Science.gov

Sample records for spe b-induced apoptosis

  1. Epothilone B induces extrinsic pathway of apoptosis in human SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rogalska, Aneta; Gajek, Arkadiusz; Marczak, Agnieszka

    2014-06-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying epothilone B (EpoB) induced apoptosis were investigated in SKOV-3 human ovarian cancer cells. The aim of this research was to compare EpoB's, which belongs to the new class of anticancer drugs, with paclitaxel's (PTX) ability to induce apoptosis. The mode of cell death was assessed colorimetrically, fluorimetrically and by immunoblot analyses through measuring DNA fragmentation, the level of intracellular calcium, the level of cytochrome c, TRAIL, the cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and the activation of caspase-9, -8 and -3. EpoB leads to an increase of the cytosolic level of cytochrome c after 4 h of cell treatment. After 24 and 48 h of cell treatment the level of intracellular calcium also increased by about 21% and 24% respectively. Moreover, EpoB, similarly to PTX, promoted the expression of TRAIL in lymphocytes, although high TRAIL expression on tumor cells was detected only after adding EpoB to SKOV-3 cells. EpoB mediates caspases-8 and -3 activation, which is independent of the reduction in the amount of caspase-9. Epitope-specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies revealed characteristic apoptotic changes that included cleavage of the 116 kDa PARP polypeptide to 25 kDa fragments. The results of our study show that EpoB induces mainly the extrinsic pathway. PMID:24583341

  2. LincRNA-p21 acts as a mediator of ING1b-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Tran, U M; Rajarajacholan, U; Soh, J; Kim, T-s; Thalappilly, S; Sensen, C W; Riabowol, K

    2015-01-01

    ING1b is a tumor suppressor that affects transcription, cell cycle control and apoptosis. ING1b is deregulated in disease, and its activity is closely linked to that of p53. In addition to regulating protein-coding genes, we found that ING1b also influences the expression of large intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs). In particular, lincRNA-p21 was significantly induced after DNA-damage stress or by ING1b overexpression. Furthermore, lincRNA-p21 expression in response to DNA damage was significantly attenuated in cells lacking ING1b. LincRNA-p21 is also a target of p53 and can trigger apoptosis in mouse cell models. We found that this function of lincRNA-p21 is conserved in human cell models. Moreover, ING1b and p53 could function independently to influence lincRNA-p21 expression. However, their effects become more additive under conditions of stress. In particular, ING1b regulates lincRNA-p21 levels by binding to its promoter and is required for induction of lincRNA-p21 by p53. The ability of ING1b to cause apoptosis is also impaired in the absence of lincRNA-p21. Surprisingly, deletion of the ING1b plant homeodomain, which allows it to bind histones and regulate chromatin structure, did not alter regulation of lincRNA-p21. Our findings suggest that ING1b induces lincRNA-p21 expression independently of histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation mark recognition and that lincRNA-p21 functions downstream of ING1b. Thus, regulation at the level of lincRNA-p21 may represent the point at which ING1b and p53 pathways converge to induce apoptosis under specific stress conditions. PMID:25741593

  3. Inhibition of NF-kappaB induces apoptosis of KSHV-infected primary effusion lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Keller, S A; Schattner, E J; Cesarman, E

    2000-10-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), or human herpervirus 8 (HHV-8), is a gamma-herpesvirus that infects human lymphocytes and is associated with primary effusion lymphoma (PEL). Currently, the role of viral infection in the transformation of PEL cells is unknown. One possibility is that KSHV, like the lymphotropic viruses Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human T-cell leukemia virus I (HTLV-I), activates the transcription factor NF-kappaB to promote survival and proliferation of infected lymphocytes. To examine this possibility, we assessed NF-kappaB activity in KSHV-infected PEL cell lines and primary tumor specimens by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). We observed that NF-kappaB is constitutively activated in all KSHV-infected lymphomas, and consists of 2 predominant complexes, p65/p50 heterodimers and p50/p50 homodimers. Inhibition experiments demonstrated that Bay 11-7082, an irreversible inhibitor of IkappaBalpha phosphorylation, completely and specifically abrogated the NF-kappaB/DNA binding in PEL cells. PEL cells treated with Bay 11 demonstrated down-regulation of the NF-kappaB inducible cytokine interleukin 6 (IL-6), and apoptosis. These results suggest that NF-kappaB activity is necessary for survival of KSHV-infected lymphoma cells, and that pharmacologic inhibition of NF-kappaB may be an effective treatment for PEL. PMID:11001908

  4. Mangiferin induces apoptosis in multiple myeloma cell lines by suppressing the activation of nuclear factor kappa B-inducing kinase.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Tomoya; Tsubaki, Masanobu; Kino, Toshiki; Yamagishi, Misa; Iida, Megumi; Itoh, Tatsuki; Imano, Motohiro; Tanabe, Genzoh; Muraoka, Osamu; Satou, Takao; Nishida, Shozo

    2016-05-01

    Mangiferin is a naturally occurring glucosyl xanthone, which induces apoptosis in various cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanism underlying mangiferin-induced apoptosis has not been clarified thus far. Therefore, we examined the molecular mechanism underlying mangiferin-induced apoptosis in multiple myeloma (MM) cell lines. We found that mangiferin decreased the viability of MM cell lines in a concentration-dependent manner. We also observed an increased number of apoptotic cells, caspase-3 activation, and a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, mangiferin inhibited the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and expression of phosphorylated inhibitor kappa B (IκB) and increased the expression of IκB protein, whereas no changes were observed in the phosphorylation levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2), and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). The molecular mechanism responsible for mangiferin-induced inhibition of nuclear translocation of NF-κB was a decrease in the expression of phosphorylated NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK). Moreover, mangiferin decreased the expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), survivin, and Bcl-xL proteins. Knockdown of NIK expression showed results similar to those observed with mangiferin treatment. Our results suggest that mangiferin induces apoptosis through the inhibition of nuclear translocation of NF-κB by suppressing NIK activation in MM cell lines. Our results provide a new insight into the molecular mechanism of mangiferin-induced apoptosis. Importantly, since the number of reported NIK inhibitors is limited, mangiferin, which targets NIK, may be a potential anticancer agent for the treatment of MM. PMID:26996543

  5. Exogenous and Endogeneous Disialosyl Ganglioside GD1b Induces Apoptosis of MCF-7 Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sun-Hyung; Lee, Ji-Min; Kwon, Kyung-Min; Kwak, Choong-Hwan; Abekura, Fukushi; Park, Jun-Young; Cho, Seung-Hak; Lee, Kichoon; Chang, Young-Chae; Lee, Young-Choon; Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Ha, Ki-Tae; Chang, Hyeun-Wook; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Gangliosides have been known to play a role in the regulation of apoptosis in cancer cells. This study has employed disialyl-ganglioside GD1b to apoptosis in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells using exogenous treatment of the cells with GD1b and endogenous expression of GD1b in MCF-7 cells. First, apoptosis in MCF-7 cells was observed after treatment of GD1b. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with GD1b reduced cell growth rates in a dose and time dependent manner during GD1b treatment, as determined by XTT assay. Among the various gangliosides, GD1b specifically induced apoptosis of the MCF-7 cells. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence assays showed that GD1b specifically induces apoptosis in the MCF-7 cells with Annexin V binding for apoptotic actions in early stage and propidium iodide (PI) staining the nucleus of the MCF-7 cells. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with GD1b activated apoptotic molecules such as processed forms of caspase-8, -7 and PARP (Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase), without any change in the expression of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis molecules such as Bax and Bcl-2. Second, to investigate the effect of endogenously produced GD1b on the regulation of cell function, UDP-gal: β1,3-galactosyltransferase-2 (GD1b synthase, Gal-T2) gene has been transfected into the MCF-7 cells. Using the GD1b synthase-transfectants, apoptosis-related signal proteins linked to phenotype changes were examined. Similar to the exogenous GD1b treatment, the cell growth of the GD1b synthase gene-transfectants was significantly suppressed compared with the vector-transfectant cell lines and transfection activated the apoptotic molecules such as processed forms of caspase-8, -7 and PARP, but not the levels of expression of Bax and Bcl-2. GD1b-induced apoptosis was blocked by caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD. Therefore, taken together, it was concluded that GD1b could play an important role in the regulation of breast cancer apoptosis. PMID:27144558

  6. Hesperidin Attenuates Ultraviolet B-Induced Apoptosis by Mitigating Oxidative Stress in Human Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Madduma Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara; Piao, Mei Jing; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Ryu, Yea Seong; Han, Xia; Oh, Min Chang; Jung, Uhee; Kim, In Gyu; Hyun, Jin Won

    2016-05-01

    Human skin cells undergo pathophysiological processes via generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon excessive exposure to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation. This study investigated the ability of hesperidin (C28H34O15) to prevent apoptosis due to oxidative stress generated through UVB-induced ROS. Hesperidin significantly scavenged ROS generated by UVB radiation, attenuated the oxidation of cellular macromolecules, established mitochondrial membrane polarization, and prevented the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol. Hesperidin downregulated expression of caspase-9, caspase-3, and Bcl-2-associated X protein, and upregulated expression of B-cell lymphoma 2. Hesperidin absorbed wavelengths of light within the UVB range. In summary, hesperidin shielded human keratinocytes from UVB radiation-induced damage and apoptosis via its antioxidant and UVB absorption properties. PMID:26797112

  7. Hesperidin Attenuates Ultraviolet B-Induced Apoptosis by Mitigating Oxidative Stress in Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara Madduma; Piao, Mei Jing; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Ryu, Yea Seong; Han, Xia; Oh, Min Chang; Jung, Uhee; Kim, In Gyu; Hyun, Jin Won

    2016-01-01

    Human skin cells undergo pathophysiological processes via generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon excessive exposure to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation. This study investigated the ability of hesperidin (C28H34O15) to prevent apoptosis due to oxidative stress generated through UVB-induced ROS. Hesperidin significantly scavenged ROS generated by UVB radiation, attenuated the oxidation of cellular macromolecules, established mitochondrial membrane polarization, and prevented the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol. Hesperidin downregulated expression of caspase-9, caspase-3, and Bcl-2-associated X protein, and upregulated expression of B-cell lymphoma 2. Hesperidin absorbed wavelengths of light within the UVB range. In summary, hesperidin shielded human keratinocytes from UVB radiation-induced damage and apoptosis via its antioxidant and UVB absorption properties. PMID:26797112

  8. Heparin Interaction with the Primed Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte CD11b Induces Apoptosis and Prevents Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Mazor, Meital; Mazor, Rafi; Kristal, Batya; Kistler, Erik B.; Ziv, Inbal; Chezar, Judith; Sela, Shifra

    2015-01-01

    Heparin is known to have anti-inflammatory effects, yet the mechanisms are not completely understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that heparin has a direct effect on activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs), changing their activation state, and can explain its anti-inflammatory effect. To test our hypothesis, we designed both in vitro and ex vivo studies to elucidate the mechanism by which heparin modulates PMNL functions and therefore the inflammatory response. We specifically tested the hypothesis that priming of PMNLs renders them more susceptible to heparin. Amplified levels of CD11b and increased rate of superoxide release manifested PMNL priming. Increase in cell priming resulted in a dose-dependent increase in heparin binding to PMNLs followed by augmented apoptosis. Blocking antibodies to CD11b inhibited heparin binding and abolished the apoptotic response. Moreover, heparin caused a significant dose-dependent decrease in the rate of superoxide release from PMNLs, which was blunted by blocking antibodies to CD11b. Altogether, this study shows that the interaction of heparin with the PMNL CD11b results in cell apoptosis and explains heparin's anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:26819958

  9. Macranthoside B Induces Apoptosis and Autophagy Via Reactive Oxygen Species Accumulation in Human Ovarian Cancer A2780 Cells.

    PubMed

    Shan, Yu; Guan, Fuqin; Zhao, Xingzeng; Wang, Ming; Chen, Yu; Wang, Qizhi; Feng, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Macranthoside B (MB), a saponin compound in Lonicera macranthoides, can block cell proliferation and induce cell death in several types of cancer cells; however, the precise mechanisms by which MB exerts its anticancer effects remain poorly understood. MB blocked A2780 human ovarian carcinoma cell proliferation both dose- and time-dependently. MB induced apoptosis, with increased poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and caspase-3/9 cleavage. MB also caused autophagy in A2780 cells, with light chain 3 (LC3)-II elevation. Inhibiting MB-induced autophagy with the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) significantly decreased apoptosis, with a reduction of growth inhibition; inhibiting MB-induced apoptosis with the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK did not decrease autophagy but elevated LC3-II levels, indicating that MB-induced autophagy is cytotoxic and may be upstream of apoptosis. Furthermore, MB increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, with activated 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), decreased mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and P70S6 kinase phosphorylation, and increased PARP and caspase-3/9 cleavage, and LC3-II elevation; treatment with the ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine and the AMPK inhibitor Compound C diminished this effect. Therefore, the ROS/AMPK/mTOR pathway mediates the effect of MB on induction of apoptosis via autophagy in human ovarian carcinoma cells. PMID:26943028

  10. Eriocalyxin B induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells through caspase- and p53-dependent pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lin; Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong ; Yue, Grace G.L.; State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong ; Lau, Clara B.S.; Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong ; Sun, Handong; Fung, Kwok Pui; Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong ; Leung, Ping Chung; State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong ; Han, Quanbin; State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; School of Chinese Medicine, The Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong ; Leung, Po Sing

    2012-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is difficult to detect early and responds poorly to chemotherapy. A breakthrough in the development of new therapeutic agents is urgently needed. Eriocalyxin B (EriB), isolated from the Isodon eriocalyx plant, is an ent-kaurane diterpenoid with promise as a broad-spectrum anti-cancer agent. The anti-leukemic activity of EriB, including the underlying mechanisms involved, has been particularly well documented. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time EriB's potent cytotoxicity against four pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines, namely PANC-1, SW1990, CAPAN-1, and CAPAN-2. The effects were comparable to that of the chemotherapeutic camptothecin (CAM), but with much lower toxicity against normal human liver WRL68 cells. EriB's cytoxicity against CAPAN-2 cells was found to involve caspase-dependent apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. Moreover, the p53 pathway was found to be activated by EriB in these cells. Furthermore, in vivo studies showed that EriB inhibited the growth of human pancreatic tumor xenografts in BALB/c nude mice without significant secondary adverse effects. These results suggest that EriB should be considered a candidate for pancreatic cancer treatment. -- Highlights: ► We study Eriocalyxin B (EriB)'s cytotoxic effects on pancreatic cancer cell lines. ► EriB inhibits cell proliferation via mediation of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. ► The effects are involved in caspase-dependent apoptosis and p53 pathway. ► In vivo study also shows EriB inhibits the growth of human pancreatic tumor. ► EriB can be a good candidate for chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer.

  11. Involvement of the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways in ultraviolet B-induced apoptosis of corneal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ubels, John L; Glupker, Courtney D; Schotanus, Mark P; Haarsma, Loren D

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this study was to elucidate the pathway by which UVB initiates efflux of K(+) and subsequently apoptosis in human corneal limbal epithelial (HCLE) cells. The initial focus of the study was on the extrinsic pathway involving Fas. HCLE cells transfected with Fas siRNA were exposed to 80-150 mJ/cm(2) UVB and incubated in culture medium with 5.5 mM K(+). Knockdown of Fas resulted in limited reduction in UVB-induced caspase-8 and -3 activity. Patch-clamp recordings showed no difference in UVB-induced normalized K(+) currents between Fas transfected and control cells. Knockdown of caspase-8 had no effect on the activation of caspase-3 following UVB exposure, while a caspase-8 inhibitor completely eliminated UVB activation of caspase-3. This suggests that caspase-8 is a robust enzyme, able to activate caspase-3 via residual caspase-8 present after knockdown, and that caspase-8 is directly involved in the UVB activation of caspase-3. Inhibition of caspase-9 significantly decreased the activation of caspases-8 and -3 in response to UVB. Knockdown of Apaf-1, required for activation of caspase-9, resulted in a significant reduction in UVB-induced activation of caspases-9, -8, and -3. Knockdown of Apaf-1 also inhibited intrinsic and UVB-induced levels of apoptosis, as determined by DNA fragmentation measured by TUNEL assay. In UVB exposed cultures treated with caspase-3 inhibitor, the percentage of apoptotic cells was reduced to control levels, confirming the necessity of caspase-3 activation in DNA fragmentation. The lack of effect of Fas knockdown on K(+) channel activation, as well as the limited effect on activation of caspases-8 and -3, strongly suggest that Fas and the extrinsic pathway is not of primary importance in the initiation of apoptosis in response to UVB in HCLE cells. Inhibition of caspase-8 and -3 activation following inhibition of caspase-9, as well as reduction in activation of caspases-9, -8, and -3 and DNA fragmentation in response to Apaf-1 knockdown support the conclusion that the intrinsic pathway is more important in UVB-induced apoptosis in HCLE cells. PMID:26559338

  12. Licochalcone B induces apoptosis of human oral squamous cell carcinoma through the extrinsic- and intrinsic-signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hana; Yoon, Goo; Shin, Jae-Cheon; Park, Seon-Min; Cho, Seung-Sik; Cho, Jin Hyoung; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Liu, Kangdong; Cho, Young Sik; Chae, Jung-Il; Shim, Jung-Hyun

    2016-04-01

    Licochalcone B (Lico B), which belongs to the retrochalcone family, is isolated from the roots of Chinese licorice. Lico B has been reported to have several other useful pharmacological properties, such as anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antioxidant, antiulcer, anticancer, and anti-metastasis activities. We elucidated the underlying mechanism by which Lico B can induce apoptosis in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Our results showed that exposure of OSCC cells (HN22 and HSC4) to Lico B significantly inhibited cell proliferation in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Lico B caused cell cycle arrest at G1 phase along with downregulation of cyclin D1 and upregulation of p21 and p27 proteins. Lico B also facilitated the diffusion of phospholipid phosphatidylserine (PS) from inner to outer leaflets of the plasma membrane with chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation, accumulated sub-G1 population in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, Lico B promoted the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which, in turn, can induce CHOP, death receptor (DR) 4 and DR5. Lico B treatment induced downregulation of anti-apoptotic proteins (Bid and Bcl-xl and Mcl-1), and up-regulation of pro-apoptotic protein (Bax). Lico B also led to the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), resulting in cytochrome c release. As can be expected from the above results, the apoptotic protease activating factor-1 (Apaf-1) and survivin were oppositely expressed in favor of apoptotic cell death. This notion was supported by the fact that Lico B activated multi-caspases with cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) protein. Therefore, it is suggested that Lico B is a promising drug for the treatment of human oral cancer via the induction of apoptotic cell death. PMID:26847145

  13. Aspafilioside B induces G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by up-regulating H-Ras and N-Ras via ERK and p38 MAPK signaling pathways in human hepatoma HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Ning, Rui; Chen, Rui-Ni; Huang, Xue-Feng; Dai, Qin-Sheng; Hu, Jin-Hua; Wang, Yu-Wen; Wu, Li-Li; Xiong, Jing; Hu, Gang; Guo, Qing-Long; Yang, Jian; Wang, Hao

    2016-05-01

    We recently establish that aspafilioside B, a steroidal saponin extracted from Asparagus filicinus, is an active cytotoxic component. However, its antitumor activity is till unknown. In this study, the anticancer effect of aspafilioside B against HCC cells and the underlying mechanisms were investigated. Our results showed that aspafilioside B inhibited the growth and proliferation of HCC cell lines. Further study revealed that aspafilioside B could significantly induce G2 phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, accompanying the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), but blocking ROS generation with N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) could not prevent G2/M arrest and apoptosis. Additionally, treatment with aspafilioside B induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 MAP kinase. Moreover, both ERK inhibitor PD98059 and p38 inhibitor SB203580 almost abolished the G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis induced by aspafilioside B, and reversed the expression of cell cycle- and apoptosis-related proteins. We also found that aspafilioside B treatment increased both Ras and Raf activation, and transfection of cells with H-Ras and N-Ras shRNA almost attenuated aspafilioside B-induced G2 phase arrest and apoptosis as well as the ERK and p38 activation. Finally, in vivo, aspafilioside B suppressed tumor growth in mouse xenograft models, and the mechanism was the same as in vitro study. Collectively, these findings indicated that aspafilioside B may up-regulate H-Ras and N-Ras, causing c-Raf phosphorylation, and lead to ERK and p38 activation, which consequently induced the G2 phase arrest and apoptosis. This study provides the evidence that aspafilioside B is a promising therapeutic agent against HCC. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25683703

  14. FAP-1-mediated activation of NF-kappaB induces resistance of head and neck cancer to Fas-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wieckowski, Eva; Atarashi, Yoshinari; Stanson, Joanna; Sato, Taka-Aki; Whiteside, Theresa L

    2007-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms responsible for tumor resistance to apoptosis often involve the Fas/FasL pathway. While squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN) express both Fas and FasL, their resistance to self-induced apoptosis or apoptosis mediated by Fas agonistic antibody (CH-11Ab) was independent of the level of Fas surface expression or the presence of soluble Fas in supernatants of primary or metastatic SCCHN cell lines. By in vitro immunoselection, using PCI-15A cell line treated with successive cycles of CH-11 Ab, Fas-resistant sublines with the parental genotype were selected. Such sublines failed to cleave caspase-8 upon Fas engagement and were resistant to CH-11 Ab, although they remained sensitive to VP-16 or staurosporin. In the presence of cycloheximide, the selected SCCHN sublines become susceptible to CH-11 Ab, and showed cleavage of caspase-8, suggesting that apoptosis resistance was mediated by an inhibitory protein(s) acting upstream of caspase-8. Overexpression of Fas-associated phosphatase 1 (FAP-1), but not cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (cFLIP) in SCCHN sublines was documented by Western blots and RT-PCR analyses. The FAP-1+ selected sublines also downregulated cell surface Fas. A high phosphorylation level of IkappaB kappa, NFkappaB activation and upregulation of Bcl-2 expression were observed in the FAP-1+ sublines. Treatment with the phosphatase inhibitor, orthovanadate, or silencing of FAP-1 with siRNA abolished their resistance to apoptosis, suggesting that FAP-1 phosphatase activity could be responsible for NF-kappaB activation and resistance of SCCHN cells to Fas-mediated apoptosis. PMID:16888780

  15. ARID3B Induces Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Mediated Apoptosis While a Novel ARID3B Splice Form Does Not Induce Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Stancy; Deneke, Victoria E.; Cowden Dahl, Karen D.

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a common occurrence in many cancers. Alternative splicing is linked with decreased apoptosis and chemoresistance in cancer cells. We previously demonstrated that ARID3B, a member of the AT-rich interactive domain (ARID) family of DNA binding proteins, is overexpressed in ovarian cancer. Therefore we wanted to assess the effect of ARID3B splice forms on cell viability. We identified a novel splice form of the ARID3B gene (designated as ARID3B Sh), which lacks the C-terminal exons 5–9 present in the full-length isoform (ARID3B Fl). ARID3B Fl is expressed in a variety of cancer cell lines. Expression of ARID3B Sh varied by cell type, but was highly expressed in most ovarian cancer lines. ARID3B is modestly transcriptionally activated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling through the PEA3 transcription factor. We further found that ARID3B Fl is predominantly nuclear but is also present at the plasma membrane and in the cytosol. Endogenous ARID3B Sh is present in nuclear fractions, yet, when overexpressed ARID3B Sh accumulates in the cytosol and membrane fractions. The differential localization of these isoforms suggests they have different functions. Importantly, ARID3B Fl overexpression results in upregulation of pro-apoptotic BIM and induces Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFα) and TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) induced cell death. The ARID3B Fl-induced genes include TNFα, TRAIL, TRADD, TNF-R2, Caspase 10 and Caspase 7. Interestingly, ARID3B Sh does not induce apoptosis or expression of these genes. ARID3B Fl induces death receptor mediated apoptosis while the novel splice form ARID3B Sh does not induce cell death. Therefore alternative splice forms of ARID3B may play different roles in ovarian cancer progression. PMID:22860069

  16. Caveolin-1-dependent and -independent uPAR signaling pathways contribute to ganglioside GT1b induced early apoptosis in A549 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jung-Hoo; Sung, Jung-Suk; Kim, Jung Min; Chung, Young-Ho; Park, Jun Soo; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Jang, Ik-Soon

    2014-01-01

    Urokinase receptor interacts with α5β1-integrin and enhances cancer cell proliferation and metastasis. Activation of α5β1-integrin requires caveolin-1 and is regulated by uPAR, which upregulates persistently the activated ERK necessary for tumor growth. In this study, we show that the ganglioside GT1b induces proapoptotic signaling through two uPAR-ERK signaling pathways in A549 lung cancer cells. GT1b downregulated the expression of α5β1 integrin, caveolin-1, fibronectin, FAK, and ERK, whereas GT1b upregulated the expression of p53 and uPAR, suggesting GT1b mediated depletion of caveolin-1 in uPAR-expressing A549 cells also disrupts uPAR/integrin complexes, resulting in downregulation of fibronectin-α5β1-integrin-ERK signaling. Following p53 siRNA treatment, FAK and ERK expression was recovered, meaning the presence of reentry uPAR-FAK-ERK signaling pathway. These findings reveal that GT1b is involved in both caveolin-1-dependent uPAR-α5β1-integrin-ERK signaling and caveolin-1-independent uPAR-FAK-ERK signaling. These results suggest a novel function of GT1b as a dual regulator of ERK by modulating caveolin-1 and p53. PMID:25520869

  17. Paeoniflorin attenuates ultraviolet B-induced apoptosis in human keratinocytes by inhibiting the ROS-p38-p53 pathway.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingwen; Wang, Shangshang; Wu, Xiao; Zuo, Fuguo; Qin, Haihong; Wu, Jinfeng

    2016-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light is one of the most harmful environmental factors that contribute to skin damage. Exposure to UV induces extensive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and results in photoaging and skin cancer development. One approach to protecting human skin against UV radiation is the use of antioxidants. In recent years, naturally occurring herbal compounds have gained considerable attention as protective agents for UV exposure. Paeoniflorin (PF) is a novel natural antioxidant, which is isolated from peony root (Radix Paeoniae Alba). The present study evaluated the protective effects of PF on UV‑induced skin damage in vitro, and demonstrated that the effects were mediated via the ROS‑p38‑p53 pathway. The results of the present study demonstrated that treatment with PF (25, 50, and 100 µM) significantly increased the percentage of viable keratinocytes after UV‑B exposure. In addition, cell death analysis indicated that PF treatment markedly reduced UV‑B‑radiation‑induced apoptosis in keratinocytes, which was accompanied by increased procaspase 3 expression and decreased cleaved caspase 3 expression. Treatment with PF markedly reduced the production of ROS, and inhibited the activation of p38 and p53 in human keratinocytes, thus suggesting that the ROS‑p38‑p53 pathway has a role in UV‑B‑induced skin damage. In conclusion, the present study reported that PF was able to attenuate UV‑B‑induced cell damage in human keratinocytes. Notably, these effects were shown to be mediated, at least in part, via inhibition of the ROS-p38-p53 pathway. PMID:26936104

  18. SPE (tm) electrolyzers for space propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shane, E. M.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on SPE electrolyzers for space propulsion are presented. Topics covered include: SPE electrochemical cell reactions; SPE fuel cell/electrolyzer features; SPE cell life capability; SPE cell voltage stability; state-of-the-art SPE cell structure; electrolysis cell stack; electrolysis system; integrated propulsion test article-electrolyzer module components; and oxygen generator module.

  19. PEM/SPE fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Grot, S.A.

    1998-01-13

    A PEM/SPE fuel cell is described including a membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) having a plurality of oriented filament embedded the face thereof for supporting the MEA and conducting current therefrom to contiguous electrode plates. 4 figs.

  20. PEM/SPE fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Grot, Stephen Andreas

    1998-01-01

    A PEM/SPE fuel cell including a membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) having a plurality of oriented filament embedded the face thereof for supporting the MEA and conducting current therefrom to contiguous electrode plates.

  1. A combination of STI571 and BCR-ABL1 siRNA with overexpressed p15INK4B induced enhanced proliferation inhibition and apoptosis in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Xia, D Y; Liu, L; Hao, M W; Liu, Q; Chen, R A; Liang, Y M

    2014-12-01

    p15INK4B, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, has been recognized as a tumor suppressor. Loss of or methylation of the p15INK4B gene in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells enhances myeloid progenitor formation from common myeloid progenitors. Therefore, we examined the effects of overexpressed p15INK4B on proliferation and apoptosis of CML cells. Overexpression of p15INK4B inhibited the growth of K562 cells by downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and cyclin D1 expression. Overexpression of p15INK4B also induced apoptosis of K562 cells by upregulating Bax expression and downregulating Bcl-2 expression. Overexpression of p15INK4B together with STI571 (imatinib) or BCR-ABL1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) also enhanced growth inhibition and apoptosis induction of K562 cells. The enhanced effect was also mediated by reduction of cyclin D1 and CDK4 and regulation of Bax and Bcl-2. In conclusion, our study may provide new insights into the role of p15INK4B in CML and a potential therapeutic target for overcoming tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance in CML. PMID:25387678

  2. Human papillomavirus type 16 E6 activates NF-kappaB, induces cIAP-2 expression, and protects against apoptosis in a PDZ binding motif-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    James, Michael A; Lee, John H; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J

    2006-06-01

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is a critical factor in the pathogenesis of most cervical cancers and some aerodigestive cancers. The HPV E6 oncoprotein from high-risk HPV types contributes to the immortalization and transformation of cells by multiple mechanisms, including degradation of p53, transcriptional activation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), and degradation of several proteins containing PDZ domains. The ability of E6 to bind PDZ domain-containing proteins is independent of p53 degradation or hTERT activation but does correlate with oncogenic potential (R. A. Watson, M. Thomas, L. Banks, and S. Roberts, J. Cell Sci. 116:4925-4934, 2003) and is essential for induction of epithelial hyperplasia in vivo (M. L. Nguyen, M. M. Nguyen, D. Lee, A. E. Griep, and P. F. Lambert, J. Virol. 77:6957-6964, 2003). In this study, we found that HPV type 16 E6 was able to activate NF-kappaB in airway epithelial cells through the induction of nuclear binding activity of p52-containing NF-kappaB complexes in a PDZ binding motif-dependent manner. Transcript accumulation for the NF-kappaB-responsive antiapoptotic gene encoding cIAP-2 and binding of nuclear factors to the proximal NF-kappaB binding site of the cIAP-2 gene promoter are induced by E6 expression. Furthermore, E6 is able to protect cells from TNF-induced apoptosis. All of these E6-dependent phenotypes are dependent on the presence of the PDZ binding motif of E6. Our results imply a role for targeting of PDZ proteins by E6 in NF-kappaB activation and protection from apoptosis in airway epithelial cells. PMID:16699010

  3. Biological Response to SPE Exposures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Kim, M.; Shinn, J. L.; Jones, T. D.; Chang, C. K.

    2004-01-01

    It has long been recognized that a single solar particle event (SPE) can produce, over a short period of time, exposures on the order of LD50 for humans under normal physiological conditions. It is further recognized that recovery from injury over the period of exposure would greatly increase the chances of survival (dose rate effects) although such effects were left unquantified. In the present report we use the bioresponse model derived from a broad range of animal and human exposure data for evaluation of troop readiness in tactical nuclear warfare to evaluate the biological risk posed by the solar event of 4 August 1972. The astronaut blood forming organ (BFO) exposure in deep space would have been 2.2 Sv (1.6 Gy) in a space suit, 1.8 Sv (1.3 Gy) in an aluminum pressure vessel, and 0.7 Sv (0.5 Gy) in an equipment room compared to an X-ray mortality threshold of 1.5 Gy (assuming high dose rate). We find BFO dose rate effectiveness factors for this SPE on the order of 3 to 4, greatly reducing the mortality risks for this event. There is an approximate 3 percent chance that an even larger event may occur for which exposures could be 2-4 times higher. Assured survival of the astronaut requires added shelter shielding and a warning system for this event. The required mass of the shelter shield can be greatly reduced by using hydrogenous materials such as polymers, water, food, and other biological materials in its construction. Limitations of the current bioresponse model arise from the exposures taking place in the microgravity environment wherein the immune system is already challenged and the effective mortality threshold may be reduced by a factor of two. Such microgravity effects could greatly affect astronaut risks.

  4. Current SPE Hydrodynamic Modeling and Path Forward

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban

    2012-08-14

    Extensive work has been conducted on SPE analysis efforts: Fault effects Non-uniform weathered layer analysis MUNROU: material library incorporation, parallelization, and development of non-locking tets Development of a unique continuum-based-visco-plastic strain-rate-dependent material model With corrected SPE data path is now set for a multipronged approach to fully understand experimental series shot effects.

  5. Recent advances in SPE (tm) water electrolyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, James F.

    1993-01-01

    A new cell structure has been introduced into the SPE Water Electrolyzer which has improved overall characteristics significantly. Weight, reliability, and efficiency are the characteristics that are improved the most, with volume having a second order improvement. This paper discusses the capabilities of the new cell structure and the impact it would have in various space applications.

  6. SPE water electrolyzers in support of the lunar outpost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, J. F.

    1992-01-01

    During the 1970s, the SPE water electrolyzer, which uses ion exchange membranes as its sole electrolyte, was developed for nuclear submarine metabolic oxygen production. These developments included SPE water electrolyzer operation at up to 3,000 psia and at current densities in excess of 1,000 amps per square foot. The SPE water electrolyzer system is now fully qualified for both the U.S. and U.K. Navies with tens of thousands of system hours accumulated at sea. During the 1980s, the basic SPE water electrolyzer cell structure developed for the Navies was incorporated into several demonstrations for NASA's Space Station Program. Among these were: the SPE regenerative fuel cell for electrical energy storage; the SPE water electrolyzer for metabolic oxygen production; and the high pressure SPE water electrolyzer for reboost propulsion reactant production. In the 1990s, one emphasis will be the development of SPE water electrolyzers for the Lunar Outposts Currently defined potential Lunar Outpost applications for the SPE water electrolyzer include: SPE water electrolyzers for metabolic oxygen and potable water production from reclaimed water; and SPE water electrolyzers operating at high pressure as part of stationary and mobile surface energy storage systems.

  7. Secondary solid-state SPE cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkow, Krystyna W.; Sammells, Anthony F.

    1987-03-01

    The possibility of using alkali-ion-conducting solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) in storage cells was investigated. Solid-state storage cells were constructed with a morphologically invariant electrode/SPE interface where SPEs based upon polyethylene oxide (PEO), PEO/polyethylene glycol mixtures, or polyphosphazenes were used. For Li(+)-conducting cells, LixWO2 was used for the negative, and TiS2 for the positive electrode; cells utilizing Na(+)-conducting SPEs contained electrodes based upon transition metals incorporated into the immobile Al(3+) lattice sites of beta double-prime alumina. The results on the current-voltage dependence and charge-discharge characterization of these cells are presented.

  8. SPE propulsion electrolyzer for NASA's integrated propulsion test article

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-08-01

    Hamilton Standard has delivered a 3000 PSI SPE Propulsion Electrolyzer Stack and Special Test Fixture to the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) Integrated Propulsion Test Article (IPTA) program in June 1990, per contract NAS9-18030. This prototype unit demonstrates the feasibility of SPE-high pressure water electrolysis for future space applications such as Space Station propulsion and Lunar/Mars energy storage. The SPE-Propulsion Electrolyzer has met or exceeded all IPTA program goals. It continues to function as the primary hydrogen and oxygen source for the IPTA test bed at the NASA/JSC Propulsion and Power Division Thermochemical Test Branch.

  9. SPE propulsion electrolyzer for NASA's integrated propulsion test article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Hamilton Standard has delivered a 3000 PSI SPE Propulsion Electrolyzer Stack and Special Test Fixture to the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) Integrated Propulsion Test Article (IPTA) program in June 1990, per contract NAS9-18030. This prototype unit demonstrates the feasibility of SPE-high pressure water electrolysis for future space applications such as Space Station propulsion and Lunar/Mars energy storage. The SPE-Propulsion Electrolyzer has met or exceeded all IPTA program goals. It continues to function as the primary hydrogen and oxygen source for the IPTA test bed at the NASA/JSC Propulsion and Power Division Thermochemical Test Branch.

  10. SPE (tm) regenerative hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells for extraterrestrial surface and microgravity applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, J. F.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on SPE regenerative hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells for extraterrestrial surface and microgravity applications are presented. Topics covered include: hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell energy storage system; electrochemical cell reactions; SPE cell voltage stability; passive water removal SPE fuel cell; fuel cell performance; SPE water electrolyzers; hydrophobic oxygen phase separator; hydrophilic/electrochemical hydrogen phase separator; and unitized regenerative fuel cell.

  11. SPE(R)-OBOGS: On-board oxygen generating sustem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, J.; Smith, W.

    1995-01-01

    Regulations require oxygen usage by commercial airline flight crews during check out and during certain aircraft configurations. This oxygen is drawn from a high pressure onboard pressure cylinder storage system. In a typical aircraft oxygen cylinder removal for oxygen ground servicing is conducted every 4 to 6 weeks. An on board oxygen generating system has been developed to eliminate the need for oxygen ground servicing. The SPE-OBOGS supplies oxygen during flight in a 'trickle charge' mode to replenish the consumed oxygen at pressures up to 1850 psi. The Electrochemical cell stack is the fundamental SPE-OBOGS system component. The same basic proton exchange membrane technology, previously used for the Gemini program fuel cells and currently used in nuclear submarines as oxygen generators, is used in the SPE-OBOGS. An in-serivce evaluation of the SPE-OBOGS is in the planning stage and a zero gravity version is being promoted for on orbit space suit oxygen system recharge. Summary results of the SPE-OBOGS development will be addressed.

  12. Theoretical performance of hydrogen-bromine rechargeable SPE fuel cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savinell, Robert F.; Fritts, S. D.

    1987-01-01

    A mathematical model was formulated to describe the performance of a hydrogen-bromine fuel cell. Porous electrode theory was applied to the carbon felt flow-by electrode and was coupled to theory describing the solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) system. Parametric studies using the numerical solution to this model were performed to determine the effect of kinetic, mass transfer, and design parameters on the performance of the fuel cell. The results indicate that the cell performance is most sensitive to the transport properties of the SPE membrane. The model was also shown to be a useful tool for scale-up studies.

  13. Spermiogenesis initiation in Caenorhabditis elegans involves a casein kinase 1 encoded by the spe-6 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Muhlrad, Paul J; Ward, Samuel

    2002-01-01

    Immature spermatids from Caenorhabditis elegans are stimulated by an external activation signal to reorganize their membranes and cytoskeleton to form crawling spermatozoa. This rapid maturation, termed spermiogenesis, occurs without any new gene expression. To better understand this signal transduction pathway, we isolated suppressors of a mutation in the spe-27 gene, which is part of the pathway. The suppressors bypass the requirement for spe-27, as well as three other genes that act in this pathway, spe-8, spe-12, and spe-29. Eighteen of the suppressor mutations are new alleles of spe-6, a previously identified gene required for an early stage of spermatogenesis. The original spe-6 mutations are loss-of-function alleles that prevent major sperm protein (MSP) assembly in the fibrous bodies of spermatocytes and arrest development in meiosis. We have isolated the spe-6 gene and find that it encodes a predicted protein-serine/threonine kinase in the casein kinase 1 family. The suppressor mutations appear to be reduction-of-function alleles. We propose a model whereby SPE-6, in addition to its early role in spermatocyte development, inhibits spermiogenesis until the activation signal is received. The activation signal is transduced through SPE-8, SPE-12, SPE-27, and SPE-29 to relieve SPE-6 repression, thus triggering the formation of crawling spermatozoa. PMID:12019230

  14. Enniatin B-induced cell death and inflammatory responses in RAW 267.4 murine macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Gammelsrud, A.; Department of Air Pollution and Noise, Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, N-0403 Oslo ; Solhaug, A.; Dendelé, B.; Sandberg, W.J.; Ivanova, L.; Kocbach Bølling, A.; Lagadic-Gossmann, D.; Refsnes, M.; Becher, R.; Eriksen, G.; Holme, J.A.

    2012-05-15

    The mycotoxin enniatin B (EnnB) is predominantly produced by species of the Fusarium genera, and often found in grain. The cytotoxic effect of EnnB has been suggested to be related to its ability to form ionophores in cell membranes. The present study examines the effects of EnnB on cell death, differentiation, proliferation and pro-inflammatory responses in the murine monocyte–macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. Exposure to EnnB for 24 h caused an accumulation of cells in the G0/G1-phase with a corresponding decrease in cyclin D1. This cell cycle-arrest was possibly also linked to the reduced cellular ability to capture and internalize receptors as illustrated by the lipid marker ganglioside GM1. EnnB also increased the number of apoptotic, early apoptotic and necrotic cells, as well as cells with elongated spindle-like morphology. The Neutral Red assay indicated that EnnB induced lysosomal damage; supported by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showing accumulation of lipids inside the lysosomes forming lamellar structures/myelin bodies. Enhanced levels of activated caspase-1 were observed after EnnB exposure and the caspase-1 specific inhibitor ZYVAD-FMK reduced EnnB-induced apoptosis. Moreover, EnnB increased the release of interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) in cells primed with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and this response was reduced by both ZYVAD-FMK and the cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074Me. In conclusion, EnnB was found to induce cell cycle arrest, cell death and inflammation. Caspase-1 appeared to be involved in the apoptosis and release of IL-1β and possibly activation of the inflammasome through lysosomal damage and leakage of cathepsin B. -- Highlights: ► The mycotoxin EnnB induced cell cycle arrest, cell death and inflammation. ► The G0/G1-arrest was linked to a reduced ability to internalize receptors. ► EnnB caused lysosomal damage, leakage of cathepsin B and caspase-1 cleavage. ► Caspase-1 was partly involved in both apoptosis and release of IL-1β. ► There was a synergistic action between EnnB and bacterial LPS.

  15. Proceedings of the 1991 SPE gas technology symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the 1991 SPE Gas Technology Symposium. Included are the following papers: Maximizing gas recovery from strong water-drive reservoirs, Measurement of coal cleat porosity and relative permeability characteristics, recent developments in gas dehydration and hydrate inhibition.

  16. Project "Getting Up to Spe-ed": Preliminary Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Katharine D.; Welton, Evonn N.

    This report discusses preliminary findings of Project "Getting Up to Spe-ed", a project designed to ensure undergraduate education students are well versed in inclusionary practices and endowed with the skills necessary to make appropriate modifications, to inform undergraduate faculty of the latest rules/regulations and trends regarding students…

  17. Assay development for the discovery of semaphorin 3B inducing agents from natural product sources.

    PubMed

    Yong, Yeonjoong; Pan, Li; Ren, Yulin; Fatima, Nighat; Ahmed, Safia; Chang, Leng Chee; Zhang, Xiaoli; Kinghorn, A Douglas; Swanson, Steven M; Carcache de Blanco, Esperanza J

    2014-10-01

    Semaphorins are a class of membrane-bound and secreted proteins. They have been found to regulate basic cell functions such as axonal growth cone guidance and recent studies have focused on their effect on tumor progression. Semaphorin 3B (Sema3B) particularly is a secreted protein that has been known to modulate proliferation and apoptosis, processes that are critical for tumor progression and development. In spite of its importance, there is yet no high-throughput screening assay available to detect or quantify the expression of Sema3B for natural product anticancer drug discovery purposes. Therefore, the development of a new high-throughput bioassay for the discovery of Sema3B inducing agents from natural product sources is described herein. A wide variety of pure compounds and extracts from plants and microorganisms has been found suitable for screening using this Sema3B assay to detect and quantify the effect of Sema3B inducing agents and thereby identify new selective bioactive Sema3B lead compounds for anticancer drug discovery and development. Also, this new bioassay procedure is based on a high-throughput platform using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that involves the optimization of sensitivity and selectivity levels as well as accuracy, reproducibility, robustness, and cost effectiveness. PMID:25016954

  18. Assay Development for the Discovery of Semaphorin 3B Inducing Agents from Natural Product Sources

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Yeonjoong; Pan, Li; Ren, Yulin; Fatima, Nighat; Ahmed, Safia; Chang, Leng Chee; Zhang, Xiaoli; Kinghorn, A. Douglas; Swanson, Steven M.; Carcache de Blanco, Esperanza J.

    2014-01-01

    Semaphorins are a class of membrane-bound and secreted proteins. They have been found to regulate basic cell functions such as axonal growth cone guidance and recent studies have focused on their effect on tumor progression. Semaphorin 3B (Sema 3B) particularly is a secreted protein that has been known to modulate proliferation and apoptosis, processes that are critical for tumor progression and development. In spite of its importance, there is yet no high-throughput screening assay available to detect or quantify the expression of Sema 3B for natural product anticancer drug discovery purposes. Therefore, the development of a new high-throughput bioassay for the discovery of Sema 3B inducing agents from natural product sources is described herein. A wide variety of pure compounds and extracts from plants and microorganisms has been found suitable for screening using this Sema 3B assay to detect and quantify the effect of Sema 3B inducing agents and thereby identify new selective bioactive Sema 3B lead compounds for anticancer drug discovery and development. Also, this new bioassay procedure is based on a high-throughput platform using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that involves the optimization of sensitivity and selectivity levels as well as accuracy, reproducibility, robustness, and cost effectiveness. PMID:25016954

  19. SPE (tm) water electrolyzers in support of mission from planet Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    During the 1970's, the Solid Polymer Electrolyte (SPE) water electrolyzer, which uses ion exchange membranes as its sole electrolyte, was developed for nuclear submarine metabolic oxygen production. SPE water electrolyzer developments included operation at up to 3,000 psia and at current densities in excess of 1,000 amps per square foot. The SPE water electrolyzer system has accumulated tens of thousands of system hours with the Navies of both the United States and the United Kingdom. During the 1980's, the basic SPE water electrolyzer cell structure developed for the Navies was incorporated into several demonstrators for NASA's Space Station Program. Among these were: (1) the SPE regenerative fuel cell for electrical energy storage; (2) the SPE water electrolyzer for metabolic oxygen production; and (3) the high pressure SPE water electrolyzer for reboost propellant production. In the 1990's, emphasis will be the development of SPE water electrolyzers for Mission from Planet Earth. Currently defined potential applications for the SPE water electrolyzer include: (1) SPE water electrolyzers operating at high pressure as part of a regenerative fuel cell extraterrestrial surface energy storage system; (2) SPE water electrolyzers for propellant production from extraterrestrial indigenous materials; and (3) SPE water electrolyzers for metabolic oxygen and potable water production from reclaimed water.

