditions. Although these findings hardly constitute a coherent picture, with the same arrestin subtypes, sometimes via the same signaling pathways, reported to promote or inhibit cell death, this might reflect real differences in pro- and antiapoptotic signaling in different cells under a variety of conditions. Recent finding suggests that one of the nonvisual subtypes, arrestin-2, is specifically cleaved by caspases. Generated fragment actively participates in the core mechanism of apoptosis: it assists another product of caspase activity, tBID, in releasing cytochrome C from mitochondria. This is the point of no return in committing vertebrate cells to death, and the aspartate where caspases cleave arrestin-2 is evolutionary conserved in vertebrate, but not in invertebrate arrestins. In contrast to wild-type arrestin-2, its caspase-resistant mutant does not facilitate cell death. PMID:24292837

  3. Analysis of cannabis in oral fluid specimens by GC-MS with automatic SPE.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyeyoung; Baeck, Seungkyung; Kim, Eunmi; Lee, Sooyeun; Jang, Moonhee; Lee, Juseon; Choi, Hwakyung; Chung, Heesun

    2009-12-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is the most commonly abused drug in Korea, followed by cannabis. Traditionally, MA analysis is carried out on both urine and hair samples and cannabis analysis in urine samples only. Despite the fact that oral fluid has become increasingly popular as an alternative specimen in the field of driving under the influence of drugs (DUID) and work place drug testing, its application has not been expanded to drug analysis in Korea. Oral fluid is easy to collect and handle and can provide an indication of recent drug abuse. In this study, we present an analytical method using GC-MS to determine tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and its main metabolite 11-nor-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH) in oral fluid. The validated method was applied to oral fluid samples collected from drug abuse suspects and the results were compared with those in urine. The stability of THC and THC-COOH in oral fluid stored in different containers was also investigated. Oral fluid specimens from 12 drug abuse suspects, submitted by the police, were collected by direct expectoration. The samples were screened with microplate ELISA. For confirmation they were extracted using automated SPE with mixed-mode cation exchange cartridge, derivatized and analyzed by GC-MS using selective ion monitoring (SIM). The concentrations ofTHC and THC-COOH in oral fluid showed a large variation and the results from oral fluid and urine samples from cannabis abusers did not show any correlation. Thus, detailed information about time interval between drug use and sample collection is needed to interpret the oral fluid results properly. In addition, further investigation about the detection time window ofTHC and THC-COOH in oral fluid is required to substitute oral fluid for urine in drug testing. PMID:20120601

  4. The SpeX Prism Library Analysis Toolkit: Design Considerations and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgasser, Adam J.; Aganze, Christian; Escala, Ivana; Lopez, Mike; Choban, Caleb; Jin, Yuhui; Iyer, Aishwarya; Tallis, Melisa; Suarez, Adrian; Sahi, Maitrayee

    2016-01-01

    Various observational and theoretical spectral libraries now exist for galaxies, stars, planets and other objects, which have proven useful for classification, interpretation, simulation and model development. Effective use of these libraries relies on analysis tools, which are often left to users to develop. In this poster, we describe a program to develop a combined spectral data repository and Python-based analysis toolkit for low-resolution spectra of very low mass dwarfs (late M, L and T dwarfs), which enables visualization, spectral index analysis, classification, atmosphere model comparison, and binary modeling for nearly 2000 library spectra and user-submitted data. The SpeX Prism Library Analysis Toolkit (SPLAT) is being constructed as a collaborative, student-centered, learning-through-research model with high school, undergraduate and graduate students and regional science teachers, who populate the database and build the analysis tools through quarterly challenge exercises and summer research projects. In this poster, I describe the design considerations of the toolkit, its current status and development plan, and report the first published results led by undergraduate students. The combined data and analysis tools are ideal for characterizing cool stellar and exoplanetary atmospheres (including direct exoplanetary spectra observations by Gemini/GPI, VLT/SPHERE, and JWST), and the toolkit design can be readily adapted for other spectral datasets as well.This material is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant No. NNX15AI75G. SPLAT code can be found at https://github.com/aburgasser/splat.

  5. Optimization of a pre-MEKC separation SPE procedure for steroid molecules in human urine samples.

    PubMed

    Ol?dzka, Ilona; Kowalski, Piotr; Dziomba, Szymon; Szmudanowski, Piotr; B?czek, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Many steroid hormones can be considered as potential biomarkers and their determination in body fluids can create opportunities for the rapid diagnosis of many diseases and disorders of the human body. Most existing methods for the determination of steroids are usually time- and labor-consuming and quite costly. Therefore, the aim of analytical laboratories is to develop a new, relatively low-cost and rapid implementation methodology for their determination in biological samples. Due to the fact that there is little literature data on concentrations of steroid hormones in urine samples, we have made attempts at the electrophoretic determination of these compounds. For this purpose, an extraction procedure for the optimized separation and simultaneous determination of seven steroid hormones in urine samples has been investigated. The isolation of analytes from biological samples was performed by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) with dichloromethane and compared to solid phase extraction (SPE) with C18 and hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) columns. To separate all the analytes a micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECK) technique was employed. For full separation of all the analytes a running buffer (pH 9.2), composed of 10 mM sodium tetraborate decahydrate (borax), 50 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and 10% methanol was selected. The methodology developed in this work for the determination of steroid hormones meets all the requirements of analytical methods. The applicability of the method has been confirmed for the analysis of urine samples collected from volunteers--both men and women (students, amateur bodybuilders, using and not applying steroid doping). The data obtained during this work can be successfully used for further research on the determination of steroid hormones in urine samples. PMID:24232737

  6. Apoptosis: future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ward, Carol; Rossi, Adriano G; Haslett, Christopher; Dransfield, Ian

    2003-01-01

    The field of apoptosis has expanded to include research in almost all subject areas of cell biology. Despite this growth, there are still many unanswered questions, some of which are fundamental to the development of therapeutic strategies. Most importantly, the underlying mechanisms involved in conferring specificity of apoptotic signals must be determined. This will allow the development of treatments to delete injured or transformed cells and minimize damage to other tissues. Such information is also necessary to combat degenerative diseases, to prevent critical loss of cells. In addition, it would be of therapeutic benefit to selectively induce apoptosis in specific cells where removal of unwanted cells is required (e.g. tumour cells in malignant tissue or inflammatory cells responsible for tissue damage in chronic inflammatory disease). Therefore we have to understand how the full complement of signalling pathways, and survival and apoptotic proteins determine the end effect of an apoptotic signal. Apoptotic cells are known to functionally influence phagocytes that ingest them, but little is known of the effect of apoptosis on neighbouring cells or of signals generated during the apoptotic process itself. Although the processes of mitosis and apoptosis would appear to be diametrically opposed, cell-cycle proteins are involved in apoptosis, and may be able to influence cell-death mechanisms; conversely, proliferation may be caspase-dependent in some cells. Further study is necessary to discover how these pathways are interlinked since such knowledge would be particularly useful in cancer treatment. The link between pathogen-survival strategies and apoptotic mechanisms will also reward further work. Viruses, in particular, exploit cellular survival and death pathways for replication purposes and may represent a targeting approach for specific treatments. PMID:14585080

  7. Geologic Assessment of the Damage Zone from the Second Test at Source Physics Experiment-Nevada (SPE-N)

    SciTech Connect

    ,

    2012-09-18

    The National Center for Nuclear Security (NCNS), established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, is conducting a series of explosive tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS; formerly the Nevada Test Site) that are designed to increase the understanding of certain basic physical phenomena associated with underground explosions. These tests will aid in developing technologies that might be used to detect underground nuclear explosions in support of verification activities for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The initial NCNS project is a series of explosive tests, known collectively as the Source Physics Experiment at the NNSS (SPE-N), being conducted in granitic rocks at the Climax stock in northern Yucca Flat. The SPE-N test series is designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves. The data will be used to improve the predictive capability of calculational models for detecting and characterizing underground explosions. The first SPE-N test (SPE-N-1) was a calibration shot conducted in May 2011, using 100 kilograms (kg) of explosives at the depth of 54.9 meters (m) (180 feet [ft]) in the U-15n source hole. SPE-N-2 was conducted in October 2011, using 1,000 kg of explosives at the depth of 45.7 m (150 ft) in the same source hole. Following the SPE-N-2 test, the core hole U-15n#10 was drilled at an angle from the surface to intercept the SPE-N-2 shot point location to obtain information necessary to characterize the damage zone. The desire was to determine the position of the damage zone near the shot point, at least on the northeast side, where the core hole penetrated it. The three-dimensional shape and symmetry of the damage zone are unknown at this time. Rather than spherical in shape, the dimensions of the damage zone could be influenced by the natural fracture sets in the vicinity. Geologic characterization of the borehole included geophysical logging, a directional survey, and geologic description of the core to document visual evidence of damage. Selected core samples were provided to Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for laboratory tests (to be reported by SNL). A significant natural fault zone was encountered in the U-15n#10 angle core hole between the drilled depths of 149 and 155 ft (straight-line distance or range station [RS] from the shot point of 7.5 to 5.7 m). However, several of the fractures observed in the U-15n#10 hole are interpreted as having been caused by the explosion. These fractures are characterized by a fresh, mechanically broken look, with uncoated and very irregular surfaces. They tend to terminate against natural fractures and have orientations that differ from the previously defined natural fracture sets. The most distant fracture from the shot point that could be interpreted as having been caused by the explosion was seen at approximately RS 10.0 m. No other possibly explosion-induced fractures are apparent above the fault, but are common starting at RS 5.4 m, which is below the fault. It is unknown how the fault zone might have affected the propagation of seismic waves or how the materials in the fault zone (altered granite, breccia, gouge) were affected by the explosion. From RS 3.3 m to the end of the recovered core at RS 1.6 m, some of the core samples are softer and lighter in color, but do not appear to be weathered. It is thought this could be indicative of the presence of distributed microfracturing.

  8. MicroRNA-125b induces tau hyperphosphorylation and cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Banzhaf-Strathmann, Julia; Benito, Eva; May, Stephanie; Arzberger, Thomas; Tahirovic, Sabina; Kretzschmar, Hans; Fischer, André; Edbauer, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent form of dementia, but no clear disease-initiating mechanism is known. Aβ deposits and neuronal tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated tau are characteristic for AD. Here, we analyze the contribution of microRNA-125b (miR-125b), which is elevated in AD. In primary neurons, overexpression of miR-125b causes tau hyperphosphorylation and an upregulation of p35, cdk5, and p44/42-MAPK signaling. In parallel, the phosphatases DUSP6 and PPP1CA and the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-W are downregulated as direct targets of miR-125b. Knockdown of these phosphatases induces tau hyperphosphorylation, and overexpression of PPP1CA and Bcl-W prevents miR-125b-induced tau phosphorylation, suggesting that they mediate the effects of miR-125b on tau. Conversely, suppression of miR-125b in neurons by tough decoys reduces tau phosphorylation and kinase expression/activity. Injecting miR-125b into the hippocampus of mice impairs associative learning and is accompanied by downregulation of Bcl-W, DUSP6, and PPP1CA, resulting in increased tau phosphorylation in vivo. Importantly, DUSP6 and PPP1CA are also reduced in AD brains. These data implicate miR-125b in the pathogenesis of AD by promoting pathological tau phosphorylation. PMID:25001178

  9. Brevenal inhibits pacific ciguatoxin-1B-induced neurosecretion from bovine chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Csar; Wen, Peter J; Nguyen-Huu, Truong D; Alvarez, Martha; Benoit, Evelyne; Bourdelais, Andrea J; Lewis, Richard J; Baden, Daniel G; Molg, Jordi; Meunier, Frdric A

    2008-01-01

    Ciguatoxins and brevetoxins are neurotoxic cyclic polyether compounds produced by dinoflagellates, which are responsible for ciguatera and neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP) respectively. Recently, brevenal, a natural compound was found to specifically inhibit brevetoxin action and to have a beneficial effect in NSP. Considering that brevetoxin and ciguatoxin specifically activate voltage-sensitive Na+ channels through the same binding site, brevenal has therefore a good potential for the treatment of ciguatera. Pacific ciguatoxin-1B (P-CTX-1B) activates voltage-sensitive Na+ channels and promotes an increase in neurotransmitter release believed to underpin the symptoms associated with ciguatera. However, the mechanism through which slow Na+ influx promotes neurosecretion is not fully understood. In the present study, we used chromaffin cells as a model to reconstitute the sequence of events culminating in ciguatoxin-evoked neurosecretion. We show that P-CTX-1B induces a tetrodotoxin-sensitive rise in intracellular Na+, closely followed by an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ responsible for promoting SNARE-dependent catecholamine secretion. Our results reveal that brevenal and beta-naphtoyl-brevetoxin prevent P-CTX-1B secretagogue activity without affecting nicotine or barium-induced catecholamine secretion. Brevenal is therefore a potent inhibitor of ciguatoxin-induced neurotoxic effect and a potential treatment for ciguatera. PMID:18941627

  10. Brevenal Inhibits Pacific Ciguatoxin-1B-Induced Neurosecretion from Bovine Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mattei, Csar; Alvarez, Martha; Benoit, Evelyne; Bourdelais, Andrea J.; Lewis, Richard J.; Baden, Daniel G.; Molg, Jordi; Meunier, Frdric A.

    2008-01-01

    Ciguatoxins and brevetoxins are neurotoxic cyclic polyether compounds produced by dinoflagellates, which are responsible for ciguatera and neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP) respectively. Recently, brevenal, a natural compound was found to specifically inhibit brevetoxin action and to have a beneficial effect in NSP. Considering that brevetoxin and ciguatoxin specifically activate voltage-sensitive Na+ channels through the same binding site, brevenal has therefore a good potential for the treatment of ciguatera. Pacific ciguatoxin-1B (P-CTX-1B) activates voltage-sensitive Na+ channels and promotes an increase in neurotransmitter release believed to underpin the symptoms associated with ciguatera. However, the mechanism through which slow Na+ influx promotes neurosecretion is not fully understood. In the present study, we used chromaffin cells as a model to reconstitute the sequence of events culminating in ciguatoxin-evoked neurosecretion. We show that P-CTX-1B induces a tetrodotoxin-sensitive rise in intracellular Na+, closely followed by an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ responsible for promoting SNARE-dependent catecholamine secretion. Our results reveal that brevenal and ?-naphtoyl-brevetoxin prevent P-CTX-1B secretagogue activity without affecting nicotine or barium-induced catecholamine secretion. Brevenal is therefore a potent inhibitor of ciguatoxin-induced neurotoxic effect and a potential treatment for ciguatera. PMID:18941627

  11. Ram ion scattering caused by space shuttle v times B induced differential charging

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, I.; Davis, V.A. )

    1987-08-01

    Observations of secondary, high-inclination ions streams have been reported in the literature. The authors of these previous papers attributed the source of the secondary ions to a disturbed region in the plasma about 10 m form the space shuttle Orbiter. A new theory has been developed which shows how v {times} B induces differential charging on the plasma diagnostics package (PDP) can scatter the ram ion flux. Some of these ions are reflected back to the PDP and may be the source of the observed ion distributions. The effect is unique to large spacecraft; it occurs only when the magnitude of the induced v {times} B potentials are much larger than the electron thermal energy and of the order of the ion ram energy. That the ion streams observed at large angles must have been reflected from the PDP surface is demonstrated with three-dimensional sheath and particle trajectory calculations using the low earth orbit version of the NASA Charging Analyzer Program (NASCAP/LEO).

  12. MicroRNA-125b induces tau hyperphosphorylation and cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Banzhaf-Strathmann, Julia; Benito, Eva; May, Stephanie; Arzberger, Thomas; Tahirovic, Sabina; Kretzschmar, Hans; Fischer, Andr; Edbauer, Dieter

    2014-08-01

    Sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent form of dementia, but no clear disease-initiating mechanism is known. A? deposits and neuronal tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated tau are characteristic for AD. Here, we analyze the contribution of microRNA-125b (miR-125b), which is elevated in AD. In primary neurons, overexpression of miR-125b causes tau hyperphosphorylation and an upregulation of p35, cdk5, and p44/42-MAPK signaling. In parallel, the phosphatases DUSP6 and PPP1CA and the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-W are downregulated as direct targets of miR-125b. Knockdown of these phosphatases induces tau hyperphosphorylation, and overexpression of PPP1CA and Bcl-W prevents miR-125b-induced tau phosphorylation, suggesting that they mediate the effects of miR-125b on tau. Conversely, suppression of miR-125b in neurons by tough decoys reduces tau phosphorylation and kinase expression/activity. Injecting miR-125b into the hippocampus of mice impairs associative learning and is accompanied by downregulation of Bcl-W, DUSP6, and PPP1CA, resulting in increased tau phosphorylation in vivo. Importantly, DUSP6 and PPP1CA are also reduced in AD brains. These data implicate miR-125b in the pathogenesis of AD by promoting pathological tau phosphorylation. PMID:25001178

  13. Expression of NF-?B-inducing kinase in breast carcinoma tissue and its clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuliang; Wang, Yong; Mao, Zheyu; Huang, Danqing; Zhou, Junwei; Wang, Xudong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of nuclear factor-?B-inducing kinase (NIK) in breast carcinoma tissue and tumor-adjacent normal breast tissue and evaluate its clinical significance. Methods: Surgically resected tissue specimens were collected from 82 patients with breast carcinoma who underwent surgical treatment at our hospital from March 2001 to December 2009. The diagnoses of all patients were confirmed by postoperative pathological examinations. NIK protein expression in breast carcinoma tissue and adjacent normal breast tissue was detected by immunohistochemistry; the association between NIK expression and the clinicopathological features and prognosis of patients with breast carcinoma was examined. Results: The positive expression rate of NIK in breast carcinoma tissue was significantly higher than that in normal tissue (63.4% vs. 25.6%, P < 0.05). Additionally, NIK expression showed no relationship to the tumor size, age, degree of differentiation, or pathological type; however, it showed a significant correlation with lymph node metastasis and the clinical stage of patients (P < 0.05). The five-year survival rate was significantly lower in breast carcinoma patients who were positive for NIK expression than in those who were negative for NIK expression (P = 0.006). Conclusion: NIK expression was significantly increased in the tumor tissue of patients with breast carcinoma, which may be an important factor that affects the prognosis of these patients. PMID:26823811

  14. Role of WNT7B-induced Noncanonical Pathway in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Dali; Decker, Keith F.; Zhou, Tianhua; Chen, Jianquan; Qi, Zongtai; Jacobs, Kathryn; Weilbaecher, Katherine N.; Corey, Eva; Long, Fanxin; Jia, Li

    2014-01-01

    Advanced prostate cancer is characterized by incurable castration-resistant progression and osteoblastic bone metastasis. While androgen deprivation therapy remains the primary treatment for advanced prostate cancer, resistance inevitably develops. Importantly, mounting evidence indicates that androgen receptor (AR) signaling continues to play a critical role in the growth of advanced prostate cancer despite androgen deprivation. While the mechanisms of aberrant AR activation in advanced prostate cancer have been extensively studied, the downstream AR target genes involved in the progression of castration resistance are largely unknown. Here, we identify WNT7B as a direct AR target gene highly expressed in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cells. Our results show that expression of WNT7B is necessary for the growth of prostate cancer cells and that this effect is enhanced under androgen-deprived conditions. Further analyses reveal that WNT7B promotes androgen-independent growth of CRPC cells likely through the activation of protein kinase C isozymes. Our results also show that prostate cancer-produced WNT7B induces osteoblast differentiation in vitro through a direct cell–cell interaction, and that WNT7B is upregulated in human prostate cancer xenografts that cause an osteoblastic reaction when grown in bone. Taken together, these results suggest that AR-regulated WNT7B signaling is critical for the growth of CRPC and development of the osteoblastic bone response characteristic of advanced prostate cancer. PMID:23386686

  15. Protective effect of fucoxanthin isolated from Sargassum siliquastrum on UV-B induced cell damage.

    PubMed

    Heo, Soo-Jin; Jeon, You-Jin

    2009-05-01

    Fucoxanthin is a carotenoid isolated from Sargassum siliquastrum and is considered to be one of major active compound of marine algae. In this study, we investigated and confirmed the protective effect of fucoxanthin on UV-B induced cell injury in human fibroblast via 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA), 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), and comet assays. Intracellular ROS generated by exposure to UV-B radiation, which was significantly decreased by addition with various concentrations of fucoxanthin. Cell survival rate was increased with fucoxanthin pre-treated cells, which was reached around 81.47% at 100 microM, and the inhibitory effect of cell damage exhibited dose-dependent manner. Moreover, fucoxanthin having protective properties was demonstrated via Hoechst 33342/PI staining. Hence, on the basis of the above-mentioned studies, fucoxanthin has the ability to protect against oxidative stress induced by UV-B radiation and which might be applied to antioxidant and cosmeceutical industries. PMID:19264501

  16. Contribution of reactive oxygen species to UV-B-induced damage in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Santos, Ana L; Gomes, Newton C M; Henriques, Isabel; Almeida, Adelaide; Correia, Antnio; Cunha, ngela

    2012-12-01

    The present work aimed to identify the reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced during UV-B exposure and their biochemical targets, in a set of bacterial isolates displaying different UV susceptibilities. For that, specific exogenous ROS scavengers (catalase/CAT, superoxide dismutase/SOD, sodium azide and mannitol) were used. Biological effects were assessed from total bacterial number, colony counts and heterotrophic activity (glucose uptake and respiration). DNA strand breakage, ROS generation, oxidative damage to proteins and lipids were used as markers of oxidative stress. Sodium azide conferred a statistically significant protection in terms of lipid oxidation and cell survival, suggesting that singlet oxygen might play an important role in UV-B induced cell inactivation. Mannitol exerted a significant protection against DNA strand breakage and protein carbonylation, assigning hydroxyl radicals to DNA and protein damage. The addition of exogenous CAT and SOD significantly protected the capacity for glucose uptake and respiration, suggesting that superoxide and H(2)O(2) are involved in the impairment of activity during UV-B exposure. The observation that amendment with ROS scavengers can sometimes also exert a pro-oxidant effect suggests that the intracellular oxidant status of the cell ultimately determines the efficiency of antioxidant defenses. PMID:23026387

  17. Ram ion scattering caused by Space Shuttle v x B induced differential charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, I.; Davis, V. A.

    1987-01-01

    Observations of secondary, high-inclination ions streams have been reported in the literature. The authors of these previous papers attributed the source of the secondary ions to a disturbed region in the plasma about 10 m from the Space Shuttle Orbiter. A new theory has been developed which shows how v x B induced differential charging on the plasma diagnostics package (PDP) can scatter the ram ion flux. Some of these ions are reflected back to the PDP and may be the sorce of the observed ion distributions. The effect is unique to large spacecraft; it occurs only when the magnitude of the induced v x B potentials are much larger than the electron thermal energy and of the order of the ion ram energy. That the ion streams observed at large angles must have been reflected from the PDP surface is demonstrated with three-dimensional sheath and particle trajectory calculations using the low earth orbit version of the NASA Charging Analyzer Program (NASCAP/LEO).

  18. Identification of an epithelial cell receptor responsible for Clostridium difficile TcdB-induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    LaFrance, Michelle E; Farrow, Melissa A; Chandrasekaran, Ramyavardhanee; Sheng, Jinsong; Rubin, Donald H; Lacy, D Borden

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea in the United States. The two main virulence factors of C. difficile are the large toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which enter colonic epithelial cells and cause fluid secretion, inflammation, and cell death. Using a gene-trap insertional mutagenesis screen, we identified poliovirus receptor-like 3 (PVRL3) as a cellular factor necessary for TcdB-mediated cytotoxicity. Disruption of PVRL3 expression by gene-trap mutagenesis, shRNA, or CRISPR/Cas9 mutagenesis resulted in resistance of cells to TcdB. Complementation of the gene-trap or CRISPR mutants with PVRL3 resulted in restoration of TcdB-mediated cell death. Purified PVRL3 ectodomain bound to TcdB by pull-down. Pretreatment of cells with a monoclonal antibody against PVRL3 or prebinding TcdB to PVRL3 ectodomain also inhibited cytotoxicity in cell culture. The receptor is highly expressed on the surface epithelium of the human colon and was observed to colocalize with TcdB in both an explant model and in tissue from a patient with pseudomembranous colitis. These data suggest PVRL3 is a physiologically relevant binding partner that can serve as a target for the prevention of TcdB-induced cytotoxicity in C. difficile infection. PMID:26038560

  19. Identification of an epithelial cell receptor responsible for Clostridium difficile TcdB-induced cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    LaFrance, Michelle E.; Farrow, Melissa A.; Chandrasekaran, Ramyavardhanee; Sheng, Jinsong; Rubin, Donald H.; Lacy, D. Borden

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea in the United States. The two main virulence factors of C. difficile are the large toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which enter colonic epithelial cells and cause fluid secretion, inflammation, and cell death. Using a gene-trap insertional mutagenesis screen, we identified poliovirus receptor-like 3 (PVRL3) as a cellular factor necessary for TcdB-mediated cytotoxicity. Disruption of PVRL3 expression by gene-trap mutagenesis, shRNA, or CRISPR/Cas9 mutagenesis resulted in resistance of cells to TcdB. Complementation of the gene-trap or CRISPR mutants with PVRL3 resulted in restoration of TcdB-mediated cell death. Purified PVRL3 ectodomain bound to TcdB by pull-down. Pretreatment of cells with a monoclonal antibody against PVRL3 or prebinding TcdB to PVRL3 ectodomain also inhibited cytotoxicity in cell culture. The receptor is highly expressed on the surface epithelium of the human colon and was observed to colocalize with TcdB in both an explant model and in tissue from a patient with pseudomembranous colitis. These data suggest PVRL3 is a physiologically relevant binding partner that can serve as a target for the prevention of TcdB-induced cytotoxicity in C. difficile infection. PMID:26038560

  20. Integrated solid-phase extraction-capillary liquid chromatography (speLC) interfaced to ESI-MS/MS for fast characterization and quantification of protein and proteomes.

    PubMed

    Falkenby, Lasse Gaarde; Such-Sanmartín, Gerard; Larsen, Martin R; Vorm, Ole; Bache, Nicolai; Jensen, Ole N

    2014-12-01

    The high peptide sequencing speed provided by modern hybrid tandem mass spectrometers enables the utilization of fast liquid chromatographic (LC) separation techniques. We present a robust solid-phase extraction/capillary LC system (speLC) for 5-10 min separation of semicomplex peptide mixtures prior to ESI-MS/MS for peptide sequencing. This speLC-MS/MS system eliminates sample-to-sample carry-over by using disposable micropipette solid-phase extraction tips (StageTips) for peptide sample loading, concentration, and desalting. Automated analysis of 192 replicates of E. coli peptide mixtures in 30 h demonstrated the throughput, stability, and reproducibility of the system. The speLC-MS/MS system detected low-femtomole amounts of peptides and allowed sequencing of 1 μg of HeLa cells protein extracts at a rate of ∼ 90 peptides/min, identifying more than 1500 peptides (>500 proteins) in a 10 min speLC-MS/MS experiment. Analysis by selected reaction monitoring by speLC-SRM-MS/MS of distinct peptides derived from the blood proteins IGF1, IGF2, IBP2, and IBP3 demonstrated protein quantification with CV values below 10% across 96 replicates. The speLC-MS/MS system is ideally suited for fast screening and characterization of large numbers of peptide-containing samples in biological, biomedical, and clinical laboratories. PMID:25277625

  1. Mechanisms of Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Savitskaya, M A; Onishchenko, G E

    2015-11-01

    Nearly 15 types of programmed cell death (PCD) have been identified to date. Among them, apoptosis is the most common and well-studied type of PCD. In this review, we discuss different apoptotic pathways in which plasma membrane and membrane organelles, such as mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, lysosomes, and nucleus play the pivotal role. Data concerning caspase cascades involved in these mechanisms are described. Various apoptosis induction mechanisms are analyzed and compared. The close relations between them and the possibility of switching from one pathway to another are demonstrated. In most cases, the result of these pathways is mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and/or caspase activation. These two events are closely linked and serve as the central point of integration of the apoptotic cell death pathways. PMID:26615431

  2. Mortalin, Apoptosis, and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Londono, Carolina; Osorio, Cristina; Gama, Vivian; Alzate, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    Mortalin is a highly conserved heat-shock chaperone usually found in multiple subcellular locations. It has several binding partners and has been implicated in various functions ranging from stress response, control of cell proliferation, and inhibition/prevention of apoptosis. The activity of this protein involves different structural and functional mechanisms, and minor alterations in its expression level may lead to serious biological consequences, including neurodegeneration. In this article we review the most current data associated with mortalins binding partners and how these protein-protein interactions may be implicated in apoptosis and neurodegeneration. A complete understanding of the molecular pathways in which mortalin is involved is important for the development of therapeutic strategies for cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24970131

  3. Apoptosis and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, R S; Manolagas, S C

    2000-02-01

    During normal bone remodeling, the rate of supply of new osteoblasts and osteoclasts and the timing of the death of osteoclasts, osteoblasts, and osteocytes by apoptosis are critical determinants of the initiation of new BMUs and the extension or reduction of the lifetime of existing ones. Disruption of the fine balance among these processes may be an important mechanism behind the deranged bone turnover found in most metabolic disorders of the adult skeleton. Like most armies, the amount 5 of work done by bone cells is far more dependent on numbers than vigor. Therapeutic agents that alter the prevalence of apoptosis of osteoblasts and osteoclasts can correct the imbalance in cell numbers that is the basis of the diminished bone mass and increased risk of fractures in osteoporosis. PMID:11126309

  4. Preparation of malathion MIP-SPE and its application in environmental analysis.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Hai Gen; Zhu, Jian Xin; Zhan, Chun Rui; Shi, Lei; Xing, Ming; Guo, Ping; Ding, Yuan; Yang, Hong

    2015-07-01

    Malathion is an organophosphorous insecticide for controlling insects on fruits and vegetables, miscellaneous household insects, and animal parasites. It is important to develop highly efficient and selective pre-treatment method for analyzing malathion residues in environment and samples from agricultural products based on the molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). In this study, we developed a tailor-made MIP method with highly specific recognization to the template. The MIPs were prepared using malathion as a template, methacrylic acid (MAA) as a functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as a crosslinker, azodiisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as an initiator, and the acetonitrile-chloroform (1:1, v/v) as a porogen. The molecular recognization mechanism of malathion and MAA was evaluated by molecular simulation, ultraviolet spectrometry (UV), and (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR). MAA interacted specifically with malathion by hydrogen bond with a ratio of 2:1. The MIPs exhibit a high affinity, recognition specificity, and efficient adsorption performance for malathion. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), surface area and porosimeter analyzer, thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyzer (TG/DTA) were used to characterize the properties of MIP. The malathion residues in soil, tap water, and cabbage were cleaned up by MIP-SPE, detected quantitatively using GC-FPD, and confirmed by GC-MS/MS. The limits of tap water, soil, and cabbage were confined to 0.001 mg L(-1), 0.004 and 0.004 mg kg(-1), respectively. The spiked recoveries of malathion were 96.06-111.49% (with RSD being 5.7-9.2%), 98.13-103.83% (RSD, 3.5-8.7%), and 84.94-93.69% (RSD, 4.7-5.8%) for tap water, soil, and cabbage samples, respectively. Thus, the method developed here can be used effectively in assessing malathion residues in multiple environmental samples. The aim of the study was to provide an efficient, selective, and accurate method for analyzing malathion at trace levels in multiple media. PMID:26038320

  5. IRTF/SpeX NIR Emission Spectra of WASP-1b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemhard, Heather; Creech-Eakman, M.; Deroo, P. D.; Zhao, M.

    2011-05-01

    Of the more than 500 known exoplanets, the detailed chemical composition of only a handful of exoplanet atmospheres is known. We endeavor to remedy this imbalance by using ground-based spectroscopy, which has been demonstrated to reliably reproduce space-based results (Swain et al., Nature 463, 2010) while obtaining new and unexpected information. Our IRTF/SpeX SXD (0.8-2.4 micron cross-dispersed) observations of two secondary eclipses of the exoplanet WASP-1b, obtained September and October 2010, will be used to accomplish two main goals: first, to extend the application of exoplanet ground-based spectroscopy to a wider range of targets than are presently characterized; and second, to probe the temperature structure and begin to characterize the composition of the dayside of the atmosphere. We will show our data reduction steps and initial results based on the reduction method introduced by the Exospec team (Swain et al., Nature 463, 2010) WASP-1b is a 1.44±0.04 RJ, 0.89±0.11 MJ exoplanet in a 2.52 day orbit around its parent star (Cameron et al., MNRAS 375, 2007; Charbonneau et al., ApJ 638, 2007). It has a very low density, which puts it in a group of highly irradiated hot-Jupiters with overly inflated radii known as pM class exoplanets. Theory predicts that we should expect to find a thermal inversion, as well as evidence of H2O and CO (Fortney et al., ApJ, 678, 2008). However, the reason for the inflated radii of these exoplanets is still a matter of great debate (Miller et al., ApJ 702, 2009; Spiegel et al., ApJ 699, 2009; Madhusudhan & Seager, ApJ 725, 2010; Guillot, A&A 520, 2010); determining the structure and composition of the atmospheres of this class of exoplanets may help us sort among competing theories as to the structure and source of the inflated radius.

  6. Discrete and continuum simulations of near-field ground motion from Source Physics Experiments (SPE) (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzedine, S. M.; Vorobiev, O.; Herbold, E. B.; Glenn, L. A.; Antoun, T.

    2013-12-01

    This work is focused on analysis of near-field measurements (up to 100 m from the source) recorded during Source Physics Experiments in a granitic formation. One of the main goals of these experiments is to investigate the possible mechanisms of shear wave generation in the nonlinear source region. SPE experiments revealed significant tangential motion (up to 30 % of the magnitude in the radial direction) at many locations. Furthermore, azimuthal variations in radial velocities were also observed which cannot be generated by a spherical source in isotropic materials. Understanding the nature of this non-radial motion is important for discriminating between the natural seismicity and underground explosions signatures. Possible mechanisms leading to such motion include, but not limited to, heterogeneities in the rock such as joints, faults and geologic layers as well as surface topography and vertical motion at the surface caused by material spall and gravity. We have performed a three dimensional computational studies considering all these effects. Both discrete and continuum methods have been employed to model heterogeneities. In the discrete method, the joints and faults were represented by cohesive contact elements. This enables us to examine various friction laws at the joints which include softening, dilatancy, water saturation and rate-dependent friction. Yet this approach requires the mesh to be aligned with joints, which may present technical difficulties in three dimensions when multiple non-persistent joints are present. In addition, the discrete method is more computationally expensive. The continuum approach assumes that the joints are stiff and the dilatancy and shear softening can be neglected. In this approach, the joints are modeled as weakness planes within the material, which are imbedded into and pass through many finite elements. The advantage of this approach is that it requires neither sophisticated meshing algorithms nor contact detection algorithm. It is also suitable for evaluating the bounds of possible shear motion due to uncertainties in the joints distribution. Details of this uncertainty quantification study are presented in a separate abstract (Vorobiev, et.al). In the present work using both the continuum and the discrete approaches we study the effects of the surface spall, in-situ stress and joint orientation on the observed near-field motion. Three dimensional numerical simulations are performed for different burial depths and yields to investigate scalability of both radial and shear motions. The motion calculated in the near-field is then propagated into a far field. Results of the far field study are presented in an accompanied work (Pitarka, et al). This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. NF-?B inducing kinase (NIK) modulates melanoma tumorigenesis by regulating expression of pro-survival factors through the ?-catenin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Thu, Yee Mon; Su, Yingjun; Yang, Jinming; Splittgerber, Ryan; Na, Songqing; Boyd, Alan; Mosse, Claudio; Simons, Christopher; Richmond, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) inducing kinase (NIK) is a MAP3K that regulates the activation of NF-?B. NIK is often highly expressed in tumor cells, including melanoma, but the significance of this in melanoma progression has been unclear. Tissue microarray analysis of NIK expression reveals that dysplastic nevi (n=22), primary (n=15) and metastatic melanoma (n=13) lesions showed a statistically significant elevation in NIK expression when compared to benign nevi (n=30). Moreover, when shRNA techniques were used to knock-down NIK, the resultant NIK-depleted melanoma cell lines exhibited decreased proliferation, increased apoptosis, and reduced tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. As expected, when NIK was depleted there was decreased activation of the non-canonical NF-?B pathway, while canonical NF-?B activation remained intact. NIK depletion also resulted in reduced expression of genes that contribute to tumor growth, including CXCR4, c-MYC and c-MET, and pro-survival factors such as BCL2 and survivin. These changes in gene expression are not fully explained by the attenuation of the non-canonical NF-?B pathway. Shown here for the first time is the demonstration that NIK modulates ?-catenin mediated transcription to promote expression of survivin. NIK-depleted melanoma cells exhibited down-regulation of survivin as well as other ?-catenin regulated genes including c-MYC, c-MET and CCND2. These data indicate that NIK mediates both ?-catenin and NF-?B regulated transcription to modulate melanoma survival and growth. Thus, NIK may be a promising therapeutic target for melanoma. PMID:21963849

  8. UV-BInduced DNA Damage and Repair in the Mouse Lens

    PubMed Central

    Mesa, Rosana; Bassnett, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Epidemiologic studies have linked UV-B exposure to development of cortical cataracts, but the underlying molecular mechanism(s) is unresolved. Here, we used a mouse model to examine the nature and distribution of DNA photolesions produced by ocular UV-B irradiation. Methods. Anesthetized mice, eye globes, or isolated lenses were exposed to UV-B. Antibodies specific for 6-4 photoproducts (6-4 PPs) or cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) were used to visualize DNA adducts. Results. Illumination of intact globes with UV-Binduced 6-4 PP and CPD formation in cells of the cornea, anterior iris, and central lens epithelium. Photolesions were not detected in retina or lens cells situated in the shadow of the iris. Photolesions in lens epithelial cells were produced with radiant exposures significantly below the minimal erythemal dose. Lens epithelial cells rapidly repaired 6-4 PPs, but CPD levels did not markedly diminish, even over extended postirradiation recovery periods in vitro or in vivo. The repair of 6-4 PPs did not depend on the proliferative activity of the epithelial cells, since the repair rate in the mitotically-active germinative zone (GZ) was indistinguishable from that of quiescent cells in the central epithelium. Conclusions. Even relatively modest exposures to UV-B produced 6-4 PP and CPD photolesions in lens epithelial cells. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer lesions were particularly prevalent and were repaired slowly if at all. Studies on sun-exposed skin have established a causal connection between photolesions and so-called UV-signature mutations. If similar mechanisms apply in the lens, it suggests that somatic mutations in lens epithelial cells may contribute to the development of cortical cataracts. PMID:24022010

  9. Ganglioside GQ1b induces dopamine release through the activation of Pyk2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhao; Chu, Shi-Feng; Mou, Zheng; Gao, Yan; Wang, Zhen-Zhen; Wei, Gui-Ning; Chen, Nai-Hong

    2016-03-01

    Growing evidence indicates that GQ1b, one of the gangliosides members, contributes to synaptic transmission and synapse formation. Previous studies have shown that GQ1b could enhance depolarization induced neurotransmitter release, while the role of GQ1b in asynchronous release is still largely unknown. Here in our result, we found low concentration of GQ1b, but not GT1b or GD1b (which were generated from GQ1b by plasma membrane-associated sialidases), evoked asynchronous dopamine (DA) release from both clonal rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells and rat striatal slices significantly. The release peaked at 2min after GQ1b exposure, and lasted for more than 6min. This effect was caused by the enhancement of intracellular Ca(2+) and the activation of Pyk2. Inhibition of Pyk2 by PF-431396 (a dual inhibitor of Pyk2 and FAK) or Pyk2 siRNA abolished DA release induced by GQ1b. Moreover, Pyk2 Y402, but not other tyrosine site, was phosphorylated at the peaking time. The mutant of Pyk2 Y402 (Pyk2-Y402F) was built to confirm the essential role of Y402 activation. Further studies revealed that activated Pyk2 stimulated ERK1/2 and p-38, while only the ERK1/2 activation was indispensable for GQ1b induced DA release, which interacted with Synapsin I directly and led to its phosphorylation, then depolymerization of F-actin, thus contributed to DA release. In conclusion, low concentration of GQ1b is able to enhance asynchronous DA release through Pyk2/ERK/Synapsin I/actin pathway. Our findings provide new insights into the role of GQ1b in neuronal communication, and implicate the potential application of GQ1b in neurological disorders. PMID:26704905

  10. NGFI-B targets mitochondria and induces cardiomyocyte apoptosis in restraint-stressed rats by mediating energy metabolism disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wang, XinXing; Liu, XiaoHua; Kong, RuiRui; Zhan, Rui; Wang, XiaoMing; Leng, Xue; Gong, JingBo; Duan, Meng; Wang, LiQun; Wu, Lei

    2009-01-01

    NGFI-B/Nur77/TR3, originally identified as an immediate-early gene rapidly induced by serum and growth factors, is a member of the steroid hormone nuclear receptor superfamily with no identified endogenous ligand. NGFI-B induces apoptosis in a number of cell lineages exposed to proapoptotic stimuli by directly targeting the mitochondria, inducing cytochrome c release. The present study was designed to determine the role of NGFI-B in cardiomyocytes of restraint-stressed rats. The NGFI-B content was increased in mitochondria and reduced in plasma as apoptosis increased. Analysis showed that NGFI-B induces cardiomyocyte apoptosis in restraint-stressed rats by mediating mitochondrial energy metabolism disorder. Several novel mitochondrial proteins, which correlate with NGFI-B, were reported in cardiomyocyte apoptosis of restraint-stressed rats. Five proteins associated with NGFI-B participate directly in mitochondrial energy metabolism. Studies of mitochondrial respiratory efficiency and ATP synthase activity strongly support the findings. These results provide significant information for comprehensively understanding the cellular mechanism of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:19412742

  11. Simple SPE-HPLC determination of some common drugs and herbicides of environmental concern by pulsed amperometry.

    PubMed

    Rivoira, L; De Carlo, R M; Cavalli, S; Bruzzoniti, M C

    2015-01-01

    In this work the electrochemical behavior of substances of environmental concern [bentazone, atrazine, carbamazepine, phenytoin and its metabolite 5-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5-phenylhydantoin, HPPH] on a glassy carbon working electrode (Ag/AgCl reference electrode) was studied with the aim to develop a HPLC method coupled with amperometric detection. Constant potential (DC), pulsed amperometric detection modes were studied. For the pulsed mode, several waveforms were set and investigated. Detection conditions were optimized as a function of eluent pH. In order to reduce the limits of detection and to analyze natural water samples, a SPE protocol was optimized to be coupled to the developed procedure. For this aim, five sorbents of different physico-chemical characteristics were tested optimizing a recovery procedure for each of the cartridge evaluated. At the optimized SPE conditions, recoveries were included in the range (R=90.2-100.5% for all the analytes, with excellent reproducibility (<%, n=3). The method detection limits obtained by pulsed amperometry after the SPE protocol (preconcentration factor 100) were 113 ng L(-1) (0.47 nmol L(-1)), 67 ng L(-1) (0.25 nmol L(-1)), 234 ng L(-1) (1.1 nmol L(-1)), for bentazone, HPPH and carbamazepine, respectively. Robustness of the method was assessed for each analyte at a concentration level corresponding to about three times the limit of detection, through the evaluation of intra-day (n=13) and inter-day tests (4 days, n=52). Finally the method was successfully applied for the analysis of a river sample (Po River, Turin, Italy). PMID:25281094

  12. Use of two SPE-GC/MS methods for field isolation and quantitation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Furlong, E.T.; Koleis, J.C.; Gates, P.M.

    1995-12-31

    Increasing sensitivity and subsequently improving method-detection limits for a variety of organic contaminant compounds is an ongoing effort in environmental analytical chemistry. Several field-deployable isolation techniques have been developed for concentrating hydrophobic organic contaminants from large (> 1 liter) volumes of aqueous samples. The capacity of large-volume solid-phase extraction (LV-SPE) was used as part of a simple, efficient, field-operable technique for isolating microgram-per-liter to nanogram-per-liter quantities of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in 4- to 8-liter ground-water samples from a petroleum- contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minn.

  13. Development of colorimetric solid Phase Extraction (C-SPE) for in-flight Monitoring of spacecraft Water Supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Bryan Gazda

    2004-12-19

    Although having recently been extremely successful gathering data on the surface of Mars, robotic missions are not an effective substitute for the insight and knowledge about our solar system that can be gained though first-hand exploration. Earlier this year, President Bush presented a ''new course'' for the U.S. space program that shifts NASA's focus to the development of new manned space vehicles to the return of humans to the moon. Re-establishing the human presence on the moon will eventually lead to humans permanently living and working in space and also serve as a possible launch point for missions into deeper space. There are several obstacles to the realization of these goals, most notably the lack of life support and environmental regeneration and monitoring hardware capable of functioning on long duration spaceflight. In the case of the latter, past experience on the International Space Station (ISS), Mir, and the Space Shuttle has strongly underscored the need to develop broad spectrum in-flight chemical sensors that: (1) meet current environmental monitoring requirements on ISS as well as projected requirements for future missions, and (2) enable the in-situ acquisition and analysis of analytical data in order to further define on-orbit monitoring requirements. Additionally, systems must be designed to account for factors unique to on-orbit deployment such as crew time availability, payload restrictions, material consumption, and effective operation in microgravity. This dissertation focuses on the development, ground testing, and microgravity flight demonstration of Colorimetric Solid Phase Extraction (C-SPE) as a candidate technology to meet the near- and long-term water quality monitoring needs of NASA. The introduction will elaborate further on the operational and design requirements for on-orbit water quality monitoring systems by discussing some of the characteristics of an ''ideal'' system. A description of C-SPE and how the individual components of the platform are combined to satisfy many of these requirements is then presented, along with a literature review on the applications of C-SPE and similar sorption-spectrophotometric techniques. Finally, a brief overview of diffuse reflection spectroscopy and the Kubelka-Munk function, which are used to quantify analytes via C-SPE, is presented.

  14. Crystal structure of the streptococcal superantigen SpeI and functional role of a novel loop domain in T cell activation by group V superantigens.

    PubMed

    Brouillard, Jean-Nicholas P; Gnther, Sebastian; Varma, Ashok K; Gryski, Irene; Herfst, Christine A; Rahman, A K M Nur-ur; Leung, Donald Y M; Schlievert, Patrick M; Madrenas, Joaqun; Sundberg, Eric J; McCormick, John K

    2007-04-01

    Superantigens (SAgs) are potent microbial toxins that bind simultaneously to T cell receptors (TCRs) and class II major histocompatibility complex molecules, resulting in the activation and expansion of large T cell subsets and the onset of numerous human diseases. Within the bacterial SAg family, streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin I (SpeI) has been classified as belonging to the group V SAg subclass, which are characterized by a unique, relatively conserved approximately 15 amino acid extension (amino acid residues 154 to 170 in SpeI; herein referred to as the alpha3-beta8 loop), absent in SAg groups I through IV. Here, we report the crystal structure of SpeI at 1.56 A resolution. Although the alpha3-beta8 loop in SpeI is several residues shorter than that of another group V SAg, staphylococcal enterotoxin serotype I, the C-terminal portions of these loops, which are located adjacent to the putative TCR binding site, are structurally similar. Mutagenesis and subsequent functional analysis of SpeI indicates that TCR beta-chains are likely engaged in a similar general orientation as other characterized SAgs. We show, however, that the alpha3-beta8 loop length, and the presence of key glycine residues, are necessary for optimal activation of T cells. Based on Vbeta-skewing analysis of human T cells activated with SpeI and structural models, we propose that the alpha3-beta8 loop is positioned to form productive intermolecular contacts with the TCR beta-chain, likely in framework region 3, and that these contacts are required for optimal TCR recognition by SpeI, and likely all other group V SAgs. PMID:17303163

  15. The Caenorhabditis Elegans Spe-6 Gene Is Required for Major Sperm Protein Assembly and Shows Second Site Non-Complementation with an Unlinked Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Varkey, J. P.; Jansma, P. L.; Minniti, A. N.; Ward, S.

    1993-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans spermatozoa move by crawling. Their motility requires thin cytoskeletal filaments assembled from a unique cytoskeletal protein, the major sperm protein (MSP). During normal sperm development the MSP is segregated to developing sperm by assembly into filaments that form a paracrystalline array in a transient organelle, the fibrous body-membranous organelle. Mutations in the spe-6 gene cause sterility because they lead to defective primary spermatocytes that do not form spermatids. In these mutant spermatocytes the MSP fails to assemble into fibrous body filaments. Instead, the unassembled MSP distributes throughout the cytoplasm and nucleus. Thus, the spe-6 gene product is necessary for normal MSP localization and assembly during sperm development. In addition to their MSP assembly defect, spe-6 mutant spermatocytes arrest meiosis at diakinesis although their spindle pole bodies still replicate and separate. This results in spermatocytes with four half-spindles surrounding condensed, but unsegregated, chromosomes. All four spe-6 alleles, as well as a chromosome III deficiency that deletes the spe-6 gene, fail to complement two small overlapping chromosome IV deficiencies, eDf18 and eDf19. This non-allele-specific second site non-complementation suggests a concentration-dependent interaction between the spe-6 gene product and products of the gene(s) under eDf18 and eDf19, which include a cluster of sperm-specific genes. Since MSP filament assembly is highly concentration-dependent in vitro, the non-complementation might be expected if the sperm-specific gene products under eDf18 and eDf19 were needed together with the spe-6 gene product to promote MSP assembly. PMID:8417991

  16. Role of Calpain in Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Momeni, Hamid Reza

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis, a form of programmed cell death that occurs under physiological as well as pathological conditions, is characterized by morphological and biochemical features. While the importance of caspases in apoptosis is established, several noncaspase proteases (Ca2+-dependent proteases) such as calpain may play a role in the execution of apoptosis. The calpain family consists of two major isoforms, calpain I and calpain II which require M and mM Ca2+ concentrations to initiate their activity. An increase in intracellular Ca2+ level is thought to trigger a cascade of biochemical processes including calpain activation. Once activated, calpains degrade membrane, cytoplasmic and nuclear substrates, leading to the breakdown of cellular architecture and finally apoptosis. The activation of calpain has been implicated in neuronal apoptosis following spinal cord injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. This review focuses on calpain with an emphasis on its key role in the proteolysis of cellular protein substrates following apoptosis. PMID:23507938

  17. Isorhamnetin Protects Human Keratinocytes against Ultraviolet B-Induced Cell Damage

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xia; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Madduma Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara; Yoo, Eun Sook; Koh, Young Sang; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Shin, Jennifer H; Park, Yeunsoo; Yoo, Suk Jae; Chae, Sungwook; Hyun, Jin Won

    2015-01-01

    Isorhamnetin (3-methylquercetin) is a flavonoid derived from the fruits of certain medicinal plants. This study investigated the photoprotective properties of isorhamnetin against cell damage and apoptosis resulting from excessive ultraviolet (UV) B exposure in human HaCaT keratinocytes. Isorhamnetin eliminated UVB-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and attenuated the oxidative modification of DNA, lipids, and proteins in response to UVB radiation. Moreover, isorhamnetin repressed UVB-facilitated programmed cell death in the keratinocytes, as evidenced by a reduction in apoptotic body formation, and nuclear fragmentation. Additionally, isorhamnetin suppressed the ability of UVB light to trigger mitochondrial dysfunction. Taken together, these results indicate that isorhamnetin has the potential to protect human keratinocytes against UVB-induced cell damage and death. PMID:26157553

  18. Excess NF-?B induces ectopic odontogenesis in embryonic incisor epithelium.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, J; Kawasaki, K; Porntaveetus, T; Kawasaki, M; Otsuka-Tanaka, Y; Miake, Y; Ota, M S; Watanabe, M; Hishinuma, M; Nomoto, T; Oommen, S; Ghafoor, S; Harada, F; Nozawa-Inoue, K; Maeda, T; Peterkov, R; Lesot, H; Inoue, J; Akiyama, T; Schmidt-Ullrich, R; Liu, B; Hu, Y; Page, A; Ramrez, ; Sharpe, P T; Ohazama, A

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-?B) signaling plays critical roles in many physiological and pathological processes, including regulating organogenesis. Down-regulation of NF-?B signaling during development results in hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia. The roles of NF-?B signaling in tooth development, however, are not fully understood. We examined mice overexpressing IKK?, an essential component of the NF-?B pathway, under keratin 5 promoter (K5-Ikk?). K5-Ikk? mice showed supernumerary incisors whose formation was accompanied by up-regulation of canonical Wnt signaling. Apoptosis that is normally observed in wild-type incisor epithelium was reduced in K5-Ikk? mice. The supernumerary incisors in K5-Ikk? mice were found to phenocopy extra incisors in mice with mutations of Wnt inhibitor, Wise. Excess NF-?B activity thus induces an ectopic odontogenesis program that is usually suppressed under physiological conditions. PMID:25376721

  19. Isorhamnetin Protects Human Keratinocytes against Ultraviolet B-Induced Cell Damage.

    PubMed

    Han, Xia; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Madduma Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara; Yoo, Eun Sook; Koh, Young Sang; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Shin, Jennifer H; Park, Yeunsoo; Yoo, Suk Jae; Chae, Sungwook; Hyun, Jin Won

    2015-07-01

    Isorhamnetin (3-methylquercetin) is a flavonoid derived from the fruits of certain medicinal plants. This study investigated the photoprotective properties of isorhamnetin against cell damage and apoptosis resulting from excessive ultraviolet (UV) B exposure in human HaCaT keratinocytes. Isorhamnetin eliminated UVB-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and attenuated the oxidative modification of DNA, lipids, and proteins in response to UVB radiation. Moreover, isorhamnetin repressed UVB-facilitated programmed cell death in the keratinocytes, as evidenced by a reduction in apoptotic body formation, and nuclear fragmentation. Additionally, isorhamnetin suppressed the ability of UVB light to trigger mitochondrial dysfunction. Taken together, these results indicate that isorhamnetin has the potential to protect human keratinocytes against UVB-induced cell damage and death. PMID:26157553

  20. Role of Apoptosis in disease

    PubMed Central

    Favaloro, B.; Allocati, N.; Graziano, V.; Di Ilio, C.; De Laurenzi, V.

    2012-01-01

    Since the initial description of apoptosis, a number of different forms of cell death have been described. In this review we will focus on classic caspase-dependent apoptosis and its variations that contribute to diseases. Over fifty years of research have clarified molecular mechanisms involved in apoptotic signaling as well and shown that alterations of these pathways lead to human diseases. Indeed both reduced and increased apoptosis can result in pathology. More recently these findings have led to the development of therapeutic approaches based on regulation of apoptosis, some of which are in clinical trials or have entered medical practice. PMID:22683550

  1. Microdamage and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Noble, Brendon

    2005-01-01

    Microdamage of healthy bone leads to targeted removal and repair of the damage. This process must involve the production of specific targeting signals. The identity of these signals is unknown but constitutes a legitimate research goal since it is this targeting process which appears to become impaired in ageing and disease. Here we discuss the potential role of the matrix bound osteocyte in the sensing and targeting of microdamage. In particular we will review current understanding concerning the apoptotic death of osteocytes at sites of microdamage and discuss the potential physiological significance of these findings in the light of knowledge of the significance of apoptosis in other cell systems. PMID:16123028

  2. Suppressive effects of ascorbate derivatives on ultraviolet-B-induced injury in HaCaT human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Shin; Tada, Mikiro; Yamada, Koji; Takahata, Kyoya

    2004-01-01

    The aging of skin, including sunburning, is caused by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Here, we examined the inhibitory effect of ascorbic acid (AsA) and its derivatives AsA 2-phosphate (AA-2P) and AsA 2-glucoside (AA-2G) on UV-B- induced cytotoxicity in HaCaT keratinocytes. Results show that cell viability significantly decreased when exposed to UV-B at 0.1-0.4 J/cm2 in a dose-dependent manner. In this study, AsA could not inhibit cytotoxicity, but AA-2P and AA-2G was able to cancel the harmful effect of UV-B when treated at high levels of 0.5-5 mM. These results indicate that the masking of the C-2 OH group may be an effective modification for AsA to inhibit UV-B-induced cytotoxicity in human keratinocytes. PMID:15311965

  3. DOE/NV/25946--1586 Geologic Assessment of the Damage Zone from the Second Test at Source Physics Experiment-Nevada (SPE-N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, M.; Huckins-Gang, H.; Prothro, L.; Reed, D.