  20. Data Release Report for Source Physics Experiments 2 and 3 (SPE-2 and SPE-3) Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, Margaret; Obi, Curtis

    2015-04-30

    The second Source Physics Experiment shot (SPE-2) was conducted in Nevada on October 25, 2011, at 1900:00.011623 Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). The explosive source was 997 kilograms (kg) trinitrotoluene (TNT) equivalent of sensitized heavy ammonium fuel oil (SHANFO) detonated at a depth of 45.7 meters (m). The third Source Physics Experiment shot (SPE-3) was conducted in Nevada on July 24, 2012, at 1800:00.44835 GMT. The explosive source was 905 kg TNT equivalent of SHANFO detonated at a depth of 45.8 m. Both shots were recorded by an extensive set of instrumentation that includes sensors both at near-field (less than 100 m) and far-field (100 m or greater) distances. The near-field instruments consisted of three-component accelerometers deployed in boreholes at 15, 46, and 55 m depths around the shot and a set of single-component vertical accelerometers on the surface. The far-field network was composed of a variety of seismic and acoustic sensors, including short-period geophones, broadband seismometers, three-component accelerometers, and rotational seismometers at distances of 100 m to 25 kilometers. This report coincides with the release of these data for analysts and organizations that are not participants in this program. This report describes the second and third Source Physics Experiment shots and the various types of near-field and farfield data that are available.This revised document includes reports on baseline shift corrections for the SPE-2 and SPE-3 shots that were missing from the original January 2015 version.

  1. Spermidine synthase of Escherichia coli: localization of the speE gene.

    PubMed Central

    Tabor, C W; Tabor, H; Xie, Q W

    1986-01-01

    We have obtained Escherichia coli mutants lacking spermidine synthase (putrescine aminopropyltransferase) and have found that the mutated gene (speE) is located immediately upstream from the gene coding for S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (speD); these genes are located at 2.7 minutes on the E. coli chromosome. Both genes are present in a 1795-base-pair fragment of E. coli DNA that was cloned into pBR322. Deletion of 105 bases upstream of speE caused a coordinate loss of both activities, indicating that speE and speD constitute a single operon. speE and speD have also been cloned separately in a high-expression vector; strains carrying these plasmids overproduce the respective enzymes. PMID:3526348

  2. SPE-NMR metabolite sub-profiling of urine.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Doris M; Spiesser, Laura; Garnier, Maxime; de Roo, Niels; van Dorsten, Ferdi; Hollebrands, Boudewijn; van Velzen, Ewoud; Draijer, Richard; van Duynhoven, John

    2012-11-01

    NMR-based metabolite profiling of urine is a fast and reproducible method for detection of numerous metabolites with diverse chemical properties. However, signal overlap in the (1)H NMR profiles of human urine may hamper quantification and identification of metabolites. Therefore, a new method has been developed using automated solid-phase extraction (SPE) combined with NMR metabolite profiling. SPE-NMR of urine resulted in three fractions with complementary and reproducible sub-profiles. The sub-profile from the wash fraction (100 % water) contained polar metabolites; that from the first eluted fraction (10 % methanol-90 % water) semi-polar metabolites; and that from the second eluted fraction (100 % methanol) aromatic metabolites. The method was validated by analysis of urine samples collected from a crossover human nutritional intervention trial in which healthy volunteers consumed capsules containing a polyphenol-rich mixture of red wine and grape juice extract (WGM), the same polyphenol mixture dissolved in a soy drink (WGM_Soy), or a placebo (PLA), over a period of five days. Consumption of WGM clearly increased urinary excretion of 4-hydroxyhippuric acid, hippuric acid, 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, homovanillic acid, and 3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-3-hydroxypropionic acid. However, there was no difference between the excreted amounts of these metabolites after consumption of WGM or WGM_Soy, indicating that the soy drink is a suitable carrier for WGM polyphenols. Interestingly, WGM_Soy induced a significant increase in excretion of cis-aconitate compared with WGM and PLA, suggesting a higher demand on the tricarboxylic acid cycle. In conclusion, SPE-NMR metabolite sub-profiling is a reliable and improved method for quantification and identification of metabolites in urine to discover dietary effects and markers of phytochemical exposure. PMID:22932811

  3. SPE OBOGS: On-board Oxygen Generating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, William F.; McElroy, James F.

    1996-01-01

    Regulations require oxygen usage by commercial airliners during check out and during certain aircraft configurations. This oxygen is drawn from a high pressure on-board cylinder storage system. In a typical aircraft, oxygen cylinder removal for oxygen ground servicing is conducted every 4 to 6 weeks. In the early 1990's, it was recognized that an on-board oxygen generating system (OBOGS) could provide an economic advantage for the airlines. An in-flight service evaluation (ISE) of the SPE-OBOGS by United Technologies Corporate is in the planning stage.

  4. NEAR FIELD MODELING OF SPE1 EXPERIMENT AND PREDICTION OF THE SECOND SOURCE PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS (SPE2)

    SciTech Connect

    Antoun, T; Xu, H; Vorobiev, O; Lomov, I

    2011-10-20

    Motion along joints and fractures in the rock has been proposed as one of the sources of near-source shear wave generation, and demonstrating the validity of this hypothesis is a focal scientific objective of the source physics experimental campaign in the Climax Stock granitic outcrop. A modeling effort has been undertaken by LLNL to complement the experimental campaign, and over the long term provide a validated computation capability for the nuclear explosion monitoring community. The approach involves performing the near-field nonlinear modeling with hydrodynamic codes (e.g., GEODYN, GEODYN-L), and the far-field seismic propagation with an elastic wave propagation code (e.g., WPP). the codes will be coupled together to provide a comprehensive source-to-sensor modeling capability. The technical approach involves pre-test predictions of each of the SPE experiments using their state of the art modeling capabilities, followed by code improvements to alleviate deficiencies identified in the pre-test predictions. This spiral development cycle wherein simulations are used to guide experimental design and the data from the experiment used to improve the models is the most effective approach to enable a transition from the descriptive phenomenological models in current use to the predictive, hybrid physics models needed for a science-based modeling capability for nuclear explosion monitoring. The objective of this report is to describe initial results of non-linear motion predictions of the first two SPE shots in the Climax Stock: a 220-lb shot at a depth of 180 ft (SPE No.1), and a 2570-lb shot at a depth of 150 ft (SPE No.2). The simulations were performed using the LLNL ensemble granite model, a model developed to match velocity and displacement attenuation from HARDHAT, PILE DRIVER, and SHOAL, as well as Russian and French nuclear test data in granitic rocks. This model represents the state of the art modeling capabilities as they existed when the SPE campaign was launched in 2010, and the simulation results presented here will establish a baseline that will be used for gauging progress as planned modeling improvements are implemented during the remainder of the SPE program. The initial simulations were performed under 2D axisymmetric conditions assuming the geologic medium to be a homogeneous half space. However, logging data obtained from the emplacement hole reveal two major faults that intersect the borehole at two different depth intervals (NSTec report, 2011) and four major joint sets. To evaluate the effect of these discrete structures on the wave forms generated they have performed 2D and 3D analysis with a Lagrangian hydrocode, GEODYN-L that shares the same material models with GEODYN but can explicitly take joints and fault into consideration. They discuss results obtained using these two different approaches in this report.

  5. SPE-8, a protein-tyrosine kinase, localizes to the spermatid cell membrane through interaction with other members of the SPE-8 group spermatid activation signaling pathway in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The SPE-8 group gene products transduce the signal for spermatid activation initiated by extracellular zinc in C. elegans. Mutations in the spe-8 group genes result in hermaphrodite-derived spermatids that cannot activate to crawling spermatozoa, although spermatids from mutant males activate through a pathway induced by extracellular TRY-5 protease present in male seminal fluid. Results Here, we identify SPE-8 as a member of a large family of sperm-expressed non-receptor-like protein-tyrosine kinases. A rescuing SPE-8::GFP translational fusion reporter localizes to the plasma membrane in all spermatogenic cells from the primary spermatocyte stage through spermatids. Once spermatids become activated to spermatozoa, the reporter moves from the plasma membrane to the cytoplasm. Mutations in the spe-8 group genes spe-12, spe-19, and spe-27 disrupt localization of the reporter to the plasma membrane, while localization appears near normal in a spe-29 mutant background. Conclusions These results suggest that the SPE-8 group proteins form a functional complex localized at the plasma membrane, and that SPE-8 is correctly positioned only when all members of the SPE-8 group are present, with the possible exception of SPE-29. Further, SPE-8 is released from the membrane when the activation signal is transduced into the spermatid. PMID:25022984

  6. Data Release Report for Source Physics Experiments 2 and 3 (SPE-2 and SPE-3) Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, Margaret; Obi, Curtis

    2015-01-26

    The second Source Physics Experiment shot (SPE-2) was conducted in Nevada on October 25, 2011, at 1900:00.011623 Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). The explosive source was 997 kilograms (kg) trinitrotoluene (TNT) equivalent of sensitized heavy ammonium fuel oil (SHANFO) detonated at a depth of 45.7 meters (m). The third Source Physics Experiment shot (SPE-3) was conducted in Nevada on July 24, 2012, at 1800:00.44835 GMT. The explosive source was 905 kg TNT equivalent of SHANFO detonated at a depth of 45.8 m. Both shots were recorded by an extensive set of instrumentation that includes sensors both at near-field (less than 100 m) and far-field (100 m or greater) distances. The near-field instruments consisted of three-component accelerometers deployed in boreholes at 15, 46, and 55 m depths around the shot and a set of single-component vertical accelerometers on the surface. The far-field network was composed of a variety of seismic and acoustic sensors, including short-period geophones, broadband seismometers, three-component accelerometers, and rotational seismometers at distances of 100 m to 25 kilometers. This report coincides with the release of these data for analysts and organizations that are not participants in this program. This report describes the second and third Source Physics Experiment shots and the various types of near-field and far-field data that are available.

  7. Premature Sperm Activation and Defective Spermatogenesis Caused by Loss of spe-46 Function in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Liau, Wei-Siang; Nasri, Ubaydah; Elmatari, Daniel; Rothman, Jason; LaMunyon, Craig W.

    2013-01-01

    Given limited resources for motility, sperm cell activation must be precisely timed to ensure the greatest likelihood of fertilization. Like those of most species, the sperm of C. elegans become active only after encountering an external signaling molecule. Activation coincides with spermiogenesis, the final step in spermatogenesis, when the spherical spermatid undergoes wholesale reorganization to produce a pseudopod. Here, we describe a gene involved in sperm activation, spe-46. This gene was identified in a suppressor screen of spe-27(it132ts), a sperm-expressed gene whose product functions in the transduction of the spermatid activation signal. While spe-27(it132ts) worms are sterile at 25°C, the spe-46(hc197)I; spe-27(it132ts)IV double mutants regain partial fertility. Single nucleotide polymorphism mapping, whole genome sequencing, and transformation rescue were employed to identify the spe-46 coding sequence. It encodes a protein with seven predicted transmembrane domains but with no other predicted functional domains or homology outside of nematodes. Expression is limited to spermatogenic tissue, and a transcriptional GFP fusion shows expression corresponds with the onset of the pachytene stage of meiosis. The spe-46(hc197) mutation bypasses the need for the activation signal; mutant sperm activate prematurely without an activation signal in males, and mutant males are sterile. In an otherwise wild-type genome, the spe-46(hc197) mutation induces a sperm defective phenotype. In addition to premature activation, spe-46(hc197) sperm exhibit numerous defects including aneuploidy, vacuolization, protruding spikes, and precocious fusion of membranous organelles. Hemizygous worms [spe-46(hc197)/mnDf111] are effectively sterile. Thus, spe-46 appears to be involved in the regulation of spermatid activation during spermiogenesis, with the null phenotype being an absence of functional sperm and hypomorphic phenotypes being premature spermatid activation and numerous sperm cell defects. PMID:23483899

  8. Method of making MEA for PEM/SPE fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Hulett, Jay S.

    2000-01-01

    A method of making a membrane-electrode-assembly (MEA) for a PEM/SPE fuel cell comprising applying a slurry of electrode-forming material directly onto a membrane-electrolyte film. The slurry comprises a liquid vehicle carrying catalyst particles and a binder for the catalyst particles. The membrane-electrolyte is preswollen by contact with the vehicle before the electrode-forming slurry is applied to the membrane-electrolyte. The swollen membrane-electrolyte is constrained against shrinking in the "x" and "y" directions during drying. Following assembly of the fuel cell, the MEA is rehydrated inside the fuel cell such that it swells in the "z" direction for enhanced electrical contact with contiguous electrically conductive components of the fuel cell.

  9. SPeNSE: Study of Personnel Needs in Special Education. Final Report of the Paperwork Substudy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Elaine; Chen, Liwan; Schroll, Karen; Klein, Sheri

    This report presents findings from the Paperwork Substudy of the Study of Personnel Needs in Special Education (SPeNSE), which explores issues of teacher quality. In the Paperwork Substudy, researchers surveyed a subsample of special education teachers (n=972) who completed the original SPeNSE interview to collect more detailed information about…

  10. Solid Polymer Electrolyte (SPE) fuel cell technology, program review, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of the solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) fuel cell program is to advance the SPE fuel cell technology in four target areas. These areas are: (1) reduced fuel cell costs; (2) reduced fuel cell weight; (3) improved fuel cell efficiency; and (4) increased systems compatibility.

  11. Osteopontin Facilitates Ultraviolet B-induced Squamous Cell Carcinoma Development

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pi-Ling; Hsieh, Yu-Hua; Wang, Chao-Cheng; Juliana, M. Margaret; Tsuruta, Yuko; Timares, Laura; Elmets, Craig; Ho, Kang-Jey

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteopontin (OPN) is a matricellular glycoprotein that is markedly expressed in cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (cSCCs) and in actinic keratoses implicating its role in photocarcinogenesis. Objective To determine whether OPN facilitates the development of cSCC and its function. Methods cSCCs development was compared between wild-type (WT) and OPN-null mice subjected to UVB irradiation for 43 weeks. UVB-induced OPN expression was determined by Western blot, immunoprecipitation, ELISA, and semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Epidermal layer and TUNEL analyses assessed if OPN mediates UVB-induced epidermal hyperplasia or suppresses UVB-induced apoptosis of basal keratinocytes, respectively. In vitro experiments determined whether OPN enhances cell survival of UVB-induced apoptosis and its potential mechanisms. Immunohistochemical analyses of epidermis assessed the expression of CD44 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK), molecules that mediate OPN survival function. Results Compared to female WT mice, OPN-null mice did not develop cSCCs. UVB irradiation stimulated OPN protein expression in the dorsal skin by 11 h and remains high at 24 to 48h.OPN did not mediate UVB-induced epidermal hyperplasia; instead, it protected basal keratinocytes from undergoing apoptosis upon UVB exposure. Likewise, the addition of OPN suppressed UVB-induced OPN-null cSCC cell apoptosis, the activation of caspase-9 activity, and increased phosphorylation of FAK at Y397. Furthermore, the expression of CD44 and FAK in WT mice epidermis was greater than that of OPN-null mice prior to and during early acute UVB exposure. Conclusion These data support the hypothesis that chronic UVB-induced OPN expression protects the survival of initiated basal keratinocytes and, consequently, facilitates cSCC develop. PMID:24888687

  12. SPE-39 Family Proteins Interact with the HOPS Complex and Function in Lysosomal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guang-dan; Salazar, Gloria; Zlatic, Stephanie A.; Fiza, Babar; Doucette, Michele M.; Heilman, Craig J.; Levey, Allan I.

    2009-01-01

    Yeast and animal homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting (HOPS) complexes contain conserved subunits, but HOPS-mediated traffic in animals might require additional proteins. Here, we demonstrate that SPE-39 homologues, which are found only in animals, are present in RAB5-, RAB7-, and RAB11-positive endosomes where they play a conserved role in lysosomal delivery and probably function via their interaction with the core HOPS complex. Although Caenorhabditis elegans spe-39 mutants were initially identified as having abnormal vesicular biogenesis during spermatogenesis, we show that these mutants also have disrupted processing of endocytosed proteins in oocytes and coelomocytes. C. elegans SPE-39 interacts in vitro with both VPS33A and VPS33B, whereas RNA interference of VPS33B causes spe-39–like spermatogenesis defects. The human SPE-39 orthologue C14orf133 also interacts with VPS33 homologues and both coimmunoprecipitates and cosediments with other HOPS subunits. SPE-39 knockdown in cultured human cells altered the morphology of syntaxin 7-, syntaxin 8-, and syntaxin 13-positive endosomes. These effects occurred concomitantly with delayed mannose 6-phosphate receptor-mediated cathepsin D delivery and degradation of internalized epidermal growth factor receptors. Our findings establish that SPE-39 proteins are a previously unrecognized regulator of lysosomal delivery and that C. elegans spermatogenesis is an experimental system useful for identifying conserved regulators of metazoan lysosomal biogenesis. PMID:19109425

  13. The Caenorhabditis elegans spe-39 gene is required for intracellular membrane reorganization during spermatogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guang-Dan; L'Hernault, Steven W

    2003-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans spermatid formation involves asymmetric partitioning of cytoplasm during the second meiotic division. This process is mediated by specialized ER/Golgi-derived fibrous body-membranous organelles (FB-MOs), which have a fibrous body (FB) composed of bundled major sperm protein filaments and a vesicular membranous organelle (MO). spe-39 mutant spermatocytes complete meiosis but do not usually form spermatids. Ultrastructural examination of spe-39 spermatocytes reveals that MOs are absent, while FBs are disorganized and not surrounded by the membrane envelope usually observed in wild type. Instead, spe-39 spermatocytes contain many small vesicles with internal membranes, suggesting they are related to MOs. The spe-39 gene was identified and it encodes a novel hydrophilic protein. Immunofluorescence with a specific SPE-39 antiserum reveals that it is distributed through much of the cytoplasm and not specifically associated with FB-MOs in spermatocytes and spermatids. The spe-39 gene has orthologs in Drosophila melanogaster and humans but no homolog was identified in the yeast genome. This suggests that the specialized membrane biogenesis steps that occur during C. elegans spermatogenesis are part of a conserved process that requires SPE-39 homologs in other metazoan cell types. PMID:14504223

  14. SPE for the simultaneous determination of various isothiocyanates.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Eli Adjélé; Bindler, Françoise; Marchioni, Eric; Bergaentzlé, Martine; Benrabah, Tamime; Ennahar, Saïd

    2012-12-01

    Several SPE sorbents were investigated for the extraction of a group of chemically diverse isothiocyanates (ITCs). They included bonded silica, carbon-based, and polymer-based sorbents with various functional groups. Results showed large differences in the ability of these sorbents to simultaneously extract ITCs from standard solutions. Recovery rates were on average the highest with divinylbenzene (DVB) based polymeric sorbents, especially with a DVB/N-vinylpyrrolidone copolymer that had recovery rates ranging between 86.7 and 95.6%. These sorbents achieved the most balanced extraction efficiency between aliphatic and aromatic, polar, and nonpolar ITCs. With graphitized carbon, C(18)-bonded silica, and amide-containing sorbent, recovery levels were higher for the two least polar aromatic ITCs (benzyl ITC and phenylethyl ITC), whereas for the polar aliphatic ITCs levels were the lowest. The least retained one, was methyl ITC that is the most polar with recoveries between 0 and 31.5%. The presence of amide groups, especially in a polyamide sorbent, appeared to be particularly unsuitable for the extraction of aliphatic ITCs. A copolymer made up of DVB and N-vinylpyrrolidone was therefore shown to be the most suited for the extraction of both aliphatic and aromatic ITCs. PMID:23109492

  15. Pre-shot simulations of far-field ground motion for the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) Explosions at the Climax Stock, Nevada National Security Site: SPE2

    SciTech Connect

    Mellors, R J; Rodgers, A; Walter, W; Ford, S; Xu, H; Matzel, E; Myers, S; Petersson, N A; Sjogreen, B; Hauk, T; Wagoner, J

    2011-10-18

    The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is planning a 1000 kg (TNT equivalent) shot (SPE2) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) in a granite borehole at a depth (canister centroid) of 45 meters. This shot follows an earlier shot of 100 kg in the same borehole at a depth 60 m. Surrounding the shotpoint is an extensive array of seismic sensors arrayed in 5 radial lines extending out 2 km to the north and east and approximately 10-15 to the south and west. Prior to SPE1, simulations using a finite difference code and a 3D numerical model based on the geologic setting were conducted, which predicted higher amplitudes to the south and east in the alluvium of Yucca Flat along with significant energy on the transverse components caused by scattering within the 3D volume along with some contribution by topographic scattering. Observations from the SPE1 shot largely confirmed these predictions although the ratio of transverse energy relative to the vertical and radial components was in general larger than predicted. A new set of simulations has been conducted for the upcoming SPE2 shot. These include improvements to the velocity model based on SPE1 observations as well as new capabilities added to the simulation code. The most significant is the addition of a new source model within the finite difference code by using the predicted ground velocities from a hydrodynamic code (GEODYN) as driving condition on the boundaries of a cube embedded within WPP which provides a more sophisticated source modeling capability linked directly to source site materials (e.g. granite) and type and size of source. Two sets of SPE2 simulations are conducted, one with a GEODYN source and 3D complex media (no topography node spacing of 5 m) and one with a standard isotropic pre-defined time function (3D complex media with topography, node spacing of 5 m). Results were provided as time series at specific points corresponding to sensor locations for both translational (x,y,z) and rotational components. Estimates of spectral scaling for SPE2 are provided using a modified version of the Mueller-Murphy model. An estimate of expected aftershock probabilities were also provided, based on the methodology of Ford and Walter, [2010].

  16. IRTF SpeX Observations of Orbital Object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckalew, B.; Abercromby, K.; Cowardin, H.

    Presented herein are the results of the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) spectral observations of orbiting objects taken between 2006-2008. The data collected using the SpeX infrared spectrograph cover the wavelength range 1-8 ?m. Overall, data were collected on twenty different orbiting objects at or near the geosynchronous (GEO) regime. Four of the objects were controlled spacecraft, seven were non-controlled spacecraft, five were rocket bodies, and the final four were cataloged as debris pieces. The remotely collected data are compared to the laboratory-collected reflectance data on typical spacecraft materials thereby general materials are identified but not specific types. These results highlight the usefulness of observations in the infrared focusing on features from hydrocarbons due to paint, silicon, and the beginning of thermal emission from the debris itself. The spacecraft, both the controlled and non-controlled, show distinct features due to solar panels while the rocket bodies do not. The variations in signature between the types of rocket bodies show a presence of metals instead of solar panels showing that one can distinguish most spacecraft from rocket bodies through the infrared spectrum analysis. Finally, the debris pieces tend to show featureless, dark spectra. These results show that the laboratory data in its current state give an excellent idea as to the materials on the surface of the objects. Further remote data collection as well as updating the models to include noise, surface roughness, and material degradation is necessary to make a better assessment of material types. However, based on the current state of the comparison between the observations and the laboratory data, infrared spectroscopic data are adequate to classify objects in GEO as spacecraft, rocket bodies, or debris.

  17. SPE (trademark) Oxygen Generator Assembly (OGA). (Refurbishment of the technology demonstrator LFSPE oxygen generation subsystem)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    The SPE Oxygen Generator Assembly (OGA) has been modified to correct operational deficiencies present in the original system, and to effect changes to the system hardware and software such that its operating conditions are consistent with the latest configuration requirements for the International Space Station Alpha (ISSA). The effectiveness of these changes has recently been verified through a comprehensive test program which saw the SPE OGA operate for over 740 hours at various test conditions, including over 690 hours, or approximately 460 cycles, simulating the orbit of the space station. This report documents the changes made to the SPE OGA, presents and discusses the test results from the acceptance test program, and provides recommendations for additional development activities pertinent to evolution of the SPE OGA to a flight configuration. Copies of the test data from the acceptance test program are provided with this report on 3.5 inch diskettes in self-extracting archive files.

  18. Neuropeptide B Induces Slow Wave Sleep in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hirashima, Noriko; Tsunematsu, Tomomi; Ichiki, Kanako; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Kilduff, Thomas S.; Yamanaka, Akihiro

    2011-01-01

    Study Objective: Neuropeptide B (NPB) and neuropeptide W (NPW) are two recently identified neuropeptides that act as endogenous ligands to orphan G protein coupled receptors, GPR7 and GPR8. In rodents, the GPR8 ortholog is absent and both NPB and NPW function exclusively through GPR7. Although NPB and NPW are implicated in the regulation of feeding behavior, endocrine function, and pain sensation, their physiological role is incompletely understood. Design: NPB or saline was administered into the lateral ventricle of mice during both the light and dark periods. In separate experiments, spontaneous locomotor activity or EEG and EMG were recorded after intracerebroventricular (i.c.v). injection. To confirm the involvement of GPR7 in NPB-induced responses, GPR7 knockout mice were also subjected to i.c.v. injections. Measurements and Results: NPB injections reduced locomotor activity during the dark period, but not during the light period. EEG and EMG recordings in freely moving mice revealed that NPB injection decreased the time spent in the waking state and increased the time spent in slow wave sleep (SWS) during the dark period. The time spent in paradoxical sleep was unaffected. The spectral power of NPB-induced SWS was indistinguishable from that of physiological SWS. The NPB-induced increase in SWS was not observed in GPR7 knockout mice. Conclusion: These results suggest that NPB induced physiological SWS through GPR7 and that NPB and GPR7 may have a role in modulating the occurrence of sleep and wakefulness. Citation: Hirashima N; Tsunematsu T; Ichiki K; Tanaka H; Kilduff TS; Yamanaka A. Neuropeptide B induces slow wave sleep in mice. SLEEP 2011;34(1):31-37. PMID:21203369

  19. Characterization of plasma protein binding dissociation with online SPE-HPLC

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Fan, Yiran; Wang, Yunlong; Lu, Yaxin; Yin, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    A novel parameter of relative recovery (Rre) was defined and determined by online SPE-HPLC to characterize plasma protein binding (PPB) kinetics of highly plasma binding drugs. The proportional relationship of Rre with koff of PPB has been established with a new SPE model. A rapid, easy to use method could potentially be used to categorize PK properties of the drug candidates in the decision process of drug discovery and development. PMID:26460813

  20. Vps33b pathogenic mutations preferentially affect VIPAS39/SPE-39-positive endosomes.

    PubMed

    Tornieri, Karine; Zlatic, Stephanie A; Mullin, Ariana P; Werner, Erica; Harrison, Robert; L'hernault, Steven W; Faundez, Victor

    2013-12-20

    Mutations in Vps33 isoforms cause pigment dilution in mice (Vps33a, buff) and Drosophila (car) and the neurogenic arthrogryposis, renal dysfunction and cholestasis syndrome in humans (ARC1, VPS33B). The later disease is also caused by mutations in VIPAS39, (Vps33b interacting protein, apical-basolateral polarity regulator, SPE-39 homolog; ARC2), a protein that interacts with the HOmotypic fusion and Protein Sorting (HOPS) complex, a tether necessary for endosome-lysosome traffic. These syndromes offer insight into fundamental endosome traffic processes unique to metazoans. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying these mutant phenotypes remain poorly understood. Here we investigate interactions of wild-type and disease-causing mutations in VIPAS39/SPE-39 and Vps33b by yeast two hybrid, immunoprecipitation and quantitative fluorescent microscopy. We find that although few mutations prevent interaction between VIPAS39/SPE-39 and Vps33b, some mutants fragment VIPAS39/SPE-39-positive endosomes, but all mutants alter the subcellular localization of Vps33b to VIPAS39/SPE-39-positive endosomes. Our data suggest that the ARC syndrome may result through impaired VIPAS39/SPE-39 and Vps33b-dependent endosomal maturation or fusion. PMID:23918659

  1. Vps33b pathogenic mutations preferentially affect VIPAS39/SPE-39-positive endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Tornieri, Karine; Zlatic, Stephanie A.; Mullin, Ariana P.; Werner, Erica; Harrison, Robert; L'Hernault, Steven W.; Faundez, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in Vps33 isoforms cause pigment dilution in mice (Vps33a, buff) and Drosophila (car) and the neurogenic arthrogryposis, renal dysfunction and cholestasis syndrome in humans (ARC1, VPS33B). The later disease is also caused by mutations in VIPAS39, (Vps33b interacting protein, apical-basolateral polarity regulator, SPE-39 homolog; ARC2), a protein that interacts with the HOmotypic fusion and Protein Sorting (HOPS) complex, a tether necessary for endosome–lysosome traffic. These syndromes offer insight into fundamental endosome traffic processes unique to metazoans. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying these mutant phenotypes remain poorly understood. Here we investigate interactions of wild-type and disease-causing mutations in VIPAS39/SPE-39 and Vps33b by yeast two hybrid, immunoprecipitation and quantitative fluorescent microscopy. We find that although few mutations prevent interaction between VIPAS39/SPE-39 and Vps33b, some mutants fragment VIPAS39/SPE-39-positive endosomes, but all mutants alter the subcellular localization of Vps33b to VIPAS39/SPE-39-positive endosomes. Our data suggest that the ARC syndrome may result through impaired VIPAS39/SPE-39 and Vps33b-dependent endosomal maturation or fusion. PMID:23918659

  2. Phenotypic comparison of samdc and spe mutants reveals complex relationships of polyamine metabolism in Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Valdés-Santiago, Laura; Cervantes-Chávez, José Antonio; Winkler, Robert; León-Ramírez, Claudia G; Ruiz-Herrera, José

    2012-03-01

    Synthesis of spermidine involves the action of two enzymes, spermidine synthase (Spe) and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (Samdc). Previously we cloned and disrupted the gene encoding Spe as a first approach to unravel the biological function of spermidine in Ustilago maydis. With this background, the present study was designed to provide a better understanding of the role played by Samdc in the regulation of the synthesis of this polyamine. With this aim we proceeded to isolate and delete the gene encoding Samdc from U. maydis, and made a comparative analysis of the phenotypes of samdc and spe mutants. Both spe and samdc mutants behaved as spermidine auxotrophs, and were more sensitive than the wild-type strain to different stress conditions. However, the two mutants displayed significant differences: in contrast to spe mutants, samdc mutants were more sensitive to LiCl stress, high spermidine concentrations counteracted their dimorphic deficiency, and they were completely avirulent. It is suggested that these differences are possibly related to differences in exogenous spermidine uptake or the differential location of the respective enzymes in the cell. Alternatively, since samdc mutants accumulate higher levels of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), whereas spe mutants accumulate decarboxylated SAM, the known opposite roles of these metabolites in the processes of methylation and differentiation offer an additional attractive hypothesis to explain the phenotypic differences of the two mutants, and provide insights into the additional roles of polyamine metabolism in the physiology of the cell. PMID:22222500

  3. Targeting Mitochondria with Avocatin B Induces Selective Leukemia Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eric A; Angka, Leonard; Rota, Sarah-Grace; Hanlon, Thomas; Mitchell, Andrew; Hurren, Rose; Wang, Xiao Ming; Gronda, Marcela; Boyaci, Ezel; Bojko, Barbara; Minden, Mark; Sriskanthadevan, Shrivani; Datti, Alessandro; Wrana, Jeffery L; Edginton, Andrea; Pawliszyn, Janusz; Joseph, Jamie W; Quadrilatero, Joe; Schimmer, Aaron D; Spagnuolo, Paul A

    2015-06-15

    Treatment regimens for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) continue to offer weak clinical outcomes. Through a high-throughput cell-based screen, we identified avocatin B, a lipid derived from avocado fruit, as a novel compound with cytotoxic activity in AML. Avocatin B reduced human primary AML cell viability without effect on normal peripheral blood stem cells. Functional stem cell assays demonstrated selectivity toward AML progenitor and stem cells without effects on normal hematopoietic stem cells. Mechanistic investigations indicated that cytotoxicity relied on mitochondrial localization, as cells lacking functional mitochondria or CPT1, the enzyme that facilitates mitochondria lipid transport, were insensitive to avocatin B. Furthermore, avocatin B inhibited fatty acid oxidation and decreased NADPH levels, resulting in ROS-dependent leukemia cell death characterized by the release of mitochondrial proteins, apoptosis-inducing factor, and cytochrome c. This study reveals a novel strategy for selective leukemia cell eradication based on a specific difference in mitochondrial function. PMID:26077472

  4. The majority of 9,729 group A streptococcus strains causing disease secrete SpeB cysteine protease: pathogenesis implications.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Randall J; Raghuram, Anjali; Cantu, Concepcion; Hartman, Meredith H; Jimenez, Francisco E; Lee, Susan; Ngo, Ashley; Rice, Kelsey A; Saddington, Deborah; Spillman, Hannaka; Valson, Chandni; Flores, Anthony R; Beres, Stephen B; Long, S Wesley; Nasser, Waleed; Musser, James M

    2015-12-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS), the causative agent of pharyngitis and necrotizing fasciitis, secretes the potent cysteine protease SpeB. Several lines of evidence suggest that SpeB is an important virulence factor. SpeB is expressed in human infections, protects mice from lethal challenge when used as a vaccine, and contributes significantly to tissue destruction and dissemination in animal models. However, recent descriptions of mutations in genes implicated in SpeB production have led to the idea that GAS may be under selective pressure to decrease secreted SpeB protease activity during infection. Thus, two divergent hypotheses have been proposed. One postulates that SpeB is a key contributor to pathogenesis; the other, that GAS is under selection to decrease SpeB during infection. In order to distinguish between these alternative hypotheses, we performed casein hydrolysis assays to measure the SpeB protease activity secreted by 6,775 GAS strains recovered from infected humans. The results demonstrated that 84.3% of the strains have a wild-type SpeB protease phenotype. The availability of whole-genome sequence data allowed us to determine the relative frequencies of mutations in genes implicated in SpeB production. The most abundantly mutated genes were direct transcription regulators. We also sequenced the genomes of 2,954 GAS isolates recovered from nonhuman primates with experimental necrotizing fasciitis. No mutations that would result in a SpeB-deficient phenotype were identified. Taken together, these data unambiguously demonstrate that the great majority of GAS strains recovered from infected humans secrete wild-type levels of SpeB protease activity. Our data confirm the important role of SpeB in GAS pathogenesis and help end a long-standing controversy. PMID:26416912

  5. Spacecraft Solar Particle Event (SPE) Shielding: Shielding Effectiveness as a Function of SPE model as Determined with the FLUKA Radiation Transport Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steve; Atwell, William; Reddell, Brandon; Rojdev, Kristina

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of both satellite and surface neutron monitor data demonstrate that the widely utilized Exponential model of solar particle event (SPE) proton kinetic energy spectra can seriously underestimate SPE proton flux, especially at the highest kinetic energies. The more recently developed Band model produces better agreement with neutron monitor data ground level events (GLEs) and is believed to be considerably more accurate at high kinetic energies. Here, we report the results of modeling and simulation studies in which the radiation transport code FLUKA (FLUktuierende KAskade) is used to determine the changes in total ionizing dose (TID) and single-event environments (SEE) behind aluminum, polyethylene, carbon, and titanium shielding masses when the assumed form (i. e., Band or Exponential) of the solar particle event (SPE) kinetic energy spectra is changed. FLUKA simulations have fully three dimensions with an isotropic particle flux incident on a concentric spherical shell shielding mass and detector structure. The effects are reported for both energetic primary protons penetrating the shield mass and secondary particle showers caused by energetic primary protons colliding with shielding mass nuclei. Our results, in agreement with previous studies, show that use of the Exponential form of the event

  6. Theoretical performance of hydrogen-bromine rechargeable SPE fuel cell. [Solid Polymer Electrolyte

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savinell, R. F.; Fritts, S. D.

    1988-01-01

    A mathematical model was formulated to describe the performance of a hydrogen-bromine fuel cell. Porous electrode theory was applied to the carbon felt flow-by electrode and was coupled to theory describing the solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) system. Parametric studies using the numerical solution to this model were performed to determine the effect of kinetic, mass transfer, and design parameters on the performance of the fuel cell. The results indicate that the cell performance is most sensitive to the transport properties of the SPE membrane. The model was also shown to be a useful tool for scale-up studies.

  7. Glufosinate ammonium clean-up procedure from water samples using SPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayeb M., A.; Ismail B., S.; Mardiana-Jansar, K.; Ta, Goh Choo; Agustar, Hani Kartini

    2015-09-01

    For the determination of glufosinate ammonium residue in soil and water samples, different solid phase extraction (SPE) sorbent efficiency was studied. Four different SPE sorbents i.e.: CROMABOND PS-H+, CROMABOND PS-OH-, ISOLUTE ENV+, Water Sep-Pak and OASIS HLB were used. Sample clean-up performance was evaluated using high performance liquid chromatography (Agilent 1220 infinity LC) with fluorescence detector. Detection of FMO-derivatives was done at λ ex = 260 nm and λ em= 310 nm. OASIS HLB column was the most suitable for the clean-up in view of the overall feasibility of the analysis.

  8. Germline survival and apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gartner, Anton; Boag, Peter R; Blackwell, T Keith

    2008-01-01

    Germline apoptosis shares with somatic apoptosis a reliance on key components of the core apoptotic machinery, including CED-3 and CED-4. However, germline apoptosis differs from somatic apoptosis in its regulation. Whereas somatic apoptosis is developmentally programmed by cell lineage, germline apoptosis occurs as part of an oogenesis program. One category of germline apoptosis, dubbed "physiological" germline apoptosis, reduces the number of cells that complete oogenesis, and is independent of the BH3-only apoptosis effecter EGL-1. A second category, termed "stress-induced" germline apoptosis, is triggered by a genomic integrity checkpoint. Some mechanisms that are monitored by this DNA-damage checkpoint are also involved in germ cell "immortality," or preservation of a continuous germ cell lineage over successive generations. In addition, exposure to certain environmental insults or pathogens induces germ cell apoptosis. Here we will review the mechanisms that control each of the pathways leading to germ cell apoptosis and discuss their functional significance. Germline apoptosis is an integral part of oogenesis in many animals, including humans. Because many of the regulators of C. elegans germline apoptosis are conserved, we suggest that this nematode provides a valuable model for understanding controls of germline apoptosis more broadly. PMID:18781708

  9. Spacecraft Solar Particle Event (SPE) Shielding: Shielding Effectiveness as a Function of SPE Model as Determined with the FLUKA Radiation Transport Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koontz, S. L.; Atwell, W. A.; Reddell, B.; Rojdev, K.

    2010-12-01

    In the this paper, we report the results of modeling and simulation studies in which the radiation transport code FLUKA (FLUktuierende KAskade) is used to determine the changes in total ionizing dose (TID) and single-event effect (SEE) environments behind aluminum, polyethylene, carbon, and titanium shielding masses when the assumed form (i.e., Band or Exponential) of the solar particle event (SPE) kinetic energy spectra is changed. FLUKA simulations are fully three dimensional with an isotropic particle flux incident on a concentric spherical shell shielding mass and detector structure. FLUKA is a fully integrated and extensively verified Monte Carlo simulation package for the interaction and transport of high-energy particles and nuclei in matter. The effects are reported of both energetic primary protons penetrating the shield mass and secondary particle showers caused by energetic primary protons colliding with shielding mass nuclei. SPE heavy ion spectra are not addressed. Our results, in agreement with previous studies, show that use of the Exponential form of the event spectra can seriously underestimate spacecraft SPE TID and SEE environments in some, but not all, shielding mass cases. The SPE spectra investigated are taken from four specific SPEs that produced ground-level events (GLEs) during solar cycle 23 (1997-2008). GLEs are produced by highly energetic solar particle events (ESP), i.e., those that contain significant fluences of 700 MeV to 10 GeV protons. Highly energetic SPEs are implicated in increased rates of spacecraft anomalies and spacecraft failures. High-energy protons interact with Earth’s atmosphere via nuclear reaction to produce secondary particles, some of which are neutrons that can be detected at the Earth’s surface by the global neutron monitor network. GLEs are one part of the overall SPE resulting from a particular solar flare or coronal mass ejection event on the sun. The ESP part of the particle event, detected by spacecraft, is often associated with the arrival of a “shock front” at Earth some hours after the arrival of the GLE. The specific SPEs used in this analysis are those of: 1) November 6, 1997 - GLE only; 2) July 14-15, 2000 - GLE from the 14th plus ESP from the 15th; 3) November 4-6, 2001 - GLE and ESP from the 4th; and 4) October 28-29, 2003 - GLE and ESP from the 28th plus GLE from the 29th. The corresponding Band and Exponential spectra used in this paper are like those previously reported.

  10. Steap4 attenuates high glucose and S100B-induced effects in mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Chao-Tang; Guh, Jinn-Yuh; Lu, Chi-Yu; Wang, Yeng-Tseng; Chen, Hung-Chun; Chuang, Lea-Yea

    2015-06-01

    Six-transmembrane epithelial antigen of prostate 4 (Steap4)-knockout mice develop hyperglycaemia and inflammation whereas Steap4 overexpression attenuates atherosclerosis in diabetic mice. Thus, we studied the roles of Steap4 in high glucose (HG, 27.5 mM) or S100B (1 μM, a ligand for the receptor for advanced glycation end-product or RAGE)-induced effects in mouse mesangial (MES13) cells. We found that HG-induced Steap4 protein expression was dependent on S100B. HG increased cell membrane, but not cytosolic, Steap4 protein expression. HG increased protein-protein interaction between Steap4 and S100B, which was confirmed by mass spectrometry of immunoprecipitated S100B. SP600125, LY294002 and AG490 attenuated S100B-induced Steap4 protein expression or gene transcriptional activity. A mutation in signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) site 2 of the Steap4 promoter constructs resulted in a marked decrease in HG or S100B-induced activation of Steap4 gene transcription. Overexpression of Steap4 attenuates HG or S100B-induced collagen IV, fibronectin and cyclooxygenase 2 protein expression. Overexpression of Steap4 attenuates HG or S100B-induced transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Moreover, overexpression of Steap4 attenuates S100B-induced signalling. Finally, overexpressing Steap4 attenuated renal expression of fibronectin, S100B, TGF-β, type IV collagen, p-Akt, p-extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 and p-Stat3 in streptozotocin-diabetic mice. Thus, overexpression of Steap4 attenuated HG or S100B-induced effects in MES13 cells and attenuated some of S100B-induced effects in diabetic mouse kidneys. PMID:25817898

  11. Steap4 attenuates high glucose and S100B-induced effects in mesangial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Chao-Tang; Guh, Jinn-Yuh; Lu, Chi-Yu; Wang, Yeng-Tseng; Chen, Hung-Chun; Chuang, Lea-Yea

    2015-01-01

    Six-transmembrane epithelial antigen of prostate 4 (Steap4)-knockout mice develop hyperglycaemia and inflammation whereas Steap4 overexpression attenuates atherosclerosis in diabetic mice. Thus, we studied the roles of Steap4 in high glucose (HG, 27.5 mM) or S100B (1 μM, a ligand for the receptor for advanced glycation end-product or RAGE)-induced effects in mouse mesangial (MES13) cells. We found that HG-induced Steap4 protein expression was dependent on S100B. HG increased cell membrane, but not cytosolic, Steap4 protein expression. HG increased protein-protein interaction between Steap4 and S100B, which was confirmed by mass spectrometry of immunoprecipitated S100B. SP600125, LY294002 and AG490 attenuated S100B-induced Steap4 protein expression or gene transcriptional activity. A mutation in signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) site 2 of the Steap4 promoter constructs resulted in a marked decrease in HG or S100B-induced activation of Steap4 gene transcription. Overexpression of Steap4 attenuates HG or S100B-induced collagen IV, fibronectin and cyclooxygenase 2 protein expression. Overexpression of Steap4 attenuates HG or S100B-induced transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Moreover, overexpression of Steap4 attenuates S100B-induced signalling. Finally, overexpressing Steap4 attenuated renal expression of fibronectin, S100B, TGF-β, type IV collagen, p-Akt, p-extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 and p-Stat3 in streptozotocin-diabetic mice. Thus, overexpression of Steap4 attenuated HG or S100B-induced effects in MES13 cells and attenuated some of S100B-induced effects in diabetic mouse kidneys. PMID:25817898

  12. Determination of trace organic pollutants in aqueous samples using GC/MS and SPE techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, L.J.; Yamamoto, M.; Fitzsimmons, S.; Shen, Y.

    1996-11-01

    This study evaluates the advantage of using GC/MS (ion trap) and solid phase extraction (SPE) for the determination of semi-volatile organics which cover priority pollutants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, phthalates, and synthetic organic analytes. SPE of trace organic compounds using reverse phase sorbent is attractive compared to the more traditional methods that utilize liquid-liquid extraction or microextraction for the removal of these pollutants from aqueous samples. GC/MS method involving SPE for sample preparation reduces manual labor, speed sample processing,and substantially reduces the volume of solvent required. Also, the application of axial modulation ion trap mass spectrometry improved sensitivity in GC/MS analysis and the method accuracy and precision of semi-volatile organics from GC/MS (ion trap) are very competitive with electron capture detector and photo ionization detector. Systematic studies were done to determine the factors that effect the optimum disk sampling/elution conditions to achieve the quality control requirements for the compliance monitoring. The recoveries of phthalates, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH`s) and most of the organic pesticides, which have very hydrophobic nature and high boiling points, are very acceptable. Consequently GC/MS analysis using solid phase extraction (SPE) techniques can be applied as the primary analytical method and final conformation tool for the routine monitoring samples such as ground water, surface water and reclaimed water for the determination of trace organic pollutants with improved sensitivity, reduced extraction time and monitoring expense.

  13. LC-SPE-NMR Identification of Co-products from Biomass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hyphenated technique of LC-SPE-NMR was utilized to isolate and identify cinnamic acids and investigate their derivatives from the chloroform extract from Coastal bermudagrass. This method has shown to be useful in handling impure mixtures of extractants from biomass material. It overcomes the ...

  14. Surface Signature Characterization at SPE through Ground-Proximal Methods: Methodology Change and Technical Justification

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.

    2015-09-09

    A portion of LANL’s FY15 SPE objectives includes initial ground-based or ground-proximal investigations at the SPE Phase 2 site. The area of interest is the U2ez location in Yucca Flat. This collection serves as a baseline for discrimination of surface features and acquisition of topographic signatures prior to any development or pre-shot activities associated with SPE Phase 2. Our team originally intended to perform our field investigations using previously vetted ground-based (GB) LIDAR methodologies. However, the extended proposed time frame of the GB LIDAR data collection, and associated data processing time and delivery date, were unacceptable. After technical consultation and careful literature research, LANL identified an alternative methodology to achieve our technical objectives and fully support critical model parameterization. Very-low-altitude unmanned aerial systems (UAS) photogrammetry appeared to satisfy our objectives in lieu of GB LIDAR. The SPE Phase 2 baseline collection was used as a test of this UAS photogrammetric methodology.

  15. Beginning Special Educators: Characteristics, Qualifications, and Experiences. SPeNSE Summary Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billingsley, Bonnie S.

    This report from the Study of Personnel Needs in Special Education (SPeNSE) provides a profile of the characteristics, qualifications, work experiences, and career plans of teachers with fewer than 3 years of experience. Findings indicate: (1) beginning teachers were more likely to work in suburban systems (50 percent); (2) the majority do not…

  16. Recruiting and Retaining High-Quality Teachers. SPeNSE Summary Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westat, Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This report summarizes the data from the Study of Special Needs in Special Education (SPeNSE), a national study of personnel in special education. It focuses on data related to recruiting and retaining high-quality special education teachers. Findings indicate: (1) in 1999-2000, more than 12,000 openings for special education teachers were left…

  17. A High-Quality Teacher for Every Classroom. SPeNSE Summary Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westat, Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This report from the Study of Personnel Needs in Special Education (SPeNSE) focuses on working conditions that affect special education teachers and how teachers acquire needed professional skills. The report found: (1) 80% of special education teachers serve students with two or more primary disabilities; (2) almost one-fourth of students served…

  18. cDNA cloning, functional expression and antifungal activities of a dimeric plant defensin SPE10 from Pachyrrhizus erosus seeds.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaomin; Wang, Jing; Wu, Fang; Li, Xu; Teng, Maikun; Gong, Weimin

    2005-01-01

    SPE10 is an antifungal protein isolated from the seeds of Pachyrrhizus erosus. cDNA encoding a 47 amino acid peptide was cloned by RT-PCR and the gene sequence proved SPE10 to be a new member of plant defensin family. The synthetic cDNA with codons preferred in yeast was cloned into the pPIC9 plasmid directly in-frame with the secretion signal alpha-mating factor, and highly expressed in methylotrophic Pichia pastoris. Activity assays showed the recombinant SPE10 inhibited specifically the growth of several pathogenic fungi as native SPE10. Circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy analysis indicated that the native and recombinant protein should have same folding, though there are eight cystein residues in the sequence. Several evidence suggested SPE10 should be the first dimeric plant defensin reported so far. PMID:15821865

  19. Solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography (SPE-LC) interface for automated peptide separation and identification by tandem mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hørning, Ole Bjeld; Theodorsen, Søren; Vorm, Ole; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2007-12-01

    Reversed-phase solid phase extraction (SPE) is a simple and widely used technique for desalting and concentration of peptide and protein samples prior to mass spectrometry analysis. Often, SPE sample preparation is done manually and the samples eluted, dried and reconstituted into 96-well titer plates for subsequent LC-MS/MS analysis. To reduce the number of sample handling stages and increase throughput, we developed a robotic system to interface off-line SPE to LC-ESI-MS/MS. Samples were manually loaded onto disposable SPE tips that subsequently were connected in-line with a capillary chromatography column. Peptides were recovered from the SPE column and separated on the RP-LC column using isocratic elution conditions and analysed by electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. Peptide mixtures eluted within approximately 5 min, with individual peptide peak resolution of ~7 s (FWHM), making the SPE-LC suited for analysis of medium complex samples (3-12 protein components). For optimum performance, the isocratic flow rate was reduced to 30 nL/min, producing nanoelectrospray like conditions which ensure high ionisation efficiency and sensitivity. Using a modified autosampler for mounting and disposing of the SPE tips, the SPE-LC-MS/MS system could analyse six samples per hour, and up to 192 SPE tips in one batch. The relatively high sample throughput, medium separation power and high sensitivity makes the automated SPE-LC-MS/MS setup attractive for proteomics experiments as demonstrated by the identification of the components of simple protein mixtures and of proteins recovered from 2DE gels.

  20. An Overview of the Source Physics Experiments (SPE) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snelson, C. M.; Barker, D. L.; White, R. L.; Emmitt, R. F.; Townsend, M. J.; Graves, T. E.; Becker, S. A.; Teel, M. G.; Lee, P.; Antoun, T. H.; Rodgers, A.; Walter, W. R.; Mellors, R. J.; Brunish, W. M.; Bradley, C. R.; Patton, H. J.; Hawkins, W. L.; Corbell, B. H.; Abbott, R. E.; SPE Working Group

    2011-12-01

    Modeling of explosion phenomenology has been primarily empirically based when looking at the seismic, infrasound, and acoustic signals. In order to detect low-yield nuclear explosions under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), we must be able to understand and model the explosive source in settings beyond where we have empirical data. The Source Physics Experiments (SPE) at the Nevada National Security Site are the first step in this endeavor to link the empirically based with the physics-based modeling to develop this predictive capability. The current series of tests is being conducted in a granite body called the Climax Stock. This location was chosen for several reasons, including the site's expected "simple geology"-the granite is a fairly homogeneous body. In addition, data are available from underground nuclear tests that were conducted in the same rock body, and the nature of the geology has been well-documented. Among the project goals for the SPE is to provide fully coupled seismic energy to the seismic and acoustic seismic arrays so that the transition between the near and far-field data can be modeled and our scientists can begin to understand how non-linear effects and anisotropy control seismic energy transmission and partitioning. The first shot for the SPE was conducted in May 2011 as a calibration shot (SPE1) with 220 lb (100 kg) of chemical explosives set at a depth of 180 ft (55 m). An array of sensors and diagnostics recorded the shot data, including accelerometers, geophones, rotational sensors, short-period and broadband seismic sensors, Continuous Reflectometry for Radius vs. Time Experiment (CORRTEX), Time of Arrival (TOA), Velocity of Detonation (VOD) as well as infrasound sensors. The three-component accelerometer packages were set at depths of 180 ft (55 m), 150 ft (46 m), and 50 ft (15 m) in two rings around ground zero (GZ); the inner ring was at 10 m and the outer ring was 20 m from GZ. Six sets of surface accelerometers (100 and 500 g) were placed along in an azimuth of SW from GZ every 10 m. Seven infrasound sensors were placed in an array around the GZ, extending from tens of meters to kilometers. Over 100 seismic stations were positioned, most of which were in five radial lines from GZ out to 2 km. Over 400 data channels were recorded for SPE1, and data recovery was about 95% with high signal to noise ratio. Future tests will be conducted in the same shot hole as SPE1. The SPE2 experiment will consist of 2200 lb (1000 kg) of chemical explosives shot at 150 ft (46 m) depth utilizing the above-described instrumentation. Subsequent SPE shots will be the same size, within the same shot hole, and within the damage zone. The ultimate goal of the SPE Project is to develop predictive capability for using seismic energy as a tool for CTBT issues. This work was done by National Security Technologies, LLC, under Contract No. DE AC52 06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  1. Cannabisin B induces autophagic cell death by inhibiting the AKT/mTOR pathway and S phase cell cycle arrest in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tianpeng; Hao, Jianxiong; He, Jinfeng; Zhang, Jianchun; Li, Yingcong; Liu, Rui; Li, Lite

    2013-06-01

    This study investigates the anticancer properties of cannabisin B, purified from hempseed hull, in HepG2 human hepatoblastoma cells. The results indicate that cannabisin B significantly inhibited cell proliferation by inducing autophagic cell death rather than typical apoptosis. Cell viability transiently increased upon the addition of a low concentration of cannabisin B but decreased upon the addition of high concentrations. Cannabisin B-induced changes in cell viability were completely inhibited by pre-treatment with 3-methyladenine (3-MA), indicating that the induction of autophagy by cannabisin B caused cell death. Additionally, cannabisin B induced S phase cell cycle arrest in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, cannabisin B was found to inhibit survival signaling by blocking the activation of AKT and down-stream targets of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). These findings suggest that cannabisin B possesses considerable antiproliferative activity and that it may be utilised as a promising chemopreventive agent against hepatoblastoma disease. PMID:23411211

  2. Glycyrrhizic acid prevents ultraviolet-B-induced photodamage: a role for mitogen-activated protein kinases, nuclear factor kappa B and mitochondrial apoptotic pathway.

    PubMed

    Afnan, Quadri; Kaiser, Peerzada J; Rafiq, Rather A; Nazir, Lone A; Bhushan, Shashi; Bhardwaj, Subhash C; Sandhir, Rajat; Tasduq, Sheikh A

    2016-06-01

    Glycyrrhizic acid (GA), a natural triterpene, has received attention as an agent that has protective effects against chronic diseases including ultraviolet UV-B-induced skin photodamage. However, the mechanism of its protective effect remains elusive. Here, we used an immortalized human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) and a small animal model (BALB/c mice), to investigate the protective effects of GA against UV-B-induced oxidative damage, and additionally, delineated the molecular mechanisms involved in the UV-B-mediated inflammatory and apoptotic response. In the HaCaT cells, GA inhibited the UV-B-mediated increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and down-regulated the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1α, -1β and -6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). GA inhibited UV-B-mediated activation of p38 and JNK MAP kinases, COX-2 expression and nuclear translocation of NF-κB. Furthermore, GA inhibited UV-B-mediated apoptosis by attenuating translocation of Bax from the cytosol to mitochondria, thus preserving mitochondrial integrity. GA-treated HaCaT cells also exhibited elevated antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein, concomitant with reduced caspase-3 cleavage and decreased PARP-1 protein. In BALB/c mice, topical application of GA on dorsal skin exposed to UV-B irradiation protected against epidermal hyperplasia, lymphocyte infiltration and expression of several inflammatory proteins, p38, JNK, COX-2, NF-κB and ICAM-1. Based on the above findings, we conclude that GA protects against UV-B-mediated photodamage by inhibiting the signalling cascades triggered by oxidative stress, including MAPK/NF-κB activation, as well as apoptosis. Thus, GA has strong potential to be used as a therapeutic/cosmeceutical agent against photodamage. PMID:26836460

  3. Identification and Co-complex Structure of a New S. pyogenes SpeB Small Molecule Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ana Y; González-Páez, Gonzalo E; Wolan, Dennis W

    2015-07-21

    The secreted Streptococcus pyogenes cysteine protease SpeB is implicated in host immune system evasion and bacterial virulence. We present a small molecule inhibitor of SpeB 2477 identified from a high-throughput screen based on the hydrolysis of a fluorogenic peptide substrate Ac-AIK-AMC. 2477 inhibits other SpeB-related proteases but not human caspase-3, suggesting that the molecule targets proteases with the papain-like structural fold. A 1.59 Å X-ray crystal structure of 2477 bound to the SpeB active site reveals the mechanism of inhibition and the essential constituents of 2477 necessary for binding. An assessment against a panel of 2477 derivatives confirms our structural findings and shows that a carbamate and nitrile on 2477 are required for SpeB inhibition, as these moieties provide an extensive network of electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding interactions with SpeB active site residues. Surprisingly, despite 2477 having a reduced inhibitory potential against papain, the majority of 2477-related compounds inhibit papain to a much greater and broader extent than SpeB. These findings indicate that SpeB is more stringently selective than papain for this panel of small molecule inhibitors. On the basis of our structural and biochemical characterization, we propose modifications to 2477 for subsequent rounds of inhibitor design that will impart specificity to SpeB over other papain-like proteases, including alterations of the compound to exploit the differences in CA protease active site pocket sizes and electrostatics. PMID:26132413

  4. Hindlimb Suspension and SPE-Like Radiation Impairs Clearance of Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minghong; Holmes, Veronica; Zhou, Yu; Ni, Houping; Sanzari, Jenine K.; Kennedy, Ann R.; Weissman, Drew

    2014-01-01

    A major risk of extended space travel is the combined effects of weightlessness and radiation exposure on the immune system. In this study, we used the hindlimb suspension model of microgravity that includes the other space stressors, situational and confinement stress and alterations in food intake, and solar particle event (SPE)-like radiation to measure the combined effects on the ability to control bacterial infections. A massive increase in morbidity and decrease in the ability to control bacterial growth was observed using 2 different types of bacteria delivered by systemic and pulmonary routes in 3 different strains of mice. These data suggest that an astronaut exposed to a strong SPE during extended space travel is at increased risk for the development of infections that could potentially be severe and interfere with mission success and astronaut health. PMID:24454913

  5. A New Method of Facial Expression Recognition Based on SPE Plus SVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Zilu; Huang, Mingwei; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Zhewei

    A novel method of facial expression recognition (FER) is presented, which uses stochastic proximity embedding (SPE) for data dimension reduction, and support vector machine (SVM) for expression classification. The proposed algorithm is applied to Japanese Female Facial Expression (JAFFE) database for FER, better performance is obtained compared with some traditional algorithms, such as PCA and LDA etc.. The result have further proved the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  6. PHARMACOLOGIC PROBING OF AMPHOTERICIN B-INDUCED RENAL DYSFUNCTION IN THE NEONATAL RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pharmacologic Probing of Amphotericin B-Induced Renal Dysfunction in the Neonatal Rat. Gray, J.A., and Kavlock, R.J. (1988). Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 93, 360-368. Acetazolamide, furosemide, chlorothiazide, and amiloride pharmacologic agents that act primarily in the proximal tub...

  7. Antimicrobial Peptide Lactoferricin B-Induced Rapid Leakage of Internal Contents from Single Giant Unilamellar Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Moniruzzaman, Md; Alam, Jahangir Md; Dohra, Hideo; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2015-09-29

    Enzymatic digestion of bovine lactoferrin generates lactoferricin B (Lfcin B), a 25-mer peptide with strong antimicrobial activity of unknown mechanism. To elucidate the mechanistic basis of Lfcin B bactericidal activity, we investigated the interaction of Lfcin B with Escherichia coli and liposomes of lipid membranes. Lfcin B induced the influx of a membrane-impermeant fluorescent probe, SYTOX green, from the outside of E. coli into its cytoplasm. Lfcin B induced gradual leakage of calcein from large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) of dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (DOPG)/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) membranes. To clarify the cause of Lfcin B-induced leakage of calcein from the LUVs, we used the single giant unilamellar vesicle (GUV) method to investigate the interaction of Lfcin B with calcein-containing DOPG/DOPC-GUVs. We observed that a rapid leakage of calcein from a GUV started stochastically; statistical analysis provided a rate constant for Lfcin B-induced pore formation, kp. On the other hand, phase-contrast microscopic images revealed that Lfcin B induced a rapid leakage of sucrose from the single GUVs with concomitant appearance of a spherical GUV of smaller diameter. Because of the very fast leakage, and at the present time resolution of the experiments (33 ms), we could not follow the evolution of pore nor the process of the structural changes of the GUV. Here we used the term "local rupture" to express the rapid leakage of sucrose and determined the rate constant of local rupture, kL. On the basis of the comparison between kp and kL, we concluded that the leakage of calcein from single GUVs occurred as a result of a local rupture in the GUVs and that smaller pores inducing leakage of calcein were not formed before the local rupture. The results of the effect of the surface charge density of lipid membranes and that of salt concentration in buffer on kp clearly show that kp increases with an increase in the extent of electrostatic interactions due to the surface charges. Analysis of Lfcin B-induced shape changes indicated that the binding of Lfcin B increased the area of the outer monolayer of GUVs. These results indicate that Lfcin B-induced damage of the plasma membrane of E. coli with its concomitant rapid leakage of internal contents is a key factor for the bactericidal activity of LfcinB. PMID:26368853

  8. Comparison of Radiation Transport Codes, HZETRN, HETC and FLUKA, Using the 1956 Webber SPE Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, John H.; Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Handler, Thomas; Gabriel, Tony A.; Pinsky, Lawrence S.; Reddell, Brandon; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Singleterry, Robert C.; Norbury, John W.; Badavi, Francis F.; Aghara, Sukesh K.

    2009-01-01

    Protection of astronauts and instrumentation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) in the harsh environment of space is of prime importance in the design of personal shielding, spacec raft, and mission planning. Early entry of radiation constraints into the design process enables optimal shielding strategies, but demands efficient and accurate tools that can be used by design engineers in every phase of an evolving space project. The radiation transport code , HZETRN, is an efficient tool for analyzing the shielding effectiveness of materials exposed to space radiation. In this paper, HZETRN is compared to the Monte Carlo codes HETC-HEDS and FLUKA, for a shield/target configuration comprised of a 20 g/sq cm Aluminum slab in front of a 30 g/cm^2 slab of water exposed to the February 1956 SPE, as mode led by the Webber spectrum. Neutron and proton fluence spectra, as well as dose and dose equivalent values, are compared at various depths in the water target. This study shows that there are many regions where HZETRN agrees with both HETC-HEDS and FLUKA for this shield/target configuration and the SPE environment. However, there are also regions where there are appreciable differences between the three computer c odes.

  9. The Crystal Structure of Escherichia coli Spermidine Synthase SpeE Reveals a Unique Substrate-binding Pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.; Chua, T; Tkaczuk, K; Bujnicki, J; Sivaraman, J

    2010-01-01

    Polyamines are essential in all branches of life. Biosynthesis of spermidine, one of the most ubiquitous polyamines, is catalyzed by spermidine synthase (SpeE). Although the function of this enzyme from Escherichia coli has been thoroughly characterized, its structural details remain unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of E. coli SpeE and study its interaction with the ligands by isothermal titration calorimetry and computational modelling. SpeE consists of two domains - a small N-terminal {beta}-strand domain, and a C-terminal catalytic domain that adopts a canonical methyltransferase (MTase) Rossmann fold. The protein forms a dimer in the crystal and in solution. Structural comparison of E. coli SpeE to its homologs reveals that it has a large and unique substrate-binding cleft that may account for its lower amine substrate specificity.

  10. Yersinia enterocolitica YopT and Clostridium difficile Toxin B Induce Expression of GILZ in Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Köberle, Martin; Göppel, David; Grandl, Tanja; Gaentzsch, Peer; Manncke, Birgit; Berchtold, Susanne; Müller, Steffen; Lüscher, Bernhard; Asselin-Labat, Marie-Liesse; Pallardy, Marc; Sorg, Isabel; Langer, Simon; Barth, Holger; Zumbihl, Robert; Autenrieth, Ingo B.; Bohn, Erwin

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoid induced-leucine zipper (GILZ) has been shown to be induced in cells by different stimuli such as glucocorticoids, IL-10 or deprivation of IL-2. GILZ has anti-inflammatory properties and may be involved in signalling modulating apoptosis. Herein we demonstrate that wildtype Yersinia enterocolitica which carry the pYV plasmid upregulated GILZ mRNA levels and protein expression in epithelial cells. Infection of HeLa cells with different Yersinia mutant strains revealed that the protease activity of YopT, which cleaves the membrane-bound form of Rho GTPases was sufficient to induce GILZ expression. Similarly, Clostridium difficile toxin B, another bacterial inhibitor of Rho GTPases induced GILZ expression. YopT and toxin B both increased transcriptional activity of the GILZ promoter in HeLa cells. GILZ expression could not be linked to the inactivation of an individual Rho GTPase by these toxins. However, forced expression of RhoA and RhoB decreased basal GILZ promoter activity. Furthermore, MAPK activation proved necessary for profound GILZ induction by toxin B. Promoter studies and gel shift analyses defined binding of upstream stimulatory factor (USF) 1 and 2 to a canonical c-Myc binding site (E-box) in the GILZ promoter as a crucial step of its trans-activation. In addition we could show that USF-1 and USF-2 are essential for basal as well as toxin B induced GILZ expression. These findings define a novel way of GILZ promoter trans-activation mediated by bacterial toxins and differentiate it from those mediated by dexamethasone or deprivation of IL-2. PMID:22792400

  11. Substrate-induced allosteric change in the quaternary structure of the spermidine N-acetyltransferase SpeG

    SciTech Connect

    Filippova, Ekaterina V.; Weigand, Steven J.; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Kiryukhina, Olga; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Anderson, Wayne F.

    2015-09-26

    The spermidine N-acetyltransferase SpeG is a dodecameric enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl coenzyme A to polyamines such as spermidine and spermine. SpeG has an allosteric polyamine-binding site and acetylating polyamines regulate their intracellular concentrations. The structures of SpeG from Vibrio cholerae in complexes with polyamines and cofactor have been characterized earlier. Here, we present the dodecameric structure of SpeG from V. cholerae in a ligand-free form in three different conformational states: open, intermediate and closed. All structures were crystallized in C2 space group symmetry and contain six monomers in the asymmetric unit cell. Two hexamers related by crystallographic 2-fold symmetry form the SpeG dodecamer. The open and intermediate states have a unique open dodecameric ring. This SpeG dodecamer is asymmetric except for the one 2-fold axis and is unlike any known dodecameric structure. Using a fluorescence thermal shift assay, size-exclusion chromatography with multi-angle light scattering, small-angle X-ray scattering analysis, negative-stain electron microscopy and structural analysis, we demonstrate that this unique open dodecameric state exists in solution. As a result, our combined results indicate that polyamines trigger conformational changes and induce the symmetric closed dodecameric state of the protein when they bind to their allosteric sites.

  12. Substrate-induced allosteric change in the quaternary structure of the spermidine N-acetyltransferase SpeG

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Filippova, Ekaterina V.; Weigand, Steven J.; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Kiryukhina, Olga; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Anderson, Wayne F.

    2015-09-26

    The spermidine N-acetyltransferase SpeG is a dodecameric enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl coenzyme A to polyamines such as spermidine and spermine. SpeG has an allosteric polyamine-binding site and acetylating polyamines regulate their intracellular concentrations. The structures of SpeG from Vibrio cholerae in complexes with polyamines and cofactor have been characterized earlier. Here, we present the dodecameric structure of SpeG from V. cholerae in a ligand-free form in three different conformational states: open, intermediate and closed. All structures were crystallized in C2 space group symmetry and contain six monomers in the asymmetric unit cell. Twomore » hexamers related by crystallographic 2-fold symmetry form the SpeG dodecamer. The open and intermediate states have a unique open dodecameric ring. This SpeG dodecamer is asymmetric except for the one 2-fold axis and is unlike any known dodecameric structure. Using a fluorescence thermal shift assay, size-exclusion chromatography with multi-angle light scattering, small-angle X-ray scattering analysis, negative-stain electron microscopy and structural analysis, we demonstrate that this unique open dodecameric state exists in solution. As a result, our combined results indicate that polyamines trigger conformational changes and induce the symmetric closed dodecameric state of the protein when they bind to their allosteric sites.« less

  13. Substrate-Induced Allosteric Change in the Quaternary Structure of the Spermidine N-Acetyltransferase SpeG.

    PubMed

    Filippova, Ekaterina V; Weigand, Steven; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Kiryukhina, Olga; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Anderson, Wayne F

    2015-11-01

    The spermidine N-acetyltransferase SpeG is a dodecameric enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl coenzyme A to polyamines such as spermidine and spermine. SpeG has an allosteric polyamine-binding site and acetylating polyamines regulate their intracellular concentrations. The structures of SpeG from Vibrio cholerae in complexes with polyamines and cofactor have been characterized earlier. Here, we present the dodecameric structure of SpeG from V. cholerae in a ligand-free form in three different conformational states: open, intermediate and closed. All structures were crystallized in C2 space group symmetry and contain six monomers in the asymmetric unit cell. Two hexamers related by crystallographic 2-fold symmetry form the SpeG dodecamer. The open and intermediate states have a unique open dodecameric ring. This SpeG dodecamer is asymmetric except for the one 2-fold axis and is unlike any known dodecameric structure. Using a fluorescence thermal shift assay, size-exclusion chromatography with multi-angle light scattering, small-angle X-ray scattering analysis, negative-stain electron microscopy and structural analysis, we demonstrate that this unique open dodecameric state exists in solution. Our combined results indicate that polyamines trigger conformational changes and induce the symmetric closed dodecameric state of the protein when they bind to their allosteric sites. PMID:26410587

  14. Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription-5 Mediates Neuronal Apoptosis Induced by Inhibition of Rac GTPase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Trisha R.; Loucks, F. Alexandra; Schroeder, Emily K.; Nevalainen, Marja T.; Tyler, Kenneth L.; Aktories, Klaus; Bouchard, Ron J.; Linseman, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    In several neuronal cell types, the small GTPase Rac is essential for survival. We have shown previously that the Rho family GTPase inhibitor Clostridium difficile toxin B (ToxB) induces apoptosis in primary rat cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) principally via inhibition of Rac GTPase function. In the present study, incubation with ToxB activated a proapoptotic Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway, and a pan-JAK inhibitor protected CGNs from Rac inhibition. STAT1 expression was induced by ToxB; however, CGNs from STAT1 knock-out mice succumbed to ToxB-induced apoptosis as readily as wild-type CGNs. STAT3 displayed enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation following treatment with ToxB, and a reputed inhibitor of STAT3, cucurbitacin (JSI-124), reduced CGN apoptosis. Unexpectedly, JSI-124 failed to block STAT3 phosphorylation, and CGNs were not protected from ToxB by other known STAT3 inhibitors. In contrast, STAT5A tyrosine phosphorylation induced by ToxB was suppressed by JSI-124. In addition, roscovitine similarly inhibited STAT5A phosphorylation and protected CGNs from ToxB-induced apoptosis. Consistent with these results, adenoviral infection with a dominant negative STAT5 mutant, but not wild-type STAT5, significantly decreased ToxB-induced apoptosis of CGNs. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation with a STAT5 antibody revealed increased STAT5 binding to the promoter region of prosurvival Bcl-xL. STAT5 was recruited to the Bcl-xL promoter region in a ToxB-dependent manner, and this DNA binding preceded Bcl-xL down-regulation, suggesting transcriptional repression. These data indicate that a novel JAK/STAT5 proapoptotic pathway significantly contributes to neuronal apoptosis induced by the inhibition of Rac GTPase. PMID:22378792

  15. Signal transducer and activator of transcription-5 mediates neuronal apoptosis induced by inhibition of Rac GTPase activity.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz, Trisha R; Loucks, F Alexandra; Schroeder, Emily K; Nevalainen, Marja T; Tyler, Kenneth L; Aktories, Klaus; Bouchard, Ron J; Linseman, Daniel A

    2012-05-11

    In several neuronal cell types, the small GTPase Rac is essential for survival. We have shown previously that the Rho family GTPase inhibitor Clostridium difficile toxin B (ToxB) induces apoptosis in primary rat cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) principally via inhibition of Rac GTPase function. In the present study, incubation with ToxB activated a proapoptotic Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway, and a pan-JAK inhibitor protected CGNs from Rac inhibition. STAT1 expression was induced by ToxB; however, CGNs from STAT1 knock-out mice succumbed to ToxB-induced apoptosis as readily as wild-type CGNs. STAT3 displayed enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation following treatment with ToxB, and a reputed inhibitor of STAT3, cucurbitacin (JSI-124), reduced CGN apoptosis. Unexpectedly, JSI-124 failed to block STAT3 phosphorylation, and CGNs were not protected from ToxB by other known STAT3 inhibitors. In contrast, STAT5A tyrosine phosphorylation induced by ToxB was suppressed by JSI-124. In addition, roscovitine similarly inhibited STAT5A phosphorylation and protected CGNs from ToxB-induced apoptosis. Consistent with these results, adenoviral infection with a dominant negative STAT5 mutant, but not wild-type STAT5, significantly decreased ToxB-induced apoptosis of CGNs. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation with a STAT5 antibody revealed increased STAT5 binding to the promoter region of prosurvival Bcl-xL. STAT5 was recruited to the Bcl-xL promoter region in a ToxB-dependent manner, and this DNA binding preceded Bcl-xL down-regulation, suggesting transcriptional repression. These data indicate that a novel JAK/STAT5 proapoptotic pathway significantly contributes to neuronal apoptosis induced by the inhibition of Rac GTPase. PMID:22378792

  16. Possible involvement of a tetrahydrobiopterin in photoreception for UV-B-induced anthocyanin synthesis in carrot.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Junko; Nakata, Rieko; Ueno, Hiroshi; Murakami, Akio; Iseki, Mineo; Watanabe, Masakatsu

    2014-01-01

    Our previous studies of action spectra for UV-B-induced anthocyanin accumulation in cultured carrot cells indicated that a reduced form of pterin, possibly tetrahydrobiopterin, contributes to UV-B photoreception. In this report, we provide additional evidence for the involvement of pterin in UV-B light sensing. UV-B-induced phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity was considerably suppressed by N-acetylserotonin (an inhibitor of tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis), and this suppression was partially recovered by adding biopterin or tetrahydrobiobiopterin. In addition, protein(s) specifically bound to biopterin were detected by radiolabeling experiments in N-acetylserotonin-treated cells. Furthermore, diphenyleneiodonium, a potent inhibitor of electron transfer, completely suppressed UV-B-induced PAL activity. These results suggest the occurrence of an unidentified UV-B photoreceptor (other than UVR8, the tryptophan-based UV-B sensor originally identified in Arabidopsis) with reduced pterin in carrot cells. After reexamining published action spectra, we suggest that anthocyanin synthesis is coordinately regulated by these two UV-B sensors. PMID:24943195

  17. Large-N Over the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) Phase I and Phase II Test Beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snelson, C. M.; Carmichael, J. D.; Mellors, R. J.; Abbott, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    One of the current challenges in the field of monitoring and verification is source discrimination of low-yield nuclear explosions from background seismicity, both natural and anthropogenic. Work is underway at the Nevada National Security Site to conduct a series of chemical explosion experiments using a multi-institutional, multi-disciplinary approach. The goal of this series of experiments, called the Source Physics Experiments (SPE), is to refine the understanding of the effect of earth structures on source phenomenology and energy partitioning in the source region, the transition of seismic energy from the near field to the far field, and the development of S waves observed in the far field. To fully explore these problems, the SPE series includes tests in both hard and soft rock geologic environments. The project comprises a number of activities, which range from characterizing the shallow subsurface to acquiring new explosion data from both the near field (<100 m) and the far field (>100 m). SPE includes a series of planned explosions (with different yields and depths of burials), which are conducted in the same hole and monitored by a diverse set of sensors recording characteristics of the explosions, ground-shock, seismo-acoustic energy propagation. This presentation focuses on imaging the full 3D wavefield over hard rock and soft rock test beds using a large number of seismic sensors. This overview presents statistical analyses of optimal sensor layout required to estimate wavefield discriminants and the planned deployment for the upcoming experiments. This work was conducted under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Anion exchange SPE and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in GHB analysis.

    PubMed

    Elian, Albert A; Hackett, Jeffery

    2011-12-01

    In this study, the extraction of γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) from urine using solid-phase extraction (SPE) is described. SPE was performed on anion exchange columns after samples of urine had been diluted with de-ionized water. After application of the diluted samples containing GHB-d(6) as an internal standard, the sorbent was washed with deionized water and methanol and dried. The GHB was eluted from the SPE column with a solvent consisting of methanol containing 6% glacial acetic acid. The eluent was collected, evaporated to dryness, and dissolved in mobile phase (100 μL) for analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in negative multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. Liquid chromatography was performed in gradient mode employing a biphenyl column and a mobile phase consisting of acetontitrile (containing 0.1% formic acid) and 0.1% aqueous formic acid. The total run time for each analysis was less than 5 min. The limits of detection/quantification for this method were determined to be 50 and 100 ng/mL, respectively. The method was found to be linear from 500 ng/mL to 10,000 ng/mL (r(2)>0.995). The recovery of GHB was found to be greater than 75%. In this report, results of authentic urine samples analyzed for GHB by this method are presented. GHB concentrations in these samples were found to be range from less than 500 ng/mL to 5110 ng/mL. PMID:22055831

  19. Calpains, mitochondria, and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Matthew A.; Schnellmann, Rick G.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial activity is critical for efficient function of the cardiovascular system. In response to cardiovascular injury, mitochondrial dysfunction occurs and can lead to apoptosis and necrosis. Calpains are a 15-member family of Ca2+-activated cysteine proteases localized to the cytosol and mitochondria, and several have been shown to regulate apoptosis and necrosis. For example, in endothelial cells, Ca2+ overload causes mitochondrial calpain 1 cleavage of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger leading to mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation. Also, activated calpain 1 cleaves Bid, inducing cytochrome c release and apoptosis. In renal cells, calpains 1 and 2 promote apoptosis and necrosis by cleaving cytoskeletal proteins, which increases plasma membrane permeability and cleavage of caspases. Calpain 10 cleaves electron transport chain proteins, causing decreased mitochondrial respiration and excessive activation, or inhibition of calpain 10 activity induces mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. In cardiomyocytes, calpain 1 activates caspase 3 and poly-ADP ribose polymerase during tumour necrosis factor-α-induced apoptosis, and calpain 1 cleaves apoptosis-inducing factor after Ca2+ overload. Many of these observations have been elucidated with calpain inhibitors, but most calpain inhibitors are not specific for calpains or a specific calpain family member, creating more questions. The following review will discuss how calpains affect mitochondrial function and apoptosis within the cardiovascular system. PMID:22581845

  20. Estimates of HZE particle contributions to SPE radiation exposures on interplanetary missions.

    PubMed

    Townsend, L W; Cucinotta, F A; Wilson, J W; Bagga, R

    1994-01-01

    Estimates of radiation doses resulting from possible HZE (high energy heavy ion) components of solar particle events (SPEs) are presented for crews of manned interplanetary missions. The calculations assume a model spectrum obtained by folding measured solar flare HZE particle abundances with the measured energy spectra of SPE alpha particles. These hypothetical spectra are then transported through aluminum spacecraft shielding. The results, presented as estimates of absorbed dose and dose equivalent, indicate that HZE components by themselves are not a major concern for crew protection but should be included in any overall risk assessment. The predictions are found to be sensitive to the assumed spectral hardness parameters. PMID:11538032

  1. Molecularly imprinted silica as a selective SPE sorbent for triazine herbicides.

    PubMed

    Gomes Costa Silva, Raquel; Rosa Morais Vigna, Camila; Bottoli, Carla B G; Collins, Carol H; Augusto, Fabio

    2010-05-01

    A molecularly imprinted organically modified silica was prepared through a simple sol-gel procedure and evaluated as a specific sorbent for SPE of triazine herbicides. The material proved to be highly selective for the template molecule, atrazine, as well as for other structurally related species such as simazine and propazine. The performance of this material was shown to be comparable with commercial acrylate-based molecularly imprinted polymers. The molecularly imprinted silica was applied for the determination of trace levels of the target triazine analytes in sugar cane juice (locally called "garapa"). PMID:20201047

  2. Estimates of HZE particle contributions to SPE radiation exposures on interplanetary missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Bagga, R.

    1994-01-01

    Estimates of radiation doses resulting from possible HZE (high energy heavy ion) components of Solar Particle Events (SPEs) are presented for crews of manned interplanetary missions. The calculations assume a model spectrum obtained by folding measured solar flare HZE particle abundances with the measured energy spectra of SPE alpha particles. These hypothetical spectra are then transported through aluminum spacecraft shielding. The results, presented as estimates of absorbed dose and dose equivalent, indicate that HZE components by themselves are not a major concern for crew protection but should be included in any overall risk assessment. The predictions are found to be sensitive to the assumed spectral hardness parameters.

  3. Simultaneous determination of seven pesticides in waters using multi-walled carbon nanotube SPE and NACE.

    PubMed

    Asensio-Ramos, María; Hernández-Borges, Javier; Ravelo-Pérez, Lidia M; Rodríguez-Delgado, Miguel Angel

    2008-11-01

    In this work, NACE with UV detection is combined with SPE using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) as stationary phase to determine a group of seven pesticides (pirimicarb, pyrifenox, penconazol, carbendazim, cyromazine, pyrimethanil and cyprodinil) in mineral water samples using ametryn as internal standard. The optimized BGE, consisting of a mixture of MeOH and ACN (1:2 v/v) with 90 mM SDS and 20.5 mM HClO(4), was satisfactory to get a good resolution of the seven compounds in less than 13 min. On-line preconcentration was carried out by electrokinetic injection of the sample dissolved in 78:22 v/v MeOH/ACN, 1.11 mM HClO(4). Repeatability was studied for the same day (n=4), for nine different days (n=36) and for four different capillaries. RSD values were appropriate in all cases, i.e. in the range 4.3-9.4% between different capillaries. MWCNT of 10-15 nm od, 2-6 nm id and 0.1-10 mum length were used as SPE materials for the preconcentration of these pesticides from water samples. SPE parameters influencing the enrichment were optimized and the most favorable conditions were as follows: the amount of stationary phase, eluent, sample pH and sample volume were 40 mg MWCNT, 10 mL ACN and 10 mL dichloromethane containing 5% v/v formic acid, pH 8.0, and 750 mL, respectively. Mean recovery values ranged between 53 and 94% for Milli-Q water and between 47 and 93% for mineral waters (RSD values were in the range 2-16%). The method allowed the determination of these pesticides at concentrations below the maximum residue limits established by the European Union legislation (LOD in the range 27-58 ng/L). When the cost, amount and type of the carbon nanotubes used in this work are compared with those carbon nanotubes previously used in the literature it is clear that the proposed materials can be used as economical stationary phases, even cheaper than conventional SPE cartridges. PMID:18956435

  4. Srv Mediated Dispersal of Streptococcal Biofilms Through SpeB Is Observed in CovRS+ Strains

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Kristie L.; Braden, Amy K.; Holder, Robert C.; Reid, Sean D.

    2011-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a human specific pathogen capable of causing both mild infections and severe invasive disease. We and others have shown that GAS is able to form biofilms during infection. That is to say, they form a three-dimensional, surface attached structure consisting of bacteria and a multi-component extracellular matrix. The mechanisms involved in regulation and dispersal of these GAS structures are still unclear. Recently we have reported that in the absence of the transcriptional regulator Srv in the MGAS5005 background, the cysteine protease SpeB is constitutively produced, leading to increased tissue damage and decreased biofilm formation during a subcutaneous infection in a mouse model. This was interesting because MGAS5005 has a naturally occurring mutation that inactivates the sensor kinase domain of the two component regulatory system CovRS. Others have previously shown that strains lacking covS are associated with decreased SpeB production due to CovR repression of speB expression. Thus, our results suggest the inactivation of srv can bypass CovR repression and lead to constitutive SpeB production. We hypothesized that Srv control of SpeB production may be a mechanism to regulate biofilm dispersal and provide a mechanism by which mild infection can transition to severe disease through biofilm dispersal. The question remained however, is this mechanism conserved among GAS strains or restricted to the unique genetic makeup of MGAS5005. Here we show that Srv mediated control of SpeB and biofilm dispersal is conserved in the invasive clinical isolates RGAS053 (serotype M1) and MGAS315 (serotype M3), both of which have covS intact. This work provides additional evidence that Srv regulated control of SpeB may mediate biofilm formation and dispersal in diverse strain backgrounds. PMID:22163320

  5. A novel polyamine allosteric site of SpeG from Vibrio cholerae is revealed by its dodecameric structure

    PubMed Central

    Filippova, Ekaterina V.; Kuhn, Misty L.; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Kiryukhina, Olga; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Ballicora, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Spermidine N-acetyltransferase, encoded by the gene speG, catalyzes the initial step in the degradation of polyamines and is a critical enzyme for determining the polyamine concentrations in bacteria. In Escherichia coli, studies have shown that SpeG is the enzyme responsible for acetylating spermidine under stress conditions and for preventing spermidine toxicity. Not all bacteria contain speG, and many bacterial pathogens have developed strategies to either acquire or silence it for pathogenesis. Here, we present thorough kinetic analyses combined with structural characterization of the VCA0947 SpeG enzyme from the important human pathogen Vibrio cholerae. Our studies revealed the unexpected presence of a previously unknown allosteric site and an unusual dodecameric structure for a member of the Gcn5-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) superfamily. We show that SpeG forms dodecamers in solution and in crystals and describe its three-dimensional structure in several ligand-free and liganded structures. Importantly, these structural data define the first view of a polyamine bound in an allosteric site of an N-acetyltransferase. Kinetic characterization of SpeG from V. cholerae showed that it acetylates spermidine and spermine. The behavior of this enzyme is complex and exhibits sigmoidal curves and substrate inhibition. We performed a detailed non-linear regression kinetic analysis to simultaneously fit families of substrate saturation curves to uncover a simple kinetic mechanism that explains the apparent complexity of this enzyme. Our results provide a fundamental understanding of the bacterial SpeG enzyme, which will be key towards understanding the regulation of polyamine levels in bacteria during pathogenesis. PMID:25623305

  6. Mechanism of the Antigen-Independent Cytokinergic SPE-7 IgE Activation of Human Mast Cells in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bax, Heather J.; Bowen, Holly; Dodev, Tihomir S.; Sutton, Brian J.; Gould, Hannah J.

    2015-01-01

    Release of pro-inflammatory mediators by mast cells is a key feature of allergic disease. The ‘dogma’ is that IgE molecules merely sensitise mast cells by binding FcεRI prior to cross-linking by multivalent allergen, receptor aggregation and mast cell activation. However, certain monoclonal IgE antibodies have been shown to elicit mast cell activation in an antigen-independent cytokinergic manner, and DNP-specific murine SPE-7 IgE is the most highly cytokinergic antibody known. We show that both monovalent hapten and recombinant SPE-7 IgE Fab inhibit its cytokinergic activity as measured by mast cell degranulation and TNF-α release. Using SPE-7 IgE, a non-cytokinergic human IgE and a poorly cytokinergic murine IgE, we reveal that interaction of the Fab region of ‘free’ SPE-7 IgE with the Fab of FcεRI-bound SPE-7 IgE is the basis of its cytokinergic activity. We rule out involvement of IgE Fc, Cε1 and Cλ/κ domains, and propose that ‘free’ SPE-7 IgE binds to FcεRI-bound SPE-7 IgE by an Fv-Fv interaction. Initial formation of a tri-molecular complex (one ‘free’ IgE molecule cross-linking two receptor-bound IgE molecules) leads to capture of further ‘free’ and receptor-bound IgEs to form larger clusters that trigger mast cell activation. PMID:25892150

  7. Geologic Assessment of the Damage Zone from the Second Test at Source Physics Experiment-Nevada (SPE-N)

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, M. J.; Huckins-Gang, H. E.; Prothro, L. B.; Reed, D. N.

    2012-12-01

    The National Center for Nuclear Security, established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), is conducting a series of explosive tests at the Nevada National Security Site that are designed to increase the understanding of certain basic physical phenomena associated with underground explosions. These tests will aid in developing technologies that might be used to detect underground nuclear explosions in support of verification activities for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. The initial project is a series of explosive tests, known collectively as the Source Physics Experiment-Nevada (SPE-N), being conducted in granitic rocks. The SPE-N test series is designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves. The results will help advance the seismic monitoring capability of the United States by improving the predictive capability of physics-based modeling of explosive phenomena. The first SPE N (SPE-N-1) test was conducted in May 2011, using 100 kg of explosives at the depth of 54.9 m in the U 15n source hole. SPE-N-2 was conducted in October 2011, using 1,000 kg of explosives at the depth of 45.7 m in the same source hole. The SPE-N-3 test was conducted in the same source hole in July 2012, using the same amount and type of explosive as for SPE-N-2, and at the same depth as SPE-N-2, within the damage zone created by the SPE-N-2 explosion to investigate damage effects on seismic wave propagation. Following the SPE-N-2 shot and prior to the SPE-N-3 shot, the core hole U-15n#10 was drilled at an angle from the surface to intercept the SPE-N-2 shot point location to obtain information necessary to characterize the damage zone. The objective was to determine the position of the damage zone near the shot point, at least on the northeast, where the core hole penetrated it, and obtain information on the properties of the damaged medium. Geologic characterization of the post-SPE-N-2 core hole included geophysical logging, a directional survey, and geologic description of the core to document visual evidence of damage. Selected core samples were provided to Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for measurement of physical and mechanical properties. A video was also run in the source hole after it was cleaned out. A significant natural fault zone was encountered in the angle core hole between 5.7 and 7.5 m from the shot point. However, several of the fractures observed in the core hole are interpreted as having been caused by the explosion. The fractures are characterized by a “fresh,” mechanically broken look, with uncoated and very irregular surfaces. They tend to terminate against natural fractures and have orientations that differ from the previously defined natural fracture sets; they are common starting at about 5.4 m from the shot point. Within about 3.3 m of the shot point to the end of the recovered core at 1.6 m from the shot point, some of the core samples are softer and lighter in color, but do not appear to be weathered. It is thought this could be indicative of the presence of distributed microfracturing.

  8. cDNA cloning, expression, and mutagenesis of a PR-10 protein SPE-16 from the seeds of Pachyrrhizus erosus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fang; Yan, Ming; Li, Yikun; Chang, Shaojie; Song, Xiaomin; Zhou, Zhaocai; Gong, Weimin

    2003-12-19

    SPE-16 is a new 16kDa protein that has been purified from the seeds of Pachyrrhizus erosus. It's N-terminal amino acid sequence shows significant sequence homology to pathogenesis-related class 10 proteins. cDNA encoding 150 amino acids was cloned by RT-PCR and the gene sequence proved SPE-16 to be a new member of PR-10 family. The cDNA was cloned into pET15b plasmid and expressed in Escherichia coli. The bacterially expressed SPE-16 also demonstrated ribonuclease-like activity in vitro. Site-directed mutation of three conserved amino acids E95A, E147A, Y150A, and a P-loop truncated form were constructed and their different effects on ribonuclease activities were observed. SPE-16 is also able to bind the fluorescent probe 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonate (ANS) in the native state. The ANS anion is a much-utilized "hydrophobic probe" for proteins. This binding activity indicated another biological function of SPE-16. PMID:14680830

  9. Recent improvements in SPE3D: a VR-based surgery planning environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkowski, Marcin; Sitnik, Robert; Verdonschot, Nico

    2014-02-01

    SPE3D is a surgery planning environment developed within TLEMsafe project [1] (funded by the European Commission FP7). It enables the operator to plan a surgical procedure on the customized musculoskeletal (MS) model of the patient's lower limbs, send the modified model to the biomechanical analysis module, and export the scenario's parameters to the surgical navigation system. The personalized patient-specific three-dimensional (3-D) MS model is registered with 3-D MRI dataset of lower limbs and the two modalities may be visualized simultaneously. Apart from main planes, any arbitrary MRI cross-section can be rendered on the 3-D MS model in real time. The interface provides tools for: bone cutting, manipulating and removal, repositioning muscle insertion points, modifying muscle force, removing muscles and placing implants stored in the implant library. SPE3D supports stereoscopic viewing as well as natural inspection/manipulation with use of haptic devices. Alternatively, it may be controlled with use of a standard computer keyboard, mouse and 2D display or a touch screen (e.g. in an operating room). The interface may be utilized in two main fields. Experienced surgeons may use it to simulate their operative plans and prepare input data for a surgical navigation system while student or novice surgeons can use it for training.