    2012-12-01

    The National Center for Nuclear Security, established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, is conducting a series of explosive tests at the Nevada National Security Site that are designed to increase the understanding of certain basic physical phenomena associated with underground explosions. These tests will aid in developing technologies that might be used to detect underground nuclear explosions in support of verification activities for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. The initial project is a series of explosive tests, known collectively as the Source Physics Experiment-Nevada (SPE-N), being conducted in granitic rocks. The SPE N test series is designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves. The results will help advance the seismic monitoring capability of the United States by improving the predictive capability of physics-based modeling of explosive phenomena. The first SPE N (SPE N1) test was conducted in May 2011, using 0.1 ton of explosives at the depth of 54.9 m in the U 15n source hole. SPE N2 was conducted in October 2011, using 1.0 ton of explosives at the depth of 45.7 m in the same source hole. The SPE N3 test was conducted in the same source hole in July 2012, using the same amount and type of explosive as for SPE N2, and at the same depth as SPE N2, within the damage zone created by the SPE N2 explosion to investigate damage effects on seismic wave propagation. Following the SPE N2 shot and prior to the SPE N3 shot, the core hole U-15n#10 was drilled at an angle from the surface to intercept the SPE N2 shot point location to obtain information necessary to characterize the damage zone. The desire was to determine the position of the damage zone near the shot point, at least on the northeast, where the core hole penetrated it, and obtain information on the properties of the damaged medium. Geologic characterization of the post-SPE N2 core hole included geophysical logging, a directional survey, and geologic description of the core to document visual evidence of damage. Selected core samples were provided to Sandia National Laboratories for measurement of physical and mechanical properties. A video was also run in the source hole after it was cleaned out. A significant natural fault zone was encountered in the angle core hole between 5.7 and 7.5 m from the shot point. However, several of the fractures observed in the core hole are interpreted as having been caused by the explosion. The fractures are characterized by a "fresh," mechanically broken look, with uncoated and very irregular surfaces. They tend to terminate against natural fractures and have orientations that differ from the previously defined natural fracture sets; they are common starting at about 5.4 m from the shot point. Within about 3.3 m of the shot point to the end of the recovered core at 1.6 m from the shot point, some of the core samples are softer and lighter in color, but do not appear to be weathered. It is thought this could be indicative of the presence of distributed microfracturing. This work was done by National Security Technologies, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  4. Micro-solid-phase extraction (-SPE) of organophosphorous pesticides from wheat followed by LC-MS/MS determination.

    PubMed

    Pelle, Flavio Della; Di Crescenzo, Maria Chiara; Sergi, Manuel; Montesano, Camilla; Di Ottavio, Francesca; Scarpone, Rossana; Scortichini, Giampiero; Compagnone, Dario

    2016-02-01

    A rapid, selective and effective method of extraction, clean-up and concentration of organophosphorous pesticides from wheat followed by electrospray (ESI) LC-MS/MS analysis was developed. The ?-SPE (micro-solid-phase extraction) procedure resulted in good analytical performance and reduced at the same time matrix effects, analysis time and solvent consumption. Limits of detection (LODs) and quantification (LOQs) were in the range of 0.3-10 and 1-30 ?gkg(-1), respectively, with good reproducibility (RSD?13.8) and recoveries between 75% and 109%. Coefficients of determination (r(2)) were greater than 0.996 for the studied pesticides. Despite the reduced sorbent bed mass of ?-SPE tips (4.2mg), the analytical data showed that no saturation phenomena occurs in the tested range of concentration both for single compounds and mixtures. Several real samples were analysed and the concentrations of the selected pesticides were found to be below the respective maximum residue limit (MRLs). PMID:26600315

  5. An automated SPE/LC/MS/MS method for the analysis of cocaine and metabolites in whole blood.

    PubMed

    Jagerdeo, Eshwar; Montgomery, Madeline A; Lebeau, Marc A; Sibum, Martin

    2008-10-15

    As laboratories are called upon to develop novel, fast, and sensitive methods, here we present a completely automated method for the analysis of cocaine and its metabolites (benzoylecgonine, ecgonine methyl ester, ecgonine and cocaethylene) from whole blood. This method utilizes an online solid-phase extraction (SPE) with high performance liquid chromatographic separation and tandem mass spectrometric detection. Pretreatment of samples involve only protein precipitation and ultracentrifugation. An efficient online solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure was developed using Hysphere MM anion sorbent. A gradient chromatography method with a Gemini C6-Phenyl (50mmx3.00mm i.d., 5microm) column was used for the complete separation of all components. Analysis was by positive ion mode electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry, using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) to enhance the selectivity and sensitivity of the method. For the analysis, two MRM transitions are monitored for each analyte and one transition is monitored for each internal standard. With a 30-microL sample injection, linearity was analyte dependent but generally fell between 8 and 500ng/mL. The limits of detection (LODs) for the method ranged from 3 to 16ng/mL and the limits of quantitation (LOQs) ranged from 8 to 47ng/mL. The bias and precision were determined using a simple analysis of variance (ANOVA: single factor). The results demonstrate bias as <7%, and %precision as <9% for all components at each QC level. PMID:18829399

  6. Small angle X-ray scattering data and structure factor fitting for the study of the quaternary structure of the spermidine N-acetyltransferase SpeG.

    PubMed

    Weigand, Steven; Filippova, Ekaterina V; Kiryukhina, Olga; Anderson, Wayne F

    2016-03-01

    Here we describe the treatment of the small-angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) data used during SpeG quaternary structure study as part of the research article "Substrate induced allosteric change in the quaternary structure of the spermidine N-acetyltransferase SpeG" published in Journal of Molecular Biology [1]. These data were collected on two separate area detectors as separate dilution series of the SpeG and the SpeG with spermine samples along with data from their companion buffers. The data were radially integrated, corrected for incident beam variation, and scaled to absolute units. After subtraction of volume-fraction scaled buffer scattering and division by the SpeG concentration, multiple scattering curves free of an inter-molecular structure factor were derived from the dilution series. Rather than extrapolating to infinite dilution, the structure factor contribution was estimated by fitting to the full set of data provided by dividing the scattering curves of a dilution series by the curve from the most dilute sample in that series. PMID:26793756

  7. Small angle X-ray scattering data and structure factor fitting for the study of the quaternary structure of the spermidine N-acetyltransferase SpeG

    PubMed Central

    Weigand, Steven; Filippova, Ekaterina V.; Kiryukhina, Olga; Anderson, Wayne F.

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe the treatment of the small-angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) data used during SpeG quaternary structure study as part of the research article “Substrate induced allosteric change in the quaternary structure of the spermidine N-acetyltransferase SpeG” published in Journal of Molecular Biology [1]. These data were collected on two separate area detectors as separate dilution series of the SpeG and the SpeG with spermine samples along with data from their companion buffers. The data were radially integrated, corrected for incident beam variation, and scaled to absolute units. After subtraction of volume-fraction scaled buffer scattering and division by the SpeG concentration, multiple scattering curves free of an inter-molecular structure factor were derived from the dilution series. Rather than extrapolating to infinite dilution, the structure factor contribution was estimated by fitting to the full set of data provided by dividing the scattering curves of a dilution series by the curve from the most dilute sample in that series. PMID:26793756

  8. Broad-spectrum antibiotic or G-CSF as potential countermeasures for impaired control of bacterial infection associated with an SPE exposure during spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Li, Minghong; Holmes, Veronica; Ni, Houping; Sanzari, Jenine K; Romero-Weaver, Ana L; Lin, Liyong; Carabe-Fernandez, Alejandro; Diffenderfer, Eric S; Kennedy, Ann R; Weissman, Drew

    2015-01-01

    A major risk for astronauts during prolonged space flight is infection as a result of the combined effects of microgravity, situational and confinement stress, alterations in food intake, altered circadian rhythm, and radiation that can significantly impair the immune system and the body's defense systems. We previously reported a massive increase in morbidity with a decrease in the ability to control a bacterial challenge when mice were maintained under hindlimb suspension (HS) conditions and exposed to solar particle event (SPE)-like radiation. HS and SPE-like radiation treatment alone resulted in a borderline significant increase in morbidity. Therefore, development and testing of countermeasures that can be used during extended space missions in the setting of exposure to SPE radiation becomes a serious need. In the present study, we investigated the efficacy of enrofloxacin (an orally bioavailable antibiotic) and Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) (Neulasta) on enhancing resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in mice subjected to HS and SPE-like radiation. The results revealed that treatment with enrofloxacin or G-CSF enhanced bacterial clearance and significantly decreased morbidity and mortality in challenged mice exposed to suspension and radiation. These results establish that antibiotics, such as enrofloxacin, and G-CSF could be effective countermeasures to decrease the risk of bacterial infections after exposure to SPE radiation during extended space flight, thereby reducing both the risk to the crew and the danger of mission failure. PMID:25793272

  9. Broad-Spectrum Antibiotic or G-CSF as Potential Countermeasures for Impaired Control of Bacterial Infection Associated with an SPE Exposure during Spaceflight

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minghong; Holmes, Veronica; Ni, Houping; Sanzari, Jenine K.; Romero-Weaver, Ana L.; Lin, Liyong; Carabe-Fernandez, Alejandro; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Kennedy, Ann R.; Weissman, Drew

    2015-01-01

    A major risk for astronauts during prolonged space flight is infection as a result of the combined effects of microgravity, situational and confinement stress, alterations in food intake, altered circadian rhythm, and radiation that can significantly impair the immune system and the body’s defense systems. We previously reported a massive increase in morbidity with a decrease in the ability to control a bacterial challenge when mice were maintained under hindlimb suspension (HS) conditions and exposed to solar particle event (SPE)-like radiation. HS and SPE-like radiation treatment alone resulted in a borderline significant increase in morbidity. Therefore, development and testing of countermeasures that can be used during extended space missions in the setting of exposure to SPE radiation becomes a serious need. In the present study, we investigated the efficacy of enrofloxacin (an orally bioavailable antibiotic) and Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) (Neulasta) on enhancing resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in mice subjected to HS and SPE-like radiation. The results revealed that treatment with enrofloxacin or G-CSF enhanced bacterial clearance and significantly decreased morbidity and mortality in challenged mice exposed to suspension and radiation. These results establish that antibiotics, such as enrofloxacin, and G-CSF could be effective countermeasures to decrease the risk of bacterial infections after exposure to SPE radiation during extended space flight, thereby reducing both the risk to the crew and the danger of mission failure. PMID:25793272

  10. Apoptosis and cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Makin, G; Hickman, J A

    2000-07-01

    Apoptosis is a fundamental mechanism of cell death that can be engaged by a range of cellular insults. One of the major modes of action of chemotherapeutic drugs may be via the activation of apoptosis. Understanding how the cell death program is engaged following an insult, and hence why it fails to be engaged in certain settings, offers a novel approach to overcoming the clinical problem of drug resistance. The tumour suppressor gene p53 and its downstream effector genes p21, mdm-2, and gadd45 seem to be important in the cellular response to genotoxic drug induced damage. Considerable evidence has accrued about the effect of mutations of this pathway on drug sensitivity and this is discussed. The expanding Bcl-2 family of proteins also play an important role in the cell death program. Evidence suggests that these proteins may function as integrators of damage signals, and may be the final decision point as to whether a cell lives or dies. These proteins may thus represent a logical target for new approaches to overcoming drug resistance. PMID:10928287

  11. Lovastatin induces platelet apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qing; Li, Ming; Chen, Mengxing; Zhou, Ling; Zhao, Lili; Hu, Renping; Yan, Rong; Dai, Kesheng

    2016-03-01

    Statins are widely used in the prevention of atherosclerosis and treatment of coronary artery disease because of pleiotropic effects on thrombosis. Thrombocytopenia and hemorrhage occurred in some statin-treated patients, but the reason remains unclear. In the current study, we show that lovastatin dose-dependently induces depolarization of mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential, leading to up-regulation of Bak, down-regulation of Bcl-XL, and activation of caspase-3/8/9. Lovastatin treatment did not increase the surface expression of P-selectin or PAC-1 binding but led to strongly reduced collagen- and thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. The integrin αIIbβ3 antagonist, RGDS, inhibited lovastatin-induced apoptosis in both human platelets and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably expressing integrin αIIbβ3. The number of circulating platelets in mice was significantly reduced after intraperitoneal injections with lovastatin. Taken together, these data indicate that lovastatin induced caspase-dependent platelet apoptosis. Lovastatin does not incur platelet activation, whereas impairs platelet function and reduces circulating platelets in vivo, suggesting the possible pathogenesis of thrombocytopenia and hemorrhage in patients treated with statins. PMID:26773364

  12. Nuclear Apoptosis Contributes to Sarcopenia

    PubMed Central

    Alway, Stephen E.; Siu, Parco M.

    2009-01-01

    Apoptosis results in DNA fragmentation and, subsequently, destruction of cells containing a single nucleus. Our hypothesis is that multinucleated cells such as muscle fibers can experience apoptotic-induced loss of single nuclei (nuclear apoptosis) without destruction of the entire fiber. The loss of nuclei likely contributes to atrophy and sarcopenia. Furthermore, increased chronic activity attenuates apoptotic signaling, which may reduce sarcopenia. PMID:18362685

  13. Apoptosis and the Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    White, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    The airway epithelium functions as a barrier and front line of host defense in the lung. Apoptosis or programmed cell death can be elicited in the epithelium as a response to viral infection, exposure to allergen or to environmental toxins, or to drugs. While apoptosis can be induced via activation of death receptors on the cell surface or by disruption of mitochondrial polarity, epithelial cells compared to inflammatory cells are more resistant to apoptotic stimuli. This paper focuses on the response of airway epithelium to apoptosis in the normal state, apoptosis as a potential regulator of the number and types of epithelial cells in the airway, and the contribution of epithelial cell apoptosis in important airways diseases. PMID:22203854

  14. Apoptosis Evaluation by Electrochemical Techniques.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jian; Miao, Peng

    2016-03-01

    Apoptosis has close relevance to pathology, pharmacology, and toxicology. Accurate and convenient detection of apoptosis would be beneficial for biological study, clinical diagnosis, and drug development. Based on distinct features of apoptotic cells, a diversity of analytical techniques have been exploited for sensitive analysis of apoptosis, such as surface plasmon resonance, electrochemical methods, flow cytometry, and some imaging assays. Among them, the features of simplicity, easy operation, low cost, and high sensitivity make electrochemical techniques powerful tools to investigate electron-transfer processes of in vitro biological systems. In this contribution, a general overview of current knowledge on various technical approaches for apoptosis evaluation is provided. Furthermore, recently developed electrochemical biosensors for detecting apoptotic cells and their advantages over traditional methods are summarized. One of the main considerations focuses on designing the recognition elements based on various biochemical events during apoptosis. PMID:26588799

  15. Epigenetic silencing BCL6B induced colorectal cancer proliferation and metastasis by inhibiting P53 signaling.

    PubMed

    Hu, Sui; Cao, Baoping; Zhang, Meiying; Linghu, Enqiang; Zhan, Qimin; Brock, Malcolm V; Herman, James G; Mao, Gaoping; Guo, Mingzhou

    2015-01-01

    BCL6B, a homologue of BCL6, has been reported to be frequently methylated in human gastric cancer. The epigenetic change and the function of BCL6B remains to be elucidated in colorectal cancer. 7 colorectal cancer cell lines (RKO, HT-29, DLD1, LOVO, HCT116, SW480, SW620) and 102 cases of primary colorectal cancer samples were used in this study. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR, methylation specific PCR (MSP), Flow cytometry and western blot were employed. Loss of BCL6B expression was found in HT29, RKO LOVO, SW480, SW620 and DLD1 cells, and reduced expression was found in HCT116 cell line. Complete methylation was found in HT29, RKO, LOVO, SW480, SW620 and DLD1 cells, partial methylation was detected in HCT116 cells. Restoration of BCL6B expression was induced by 5-Aza treatment in these colorectal cancer cells. BCL6B was methylated in 79.4% (81/102) of primary human colorectal cancer and reduced expression was associated with promoter region hypermethylation (p < 0.05). Methylation of BCL6B is associated with late stage (p < 0.05) and lymph node metastasis (p < 0.05). Re-expression of BCL6B inhibited cell proliferation, invasion and migration in RKO and HT29 cells. BCL6B activated P53 signaling and induced apoptosis, Re-expression of BCL6B sensitized RKO and HT29 cells to 5-fluorouracil. In conclusion, BCL6B was frequently methylated in human colorectal cancer and its expression was regulated by promoter region methylation. Methylation of BCL6B is a prognostic and chemo-sensitive marker in colorectal cancer. BCL6B suppresses colorectal cancer growth by activating P53 signaling. PMID:25973304

  16. Epigenetic silencing BCL6B induced colorectal cancer proliferation and metastasis by inhibiting P53 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sui; Cao, Baoping; Zhang, Meiying; Linghu, Enqiang; Zhan, Qimin; Brock, Malcolm V; Herman, James G; Mao, Gaoping; Guo, Mingzhou

    2015-01-01

    BCL6B, a homologue of BCL6, has been reported to be frequently methylated in human gastric cancer. The epigenetic change and the function of BCL6B remains to be elucidated in colorectal cancer. 7 colorectal cancer cell lines (RKO, HT-29, DLD1, LOVO, HCT116, SW480, SW620) and 102 cases of primary colorectal cancer samples were used in this study. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR, methylation specific PCR (MSP), Flow cytometry and western blot were employed. Loss of BCL6B expression was found in HT29, RKO LOVO, SW480, SW620 and DLD1 cells, and reduced expression was found in HCT116 cell line. Complete methylation was found in HT29, RKO, LOVO, SW480, SW620 and DLD1 cells, partial methylation was detected in HCT116 cells. Restoration of BCL6B expression was induced by 5-Aza treatment in these colorectal cancer cells. BCL6B was methylated in 79.4% (81/102) of primary human colorectal cancer and reduced expression was associated with promoter region hypermethylation (p < 0.05). Methylation of BCL6B is associated with late stage (p < 0.05) and lymph node metastasis (p < 0.05). Re-expression of BCL6B inhibited cell proliferation, invasion and migration in RKO and HT29 cells. BCL6B activated P53 signaling and induced apoptosis, Re-expression of BCL6B sensitized RKO and HT29 cells to 5-fluorouracil. In conclusion, BCL6B was frequently methylated in human colorectal cancer and its expression was regulated by promoter region methylation. Methylation of BCL6B is a prognostic and chemo-sensitive marker in colorectal cancer. BCL6B suppresses colorectal cancer growth by activating P53 signaling. PMID:25973304

  17. Exercise-induced leukocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Karsten; Mooren, Frank C

    2014-01-01

    Physical exercise is well known to affect leukocyte numbers and function. While regular exercise training has been shown to enhance specific immune functions, acute bouts of intensive exercise often lead to a pro-inflammatory response accompanied by a transient lymphocytopenia and neutrophilia. It can be assumed, that lymphocytopenia can be attributed at least partially to an enhanced lymphocyte apoptosis. In contrast, regulation of neutrophil apoptosis after exercise remains controversial since studies demonstrated both an up-regulation as well as a down-regulation of cell death. However, these discrepancies may be due to differences in exercise protocols, subjects' fitness levels, and to different methodological approaches. Two major signalling pathways of exercise induced apoptosis have been identified. First the external receptor mediated pathway using death receptors, and second the internal, oxidative-mediated pathway which encompasses the mitochondria. Potential apoptosis modulating mediators are reactive oxygen species (ROS), glucocorticoids and cytokines which are part of the systemic inflammatory response evoked after acute intensive exercise. Finally, the physiological impact and clinical relevance of leukocyte apoptosis will be discussed. On the one hand, exercise-induced apoptosis might be a mechanism to remove activated and potentially autoreactive immune cells. On the other hand, apoptosis might be a regulatory mechanism which is necessary for tissue reorganization and adaptational training processes. PMID:24974724

  18. Development and Application of a Novel SPE-Method for Bioassay-Guided Fractionation of Marine Extracts.

    PubMed

    Cutignano, Adele; Nuzzo, Genoveffa; Ianora, Adrianna; Luongo, Elvira; Romano, Giovanna; Gallo, Carmela; Sansone, Clementina; Aprea, Susanna; Mancini, Francesca; D'Oro, Ugo; Fontana, Angelo

    2015-09-01

    The biological diversity of marine habitats is a unique source of chemical compounds with potential use as pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and dietary supplements. However, biological screening and chemical analysis of marine extracts pose specific technical constraints and require adequate sample preparation. Here we report an improved method on Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) to fractionate organic extracts containing high concentration of salt that hampers the recovery of secondary metabolites. The procedure uses a water suspension to load the extracts on a poly(styrene-divynylbenzene)-based support and a stepwise organic solvent elution to effectively desalt and fractionate the organic components. The novel protocol has been tested on MeOH-soluble material from three model organisms (Reniera sarai, Dendrilla membranosa and Amphidinium carterae) and was validated on a small panel of 47 marine samples, including sponges and protists, within discovery programs for identification of immuno-stimulatory and anti-infective natural products. PMID:26378547

  19. Determination of acrylamide in coffee and coffee products by GC-MS using an improved SPE clean-up.

    PubMed

    Soares, C; Cunha, S; Fernandes, J

    2006-12-01

    An improved gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method to determine acrylamide (AA) in coffee and coffee products was developed. The method was based on two main purification steps: the first with ethanol and Carrez solutions in order to precipitate polysaccharides and proteins, respectively; and the second with a layered solid-phase extraction (SPE) column which proved to be efficient in the elimination of the main chromatographic interferences. The method is applicable to a wide range of coffee products. Twenty-six samples of different coffee products were analysed. The levels of AA were in the range 11.4-36.2 microg l-1 for 'espresso coffee' and 200.8-229.4 microg l-1 for coffee blends with cereals. The results indicate that the presence of cereals significantly increased the levels of AA. PMID:17118870

  20. Development and Application of a Novel SPE-Method for Bioassay-Guided Fractionation of Marine Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Cutignano, Adele; Nuzzo, Genoveffa; Ianora, Adrianna; Luongo, Elvira; Romano, Giovanna; Gallo, Carmela; Sansone, Clementina; Aprea, Susanna; Mancini, Francesca; DOro, Ugo; Fontana, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    The biological diversity of marine habitats is a unique source of chemical compounds with potential use as pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and dietary supplements. However, biological screening and chemical analysis of marine extracts pose specific technical constraints and require adequate sample preparation. Here we report an improved method on Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) to fractionate organic extracts containing high concentration of salt that hampers the recovery of secondary metabolites. The procedure uses a water suspension to load the extracts on a poly(styrene-divynylbenzene)-based support and a stepwise organic solvent elution to effectively desalt and fractionate the organic components. The novel protocol has been tested on MeOH-soluble material from three model organisms (Reniera sarai, Dendrilla membranosa and Amphidinium carterae) and was validated on a small panel of 47 marine samples, including sponges and protists, within discovery programs for identification of immuno-stimulatory and anti-infective natural products. PMID:26378547

  1. Seismic source functions from free-field ground motions recorded on SPE: Implications for source models of small, shallow explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rougier, Esteban; Patton, Howard J.

    2015-05-01

    Reduced displacement potentials (RDPs) for chemical explosions of the Source Physics Experiments (SPE) in granite at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site are estimated from free-field ground motion recordings. Far-field P wave source functions are proportional to the time derivative of RDPs. Frequency domain comparisons between measured source functions and model predictions show that high-frequency amplitudes roll off as ω- 2, but models fail to predict the observed seismic moment, corner frequency, and spectral overshoot. All three features are fit satisfactorily for the SPE-2 test after cavity radius Rc is reduced by 12%, elastic radius is reduced by 58%, and peak-to-static pressure ratio on the elastic radius is increased by 100%, all with respect to the Mueller-Murphy model modified with the Denny-Johnson Rc scaling law. A large discrepancy is found between the cavity volume inferred from RDPs and the volume estimated from laser scans of the emplacement hole. The measurements imply a scaled Rc of ~5 m/kt1/3, more than a factor of 2 smaller than nuclear explosions. Less than 25% of the seismic moment can be attributed to cavity formation. A breakdown of the incompressibility assumption due to shear dilatancy of the source medium around the cavity is the likely explanation. New formulas are developed for volume changes due to medium bulking (or compaction). A 0.04% decrease of average density inside the elastic radius accounts for the missing volumetric moment. Assuming incompressibility, established Rc scaling laws predicted the moment reasonable well, but it was only fortuitous because dilation of the source medium compensated for the small cavity volume.

  2. Ultraviolet-B-induced oxidative stress and responses of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle in a marine macroalga Ulva fasciata.

    PubMed

    Shiu, Chia-Tai; Lee, Tse-Min

    2005-11-01

    The regulation of the antioxidant defence system by ultraviolet-B (UV-B) was determined in a marine macroalga Ulva fasciata Delile exposed to low (0.5, 1 W m(-2)), medium (2.5, 5 W m(-2)), and high (10, 20 W m(-2)) UV-B irradiance. UV-B > or =2.5 W m(-2) increased H2O2 contents that are positively correlated with lipid peroxidation and total peroxide contents. Inhibition of the UV-B-induced H2O2 increase by a specific O2.- scavenger, 1,2-dihydroxy-benzene-3,5-disulphonic acid, shows that O2.- is the primary source of H2O2. Superoxide dismutase activity was increased by UV-B with a peak at 2.5 W m(-2), which did not match the H2O2 pattern. Alleviation of UV-B-induced oxidative damage by a H2O2 scavenger, dimethylthiourea, and a free radical scavenger, sodium benzoate, which inhibited UV-B-induced H2O2 accumulation, suggests that oxidative damage caused by UV-B > or = 2.5 W m(-2) is ascribed to accumulated H2O2. However, a decrease in growth rate and TTC reduction ability only at high UV-B doses indicates that the defence and repairing systems operate at low and medium UV-B doses. H2O2 not only can be excreted but can also be detoxified via the ascorbate-glutathione cycle. Increases in catalase, peroxidase, ascorbate peroxidase, and glutathione reductase activities and ascorbate (AsA) and glutathione pools, as well as AsA regeneration ability, function to keep the balance of cellular H2O2 under low UV-B doses. Dehydroascorbate reductase and monodehydroascorbate reductase are responsible for AsA regeneration under low and medium UV-B radiation, respectively. The appearance of oxidative damage in medium and high UV-B flux is attributable to a lower induction of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle as an antioxidant defence system. Overall, the availability of antioxidants and the induction of antioxidant enzyme activities for detoxifying reactive oxygen species (ROS) are regulated in U. fasciata against UV-B-induced oxidative stress, and experiments using ROS scavengers demonstrate that the antioxidant defence system is modulated by O2.- or H2O2. PMID:16157654

  3. Effect of pretreatment of salt, copper and temperature on ultraviolet-B-induced antioxidants in diazotrophic cyanobacterium Anabaena doliolum.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Ashish Kumar; Bhargava, Poonam; Mishra, Yogesh; Shukla, Bideh; Rai, Lal Chand

    2006-01-01

    Effect of salt, copper, and temperature pretreatments on the UV-B-induced oxidative damage, measured in terms of peroxide and MDA (lipid peroxidation) contents, was studied in the diazotrophic cyanobacterium Anabaena doliolum. To understand the survival strategy enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, and ascorbate peroxidase) and non-enzymatic (glutathione, ascorbate, alpha-tocopherol and carotenoid) antioxidants were studied. Among the various pretreatments salt was found to decrease and copper and temperature pretreatments increased the deleterious effects of UV-B. This study is the first to demonstrate that physical stress (high temperature) enhanced the damaging effect of UV-B more profoundly than chemical stresses (salt and copper). PMID:16598827

  4. Ultrahigh and High Resolution Structures and Mutational Analysis of Monomeric Streptococcus pyogenes SpeB Reveal a Functional Role for the Glycine-rich C-terminal Loop

    SciTech Connect

    González-Páez, Gonzalo E.; Wolan, Dennis W.

    2012-09-05

    Cysteine protease SpeB is secreted from Streptococcus pyogenes and has been studied as a potential virulence factor since its identification almost 70 years ago. Here, we report the crystal structures of apo mature SpeB to 1.06 {angstrom} resolution as well as complexes with the general cysteine protease inhibitor trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido(4-guanidino)butane and a novel substrate mimetic peptide inhibitor. These structures uncover conformational changes associated with maturation of SpeB from the inactive zymogen to its active form and identify the residues required for substrate binding. With the use of a newly developed fluorogenic tripeptide substrate to measure SpeB activity, we determined IC{sub 50} values for trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido(4-guanidino)butane and our new peptide inhibitor and the effects of mutations within the C-terminal active site loop. The structures and mutational analysis suggest that the conformational movements of the glycine-rich C-terminal loop are important for the recognition and recruitment of biological substrates and release of hydrolyzed products.

  5. Effect of SPE-like Proton or Photon Radiation on the Kinetics of Mouse Peripheral Blood Cells and Radiation Biological Effectiveness Determinations

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Weaver, A.L.; Wan, X.S.; Diffenderfer, E.S.; Lin, L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Exploration missions outside low-Earth orbit are being planned; therefore, it is critical to understand the risk astronauts would be exposed to in the space environment, especially during extravehicular activities (EVAs). Reductions in white blood cell (WBC) numbers can occur as a result of exposure to solar particle event (SPE) radiation. The aim of the present study was to determine the duration of the effects on blood cell numbers from exposure to a single whole-body dose of SPE-like proton radiation or photon radiation as well as to determine the radiation biological effectiveness (RBE) values at those times when radiation exposure causes blood cell numbers to experience the most critical effects when using mice as a model. Our results indicate that both types of radiation cause significant reductions in the numbers of all blood cell types at different times post-irradiation. The RBE values were not significantly different from 1.0. These results indicate that the risk estimations for astronauts from exposure of mice to SPE-like proton radiation are comparable to those previously made for doses of standard reference radiations, suggesting that countermeasures should be developed for the decreases in blood cell counts observed following the exposure of mice to SPE radiation. Key Words: Proton radiationGamma radiationBlood cell countsSolar particle event. Astrobiology 13, 570577. PMID:23980767

  6. Effect of SPE-like proton or photon radiation on the kinetics of mouse peripheral blood cells and radiation biological effectiveness determinations.

    PubMed

    Romero-Weaver, A L; Wan, X S; Diffenderfer, E S; Lin, L; Kennedy, A R

    2013-06-01

    Exploration missions outside low-Earth orbit are being planned; therefore, it is critical to understand the risk astronauts would be exposed to in the space environment, especially during extravehicular activities (EVAs). Reductions in white blood cell (WBC) numbers can occur as a result of exposure to solar particle event (SPE) radiation. The aim of the present study was to determine the duration of the effects on blood cell numbers from exposure to a single whole-body dose of SPE-like proton radiation or photon radiation as well as to determine the radiation biological effectiveness (RBE) values at those times when radiation exposure causes blood cell numbers to experience the most critical effects when using mice as a model. Our results indicate that both types of radiation cause significant reductions in the numbers of all blood cell types at different times post-irradiation. The RBE values were not significantly different from 1.0. These results indicate that the risk estimations for astronauts from exposure of mice to SPE-like proton radiation are comparable to those previously made for doses of standard reference radiations, suggesting that countermeasures should be developed for the decreases in blood cell counts observed following the exposure of mice to SPE radiation. PMID:23980767

  7. Beyond Apoptosis in Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Colonna, Lucrezia; Lood, Christian; Elkon, Keith B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by autoantibodies directed against nuclear autoantigens normally concealed from immune recognition in healthy individuals. Here we summarize recently identified mechanisms of abnormal cell death leading to exposure and aberrant processing of nucleoprotein self antigens, and discuss their role in the SLE pathogenesis. Recent findings During the past few years, the unveiling of several new forms of cell death has expanded our understanding beyond the simple view of “apoptotic” versus “necrotic” cell death. SLE patients show abnormalities in cell death at several levels, including increased rates of apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy, as well as reduced clearance of dying cells. These abnormalities lead to an increased autoantigen burden and also antigen modifications, such as nucleic acid oxidation that increase the inflammatory properties of self antigens. Recent investigations have highlighted the role of opsonins in determining the immunogenic versus tolerogenic characteristics of self antigens. Summary Dysregulation of different forms of programmed cell death contributes to increased exposure, availability, and immunogenic characteristic of intracellular self antigens, which all participate in development of lupus autoimmunity. As our understanding of abnormalities of cell death in SLE advances, potential therapeutic opportunities await human implementation. PMID:25036095

  8. Apoptosis and acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Havasi, Andrea; Borkan, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Improved mechanistic understanding of renal cell death in acute kidney injury (AKI) has generated new therapeutic targets. Clearly, the classic lesion of acute tubular necrosis is not adequate to describe the consequences of renal ischemia, nephrotoxin exposure, or sepsis on glomerular filtration rate. Experimental evidence supports a pathogenic role for apoptosis in AKI. Interestingly, proximal tubule epithelial cells are highly susceptible to apoptosis, and injury at this site contributes to organ failure. During apoptosis, well-orchestrated events converge at the mitochondrion, the organelle that integrates life and death signals generated by the BCL2 (B-cell lymphoma 2) protein family. Death requires the perfect storm for outer mitochondrial membrane injury to release its cellular executioners. The complexity of this process affords new targets for effective interventions, both before and after renal insults. Inhibiting apoptosis appears to be critical, because circulating factors released by the injured kidney induce apoptosis and inflammation in distant organs including the heart, lung, liver, and brain, potentially contributing to the high morbidity and mortality associated with AKI. Manipulation of known stress kinases upstream of mitochondrial injury, induction of endogenous, anti-apoptotic proteins, and improved understanding of the timing and consequences of renal cell apoptosis will inevitably improve the outcome of human AKI. PMID:21562469

  9. Effects of different light conditions on repair of UV-B-induced damage in carpospores of Chondrus ocellatus Holm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Qing; Xiao, Hui; Wang, You; Tang, Xuexi

    2015-05-01

    We evaluated the effects of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation and different light conditions on the repair of UV-B-induced damage in carpospores of Chondrus ocellatus Holm (Rhodophyta) in laboratory experiments. Carpospores were treated daily with different doses of UV-B radiation for 48 days, when vertical branches had formed in all treatments; after each daily treatment, the carpospores were subjected to photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), darkness, red light, or blue light during a 2-h repair stage. Carpospore diameters were measured every 4 days. We measured the growth and cellular contents of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), chlorophyll a, phycoerythrin, and UV-B-absorbing mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) in carpospores on Day 48. Low doses of UV-B radiation (36 and 72 J/m2) accelerated the growth of C. ocellatus. However, as the amount of UV-B radiation increased, the growth rate decreased and morphological changes occurred. UV-B radiation significant damaged DNA and photosynthetic pigments and induced three kind of MAAs, palythine, asterina-330, and shinorine. PAR conditions were best for repairing UV-B-induced damage. Darkness promoted the activity of the DNA darkrepair mechanism. Red light enhanced phycoerythrin synthesis but inhibited light repair of DNA. Although blue light, increased the activity of DNA photolyase, greatly improving remediation efficiency, the growth and development of C. ocellatus carpospores were slower than in other light treatments.

  10. Liquid Metering Centrifuge Sticks (LMCS): A Centrifugal Approach to Metering Known Sample Volumes for Colorimetric Solid Phase Extraction (C-SPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazda, Daniel B.; Schultz, John R.; Clarke, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    Phase separation is one of the most significant obstacles encountered during the development of analytical methods for water quality monitoring in spacecraft environments. Removing air bubbles from water samples prior to analysis is a routine task on earth; however, in the absence of gravity, this routine task becomes extremely difficult. This paper details the development and initial ground testing of liquid metering centrifuge sticks (LMCS), devices designed to collect and meter a known volume of bubble-free water in microgravity. The LMCS uses centrifugal force to eliminate entrapped air and reproducibly meter liquid sample volumes for analysis with Colorimetric Solid Phase Extraction (C-SPE). C-SPE is a sorption-spectrophotometric platform that is being developed as a potential spacecraft water quality monitoring system. C-SPE utilizes solid phase extraction membranes impregnated with analyte-specific colorimetric reagents to concentrate and complex target analytes in spacecraft water samples. The mass of analyte extracted from the water sample is determined using diffuse reflectance (DR) data collected from the membrane surface and an analyte-specific calibration curve. The analyte concentration can then be calculated from the mass of extracted analyte and the volume of the sample analyzed. Previous flight experiments conducted in microgravity conditions aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft demonstrated that the inability to collect and meter a known volume of water using a syringe was a limiting factor in the accuracy of C-SPE measurements. Herein, results obtained from ground based C-SPE experiments using ionic silver as a test analyte and either the LMCS or syringes for sample metering are compared to evaluate the performance of the LMCS. These results indicate very good agreement between the two sample metering methods and clearly illustrate the potential of utilizing centrifugal forces to achieve phase separation and metering of water samples in microgravity.

  11. Pre-Shot Simulations of Far-Field Ground Motions for the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) Explosions at the Climax Stock, Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A J; Wagoner, J; Petersson, N A; Sjogreen, B

    2010-11-07

    The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) will involve a series of explosions in various geologic and emplacement conditions to validate numerical simulation methods to predict behavior of seismic wave excitation and propagation for nuclear test monitoring. The first SPE's currently underway involve explosions in the Climax Stock (granitic geology) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Detailed geologic data and published material properties for the major lithologic units of the NNSS and surrounding region were used to build three-dimensional models for seismic wave propagation simulations. The geologic structure near the SPE shot point is quite varied including granitic, carbonate, tuff and alluvium lithologies. We performed preliminary ground motion simulations for a near-source domain covering 8 km x 8 km at the surface centered on the shot point to investigate various source and propagation effects using WPP, LLNL's anelastic seismic wave finite difference code. Simulations indicate that variations in wave propagation properties of the sub-surface will generate strongly path-dependent response once the energy has left the relatively small granitic geology of the near-surface Climax Stock near the SPE shot point. Rough topography to the north and west of SPE shot point causes additional complexity in the signals including energy on the transverse components. Waves propagate much faster through the granitic and carbonate formations and slower through the tuff and alluvium. Synthetic seismograms for a pure explosion source in a 3D geologic structure show large amplitudes on transverse component. For paths to the south sampling the granite, tuff and alluvium lithologies transverse component amplitudes are as high as 50% of that on the vertical and radial components.

  12. The Source Physics Experiments (SPE): A Physics-Based Approach to Discriminate Low-Yield Nuclear Events (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snelson, C. M.; Chipman, V.; White, R. L.; Emmitt, R.; Townsend, M.

    2013-12-01

    Discriminating low-yield nuclear explosions is one of the current challenges in the field of monitoring and verification. Work is currently underway in Nevada to address this challenge by conducting a series of experiments using a physics-based approach. This has been accomplished by using a multifaceted, multi-disciplinary approach that includes a range of activities, from characterizing the shallow subsurface to acquiring new explosion data both in the near field (< 100 m from the source) to the far field (> 100 m to 10 s km from the source). The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is a collaborative project between National Security Technologies, LLC, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, and the Air Force Technical Applications Center. The goal of the SPE is to understand the transition of seismic energy from the near field to the far field; to understand the development of S-waves in explosives sources; and to understand how anisotropy controls seismic energy transmission and partitioning. To fully explore these problems, the SPE test series includes tests in both simple and complex geology cases. The current series is being conducted in a highly fractured granite body. This location was chosen, in part, because it was the location of previous nuclear tests in the same rock body and because generally the geology has been well characterized. In addition to historic data, high-resolution seismic reflection, cross-hole tomography, core samples, LIDAR, hyperspectral, and fracture mapping data have been acquired to further characterize and detect changes after each of the shot across the test bed. The complex geology series includes 7 planned shots using conventional explosives in the same shot hole surrounded by Continuous Reflectometry for Radius vs. Time Experiment (CORRTEX), Time of Arrival, Velocity of Detonation, down-hole accelerometers, surface accelerometers, infrasound, and a suite of seismic sensors of various frequency bands from the near field to the far field. This allows for the use of a single test bed in the granite instead of multiple test beds to obtain the same results. The shots are planned at various depths to obtain a Green's function, scaled depth-of-burial data, nominal depth-of-burial data and damage-zone data. Three shots have been executed to date and the fourth is planned for August 2013 as a 220 lb (100 kg) TNT equivalent shot at a depth of 315 ft (96 m). Over 400 data channels have been recorded on the first series of shots with high fidelity. Once the complex geology site data have been exploited, a new test bed will be developed in a simpler geology to test these physics-based models. Ultimately, the results from this project will provide the next advances in the science of monitoring to enable a physics-based predicative capability. This work was done by National Security Technologies, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy. DOE/NV/25946--1835.

  13. Photo-protective effect of americanin B against ultraviolet B-induced damage in cultured human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Yao, Cheng Wen; Cha, Ji Won; Shin, Jennifer H; Yoo, Suk Jae; Hyun, Jin Won

    2014-11-01

    Excessive ultraviolet (UV) radiation, a constituent of sunlight, can induce multiple types of skin damage. We recently demonstrated that americanin B, a lignin compound, protected cells against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced damage by exerting antioxidant effects and inhibiting apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the ability of americanin B to protect against cell injury induced by UVB (280-320nm), the most harmful UV wavelengths, in human HaCaT keratinocytes. Americanin B absorbed UVB, eliminated UVB-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and decreased the extent of UVB-induced oxidative modification of lipids, proteins, and DNA. In addition, americanin B inhibited UVB-induced apoptosis, as indicated by reductions in apoptotic body formation and DNA fragmentation. Furthermore, americanin B reversed the depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane induced by UVB exposure. These protective activities were associated with down-regulation of apoptosis-promoting proteins, Bax, caspase-9, and caspase-3 and up-regulation of an apoptosis inhibitor, Bcl-2. These results suggest that americanin B can protect human keratinocytes against UVB-induced cell damage. PMID:25461549

  14. Simultaneous online SPE-LC-MS/MS quantification of six widely used synthetic progestins in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Moser, Christina; Zoderer, Daniela; Luef, Gerhard; Rauchenzauner, Markus; Wildt, Ludwig; Griesmacher, Andrea; Seger, Christoph

    2012-05-01

    Co-administration of synthetic progestin containing hormonal contraceptives (HCs) and antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is a common clinical situation which needs specific considerations due to drug interactions. Several studies have demonstrated that lamotrigine plasma levels are significantly decreased during co-medication with HCs, and that this interaction is associated with increased seizure frequency in most of the cases. Additionally, an increase in contraceptive failure and unintended pregnancy could be observed during co-medication. Hence, monitoring of progestin plasma levels in patients with AED co-medication is of interest. A rapid and reliable online solid-phase extraction-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (online SPE-LC-MS/MS) method using gradient elution in the LC domain was established and validated for the simultaneous quantitative determination of gestodene, dienogest, drospirenone, etonogestrel, cyproterone acetate, and levonorgestrel in human plasma. The online SPE-LC-MS/MS method covered a quantification concentration range of 5-100 ng/ml for dienogest, 1-100 ng/ml for etonogestrel and 2-100 ng/ml for all other analytes. Stable isotope-labeled internal standards were used for analyte quantification based on selected reaction monitoring experiments. Inter- and intra-assay precision and accuracy were determined from quality control (QC) samples at the lower limits of quantification and at low, medium, and high concentration levels within the calibration range. Inter-assay reproducibility at the QC levels was better than 10% (relative standard deviation, RSD), accuracy at these levels ranged from -3.7% to 11.3%. Total extraction efficiency, tested at three concentrations, ranged from 92.5% to 106.4%. Matrix interferences were excluded by post-column infusion experiments. To prove the applicability of the assay in clinical cohorts, a sample set (n = 298) stemming from study patients under AED/oral HC co-medication was screened for progestin plasma levels. This method has to be considered a research-use-only assay and must not be used for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes, since it did not undergo formal performance evaluation in the sense of the IVD directive (98/79/EG) of the European Community. PMID:22160205

  15. Application of HPLC-DAD after SPE/QuEChERS with ZrO2-based sorbent in d-SPE clean-up step for pesticide analysis in edible oils.

    PubMed

    Tuzimski, Tomasz; Rejczak, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the solid-phase extraction/quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe (SPE/QuEChERS) technique was adapted to develop a simple sample treatment for multi-residue pesticide analysis of edible oils. The proposed method is based on liquid-liquid partitioning with acetonitrile followed by dispersive solid phase extraction using zirconia-coated silica particles for extract purification. To evaluate the described method, 21 pesticides belonging to different chemical classes were analysed using high performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection (HPLC-DAD). For validation purposes, recovery studies were performed at 75 ng g(-1), 125 ng g(-1), 250 ng g(-1), 500 ng g(-1) and 1000 ng g(-1) levels. Recoveries were over the range of 50-130% for most of the analytes, with relative standard deviations less than 15% being observed. HPLC-DAD provided suitable linearity, precision and accuracy. The validated method was successfully applied to the analysis of edible oil samples selected from the market. PMID:26212943

  16. Bovine lactoferricin causes apoptosis in Jurkat T-leukemia cells by sequential permeabilization of the cell membrane and targeting of mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Mader, Jamie S.; Richardson, Angela; Salsman, Jayme; Top, Deniz; Antueno, Roberto de; Duncan, Roy; Hoskin, David W. . E-mail: d.w.hoskin@dal.ca

    2007-07-15

    Bovine lactoferricin (LfcinB) is a cationic antimicrobial peptide that kills Jurkat T-leukemia cells by the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. However, the process by which LfcinB triggers mitochondria-dependent apoptosis is not well understood. Here, we show that LfcinB-induced apoptosis in Jurkat T-leukemia cells was preceded by LfcinB binding to, and progressive permeabilization of the cell membrane. Colloidal gold electron microscopy revealed that LfcinB entered the cytoplasm of Jurkat T-leukemia cells prior to the onset of mitochondrial depolarization. LfcinB was not internalized by endocytosis because endocytosis inhibitors did not prevent LfcinB-induced cytotoxicity. Furthermore, intracellular delivery of LfcinB via fusogenic liposomes caused the death of Jurkat T-leukemia cells, as well as normal human fibroblasts. Collectively, these findings suggest that LfcinB caused damage to the cell membrane that allowed LfcinB to enter the cytoplasm of Jurkat T-leukemia cells and mediate cytotoxicity. In addition, confocal microscopy showed that intracellular LfcinB co-localized with mitochondria in Jurkat T-leukemia cells, while flow cytometry and colloidal gold electron microscopy showed that LfcinB rapidly associated with purified mitochondria. Furthermore, purified mitochondria treated with LfcinB rapidly lost transmembrane potential and released cytochrome c. We conclude that LfcinB-induced apoptosis in Jurkat T-leukemia cells resulted from cell membrane damage and the subsequent disruption of mitochondrial membranes by internalized LfcinB.

  17. Real-Time Data Management, IP Telemetry, Data Integration, and Data Center Operations for the Source Physics Experiment (SPE), Nevada National Security Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plank, G.; Slater, D.; Torrisi, J.; Presser, R.; Williams, M.; Smith, K. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Nevada Seismological Laboratory (NSL) manages time-series data and high-throughput IP telemetry for the National Center for Nuclear Security (NCNS) Source Physics Experiment (SPE), underway on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). During active-source experiments, SPE's heterogeneous systems record over 350 channels of a variety of data types including seismic, infrasound, acoustic, and electro-magnetic. During the interim periods, broadband and short period instruments record approximately 200 channels of continuous, high-sample-rate seismic data. Frequent changes in sensor and station configurations create a challenging meta-data environment. Meta-data account for complete operational histories, including sensor types, serial numbers, gains, sample rates, orientations, instrument responses, data-logger types etc. To date, these catalogue 217 stations, over 40 different sensor types, and over 1000 unique recording configurations (epochs). Facilities for processing, backup, and distribution of time-series data currently span four Linux servers, 60Tb of disk capacity, and two data centers. Bandwidth, physical security, and redundant power and cooling systems for acquisition, processing, and backup servers are provided by NSL's Reno data center. The Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) System Computer Services (SCS) in Las Vegas provides similar facilities for the distribution server. NSL staff handle setup, maintenance, and security of all data management systems. SPE PIs have remote access to meta-data, raw data, and CSS3.0 compilations, via SSL-based transfers such as rsync or secure-copy, as well as shell access for data browsing and limited processing. Meta-data are continuously updated and posted on the Las Vegas distribution server as station histories are better understood and errors are corrected. Raw time series and refined CSS3.0 data compilations with standardized formats are transferred to the Las Vegas data server as available. For better data availability and station monitoring, SPE is beginning to leverage NSL's wide-area digital IP network with nine SPE stations and six Rock Valley area stations that stream continuous recordings in real time to the NSL Reno data center. These stations, in addition to eight regional legacy stations supported by National Security Technologies (NSTec), are integrated with NSL's regional monitoring network and constrain a high-quality local earthquake catalog for NNSS. The telemetered stations provide critical capabilities for SPE, and infrastructure for earthquake response on NNSS as well as southern Nevada and the Las Vegas area.

  18. Plant microtubules reorganization under the indirect UV-B exposure and during UV-B-induced programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Krasylenko, Yuliya A.; Yemets, Alla I.; Blume, Yaroslav B.

    2013-01-01

    The role of microtubules in cellular pathways of UV-B signaling in plants as well as in related structural cell response become into focus of few last publications. As microtubules in plant cell reorient/reorganize (become randomized, fragmented or depolymerized) in a response to direct UV-B exposure, these cytoskeletal components could be involved into UV-B signaling pathways as highly responsive players. In the current addendum, indirect UV-B-induced microtubules reorganization in cells of shielded Arabidopsis thaliana (GFP-MAP4) primary roots and the correspondence of microtubules depolymerization with the typical hallmarks of the programmed cell death in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 (GFP-MBD) cells are discussed. PMID:23438586

  19. The interplay of transcription factors in suppression of UV-B induced flavonol accumulation by flg22.

    PubMed

    Schenke, Dirk; Cai, Daguang

    2014-04-10

    Biotic stress can be mimicked by application of elicitors, which comprise of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs). Treatment of plant cell cultures with MAMPs such as flg22 suppressed the expression of UV-B-induced flavonol pathway genes (FPGs) in parsley, carrot and Arabidopsis. This is thought to allow the plant focusing its secondary metabolism on the pathogen defense during MAMP-triggered immunity (MTI). Recently we reported that this suppression also depends on prevention of histone 3 acetylation at lysine 9 (H3K9ac), a hallmark for gene activation. Here we describe a possible regulation between UV-B and flg22 signaling cascades, and the interplay of MYB and WRKY transcription factors in regulating the expression of the FPGs. PMID:24721804

  20. A ?-SPE procedure for the determination of cannabinoids and their metabolites in urine by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Montesano, Camilla; Sergi, Manuel; Odoardi, Sara; Simeoni, Maria Chiara; Compagnone, Dario; Curini, Roberta

    2014-03-01

    In this paper the development and validation of a method for the analysis of THC-COOH, THC, THC-OH, CBD and CBN in their total form in urine by LC-MS/MS is presented. Tandem hydrolysis, i.e. enzymatic and basic, has been found optimal for the simultaneous analysis of the selected analytes in urine: basic hydrolysis is more effective for the cleavage of THC-COOH glucuronide while enzymatic hydrolysis allows the cleavage of the conjugated cannabinoids possessing ether bonds (THC, THC-OH, CBD). The whole procedure requires a 2h enzymatic hydrolysis using only 90?L of urine by ?-SPE extraction technique with C18 tips. Clear advantages in terms of time and of enzyme reduction are obtained and the cost of the analysis can be dramatically reduced. Satisfactory recovery values and matrix effect are obtained, and the chromatographic run, performed with a fused-core column, allowed the complete analyte separation in only 3min (total run 5.8min) with a common HPLC system. Furthermore the whole procedure has been validated according to SWGTOX guidelines: LOQs are between 6 and 10ppb, quite lower than the requested cut-off for urine testing; intermediate reproducibility of the selected analytes is below 10% and accuracy is between 85% and 113%, except for CBD, included only for semi-quantitative determination. PMID:24469020

  1. Detailed comparison of observed dose-time profile of October 19-20, 1989 SPE on Mir with model calculations.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, G D; Atwell, W

    1999-06-01

    The dose rate dynamics of the October 19-20, 1989 solar energetic particle (SPE) event as observed by the Liulin instrument onboard the Mir orbital station was analyzed in light of new calculations of the geomagnetic cutoff and improved estimates of the >100 MeV energy spectra from the GOES satellite instrument. The new calculations were performed using the as-flown Mir orbital trajectory and includes time variations of the cutoff rigidity due to changes in the Kp index. Although the agreement of total event integrated calculated dose to the measured dose is good, it results from some measured dose-time profile being higher and some lower than model calculations. They point to the need to include the diurnal variation of the geomagnetic cutoff and modifications of the cutoffs to variations in Kp in model calculations. Understanding of such events in light of the upcoming construction of the International Space Station during the period of maximum solar activity needs to be vigorously pursued. PMID:11543128

  2. [Simultaneous determination of 5 kinds of alkaloids in Kechuanning tablets by SPE-UPLC under different UV-vis wavelength].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-li; Li, Dong-mei; Feng, Li; Yuan, Hao

    2011-05-01

    The paper is to establish a method for simultaneous determination of 5 kinds of alkaloids in ephedra and poppy which are in Kechuanning tablets. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) was adopted in pretreatment, and a UPLC method with 2 different wavelengths had been developed: 210 nm for the detection of morphine, codeine phosphate, ephedrine hydrochloride and pseudoephedrine hydrochloride, and 251 nm for papaverine hydrochloride. The column used was Acquity UPLC BEH C18 (100 mm x 2.1 mm ID, 1.7 microm) with linear gradient elution using acetonitrile and 0.1% phosphoric acid. The flow rate was 0.4 mL.min-1, and the column temperature was 30 degrees C. The linear response range was 0.375 0 - 12.50 microg.mL-1 for morphine, 0.064 32 - 2.144 microg.mL-1 for codeine phosphate, 0.030 06 - 1.002 microg.mL-1 for papaverine hydrochloride, 1.126 - 37.52 microg.mL-1 for ephedrine hydrochloride, 0.287 8 - 9.592 microg.mL-1 for pseudoephedrine hydrochloride (r = 0.999 7). The average recoveries of these compounds were 99.26%, 100.6%, 95.29%, 100.1% and 97.48%, respectively. This is a more reasonable and credible method of quality control for Kechuanning tablets. PMID:21800548

  3. 3D MHD modeling of fusion plasmas with the PIXIE3D and SpeCyl codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfiglio, D.; Cappello, S.; Veranda, M.; Chacn, L.; Escande, D. F.

    2014-10-01

    Recent advancements in nonlinear 3D MHD modeling of fusion plasmas with the PIXIE3D and SpeCyl codes are reported. The fundamental mathematical correctness of the two codes was proven by a nonlinear cross-benchmark study. The codes have then been used to model the three main configurations for magnetic confinement, namely tokamak, stellarator and reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas. Qualitative agreement with respect to experimental observations in the RFX-mod device operated as both RFP and tokamak has been demonstrated by taking advantage of numerical features such as the possibility of applying 3D external magnetic perturbations. More recently, 3D magnetic perturbations have also been used to obtain stellarator fields. The toroidal coupling between MHD modes (as provided by PIXIE3D in toroidal geometry) affects both the MHD dynamics and the magnetic topology. In addition, PIXIE3D solves the heat transport equation with self-consistent coupling between resistivity (affecting Ohmic heating) and temperature. The use of this feature will be discussed, with particular attention to the RFP case.