  10. IRTF/SPeX Observations of the Unusual Kepler Light Curve System KIC8462852

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisse, C. M.; Sitko, M. L.; Marengo, M.

    2015-12-01

    We have utilized the NASA/IRTF 3 m SpeX instrument's high-resolution spectral mode to observe and characterize the near-infrared flux emanating from the unusual Kepler light curve system KIC 8462852. By comparing the resulting 0.8-4.2 μm spectrum to a mesh of model photospheric spectra, the 6 emission line analyses of the Rayner et al. catalog, and the 25 system collections of debris disks we have observed to date using SpeX under the Near InfraRed Debris disk Survey, we have been able to additionally characterize the system. Within the errors of our measurements, this star looks like a normal solar abundance main-sequence F1V to F3V dwarf star without any obvious traces of significant circumstellar dust or gas. Using Connelley & Greene's emission measures, we also see no evidence of significant ongoing accretion onto the star nor any stellar outflow away from it. Our results are inconsistent with large amounts of static close-in obscuring material or the unusual behavior of a YSO system, but are consistent with the favored episodic giant comet models of a Gyr old stellar system favored by Boyajian et al. We speculate that KIC 8462852, like the ˜1.4 Gyr old F2V system η Corvi, is undergoing a late heavy bombardment, but is only in its very early stages.

  11. Design and test status for life support applications of SPE oxygen generation systems. [Solid Polymer Electrolyte

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titterington, W. A.; Erickson, A. C.

    1975-01-01

    An advanced six-man rated oxygen generation system has been fabricated and tested as part of a NASA/JSC technology development program for a long lived, manned spacecraft life support system. Details of the design and tests results are presented. The system is based on the Solid Polymer Electrolyte (SPE) water electrolysis technology and its nominal operating conditions are 2760 kN/sq m (400 psia) and 355 K (180 F) with an electrolysis module current density capability up to 350 mA/sq cm (326 ASF). The system is centered on a 13-cell SPE water electrolysis module having a single cell active area of 214 sq cm (33 sq in) and it incorporates instrumentation and controls for single pushbutton automatic startup/shutdown, component fault detection and isolation, and self-contained sensors and controls for automatic safe emergency shutdown. The system has been tested in both the orbital cyclic and continuous mode of operation. Various parametric tests have been completed to define the system capability for potential application in spacecraft environmental systems.

  12. Application of HPLC and TLC with diode array detection after SPE to the determination of pesticides in water samples from the Zemborzycki Reservoir (Lublin, southeastern Poland).

    PubMed

    Tuzimski, Tomasz

    2010-01-01

    The application of TLC with a diode array detector (TLC-DAD) and HPLC-DAD after SPE for identification and quantitative analysis of pesticides in water samples is demonstrated. The procedures described for the determination of compounds are inexpensive and can be applied to routine analysis of analytes in water samples after preliminary cleanup and concentration by SPE. Average recoveries for four different cartridges and three solvents by the proposed HPLC-DAD method after SPE also are presented. The efficiency of the SPE procedure was evaluated using real water samples from the Zemborzycki Reservoir, near Lublin, southeastern Poland. The method was validated for precision, repeatability, and accuracy. PMID:21313800

  13. Translation control in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liwak, U; Faye, M D; Holcik, M

    2012-10-01

    Regulation of protein synthesis, although known for many decades, has only recently begun to be recognized as a critical control mechanism for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and cellular stress response. One of the key advantages of translational control is the ability of cells to rapidly reprogram the protein output in response to internal or external triggers. This is particularly important during cellular response to stress that may lead to apoptosis by providing cells with a fine tuning mechanism that tips the balance between cell survival or apoptosis. In the following review we highlight several distinct mechanisms of translation control and provide specific examples of translational control during apoptosis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Apoptosis: Four Decades Later". PMID:23070007

  14. Induction of Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The apoptotic activity of plants is checked to confirm its anti-tumour and anti-cancer activity. Apoptosis is a specific process that leads to intrinsic programmed cell death which is essential in the homeostasis of normal tissues of the body and occurs in various physiological and pathological situations. Method to check apoptosis in EAC cells and DNA analysis are featured in this chapter as a preliminary test manner. PMID:26939284

  15. Serum Bile Acids Are Associated with Pathological Progression of Hepatitis B-Induced Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoning; Xie, Guoxiang; Zhao, Aihua; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Huang, Fengjie; Wang, Yixing; Yao, Chun; Jia, Wei; Liu, Ping

    2016-04-01

    Recent metabonomic studies have identified an important role of bile acids in patients with liver cirrhosis. Serum bile acids, such as glycocholate (GCA), glycochenodeoxycholate (GCDCA), taurocholate (TCA), and taurochenodeoxycholate (TCDCA), increased significantly in liver cirrhosis patients. Our recently published urinary metabonomic study showed that glycocholate 3-glucuronide, taurohyocholate, TCA, glycolithocholate 3-sulfate, and glycoursodeoxycholate (GUDCA) were markedly increased in hepatitis B-induced cirrhotic patients (n = 63) compared with healthy controls (n = 31). The urinary levels of GUDCA were able to differentiate among three stages of cirrhotic patients with Child-Pugh (CP) score A, B, and C. In this study, we recruited two new cohorts of patients with hepatitis-B-induced cirrhosis and healthy control subjects and quantitatively profiled their serum bile acids using ultra-performance liquid chromatography triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. Serum bile acid profile and corresponding differential bile acids were characterized, in addition to the blood routine, liver, and renal function tests. The alterations of bile acids contributing to the intergroup variation between healthy controls and cirrhotic patients and among pathological stages of CP grade A, B and C were also investigated. Five bile acids, GCA, GCDCA, TCA, TCDCA, and GUDCA, were significantly altered among different stages of liver cirrhosis (n = 85), which was validated with an independent cohort of cirrhotic patients (n = 53). Our results show that dynamic alteration of serum bile acids is indicative of an exacerbated liver function, highlighting their potential as biomarkers for staging the liver cirrhosis and monitoring its progression. PMID:25964117

  16. Galangin (3,5,7-Trihydroxyflavone) Shields Human Keratinocytes from Ultraviolet B-Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Madduma Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Cha, Ji Won; Han, Xia; Choi, Yung Hyun; Chae, Sungwook; Hyun, Jin Won

    2015-01-01

    Most skin damage caused by ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation is owing to the generation of reactive oxygen species. Phytochemicals can act as antioxidants against UVB-induced oxidative stress. This study investigated the protective effects of the flavone galangin against UVB-induced oxidative damage in human keratinocytes. Galangin efficiently scavenged free radicals and reduced UVB-induced damage to cellular macromolecules, such as DNA, lipids, and proteins. Furthermore, galangin rescued cells undergoing apoptosis induced by UVB radiation via recovering mitochondrial polarization and down-regulating apoptotic proteins. These results showed that galangin protects human keratinocytes against UVB radiation-induced cellular damage and apoptosis via its antioxidant effects. PMID:25767685

  17. An Overview of the Source Physics Experiment at the Nevada National Security Site (SPE-N)

    SciTech Connect

    Snelson, C. M., Chipman, V. D., White, R. L., Emmitt, R. F., Townsend, M. J., Barker, D., Lee, P.

    2012-07-11

    Understanding the changes in seismic energy as it travels from the near field to the far field is the ultimate goal in monitoring for explosive events of interest. This requires a clear understanding of explosion phenomenology as it relates to seismic, infrasound, and acoustic signals. Although there has been much progress in modeling these phenomena, this has been primarily based in the empirical realm. As a result, the logical next step in advancing the seismic monitoring capability of the United States is to conduct field tests that can expand the predictive capability of the physics-based modeling currently under development. The Source Physics Experiment at the Nevada National Security Site (SPE-N) is the first step in this endeavor to link the empirically based with the physics-based modeling. This is a collaborative project between National Security Technologies (NSTec), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), and the Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC). The test series require both the simple and complex cases to fully characterize the problem, which is to understand the transition of seismic energy from the near field to the far field; to understand the development of S-waves in explosives sources; and how anisotropy controls seismic energy transmission and partitioning. The current series is being conducted in a granite body called the Climax Stock. This location was chosen for several reasons, including the fairly homogenous granite; the location of previous nuclear tests in the same rock body; and generally the geology has been well characterized. The simple geology series is planned for 7 shots using conventional explosives in the same shot hole surrounded by Continuous Reflectometry for Radius vs. Time Experiment (CORRTEX), Time of Arrival (TOA), Velocity of Detonation (VOD), down-hole accelerometers, surface accelerometers, infrasound, and a suite of seismic sensors of various frequency bands from the near field to the far field. This allows for the use of a single test bed in the simple geology case instead of multiple tests beds to obtain the same results. The shots are planned at various depths to obtain a Green’s function, scaled-depth of burial data, nominal depth of burial data and damage zone data. SPE1-N was conducted in May 2011 as a 220 lb (100 kg) TNT equivalent calibration shot at a depth of 180 ft (55 m). SPE2-N was conducted in October 2011 as a 2200 lb (1000 kg) TNT equivalent calibration shot at a depth of 150 ft (46 m). SPE3-N was conducted in July 2012 as a 2200 lb (1000 kg) TNT equivalent calibration shot at a depth of 150 ft (46 m) in the damaged zone. Over 400 data channels were recorded for each of these shots and data recovery was about 95% with high signal to noise ratio. Once the simple geology site data has been utilized, a new test bed will be developed in a complex geology site to test these physics based models. Ultimately, the results from this project will provide the next advances in the science of monitoring to enable a physics-based predicative capability.

  18. The Source Physics Experiments (SPE) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS): An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snelson, C. M.; Chipman, V.; White, R. L.; Emmitt, R.; Townsend, M.; Barker, D.; Lee, P.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the changes in seismic energy as it travels from the near field to the far field is the ultimate goal in monitoring for explosive events of interest. This requires a clear understanding of explosion phenomenology as it relates to seismic, infrasound, and acoustic signals. Although there has been much progress in modeling these phenomena, this has been primarily based in the empirical realm. As a result, the logical next step in advancing the seismic monitoring capability of the United States is to conduct field tests that can expand the predictive capability of the physics-based modeling currently under development. The Source Physics Experiment at the Nevada National Security Site (SPE) is the first step in this endeavor to link the empirically based with the physics-based modeling. This is a collaborative project between National Security Technologies (NSTec), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), and the Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC). The test series require both the simple and complex cases to fully characterize the problem, which is to understand the transition of seismic energy from the near field to the far field; to understand the development of S-waves in explosives sources; and how anisotropy controls seismic energy transmission and partitioning. The current series is being conducted in a granite body called the Climax Stock. This location was chosen for several reasons, including the fairly homogenous granite; the location of previous nuclear tests in the same rock body; and generally the geology has been well characterized. The simple geology series is planned for 7 shots using conventional explosives in the same shot hole surrounded by Continuous Reflectometry for Radius vs. Time Experiment (CORRTEX), Time of Arrival (TOA), Velocity of Detonation (VOD), down-hole accelerometers, surface accelerometers, infrasound, and a suite of seismic sensors of various frequency bands from the near field to the far field. This allows for the use of a single test bed in the simple geology case instead of multiple tests beds to obtain the same results. The shots are planned at various depths to obtain a Green's function, scaled-depth of burial data, nominal depth of burial data and damage zone data. SPE1 was conducted in May 2011 as a 220 lb (100 kg) TNT equivalent calibration shot at a depth of 180 ft (55 m). SPE2 was conducted in October 2011 as a 2200 lb (1000 kg) TNT equivalent calibration shot at a depth of 150 ft (46 m). SPE3 was conducted in July 2012 as a 2200 lb (1000 kg) TNT equivalent calibration shot at a depth of 150 ft (46 m) in the damaged zone. Over 400 data channels were recorded for each of these shots and data recovery was about 95% with high signal to noise ratio. Once the simple geology site data has been utilized, a new test bed will be developed in a complex geology site to test these physics based models. Ultimately, the results from this project will provide the next advances in the science of monitoring to enable a physics-based predicative capability. This work was done by National Security Technologies, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy. DOE/NV/25946--1584

  19. Utilising copper screen-printed electrodes (CuSPE) for the electroanalytical sensing of sulfide.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Bhawana; Bernalte, Elena; Smith, Jamie P; Foster, Christopher W; Linton, Patricia E; Sawant, Shilpa N; Banks, Craig E

    2016-02-01

    A mediatorless sulfide electrochemical sensing platform utilising a novel nanocopper-oxide screen-printed electrodes (CuSPE) is reported for the first time. The state-of-the-art screen-printed electrochemical sensors demonstrate their capability to quantify sulfide within both the presence and absence of an array of interferents with good levels of sensitivity and repeatability. The direct sensing (using linear sweep voltammetry) of sulfide utilising the CuSPEs provides a mediatorless approach for the detection of sulfide, yielding useful analytical signatures that can be successfully quantified. The proposed novel protocol using the CuSPEs is successfully applied to the sensing of sulfide within drinking water exhibiting a high level of recovery. PMID:26815001

  20. Application of Nanofiber-packed SPE for Determination of Urinary 1-Hydroxypyrene Level Using HPLC

    PubMed Central

    Ifegwu, Okechukwu Clinton; Anyakora, Chimezie; Chigome, Samuel; Torto, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    It is always desirable to achieve maximum sample clean-up, extraction, and pre-concentration with the minimum possible organic solvent. The miniaturization of sample preparation devices was successfully demonstrated by packing 10 mg of 11 electrospun polymer nanofibers into pipette tip micro column and mini disc cartridges for efficient pre-concentration of 1-hydroxypyrene in urine samples. 1-hydroxypyrene is an extensively studied biomarker of the largest class of chemical carcinogens. Excretory 1-hydroxypyrene was monitored with HPLC/fluorescence detector. Important parameters influencing the percentage recovery such as fiber diameter, fiber packing amount, eluent, fiber packing format, eluent volume, surface area, porosity, and breakthrough parameters were thoroughly studied and optimized. Under optimized condition, there was a near perfect linearity of response in the range of 1–1000 μg/L with a coefficient of determination (r2) between 0.9992 and 0.9999 and precision (% RSD) ≤7.64% (n = 6) for all the analysis (10, 25, and 50 μg/L). The Limit of detection (LOD) was between 0.022 and 0.15 μg/L. When compared to the batch studies, both disc packed nanofiber sorbents and pipette tip packed sorbents exhibited evident dominance based on their efficiencies. The experimental results showed comparable absolute recoveries for the mini disc packed fibers (84% for Nylon 6) and micro columns (80% for Nylon 6), although the disc displayed slightly higher recoveries possibly due to the exposure of the analyte to a larger reacting surface. The results also showed highly comparative extraction efficiencies between the nanofibers and conventional C-18 SPE sorbent. Nevertheless, miniaturized SPE devices simplified sample preparation, reducing back pressure, time of the analysis with acceptable reliability, selectivity, detection levels, and environmental friendliness, hence promoting green chemistry. PMID:24812483

  1. Application of Nanofiber-packed SPE for Determination of Urinary 1-Hydroxypyrene Level Using HPLC.

    PubMed

    Ifegwu, Okechukwu Clinton; Anyakora, Chimezie; Chigome, Samuel; Torto, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    It is always desirable to achieve maximum sample clean-up, extraction, and pre-concentration with the minimum possible organic solvent. The miniaturization of sample preparation devices was successfully demonstrated by packing 10 mg of 11 electrospun polymer nanofibers into pipette tip micro column and mini disc cartridges for efficient pre-concentration of 1-hydroxypyrene in urine samples. 1-hydroxypyrene is an extensively studied biomarker of the largest class of chemical carcinogens. Excretory 1-hydroxypyrene was monitored with HPLC/fluorescence detector. Important parameters influencing the percentage recovery such as fiber diameter, fiber packing amount, eluent, fiber packing format, eluent volume, surface area, porosity, and breakthrough parameters were thoroughly studied and optimized. Under optimized condition, there was a near perfect linearity of response in the range of 1-1000 μg/L with a coefficient of determination (r (2)) between 0.9992 and 0.9999 and precision (% RSD) ≤7.64% (n = 6) for all the analysis (10, 25, and 50 μg/L). The Limit of detection (LOD) was between 0.022 and 0.15 μg/L. When compared to the batch studies, both disc packed nanofiber sorbents and pipette tip packed sorbents exhibited evident dominance based on their efficiencies. The experimental results showed comparable absolute recoveries for the mini disc packed fibers (84% for Nylon 6) and micro columns (80% for Nylon 6), although the disc displayed slightly higher recoveries possibly due to the exposure of the analyte to a larger reacting surface. The results also showed highly comparative extraction efficiencies between the nanofibers and conventional C-18 SPE sorbent. Nevertheless, miniaturized SPE devices simplified sample preparation, reducing back pressure, time of the analysis with acceptable reliability, selectivity, detection levels, and environmental friendliness, hence promoting green chemistry. PMID:24812483

  2. Optimization of an SPE and GC/MS Method for Analyzing Endocrine Disrupting Compounds in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S. M.; Bodour, A.; Murray, K. E.

    2006-12-01

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) are compounds that interrupt hormonal functions in the body. The literature reports the presence of EDCs in all environmental matrices (air, water and soil) at concentrations of at least 1 nanogram/liter (ng/l), which may be high enough to induce adverse health effects. Therefore, reliable analytical methods for detecting trace amounts of EDCs in water is very important for investigating and controlling their concentrations in the environment. This study investigated a method for analyzing four known or suspected EDCs (chlorpyrifos, musk HHCB, diethyl phthalate, and butylated hydroxyanisole) in water samples. The analytical method was based on the USGS wastewater method developed by Zaugg et al. (2001), but modified, using solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. The EDCs were extracted using 60mg Water Oasis hydrophilic-lipophillic balance (HLB) extraction cartridges. The SPE efficiency was investigated by using different initial extraction volumes and different EDC concentrations. The lowest concentration was 1ng/l and the lowest extraction volume was 100mL. Results of the study indicate that the initial oven temperature conditions and rate of temperature increases affects the peak signal to noise ratio and the sample run-time in the GC/MS. An increase in gas flow rate did not show any significant changes and hence was maintained at 1ml/min. Preliminary data suggests that the percent recovery of the compounds obtained using this method either met or exceeded those presented by Zaugg et al. (2001) as the USGS wastewater method.

  3. Characteristics of Four SPE Classes According to Onset Timing and Proton Acceleration Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Roksoon

    2015-04-01

    In our previous work (Kim et al., 2015), we suggested a new classification scheme, which categorizes the SPEs into four groups based on association with flare or CME inferred from onset timings as well as proton acceleration patterns using multienergy observations. In this study, we have tried to find whether there are any typical characteristics of associated events and acceleration sites in each group using 42 SPEs from 1997 to 2012. We find: (i) if the proton acceleration starts from a lower energy, a SPE has a higher chance to be a strong event (> 5000 pfu) even if the associated flare and CME are not so strong. The only difference between the SPEs associated with flare and CME is the location of the acceleration site. For the former, the sites are very low ( ~1 Rs) and close to the western limb, while the latter has a relatively higher (mean=6.05 Rs) and wider acceleration sites. (ii) When the proton acceleration starts from the higher energy, a SPE tends to be a relatively weak event (< 1000 pfu), in spite of its associated CME is relatively stronger than previous group. (iii) The SPEs categorized by the simultaneous proton acceleration in whole energy range within 10 minutes, tend to show the weakest proton flux (mean=327 pfu) in spite of strong related eruptions. Their acceleration heights are very close to the locations of type II radio bursts. Based on those results, we suggest that the different characteristics of the four groups are mainly due to the different mechanisms governing the acceleration pattern and interval, and different condition such as the acceleration location.

  4. Characteristics of four SPE groups with different origins and acceleration processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, R.-S.; Cho, K.-S.; Lee, J.; Bong, S.-C.; Joshi, A. D.; Park, Y.-D.

    2015-09-01

    Solar proton events (SPEs) can be categorized into four groups based on their associations with flare or CME inferred from onset timings as well as acceleration patterns using multienergy observations. In this study, we have investigated whether there are any typical characteristics of associated events and acceleration sites in each group using 42 SPEs from 1997 to 2012. We find the following: (i) if the proton acceleration starts from a lower energy, a SPE has a higher chance to be a strong event (> 5000 particle flux per unit (pfu)) even if its associated flare and/or CME are not so strong. The only difference between the SPEs associated with flare and CME is the location of the acceleration site. (ii) For the former (Group A), the sites are very low (˜ 1 Rs) and close to the western limb, while the latter (Group C) have relatively higher (mean = 6.05 Rs) and wider acceleration sites. (iii) When the proton acceleration starts from the higher energy (Group B), a SPE tends to be a relatively weak event (< 1000 pfu), although its associated CME is relatively stronger than previous groups. (iv) The SPEs categorized by the simultaneous acceleration in whole energy range within 10 min (Group D) tend to show the weakest proton flux (mean = 327 pfu) in spite of strong associated eruptions. Based on those results, we suggest that the different characteristics of SPEs are mainly due to the different conditions of magnetic connectivity and particle density, which are changed with longitude and height as well as their origin.

  5. In-line SPE-CE using a fritless bead string design--application for the analysis of organic sulfonates including inline SPE-CE-MS for APTS-labeled glycans.

    PubMed

    Joo, Kevin; Sommer, Johannes; Bunz, Svenja-Catharina; Neus, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Despite many advantages like high separation efficiency CE comprises the main limitation of low concentration sensitivity, when compared to HPLC. In-line SPE is an efficient way to increase concentration sensitivity. Here, a fritless in-line-SPE-CE-MS method was developed in order to analyze anions of strong acids. Mixed-mode (weak anion exchange and RP) particles were used for enrichment and an acidic BGE was applied for separation. Different particle and capillary sizes were tested. A novel bead string design with a 100 ?m id column filled with particles of 90 ?m followed by a separation capillary with 50 ?m id was easy to prepare and showed the best performance with respect to separation efficiency and reproducibility. Three aromatic sulfonic acids were employed in an in-line SPE-CE-UV approach for method development. Method validation was performed with respect to reproducibility, robustness, and linearity. Thereafter the method was transferred to SPE-CE-MS and applied to the analysis of glycans labeled with 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid. Lower limits of detection in the low nM range were achieved injecting about 10 ?L of sample. This corresponds to an enrichment factor of more than 800 compared to the corresponding CE-MS method without preconcentration. PMID:24170563

  6. [Apoptosis in toxicologic pathology].

    PubMed

    Ferencić, Zeljko

    2009-10-01

    Toxicologic pathology provides expertise to the interpretation of the toxicity and safety of pharmaceuticals, biological agents, human and animal food aditives, environmental and industrial chemicals, and medical devices in animal studies. The histopathology findings are integrated with other study data (clinical and biochemistry data, autopsy) providing a comprehensive report on efficacy and safety of a chemical, device or material and the relationship of toxicity to exposure. Since its discovery, apoptosis emerged as a molecular control point in the regulation of physiological processes, toxic insults and diseases by means of a programmed cell death. Numerous factors include chemicals, oxidative stress, anoxia, and irradiation. Suppression, overexpression or mutation of a number of genes which orchestrate the apoptotic process are associated with disease. Also, the disbalance in apoptosis processes is documented in viral, autoimmune and neurodegenerative diseases, as well as in tumors. Research in the pharmacologic industry is driven toward developing new drugs for treatment schedules for these and other diseases. Toxicologic pathology findings of apoptosis should assist regulatory agencies in understanding the potential hazard or benefit of the tested substance (is the finding of apoptosis normal variation, spontaneous event or provoked by tested drug). Since the great majority of initial histopathological examinations made on toxicity studies and animal disease models are done on routine hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides, the morphology alone is sufficient for accurate and adequate identification of apoptosis. PMID:19999544

  7. Spaceflight Associated Apoptosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichiki, Albert T.; Gibson, Linda A.; Allebban, Zuhair

    1996-01-01

    Lymphoid tissues have been shown to atrophy in rats flown on Russian spaceflights. Histological examination indicated evidence for cell degradation. Lymphoid tissues from rats flown on Spacelab Life Sciences-2 mission were analyzed for apoptosis by evidence of fragmented lymphocytes, which could be engulfed by macrophages, or DNA strand breaks using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. Apoptosis was not detected in the thymus and spleen collected inflight or from the synchronous ground rats but was detected in the thymus, spleen and inguinal lymph node of the flight animals on recovery. These results indicate that the apoptosis observed in the lymphatic tissues of the rats on recovery could have been induced by the gravitational stress of reentry, corroborating the findings from the early space-flight observations.

  8. NF-?B-inducing kinase is essential for B-cell maintenance in mice.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Matthias; Macht, Anna; Waisman, Ari; Hvelmeyer, Nadine

    2016-03-01

    NF-?B-inducing kinase (NIK) is a key mediator of the noncanonical NF-?B signaling pathway, which is critical for normal B-cell development and function. It is well established that the complete deletion of NIK in mice results in defective B cells and impaired secondary lymphoid organogenesis. To address the role of NIK deficiency specifically in B cells, we generated a new mouse strain for the conditional deletion of this kinase. Deletion of NIK during B-cell development results in a drastic reduction of mature B cells from the transitional 2 stage on, while B-1 B cells are less affected. Moreover, deletion of NIK in the germinal centers decreases the numbers of germinal center B cells and impairs the ability of NIK-deficient B cells to develop into class-switched cells in vivo. This new mouse strain will be helpful for studying the role of NIK in different cell types of the body. PMID:26593098

  9. [Molecular control of apoptosis].

    PubMed

    Dubois-Dauphin, M

    2003-03-01

    Apoptotic cell death is a natural event necessary to shaping the developing nervous system and is a feature of neurodegenerative disease pathology. Subtle interactions between pro- and anti-apoptotic molecules are controlled by environmental factors such as trophic factors. The mitochondrion is a major component regulating these interactions. At the time of apoptosis, proteases, called caspases, are activated to ensure cell breakdown. In living cells, intracellular components ensure the inhibition of caspases. As such, caspases are therapeutic targets to induce or to prevent apoptosis. PMID:12746608

  10. [Sphingolipid and apoptosis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Hu, Xiao-Song; Shi, Jie-Ping

    2003-07-01

    Over the last decade, considerable progress has been made in the study of sphingolipids with the development of biological techniques. Sphingolipids play important roles in diverse physiological process, including cytoskeleton migration, angiogenesis, embryonic development and signal transduction. Except for this, the lastest evidence has suggested that sphingolipids and their metabolite (ceramide, sphingosine, sphingosine 1-phosphate) can induce apoptosis in a wide variety of tumor cell lines such as LoVo HT29, Bel7402, A549, CNE2 cells. This paper is attempted to review the recent advances of investigation into the relationship between sphingolipids and apoptosis. PMID:14628466

  11. [Apoptosis during embryo development].

    PubMed

    Jezek, Davor; Kozina, Viviana

    2009-10-01

    The development of human embryo includes two essential processes, i.e., rapid mitotic activity of cells and gradual differentiation of tissues and organs. The latter process is very often characterized by extensive migration of cells from their site of origin to the site of definitive location, inductive action of the neighboring germ layers and programmed cell death (apoptosis). This paper describes examples of proliferative and apoptotic processes during the development of human embryo. The development of trilaminar germ disk, skin, gonads, central and peripheral nerve system as well as limbs provides instructive examples of how apoptosis regulates the development and differentiation of cells. PMID:19999545

  12. Effects of schisandrin B pretreatment on tumor necrosis factor-alpha induced apoptosis and Hsp70 expression in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Ip, S P; Che, C T; Kong, Y C; Ko, K M

    2001-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) could cause apoptosis in hepatic tissue of D-galactosamine sensitized mice, as evidenced by the increase in the extent of DNA fragmentation. The hepatic apoptosis induced by TNFalpha was associated with hepatocellular damage as assessed by plasma alanine aminotransferase activity. Schisandrin B (Sch B) pretreatment at daily doses ranging from 0.5 to 2 mmol/kg for 3 days caused a dose-dependent protection against TNFalpha-induced apoptosis in mice. The hepatoprotection was accompanied by a parallel reduction in the extent of hepatocellular damage. The same Sch B pretreatment regimens increased hepatic Hsp70 level in a dose-dependent manner. The relevance of Sch B-induced increase in Hsp70 expression to the prevention of TNFalpha-triggered hepatic apoptosis remains to be elucidated. PMID:11525242

  13. Role of AtMSH7 in UV-B-induced DNA damage recognition and recombination.

    PubMed

    Lario, Luciana Daniela; Botta, Pablo; Casati, Paula; Spampinato, Claudia Patricia

    2015-06-01

    The mismatch repair (MMR) system maintains genome integrity by correcting replication-associated errors and inhibiting recombination between divergent DNA sequences. The basic features of the pathway have been highly conserved throughout evolution, although the nature and number of the proteins involved in this DNA repair system vary among organisms. Plants have an extra mismatch recognition protein, MutSγ, which is a heterodimer: MSH2-MSH7. To further understand the role of MSH7 in vivo, we present data from this protein in Arabidopsis thaliana. First, we generated transgenic plants that express β-glucuronidase (GUS) under the control of the MSH7 promoter. Histochemical staining of the transgenic plants indicated that MSH7 is preferentially expressed in proliferating tissues. Then, we identified msh7 T-DNA insertion mutants. Plants deficient in MSH7 show increased levels of UV-B-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers relative to wild-type (WT) plants. Consistent with the patterns of MSH7 expression, we next analysed the role of the protein during somatic and meiotic recombination. The frequency of somatic recombination between homologous or homeologous repeats (divergence level of 1.6%) was monitored using a previously described GUS recombination reporter assay. Disruption of MSH7 has no effect on the rates of somatic homologous or homeologous recombination under control conditions or after UV-B exposure. However, the rate of meiotic recombination between two genetically linked seed-specific fluorescent markers was 97% higher in msh7 than in WT plants. Taken together, these results suggest that MSH7 is involved in UV-B-induced DNA damage recognition and in controlling meiotic recombination. PMID:25465032

  14. [Estrogens determination of livestock dung based on UE-SPE-HPLC/FLD].

    PubMed

    Fu, Yin-Jie; Ling, Wan-Ting; Dong, Chang-Xun; Liu, Juan; Gao, Yan-Zheng; Pan, Yu-Lan

    2013-11-01

    A method for detecting the estrogens estriol, 17beta-estradiol, ethinyl estradiol, and bisphenol A in livestock dung was established by the combination of ultrasonic extraction (UE), solid phase extraction (SPE) purification, and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detector (FLD). The dung samples were extracted with ethyl acetate ultrasonication for 30 min, and purified with C18 solid phase extraction column and related solvents. The test four estrogens in the dung samples were isolated with Inertsil ODS-SP-C18 reversed-phase columns (150 mm x 4.6 mm, 5 microm), and the isolated estrogens were detected with HPLC/FLD. The mobile phase of HPLC for the detection was methanol/acetonitrile/water (volume ratio of 20:30:50), with a flow rate of 0.8 mL x min(-1). The excitation and emission wavelengths of FLD were 280 and 310 nm, respectively, the HPLC column temperature was 40 degrees C, and the injection volume was 20 microL. Good linearity (correlation coefficient greater than 0.9995) was observed by the HPLC/FLD detection when the test four estrogens concentrations were in the range of 1.00-1000.00 microg x L(-1). The detection limit of estriol, bisphenol A, 17beta-estradiol, and ethinyl estradiol was 3.35, 5.01, 2.13, and 1.12 microg x kg(-1), respectively. When the added estrogens concentrations of pig, cow, and chicken dung samples were 0.05, 0.40, and, 1.00 microg x kg(-1), the average recovery of the four estrogens was 75.1%-91.1%, 78.4%-117.0%, and 78.6%-97.8%, respectively, with the relatively standard deviations (RSD, n = 6) all less than 6%. By adopting the established SPE-HPLC/FLD method to detect the estrogens in real pig, cow, and chicken dung samples from parts of the large-scale livestock raising farms in Nanjing of East China, the detection reproducibility was high, and the detection limit was low, being available and effective for the detection of the estrogens in livestock dung. PMID:24564161

  15. Simultaneous determination of most prescribed antibiotics in multiple urban wastewater by SPE-LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Rossmann, Julia; Schubert, Sara; Gurke, Robert; Oertel, Reinhard; Kirch, Wilhelm

    2014-10-15

    A rapid analytical method was developed for the application of a long-term monitoring (>one year) of the most prescribed and often in hospitals used antibiotics in diverse wastewaters of an urban sewage treatment plant (STP). Additionally to the selected multi-class antibiotics amoxicillin, penicillin V and piperacillin (penicillins), cefotaxime and cefuroxime (cephalosporins), azithromycin, clarithromycin and roxithromycin (macrolids), ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin-ofloxacin (fluoroquinolones), clindamycin (lincosamide), doxycycline (tetracycline), sulfamethoxazole (sulfonamide) and trimethoprim (dihydrofolate reductase inhibitor), the bioactive metabolite clindamycin-sulfoxide, the reserve antibiotic vancomycin (glycopeptide) and as tracer of the STP the anticonvulsant carbamazepine and the antifungal fluconazole were involved. The analytical method combines a low-sample-volume solid phase extraction (SPE), followed by a chromatographic separation using a reversed phase (RP) and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) technique, respectively, coupled to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Detection was performed with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) measured with positive electrospray ionization (ESI+). The extraction efficiency of different SPE cartridges and optimized pH-values of the preparation procedure were tested. Finally, the extraction of antibiotics was realized with the Oasis HLB cartridge and a pH adjustment at 3.5. An external calibration curve in diluted blank urine was used for quality control of the sample set of daily composite samples of the STP for the duration of one year monitoring. The squared coefficient of determination (r(2)) in the concentration range (20-20,000ng/L or 100-100,000ng/L) of the calibration curves for the method was higher than 0.99 for all determined substances. The limit of quantification (LoQ) ranged between 0.8ng/L (azithromycin) and 245.1ng/L (vancomycin). Furthermore, a standard addition was used for quantification in wastewater samples. The process efficiencies ranged from 20% (doxycycline) to 134% (cefuroxime) in influent samples and from 31% (doxycycline) to 171% (cefuroxime) in effluent samples of the STP. All selected substances have been found in wastewater samples. Cefuroxime, doxycycline, levofloxacin, piperacillin, sulfamethoxazole and carbamazepine showed highest concentrations up to 6.2μg/L. PMID:25171505

  16. Unc93b Induces Apoptotic Cell Death and Is Cleaved by Host and Enteroviral Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Katharine G.; Coyne, Carolyn B.

    2015-01-01

    Unc93b is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident transmembrane protein that serves to bind and traffic toll-like receptors (TLRs) from the ER to their appropriate subcellular locations for ligand sensing. Because of its role in TLR trafficking, Unc93b is necessary for an effective innate immune response to coxsackievirus B3 (CVB), a positive-sense single stranded RNA virus belonging to the enterovirus family. Here, we show that Unc93b is cleaved by a CVB-encoded cysteine protease (3Cpro) during viral replication. Further, we define a role for Unc93b in the induction of apoptotic cell death and show that expression of wild-type Unc93b, but not a mutant incapable of binding TLRs or exiting the ER (H412R), induces apoptosis. Furthermore, we show that cellular caspases activated during apoptosis directly cleave Unc93b. Interestingly, we show that the 3Cpro- and caspase-mediated cleavage of Unc93b both occur within ten amino acids in the distal N-terminus of Unc93b. Mechanistically, neither caspase-mediated nor 3Cpro-mediated cleavage of Unc93b altered its trafficking function, inhibited its role in facilitating TLR3 or TLR8 signaling, or altered its apoptosis-inducing effects. Taken together, our studies show that Unc93b is targeted by both viral- and host cell-specific proteases and identify a function of Unc93b in the induction of apoptotic cell death. PMID:26509685

  17. The Development and Optimization of Techniques for Monitoring Water Quality on-Board Spacecraft Using Colorimetric Solid-Phase Extraction (C-SPE)

    SciTech Connect

    April Hill

    2007-12-01

    The main focus of this dissertation is the design, development, and ground and microgravity validation of methods for monitoring drinking water quality on-board NASA spacecraft using clorimetric-solid phase extraction (C-SPE). The Introduction will overview the need for in-flight water quality analysis and will detail some of the challenges associated with operations in the absence of gravity. The ability of C-SPE methods to meet these challenges will then be discussed, followed by a literature review on existing applications of C-SPE and similar techniques. Finally, a brief discussion of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy theory, which provides a means for analyte identification and quantification in C-SPE analyses, is presented. Following the Introduction, four research chapters are presented as separate manuscripts. Chapter 1 reports the results from microgravity testing of existing C-SPE methods and procedures aboard NASA's C-9 microgravity simulator. Chapter 2 discusses the development of a C-SPE method for determining the total concentration of biocidal silver (i.e., in both dissolved and colloidal forms) in water samples. Chapter 3 presents the first application of the C-SPE technique to the determination of an organic analyte (i.e., formaldehyde). Chapter 4, which is a departure from the main focus of the thesis, details the results of an investigation into the effect of substrate rotation on the kinetics involved in the antigen and labeling steps in sandwich immunoassays. These research chapters are followed by general conclusions and a prospectus section.

  18. ACME encoded speG abrogates the unique hypersensitivity of Staphylococcus aureus to exogenous polyamines

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Gauri S.; Spontak, Jeffrey S.; Klapper, David G.; Richardson, Anthony R.

    2011-01-01

    Polyamines, including spermine (Spm) and spermidine (Spd), are aliphatic cations that are reportedly synthesized by all living organisms. They exert pleiotropic effects on cells and are required for efficient nucleic acid and protein synthesis. Here, we report that the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus lacks identifiable polyamine biosynthetic genes, and consequently produces no Spm/Spd or their precursor compounds putrescine and agmatine. Moreover, while supplementing defined medium with polyamines generally enhances bacterial growth, Spm and Spd exert bactericidal effects on S. aureus at physiologic concentrations. Small colony variants specifically lacking menaquinone biosynthesis arose after prolonged Spm exposure and exhibited reduced polyamine-sensitivity. However, other respiratory-defective mutants were no less susceptible to Spm implying menaquinone itself rather than general respiration is required for full Spm-toxicity. Polyamine hypersensitivity distinguishes S. aureus from other bacteria and is exhibited by all tested strains save those belonging to the USA-300 group of Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA). We identified one gene within the USA-300-specific Arginine Catabolic Mobile Element (ACME) encoding a Spm/Spd N-acetyltransferase that is necessary and sufficient for polyamine resistance. S. aureus encounters significant polyamine levels during infection, however the acquisition of ACME encoded speG allows USA-300 clones to circumvent polyamine-hypersensitivity, a peculiar trait of S. aureus. PMID:21902734

  19. Data Release Report for Source Physics Experiment 1 (SPE-1), Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, Margaret; Mercadente, Jennifer

    2014-04-28

    The first Source Physics Experiment shot (SPE-1) was conducted in May 2011. The explosive source was a ~100-kilogram TNT-equivalent chemical set at a depth of 60 meters. It was recorded by an extensive set of instrumentation that includes sensors both at near-field (less than 100 meters) and far-field (more than 100 meters) distances. The near-field instruments consisted of three-component accelerometers deployed in boreholes around the shot and a set of singlecomponent vertical accelerometers on the surface. The far-field network comprised a variety of seismic and acoustic sensors, including short-period geophones, broadband seismometers, three-component accelerometers, and rotational seismometers at distances of 100 meters to 25 kilometers. This report coincides with the release of these data for analysts and organizations that are not participants in this program. This report describes the first Source Physics Experiment and the various types of near-field and far-field data that are available.

  20. HPLC-F analysis of melatonin and resveratrol isomers in wine using an SPE procedure.

    PubMed

    Mercolini, Laura; Addolorata Saracino, Maria; Bugamelli, Francesca; Ferranti, Anna; Malaguti, Marco; Hrelia, Silvana; Raggi, Maria Augusta

    2008-04-01

    An original analytical method has been developed for the determination of the antioxidants trans-resveratrol (t-RSV) and cis-resveratrol (c-RSV) and of melatonin (MLT) in red and white wine. The method is based on HPLC coupled to fluorescence detection. Separation was obtained by using a RP column (C8, 150 mm x 4.6 mm id, 5 mum) and a mobile phase composed of 79% aqueous phosphate buffer at pH 3.0 and 21% ACN. Fluorescence intensity was monitored at lambda = 386 nm while exciting at lambda = 298 nm, mirtazapine was used as the internal standard. A careful pretreatment of wine samples was developed, using SPE with C18 cartridges (100 mg, 1 mL). The calibration curves were linear over the following concentration ranges: 0.03-5.00 ng/mL for MLT, 3-500 ng/mL for t-RSV and 1-150 ng/mL for c-RSV. The LOD values were 0.01 ng/mL for MLT, 1 ng/mL for t-RSV and 0.3 ng/mL for c-RSV. Precision data, as well as extraction yield and sample purification results, were satisfactory. Thus, the method seems to be suitable for the analysis of MLT and resveratrol isomers in wine samples. Moreover, wine total polyphenol content and antioxidant activity were evaluated. PMID:18338365

  1. Characterisation of antimicrobial extracts from dandelion root (Taraxacum officinale) using LC-SPE-NMR.

    PubMed

    Kenny, O; Brunton, N P; Walsh, D; Hewage, C M; McLoughlin, P; Smyth, T J

    2015-04-01

    Plant extracts have traditionally been used as sources of natural antimicrobial compounds, although in many cases, the compounds responsible for their antimicrobial efficacy have not been identified. In this study, crude and dialysed extracts from dandelion root (Taraxacum officinale) were evaluated for their antimicrobial properties against Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial strains. The methanol hydrophobic crude extract (DRE3) demonstrated the strongest inhibition of microbial growth against Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus and Bacillus cereus strains. Normal phase (NP) fractionation of DRE3 resulted in two fractions (NPF4 and NPF5) with enhanced antimicrobial activity. Further NP fractionation of NPF4 resulted in two fractions (NPF403 and NPF406) with increased antimicrobial activity. Further isolation and characterisation of compounds in NPF406 using liquid chromatography solid phase extraction nuclear magnetic resonance LC-SPE-NMR resulted in the identification of 9-hydroxyoctadecatrienoic acid and 9-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid, while the phenolic compounds vanillin, coniferaldehyde and p-methoxyphenylglyoxylic acid were also identified respectively. The molecular mass of these compounds was confirmed by LC mass spectroscopy (MS)/MS. In summary, the antimicrobial efficacy of dandelion root extracts demonstrated in this study support the use of dandelion root as a source of natural antimicrobial compounds. PMID:25644491

  2. Shear Wave Generation and Modeling Ground Motion From a Source Physics Experiment (SPE) Underground Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitarka, Arben; Mellors, Robert; Rodgers, Arthur; Vorobiev, Oleg; Ezzedine, Souheil; Matzel, Eric; Ford, Sean; Walter, Bill; Antoun, Tarabay; Wagoner, Jeffery; Pasyanos, Mike; Petersson, Anders; Sjogreen, Bjorn

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the excitation and propagation of far-field (epicentral distance larger than 20 m) seismic waves by analyzing and modeling ground motion from an underground chemical explosion recorded during the Source Physics Experiment (SPE), Nevada. The far-field recorded ground motion is characterized by complex features, such as large azimuthal variations in P- and S-wave amplitudes, as well as substantial energy on the tangential component of motion. Shear wave energy is also observed on the tangential component of the near-field motion (epicentral distance smaller than 20 m) suggesting that shear waves were generated at or very near the source. These features become more pronounced as the waves propagate away from the source. We address the shear wave generation during the explosion by modeling ground motion waveforms recorded in the frequency range 0.01-20 Hz, at distances of up to 1 km. We used a physics based approach that combines hydrodynamic modeling of the source with anelastic modeling of wave propagation in order to separate the contributions from the source and near-source wave scattering on shear motion generation. We found that wave propagation scattering caused by the near-source geological environment, including surface topography, contributes to enhancement of shear waves generated from the explosion source. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25946/ NST11-NCNS-TM-EXP-PD15.

  3. An automated high-throughput SPE micro-elution method for perfluoroalkyl substances in human serum.

    PubMed

    Huber, Sandra; Brox, Jan

    2015-05-01

    An automated high-throughput solid phase extraction (SPE) micro-elution method for 8 perfluorosulfonic acids, 11 perfluorocarboxylic acids and fluorooctane sulfonamide in human serum was developed. Importance was attached to the application of small volumes of reagents and solvents in addition to low sample volumes (50 μL) in order to save the highly valuable sample material for follow-up and other studies. Instrumental analysis was performed by ultra high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). The recoveries of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) were satisfactory and between 70 and 120% for most of the compounds at the three investigated spike concentrations. Perfluorobutane sulfonate (PFBS) was slightly underestimated at high concentrations (20 ng/mL; 67%), whereas perfluoropentanoate (PFPA), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) were overestimated with 134, 131 and 133% respectively, at low spike concentrations (0.2 ng/mL). The precision of the method was below 20% coefficient of variation (CV%) for all target compounds with the only exception of PFOS (22%) at low spike concentrations. Method detection limits ranged from 0.006 to 0.34 ng/mL. High sensitivity, accuracy, repeatability and robustness have been demonstrated for an appropriate concentration range. The applicability for real samples was satisfactory demonstrated by analysis of 40 sera samples from the general population from Tromsø, Norway. PMID:25795026

  4. Asteroid 21 Lutetia at 3 μm: Observations with IRTF SpeX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivkin, Andrew S.; Clark, Beth E.; Ockert-Bell, Maureen; Volquardsen, Eric; Howell, Ellen S.; Bus, Schelte J.; Thomas, Cristina A.; Shepard, Michael

    2011-11-01

    We present observations of Asteroid 21 Lutetia collected 2003-2008 using the SpeX instrument on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) covering 2-4 μm. We also reevaluate NSFCam observations obtained in 1996 (Rivkin, A.S., Lebofsky, L.A., Clark, B.E., Howell, E.S., Britt, D.T. [2000]. Icarus 145, 351-368). Taken together, these show deeper 3-μm band depths (of order 3-5%) in the southern hemisphere of Lutetia, and shallower band depths (of order 2% or less) in the north. Such variation is consistent with observations at shorter wavelength by previous workers (Nedelcu, D.A. et al. [2007]. Astron. Astrophys. 470, 1157-1164; Lazzarin, M. et al. [2010]. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 408, 1433-1437), who observed hemispheric-level variations from C-like spectra to X-like spectra. While the shallowness of absorption bands on Lutetia hinders identification of its surface composition, goethite appears plausible as a constituent in its southern hemisphere (Beck, P., Quirico, E., Sevestre, D., Montes-Hernandez, G., Pommerol, A., Schmitt, B. [2011]. Astron. Astrophys. 526, A85-A89). Mathematical models of space weathered goethite are most consistent with Lutetia's southern hemisphere spectrum, but more work and further observations are necessary to confirm this suggestion.

  5. SPE/WPC reserve definitions to provide more accurate, consistent estimates

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    Oil and gas reserves make up a producing company`s asset base, which generates future profits and investment capital. Hydrocarbon reserves are also a major source of energy for international governments, in addition to being an important aspect of a country`s stability both economically and politically. Therefore, both industry and governments must know the amount of oil and gas currently available for production, as well as the available quantities that are expected in the future through field development, technological advances and exploration activities. For this purpose, an industry-wide nomenclature is required to classify the current and future quantities predicted to be recovered from hydrocarbon bearing reservoirs based on the likelihood of their commercial recoverability. A single set of reserve definitions jointly drafted by SPE and WPC was approved in March 1997. The result of several years of collaboration between the two groups, the single definition set, which provides a standard nomenclature, should increase accuracy in reserves evaluation and ensure consistency in reserves classification throughout the industry.

  6. Analgesic efficacy of sodium salicylate in an amphotericin B-induced bovine synovitis-arthritis model.

    PubMed

    Kotschwar, J L; Coetzee, J F; Anderson, D E; Gehring, R; KuKanich, B; Apley, M D

    2009-08-01

    This study examined the efficacy of sodium salicylate for providing analgesia in an amphotericin B-induced bovine synovitis-arthritis model using 10 male Holstein calves, 4 to 6 mo old and weighing approximately 250 kg. The study used a repeated measures partial crossover design with 2 phases, consisting of 3 treatment periods within each phase. Calves were blocked by body weight and randomly assigned to the sodium salicylate (50 mg/kg i.v.) or placebo group for phase 1. In period 1, lameness induction was simulated with a needle prick of the coronary band, followed by drug or placebo administration. At predetermined time points, serial blood samples for cortisol and salicylate concentrations, electrodermal activity measurements, heart rates, and pressure mat data were collected. Visual lameness scores were recorded by an observer blinded to treatments. In period 2, lameness was induced with injection of amphotericin B into the distal interphalangeal joint, followed by drug or placebo administration, with sample collection as described previously. In period 3, the drug or placebo was administered to the respective calves with sample collection. After a 10-d washout period, phase 2 was conducted with treatments crossed over between groups. Cortisol and salicylate samples were analyzed by competitive chemiluminescent immunoassay and fluorescence polarization immunoassay, respectively. The pharmacokinetic data were analyzed using compartmental analysis. Mean intravenous salicylate apparent volume of distribution was 0.2 +/- 0.005 L/kg, total body clearance was 4.3 +/- 0.2 mL/min.kg, and elimination half-life was 36.9 +/- 1.2 min. The repeated measures data were analyzed based on a univariate split-plot approach with a random effects-mixed model. Differences in stance phase duration and serum cortisol concentration values were seen both between periods and between treatment group x periods; differences in heart rate, contact surface area, and contact pressure values were seen between periods, suggesting that our lameness model was effective. No differences were seen between treatment groups. When analyzed by visual lameness score, differences were seen in heart rate, contact surface area, contact pressure, and cortisol concentrations. Area under the time-effect curves, determined by using the trapezoidal rule, had results similar to the repeated measures data, except for a difference in period for electrodermal activity. This amphotericin B-induced synovitis-arthritis model is a useful tool for studying changes associated with lameness in cattle. Sodium salicylate was not effective in providing analgesia after lameness. PMID:19620655

  7. CORRTEX Diagnostic Deployment for the SPE-III experiment, 24 July 2012: Fielding Report and Preliminary Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, Thomas D.; Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.

    2012-08-29

    The Continuous Reflectometry for Radius vs Time Experiments (CORRTEX) diagnostic system was deployed for the third explosives test in the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) sequence to monitor and verify several conditions of the experiment including the detonation velocity of the explosive package and functioning of explosive initiators. Six distance-marked coaxial cables were installed on the SPE-III explosives canister, and key locations documented through along-cable length measurements and photography. CORRTEX uses electrical-pulse time-domain reflectometry to continuously record the two-way transit time (TWTT) of the cables. As the shock front of the detonation advances, the coaxial cable is shorted or destroyed, and the resulting TWTT also decreases. Interpretation of these changes as a function of TWTT can be converted to positional measurements using known parameters of the cables.

  8. Apoptosis and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, R S; Manolagas, S C

    2000-02-01

    During normal bone remodeling, the rate of supply of new osteoblasts and osteoclasts and the timing of the death of osteoclasts, osteoblasts, and osteocytes by apoptosis are critical determinants of the initiation of new BMUs and the extension or reduction of the lifetime of existing ones. Disruption of the fine balance among these processes may be an important mechanism behind the deranged bone turnover found in most metabolic disorders of the adult skeleton. Like most armies, the amount 5 of work done by bone cells is far more dependent on numbers than vigor. Therapeutic agents that alter the prevalence of apoptosis of osteoblasts and osteoclasts can correct the imbalance in cell numbers that is the basis of the diminished bone mass and increased risk of fractures in osteoporosis. PMID:11126309

  9. Development and validation of an SPE HG-AAS method for determination of inorganic arsenic in samples of marine origin.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Rie R; Hedegaard, Rikke V; Larsen, Erik H; Sloth, Jens J

    2012-07-01

    The present paper describes a novel method for the quantitative determination of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in food and feed of marine origin. The samples were subjected to microwave-assisted extraction using diluted hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide, which solubilised the analytes and oxidised arsenite (As(III)) to arsenate (As(V)). Subsequently, a pH buffering of the sample extract at pH 6 enabled selective elution of As(V) from a strong anion exchange solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridge. Hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS) was applied to quantify the concentration of iAs (sum of As(III) and As(V)) as the total arsenic (As) in the SPE eluate. The results of the in-house validation showed that mean recoveries of 101-104% were achieved for samples spiked with iAs at 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mg·kg(-1), respectively. The limit of detection was 0.08 mg kg(-1), and the repeatability (RSD(r)) and intra-laboratory reproducibility (RSD(IR)) were less than 8% and 13%, respectively, for samples containing 0.2 to 1.5 mg kg(-1) iAs. The trueness of the SPE HG-AAS method was verified by confirming results obtained by parallel analysis using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. It was demonstrated that the two sets of results were not significantly different (P < 0.05). The SPE HG-AAS method was applied to 20 marine food and feed samples, and concentrations of up to 0.14 mg kg(-1) of iAs were detected. PMID:22526669

  10. A new piece of the Shigella Pathogenicity puzzle: spermidine accumulation by silencing of the speG gene [corrected].

    PubMed

    Barbagallo, Marialuisa; Di Martino, Maria Letizia; Marcocci, Lucia; Pietrangeli, Paola; De Carolis, Elena; Casalino, Mariassunta; Colonna, Bianca; Prosseda, Gianni

    2011-01-01

    The genome of Shigella, a gram negative bacterium which is the causative agent of bacillary dysentery, shares strong homologies with that of its commensal ancestor, Escherichia coli. The acquisition, by lateral gene transfer, of a large plasmid carrying virulence determinants has been a crucial event in the evolution towards the pathogenic lifestyle and has been paralleled by the occurrence of mutations affecting genes, which negatively interfere with the expression of virulence factors. In this context, we have analysed to what extent the presence of the plasmid-encoded virF gene, the major activator of the Shigella regulon for invasive phenotype, has modified the transcriptional profile of E. coli. Combining results from transcriptome assays and comparative genome analyses we show that in E. coli VirF, besides being able to up-regulate several chromosomal genes, which potentially influence bacterial fitness within the host, also activates genes which have been lost by Shigella. We have focused our attention on the speG gene, which encodes spermidine acetyltransferase, an enzyme catalysing the conversion of spermidine into the physiologically inert acetylspermidine, since recent evidence stresses the involvement of polyamines in microbial pathogenesis. Through identification of diverse mutations, which prevent expression of a functional SpeG protein, we show that the speG gene has been silenced by convergent evolution and that its inactivation causes the marked increase of intracellular spermidine in all Shigella spp. This enhances the survival of Shigella under oxidative stress and allows it to better face the adverse conditions it encounters inside macrophage. This is supported by the outcome of infection assays performed in mouse peritoneal macrophages and of a competitive-infection assay on J774 macrophage cell culture. Our observations fully support the pathoadaptive nature of speG inactivation in Shigella and reveal that the accumulation of spermidine is a key determinant in the pathogenicity strategy adopted by this microrganism. PMID:22102881

  11. Tumor Progression and Oncogene Addiction in a PDGF-B-Induced Model of Gliomagenesis12

    PubMed Central

    Calzolari, Filippo; Appolloni, Irene; Tutucci, Evelina; Caviglia, Sara; Terrile, Marta; Corte, Giorgio; Malatesta, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF-B) overexpression induces gliomas of different grades from murine embryonic neural progenitors. For the first time, we formally demonstrated that PDGF-B-induced neoplasms undergo progression from nontumorigenic low-grade tumors toward highly malignant forms. This result, showing that PDGF-B signaling alone is insufficient to confer malignancy to cells, entails the requirement for further molecular lesions in this process. Our results indicate that one of these lesions is represented by the down-regulation of the oncosuppressor Btg2. By in vivo transplantation assays, we further demonstrate that fully progressed tumors are PDGF-B-addicted because their tumor-propagating ability is lost when the PDGF-B transgene is silenced, whereas it is promptly reacquired after its reactivation. We provide evidence that this oncogene addiction is not caused by the need for PDGF-B as a mitogen but, rather, to the fact that PDGF-B is required to overcome cell-cell contact inhibition and to confer in vivo infiltrating potential on tumor cells. PMID:19048116

  12. Ram ion scattering caused by Space Shuttle v x B induced differential charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, I.; Davis, V. A.

    1987-01-01

    Observations of secondary, high-inclination ions streams have been reported in the literature. The authors of these previous papers attributed the source of the secondary ions to a disturbed region in the plasma about 10 m from the Space Shuttle Orbiter. A new theory has been developed which shows how v x B induced differential charging on the plasma diagnostics package (PDP) can scatter the ram ion flux. Some of these ions are reflected back to the PDP and may be the sorce of the observed ion distributions. The effect is unique to large spacecraft; it occurs only when the magnitude of the induced v x B potentials are much larger than the electron thermal energy and of the order of the ion ram energy. That the ion streams observed at large angles must have been reflected from the PDP surface is demonstrated with three-dimensional sheath and particle trajectory calculations using the low earth orbit version of the NASA Charging Analyzer Program (NASCAP/LEO).

  13. Ram ion scattering caused by space shuttle v times B induced differential charging

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, I.; Davis, V.A. )

    1987-08-01

    Observations of secondary, high-inclination ions streams have been reported in the literature. The authors of these previous papers attributed the source of the secondary ions to a disturbed region in the plasma about 10 m form the space shuttle Orbiter. A new theory has been developed which shows how v {times} B induces differential charging on the plasma diagnostics package (PDP) can scatter the ram ion flux. Some of these ions are reflected back to the PDP and may be the source of the observed ion distributions. The effect is unique to large spacecraft; it occurs only when the magnitude of the induced v {times} B potentials are much larger than the electron thermal energy and of the order of the ion ram energy. That the ion streams observed at large angles must have been reflected from the PDP surface is demonstrated with three-dimensional sheath and particle trajectory calculations using the low earth orbit version of the NASA Charging Analyzer Program (NASCAP/LEO).

  14. Role of WNT7B-induced Noncanonical Pathway in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Dali; Decker, Keith F.; Zhou, Tianhua; Chen, Jianquan; Qi, Zongtai; Jacobs, Kathryn; Weilbaecher, Katherine N.; Corey, Eva; Long, Fanxin; Jia, Li

    2014-01-01

    Advanced prostate cancer is characterized by incurable castration-resistant progression and osteoblastic bone metastasis. While androgen deprivation therapy remains the primary treatment for advanced prostate cancer, resistance inevitably develops. Importantly, mounting evidence indicates that androgen receptor (AR) signaling continues to play a critical role in the growth of advanced prostate cancer despite androgen deprivation. While the mechanisms of aberrant AR activation in advanced prostate cancer have been extensively studied, the downstream AR target genes involved in the progression of castration resistance are largely unknown. Here, we identify WNT7B as a direct AR target gene highly expressed in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cells. Our results show that expression of WNT7B is necessary for the growth of prostate cancer cells and that this effect is enhanced under androgen-deprived conditions. Further analyses reveal that WNT7B promotes androgen-independent growth of CRPC cells likely through the activation of protein kinase C isozymes. Our results also show that prostate cancer-produced WNT7B induces osteoblast differentiation in vitro through a direct cell–cell interaction, and that WNT7B is upregulated in human prostate cancer xenografts that cause an osteoblastic reaction when grown in bone. Taken together, these results suggest that AR-regulated WNT7B signaling is critical for the growth of CRPC and development of the osteoblastic bone response characteristic of advanced prostate cancer. PMID:23386686

  15. Plant DNA-damage repair/toleration 100 protein repairs UV-B-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Nozomi; Suzuki, Nana; Nakajima, Yuko; Suzuki, Shunji

    2014-09-01

    We report the characterization of VvDRT100-L, a grape DNA-damage repair/toleration 100 protein. VvDRT100-L has nine leucine-rich repeats and belongs to the plant DRT100 protein family. VvDRT100-L is expressed abundantly in green organs of grapevines, including tendrils, leaves, and green berry skins. The overexpression of VvDRT100-L in Arabidopsis plants decreased the number of abasic sites and the frequency of DNA single-strand breaks in the DNA damaged by UV-B irradiation, whereas UV-B irradiation markedly increased the number of abasic sites and the frequency of DNA single-strand breaks in T-DNA insertion mutant drt100 plants. VvDRT100-L-overexpressing plants remained viable and noticeably healthy under lethal UV doses, suggesting that VvDRT100-L may enhance UV tolerance in plant. Taken together, we concluded that VvDRT100-L might play an important role in the repair and toleration of UV-B-induced DNA damage. These findings would help us better understand how plants acquire UV stress acclimation, tolerance and DNA repair. PMID:24951183

  16. Identification of an epithelial cell receptor responsible for Clostridium difficile TcdB-induced cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    LaFrance, Michelle E.; Farrow, Melissa A.; Chandrasekaran, Ramyavardhanee; Sheng, Jinsong; Rubin, Donald H.; Lacy, D. Borden

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea in the United States. The two main virulence factors of C. difficile are the large toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which enter colonic epithelial cells and cause fluid secretion, inflammation, and cell death. Using a gene-trap insertional mutagenesis screen, we identified poliovirus receptor-like 3 (PVRL3) as a cellular factor necessary for TcdB-mediated cytotoxicity. Disruption of PVRL3 expression by gene-trap mutagenesis, shRNA, or CRISPR/Cas9 mutagenesis resulted in resistance of cells to TcdB. Complementation of the gene-trap or CRISPR mutants with PVRL3 resulted in restoration of TcdB-mediated cell death. Purified PVRL3 ectodomain bound to TcdB by pull-down. Pretreatment of cells with a monoclonal antibody against PVRL3 or prebinding TcdB to PVRL3 ectodomain also inhibited cytotoxicity in cell culture. The receptor is highly expressed on the surface epithelium of the human colon and was observed to colocalize with TcdB in both an explant model and in tissue from a patient with pseudomembranous colitis. These data suggest PVRL3 is a physiologically relevant binding partner that can serve as a target for the prevention of TcdB-induced cytotoxicity in C. difficile infection. PMID:26038560

  17. Brevenal Inhibits Pacific Ciguatoxin-1B-Induced Neurosecretion from Bovine Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mattei, Csar; Alvarez, Martha; Benoit, Evelyne; Bourdelais, Andrea J.; Lewis, Richard J.; Baden, Daniel G.; Molg, Jordi; Meunier, Frdric A.

    2008-01-01

    Ciguatoxins and brevetoxins are neurotoxic cyclic polyether compounds produced by dinoflagellates, which are responsible for ciguatera and neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP) respectively. Recently, brevenal, a natural compound was found to specifically inhibit brevetoxin action and to have a beneficial effect in NSP. Considering that brevetoxin and ciguatoxin specifically activate voltage-sensitive Na+ channels through the same binding site, brevenal has therefore a good potential for the treatment of ciguatera. Pacific ciguatoxin-1B (P-CTX-1B) activates voltage-sensitive Na+ channels and promotes an increase in neurotransmitter release believed to underpin the symptoms associated with ciguatera. However, the mechanism through which slow Na+ influx promotes neurosecretion is not fully understood. In the present study, we used chromaffin cells as a model to reconstitute the sequence of events culminating in ciguatoxin-evoked neurosecretion. We show that P-CTX-1B induces a tetrodotoxin-sensitive rise in intracellular Na+, closely followed by an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ responsible for promoting SNARE-dependent catecholamine secretion. Our results reveal that brevenal and ?-naphtoyl-brevetoxin prevent P-CTX-1B secretagogue activity without affecting nicotine or barium-induced catecholamine secretion. Brevenal is therefore a potent inhibitor of ciguatoxin-induced neurotoxic effect and a potential treatment for ciguatera. PMID:18941627

  18. MicroRNA-125b induces tau hyperphosphorylation and cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Banzhaf-Strathmann, Julia; Benito, Eva; May, Stephanie; Arzberger, Thomas; Tahirovic, Sabina; Kretzschmar, Hans; Fischer, André; Edbauer, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent form of dementia, but no clear disease-initiating mechanism is known. Aβ deposits and neuronal tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated tau are characteristic for AD. Here, we analyze the contribution of microRNA-125b (miR-125b), which is elevated in AD. In primary neurons, overexpression of miR-125b causes tau hyperphosphorylation and an upregulation of p35, cdk5, and p44/42-MAPK signaling. In parallel, the phosphatases DUSP6 and PPP1CA and the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-W are downregulated as direct targets of miR-125b. Knockdown of these phosphatases induces tau hyperphosphorylation, and overexpression of PPP1CA and Bcl-W prevents miR-125b-induced tau phosphorylation, suggesting that they mediate the effects of miR-125b on tau. Conversely, suppression of miR-125b in neurons by tough decoys reduces tau phosphorylation and kinase expression/activity. Injecting miR-125b into the hippocampus of mice impairs associative learning and is accompanied by downregulation of Bcl-W, DUSP6, and PPP1CA, resulting in increased tau phosphorylation in vivo. Importantly, DUSP6 and PPP1CA are also reduced in AD brains. These data implicate miR-125b in the pathogenesis of AD by promoting pathological tau phosphorylation. PMID:25001178

  19. Application of RP-HPLC-diode array detector after SPE to the determination of pesticides in pepper samples.

    PubMed

    Tuzimski, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    The application of HPLC-diode array detector (DAD) after SPE for identification and quantitative analysis of pesticides in red and green pepper samples is demonstrated. An HPLC procedure on an RP column (C18) was developed for analysis of selected pesticides from different chemical groups: metamitron, metalaxyl, linuron, and prometryn. Average recoveries for C18 Polar Plus cartridges and solvents by the proposed RP-HPLC-DAD method after SPE are presented. Average recoveries from the spiked samples and the SDs were 22.5 +/- 2.2, 138.0 +/- 4.1, 78.6 +/- 2.8, and 109.2 +/- 2.3% for metamitron, metalaxyl, linuron, and prometryn, respectively, at concentrations of 7 microg/g in the plant material. The efficiency of the SPE procedure was evaluated using real food samples. The quantities of prometryn, linuron, metalaxyl, and metamitron determined were in the ranges of 0.02-2.24 microg/g (n = 24), 0.08-1.01 microg/g (n = 9), 1.61-2.28 microg/g (n=4), and 0.05-1.07 microg/g (n = 3), respectively, in plant material sampled in 2011. The method was validated for precision, repeatability, and accuracy. PMID:23175966

  20. Determination of abamectin in citrus fruits using SPE combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and HPLC-UV detection.

    PubMed

    Rezaee, Mohammad; Mashayekhi, Hossein Ali; Saleh, Abolfazl; Abdollahzadeh, Yaser; Naeeni, Mohammad Hosein; Fattahi, Nazir

    2013-08-01

    A new pretreatment method, SPE combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, was proposed for the determination of abamectin in citrus fruit samples for the first time. In this method, fruit samples were extracted by ultrasound-assisted extraction followed by SPE. Then, the SPE was used as a disperser solvent in the next dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction step for further purification and enrichment of abamectin. The effects of various parameters on the extraction efficiency of the proposed method were investigated and optimized. Good linearity of abamectin was obtained from 0.005 to 10.0 mg/kg for B1a and from 0.05 to 10.0 mg/kg for B1b with correlation coefficient (r(2)) of 0.998 for B1a and 0.991 for B1b, respectively. The LODs were 0.001 and 0.008 mg/kg (S/N = 3) for B1a and B1b, respectively. The relative recoveries at three spiked levels were ranged from 87 to 96% with the RSD less than 11% (n = 3). The method has been successfully applied to the determination of abamectin in citrus fruit samples. PMID:23913592

  1. Analysis of drugs of abuse by online SPE-LC high resolution mass spectrometry: communal assessment of consumption.

    PubMed

    Heuett, Nubia V; Ramirez, Cesar E; Fernandez, Adolfo; Gardinali, Piero R

    2015-04-01

    An online SPE-LC-HRMS method was developed to monitor the consumption of 18 drugs of abuse (DOAs) including amphetamines, opioids, cocainics, cannabinoids, lysergics, and their corresponding metabolites in a well characterized college campus setting via wastewater analysis. Filtered and diluted (10×) sewage water samples (5 mL inj.) were automatically pre-concentrated and analyzed in 15 min using a Thermo EQuan MAX online SPE system equipped with a HyperSep™ Retain PEP (20×2.1 mm×12 μm) SPE column and a Hypersil Gold™ aQ (150×2.1 mm×3 μm) analytical column. A Q Exactive™ Hybrid Quadrupole-Orbitrap HRMS was used in full scan mode (R=140,000) for positive identification, and quantitation of target compounds. Method detection limits for all analytes ranged between 0.6 and 1.7 ng/L in sewage. A total of 14 DOAs were detected from two different locations (dorms and main college campus) within a one-year period. Most frequently detected drugs throughout the entire study were amphetamine (>96%) and THC's metabolite 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ-9-THC (>100%) with maximum concentrations of 5956 and 2413 ng/L respectively. Daily doses per 1000 people were determined in order to assess consumption of THC, amphetamine, heroin and cocaine, in both dorms and main campus. PMID:25553546

  2. Colorimetric-Solid Phase Extraction Technology for Water Quality Monitoring: Evaluation of C-SPE and Debubbling Methods in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazen-Bosveld, April; Lipert, Robert J.; Nordling, John; Shih, Chien-Ju; Siperko, Lorraine; Porter, Marc D.; Gazda, Daniel B.; Rutz, Jeff A.; Straub, John E.; Schultz, John R.; McCoy, J. Torin

    2007-01-01

    Colorimetric-solid phase extraction (C-SPE) is being developed as a method for in-flight monitoring of spacecraft water quality. C-SPE is based on measuring the change in the diffuse reflectance spectrum of indicator disks following exposure to a water sample. Previous microgravity testing has shown that air bubbles suspended in water samples can cause uncertainty in the volume of liquid passed through the disks, leading to errors in the determination of water quality parameter concentrations. We report here the results of a recent series of C-9 microgravity experiments designed to evaluate manual manipulation as a means to collect bubble-free water samples of specified volumes from water sample bags containing up to 47% air. The effectiveness of manual manipulation was verified by comparing the results from C-SPE analyses of silver(I) and iodine performed in-flight using samples collected and debubbled in microgravity to those performed on-ground using bubble-free samples. The ground and flight results showed excellent agreement, demonstrating that manual manipulation is an effective means for collecting bubble-free water samples in microgravity.

  3. The cell envelope-associated protein, LytR, regulates the cysteine protease SpeB in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Minami, Masaaki; Ichikawa, Mariko; Ohta, Michio; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2012-05-01

    The LytR family of cell envelope-associated transcriptional attenuators in bacteria has been brought into focus of scientific interest on the expression of various virulence factors, as well as bacterial cell envelope maintenance. However, this protein of Streptococcus pyogenes has been only described as cell surface-associated protein, and its function is completely unknown. We created lytR mutant strains from two independent S. pyogenes strains to analyze the function of LytR. The protease assay in culture supernatant showed that lytR mutant had the higher cysteine protease activity than wild-type. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and western blotting analysis revealed that the amount of cysteine protease, SpeB in lytR mutant was more compared with that in wild-type. The level of speB mRNA in lytR mutant also increased compared with that of wild-type. The membrane integrity and potential in lytR mutant also were decreased compared with that of wild-type. Murine infection model showed that less survival was detected in mice inoculated with lytR mutant than that with wild-type, and the size of wound lesion of mice with lytR mutant was larger than that with wild-type. Our data suggest that the lytR regulates the expression of SpeB in S. pyogenes with relation to membrane integrity. PMID:22515297

  4. Sphingolipids and mitochondrial apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Gauri A; Beverly, Levi J; Siskind, Leah J

    2016-04-01

    The sphingolipid family of lipids modulate several cellular processes, including proliferation, cell cycle regulation, inflammatory signaling pathways, and cell death. Several members of the sphingolipid pathway have opposing functions and thus imbalances in sphingolipid metabolism result in deregulated cellular processes, which cause or contribute to diseases and disorders in humans. A key cellular process regulated by sphingolipids is apoptosis, or programmed cell death. Sphingolipids play an important role in both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways depending on the stimuli, cell type and cellular response to the stress. During mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis, multiple pathways converge on mitochondria and induce mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP). MOMP results in the release of intermembrane space proteins such as cytochrome c and Apaf1 into the cytosol where they activate the caspases and DNases that execute cell death. The precise molecular components of the pore(s) responsible for MOMP are unknown, but sphingolipids are thought to play a role. Here, we review evidence for a role of sphingolipids in the induction of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis with a focus on potential underlying molecular mechanisms by which altered sphingolipid metabolism indirectly or directly induce MOMP. Data available on these mechanisms is reviewed, and the focus and limitations of previous and current studies are discussed to present important unanswered questions and potential future directions. PMID:25620271

  5. Optimization of a pre-MEKC separation SPE procedure for steroid molecules in human urine samples.

    PubMed

    Olędzka, Ilona; Kowalski, Piotr; Dziomba, Szymon; Szmudanowski, Piotr; Bączek, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Many steroid hormones can be considered as potential biomarkers and their determination in body fluids can create opportunities for the rapid diagnosis of many diseases and disorders of the human body. Most existing methods for the determination of steroids are usually time- and labor-consuming and quite costly. Therefore, the aim of analytical laboratories is to develop a new, relatively low-cost and rapid implementation methodology for their determination in biological samples. Due to the fact that there is little literature data on concentrations of steroid hormones in urine samples, we have made attempts at the electrophoretic determination of these compounds. For this purpose, an extraction procedure for the optimized separation and simultaneous determination of seven steroid hormones in urine samples has been investigated. The isolation of analytes from biological samples was performed by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) with dichloromethane and compared to solid phase extraction (SPE) with C18 and hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) columns. To separate all the analytes a micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECK) technique was employed. For full separation of all the analytes a running buffer (pH 9.2), composed of 10 mM sodium tetraborate decahydrate (borax), 50 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and 10% methanol was selected. The methodology developed in this work for the determination of steroid hormones meets all the requirements of analytical methods. The applicability of the method has been confirmed for the analysis of urine samples collected from volunteers--both men and women (students, amateur bodybuilders, using and not applying steroid doping). The data obtained during this work can be successfully used for further research on the determination of steroid hormones in urine samples. PMID:24232737

  6. The SpeX Prism Library Analysis Toolkit: Design Considerations and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgasser, Adam J.; Aganze, Christian; Escala, Ivana; Lopez, Mike; Choban, Caleb; Jin, Yuhui; Iyer, Aishwarya; Tallis, Melisa; Suarez, Adrian; Sahi, Maitrayee

    2016-01-01

    Various observational and theoretical spectral libraries now exist for galaxies, stars, planets and other objects, which have proven useful for classification, interpretation, simulation and model development. Effective use of these libraries relies on analysis tools, which are often left to users to develop. In this poster, we describe a program to develop a combined spectral data repository and Python-based analysis toolkit for low-resolution spectra of very low mass dwarfs (late M, L and T dwarfs), which enables visualization, spectral index analysis, classification, atmosphere model comparison, and binary modeling for nearly 2000 library spectra and user-submitted data. The SpeX Prism Library Analysis Toolkit (SPLAT) is being constructed as a collaborative, student-centered, learning-through-research model with high school, undergraduate and graduate students and regional science teachers, who populate the database and build the analysis tools through quarterly challenge exercises and summer research projects. In this poster, I describe the design considerations of the toolkit, its current status and development plan, and report the first published results led by undergraduate students. The combined data and analysis tools are ideal for characterizing cool stellar and exoplanetary atmospheres (including direct exoplanetary spectra observations by Gemini/GPI, VLT/SPHERE, and JWST), and the toolkit design can be readily adapted for other spectral datasets as well.This material is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant No. NNX15AI75G. SPLAT code can be found at https://github.com/aburgasser/splat.

  7. Composition and evolution of Triton's icy surface between 2002-2014 from SpeX/IRTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holler, Bryan J.; Young, Leslie A.; Grundy, William M.; Olkin, Cathy B.

    2015-11-01

    We observed Triton in the near-infrared (0.7-2.5 μm) over 63 nights using the SpeX instrument at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) between 2002 and 2014. Triton’s spectrum has absorption features due to N2, CO, CH4, CO2, and H2O in this wavelength range. We calculated the equivalent width (or fractional band depth for H2O) of select absorption bands in each of the 63 night-averaged spectra. Longitudinal distributions for the volatile ices (N2, CO, CH4) show large rotational amplitude, while the non-volatile ices (CO2, H2O) show little amplitude over one Triton rotation. Absorption from N2 and CH4 increased over the period of the observations, whereas absorption from the non-volatile ices remained constant. The sub-solar latitude on Triton is currently at -42 degrees south, so some areas of Triton are visible for a full rotation. Combined with our findings, this suggests that the southern latitudes are dominated by non-volatile ices, with larger concentrations of volatile ices found in the observable region north of the equator. Changing viewing geometry over the period of the observations explains the increase in volatile absorption: As the sub-solar point moves northwards, more of the volatile-rich northern regions are coming directly into view. Geological evidence from Voyager 2 pointed to a southern hemisphere dominated by volatile ices; significant changes have occurred over the intervening quarter century.

  8. NF-κB inducing kinase (NIK) modulates melanoma tumorigenesis by regulating expression of pro-survival factors through the β-catenin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Thu, Yee Mon; Su, Yingjun; Yang, Jinming; Splittgerber, Ryan; Na, Songqing; Boyd, Alan; Mosse, Claudio; Simons, Christopher; Richmond, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inducing kinase (NIK) is a MAP3K that regulates the activation of NF-κB. NIK is often highly expressed in tumor cells, including melanoma, but the significance of this in melanoma progression has been unclear. Tissue microarray analysis of NIK expression reveals that dysplastic nevi (n=22), primary (n=15) and metastatic melanoma (n=13) lesions showed a statistically significant elevation in NIK expression when compared to benign nevi (n=30). Moreover, when shRNA techniques were used to knock-down NIK, the resultant NIK-depleted melanoma cell lines exhibited decreased proliferation, increased apoptosis, and reduced tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. As expected, when NIK was depleted there was decreased activation of the non-canonical NF-κB pathway, while canonical NF-κB activation remained intact. NIK depletion also resulted in reduced expression of genes that contribute to tumor growth, including CXCR4, c-MYC and c-MET, and pro-survival factors such as BCL2 and survivin. These changes in gene expression are not fully explained by the attenuation of the non-canonical NF-κB pathway. Shown here for the first time is the demonstration that NIK modulates β-catenin mediated transcription to promote expression of survivin. NIK-depleted melanoma cells exhibited down-regulation of survivin as well as other β-catenin regulated genes including c-MYC, c-MET and CCND2. These data indicate that NIK mediates both β-catenin and NF-κB regulated transcription to modulate melanoma survival and growth. Thus, NIK may be a promising therapeutic target for melanoma. PMID:21963849

  9. Impacts of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Its speG Gene on the Transcriptomes of In Vitro M Cells and Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ke-Chuan; Huang, Chih-Hung; Huang, Ching-Jou

    2016-01-01

    Microfold or membranous (M) cells are specialized intestinal epithelial cells responsible for host immunity. The speG mutant of Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a nonreplicating strain within human cells to be a candidate vaccine vector for interacting with M cells. We conducted this study to identify the genes are differently expressed between in vitro M cells and Caco-2 cells, and to determine whether S. Typhimurium and speG affect the transcriptomes of both cell types. In vitro M cells and Caco-2 cells were infected with wild-type (WT) S. Typhimurium, its ΔspeG mutant, or none for 1 h for RNA microarrays; the transcriptomes among the 6 pools were pairwisely compared. Genetic loci encoding scaffold (e.g., HSCHR7_CTG4_4, HSCHR9_CTG9_35), long noncoding RNA, membrane-associated protein (PITPNB), neuron-related proteins (OR8D1, OR10G9, and NTNG2), and transporter proteins (MICU2 and SLC28A1) were significantly upregulated in uninfected M cells compared with uninfected Caco-2 cells; and their encoding proteins are promising M-cell markers. Significantly upregulated HSCHR7_CTG4_4 of uninfected in vitro M cells were speG-independently downregulated by S. Typhimurium infection that is a remarkable change representing an important but unreported characteristic of M cells. The immune responses of in vitro M cells and Caco-2 cells can differ and reply on speG or not, with speG-dependent regulation of KYL4, SCTR, IL6, TNF, and CELF4 in Caco-2 cells, JUN, KLF6, and KCTD11 in M cells, or speG-independent modulation of ZFP36 in both cells. This study facilitates understanding of the immune responses of in vitro M cells after administering the S. Typhimurium ΔspeG mutant as a future vaccine vector. PMID:27064787

  10. Geologic Assessment of the Damage Zone from the Second Test at Source Physics Experiment-Nevada (SPE-N)

    SciTech Connect

    ,

    2012-09-18

    The National Center for Nuclear Security (NCNS), established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, is conducting a series of explosive tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS; formerly the Nevada Test Site) that are designed to increase the understanding of certain basic physical phenomena associated with underground explosions. These tests will aid in developing technologies that might be used to detect underground nuclear explosions in support of verification activities for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The initial NCNS project is a series of explosive tests, known collectively as the Source Physics Experiment at the NNSS (SPE-N), being conducted in granitic rocks at the Climax stock in northern Yucca Flat. The SPE-N test series is designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves. The data will be used to improve the predictive capability of calculational models for detecting and characterizing underground explosions. The first SPE-N test (SPE-N-1) was a “calibration” shot conducted in May 2011, using 100 kilograms (kg) of explosives at the depth of 54.9 meters (m) (180 feet [ft]) in the U-15n source hole. SPE-N-2 was conducted in October 2011, using 1,000 kg of explosives at the depth of 45.7 m (150 ft) in the same source hole. Following the SPE-N-2 test, the core hole U-15n#10 was drilled at an angle from the surface to intercept the SPE-N-2 shot point location to obtain information necessary to characterize the damage zone. The desire was to determine the position of the damage zone near the shot point, at least on the northeast side, where the core hole penetrated it. The three-dimensional shape and symmetry of the damage zone are unknown at this time. Rather than spherical in shape, the dimensions of the damage zone could be influenced by the natural fracture sets in the vicinity. Geologic characterization of the borehole included geophysical logging, a directional survey, and geologic description of the core to document visual evidence of damage. Selected core samples were provided to Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for laboratory tests (to be reported by SNL). A significant natural fault zone was encountered in the U-15n#10 angle core hole between the drilled depths of 149 and 155 ft (straight-line distance or range station [RS] from the shot point of 7.5 to 5.7 m). However, several of the fractures observed in the U-15n#10 hole are interpreted as having been caused by the explosion. These fractures are characterized by a “fresh,” mechanically broken look, with uncoated and very irregular surfaces. They tend to terminate against natural fractures and have orientations that differ from the previously defined natural fracture sets. The most distant fracture from the shot point that could be interpreted as having been caused by the explosion was seen at approximately RS 10.0 m. No other possibly explosion-induced fractures are apparent above the fault, but are common starting at RS 5.4 m, which is below the fault. It is unknown how the fault zone might have affected the propagation of seismic waves or how the materials in the fault zone (altered granite, breccia, gouge) were affected by the explosion. From RS 3.3 m to the end of the recovered core at RS 1.6 m, some of the core samples are softer and lighter in color, but do not appear to be weathered. It is thought this could be indicative of the presence of distributed microfracturing.

  11. UV-BInduced DNA Damage and Repair in the Mouse Lens

    PubMed Central

    Mesa, Rosana; Bassnett, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Epidemiologic studies have linked UV-B exposure to development of cortical cataracts, but the underlying molecular mechanism(s) is unresolved. Here, we used a mouse model to examine the nature and distribution of DNA photolesions produced by ocular UV-B irradiation. Methods. Anesthetized mice, eye globes, or isolated lenses were exposed to UV-B. Antibodies specific for 6-4 photoproducts (6-4 PPs) or cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) were used to visualize DNA adducts. Results. Illumination of intact globes with UV-Binduced 6-4 PP and CPD formation in cells of the cornea, anterior iris, and central lens epithelium. Photolesions were not detected in retina or lens cells situated in the shadow of the iris. Photolesions in lens epithelial cells were produced with radiant exposures significantly below the minimal erythemal dose. Lens epithelial cells rapidly repaired 6-4 PPs, but CPD levels did not markedly diminish, even over extended postirradiation recovery periods in vitro or in vivo. The repair of 6-4 PPs did not depend on the proliferative activity of the epithelial cells, since the repair rate in the mitotically-active germinative zone (GZ) was indistinguishable from that of quiescent cells in the central epithelium. Conclusions. Even relatively modest exposures to UV-B produced 6-4 PP and CPD photolesions in lens epithelial cells. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer lesions were particularly prevalent and were repaired slowly if at all. Studies on sun-exposed skin have established a causal connection between photolesions and so-called UV-signature mutations. If similar mechanisms apply in the lens, it suggests that somatic mutations in lens epithelial cells may contribute to the development of cortical cataracts. PMID:24022010

  12. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester Protects against Amphotericin B Induced Nephrotoxicity in Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Altuntaş, Atila; Yılmaz, H. Ramazan; Altuntaş, Ayşegül; Uz, Efkan; Demir, Murat; Gökçimen, Alparslan; Aksu, Oğuzhan; Bayram, Dilek Şenol; Sezer, Mehmet Tuğrul

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate whether caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), an active component of propolis extract, has a protective effect on amphotericin B induced nephrotoxicity in rat models. Male Wistar-Albino rats were randomly divided into four groups: (I) control group (n = 10), (II) CAPE group (n = 9) which received 10 μmol/kg CAPE intraperitoneally (i.p.), (III) amphotericin B group (n = 7) which received one dose of 50 mg/kg amphotericin B, and (IV) amphotericin B plus CAPE group (n = 7) which received 10 μmol/kg CAPE i.p. and one dose of 50 mg/kg amphotericin B. The left kidney was evaluated histopathologically for nephrotoxicity. Levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), enzyme activities including catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured in the right kidney. Histopathological damage was prominent in the amphotericin B group compared to controls, and the severity of damage was lowered by CAPE administration. The activity of SOD, MDA, and NO levels increased and catalase activity decreased in the amphotericin B group compared to the control group (P = 0.0001, P = 0.003, P = 0.0001, and P = 0.0001, resp.). Amphotericin B plus CAPE treatment caused a significant decrease in MDA, NO levels, and SOD activity (P = 0.04, P = 0.02, and P = 0.0001, resp.) and caused an increase in CAT activity compared with amphotericin B treatment alone (P = 0.005). CAPE treatment seems to be an effective adjuvant agent for the prevention of amphotericin B nephrotoxicity in rat models. PMID:25032223

  13. Ganglioside GQ1b induces dopamine release through the activation of Pyk2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhao; Chu, Shi-Feng; Mou, Zheng; Gao, Yan; Wang, Zhen-Zhen; Wei, Gui-Ning; Chen, Nai-Hong

    2016-03-01

    Growing evidence indicates that GQ1b, one of the gangliosides members, contributes to synaptic transmission and synapse formation. Previous studies have shown that GQ1b could enhance depolarization induced neurotransmitter release, while the role of GQ1b in asynchronous release is still largely unknown. Here in our result, we found low concentration of GQ1b, but not GT1b or GD1b (which were generated from GQ1b by plasma membrane-associated sialidases), evoked asynchronous dopamine (DA) release from both clonal rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells and rat striatal slices significantly. The release peaked at 2min after GQ1b exposure, and lasted for more than 6min. This effect was caused by the enhancement of intracellular Ca(2+) and the activation of Pyk2. Inhibition of Pyk2 by PF-431396 (a dual inhibitor of Pyk2 and FAK) or Pyk2 siRNA abolished DA release induced by GQ1b. Moreover, Pyk2 Y402, but not other tyrosine site, was phosphorylated at the peaking time. The mutant of Pyk2 Y402 (Pyk2-Y402F) was built to confirm the essential role of Y402 activation. Further studies revealed that activated Pyk2 stimulated ERK1/2 and p-38, while only the ERK1/2 activation was indispensable for GQ1b induced DA release, which interacted with Synapsin I directly and led to its phosphorylation, then depolymerization of F-actin, thus contributed to DA release. In conclusion, low concentration of GQ1b is able to enhance asynchronous DA release through Pyk2/ERK/Synapsin I/actin pathway. Our findings provide new insights into the role of GQ1b in neuronal communication, and implicate the potential application of GQ1b in neurological disorders. PMID:26704905

  14. Integrated solid-phase extraction-capillary liquid chromatography (speLC) interfaced to ESI-MS/MS for fast characterization and quantification of protein and proteomes.

    PubMed

    Falkenby, Lasse Gaarde; Such-Sanmartín, Gerard; Larsen, Martin R; Vorm, Ole; Bache, Nicolai; Jensen, Ole N

    2014-12-01

    The high peptide sequencing speed provided by modern hybrid tandem mass spectrometers enables the utilization of fast liquid chromatographic (LC) separation techniques. We present a robust solid-phase extraction/capillary LC system (speLC) for 5-10 min separation of semicomplex peptide mixtures prior to ESI-MS/MS for peptide sequencing. This speLC-MS/MS system eliminates sample-to-sample carry-over by using disposable micropipette solid-phase extraction tips (StageTips) for peptide sample loading, concentration, and desalting. Automated analysis of 192 replicates of E. coli peptide mixtures in 30 h demonstrated the throughput, stability, and reproducibility of the system. The speLC-MS/MS system detected low-femtomole amounts of peptides and allowed sequencing of 1 μg of HeLa cells protein extracts at a rate of ∼ 90 peptides/min, identifying more than 1500 peptides (>500 proteins) in a 10 min speLC-MS/MS experiment. Analysis by selected reaction monitoring by speLC-SRM-MS/MS of distinct peptides derived from the blood proteins IGF1, IGF2, IBP2, and IBP3 demonstrated protein quantification with CV values below 10% across 96 replicates. The speLC-MS/MS system is ideally suited for fast screening and characterization of large numbers of peptide-containing samples in biological, biomedical, and clinical laboratories. PMID:25277625

  15. Role of Apoptosis in disease

    PubMed Central

    Favaloro, B.; Allocati, N.; Graziano, V.; Di Ilio, C.; De Laurenzi, V.

    2012-01-01

    Since the initial description of apoptosis, a number of different forms of cell death have been described. In this review we will focus on classic caspase-dependent apoptosis and its variations that contribute to diseases. Over fifty years of research have clarified molecular mechanisms involved in apoptotic signaling as well and shown that alterations of these pathways lead to human diseases. Indeed both reduced and increased apoptosis can result in pathology. More recently these findings have led to the development of therapeutic approaches based on regulation of apoptosis, some of which are in clinical trials or have entered medical practice. PMID:22683550

  16. Isorhamnetin Protects Human Keratinocytes against Ultraviolet B-Induced Cell Damage.

    PubMed

    Han, Xia; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Madduma Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara; Yoo, Eun Sook; Koh, Young Sang; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Shin, Jennifer H; Park, Yeunsoo; Yoo, Suk Jae; Chae, Sungwook; Hyun, Jin Won

    2015-07-01

    Isorhamnetin (3-methylquercetin) is a flavonoid derived from the fruits of certain medicinal plants. This study investigated the photoprotective properties of isorhamnetin against cell damage and apoptosis resulting from excessive ultraviolet (UV) B exposure in human HaCaT keratinocytes. Isorhamnetin eliminated UVB-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and attenuated the oxidative modification of DNA, lipids, and proteins in response to UVB radiation. Moreover, isorhamnetin repressed UVB-facilitated programmed cell death in the keratinocytes, as evidenced by a reduction in apoptotic body formation, and nuclear fragmentation. Additionally, isorhamnetin suppressed the ability of UVB light to trigger mitochondrial dysfunction. Taken together, these results indicate that isorhamnetin has the potential to protect human keratinocytes against UVB-induced cell damage and death. PMID:26157553

  17. Isorhamnetin Protects Human Keratinocytes against Ultraviolet B-Induced Cell Damage

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xia; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Madduma Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara; Yoo, Eun Sook; Koh, Young Sang; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Shin, Jennifer H; Park, Yeunsoo; Yoo, Suk Jae; Chae, Sungwook; Hyun, Jin Won

    2015-01-01

    Isorhamnetin (3-methylquercetin) is a flavonoid derived from the fruits of certain medicinal plants. This study investigated the photoprotective properties of isorhamnetin against cell damage and apoptosis resulting from excessive ultraviolet (UV) B exposure in human HaCaT keratinocytes. Isorhamnetin eliminated UVB-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and attenuated the oxidative modification of DNA, lipids, and proteins in response to UVB radiation. Moreover, isorhamnetin repressed UVB-facilitated programmed cell death in the keratinocytes, as evidenced by a reduction in apoptotic body formation, and nuclear fragmentation. Additionally, isorhamnetin suppressed the ability of UVB light to trigger mitochondrial dysfunction. Taken together, these results indicate that isorhamnetin has the potential to protect human keratinocytes against UVB-induced cell damage and death. PMID:26157553

  18. Discrete and continuum simulations of near-field ground motion from Source Physics Experiments (SPE) (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzedine, S. M.; Vorobiev, O.; Herbold, E. B.; Glenn, L. A.; Antoun, T.