  4. Quantitative measurements of corticosteroids in ex vivo samples using on-line SPE-LC/MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lan; Chiou, William J; Camp, Heidi S; Burns, David J; Cheng, Xueheng

    2009-01-15

    Abnormal elevation of 11beta-HSD1 activities in tissues, such as fat and brain, may contribute to the development of the abdominal obesity and Alzheimer disease, and the inhibition of 11beta-HSD1 might be beneficial to the management of these diseases. To assess the effects of pharmacologic inhibitors of 11beta-HSD1, we developed a fast LC/MS/MS method to quantify corticosteroids in minced tissue samples in the presence of 11beta-HSD substrates. The novel on-line SPE-LC/MS/MS method was developed with dual binary gradient and a throughput of 4.5 min/sample. A total of six corticosteroids (cortisol, cortisone, corticosterone, dehydrocorticosterone, dexamethasone, and dehydrodexamethasone) were studied. The lower limit of quantitation from 0.40 to 11.4 fmol and 4.5 orders magnitude of dynamic range were obtained for these six compounds. Three novel enzymatic bi-products, all isomers of cortisol, were observed in the liver or fat samples. Two of them were identified by matching the HPLC retention times and MS/MS spectra with authentic compounds. The potential interferences of these isomers and their removal are discussed. PMID:19119084

  5. Apoptosis in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, N; Anand, S

    1995-04-01

    Two distinct forms of cell death are known, necrosis which results from physical or chemical insult and apoptosis or programmed cell death results from programming within the cell for self destruction in response to internal and external stimuli. Apoptosis is a genetically governed process of cell death occurring in development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. It occurs to get rid of individual cells that become unwanted for various reasons or that present a threat to the organism. It is accompanied by distinct morphological changes. DNA fragmentation in most cases, and appears to be caused by the activities of specific genes. Its defective regulation may play a part in the aetiology of cancer, AIDS, autoimmune and degenerative diseases. Apoptosis offers potential for prevention and therapeutic modulation of these disorders. PMID:7649613

  6. Molecular mechanisms of hepatic apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, K

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is a prominent feature of liver diseases. Causative factors such as alcohol, viruses, toxic bile acids, fatty acids, drugs, and immune response, can induce apoptotic cell death via membrane receptors and intracellular stress. Apoptotic signaling network, including membrane death receptor-mediated cascade, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, lysosomal permeabilization, and mitochondrial dysfunction, is intermixed each other, but one mechanism may dominate at a particular stage. Mechanisms of hepatic apoptosis are complicated by multiple signaling pathways. The progression of liver disease is affected by the balance between apoptotic and antiapoptotic capabilities. Therapeutic options of liver injury are impacted by the clear understanding toward mechanisms of hepatic apoptosis. PMID:24434519

  7. Apoptosis: Targets in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Westphal, Sabine; Kalthoff, Holger

    2003-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is characterized by poor prognosis, because of late diagnosis and lack of response to chemo- and/or radiation therapies. Resistance to apoptosis mainly causes this insensitivity to conventional therapies. Apoptosis or programmed cell death is a central regulator of tissue homeostasis. Certain genetic disturbances of apoptotic signaling pathways have been found in carcinomas leading to tumor development and progression. In the past few years, the knowledge about the complex pathways of apoptosis has strongly increased and new therapeutic approaches based on this knowledge are being developed. This review will focus on the role of apoptotic proteins contributing to pancreatic cancer development and progression and will demonstrate possible targets to influence this deadly disease. PMID:12605713

  8. Molecular mechanisms of hepatic apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, K

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is a prominent feature of liver diseases. Causative factors such as alcohol, viruses, toxic bile acids, fatty acids, drugs, and immune response, can induce apoptotic cell death via membrane receptors and intracellular stress. Apoptotic signaling network, including membrane death receptor-mediated cascade, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, lysosomal permeabilization, and mitochondrial dysfunction, is intermixed each other, but one mechanism may dominate at a particular stage. Mechanisms of hepatic apoptosis are complicated by multiple signaling pathways. The progression of liver disease is affected by the balance between apoptotic and antiapoptotic capabilities. Therapeutic options of liver injury are impacted by the clear understanding toward mechanisms of hepatic apoptosis. PMID:24434519

  9. Role of apoptosis in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Todaro, Matilde; Zeuner, Ann; Stassi, Giorgio

    2004-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by the activity of autoreactive lymphocytes that produce antibodies targeting self tissue or organ for destruction. Although the pathogenesis of these diseases is poorly understood, during the past two decades basic research has indicated apoptosis as the pivotal molecular mechanism leading to autoimmunity. Recently cytokines have been invoked in the regulation of the apoptosis-related factors and death receptors in autoimmune target destruction. These research advances have contributed to the identification of mechanisms controlling autoimmunity for defining novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:14997028

  10. Use of diffusion-ordered NMR spectroscopy and HPLC-UV-SPE-NMR to identify undeclared synthetic drugs in medicines illegally sold as phytotherapies.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lorena M A; Filho, Elenilson G A; Thomasi, Sérgio S; Silva, Bianca F; Ferreira, Antonio G; Venâncio, Tiago

    2013-09-01

    The informal (and/or illegal) e-commerce of pharmaceutical formulations causes problems that governmental health agencies find hard to control, one of which concerns formulas sold as natural products. The purpose of this work was to explore the advantages and limitations of DOSY and HPLC-UV-SPE-NMR. These techniques were used to identify the components of a formula illegally marketed in Brazil as an herbal medicine possessing anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. DOSY was able to detect the major components present at higher concentrations. Complete characterization was achieved using HPLC-UV-SPE-NMR, and 1D and 2D NMR analyses enabled the identification of known synthetic drugs. These were ranitidine and a mixture of orphenadrine citrate, piroxicam, and dexamethasone, which are co-formulated in a remedy called Rheumazim that is used to relieve severe pain, but it is prohibited in Brazil because of a lack of sufficient pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information. PMID:23818305

  11. The mechanism of PDT-induced apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiongwei; Liu, Timon C.; Ding, Xin-Min; Gu, Ying; Liu, Fan-Guang; Liu, Song-Hao

    2003-12-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) can induce apoptosis in many cancer cells in vitro and in tumors in vivo. Cells become more oxidation with PDT, and maintain differentiation and proliferation, go apoptosis and necrosis with the increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration. ROS can induce apoptosis through mitochondria by inhibiting respiration chain or oxidative phosphorylation or damaging mitochondrial membrane. ROS can initiate apoptosis through endoplamic reticulum(ER) by opening Ca2+ channel or starting unfold protein response (UPR). ROS can also induce apoptosis through Golgi by producing ganglioside GD3 by use of ceramide, which induces apoptosis by activating caspase-3, JNK and p38 MAPK. It can also induce apoptosis by activating Bip (mitochondria-dependant) or preocaspase-12 (mitochondria- independent) or inhibiting protein synthesizing. There are so complicated cross-talking among different signal pathways or organnells that we think PDT-induced apoptosis is mediated by multiplex pathways and excessive levels in a refined network.

  12. Determination of polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in small volumes of human blood by high-throughput on-line SPE-LVI-GC-HRMS.

    PubMed

    Wittsiepe, Jürgen; Nestola, Marco; Kohne, Matthias; Zinn, Peter; Wilhelm, Michael

    2014-01-15

    A fully automated and robust method featuring on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) and large volume injection (LVI) gas chromatographic (GC) high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) is used to determine polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides, such as penta- and hexachlorobenzene (PeCBz, HxCBz), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCH) and 4,4'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethene (a metabolite of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT)), with only 200μl of human blood, serum or plasma. After spiking the sample with (13)C-labeled internal standards and precipitating the proteins, the sample is passed through a 10mm×2.0mm ID SPE cartridge filled with C18 material that adsorbs the analytes. After washing and drying, the cartridge is extracted with hexane/dodecane (99/1, v/v); the extract is directly injected into a LVI where GC/HRMS analysis follows. The fully automated system utilizes a robotic autosampler and a modular SPE system including two high-pressure syringe pumps, an automatic SPE cartridge exchanger unit and 6 switchable valves. All sample preparation steps are performed within 20min during the GC run of a previous sample, limiting the throughput with only the GC runtime. The contents are quantified using the isotope dilution method. Due to laboratory air contamination problems, we achieved LOQs of 0.017 (PeCBz), 0.009 (HxCBz), 0.007 (HCH), 0.016 (DDE), while for the six indicator PCBs, we achieved values of 0.030 (PCB-28), 0.044 (PCB-52), 0.024 (PCB-101), 0.009 (PCB-138), 0.015 (PCB-153) and 0.008 (PCB-180)μg/l serum. Under clean laboratory air conditions, these values may be improved. This method is recommended when high throughput is desirable and/or only small amounts of material are available, such as during studies involving children. PMID:24361859

  13. Bulk segregant analysis followed by high-throughput sequencing reveals the Neurospora cell cycle gene, ndc-1, to be allelic with the gene for ornithine decarboxylase, spe-1.

    PubMed

    Pomraning, Kyle R; Smith, Kristina M; Freitag, Michael

    2011-06-01

    With the advent of high-throughput DNA sequencing, it is now straightforward and inexpensive to generate high-density small nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) maps. Here we combined high-throughput sequencing with bulk segregant analysis to expedite mutation mapping. The general map location of a mutation can be identified by a single backcross to a strain enriched in SNPs compared to a standard wild-type strain. Bulk segregant analysis simultaneously increases the likelihood of determining the precise nature of the mutation. We present here a high-density SNP map between Neurospora crassa Mauriceville-1-c (FGSC2225) and OR74A (FGSC2489), the strains most typically used by Neurospora researchers to carry out mapping crosses. We further have demonstrated the utility of the Mauriceville sequence and our approach by mapping the mutation responsible for the only existing temperature-sensitive (ts) cell cycle mutation in Neurospora, nuclear division cycle-1 (ndc-1). The single T-to-C point mutation maps to the gene encoding ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), spe-1 (NCU01271), and changes a Phe to a Ser residue within a highly conserved motif next to the catalytic site of the enzyme. By growth on spermidine and complementation with a wild-type spe-1 gene, we showed that the defect in spe-1 is responsible for the ts ndc-1 mutation. Based on our results, we propose changing ndc-1 to spe-1(ndc), which reflects that this mutation results in an ODC with a specific nuclear division defect. PMID:21515825

  14. Development and optimization of SPE-HPLC-UV/ELSD for simultaneous determination of nine bioactive components in Shenqi Fuzheng Injection based on Quality by Design principles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Qu, Haibin

    2016-03-01

    A method combining solid phase extraction, high performance liquid chromatography, and ultraviolet/evaporative light scattering detection (SPE-HPLC-UV/ELSD) was developed according to Quality by Design (QbD) principles and used to assay nine bioactive compounds within a botanical drug, Shenqi Fuzheng Injection. Risk assessment and a Plackett-Burman design were utilized to evaluate the impact of 11 factors on the resolutions and signal-to-noise of chromatographic peaks. Multiple regression and Pareto ranking analysis indicated that the sorbent mass, sample volume, flow rate, column temperature, evaporator temperature, and gas flow rate were statistically significant (p < 0.05) in this procedure. Furthermore, a Box-Behnken design combined with response surface analysis was employed to study the relationships between the quality of SPE-HPLC-UV/ELSD analysis and four significant factors, i.e., flow rate, column temperature, evaporator temperature, and gas flow rate. An analytical design space of SPE-HPLC-UV/ELSD was then constructed by calculated Monte Carlo probability. In the presented approach, the operating parameters of sample preparation, chromatographic separation, and compound detection were investigated simultaneously. Eight terms of method validation, i.e., system-suitability tests, method robustness/ruggedness, sensitivity, precision, repeatability, linearity, accuracy, and stability, were accomplished at a selected working point. These results revealed that the QbD principles were suitable in the development of analytical procedures for samples in complex matrices. Meanwhile, the analytical quality and method robustness were validated by the analytical design space. The presented strategy provides a tutorial on the development of a robust QbD-compliant quantitative method for samples in complex matrices. Graphical Abstract Quality by design compliant SPE-HPLC-UV/ELSD method for quantitative analysis of Shenqi Fuzheng Injection. PMID:26825340

  15. Pancreatic carcinogenesis: apoptosis and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Onizuka, Shinya; Kawakami, Shunsuke; Taniguchi, Ken; Fujioka, Hikaru; Miyashita, Kosei

    2004-04-01

    Apoptosis and angiogenesis are critical biologic processes that are altered during carcinogenesis. Both apoptosis and angiogenesis may play an important role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Despite numerous advances in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer, its prognosis remains dismal and a new therapeutic approach is much needed. Recent research has revealed that apoptosis and angiogenesis are closely interrelated. Several reports show that a tumor suppresser gene that is expressed in pancreatic carcinoma and related to malignant potential can induce apoptosis and also inhibit angiogenesis. At present, it is generally accepted that tumor growth in cancers, including pancreatic cancer, depends on angiogenesis. We have identified 2 new angiogenesis inhibitors from a conditioned medium of human pancreatic carcinoma cell line (BxPC-3): antiangiogenic antithrombin III (aaAT-III) and vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf). These molecules were able to regress tumors in severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) mice, demonstrating potent inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. Moreover, the angiogenesis inhibitors induced tumor dormancy in the animal model. These results suggest that antiangiogenic therapy using angiogenesis inhibitors may become a new strategy for treatment of pancreatic cancer in the near future. PMID:15084979

  16. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Annie; Gibbons, Anne E.; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    Genetically-encoded fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) reporters are powerful tools to analyze cell signaling and function at single cell resolution in standard two-dimensional cell cultures, but these reporters rarely have been applied to three-dimensional environments. FRET interactions between donor and acceptor molecules typically are determined by changes in relative fluorescence intensities, but wavelength-dependent differences in absorption of light complicate this analysis method in three-dimensional settings. Here we report fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) with phasor analysis, a method that displays fluorescence lifetimes on a pixel-wise basis in real time, to quantify apoptosis in breast cancer cells stably expressing a genetically encoded FRET reporter. This microscopic imaging technology allowed us to identify treatment-induced apoptosis in single breast cancer cells in environments ranging from two-dimensional cell culture, spheroids with cancer and bone marrow stromal cells, and living mice with orthotopic human breast cancer xenografts. Using this imaging strategy, we showed that combined metabolic therapy targeting glycolysis and glutamine pathways significantly reduced overall breast cancer metabolism and induced apoptosis. We also determined that distinct subpopulations of bone marrow stromal cells control resistance of breast cancer cells to chemotherapy, suggesting heterogeneity of treatment responses of malignant cells in different bone marrow niches. Overall, this study establishes FLIM with phasor analysis as an imaging tool for apoptosis in cell-based assays and living mice, enabling real-time, cellular-level assessment of treatment efficacy and heterogeneity. PMID:26771007

  17. APOPTOSIS IN WHOLE MOUSE OVARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Apoptosis in Whole Mouse Ovaries
    Robert M. Zucker Susan C. Jeffay and Sally D. Perreault
    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, 27711.

  18. Magnetic Ligand Fishing as a Targeting Tool for HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR: α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Ligands and Alkylresorcinol Glycosides from Eugenia catharinae.

    PubMed

    Wubshet, Sileshi G; Brighente, Inês M C; Moaddel, Ruin; Staerk, Dan

    2015-11-25

    A bioanalytical platform combining magnetic ligand fishing for α-glucosidase inhibition profiling and HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR for structural identification of α-glucosidase inhibitory ligands, both directly from crude plant extracts, is presented. Magnetic beads with N-terminus-coupled α-glucosidase were synthesized and characterized for their inherent catalytic activity. Ligand fishing with the immobilized enzyme was optimized using an artificial test mixture consisting of caffeine, ferulic acid, and luteolin before proof-of-concept with the crude extract of Eugenia catharinae. The combination of ligand fishing and HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR identified myricetin 3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside, myricetin, quercetin, and kaempferol as α-glucosidase inhibitory ligands in E. catharinae. Furthermore, HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR analysis led to identification of six new alkylresorcinol glycosides, i.e., 5-(2-oxopentyl)resorcinol 4-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, 5-propylresorcinol 4-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, 5-pentylresorcinol 4-O-[α-D-apiofuranosyl-(1→6)]-β-D-glucopyranoside, 5-pentylresorcinol 4-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, 4-hydroxy-3-O-methyl-5-pentylresorcinol 1-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, and 3-O-methyl-5-pentylresorcinol 1-O-[β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→6)]-β-D-glucopyranoside. PMID:26496505

  19. Direct rapid analysis of multiple PPCPs in municipal wastewater using ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry without SPE pre-concentration.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ke; Li, Bing; Zhang, Tong

    2012-08-13

    Ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) was utilized to develop a rapid, sensitive and reliable method without solid phase extraction (SPE) pre-concentration for trace analysis of 11 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in influent and effluent from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). This method not only shortened the analysis time but also reduced analysis cost significantly by omitting SPE process and avoiding the consumption of SPE cartridge. Detection parameters for UHPLC-MS/MS analysis were optimized, including sample pH, eluent, mobile phase (solvent and additive), column temperature, and flow rate. Under the optimal conditions, all analytes were well separated and detected within 8.0min by UHPLC-MS/MS. The method quantification limits (MQLs) for the 11 PPCPs ranged from 0.040 to 88ngL(-1) and from 0.030 to 90ngL(-1) for influent and effluent, respectively. The matrix effect was systematically investigated and quantified for different types of samples. The analysis of influent and effluent samples of two WWTPs in Hong Kong revealed the presence of 11 PPCPs, including acyclovir, benzophenone-3, benzylparaben, carbamazepine, ethylparaben, fluconazole, fluoxetine, methylparaben, metronidazole, propylparaben, and ranitidine. Their concentrations ranged from 9.1 to 1810ngL(-1) in influent and from 6.5 to 823ngL(-1) in effluent samples collected from Hong Kong WWTPs. PMID:22790701

  20. Crystal structure of the zymogen form of the group A Streptococcus virulence factor SpeB: An integrin-binding cysteine protease

    PubMed Central

    Kagawa, Todd F.; Cooney, Jakki C.; Baker, Heather M.; McSweeney, Sean; Liu, Mengyao; Gubba, Siddeswar; Musser, James M.; Baker, Edward N.

    2000-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria secrete protein toxins that weaken or disable their host, and thereby act as virulence factors. We have determined the crystal structure of streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SpeB), a cysteine protease that is a major virulence factor of the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes and participates in invasive disease episodes, including necrotizing fasciitis. The structure, determined for the 40-kDa precursor form of SpeB at 1.6-? resolution, reveals that the protein is a distant homologue of the papain superfamily that includes the mammalian cathepsins B, K, L, and S. Despite negligible sequence identity, the protease portion has the canonical papain fold, albeit with major loop insertions and deletions. The catalytic site differs from most other cysteine proteases in that it lacks the Asn residue of the Cys-His-Asn triad. The prosegment has a unique fold and inactivation mechanism that involves displacement of the catalytically essential His residue by a loop inserted into the active site. The structure also reveals the surface location of an integrin-binding Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif that is a feature unique to SpeB among cysteine proteases and is linked to the pathogenesis of the most invasive strains of S. pyogenes. PMID:10681429

  1. Development of a bioassay-coupled HPLC-SPE-ttNMR platform for identification of ?-glucosidase inhibitors in apple peel (Malus domestica Borkh.).

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jeppe S; Lauridsen, Michael B; Dragsted, Lars O; Nielsen, John; Staerk, Dan

    2012-12-01

    This work describes an analytical platform based on a high-resolution ?-glucosidase inhibition assay in combination with hyphenation of high-performance liquid chromatography, solid-phase extraction, and tube-transfer nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, i.e., HPLC-SPE-ttNMR/high-resolution ?-glucosidase assay. The platform enables fast screening for individual ?-glucosidase inhibitory analytes in complex matrices, followed by structural identification targeted these ?-glucosidase inhibitors, as demonstrated by a proof-of-concept study with extract of 'Pink Lady' apple peel. A scout-separation produced a high-resolution biochromatogram and a HPLC chromatogram, which were used for pinpointing HPLC peaks displaying ?-glucosidase inhibition. Active analytes were cumulatively trapped on SPE cartridges and the structures identified by (1)H NMR experiments obtained in the HPLC-SPE-ttNMR mode. (-)-Epicatechin (1), reynoutrin (3) and avicularin (4) were identified as active compounds. IC(50) of the active compounds were determined along with six structurally related compounds. Quercetin was the most potent inhibitor with an IC(50) of 8.10.4?M. The platform proved to be an efficient method for the identification of ?-glucosidase inhibitors. PMID:22953911

  2. Application of Colorimetric Solid Phase Extraction (C-SPE) to Monitoring Nickel(II) and Lead(II) in Spacecraft Water Supplies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz, Neil C.; Gazda, Daniel B.; Fritz, James S.; Porter, Marc D.; Rutz, Jeff; Mudgett, Paul; Schultz, John

    2004-01-01

    Archived water samples collected on the International Space Station (ISS) and returned to Earth for analysis have, in a few instances, contained trace levels of heavy metals. Building on our previous advances using Colorimetric Solid Phase Extraction (C-SPE) as a biocide monitoring technique, we are devising methods for the low level monitoring of nickel(II), lead(II) and other heavy metals. C-SPE is a sorption-spectrophotometric platform based on the extraction of analytes onto a membrane impregnated with a colorimetric reagent that are then quantified on the surface of the membrane using a diffuse reflectance spectrophotometer. Along these lines, we have determined nickel(II) via complexation with dimethylglyoxime (DMG) and begun to examine the analysis of lead(II) by its reaction with 2,5- dimercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole (DMTD) and 4-(2- pyridylazo)-resorcinol (PAR). These developments are also extending a new variant of C-SPE in which immobilized reagents are being incorporated into this methodology in order to optimize sample reaction conditions and to introduce the colorimetric reagent. This paper describes the status of our development of these two new methods.

  3. uPAR and Cathepsin B Downregulation Induces Apoptosis by Targeting Calcineurin A to BAD via Bcl-2 in Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Malla, Rama Rao; Gopinath, Sreelatha; Gondi, Christopher S.; Alapati, Kiranmai; Dinh, Dzung H.; Tsung, Andrew J.; Rao, Jasti S.

    2011-01-01

    Cathepsin B and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) are postulated to play key roles in glioma invasion. Calcineurin is one of the key regulators of mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis, but its mechanism is poorly understood. Hence, we studied subcellular localization of calcineurin after transcriptional downregulation of uPAR and cathepsin B in glioma. In the present study, efficient downregulation of uPAR and cathepsin B increased the translocation of calcineurin A from the mitochondria to the cytosol, decreased pBAD (S136) expression and its interaction with 14-3-3?, and increased the interaction of BAD with Bcl-Xl. Co-depletion of uPAR and cathepsin B induced mitochondrial translocation of BAD and caspase 3 as well as PARP activation, cytochrome c and SMAC release. These effects were inhibited by FK506 (10 ?M), a specific inhibitor of calcineurin. Calcineurin A was co-localized and also co-immunoprecipitated with Bcl-2. This interaction decreased with co-depletion of uPAR and cathepsin B and also with Bcl-2 inhibitor, HA 14-1 (20 ?g/mL). Altered localization and interaction of calcineurin A with Bcl-2 was also observed in vivo when uPAR and cathepsin B were downregulated. In conclusion, downregulation of uPAR and cathepsin B induced apoptosis by targeting calcineurin A to BAD via Bcl-2 in glioma. PMID:21964739

  4. An optimized and validated SPE-LC-MS/MS method for the determination of caffeine and paraxanthine in hair.

    PubMed

    De Kesel, Pieter M M; Lambert, Willy E; Stove, Christophe P

    2015-11-01

    Caffeine is the probe drug of choice to assess the phenotype of the drug metabolizing enzyme CYP1A2. Typically, molar concentration ratios of paraxanthine, caffeine's major metabolite, to its precursor are determined in plasma following administration of a caffeine test dose. The aim of this study was to develop and validate an LC-MS/MS method for the determination of caffeine and paraxanthine in hair. The different steps of a hair extraction procedure were thoroughly optimized. Following a three-step decontamination procedure, caffeine and paraxanthine were extracted from 20 mg of ground hair using a solution of protease type VIII in Tris buffer (pH 7.5). Resulting hair extracts were cleaned up on Strata-X™ SPE cartridges. All samples were analyzed on a Waters Acquity UPLC® system coupled to an AB SCIEX API 4000™ triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The final method was fully validated based on international guidelines. Linear calibration lines for caffeine and paraxanthine ranged from 20 to 500 pg/mg. Precision (%RSD) and accuracy (%bias) were below 12% and 7%, respectively. The isotopically labeled internal standards compensated for the ion suppression observed for both compounds. Relative matrix effects were below 15%RSD. The recovery of the sample preparation procedure was high (>85%) and reproducible. Caffeine and paraxanthine were stable in hair for at least 644 days. The effect of the hair decontamination procedure was evaluated as well. Finally, the applicability of the developed procedure was demonstrated by determining caffeine and paraxanthine concentrations in hair samples of ten healthy volunteers. The optimized and validated method for determination of caffeine and paraxanthine in hair proved to be reliable and may serve to evaluate the potential of hair analysis for CYP1A2 phenotyping. PMID:26452792

  5. Dispersal of Group A Streptococcal Biofilms by the Cysteine Protease SpeB Leads to Increased Disease Severity in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Kristie L.; Roberts, Amity L.; Holder, Robert C.; Reid, Sean D.

    2011-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a Gram-positive human pathogen best known for causing pharyngeal and mild skin infections. However, in the 1980's there was an increase in severe GAS infections including cellulitis and deeper tissue infections like necrotizing fasciitis. Particularly striking about this elevation in the incidence of severe disease was that those most often affected were previously healthy individuals. Several groups have shown that changes in gene content or regulation, as with proteases, may contribute to severe disease; yet strains harboring these proteases continue to cause mild disease as well. We and others have shown that group A streptococci (MGAS5005) reside within biofilms both in vitro and in vivo. That is to say that the organism colonizes a host surface and forms a 3-dimensional community encased in a protective matrix of extracellular protein, DNA and polysaccharide(s). However, the mechanism of assembly or dispersal of these structures is unclear, as is the relationship of these structures to disease outcome. Recently we reported that allelic replacement of the streptococcal regulator srv resulted in constitutive production of the streptococcal cysteine protease SpeB. We further showed that the constitutive production of SpeB significantly decreased MGAS5005Δsrv biofilm formation in vitro. Here we show that mice infected with MGAS5005Δsrv had significantly larger lesion development than wild-type infected animals. Histopathology, Gram-staining and immunofluorescence link the increased lesion development with lack of disease containment, lack of biofilm formation, and readily detectable levels of SpeB in the tissue. Treatment of MGAS5005Δsrv infected lesions with a chemical inhibitor of SpeB significantly reduced lesion formation and disease spread to wild-type levels. Furthermore, inactivation of speB in the MGAS5005Δsrv background reduced lesion formation to wild-type levels. Taken together, these data suggest a mechanism by which GAS disease may transition from mild to severe through the Srv mediated dispersal of GAS biofilms. PMID:21547075

  6. Apoptosis-inducing and apoptosis-preventing functions of poliovirus.

    PubMed

    Tolskaya, E A; Romanova, L I; Kolesnikova, M S; Ivannikova, T A; Smirnova, E A; Raikhlin, N T; Agol, V I

    1995-02-01

    Data showing that an apoptotic reaction (the exit into the cytoplasm and nucleolytic internucleosomal degradation of chromosomal DNA, compaction and fragmentation of chromatin, cellular shrinkage, and cytoplasmic blebbing) developed in a subline of HeLa-S3 cells upon nonpermissive poliovirus infection with either a guanidine-sensitive poliovirus in the presence of guanidine, a guanidine-dependent mutant in the absence of guanidine, or certain temperature-sensitive mutants at a restrictive temperature are presented. Essentially, no apoptotic reaction occurred upon permissive infection of these cells. Both permissive and nonpermissive infections resulted in the inhibition of host protein synthesis. Actinomycin D or cycloheximide also elicited a rapid apoptotic reaction in uninfected cells. However, preinfection or coinfection with poliovirus prevented the apoptotic response to the addition of actinomycin D, and preinfection blocked cycloheximide-induced apoptosis as well. These data fit a model in which the cells used are prepared to develop apoptosis, with their viability due to the presence of certain short-lived mRNA and protein species. Poliovirus infection turns on two oppositely directed sets of reactions. On the one hand, the balance is driven toward apoptosis, probably via the shutoff of host macromolecular synthesis. On the other hand, viral protein exhibits antiapoptotic activity, thereby preventing premature cell death. To our knowledge, this is the first description of an antiapoptotic function for an RNA virus. PMID:7529330

  7. Apoptosis in virus infection dynamics models

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ruili; Dong, Yueping; Huang, Gang; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, on the basis of the simplified two-dimensional virus infection dynamics model, we propose two extended models that aim at incorporating the influence of activation-induced apoptosis which directly affects the population of uninfected cells. The theoretical analysis shows that increasing apoptosis plays a positive role in control of virus infection. However, after being included the third population of cytotoxic T lymphocytes immune response in HIV-infected patients, it shows that depending on intensity of the apoptosis of healthy cells, the apoptosis can either promote or comfort the long-term evolution of HIV infection. Further, the discrete-time delay of apoptosis is incorporated into the pervious model. Stability switching occurs as the time delay in apoptosis increases. Numerical simulations are performed to illustrate the theoretical results and display the different impacts of a delay in apoptosis. PMID:24963975

  8. Cell intrinsic role of NF-?B-inducing kinase in regulating T cell-mediated immune and autoimmune responses.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanchuan; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Xiaofei; Xie, Xiaoping; Chen, Xiang; Jie, Zuliang; Zou, Qiang; Hu, Hongbo; Zhu, Lele; Cheng, Xuhong; Brightbill, Hans D; Wu, Lawren C; Wang, Linfang; Sun, Shao-Cong

    2016-01-01

    NF-?B inducing kinase (NIK) is a central component of the noncanonical NF-?B signaling pathway. Although NIK has been extensively studied for its function in the regulation of lymphoid organ development and B-cell maturation, the role of NIK in regulating T cell functions remains unclear and controversial. Using T cell-conditional NIK knockout mice, we here demonstrate that although NIK is dispensable for thymocyte development, it has a cell-intrinsic role in regulating the homeostasis and function of peripheral T cells. T cell-specific NIK ablation reduced the frequency of effector/memory-like T cells and impaired T cell responses to bacterial infection. The T cell-conditional NIK knockout mice were also defective in generation of inflammatory T cells and refractory to the induction of a T cell-dependent autoimmune disease, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Our data suggest a crucial role for NIK in mediating the generation of effector T cells and their recall responses to antigens. Together, these findings establish NIK as a cell-intrinsic mediator of T cell functions in both immune and autoimmune responses. PMID:26912039

  9. Polymyxin B-Induced Release of Low-Molecular-Weight, Heat-Labile Enterotoxin from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Doyle J.; Evans, Dolores G.; Gorbach, Sherwood L.

    1974-01-01

    Polymyxin B-induced release of enterotoxin from Escherichia coli strain H-10407 was demonstrated. Incubation of E. coli cells derived from 6-h cultures with polymyxin caused the rapid release of enterotoxin with a molecular weight of approximately 20,000, as estimated by the gel filtration technique. The rapidity of the release of enterotoxin indicates that it probably resides in the periplasmic space of the cell. The low-molecular-weight enterotoxin possessed vascular permeability factor and diarrheagenic activities, both of which were found to be heat-labile. The permeability factor activity of this enterotoxin was neutralized by antisera prepared against crude E. coli enterotoxin, Vibrio cholerae enterotoxin (choleragen), and V. cholerae toxoid (choleragenoid), respectively. Supernatant fluids of 6-h E. coli cultures did not contain this molecular form of enterotoxin but did contain very high-molecular-weight, heat-labile enterotoxin. Incubation of cells derived from older (18 h) cultures with polymyxin caused the release of both low- (20,000) and high-molecular-weight forms of enterotoxin. We concluded that either the 20,000-dalton form of heat-labile enterotoxin is not released by E. coli under in vitro growth conditions or that enterotoxin released in this form is rapidly destroyed or inactivated. PMID:16558081

  10. NF-?B-induced microRNA-31 promotes epidermal hyperplasia by repressing protein phosphatase 6 in psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Sha; Xu, Zhenyao; Lou, Fangzhou; Zhang, Lingyun; Ke, Fang; Bai, Jing; Liu, Zhaoyuan; Liu, Jinlin; Wang, Hong; Zhu, Huiyuan; Sun, Yang; Cai, Wei; Gao, Yuanyuan; Su, Bing; Li, Qun; Yang, Xiao; Yu, Jianxiu; Lai, Yuping; Yu, Xue-Zhong; Zheng, Yan; Shen, Nan; Chin, Y. Eugene; Wang, Honglin

    2015-01-01

    NF-?B is constitutively activated in psoriatic epidermis. However, how activated NF-?B promotes keratinocyte hyperproliferation in psoriasis is largely unknown. Here we report that the NF-?B activation triggered by inflammatory cytokines induces the transcription of microRNA (miRNA) miR-31, one of the most dynamic miRNAs identified in the skin of psoriatic patients and mouse models. The genetic deficiency of miR-31 in keratinocytes inhibits their hyperproliferation, decreases acanthosis and reduces the disease severity in psoriasis mouse models. Furthermore, protein phosphatase 6 (ppp6c), a negative regulator that restricts the G1 to S phase progression, is diminished in human psoriatic epidermis and is directly targeted by miR-31. The inhibition of ppp6c is functionally important for miR-31-mediated biological effects. Moreover, NF-?B activation inhibits ppp6c expression directly through the induction of miR-31, and enhances keratinocyte proliferation. Thus, our data identify NF-?B-induced miR-31 and its target, ppp6c, as critical factors for the hyperproliferation of epidermis in psoriasis. PMID:26138368

  11. Nitric oxide functions as a signal in ultraviolet-B-induced baicalin accumulation in Scutellaria baicalensis suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Jie; Li, Xue-Qin; Sun, Jun-Wei; Jin, Song-Heng

    2014-01-01

    Stress induced by ultraviolet-B (UV-B) irradiation stimulates the accumulation of various secondary metabolites in plants. Nitric oxide (NO) serves as an important secondary messenger in UV-B stress-induced signal transduction pathways. NO can be synthesized in plants by either enzymatic catalysis or an inorganic nitrogen pathway. The effects of UV-B irradiation on the production of baicalin and the associated molecular pathways in plant cells are poorly understood. In this study, nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, NO release and the generation of baicalin were investigated in cell suspension cultures of Scutellaria baicalensis exposed to UV-B irradiation. UV-B irradiation significantly increased NOS activity, NO release and baicalin biosynthesis in S. baicalensis cells. Additionally, exogenous NO supplied by the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), led to a similar increase in the baicalin content as the UV-B treatment. The NOS inhibitor, N?-nitro-l-arginine (LNNA), and NO scavenger, 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) partially inhibited UV-B-induced NO release and baicalin accumulation. These results suggest that NO is generated by NOS or NOS-like enzymes and plays an important role in baicalin biosynthesis as part of the defense response of S. baicalensis cells to UV-B irradiation. PMID:24646913

  12. Nitric Oxide Functions as a Signal in Ultraviolet-B-Induced Baicalin Accumulation in Scutellaria baicalensis Suspension Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin-Jie; Li, Xue-Qin; Sun, Jun-Wei; Jin, Song-Heng

    2014-01-01

    Stress induced by ultraviolet-B (UV-B) irradiation stimulates the accumulation of various secondary metabolites in plants. Nitric oxide (NO) serves as an important secondary messenger in UV-B stress-induced signal transduction pathways. NO can be synthesized in plants by either enzymatic catalysis or an inorganic nitrogen pathway. The effects of UV-B irradiation on the production of baicalin and the associated molecular pathways in plant cells are poorly understood. In this study, nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, NO release and the generation of baicalin were investigated in cell suspension cultures of Scutellaria baicalensis exposed to UV-B irradiation. UV-B irradiation significantly increased NOS activity, NO release and baicalin biosynthesis in S. baicalensis cells. Additionally, exogenous NO supplied by the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), led to a similar increase in the baicalin content as the UV-B treatment. The NOS inhibitor, N?-nitro-l-arginine (LNNA), and NO scavenger, 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) partially inhibited UV-B-induced NO release and baicalin accumulation. These results suggest that NO is generated by NOS or NOS-like enzymes and plays an important role in baicalin biosynthesis as part of the defense response of S. baicalensis cells to UV-B irradiation. PMID:24646913

  13. Cell intrinsic role of NF-κB-inducing kinase in regulating T cell-mediated immune and autoimmune responses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanchuan; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Xiaofei; Xie, Xiaoping; Chen, Xiang; Jie, Zuliang; Zou, Qiang; Hu, Hongbo; Zhu, Lele; Cheng, Xuhong; Brightbill, Hans D; Wu, Lawren C.; Wang, Linfang; Sun, Shao-Cong

    2016-01-01

    NF-κB inducing kinase (NIK) is a central component of the noncanonical NF-κB signaling pathway. Although NIK has been extensively studied for its function in the regulation of lymphoid organ development and B-cell maturation, the role of NIK in regulating T cell functions remains unclear and controversial. Using T cell-conditional NIK knockout mice, we here demonstrate that although NIK is dispensable for thymocyte development, it has a cell-intrinsic role in regulating the homeostasis and function of peripheral T cells. T cell-specific NIK ablation reduced the frequency of effector/memory-like T cells and impaired T cell responses to bacterial infection. The T cell-conditional NIK knockout mice were also defective in generation of inflammatory T cells and refractory to the induction of a T cell-dependent autoimmune disease, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Our data suggest a crucial role for NIK in mediating the generation of effector T cells and their recall responses to antigens. Together, these findings establish NIK as a cell-intrinsic mediator of T cell functions in both immune and autoimmune responses. PMID:26912039

  14. Interaction of COP1 and UVR8 regulates UV-B-induced photomorphogenesis and stress acclimation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Favory, Jean-Jacques; Stec, Agnieszka; Gruber, Henriette; Rizzini, Luca; Oravecz, Attila; Funk, Markus; Albert, Andreas; Cloix, Catherine; Jenkins, Gareth I; Oakeley, Edward J; Seidlitz, Harald K; Nagy, Ferenc; Ulm, Roman

    2009-01-01

    The ultraviolet-B (UV-B) portion of the solar radiation functions as an environmental signal for which plants have evolved specific and sensitive UV-B perception systems. The UV-B-specific UV RESPONSE LOCUS 8 (UVR8) and the multifunctional E3 ubiquitin ligase CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (COP1) are key regulators of the UV-B response. We show here that uvr8-null mutants are deficient in UV-B-induced photomorphogenesis and hypersensitive to UV-B stress, whereas overexpression of UVR8 results in enhanced UV-B photomorphogenesis, acclimation and tolerance to UV-B stress. By using sun simulators, we provide evidence at the physiological level that UV-B acclimation mediated by the UV-B-specific photoregulatory pathway is indeed required for survival in sunlight. At the molecular level, we demonstrate that the wild type but not the mutant UVR8 and COP1 proteins directly interact in a UV-B-dependent, rapid manner in planta. These data collectively suggest that UV-B-specific interaction of COP1 and UVR8 in the nucleus is a very early step in signalling and responsible for the plant's coordinated response to UV-B ensuring UV-B acclimation and protection in the natural environment. PMID:19165148

  15. Pin1 in Neuronal Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Esther B.E.; Bonni, Azad

    2009-01-01

    While the role of the prolyl isomerase Pin1 in dividing cells has long been recognized, Pin1s function in postmitotic neurons is poorly understood. We have identified a novel mechanism by which Pin1 mediates activation of the mitochondrial cell death machinery specifically in neurons. This perspective presents a sophisticated signaling pathway that triggers neuronal apoptosis upon JNK-mediated phosphorylation of the BH3-only protein BIMEL at serine 65. Pin1 is enriched at the mitochondria in neurons together with BIMEL and components of a neuron-specific JNK signaling complex and functions as a molecular switch that couples the phosphorylation of BIMEL by JNK to apoptosis specifically in neurons. We discuss how these findings relate to our understanding of the development of the nervous system and the pathogenesis of neurologic disorders. PMID:17568190

  16. Peptaibiomics: an advanced, rapid and selective analysis of peptaibiotics/peptaibols by SPE/LC-ES-MS.

    PubMed

    Krause, C; Kirschbaum, J; Brckner, H

    2006-06-01

    "Proteomics" and "peptidomics" are used as technical terms to define the analysis and study of all proteins and peptides expressed in an organism or tissue. In analogy we propose the name peptaibiomics for the analysis of a group of fungal peptide antibiotics (peptaibiotics) containing the characteristic amino acid Aib (alpha-aminoisobutyric acid). In analogy to the peptidome the complete expression of peptaibiotics by fungal multienzyme complexes should be named the peptaibiome. Peptaibiotics are defined as peptides containing Aib and exerting a variety of bioactivities. They comprise the sub-groups of N-acetylated peptaibols, characterized also by a C-terminal amide-linked 2-amino alcohol, and lipopeptaibols having in place of an acetyl group a lipophilic fatty acid acyl group. Furthermore, lipoaminopeptides are also known with long-chain fatty acid on the N-termini, a lipoamino acid in position three and a strongly basic secondary or tertiary amine form a subgroup of mixed forms which could not be integrated in one of these three previously mentioned groups. Here we present a specific and rapid screening method on the peptaibiome applicable directly onto filamentous fungi cultured in a single Petri dish. The method comprises solid-phase extraction (SPE) of peptaibiotics followed by on-line reversed-phase HPLC coupled to an ion trap electrospray tandem mass spectrometer (ES-MS). The presence of these peptides is indicated by characteristic mass differences of Deltam = 85.1 Da representing Aib-residues which can be observed in the b-series of acylium fragment ions resulting from ES-MS. Partial sequences can be deduced from the data and compared with structures compiled in electronic peptaibol data bases. The judgement is possible whether or not structures are novel, already known or related to known structures. Suitability of the method is demonstrated with the analysis of strains of Trichoderma and its teleomorph Hypocrea. New sequences of peptaibiotics are presented and those being related to established 10- to 18-residue peptaibols trichovirin, trichogin and trichotoxin, which have been described in the literature. PMID:16622603

  17. Transgenic overexpression of cdx1b induces metaplastic changes of gene expression in zebrafish esophageal squamous epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Chen, Hao; Liu, Xiuping; Zhang, Chengjin; Cole, Gregory J; Lee, Ju-Ahng; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2013-06-01

    Cdx2 has been suggested to play an important role in Barrett's esophagus or intestinal metaplasia (IM) in the esophagus. To investigate whether transgenic overexpression of cdx1b, the functional equivalent of mammalian Cdx2 in zebrafish, may lead to IM of zebrafish esophageal squamous epithelium, a transgenic zebrafish system was developed by expressing cdx1b gene under the control of zebrafish keratin 5 promoter (krt5p). Gene expression in the esophageal squamous epithelium of wild-type and transgenic zebrafish was analyzed by Affymetrix microarray and confirmed by in situ hybridization. Morphology, mucin expression, cell proliferation, and apoptosis were analyzed by hematoxylin & eosin (HE) staining, Periodic acid Schiff (PAS) Alcian blue staining, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemical staining, and TUNEL assay as well. cdx1b was found to be overexpressed in the nuclei of esophageal squamous epithelial cells of the transgenic zebrafish. Ectopic expression of cdx1b disturbed the development of this epithelium in larval zebrafish and induced metaplastic changes in gene expression in the esophageal squamous epithelial cells of adult zebrafish, that is, up-regulation of intestinal differentiation markers and down-regulation of squamous differentiation markers. However, cdx1b failed to induce histological IM, or to modulate cell proliferation and apoptosis in the squamous epithelium of adult transgenic zebrafish. PMID:23672288

  18. UV-B-Induced CPD Photolyase Gene Expression is Regulated by UVR8-Dependent and -Independent Pathways in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Teranishi, Mika; Yamaguchi, Hiroko; Matsushita, Tomonao; Watahiki, Masaaki K; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Li, Shao-Shan; Hidema, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Plants have evolved various mechanisms that protect against the harmful effects of UV-B radiation (280-315 nm) on growth and development. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) photolyase, the repair enzyme for UV-B-induced CPDs, is essential for protecting cells from UV-B radiation. Expression of the CPD photolyase gene (PHR) is controlled by light with various wavelengths including UV-B, but the mechanisms of this regulation remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the regulation of PHR expression by light with various wavelengths, in particular low-fluence UV-B radiation (280 nm, 0.2 µmol m(-2) s(-1)), in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings grown under light-dark cycles for 7 d and then adapted to the dark for 3 d. Low-fluence UV-B radiation induced CPDs but not reactive oxygen species. AtPHR expression was effectively induced by UV-B, UV-A (375 nm) and blue light. Expression induced by UV-A and blue light was predominantly regulated by the cryptochrome-dependent pathway, whereas phytochromes A and B played a minor but noticeable role. Expression induced by UV-B was predominantly regulated by the UVR8-dependent pathway. AtPHR expression was also mediated by a UVR8-independent pathway, which is correlated with CPD accumulation induced by UV-B radiation. These results indicate that Arabidopsis has evolved diverse mechanisms to regulate CPD photolyase expression by multiple photoreceptor signaling pathways, including UVR8-dependent and -independent pathways, as protection against harmful effects of UV-B radiation. PMID:26272552

  19. UV-B-induced signaling events leading to enhanced-production of catharanthine in Catharanthus roseus cell suspension cultures.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Ramani S; Chelliah J

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Elicitations are considered to be an important strategy towards improved in vitro production of secondary metabolites. In cell cultures, biotic and abiotic elicitors have effectively stimulated the production of plant secondary metabolites. However, molecular basis of elicitor-signaling cascades leading to increased production of secondary metabolites of plant cell is largely unknown. Exposure of Catharanthus roseus cell suspension culture to low dose of UV-B irradiation was found to increase the amount of catharanthine and transcription of genes encoding tryptophan decarboxylase (Tdc) and strictosidine synthase (Str). In the present study, the signaling pathway mediating UV-B-induced catharanthine accumulation in C. roseus suspension cultures were investigated.RESULTS: Here, we investigate whether cell surface receptors, medium alkalinization, Ca2+ influx, H2O2, CDPK and MAPK play required roles in UV-B signaling leading to enhanced production of catharanthine in C. roseus cell suspension cultures. C. roseus cells were pretreated with various agonists and inhibitors of known signaling components and their effects on the accumulation of Tdc and Str transcripts as well as amount of catharanthine production were investigated by various molecular biology techniques. It has been found that the catharanthine accumulation and transcription of Tdc and Str were inhibited by 3-4 fold upon pretreatment of various inhibitors like suramin, N-acetyl cysteine, inhibitors of calcium fluxes, staurosporine etc.CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrate that cell surface receptor(s), Ca2+ influx, medium alkalinization, CDPK, H2O2 and MAPK play significant roles in UV-B signaling leading to stimulation of Tdc and Str genes and the accumulation of catharanthine in C. roseus cell suspension cultures. Based on these findings, a model for signal transduction cascade has been proposed.

  20. Toxicological screening of human plasma by on-line SPE-HPLC-DAD: identification and quantification of acidic and neutral drugs.

    PubMed

    Mut, Ludmila; Grobosch, Thomas; Binscheck-Domaß, Torsten; Frenzel, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    A multi-analyte screening method for the quantification of 50 acidic/neutral drugs in human plasma based on on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE)-HPLC with photodiode array detection (DAD) was developed, validated and applied for clinical investigation. Acetone and methanol for protein precipitation, three different SPE materials (two electro-neutral, one strong anion-exchange, one weak cation-exchange) for on-line extraction, five HPLC-columns [one C18 (GeminiNX), two phenyl-hexyl (Gemini C6 -Phenyl, Kinetex Phenyl-Hexyl) and two pentafluorophenyl (LunaPFP(2), KinetexPFP)] for analytical separation were tested. For sample pre-treatment, acetone in the ratio 1:2 (plasma:acetone) showed a better baseline and fewer matrix peaks in the chromatogram than methanol. Only the strong anion-exchanger SPE cartridge (StrataX-A, pH 6) allowed the extraction of salicylic acid. Analytical separation was carried out on a Gemini C6 -Phenyl column (150 × 4.6 mm, 3 µm) using gradient elution with acetonitrile-water 90:10 (v/v) and phosphate buffer (pH 2.3). Linear calibration curves with correlation coefficients r ≥ 0.9950/0.9910 were obtained for 46/four analytes. Additionally, this method allows the quantification of 23 analytes for therapeutic drug monitoring. Limits of quantitation ranged from 0.1 (amobarbital) to 23 mg/L (salicylic acid). Inter-/intra-day precisions of quality control samples (low/high) were better than 13% and accuracy (bias) ranged from -14 to 10%. A computer-assisted database was created for automated detection of 223 analytes of toxicological interests. Four cases of multi-drug intoxications are presented. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26147870

  1. A Compact Laboratory Spectro-Goniometer (CLabSpeG) to Assess the BRDF of Materials. Presentation, Calibration and Implementation on Fagus sylvatica L. Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Biliouris, Dimitrios; Verstraeten, Willem W.; Dutr, Phillip; van Aardt, Jan A.N.; Muys, Bart; Coppin, Pol

    2007-01-01

    The design and calibration of a new hyperspectral Compact Laboratory Spectro-Goniometer (CLabSpeG) is presented. CLabSpeG effectively measures the bidirectional reflectance Factor (BRF) of a sample, using a halogen light source and an Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) spectroradiometer. The apparatus collects 4356 reflectance data readings covering the spectrum from 350 nm to 2500 nm by independent positioning of the sensor, sample holder, and light source. It has an azimuth and zenith resolution of 30 and 15 degrees, respectively. CLabSpeG is used to collect BRF data and extract Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) data of non-isotropic vegetation elements such as bark, soil, and leaves. Accurate calibration has ensured robust geometric accuracy of the apparatus, correction for the conicality of the light source, while sufficient radiometric stability and repeatability between measurements are obtained. The bidirectional reflectance data collection is automated and remotely controlled and takes approximately two and half hours for a BRF measurement cycle over a full hemisphere with 125 cm radius and 2.4 minutes for a single BRF acquisition. A specific protocol for vegetative leaf collection and measurement was established in order to investigate the possibility to extract BRDF values from Fagus sylvatica L. leaves under laboratory conditions. Drying leaf effects induce a reflectance change during the BRF measurements due to the laboratory illumination source. Therefore, the full hemisphere could not be covered with one leaf. Instead 12 BRF measurements per leaf were acquired covering all azimuth positions for a single light source zenith position. Data are collected in radiance format and reflectance is calculated by dividing the leaf cycle measurement with a radiance cycle of a Spectralon reference panel, multiplied by a Spectralon reflectance correction factor and a factor to correct for the conical effect of the light source. BRF results of measured leaves are presented.

  2. Comprehensive non-targeted analysis of contaminated groundwater of a former ammunition destruction site using 1H-NMR and HPLC-SPE-NMR/TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Godejohann, Markus; Heintz, Lea; Daolio, Cristina; Berset, Jean-Daniel; Muff, Daniel

    2009-09-15

    The aim of the present study was to explore the capabilities of the combination of 1H NMR (proton nuclear magnetic resonance) mixture analysis and HPLC-SPE-NMR/TOF-MS (high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to solid-phase extraction and nuclear magnetic resonance and time-of-flight mass spectrometry) for the characterization of xenobiotic contaminants in groundwater samples. As an example, solid-phase extracts of two groundwater samples taken from a former ammunition destruction site in Switzerland were investigated. 1H NMR spectra of postcolumn SPE enriched compounds, together with accurate mass measurements, allowed the structural elucidation of unknowns. This untargeted approach allowed us to identify expected residues of explosives such as 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (2,4,6-TNT), Hexogen (RDX) and Octogen (HMX), degradation products of TNT (1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (1,3,5-TNB), 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene (2-A-4,6-DNT), 3,5-dinitrophenol (3,5-DNP), 3,5-dinitroaniline (3,5-DNA), 2,6-dinitroanthranite, and 2-Hydroxy-4,6-dinitrobenzonitrile), benzoic acid, Bisphenol A (a known endocrine disruptor compound), and some toxicologically relevant additives for propelling charges: Centralite I (1,3-diethyl-1,3-diphenylurea), DPU (N,N-diphenylurethane), N,N-diphenylcarbamate (Acardite II), and N-methyl-N-phenylurethane. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the presence of these additives in environmental samples. Extraction recoveries for Centralite I and DPU have been determined. Contaminants identified by our techniques were quantified based on HPLC-UV (HPLC-ultraviolet detection) and 1H NMR mixture analysis. The concentrations of the contaminants ranged between 0.1 and 48 microg/L assuming 100% recovery for the SPE step. PMID:19806741

  3. Orally Administered Fructose Increases the Numbers of Peripheral Lymphocytes Reduced by Exposure of Mice to Gamma or SPE-like Proton Radiation.

    PubMed

    Romero-Weaver, A L; Ni, J; Lin, L; Kennedy, A R

    2014-07-01

    Exposure of the whole body or a major portion of the body to ionizing radiation can result in Acute Radiation Sickness (ARS), which can cause symptoms that range from mild to severe, and include death. One of the syndromes that can occur during ARS is the hematopoietic syndrome, which is characterized by a reduction in bone marrow cells as well as the number of circulating blood cells. Doses capable of causing this syndrome can result from conventional radiation therapy and accidental exposure to ionizing radiation. It is of concern that this syndrome could also occur during space exploration class missions in which astronauts could be exposed to significant doses of solar particle event (SPE) radiation. Of particular concern is the reduction of lymphocytes and granulocytes, which are major components of the immune system. A significant reduction in their numbers can compromise the immune system, causing a higher risk for the development of infections which could jeopardize the success of the mission. Although there are no specific countermeasures utilized for the ARS resulting from exposure to space radiation(s), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been proposed as a countermeasure for the low number of neutrophils caused by SPE radiation, but so far no countermeasure exists for a reduced number of circulating lymphocytes. The present study demonstrates that orally administered fructose significantly increases the number of peripheral lymphocytes reduced by exposure of mice to 2 Gy of gamma- or SPE-like proton radiation, making it a potential countermeasure for this biological end-point. PMID:25360417

  4. Orally Administered Fructose Increases the Numbers of Peripheral Lymphocytes Reduced by Exposure of Mice to Gamma or SPE-like Proton Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Weaver, A.L.; Ni, J.; Lin, L.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of the whole body or a major portion of the body to ionizing radiation can result in Acute Radiation Sickness (ARS), which can cause symptoms that range from mild to severe, and include death. One of the syndromes that can occur during ARS is the hematopoietic syndrome, which is characterized by a reduction in bone marrow cells as well as the number of circulating blood cells. Doses capable of causing this syndrome can result from conventional radiation therapy and accidental exposure to ionizing radiation. It is of concern that this syndrome could also occur during space exploration class missions in which astronauts could be exposed to significant doses of solar particle event (SPE) radiation. Of particular concern is the reduction of lymphocytes and granulocytes, which are major components of the immune system. A significant reduction in their numbers can compromise the immune system, causing a higher risk for the development of infections which could jeopardize the success of the mission. Although there are no specific countermeasures utilized for the ARS resulting from exposure to space radiation(s), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been proposed as a countermeasure for the low number of neutrophils caused by SPE radiation, but so far no countermeasure exists for a reduced number of circulating lymphocytes. The present study demonstrates that orally administered fructose significantly increases the number of peripheral lymphocytes reduced by exposure of mice to 2 Gy of gamma- or SPE-like proton radiation, making it a potential countermeasure for this biological end-point. PMID:25360417

  5. Human papillomavirus oncoproteins and apoptosis (Review)

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, PEIYUE; YUE, YING

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the literature and identify the association between human papillomavirus (HPV) oncoproteins and apoptosis. HPV-associated apoptosis may be primarily blocked by a number of oncoproteins, including E5, E6 and E7. E5 protein protects cells from tumor necrosis factor-associated apoptosis; the oncoprotein E6 predominantly inhibits apoptosis through the p53 pathway; and oncoprotein E7 is involved in apoptosis activation and inhibition. In addition, HPV oncoproteins are involved in activating or repressing the transcription of E6/E7. In conclusion, HPV oncoproteins, including E5, E6 and E7 protein, may interfere with apoptosis via certain regulatory principles. PMID:24348754

  6. Fully automated trace level determination of parent and alkylated PAHs in environmental waters by online SPE-LC-APPI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Cesar E; Wang, Chengtao; Gardinali, Piero R

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous compounds that enter the environment from natural and anthropogenic sources, often used as markers to determine the extent, fate, and potential effects on natural resources after a crude oil accidental release. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) after liquid-liquid extraction (LLE+GC-MS) has been extensively used to isolate and quantify both parent and alkylated PAHs. However, it requires labor-intensive extraction and cleanup steps and generates large amounts of toxic solvent waste. Therefore, there is a clear need for greener, faster techniques with enough reproducibility and sensitivity to quantify many PAHs in large numbers of water samples in a short period of time. This study combines online solid-phase extraction followed by liquid chromatography (LC) separation with dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) and tandem MS detection, to provide a one-step protocol that detects PAHs at low nanograms per liter with almost no sample preparation and with a significantly lower consumption of toxic halogenated solvents. Water samples were amended with methanol, fortified with isotopically labeled PAHs, and loaded onto an online SPE column, using a large-volume sample loop with an auxiliary LC pump for sample preconcentration and salt removal. The loaded SPE column was connected to an UPLC pump and analytes were backflushed to a Thermo Hypersil Green PAH analytical column where a 20-min gradient separation was performed at a variable flow rate. Detection was performed by a triple-quadrupole MS equipped with a gas-phase dopant delivery system, using 1.50mL of chlorobenzene dopant per run. In contrast, LLE+GC-MS typically use 150mL of organic solvents per sample, and methylene chloride is preferred because of its low boiling point. However, this solvent has a higher environmental persistence than chlorobenzene and is considered a carcinogen. The automated system is capable of performing injection, online SPE, inorganic species removal, LC separation, and MS/MS detection in 28min. Selective reaction monitoring was used to detect 28 parent PAHs and 15 families of alkylated PAHs. The methodology is comparable to traditional GC-MS and was tested with surface seawater, rainwater runoff, and a wastewater treatment plant effluent. Positive detections above reporting limits are described. The virtual absence of sample preparation could be particularly advantageous for real-time monitoring of discharge events that introduce PAHs into environmental compartments, such as accidental releases of petroleum derivates and other human-related events. This work covers optimization of APPI detection and SPE extraction efficiency, a comparison with LLE+GC-MS in terms of sensitivity and chromatographic resolution, and examples of environmental applications. PMID:24217946

  7. Preparation of guanidinium terminus-molecularly imprinted polymers for selective recognition and solid-phase extraction (SPE) of [arginine]-microcystins.