    2013-12-01

    This work is focused on analysis of near-field measurements (up to 100 m from the source) recorded during Source Physics Experiments in a granitic formation. One of the main goals of these experiments is to investigate the possible mechanisms of shear wave generation in the nonlinear source region. SPE experiments revealed significant tangential motion (up to 30 % of the magnitude in the radial direction) at many locations. Furthermore, azimuthal variations in radial velocities were also observed which cannot be generated by a spherical source in isotropic materials. Understanding the nature of this non-radial motion is important for discriminating between the natural seismicity and underground explosions signatures. Possible mechanisms leading to such motion include, but not limited to, heterogeneities in the rock such as joints, faults and geologic layers as well as surface topography and vertical motion at the surface caused by material spall and gravity. We have performed a three dimensional computational studies considering all these effects. Both discrete and continuum methods have been employed to model heterogeneities. In the discrete method, the joints and faults were represented by cohesive contact elements. This enables us to examine various friction laws at the joints which include softening, dilatancy, water saturation and rate-dependent friction. Yet this approach requires the mesh to be aligned with joints, which may present technical difficulties in three dimensions when multiple non-persistent joints are present. In addition, the discrete method is more computationally expensive. The continuum approach assumes that the joints are stiff and the dilatancy and shear softening can be neglected. In this approach, the joints are modeled as weakness planes within the material, which are imbedded into and pass through many finite elements. The advantage of this approach is that it requires neither sophisticated meshing algorithms nor contact detection algorithm. It is also suitable for evaluating the bounds of possible shear motion due to uncertainties in the joints distribution. Details of this uncertainty quantification study are presented in a separate abstract (Vorobiev, et.al). In the present work using both the continuum and the discrete approaches we study the effects of the surface spall, in-situ stress and joint orientation on the observed near-field motion. Three dimensional numerical simulations are performed for different burial depths and yields to investigate scalability of both radial and shear motions. The motion calculated in the near-field is then propagated into a far field. Results of the far field study are presented in an accompanied work (Pitarka, et al). This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Preparation of malathion MIP-SPE and its application in environmental analysis.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Hai Gen; Zhu, Jian Xin; Zhan, Chun Rui; Shi, Lei; Xing, Ming; Guo, Ping; Ding, Yuan; Yang, Hong

    2015-07-01

    Malathion is an organophosphorous insecticide for controlling insects on fruits and vegetables, miscellaneous household insects, and animal parasites. It is important to develop highly efficient and selective pre-treatment method for analyzing malathion residues in environment and samples from agricultural products based on the molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). In this study, we developed a tailor-made MIP method with highly specific recognization to the template. The MIPs were prepared using malathion as a template, methacrylic acid (MAA) as a functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as a crosslinker, azodiisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as an initiator, and the acetonitrile-chloroform (1:1, v/v) as a porogen. The molecular recognization mechanism of malathion and MAA was evaluated by molecular simulation, ultraviolet spectrometry (UV), and (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR). MAA interacted specifically with malathion by hydrogen bond with a ratio of 2:1. The MIPs exhibit a high affinity, recognition specificity, and efficient adsorption performance for malathion. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), surface area and porosimeter analyzer, thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyzer (TG/DTA) were used to characterize the properties of MIP. The malathion residues in soil, tap water, and cabbage were cleaned up by MIP-SPE, detected quantitatively using GC-FPD, and confirmed by GC-MS/MS. The limits of tap water, soil, and cabbage were confined to 0.001 mg L(-1), 0.004 and 0.004 mg kg(-1), respectively. The spiked recoveries of malathion were 96.06-111.49% (with RSD being 5.7-9.2%), 98.13-103.83% (RSD, 3.5-8.7%), and 84.94-93.69% (RSD, 4.7-5.8%) for tap water, soil, and cabbage samples, respectively. Thus, the method developed here can be used effectively in assessing malathion residues in multiple environmental samples. The aim of the study was to provide an efficient, selective, and accurate method for analyzing malathion at trace levels in multiple media. PMID:26038320

  20. IRTF/SpeX NIR Emission Spectra of WASP-1b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemhard, Heather; Creech-Eakman, M.; Deroo, P. D.; Zhao, M.

    2011-05-01

    Of the more than 500 known exoplanets, the detailed chemical composition of only a handful of exoplanet atmospheres is known. We endeavor to remedy this imbalance by using ground-based spectroscopy, which has been demonstrated to reliably reproduce space-based results (Swain et al., Nature 463, 2010) while obtaining new and unexpected information. Our IRTF/SpeX SXD (0.8-2.4 micron cross-dispersed) observations of two secondary eclipses of the exoplanet WASP-1b, obtained September and October 2010, will be used to accomplish two main goals: first, to extend the application of exoplanet ground-based spectroscopy to a wider range of targets than are presently characterized; and second, to probe the temperature structure and begin to characterize the composition of the dayside of the atmosphere. We will show our data reduction steps and initial results based on the reduction method introduced by the Exospec team (Swain et al., Nature 463, 2010) WASP-1b is a 1.44±0.04 RJ, 0.89±0.11 MJ exoplanet in a 2.52 day orbit around its parent star (Cameron et al., MNRAS 375, 2007; Charbonneau et al., ApJ 638, 2007). It has a very low density, which puts it in a group of highly irradiated hot-Jupiters with overly inflated radii known as pM class exoplanets. Theory predicts that we should expect to find a thermal inversion, as well as evidence of H2O and CO (Fortney et al., ApJ, 678, 2008). However, the reason for the inflated radii of these exoplanets is still a matter of great debate (Miller et al., ApJ 702, 2009; Spiegel et al., ApJ 699, 2009; Madhusudhan & Seager, ApJ 725, 2010; Guillot, A&A 520, 2010); determining the structure and composition of the atmospheres of this class of exoplanets may help us sort among competing theories as to the structure and source of the inflated radius.

  1. Cucurbitacin B inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis via STAT3 pathway inhibition in A549 lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, MENG; BIAN, ZHI-GANG; ZHANG, YI; WANG, JIA-HE; KAN, LIANG; WANG, XIN; NIU, HUI-YAN; HE, PING

    2014-01-01

    Natural products are a great source of cancer chemotherapeutic agents. The present study was conducted to investigate whether cucurbitacin B (CuB), one of the most potent and widely used cucurbitacins, inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in the A549 lung cancer cell line. Furthermore, CuB induced apoptosis of A549 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, as determined by fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopy. The present study also demonstrated that CuB dose-dependently inhibited lung cancer cell proliferation, with cell cycle inhibition and cyclin B1 downregulation. Apoptosis induced by CuB was shown to be associated with cytochrome c release, B-cell lymphoma 2 downregulation and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway inhibition. CuB may prove to be a useful approach for the chemotherapy of lung cancer. PMID:25242136

  2. Biomarkers of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ward, T H; Cummings, J; Dean, E; Greystoke, A; Hou, J M; Backen, A; Ranson, M; Dive, C

    2008-01-01

    Within the era of molecularly targeted anticancer agents, it has become increasingly important to provide proof of mechanism as early on as possible in the drug development cycle, especially in the clinic. Selective activation of apoptosis is often cited as one of the major goals of cancer chemotherapy. Thus, the present minireview focuses on a discussion of the pros and cons of a variety of methodological approaches to detect different components of the apoptotic cascade as potential biomarkers of programmed cell death. The bulk of the discussion centres on serological assays utilising the technique of ELISA, since here there is an obvious advantage of sampling multiple time points. Potential biomarkers of apoptosis including circulating tumour cells, cytokeratins and DNA nucleosomes are discussed at length. However, accepting that a single biomarker may not have the power to predict proof of concept and patient outcome, it is clear that in the future more emphasis will be placed on technologies that can analyse panels of biomarkers in small volumes of samples. To this end the increased throughput afforded by multiplex ELISA technologies is discussed. PMID:19238626

  3. Apoptosis Resistance in Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Salmassi, Ali; Acar-Perk, Bengi; Schmutzler, Andreas G.; Koch, Kerstin; Püngel, Frank; Jonat, Walter; Mettler, Liselotte

    2011-01-01

    Introduction In a cytological analysis of endometriotic lesions neither granulocytes nor cytotoxic T-cells appear in an appreciable number. Based on this observation we aimed to know, whether programmed cell death plays an essential role in the destruction of dystopic endometrium. Disturbances of the physiological mechanisms of apoptosis, a persistence of endometrial tissue could explain the disease. Another aspect of this consideration is the proliferation competence of the dystopic mucous membrane. Methods Endometriotic lesions of 15 patients were examined through a combined measurement of apoptosis activity with the TUNEL technique (terminal deoxyribosyltransferase mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling) and the proliferation activity (with the help of the Ki-67-Antigens using the monoclonal antibody Ki-S5). Results Twelve out of 15 women studied showed a positive apoptotic activity of 3-47% with a proliferation activity of 2-25% of epithelial cells. Therefore we concluded that the persistence of dystopic endometrium requires proliferative epithelial cells from middle to lower endometrial layers. Conclusion A dystopia misalignment of the epithelia of the upper layers of the functionalism can be rapidly eliminated by apoptotic procedures. PMID:23678417

  4. Lovastatin induces platelet apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qing; Li, Ming; Chen, Mengxing; Zhou, Ling; Zhao, Lili; Hu, Renping; Yan, Rong; Dai, Kesheng

    2016-03-01

    Statins are widely used in the prevention of atherosclerosis and treatment of coronary artery disease because of pleiotropic effects on thrombosis. Thrombocytopenia and hemorrhage occurred in some statin-treated patients, but the reason remains unclear. In the current study, we show that lovastatin dose-dependently induces depolarization of mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential, leading to up-regulation of Bak, down-regulation of Bcl-XL, and activation of caspase-3/8/9. Lovastatin treatment did not increase the surface expression of P-selectin or PAC-1 binding but led to strongly reduced collagen- and thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. The integrin αIIbβ3 antagonist, RGDS, inhibited lovastatin-induced apoptosis in both human platelets and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably expressing integrin αIIbβ3. The number of circulating platelets in mice was significantly reduced after intraperitoneal injections with lovastatin. Taken together, these data indicate that lovastatin induced caspase-dependent platelet apoptosis. Lovastatin does not incur platelet activation, whereas impairs platelet function and reduces circulating platelets in vivo, suggesting the possible pathogenesis of thrombocytopenia and hemorrhage in patients treated with statins. PMID:26773364

  5. The role and interactions of cytosolic alkalization and hydrogen peroxide in ultraviolet B-induced stomatal closure in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Ge, Xiao-Min; Wu, Mi-Mi; Li, Xuan; He, Jun-Min

    2014-02-01

    Cytosolic alkalization has been shown to function as a key player in multiple stimuli-induced stomatal closure, but its role and relationship with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in ultraviolet B (UV-B)-induced stomatal closure remains unknown. In this paper, by stomatal bioassay and laser-scanning confocal microscopy, we observed that 0.5 W m(-2) UV-B induced cytosolic alkalization and H2O2 production in guard cells while inducing stomatal closure in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Butyrate (a weak acid) reduced the cytosolic pH/H2O2 production and prevented stomatal closure by UV-B. Methylamine (a weak base) induced H2O2 production and stomatal closure while enhancing the cytosolic alkalization in guard cells under light alone. The rise in cytosolic pH of wild-type guard cells on exposure to UV-B was evident at 15 min and substantial at 45 min while H2O2 production started to largely increase after 60 min. The failure of UV-B-induced H2O2 production in AtrbohD/F guard cells did not affect the changes of guard cell pH during the first 60 min of UV-B radiation, but largely suppressed cytosolic alkalization after 60 min of UV-B radiation. These results indicate that cytosolic alkalization mediates UV-B-induced stomatal closure via activating H2O2 production and that H2O2 production can feedback-enhance cytosolic alkalization in Arabidopsis guard cells. PMID:24388518

  6. Nuclear Apoptosis Contributes to Sarcopenia

    PubMed Central

    Alway, Stephen E.; Siu, Parco M.

    2009-01-01

    Apoptosis results in DNA fragmentation and, subsequently, destruction of cells containing a single nucleus. Our hypothesis is that multinucleated cells such as muscle fibers can experience apoptotic-induced loss of single nuclei (nuclear apoptosis) without destruction of the entire fiber. The loss of nuclei likely contributes to atrophy and sarcopenia. Furthermore, increased chronic activity attenuates apoptotic signaling, which may reduce sarcopenia. PMID:18362685

  7. Apoptosis Evaluation by Electrochemical Techniques.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jian; Miao, Peng

    2016-03-01

    Apoptosis has close relevance to pathology, pharmacology, and toxicology. Accurate and convenient detection of apoptosis would be beneficial for biological study, clinical diagnosis, and drug development. Based on distinct features of apoptotic cells, a diversity of analytical techniques have been exploited for sensitive analysis of apoptosis, such as surface plasmon resonance, electrochemical methods, flow cytometry, and some imaging assays. Among them, the features of simplicity, easy operation, low cost, and high sensitivity make electrochemical techniques powerful tools to investigate electron-transfer processes of in vitro biological systems. In this contribution, a general overview of current knowledge on various technical approaches for apoptosis evaluation is provided. Furthermore, recently developed electrochemical biosensors for detecting apoptotic cells and their advantages over traditional methods are summarized. One of the main considerations focuses on designing the recognition elements based on various biochemical events during apoptosis. PMID:26588799

  8. Apoptosis and the Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    White, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    The airway epithelium functions as a barrier and front line of host defense in the lung. Apoptosis or programmed cell death can be elicited in the epithelium as a response to viral infection, exposure to allergen or to environmental toxins, or to drugs. While apoptosis can be induced via activation of death receptors on the cell surface or by disruption of mitochondrial polarity, epithelial cells compared to inflammatory cells are more resistant to apoptotic stimuli. This paper focuses on the response of airway epithelium to apoptosis in the normal state, apoptosis as a potential regulator of the number and types of epithelial cells in the airway, and the contribution of epithelial cell apoptosis in important airways diseases. PMID:22203854

  9. Polar low ionospheric responses to the most energetic SPE of the solar cycle#23 based on cosmic noise absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacini, A. A.; Garnett Marques Brum, C.

    2013-12-01

    We present a detailed study of the impact of solar proton event over the polar low ionosphere, occurred Jan/2005, during the descendent phase of the last solar activity cycle XXIII. This event was the hardest SPE of the last solar cycle, and was associated to a solar X-ray flare X.2 and CME halo. For this study, we are using cosmic noise absorption data measured by a riometer located in Oulu, Finland (65N) along with solar proton data from GOES satellite. Based on computation simulations we intend to explain the 30MHz riometer absorption events based on variations of the flux and spectrum of the energetic particle precipitated.

  10. Development of colorimetric solid Phase Extraction (C-SPE) for in-flight Monitoring of spacecraft Water Supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Bryan Gazda

    2004-12-19

    Although having recently been extremely successful gathering data on the surface of Mars, robotic missions are not an effective substitute for the insight and knowledge about our solar system that can be gained though first-hand exploration. Earlier this year, President Bush presented a ''new course'' for the U.S. space program that shifts NASA's focus to the development of new manned space vehicles to the return of humans to the moon. Re-establishing the human presence on the moon will eventually lead to humans permanently living and working in space and also serve as a possible launch point for missions into deeper space. There are several obstacles to the realization of these goals, most notably the lack of life support and environmental regeneration and monitoring hardware capable of functioning on long duration spaceflight. In the case of the latter, past experience on the International Space Station (ISS), Mir, and the Space Shuttle has strongly underscored the need to develop broad spectrum in-flight chemical sensors that: (1) meet current environmental monitoring requirements on ISS as well as projected requirements for future missions, and (2) enable the in-situ acquisition and analysis of analytical data in order to further define on-orbit monitoring requirements. Additionally, systems must be designed to account for factors unique to on-orbit deployment such as crew time availability, payload restrictions, material consumption, and effective operation in microgravity. This dissertation focuses on the development, ground testing, and microgravity flight demonstration of Colorimetric Solid Phase Extraction (C-SPE) as a candidate technology to meet the near- and long-term water quality monitoring needs of NASA. The introduction will elaborate further on the operational and design requirements for on-orbit water quality monitoring systems by discussing some of the characteristics of an ''ideal'' system. A description of C-SPE and how the individual components of the platform are combined to satisfy many of these requirements is then presented, along with a literature review on the applications of C-SPE and similar sorption-spectrophotometric techniques. Finally, a brief overview of diffuse reflection spectroscopy and the Kubelka-Munk function, which are used to quantify analytes via C-SPE, is presented.

  11. Crystal structure of the streptococcal superantigen SpeI and functional role of a novel loop domain in T cell activation by group V superantigens.

    PubMed

    Brouillard, Jean-Nicholas P; Gnther, Sebastian; Varma, Ashok K; Gryski, Irene; Herfst, Christine A; Rahman, A K M Nur-ur; Leung, Donald Y M; Schlievert, Patrick M; Madrenas, Joaqun; Sundberg, Eric J; McCormick, John K

    2007-04-01

    Superantigens (SAgs) are potent microbial toxins that bind simultaneously to T cell receptors (TCRs) and class II major histocompatibility complex molecules, resulting in the activation and expansion of large T cell subsets and the onset of numerous human diseases. Within the bacterial SAg family, streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin I (SpeI) has been classified as belonging to the group V SAg subclass, which are characterized by a unique, relatively conserved approximately 15 amino acid extension (amino acid residues 154 to 170 in SpeI; herein referred to as the alpha3-beta8 loop), absent in SAg groups I through IV. Here, we report the crystal structure of SpeI at 1.56 A resolution. Although the alpha3-beta8 loop in SpeI is several residues shorter than that of another group V SAg, staphylococcal enterotoxin serotype I, the C-terminal portions of these loops, which are located adjacent to the putative TCR binding site, are structurally similar. Mutagenesis and subsequent functional analysis of SpeI indicates that TCR beta-chains are likely engaged in a similar general orientation as other characterized SAgs. We show, however, that the alpha3-beta8 loop length, and the presence of key glycine residues, are necessary for optimal activation of T cells. Based on Vbeta-skewing analysis of human T cells activated with SpeI and structural models, we propose that the alpha3-beta8 loop is positioned to form productive intermolecular contacts with the TCR beta-chain, likely in framework region 3, and that these contacts are required for optimal TCR recognition by SpeI, and likely all other group V SAgs. PMID:17303163

  12. The Caenorhabditis Elegans Spe-6 Gene Is Required for Major Sperm Protein Assembly and Shows Second Site Non-Complementation with an Unlinked Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Varkey, J. P.; Jansma, P. L.; Minniti, A. N.; Ward, S.

    1993-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans spermatozoa move by crawling. Their motility requires thin cytoskeletal filaments assembled from a unique cytoskeletal protein, the major sperm protein (MSP). During normal sperm development the MSP is segregated to developing sperm by assembly into filaments that form a paracrystalline array in a transient organelle, the fibrous body-membranous organelle. Mutations in the spe-6 gene cause sterility because they lead to defective primary spermatocytes that do not form spermatids. In these mutant spermatocytes the MSP fails to assemble into fibrous body filaments. Instead, the unassembled MSP distributes throughout the cytoplasm and nucleus. Thus, the spe-6 gene product is necessary for normal MSP localization and assembly during sperm development. In addition to their MSP assembly defect, spe-6 mutant spermatocytes arrest meiosis at diakinesis although their spindle pole bodies still replicate and separate. This results in spermatocytes with four half-spindles surrounding condensed, but unsegregated, chromosomes. All four spe-6 alleles, as well as a chromosome III deficiency that deletes the spe-6 gene, fail to complement two small overlapping chromosome IV deficiencies, eDf18 and eDf19. This non-allele-specific second site non-complementation suggests a concentration-dependent interaction between the spe-6 gene product and products of the gene(s) under eDf18 and eDf19, which include a cluster of sperm-specific genes. Since MSP filament assembly is highly concentration-dependent in vitro, the non-complementation might be expected if the sperm-specific gene products under eDf18 and eDf19 were needed together with the spe-6 gene product to promote MSP assembly. PMID:8417991

  13. Oral administration of bovine lactoferrin attenuates ultraviolet B-induced skin photodamage in hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Murata, M; Satoh, T; Wakabayashi, H; Yamauchi, K; Abe, F; Nomura, Y

    2014-02-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is recognized as a host defensive glycoprotein, especially for newborn infants. The aim of this study was to investigate whether orally administered LF had protective activity against UV-induced skin damage in hairless mice. Transepidermal water loss and skin hydration were evaluated in nonirradiated mice, UVB-irradiated mice, and UVB-irradiated and LF-administered mice. Supplementation with LF (1,600 mg/kg per day) effectively suppressed the increase in transepidermal water loss, reduction in skin hydration, aberrant epidermal hyperplasia, and cell apoptosis induced by UV irradiation. Although no significant changes in superoxide dismutase-like activity or malondialdehyde levels were observed in the skin with both UV irradiation and LF administration, UV-stimulated IL-1β levels in the skin were significantly suppressed by the administration of LF. Oral supplementation with LF has the potential to reduce IL-1β levels and prevent UV-induced skin damage. Further studies are needed to elucidate the relationships between the antiinflammatory effects and skin protective function of LF. PMID:24359814

  14. DOE/NV/25946--1586 Geologic Assessment of the Damage Zone from the Second Test at Source Physics Experiment-Nevada (SPE-N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, M.; Huckins-Gang, H.; Prothro, L.; Reed, D.

    2012-12-01

    The National Center for Nuclear Security, established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, is conducting a series of explosive tests at the Nevada National Security Site that are designed to increase the understanding of certain basic physical phenomena associated with underground explosions. These tests will aid in developing technologies that might be used to detect underground nuclear explosions in support of verification activities for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. The initial project is a series of explosive tests, known collectively as the Source Physics Experiment-Nevada (SPE-N), being conducted in granitic rocks. The SPE N test series is designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves. The results will help advance the seismic monitoring capability of the United States by improving the predictive capability of physics-based modeling of explosive phenomena. The first SPE N (SPE N1) test was conducted in May 2011, using 0.1 ton of explosives at the depth of 54.9 m in the U 15n source hole. SPE N2 was conducted in October 2011, using 1.0 ton of explosives at the depth of 45.7 m in the same source hole. The SPE N3 test was conducted in the same source hole in July 2012, using the same amount and type of explosive as for SPE N2, and at the same depth as SPE N2, within the damage zone created by the SPE N2 explosion to investigate damage effects on seismic wave propagation. Following the SPE N2 shot and prior to the SPE N3 shot, the core hole U-15n#10 was drilled at an angle from the surface to intercept the SPE N2 shot point location to obtain information necessary to characterize the damage zone. The desire was to determine the position of the damage zone near the shot point, at least on the northeast, where the core hole penetrated it, and obtain information on the properties of the damaged medium. Geologic characterization of the post-SPE N2 core hole included geophysical logging, a directional survey, and geologic description of the core to document visual evidence of damage. Selected core samples were provided to Sandia National Laboratories for measurement of physical and mechanical properties. A video was also run in the source hole after it was cleaned out. A significant natural fault zone was encountered in the angle core hole between 5.7 and 7.5 m from the shot point. However, several of the fractures observed in the core hole are interpreted as having been caused by the explosion. The fractures are characterized by a "fresh," mechanically broken look, with uncoated and very irregular surfaces. They tend to terminate against natural fractures and have orientations that differ from the previously defined natural fracture sets; they are common starting at about 5.4 m from the shot point. Within about 3.3 m of the shot point to the end of the recovered core at 1.6 m from the shot point, some of the core samples are softer and lighter in color, but do not appear to be weathered. It is thought this could be indicative of the presence of distributed microfracturing. This work was done by National Security Technologies, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  15. Exercise-induced leukocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Karsten; Mooren, Frank C

    2014-01-01

    Physical exercise is well known to affect leukocyte numbers and function. While regular exercise training has been shown to enhance specific immune functions, acute bouts of intensive exercise often lead to a pro-inflammatory response accompanied by a transient lymphocytopenia and neutrophilia. It can be assumed, that lymphocytopenia can be attributed at least partially to an enhanced lymphocyte apoptosis. In contrast, regulation of neutrophil apoptosis after exercise remains controversial since studies demonstrated both an up-regulation as well as a down-regulation of cell death. However, these discrepancies may be due to differences in exercise protocols, subjects' fitness levels, and to different methodological approaches. Two major signalling pathways of exercise induced apoptosis have been identified. First the external receptor mediated pathway using death receptors, and second the internal, oxidative-mediated pathway which encompasses the mitochondria. Potential apoptosis modulating mediators are reactive oxygen species (ROS), glucocorticoids and cytokines which are part of the systemic inflammatory response evoked after acute intensive exercise. Finally, the physiological impact and clinical relevance of leukocyte apoptosis will be discussed. On the one hand, exercise-induced apoptosis might be a mechanism to remove activated and potentially autoreactive immune cells. On the other hand, apoptosis might be a regulatory mechanism which is necessary for tissue reorganization and adaptational training processes. PMID:24974724

  16. Broad-Spectrum Antibiotic or G-CSF as Potential Countermeasures for Impaired Control of Bacterial Infection Associated with an SPE Exposure during Spaceflight

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minghong; Holmes, Veronica; Ni, Houping; Sanzari, Jenine K.; Romero-Weaver, Ana L.; Lin, Liyong; Carabe-Fernandez, Alejandro; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Kennedy, Ann R.; Weissman, Drew

    2015-01-01

    A major risk for astronauts during prolonged space flight is infection as a result of the combined effects of microgravity, situational and confinement stress, alterations in food intake, altered circadian rhythm, and radiation that can significantly impair the immune system and the body’s defense systems. We previously reported a massive increase in morbidity with a decrease in the ability to control a bacterial challenge when mice were maintained under hindlimb suspension (HS) conditions and exposed to solar particle event (SPE)-like radiation. HS and SPE-like radiation treatment alone resulted in a borderline significant increase in morbidity. Therefore, development and testing of countermeasures that can be used during extended space missions in the setting of exposure to SPE radiation becomes a serious need. In the present study, we investigated the efficacy of enrofloxacin (an orally bioavailable antibiotic) and Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) (Neulasta) on enhancing resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in mice subjected to HS and SPE-like radiation. The results revealed that treatment with enrofloxacin or G-CSF enhanced bacterial clearance and significantly decreased morbidity and mortality in challenged mice exposed to suspension and radiation. These results establish that antibiotics, such as enrofloxacin, and G-CSF could be effective countermeasures to decrease the risk of bacterial infections after exposure to SPE radiation during extended space flight, thereby reducing both the risk to the crew and the danger of mission failure. PMID:25793272

  17. Small angle X-ray scattering data and structure factor fitting for the study of the quaternary structure of the spermidine N-acetyltransferase SpeG.

    PubMed

    Weigand, Steven; Filippova, Ekaterina V; Kiryukhina, Olga; Anderson, Wayne F

    2016-03-01

    Here we describe the treatment of the small-angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) data used during SpeG quaternary structure study as part of the research article "Substrate induced allosteric change in the quaternary structure of the spermidine N-acetyltransferase SpeG" published in Journal of Molecular Biology [1]. These data were collected on two separate area detectors as separate dilution series of the SpeG and the SpeG with spermine samples along with data from their companion buffers. The data were radially integrated, corrected for incident beam variation, and scaled to absolute units. After subtraction of volume-fraction scaled buffer scattering and division by the SpeG concentration, multiple scattering curves free of an inter-molecular structure factor were derived from the dilution series. Rather than extrapolating to infinite dilution, the structure factor contribution was estimated by fitting to the full set of data provided by dividing the scattering curves of a dilution series by the curve from the most dilute sample in that series. PMID:26793756

  18. Broad-spectrum antibiotic or G-CSF as potential countermeasures for impaired control of bacterial infection associated with an SPE exposure during spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Li, Minghong; Holmes, Veronica; Ni, Houping; Sanzari, Jenine K; Romero-Weaver, Ana L; Lin, Liyong; Carabe-Fernandez, Alejandro; Diffenderfer, Eric S; Kennedy, Ann R; Weissman, Drew

    2015-01-01

    A major risk for astronauts during prolonged space flight is infection as a result of the combined effects of microgravity, situational and confinement stress, alterations in food intake, altered circadian rhythm, and radiation that can significantly impair the immune system and the body's defense systems. We previously reported a massive increase in morbidity with a decrease in the ability to control a bacterial challenge when mice were maintained under hindlimb suspension (HS) conditions and exposed to solar particle event (SPE)-like radiation. HS and SPE-like radiation treatment alone resulted in a borderline significant increase in morbidity. Therefore, development and testing of countermeasures that can be used during extended space missions in the setting of exposure to SPE radiation becomes a serious need. In the present study, we investigated the efficacy of enrofloxacin (an orally bioavailable antibiotic) and Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) (Neulasta) on enhancing resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in mice subjected to HS and SPE-like radiation. The results revealed that treatment with enrofloxacin or G-CSF enhanced bacterial clearance and significantly decreased morbidity and mortality in challenged mice exposed to suspension and radiation. These results establish that antibiotics, such as enrofloxacin, and G-CSF could be effective countermeasures to decrease the risk of bacterial infections after exposure to SPE radiation during extended space flight, thereby reducing both the risk to the crew and the danger of mission failure. PMID:25793272

  19. Small angle X-ray scattering data and structure factor fitting for the study of the quaternary structure of the spermidine N-acetyltransferase SpeG

    PubMed Central

    Weigand, Steven; Filippova, Ekaterina V.; Kiryukhina, Olga; Anderson, Wayne F.

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe the treatment of the small-angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) data used during SpeG quaternary structure study as part of the research article “Substrate induced allosteric change in the quaternary structure of the spermidine N-acetyltransferase SpeG” published in Journal of Molecular Biology [1]. These data were collected on two separate area detectors as separate dilution series of the SpeG and the SpeG with spermine samples along with data from their companion buffers. The data were radially integrated, corrected for incident beam variation, and scaled to absolute units. After subtraction of volume-fraction scaled buffer scattering and division by the SpeG concentration, multiple scattering curves free of an inter-molecular structure factor were derived from the dilution series. Rather than extrapolating to infinite dilution, the structure factor contribution was estimated by fitting to the full set of data provided by dividing the scattering curves of a dilution series by the curve from the most dilute sample in that series. PMID:26793756

  20. Micro-solid-phase extraction (-SPE) of organophosphorous pesticides from wheat followed by LC-MS/MS determination.

    PubMed

    Pelle, Flavio Della; Di Crescenzo, Maria Chiara; Sergi, Manuel; Montesano, Camilla; Di Ottavio, Francesca; Scarpone, Rossana; Scortichini, Giampiero; Compagnone, Dario

    2016-02-01

    A rapid, selective and effective method of extraction, clean-up and concentration of organophosphorous pesticides from wheat followed by electrospray (ESI) LC-MS/MS analysis was developed. The ?-SPE (micro-solid-phase extraction) procedure resulted in good analytical performance and reduced at the same time matrix effects, analysis time and solvent consumption. Limits of detection (LODs) and quantification (LOQs) were in the range of 0.3-10 and 1-30 ?gkg(-1), respectively, with good reproducibility (RSD?13.8) and recoveries between 75% and 109%. Coefficients of determination (r(2)) were greater than 0.996 for the studied pesticides. Despite the reduced sorbent bed mass of ?-SPE tips (4.2mg), the analytical data showed that no saturation phenomena occurs in the tested range of concentration both for single compounds and mixtures. Several real samples were analysed and the concentrations of the selected pesticides were found to be below the respective maximum residue limit (MRLs). PMID:26600315

  1. Beyond Apoptosis in Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Colonna, Lucrezia; Lood, Christian; Elkon, Keith B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by autoantibodies directed against nuclear autoantigens normally concealed from immune recognition in healthy individuals. Here we summarize recently identified mechanisms of abnormal cell death leading to exposure and aberrant processing of nucleoprotein self antigens, and discuss their role in the SLE pathogenesis. Recent findings During the past few years, the unveiling of several new forms of cell death has expanded our understanding beyond the simple view of “apoptotic” versus “necrotic” cell death. SLE patients show abnormalities in cell death at several levels, including increased rates of apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy, as well as reduced clearance of dying cells. These abnormalities lead to an increased autoantigen burden and also antigen modifications, such as nucleic acid oxidation that increase the inflammatory properties of self antigens. Recent investigations have highlighted the role of opsonins in determining the immunogenic versus tolerogenic characteristics of self antigens. Summary Dysregulation of different forms of programmed cell death contributes to increased exposure, availability, and immunogenic characteristic of intracellular self antigens, which all participate in development of lupus autoimmunity. As our understanding of abnormalities of cell death in SLE advances, potential therapeutic opportunities await human implementation. PMID:25036095

  2. Cytoskeleton and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ndozangue-Touriguine, Olivia; Hamelin, Jocelyne; Bréard, Jacqueline

    2008-07-01

    Apoptosis is a genetically programmed and physiological mode of cell death that leads to the removal of unwanted or abnormal cells. Cysteine-proteases called caspases are responsible for the apoptotic execution phase which is characterized by specific biochemical events as well as morphological changes. These changes, which lead to the orderly dismantling of the apoptotic cell, include cell contraction, dynamic membrane blebbing, chromatin condensation, nuclear disintegration, cell fragmentation followed by phagocytosis of the dying cell. They involve major modifications of the cytoskeleton which are largely mediated by cleavage of several of its components by caspases. For example, dynamic membrane blebbing is due to the increased contractility of the acto-myosin system following myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation. MLC phosphorylation is a consequence of the cleavage of a Rho GTPase effector, the kinase ROCK I, by caspase-3. This cleavage induces a constitutive kinase activity by removal of an inhibitory domain. Chromatin condensation is facilitated by the processing of lamins by caspases. Collapse of the cytokeratin network is mediated by cleavage of keratin 18. On another hand, the actin cytoskeleton rearrangement needed in the phagocyte for engulfment of the dying cell is due to the activation of the small GTPase Rac, a GTPase of the Rho family that induces actin polymerisation and formation of lamellipodia. In addition to mediating the morphological modifications of the apoptotic cell, several proteins of the cytoskeleton such as actin and keratins are also involved in the regulation of apoptotic signaling. PMID:18462707

  3. Development and validation of an on-line multidimensional SPE-LC-MS/MS method for the quantitation of Tetrandrine in blood samples.

    PubMed

    Caglar, Sena; Morello, Rosa; Boos, Karl-Siegfried

    2015-04-15

    On-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) is becoming an increasingly widespread technique in the clean-up of complex matrices such as body fluids, prior to chromatographic analysis. The use of small SPE columns instead of disposable SPE cartridges allows multiple injections and complete automation. In addition, it decreases the cost of consumables and improves the quality of the overall analysis. Coupling of SPE with HPLC combines sample preparation and separation in one system. In this paper a validated on-line multidimensional (MD) SPE-LC-MS/MS method is described for the determination of Tetrandrine (model drug) in human blood samples. The developed method showed the applicability of direct injection of plasma samples to an on-line MD-SPE-LC-MS/MS system to determine small molecules i.e. drugs. The experimental design is unique. Quantification was through tandem mass spectrometry with positive electrospray ionization (ESI) and multiple reactions monitoring (MRM). The limit of detection was calculated as 31.98 ng/mL. The linear range of the method was between 40.0 and 800.0 ng/mL. Pharmacokinetic parameters are usually determined by analysis of drug concentrations in plasma rather than whole blood. Parameters determined using plasma data may be misleading if concentrations of drug differ between plasma and red blood cells. We successfully applied the developed method for the determination of the distribution coefficient of the model drug Tetrandrine between human red blood cells and blood plasma proteins. The determination of distribution coefficient study results demonstrated that the developed method can provide direct and accurate measurement of RBC partitioning in a model drug and could be applied for screening of other compounds for potential high RBC partition, predicting potential drug toxicity and investigating mechanisms associated with RBC partitions. PMID:25746132

  4. Effect of pretreatment of salt, copper and temperature on ultraviolet-B-induced antioxidants in diazotrophic cyanobacterium Anabaena doliolum.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Ashish Kumar; Bhargava, Poonam; Mishra, Yogesh; Shukla, Bideh; Rai, Lal Chand

    2006-01-01

    Effect of salt, copper, and temperature pretreatments on the UV-B-induced oxidative damage, measured in terms of peroxide and MDA (lipid peroxidation) contents, was studied in the diazotrophic cyanobacterium Anabaena doliolum. To understand the survival strategy enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, and ascorbate peroxidase) and non-enzymatic (glutathione, ascorbate, alpha-tocopherol and carotenoid) antioxidants were studied. Among the various pretreatments salt was found to decrease and copper and temperature pretreatments increased the deleterious effects of UV-B. This study is the first to demonstrate that physical stress (high temperature) enhanced the damaging effect of UV-B more profoundly than chemical stresses (salt and copper). PMID:16598827

  5. Experimental design for TBT quantification by isotope dilution SPE-GC-ICP-MS under the European water framework directive.

    PubMed

    Alasonati, Enrica; Fabbri, Barbara; Fettig, Ina; Yardin, Catherine; Del Castillo Busto, Maria Estela; Richter, Janine; Philipp, Rosemarie; Fisicaro, Paola

    2015-03-01

    In Europe the maximum allowable concentration for tributyltin (TBT) compounds in surface water has been regulated by the water framework directive (WFD) and daughter directive that impose a limit of 0.2 ng L(-1) in whole water (as tributyltin cation). Despite the large number of different methodologies for the quantification of organotin species developed in the last two decades, standardised analytical methods at required concentration level do not exist. TBT quantification at picogram level requires efficient and accurate sample preparation and preconcentration, and maximum care to avoid blank contamination. To meet the WFD requirement, a method for the quantification of TBT in mineral water at environmental quality standard (EQS) level, based on solid phase extraction (SPE), was developed and optimised. The quantification was done using species-specific isotope dilution (SSID) followed by gas chromatography (GC) coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The analytical process was optimised using a design of experiment (DOE) based on a factorial fractionary plan. The DOE allowed to evaluate 3 qualitative factors (type of stationary phase and eluent, phase mass and eluent volume, pH and analyte ethylation procedure) for a total of 13 levels studied, and a sample volume in the range of 250-1000 mL. Four different models fitting the results were defined and evaluated with statistic tools: one of them was selected and optimised to find the best procedural conditions. C18 phase was found to be the best stationary phase for SPE experiments. The 4 solvents tested with C18, the pH and ethylation conditions, the mass of the phases, the volume of the eluents and the sample volume can all be optimal, but depending on their respective combination. For that reason, the equation of the model conceived in this work is a useful decisional tool for the planning of experiments, because it can be applied to predict the TBT mass fraction recovery when the experimental conditions are drawn. This work shows that SPE is a convenient technique for TBT pre-concentration at pico-trace levels and a robust approach: in fact (i) number of different experimental conditions led to satisfactory results and (ii) the participation of two institutes to the experimental work did not impact the developed model. PMID:25618710

  6. Liver myofibroblasts up-regulate monocyte CD163 expression via PGE2 during hepatitis B induced liver failure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although patients with liver failure exhibit a generalized inflammatory-imbalance status, substantial evidence indicates that this immunosuppressive or anti-inflammatory state may be deleterious. Increased expression of CD163 (known to be involved in several anti-inflammatory functions of the immune system) in patients with liver failure is significantly correlated with a fatal outcome. However, little is known of the regulatory mechanisms that influence the expression of CD163. Methods We assessed the expression of CD163 on monocytes from both circulating cells and the liver tissues of patients with hepatitis B induced liver failure using flow cytometry and isolated the myofibroblasts from diseased livers. The ability of human liver myofibroblasts to regulate CD163 expression on monocytes was studied in vitro. Results We showed that CD163+ monocytes were enriched primarily in diseased livers and that they were associated with liver myofibroblasts in the same area. Accordingly, liver myofibroblasts were significantly superior to normal skin fibroblasts in inducing the expression of CD163 on monocytes in vitro. Moreover, we found that liver myofibroblasts triggered the activation of monocytes by secreting PGE2. Inhibition of PGE2 production in liver myofibroblasts using NS-398 markedly reduced CD163 expression in vitro. Conclusion These results suggest that liver myofibroblasts play a direct role in regulating the expression of CD163 on monocytes in human liver tissues and thereby may regulate monocyte function during hepatitis B induced liver failure. PMID:24597777

  7. Effects of different light conditions on repair of UV-B-induced damage in carpospores of Chondrus ocellatus Holm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Qing; Xiao, Hui; Wang, You; Tang, Xuexi

    2015-05-01

    We evaluated the effects of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation and different light conditions on the repair of UV-B-induced damage in carpospores of Chondrus ocellatus Holm (Rhodophyta) in laboratory experiments. Carpospores were treated daily with different doses of UV-B radiation for 48 days, when vertical branches had formed in all treatments; after each daily treatment, the carpospores were subjected to photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), darkness, red light, or blue light during a 2-h repair stage. Carpospore diameters were measured every 4 days. We measured the growth and cellular contents of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), chlorophyll a, phycoerythrin, and UV-B-absorbing mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) in carpospores on Day 48. Low doses of UV-B radiation (36 and 72 J/m2) accelerated the growth of C. ocellatus. However, as the amount of UV-B radiation increased, the growth rate decreased and morphological changes occurred. UV-B radiation significant damaged DNA and photosynthetic pigments and induced three kind of MAAs, palythine, asterina-330, and shinorine. PAR conditions were best for repairing UV-B-induced damage. Darkness promoted the activity of the DNA darkrepair mechanism. Red light enhanced phycoerythrin synthesis but inhibited light repair of DNA. Although blue light, increased the activity of DNA photolyase, greatly improving remediation efficiency, the growth and development of C. ocellatus carpospores were slower than in other light treatments.

  8. Involvement of Inositol Biosynthesis and Nitric Oxide in the Mediation of UV-B Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lytvyn, Dmytro I.; Raynaud, Cécile; Yemets, Alla I.; Bergounioux, Catherine; Blume, Yaroslav B.

    2016-01-01

    The involvement of NO-signaling in ultraviolet B (UV-B) induced oxidative stress (OS) in plants is an open question. Inositol biosynthesis contributes to numerous cellular functions, including the regulation of plants tolerance to stress. This work reveals the involvement of inositol-3-phosphate synthase 1 (IPS1), a key enzyme for biosynthesis of myo-inositol and its derivatives, in the response to NO-dependent OS in Arabidopsis. Homozygous mutants deficient for IPS1 (atips1) and wild-type plants were transformed with a reduction- grx1-rogfp2 and used for the dynamic measurement of UV-B-induced and SNP (sodium nitroprusside)-mediated oxidative stresses by confocal microscopy. atips1 mutants displayed greater tissue-specific resistance to the action of UV-B than the wild type. SNP can act both as an oxidant or repairer depending on the applied concentration, but mutant plants were more tolerant than the wild type to nitrosative effects of high concentration of SNP. Additionally, pretreatment with low concentrations of SNP (10, 100 μM) before UV-B irradiation resulted in a tissue-specific protective effect that was enhanced in atips1. We conclude that the interplay between nitric oxide and inositol signaling can be involved in the mediation of UV-B-initiated oxidative stress in the plant cell. PMID:27148278

  9. Histatin 5 binds to Porphyromonas gingivalis hemagglutinin B (HagB) and alters HagB-induced chemokine responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgwardt, Derek S.; Martin, Aaron D.; van Hemert, Jonathan R.; Yang, Jianyi; Fischer, Carol L.; Recker, Erica N.; Nair, Prashant R.; Vidva, Robinson; Chandrashekaraiah, Shwetha; Progulske-Fox, Ann; Drake, David; Cavanaugh, Joseph E.; Vali, Shireen; Zhang, Yang; Brogden, Kim A.

    2014-01-01

    Histatins are human salivary gland peptides with anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we hypothesized that histatin 5 binds to Porphyromonas gingivalis hemagglutinin B (HagB) and attenuates HagB-induced chemokine responses in human myeloid dendritic cells. Histatin 5 bound to immobilized HagB in a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy-based biosensor system. SPR spectroscopy kinetic and equilibrium analyses, protein microarray studies, and I-TASSER structural modeling studies all demonstrated two histatin 5 binding sites on HagB. One site had a stronger affinity with a KD1 of 1.9 μM and one site had a weaker affinity with a KD2 of 60.0 μM. Binding has biological implications and predictive modeling studies and exposure of dendritic cells both demonstrated that 20.0 μM histatin 5 attenuated (p < 0.05) 0.02 μM HagB-induced CCL3/MIP-1α, CCL4/MIP-1β, and TNFα responses. Thus histatin 5 is capable of attenuating chemokine responses, which may help control oral inflammation.

  10. Polar low ionospheric responses to the most energetic SPE of the solar cycle#23 based on cosmic noise absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacini, A. A.; Brum, C. G.

    2013-05-01

    We present a detailed study of the impact of solar proton event over the polar low ionosphere, occurred in Jan/2005, during the descendent phase of the XXIII solar activity cycle. This event was the hardest SPE of the last solar cycle, and was associated to a solar X-ray flare X.2 and CME halo. For this study, we are using cosmic noise absorption data measured by a riometer located in Oulu, Finland (65oN) along with solar proton data from GOES satellite. Based on computation simulations we intend to explain the 30MHz riometer absorption events based on variations of the flux and spectrum of the energetic particle precipitated.