    PubMed

    Mbukwa, Elbert A; Msagati, Titus A M; Mamba, Bhekie B

    2013-05-01

    About 70 % of microcystin (MC) congeners reported in literature consist of L-arginine amino acid (R) with its guanidinium terminal extending out of the cyclic moiety of these MCs. Molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) bearing guanidinium terminus cavities was successfully synthesised using L-arginine as a template. Non-imprinted polymer (NIP; without template) was also synthesised for control purposes. The surface area, total pore volume and average pore diameter of MIP and NIP were 267.13 m(2)/g, 0.63 cm(3)/g and 88.39 ; 249.39 m(2)/g; 0.54 cm(3)/g and 87.14 , respectively. The polymers were investigated for selective recognition and extraction of [arginine]-MCs in water using solid-phase extraction/liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry (SPE/LC-ESI-MS) method. Representative model standard solutions (0.5-10.0 ?g/L) of MC-LR and MC-LY were spiked in distilled water, recovered by SPE and quantified by LC-ESI-MS. In this study, Oasis Waters HLB cartridges served as positive control SPE sorbents. The MIP recognised MC-LR with high recoveries (70.8-91.4 %; r(2) = 0.9962) comparable to HLB cartridges (71.0-91.85 %; r(2) = 0.9993), whereas the NIP did not recognise or retain MC-LR. Also, neither MIP nor NIP recognised or retained MC-LY. Extracts of environmental toxic Microcystis aeruginosa were subjected to SPE procedure employing MIP, NIP and HLB cartridges. Microcystin-LR, -YR, -RR, -WR, -(H4)YR and (D-Asp(3), Dha(7))MC-RR were extracted by MIP and HLB cartridges only as confirmed by LC-ESI-MS. This study demonstrated that the prepared MIP have potential applications for the removal in water and LC-ESI-MS identifications of MCs consisting the guanidinium moiety, i.e.[arginine]-MCs, and in particular targeting commonly encountered toxic congeners, MC-LR, -YR and -RR. PMID:23430182

  8. RTF+SpeX Near-IR Images and Spectra of the Moon Pre-impact and at Impact of SMART-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Ennico, Kimberly A.; Colaprete, Anthony; Lucey, Paul G.; Tokunaga, Alan T.; Rayner, John T.; Meech, Karen J.; Foing, B.; Ehrenfreund, P.

    2006-01-01

    We present SpeX 0.8-2.5 micron spectra and Br-gamma or J H or K-band images of the Moon on 2006 July 10 UT, 2006 Sep 1 UT, and 2006 Sep 3 UT. The first two dates are data taken in preparation (near Full Moon and 1 st quarter Moon) for observing the impact of ESA's SMART-1 Lunar satellite on 2006 Sep 3 UT. We hope to be presenting images (about 1 arc minute by 1 arc minute), and low resolution (Prism mode) spectra of the SMART-1 impact to be taken with the 60 arc second long slit.

  9. Taxol induces caspase-10-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Jung; Wu, Ching-Haung; Gordon, John D; Zhong, Xiaoling; Emami, Armaghan; Safa, Ahmad R

    2004-12-01

    Taxol (paclitaxel) is known to inhibit cell growth and trigger significant apoptosis in various cancer cells. Although taxol induces apoptosis of cancer cells, its exact mechanism of action is not yet known. In this study we investigated death receptors, FAS-associated death domain protein (FADD), the activation of caspases-10 and -8 as well as the downstream caspases, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in taxol-induced apoptosis in the CCRF-HSB-2 human lymphoblastic leukemia cell line. Pretreating the cells with neutralizing antibodies to Fas, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha receptor 1, or TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptors (DR4 and DR5) did not affect taxol-induced apoptosis, but transfection of the cells with a dominant negative FADD plasmid resulted in inhibition of taxol-induced apoptosis, revealing that taxol induces apoptosis independently of these death receptors but dependently on FADD. Furthermore, the drug induced activation of caspases-10, -8, -6, and -3, cleaved Bcl-2, Bid, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and lamin B, and down-regulated cellular levels of FLICE-like inhibitory protein (FLIP) and X-chromosome-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP). However, despite the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria in taxol-treated cells, caspase-9 was not activated. Inhibitors of caspases-8, -6, or -3 partially inhibited taxol-induced apoptosis, whereas the caspase-10 inhibitor totally abrogated this process. Taxol-induced apoptosis was also associated with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (Deltapsim) and a significant increase in ROS generation. However, increased ROS production was not directly involved in taxol-triggered apoptosis. Therefore, these results demonstrate for the first time that taxol induces FADD-dependent apoptosis primarily through activation of caspase-10 but independently of death receptors. PMID:15452117

  10. Eckol inhibits ultraviolet B-induced cell damage in human keratinocytes via a decrease in oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Piao, Mei Jing; Lee, Nam Ho; Chae, Sungwook; Hyun, Jin Won

    2012-01-01

    In previous reports, the antioxidant effects of eckol were shown to protect cells against hydrogen peroxide- and gamma ray-induced oxidative stress. In this study, the role of eckol in protecting human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT) against UVB-induced oxidative cell damage was investigated. Also, triphlorethol-A, one of the chemical components in Ecklonia cava, and quercetin a well known antioxidant, were compared with eckol in terms of antioxidant activity based on chemical structure. Eckol decreased UVB-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), decreased injury to cellular components resulting from UVB-induced oxidative stress, and restored cell viability. In addition, eckol reduced UVB-induced apoptosis by inhibiting the disruption of mitochondrial membranes. These results suggest that eckol protects human keratinocytes against UVB-induced oxidative stress by scavenging ROS, thereby lessening injury to cellular components. PMID:22687478

  11. Multiple anti-inflammatory pathways triggered by resveratrol lead to amelioration of staphylococcal enterotoxin B-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Inhalation of the superantigen,staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), leads to the activation of the host T and invariant natural killer (iNK) T cells, thereby resulting in acute lung inflammation and respiratory failure but the underlying mechanism(s) of disease remain elusive, with limited treatment options. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effectiveness of resveratrol, a plant polyphenol, during SEB-induced lung inflammation. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH C57BL/6 mice were exposed to SEB (50 gper mouse), administered intranasally, and were treated with resveratrol (100 mgkg?1) before or after SEB exposure. Lung injury was studied by measuring vascular permeability, histopathological examination, nature of infiltrating cells, inflammatory cytokine induction in the bronchoalveolar fluid (BALF), apoptosis in SEB-activated T cells and regulation of SIRT1 and NF-?B signalling pathways. KEY RESULTS Pretreatment and post-treatment with resveratrol significantly reduced SEB-induced pulmonary vascular permeability, and inflammation. Resveratrol significantly reduced lung infiltrating cells and attenuated the cytokine storm in SEB-exposed mice, which correlated with increased caspase-8-dependent apoptosis in SEB-activated T cells. Resveratrol treatment also markedly up-regulated Cd11b+ and Gr1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) that inhibited SEB-mediated T cell activation in vitro. In addition, resveratrol treatment was accompanied by up-regulation of SIRT1 and down-regulation of NF-?B in the inflammatory cells of the lungs. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The current study demonstrates that resveratrol may constitute a novel therapeutic modality to prevent and treat SEB-induced lung inflammation inasmuch because it acts through several pathways to reduce pulmonary inflammation. PMID:22646800

  12. Radiation-induced apoptosis: Relevance to radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dewey, W.C.; Ling, C.C.; Meyn, R.E.

    1995-11-01

    Radiation-induced apoptosis is reviewed in terms of: (a) the identification of apoptotic and necrotic cells, (b) observations in vitro and in vivo of radiation-induced apoptosis, (c) genes controlling apoptosis, (d) evidence that the target may be the plasma membrane or nuclear DNA, (e) quantitative comparisons of apoptotic death and reproductive (clonogenic) death, (f) the importance of radiation-induced apoptosis in radiotherapy, and (g) studies of radiation-induced apoptosis that are needed. High priority should be placed on determining the molecular pathways that are important in the expression and modulation of radiation-induced apoptosis. Specifically, the events that modulate the apoptosis that occurs in interphase before the cell can divide should be distinguished from the events before division that modulate the misrepair of DNA damage, that results in chromosomal aberrations observed in mitotic cells, which in turn cause the progeny of the dividing cell with aberrations to die by either apoptosis or necrosis. Then, molecular events that determine whether a cell that divides with or without a chromosomal aberration will produce progeny that apoptose or necrose need to be identified. These considerations are important for determining how modulation of radiation-induced apoptosis will affect the ultimate clonogenic survival, and possibly genomic instability in the surviving progeny. 78 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Apoptosis and Molecular Targeting Therapy in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohamed; Watari, Hidemichi; AbuAlmaaty, Ali; Ohba, Yusuke; Sakuragi, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is the programmed cell death which maintains the healthy survival/death balance in metazoan cells. Defect in apoptosis can cause cancer or autoimmunity, while enhanced apoptosis may cause degenerative diseases. The apoptotic signals contribute into safeguarding the genomic integrity while defective apoptosis may promote carcinogenesis. The apoptotic signals are complicated and they are regulated at several levels. The signals of carcinogenesis modulate the central control points of the apoptotic pathways, including inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins and FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP). The tumor cells may use some of several molecular mechanisms to suppress apoptosis and acquire resistance to apoptotic agents, for example, by the expression of antiapoptotic proteins such as Bcl-2 or by the downregulation or mutation of proapoptotic proteins such as BAX. In this review, we provide the main regulatory molecules that govern the main basic mechanisms, extrinsic and intrinsic, of apoptosis in normal cells. We discuss how carcinogenesis could be developed via defective apoptotic pathways or their convergence. We listed some molecules which could be targeted to stimulate apoptosis in different cancers. Together, we briefly discuss the development of some promising cancer treatment strategies which target apoptotic inhibitors including Bcl-2 family proteins, IAPs, and c-FLIP for apoptosis induction. PMID:25013758

  14. Mitochondrial Dynamics: Functional Link with Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Otera, Hidenori; Mihara, Katsuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria participate in a variety of physiologic processes, such as ATP production, lipid metabolism, iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, and calcium buffering. The morphology of mitochondria changes dynamically due to their frequent fusion and division in response to cellular conditions, and these dynamics are an important constituent of apoptosis. The discovery of large GTPase family proteins that regulate mitochondrial dynamics, together with novel insights into the role of mitochondrial fusion and fission in apoptosis, has provided important clues to understanding the molecular mechanisms of cellular apoptosis. In this paper, we briefly summarize current knowledge of the role of mitochondrial dynamics in apoptosis and cell pathophysiology in mammalian cells. PMID:22536251

  15. Death-Defining Immune Responses After Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Campisi, L.; Cummings, R. J.; Blander, J. Magarian

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is a programmed form of cell death whereby characteristic internal cellular dismantling is accompanied by the preservation of plasma membrane integrity. Maintaining this order during apoptosis prevents the release of cellular contents and ensures a noninflammatory death. Here, we consider examples of apoptosis in different contexts and discuss how the same form of cell death could have different immunological consequences. Multiple parameters such as cell death as a result of microbial infection, the nature of the inflammatory microenvironment, the type of responding phagocytic cells and the genetic background of the host organism all differentially influence the immunological consequences of apoptosis. PMID:24903539

  16. Apoptosis in cancer: from pathogenesis to treatment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis is an ordered and orchestrated cellular process that occurs in physiological and pathological conditions. It is also one of the most studied topics among cell biologists. An understanding of the underlying mechanism of apoptosis is important as it plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of many diseases. In some, the problem is due to too much apoptosis, such as in the case of degenerative diseases while in others, too little apoptosis is the culprit. Cancer is one of the scenarios where too little apoptosis occurs, resulting in malignant cells that will not die. The mechanism of apoptosis is complex and involves many pathways. Defects can occur at any point along these pathways, leading to malignant transformation of the affected cells, tumour metastasis and resistance to anticancer drugs. Despite being the cause of problem, apoptosis plays an important role in the treatment of cancer as it is a popular target of many treatment strategies. The abundance of literature suggests that targeting apoptosis in cancer is feasible. However, many troubling questions arise with the use of new drugs or treatment strategies that are designed to enhance apoptosis and critical tests must be passed before they can be used safely in human subjects. PMID:21943236

  17. Role of Urine Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin in the Early Diagnosis of Amphotericin B-Induced Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Paulo Novis; Macedo, Michael Nascimento; Kobayashi, Carla Dinamrica; Moreno, Lis; Guimares, Luiz Henrique Santos; Machado, Paulo Roberto Lima; Badar, Roberto; Carvalho, Edgar M; Glesby, Marshall Jay

    2015-11-01

    Determination of the neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) level can be used to detect acute kidney injury (AKI) earlier than determination of the serum creatinine (SCr) level in settings such as cardiac surgery, contrast nephropathy, and intensive care units. We hypothesized that urine NGAL (UrNGAL) would be an early biomarker of drug nephrotoxicity. To test this, we studied hemodynamically stable patients treated with amphotericin B (AmB). We measured the SCr and UrNGAL levels at the baseline and daily after initiation of AmB up to day 14 or development of AKI by the use of the SCr criterion. AKI was defined according to a Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criterion (an increase in the SCr level by ?0.3 mg/dl within 48 h or an SCr level ?1.5 times the baseline level within 7 days). We studied 24 patients with a mean age of 48.4 16.4 years. Most patients were male, and the patients received AmB (12 received AmB deoxycholate and 12 received liposomal AmB) for the treatment of leishmaniasis (91.7%). Overall, 17/24 patients fulfilled a KDIGO criterion for AKI. Peak UrNGAL levels were higher in patients with AKI than in patients without AKI and in recipients of AmB deoxycholate than in recipients of liposomal AmB. The diagnostic performance of the UrNGAL level on day 5 for the detection of AKI was moderate, with the area under the curve (AUC) being 0.68 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.41 to 0.95). In the subgroup receiving AmB deoxycholate, however, the AUC rose to 0.89 (95% CI, 0.67 to 1.00). In a patient-level analysis, we found that AKI could be detected 3.2 days earlier by the use of the UrNGAL criterion than by the use of the SCr criterion (times to AKI by the UrNGAL and SCr criteria, 3.7 2.5 versus 6.9 3.3 days, respectively; P = 0.001). Future studies should evaluate if a treatment strategy oriented toward evaluation of UrNGAL levels will improve outcomes. These findings for AmB-induced AKI in leishmaniasis patients could serve as a basis for the investigation of urine biomarkers in the early detection of drug nephrotoxicity in other clinical settings. PMID:26303800

  18. Rapid determination of memantine in human plasma by using nanoring carboxyl-functionalized paramagnetic molecularly imprinted polymer d-?-SPE and UFLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Hai-Wen; Xia, Lei; Gong, Li-Min; Ruan, Lie-Min; Zhao, Yong-Gang

    2015-06-01

    A novel, simple, and sensitive method based on the use of dispersive micro-solid-phase extraction (d-?-SPE) procedure combined with ultra-fast liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (UFLC-MS/MS) for the determination of memantine (ME) was developed and validated over the linearity range 0.05-10.0?g/L with 100??L of human plasma using memantine-D6 (ME-D6) as the internal standard. The novel nanoring carboxyl-functionalized paramagnetic molecularly imprinted polymer (NR-CF-Mag-MIP) was synthesized by ultrasound-assisted suspension polymerization, using ME as a template molecule, methacrylic acid as a functional monomer, and divinylbenzene as a cross-linking agent. The NR-CF-Mag-MIP was used as the d-?-SPE sorbent to extract ME from human plasma samples. The obtained results demonstrated the higher extraction capacity of NR-CF-Mag-MIP with recoveries between 97.6 and 101%. The limits of quantification (LOQs) for ME was 0.015?g/L. Validation results on linearity, specificity, accuracy, precision, and stability, as well as on application to the analysis of samples taken up to 480?h after oral administration of 20?mg (two 10?mg capsules) of ME in healthy volunteers demonstrated the applicability to bioequivalence studies. PMID:25209851

  19. Assessment of constituents in Allium by multivariate data analysis, high-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition assay and HPLC-SPE-NMR.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jeppe S; Nyberg, Nils T; Staerk, Dan

    2014-10-15

    Bulbs and leaves of 35 Allium species and cultivars bought or collected in 2010-2012 were investigated with multivariate data analysis, high-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition assays and HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR with the aim of exploring the potential of Allium as a future functional food for management of type 2 diabetes. It was found that 30 out of 106 crude extracts showed more than 80% inhibition of the α-glucosidase enzyme at a concentration of 40mg/mL (dry sample) or 0.4g/mL (fresh sample). High-resolution α-glucosidase biochromatograms of these extracts allowed fast identification of three analytes with α-glucosidase inhibitory activity, and subsequent HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR experiments allowed identification of these as N-p-coumaroyloctopamine, N-p-coumaroyltyramine, and quercetin. The distribution of these three compounds was mapped for all samples by HPLC-ESI-HRMS. Unsupervised principal component analysis of samples from 2012 indicated that a major difference between fresh material and dried material is the increased amount of quercetin, a known α-glucosidase inhibitor. PMID:24837940

  20. Chemical Explosion Experiments to Improve Nuclear Test Monitoring [Developing a New Paradigm for Nuclear Test Monitoring with the Source Physics Experiments (SPE)

    SciTech Connect

    Snelson, Catherine M.; Abbott, Robert E.; Broome, Scott T.; Mellors, Robert J.; Patton, Howard J.; Sussman, Aviva J.; Townsend, Margaret J.; Walter, William R.

    2013-07-02

    A series of chemical explosions, called the Source Physics Experiments (SPE), is being conducted under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to develop a new more physics-based paradigm for nuclear test monitoring. Currently, monitoring relies on semi-empirical models to discriminate explosions from earthquakes and to estimate key parameters such as yield. While these models have been highly successful monitoring established test sites, there is concern that future tests could occur in media and at scale depths of burial outside of our empirical experience. This is highlighted by North Korean tests, which exhibit poor performance of a reliable discriminant, mb:Ms (Selby et al., 2012), possibly due to source emplacement and differences in seismic responses for nascent and established test sites. The goal of SPE is to replace these semi-empirical relationships with numerical techniques grounded in a physical basis and thus applicable to any geologic setting or depth.

  1. Bioanalytical method development for quantification of ulifloxacin, fenbufen and felbinac in rat plasma by solid-phase extraction (SPE) and HPLC with PDA detection.

    PubMed

    Ferrone, Vincenzo; Carlucci, Maura; Palumbo, Paola; Carlucci, Giuseppe

    2016-05-10

    A procedure based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) followed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with PDA detection has been developed for the analysis of multiple drugs in rat plasma. The analytes evaluated were ulifloxacin, fenbufen and felbinac. Eight different solid phase extraction cartridges were tested to evaluate their applicability for the isolation of drugs from rat plasma. Comparison were recovery of different drugs and reproducibility. The samples were analyzed by HPLC using a Kinetex C18 EVO column and acetonitrile-10mM ammonium acetate-methanol as the mobile phase under gradient elution conditions. SPE combined with HPLC-PDA allowed the determination of drugs over a linear range of 0.05-15μg/mL for ulifloxacin while 0.5-50μg/mL for felbinac and fenbufen, with limit of detection at 0.05 for ulifloxacin and 0.5 for felbinac and fenbufen. Bond Elut Plexa sorbent was found to provide the most effective clean-up, removing the greatest amount of interfering substance and simultaneously ensuring analyte recoveries higher than 93.54% with relative standard deviation (RSD) <10%. The method was applied with good accuracy and precision in the determination of ulifloxacin, fenbufen and felbinac in rat plasma obtained from rats treated with selected drugs. This method permits its application to pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies of these analytes and will facilitate detailed investigations on the interactions between new fluoroquinolones and fenbufen. PMID:26898973

  2. Monolithic poly (SPE-co-BVPE) capillary columns as a novel hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography stationary phase for the separation of polar analytes.

    PubMed

    Foo, Hsiao Ching; Heaton, James; Smith, Norman W; Stanley, Shawn

    2012-10-15

    A novel hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) stationary phase was prepared by the co-polymerisation of zwitterionic N,N'-dimethyl-N-methacryloxyethyl-N-(3-sulfopropyl) ammonium betaine (SPE) and the crosslinker 1,2-bis(p-vinylphenyl) ethane (BVPE) in the presence of the porogens, toluene and methanol. Monolithic columns were produced by carrying out the α,α'-azoisobutyronitrile (AIBN) initiated reaction for 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 h inside a 200 μm i.d. fused silica capillary at 75°C (water bath). The optimum polymerisation time was shown to be 2 h, as this resulted in good porosity, due to enlarged flow-channels and the presence of a higher proportion of mesopores provided a relatively larger surface area than the other columns. The chromatographic properties of the optimised poly (SPE-co-BVPE) monolithic column were evaluated with test mixtures containing both basic and neutral compounds in the HILIC gradient separation mode. This produced relatively sharp peaks (average peak width at half height=0.1 min) with average asymmetry factors of 1.4 and baseline resolution was obtained for all the compounds. Using the isocratic separation of the test mixture, the number of theoretical plates (N) per metre calculated was between 26,888 and 35,930 by using average values obtained for triplicate injections of the compounds thiourea, toluene and acrylamide. PMID:23141347

  3. Molecularly imprinted SPE coupled with HPLC for the selective separation and enrichment of alkyl imidazolium ionic liquids in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Xia, Gao; Jing, Fan; Guifen, Zhu; Xiaolong, Wang; Jianji, Wang

    2013-10-01

    A novel 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquid surface imprinted solid-phase sorbent was synthesized. The as-prepared material was characterized by SEM, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analysis and Fourier Transform IR measurements. Then its adsorption properties for alkyl imidazolium ionic liquids, including adsorption capacities, adsorption kinetics, and properties of selective separation and enrichment were studied in detail. It was shown that the ionic liquid surface imprinted polymer exhibited high selective recognition characteristics for the imidazolium chloride ionic liquids with short alkyl chains (C(n)mimCl, n = 2, 4, 6, 8) and the adsorption equilibrium was achieved within 25 min. Various parameters were optimized for the 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquid surface imprinted polymer SPE column, such as flow rate, eluent solvent, selectivity, and reusability of the column. Then, the SPE column coupled with HPLC was used for the determination of alkyl imidazolium ionic liquids. Experimental results showed that the existence of their structural analogs and common concomitants in environmental matrices did not affect the enrichment of 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride ionic liquid. The average recoveries of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquid in spiked water samples were in the range of 92.0-102.0% with the RSD lower than 5.8%. PMID:23970465

  4. Elevated urinary levels of carcinogenic N-nitrosamines in patients with urinary tract infections measured by isotope dilution online SPE LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chiung-Wen; Shih, Ying-Ming; Liu, Hung-Hsin; Chiang, Yi-Chen; Chen, Chih-Ming; Chao, Mu-Rong

    2016-06-01

    N-nitrosamines (NAms) are well-documented for their carcinogenic potential. Human exposure to NAms may arise from the daily environment and endogenous formation via the reaction of secondary amines with nitrites or from bacteria infection. We describe the use of isotope dilution online solid-phase extraction (SPE) LC-MS/MS to quantify nine NAms in human urine. This method was validated and further applied to healthy subjects and patients with urinary tract infection (UTI). N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N-nitrosomethylethylamine (NMEA), N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR) and N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR) were analyzed with an APCI source, while N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP), N-nitrosodi-n-propylamine (NDPA), N-nitrosodibutylamine (NDBA) and N-nitrosodiphenylamine (NDPhA) were quantified with an ESI source, due to their effect on the sensitivity and chromatography. NDMA was the most abundant N-nitrosamine, while NDPhA was firstly identified in human. UTI patients had three to twelve-fold higher concentrations for NDMA, NPIP, NDEA, NMOR and NDBA in urine than healthy subjects, and the NAms were significantly decreased after antibiotics treatment. NDMA concentrations were also significantly correlated with the pH value, leukocyte esterase activity or nitrite in urines of UTI patients. Our findings by online SPE LC-MS/MS method evidenced that UTI patients experienced various NAms exposures, especially the potent carcinogen NDMA, which was likely induced by bacteria infection. PMID:26937867

  5. Simultaneous determination of isoflavones and resveratrols for adulteration detection of soybean and peanut oils by mixed-mode SPE LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Ma, Fei; Li, Peiwu; Li, Guangming; Zhang, Liangxiao; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Wen; Wang, Xiupin

    2015-06-01

    To ensure authenticity of vegetable oils, isoflavones (genistein, genistin, daidzein and daidzin) and resveratrols (cis-resveratrol and trans-resveratrol) were selected as the putative markers for adulteration of soybean and peanut oils. Firstly, mixed mode solid-phase extraction coupled with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (mixed-mode SPE LC-MS/MS) method was developed to analyze isoflavones and resveratrols in vegetable oils. The concentration of marker compounds in vegetable oils were 0.08-1.47mgkg(-1) for daidzein, ND-78.9μgkg(-1) for daidzin, 0.40-5.89mgkg(-1) for genistein, 1.2-114.9μgkg(-1) for genistin, 3.1-85.0μgkg(-1) for trans-resveratrol and 1.9-51.0μgkg(-1) for cis-resveratrol, which are compatible with the raw materials for oil press. Additionally, the applicability of this method has been successfully tested in thirteen vegetable oils from the market. Mixed-mode SPE LC-MS/MS method can simultaneously detect isoflavones and resveratrols in vegetable oils and assess adulteration and quality of soybean and peanut oils. PMID:25624257

  6. Chemical Explosion Experiments to Improve Nuclear Test Monitoring [Developing a New Paradigm for Nuclear Test Monitoring with the Source Physics Experiments (SPE)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Snelson, Catherine M.; Abbott, Robert E.; Broome, Scott T.; Mellors, Robert J.; Patton, Howard J.; Sussman, Aviva J.; Townsend, Margaret J.; Walter, William R.

    2013-07-02

    A series of chemical explosions, called the Source Physics Experiments (SPE), is being conducted under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to develop a new more physics-based paradigm for nuclear test monitoring. Currently, monitoring relies on semi-empirical models to discriminate explosions from earthquakes and to estimate key parameters such as yield. While these models have been highly successful monitoring established test sites, there is concern that future tests could occur in media and at scale depths of burial outside of our empirical experience. This is highlighted by North Korean tests, which exhibit poormore » performance of a reliable discriminant, mb:Ms (Selby et al., 2012), possibly due to source emplacement and differences in seismic responses for nascent and established test sites. The goal of SPE is to replace these semi-empirical relationships with numerical techniques grounded in a physical basis and thus applicable to any geologic setting or depth.« less

  7. Stem cell ageing and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Fulle, Stefania; Centurione, Lucia; Mancinelli, Rosa; Sancilio, Silvia; Manzoli, Francesco Antonio; Di Pietro, Roberta

    2012-01-01

    Ageing has been defined as the process of deterioration of many body functions over the lifespan of an individual. In spite of the number of different theories about ageing, there is a general consensus in identifying ageing effects in a reduced capacity to regenerate injured tissues or organs and an increased propensity to infections and cancer. In recent years the stem cell theory of ageing has gained much attention. Adult stem cells residing in mammalian tissues are essential for tissue homeostasis and repair throughout adult life. With advancing age, the highly regulated molecular signalling necessary to ensure proper cellular, tissue, and organ homeostasis loses coordination and leads, as a consequence, to a compromised potential of regeneration and repair of damaged cells and tissues. Although a complete comprehension of the molecular mechanisms involved in stem cell ageing and apoptosis is far to be reached, recent studies are beginning to unravel the processes involved in stem cell ageing, particularly in adult skeletal muscle stem cells, namely satellite cells. Thus, the focus of this review is to analyse the relationship between stem cell ageing and apoptosis with a peculiar attention to human satellite cells as compared to haematopoietic stem cells. Undoubtedly, the knowledge of age-related changes of stem cells will help in understanding the ageing process itself and will provide novel therapeutic challenges for improved tissue regeneration. PMID:22352749

  8. Differentiation and apoptosis in pilomatrixoma.

    PubMed

    Ishige, Toshiyuki; Kikuchi, Kentaro; Miyazaki, Yuji; Hara, Hiroyuki; Yoshino, Atsuo; Terui, Tadashi; Katayama, Yoichi; Kusama, Kaoru; Nemoto, Norimichi

    2011-02-01

    We carried out a histopathologic study of pilomatrixoma, a benign skin tumor, and also examined apoptosis and hair differentiation with the aim to understand the presence of amorphous debris and cyst formation in the tumor. Among 16 cases of pilomatrixoma examined, 11 were at the early regressive stage and 5 were at the late regressive stage according to the classification by Kaddu et al. In the former cases, tumor nests were basically composed of basophilic, transitional, and shadow cells. Cyst formation was evident in all cases and squamoid epithelium was observed in 4 cases at the early regressive stage. Amorphous debris was found in all cases including those at the late regressive stage. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed positive reaction products for β-catenin and Lef-1 in basophilic and transitional cells, although their distribution differed. Immunoreactivity for β-catenin was observed in the lower transitional cells, whereas immunoreactivity for Lef-1 was also evident in the upper transitional cells. Positive reactions for hair keratins were found in the cytoplasm of transitional and shadow cells, but not in the amorphous debris. Examination by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) method revealed positive reactions in transitional and some shadow cells. These results suggest that in pilomatrixoma, production of hair keratin and induction of apoptosis may occur at the same time, and that unlike the normal hair follicle irregular expression of β-catenin and Lef-1 results in the appearance of amorphous debris and cyst formation. PMID:21239898

  9. VASP Activation via the G?13/RhoA/PKA Pathway Mediates Cucurbitacin-B-Induced Actin Aggregation and Cofilin-Actin Rod Formation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan-Ting; Xu, Li-Hui; Lu, Qun; Liu, Kun-Peng; Liu, Pei-Yan; Ji, Fang; Liu, Xiao-Ming; Ouyang, Dong-Yun; He, Xian-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Cucurbitacin B (CuB), a potent antineoplastic agent of cucurbitacin triterpenoids, induces rapid disruption of actin cytoskeleton and aberrant cell cycle inhibiting carcinogenesis. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of such anticancer effects remains incompletely understood. In this study, we showed that CuB treatment rapidly induced vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation (i.e. activation) at the Ser157 residue and generated VASP clumps which were co-localized with amorphous actin aggregates prior to the formation of highly-ordered cofilin-actin rods in melanoma cells. Knockdown of VASP or inhibition of VASP activation using PKA-specific inhibitor H89 suppressed CuB-induced VASP activation, actin aggregation and cofilin-actin rod formation. The VASP activation was mediated by cAMP-independent PKA activation as CuB decreased the levels of cAMP while MDL12330A, an inhibitor of adenylyl cyclase, had weak effect on VASP activation. Knockdown of either G?13 or RhoA not only suppressed VASP activation, but also ameliorated CuB-induced actin aggregation and abrogated cofilin-actin rod formation. Collectively, our studies highlighted that the CuB-induced actin aggregation and cofilin-actin rod formation was mediated via the G?13/RhoA/PKA/VASP pathway. PMID:24691407

  10. Apoptosis in mammalian oocytes: a review.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Meenakshi; Prasad, Shilpa; Tripathi, Anima; Pandey, Ashutosh N; Ali, Irfan; Singh, Arvind K; Shrivastav, Tulsidas G; Chaube, Shail K

    2015-08-01

    Apoptosis causes elimination of more than 99% of germ cells from cohort of ovary through follicular atresia. Less than 1% of germ cells, which are culminated in oocytes further undergo apoptosis during last phases of oogenesis and depletes ovarian reserve in most of the mammalian species including human. There are several players that induce apoptosis directly or indirectly in oocytes at various stages of meiotic cell cycle. Premature removal of encircling granulosa cells from immature oocytes, reduced levels of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate, increased levels of calcium (Ca(2+)) and oxidants, sustained reduced level of maturation promoting factor, depletion of survival factors, nutrients and cell cycle proteins, reduced meiotic competency, increased levels of proapoptotic as well as apoptotic factors lead to oocyte apoptosis. The BH3-only proteins also act as key regulators of apoptosis in oocyte within the ovary. Both intrinsic (mitochondria-mediated) as well as extrinsic (cell surface death receptor-mediated) pathways are involved in oocyte apoptosis. BID, a BH3-only protein act as a bridge between both apoptotic pathways and its cleavage activates cell death machinery of both the pathways inside the follicular microenvironment. Oocyte apoptosis leads to the depletion of ovarian reserve that directly affects reproductive outcome of various mammals including human. In this review article, we highlight some of the important players and describe the pathways involved during oocyte apoptosis in mammals. PMID:25958165

  11. Apoptosis: A Review of Programmed Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, Susan

    2007-01-01

    The process of programmed cell death, or apoptosis, is generally characterized by distinct morphological characteristics and energy-dependent biochemical mechanisms. Apoptosis is considered a vital component of various processes including normal cell turnover, proper development and functioning of the immune system, hormone-dependent atrophy, embryonic development and chemical-induced cell death. Inappropriate apoptosis (either too little or too much) is a factor in many human conditions including neurodegenerative diseases, ischemic damage, autoimmune disorders and many types of cancer. The ability to modulate the life or death of a cell is recognized for its immense therapeutic potential. Therefore, research continues to focus on the elucidation and analysis of the cell cycle machinery and signaling pathways that control cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. To that end, the field of apoptosis research has been moving forward at an alarmingly rapid rate. Although many of the key apoptotic proteins have been identified, the molecular mechanisms of action or inaction of these proteins remain to be elucidated. The goal of this review is to provide a general overview of current knowledge on the process of apoptosis including morphology, biochemistry, the role of apoptosis in health and disease, detection methods, as well as a discussion of potential alternative forms of apoptosis. PMID:17562483

  12. Apoptosis in acquired and genetic hearing impairment

    PubMed Central

    de Beeck, Ken Op; Schacht, Jochen; Van Camp, Guy

    2012-01-01

    Apoptosis is an important physiological process. Normally, a healthy cell maintains a delicate balance between pro- and anti-apoptotic factors, allowing it to live and proliferate. It is thus not surprising that disturbance of this delicate balance may result in disease. It is a well known fact that apoptosis also contributes to several acquired forms of hearing impairment. Noise-induced hearing loss is the result of prolonged exposure to excessive noise, triggering apoptosis in terminally differentiated sensory hair cells. Moreover, hearing loss caused by the use of therapeutic drugs such as aminoglycoside antibiotics and cisplatin potentially may result in the activation of apoptosis in sensory hair cells leading to hearing loss due to the “ototoxicity” of the drugs. Finally, apoptosis is a key contributor to the development of presbycusis, age-related hearing loss. Recently, several mutations in apoptosis genes were identified as the cause of monogenic hearing impairment. These genes are TJP2, DFNA5 and MSRB3. This implies that apoptosis not only contributes to the pathology of acquired forms of hearing impairment, but also to genetic hearing impairment as well. We believe that these genes constitute a new functional class within the hearing loss field. Here, the contribution of apoptosis in the pathology of both acquired and genetic hearing impairment is reviewed. PMID:21782914

  13. THE ROLE OF APOPTOSIS IN NEUROTOXICOLOGY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The role of apoptosis in neurodegeneration in developing animals and in adults has become increasingly apparent in the past ten years. Normal apoptosis occurs in the CNS from the embryonic stage through senescence, with different cells in each region of the nervous system having ...

  14. Proteases in Fas-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhivotovsky, B; Burgess, D H; Schlegel, J; Prn, M I; Vanags, D; Orrenius, S

    1997-01-01

    Involvement of a unique family of cysteine proteases in the multistep apoptotic process has been documented. Cloning of several mammalian genes identifies some components of this cellular response. However, it is currently unclear which protease plays a role as a signal and/or effector of apoptosis. We summarize contributions to the data concerning proteases in Fas-mediated apoptosis. PMID:9015753

  15. Critical role of ARID3B in the expression of pro-apoptotic p53-target genes and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Pratama, Endrawan; Tian, Xiaohui; Lestari, Widya; Iseki, Sachiko; Ichwan, Solachuddin J A; Ikeda, Masa-Aki

    ARID3A and ARID3B are transcriptional targets of p53. Recently, it has been reported that ARID3A plays a critical role in the transcriptional activation of pro-arrest p21 in response to DNA damage. However, the role of ARID3B in the p53 regulatory pathway remains poorly understood. Here we show that ARID3A and ARID3B specifically bind to putative ARID3-binding sites in p53 target genes in vitro and in vivo. ARID3B and, to a lesser extent, ARID3A silencing blocked transcriptional activation of pro-apoptotic p53 target genes, such as PUMA, PIG3, and p53. Furthermore, ectopic ARID3B, to a lesser extent, ARID3A expression activated the pro-apoptotic gene expression, and only ARID3B induced apoptosis. Finally, ARID3B but not ARID3A silencing blocked apoptosis induction following DNA damage. These results indicated that, although ARID3B and ARID3A share overlapping functions, ARID3B play a key role in the expression of pro-apoptotic p53-target genes and apoptosis. PMID:26519881

  16. Induction of apoptosis by Shiga toxins

    PubMed Central

    Tesh, Vernon L

    2010-01-01

    Shiga toxins comprise a family of structurally and functionally related protein toxins expressed by Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 and multiple serotypes of Escherichia coli. While the capacity of Shiga toxins to inhibit protein synthesis by catalytic inactivation of eukaryotic ribosomes has been well described, it is also apparent that Shiga toxins trigger apoptosis in many cell types. This review presents evidence that Shiga toxins induce apoptosis of epithelial, endothelial, leukocytic, lymphoid and neuronal cells. Apoptotic signaling pathways activated by the toxins are reviewed with an emphasis on signaling mechanisms that are shared among different cell types. Data suggesting that Shiga toxins induce apoptosis through the endoplasmic reticulum stress response and clinical evidence demonstrating apoptosis in humans infected with Shiga toxin-producing bacteria are briefly discussed. The potential for use of Shiga toxins to induce apoptosis in cancer cells is briefly reviewed. PMID:20210553

  17. Activation of TLR5 induces podocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xu; Huang, Haiting; You, Yanwu; Tang, Chunrong; Gu, Xiangjun; Huang, Meiying; Tan, Junhua; Wang, Jie

    2016-03-01

    The apoptosis plays a critical role in a number of inflammatory disorders. Bacterial infection is one of the causes inducing apoptosis. This study aims to investigate the mechanism by which activation of TLR5 induces podocyte apoptosis. In this study, a podocyte cell line was cultured in RPMI1640 medium. The expression of TLR5 was assessed by real-time PCR and Western blotting. The Fas ligand gene transcription was assessed by immunoprecipitation and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. The results showed that the expression of TLR5 was observed in the podocytes at both mRNA and protein levels. Exposure to TLR5 ligand, flagellin, induced Fas ligand expression and podocyte apoptosis. p300, one of the histone acetyltransferases, mediated the Fas ligand gene transcription in podocytes. In conclusion, TLR5 activation plays an important role in the induction of podocyte apoptosis. Copyright 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26914743

  18. Hepatitis C virus infection and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Richard; Baumert, Thomas; Blum, Hubert E

    2007-01-01

    Apoptosis is central for the control and elimination of viral infections. In chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, enhanced hepatocyte apoptosis and upregulation of the death inducing ligands CD95/Fas, TRAIL and TNF? occur. Nevertheless, HCV infection persists in the majority of patients. The impact of apoptosis in chronic HCV infection is not well understood. It may be harmful by triggering liver fibrosis, or essential in interferon (IFN) induced HCV elimination. For virtually all HCV proteins, pro- and anti-apoptotic effects have been described, especially for the core and NS5A protein. To date, it is not known which HCV protein affects apoptosis in vivo and whether the infectious virions act pro- or anti-apoptotic. With the availability of an infectious tissue culture system, we now can address pathophysiologically relevant issues. This review focuses on the effect of HCV infection and different HCV proteins on apoptosis and of the corresponding signaling cascades. PMID:17828818

  19. Apoptosis inducers in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Billard, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is characterized by a typical defect in apoptosis and is still an incurable disease. Numerous apoptosis inducers have been described. These synthetic compounds and natural products (mainly derived from plants) display antileukemic properties in vitro and in vivo and some have even been tested in the clinic in CLL. They act through several different mechanisms. Most of them involve proteins of the Bcl-2 family, which are the key regulators in triggering the mitochondrial pathway of caspase-dependent apoptosis. Thus, the Mcl-1/Noxa axis appeared as a target. Here I overview natural and synthetic apoptosis inducers and their mechanisms of action in CLL cells. Opportunities for developing novel, apoptosis-based therapeutics are presented. PMID:24525395

  20. Apoptosis inversely correlates with rabies virus neurotropism.

    PubMed

    Thoulouze, Maria-Isabel; Lafage, Mireille; Yuste, Victor J; Kroemer, Guido; Susin, Santos A; Israel, Nicole; Lafon, Monique

    2003-12-01

    We report that non-neurotropic rabies virus (RV) strains, currently used to immunize wildlife against rabies, induces not only a caspase-dependent apoptosis in the human lymphoblastoid Jurkat T cell line (Jurkat-vect), but also a caspase-independent pathway. Cell redistribution of the apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) was observed in Jurkat-vect infected with RV vaccine strain. Bcl-2 overproduction in Jurkat T cells (Jurkat-Bcl-2) abolished both caspase activation and AIF distribution. In contrast, strain of neurotropic RV did not induce apoptosis. The inverse correlation of the induction of apoptosis and the capacity of a virus strain to invade the brain suggests that blockage of apoptosis could be a strategy selected by neurotropic virus to favor its progression through the nervous system. PMID:15033799

  1. Autophagy and apoptosis: where do they meet?

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Subhadip; Panda, Prashanta Kumar; Sinha, Niharika; Das, Durgesh Nandini; Bhutia, Sujit Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Autophagy and apoptosis are two important cellular processes with complex and intersecting protein networks; as such, they have been the subjects of intense investigation. Recent advances have elucidated the key players and their molecular circuitry. For instance, the discovery of Beclin-1's interacting partners has resulted in the identification of Bcl-2 as a central regulator of autophagy and apoptosis, which functions by interacting with both Beclin-1 and Bax/Bak respectively. When localized to the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, Bcl-2 inhibits autophagy. Cellular stress causes the displacement of Bcl-2 from Beclin-1 and Bax, thereby triggering autophagy and apoptosis, respectively. The induction of autophagy or apoptosis results in disruption of complexes by BH3-only proteins and through post-translational modification. The mechanisms linking autophagy and apoptosis are not fully defined; however, recent discoveries have revealed that several apoptotic proteins (e.g., PUMA, Noxa, Nix, Bax, XIAP, and Bim) modulate autophagy. Moreover, autophagic proteins that control nucleation and elongation regulate intrinsic apoptosis through calpain- and caspase-mediated cleavage of autophagy-related proteins, which switches the cellular program from autophagy to apoptosis. Similarly, several autophagic proteins are implicated in extrinsic apoptosis. This highlights a dual cellular role for autophagy. On one hand, autophagy degrades damaged mitochondria and caspases, and on the other hand, it provides a membrane-based intracellular platform for caspase processing in the regulation of apoptosis. In this review, we highlight the crucial factors governing the crosstalk between autophagy and apoptosis and describe the mechanisms controlling cell survival and cell death. PMID:24415198

  2. Photo-protection by 3-bromo-4, 5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde against ultraviolet B-induced oxidative stress in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Yu Jae; Piao, Mei Jing; Zhang, Rui; Choi, Yung Hyun; Chae, Sungwook; Hyun, Jin Won

    2012-09-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation leads to epidermal damage and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in skin cells, including keratinocytes. Therefore, the photo-protective effect of 3-bromo-4, 5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (BDB) against UVB was assessed in human HaCaT keratinocytes exposed to UVB radiation in vitro. BDB restored cell viability, which decreased upon exposure to UVB radiation. BDB exhibited scavenging activity against 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals, intracellular ROS induced by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) or UVB radiation, the superoxide anion generated by the xanthine/xanthine oxidase system, and the hydroxyl radical generated by the Fenton reaction (FeSO(4)+H(2)O(2)). Moreover, BDB absorbed UVB and decreased injury resulting from UVB-induced oxidative stress to lipids, proteins and DNA. Finally, BDB reduced UVB-induced apoptosis, as exemplified by fewer apoptotic bodies and a reduction in DNA fragmentation. Taken together, these results suggest that BDB protects human keratinocytes against UVB-induced oxidative stress by scavenging ROS and absorbing UVB rays, thereby reducing injury to cellular components. PMID:22795593

  3. Effective application of freezing lipid precipitation and SCX-SPE for determination of pyrrolizidine alkaloids in high lipid foodstuffs by LC-ESI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Soo Hwan; Kim, Min-Sun; Kim, Sang Hoon; Park, Hyun Mee; Pyo, Heesoo; Lee, Yong Moon; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Hong, Jongki

    2015-06-15

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are naturally occurring plant toxins associated with serious hepatic disease in humans and animals. In this study, rapid and sensitive analytical method was developed for the determination of 9 toxic PAs in popularly high lipid foodstuffs by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). PAs in lipid foodstuff were effectively purified by freezing lipid precipitation (FLP) and strong cation exchange (SCX)-solid-phase extraction (SPE). Especially, FLP could easily remove the large amounts of triacylglycerols in the lipid sample extract and effectively combine with SPE cleanup. During the FLP procedure, over 77% of the lipids in the foodstuff extracts were rapidly eliminated without any significant loss of the PAs with over 81% recovery. The elimination efficiency of lipids by FLP was tested with LC-atmospheric chemical ionization (APCI)-MS. For further purification, SCX-SPE cartridge could successfully purify PAs from the remaining interfering substances by the variation pH with 5% NH4OH in methanol. For precise quantification and confirmation of PAs in complicate sample matrices, appropriate transition ions in LC-MS/MS-multiple-ion reaction monitoring (MRM) mode were selected on the basis of MS/MS fragmentation pathways of PAs. The established analytical method was validated in terms of the linearity, limits of detection (LOD), and quantification (LOQ), precision, and accuracy. The method was deemed satisfactory by inter- and intra-day validation and exhibited both high accuracy and precision (relative standard deviation<11.06%). Overall limits of detection and quantitation of PAs were approximately 0.06-0.60ng/mL at a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 3 and were about 0.20-1.99ng/mL at a S/N of 10 for all foodstuffs. The established method was successfully applied for the monitoring of toxic PAs in several types of high lipid foodstuffs such as soybeans, seed oil, milk, and margarine. PMID:25958321

  4. Honey and Apoptosis in Human Gastric Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Aida; Somi, Mohammad H; Safaiyan, Abdolrasoul; Modaresi, Jabiz; Ostadrahimi, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    Background: Gastric cancer is the fourth most common malignancy in the world. Honey is a complex mixture of special biological active constituents. Honey possesses antioxidant and antitumor properties. Nutritional studies have indicated that consumption of honey modulates the risk of developing gastric cancer. On the other hand, apoptosis has been reported to play a decisive role in precancerous changes. Our chief study was conducted to assess the relationship between consumption of honey and apoptosis in human gastric mucosa. Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 98 subjects over 18 years old, referred to two hospitals in Tabriz, Iran. Subjects were undergone an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, 62 subjects were finally enrolled. Honey consumption was assessed by a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and apoptosis was detected by TUNEL technique. We tested polynomial curve to find the best fit between honey consumption and apoptosis. Results: A positive relation between honey consumption and apoptosis was found (P=0.024). Our results indicated that the final and the best fit curve was: apoptosis = 1.714+1.648(honey amount) - 0.533(honey amount)2 +1.83310-5(honey amount)7. Conclusion: Honey consumption had positive effects on gastric cancer by inducing apoptosis in gastric mucosa. PMID:24688918

  5. Apoptosis induced by bovine ephemeral fever virus.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia J; Shih, Wen L; Yu, Feng L; Liao, Ming H; Liu, Hung J

    2004-12-15

    The potential significance of bovine ephemeral fever virus (BEFV)-induced apoptosis and involved viral molecules was fully unknown. In the present study, evidence is provided demonstrating that bovine ephemeral fever virus induces apoptosis in several cell lines. Five types of assays for apoptosis were used in examining BEFV-infected cells. (1) Assay for DNA fragmentation, (2) nuclear staining with acridine orange, (3) ELISA detection of cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragment, (4) terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end labelling (TUNEL) assay of BEFV-infected cells, (5) observation of blebbing of the plasma membrane and the formation of apoptotic bodies of apoptic cells by scanning electron microscope. The level of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in BEFV-infected cells was increased significantly after 20-25 h post-infection. Caspases-2, -3, -4, -6, -8, -9, and -10 were activated in BEFV-infected BHK-21 cells. To determine further whether BEFV-induced apoptosis was caspase-dependent, the effect of the tripeptide pan-ICE (caspase) inhibitor N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethyketone on the inhibition of apoptosis in BEFV-infected BHK-21 cells, was investigated. Apoptosis could be blocked by the caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-fmk), indicating that BEFV induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in cultured cells. PMID:15542140

  6. Chemopreventive Effects of Sarcotriol on Ultraviolet B-induced Skin Tumor Development in SKH-1 Hairless Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kundoor, Vipra; Zhang, Xiaoying; Bommareddy, Ajay; Khalifa, Sherief; Fahmy, Hesham; Dwivedi, Chandradhar

    2007-01-01

    Sarcotriol (ST) has been shown to be chemopreventive on 7,12-dimethyl-benz(a)anthracene (DMBA) initiated and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-promoted skin tumor development in CD-1 mice in recent studies from our laboratory. The objective of this study was to determine the chemopreventive effects of ST on ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced skin tumor development in female SKH-1 hairless mice, an experimental model relevant to human skin cancer development, and its possible mechanisms of action. Female SKH-1 mice were divided into two groups: Control and ST treated. Control was topically treated with 100 ?L acetone and ST treated group administered with 30 ?g ST in 100 ?L acetone one hour before UVB exposure. For UVB-induced tumorigenesis, carcinogenesis was initiated and promoted by UVB (180 mJ/cm2). Group weights and tumor counts were taken once every week. After 30 weeks, mice were sacrificed and dorsal skin samples were collected. The proteins from the skin sample were further used for SDS-PAGE and Western blotting using specific antibodies against caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9 and p53. Tumor multiplicity was found 19.6, 5.2 in the control and ST treated groups respectively. Caspase-3, -8, -9 and p53 were significantly (P < 0.05) upregulated in ST treated group compared to Control group. Together, this study for the first time identifies the chemopreventive effects of ST in UVB-induced carcinogenesis possibly by inducing apoptosis and upregulating p53. PMID:18463728

  7. Effects of ginseng saponins isolated from red ginseng on ultraviolet B-induced skin aging in hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Gon; Sumiyoshi, Maho; Sakanaka, Masahiro; Kimura, Yoshiyuki

    2009-01-01

    It is well-known that chronic ultraviolet B (UVB) exposure at low-dose causes skin photoaging including increases in skin thickness and wrinkle formation and reduction in skin elasticity. This study examined the effects of total saponins and ginsenoside Rb(1) isolated from Red Ginseng roots on skin thickness, elasticity, and wrinkle formation caused by long-term, low-dose UVB irradiation in hairless mice. The topical application of total ginseng saponins (10 pg or 100 ng/mouse) and ginsenoside Rb(1) (100 fg, 10 pg, or 1 ng/mouse) significantly inhibited increases in skin thickness and wrinkle formation and the reduction in skin elasticity induced by long-term UVB irradiation. Furthermore, we examined the histological effects of total saponins and ginsenoside Rb(1) in the skin of UVB-irradiated hairless mice. The increases in apoptotic, Ki-67-, and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine-positive cells induced by UVB exposure were prevented by the topical application of total saponins and ginsenoside Rb(1). Furthermore, total saponins and ginsenoside Rb(1) prevented the disruption of collagen fibers induced by the long-term UVB irradiation. Ginsenoside Rb(1) (100 fg, 10 pg, and 1 ng/ml) increased the Bcl-2 expression level in UVB-treated human keratinocytes. The protective effect of ginsenoside Rb(1) on UVB-mediated apoptosis may be due to the up-regulation of Bcl-2 expression. These results suggest that the protective effect of ginsenoside Rb(1) on skin photoaging induced by chronic UVB exposure may be due to the increase in collagen synthesis and/or the inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase expression in dermal fibroblasts. PMID:19041641

  8. RSF1 Is a Positive Regulator of NF-?BInduced Gene Expression Required for Ovarian Cancer Chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yeong-In; Ahn, Ji-Hye; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Shin, Ie-Ming; Choi, Jung-Hye

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression or amplification of the RSF1 gene has been associated with poor prognosis in various human cancers, including ovarian cancer. In previous work, RSF1 was identified as an amplified gene that facilitated the development of paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancer. In the present study, we further demonstrated that RSF1 expression inversely correlated with paclitaxel response in patients with ovarian cancer and the mouse xenograft model. In addition, RSF1-overexpressing paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines were found to express elevated levels of genes regulated by NF-?B, including some involved with the evasion of apoptosis (CFLAR, XIAP, BCL2, and BCL2L1) and inflammation (PTGS2). In addition, ectopic expression of RSF1 using Tet-off inducible SKOV3 cells significantly enhanced NF-?Bdependent gene expression and transcriptional activation of NF-?B. An RSF1 knockdown using short hairpin RNAs suppressed these same pathways. Moreover, pretreatment with NF-?B inhibitors or downregulation of NF-?Bregulated gene expression considerably enhanced paclitaxel sensitivity in RSF1-overexpressing OVCAR3 and/or RSF1-induced SKOV3 cells. A coimmunoprecipitation assay revealed that RSF1 interacts with NF-?B and CREB-binding protein, a ubiquitous coactivator for NF-?B. Recruitment of RSF1 to the NF-?B binding element in the PTGS2 and XIAP promoters was demonstrated by the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Furthermore, hSNF2H, a well-known binding partner of RSF1, was partially involved in the interaction between RSF1 and NF-?B. Taken together, these data suggest that RSF1 may function as a coactivator for NF-?B, consequently augmenting expression of genes necessary for the development of chemoresistance in ovarian cancer cells. PMID:24566868

  9. Oxygen toxicity induces apoptosis in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Satoh, T; Enokido, Y; Kubo, T; Yamada, M; Hatanaka, H

    1998-12-01

    1. A high oxygen atmosphere induced apoptosis in cultured neuronal cells including PC12 cells and rat embryonic cortical, hippocampal, and basal forebrain neurons associated with DNA fragmentation and nuclear condensation. 2. The sensitivity of CNS neurons to a high-oxygen atmosphere was the following order; cortex > basal forebrain > hippocampus. 3. Cycloheximide and actinomycin-D inhibited the apoptosis, indicating that it depends on new macromolecular synthesis. In contrast, cultured postnatal CNS neurons were resistant to oxidative stress. 4. Neurotrophic factors such as nerve growth factor (NGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), and epidermal growth factor (EGF) blocked the apoptosis induced by a high-oxygen atmosphere. PMID:9876872

  10. Apoptosis, autophagy, necroptosis, and cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhenyi; Yang, Zuozhang; Xu, Yongqing; Chen, Yongbin; Yu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is a crucial hallmark of cancer progression, which involves numerous factors including the degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM), the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), tumor angiogenesis, the development of an inflammatory tumor microenvironment, and defects in programmed cell death. Programmed cell death, such as apoptosis, autophagy, and necroptosis, plays crucial roles in metastatic processes. Malignant tumor cells must overcome these various forms of cell death to metastasize. This review summarizes the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms by which key regulators of apoptosis, autophagy, and necroptosis participate in cancer metastasis and discusses the crosstalk between apoptosis, autophagy, and necroptosis involved in the regulation of cancer metastasis. PMID:25743109

  11. The Role of Mitochondria in Apoptosis*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunxin; Youle, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria play key roles in activating apoptosis in mammalian cells. Bcl-2 family members regulate the release of proteins from the space between the mitochondrial inner and outer membrane that, once in the cytosol, activate caspase proteases that dismantle cells and signal efficient phagocytosis of cell corpses. Here we review the extensive literature on proteins released from the intermembrane space and consider genetic evidence for and against their roles in apoptosis activation. We also compare and contrast apoptosis pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, and mammals that indicate major mysteries remaining to be solved. PMID:19659442

  12. High-Throughput Quantitation of Busulfan in Plasma Using Ultrafast Solid-Phase Extraction Tandem Mass Spectrometry (SPE-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Langman, Loralie J; Danso, Darlington; Robert, Enger; Jannetto, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Busulfan is a commonly used antineoplastic agent to condition/ablate bone marrow cells before hematopoietic stem cell transplant. While intravenous (IV) formulations of busulfan are now available and have lower incidences of toxicity and treatment related mortality compared to oral dosing, it still displays large pharmacokinetic variability. As a result, studies have shown that therapeutic drug monitoring is clinically useful to minimize graft failure, disease reoccurrence, and toxicities like veno-occlusive disease and neurologic toxicity. Current methods for assaying busulfan include the use of GC/MS, HPLC, and LC-MS/MS. The clinical need for faster turnaround times and increased testing volumes has required laboratories to develop faster methods of analysis for higher throughput of samples. Therefore, we present a method for the quantification of busulfan in plasma using an ultrafast SPE-MS/MS which has much faster sample cycle times (<20 s per sample) and comparable analytical results to GC/MS. PMID:26660177

  13. Quantitation of Chloramphenicol and Nitrofuran Metabolites in Aquaculture Products Using Microwave-Assisted Derivatization, Automated SPE, and LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Veach, Brian T; Baker, Chris A; Kibbey, John H; Fong, Andrew; Broadaway, Bryanna J; Drake, Connie P

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a rapid and robust method utilizing microwave-assisted derivatization, automated SPE, and LC-MS/MS for the quantitation and confirmation of chloramphenicol (CAP) and nitrofuran metabolites in various aquaculture matrixes. The use of equipment presented in this work allowed extractions to be completed on average within 6 h, with quantitation accuracy ranging from 89 to 107% and RSD≤8.3%. The demonstrated detection limits for all the nitrofuran metabolites of interest in three different matrixes were ≤0.06 ng/g, with a quantitation limit of ≤0.2 ng/g. Additionally, the method exhibited a CAP detection limit for all matrixes≤0.01 ng/g and an LOQ of ≤0.03 ng/g. PMID:26025616

  14. HPLC-SPE-NMR characterization of major metabolites in Salvia fruticosa Mill. extract with antifungal potential: relevance of carnosic acid, carnosol, and hispidulin.

    PubMed

    Exarchou, Vassiliki; Kanetis, Loukas; Charalambous, Zenovia; Apers, Sandra; Pieters, Luc; Gekas, Vassilis; Goulas, Vlasios

    2015-01-21

    Plant pathogenic fungi are considered of significant economic importance for adversely affecting both quantitatively and qualitatively fresh and processed produce. Extracts of Salvia fruticosa were initially screened for their antifungal activity, and the ethyl acetate fraction, being the most active, was further analyzed using HPLC-SPE-NMR hyphenation. The methoxylated flavones hispidulin, salvigenin, and cirsimaritin and the diterpenes carnosic acid, carnosol, and 12-methoxycarnosic acid were identified as the major components of the extract. In addition, the concentration levels of all identified components were determined using q-NMR. The antifungal activity of the crude extract and selected phytochemicals was estimated against the fungal species Aspergillus tubingensis, Botrytis cinerea, and Penicillium digitatum. The estimated MIC and MFC values of the ethyl acetate extract of S. fruticosa, as well as three of its major constituents, carnosic acid, carnosol, and hispidulin, support their antifungal activity, especially against B. cinerea and P. digitatum, suggesting their potential use in food and agricultural systems. PMID:25537192

  15. Outcompeting GC for the detection of legacy chlorinated pesticides: online-SPE UPLC APCI/MSMS detection of endosulfans at part per trillion levels.

    PubMed

    Quinete, Natalia; Wang, Jian; Fernandez, Adolfo; Castro, Joffre; Gardinali, Piero R

    2013-07-01

    Endosulfan, the last remaining organochlorine pesticide, has been the subject of a number of international regulations and restriction/banning action plans worldwide. Occurrence of endosulfan residues in South Florida environments has been widely described in the literature for more than two decades. This work describes a selective, sensitive, and fast online solid-phase extraction (SPE) method coupled with liquid chromatography separation and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for the determination of endosulfan isomers and endosulfan sulfate in water samples at low part per trillion levels with very little sample preparation. A negative atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source was carefully optimized to produce reproducible spectra of the target compounds with no adduct ion formation. Selected reaction monitoring transitions were monitored and quantitation was performed against a per-deuterated internal standard β-endosulfan (d4). The automated online SPE clean-up was performed using only 20 mL of untreated water sample prior to LC-MS/MS analysis. The method was capable of separating and quantifying endosulfan within a 24-min run using acetonitrile and water as mobile phases and presenting statistically calculated method detection limits of 3, 10, and 7 ng/L for endosulfan sulfate, α-endosulfan, and β-endosulfan, respectively. In addition, a QuEChERS method was successfully developed and applied for endosulfan determination in sediments/soils, floating and submerged algal mats, and small fish. Minimal matrix effects were observed in all matrices analyzed and recoveries for all analytes ranged from 50-144 %. The developed methodology was applied to monitor the occurrence and to assess the potential transport of endosulfan in the Loveland Slough watershed, an area adjacent to Everglades National Park showing long-term contamination with endosulfans. PMID:23386002

  16. The regulation of apoptosis by microbial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Moss, J E; Aliprantis, A O; Zychlinsky, A

    1999-01-01

    In the past few years, there has been remarkable progress unraveling the mechanism and significance of eukaryotic programmed cell death (PCD), or apoptosis. Not surprisingly, it has been discovered that numerous, unrelated microbial pathogens engage or circumvent the host's apoptotic program. In this chapter, we briefly summarize apoptosis, emphasizing those studies which assist the reader in understanding the subsequent discussion on PCD and pathogens. We then examine the relationship between virulent bacteria and apoptosis. This section is organized to reflect both common and diverse mechanisms employed by bacteria to induce PCD. A short discussion of parasites and fungi is followed by a detailed description of the interaction of viral pathogens with the apoptotic machinery. Throughout the review, apoptosis is considered within the broader contexts of pathogenesis, virulence, and host defense. Our goals are to update the reader on this rapidly expanding field and identify topics in the current literature which demand further investigation. PMID:10212981

  17. Does exercise really induce lymphocyte apoptosis?

    PubMed

    Navalta, James Wilfred; McFarlin, Brian Keith; Lyons, Thomas Scott

    2010-01-01

    While the stress associated with acute exercise has been reported to induce significant lymphocyte apoptosis, not all investigations have confirmed this finding. Regardless of animal or human subjects, exercise-induced lymphocyte apoptosis may be induced via an external receptor-mediated pathway, or internally via the mitochondria through an oxidative-mediated pathway. On the other hand, investigators reporting no effect of acute exercise on lymphocyte apoptosis speculate that cell death may be dissociated from these pathways, and explain exercise lymphocytopenia by selective migration of the lymphocytes back into the lymphoid pools. Discrepancies may be due to sensitivity issues related to the methodology used to assess cell death. Limitations to various methods used to evaluate exercise-induced lymphocyte apoptosis are detailed, and considerations for a new technique are outlined. PMID:20036894

  18. Apoptosis: a guide for the perplexed.

    PubMed

    Sloviter, Robert S

    2002-01-01

    The term 'apoptosis' describes an active process of cellular deconstruction originally contrasted morphologically with necrosis. The mistaken equivalence of the terms apoptosis and 'programmed cell death' has caused confusion and implied that apoptosis is an identifiable therapeutic target rather than a name of a type of cell death. The roots of confusion are suggested to lie not in superficial disagreements about the morphology and biochemistry of cell death, but in the lamentable disconnection of modern science from its philosophical foundations (i.e. Socratic definition, nominalism versus realism, and William of Ockham's advocacy of Aristotelian metaphysics over Plato's Theory of Forms). Renewed awareness of these issues might be the key to understanding that apoptosis is a created concept, not a real entity, and that the use of terms that defy definition has become an obstacle to clear thinking about preventable cell death. PMID:11804647

  19. Autophagy and apoptosis in liver injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kewei

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a primary characteristic in the pathogenesis of liver disease. Hepatic apoptosis is regulated by autophagic activity. However, mechanisms mediating their interaction remain to be determined. Basal level of autophagy ensures the physiological turnover of old and damaged organelles. Autophagy also is an adaptive response under stressful conditions. Autophagy can control cell fate through different cross-talk signals. A complex interplay between hepatic autophagy and apoptosis determines the degree of hepatic apoptosis and the progression of liver disease as demonstrated by pre-clinical models and clinical trials. This review summarizes recent advances on roles of autophagy that plays in pathophysiology of liver. The autophagic pathway can be a novel therapeutic target for liver disease. PMID:25927598

  20. Quantification of Apoptosis in Mouse Atherosclerotic Lesions.

    PubMed

    Figg, Nichola L; Bennett, Martin R

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a key process occurring in atherosclerosis, both in humans and in animal models. Apoptosis occurs in all cell types studied thus far, and thus lineage marking is often necessary. Apoptosis should be ascertained using a combination of morphological features and activation of specific pathways (e.g., terminal UTP nick end labeling-TUNEL). Both TUNEL and cryptic epitope antibodies (e.g., cleaved caspase 3) can be used, although they will often give different frequencies. Apoptotic frequency but not rate can be estimated from these methods, as we do not know the timing of apoptosis or how much of the process is marked by each method. We describe the morphological and immunohistochemical methods used in our laboratory to detect apoptotic cells in animal and human atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:26445790

  1. Mitochondrial Ceramide and the Induction of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Siskind, Leah J.

    2007-01-01

    In most cell types, a key event in apoptosis is the release of proapoptotic intermembrane space proteins from mitochondria to the cytoplasm. In general, it is the release of these intermembrane space proteins that is responsible for the activation of caspases and DNases that are responsible for the execution of apoptosis. The mechanism for the increased permeability of the mitochondrial outer membrane during the induction phase of apoptosis is currently unknown and highly debated. This review will focus on one such proposed mechanism, namely, the formation of ceramide channels in the mitochondrial outer membrane. Ceramides are known to play a major regulatory role in apoptosis by inducing the release of proapoptotic proteins from the mitochondria. As mitochondria are known to contain the enzymes responsible for the synthesis and hydrolysis of ceramide, there exists a mechanism for regulating the level of ceramide in mitochondria. In addition, mitochondrial ceramide levels have been shown to be elevated prior to the induction phase of apoptosis. Ceramide has been shown to form large protein permeable channels in planar phospholipid and mitochondrial outer membranes. Thus, ceramide channels are good candidates for the pathway with which proapoptotic proteins are released from mitochondria during the induction phase of apoptosis. PMID:16167171

  2. DPI induces mitochondrial superoxide-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Nianyu; Ragheb, Kathy; Lawler, Gretchen; Sturgis, Jennie; Rajwa, Bartek; Melendez, J Andres; Robinson, J Paul

    2003-02-15

    The iodonium compounds diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) and diphenyliodonium (IDP) are well-known phagocyte NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitors. However, it has been shown that at high concentrations they can inhibit the mitochondrial respiratory chain as well. Since inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain has been shown to induce superoxide production and apoptosis, we investigated the effect of iodonium compounds on mitochondria-derived superoxide and apoptosis. Mitochondrial superoxide production was measured on both cultured cells and isolated rat-heart submitochondrial particles. Mitochondria function was examined by monitoring mitochondrial membrane potential. Apoptotic pathways were studied by measuring cytochrome c release and caspase 3 activation. Apoptosis was characterized by detecting DNA fragmentation on agarose gel and measuring propidium iodide- (PI-) stained subdiploid cells using flow cytometry. Our results showed that DPI could induce mitochondrial superoxide production. The same concentration of DPI induced apoptosis by decreasing mitochondrial membrane potential and releasing cytochrome c. Addition of antioxidants or overexpression of MnSOD significantly reduced DPI-induced mitochondrial damage, cytochrome c release, caspase activation, and apoptosis. These observations suggest that DPI can induce apoptosis via induction of mitochondrial superoxide. DPI-induced mitochondrial superoxide production may prove to be a useful model to study the signaling pathways of mitochondrial superoxide. PMID:12566072

  3. SPE Combined with HPLC-APCI-MS Analysis of Pesticides in Water: Method Performance and Application in a Reconnaissance Survey of Residues in Drinking Water in Greater Cairo (Egypt)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The portability, ease of use, and potential to enhance analyte stability makes solid-phase extraction (SPE) an attractive technique for extracting water samples collected for pesticide residue analysis prior to their shipment to analytical laboratories. The technique is especially valuable when samp...

  4. Determination of analytes in medical herbs extracts by SPE coupled with two-dimensional planar chromatography in combination with diode array scanning densitometry and HPLC-diode array detector.

    PubMed

    Tuzimski, Tomasz

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate an application of 2-D high-performance planar chromatography-diode array detector (DAD) and HPLC-DAD after solid-phase extraction (SPE) for identification and quantitative analysis of pesticides (isoproturon, aziprotryne, hexazinone, flufenoxuron, methabenzthiazuron, procymidone, and ?-cypermethrin) in Melissa officinalis L. (Labiatae) samples. The procedure described for the determination of compounds is inexpensive and can be applied to routine analysis of analytes in medical herbs' samples after preliminary cleanup and concentration by SPE. Average recoveries on C18 SPE cartridges of pesticides eluted with 5 mL tetrahydrofuran by the proposed HPLC-DAD method, before and after 2-D-high-performance planar chromatography separation of analytes from M. officinalis L. samples spiked with pesticide at a concentration level of 10 ?g/g in plant material are presented. Method validation parameters for the quantification of pesticides by the proposed HPLC-DAD after SPE method are also presented. PMID:21171173

  5. UV-B Induced Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species Promotes Formation of BFA-Induced Compartments in Cells of Arabidopsis Root Apices.

    PubMed

    Yokawa, Ken; Kagenishi, Tomoko; Baluška, František

    2015-01-01

    UV-B radiation is an important part of the electromagnetic spectrum emitted by the sun. For much of the period of biological evolution organisms have been exposed to UV radiation, and have developed diverse mechanisms to cope with this potential stress factor. Roots are usually shielded from exposure to UV by the surrounding soil, but may nevertheless be exposed to high energy radiation on the soil surface. Due to their high sensitivity to UV-B radiation, plant roots need to respond rapidly in order to minimize exposure on the surface. In addition to root gravitropism, effective light perception by roots has recently been discovered to be essential for triggering negative root phototropism in Arabidopsis. However, it is not fully understood how UV-B affects root growth and phototropism. Here, we report that UV-B induces rapid generation of reactive oxygen species which in turn promotes the formation of BFA-induced compartments in the Arabidopsis root apex. During unilateral UV-B irradiation of roots changes in auxin concentration on the illuminated side have been recorded. In conclusion, UV-B-induced and ROS-mediated stimulation of vesicle recycling promotes root growth and induces negative phototropism. PMID:26793199

  6. UV-B Induced Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species Promotes Formation of BFA-Induced Compartments in Cells of Arabidopsis Root Apices

    PubMed Central

    Yokawa, Ken; Kagenishi, Tomoko; Baluška, František

    2016-01-01

    UV-B radiation is an important part of the electromagnetic spectrum emitted by the sun. For much of the period of biological evolution organisms have been exposed to UV radiation, and have developed diverse mechanisms to cope with this potential stress factor. Roots are usually shielded from exposure to UV by the surrounding soil, but may nevertheless be exposed to high energy radiation on the soil surface. Due to their high sensitivity to UV-B radiation, plant roots need to respond rapidly in order to minimize exposure on the surface. In addition to root gravitropism, effective light perception by roots has recently been discovered to be essential for triggering negative root phototropism in Arabidopsis. However, it is not fully understood how UV-B affects root growth and phototropism. Here, we report that UV-B induces rapid generation of reactive oxygen species which in turn promotes the formation of BFA-induced compartments in the Arabidopsis root apex. During unilateral UV-B irradiation of roots changes in auxin concentration on the illuminated side have been recorded. In conclusion, UV-B-induced and ROS-mediated stimulation of vesicle recycling promotes root growth and induces negative phototropism. PMID:26793199

  7. Heat shock protein 90 associates with monarch-1 and regulates its ability to promote degradation of NF-kappaB-inducing kinase.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Janelle C; Lich, John D; Aziz, Ramy K; Kotb, Malak; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2007-11-01

    Monarch-1/NLRP12 is expressed in myeloid cells and functions as a negative regulator of inflammation by inducing proteasome-mediated degradation of NF-kappaB-inducing kinase. Monarch-1 is a member of the CATERPILLER gene family, also known as the nucleotide-binding domain leucine-rich repeat gene family. This family shares strong structural homology to major immune regulators expressed in lower organisms, including plants. In plants, these disease-resistance proteins (R proteins) sense pathogenic insult and initiate a protective response to limit pathogen growth. To perform this role, many R proteins require the highly conserved chaperone molecule, heat shock protein (Hsp) 90. Using a two-dimensional gel/mass spectrometry system, we detected the association of the nucleotide-binding domain leucine-rich repeat protein Monarch-1 with heat shock proteins. Further analysis indicates that analogous to plant R proteins, Hsp90 is required for Monarch-1 activity. In human monocytes, Monarch-1 associates with Hsp90, and these complexes are sensitive to treatment with specific Hsp90 inhibitors. Disruption of these complexes results in rapid degradation of Monarch-1 via the proteasome and prevents Monarch-1-induced proteolysis of NF-kappaB-inducing kinase. This demonstrates that Hsp90 is a critical regulator of Monarch-1 anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:17947705

  8. D1 protein turnover is involved in protection of Photosystem II against UV-B induced damage in the cyanobacterium Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongyan; Abasova, Leyla; Cheregi, Otilia; Dek, Zsuzsanna; Gao, Kunshan; Vass, Imre

    2011-01-01

    By using two strains of Arthrospira (Spirulina)platensis, an economically important filamentous cyanobacterium, we compared the impairment of PSII activity and loss of D1 protein content under UV-B radiation. Our study showed that UV-B radiation induced a gradual loss of the oxygen-evolving activity to about 56% after 180 min UV-B irradiation both in strains 439 and D-0083, which have been kept under indoor and an outdoor culturing conditions, respectively for a prolonged period of time. The loss of oxygen evolution was accelerated in both strains in the presence of lincomycin, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, and the amount of D1 protein showed a decrease comparable to that of oxygen evolution during the UV-B exposure. However, the UV-B induced loss of oxygen-evolving activity and D1 protein amount was largely prevented when A. platensis cells were exposed to UV-B irradiance supplemented with visible light. Comparison of the two strains also showed a smaller extent of D1 protein synthesis dependent PSII repair in the indoor strain. Our results show that turnover of the D1 protein is an important defense mechanism to counteract the UV-B induced damage of PSII in A. platensis, and also that visible light plays an important role in maintaining the function of PSII under simultaneous exposure to UV-B and visible light. PMID:21300555

  9. Apoptosis predominates in nonmyocytes in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Park, Misun; Shen, You-Tang; Gaussin, Vinciane; Heyndrickx, Guy R; Bartunek, Jozef; Resuello, Ranillo R G; Natividad, Filipinas F; Kitsis, Richard N; Vatner, Dorothy E; Vatner, Stephen F

    2009-08-01

    The goal of this investigation was to determine the distribution of myocardial apoptosis in myocytes and nonmyocytes in primates and patients with heart failure (HF). Almost all clinical cardiologists and cardiovascular investigators believe that myocyte apoptosis is considered to be a cardinal sign of HF and a major factor in its pathogenesis. However, with the knowledge that 75% of the number of cells in the heart are nonmyocytes, it is important to determine whether the apoptosis in HF is occurring in myocytes or in nonmyocytes. We studied both a nonhuman primate model of chronic HF, induced by rapid pacing 2-6 mo after myocardial infarction (MI), and biopsies from patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy. Dual labeling with a cardiac muscle marker was used to discriminate apoptosis in myocytes versus nonmyocytes. Left ventricular ejection fraction decreased following MI (from 78% to 60%) and further with HF (35%, P < 0.05). As expected, total apoptosis was increased in the myocardium following recovery from MI (0.62 cells/mm(2)) and increased further with the development of HF (1.91 cells/mm(2)). Surprisingly, the majority of apoptotic cells in MI and MI + HF, and in both the adjacent and remote areas, were nonmyocytes. This was also observed in myocardial biopsies from patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy. We found that macrophages contributed the largest fraction of apoptotic nonmyocytes (41% vs. 18% neutrophils, 16% fibroblast, and 25% endothelial and other cells). Although HF in the failing human and monkey heart is characterized by significant apoptosis, in contrast to current concepts, the apoptosis in nonmyocytes was eight- to ninefold greater than in myocytes. PMID:19465551

  10. Chondrocyte Apoptosis in the Pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a highly-regulated, active process of cell death involved in development, homeostasis and aging. Dysregulation of apoptosis leads to pathological states, such as cancer, developmental anomalies and degenerative diseases. Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common chronic joint disease in the elderly population, is characterized by progressive destruction of articular cartilage, resulting in significant disability. Because articular cartilage depends solely on its resident cells, the chondrocytes, for the maintenance of extracellular matrix, the compromising of chondrocyte function and survival would lead to the failure of the articular cartilage. The role of subchondral bone in the maintenance of proper cartilage matrix has been suggested as well, and it has been proposed that both articular cartilage and subchondral bone interact with each other in the maintenance of articular integrity and physiology. Some investigators include both articular cartilage and subchondral bone as targets for repairing joint degeneration. In late-stage OA, the cartilage becomes hypocellular, often accompanied by lacunar emptying, which has been considered as evidence that chondrocyte death is a central feature in OA progression. Apoptosis clearly occurs in osteoarthritic cartilage; however, the relative contribution of chondrocyte apoptosis in the pathogenesis of OA is difficult to evaluate, and contradictory reports exist on the rate of apoptotic chondrocytes in osteoarthritic cartilage. It is not clear whether chondrocyte apoptosis is the inducer of cartilage degeneration or a byproduct of cartilage destruction. Chondrocyte death and matrix loss may form a vicious cycle, with the progression of one aggravating the other, and the literature reveals that there is a definite correlation between the degree of cartilage damage and chondrocyte apoptosis. Because current treatments for OA act only on symptoms and do not prevent or cure OA, chondrocyte apoptosis would be a valid target to modulate cartilage degeneration. PMID:26528972

  11. CASPASE CONTROL: PROTAGONISTS OF CANCER CELL APOPTOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Fiandalo, M.V.; Kyprianou, N.

    2013-01-01

    Emergence of castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer is due to activation of survival pathways, including apoptosis suppression and anoikis resistance, and increased neovascularization. Thus targeting of apoptotic players is of critical significance in prostate cancer therapy since loss of apoptosis and resistance to anoikis are critical in aberrant malignant growth, metastasis and conferring therapeutic failure. The majority of therapeutic agents act through intrinsic mitochondrial, extrinsic death receptor pathways or endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways to induce apoptosis. Current therapeutic strategies target restoring regulatory molecules that govern the pro-survival pathways such as PTEN which regulates AKT activity. Other strategies focus on reactivating the apoptotic pathways either by down-regulating anti-apoptotic players such as BCL-2 or by up-regulating pro-apoptotic protein families, most notably, the caspases. Caspases are a family of cystine proteases which serve critical roles in apoptotic and inflammatory signaling pathways. During tumorigenesis, significant loss or inactivation of lead members in the caspase family leads to impairing apoptosis induction, causing a dramatic imbalance in the growth dynamics, ultimately resulting in aberrant growth of human cancers. Recent exploitation of apoptosis pathways towards re-instating apoptosis induction via caspase re-activation has provided new molecular platforms for the development of therapeutic strategies effective against advanced prostate cancer as well as other solid tumors. This review will discuss the current cellular landscape featuring the caspase family in tumor cells and their activation via pharmacologic intervention towards optimized anti-cancer therapeutic modalities. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Apoptosis: Four Decades Later. PMID:23070001

  12. Chondrocyte Apoptosis in the Pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a highly-regulated, active process of cell death involved in development, homeostasis and aging. Dysregulation of apoptosis leads to pathological states, such as cancer, developmental anomalies and degenerative diseases. Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common chronic joint disease in the elderly population, is characterized by progressive destruction of articular cartilage, resulting in significant disability. Because articular cartilage depends solely on its resident cells, the chondrocytes, for the maintenance of extracellular matrix, the compromising of chondrocyte function and survival would lead to the failure of the articular cartilage. The role of subchondral bone in the maintenance of proper cartilage matrix has been suggested as well, and it has been proposed that both articular cartilage and subchondral bone interact with each other in the maintenance of articular integrity and physiology. Some investigators include both articular cartilage and subchondral bone as targets for repairing joint degeneration. In late-stage OA, the cartilage becomes hypocellular, often accompanied by lacunar emptying, which has been considered as evidence that chondrocyte death is a central feature in OA progression. Apoptosis clearly occurs in osteoarthritic cartilage; however, the relative contribution of chondrocyte apoptosis in the pathogenesis of OA is difficult to evaluate, and contradictory reports exist on the rate of apoptotic chondrocytes in osteoarthritic cartilage. It is not clear whether chondrocyte apoptosis is the inducer of cartilage degeneration or a byproduct of cartilage destruction. Chondrocyte death and matrix loss may form a vicious cycle, with the progression of one aggravating the other, and the literature reveals that there is a definite correlation between the degree of cartilage damage and chondrocyte apoptosis. Because current treatments for OA act only on symptoms and do not prevent or cure OA, chondrocyte apoptosis would be a valid target to modulate cartilage degeneration. PMID:26528972

  13. An on-line SPE-HPLC method for effective sample preconcentration and determination of fenoxycarb and cis, trans-permethrin in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Šatínský, Dalibor; Naibrtová, Linda; Fernández-Ramos, Carolina; Solich, Petr

    2015-09-01

    A new on-line SPE-HPLC method using fused-core columns for on-line solid phase extraction and large volume sample injection for increasing the sensitivity of detection was developed for the determination of insecticides fenoxycarb and cis-, trans-permethrin in surface waters. The separation was carried out on fused-core column Phenyl-Hexyl (100×4.6 mm), particle size 2.7 µm with mobile phase acetonitrile:water in gradient mode at flow rate 1.0 mL min(-1), column temperature 45°C. Large volume sample injection (1500 µL) to the extraction dimension using short precolumn Ascentis Express RP C-18 (5×4.6 mm); fused-core particle size 2.7 µm allowed effective sample preconcentration and efficient ballast sample matrix removal. The washing mobile phase consisting of a mixture of acetonitrile:water; 30:70, (v/v) was pumped at flow rate of 0.5 mL min(-1) through the extraction precolumn to the waste. Time of the valve switch for transferring the preconcentrated sample zone from the extraction to the separation column was set at 3rd min. Elution of preconcentrated insecticides from the extraction precolumn and separation on the analytical column was performed in gradient mode. Linear gradient elution started from 40% of acetonitrile at time of valve switch from SPE column (3rd min) to 95% of acetonitrile at 7th min. Synthetic dye sudan I was chosen as an internal standard. UV detection at wavelength 225 nm was used and the method reached the limits of detection (LOD) at ng mL(-1) levels for both insecticides. The method showing on-line sample pretreatment and preconcentration with highly sensitive determination of insecticides was applied for monitoring of fenoxycarb and both permethrin isomers in different surface water samples in Czech Republic. The time of whole analysis including on-line extraction, interferences removal, chromatography separation and system equilibration was less than 8 min. PMID:26003701

  14. Targeting the Apoptosis Pathway in Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Shadia; Wang, Rui; Gandhi, Varsha

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is a cell death program that is well-orchestrated for normal tissue homeostasis and for removal of damaged, old, or infected cells. It is regulated by intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. The intrinsic pathway responds to signals such as ultraviolet radiation or DNA damage and activates “executioner” caspases through a mitochondria-dependent pathway. The extrinsic pathway is activated by death signals induced, for example, by an infection that activates the immune system or receptor-mediated pathways. The extrinsic pathway signals also cascade down to executioner caspases that cleave target proteins and lead to cell death. Strict control of cellular apoptosis is important for the hematopoietic system as it has a high turnover rate. However, the apoptosis program is often deregulated in hematologic malignancies leading to the accumulation of malignant cells. Therefore, apoptosis pathways have been identified for development of anticancer therapeutics. We review here the proteins that have been targeted for anticancer drug development in hematologic malignancies. These include BCL-2 family proteins, death ligands and receptors, inhibitor of apoptosis family proteins, and caspases. Except for caspase activators, drugs that target each of these classes of proteins have advanced into clinical trials. PMID:24295132

  15. Estrogen Regulation of Apoptosis in Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Peter G; Gerace, Ken V; Roland, Rene L; Chrzan, Brian G

    2010-01-01

    Dysregulated apoptosis is a critical failure associated with prominent degenerative diseases including osteoporosis. In bone, estrogen deficiency has been associated with accelerated osteoblast apoptosis and susceptibility to osteoporotic fractures. Hormone therapy continues to be an effective option for preventing osteoporosis and bone fractures. Induction of apoptosis in G-292 human osteoblastic cells by exposure to etoposide or the inflammatory cytokine TNF? promoted acute caspase-3/7 activity and this increased activity was inhibited by pretreatment with estradiol. Etoposide also increased the expression of a battery of apoptosis-promoting genes and this expression was also inhibited by estradiol. Among the apoptotic genes whose expression was inhibited by estradiol was ITPR1, which encodes the type 1 InsP3R. InsP3Rs are intracellular calcium channels and key proapoptotic mediators. Estradiol via estrogen receptor ?1 suppresses ITPR1 gene transcription in G-292 cells. These analyses suggest that an underlying basis of the beneficial activity of estrogens in combating osteoporosis may involve the prevention of apoptosis in osteoblasts and that a key event in this process is the repression of apoptotic gene expression and inhibition of caspase-3/7. PMID:19426747

  16. NMR exposure sensitizes tumor cells to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ghibelli, L; Cerella, C; Cordisco, S; Clavarino, G; Marazzi, S; De Nicola, M; Nuccitelli, S; D'Alessio, M; Magrini, A; Bergamaschi, A; Guerrisi, V; Porfiri, L M

    2006-03-01

    NMR technology has dramatically contributed to the revolution of image diagnostic. NMR apparatuses use combinations of microwaves over a homogeneous strong (1 Tesla) static magnetic field. We had previously shown that low intensity (0.3-66 mT) static magnetic fields deeply affect apoptosis in a Ca2+ dependent fashion (Fanelli et al., 1999 FASEBJ., 13;95-102). The rationale of the present study is to examine whether exposure to the static magnetic fields of NMR can affect apoptosis induced on reporter tumor cells of haematopoietic origin. The impressive result was the strong increase (1.8-2.5 fold) of damage-induced apoptosis by NMR. This potentiation is due to cytosolic Ca2+ overload consequent to NMR-promoted Ca2+ influx, since it is prevented by intracellular (BAPTA-AM) and extracellular (EGTA) Ca2+ chelation or by inhibition of plasma membrane L-type Ca2+ channels. Three-days follow up of treated cultures shows that NMR decrease long term cell survival, thus increasing the efficiency of cytocidal treatments. Importantly, mononuclear white blood cells are not sensitised to apoptosis by NMR, showing that NMR may increase the differential cytotoxicity of antitumor drugs on tumor vs normal cells. This strong, differential potentiating effect of NMR on tumor cell apoptosis may have important implications, being in fact a possible adjuvant for antitumor therapies. PMID:16528477

  17. Measuring Apoptosis by Microscopy and Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Hollville, Emilie; Martin, Seamus J

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis is a mode of programmed cell death that plays an important role during development and in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Numerous physiological as well as pathological stimuli trigger apoptosis such as engagement of Fas, TRAIL, or TNF receptors, growth factor deprivation, hypoxia, or exposure to cytotoxic drugs. Apoptosis is coordinated from within by members of the caspase family of cysteine proteases that, upon activation, trigger a series of morphological changes including cell shrinkage, extensive plasma membrane blebbing, chromatin condensation, DNA hydrolysis, and nuclear fragmentation. These dramatic structural and biochemical alterations result not only in the controlled dismantling of the cell, but also in the efficient recognition and removal of apoptotic cells by phagocytes. Necrosis, which is typically nonprogrammed or imposed upon the cell by overwhelming membrane or organelle damage, is characterized by rapid plasma membrane rupture followed by organelle and cell swelling. Necrosis is often provoked by infectious agents or a severe departure from physiological conditions. This unit describes protocols for the measurement of apoptosis and for distinguishing apoptosis from necrosis. 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:26836509

  18. Baicalin Induced Dendritic Cell Apoptosis in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huahua; Jiao, Qingqing; Gong, Qianfeng; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Weidong; Hu, Zhenlin

    2011-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effects of baicalin (BA), a major flavonoid constituent found in the herb Baikal skullcap, on dendritic cells (DCs). DCs were generated by culturing murine bone marrow (BM) cells for 6 days with granulocytemacrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin (IL)-4, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was added on day 5 to stimulate DCs maturation. The expression levels of DC maturity markers (CD80/CD86) were assessed by flow cytometry using direct immunofluorescence method. IL-12 levels in the culture supernatants were assayed by ELISA. Apoptosis of DCs was analyzed by flow cytometry after annexin V/propidium iodide staining. The mitochondrial membrane potential (??m) changes were measured by using the J-aggregate forming lipophilic cation 5,5?,6,6?-tetrachloro-1,1?,3,3?-tetraethylbenzimidazolcarbocyanine iodide (JC-1). Exposure of DCs to BA (250??M) during BM cell differentiation showed no effects on the up-regulation of CD80/CD86 expression on DCs in response to LPS stimulation, but reduced DCs recovery by inducing apoptosis, and significantly inhibited the release of IL-12 to culture supernatants. BA-induced DC apoptosis in a time- and dose-dependent way, and immature DCs were more sensitive for BA-induced apoptosis than mature DC. BA also induced ??m changes in DCs. These results demonstrate that BA induces selective apoptosis in immature DCs possibly through mitochondria-mediated pathway. PMID:21687510

  19. Sodium nitroprusside induces apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qian; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2013-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by a slowly progressing degradation of the matrix and destruction of articular cartilage. Apoptosis of chondrocyte is accounted for the mechanism of OA. Nitric oxide (NO), as a stimulus, has been shown to induce chondrocyte apoptosis by activating the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), increasing the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and the level of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), inhibiting the proteoglycan synthesis and type II collagen expression. In this study, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was administered to be the NO donor to explore the mechanism of NO-induced apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes obtained from six weeks old New Zealand rabbits. CCK-8 assay revealed the inhibitory effect of SNP on cell viability. We used flow cytometry (FCM) to assess the form of cell death by Annexin-V/propidium iodide (PI) double staining, and evaluate the change of mitochondrial membrane potential (??m). We found that the SNP induced chondrocyte apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner and an observable reduction of ??m. In conclusion, our findings indicate that SNP induces apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes via a mitochondria-mediated pathway.

  20. The role of intracellular oxidants in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Slater, A F; Nobel, C S; Orrenius, S

    1995-05-24

    Apoptotic cell death is a complex process whose biochemistry is poorly understood. Direct exposure of various cell types of oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide or lipid hydroperoxides can directly induce apoptosis, while in many experimental models pretreatment of cells with antioxidants has been shown to protect against this form of cell death. Recent experimental evidence suggests that multiple forms of thymocyte apoptosis can be inhibited by free radical spin traps, spin probes and thiol reductants, and that this inhibition correlates with a lower oxidative burden within the treated cells. Possible sites of production of these oxidants include mitochondrial electron transport and phospholipase A2-activated arachidonic acid metabolism, while intracellular targets may include redox sensitive transcription factors and inhibitory proteins that must be tagged for proteolysis before apoptosis can commence. PMID:7599226

  1. Lipid Metabolism, Apoptosis and Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chunfa; Freter, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Lipid metabolism is regulated by multiple signaling pathways, and generates a variety of bioactive lipid molecules. These bioactive lipid molecules known as signaling molecules, such as fatty acid, eicosanoids, diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid, lysophophatidic acid, ceramide, sphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol-3 phosphate, and cholesterol, are involved in the activation or regulation of different signaling pathways. Lipid metabolism participates in the regulation of many cellular processes such as cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, survival, apoptosis, inflammation, motility, membrane homeostasis, chemotherapy response, and drug resistance. Bioactive lipid molecules promote apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway by modulating mitochondrial membrane permeability and activating different enzymes including caspases. In this review, we discuss recent data in the fields of lipid metabolism, lipid-mediated apoptosis, and cancer therapy. In conclusion, understanding the underlying molecular mechanism of lipid metabolism and the function of different lipid molecules could provide the basis for cancer cell death rationale, discover novel and potential targets, and develop new anticancer drugs for cancer therapy. PMID:25561239

  2. Apoptosis: role in myeloid cell development

    PubMed Central

    Sarvothaman, Shilpa; Undi, Ram Babu; Pasupuleti, Satya Ratan; Gutti, Usha

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoiesis is the process that generates blood cells in an organism from the pluripotent stem cells. Hematopoietic stem cells are characterized by their ability to undergo self-renewal and differentiation. The self-renewing ability ensures that these pluripotent cells are not depleted from the bone marrow niche. A proper balance between cell death and cell survival is necessary to maintain a homeostatic condition, hence, apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is an essential step in hematopoiesis. Recent studies, however, have introduced a new aspect to this process, citing the significance of the apoptosis mediator, caspase, in cell development and differentiation. Extensive research has been carried out to study the possible role of caspases and other apoptosis related factors in the developmental processes. This review focuses on the various apoptotic factors involved in the development and differentiation of myeloid lineage cells: erythrocytes, megakaryocytes, and macrophages. PMID:26157776

  3. Lipid metabolism, apoptosis and cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chunfa; Freter, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Lipid metabolism is regulated by multiple signaling pathways, and generates a variety of bioactive lipid molecules. These bioactive lipid molecules known as signaling molecules, such as fatty acid, eicosanoids, diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid, lysophophatidic acid, ceramide, sphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol-3 phosphate, and cholesterol, are involved in the activation or regulation of different signaling pathways. Lipid metabolism participates in the regulation of many cellular processes such as cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, survival, apoptosis, inflammation, motility, membrane homeostasis, chemotherapy response, and drug resistance. Bioactive lipid molecules promote apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway by modulating mitochondrial membrane permeability and activating different enzymes including caspases. In this review, we discuss recent data in the fields of lipid metabolism, lipid-mediated apoptosis, and cancer therapy. In conclusion, understanding the underlying molecular mechanism of lipid metabolism and the function of different lipid molecules could provide the basis for cancer cell death rationale, discover novel and potential targets, and develop new anticancer drugs for cancer therapy. PMID:25561239

  4. Apoptosis and Cytokines in Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Syn, Wing-Kin; Choi, Steve S; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2009-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the commonest causes of chronic liver disease in the United States, and represents several overlapping clinicopathological states, ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Although dysregulated lipid accumulation occurs across the spectrum of NAFLD, features of liver cell injury such as hepatocyte ballooning, cytoskeletal changes (Mallory-Denk bodies) and hepatocyte apoptosis occur predominantly in NASH, and distinguish NASH from simple steatosis. Indeed, NASH is a more serious form of liver damage, as cirrhosis and / or hepatocellular carcinoma are potential outcomes of NASH, but rarely occurs in individuals with simple steatosis. Hepatic injury and apoptosis that occur in adults is often dysregulated and is accompanied by the accumulation of immune cells, which produce cytokines and growth factors that drives chronic inflammation and may result in fibrosis. The purpose of this review is to summarize the process of apoptosis and roles of putative cytokines in progressive NAFLD. PMID:19818305

  5. Apoptosis in Drosophila: which role for mitochondria?

    PubMed

    Clavier, Amandine; Rincheval-Arnold, Aurore; Colin, Jessie; Mignotte, Bernard; Gunal, Isabelle

    2016-03-01

    It is now well established that the mitochondrion is a central regulator of mammalian cell apoptosis. However, the importance of this organelle in non-mammalian apoptosis has long been regarded as minor, mainly because of the absence of a crucial role for cytochromec in caspase activation. Recent results indicate that the control of caspase activation and cell death in Drosophila occurs at the mitochondrial level. Numerous proteins, including RHG proteins and proteins of the Bcl-2 family that are key regulators of Drosophila apoptosis, constitutively or transiently localize in mitochondria. These proteins participate in the cell death process at different levels such as degradation of Diap1, a Drosophila IAP, production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species or stimulation of the mitochondrial fission machinery. Here, we review these mitochondrial events that might have their counterpart in human. PMID:26679112

  6. Shikonin causes cell-cycle arrest and induces apoptosis by regulating the EGFR-NF-?B signalling pathway in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Rong; Li, You; Gao, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Shikonin, a naphthoquinone pigment isolated from the Chinese herbal Zicao, has been shown to exhibit antioxidant and anticancer effects. In the present study, we investigated the antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of shikonin on A431 cells and explored the underlying molecular mechanisms. In the present study, our results showed that shikonin significantly inhibited the growth of A431 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, and caused cell cycle arrest by upregulation of p21 and p27, and downregulation of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases. In addition, shikonin evidently induced apoptosis due to decreasing Bcl-2 expression, increasing Bax expression, activating caspase and inactivating NF-?B, while pretreatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor Z-Asp-CH2-DCB abrogated shikonin-induced apoptosis. Moreover, EGF could significantly increase the NF-?B DNA-binding activity and reversed the shikonin-induced inactivation of NF-?B. As anticipated AG1478 (EGFR inhibitor) and Bay11-7082 (NF-?B inhibitor) blocked EGF-reversed the inactivation of NF-?B induced by shikonin. Our data also showed that EGF could evidently reverse the shikonin-induced decreases in cell viability and increases in apoptosis. Then, the NF-?B inhibitors such as Bay11-7082, SN50, Helenalin and the EGFR inhibitor AG1478 and its downstream inhibitor such as PI3K inhibitor LY294002 and STAT3 inhibitor Stattic dramatically blocked EGF-reversed decreases in cell viability and increases in apoptosis induced by shikonin. Collectively, our findings indicated that shikonin inhibited cell growth and caused cell cycle arrest of the A431 cells through the regulation of apoptosis. Moreover, these effects were mediated at least partially by suppressing the activation of the EGFR-NF-?B signaling pathways. PMID:25720435

  7. Molecular mechanisms of the combination of retinoid and interferon-gamma for inducing differentiation and increasing apoptosis in human glioblastoma T98G and U87MG cells.

    PubMed

    Das, Arabinda; Banik, Naren L; Ray, Swapan K

    2009-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the deadliest brain tumor that remains incurable. We examined efficacy of combination of retinoid and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in human glioblastoma T98G and U87MG cells. We conjectured that retinoid could induce differentiation with down regulation of telomerase activity to increase sensitivity to IFN-gamma for apoptosis in glioblastoma cells. Indeed, treatment of cells with 1 muM all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) or 1 muM 13-cis retinoic acid (13-CRA) for 7 days induced astrocytic differentiation with upregulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and down regulation of telomerase activity. Wright staining and ApopTag assay showed, respectively, morphological and biochemical features of apoptosis in glioblastoma cells following exposure to 200 units/ml IFN-gamma for 48 h. Induction of differentiation was associated with decreases in levels of nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and production of nitric oxide (NO) so as to increase sensitivity to IFN-gamma for apoptosis. Notably, IFN-gamma induced signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT-1) to bind to gamma-activated sequence (GAS) of the target gene. Also, IFN-gamma activated caspase-8 and cleaved Bid to truncated Bid (tBid) for translocation to mitochondria. Fura-2 assay showed increases in intracellular free [Ca2+] and activation of calpain in apoptotic cells. Besides, increases in Bax:Bcl-2 ratio and mitochondrial release of cytochrome c and Smac into the cytosol activated caspase-9 and caspase-3 for apoptosis. Taken together, our results showed that retinoid induced astrocytic differentiation with down regulation of telomerase activity and enhanced sensitivity to IFN-gamma for increasing apoptosis in human glioblastoma cells. PMID:18368485

  8. Shikonin causes cell-cycle arrest and induces apoptosis by regulating the EGFR–NF-κB signalling pathway in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Rong; Li, You; Gao, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Shikonin, a naphthoquinone pigment isolated from the Chinese herbal Zicao, has been shown to exhibit antioxidant and anticancer effects. In the present study, we investigated the antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of shikonin on A431 cells and explored the underlying molecular mechanisms. In the present study, our results showed that shikonin significantly inhibited the growth of A431 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, and caused cell cycle arrest by upregulation of p21 and p27, and downregulation of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases. In addition, shikonin evidently induced apoptosis due to decreasing Bcl-2 expression, increasing Bax expression, activating caspase and inactivating NF-κB, while pretreatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor Z-Asp-CH2-DCB abrogated shikonin-induced apoptosis. Moreover, EGF could significantly increase the NF-κB DNA-binding activity and reversed the shikonin-induced inactivation of NF-κB. As anticipated AG1478 (EGFR inhibitor) and Bay11-7082 (NF-κB inhibitor) blocked EGF-reversed the inactivation of NF-κB induced by shikonin. Our data also showed that EGF could evidently reverse the shikonin-induced decreases in cell viability and increases in apoptosis. Then, the NF-κB inhibitors such as Bay11-7082, SN50, Helenalin and the EGFR inhibitor AG1478 and its downstream inhibitor such as PI3K inhibitor LY294002 and STAT3 inhibitor Stattic dramatically blocked EGF-reversed decreases in cell viability and increases in apoptosis induced by shikonin. Collectively, our findings indicated that shikonin inhibited cell growth and caused cell cycle arrest of the A431 cells through the regulation of apoptosis. Moreover, these effects were mediated at least partially by suppressing the activation of the EGFR–NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:25720435

  9. IkappaB kinase subunits alpha and gamma are required for activation of NF-kappaB and induction of apoptosis by mammalian reovirus.

    PubMed

    Hansberger, Mark W; Campbell, Jacquelyn A; Danthi, Pranav; Arrate, Pia; Pennington, Kevin N; Marcu, Kenneth B; Ballard, Dean W; Dermody, Terence S

    2007-02-01

    Reoviruses induce apoptosis both in cultured cells and in vivo. Apoptosis plays a major role in the pathogenesis of reovirus encephalitis and myocarditis in infected mice. Reovirus-induced apoptosis is dependent on the activation of transcription factor NF-kappaB and downstream cellular genes. To better understand the mechanism of NF-kappaB activation by reovirus, NF-kappaB signaling intermediates under reovirus control were investigated at the level of Rel, IkappaB, and IkappaB kinase (IKK) proteins. We found that reovirus infection leads initially to nuclear translocation of p50 and RelA, followed by delayed mobilization of c-Rel and p52. This biphasic pattern of Rel protein activation is associated with the degradation of the NF-kappaB inhibitor IkappaBalpha but not the structurally related inhibitors IkappaBbeta or IkappaBepsilon. Using IKK subunit-specific small interfering RNAs and cells deficient in individual IKK subunits, we demonstrate that IKKalpha but not IKKbeta is required for reovirus-induced NF-kappaB activation and apoptosis. Despite the preferential usage of IKKalpha, both NF-kappaB activation and apoptosis were attenuated in cells lacking IKKgamma/Nemo, an essential regulatory subunit of IKKbeta. Moreover, deletion of the gene encoding NF-kappaB-inducing kinase, which is known to modulate IKKalpha function, had no inhibitory effect on either response in reovirus-infected cells. Collectively, these findings indicate a novel pathway of NF-kappaB/Rel activation involving IKKalpha and IKKgamma/Nemo, which together mediate the expression of downstream proapoptotic genes in reovirus-infected cells. PMID:17121808

  10. I?B Kinase Subunits ? and ? Are Required for Activation of NF-?B and Induction of Apoptosis by Mammalian Reovirus?

    PubMed Central

    Hansberger, Mark W.; Campbell, Jacquelyn A.; Danthi, Pranav; Arrate, Pia; Pennington, Kevin N.; Marcu, Kenneth B.; Ballard, Dean W.; Dermody, Terence S.

    2007-01-01

    Reoviruses induce apoptosis both in cultured cells and in vivo. Apoptosis plays a major role in the pathogenesis of reovirus encephalitis and myocarditis in infected mice. Reovirus-induced apoptosis is dependent on the activation of transcription factor NF-?B and downstream cellular genes. To better understand the mechanism of NF-?B activation by reovirus, NF-?B signaling intermediates under reovirus control were investigated at the level of Rel, I?B, and I?B kinase (IKK) proteins. We found that reovirus infection leads initially to nuclear translocation of p50 and RelA, followed by delayed mobilization of c-Rel and p52. This biphasic pattern of Rel protein activation is associated with the degradation of the NF-?B inhibitor I?B? but not the structurally related inhibitors I?B? or I?B?. Using IKK subunit-specific small interfering RNAs and cells deficient in individual IKK subunits, we demonstrate that IKK? but not IKK? is required for reovirus-induced NF-?B activation and apoptosis. Despite the preferential usage of IKK?, both NF-?B activation and apoptosis were attenuated in cells lacking IKK?/Nemo, an essential regulatory subunit of IKK?. Moreover, deletion of the gene encoding NF-?B-inducing kinase, which is known to modulate IKK? function, had no inhibitory effect on either response in reovirus-infected cells. Collectively, these findings indicate a novel pathway of NF-?B/Rel activation involving IKK? and IKK?/Nemo, which together mediate the expression of downstream proapoptotic genes in reovirus-infected cells. PMID:17121808

  11. The NF?B-inducing kinase is essential for the developmental programming of skin-resident and IL-17-producing ?? T cells

    PubMed Central

    Mair, Florian; Joller, Stefanie; Hoeppli, Romy; Onder, Lucas; Hahn, Matthias; Ludewig, Burkhard; Waisman, Ari; Becher, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    ?? T cells contribute to first line immune defense, particularly through their ability for rapid production of proinflammatory cytokines. The cytokine profile of ?? T cells is hard-wired already during thymic development. Yet, the molecular pathways underlying this phenomenon are incompletely understood. Here we show that signaling via the NF?B-inducing kinase (NIK) is essential for the formation of a fully functional ?? T cell compartment. In the absence of NIK, development of V?5+ dendritic epidermal T cells (DETCs) was halted in the embryonic thymus, and impaired NIK function caused a selective loss of IL-17 expression by ?? T cells. Using a novel conditional mutant of NIK, we could show in vivo that NIK signaling in thymic epithelial cells is essential for the thymic hardwiring of ?? T cell cytokine production. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10087.001 PMID:26637788

  12. Apoptosis and Necrosis in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Guicciardi, Maria Eugenia; Malhi, Harmeet; Mott, Justin L.; Gores, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    Because of its unique function and anatomical location, the liver is exposed to a multitude of toxins and xenobiotics, including medications and alcohol, as well as to infection by hepatotropic viruses, and therefore, is highly susceptible to tissue injury. Cell death in the liver occurs mainly by apoptosis or necrosis, with apoptosis also being the physiologic route to eliminate damaged or infected cells and to maintain tissue homeostasis. Liver cells, especially hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, are particularly susceptible to death receptor-mediated apoptosis, given the ubiquitous expression of the death receptors in the organ. In a quite unique way, death receptor-induced apoptosis in these cells is mediated by both mitochondrial and lysosomal permeabilization. Signaling between the endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria promotes hepatocyte apoptosis in response to excessive free fatty acid generation during the metabolic syndrome. These cell death pathways are partially regulated by microRNAs. Necrosis in the liver is generally associated with acute injury (i.e., ischemia/reperfusion injury) and has been long considered an unregulated process. Recently, a new form of “programmed” necrosis (named necroptosis) has been described: the role of necroptosis in the liver has yet to be explored. However, the minimal expression of a key player in this process in the liver suggests this form of cell death may be uncommon in liver diseases. Because apoptosis is a key feature of so many diseases of the liver, therapeutic modulation of liver cell death holds promise. An updated overview of these concepts is given in this article. PMID:23720337

  13. High-resolution bioactivity profiling combined with HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR: α-Glucosidase inhibitors and acetylated ellagic acid rhamnosides from Myrcia palustris DC. (Myrtaceae).

    PubMed

    Wubshet, Sileshi G; Moresco, Henrique H; Tahtah, Yousof; Brighente, Inês M C; Staerk, Dan

    2015-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is an endocrine metabolic disease with a worldwide prevalence of more than 8%, and an expected increase close to 50% in the next 15-20years. T2D is associated with severe and life-threatening complications like retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy, and cardiovascular diseases, and therefore improved drug leads or functional foods containing α-glucosidase inhibitors are needed for management of blood glucose. In this study, leaves of Myrcia palustris were investigated by high-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition profiling combined with HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR. This led to identification of casuarinin, myricetin 3-O-β-d-(6″-galloyl)galactopyranoside, kaempferol 3-O-β-d-galactopyranoside, myricetin, and quercetin as α-glucosidase inhibitors. In addition, four acetylated ellagic acid rhamnosides, i.e., 4-O-(2″,4″-O-diacetyl-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl)ellagic acid, 4-O-(2″,3″-O-diacetyl-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl)ellagic acid, 4-O-(3″,4″-O-diacetyl-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl)ellagic acid, and 4-O-(2″,3″,4″-O-triacetyl-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl)ellagic acid were identified. PMID:25935545

  14. Development of a targeted method for twenty-three metabolites related to polyphenol gut microbial metabolism in biological samples, using SPE and UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Gasperotti, Mattia; Masuero, Domenico; Guella, Graziano; Mattivi, Fulvio; Vrhovsek, Urska

    2014-10-01

    An increasing number of studies have concerned the profiling of polyphenol microbial metabolites, especially in urine or plasma, but only a few have regarded their accurate quantification. This study reports on a new ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method with electrospray ionisation (UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS) using a simple clean-up step with solid phase extraction (SPE) and validation on different biological matrices. The method was tested with spiked samples of liver, heart, kidneys, brain, blood and urine. The purification procedure, after the evaluation of three different cartridges, makes it possible to obtain cleaner samples and better quantification of putative trace metabolites, especially related to dietary studies, with concentrations below ng/g in tissue and for urine and blood, starting from ng/ml. Limits of detection and linear range were also assessed using mixed polyphenol metabolite standards. Short chromatographic separation was carried out for 23 target compounds related to the polyphenol microbial metabolism, coupled with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer for their accurate quantification. By analysing different spiked biological samples we were able to test metabolite detection in the matrix and validate the overall recovery of the method, from purification to quantification. The method developed can be successfully applied and is suitable for high-throughput targeted metabolomics analysis related to nutritional intervention, or the study of the metabolic mechanism in response to a polyphenol-rich diet. PMID:25059152

  15. A new SPE/GC-fid method for the determination of cholesterol oxidation products. Application to subcutaneous fat from Iberian dry-cured ham.