  11. Development and Application of a Novel SPE-Method for Bioassay-Guided Fractionation of Marine Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Cutignano, Adele; Nuzzo, Genoveffa; Ianora, Adrianna; Luongo, Elvira; Romano, Giovanna; Gallo, Carmela; Sansone, Clementina; Aprea, Susanna; Mancini, Francesca; D’Oro, Ugo; Fontana, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    The biological diversity of marine habitats is a unique source of chemical compounds with potential use as pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and dietary supplements. However, biological screening and chemical analysis of marine extracts pose specific technical constraints and require adequate sample preparation. Here we report an improved method on Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) to fractionate organic extracts containing high concentration of salt that hampers the recovery of secondary metabolites. The procedure uses a water suspension to load the extracts on a poly(styrene-divynylbenzene)-based support and a stepwise organic solvent elution to effectively desalt and fractionate the organic components. The novel protocol has been tested on MeOH-soluble material from three model organisms (Reniera sarai, Dendrilla membranosa and Amphidinium carterae) and was validated on a small panel of 47 marine samples, including sponges and protists, within discovery programs for identification of immuno-stimulatory and anti-infective natural products. PMID:26378547

  12. WDM compatible and electrically tunable SPE-OCDMA system based on the temporal self-imaging effect.

    PubMed

    Tainta, S; Amaya, W; Erro, M J; Garde, M J; Sales, S; Muriel, M A

    2011-02-01

    A coding/decoding setup for a spectral phase encoding optical code-division multiple access (SPE-OCDMA) system has been developed. The proposal is based on the temporal self-imaging effect and the use of an easily tunable electro-optic phase modulator to achieve line-by-line coding of the transmitted signal, thus assuring compatibility with WDM techniques. Modulation of the code is performed at the same rate as the data, avoiding the use of high-bandwidth electro-optic modulators. As proof of concept of the technique, experimental results are presented for a back-to-back coder/decoder setup transmitting a 10 GHz unmodulated optical pulse train within an 80 GHz optical window and using 8-chip Hadamard codes. PMID:21283203

  13. Development and Application of a Novel SPE-Method for Bioassay-Guided Fractionation of Marine Extracts.

    PubMed

    Cutignano, Adele; Nuzzo, Genoveffa; Ianora, Adrianna; Luongo, Elvira; Romano, Giovanna; Gallo, Carmela; Sansone, Clementina; Aprea, Susanna; Mancini, Francesca; D'Oro, Ugo; Fontana, Angelo

    2015-09-01

    The biological diversity of marine habitats is a unique source of chemical compounds with potential use as pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and dietary supplements. However, biological screening and chemical analysis of marine extracts pose specific technical constraints and require adequate sample preparation. Here we report an improved method on Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) to fractionate organic extracts containing high concentration of salt that hampers the recovery of secondary metabolites. The procedure uses a water suspension to load the extracts on a poly(styrene-divynylbenzene)-based support and a stepwise organic solvent elution to effectively desalt and fractionate the organic components. The novel protocol has been tested on MeOH-soluble material from three model organisms (Reniera sarai, Dendrilla membranosa and Amphidinium carterae) and was validated on a small panel of 47 marine samples, including sponges and protists, within discovery programs for identification of immuno-stimulatory and anti-infective natural products. PMID:26378547

  14. Androgens indirectly accelerate thymocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Dulos, G J; Bagchus, W M

    2001-02-01

    Apoptotic processes, or the disturbance of the natural regulation of these processes, may be involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases (AID). Women are, in general, more susceptible than men to develop AID like rheumatoid arthritis. Androgens and glucocorticoids, in contrast to oestrogens, have favourable effects in AID models as well as in human AID. It is known that glucocorticoids (GC), used for treatment of AID, increase apoptosis in the thymus resulting in decreased numbers of CD4+ CD8+ thymocytes. It was asked whether androgens, in contrast to oestrogens, exert their favourable effects in the treatment of AID by a mechanism comparable to that described for GC by eliminating the apoptosis prone CD4+ CD8+ population in the thymus. Although both androgens and oestrogens proved thymolytic, a significantly decreased percentage of CD4+ CD8+ thymocytes was observed by flow cytometry after treatment of mice with the androgen methyltestosterone, but not with the oestrogen ethinylestradiol. To investigate whether the observed thymolytic effects were due to the presence of hormone receptors on thymocytes, cells were isolated from the thymus and incubated with androgens or oestrogens to measure apoptosis. Several techniques were used to determine thymocyte apoptosis in vitro, but no enhanced apoptotic signal was observed. Using the very sensitive TUNEL assay, no direct effect of androgens on thymocytes in vitro could be observed. This is in sharp contrast to the high signal observed with GC. Therefore, upon in vivo androgen treatment, other cells containing androgen receptors than thymocytes are probably involved in inducing the increase in thymic apoptosis. To study the role of the androgen receptor on thymocyte apoptosis, androgen receptor mutant (Tfm/Y) mice were treated with androgens. No alterations of thymocyte subpopulations were seen, suggesting that changes in the percentage of CD4+ CD8+ thymocytes after administration of androgens depend on the presence of functional androgen receptors. Thus, it is concluded that androgens indirectly accelerate thymocyte apoptosis in vivo. PMID:11360932

  15. Seismic source functions from free-field ground motions recorded on SPE: Implications for source models of small, shallow explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rougier, Esteban; Patton, Howard J.

    2015-05-01

    Reduced displacement potentials (RDPs) for chemical explosions of the Source Physics Experiments (SPE) in granite at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site are estimated from free-field ground motion recordings. Far-field P wave source functions are proportional to the time derivative of RDPs. Frequency domain comparisons between measured source functions and model predictions show that high-frequency amplitudes roll off as ω- 2, but models fail to predict the observed seismic moment, corner frequency, and spectral overshoot. All three features are fit satisfactorily for the SPE-2 test after cavity radius Rc is reduced by 12%, elastic radius is reduced by 58%, and peak-to-static pressure ratio on the elastic radius is increased by 100%, all with respect to the Mueller-Murphy model modified with the Denny-Johnson Rc scaling law. A large discrepancy is found between the cavity volume inferred from RDPs and the volume estimated from laser scans of the emplacement hole. The measurements imply a scaled Rc of ~5 m/kt1/3, more than a factor of 2 smaller than nuclear explosions. Less than 25% of the seismic moment can be attributed to cavity formation. A breakdown of the incompressibility assumption due to shear dilatancy of the source medium around the cavity is the likely explanation. New formulas are developed for volume changes due to medium bulking (or compaction). A 0.04% decrease of average density inside the elastic radius accounts for the missing volumetric moment. Assuming incompressibility, established Rc scaling laws predicted the moment reasonable well, but it was only fortuitous because dilation of the source medium compensated for the small cavity volume.

  16. Photo-protective effect of americanin B against ultraviolet B-induced damage in cultured human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Yao, Cheng Wen; Cha, Ji Won; Shin, Jennifer H; Yoo, Suk Jae; Hyun, Jin Won

    2014-11-01

    Excessive ultraviolet (UV) radiation, a constituent of sunlight, can induce multiple types of skin damage. We recently demonstrated that americanin B, a lignin compound, protected cells against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced damage by exerting antioxidant effects and inhibiting apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the ability of americanin B to protect against cell injury induced by UVB (280-320nm), the most harmful UV wavelengths, in human HaCaT keratinocytes. Americanin B absorbed UVB, eliminated UVB-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and decreased the extent of UVB-induced oxidative modification of lipids, proteins, and DNA. In addition, americanin B inhibited UVB-induced apoptosis, as indicated by reductions in apoptotic body formation and DNA fragmentation. Furthermore, americanin B reversed the depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane induced by UVB exposure. These protective activities were associated with down-regulation of apoptosis-promoting proteins, Bax, caspase-9, and caspase-3 and up-regulation of an apoptosis inhibitor, Bcl-2. These results suggest that americanin B can protect human keratinocytes against UVB-induced cell damage. PMID:25461549

  17. Ultrahigh and High Resolution Structures and Mutational Analysis of Monomeric Streptococcus pyogenes SpeB Reveal a Functional Role for the Glycine-rich C-terminal Loop

    SciTech Connect

    González-Páez, Gonzalo E.; Wolan, Dennis W.

    2012-09-05

    Cysteine protease SpeB is secreted from Streptococcus pyogenes and has been studied as a potential virulence factor since its identification almost 70 years ago. Here, we report the crystal structures of apo mature SpeB to 1.06 {angstrom} resolution as well as complexes with the general cysteine protease inhibitor trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido(4-guanidino)butane and a novel substrate mimetic peptide inhibitor. These structures uncover conformational changes associated with maturation of SpeB from the inactive zymogen to its active form and identify the residues required for substrate binding. With the use of a newly developed fluorogenic tripeptide substrate to measure SpeB activity, we determined IC{sub 50} values for trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido(4-guanidino)butane and our new peptide inhibitor and the effects of mutations within the C-terminal active site loop. The structures and mutational analysis suggest that the conformational movements of the glycine-rich C-terminal loop are important for the recognition and recruitment of biological substrates and release of hydrolyzed products.

  18. Effect of SPE-like Proton or Photon Radiation on the Kinetics of Mouse Peripheral Blood Cells and Radiation Biological Effectiveness Determinations

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Weaver, A.L.; Wan, X.S.; Diffenderfer, E.S.; Lin, L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Exploration missions outside low-Earth orbit are being planned; therefore, it is critical to understand the risk astronauts would be exposed to in the space environment, especially during extravehicular activities (EVAs). Reductions in white blood cell (WBC) numbers can occur as a result of exposure to solar particle event (SPE) radiation. The aim of the present study was to determine the duration of the effects on blood cell numbers from exposure to a single whole-body dose of SPE-like proton radiation or photon radiation as well as to determine the radiation biological effectiveness (RBE) values at those times when radiation exposure causes blood cell numbers to experience the most critical effects when using mice as a model. Our results indicate that both types of radiation cause significant reductions in the numbers of all blood cell types at different times post-irradiation. The RBE values were not significantly different from 1.0. These results indicate that the risk estimations for astronauts from exposure of mice to SPE-like proton radiation are comparable to those previously made for doses of standard reference radiations, suggesting that countermeasures should be developed for the decreases in blood cell counts observed following the exposure of mice to SPE radiation. Key Words: Proton radiation—Gamma radiation—Blood cell counts—Solar particle event. Astrobiology 13, 570–577. PMID:23980767

  19. Apoptosis: Targets in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Westphal, Sabine; Kalthoff, Holger

    2003-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is characterized by poor prognosis, because of late diagnosis and lack of response to chemo- and/or radiation therapies. Resistance to apoptosis mainly causes this insensitivity to conventional therapies. Apoptosis or programmed cell death is a central regulator of tissue homeostasis. Certain genetic disturbances of apoptotic signaling pathways have been found in carcinomas leading to tumor development and progression. In the past few years, the knowledge about the complex pathways of apoptosis has strongly increased and new therapeutic approaches based on this knowledge are being developed. This review will focus on the role of apoptotic proteins contributing to pancreatic cancer development and progression and will demonstrate possible targets to influence this deadly disease. PMID:12605713

  20. Molecular mechanisms of hepatic apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, K

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is a prominent feature of liver diseases. Causative factors such as alcohol, viruses, toxic bile acids, fatty acids, drugs, and immune response, can induce apoptotic cell death via membrane receptors and intracellular stress. Apoptotic signaling network, including membrane death receptor-mediated cascade, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, lysosomal permeabilization, and mitochondrial dysfunction, is intermixed each other, but one mechanism may dominate at a particular stage. Mechanisms of hepatic apoptosis are complicated by multiple signaling pathways. The progression of liver disease is affected by the balance between apoptotic and antiapoptotic capabilities. Therapeutic options of liver injury are impacted by the clear understanding toward mechanisms of hepatic apoptosis. PMID:24434519

  1. Molecular mechanisms of hepatic apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, K

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is a prominent feature of liver diseases. Causative factors such as alcohol, viruses, toxic bile acids, fatty acids, drugs, and immune response, can induce apoptotic cell death via membrane receptors and intracellular stress. Apoptotic signaling network, including membrane death receptor-mediated cascade, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, lysosomal permeabilization, and mitochondrial dysfunction, is intermixed each other, but one mechanism may dominate at a particular stage. Mechanisms of hepatic apoptosis are complicated by multiple signaling pathways. The progression of liver disease is affected by the balance between apoptotic and antiapoptotic capabilities. Therapeutic options of liver injury are impacted by the clear understanding toward mechanisms of hepatic apoptosis. PMID:24434519

  2. Caspases: the executioners of apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, G M

    1997-01-01

    Apoptosis is a major form of cell death, characterized initially by a series of stereotypic morphological changes. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the gene ced-3 encodes a protein required for developmental cell death. Since the recognition that CED-3 has sequence identity with the mammalian cysteine protease interleukin-1 beta-converting enzyme (ICE), a family of at least 10 related cysteine proteases has been identified. These proteins are characterized by almost absolute specificity for aspartic acid in the P1 position. All the caspases (ICE-like proteases) contain a conserved QACXG (where X is R, Q or G) pentapeptide active-site motif. Capases are synthesized as inactive proenzymes comprising an N-terminal peptide (prodomain) together with one large and one small subunit. The crystal structures of both caspase-1 and caspase-3 show that the active enzyme is a heterotetramer, containing two small and two large subunits. Activation of caspases during apoptosis results in the cleavage of critical cellular substrates, including poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and lamins, so precipitating the dramatic morphological changes of apoptosis. Apoptosis induced by CD95 (Fas/APO-1) and tumour necrosis factor activates caspase-8 (MACH/FLICE/Mch5), which contains an N-terminus with FADD (Fas-associating protein with death domain)-like death effector domains, so providing a direct link between cell death receptors and the caspases. The importance of caspase prodomains in the regulation of apoptosis is further highlighted by the recognition of adapter molecules, such as RAIDD [receptor-interacting protein (RIP)-associated ICH-1/CED-3-homologous protein with a death domain]/CRADD (caspase and RIP adapter with death domain), which binds to the prodomain of caspase-2 and recruits it to the signalling complex. Cells undergoing apoptosis following triggering of death receptors execute the death programme by activating a hierarchy of caspases, with caspase-8 and possibly caspase-10 being at or near the apex of this apoptotic cascade. PMID:9337844

  3. Bovine lactoferricin causes apoptosis in Jurkat T-leukemia cells by sequential permeabilization of the cell membrane and targeting of mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Mader, Jamie S.; Richardson, Angela; Salsman, Jayme; Top, Deniz; Antueno, Roberto de; Duncan, Roy; Hoskin, David W. . E-mail: d.w.hoskin@dal.ca

    2007-07-15

    Bovine lactoferricin (LfcinB) is a cationic antimicrobial peptide that kills Jurkat T-leukemia cells by the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. However, the process by which LfcinB triggers mitochondria-dependent apoptosis is not well understood. Here, we show that LfcinB-induced apoptosis in Jurkat T-leukemia cells was preceded by LfcinB binding to, and progressive permeabilization of the cell membrane. Colloidal gold electron microscopy revealed that LfcinB entered the cytoplasm of Jurkat T-leukemia cells prior to the onset of mitochondrial depolarization. LfcinB was not internalized by endocytosis because endocytosis inhibitors did not prevent LfcinB-induced cytotoxicity. Furthermore, intracellular delivery of LfcinB via fusogenic liposomes caused the death of Jurkat T-leukemia cells, as well as normal human fibroblasts. Collectively, these findings suggest that LfcinB caused damage to the cell membrane that allowed LfcinB to enter the cytoplasm of Jurkat T-leukemia cells and mediate cytotoxicity. In addition, confocal microscopy showed that intracellular LfcinB co-localized with mitochondria in Jurkat T-leukemia cells, while flow cytometry and colloidal gold electron microscopy showed that LfcinB rapidly associated with purified mitochondria. Furthermore, purified mitochondria treated with LfcinB rapidly lost transmembrane potential and released cytochrome c. We conclude that LfcinB-induced apoptosis in Jurkat T-leukemia cells resulted from cell membrane damage and the subsequent disruption of mitochondrial membranes by internalized LfcinB.

  4. Pre-Shot Simulations of Far-Field Ground Motions for the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) Explosions at the Climax Stock, Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A J; Wagoner, J; Petersson, N A; Sjogreen, B

    2010-11-07

    The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) will involve a series of explosions in various geologic and emplacement conditions to validate numerical simulation methods to predict behavior of seismic wave excitation and propagation for nuclear test monitoring. The first SPE's currently underway involve explosions in the Climax Stock (granitic geology) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Detailed geologic data and published material properties for the major lithologic units of the NNSS and surrounding region were used to build three-dimensional models for seismic wave propagation simulations. The geologic structure near the SPE shot point is quite varied including granitic, carbonate, tuff and alluvium lithologies. We performed preliminary ground motion simulations for a near-source domain covering 8 km x 8 km at the surface centered on the shot point to investigate various source and propagation effects using WPP, LLNL's anelastic seismic wave finite difference code. Simulations indicate that variations in wave propagation properties of the sub-surface will generate strongly path-dependent response once the energy has left the relatively small granitic geology of the near-surface Climax Stock near the SPE shot point. Rough topography to the north and west of SPE shot point causes additional complexity in the signals including energy on the transverse components. Waves propagate much faster through the granitic and carbonate formations and slower through the tuff and alluvium. Synthetic seismograms for a pure explosion source in a 3D geologic structure show large amplitudes on transverse component. For paths to the south sampling the granite, tuff and alluvium lithologies transverse component amplitudes are as high as 50% of that on the vertical and radial components.

  5. Liquid Metering Centrifuge Sticks (LMCS): A Centrifugal Approach to Metering Known Sample Volumes for Colorimetric Solid Phase Extraction (C-SPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazda, Daniel B.; Schultz, John R.; Clarke, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    Phase separation is one of the most significant obstacles encountered during the development of analytical methods for water quality monitoring in spacecraft environments. Removing air bubbles from water samples prior to analysis is a routine task on earth; however, in the absence of gravity, this routine task becomes extremely difficult. This paper details the development and initial ground testing of liquid metering centrifuge sticks (LMCS), devices designed to collect and meter a known volume of bubble-free water in microgravity. The LMCS uses centrifugal force to eliminate entrapped air and reproducibly meter liquid sample volumes for analysis with Colorimetric Solid Phase Extraction (C-SPE). C-SPE is a sorption-spectrophotometric platform that is being developed as a potential spacecraft water quality monitoring system. C-SPE utilizes solid phase extraction membranes impregnated with analyte-specific colorimetric reagents to concentrate and complex target analytes in spacecraft water samples. The mass of analyte extracted from the water sample is determined using diffuse reflectance (DR) data collected from the membrane surface and an analyte-specific calibration curve. The analyte concentration can then be calculated from the mass of extracted analyte and the volume of the sample analyzed. Previous flight experiments conducted in microgravity conditions aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft demonstrated that the inability to collect and meter a known volume of water using a syringe was a limiting factor in the accuracy of C-SPE measurements. Herein, results obtained from ground based C-SPE experiments using ionic silver as a test analyte and either the LMCS or syringes for sample metering are compared to evaluate the performance of the LMCS. These results indicate very good agreement between the two sample metering methods and clearly illustrate the potential of utilizing centrifugal forces to achieve phase separation and metering of water samples in microgravity.

  6. The interplay of transcription factors in suppression of UV-B induced flavonol accumulation by flg22.

    PubMed

    Schenke, Dirk; Cai, Daguang

    2014-04-10

    Biotic stress can be mimicked by application of elicitors, which comprise of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs). Treatment of plant cell cultures with MAMPs such as flg22 suppressed the expression of UV-B-induced flavonol pathway genes (FPGs) in parsley, carrot and Arabidopsis. This is thought to allow the plant focusing its secondary metabolism on the pathogen defense during MAMP-triggered immunity (MTI). Recently we reported that this suppression also depends on prevention of histone 3 acetylation at lysine 9 (H3K9ac), a hallmark for gene activation. Here we describe a possible regulation between UV-B and flg22 signaling cascades, and the interplay of MYB and WRKY transcription factors in regulating the expression of the FPGs. PMID:24721804

  7. Plant microtubules reorganization under the indirect UV-B exposure and during UV-B-induced programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Krasylenko, Yuliya A.; Yemets, Alla I.; Blume, Yaroslav B.

    2013-01-01

    The role of microtubules in cellular pathways of UV-B signaling in plants as well as in related structural cell response become into focus of few last publications. As microtubules in plant cell reorient/reorganize (become randomized, fragmented or depolymerized) in a response to direct UV-B exposure, these cytoskeletal components could be involved into UV-B signaling pathways as highly responsive players. In the current addendum, indirect UV-B-induced microtubules reorganization in cells of shielded Arabidopsis thaliana (GFP-MAP4) primary roots and the correspondence of microtubules depolymerization with the typical hallmarks of the programmed cell death in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 (GFP-MBD) cells are discussed. PMID:23438586

  8. The mechanism of PDT-induced apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiongwei; Liu, Timon C.; Ding, Xin-Min; Gu, Ying; Liu, Fan-Guang; Liu, Song-Hao

    2003-12-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) can induce apoptosis in many cancer cells in vitro and in tumors in vivo. Cells become more oxidation with PDT, and maintain differentiation and proliferation, go apoptosis and necrosis with the increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration. ROS can induce apoptosis through mitochondria by inhibiting respiration chain or oxidative phosphorylation or damaging mitochondrial membrane. ROS can initiate apoptosis through endoplamic reticulum(ER) by opening Ca2+ channel or starting unfold protein response (UPR). ROS can also induce apoptosis through Golgi by producing ganglioside GD3 by use of ceramide, which induces apoptosis by activating caspase-3, JNK and p38 MAPK. It can also induce apoptosis by activating Bip (mitochondria-dependant) or preocaspase-12 (mitochondria- independent) or inhibiting protein synthesizing. There are so complicated cross-talking among different signal pathways or organnells that we think PDT-induced apoptosis is mediated by multiplex pathways and excessive levels in a refined network.

  9. Investigation of the superconducting proximity effect (SPE) and magnetic dead layers (MDL) in thin film double layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateishi, Go

    When a thin superconducting film (S film) is condensed onto a thin normal conducting film (N film), the first layers of the S film loose their superconductivity. This phenomenon is generally called the "superconducting proximity effect (SPE)". As an investigation of SPE we focus on the transition temperature of extremely thin NS double layers in the thin regime. Normal metal is condensed on top of insulating Sb, then Pb is deposited on it in small steps. The transition temperature is plotted in an inverse Tc-reduction 1/Delta T c =1/(Ts - Tc) versus Pb thickness graph. To compare our experimental results with the theoretical prediction, a numerical calculation of the SN double layer is performed by our group using the linear gap equation. As a result, there are large discrepancies between the experimental and theoretical results generally. The results of the NS double layers can be divided into three groups in terms of their discrepancies between experiment and theory.(1) Non-coupling (Tc = 0 K): N= Mg, Ag, Cu, Au. There are large deviations between experiment and theory by a factor to the order of 2.5. (2) Weak coupling (Tc is low (< 2.5 K)) : N=Cd, Zn, Al. Deviation is present, but only by a factor of 1.5. (3) Intermediate coupling (T c is around half of Pb's (≈ 4.5 K)) : N=In, Sn. The experimental results agree with the theory. Next, we examine the detection of the magnetic dead layer (MDL) of Ni thin films in terms of the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) with several non-magnetic metal substrates. In our results, when Ni film is contact with a polyvalent metal substrate film, the sandwich film has around 2 to 3.5 at.lay. of magnetic dead layers. However we have not observed the magnetic dead Ni layers with the alkali and noble metal substrate film. Finally, we revisit the Pb/Ni system to measure the magnetic scattering of Ni with the method of Weak Localization (WL) to compare with the dephasing rate due to the Tc-reduction. In this series, we use only very thin Pb films between 1.3 and 5 at.lay. deposited on top of the Ag substrate with about 37 at.lay. thickness, because we make the Ag substrate suppress the superconductivity of the extremely thin Pb film with the SPE and avoid the Azlamazov-Larkin fluctuations. After comparison, it becomes clear that the dephasing rate from the Tc-reduction method is much larger than that measured by the weak localization (the factor is around 120). We consider not only "pair breaking" but also "pair weakening", and conclude that the reduction of the superconducting transition temperature is not due to dephasing by magnetic scattering but due to the resonance scattering of Cooper pairs by non-magnetic d-states.

  10. The Source Physics Experiments (SPE): A Physics-Based Approach to Discriminate Low-Yield Nuclear Events (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snelson, C. M.; Chipman, V.; White, R. L.; Emmitt, R.; Townsend, M.

    2013-12-01

    Discriminating low-yield nuclear explosions is one of the current challenges in the field of monitoring and verification. Work is currently underway in Nevada to address this challenge by conducting a series of experiments using a physics-based approach. This has been accomplished by using a multifaceted, multi-disciplinary approach that includes a range of activities, from characterizing the shallow subsurface to acquiring new explosion data both in the near field (< 100 m from the source) to the far field (> 100 m to 10 s km from the source). The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is a collaborative project between National Security Technologies, LLC, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, and the Air Force Technical Applications Center. The goal of the SPE is to understand the transition of seismic energy from the near field to the far field; to understand the development of S-waves in explosives sources; and to understand how anisotropy controls seismic energy transmission and partitioning. To fully explore these problems, the SPE test series includes tests in both simple and complex geology cases. The current series is being conducted in a highly fractured granite body. This location was chosen, in part, because it was the location of previous nuclear tests in the same rock body and because generally the geology has been well characterized. In addition to historic data, high-resolution seismic reflection, cross-hole tomography, core samples, LIDAR, hyperspectral, and fracture mapping data have been acquired to further characterize and detect changes after each of the shot across the test bed. The complex geology series includes 7 planned shots using conventional explosives in the same shot hole surrounded by Continuous Reflectometry for Radius vs. Time Experiment (CORRTEX), Time of Arrival, Velocity of Detonation, down-hole accelerometers, surface accelerometers, infrasound, and a suite of seismic sensors of various frequency bands from the near field to the far field. This allows for the use of a single test bed in the granite instead of multiple test beds to obtain the same results. The shots are planned at various depths to obtain a Green's function, scaled depth-of-burial data, nominal depth-of-burial data and damage-zone data. Three shots have been executed to date and the fourth is planned for August 2013 as a 220 lb (100 kg) TNT equivalent shot at a depth of 315 ft (96 m). Over 400 data channels have been recorded on the first series of shots with high fidelity. Once the complex geology site data have been exploited, a new test bed will be developed in a simpler geology to test these physics-based models. Ultimately, the results from this project will provide the next advances in the science of monitoring to enable a physics-based predicative capability. This work was done by National Security Technologies, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy. DOE/NV/25946--1835.

  11. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Annie; Gibbons, Anne E.; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    Genetically-encoded fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) reporters are powerful tools to analyze cell signaling and function at single cell resolution in standard two-dimensional cell cultures, but these reporters rarely have been applied to three-dimensional environments. FRET interactions between donor and acceptor molecules typically are determined by changes in relative fluorescence intensities, but wavelength-dependent differences in absorption of light complicate this analysis method in three-dimensional settings. Here we report fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) with phasor analysis, a method that displays fluorescence lifetimes on a pixel-wise basis in real time, to quantify apoptosis in breast cancer cells stably expressing a genetically encoded FRET reporter. This microscopic imaging technology allowed us to identify treatment-induced apoptosis in single breast cancer cells in environments ranging from two-dimensional cell culture, spheroids with cancer and bone marrow stromal cells, and living mice with orthotopic human breast cancer xenografts. Using this imaging strategy, we showed that combined metabolic therapy targeting glycolysis and glutamine pathways significantly reduced overall breast cancer metabolism and induced apoptosis. We also determined that distinct subpopulations of bone marrow stromal cells control resistance of breast cancer cells to chemotherapy, suggesting heterogeneity of treatment responses of malignant cells in different bone marrow niches. Overall, this study establishes FLIM with phasor analysis as an imaging tool for apoptosis in cell-based assays and living mice, enabling real-time, cellular-level assessment of treatment efficacy and heterogeneity. PMID:26771007

  12. APOPTOSIS IN WHOLE MOUSE OVARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Apoptosis in Whole Mouse Ovaries
    Robert M. Zucker Susan C. Jeffay and Sally D. Perreault
    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, 27711.

  13. Pancreatic carcinogenesis: apoptosis and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Onizuka, Shinya; Kawakami, Shunsuke; Taniguchi, Ken; Fujioka, Hikaru; Miyashita, Kosei

    2004-04-01

    Apoptosis and angiogenesis are critical biologic processes that are altered during carcinogenesis. Both apoptosis and angiogenesis may play an important role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Despite numerous advances in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer, its prognosis remains dismal and a new therapeutic approach is much needed. Recent research has revealed that apoptosis and angiogenesis are closely interrelated. Several reports show that a tumor suppresser gene that is expressed in pancreatic carcinoma and related to malignant potential can induce apoptosis and also inhibit angiogenesis. At present, it is generally accepted that tumor growth in cancers, including pancreatic cancer, depends on angiogenesis. We have identified 2 new angiogenesis inhibitors from a conditioned medium of human pancreatic carcinoma cell line (BxPC-3): antiangiogenic antithrombin III (aaAT-III) and vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf). These molecules were able to regress tumors in severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) mice, demonstrating potent inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. Moreover, the angiogenesis inhibitors induced tumor dormancy in the animal model. These results suggest that antiangiogenic therapy using angiogenesis inhibitors may become a new strategy for treatment of pancreatic cancer in the near future. PMID:15084979

  14. Real-Time Data Management, IP Telemetry, Data Integration, and Data Center Operations for the Source Physics Experiment (SPE), Nevada National Security Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plank, G.; Slater, D.; Torrisi, J.; Presser, R.; Williams, M.; Smith, K. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Nevada Seismological Laboratory (NSL) manages time-series data and high-throughput IP telemetry for the National Center for Nuclear Security (NCNS) Source Physics Experiment (SPE), underway on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). During active-source experiments, SPE's heterogeneous systems record over 350 channels of a variety of data types including seismic, infrasound, acoustic, and electro-magnetic. During the interim periods, broadband and short period instruments record approximately 200 channels of continuous, high-sample-rate seismic data. Frequent changes in sensor and station configurations create a challenging meta-data environment. Meta-data account for complete operational histories, including sensor types, serial numbers, gains, sample rates, orientations, instrument responses, data-logger types etc. To date, these catalogue 217 stations, over 40 different sensor types, and over 1000 unique recording configurations (epochs). Facilities for processing, backup, and distribution of time-series data currently span four Linux servers, 60Tb of disk capacity, and two data centers. Bandwidth, physical security, and redundant power and cooling systems for acquisition, processing, and backup servers are provided by NSL's Reno data center. The Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) System Computer Services (SCS) in Las Vegas provides similar facilities for the distribution server. NSL staff handle setup, maintenance, and security of all data management systems. SPE PIs have remote access to meta-data, raw data, and CSS3.0 compilations, via SSL-based transfers such as rsync or secure-copy, as well as shell access for data browsing and limited processing. Meta-data are continuously updated and posted on the Las Vegas distribution server as station histories are better understood and errors are corrected. Raw time series and refined CSS3.0 data compilations with standardized formats are transferred to the Las Vegas data server as available. For better data availability and station monitoring, SPE is beginning to leverage NSL's wide-area digital IP network with nine SPE stations and six Rock Valley area stations that stream continuous recordings in real time to the NSL Reno data center. These stations, in addition to eight regional legacy stations supported by National Security Technologies (NSTec), are integrated with NSL's regional monitoring network and constrain a high-quality local earthquake catalog for NNSS. The telemetered stations provide critical capabilities for SPE, and infrastructure for earthquake response on NNSS as well as southern Nevada and the Las Vegas area.

  15. Quantitative measurements of corticosteroids in ex vivo samples using on-line SPE-LC/MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lan; Chiou, William J; Camp, Heidi S; Burns, David J; Cheng, Xueheng

    2009-01-15

    Abnormal elevation of 11beta-HSD1 activities in tissues, such as fat and brain, may contribute to the development of the abdominal obesity and Alzheimer disease, and the inhibition of 11beta-HSD1 might be beneficial to the management of these diseases. To assess the effects of pharmacologic inhibitors of 11beta-HSD1, we developed a fast LC/MS/MS method to quantify corticosteroids in minced tissue samples in the presence of 11beta-HSD substrates. The novel on-line SPE-LC/MS/MS method was developed with dual binary gradient and a throughput of 4.5 min/sample. A total of six corticosteroids (cortisol, cortisone, corticosterone, dehydrocorticosterone, dexamethasone, and dehydrodexamethasone) were studied. The lower limit of quantitation from 0.40 to 11.4 fmol and 4.5 orders magnitude of dynamic range were obtained for these six compounds. Three novel enzymatic bi-products, all isomers of cortisol, were observed in the liver or fat samples. Two of them were identified by matching the HPLC retention times and MS/MS spectra with authentic compounds. The potential interferences of these isomers and their removal are discussed. PMID:19119084

  16. Streptococcus pyogenes c-di-AMP Phosphodiesterase, GdpP, Influences SpeB Processing and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyu Hong; Kang, Song Ok

    2013-01-01

    Small cyclic nucleotide derivatives are employed as second messengers by both prokaryotes and eukaryotes to regulate diverse cellular processes responding to various signals. In bacteria, c-di-AMP has been discovered most recently, and some Gram-positive pathogens including S. pyogenes use this cyclic nucleotide derivative as a second messenger instead of c-di-GMP, a well-studied important bacterial second messenger. GdpP, c-di-AMP phosphodiesterase, is responsible for degrading c-di-AMP inside cells, and the cellular role of GdpP in S. pyogenes has not been examined yet. To test the cellular role of GdpP, we created a strain with a nonpolar inframe deletion of the gdpP gene, and examined the properties of the strain including virulence. From this study, we demonstrated that GdpP influences the biogenesis of SpeB, the major secreted cysteine protease, at a post-translational level, susceptibility to the beta lactam antibiotic ampicillin, and is necessary for full virulence in a murine subcutaneous infection model. PMID:23869242

  17. Detailed comparison of observed dose-time profile of October 19-20, 1989 SPE on Mir with model calculations.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, G D; Atwell, W

    1999-06-01

    The dose rate dynamics of the October 19-20, 1989 solar energetic particle (SPE) event as observed by the Liulin instrument onboard the Mir orbital station was analyzed in light of new calculations of the geomagnetic cutoff and improved estimates of the >100 MeV energy spectra from the GOES satellite instrument. The new calculations were performed using the as-flown Mir orbital trajectory and includes time variations of the cutoff rigidity due to changes in the Kp index. Although the agreement of total event integrated calculated dose to the measured dose is good, it results from some measured dose-time profile being higher and some lower than model calculations. They point to the need to include the diurnal variation of the geomagnetic cutoff and modifications of the cutoffs to variations in Kp in model calculations. Understanding of such events in light of the upcoming construction of the International Space Station during the period of maximum solar activity needs to be vigorously pursued. PMID:11543128

  18. Rapid Determination of Dichlofluanid Residues in Vegetables Using Dispersive-SPE Sample Preparation Combined with Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xue; Cao, Shurui; Li, Xianliang; Xi, Cunxian; Ding, Xiaowen; Xu, Fen; Hu, Jiangtao; Chen, Zhiqiong

    2016-05-01

    A method for rapid determination of dichlofluanid residue in vegetables using dispersive solid-phase extraction (dispersive-SPE) sample preparation combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed. Samples were extracted with actone-ethyl acetate (1:1, V/V), and then detected by GC-MS with an external standard method after being purified by optimized primary secondary amine, graphitized carbon black and anhydrous magnesium sulphate (MgSO4). It turned out that dichlofluanid showed a good linearity (y= 2.7E+ 5x- 2710.5) over the range of 0.02-2.00 mg/L with a correlation coefficient of 0.9994. The limit of detection was 0.13 μg/kg (S/N = 3) and the limit of quantification was 0.43 µg/kg (S/N = 10). The recoveries of the dichlofluanid were in the range of 73.3-106.7, 83.3-116.7 and 83.3∼106.7% with the spiked levels of 0.01, 0.02 and 0.05 mg/kg, and the relative standard deviations were in the range of 4.1-22.3%. Compared with the reported literature, the method is more simple, rapid, sensitive, reliable and can be applied to many vegetables. PMID:26921896

  19. [Simultaneous determination of 5 kinds of alkaloids in Kechuanning tablets by SPE-UPLC under different UV-vis wavelength].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-li; Li, Dong-mei; Feng, Li; Yuan, Hao

    2011-05-01

    The paper is to establish a method for simultaneous determination of 5 kinds of alkaloids in ephedra and poppy which are in Kechuanning tablets. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) was adopted in pretreatment, and a UPLC method with 2 different wavelengths had been developed: 210 nm for the detection of morphine, codeine phosphate, ephedrine hydrochloride and pseudoephedrine hydrochloride, and 251 nm for papaverine hydrochloride. The column used was Acquity UPLC BEH C18 (100 mm x 2.1 mm ID, 1.7 microm) with linear gradient elution using acetonitrile and 0.1% phosphoric acid. The flow rate was 0.4 mL.min-1, and the column temperature was 30 degrees C. The linear response range was 0.375 0 - 12.50 microg.mL-1 for morphine, 0.064 32 - 2.144 microg.mL-1 for codeine phosphate, 0.030 06 - 1.002 microg.mL-1 for papaverine hydrochloride, 1.126 - 37.52 microg.mL-1 for ephedrine hydrochloride, 0.287 8 - 9.592 microg.mL-1 for pseudoephedrine hydrochloride (r = 0.999 7). The average recoveries of these compounds were 99.26%, 100.6%, 95.29%, 100.1% and 97.48%, respectively. This is a more reasonable and credible method of quality control for Kechuanning tablets. PMID:21800548

  20. Detailed Comparison of Observed Dose-Time Profile of October 19-20, 1989 SPE on Mir with Model Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, Gautam D.; Atwell, William

    1999-01-01

    The dose rate dynamics of the October 19-20,1989 solar energetic particle (SPE) event as observed by the Liulin instrument onboard the Mir orbital station was analyzed in light of new calculations of the geomagnetic cutoff and improved estimates of the less than 100 MeV energy spectra from the GOES satellite instrument. The new calculations were performed using the as-flown Mir orbital trajectory and includes time variations of the cutoff rigidity due to changes in the kappa (sub p) index. Although the agreement of total event integrated calculated dose to the measured dose is good, it results from some measured dose-time profile been higher and some lower than model calculations. They point to the need to include the diurnal variation of the geomagnetic cutoff and modifications of the cutoffs to variations in kappa (sub p) in model calculations. Understanding of such events in light of the upcoming construction of the International Space Station during the period of maximum solar activity needs to be vigorously pursued.

  1. Apoptosis-inducing and apoptosis-preventing functions of poliovirus.

    PubMed

    Tolskaya, E A; Romanova, L I; Kolesnikova, M S; Ivannikova, T A; Smirnova, E A; Raikhlin, N T; Agol, V I

    1995-02-01

    Data showing that an apoptotic reaction (the exit into the cytoplasm and nucleolytic internucleosomal degradation of chromosomal DNA, compaction and fragmentation of chromatin, cellular shrinkage, and cytoplasmic blebbing) developed in a subline of HeLa-S3 cells upon nonpermissive poliovirus infection with either a guanidine-sensitive poliovirus in the presence of guanidine, a guanidine-dependent mutant in the absence of guanidine, or certain temperature-sensitive mutants at a restrictive temperature are presented. Essentially, no apoptotic reaction occurred upon permissive infection of these cells. Both permissive and nonpermissive infections resulted in the inhibition of host protein synthesis. Actinomycin D or cycloheximide also elicited a rapid apoptotic reaction in uninfected cells. However, preinfection or coinfection with poliovirus prevented the apoptotic response to the addition of actinomycin D, and preinfection blocked cycloheximide-induced apoptosis as well. These data fit a model in which the cells used are prepared to develop apoptosis, with their viability due to the presence of certain short-lived mRNA and protein species. Poliovirus infection turns on two oppositely directed sets of reactions. On the one hand, the balance is driven toward apoptosis, probably via the shutoff of host macromolecular synthesis. On the other hand, viral protein exhibits antiapoptotic activity, thereby preventing premature cell death. To our knowledge, this is the first description of an antiapoptotic function for an RNA virus. PMID:7529330

  2. Glycyrrhizic acid pretreatment prevents sepsis-induced acute kidney injury via suppressing inflammation, apoptosis and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongyu; Liu, Zhenning; Shen, Haitao; Jin, Shuai; Zhang, Shun

    2016-06-15

    Glycyrrhizic acid (GA), an active ingredient in licorice, has multiple pharmacological activities. The aim of our study was to investigate the molecular mechanism involved in the protective effects of GA in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated rat mesangial cells (HBZY-1) and septic rats. Sepsis model was established by injection of 5mg/kg LPS in rats or incubation with 1μg/ml LPS for 24h in HBZY-1 cells. A variety of molecular biological experiments were carried out to assess the effects of GA on inflammation, apoptosis, and oxidative stress. First we found that GA alleviated sepsis-induced kidney injury in vivo. Furthermore, GA suppressed inflammatory response in vivo and in vitro. Additionally, GA inhibited cell apoptosis and the changes in expressions of apoptosis related proteins induced by LPS. Moreover, GA markedly inhibited oxidative stress induced by LPS via activation of ERK signaling pathway. Finally GA could inhibit the activation of NF-κ B induced by LPS. Our present study indicates that GA has a protective effect against sepsis-induced inflammatory response, apoptosis, and oxidative stress damage, which provides a molecular basis for a new medical treatment of septic acute kidney injury. PMID:27063444

  3. Ion channels in the regulation of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kondratskyi, Artem; Kondratska, Kateryna; Skryma, Roman; Prevarskaya, Natalia

    2015-10-01

    Apoptosis, a type of genetically controlled cell death, is a fundamental cellular mechanism utilized by multicellular organisms for disposal of cells that are no longer needed or potentially detrimental. Given the crucial role of apoptosis in physiology, deregulation of apoptotic machinery is associated with various diseases as well as abnormalities in development. Acquired resistance to apoptosis represents the common feature of most and perhaps all types of cancer. Therefore, repairing and reactivating apoptosis represents a promising strategy to fight cancer. Accumulated evidence identifies ion channels as essential regulators of apoptosis. However, the contribution of specific ion channels to apoptosis varies greatly depending on cell type, ion channel type and intracellular localization, pathology as well as intracellular signaling pathways involved. Here we discuss the involvement of major types of ion channels in apoptosis regulation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers. PMID:25450339

  4. Use of diffusion-ordered NMR spectroscopy and HPLC-UV-SPE-NMR to identify undeclared synthetic drugs in medicines illegally sold as phytotherapies.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lorena M A; Filho, Elenilson G A; Thomasi, Sérgio S; Silva, Bianca F; Ferreira, Antonio G; Venâncio, Tiago

    2013-09-01

    The informal (and/or illegal) e-commerce of pharmaceutical formulations causes problems that governmental health agencies find hard to control, one of which concerns formulas sold as natural products. The purpose of this work was to explore the advantages and limitations of DOSY and HPLC-UV-SPE-NMR. These techniques were used to identify the components of a formula illegally marketed in Brazil as an herbal medicine possessing anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. DOSY was able to detect the major components present at higher concentrations. Complete characterization was achieved using HPLC-UV-SPE-NMR, and 1D and 2D NMR analyses enabled the identification of known synthetic drugs. These were ranitidine and a mixture of orphenadrine citrate, piroxicam, and dexamethasone, which are co-formulated in a remedy called Rheumazim that is used to relieve severe pain, but it is prohibited in Brazil because of a lack of sufficient pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information. PMID:23818305

  5. Pin1 in Neuronal Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Esther B.E.; Bonni, Azad

    2009-01-01

    While the role of the prolyl isomerase Pin1 in dividing cells has long been recognized, Pin1’s function in postmitotic neurons is poorly understood. We have identified a novel mechanism by which Pin1 mediates activation of the mitochondrial cell death machinery specifically in neurons. This perspective presents a sophisticated signaling pathway that triggers neuronal apoptosis upon JNK-mediated phosphorylation of the BH3-only protein BIMEL at serine 65. Pin1 is enriched at the mitochondria in neurons together with BIMEL and components of a neuron-specific JNK signaling complex and functions as a molecular switch that couples the phosphorylation of BIMEL by JNK to apoptosis specifically in neurons. We discuss how these findings relate to our understanding of the development of the nervous system and the pathogenesis of neurologic disorders. PMID:17568190

  6. Studying apoptosis in the Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Eimon, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) have been extensively used to study apoptotic cell death during normal development and under a wide range of experimental manipulations. A number of features make zebrafish a particularly powerful model organism: (1) embryos are small in size, develop rapidly outside the mother, and are optically transparent; (2) tools are readily available for rapid knockdown and overexpression of genes; and (3) embryos can be arrayed into multiwell plates and are permeable to a wide range of drugs and small molecules. The molecular machinery underlying the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathways appears to be highly conserved between zebrafish and mammals. In this chapter, techniques are described for detecting apoptotic cells in situ in both fixed and live zebrafish embryos. Methods for inducing and inhibiting apoptosis and for functionally manipulating genes involved in apoptotic signaling are also discussed. PMID:24974299

  7. Development and optimization of SPE-HPLC-UV/ELSD for simultaneous determination of nine bioactive components in Shenqi Fuzheng Injection based on Quality by Design principles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Qu, Haibin

    2016-03-01

    A method combining solid phase extraction, high performance liquid chromatography, and ultraviolet/evaporative light scattering detection (SPE-HPLC-UV/ELSD) was developed according to Quality by Design (QbD) principles and used to assay nine bioactive compounds within a botanical drug, Shenqi Fuzheng Injection. Risk assessment and a Plackett-Burman design were utilized to evaluate the impact of 11 factors on the resolutions and signal-to-noise of chromatographic peaks. Multiple regression and Pareto ranking analysis indicated that the sorbent mass, sample volume, flow rate, column temperature, evaporator temperature, and gas flow rate were statistically significant (p < 0.05) in this procedure. Furthermore, a Box-Behnken design combined with response surface analysis was employed to study the relationships between the quality of SPE-HPLC-UV/ELSD analysis and four significant factors, i.e., flow rate, column temperature, evaporator temperature, and gas flow rate. An analytical design space of SPE-HPLC-UV/ELSD was then constructed by calculated Monte Carlo probability. In the presented approach, the operating parameters of sample preparation, chromatographic separation, and compound detection were investigated simultaneously. Eight terms of method validation, i.e., system-suitability tests, method robustness/ruggedness, sensitivity, precision, repeatability, linearity, accuracy, and stability, were accomplished at a selected working point. These results revealed that the QbD principles were suitable in the development of analytical procedures for samples in complex matrices. Meanwhile, the analytical quality and method robustness were validated by the analytical design space. The presented strategy provides a tutorial on the development of a robust QbD-compliant quantitative method for samples in complex matrices. Graphical Abstract Quality by design compliant SPE-HPLC-UV/ELSD method for quantitative analysis of Shenqi Fuzheng Injection. PMID:26825340

  8. Determination of polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in small volumes of human blood by high-throughput on-line SPE-LVI-GC-HRMS.