    PubMed

    Narvez-Rivas, Mnica; Pham, Alessandra J; Schilling, M Wes; Len-Camacho, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    A new method for the isolation and analysis of cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) using solid phase extraction (SPE) and silica columns was developed using gas chromatography-flame ion detection (GC-FID). The method comprises of saponification and liquid-liquid extraction of the unsaponifiable fraction prior to the isolation and derivatization of the COPs to trimethylsilyl ethers. The COPs used in this study are cholestane-5?-6?-epoxide, cholestane-3?-5?-6?-triol, 25-hydroxycholesterol and 5-cholesten-3?-ol-7-one. In order to identify the COPs fraction a GC-ion-trap-mass spectrometry experiment were conducted using authentic standards to verify the presence of the COPs. The method was effective at rapidly separating the COPs (25 min run). Calibration curves were linear with the LODs and LOQs bellow 0.03 and 0.07 mgkg(-1) for all cases, respectively. This methodology gave a total recovery for every compound that was used in the study. Betulin was used as an internal standard to monitor the recovery. The method was validated with a standard mixture of COPs. The method has been applied to characterize the COP fraction of subcutaneous fat from Iberian dry-cured ham. Cholestane-5?-6?-epoxide, cholestane-3?-5?-6?-triol, 25-hydroxycholesterol and 5-cholesten-3?-ol-7-one have been identified for the first time in these samples. PMID:24720962

  16. SpeX SPECTROSCOPY OF UNRESOLVED VERY LOW MASS BINARIES. I. IDENTIFICATION OF 17 CANDIDATE BINARIES STRADDLING THE L DWARF/T DWARF TRANSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Burgasser, Adam J.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Cushing, Michael; Looper, Dagny L.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Reid, I. Neill

    2010-02-20

    We report the identification of 17 candidate brown dwarf binaries whose components straddle the L dwarf/T dwarf transition. These sources were culled from a large near-infrared spectral sample of L and T dwarfs observed with the Infrared Telescope Facility SpeX spectrograph. Candidates were selected on the basis of spectral ratios which segregate known (resolved) L dwarf/T dwarf pairs from presumably single sources. Composite templates, constructed by combining 13,581 pairs of absolute flux-calibrated spectra, are shown to provide statistically superior fits to the spectra of our 17 candidates as compared to single templates. Ten of these candidates appear to have secondary components that are significantly brighter than their primaries over the 1.0-1.3 {mu}m band, indicative of rapid condensate depletion at the L dwarf/T dwarf transition. Our results support prior indications of enhanced multiplicity amongst early-type T dwarfs; 53% +- 7% of the T0-T4 dwarfs in our spectral sample are found to be either resolved or unresolved (candidate) pairs, although this is consistent with an intrinsic (volume complete) brown dwarf binary fraction of only 15%. If verified, this sample of spectral binaries more than doubles the number of known L dwarf/T dwarf transition pairs, enabling a broader exploration of this poorly understood phase of brown dwarf atmospheric evolution.

  17. SpeX spectroscopy of unresolved very low mass binaries. II. Identification of 14 candidate binaries with late-M/early-L and T dwarf components

    SciTech Connect

    Bardalez Gagliuffi, Daniella C.; Burgasser, Adam J.; Nicholls, Christine P.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Looper, Dagny L.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Cruz, Kelle; West, Andrew A.; Gizis, John E.; Metchev, Stanimir

    2014-10-20

    Multiplicity is a key statistic for understanding the formation of very low mass (VLM) stars and brown dwarfs. Currently, the separation distribution of VLM binaries remains poorly constrained at small separations (≤1 AU), leading to uncertainty in the overall binary fraction. We approach this problem by searching for late-M/early-L plus T dwarf spectral binaries whose combined light spectra exhibit distinct peculiarities, allowing for separation-independent identification. We define a set of spectral indices designed to identify these systems, and we use a spectral template fitting method to confirm and characterize spectral binary candidates from a library of 815 spectra from the SpeX Prism Spectral Libraries. We present 11 new binary candidates, confirm 3 previously reported candidates, and rule out 2 previously identified candidates, all with primary and secondary spectral types in the range M7-L7 and T1-T8, respectively. We find that subdwarfs and blue L dwarfs are the primary contaminants in our sample and propose a method for segregating these sources. If confirmed by follow-up observations, these systems may add to the growing list of tight separation binaries, whose orbital properties may yield further insight into brown dwarf formation scenarios.

  18. Development of multiclass methods for drug residues in eggs: silica SPE cleanup and LC-MS/MS analysis of ionophore and macrolide residues.

    PubMed

    Heller, David N; Nochetto, Cristina B

    2004-11-17

    A method was developed that is suitable for screening eggs for a variety of nonpolar residues in a single procedure. Residues are extracted by silica solid-phase extraction (SPE). Analysis is conducted via reverse-phase gradient liquid chromatography, electrospray ionization, and tandem ion trap mass spectrometry. For screening purposes (based on a single precursor-product ion transition) the method can detect ionophore (lasalocid, monensin, salinomycin, narasin) and macrolide (erythromycin, tylosin) residues in egg at approximately 1 ng/mL (ppb) and above and novobiocin residues at approximately 3 ppb and above. Conditions are described for confirmatory analysis based on multiple ions in the product ion spectrum. The extraction efficiency for ionophores was estimated at 60-85%, depending on drug. Recovery of macrolides and novobiocin was not as good (estimated at 40-55% after a hexane wash of the final extract was included), but the method consistently screened and confirmed these residues at concentrations below the target of 10 ppb. The method was applied to eggs from hens dosed with each drug individually. Lasalocid was found to have the highest probability of detection in eggs based on its high ionization efficiency and higher rate of deposition relative to the other drugs. The method is part of a larger scheme to provide surveillance methods for a wide variety of drug residues in eggs. PMID:15537285

  19. 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid derivatives of inositol from dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) root characterised using LC-SPE-NMR and LC-MS techniques.

    PubMed

    Kenny, O; Smyth, T J; Hewage, C M; Brunton, N P; McLoughlin, P

    2014-02-01

    The combination of hyphenated techniques, LC-SPE-NMR and LC-MS, to isolate and identify minor isomeric compounds from an ethyl acetate fraction of Taraxacum officinale root was employed in this study. Two distinct fractions of 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid derivatives of inositol were isolated and characterised by spectroscopic methods. The (1)H NMR spectra and MS data revealed two groups of compounds, one of which were derivatives of the di-4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid derivative of the inositol compound tetrahydroxy-5-[2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)acetyl] oxycyclohexyl-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl) acetate, while the other group consisted of similar tri-substituted inositol derivatives. For both fractions the derivatives of inositols vary in the number of 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid groups present and their position and geometry on the inositol ring. In total, three di-substituted and three tri-substituted 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid inositol derivates were identified for the first time along with a further two previously reported di-substituted inositol derivatives. PMID:24359632

  20. Rapid and selective quantification of L-theanine in ready-to-drink teas from Chinese market using SPE and UPLC-UV.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guoqiang; Wang, Yun; Song, Weiqi; Zhao, Bo; Dou, Yuling

    2012-11-15

    An ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) method combined with solid phase extraction (SPE) sample pre-treatment was developed and validated for the rapid quantification of L-theanine in ready-to-drink (RTD) teas. UPLC analysis of twenty-seven RTD teas from the Chinese market revealed that the L-theanine levels in various types of RTD teas were significantly different. RTD green teas were found to contain highest mean L-theanine level (37.8520.54 mg/L), followed by jasmine teas (36.6012.08 mg/L), Tieguanying teas (18.543.46 mg/L) black teas (16.896.56), Pu-erh teas (11.310.90 mg/L) and oolong teas (3.852.27 mg/L). The ratio of total polyphenols content to L-theanine content could be used as a featured parameter for differentiating RTD teas. L-theanine in RTD teas could be a reliable quality parameter that is complementary to total polyphenols. PMID:22868106

  1. Preconcentration of organochlorine pesticides in aqueous samples by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop after SPE with multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Mohammad; Rakh, Mojgan

    2014-01-01

    SPE joined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) as a novel technique combined with GC with electron-capture detection has been developed as a preconcentration technique for the determination of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in water samples. Aqueous samples were loaded onto multiwalled carbon nanotubes as sorbent. After the elution of the desired compounds from the sorbent by using acetone, the DLLME-SFO technique was performed on the obtained solution. Variables affecting the performance of both steps such as sample solution flow rate, breakthrough volume, type and volume of the elution, type and volume of extraction solvent and salt addition were studied and optimized. The new method provided an ultra enrichment factor (8280-28221) for nine OCPs. The calibration curves were linear in the range of 0.5-1000 ng/L, and the LODs ranged from 0.1-0.39 ng/L. The RSD, for 0.01 ?g/L of OCPs, was in the range of 1.39-13.50% (n = 7). The recoveries of method in water samples were 70-113%. PMID:24288158

  2. Determination of perfluorinated sulfonate and perfluorinated acids in tissues of free-living European beaver (castor fiber L.) by d-SPE/ micro-UHPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Surma, Magdalena; Gi?ejewski, Zygmunt; Zieli?ski, Henryk

    2015-10-01

    Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) are the main representatives of an rising class of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), perfluorochemicals (PFCs). In this study, determination of selected PFCs concentration in liver, brain, tail, adipose and peritoneum tissues of free-living European beaver (Castor fiber L.) was addressed. Tissue samples, collected from beavers living in Masurian Lakeland (NE Poland), were analyzed by dispersive Solid Phase Extraction (d-SPE) with micro-UHPLC-MS/MS system. In a group of ten selected pefrluorinated compounds only two perfluorinated acids (PFOA and PFNA) and one perfluorinated sulfonate (PFOS) were quantified. PFOA was detected in all analysed tissue samples in both female and male beavers in a range from 0.55 to 0.98ngg(-1) ww whereas PFOS was identified in all analyzed female beaver tissues and only in liver, subcutaneous adipose and peritoneum tissues of male beavers at the concentration level from 0.86 to 5.08ngg(-1) ww. PFNA was only identified in female beaver tissues (liver, subcutaneous adipose and peritoneum) in a range from 1.50 to 6.61ngg(-1) ww. This study demonstrated the bioaccumulation of PFCs in tissue samples collected from beavers living in area known as green lungs of Poland. The results provided in this study indicate for the increasing risk of PFCs occurrence in the environment and the level of PFCs in tissue of free-living European beavers may serve as bioindicator of environmental pollution by these compounds. PMID:26143169

  3. Preparation of molecularly imprinted polymers using theanine as dummy template and its application as SPE sorbent for the determination of eighteen amino acids in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fengling; Wang, Jing; Zhu, Lijun; Tan, Lanlan; Feng, Guanglin; Liu, Shaomin; Dai, Ya; Wang, Hua

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a novel dummy template molecularly imprinted polymer (DMIP) based on a vinyl-SiO2 microspheres surface for the simultaneous selective recognition and enrichment of 18 amino acids was prepared via a surface molecular imprinting technique using theanine as a dummy template. Compared to the imprinted polymers prepared using traditional polymerization techniques, the obtained DMIPs exhibited a regular spherical shape and were relatively monodisperse. The maximal sorption capacity (Qmax) of the resulting DMIPs for the 18 amino acids was up to 1444.3mgg(-1). A kinetic binding study showed that the sorption capacity reached 85.40% of Qmax in 25min and sorption equilibrium at 30min. The imprint factors of the sorbents ranged from 2.86 to 6.9 for the 18 amino acids, which indicated that the DMIP sorbents have high selectivity. An HPLC-UV method for the simultaneous determination of 18 amino acids in tobacco and tobacco smoke was developed using the DMIPs as sorbents for solid phase extraction (SPE) in the sample pretreatment procedure. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the materials had enrichment factors of up to 200 for the amino acids, and the recoveries of the 18 amino acids in tobacco smoke were in the range from 79% to 104% with relative standard deviations of less than 7.4%. It indicated that the obtained DMIP sorbents could specifically recognize the amino acids from complicated samples. PMID:26838422

  4. Optimization and validation of a simple and fast method for the determination of fungicides in must and wine samples by SPE and GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Lagunas-Allué, Laura; Sanz-Asensio, Jesús; Martínez-Soria, Maria-Teresa

    2012-01-01

    A rapid, simple, and low-cost method based on SPE was optimized and validated for simultaneous determination of eight fungicides belonging to different chemical classes in must and wine. The method involves extraction of 10 mL of must or wine samples with a C18 cartridge using 5 mL of dichloromethane as the elution solvent. Separation and final determination of the fungicides (vinclozolin, dichlofluanid, penconazol, captan, quinoxyfen, fluquinconazol, boscalid, and pyraclostrobin) was performed by GC coupled to single quadrupole MS. Recoveries at 10, 50, and 100 microg/L were between 71 and 106% in both matrixes for the fungicides evaluated. The calculated LOQ ranged from 1.5 to 3.4 microg/L in must and 1.1 to 3.8 microg/L in wine. Matrix effects observed for wine and must samples were overcome by using matrix-matched calibration. The developed method was linear at concentrations within the tested interval, with coefficients of determination higher than 0.999. The expanded uncertainties at 10 microg/L were <20% for all analytes. Intralaboratory precision in terms of the Horwitz ratio of the fungicides evaluated was below 0.5, suggesting the ruggedness of the method. The proposed method was applied to determine fungicide residues in must samples obtained from red grapes treated with two new commercial formulations, as well as in their corresponding final wines. PMID:23175987

  5. Determination of parent and substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in high-fat salmon using a modified QuEChERS extraction, dispersive SPE and GC-MS

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Norman D.; Wilson, Glenn R.; Anderson, Kim A.

    2011-01-01

    A fast and easy modified QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, rugged and safe) extraction method has been developed and validated for determination of 33 parent and substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in high-fat smoked salmon that greatly enhances analyte recovery compared to traditional QuEChERS procedures. Sample processing includes extraction of PAHs into a solution of ethyl acetate, acetone and iso-octane followed by cleanup with dispersive SPE and analysis by GC-MS in SIM mode. Method performance was assessed in spike recovery experiments (500 ng/g wet weight) in three commercially available smoked salmon with 3 – 11% fat. Recoveries of some 2, 3 and 5-ring PAHs were improved 50 – 200% over traditional methods, while average recovery across all PAHs was improved 67%. Method precision was good with replicate extractions typically yielding relative standard deviations < 10% and detection limits were in the low ng/g range. With this method, a single analyst could extract and cleanup ≥ 60 samples for PAH analysis in an 8 hour work day. PMID:21732651

  6. An Optimized High Throughput Clean-Up Method Using Mixed-Mode SPE Plate for the Analysis of Free Arachidonic Acid in Plasma by LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wan; Qin, Suzi; Li, Linsen; Chen, Xiaohua; Wang, Qunjie; Wei, Junfu

    2015-01-01

    A high throughput sample preparation method was developed utilizing mixed-mode solid phase extraction (SPE) in 96-well plate format for the determination of free arachidonic acid in plasma by LC-MS/MS. Plasma was mixed with 3% aqueous ammonia and loaded into each well of 96-well plate. After washing with water and methanol sequentially, 3% of formic acid in acetonitrile was used to elute arachidonic acid. The collected fraction was injected onto a reversed phase column at 30C with mobile phase of acetonitrile/water (70?:?30, v/v) and detected by LC-MS/MS coupled with electrospray ionization (ESI) in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The calibration curve ranged from 10 to 2500?ng/mL with sufficient linearity (r2 = 0.9999). The recoveries were in the range of 99.38% to 103.21% with RSD less than 6%. The limit of detection is 3?ng/mL. PMID:25873969

  7. Oxidative stress increases phosphorylation of IkappaB kinase-alpha by enhancing NF-kappaB-inducing kinase after transient focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Song, Yun Seon; Kim, Min-Soo; Kim, Hyun-Ae; Jung, Bo-In; Yang, Jiwon; Narasimhan, Purnima; Kim, Gab Seok; Jung, Joo Eun; Park, Eun-Hee; Chan, Pak H

    2010-07-01

    The IkappaB kinase (IKK) complex is a central component in the classic activation of the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) pathway. It has been reported to function in physiologic responses, including cell death and inflammation. We have shown that IKK is regulated by oxidative status after transient focal cerebral ischemia (tFCI) in mice. However, the mechanism by which oxidative stress influences IKKs after tFCI is largely unknown. Nuclear accumulation and phosphorylation of IKKalpha (pIKKalpha) were observed 1 h after 30 mins of tFCI in mice. In copper/zinc-superoxide dismutase knockout mice, levels of NF-kappaB-inducing kinase (NIK) (an upstream kinase of IKKalpha), pIKKalpha, and phosphorylation of histone H3 (pH3) on Ser10 were increased after tFCI and were higher than in wild-type mice. Immunohistochemistry showed nuclear accumulation and pIKKalpha in mouse brain endothelial cells after tFCI. Nuclear factor-kappaB-inducing kinase was increased, and it enhanced pH3 by inducing pIKKalpha after oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) in mouse brain endothelial cells. Both NIK and pH3 interactions with IKKalpha were confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation. Treatment with IKKalpha small interfering RNA significantly reduced cell death after OGD. These results suggest that augmentation of NIK, IKKalpha, and pH3 in response to oxidative stress is involved in cell death after cerebral ischemia (or stroke). PMID:20125184

  8. Ultraviolet-B-Induced Stomatal Closure in Arabidopsis Is Regulated by the UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 Photoreceptor in a Nitric Oxide-Dependent Mechanism1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Tossi, Vanesa; Lamattina, Lorenzo; Jenkins, Gareth I.; Cassia, Ral O.

    2014-01-01

    UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) signaling involves CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1, the ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5) transcription factor, and the closely related HY5 HOMOLOG. Some UV-B responses mediated by UVR8 are also regulated by nitric oxide (NO), a bioactive molecule that orchestrates a wide range of processes in plants. In this study, we investigated the participation of the UVR8 pathway and its interaction with NO in UV-B-induced stomatal movements in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Stomata in abaxial epidermal strips of Arabidopsis ecotype Landsberg erecta closed in response to increasing UV-B fluence rates, with maximal closure after 3-h exposure to 5.46 ?mol m2 s1 UV-B. Both hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and NO increased in response to UV-B, and stomatal closure was maintained by NO up to 24 h after the beginning of exposure. Stomata of plants expressing bacterial NO dioxygenase, which prevents NO accumulation, did not close in response to UV-B, although H2O2 still increased. When the uvr8-1 null mutant was exposed to UV-B, stomata remained open, irrespective of the fluence rate. Neither NO nor H2O2 increased in stomata of the uvr8-1 mutant. However, the NO donor S-nitrosoglutathione induced closure of uvr8-1 stomata to the same extent as in the wild type. Experiments with mutants in UVR8 signaling components implicated CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1, HY5, and HY5 HOMOLOG in UV-B-induced stomatal closure. This research provides evidence that the UVR8 pathway regulates stomatal closure by a mechanism involving both H2O2 and NO generation in response to UV-B exposure. PMID:24586043

  9. p38-NF-?B-promoted mitochondria-associated apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest in norcantharidin-treated HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiu; Li, Jian-Chun; Jiang, Yuan-Yuan; Xia, Ming-Yu; Tashiro, Shin-Ichi; Onodera, Satoshi; Ikejima, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Previous study proved that norcantharidin (NCTD) could exert its anticancer activity in a variety of malignant cell lines, including human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells. In this study, we found that NCTD-activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK)-nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NF-?B) signaling pathway induced mitochondrial apoptotic pathway activation and G2/M cell cycle arrest in HeLa cells. NCTD-induced mitochondria-associated apoptosis was concomitant with the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential (??(m)), translocation of Bax, down-regulation of Bcl-2 expression, and release of cytochrome c. NCTD-led G2/M cell-cycle arrest was associated with the up-regulated p21 and p-cdc25c expression and the down-regulated cyclin B and cdc2 expression. Treatment of the cells with p38 inhibitor SB203580 and NF-?B inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) showed that p38 functioned upstream of NF-?B, while augmented apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were induced in response to NCTD with NF-?B activation. Intriguingly, NF-?B had a negative feedback regulatory effect on p38 activation. Moreover, NCTD-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were significantly blocked by SB203580 and PDTC but not by pifithrin-? (p53 inhibitor). Therefore, p38-NF-?B induced mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and G2/M cell cycle arrest in NCTD-treated HeLa cells. PMID:23281704

  10. Dual high-resolution α-glucosidase and radical scavenging profiling combined with HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR for identification of minor and major constituents directly from the crude extract of Pueraria lobata.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bingrui; Kongstad, Kenneth T; Qinglei, Sun; Nyberg, Nils T; Jäger, Anna K; Staerk, Dan

    2015-02-27

    The crude methanol extract of Pueraria lobata was investigated by dual high-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition and radical scavenging profiling combined with hyphenated HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR. Direct analysis of the crude extract without preceding purification was facilitated by combining chromatograms from two analytical-scale HPLC separations of 120 and 600 μg on-column, respectively. High-resolution α-glucosidase and radical scavenging profiles were obtained after microfractionation of the eluate in 96-well microplates. This allowed full bioactivity profiling of individual peaks in the HPLC chromatogram of the crude methanol extract. Subsequent HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR analysis allowed identification of 21 known compounds in addition to two new compounds, i.e., 3'-methoxydaidzein 8-C-[α-D-apiofuranosyl-(1→6)]-β-D-glucopyranoside and 6″-O-malonyl-3'-methoxydaidzin, as well as an unstable compound tentatively identified as 3'-de-O-methylpuerariafuran. PMID:25679337

  11. Identification of adulterants in a Chinese herbal medicine by LC-HRMS and LC-MS-SPE/NMR and comparative in vivo study with standards in a hypertensive rat model.

    PubMed

    Kesting, Julie Regitze; Huang, Jingqi; Srensen, Dan

    2010-02-01

    Based on anecdotal evidence of anti-hypertensive effect of Gold Nine Soft Capsules, an in vivo study of this complex Chinese "herbal-based" medicine was initiated. Dosage of the content of Gold Nine capsules in spontaneous hypertensive rats showed a remarkably good effect. This led to further investigation of the components of the preparation and eventual identification of three known anti-hypertensive drugs; amlodipine, indapamide and valsartan, which were not declared on the label. Compounds were rapidly identified using LC-HRMS and LC-MS-SPE/NMR, quantified by HPLC, and the in vivo activity of a combination of commercially purchased standards was shown to be equivalent to that of the capsule content. Adulteration of herbal remedies and dietary supplements with synthetic drugs is an increasing problem that may lead to serious adverse effects. LC-MS-SPE/NMR as a method for the rapid identification of such adulterants is highlighted in this case study. PMID:19850434

  12. Oligodendroglial degeneration in distemper: apoptosis or necrosis?

    PubMed

    Schobesberger, M; Zurbriggen, A; Summerfield, A; Vandevelde, M; Griot, C

    1999-03-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) causes a multifocal demyelinating disease in dogs. It was previously shown that the initial demyelinating lesions are directly virus induced since a correlation between the occurrence of demyelination and CDV replication in white matter cells was observed. During the course of infection oligodendrocytes undergo distinct morphological alterations, partly due to a restricted CDV infection of these cells, and eventually disappear from the lesions. This phenomenon has been described in vivo as well as in vitro. However, the reason for the morphological alterations and the following oligodendroglial depletion remained unclear. Since virus infection can induce cell death, it was investigated whether apoptosis or necrosis plays a role in the pathogenesis of demyelination in canine distemper. In brain tissue sections from dogs with acute distemper apoptotic cells were not detected within the demyelinating lesions using morphological and biochemical cell death criteria. In chronic distemper, apoptotic cells - presumably inflammatory cells - were seen within the perivascular cuffs. These in vivo findings were correlated to the in vitro situation using CDV-infected primary dog brain cell cultures as well as Vero cells. Infection with culture-adapted CDV lead to massive necrosis but not to apoptosis. After infection with virulent CDV neither apoptosis nor necrosis was a predominant feature in either culture system. These findings suggest that virus-induced demyelination in canine distemper is not the direct consequence of apoptosis or necrosis. It is speculated that another mechanism must be responsible for the observed morphological alterations of oligodendrocytes, ultimately leading to demyelination. PMID:10090676

  13. Biophotonic probing of macromolecular transformations during apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Pliss, Artem; Kuzmin, Andrey N.; Kachynski, Aliaksandr V.; Prasad, Paras N.

    2010-01-01

    We introduce here multiplex nonlinear optical imaging as a powerful tool for studying the molecular organization and its transformation in cellular processes, with the specific example of apoptosis. Apoptosis is a process of self-initiated cell death, critically important for physiological regulation and elimination of genetic disorders. Nonlinear optical microscopy, combining the coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF), has been used for analysis of spatial distribution of major types of biomolecules: proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids in the cells while monitoring their changes during apoptosis. CARS imaging revealed that in the nuclei of proliferating cells, the proteins are distributed nearly uniformly, with local accumulations in several nuclear structures. We have found that this distribution is abruptly disrupted at the onset of apoptosis and is transformed to a progressively irregular pattern. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) studies indicate that pronounced aggregation of proteins in the nucleoplasm of apoptotic cells coincides with a gradual reduction in their mobility. PMID:20615987

  14. Excitotoxins in neuronal apoptosis and necrosis.

    PubMed

    Nicotera, P; Lipton, S A

    1999-06-01

    Neuronal loss is common to many neurodegenerative diseases. Although necrosis is a common histopathologic feature observed in neuropathologic conditions, evidence is increasing that apoptosis can significantly contribute to neuronal demise. The prevalence of either type of cell death, apoptosis or necrosis, and the relevance for the progression of disease is still unclear. The debate on the occurrence and prevalence of one or the other type of death in pathologic conditions such as stroke or neurotoxic injury may in part be resolved by the proposal that different types of cell death within a tissue reflect either partial or complete execution of a common death program. Apoptosis is an active process of cell destruction, characterized morphologically by cell shrinkage, chromatin aggregation with extensive genomic fragmentation, and nuclear pyknosis. In contrast, necrosis is characterized by cell swelling, linked to rapid energy loss, and generalized disruption of ionic and internal homeostasis. This swiftly leads to membrane lysis, release of intracellular constituents that evoke a local inflammatory reaction, edema, and injury to the surrounding tissue. During the past few years, our laboratories have studied the signals and mechanisms responsible for induction or prevention of apoptosis/necrosis in neuronal injury and this is the subject of this review. PMID:10366188

  15. Apoptosis. The role of the endonuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Arends, M. J.; Morris, R. G.; Wyllie, A. H.

    1990-01-01

    Cell death by apoptosis mediates several important physiologic and pathologic processes and appears to be intrinsically programmed. Its characteristic features are distinctive morphologic changes of nucleus and cytoplasm, along with cleavage of chromatin at regularly spaced sites. Here we study DNA organization and nuclear structure in apoptotic thymocytes to define the cleavage event and, by implication, the role of the responsible endonuclease. We show that in apoptosis, double-stranded cleavage of DNA generates two classes of chromatin fragments: 70% of DNA exists as long, H1-rich oligonucleosomes bound to the nucleus, and 30% comprises short oligonucleosomes and mononucleosomes, which are depleted in H1, enriched in HMG1 and 2, and not attached to the nucleus. This minority class probably derives from chromatin in a transcriptionally active configuration, which would allow better access to enzymes in the nucleoplasm, producing more complete digestion. The characteristic nucleolar morphology in apoptosis can also be explained in terms of cleavage of the transcriptionally active ribosomal genes, with conservation of the nucleolin-rich fibrillar center. The chromatin cleavage, nucleolar morphologic changes, and chromatin condensation were closely mimicked by micrococcal nuclease digestion of normal thymocyte nuclei in the presence of protease inhibitors. Thus, in apoptosis, selective activation of an endogenous endonuclease appears to be responsible not only for widespread chromatin cleavage but also for the major nuclear morphologic changes. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 6 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:2156431

  16. A novel method for detection of apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zagariya, Alexander M.

    2012-04-15

    There are two different Angiotensin II (ANG II) peptides in nature: Human type (ANG II) and Bovine type (ANG II*). These eight amino acid peptides differ only at position 5 where Valine is replaced by Isoleucine in the Bovine type. They are present in all species studied so far. These amino acids are different by only one atom of carbon. This difference is so small, that it will allow any of ANG II, Bovine or Human antibodies to interact with all species and create a universal method for apoptosis detection. ANG II concentrations are found at substantially higher levels in apoptotic, compared to non-apoptotic, tissues. ANG II accumulation can lead to DNA damage, mutations, carcinogenesis and cell death. We demonstrate that Bovine antiserum can be used for universal detection of apoptosis. In 2010, the worldwide market for apoptosis detection reached the $20 billion mark and significantly increases each year. Most commercially available methods are related to Annexin V and TUNNEL. Our new method based on ANG II is more widely known to physicians and scientists compared to previously used methods. Our approach offers a novel alternative for assessing apoptosis activity with enhanced sensitivity, at a lower cost and ease of use.

  17. Apoptosis drives cancer cells proliferate and metastasize

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui-An; Li, Qin-Long; Li, Zeng-Shan; Zheng, Ping-Ju; Zhang, Hui-Zhong; Huang, Xiao-Feng; Chi, Su-Min; Yang, An-Gang; Cui, Rutao

    2013-01-01

    Cancer has been considered to be the result of accumulated gene mutations, which result in uncontrolled cell proliferations for a long time. Cancers are also regarded to be capable of immune evasion. Furthermore, resistance to apoptosis was recognized as an important trait of cancer in the last score of years. However, there are numerous paradoxical issues in this whole set of theory. For example, there is no known set of genes of which mutations are responsible for human cancers. As for the trait of ‘resistance to apoptosis’, the fact is that cancer has increased frequency of apoptosis. The more malignant the tumour is, the more apoptosis shows. In this study, we propose a new theory that apoptosis plays a key role in the malignant progression and metastasis of cancer. The growth of tumour is the difference between tumour cell proliferation and attrition plus the hyperplastic growth of stroma. Increased and unpreventable death caused by innate or environmental factors such as ischaemia and inflammation drives the tumour cells to proliferate relentlessly, move to new lands to establish colonies. In short, increased cell death is the origin of malignancy. PMID:23305095

  18. THE ROLE OF APOPTOSIS IN NEUROTOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Apoptosis, a form of programmed cell death, occurs in the nervous system throughout development, but with a preponderance of cell death occurring during the prenatal and perinatal periods. Aberrant periods of increased or decreased cell death, induced by toxicants in air, water,...

  19. Fluorescence spectroscopy to assess apoptosis in myocardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranji, Mahsa; Matsubara, Muneaki; Grosso, Michael A.; Jaggard, Dwight L.; Chance, Britton; Gorman, Robert C.; Gorman, Joseph H., III

    2007-02-01

    Apoptosis induced mitochondrial destruction and dysfunction has been shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of both acute cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury and chronic myocardial infarction-induced ventricular remodeling. Unfortunately this understanding has not translated into effective therapeutic strategies for either condition-mostly due to an inability to assess mitochondrial dysfunction/apoptosis effectively in humans. All current measures of apoptosis are pseudo-quantitative and require invasive tissue biopsy. Our group has developed an optical, non-tissue destructive catheter based device that allows the quantitative regional assessment of this pathological process in vivo. This instrument has been designed to acquire fluorescence signals of intrinsic mitochondrial fluorophores, Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NAD) and Flavoprotein (FP). The normalized ratio of these fluorophores (FP/FP+NADH) called the redox ratio, is an indicator of the in vivo mitochondrial dysfunction. 1-3 We have demonstrated in a rabbit reperfusion model of apoptotic myocyte injury that this redox ratio is drastically increased which is consistent with profound apoptosis-induced "unhinging" of the mitochondrial respiratory function.

  20. Coupling HPLC-SPE-NMR with a microplate-based high-resolution antioxidant assay for efficient analysis of antioxidants in food--validation and proof-of-concept study with caper buds.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Stefanie; Wubshet, Sileshi G; Nielsen, John; Staerk, Dan

    2013-12-15

    This work describes the coupling of a microplate-based antioxidant assay with a hyphenated system consisting of high-performance liquid chromatography-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, i.e., HPLC-SPE-NMR/high-resolution antioxidant assay, for the analysis of complex food extracts. The applicability of the microplate-based antioxidant assay for high-resolution screening of common food phenolics as well as parameters related to their trapping efficiency, elution behavior, and recovery on/from SPE cartridges are described. It was found that the microplate-based high-resolution antioxidant assay is an attractive and easy implementable alternative to direct on-line screening methods. Furthermore, it was shown that Resin SH and Resin GP SPE material are superior to RP C18HD for trapping of phenolic compounds. Proof-of-concept study was performed with caper bud extract, revealing the most important antioxidants to be quercetin, kaempferol, rutin, kaempferol-3-O-?-rutinoside and N(1),N(5),N(10)-triphenylpropenoyl spermidine amides. Targeted isolation of the latter, and comprehensive NMR experiments showed them to be N(1),N(10)-di-(E)-caffeoyl-N(5)-p-(E)-coumaroyl spermidine, N(1)-(E)-caffeoyl-N(5),N(10)-di-p-(E)-coumaroyl spermidine, N(10)-(E)-caffeoyl-N(1),N(5)-di-p-(E)-coumaroyl spermidine, and N(1),N(5),N(10)-tri-p-(E)-coumaroyl spermidine amides. PMID:23993578

  1. Cellular transcriptomics: gelsolin negatively regulates the expression of apoptosis-associated genes and inhibits apoptosis in hepatocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yi; Deng, Xiaofang; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Zang, Ning; Li, Hongtao; Li, Gang; Li, Danrong; Li, Cuiping; Huang, Wendong; He, Min

    2015-01-01

    Gelsolin (GSN), which is a Ca2+-dependent actin filament severing and capping protein, plays a critical role in the cancer progress and has the potential for providing a novel thread for cancer therapy. In current study, we demonstrate the roles of GSN on anti-apoptosis of hepatocarcinoma cells by transcriptome RNA-seq method. Then flow cytometry (FCM), in-cell immunoblotting and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to examine the GSN regulatory cell apoptosis. The results revealed GSN significantly suppresses apoptosis-associated functional categories through down-regulating apoptosis-associated genes in 5 apoptosis terms and 6 relevant KEGG pathways. FCM showed a significant lower apoptotic rate in GSN-SMMC7721 (P<0.05). In-cell immunoblotting detected discrepant expression of the apoptosis factors among GSN expressed/shRNA transfectants (P<0.05). TEM observed the discernible apoptosis morphology. Above results suggest a negative relationship between GSN expression and hepatocarcinoma cell apoptosis. GSN overexpression suppresses apoptosis while down-regulated GSN promotes apoptosis. The possible mechanism could be associated with the regulation of GSN on the apoptosis-associated pathways and the apoptosis factors caspase 3 and bcl-2. PMID:26823700

  2. FemtoSpeX: a versatile optical pump-soft X-ray probe facility with 100?fs X-ray pulses of variable polarization.

    PubMed

    Holldack, Karsten; Bahrdt, Johannes; Balzer, Andreas; Bovensiepen, Uwe; Brzhezinskaya, Maria; Erko, Alexei; Eschenlohr, Andrea; Follath, Rolf; Firsov, Alexander; Frentrup, Winfried; Le Guyader, Loc; Kachel, Torsten; Kuske, Peter; Mitzner, Rolf; Mller, Roland; Pontius, Niko; Quast, Torsten; Radu, Ilie; Schmidt, Jan Simon; Schssler-Langeheine, Christian; Sperling, Mike; Stamm, Christian; Trabant, Christoph; Fhlisch, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Here the major upgrades of the femtoslicing facility at BESSY?II (Khan et al., 2006) are reviewed, giving a tutorial on how elliptical-polarized ultrashort soft X-ray pulses from electron storage rings are generated at high repetition rates. Employing a 6?kHz femtosecond-laser system consisting of two amplifiers that are seeded by one Ti:Sa oscillator, the total average flux of photons of 100?fs duration (FWHM) has been increased by a factor of 120 to up to 10(6)?photons s(-1) (0.1% bandwidth)(-1) on the sample in the range from 250 to 1400?eV. Thanks to a new beamline design, a factor of 20 enhanced flux and improvements of the stability together with the top-up mode of the accelerator have been achieved. The previously unavoidable problem of increased picosecond-background at higher repetition rates, caused by `halo' photons, has also been solved by hopping between different `camshaft' bunches in a dedicated fill pattern (`3+1 camshaft fill') of the storage ring. In addition to an increased X-ray performance at variable (linear and elliptical) polarization, the sample excitation in pump-probe experiments has been considerably extended using an optical parametric amplifier that supports the range from the near-UV to the far-IR regime. Dedicated endstations covering ultrafast magnetism experiments based on time-resolved X-ray circular dichroism have been either upgraded or, in the case of time-resolved resonant soft X-ray diffraction and reflection, newly constructed and adapted to femtoslicing requirements. Experiments at low temperatures down to 6?K and magnetic fields up to 0.5?T are supported. The FemtoSpeX facility is now operated as a 24?h user facility enabling a new class of experiments in ultrafast magnetism and in the field of transient phenomena and phase transitions in solids. PMID:25177998

  3. Validation and uncertainties evaluation of an isotope dilution-SPE-LC-MS/MS for the quantification of drug residues in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Brieudes, V; Lardy-Fontan, S; Lalere, B; Vaslin-Reimann, S; Budzinski, H

    2016-01-01

    The present work describes the development and validation of a reference method conducted at the French National Institute of Metrology (LNE) for the quantitative determination of psychoactive compounds in the dissolved fraction of surface waters. More specifically an isotope dilution-SPE-LC-MS/MS based method has been implemented for the characterization of a broad range of analytes belonging to different classes of psychotropic drugs such as benzodiazepines, antidepressants, stimulants, opiates and opioids, anticonvulsants, anti-dementia drugs, analgesics as well as the anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac in the low ngL(-1) range of concentration. Full validation of the method was performed following procedures described by the French standard NF T90-210. Limits of quantification between 0.14 and 3.54ngL(-1) were obtained. Method recoveries from 71 to 123% were observed with standard deviation below 10% in intermediate precision conditions. Accuracy was determined for every compound: measurement errors were between -4 and +1% and standard deviations in intermediate precision conditions were included within a 1-9% interval. Finally, measurement uncertainties were evaluated following the Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM). Expanded uncertainties (k=2) ranged from 2% for carbamazepine, EDDP (2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine) and venlafaxine to 17% for diazepam. The validated method was implemented to Seine river surface waters demonstrating its fitness for purpose. All compounds were detected and 22 out of 25 analytes were quantified. More specifically, measured concentration ranged from 0.39ngL(-1) for MDMA (3,4-methylene-dioxy-N-methylamphetamine) to 182ngL(-1) for gabapentine. PMID:26695245

  4. Quantitative determination of opioids in whole blood using fully automated dried blood spot desorption coupled to on-line SPE-LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Verplaetse, Ruth; Henion, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are well known, widely used painkillers. Increased stability of opioids in the dried blood spot (DBS) matrix compared to blood/plasma has been described. Other benefits provided by DBS techniques include point-of-care collection, less invasive micro sampling, more economical shipment, and convenient storage. Current methodology for analysis of micro whole blood samples for opioids is limited to the classical DBS workflow, including tedious manual punching of the DBS cards followed by extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) bioanalysis. The goal of this study was to develop and validate a fully automated on-line sample preparation procedure for the analysis of DBS micro samples relevant to the detection of opioids in finger prick blood. To this end, automated flow-through elution of DBS cards was followed by on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) and analysis by LC-MS/MS. Selective, sensitive, accurate, and reproducible quantitation of five representative opioids in human blood at sub-therapeutic, therapeutic, and toxic levels was achieved. The range of reliable response (R(2) ??0.997) was 1 to 500?ng/mL whole blood for morphine, codeine, oxycodone, hydrocodone; and 0.1 to 50?ng/mL for fentanyl. Inter-day, intra-day, and matrix inter-lot accuracy and precision was less than 15% (even at lower limits of quantitation (LLOQ) level). The method was successfully used to measure hydrocodone and its major metabolite norhydrocodone in incurred human samples. Our data support the enormous potential of DBS sampling and automated analysis for monitoring opioids as well as other pharmaceuticals in both anti-doping and pain management regimens. Copyright 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26607771

  5. Optimization and validation of a SPE-HPLC-PDA-fluorescence method for the simultaneous determination of drugs used in combined cardiovascular therapy in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Oskar; Iriarte, Gorka; Ferreirs, Nerea; Maguregui, Miren Itxaso; Alonso, Rosa Maria; Jimnez, Rosa Maria

    2009-11-01

    This paper reports the chemometrical optimization and the validation of a quantitative high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array-fluorescence (HPLC-PDA-Fluo) method for the simultaneous analysis, in human plasma, of drugs usually combined in cardiovascular therapy. Separation of chlorthalidone (CLTD), valsartan (VAL), valsartan-M1 (VAL-M1), fluvastatin (FLUV) and the internal standard (IS) candesartan cilexetil was performed on a dC18 Atlantis column (100 mm x 3.9 mm, 3 microm) using a gradient with a run time of 15 min. The mobile phase consisted of a mixture of acetonitrile and water containing 0.01% of formic acid and 10 mM of ammonium formate at pH 4.1. UV and fluorimetric (valsartan, its metabolite and fluvastatin) detectors were used. The sample preparation consisted of protein precipitation using acetonitrile suited to a solid-phase extraction (SPE) on a Strata-X cartridge for sample clean-up. Method validation was developed following the recommendations for bioanalytical method validation of International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) organizations. The method showed good linearity (31-3000 microg/l for chlorthalidone, 20-1000 microg/l for valsartan-M1, 10-5000 microg/l for valsartan and 14-1000 microg/l for fluvastatin), precision and accuracy. Recoveries were in the range of 78-91%. This method allowed the determination of these drugs in human plasma samples obtained from patients under cardiovascular treatment. PMID:19070983

  6. Solvent-assisted dispersive micro-SPE by using aminopropyl-functionalized magnetite nanoparticle followed by GC-PID for quantification of parabens in aqueous matrices.

    PubMed

    Abbasghorbani, Maryam; Attaran, Abdolmohammad; Payehghadr, Mahmood

    2013-01-01

    In this research, solvent-assisted dispersive micro-SPE was introduced as a simple modified technique for the determination of parabens in water and cosmetic samples. Aminopropyl-functionalized magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) were successfully synthesized and applied. GC with photoionization detector was used for the separation and detection of parabens. In this method, hexylacetate (15 μL) as a solvent and aminopropyl-functionalized MNPs (5 μg) as a sorbent were added to an aqueous sample (10 mL) and then the sample was sonicated. Dispersed magnetite was collected in the bottom of the conical tube by using a strong magnet and then ACN was added as a desorption solvent. Forty microliters of this solvent was transferred into a microvial and then acetic anhydride and pyridine were added, thus derivatization was performed by acetic anhydride. After evaporation, 1 μL of derivatized sample was injected into a gas chromatograph for analysis. Several important parameters, such as kind of organic solvent, desorption solvent and volume, amount of aminopropyl-functionalized MNPs and effect of salt addition were investigated. Under optimum conditions, the limits of detection achieved were between 50 and 300 ng/L, with RSDs (n = 5) lower than 8%. Under the optimum conditions, the enrichment factors ranged from 217 to 1253 and the extraction recoveries ranged from 10 to 62%. The recoveries were obtained for the analytes in river water and mouthwash solution and hand cream in the range of 87-103%. The advantages of proposed method are simplicity of operation, rapidity, high extraction yields, and environmental friendly character. PMID:23197331

  7. Biomarkers of Chondrocyte Apoptosis and Autophagy in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Weinberg, Annelie Martina; Al-Wasiyah, Mohammad K.; Alqahtani, Mohammed H.; Mobasheri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Cell death with morphological and molecular features of apoptosis has been detected in osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage, which suggests a key role for chondrocyte death/survival in the pathogenesis of OA. Identification of biomarkers of chondrocyte apoptosis may facilitate the development of novel therapies that may eliminate the cause or, at least, slow down the degenerative processes in OA. The aim of this review was to explore the molecular markers and signals that induce chondrocyte apoptosis in OA. A literature search was conducted in PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar using the keywords chondrocyte death, apoptosis, osteoarthritis, autophagy and biomarker. Several molecules considered to be markers of chondrocyte apoptosis will be discussed in this brief review. Molecular markers and signalling pathways associated with chondroycte apoptosis may turn out to be therapeutic targets in OA and approaches aimed at neutralizing apoptosis-inducing molecules may at least delay the progression of cartilage degeneration in OA. PMID:26334269

  8. miR-30b, Down-Regulated in Gastric Cancer, Promotes Apoptosis and Suppresses Tumor Growth by Targeting Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, En-Dong; Li, Na; Li, Bo-Sheng; Li, Wei; Zhang, Wei-Jun; Mao, Xu-Hu; Guo, Gang; Zou, Quan-Ming; Xiao, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignant diseases worldwide. Emerging evidence has shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) are associated with tumor development and progression. Our previous studies have revealed that H. pylori infection was able to induce the altered expression of miR-30b in gastric epithelial cells. However, little is known about the potential role of miR-30b in gastric cancer. Methods We analyzed the expression of miR-30b in gastric cancer cell lines and human gastric cancer tissues. We examined the effect of miR-30b mimics on the apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in vitro by flow cytometry (FCM) and caspase-3/7 activity assays. Nude mouse xenograft model was used to determine whether miR-30b is involved in tumorigenesis of gastric cancer. The target of miR-30b was identified by bioinformatics analysis, luciferase assay and Western blot. Finally, we performed the correlation analysis between miR-30b and its target expression in gastric cancer. Results miR-30b was significantly down-regulated in gastric cancer cells and human gastric cancer tissues. Enforced expression of miR-30b promoted the apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in vitro, and miR-30b could significantly inhibit tumorigenicity of gastric cancer by increasing the apoptosis proportion of cancer cells in vivo. Moreover, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) was identified as the potential target of miR-30b, and miR-30b level was inversely correlated with PAI-1 expression in gastric cancer. In addition, silencing of PAI-1 was able to phenocopy the effect of miR-30b overexpression on apoptosis regulation of cancer cells, and overexpression of PAI-1 could suppressed the effect of promoting cell apoptosis by miR-30b, indicating PAI-1 is potentially involved in miR-30b-induced apoptosis on cancer cells. Conclusion miR-30b may function as a novel tumor suppressor gene in gastric cancer by targeting PAI-1 and regulating the apoptosis of cancer cells. miR-30b could serve as a potential biomarker and therapeutic target against gastric cancer. PMID:25170877

  9. Cellular apoptosis in the cardiorenal axis.

    PubMed

    Virz, Grazia Maria; Clementi, Anna; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    Cardiomyocyte apoptosis plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of heart failure. It may be induced by different stimuli, and it seems to be perpetuated by oxidative stress and inflammation. In this scenario, heart failure may trigger various cell-mediated and humoral pathways affecting distant organs, such as kidneys, contributing to higher therapeutic costs, morbidity and mortality. The term Cardiorenal Syndromes describes this condition and represents an important model for exploring the pathophysiology of cardiac and renal dysfunction. In this review, we have analyzed the mechanisms of organ interaction and the role of apoptosis in heart-kidney crosstalk, in particular its role in the pathogenesis of the different types of Cardiorenal Syndromes. PMID:26852141

  10. Increased leucocyte apoptosis in transfused ?-thalassaemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Patrick B.; Porter, John; Evans, Patricia; Kwiatkowski, Janet L.; Neufeld, Ellis J.; Coates, Thomas; Giardina, Patricia J.; Grady, Robert W.; Vichinsky, Elliott; Olivieri, Nancy; Trachtenberg, Felicia; Alberti, Daniele; Fung, Ellen; Ames, Bruce; Higa, Annie; Harmatz, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Summary This exploratory study assessed apoptosis in peripheral blood leucocytes (PBL) from ?-thalassaemia patients receiving chronic transfusions and chelation therapy (deferasirox or deferoxamine) at baseline, 1, 6, and 12 months. At baseline, thalassaemic PBLs presented 50% greater levels of Bax (BAX), 75% higher caspase-3/7, 48% higher caspase-8 and 88% higher caspase-9 activities and 428% more nucleosomal DNA fragmentation than control subjects. Only neutrophils correlated significantly with apoptotic markers. Previously, we showed that over the treatment year, hepatic iron declined; we now show that the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 (BCL2), (?27.3%/year), and caspase-9 activity (?13.3%/year) declined in both treatment groups, suggesting that chelation decreases body iron and indicators of PBL apoptosis. PMID:23216540

  11. FOXOs, cancer and regulation of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Z; Tindall, DJ

    2010-01-01

    Forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factors are involved in multiple signaling pathways and play critical roles in a number of physiological and pathological processes including cancer. The importance of FOXO factors ascribes them under multiple levels of regulation including phosphorylation, acetylation/deacetylation, ubiquitination and proteinprotein interactions. As FOXO factors play a pivotal role in cell fate decision, mounting evidence suggests that FOXO factors function as tumor suppressors in a variety of cancers. FOXOs are actively involved in promoting apoptosis in a mitochondria-independent and -dependent manner by inducing the expression of death receptor ligands, including Fas ligand and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, and Bcl-2 family members, such as Bim, bNIP3 and Bcl-XL, respectively. An understanding of FOXO proteins and their biology will provide new opportunities for developing more effective therapeutic approaches to treat cancer. PMID:18391973

  12. THE CONSEQUENCES OF APOPTOSIS IN AUTOIMMUNITY

    PubMed Central

    Lleo, Ana; Selmi, Carlo; Invernizzi, Pietro; Podda, Mauro; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2008-01-01

    The clearance of apoptotic cells is a highly regulated mechanism, normally associated with anti-inflammatory response. During early stages of apoptosis the cell is promptly recognized and engulfed by professional phagocytes or tissue cells to avoid the outflow of intracellular content and limit the immunological reaction against released antigens. However, increasing evidences suggest that impairment in the uptake of apoptotic cell debris is linked to the development of autoimmunity. In fact, autoantigens have been demonstrated to be content within apoptotic bodies and apoptotic cells seems to be critical in the presentation of antigens, activation of innate immunity and regulation of macrophage cytokine secretion. We herein review the known mechanisms for regulating the uptake of the products of apoptosis in the development of autoimmunity. PMID:18513925

  13. UV-B-induced formation of reactive oxygen species and oxidative damage of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp.: protective effects of ascorbic acid and N-acetyl-L-cysteine.

    PubMed

    He, Yu-Ying; Hder, Donat P

    2002-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in the oxidative damage of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. caused by UV-B (280-315 nm) radiation. UV-B-induced overproduction of ROS as well as the oxidative stress was detected in vivo by using the ROS-sensitive probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and fluorometric analysis of DNA unwinding (FADU) methods were adapted to measure lipid peroxidation and DNA strand breaks in Anabaena sp. Moderate UV-B radiation causes an increase of ROS production, enhanced lipid peroxidation and DNA strand breaks, yielding a significantly decreased survival. In contrast, the supplementation of UV-A in our work only showed a significant increase in total ROS levels and DNA strand breaks while no significant effect on lipid peroxidation, chlorophyll bleaching or survival was observed. The presence of ascorbic acid and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) reversed the oxidative stress and protected the organisms from chlorophyll bleaching and the damage of photosynthetic apparatus induced by UV-B significantly, resulting in a considerably higher survival rate. Ascorbic acid also exhibited a significant protective effect on lipid peroxidation and DNA strand breaks while NAC did not show a substantial effect. These results suggest that ascorbic acid exhibited significantly higher protective efficiency with respect to DNA strand breaks and survival than NAC while NAC appears to be especially effective in defending the photosynthetic apparatus from oxidative damage. PMID:11897511

  14. Activin B induces human endometrial cancer cell adhesion, migration and invasion by up-regulating integrin ?3 via SMAD2/3 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Siyuan; Klausen, Christian; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Zhu, Hua; Leung, Peter C.K.

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the fourth most common female cancer and the most common gynecological malignancy. Although it comprises only ~10% of all endometrial cancers, the serous histological subtype accounts for ~40% of deaths due to its aggressive behavior and propensity to metastasize. Histopathological studies suggest that elevated expression of activin/inhibin ?B subunit is associated with reduced survival in non-endometrioid endometrial cancers (type II, mostly serous). However, little is known about the specific roles and mechanisms of activin (?B dimer) in serous endometrial cancer growth and progression. In the present study, we examined the biological functions of activin B in type II endometrial cancer cell lines, HEC-1B and KLE. Our results demonstrate that treatment with activin B increases cell migration, invasion and adhesion to vitronectin, but does not affect cell viability. Moreover, we show that activin B treatment increases integrin ?3 mRNA and protein levels via SMAD2/3-SMAD4 signaling. Importantly, siRNA knockdown studies revealed that integrin ?3 is required for basal and activin B-induced cell migration, invasion and adhesion. Our results suggest that activin B-SMAD2/3-integrin ?3 signaling could contribute to poor patient survival by promoting the invasion and/or metastasis of type II endometrial cancers. PMID:26384307

  15. Metformin Mitigates Apoptosis in Ischemic Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Elmadhun, Nassrene Y.; Sabe, Ashraf A.; Lassaletta, Antonio D.; Chu, Louis. M.; Sellke, Frank W.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Epidemiologic data has shown that metformin confers a survival advantage in patients with cardiovascular disease. Although the underlying cardioprotective mechanism is unclear, it appears to be independent of metformins insulin-sensitizing effect. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of metformin on the apoptosis pathway in the ischemic and non-ischemic cardiac tissue in a swine model of metabolic syndrome. MATERIALS AND METHODS Ossabaw miniswine were fed either a regular diet (OC, n=8), a high-cholesterol diet (OHC, n=9), or a high-cholesterol diet supplemented with metformin (OHCM n=8). After three weeks, all animals underwent placement of an ameroid constrictor to the left circumflex coronary artery to induce chronic ischemia. Seven weeks after ameroid placement, animals underwent cardiac harvest. RESULTS In the chronically ischemic myocardium, metformin significantly up-regulates pro-survival proteins: ERK, NF?B, pENOS and P38. Metformin also significantly inhibits/down-regulates pro-apoptosis proteins: FOXO3 and caspase3. Metformin decreased the percent apoptotic cells in the ischemic and non-ischemic myocardium. There was no difference in arteriolar density, capillary density, intramyocardial fibrosis or collagen deposition in the ischemic or non-ischemic myocardium. CONCLUSIONS Metformin selectively alters the apoptosis pathway by inhibiting FoxO3 and decreasing the active form of caspase 3, cleaved caspase 3. Metformin also up-regulates mitogen-activated kinase proteins p38 and ERK1/2, which are considered cardioprotective during ischemic preconditioning. Perhaps the altered activation of the apoptosis pathway in ischemic myocardium is one mechanism by which metformin is cardioprotective. PMID:24969550

  16. Autophagy and apoptosis dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Ghavami, Saeid; Shojaei, Shahla; Yeganeh, Behzad; Ande, Sudharsana R; Jangamreddy, Jaganmohan R; Mehrpour, Maryam; Christoffersson, Jonas; Chaabane, Wiem; Moghadam, Adel Rezaei; Kashani, Hessam H; Hashemi, Mohammad; Owji, Ali A; Łos, Marek J

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy and apoptosis are basic physiologic processes contributing to the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Autophagy encompasses pathways that target long-lived cytosolic proteins and damaged organelles. It involves a sequential set of events including double membrane formation, elongation, vesicle maturation and finally delivery of the targeted materials to the lysosome. Apoptotic cell death is best described through its morphology. It is characterized by cell rounding, membrane blebbing, cytoskeletal collapse, cytoplasmic condensation, and fragmentation, nuclear pyknosis, chromatin condensation/fragmentation, and formation of membrane-enveloped apoptotic bodies, that are rapidly phagocytosed by macrophages or neighboring cells. Neurodegenerative disorders are becoming increasingly prevalent, especially in the Western societies, with larger percentage of members living to an older age. They have to be seen not only as a health problem, but since they are care-intensive, they also carry a significant economic burden. Deregulation of autophagy plays a pivotal role in the etiology and/or progress of many of these diseases. Herein, we briefly review the latest findings that indicate the involvement of autophagy in neurodegenerative diseases. We provide a brief introduction to autophagy and apoptosis pathways focusing on the role of mitochondria and lysosomes. We then briefly highlight pathophysiology of common neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's diseases, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Then, we describe functions of autophagy and apoptosis in brain homeostasis, especially in the context of the aforementioned disorders. Finally, we discuss different ways that autophagy and apoptosis modulation may be employed for therapeutic intervention during the maintenance of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24211851

  17. Role of nuclear bodies in apoptosis signalling.

    PubMed

    Krieghoff-Henning, Eva; Hofmann, Thomas G

    2008-11-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs) are dynamic macromolecular multiprotein complexes that recruit and release a plethora of proteins. A considerable number of PML NB components play vital roles in apoptosis, senescence regulation and tumour suppression. The molecular basis by which PML NBs control these cellular responses is still just beginning to be understood. In addition to PML itself, numerous further tumour suppressors including transcriptional regulator p53, acetyl transferase CBP (CREB binding protein) and protein kinase HIPK2 (homeodomain interacting protein kinase 2) are recruited to PML NBs in response to genotoxic stress or oncogenic transformation and drive the senescence and apoptosis response by regulating p53 activity. Moreover, in response to death-receptor activation, PML NBs may act as nuclear depots that release apoptotic factors, such as the FLASH (FLICE-associated huge) protein, to amplify the death signal. PML NBs are also associated with other nuclear domains including Cajal bodies and nucleoli and share apoptotic regulators with these domains, implying crosstalk between NBs in apoptosis regulation. In conclusion, PML NBs appear to regulate cell death decisions through different, pathway-specific molecular mechanisms. PMID:18680765

  18. Lithium protects ethanol-induced neuronal apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Jin . E-mail: jizhong@iupui.edu; Yang Xianlin; Yao Weiguo; Lee Weihua

    2006-12-01

    Lithium is widely used for the treatment of bipolar disorder. Recent studies have demonstrated its neuroprotective effect. Ethanol is a potent neurotoxin that is particularly harmful to the developing nervous system. In this study, we evaluated lithium's neuroprotection against ethanol-induced apoptosis. Transient exposure of infant mice to ethanol caused apoptotic cell death in brain, which was prevented significantly by administering a low dose of lithium 15 min later. In cultured cerebellar granule neurons, ethanol-induced apoptosis and activation of caspase-3/9, both of which were prevented by lithium. However, lithium's protection is not mediated by its commonly known inhibition of glycogen synthase3{beta}, because neither ethanol nor lithium has significant effects on the phosphorylation of Akt (ser473) or GSK3{beta} (ser9). In addition, the selective GSK-3{beta} inhibitor SB-415286 was unable to prevent ethanol-induced apoptosis. These data suggest lithium may be used as a potential preventive measure for ethanol-induced neurological deficits.

  19. Alcohol and Apoptosis: Friends or Foes?

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Ana; Chawla, Karan; Umoh, Nsini A.; Cousins, Valerie M.; Ketegou, Assama; Reddy, Madhumati G.; AlRubaiee, Mustafa; Haddad, Georges E.; Burke, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse causes 79,000 deaths stemming from severe organ damage in the United States every year. Clinical manifestations of long-term alcohol abuse on the cardiac muscle include defective contractility with the development of dilated cardiomyopathy and low-output heart failure; which has poor prognosis with less than 25% survival for more than three years. In contrast, low alcohol consumption has been associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, however the mechanism of this phenomenon remains elusive. The aim of this study was to determine the significance of apoptosis as a mediating factor in cardiac function following chronic high alcohol versus low alcohol exposure. Adult rats were provided 5 mM (low alcohol), 100 mM (high alcohol) or pair-fed non-alcohol controls for 45 months. The hearts were dissected, sectioned and stained with cresyl violet or immunohistochemically for caspase-3, a putative marker for apoptosis. Cardiomyocytes were isolated to determine the effects of alcohol exposure on cell contraction and relaxation. High alcohol animals displayed a marked thinning of the left ventricular wall combined with elevated caspase-3 activity and decreased contractility. In contrast, low alcohol was associated with increased contractility and decreased apoptosis suggesting an overall protective mechanism induced by low levels of alcohol exposure. PMID:26610584

  20. Control of apoptosis by asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Hatzold, Julia; Conradt, Barbara

    2008-04-01

    Asymmetric cell division and apoptosis (programmed cell death) are two fundamental processes that are important for the development and function of multicellular organisms. We have found that the processes of asymmetric cell division and apoptosis can be functionally linked. Specifically, we show that asymmetric cell division in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is mediated by a pathway involving three genes, dnj-11 MIDA1, ces-2 HLF, and ces-1 Snail, that directly control the enzymatic machinery responsible for apoptosis. Interestingly, the MIDA1-like protein GlsA of the alga Volvox carteri, as well as the Snail-related proteins Snail, Escargot, and Worniu of Drosophila melanogaster, have previously been implicated in asymmetric cell division. Therefore, C. elegans dnj-11 MIDA1, ces-2 HLF, and ces-1 Snail may be components of a pathway involved in asymmetric cell division that is conserved throughout the plant and animal kingdoms. Furthermore, based on our results, we propose that this pathway directly controls the apoptotic fate in C. elegans, and possibly other animals as well. PMID:18399720

  1. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces neuronal apoptosis in HIV-encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yoshiharu; Koyanagi, Yoshio; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2003-03-01

    Neuronal loss is, frequently found in brains of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-encephalopathy. Extensive apoptosis of neurons is probably involved in the development of HIV-encephalopathy. The present study was designed to investigate the mechanism of neuronal apoptosis. For this purpose, we examined autopsy brains of two patients with HIV-encephalopathy. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells and active forms of caspase-3- and -8-positive cells, including neurons, were found in the perivascular regions of the brains. In these regions, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)+ macrophages were also observed. We also examined brains of HIV-1-infected mouse model inoculated with human cells. In these brains, TUNEL+ neurons were also found in the perivascular region, the site where infiltrated HIV-1-infected and TRAIL-expressing macrophages were observed. Using an in vitro-culture system, we also demonstrated that the HIV-1-infected monocyte-derived macrophages preferentially expressed TRAIL and that the addition of HIV-1-infected macrophages or human TRAIL-overexpressing mouse cells to cultured mouse primary neurons/glia resulted in neuronal apoptosis. Our results suggest the involvement of TRAIL expressed on HIV-1-infected macrophages in the induction of neuronal apoptosis in infected brain. PMID:12715915

  2. Prostate Apoptosis Response 4 (Par-4), a Novel Substrate of Caspase-3 during Apoptosis Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Parvesh; Singh, Mohan; Parent, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Prostate apoptosis response 4 (Par-4) is a ubiquitously expressed proapoptotic tumor suppressor protein. Here, we show for the first time, that Par-4 is a novel substrate of caspase-3 during apoptosis. We found that Par-4 is cleaved during cisplatin-induced apoptosis in human normal and cancer cell lines. Par-4 cleavage generates a C-terminal fragment of ?25 kDa, and the cleavage of Par-4 is completely inhibited by a caspase-3 inhibitor, suggesting that caspase-3 is directly involved in the cleavage of Par-4. Caspase-3-deficient MCF-7 cells do not show Par-4 cleavage in response to cisplatin treatment, and restoration of caspase-3 in MCF-7 cells produces a decrease in Par-4 levels, with the appearance of a cleaved fragment. Additionally, knockdown of Par-4 reduces caspase-3 activation and apoptosis induction. Site-directed mutagenesis reveals that Par-4 cleavage by caspase-3 occurs at an unconventional site, EEPD131?G. Interestingly, overexpression of wild-type Par-4 but not the Par-4 D131A mutant sensitizes cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Upon caspase-3 cleavage, the cleaved fragment of Par-4 accumulates in the nucleus and displays increased apoptotic activity. Overexpression of the cleaved fragment of Par-4 inhibits I?B? phosphorylation and blocks NF-?B nuclear translocation. We have identified a novel specific caspase-3 cleavage site in Par-4, and the cleaved fragment of Par-4 retains proapoptotic activity. PMID:22184067

  3. Schisandrin B inhibits cell growth and induces cellular apoptosis and autophagy in mouse hepatocytes and macrophages: implications for its hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Jin, Hua; Hu, Chengbin; He, Zhi-Xu; Yu, Zhi-Ling; Ko, Kam-Ming; Yang, Tianxin; Zhang, Xueji; Pan, Si-Yuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    A number of drugs and herbal compounds have been documented to cause hepatoxicity. Schisandrin B (Sch B) is an active dibenzocyclooctadiene isolated from Schisandrae fructus, with a wide array of pharmacological activities. However, the potential hepatotoxicity of Sch B is a major safety concern, and the underlying mechanism for Sch B-induced liver toxic effects is not fully elucidated. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the liver toxic effects and the molecular mechanisms of Sch B in mouse liver and macrophage cells. The results have shown that Sch B exhibits potent grow inhibitory, proapoptotic, and proautophagic effects in AML-12 and RAW 264.7 cells. Sch B markedly arrested cells in G1 phase in both cell lines, accompanied by the down-regulation of cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and cyclin D1 and up-regulation of p27 Kip1 and checkpoint kinase 1. Furthermore, Sch B markedly increased the apoptosis of AML-12 and RAW 264.7 cells with a decrease in the expression of B-cell lymphoma-extra-large and (Bcl-xl) B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), but an increase in the expression of B-cell lymphoma 2-associated X protein (Bax). Sch B promoted the cleavage of caspase 3 and poly-adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase (PARP) in both cell lines. Additionally, Sch B significantly induced autophagy of AML-12 and RAW 264.7 cells. Sch B inhibited the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, as indicated by their altered phosphorylation, contributing to the proautophagic effect of Sch B. Taken together, our findings show that the inducing effects of Sch B on cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and autophagy may contribute to its liver toxic effects, which might provide a clue for the investigation of the molecular toxic targets and underlying mechanisms for Sch B-induced hepatotoxicity in herbal consumers. More studies are warranted to fully delineate the underlying mechanisms, efficacy, and safety of Sch B for clinical use. PMID:25926716

  4. CD45 regulates apoptosis in peripheral T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhe; Dawes, Ritu; Petrova, Svetla; Beverley, Peter C L; Tchilian, Elma Z

    2006-06-01

    Programmed cell death (apoptosis) is a key mechanism for regulating lymphocyte numbers. Murine lymph node lymphocytes cultured in vitro without added stimuli show significant levels of apoptosis over 24 h, detectable by staining with Annexin V. CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes from transgenic (Tg) mice expressing single CD45RABC or CD45RO isoforms show increased apoptosis and the extent of apoptosis is inversely correlated with the level of CD45 expression. CD45 Tg cells exhibit phosphatidyl serine translocation and DNA oligonucleosome formation, and can be partially rescued from apoptosis by culture in caspase inhibitors or common gamma-chain-binding cytokines. We conclude that CD45 is an important regulator of spontaneous apoptosis in T lymphocytes and this mechanism may contribute to the disease associations reported for individuals expressing CD45 variant alleles. PMID:16621865

  5. Aspartame-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Horio, Yukari; Sun, Yongkun; Liu, Chuang; Saito, Takeshi; Kurasaki, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    Aspartame is an artificial sweetner added to many low-calorie foods. The safety of aspartame remains controversial even though there are many studies on its risks. In this study, to understand the physiological effects of trace amounts of artificial sweetners on cells, the effects of aspartame on apoptosis were investigated using a PC12 cell system. In addition, the mechanism of apoptosis induced by aspartame in PC12 cells and effects on apoptotic factors such as cytochrome c, apoptosis-inducing factor, and caspase family proteins were studied by Western blotting and RT-PCR. Aspartame-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, aspartame exposure increased the expressions of caspases 8 and 9, and cytochrome c. These results indicate that aspartame induces apoptosis mainly via mitochondrial pathway involved in apoptosis due to oxigen toxicity. PMID:24355796

  6. Self-consumption: the interplay of autophagy and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Mariño, Guillermo; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Baehrecke, Eric H.; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy and apoptosis control the turnover of organelles and proteins within cells, and of cells within organisms, respectively, and many stress pathways sequentially elicit autophagy, and apoptosis within the same cell. Generally autophagy blocks the induction of apoptosis, and apoptosis-associated caspase activation shuts off the autophagic process. However, in special cases, autophagy or autophagy-relevant proteins may help to induce apoptosis or necrosis, and autophagy has been shown to degrade the cytoplasm excessively, leading to ‘autophagic cell death’. The dialogue between autophagy and cell death pathways influences the normal clearance of dying cells, as well as immune recognition of dead cell antigens. Therefore, the disruption of the relationship between autophagy and apoptosis has important pathophysiological consequences. PMID:24401948

  7. Artesunate induces AIF-dependent apoptosis in A549 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen-juan; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2012-03-01

    Artesunate (ART), a semi-synthetic derivative of the sesquiterpene artemisinin extracted from the Chinese herb Artemisia annua, exerts a broad spectrum of clinical activity against human cancers. It has been shown that ART induces cancer cells death through apoptosis pathway. This study investigated whether ART treatment induced reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent cell death in the apoptosis fashion in human lung adenocarconoma A549 cell line and the proapoptotic protein apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) is involved in ART-induced apoptosis. Cells treated with ART exhibited typical apoptotic morphology as chromatin condensation, margination and shrunken nucleus. ART treatment also induced a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and AIF release from mitochondria. Silencing AIF can remarkable attenuated ART-induced apoptosis. Collectively, ART induces apoptosis by caspase-independent intrinsic pathway in A549 cells.

  8. Apoptosis as a Mechanism for Liver Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Guicciardi, Maria Eugenia; Gores, Gregory J.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocyte injury is ubiquitous in clinical practice, and the mode of cell death associated with this injury is often apoptosis, especially by death receptors. Information from experimental systems demonstrates that hepatocyte apoptosis is sufficient to cause liver hepatic fibrogenesis. The mechanisms linking hepatocyte apoptosis to hepatic fibrosis remain incompletely understood, but likely relate to engulfment of apoptotic bodies by professional phagocytic cells and stellate cells, and release of mediators by cells undergoing apoptosis. Inhibition of apoptosis with caspase inhibitors has demonstrated beneficial effects in murine models of hepatic fibrosis. Recent studies implicating Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) in liver injury and fibrosis are also of particular interest. Engulfment of apoptotic bodies is one mechanism by which the TLR9 ligand (CpG DNA motifs) could be delivered to this intracellular receptor. These concepts suggest therapy focused on interrupting the cellular mechanisms linking apoptosis to fibrosis would be useful in human liver diseases. PMID:20960379

  9. The actin cytoskeleton as a sensor and mediator of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Desouza, Melissa; Gunning, Peter W.; Stehn, Justine R.

    2012-01-01

    Apoptosis is an important biological process required for the removal of unwanted or damaged cells. Mounting evidence implicates the actin cytoskeleton as both a sensor and mediator of apoptosis. Studies also suggest that actin binding proteins (ABPs) significantly contribute to apoptosis and that actin dynamics play a key role in regulating apoptosis signaling. Changes in the organization of the actin cytoskeleton has been attributed to the process of malignant transformation and it is hypothesized that remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton may enable tumor cells to evade normal apoptotic signaling. This review aims to illuminate the role of the actin cytoskeleton in apoptosis by systematically analyzing how actin and ABPs regulate different apoptosis pathways and to also highlight the potential for developing novel compounds that target tumor-specific actin filaments. PMID:22880146

  10. The DR6 protein from human herpesvirus-6B induces p53-independent cell cycle arrest in G{sub 2}/M

    SciTech Connect

    Schleimann, Mariane H.; Hoberg, Søren; Solhøj Hansen, Aida; Bundgaard, Bettina; Witt, Christoffer T.; Kofod-Olsen, Emil; Höllsberg, Per

    2014-03-15

    HHV-6B infection inhibits cell proliferation in G{sub 2}/M, but no protein has so far been recognized to exert this function. Here we identify the protein product of direct repeat 6, DR6, as an inhibitor of G{sub 2}/M cell-cycle progression. Transfection of DR6 reduced the total number of cells compared with mock-transfected cells. Lentiviral transduction of DR6 inhibited host cell DNA synthesis in a p53-independent manner, and this inhibition was DR6 dose-dependent. A deletion of 66 amino acids from the N-terminal part of DR6 prevented efficient nuclear translocation and the ability to inhibit DNA synthesis. DR6-induced accumulation of cells in G{sub 2}/M was accompanied by an enhanced expression of cyclin B1 that accumulated predominantly in the cytoplasm. Pull-down of cyclin B1 brought down pCdk1 with the inactivating phosphorylation at Tyr15. Together, DR6 delays cell cycle with an accumulation of cells in G{sub 2}/M and thus might be involved in HHV-6B-induced cell-cycle arrest. - Highlights: • HHV-6B-encoded DR6 protein inhibits cell proliferation. • DR6 inhibits host cell DNA synthesis independent of p53. • DR6 delays the cell cycle in G{sub 2}/M. • An N-terminal sequence is necessary for DR6 function. • DR6 induces cytoplasmic accumulation of cyclin B1.

  11. miR-29b induces SOCS-1 expression by promoter demethylation and negatively regulates migration of multiple myeloma and endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Amodio, Nicola; Bellizzi, Dina; Leotta, Marzia; Raimondi, Lavinia; Biamonte, Lavinia; D’Aquila, Patrizia; Di Martino, Maria Teresa; Calimeri, Teresa; Rossi, Marco; Lionetti, Marta; Leone, Emanuela; Passarino, Giuseppe; Neri, Antonino; Giordano, Antonio; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes frequently occurs and may account for their inactivation in cancer cells. We previously demonstrated that miR-29b is a tumor suppressor microRNA (miRNA) that targets de novo DNA methyltransferases and reduces the global DNA methylation of multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Here, we provide evidence that epigenetic activity of miR-29b leads to promoter demethylation of suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 (SOCS-1), a hypermethylated tumor suppressor gene. Enforced expression of synthetic miR-29b mimics in MM cell lines resulted in SOCS-1 gene promoter demethylation, as assessed by Sequenom MassARRAY EpiTYPER analysis, and SOCS-1 protein upregulation. miR-29b-induced SOCS-1 demethylation was associated with reduced STAT3 phosphorylation and impaired NFκB activity. Downregulation of VEGF-A and IL-8 mRNAs could be detected in MM cells transfected with miR-29b mimics as well as in endothelial (HUVEC) or stromal (HS-5) cells treated with conditioned medium from miR-29b-transfected MM cells. Notably, enforced expression of miR-29b mimics increased adhesion of MM cells to HS-5 and reduced migration of both MM and HUVEC cells. These findings suggest that miR-29b is a negative regulator of either MM or endothelial cell migration. Finally, the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, which induces the expression of miR-29b, decreased global DNA methylation by a miR-29b-dependent mechanism and induced SOCS-1 promoter demethylation and protein upregulation. In conclusion, our data indicate that miR-29b is endowed with epigenetic activity and mediates previously unknown functions of bortezomib in MM cells. PMID:24091729

  12. Screening of UV-B-induced genes from apple peels by SSH: possible involvement of MdCOP1-mediated signaling cascade genes in anthocyanin accumulation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ting; Saito, Takanori; Honda, Chikako; Ban, Yusuke; Kondo, Satoru; Liu, Ji-Hong; Hatsuyama, Yoshimichi; Moriguchi, Takaya

    2013-07-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was employed to identify candidate genes involved in red coloration in apple peel with the ultraviolet (UV)-B-treated 'Mutsu'. After reverse Northern blotting verification, nearly 80 clones were successfully sequenced. Large portions of the expressed sequence tags (ESTs) are well characterized anthocyanin biosynthesis-related genes, such as chalcone synthase (11A5), flavonol synthase (12F3), anthocyanidin synthase (11H5) and UDP-glycosyl transferase (14A12) whose presence proved the success of SSH. Eight ESTs were selected for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis and their expressions were all elevated in 'Induction', further confirming the reliability of the SSH library. One EST, 11F4 (CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1: COP1) with putative function in light signal relay was further analyzed in 'Mutsu' and 'Tsugaru', along with MdHY5 (ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5: the downstream target of COP1), MdMYB22 (a possible flavonol-specific activator under the regulation of HY5, belonging to the SG7/PRODUCTION OF FLAVONOL GLYCOSIDES family) and MdMYBA. Results showed that MdCOP1, MdHY5, MdMYB22 and MdMYBA were all UV-B inducible genes and anthocyanin accumulation occurred after their increased expressions. Moreover, their expressions and anthocyanin content were enhanced under UV-B plus 17C treatment. The presence of G box, a known consensus binding site of HY5, in the MdMYBA promoter region implicated that it could be regulated by MdHY5, which was verified by the result of the yeast one-hybrid analysis. Our data suggested that UV-B irradiation would induce the utmost upstream light signaling factor, MdCOP1, which activates MdHY5 signaling by binding to the promoter regions of MdMYBs, and finally leads to the red coloration of apple peels. PMID:23171407

  13. A novel NF-kappa B-inducing kinase-MAPK signaling pathway up-regulates NF-kappa B activity in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Punita; Richmond, Ann

    2002-03-01

    Constitutive activation of NF-kappa B is an emerging hallmark of various types of tumors including breast, colon, pancreatic, ovarian, and melanoma. In melanoma cells, the basal expression of the CXC chemokine, CXCL1, is constitutively up-regulated. This up-regulation can be attributed in part to constitutive activation of NF-kappa B. Previous studies have shown an elevated basal I kappa B kinase (IKK) activity in Hs294T melanoma cells, which leads to an increased rate of I kappa B phosphorylation and degradation. This increase in I kappa B-alpha phosphorylation and degradation leads to an approximately 19-fold higher nuclear localization of NF-kappa B. However, the upstream IKK kinase activity is up-regulated by only about 2-fold and cannot account for the observed increase in NF-kappa B activity. We now demonstrate that NF-kappa B-inducing kinase (NIK) is highly expressed in melanoma cells, and IKK-associated NIK activity is enhanced in these cells compared with the normal cells. Kinase-dead NIK blocked constitutive NF-kappa B or CXCL1 promoter activity in Hs294T melanoma cells, but not in control normal human epidermal melanocytes. Transient overexpression of wild type NIK results in increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), which is inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by PD98059, an inhibitor of p42/44 MAPK. Moreover, the NF-kappa B promoter activity decreased with overexpression of dominant negative ERK expression constructs, and EMSA analyses further support the hypothesis that ERK acts upstream of NF-kappa B and regulates the NF-kappa B DNA binding activity. Taken together, our data implicate involvement of I kappa B kinase and MAPK signaling cascades in NIK-induced constitutive activation of NF-kappa B. PMID:11773061

  14. Endoplasmic reticulum stress mediates nitric oxide-induced chondrocyte apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    TAKADA, KOJI; HIROSE, JUN; YAMABE, SOICHIRO; UEHARA, YUSHUKE; MIZUTA, HIROSHI

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is one of the most important mediators of chondrocyte apoptosis, which is a notable feature of cartilage degeneration. While apoptosis of chondrocytes is induced by p53, NO can also induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which may be involved in the process of NO-induced chondrocyte apoptosis. The aims of this study were to determine whether NO-induced ER stress (ERS) leads to apoptosis of chondrocytes and to investigate the temporal relationship between the expression of C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP), an ERS-associated apoptotic molecule, and the expression of p53 during apoptosis in NO-stimulated chondrocytes. Rat chondrocytes were stimulated by sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a NO donor. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to analyze the mRNA expression of CHOP, glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) and p53. Apoptosis of chondrocytes was quantified using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). SNP-treated chondrocytes showed an increase in CHOP and GRP78 mRNA expression and underwent apoptosis. Sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA), an ERS inhibitor, reduced CHOP and GRP78, as well as SNP-stimulated apoptosis of chondrocytes, without affecting the SNP-dependent generation of NO. In addition, the blockade of CHOP following siRNA transfection reduced SNP-induced apoptosis of chondrocytes. The CHOP expression increased after apoptosis was detected in the SNP-treated chondrocytes, whereas the p53 expression increased prior to apoptosis. These data demonstrated that NO-induced ERS leads chondrocytes to apoptosis, although this effect appears to be limited to persistent impairment of NO stimulation. These findings may provide insight into the pathology of cartilage degeneration. PMID:24648941

  15. Extensive apoptosis in a case of intractable infantile status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Koshi A.; Weidenheim, Karen; Legatt, Alan D.; Shifteh, Keivan; Abbott, I. Richmond; Mosh, Solomon L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary A previously healthy 8-month-old girl underwent epilepsy surgery for intractable focal seizures with secondary generalization that progressed to status epilepticus. The major neuropathologic finding was extensive apoptosis. Investigations did not reveal any etiology for the apoptosis or the seizures. This is the first report of apoptosis, without necrosis, in association with intractable status epilepticus in the developing human brain. The findings suggest that new treatment strategies targeted to prevent apoptosis may be useful in children with prolonged status epilepticus. PMID:19464149

  16. Role of PUMA in methamphetamine-induced neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuanxiang; Qincao, Litao; Xu, Jingtao; Du, Sihao; Huang, Enping; Liu, Chao; Lin, Zhoumeng; Xie, Wei-Bing; Wang, Huijun

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to methamphetamine (METH), a widely used illicit drug, has been shown to cause neuron apoptosis. p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) is a key mediator in neuronal apoptosis. This study aimed to examine the effects of PUMA in METH-induced neuronal apoptosis. We determined PUMA protein expression in PC12 cells and SH-SY5Y cells after METH exposure using western blot. We also observed the effect of METH on neuronal apoptosis after silencing PUMA expression with siRNA using TUNEL staining and flow cytometry. Additionally, to investigate possible mechanisms of METH-induced PUMA-mediated neuronal apoptosis, we measured the protein expression of apoptotic markers, including cleaved caspase-3, cleaved PARP, Bax, B-cell leukemia/lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) and cytochrome c (cyto c), after METH treatment with or without PUMA knockdown. Results showed that METH exposure induced cell apoptosis, increased PUMA protein levels, activated caspase-3 and PARP, elevated Bax and reduced Bcl-2 expression, as well as increased the release of cyto c from mitochondria to the cytoplasm in both PC12 and SH-SY5Y cells. All these effects were attenuated or reversed after silencing PUMA. A schematic depicting the role of PUMA in METH-induced mitochondrial apoptotic pathway was proposed. Our results suggest that PUMA plays an important role in METH-triggered apoptosis and it may be a potential target for ameliorating neuronal injury and apoptosis caused by METH. PMID:26524635

  17. Investigating interference with apoptosis induction by bacterial proteins.

    PubMed

    Niu, Hua; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    2014-01-01

    The modulation of host cell apoptosis by bacterial pathogens is critical for their intracellular survival. Several intracellular bacteria achieve this by secreting proteins that interact with apoptosis pathways to inhibit host cell apoptosis. Anaplasma phagocytophilum, which causes human granulocytic anaplasmosis, is such bacterium. The protein Ats-1, translocated from A. phagocytophilum by the bacterial type IV secretion system, localizes to host cell mitochondria, and interferes with apoptosis induction. In this chapter, we present a protocol applied to investigate an anti-apoptotic effect of Ats-1. PMID:25172281

  18. Apoptosis in vascular cells induced by cold atmospheric plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sladek, Raymond; Stoffels, Eva

    2006-10-01

    Apoptosis is a natural mechanism of cellular self-destruction. It can be triggered by moderate, yet irreversible damage. Apoptosis plays a major role in tissue renewal. Artificial apoptosis induction will become a novel therapy that meets all requirements for tissue-saving surgery. Diseased tissues can disappear without inflammation and scarring. This is particularly important in treatment of blockages in body tracts (e.g. cardiovascular diseases). Artificial induction of apoptosis can be achieved by means of cold plasma treatment. In this work an atmospheric micro-plasma operated in helium/air has been used to induce apoptosis in vascular cells. Parametric studies of apoptosis induction have been conducted; the efficiency is almost 100%. The apoptotic factors are ROS/RNS (reactive oxygen and nitrogen species). Their densities in the plasma have been measured by mass spectrometry. For apoptosis induction, RNS seem to be more important than ROS, because of their relative abundance. Moreover, addition of a ROS scavenger (ascorbic acid) to the cell culture medium does not reduce the occurrence of apoptosis. Cold plasma is a very efficient tool for fundamental studies of apoptosis, and later, for controlled tissue removal in vivo.

  19. Research Advances on Pathways of Nickel-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongrui; Chen, Lian; Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Zuo, Zhicai; Deng, Junliang; Wang, Xun; Wu, Bangyuan

    2015-01-01

    High concentrations of nickel (Ni) are harmful to humans and animals. Ni targets a number of organs and produces multiple toxic effects. Apoptosis is important in Ni-induced toxicity of the kidneys, liver, nerves, and immune system. Apoptotic pathways mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Fas, and c-Myc participate in Ni-induced cell apoptosis. However, the exact mechanism of apoptosis caused by Ni is still unclear. Understanding the mechanism of Ni-induced apoptosis may help in designing measures to prevent Ni toxicity. PMID:26703593

  20. Platelets induce apoptosis via membrane-bound FasL

    PubMed Central

    Schleicher, Rebecca I.; Reichenbach, Frank; Kraft, Peter; Kumar, Anil; Lescan, Mario; Todt, Franziska; Göbel, Kerstin; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Geisler, Tobias; Bauer, Axel; Olbrich, Marcus; Schaller, Martin; Wesselborg, Sebastian; O’Reilly, Lorraine; Meuth, Sven G.; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Gawaz, Meinrad; Li, Xuri; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Edlich, Frank

    2015-01-01

    After tissue injury, both wound sealing and apoptosis contribute to restoration of tissue integrity and functionality. Although the role of platelets (PLTs) for wound closure and induction of regenerative processes is well established, the knowledge about their contribution to apoptosis is incomplete. Here, we show that PLTs present the death receptor Fas ligand (FasL) on their surface after activation. Activated PLTs as well as the isolated membrane fraction of activated PLTs but not of resting PLTs induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in primary murine neuronal cells, human neuroblastoma cells, and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Membrane protein from PLTs lacking membrane-bound FasL (FasL△m/△m) failed to induce apoptosis. Bax/Bak-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis signaling in target cells was not required for PLT-induced cell death, but increased the apoptotic response to PLT-induced Fas signaling. In vivo, PLT depletion significantly reduced apoptosis in a stroke model and an inflammation-independent model of N-methyl-d-aspartic acid-induced retinal apoptosis. Furthermore, experiments using PLT-specific PF4Cre+ FasLfl/fl mice demonstrated a role of PLT-derived FasL for tissue apoptosis. Because apoptosis secondary to injury prevents inflammation, our findings describe a novel mechanism on how PLTs contribute to tissue homeostasis. PMID:26232171

  1. Measuring and Modeling Apoptosis in Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Sabrina L.; Sorger, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    Cell death plays an essential role in the development of tissues and organisms, the etiology of disease, and the responses of cells to therapeutic drugs. Here we review progress made over the last decade in using mathematical models and quantitative, often single-cell, data to study apoptosis. We discuss the delay that follows exposure of cells to prodeath stimuli, control of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, switch-like activation of effector caspases, and variability in the timing and probability of death from one cell to the next. Finally, we discuss challenges facing the fields of biochemical modeling and systems pharmacology. PMID:21414484

  2. Detecting apoptosis in Drosophila tissues and cells

    PubMed Central

    Sarkissian, Tatevik; Timmons, Allison; Arya, Richa; Abdelwahid, Eltyeb; White, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter we discuss methods that can be used to study apoptotic cell death in the Drosophila embryo, ovary, as well as in cultured cell lines. These methods assay various aspects of the cell death process, from mitochondrial changes to caspase activation and DNA cleavage. The assays are useful for examining apoptosis in normal development and in response to developmental perturbations and external stresses. These techniques include Acridine Orange staining, TUNEL, cleaved caspase staining, caspase activity assays and assays for mitochondrial fission and permeabilization. PMID:24613678

  3. An increase of granulosa cell apoptosis mediates aqueous neem (Azadirachta indica) leaf extract-induced oocyte apoptosis in rat

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Anima; Shrivastav, Tulsidas G; Chaube, Shail K

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Neem plant (Azadirachta indica) has been extensively used in Ayurvedic system of medicine for female fertility regulation for a long time, but its mechanism of action remains poorly understood. Hence, the present study was aimed to determine whether an increase of granulosa cell apoptosis is associated with aqueous neem leaf extract (NLE)-induced oocyte apoptosis. Materials and Methods: Sexually immature female rats of 20 days old were fed NLE (50 mg/day) for 10 days and then subjected to superovulation induction protocol. The morphological changes in cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs), rate of oocyte apoptosis, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), total nitrite, and cytochrome c concentrations, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cytochrome c, p53, Bcl2 and Bax expressions, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragmentation, and estradiol 17? level in granulosa cells collected from preovulatory COCs were analyzed. Results: Aqueous NLE increased H2O2 concentration and decreased catalase activity, increased iNOS expression and total nitrite concentration, increased p53, Bax, and p53 expressions but decreased Bcl2 expression, increased cytochrome c concentration and induced DNA fragmentation in granulosa cells. An increased granulosa cell apoptosis resulted in reduced estradiol 17? concentration and induced apoptosis in ovulated oocytes. Conclusion: We conclude that aqueous NLE-induced granulosa cell apoptosis through the mitochondria-mediated pathway, reduced estradiol 17? concentration and induced apoptosis in ovulated oocytes. Thus, granulosa cell apoptosis mediates NLE-induced oocyte apoptosis during female fertility regulation in rat. PMID:23776837

  4. Reanalysis of Uranus' cloud scattering properties from IRTF/SpeX observations using a self-consistent scattering cloud retrieval scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, P. G. J.; Tice, D. S.; Fletcher, L. N.; Barstow, J. K.; Teanby, N. A.; Orton, G. S.; Davis, G. R.

    2015-04-01

    We have developed a new retrieval approach to modelling near-infrared spectra of Uranus that represents a significant improvement over previous modelling methods. We reanalysed IRTF/SpeX observations of Uranus observed in 2009 covering the wavelength range 0.8-1.8 μm and reported by Tice et al. (Tice, D.S., Irwin, P.G.J., Fletcher, L.N., Teanby, N.A., Hurley, J., Orton, G.S., Davis, G.R. [2013]. Icarus 223, 684-698). By retrieving the imaginary refractive index spectra of cloud particles we are able to consistently define the real part of the refractive index spectra, through a Kramers-Kronig analysis, and thus determine self-consistent extinction cross-section, single-scattering and phase-function spectra for the clouds and hazes in Uranus' atmosphere. We tested two different cloud-modelling schemes used in conjunction with the temperature/methane profile of Baines et al. (Baines, K.H., Mickelson, M.E., Larson, L.E., Ferguson, D.W. [1995]. Icarus 114, 328-340), a reanalysis of the Voyager-2 radio-occultation observations performed by Sromovsky, Fry and Kim (Sromovsky, L.A., Fry, P.M., Kim, J.H. [2011]. Icarus 215, 292-312), and a recent determination from Spitzer (Orton, G.S., Fletcher, L.N., Moses, J.I., Mainzer, A.K., Hines, D., Hammel, H.B., Martin-Torres, F.J., Burgdorf, M., Merlet, C., Line, M.R. [2014]. Icarus 243, 494-513). We find that both cloud-modelling schemes represent the observed centre-of-disc spectrum of Uranus well, and both require similar cloud scattering properties of the main cloud residing at ∼2 bars. However, a modified version of the Sromovsky, Fry and Kim (2011) model, with revised spectral properties of the lowest cloud layer, fits slightly better at shorter wavelengths and is more consistent with the expected vertical position of Uranus' methane cloud. We find that the bulk of the reflected radiance from Uranus arises from a thick cloud at approximately the 2 bar level, composed of particles that are significantly more absorbing at wavelengths λ > 1.0 μm than they are at shorter wavelengths λ < 1.0 μm. This spectral information provides a possible constraint on the identity of the main particle type, although we find that the scattering properties required are not consistent with any of the available laboratory data for pure NH3, NH4SH, or CH4 ice (all suspected of condensing in the upper troposphere). It is possible that the observed clouds are mixtures of tropospheric condensate mixed with photochemical products diffusing down from above, which masks their pure scattering features. Because there is no available laboratory data for pure H2S or PH3 ice (both of which might be present as well), they cannot be excluded as the cloud-forming species. We note, however, that their absorptive properties would have to be two orders of magnitude greater than the other measured ices at wavelengths greater than 1 μm to be consistent with our retrieval, which suggests that mixing with photochemical products may still be important.

  5. A Virion-Associated Protein Kinase Induces Apoptosis?

    PubMed Central

    Chitnis, Nilesh S.; Paul, Eric R.; Lawrence, Paulraj K.; Henderson, Curtis W.; Ganapathy, Saranya; Taylor, Patrick V.; Virdi, Kamaldeep S.; DCosta, Susan M.; May, Ashley R.; Bilimoria, Shan L.

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis and inhibition of host gene expression are often associated with virus infections. Many viral polypeptides modulate apoptosis by direct interaction with highly conserved apoptotic pathways. Some viruses induce apoptosis during late stages of the infection cycle, while others inhibit apoptosis to facilitate replication or maintain persistent infection. In previous work, we showed that Chilo iridescent virus (CIV) or CIV virion protein extract induces apoptosis in spruce budworm and cotton boll weevil cell cultures. Here, we characterize the product of a CIV gene (iridovirus serine/threonine kinase; istk) with signature sequences for S/T kinase and ATP binding. ISTK appears to belong to the superfamily, vaccinia-related kinases (VRKs). The istk gene was expressed in Pichia pastoris vectors. Purified ISTK (48 kDa) exhibited S/T kinase activity. Treatment with ISTK induced apoptosis in budworm cells. A 35-kDa cleavage product of ISTK retaining key signature sequences was identified during purification. Pichia-expressed 35-kDa polypeptide, designated iridoptin, induced apoptosis and inhibition of host protein synthesis in budworm and boll weevil cells. A mutation in the ATP-binding site eliminated both kinase and apoptosis activity of iridoptin, suggesting that kinase activity is essential for induction of apoptosis. Analysis with custom antibody confirmed that ISTK is a structural component of CIV particles. This is the first demonstration of a viral kinase inducing apoptosis in any virus-host system and the first identification of a factor inducing apoptosis or host protein shutoff for the family Iridoviridae. PMID:21994449

  6. Glutathione and modulation of cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Circu, Magdalena L; Aw, Tak Yee

    2012-10-01

    Apoptosis is a highly organized form of cell death that is important for tissue homeostasis, organ development and senescence. To date, the extrinsic (death receptor mediated) and intrinsic (mitochondria derived) apoptotic pathways have been characterized in mammalian cells. Reduced glutathione, is the most prevalent cellular thiol that plays an essential role in preserving a reduced intracellular environment. glutathione protection of cellular macromolecules like deoxyribose nucleic acid proteins and lipids against oxidizing, environmental and cytotoxic agents, underscores its central anti-apoptotic function. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can oxidize cellular glutathione or induce its extracellular export leading to the loss of intracellular redox homeostasis and activation of the apoptotic signaling cascade. Recent evidence uncovered a novel role for glutathione involvement in apoptotic signaling pathways wherein post-translational S-glutathiolation of protein redox active cysteines is implicated in the potentiation of apoptosis. In the present review we focus on the key aspects of glutathione redox mechanisms associated with apoptotic signaling that includes: (a) changes in cellular glutathione redox homeostasis through glutathione oxidation or GSH transport in relation to the initiation or propagation of the apoptotic cascade, and (b) evidence for S-glutathiolation in protein modulation and apoptotic initiation. PMID:22732297

  7. Glutathione and modulation of cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Circu, Magdalena L.; Aw, Tak Yee

    2012-01-01

    Apoptosis is a highly organized form of cell death that is important for tissue homeostasis, organ development and senescence. To date, the extrinsic (death receptor mediated) and intrinsic (mitochondria derived) apoptotic pathways have been characterized in mammalian cells. Reduced glutathione, GSH, is the most prevalent cellular thiol that plays an essential role in preserving a reduced intracellular environment. GSH protection of cellular macromolecules like DNA, proteins and lipids against oxidizing, environmental and cytotoxic agents, underscores its central anti-apoptotic function. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) can oxidize cellular GSH or induce its extracellular export leading to the loss of intracellular redox homeostasis and activation of the apoptotic signaling cascade. Recent evidence uncovered a novel role for GSH involvement in apoptotic signaling pathways wherein post-translational S-glutathiolation of protein redox active cysteines is implicated in the potentiation of apoptosis. In the present review we focus on the key aspects of GSH redox mechanisms associated with apoptotic signaling that includes: (a) changes in cellular GSH redox homeostasis through GSH oxidation or GSH transport in relation to the initiation or propagation of the apoptotic cascade, and (b) evidence for S-glutathiolation in protein modulation and apoptotic initiation. PMID:22732297

  8. Aloin induces apoptosis in Jurkat cells.

    PubMed

    Buenz, Eric J

    2008-03-01

    Aloe is widely used as a dietary supplement. However, there are continuing concerns over the toxicity and the purity of aloe-based products. The primary class of compounds responsible for aloe-induced toxicity are anthraquinones. One of these, aloe-emodin, has been extensively investigated for apoptosis inducing effects. Conversely, the precursor to aloe-emodin, aloin, has been subjected to only minimal investigation of any cytotoxic effects. Jurkat T cells, an established model for the study of compound toxicity, were used to evaluate the effect of aloin on cell viability. Cells were analyzed using flow cytometry and microscopy for cell size and granularity, cell membrane integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell cycle profile. Treatment with aloin resulted in a reduction in cell size, compromised membrane integrity, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, treatment with aloin resulted in alteration of the cell cycle, specifically a block at G2/M phase. Importantly, the loss of cell membrane integrity was preceded by a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, suggesting a mitochondrial-dependent pathway for aloin-induced apoptosis. These observations provide insight into the potential mechanisms of aloin-induced toxicity and thus, perhaps, aloe preparation-induced toxicity. Furthermore, because of the concern over the safety of aloe-based supplements, this work suggests that aloe supplements not containing aloin may be safer than aloe supplements containing aloin, and that aloin should be considered in addition to concentrations of aloe-emodin. PMID:18068945

  9. Rosiglitazone induces cardiotoxicity by accelerated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Pratibha; Singh, Sarvendra Vikram; Verma, Ajeet Kumar; Srivastava, Pallavi; Sultana, Sarwat; Rath, Srikanta Kumar

    2014-06-01

    Present investigation explores the cardiotoxicity of rosiglitazone (ROSI) using rat heart cardiomyocytes and db/db mice. In H9c2 cells, ROSI at 50 and 60 ?M induced an increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells and superoxide generation, along with an increase in the expression of various subunits of NADPH oxidase and nitric oxide synthases, confirmed that ROSI-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cells is by ROS generation. The increase in the expression of the antioxidants like superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) further confirmed this notion. Heme oxygenase-1, having an important role in cell protection against oxidative stress, was found to be increased along with induction of nuclear translocation of NF-E2-related factor and increased protein kinase C ? expression. Moreover, in db/db mice, oral administration of ROSI (10 mg/kg) for 10 days induced an increase in serum creatinine kinase-MB, tissue antioxidants like SOD, catalase, GR, GST, GPx expression, cardiac troponin T, and inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expression strongly support the in vitro findings. Furthermore, global gene expression studies also showed the perturbation of oxidative phosphorylation, fat cell differentiation, and electron transport chain following ROSI treatment in vivo. These results suggested that ROSI-induced cardiac damage is due to accelerated apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24249632

  10. Calcipotriol induces apoptosis in psoriatic keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Tiberio, R; Bozzo, C; Pertusi, G; Graziola, F; Gattoni, M; Griffanti, P; Boggio, P; Colombo, E; Leigheb, G

    2009-12-01

    In recent years, vitamin D3 analogues have become one of the most widely prescribed topical treatments for mild or moderate chronic plaque psoriasis. These molecules are effective and safe, but their exact mechanism of action is not completely understood. In vitro studies have shown that D3 analogues decrease proliferation and induce differentiation of keratinocytes, and have strong immunomodulating effects, but there are no conclusive data about apoptosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate differences in apoptotic response between lesional and perilesional keratinocytes of patients with psoriasis before and after treatment with calcipotriol, a synthetic vitamin D3 analogue. Keratinocytes were isolated from psoriatic plaques including lesional and perilesional skin, and cultured. Cells were treated with calcipotriol for 20 h and examined under confocal microscopy after staining with propidium iodide. The number of apoptotic cells after incubation with calcipotriol was significantly higher in lesional than in perilesional keratinocytes (P < 0.05) or non-treated psoriatic keratinocytes (P < 0.05). In conclusion, calcipotriol seems to induce apoptosis in psoriatic keratinocytes. PMID:19758385

  11. Regulation of apoptosis by endoplasmic reticulum pathways.

    PubMed

    Breckenridge, David G; Germain, Marc; Mathai, Jaigi P; Nguyen, Mai; Shore, Gordon C

    2003-11-24

    Apoptotic programmed cell death pathways are activated by a diverse array of cell extrinsic and intrinsic signals, most of which are ultimately coupled to the activation of effector caspases. In many instances, this involves an obligate propagation through mitochondria, causing egress of critical proapoptotic regulators to the cytosol. Central to the regulation of the mitochondrial checkpoint is a complex three-way interplay between members of the BCL-2 family, which are comprised of an antiapoptotic subgroup including BCL-2 itself, and the proapoptotic BAX,BAK and BH3-domain-only subgroups. Constituents of all three of these BCL-2 classes, however, also converge on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an organelle whose critical contributions to apoptosis is only now becoming apparent. In addition to propagating death-inducing stress signals itself, the ER also contributes in a fundamental way to Fas-mediated apoptosis and to p53-dependent pathways resulting from DNA damage and oncogene expression. Mobilization of ER calcium stores can initiate the activation of cytoplasmic death pathways as well as sensitize mitochondria to direct proapoptotic stimuli. Additionally, the existence of BCL-2-regulated initiator procaspase activation complexes at the ER membrane has also been described. Here, we review the potential underlying mechanisms involved in these events and discuss pathways for ER-mitochondrial crosstalk pertinent to a number of cell death stimuli. PMID:14634622

  12. Edible seaweed as future functional food: Identification of α-glucosidase inhibitors by combined use of high-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition profiling and HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bingrui; Kongstad, Kenneth T; Wiese, Stefanie; Jäger, Anna K; Staerk, Dan

    2016-07-15

    Crude chloroform, ethanol and acetone extracts of nineteen seaweed species were screened for their antioxidant and α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Samples showing more than 60% α-glucosidase inhibitory activity, at a concentration of 1mg/ml, were furthermore investigated using high-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition profiling combined with high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR-bioassay/HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR). The results showed Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesicolosus to be rich in antioxidants, equaling a Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity of 135 and 108mMTroloxmg(-1) extract, respectively. HR-bioassay/HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR showed the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of A. nodosum, F. vesoculosus, Laminaria digitata, Laminaria japonica and Undaria pinnatifida to be caused by phlorotannins as well as fatty acids - with oleic acid, linoleic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid being the most potent with IC50 values of 0.069, 0.075 and 0.10mM, respectively, and showing a mixed-type inhibition mode. PMID:26948583

  13. Emergence of the Epidemic Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strain USA300 Coincides with Horizontal Transfer of the Arginine Catabolic Mobile Element and speG-mediated Adaptations for Survival on Skin

    PubMed Central

    Planet, Paul J.; LaRussa, Samuel J.; Dana, Ali; Smith, Hannah; Xu, Amy; Ryan, Chanelle; Uhlemann, Anne-Catrin; Boundy, Sam; Goldberg, Julia; Narechania, Apurva; Kulkarni, Ritwij; Ratner, Adam J.; Geoghegan, Joan A.; Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis; Prince, Alice

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) is the largest genomic region distinguishing epidemic USA300 strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from other S. aureus strains. However, the functional relevance of ACME to infection and disease has remained unclear. Using phylogenetic analysis, we have shown that the modular segments of ACME were assembled into a single genetic locus in Staphylococcus epidermidis and then horizontally transferred to the common ancestor of USA300 strains in an extremely recent event. Acquisition of one ACME gene, speG, allowed USA300 strains to withstand levels of polyamines (e.g., spermidine) produced in skin that are toxic to other closely related S. aureus strains. speG-mediated polyamine tolerance also enhanced biofilm formation, adherence to fibrinogen/fibronectin, and resistance to antibiotic and keratinocyte-mediated killing. We suggest that these properties gave USA300 a major selective advantage during skin infection and colonization, contributing to the extraordinary evolutionary success of this clone. PMID:24345744

  14. Apoptosis induction influences reovirus replication and virulence in newborn mice.

    PubMed

    Pruijssers, Andrea J; Hengel, Holger; Abel, Ty W; Dermody, Terence S

    2013-12-01

    Apoptosis is a type of controlled cell death that is essential for development and tissue homeostasis. It also serves as a robust host response against infection by many viruses. The capacity of neurotropic viruses to induce apoptosis strongly correlates with virulence. However, the precise function of apoptosis in viral infection is not well understood. Reovirus is a neurotropic virus that induces apoptosis in a variety of cell types, including central nervous system neurons, leading to fatal encephalitis in newborn mice. To determine the effect of apoptosis on reovirus replication in the host, we generated two otherwise isogenic viruses that differ in a single amino acid in viral capsid protein ?1 that segregates with apoptotic capacity. Apoptosis-proficient and apoptosis-deficient viruses were compared for replication, dissemination, tropism, and tissue injury in newborn mice and for the capacity to spread to uninfected littermates. Our results indicate that apoptotic capacity enhances reovirus replication in the brain and consequent neurovirulence but reduces transmission efficiency. The replication advantage of the apoptosis-proficient strain is limited to the brain and correlates with enhanced infectivity of neurons. These studies reveal a new cell type-specific determinant of reovirus virulence. PMID:24067960

  15. Apoptosis in vascular smooth muscle cells: role of cell shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Orlov, S N; Dam, T V; Tremblay, J; Hamet, P

    1996-04-25

    Cell volume decrease is known to be one of the earliest steps of apoptosis in immune system cells. In this study, we compared the kinetics of apoptosis and cell volume adjustment in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) from the aorta of normotensive Brown-Norway (BN.1x) as well as spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats and in Mardin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. The transfer of VSMC to serum-deprived medium led to a transient cell volume decrease and to increased apoptosis. Both the cell volume decrease and apoptosis displayed faster kinetics in SHR than in BN.1x VSMC. Increased tonicity of serum-deprived medium by the addition of 200 mM mannitol augmented apoptosis in VSMC by 2.5- to 3-fold. In contrast to VSMC, neither apoptosis nor the cell volume of MDCK cells was affected by serum deprivation. Apoptosis in MDCK cells was also insensitive to tonicity of serum-deprived medium. There results demonstrate an initial volume decrease in VSMC undergoing apoptosis and suggest that this phenomenon is involved in triggering the apoptotic process. PMID:8630026

  16. FAS Expression and Apoptosis in the Fish Parasite Ichthyophthirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fish that survive an infection by Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) develop antibodies that immobilize and kill Ich theronts. Apoptosis of I. multifiliis theronts was caused by cutaneous antibody from channel catfish immune to Ich. The mechanism for cutaneous antibody to induce apoptosis of theron...

  17. FAS EXPRESSION AND APOPTOSIS IN THE FISH PARASITE ICHTHYOPHTHIRIUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fish that survive an infection by Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) develop antibodies that immobilize and kill Ich theronts. Apoptosis of I. multifiliis theronts was caused by cutaneous antibody from channel catfish immune to Ich. The mechanism for cutaneous antibody to induce apoptosis of theron...

  18. Mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis induced by photofrin-PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yunxia; Xing, Da

    2007-05-01

    Apoptosis is an important cellular event that plays a key role in pathogeny and therapy of many diseases. The mechanisms of the initiation and regulation of PDT-induced apoptosis are complex. Some PDT-associated apoptosis pathways involved plasma membrane death receptors, mitochondria, lysosomes and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In order to determine the apoptosis pathway induced by Photofrin-PDT, we used fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique and probe SCAT3 to monitor the dynamics of caspase-3 activation after PDT treatment and also measured caspase-8 activity. With laser scanning confocal microscopy, we found that Photofrin were localized primarily in mitochondria, the primary targets of Photofrin-PDT. Formation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected within minutes after PDT treatment. This was followed by mitochondrial membrane potential (??m), cytochrome c release, caspase-9 activity, caspase-3 activity and apoptosis. After PDT treatment, caspase-3 was activated rapidly while caspase-8 remained inactivated. Our results indicated that PDT-induced apoptosis was initiated from mitochondria pathway and independent of caspase-8 activation. The activation of caspase-3 by PDT started 20 minutes after treatment and completed in about 15 minutes. PDT-induced apoptosis is directly initiated from mitochondria pathway and not involved in the death receptors-dependent pathway. Our results demonstrated that FRET could be an effective tool to determine PDT-induced apoptosis and other cell death mechanism.

  19. Interplay of autophagy and apoptosis during PRRSV infection of Marc145 cell.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuaifeng; Zhou, Ao; Wang, Jiaxing; Zhang, Shujun

    2016-04-01

    Autophagy and apoptosis play essential roles 'in virus infection. Our study was performed to investigate the interplay between autophagy and apoptosis in PRRSV replication. In our present study, autophagy and apoptosis were induced by PRRSV infection. Viral replication was dampened/attenuated by autophagy deficient and potentiated by apoptosis inhibition. Furthermore, PRRSV replication was restored by apoptosis inhibition in autophagy deficient cells. Taken together, our findings unveil the functional relationship between autophagy and apoptosis during PRRSV replication. PMID:26774368

  20. Embryo apoptosis identification: Oocyte grade or cleavage stage?

    PubMed

    Bakri, Noraina Mohd; Ibrahim, Siti Fatimah; Osman, Nurul Atikah; Hasan, Nurhaslina; Jaffar, Farah Hanan Fathihah; Rahman, Zulaiha Abdul; Osman, Khairul

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis is a programed cell death that is vital for tissue homeostasis. However, embryo apoptosis had been known to be related to embryo fragmentation which should be avoided in in vitro fertilization (IVF). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship of embryo apoptosis with the grade of immature oocytes and cleavage stage of in vitro produced (IVP) cattle embryos. This study consisted of 345 oocytes collected through ovary slicing. Immature oocytes were graded as A, B and C. This grading was based on cumulus cell thickness and compactness. All oocytes then underwent an in vitro maturation (IVM) procedure. An IVF was done 24 h after IVM culture. Prior to staining, stage of cleaved embryos was determined and classified as either 2, 4, 8 or >8-cell embryo stage. Apoptosis status of cleaved IVP embryos was determined by using annexin V-FITC staining technique at 48 and 72 h post insemination (hpi). Apoptosis status for each embryo was classified as either early or late. The result showed that there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) of apoptosis status among grade A, B and C embryos. All grades of oocytes showed embryo apoptosis where 1.5% late apoptosis for grade A, 4.5% and 10.4% of early and late apoptosis for grade B and grade C. Early apoptosis was not seen in grade A embryo. We also noted no significant difference (p > 0.05) of apoptosis status between 2, 4, 8 and >8-cell embryo stage. Early apoptosis was also not seen in >8-cell stage. Even though there were no differences in apoptosis expression between the three classes, the cleavage rate of grade A oocytes was significantly higher (p < 0.01) than grade B and grade C. In conclusion, the apoptosis expression in the embryo can occur regardless of the oocyte quality and the cleavage stage of the embryo produced. PMID:26858565

  1. Embryo apoptosis identification: Oocyte grade or cleavage stage?

    PubMed Central

    Bakri, Noraina Mohd; Ibrahim, Siti Fatimah; Osman, Nurul Atikah; Hasan, Nurhaslina; Jaffar, Farah Hanan Fathihah; Rahman, Zulaiha Abdul; Osman, Khairul

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a programed cell death that is vital for tissue homeostasis. However, embryo apoptosis had been known to be related to embryo fragmentation which should be avoided in in vitro fertilization (IVF). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship of embryo apoptosis with the grade of immature oocytes and cleavage stage of in vitro produced (IVP) cattle embryos. This study consisted of 345 oocytes collected through ovary slicing. Immature oocytes were graded as A, B and C. This grading was based on cumulus cell thickness and compactness. All oocytes then underwent an in vitro maturation (IVM) procedure. An IVF was done 24 h after IVM culture. Prior to staining, stage of cleaved embryos was determined and classified as either 2, 4, 8 or >8-cell embryo stage. Apoptosis status of cleaved IVP embryos was determined by using annexin V-FITC staining technique at 48 and 72 h post insemination (hpi). Apoptosis status for each embryo was classified as either early or late. The result showed that there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) of apoptosis status among grade A, B and C embryos. All grades of oocytes showed embryo apoptosis where 1.5% late apoptosis for grade A, 4.5% and 10.4% of early and late apoptosis for grade B and grade C. Early apoptosis was not seen in grade A embryo. We also noted no significant difference (p > 0.05) of apoptosis status between 2, 4, 8 and >8-cell embryo stage. Early apoptosis was also not seen in >8-cell stage. Even though there were no differences in apoptosis expression between the three classes, the cleavage rate of grade A oocytes was significantly higher (p < 0.01) than grade B and grade C. In conclusion, the apoptosis expression in the embryo can occur regardless of the oocyte quality and the cleavage stage of the embryo produced. PMID:26858565

  2. Melanocytorrhagy and apoptosis in vitiligo: connecting jigsaw pieces.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ravinder; Parsad, Davinder

    2012-01-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired depigmenting disorder characterized by a chronic and progressive loss of melanocytes from the epidermis and follicular reservoir. The mechanism of melanocyte disappearance has never been clearly understood. This review discussed the data supporting the theory of melanocytorrhagy and apoptosis as one of the primary defects underlying melanocyte loss. Theory of melanocytorrhagy proposes that non-segmental vitiligo is a primary melanocytorrhagic disorder with altered melanocyte responses to friction and possibly other types of stress, inducing their detachment and subsequent transepidermal loss. Melanocytes detachment induces apoptosis whereas adherence to basement membrane suppresses apoptosis. The study of apoptosis, mechanisms of its induction, and the ways to block apoptosis is one possible way to find both the causes of depigmentation and medications to prevent its progression. PMID:22199056

  3. Lobaplatin inhibits growth of gastric cancer cells by inducing apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Chu-Yang; Lin, Xiao-Lin; Tian, Lei; Ye, Ming; Yang, Xin-Ying; Xiao, Xiu-Ying

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the anti-cancer effect of lobaplatin on human gastric cancer cells, and to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms. METHODS: The human gastric cancer cell lines MKN-28, AGS and MKN-45 were used. The cytotoxicity of lobaplatin was detected using an MTS cell proliferation assay. Flow cytometry was used to detect cell apoptosis using Annexin V-FITC Apoptosis Detection Kit. The expression of apoptosis-regulated genes was examined at the protein level using Western blot. RESULTS: Lobaplatin inhibited the proliferation of human gastric cancer cells and induced apoptosis, which may be associated with the up-regulation of Bax expression, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, p53 expression and the reduction of Bcl-2 expression. CONCLUSION: The cytotoxicity of lobaplatin may be due to its ability of inducing apoptosis of gastric cancer cells, which would support the potential use of lobaplatin for the therapy of gastric cancer. PMID:25516654

  4. [GPI-Pr Deficiency and Apoptosis of PNH Granulocytes

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Li; Xu, Cai-Min; Liu, Fu-Qiang; Lu, Zhao-Jiang; Pan, Hua-Zhen; Zhang, Zhi-Nan

    2001-09-01

    To study the relationship of Glycosyl phosphatidylinositol anchored proteins (GIP-Pr) and apoptosis of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) cells, we isolated peripheral granulocytes from 10 patients with PNH and 10 normal controls and measured apoptosis induced by serum starvation. The FCM analysis of phosphotidylserine (ps) externalization in granulocytes was determined using Annexin-V-FLUOS labeling. After the cells were induced for apoptosis in serum-free medium for 20 hours, the percentage of externalization was 78.6% in normal control cells but 39.5% in PNH cells. The results of FCM analysis of PI stained granulocytes showed that the PI positive rate was 51.5% in control cells and 30.2% in PNH cells. The gel electrophoresis analysis of DNA fragmentation all indicate that PNH granulocytes were relatively resistant to apoptosis as compared with normal controls. This resistance to apoptosis might not be related to the percentage of CD59 deficient granulocytes. PMID:12578597

  5. Role of apoptosis in colon cancer biology, therapy, and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Yu, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Deregulation of apoptosis is a hallmark of human cancer and contributes to therapeutic resistance. Recent advances in cancer genomics reveal a myriad of alterations in key pathways that directly or indirectly increase tumor cell survival. This review will outline the pathways of apoptosis in mammalian cells, and highlight the common alterations of apoptosis regulators found in colon cancer, the role of apoptosis and underlying mechanisms in colon cancer treatment and prevention, including recent advances on investigational agents, such as kinase inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors, HSP90 inhibitors, BH3 mimetics, TRAIL, and IAP antagonists. Topics will also include novel concepts, as well as opportunities and challenges for drug discovery and combination therapy by exploring cancer-specific genetic defects, and therefore selective induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. Although the emphasis is on colon cancer, the main theme and many of the aspects are applicable to other solid tumors. PMID:24273467

  6. Tumors Acquire Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein (IAP)-mediated Apoptosis Resistance through Altered Specificity of Cytosolic Proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Xu; Lei, Lu; Glas, Rickard

    2003-01-01

    Many tumors overexpress members of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family. IAPs contribute to tumor cell apoptosis resistance by the inhibition of caspases, and are degraded by the proteasome to allow further progression of apoptosis. Here we show that tumor cells can alter the specificity of cytosolic proteolysis in order to acquire apoptosis resistance, which promotes formation of rapidly growing tumors. Survival of tumor cells with low proteasomal activity can occur in the presence of high expression of Tri-peptidyl-peptidase II (TPP II), a large subtilisin-like peptidase that complements proteasomal activity. We find that this state leaves tumor cells unable of effectively degrading IAPs, and that cells in this state form rapidly growing tumors in vivo. We also find, in studies of apoptosis resistant cells derived from large in vivo tumors, that these have acquired an altered peptidase activity, with up-regulation of TPP II activity and decreased proteasomal activity. Importantly, we find that growth of subcutaneous tumors is limited by maintenance of the apoptosis resistant phenotype. The apoptosis resistant phenotype was reversed by increased expression of Smac/DIABLO, an antagonist of IAP molecules. Our data suggest a reversible mechanism in regulation of apoptosis resistance that drives tumor progression in vivo. These data are relevant in relation to the multitude of therapy-resistant clinical tumors that have increased levels of IAP molecules. PMID:12810691

  7. A systems-biological study on the identification of safe and effective molecular targets for the reduction of ultraviolet B-induced skin pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-Sung; Goh, Myeong-Jin; Kim, Junil; Choi, Tae-Jun; Kwang Lee, Hae; Joo Na, Yong; Cho, Kwang-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Melanogenesis is the process of melanin synthesis through keratinocytes-melanocytes interaction, which is triggered by the damaging effect of ultraviolet-B (UVB) rays. It is known that melanogenesis influences diverse cellular responses, including cell survival and apoptosis, via complex mechanisms of feedback and crosstalk. Therefore, an attempt to suppress melanin production by modulating the melanogenesis pathway may induce perturbations in the apoptotic balance of the cells in response to UVB irradiation, which results in various skin diseases such as melasma, vitiligo, and skin cancer. To identify such appropriate target strategies for the reduction of UVB-induced melanin synthesis, we reconstructed the melanogenesis signaling network and developed a Boolean network model. Mathematical simulations of the melanogenesis network model revealed that the inhibition of beta-catenin in the melanocytes effectively reduce melanin production while having minimal influence on the apoptotic balance of the cells. Exposing cells to a beta-catenin inhibitor decreased pigmentation but did not significantly change the B-cell Chronic lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma 2 expression, a potent regulator of apoptotic balance. Thus, our systems analysis suggests that the inhibition of beta-catenin may be the most appropriate target strategy for the reduction of UVB-induced skin pigmentation. PMID:25980672

  8. Resveratrol enhances ultraviolet B-induced cell death through nuclear factor-{kappa}B pathway in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Preeti; Kalra, Neetu; Nigam, Nidhi; George, Jasmine; Ray, Ratan Singh; Hans, Rajendra K.; Prasad, Sahdeo; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2009-06-26

    Resveratrol has been reported to suppress cancer progression in several in vivo and in vitro models, whereas ultraviolet B (UVB), a major risk for skin cancer, is known to induce cell death in cancerous cells. Here, we investigated whether resveratrol can sensitize A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells to UVB-induced cell death. We examined the combined effect of UVB (30 mJ/cm{sup 2}) and resveratrol (60 {mu}M) on A431 cells. Exposure of A431 carcinoma cells to UVB radiation or resveratrol can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. However, the combination of resveratrol and UVB exposure was associated with increased proliferation inhibition of A431 cells compared with either agent alone. Furthermore, results showed that resveratrol and UVB treatment of A431 cells disrupted the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-{kappa}B) pathway by blocking phosphorylation of serine 536 and inactivating NF-{kappa}B and subsequent degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, which regulates the expression of survivin. Resveratrol and UVB treatment also decreased the phosphorylation of tyrosine 701 of the important transcription factor signal transducer activator of transcription (STAT1), which in turn inhibited translocation of phospho-STAT1 to the nucleus. Moreover, resveratrol/UVB also inhibited the metastatic protein LIMK1, which reduced the motility of A431 cells. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the combination of resveratrol and UVB act synergistically against skin cancer cells. Thus, resveratrol is a potential chemotherapeutic agent against skin carcinogenesis.

  9. Efficacy of PLGA-loaded apigenin nanoparticles in Benzo[a]pyrene and ultraviolet-B induced skin cancer of mice: mitochondria mediated apoptotic signalling cascades.

    PubMed

    Das, Sreemanti; Das, Jayeeta; Samadder, Asmita; Paul, Avijit; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2013-12-01

    Skin cancer is increasing at an alarming rate and becoming resistant to conventional chemotherapy necessitating improved drug delivery system. We loaded apigenin (Ap), a dietary flavonoid having anti-cancer property, with poly (lactic-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NAp) to explore if nano-encapsulation could enhance anti-carcinogenic effect against ultra-violet B (UVB) and Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) induced skin tumor and mitochondrial dysfunction in mice. Particle size, morphology and zeta potential of NAp were determined using dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy. Tumor incidence and multiplicity in UVB-BaP induced mice with/without NAp treatment were ascertained and their histolopathological sections and chromosomal aberrations were studied. ROS accumulation and mitochondrial functioning through relevant markers like mitochondrial transmembrane potential were analyzed. Mitochondrial volume changes/swelling, cytochrome c (cyt c) release, mRNA and protein expressions of Apaf-1, bax, bcl-2, cyt c, cleaved caspase-9 and 3 were studied. Results showed that NAp produced better effects than Ap, due to their smaller size, and faster mobility. NAp reduced tissue damage and frequency of chromosomal aberrations, increased ROS accumulation to mediate mitochondrial-apoptosis through modulation of several apoptotic markers and mitochondrial matrix swelling. NAp showed ameliorative potentials in combating skin cancer and therefore has greater prospect of use in therapeutic management of skin cancer. PMID:24120900

  10. Neuronal migration, apoptosis and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Ezequiel; Wix, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Bipolar disorder, like the majority of psychiatric disorders, is considered a neurodevelopment disease of neurodevelopment. There is an increased rate of neuronal birth and death during this development period. In the particular case of the processes that determine neuronal death, it is known that those neurons that establish connections have to be removed from the central nervous system. There is a deficit of GABAergic interneurons in the cerebral cortex in bipolar disorder, accompanied by overexpression of proapoptic genes. There is also an alteration in the expression of molecules that mediate in the migration of these neurons and their inclusion in functional synapsis during the foetal stage. The role of these molecules in the neuronal death pathways by apoptosis will be reviewed here in an attempt to establish biological hypotheses of the genesis of bipolar disorder. PMID:22854584

  11. Enzymatic assays for probing mitochondrial apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenyu; Nicolas, Claire; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Brenner, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Isolated mitochondria are an invaluable analytical tool to probe mitochondrial function and evaluate apoptosis induction via the so-called mitochondrial pathway. Irrespective of their tissue origin (e.g., heart, liver, muscle, brain), these organelles participate actively to cell and life decision by producing energy for cell metabolism, but also by undergoing a lethal and irreversible mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP) in stress and pathological conditions. MMP consequences consist, at least in part, in loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (??m), matrix swelling, arrest of respiration and ATP production, and cytochrome c release from the intermembrane space to the cytosol. These parameters can be evaluated in vitro via several miniaturized assays, which have tremendous applications in the field of pharmacology, toxicology, diagnosis, as well as drug discovery. PMID:25634292

  12. Cellular and Nuclear Degradation during Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    He, Bin; Lu, Nan; Zhou, Zheng

    2009-01-01

    Apoptosis ensures quick death and quiet clearance of unwanted or damaged cells, without inducing much, if any, immunological responses from the organism. In metazoan organisms, apoptotic cells are swiftly engulfed by other cells. The degradation of cellular content is initiated in apoptotic cells and completed within engulfing cells. In apoptotic cells, caspase-mediated proteolysis cleaves protein substrates into fragments; nuclear DNA is partially degraded into nucleosomal units; and autophagy potentially contributes to apoptotic-cell removal. In engulfing cells, specific signaling pathways promote the sequential fusion of intracellular vesicles with phagosomes and lead to the complete degradation of apoptotic cells in an acidic environment. Phagocytic receptors that initiate the engulfment of apoptotic cells play an additional and critical role in initiating phagosome maturation through activating these signaling pathways. Here we highlight recent discoveries made in invertebrate models and mammalian systems, focusing on the molecular mechanisms that regulate the efficient degradation of apoptotic cells. PMID:19781927

  13. Inhibition of apoptosis by intracellular protozoan parasites.

    PubMed

    Heussler, V T; Kenzi, P; Rottenberg, S

    2001-09-01

    Protozoan parasites which reside inside a host cell avoid direct destruction by the immune system of the host. The infected cell, however, still has the capacity to counteract the invasive pathogen by initiating its own death, a process which is called programmed cell death or apoptosis. Apoptotic cells are recognised and phagocytosed by macrophages and the parasite is potentially eliminated together with the infected cell. This potent defence mechanism of the host cell puts strong selective pressure on the parasites which have, in turn, evolved strategies to modulate the apoptotic program of the host cell to their favour. Within the last decade, the existence of cellular signalling pathways which inhibit the apoptotic machinery has been demonstrated. It is not surprising that intracellular pathogens subvert these pathways to ensure their own survival in the infected cell. Molecular mechanisms which interfere with apoptotic pathways have been studied extensively for viruses and parasitic bacteria, but protozoan parasites have come into focus only recently. Intracellular protozoan parasites which have been reported to inhibit the apoptotic program of the host cell, are Toxoplasma gondii, Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania sp., Theileria sp., Cryptosporidium parvum, and the microsporidian Nosema algerae. Although these parasites differ in their mechanism of host cell entry and in their final intracellular localisation, they might activate similar pathways in their host cells to inhibit apoptosis. In this respect, two families of molecules, which are known for their capacity to interrupt the apoptotic program, are currently discussed in the literature. First, the expression of heat shock proteins is often induced upon parasite infection and can directly interfere with molecules of the cellular death machinery. Secondly, a more indirect effect is attributed to the parasite-dependent activation of NF-kappaB, a transcription factor that regulates the transcription of anti-apoptotic molecules. PMID:11563357

  14. Quercetin-induced apoptosis prevents EBV infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Minjung; Son, Myoungki; Ryu, Eunhyun; Shin, Yu Su; Kim, Jong Gwang; Kang, Byung Woog; Sung, Gi-Ho; Cho, Hyosun; Kang, Hyojeung

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human gamma-1 herpesvirus that establishes a lifelong latency in over 90% of the world's population. During latency, virus exists predominantly as a chromatin-associated, multicopy episome in the nuclei of a variety of tumor cells derived from B cells, T cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and epithelial cells. Licorice is the root of Glycyrrhiza uralensis or G. glabra that has traditionally cultivated in eastern part of Asia. Licorice was reported to have anti-viral, anti-inflammatory, anti-atopic, hepatoprotective, anti-neurodegenerative, anti-tumor, anti-diabetic effects and so forth. Quercetin and isoliquiritigenin are produced from licorice and highly similar in molecular structure. They have diverse bioactive effects such as antiviral activity, anti-asthmatic activity, anti-cancer activity, anti-inflammation activity, monoamine-oxidase inhibitor, and etc. To determine anti-EBV and anti-EBVaGC (Epstein-Barr virus associated gastric carcinoma) effects of licorice, we investigated antitumor and antiviral effects of quercetin and isoliquiritigenin against EBVaGC. Although both quercetin and isoliquiritigenin are cytotoxic to SNU719 cells, quercetin induced more apoptosis in SNU719 cells than isoliquiritigenin, more completely eliminated DNMT1 and DNMT3A expressions than isoliquiritigenin, and more strongly affects the cell cycle progression of SNU719 than isoliquiritigenin. Both quercetin and isoliquiritigenin induce signal transductions to stimulate apoptosis, and induce EBV gene transcription. Quercetin enhances frequency of F promoter use, whereas isoliquiritigenin enhances frequency of Q promoter use. Quercetin reduces EBV latency, whereas isoliquiritigenin increases the latency. Quercetin increases more the EBV progeny production, and inhibits more EBV infection than isoliquiritigenin. These results indicate that quercetin could be a promising candidate for antiviral and antitumor agents against EBV and human gastric carcinoma. PMID:26059439

  15. Apoptosis and the systolic dysfunction in congestive heart failure. Story of apoptosis interruptus and zombie myocytes.

    PubMed

    Narula, J; Arbustini, E; Chandrashekhar, Y; Schwaiger, M

    2001-02-01

    Although previously it was believed that apoptosis could not occur in the terminally differentiated tissue, such as adult heart muscle cells, recent studies in endomyocardial biopsies from patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and in explanted hearts from patients with end-stage heart failure undergoing cardiac transplantation have demonstrated histologic evidence of apoptosis. Whereas neurohormonal activation during heart failure leads to compensatory hemodynamic alterations, coupled with ventricular dilatation, it induces transcription factors and myocyte hypertrophy. Persistent growth stimulation in terminally differentiated cells may lead paradoxically to apoptotic cell death. The apoptosis in cardiomyopathic hearts is associated with cytochrome c release from mitochondria to cytoplasm and activation of proteolytic caspase-8 and -3. Although the caspases are duly processed, the fragmentation of the nuclear proteins (including DNA) is completed less frequently, and only a variable degree of fragmentation of cytoplasmic proteins (including contractile proteins) is observed. It is hypothesized that release of cytochrome c from mitochondria should interfere with energy production and lead to functional impairment and variable loss of contractile proteins in a living heart muscle cell should contribute to systolic dysfunction. Because a nuclear blueprint is retained, however, the dysfunctional cell may continue to exist and in favorable conditions, such as with LVAD support, the apoptotic process may subside. Potential feasibility of reversal of heart failure should renew efforts to develop more targeted pharmaceutical intervention within the apoptotic cascade and allow newer paradigm for the management of heart failure. PMID:11787805

  16. miR-125b controls apoptosis and temozolomide resistance by targeting TNFAIP3 and NKIRAS2 in glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Haemmig, S; Baumgartner, U; Glück, A; Zbinden, S; Tschan, M P; Kappeler, A; Mariani, L; Vajtai, I; Vassella, E

    2014-01-01

    Diffusely infiltrating gliomas are among the most prognostically discouraging neoplasia in human. Temozolomide (TMZ) in combination with radiotherapy is currently used for the treatment of glioblastoma (GBM) patients, but less than half of the patients respond to therapy and chemoresistance develops rapidly. Epigenetic silencing of the O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) has been associated with longer survival in GBM patients treated with TMZ, but nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)-mediated survival signaling and TP53 mutations contribute significantly to TMZ resistance. Enhanced NF-κB is in part owing to downregulation of negative regulators of NF-κB activity, including Tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3) and NF-κB inhibitor interacting RAS-like 2 (NKIRAS2). Here we provide a novel mechanism independent of TP53 and MGMT by which oncogenic miR-125b confers TMZ resistance by targeting TNFAIP3 and NKIRAS2. GBM cells overexpressing miR-125b showed increased NF-κB activity and upregulation of anti-apoptotic and cell cycle genes. This was significantly associated with resistance of GBM cells to TNFα- and TNF-related inducing ligand-induced apoptosis as well as resistance to TMZ. Conversely, overexpression of anti-miR-125b resulted in cell cycle arrest, increased apoptosis and increased sensitivity to TMZ, indicating that endogenous miR-125b is sufficient to control these processes. GBM cells overexpressing TNFAIP3 and NKIRAS2 were refractory to miR-125b-induced apoptosis resistance as well as TMZ resistance, indicating that both genes are relevant targets of miR-125b. In GBM tissues, high miR-125b expression was significantly correlated with nuclear NF-κB confirming that miR-125b is implicated in NF-κB signaling. Most remarkably, miR-125b overexpression was clearly associated with shorter overall survival of patients treated with TMZ, suggesting that this microRNA is an important predictor of response to therapy. PMID:24901050

  17. Glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis of healthy and malignant lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lindsay K.; Cidlowski, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids exert a wide range of physiological effects, including the induction of apoptosis in lymphocytes. The progression of glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis is a multi-component process requiring contributions from both genomic and cytoplasmic signaling events. There is significant evidence indicating that the transactivation activity of the glucocorticoid receptor is required for the initiation of glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis. However, the rapid cytoplasmic effects of glucocorticoids may also contribute to the glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis-signaling pathway. Endogenous glucocorticoids shape the T-cell repertoire through both the induction of apoptosis by neglect during thymocyte maturation and the antagonism of T-cell receptor (TCR)-induced apoptosis during positive selection. Owing to their ability to induce apoptosis in lymphocytes, synthetic glucocorticoids are widely used in the treatment of haematological malignancies. Glucocorticoid chemotherapy is limited, however, by the emergence of glucocorticoid resistance. The development of novel therapies designed to overcome glucocorticoid resistance will dramatically improve the efficacy of glucocorticoid therapy in the treatment of haematological malignancies. PMID:20541659

  18. Viruses, apoptosis, and neuroinflammation--a double-edged sword.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Peter G E

    2015-02-01

    Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is a fundamental and widespread cell biological process that is distinct from cell necrosis and can be induced by a wide variety of stimuli including viral infections. Apoptosis may occur via either the intrinsic or extrinsic pathways and confers several advantages to the virally infected host including the prevention of further viral propagation and the potential inhibition and resolution of inflammatory processes. Several viruses have been shown to have the capacity to induce apoptosis in susceptible cells including herpes simplex virus, Varicella-zoster virus, rabies virus, human immunodeficiency virus, and reovirus. Apoptosis has also been observed in human African trypanosomiasis which is an infection caused by a protozoan parasite. The mechanisms leading to apoptosis may differ depending on the type of infection. Apoptosis has been reported in several neurodegenerative diseases and also psychiatric disorders but the true clinical significance of such observations is not certain, and, though interesting, it is very difficult to ascribe causation in these conditions. The presence of inflammation in the central nervous system in any neurological condition, including those associated with a viral infection, is not necessarily an absolute marker of serious disease and the notion of 'good' versus 'bad' inflammation is considered to be valid in some circumstances. The precise relationship between viruses, apoptosis, and inflammation is viewed as a complex one requiring further investigation to unravel and understand its nature. PMID:25604493

  19. Lysine methyltransferase Smyd2 suppresses p53-dependent cardiomyocyte apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Sajjad, Amna; Novoyatleva, Tatyana; Vergarajauregui, Silvia; Troidl, Christian; Schermuly, Ralph T; Tucker, Haley O.; Engel, Felix B

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is an essential physiological process for proper embryogenesis as well as for homeostasis during aging. In addition, apoptosis is one of the major mechanisms causing cell loss in pathophysiological conditions such as heart failure. Thus, inhibition of apoptosis is an important approach for preventive and therapeutic strategies. Here we show that the histone 3 lysine 4- and lysine 36-specific methyltransferase Smyd2 acts as an endogenous antagonistic player of p53-dependent cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Smyd2 protein levels were significantly decreased in cardiomyocytes upon cobalt chloride-induced apoptosis or myocardial infarction, while p53 expression was enhanced. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Smyd2 in cultured cardiomyocytes further enhanced cobalt chloride-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. In contrast, Smyd2 overexpression resulted in marked methylation of p53 and prevented its accumulation as well as apoptotic cell death in an Hsp90-independent manner. Moreover, overexpression, of Smyd2, but not Smyd2Y240F lacking a methyl transferase activity, significantly rescued CoCl2-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cardioblasts. Finally, Smyd2 cardiomyocyte-specific deletion in vivo promoted apoptotic cell death upon myocardial infarction, which correlated with enhanced expression of p53 and pro-apoptotic Bax. Collectively, our data indicate Smyd2 as a cardioprotective protein by methylating p53. PMID:25014164

  20. Apoptosis modulates protective immunity to the pathogenic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Holly L.; Deepe, George S.

    2005-01-01

    Pathogen-induced apoptosis of lymphocytes is associated with increased susceptibility to infection. In this study, we determined whether apoptosis influenced host resistance to the fungus Histoplasma capsulatum. The level of apoptotic leukocytes progressively increased in the lungs of naive and immune mice during the course of H. capsulatum infection. T cells constituted the dominant apoptotic population. Apoptosis was diminished in H. capsulatuminfected gld/gld and TNF-?deficient mice; concomitantly, the fungal burden exceeded that of controls. Treatment of naive and H. capsulatumimmune mice with caspase inhibitors decreased apoptosis but markedly enhanced the severity of infection. Administration of a proapoptotic dose of suramin diminished the fungal burden. The increased burden in recipients of a caspase inhibitor was associated with elevations in IL-4 and IL10 levels. In the absence of either of these cytokines, caspase inhibition suppressed apoptosis but did not increase the fungal burden. Thus, apoptosis is a critical element of protective immunity to H. capsulatum. Production of IL-4 and IL-10 is markedly elevated when apoptosis is inhibited, and the release of these cytokines exacerbates the severity of infection. PMID:16151533

  1. Retinoids induce Nur77-dependent apoptosis in mouse thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Beta; Tth, Katalin; Sarang, Zsolt; Garabuczi, va; Szondy, Zsuzsa

    2015-03-01

    Nur77 is a transcription factor, which plays a determinant role in mediating T cell receptor-induced cell death of thymocytes. In addition to regulation of transcription, Nur77 contributes to apoptosis induction by targeting mitochondria, where it can convert Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein into a proapoptotic molecule. Previous studies have demonstrated that retinoids are actively produced in the mouse thymus and can induce a transcription-dependent apoptosis in mouse thymocytes. Here we show that retinoic acids induce the expression of Nur77, and retinoid-induced apoptosis is completely dependent on Nur77, as retinoids were unable to induce apoptosis in Nur77 null thymocytes. In wild-type thymocytes retinoids induced enhanced expression of the apoptosis-related genes FasL, TRAIL, NDG-1, Gpr65 and Bid, all of them in a Nur77-dependent manner. The combined action of these proteins led to Caspase 8-dependent Bid cleavage in the mitochondria. In addition, we could demonstrate the Nur77-dependent induction of STAT1 leading to enhanced Bim expression, and the mitochondrial translocation of Nur77 leading to the exposure of the Bcl-2/BH3 domain. The retinoid-induced apoptosis was dependent on both Caspase 8 and STAT1. Our data together indicate that retinoids induce a Nur77-dependent cell death program in thymocytes activating the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. PMID:25576519

  2. Identification of apoptosis-related PLZF target genes

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardo, Maria Victoria; Yelo, Estefania; Gimeno, Lourdes; Campillo, Jose Antonio; Parrado, Antonio . E-mail: antonio.parrado@carm.es

    2007-07-27

    The PLZF gene encodes a BTB/POZ-zinc finger-type transcription factor, involved in physiological development, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. In this paper, we investigate proliferation, survival, and gene expression regulation in stable clones from the human haematopoietic K562, DG75, and Jurkat cell lines with inducible expression of PLZF. In Jurkat cells, but not in K562 and DG75 cells, PLZF induced growth suppression and apoptosis in a cell density-dependent manner. Deletion of the BTB/POZ domain of PLZF abrogated growth suppression and apoptosis. PLZF was expressed with a nuclear speckled pattern distinctively in the full-length PLZF-expressing Jurkat clones, suggesting that the nuclear speckled localization is required for PLZF-induced apoptosis. By microarray analysis, we identified that the apoptosis-inducer TP53INP1, ID1, and ID3 genes were upregulated, and the apoptosis-inhibitor TERT gene was downregulated. The identification of apoptosis-related PLZF target genes may have biological and clinical relevance in cancer typified by altered PLZF expression.

  3. An inflammatory micro-environment promotes human adipocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Keuper, Michaela; Blüher, Matthias; Schön, Michael R; Möller, Peter; Dzyakanchuk, Anna; Amrein, Kurt; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Wabitsch, Martin; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela

    2011-06-01

    Obesity-associated macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue is responsible for both local and systemic inflammation. Recent findings suggest fat cell apoptosis as an initiator of macrophage recruitment. Here, we investigated the effects of an inflammatory micro-environment on fat cells using human THP-1 macrophages and SGBS adipocytes. Macrophage-secreted factors induced insulin resistance, inhibited insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation, and induced apoptosis of adipocytes. The apoptosis-inducing effect was even more pronounced in direct co-cultures of adipocytes and macrophages. Our data suggest a link between insulin resistance and apoptosis sensitivity. Accordingly, pharmacological and genetic inhibition of insulin signaling at the level of Akt2 sensitized adipocytes to apoptosis induction by macrophage-secreted factors. In conclusion, we describe here a novel interaction of macrophages and fat cells, i.e. induction of apoptosis. Our data suggest a feed-forward cycle in which macrophages further drive the inflammatory process by inducing insulin resistance and concomitant apoptosis of adipocytes. PMID:21501656

  4. TRPV1 receptors mediate particulate matter-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Agopyan, N; Head, J; Yu, S; Simon, S A

    2004-03-01

    Exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) is a world-wide health problem mainly because it produces adverse cardiovascular and respiratory effects that frequently result in morbidity. Despite many years of epidemiological and basic research, the mechanisms underlying PM toxicity remain largely unknown. To understand some of these mechanisms, we measured PM-induced apoptosis and necrosis in normal human airway epithelial cells and sensory neurons from both wild-type mice and mice lacking TRPV1 receptors using Alexa Fluor 488-conjugated annexin V and propidium iodide labeling, respectively. Exposure of environmental PMs containing residual oil fly ash and ash from Mount St. Helens was found to induce apoptosis, but not necrosis, as a consequence of sustained calcium influx through TRPV1 receptors. Apoptosis was completely prevented by inhibiting TRPV1 receptors with capsazepine or by removing extracellular calcium or in sensory neurons from TRPV1(-/-) mice. Binding of either one of the PMs to the cell membrane induced a capsazepine-sensitive increase in cAMP. PM-induced apoptosis was augmented upon the inhibition of PKA. PKA inhibition on its own also induced apoptosis, thereby suggesting that this pathway may be endogenously protective against apoptosis. In summary, it was found that inhibiting TRPV1 receptors prevents PM-induced apoptosis, thereby providing a potential mechanism to reduce their toxicity. PMID:14633515

  5. Role of Siglec-7 in Apoptosis in Human Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Kim Anh; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Palle, Sabine; Anselme-Bertrand, Isabelle; Arthaud, Charles-Antoine; Chavarin, Patricia; Pozzetto, Bruno; Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    Background Platelets participate in tissue repair and innate immune responses. Sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs) are well-characterized I-type lectins, which control apoptosis. Methodology/Principal Findings We characterized the expression of Siglec-7 in human platelets isolated from healthy volunteers using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Siglec-7 is primarily expressed on α granular membranes and colocalized with CD62P. Siglec-7 expression was increased upon platelet activation and correlated closely with CD62P expression. Cross-linking Siglec-7 with its ligand, ganglioside, resulted in platelet apoptosis without any significant effects on activation, aggregation, cell morphology by electron microscopy analysis or secretion. We show that ganglioside triggered four key pathways leading to apoptosis in human platelets: (i) mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) depolarization; (ii) elevated expression of pro-apoptotic Bax and Bak proteins with reduced expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein; (iii) phosphatidylserine exposure and (iv), microparticle formation. Inhibition of NAPDH oxidase, PI3K, or PKC rescued platelets from apoptosis induced by Siglec-7 recruitment, suggesting that the platelet receptors P2Y1 and GPIIbIIIa are essential for ganglioside-induced platelet apoptosis. Conclusions/Significance The present work characterizes the role of Siglec-7 and platelet receptors in regulating apoptosis and death. Because some platelet pathology involves apoptosis (idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and possibly storage lesions), Siglec-7 might be a molecular target for therapeutic intervention/prevention. PMID:25230315

  6. Mechanisms and Biomarkers of Apoptosis in Liver Disease and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Jayashree Bagchi; Oakley, Fiona; Walsh, Meagan J.

    2012-01-01

    Liver fibrosis and cirrhosis are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Development of the fibrotic scar is an outcome of chronic liver diseases of varying aetiologies including alcoholic liver disease (ALD) nonalcoholic liver disease (NAFLD) including non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) viral hepatitis B and C (HBV, HCV). The critical step in the development of scar is activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), which become the primary source of extracellular matrix. Aberrant apoptosis is a feature of chronic liver diseases and is associated with worsening stages of fibrosis. However, apoptosis is also the main mechanism promoting the resolution of fibrosis, and spontaneous or targeted apoptosis of HSC is associated with regression of fibrosis in animal models and patients with chronic liver disease. Given the importance of apoptosis in disease progression and resolution, there is much interest in precisely delineating the mechanisms involved and also developing biomarkers that accurately reflect the underlying pathogenesis. Here, we review the mechanisms driving apoptosis in development of liver disease and use of apoptosis -related biomarkers to aid in clinical diagnosis. Finally, we will also examine the recent literature regarding new insights into mechanisms involved in apoptosis of activated HSCs as possible method of fibrosis regression. PMID:22567408

  7. Probing of cancer cell apoptosis by SERS and LSCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jian; Gu, Huaimin

    2009-07-01

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) can provide information of internal structures and chemical components from different kinds of samples. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) can show morphologic information of samples by high-resolution optical images with different focal planes. In this paper, the dynamic variation of cancer cells (HELA cells) in the apoptosis was first studied by combining SERS and LSCM. After gold nanoparticles (GNPS) uptake, HELA cells were divided into two groups, and were respectively studied at six different time points of cell apoptosis period by SERS and LSCM. The LSCM images of HELA cells obtained at different time points were analyzed, and the morphology varieties of HELA cells apoptosis were obtained. It suggests that HELA cells apoptosis gradually in the apoptosis period until they died. In addition, Raman spectra of HELA cells measured at different time points were also compared. It shows that some Raman signal peaks shift, and FWHM of Raman peaks change too. The variation of internal structures and chemical constituents were analyzed according to the shifts and FWHM of the Raman peaks. The internal dynamic information and morphologic varieties from HELA cells apoptosis gained by combining SERS and LSCM will make us to understand cancer cell apoptosis throughly.

  8. Preferential apoptosis of HIV-1-specific CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Yue, Feng Yun; Kovacs, Colin M; Dimayuga, Rowena C; Gu, Xiao Xiao Jenny; Parks, Paul; Kaul, Rupert; Ostrowski, Mario A

    2005-02-15

    In contrast to other viral infections such as CMV, circulating frequencies of HIV-1-specific CD4+ T cells in peripheral blood are quantitatively diminished in the majority of HIV-1-infected individuals. One mechanism for this quantitative defect is preferential infection of HIV-1-specific CD4+ T cells, although <10% of HIV-1-specific CD4+ T cells are infected. Apoptosis has been proposed as an important contributor to the pathogenesis of CD4+ T cell depletion in HIV/AIDS. We show here that, within HIV-1-infected individuals, a greater proportion of ex vivo HIV-1-specific CD4+ T cells undergo apoptosis compared with CMV-specific CD4+ T cells (45 vs 7.4%, respectively, p < 0.05, in chronic progressors). The degree of apoptosis within HIV-1-specific CD4+ T cells correlates with viral load and disease progression, and highly active antiretroviral therapy abrogates these differences. The data support a mechanism for apoptosis in these cells similar to that found in activation-induced apoptosis through the TCR, resulting in oxygen-free radical production, mitochondrial damage, and caspase-9 activation. That HIV-1 proteins can also directly enhance activation-induced apoptosis supports a mechanism for a preferential induction of apoptosis of HIV-1-specific CD4+ T cells, which contributes to a loss of immunological control of HIV-1 replication. PMID:15699152

  9. Roles of Apoptosis and Cellular Senescence in Cancer and Aging.

    PubMed

    Cerella, Claudia; Grandjenette, Cindy; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Cancer and aging are two similar processes representing the final outcome of timedependent accumulation of various irreversible dysfunctions, mainly caused by stress-induced DNA and cellular damages. Apoptosis and senescence are two types of cellular response to damages that are altered in both cancer and aging, albeit through different mechanisms. Carcinogenesis is associated with a progressive reduction in the ability of the cells to trigger apoptosis and senescence. In contrast, in aging tissues, there is an increased accumulation of senescent cells, and the nature of apoptosis deregulation varies depending on the tissue. Thus, the prevailing model suggests that apoptosis and cellular senescence function as two essential tumor-suppressor mechanisms, ensuring the health of the individual during early and reproductive stages of life, but become detrimental and promote aging later in life. The recent discovery that various anticancer agents, including canonical inducers of apoptosis, act also as inducers of cellular senescence indicates that pro-senescence strategies may have applications in cancer prevention therapy. Therefore, dissection of the mechanisms mediating the delicate balance between apoptosis and cellular senescence will be beneficial in the therapeutic exploitation of both processes in the development of future anticancer and anti-aging strategies, including minimizing the side effects of such strategies. Here, we provide an overview of the roles of apoptosis and cellular senescence in cancer and aging. PMID:25642721

  10. Apoptosis of cholangiocytes modulated by thioredoxin of carcinogenic liver fluke.

    PubMed

    Matchimakul, Pitchaya; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Suttiprapa, Sutas; Mann, Victoria H; Popratiloff, Anastas; Laha, Thewarach; Pimenta, Rafael N; Cochran, Christina J; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Sripa, Banchob; Brindley, Paul J

    2015-08-01

    Chronic infection with the food-borne liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, frequently induces cancer of the bile ducts, cholangiocarcinoma. Opisthorchiasis is endemic in Thailand, Lao PDR, Cambodia and Vietnam, where eating undercooked freshwater fish carrying the juvenile stage of this pathogen leads to human infection. Because inhibition of apoptosis facilitates carcinogenesis, this study investigated modulation by thioredoxin from O. viverrini of apoptosis of bile duct epithelial cells, cholangiocytes. Cells of a cholangiocyte line were incubated with the parasite enzyme after which they were exposed hydrogen peroxide. Oxidative stress-induced apoptosis was monitored using flow cytometry, growth in real time and imaging of living cells using laser confocal microscopy. Immunolocalization revealed liver fluke thioredoxin within cholangiocytes. Cells exposed to thioredoxin downregulated apoptotic genes in the mitogen activated protein kinases pathway and upregulated anti-apoptosis-related genes including apoptosis signaling kinase 1, caspase 9, caspase 8, caspase 3, survivin and others. Western blots of immunoprecipitates of cell lysates revealed binding of thioredoxin to apoptosis signaling kinase 1. Together the findings indicated that thioredoxin from O. viverrini inhibited oxidative stress-induced apoptosis of bile duct epithelial cells, which supports a role for this liver fluke oxidoreductase in opisthorchiasis-induced cholangiocarcinogenesis. PMID:26007234

  11. Erdr1 Suppresses Murine Melanoma Growth via Regulation of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joohyun; Jung, Min Kyung; Park, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Kyung Eun; Cho, Daeho

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma, one of the aggressive cancers, is known to be resistant to chemotherapy. Because of its aggressive nature, effectively inducing apoptosis is necessary to treat melanoma. Erythroid differentiation regulator 1 (Erdr1) is known to be a stress-related survival factor exhibiting anti-cancer effects in several cancers. However, little is known about the functions and underlying mechanisms of Erdr1 so far. To demonstrate the effect of Erdr1 in melanoma apoptosis, recombinant murine Erdr1 was injected into mice implanted with B16F10 melanoma cells. In vivo tumor growth was significantly inhibited in mice injected with Erdr1 compared to the control. In addition, the tumor from Erdr1-injected mice showed an increased level of apoptosis. Accordingly, apoptosis-regulating factors including anti-apoptotic marker Bcl-2 and pro-apoptotic marker Bax in the tumor tissues were examined. As expected, the decreased level of Bcl-2 and increased level of Bax were detected in tumors within the mice injected with Erdr1. Based on the in vivo study, the role of Erdr1 in tumor apoptosis was further tested by incubating it with cells of the murine melanoma cell line B16F10. Erdr1-induced apoptosis in B16F10 cells was observed. Additionally, Erdr1 downregulated STAT3 activity, inhibiting apoptosis via regulation of the Bcl-2 family. Overall, data demonstrate that Erdr1 induced murine melanoma apoptosis through the regulation of Bcl-2 and Bax. These findings suggest that Erdr1 is a novel regulator of apoptosis in melanoma. PMID:26784177

  12. How do viruses control mitochondria-mediated apoptosis?

    PubMed

    Neumann, Simon; El Maadidi, Souhayla; Faletti, Laura; Haun, Florian; Labib, Shirin; Schejtman, Andrea; Maurer, Ulrich; Borner, Christoph

    2015-11-01

    There is no doubt that viruses require cells to successfully reproduce and effectively infect the next host. The question is what is the fate of the infected cells? All eukaryotic cells can "sense" viral infections and exhibit defence strategies to oppose viral replication and spread. This often leads to the elimination of the infected cells by programmed cell death or apoptosis. This "sacrifice" of infected cells represents the most primordial response of multicellular organisms to viruses. Subverting host cell apoptosis, at least for some time, is therefore a crucial strategy of viruses to ensure their replication, the production of essential viral proteins, virus assembly and the spreading to new hosts. For that reason many viruses harbor apoptosis inhibitory genes, which once inside infected cells are expressed to circumvent apoptosis induction during the virus reproduction phase. On the other hand, viruses can take advantage of stimulating apoptosis to (i) facilitate shedding and hence dissemination, (ii) to prevent infected cells from presenting viral antigens to the immune system or (iii) to kill non-infected bystander and immune cells which would limit viral propagation. Hence the decision whether an infected host cell undergoes apoptosis or not depends on virus type and pathogenicity, its capacity to oppose antiviral responses of the infected cells and/or to evade any attack from immune cells. Viral genomes have therefore been adapted throughout evolution to satisfy the need of a particular virus to induce or inhibit apoptosis during its life cycle. Here we review the different strategies used by viruses to interfere with the two major apoptosis as well as with the innate immune signaling pathways in mammalian cells. We will focus on the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway and discuss new ideas about how particular viruses could activately engage mitochondria to induce apoptosis of their host. PMID:25736565

  13. Erdr1 Suppresses Murine Melanoma Growth via Regulation of Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joohyun; Jung, Min Kyung; Park, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Kyung Eun; Cho, Daeho

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma, one of the aggressive cancers, is known to be resistant to chemotherapy. Because of its aggressive nature, effectively inducing apoptosis is necessary to treat melanoma. Erythroid differentiation regulator 1 (Erdr1) is known to be a stress-related survival factor exhibiting anti-cancer effects in several cancers. However, little is known about the functions and underlying mechanisms of Erdr1 so far. To demonstrate the effect of Erdr1 in melanoma apoptosis, recombinant murine Erdr1 was injected into mice implanted with B16F10 melanoma cells. In vivo tumor growth was significantly inhibited in mice injected with Erdr1 compared to the control. In addition, the tumor from Erdr1-injected mice showed an increased level of apoptosis. Accordingly, apoptosis-regulating factors including anti-apoptotic marker Bcl-2 and pro-apoptotic marker Bax in the tumor tissues were examined. As expected, the decreased level of Bcl-2 and increased level of Bax were detected in tumors within the mice injected with Erdr1. Based on the in vivo study, the role of Erdr1 in tumor apoptosis was further tested by incubating it with cells of the murine melanoma cell line B16F10. Erdr1-induced apoptosis in B16F10 cells was observed. Additionally, Erdr1 downregulated STAT3 activity, inhibiting apoptosis via regulation of the Bcl-2 family. Overall, data demonstrate that Erdr1 induced murine melanoma apoptosis through the regulation of Bcl-2 and Bax. These findings suggest that Erdr1 is a novel regulator of apoptosis in melanoma. PMID:26784177

  14. Tumor promoters as inhibitors of apoptosis in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Schrenk, D; Schmitz, H-J; Bohnenberger, S; Wagner, B; Wrner, W

    2004-04-01

    Multistage carcinogenesis in rat liver is widely used as an experimental model for the study of the critical events in tumor promotion. After an initial treatment with a genotoxic liver carcinogen ('initiation'), subsequent application of certain non-genotoxic agents can lead to the clonal expansion of putative preneoplastic cells ('promotion'). Obviously, the expansion of these clones is correlated with an increased occurrence of benign and malignant liver tumors at later time points. Since both proliferation and apoptosis were reported to be enhanced in putative preneoplastic liver foci, inhibition of apoptosis was suggested to play a critical role in tumor promotion. In rat hepatocytes in primary culture, the liver tumor promoter 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) inhibited apoptosis initiated by treatment of the cultures with UV irradiation but did not affect apoptosis in non-irradiated cultures. The suppression of apoptosis with TCDD coincided with an attenuated increase of the tumor suppressor protein p53 observed upon UV irradiation. Furthermore, TCDD treatment resulted in a marked hyperphosphorylation of p53. The fact that almost identical concentration-response curves were obtained for the phosphorylation of p53 and the induction of cytochrome P450(CYP)1A-catalyzed 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity indicates that p53 phosphorylation after TCDD treatment is mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling cascade. With tumor-promoting 'non-dioxin-like' polychlorinated biphenyls inhibition of UV-induced apoptosis was also observed. A comparative study investigating the effects of various concentrations did not reveal, however, a clear correlation between the suppression of apoptosis and the induction of CYP2B-catalyzed 7-pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylase (PROD) activity. In summary, inhibition of UV-induced apoptosis with liver tumor promoters is observed in rat hepatocytes in culture. Hyperphosphorylation of key proteins of apoptosis including p53 seems to play a role in this effect. PMID:15093247

  15. The Interplays between Autophagy and Apoptosis Induced by Enterovirus 71

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bei; Wang, Tao; Wang, Ji; Huang, He; Wang, Jianwei; Jin, Qi; Zhao, Zhendong

    2013-01-01

    Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the causative agent of human diseases with distinct severity, from mild hand, foot and mouth disease to severe neurological syndromes, such as encephalitis and meningitis. The lack of understanding of viral pathogenesis as well as lack of efficient vaccine and drugs against this virus impedes the control of EV71 infection. EV71 virus induces autophagy and apoptosis; however, the relationship between EV71-induced autophagy and apoptosis as well as the influence of autophagy and apoptosis on virus virulence remains unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, it was observed that the Anhui strain of EV71 induced autophagy and apoptosis in human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD-A) cells. Additionally, by either applying chemical inhibitors or knocking down single essential autophagic or apoptotic genes, inhibition of EV71 induced autophagy inhibited the apoptosis both at the autophagosome formation stage and autophagy execution stage. However, inhibition of autophagy at the stage of autophagosome and lysosome fusion promoted apoptosis. In reverse, the inhibition of EV71-induced apoptosis contributed to the conversion of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-I (LC3-I) to LC3-II and degradation of sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1/P62). Furthermore, the inhibition of autophagy in the autophagsome formation stage or apoptosis decreased the release of EV71 viral particles. Conclusions/Significance In conclusion, the results of this study not only revealed novel aspect of the interplay between autophagy and apoptosis in EV71 infection, but also provided a new insight to control EV71 infection. PMID:23437282

  16. Isatin derivatives with activity against apoptosis-resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Evdokimov, Nikolai M; Magedov, Igor V; McBrayer, Dominic; Kornienko, Alexander

    2016-03-15

    In a search of small molecules active against apoptosis-resistant cancer cells, a series of isatin-based heterocyclic compounds were synthesized and found to inhibit proliferation of cancer cell lines resistant to apoptosis. The synthesis of these compounds involved a condensation of commercially available, active methylene heterocycles with isatin proceeding in moderate to excellent yields. The heterocyclic scaffolds prepared in the current investigation appear to be a useful starting point for the development of agents to fight cancers with apoptosis resistance, and thus, associated with dismal prognoses. PMID:26883150

  17. Morphological and cytochemical determination of cell death by apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Sobel, Burton E.; Budd, Ralph C.

    2007-01-01

    Several modes of cell death are now recognized, including necrosis, apoptosis, and autophagy. Oftentimes the distinctions between these various modes may not be apparent, although the precise mode may be physiologically important. Accordingly, it is often desirable to be able to classify the mode of cell death. Apoptosis was originally defined by structural alterations in cells observable by transmitted light and electron microscopy. Today, a wide variety of imaging and cytochemical techniques are available for the investigation of apoptosis. This review will highlight many of these methods, and provide a critique on the advantages and disadvantages associated with them for the specific identification of apoptotic cells in culture and tissues. PMID:18000678

  18. Helicobacter pylori induces apoptosis of T- and B-cell lines and translocates mitochondrial apoptosis-inducing factor to nucleus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manisha; Prasad, Kashi N; Saxena, Ashish; Yachha, Surender K

    2006-04-01

    Immune cell apoptosis may play a role in human persistent Helicobacter pylori infection. We planned to study the apoptosis of T and B cells by H. pylori strains. T (Jurkat) and B (Raji) cell lines were co-cultured with cagA-positive H. pylori strains carrying different vacA genotypes (s1a/m1, s1a/m2, and s2/m2). Apoptosis was detected by microscopy, DNA fragmentation assay, and flow cytometry. Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) transfer from mitochondria to nucleus was studied by immunoblot analysis. Apoptosis of T and B cells was significantly higher in H. pylori-infected cells than in uninfected controls (s1a/m1 80%, s1a/m2 78%, s2m2 69% vs. control 16% for T cells, P < 0.001; s1 a/m1 78%, s1a/m2 73%, s2m2 62% vs. control 24% for B cells, P < 0.001 by flow cytometry) with no difference among the genotypes. AIF transfer from mitochondria to nucleus was demonstrated in both apoptotic cell lines. Thus, H. pylori induces apoptosis in T- and B-cell lines and translocates AIF. T and B cells deletion through apoptosis may explain the persistence of H. pylori infection; its role in pathogenesis needs further research. PMID:16528467

  19. Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins Physically Interact with and Block Apoptosis Induced by Drosophila Proteins HID and GRIM

    PubMed Central

    Vucic, Domagoj; Kaiser, William J.; Miller, Lois K.

    1998-01-01

    Reaper (RPR), HID, and GRIM activate apoptosis in cells programmed to die during Drosophila development. We have previously shown that transient overexpression of RPR in the lepidopteran SF-21 cell line induces apoptosis and that members of the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) family of antiapoptotic proteins can inhibit RPR-induced apoptosis and physically interact with RPR through their BIR motifs (D. Vucic, W. J. Kaiser, A. J. Harvey, and L. K. Miller, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 94:1018310188, 1997). In this study, we found that transient overexpression of HID and GRIM also induced apoptosis in the SF-21 cell line. Baculovirus and Drosophila IAPs blocked HID- and GRIM-induced apoptosis and also physically interacted with them through the BIR motifs of the IAPs. The region of sequence similarity shared by RPR, HID, and GRIM, the N-terminal 14 amino acids of each protein, was required for the induction of apoptosis by HID and its binding to IAPs. When stably overexpressed by fusion to an unrelated, nonapoptotic polypeptide, the N-terminal 37 amino acids of HID and GRIM were sufficient to induce apoptosis and confer IAP binding activity. However, GRIM was more complex than HID since the C-terminal 124 amino acids of GRIM retained apoptosis-inducing and IAP binding activity, suggesting the presence of two independent apoptotic motifs within GRIM. Coexpression of IAPs with HID stabilized HID levels and resulted in the accumulation of HID in punctate perinuclear locations which coincided with IAP localization. The physical interaction of IAPs with RPR, HID, and GRIM provides a common molecular mechanism for IAP inhibition of these Drosophila proapoptotic proteins. PMID:9584170

  20. Epithelial Cell Apoptosis in Recurrent Aphthous Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Al-Samadi, A; Drozd, A; Salem, A; Hietanen, J; Hyrinen-Immonen, R; Konttinen, Y T

    2015-07-01

    A recurrent aphthous ulcer (RAU) is a common inflammatory ulcerative lesion affecting oral mucosa. We studied the eventual apoptosis of epithelial cells from the point of view of ulcer and inflammation. RAU lesions and healthy mucosa samples were immunostained for caspase-3 and high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). DNA nicks were identified using TUNEL staining. We studied the effects of tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF?) and interferon ? (IFN?) on the toll-like receptor 2 and 4 (TLR2 and TLR4) expression of human oral SCC-25 keratinocytes. We also studied the effects of self-DNA, all-thiol-HMGB1, and disulfide-HMGB1 on epithelial cells, with or without IFN?. At the edge of RAU lesions, all epithelial cell layers were caspase-3(+), TUNEL(+), and HMGB-1(+) and had widened intercellular spaces. In contrast, healthy epithelial cells were negative for caspase-3 and TUNEL staining. HMGB1 was seen in only the basal cell layers, and the cells retained close cell-to-cell contacts. Self-DNA increased TNF-? mRNA (P = 0.02) in SCC-25 cells. Both TNF? and IFN? (P = 0.01) increased TLR2. Upon TNF? stimulation, SCC-25 cells lost their nuclear HMGB1 staining. HMGB1 did not increase IL-8, IL-6, or TNF-? mRNA in SCC-25 cells, which was unaffected by the presence of IFN?. We conclude that in healthy epithelium, the most superficial cells at the end of their life cycle are simply desquamated. In contrast, RAU is characterized by top-to-bottom apoptosis such that dead cells may slough off, leading to an ulcer. Because of a lack of scavenging anti-inflammatory macrophages, apoptotic cells probably undergo secondary necrosis releasing proinflammatory danger signals, which may contribute to the peripheral inflammatory halo. This is supported by self-DNA-induced TNF? synthesis. In contrast to TLR4- and TLR2-binding lipopolysaccharide used as a positive control, disulfide-HMGB1 did not stimulate proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:25861801