    PubMed

    Wittsiepe, Jürgen; Nestola, Marco; Kohne, Matthias; Zinn, Peter; Wilhelm, Michael

    2014-01-15

    A fully automated and robust method featuring on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) and large volume injection (LVI) gas chromatographic (GC) high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) is used to determine polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides, such as penta- and hexachlorobenzene (PeCBz, HxCBz), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCH) and 4,4'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethene (a metabolite of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT)), with only 200μl of human blood, serum or plasma. After spiking the sample with (13)C-labeled internal standards and precipitating the proteins, the sample is passed through a 10mm×2.0mm ID SPE cartridge filled with C18 material that adsorbs the analytes. After washing and drying, the cartridge is extracted with hexane/dodecane (99/1, v/v); the extract is directly injected into a LVI where GC/HRMS analysis follows. The fully automated system utilizes a robotic autosampler and a modular SPE system including two high-pressure syringe pumps, an automatic SPE cartridge exchanger unit and 6 switchable valves. All sample preparation steps are performed within 20min during the GC run of a previous sample, limiting the throughput with only the GC runtime. The contents are quantified using the isotope dilution method. Due to laboratory air contamination problems, we achieved LOQs of 0.017 (PeCBz), 0.009 (HxCBz), 0.007 (HCH), 0.016 (DDE), while for the six indicator PCBs, we achieved values of 0.030 (PCB-28), 0.044 (PCB-52), 0.024 (PCB-101), 0.009 (PCB-138), 0.015 (PCB-153) and 0.008 (PCB-180)μg/l serum. Under clean laboratory air conditions, these values may be improved. This method is recommended when high throughput is desirable and/or only small amounts of material are available, such as during studies involving children. PMID:24361859

  9. Magnetic Ligand Fishing as a Targeting Tool for HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR: α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Ligands and Alkylresorcinol Glycosides from Eugenia catharinae.

    PubMed

    Wubshet, Sileshi G; Brighente, Inês M C; Moaddel, Ruin; Staerk, Dan

    2015-11-25

    A bioanalytical platform combining magnetic ligand fishing for α-glucosidase inhibition profiling and HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR for structural identification of α-glucosidase inhibitory ligands, both directly from crude plant extracts, is presented. Magnetic beads with N-terminus-coupled α-glucosidase were synthesized and characterized for their inherent catalytic activity. Ligand fishing with the immobilized enzyme was optimized using an artificial test mixture consisting of caffeine, ferulic acid, and luteolin before proof-of-concept with the crude extract of Eugenia catharinae. The combination of ligand fishing and HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR identified myricetin 3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside, myricetin, quercetin, and kaempferol as α-glucosidase inhibitory ligands in E. catharinae. Furthermore, HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR analysis led to identification of six new alkylresorcinol glycosides, i.e., 5-(2-oxopentyl)resorcinol 4-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, 5-propylresorcinol 4-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, 5-pentylresorcinol 4-O-[α-D-apiofuranosyl-(1→6)]-β-D-glucopyranoside, 5-pentylresorcinol 4-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, 4-hydroxy-3-O-methyl-5-pentylresorcinol 1-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, and 3-O-methyl-5-pentylresorcinol 1-O-[β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→6)]-β-D-glucopyranoside. PMID:26496505

  10. Direct rapid analysis of multiple PPCPs in municipal wastewater using ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry without SPE pre-concentration.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ke; Li, Bing; Zhang, Tong

    2012-08-13

    Ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) was utilized to develop a rapid, sensitive and reliable method without solid phase extraction (SPE) pre-concentration for trace analysis of 11 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in influent and effluent from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). This method not only shortened the analysis time but also reduced analysis cost significantly by omitting SPE process and avoiding the consumption of SPE cartridge. Detection parameters for UHPLC-MS/MS analysis were optimized, including sample pH, eluent, mobile phase (solvent and additive), column temperature, and flow rate. Under the optimal conditions, all analytes were well separated and detected within 8.0min by UHPLC-MS/MS. The method quantification limits (MQLs) for the 11 PPCPs ranged from 0.040 to 88ngL(-1) and from 0.030 to 90ngL(-1) for influent and effluent, respectively. The matrix effect was systematically investigated and quantified for different types of samples. The analysis of influent and effluent samples of two WWTPs in Hong Kong revealed the presence of 11 PPCPs, including acyclovir, benzophenone-3, benzylparaben, carbamazepine, ethylparaben, fluconazole, fluoxetine, methylparaben, metronidazole, propylparaben, and ranitidine. Their concentrations ranged from 9.1 to 1810ngL(-1) in influent and from 6.5 to 823ngL(-1) in effluent samples collected from Hong Kong WWTPs. PMID:22790701

  11. Application of Colorimetric Solid Phase Extraction (C-SPE) to Monitoring Nickel(II) and Lead(II) in Spacecraft Water Supplies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz, Neil C.; Gazda, Daniel B.; Fritz, James S.; Porter, Marc D.; Rutz, Jeff; Mudgett, Paul; Schultz, John

    2004-01-01

    Archived water samples collected on the International Space Station (ISS) and returned to Earth for analysis have, in a few instances, contained trace levels of heavy metals. Building on our previous advances using Colorimetric Solid Phase Extraction (C-SPE) as a biocide monitoring technique, we are devising methods for the low level monitoring of nickel(II), lead(II) and other heavy metals. C-SPE is a sorption-spectrophotometric platform based on the extraction of analytes onto a membrane impregnated with a colorimetric reagent that are then quantified on the surface of the membrane using a diffuse reflectance spectrophotometer. Along these lines, we have determined nickel(II) via complexation with dimethylglyoxime (DMG) and begun to examine the analysis of lead(II) by its reaction with 2,5- dimercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole (DMTD) and 4-(2- pyridylazo)-resorcinol (PAR). These developments are also extending a new variant of C-SPE in which immobilized reagents are being incorporated into this methodology in order to optimize sample reaction conditions and to introduce the colorimetric reagent. This paper describes the status of our development of these two new methods.

  12. Development of Chromatographic Fingerprints of Eurycoma longifolia (Tongkat Ali) Roots Using Online Solid Phase Extraction-Liquid Chromatography (SPE-LC).

    PubMed

    Zaini, Nor Nasriah; Osman, Rozita; Juahir, Hafizan; Saim, Norashikin

    2016-01-01

    E. longifolia is attracting interest due to its pharmacological properties and pro-vitality effects. In this study, an online SPE-LC approach using polystyrene divinyl benzene (PSDVB) and C18 columns was developed in obtaining chromatographic fingerprints of E. longifolia. E. longifolia root samples were extracted using pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) technique prior to online SPE-LC. The effects of mobile phase compositions and column switching time on the chromatographic fingerprint were optimized. Validation of the developed method was studied based on eurycomanone. Linearity was in the range of 5 to 50 µg∙mL(-1) (r² = 0.997) with 3.2% relative standard deviation of peak area. The developed method was used to analyze 14 E. longifolia root samples and 10 products (capsules). Selected chemometric techniques: cluster analysis (CA), discriminant analysis (DA), and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to the fingerprint datasets of 37 selected peaks to evaluate the ability of the chromatographic fingerprint in classifying quality of E. longifolia. Three groups were obtained using CA. DA yielded 100% correlation coefficient with 19 discriminant compounds. Using PCA, E. longifolia root samples were clearly discriminated from the products. This study showed that the developed online SPE-LC method was able to provide comprehensive evaluation of E. longifolia samples for quality control purposes. PMID:27144555

  13. Cell intrinsic role of NF-?B-inducing kinase in regulating T cell-mediated immune and autoimmune responses.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanchuan; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Xiaofei; Xie, Xiaoping; Chen, Xiang; Jie, Zuliang; Zou, Qiang; Hu, Hongbo; Zhu, Lele; Cheng, Xuhong; Brightbill, Hans D; Wu, Lawren C; Wang, Linfang; Sun, Shao-Cong

    2016-01-01

    NF-?B inducing kinase (NIK) is a central component of the noncanonical NF-?B signaling pathway. Although NIK has been extensively studied for its function in the regulation of lymphoid organ development and B-cell maturation, the role of NIK in regulating T cell functions remains unclear and controversial. Using T cell-conditional NIK knockout mice, we here demonstrate that although NIK is dispensable for thymocyte development, it has a cell-intrinsic role in regulating the homeostasis and function of peripheral T cells. T cell-specific NIK ablation reduced the frequency of effector/memory-like T cells and impaired T cell responses to bacterial infection. The T cell-conditional NIK knockout mice were also defective in generation of inflammatory T cells and refractory to the induction of a T cell-dependent autoimmune disease, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Our data suggest a crucial role for NIK in mediating the generation of effector T cells and their recall responses to antigens. Together, these findings establish NIK as a cell-intrinsic mediator of T cell functions in both immune and autoimmune responses. PMID:26912039

  14. NF-κB-induced microRNA-31 promotes epidermal hyperplasia by repressing protein phosphatase 6 in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Sha; Xu, Zhenyao; Lou, Fangzhou; Zhang, Lingyun; Ke, Fang; Bai, Jing; Liu, Zhaoyuan; Liu, Jinlin; Wang, Hong; Zhu, Huiyuan; Sun, Yang; Cai, Wei; Gao, Yuanyuan; Su, Bing; Li, Qun; Yang, Xiao; Yu, Jianxiu; Lai, Yuping; Yu, Xue-Zhong; Zheng, Yan; Shen, Nan; Chin, Y Eugene; Wang, Honglin

    2015-01-01

    NF-κB is constitutively activated in psoriatic epidermis. However, how activated NF-κB promotes keratinocyte hyperproliferation in psoriasis is largely unknown. Here we report that the NF-κB activation triggered by inflammatory cytokines induces the transcription of microRNA (miRNA) miR-31, one of the most dynamic miRNAs identified in the skin of psoriatic patients and mouse models. The genetic deficiency of miR-31 in keratinocytes inhibits their hyperproliferation, decreases acanthosis and reduces the disease severity in psoriasis mouse models. Furthermore, protein phosphatase 6 (ppp6c), a negative regulator that restricts the G1 to S phase progression, is diminished in human psoriatic epidermis and is directly targeted by miR-31. The inhibition of ppp6c is functionally important for miR-31-mediated biological effects. Moreover, NF-κB activation inhibits ppp6c expression directly through the induction of miR-31, and enhances keratinocyte proliferation. Thus, our data identify NF-κB-induced miR-31 and its target, ppp6c, as critical factors for the hyperproliferation of epidermis in psoriasis. PMID:26138368

  15. Nitric oxide functions as a signal in ultraviolet-B-induced baicalin accumulation in Scutellaria baicalensis suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Jie; Li, Xue-Qin; Sun, Jun-Wei; Jin, Song-Heng

    2014-01-01

    Stress induced by ultraviolet-B (UV-B) irradiation stimulates the accumulation of various secondary metabolites in plants. Nitric oxide (NO) serves as an important secondary messenger in UV-B stress-induced signal transduction pathways. NO can be synthesized in plants by either enzymatic catalysis or an inorganic nitrogen pathway. The effects of UV-B irradiation on the production of baicalin and the associated molecular pathways in plant cells are poorly understood. In this study, nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, NO release and the generation of baicalin were investigated in cell suspension cultures of Scutellaria baicalensis exposed to UV-B irradiation. UV-B irradiation significantly increased NOS activity, NO release and baicalin biosynthesis in S. baicalensis cells. Additionally, exogenous NO supplied by the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), led to a similar increase in the baicalin content as the UV-B treatment. The NOS inhibitor, Nω-nitro-l-arginine (LNNA), and NO scavenger, 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) partially inhibited UV-B-induced NO release and baicalin accumulation. These results suggest that NO is generated by NOS or NOS-like enzymes and plays an important role in baicalin biosynthesis as part of the defense response of S. baicalensis cells to UV-B irradiation. PMID:24646913

  16. Conditional Deletion of NF-κB-Inducing Kinase (NIK) in Adult Mice Disrupts Mature B Cell Survival and Activation.

    PubMed

    Brightbill, Hans D; Jackman, Janet K; Suto, Eric; Kennedy, Heather; Jones, Charles; Chalasani, Sreedevi; Lin, Zhonghua; Tam, Lucinda; Roose-Girma, Meron; Balazs, Mercedesz; Austin, Cary D; Lee, Wyne P; Wu, Lawren C

    2015-08-01

    NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK) is a primary regulator of the noncanonical NF-κB signaling pathway, which plays a vital role downstream of BAFF, CD40L, lymphotoxin, and other inflammatory mediators. Germline deletion or inactivation of NIK in mice results in the defective development of B cells and secondary lymphoid organs, but the role of NIK in adult animals has not been studied. To address this, we generated mice containing a conditional allele of NIK. Deletion of NIK in adult mice results in decreases in B cell populations in lymph nodes and spleen, similar to what is observed upon blockade of BAFF. Consistent with this, B cells from mice in which NIK is acutely deleted fail to respond to BAFF stimulation in vitro and in vivo. In addition, mice with induced NIK deletion exhibit a significant decrease in germinal center B cells and serum IgA, which is indicative of roles for NIK in additional pathways beyond BAFF signaling. Our conditional NIK-knockout mice may be broadly useful for assessing the postdevelopmental and cell-specific roles of NIK and the noncanonical NF-κB pathway in mice. PMID:26116508

  17. Cell intrinsic role of NF-κB-inducing kinase in regulating T cell-mediated immune and autoimmune responses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanchuan; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Xiaofei; Xie, Xiaoping; Chen, Xiang; Jie, Zuliang; Zou, Qiang; Hu, Hongbo; Zhu, Lele; Cheng, Xuhong; Brightbill, Hans D; Wu, Lawren C.; Wang, Linfang; Sun, Shao-Cong

    2016-01-01

    NF-κB inducing kinase (NIK) is a central component of the noncanonical NF-κB signaling pathway. Although NIK has been extensively studied for its function in the regulation of lymphoid organ development and B-cell maturation, the role of NIK in regulating T cell functions remains unclear and controversial. Using T cell-conditional NIK knockout mice, we here demonstrate that although NIK is dispensable for thymocyte development, it has a cell-intrinsic role in regulating the homeostasis and function of peripheral T cells. T cell-specific NIK ablation reduced the frequency of effector/memory-like T cells and impaired T cell responses to bacterial infection. The T cell-conditional NIK knockout mice were also defective in generation of inflammatory T cells and refractory to the induction of a T cell-dependent autoimmune disease, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Our data suggest a crucial role for NIK in mediating the generation of effector T cells and their recall responses to antigens. Together, these findings establish NIK as a cell-intrinsic mediator of T cell functions in both immune and autoimmune responses. PMID:26912039

  18. The donor splice site mutation in NFkappaB-inducing kinase of alymphoplasia (aly/aly) mice.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Andrew J; Uhr, Therese

    2003-01-01

    The alymphoplasia (aly/aly) mouse has a spontaneous mutation maintained on a C57BL/6xAEJ ( H-2(b)) background that results in an absence of extrasplenic secondary lymphoid tissues. The cDNA defect has previously been shown to reside in a point mutation causing a G855R substitution in NFkappaB-inducing kinase (NIK). Since the aly/aly female cannot lactate, the strain must be bred by intercrossing heterozygous females with homozygous males and the offspring typed by serum IgA levels at the age of 4-6 weeks. We originally determined the genomic location of the alymphoplasia mutation by sequencing boundaries of regions homologous to human NIK exons, although recently the entire genomic sequence of murine C57BL/6 NIK has become available through the mouse genome project. The aly mutation is at position -1 of an intron donor consensus splice site. Exon-connexion PCR confirmed that splicing does occur across this site. Using the genomic information, we also developed a method of PCR typing of aly/aly mice from tail clips, and used this to derive an aly/aly muMT double-mutant strain in which antibody independent typing is essential. Genetic typing should considerably simplify husbandry and manipulation of the aly/aly genetic background, which is widely used as a recipient in lymphocyte transfer experiments to permit examination of the relative role of secondary lymphoid structures in immune responses. PMID:12557055

  19. An optimized and validated SPE-LC-MS/MS method for the determination of caffeine and paraxanthine in hair.

    PubMed

    De Kesel, Pieter M M; Lambert, Willy E; Stove, Christophe P

    2015-11-01

    Caffeine is the probe drug of choice to assess the phenotype of the drug metabolizing enzyme CYP1A2. Typically, molar concentration ratios of paraxanthine, caffeine's major metabolite, to its precursor are determined in plasma following administration of a caffeine test dose. The aim of this study was to develop and validate an LC-MS/MS method for the determination of caffeine and paraxanthine in hair. The different steps of a hair extraction procedure were thoroughly optimized. Following a three-step decontamination procedure, caffeine and paraxanthine were extracted from 20 mg of ground hair using a solution of protease type VIII in Tris buffer (pH 7.5). Resulting hair extracts were cleaned up on Strata-X™ SPE cartridges. All samples were analyzed on a Waters Acquity UPLC® system coupled to an AB SCIEX API 4000™ triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The final method was fully validated based on international guidelines. Linear calibration lines for caffeine and paraxanthine ranged from 20 to 500 pg/mg. Precision (%RSD) and accuracy (%bias) were below 12% and 7%, respectively. The isotopically labeled internal standards compensated for the ion suppression observed for both compounds. Relative matrix effects were below 15%RSD. The recovery of the sample preparation procedure was high (>85%) and reproducible. Caffeine and paraxanthine were stable in hair for at least 644 days. The effect of the hair decontamination procedure was evaluated as well. Finally, the applicability of the developed procedure was demonstrated by determining caffeine and paraxanthine concentrations in hair samples of ten healthy volunteers. The optimized and validated method for determination of caffeine and paraxanthine in hair proved to be reliable and may serve to evaluate the potential of hair analysis for CYP1A2 phenotyping. PMID:26452792

  20. Dispersal of Group A Streptococcal Biofilms by the Cysteine Protease SpeB Leads to Increased Disease Severity in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Kristie L.; Roberts, Amity L.; Holder, Robert C.; Reid, Sean D.

    2011-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a Gram-positive human pathogen best known for causing pharyngeal and mild skin infections. However, in the 1980's there was an increase in severe GAS infections including cellulitis and deeper tissue infections like necrotizing fasciitis. Particularly striking about this elevation in the incidence of severe disease was that those most often affected were previously healthy individuals. Several groups have shown that changes in gene content or regulation, as with proteases, may contribute to severe disease; yet strains harboring these proteases continue to cause mild disease as well. We and others have shown that group A streptococci (MGAS5005) reside within biofilms both in vitro and in vivo. That is to say that the organism colonizes a host surface and forms a 3-dimensional community encased in a protective matrix of extracellular protein, DNA and polysaccharide(s). However, the mechanism of assembly or dispersal of these structures is unclear, as is the relationship of these structures to disease outcome. Recently we reported that allelic replacement of the streptococcal regulator srv resulted in constitutive production of the streptococcal cysteine protease SpeB. We further showed that the constitutive production of SpeB significantly decreased MGAS5005Δsrv biofilm formation in vitro. Here we show that mice infected with MGAS5005Δsrv had significantly larger lesion development than wild-type infected animals. Histopathology, Gram-staining and immunofluorescence link the increased lesion development with lack of disease containment, lack of biofilm formation, and readily detectable levels of SpeB in the tissue. Treatment of MGAS5005Δsrv infected lesions with a chemical inhibitor of SpeB significantly reduced lesion formation and disease spread to wild-type levels. Furthermore, inactivation of speB in the MGAS5005Δsrv background reduced lesion formation to wild-type levels. Taken together, these data suggest a mechanism by which GAS disease may transition from mild to severe through the Srv mediated dispersal of GAS biofilms. PMID:21547075

  1. SPE HG-AAS method for the determination of inorganic arsenic in rice--results from method validation studies and a survey on rice products.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Rie R; Qian, Yiting; Sloth, Jens J

    2013-09-01

    The present paper describes the development, validation and application of a method for inorganic arsenic (iAs) determination in rice samples. The separation of iAs from organoarsenic compounds was done by off-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) followed by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS) detection. This approach was earlier developed for seafood samples (Rasmussen et al., Anal Bioanal Chem 403:2825-2834, 2012) and has in the present work been tailored for rice products and further optimised for a higher sample throughput and a lower detection limit. Water bath heating (90 °C, 60 min) of samples with dilute HNO3 and H2O2 solubilised and oxidised all iAs to arsenate (As(V)). Loading of buffered sample extracts (pH 6 ± 1) followed by selective elution of arsenate from a strong anion exchange SPE cartridge enabled the selective iAs quantification by HG-AAS, measuring total arsenic (As) in the SPE eluate. The in-house validation gave mean recoveries of 101-106% for spiked rice samples and in two reference samples. The limit of detection was 0.02 mg kg(-1), and repeatability and intra-laboratory reproducibility were less than 6 and 9%, respectively. The SPE HG-AAS method produced similar results compared to parallel high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis. The SPE separation step was tested collaboratively, where the laboratories (N = 10) used either HG-AAS or ICP-MS for iAs determination in a wholemeal rice powder. The trial gave satisfactory results (HorRat value of 1.6) and did not reveal significant difference (t test, p > 0.05) between HG-AAS and ICP-MS quantification. The iAs concentration in 36 rice samples purchased on the Danish retail market varied (0.03-0.60 mg kg(-1)), with the highest concentration found in a red rice sample. PMID:23604416

  2. UV-B-Induced CPD Photolyase Gene Expression is Regulated by UVR8-Dependent and -Independent Pathways in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Teranishi, Mika; Yamaguchi, Hiroko; Matsushita, Tomonao; Watahiki, Masaaki K; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Li, Shao-Shan; Hidema, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Plants have evolved various mechanisms that protect against the harmful effects of UV-B radiation (280-315 nm) on growth and development. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) photolyase, the repair enzyme for UV-B-induced CPDs, is essential for protecting cells from UV-B radiation. Expression of the CPD photolyase gene (PHR) is controlled by light with various wavelengths including UV-B, but the mechanisms of this regulation remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the regulation of PHR expression by light with various wavelengths, in particular low-fluence UV-B radiation (280 nm, 0.2 µmol m(-2) s(-1)), in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings grown under light-dark cycles for 7 d and then adapted to the dark for 3 d. Low-fluence UV-B radiation induced CPDs but not reactive oxygen species. AtPHR expression was effectively induced by UV-B, UV-A (375 nm) and blue light. Expression induced by UV-A and blue light was predominantly regulated by the cryptochrome-dependent pathway, whereas phytochromes A and B played a minor but noticeable role. Expression induced by UV-B was predominantly regulated by the UVR8-dependent pathway. AtPHR expression was also mediated by a UVR8-independent pathway, which is correlated with CPD accumulation induced by UV-B radiation. These results indicate that Arabidopsis has evolved diverse mechanisms to regulate CPD photolyase expression by multiple photoreceptor signaling pathways, including UVR8-dependent and -independent pathways, as protection against harmful effects of UV-B radiation. PMID:26272552

  3. Deleterious effect of serum proteins on the amphotericin B-induced potentiation of cisplatin in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Assem, M.; Bonvalot, S.; Beltramo, J. L.; Garrido, C.; Dimanche-Boitrel, M. T.; Genne, P.; Rebibou, J. M.; Caillot, D.; Chauffert, B.

    1994-01-01

    Inherent resistance of colon cancer cells to cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (CDDP) is partly attributed to reduced drug penetration through plasma membrane. Amphotericin B (AmB), a polyene antifungal antibiotic, has been shown to increase CDDP penetration and cytotoxicity on several non-digestive cancer cell lines. We demonstrated here that AmB dramatically increases the penetration of CDDP, and to a lesser extent that of carboplatin (Carbo-P) and oxaloplatin (L-OHP), in the primary resistant HT 29 human colon cancer cells when drug incubation is performed in serum-free medium. The cytotoxicity of CDDP but not that of Carbo-P and L-OHP was increased by AmB. However, AmB-induced potentiation of CDDP penetration and toxicity was almost completely abolished when cell incubation was performed in presence of human serum. We investigated whether the dilution of human serum by a high osmotic power gelatine solution (Lomol) could restore the positive effect of AmB on CDDP accumulation in HT 29 cells. Incubation of cells with CDDP and AmB in pure Lomol resulted in a 6-fold increase in platinum cellular content. However, addition of serum (25%) in Lomol solution reduced to only 2-fold the increase in platinum cellular content provoked by AmB. These disappointing results show that AmB is probably uninteresting as a modulator of CDDP resistance in clinical practice. The use of haemodilution to restore the positive AmB effect on platinum cellular accumulation cannot be warranted. PMID:7917908

  4. UV-B-induced signaling events leading to enhanced-production of catharanthine in Catharanthus roseus cell suspension cultures

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, Shilpa; Chelliah, Jayabaskaran

    2007-01-01

    Background Elicitations are considered to be an important strategy towards improved in vitro production of secondary metabolites. In cell cultures, biotic and abiotic elicitors have effectively stimulated the production of plant secondary metabolites. However, molecular basis of elicitor-signaling cascades leading to increased production of secondary metabolites of plant cell is largely unknown. Exposure of Catharanthus roseus cell suspension culture to low dose of UV-B irradiation was found to increase the amount of catharanthine and transcription of genes encoding tryptophan decarboxylase (Tdc) and strictosidine synthase (Str). In the present study, the signaling pathway mediating UV-B-induced catharanthine accumulation in C. roseus suspension cultures were investigated. Results Here, we investigate whether cell surface receptors, medium alkalinization, Ca2+ influx, H2O2, CDPK and MAPK play required roles in UV-B signaling leading to enhanced production of catharanthine in C. roseus cell suspension cultures. C. roseus cells were pretreated with various agonists and inhibitors of known signaling components and their effects on the accumulation of Tdc and Str transcripts as well as amount of catharanthine production were investigated by various molecular biology techniques. It has been found that the catharanthine accumulation and transcription of Tdc and Str were inhibited by 3–4 fold upon pretreatment of various inhibitors like suramin, N-acetyl cysteine, inhibitors of calcium fluxes, staurosporine etc. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that cell surface receptor(s), Ca2+ influx, medium alkalinization, CDPK, H2O2 and MAPK play significant roles in UV-B signaling leading to stimulation of Tdc and Str genes and the accumulation of catharanthine in C. roseus cell suspension cultures. Based on these findings, a model for signal transduction cascade has been proposed. PMID:17988378

  5. Apoptosis and Molecular Targeting Therapy in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohamed; Watari, Hidemichi; AbuAlmaaty, Ali; Ohba, Yusuke; Sakuragi, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is the programmed cell death which maintains the healthy survival/death balance in metazoan cells. Defect in apoptosis can cause cancer or autoimmunity, while enhanced apoptosis may cause degenerative diseases. The apoptotic signals contribute into safeguarding the genomic integrity while defective apoptosis may promote carcinogenesis. The apoptotic signals are complicated and they are regulated at several levels. The signals of carcinogenesis modulate the central control points of the apoptotic pathways, including inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins and FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP). The tumor cells may use some of several molecular mechanisms to suppress apoptosis and acquire resistance to apoptotic agents, for example, by the expression of antiapoptotic proteins such as Bcl-2 or by the downregulation or mutation of proapoptotic proteins such as BAX. In this review, we provide the main regulatory molecules that govern the main basic mechanisms, extrinsic and intrinsic, of apoptosis in normal cells. We discuss how carcinogenesis could be developed via defective apoptotic pathways or their convergence. We listed some molecules which could be targeted to stimulate apoptosis in different cancers. Together, we briefly discuss the development of some promising cancer treatment strategies which target apoptotic inhibitors including Bcl-2 family proteins, IAPs, and c-FLIP for apoptosis induction. PMID:25013758

  6. Optogenetic apoptosis: light-triggered cell death.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Robert M; Freeman, David J; Lamb, Kelsey N; Pollet, Rebecca M; Smith, Weston J; Lawrence, David S

    2015-10-01

    An optogenetic Bax has been designed that facilitates light-induced apoptosis. We demonstrate that mitochondrial recruitment of a genetically encoded light-responsive Bax results in the release of mitochondrial proteins, downstream caspase-3 cleavage, changes in cellular morphology, and ultimately cell death. Mutagenesis of a key phosphorylatable residue or modification of the C-terminus mitigates background (dark) levels of apoptosis that result from Bax overexpression. The mechanism of optogenetic Bax-mediated apoptosis was explored using a series of small molecules known to interfere with various steps in programmed cell death. Optogenetic Bax appears to form a mitochondrial apoptosis-induced channel analogous to that of endogenous Bax. PMID:26418181

  7. Death-Defining Immune Responses After Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Campisi, L.; Cummings, R. J.; Blander, J. Magarian

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is a programmed form of cell death whereby characteristic internal cellular dismantling is accompanied by the preservation of plasma membrane integrity. Maintaining this order during apoptosis prevents the release of cellular contents and ensures a noninflammatory death. Here, we consider examples of apoptosis in different contexts and discuss how the same form of cell death could have different immunological consequences. Multiple parameters such as cell death as a result of microbial infection, the nature of the inflammatory microenvironment, the type of responding phagocytic cells and the genetic background of the host organism all differentially influence the immunological consequences of apoptosis. PMID:24903539

  8. Mitochondrial Dynamics: Functional Link with Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Otera, Hidenori; Mihara, Katsuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria participate in a variety of physiologic processes, such as ATP production, lipid metabolism, iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, and calcium buffering. The morphology of mitochondria changes dynamically due to their frequent fusion and division in response to cellular conditions, and these dynamics are an important constituent of apoptosis. The discovery of large GTPase family proteins that regulate mitochondrial dynamics, together with novel insights into the role of mitochondrial fusion and fission in apoptosis, has provided important clues to understanding the molecular mechanisms of cellular apoptosis. In this paper, we briefly summarize current knowledge of the role of mitochondrial dynamics in apoptosis and cell pathophysiology in mammalian cells. PMID:22536251

  9. Morphological aspects of apoptosis in heart diseases

    PubMed Central

    Takemura, Genzou; Fujiwara, Hisayoshi

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested that apoptosis may be responsible for a significant amount of cardiomyocyte death during acute myocardial infraction as well as for a progressive loss of surviving cells in failing hearts. Typical apoptosis can indeed be induced in cardiomyocytes at the experimental conditions. In actual heart diseases, in contrast, there is very little direct morphological evidence of apoptosis in cardiomyocytes occuring at any stage of myocardial infarction and heart failure, despite the availability of much indirect evidence that includes detection of DNA fragmentation and apoptosis-related factors. For that reason, the potential efficacy of therapeutic intervention to prevent apoptosis remains controversial. This review will survey available data from both animals and humans to critically assess the role of cardiomyocyte apoptosis during myocardial infarction and its relevance to myocardial remodeling and during progression to heart failure. Also considered will be nonmyocyte interstitial cells, which have received less attention than myocytes despite definitive evidence of their apoptosis in the infarcted heart and recent studies suggesting that blockade of apoptosis among these cells mitigates postinfarction cardiac remodeling and heart failure. We conclude from our survey that there are many hurdles to surmount before regulation of apoptosis can be clinically applied in the treatment of myocardial infarction and heart failure. PMID:16563222

  10. Apoptosis in cancer: from pathogenesis to treatment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis is an ordered and orchestrated cellular process that occurs in physiological and pathological conditions. It is also one of the most studied topics among cell biologists. An understanding of the underlying mechanism of apoptosis is important as it plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of many diseases. In some, the problem is due to too much apoptosis, such as in the case of degenerative diseases while in others, too little apoptosis is the culprit. Cancer is one of the scenarios where too little apoptosis occurs, resulting in malignant cells that will not die. The mechanism of apoptosis is complex and involves many pathways. Defects can occur at any point along these pathways, leading to malignant transformation of the affected cells, tumour metastasis and resistance to anticancer drugs. Despite being the cause of problem, apoptosis plays an important role in the treatment of cancer as it is a popular target of many treatment strategies. The abundance of literature suggests that targeting apoptosis in cancer is feasible. However, many troubling questions arise with the use of new drugs or treatment strategies that are designed to enhance apoptosis and critical tests must be passed before they can be used safely in human subjects. PMID:21943236

  11. Regulation of apoptosis in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Steller, H

    2008-07-01

    Insects have made major contributions to understanding the regulation of cell death, dating back to the pioneering work of Lockshin and Williams on death of muscle cells during postembryonic development of Manduca. A physically smaller cousin of moths, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, offers unique advantages for studying the regulation of cell death in response to different apoptotic stimuli in situ. Different signaling pathways converge in Drosophila to activate a common death program through transcriptional activation of reaper, hid and grim. Reaper-family proteins induce apoptosis by binding to and antagonizing inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs), which in turn inhibit caspases. This switch from life to death relies extensively on targeted degradation of cell death proteins by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Drosophila IAP-1 (Diap1) functions as an E3-ubiquitin ligase to protect cells from unwanted death by promoting the degradation of the initiator caspase Dronc. However, in response to apoptotic signals, Reaper-family proteins are produced, which promote the auto-ubiquitination and degradation of Diap1, thereby removing the 'brakes on death' in cells that are doomed to die. More recently, several other ubiquitin pathway proteins were found to play important roles for caspase regulation, indicating that the control of cell survival and death relies extensively on targeted degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. PMID:18437164

  12. Differentiation and apoptosis in pilomatrixoma.

    PubMed

    Ishige, Toshiyuki; Kikuchi, Kentaro; Miyazaki, Yuji; Hara, Hiroyuki; Yoshino, Atsuo; Terui, Tadashi; Katayama, Yoichi; Kusama, Kaoru; Nemoto, Norimichi

    2011-02-01

    We carried out a histopathologic study of pilomatrixoma, a benign skin tumor, and also examined apoptosis and hair differentiation with the aim to understand the presence of amorphous debris and cyst formation in the tumor. Among 16 cases of pilomatrixoma examined, 11 were at the early regressive stage and 5 were at the late regressive stage according to the classification by Kaddu et al. In the former cases, tumor nests were basically composed of basophilic, transitional, and shadow cells. Cyst formation was evident in all cases and squamoid epithelium was observed in 4 cases at the early regressive stage. Amorphous debris was found in all cases including those at the late regressive stage. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed positive reaction products for β-catenin and Lef-1 in basophilic and transitional cells, although their distribution differed. Immunoreactivity for β-catenin was observed in the lower transitional cells, whereas immunoreactivity for Lef-1 was also evident in the upper transitional cells. Positive reactions for hair keratins were found in the cytoplasm of transitional and shadow cells, but not in the amorphous debris. Examination by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) method revealed positive reactions in transitional and some shadow cells. These results suggest that in pilomatrixoma, production of hair keratin and induction of apoptosis may occur at the same time, and that unlike the normal hair follicle irregular expression of β-catenin and Lef-1 results in the appearance of amorphous debris and cyst formation. PMID:21239898

  13. Apoptosis in mammalian oocytes: a review.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Meenakshi; Prasad, Shilpa; Tripathi, Anima; Pandey, Ashutosh N; Ali, Irfan; Singh, Arvind K; Shrivastav, Tulsidas G; Chaube, Shail K

    2015-08-01

    Apoptosis causes elimination of more than 99% of germ cells from cohort of ovary through follicular atresia. Less than 1% of germ cells, which are culminated in oocytes further undergo apoptosis during last phases of oogenesis and depletes ovarian reserve in most of the mammalian species including human. There are several players that induce apoptosis directly or indirectly in oocytes at various stages of meiotic cell cycle. Premature removal of encircling granulosa cells from immature oocytes, reduced levels of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate, increased levels of calcium (Ca(2+)) and oxidants, sustained reduced level of maturation promoting factor, depletion of survival factors, nutrients and cell cycle proteins, reduced meiotic competency, increased levels of proapoptotic as well as apoptotic factors lead to oocyte apoptosis. The BH3-only proteins also act as key regulators of apoptosis in oocyte within the ovary. Both intrinsic (mitochondria-mediated) as well as extrinsic (cell surface death receptor-mediated) pathways are involved in oocyte apoptosis. BID, a BH3-only protein act as a bridge between both apoptotic pathways and its cleavage activates cell death machinery of both the pathways inside the follicular microenvironment. Oocyte apoptosis leads to the depletion of ovarian reserve that directly affects reproductive outcome of various mammals including human. In this review article, we highlight some of the important players and describe the pathways involved during oocyte apoptosis in mammals. PMID:25958165

  14. Apoptosis in acquired and genetic hearing impairment

    PubMed Central

    de Beeck, Ken Op; Schacht, Jochen; Van Camp, Guy

    2012-01-01

    Apoptosis is an important physiological process. Normally, a healthy cell maintains a delicate balance between pro- and anti-apoptotic factors, allowing it to live and proliferate. It is thus not surprising that disturbance of this delicate balance may result in disease. It is a well known fact that apoptosis also contributes to several acquired forms of hearing impairment. Noise-induced hearing loss is the result of prolonged exposure to excessive noise, triggering apoptosis in terminally differentiated sensory hair cells. Moreover, hearing loss caused by the use of therapeutic drugs such as aminoglycoside antibiotics and cisplatin potentially may result in the activation of apoptosis in sensory hair cells leading to hearing loss due to the “ototoxicity” of the drugs. Finally, apoptosis is a key contributor to the development of presbycusis, age-related hearing loss. Recently, several mutations in apoptosis genes were identified as the cause of monogenic hearing impairment. These genes are TJP2, DFNA5 and MSRB3. This implies that apoptosis not only contributes to the pathology of acquired forms of hearing impairment, but also to genetic hearing impairment as well. We believe that these genes constitute a new functional class within the hearing loss field. Here, the contribution of apoptosis in the pathology of both acquired and genetic hearing impairment is reviewed. PMID:21782914

  15. THE ROLE OF APOPTOSIS IN NEUROTOXICOLOGY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The role of apoptosis in neurodegeneration in developing animals and in adults has become increasingly apparent in the past ten years. Normal apoptosis occurs in the CNS from the embryonic stage through senescence, with different cells in each region of the nervous system having ...

  16. Proteases in Fas-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhivotovsky, B; Burgess, D H; Schlegel, J; Pörn, M I; Vanags, D; Orrenius, S

    1997-01-01

    Involvement of a unique family of cysteine proteases in the multistep apoptotic process has been documented. Cloning of several mammalian genes identifies some components of this cellular response. However, it is currently unclear which protease plays a role as a signal and/or effector of apoptosis. We summarize contributions to the data concerning proteases in Fas-mediated apoptosis. PMID:9015753

  17. Apoptosis: A Review of Programmed Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, Susan

    2007-01-01

    The process of programmed cell death, or apoptosis, is generally characterized by distinct morphological characteristics and energy-dependent biochemical mechanisms. Apoptosis is considered a vital component of various processes including normal cell turnover, proper development and functioning of the immune system, hormone-dependent atrophy, embryonic development and chemical-induced cell death. Inappropriate apoptosis (either too little or too much) is a factor in many human conditions including neurodegenerative diseases, ischemic damage, autoimmune disorders and many types of cancer. The ability to modulate the life or death of a cell is recognized for its immense therapeutic potential. Therefore, research continues to focus on the elucidation and analysis of the cell cycle machinery and signaling pathways that control cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. To that end, the field of apoptosis research has been moving forward at an alarmingly rapid rate. Although many of the key apoptotic proteins have been identified, the molecular mechanisms of action or inaction of these proteins remain to be elucidated. The goal of this review is to provide a general overview of current knowledge on the process of apoptosis including morphology, biochemistry, the role of apoptosis in health and disease, detection methods, as well as a discussion of potential alternative forms of apoptosis. PMID:17562483

  18. Low-dose spiruchostatin-B, a potent histone deacetylase inhibitor enhances radiation-induced apoptosis in human lymphoma U937 cells via modulation of redox signaling.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Mati Ur; Jawaid, Paras; Zhao, Qing Li; Li, Peng; Narita, Koichi; Katoh, Tadashi; Shimizu, Tadamichi; Kondo, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    Spiruchostatin B (SP-B), is a potent histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, in addition to HDAC inhibition, the pharmacological effects of SP-B are also attributed to its ability to produce intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly H2O2. In this study, we investigated the effects of low dose (non-toxic) SP-B on radiation-induced apoptosis in human lymphoma U937 cells in vitro. The treatment of cells with low-dose SP-B induced the acetylation of histones, however, does not induce apoptosis. Whereas, the combined treatment with SP-B and radiation significantly enhanced the radiation-induced apoptosis, suggesting the potential role of this combined treatment for future radiation therapy. Interestingly, the enhancement of apoptosis was accompanied by significant increased in the ROS generation. Pre-treatment with an antioxidant, N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) significantly inhibited the enhancement of apoptosis induced by combined treatment, indicating that ROS play an essential role. It was also found that SP-B combined with radiation caused the activation of death receptor and intrinsic apoptotic pathways, via modulation of ROS-mediated signaling. Moreover, SP-B also significantly enhanced the radiation-induced apoptosis in other lymphoma cell lines such as Molt-4 and HL-60. Taken together, our findings suggest that the low-dose SP-B enhances radiation-induced apoptosis via modulation of redox signaling because of its ability to serve as an intracellular ROS generating agent, mainly (H2O2 or [Formula: see text]). This study provides further insights into the mechanism of action of SP-B with radiation and demonstrates that SP-B can be used as a future novel sensitizer for radiation therapy. PMID:27108737

  19. Role of Urine Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin in the Early Diagnosis of Amphotericin B-Induced Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Michael Nascimento; Kobayashi, Carla Dinamérica; Moreno, Lis; Guimarães, Luiz Henrique Santos; Machado, Paulo Roberto Lima; Badaró, Roberto; Carvalho, Edgar M.; Glesby, Marshall Jay

    2015-01-01

    Determination of the neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) level can be used to detect acute kidney injury (AKI) earlier than determination of the serum creatinine (SCr) level in settings such as cardiac surgery, contrast nephropathy, and intensive care units. We hypothesized that urine NGAL (UrNGAL) would be an early biomarker of drug nephrotoxicity. To test this, we studied hemodynamically stable patients treated with amphotericin B (AmB). We measured the SCr and UrNGAL levels at the baseline and daily after initiation of AmB up to day 14 or development of AKI by the use of the SCr criterion. AKI was defined according to a Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criterion (an increase in the SCr level by ≥0.3 mg/dl within 48 h or an SCr level ≥1.5 times the baseline level within 7 days). We studied 24 patients with a mean age of 48.4 ± 16.4 years. Most patients were male, and the patients received AmB (12 received AmB deoxycholate and 12 received liposomal AmB) for the treatment of leishmaniasis (91.7%). Overall, 17/24 patients fulfilled a KDIGO criterion for AKI. Peak UrNGAL levels were higher in patients with AKI than in patients without AKI and in recipients of AmB deoxycholate than in recipients of liposomal AmB. The diagnostic performance of the UrNGAL level on day 5 for the detection of AKI was moderate, with the area under the curve (AUC) being 0.68 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.41 to 0.95). In the subgroup receiving AmB deoxycholate, however, the AUC rose to 0.89 (95% CI, 0.67 to 1.00). In a patient-level analysis, we found that AKI could be detected 3.2 days earlier by the use of the UrNGAL criterion than by the use of the SCr criterion (times to AKI by the UrNGAL and SCr criteria, 3.7 ± 2.5 versus 6.9 ± 3.3 days, respectively; P = 0.001). Future studies should evaluate if a treatment strategy oriented toward evaluation of UrNGAL levels will improve outcomes. These findings for AmB-induced AKI in leishmaniasis patients could serve as a basis for the investigation of urine biomarkers in the early detection of drug nephrotoxicity in other clinical settings. PMID:26303800

  20. Bamboo charcoal as adsorbent for SPE coupled with monolithic column-HPLC for rapid determination of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water samples.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiping; Li, Mo; Li, Jinhua; Rui, Cuijie; Xin, Yanping; Xue, Qinzhao; Chen, Lingxin

    2011-10-01

    The coupling of solid-phase extraction (SPE) using bamboo charcoal (BC) as an adsorbent with a monolithic column-high performance liquid chromatography (MC-HPLC) method was developed for the high-efficiency enrichment and rapid determination of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water. Key influence factors, such as the type and the volume of the elution solvent, and the flow rate and the volume of the sample loading, were optimized to obtain a high SPE recovery and extraction efficiency. BC as an SPE adsorbent presented a high extraction efficiency due to its large specific surface area and high adsorption capacity; MC as an HPLC column accelerated the separation within 8 min because of its high porosity, fast mass transfer, and low-pressure resistance. The calibration curves for the PAHs extracted were linear in the range of 0.2-15 µg/L, with the correlation coefficients (r(2)) between 0.9970-0.9999. This method attained good precisions (relative standard deviation, RSD) from 3.5 to 10.9% for the standard PAHs I aqueous solutions at 5 µg/L; the method recoveries ranged in 52.6-121.6% for real spiked river water samples with 0.4 and 4 µg/L. The limits of detection (LODs, S/N = 3) of the method were determined from 11 and 87 ng/L. The developed method was demonstrated to be applicable for the rapid and sensitive determination of 16 PAHs in real environmental water samples. PMID:22586244

  1. Orally Administered Fructose Increases the Numbers of Peripheral Lymphocytes Reduced by Exposure of Mice to Gamma or SPE-like Proton Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Weaver, A.L.; Ni, J.; Lin, L.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of the whole body or a major portion of the body to ionizing radiation can result in Acute Radiation Sickness (ARS), which can cause symptoms that range from mild to severe, and include death. One of the syndromes that can occur during ARS is the hematopoietic syndrome, which is characterized by a reduction in bone marrow cells as well as the number of circulating blood cells. Doses capable of causing this syndrome can result from conventional radiation therapy and accidental exposure to ionizing radiation. It is of concern that this syndrome could also occur during space exploration class missions in which astronauts could be exposed to significant doses of solar particle event (SPE) radiation. Of particular concern is the reduction of lymphocytes and granulocytes, which are major components of the immune system. A significant reduction in their numbers can compromise the immune system, causing a higher risk for the development of infections which could jeopardize the success of the mission. Although there are no specific countermeasures utilized for the ARS resulting from exposure to space radiation(s), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been proposed as a countermeasure for the low number of neutrophils caused by SPE radiation, but so far no countermeasure exists for a reduced number of circulating lymphocytes. The present study demonstrates that orally administered fructose significantly increases the number of peripheral lymphocytes reduced by exposure of mice to 2 Gy of gamma- or SPE-like proton radiation, making it a potential countermeasure for this biological end-point. PMID:25360417

  2. Orally Administered Fructose Increases the Numbers of Peripheral Lymphocytes Reduced by Exposure of Mice to Gamma or SPE-like Proton Radiation.

    PubMed

    Romero-Weaver, A L; Ni, J; Lin, L; Kennedy, A R

    2014-07-01

    Exposure of the whole body or a major portion of the body to ionizing radiation can result in Acute Radiation Sickness (ARS), which can cause symptoms that range from mild to severe, and include death. One of the syndromes that can occur during ARS is the hematopoietic syndrome, which is characterized by a reduction in bone marrow cells as well as the number of circulating blood cells. Doses capable of causing this syndrome can result from conventional radiation therapy and accidental exposure to ionizing radiation. It is of concern that this syndrome could also occur during space exploration class missions in which astronauts could be exposed to significant doses of solar particle event (SPE) radiation. Of particular concern is the reduction of lymphocytes and granulocytes, which are major components of the immune system. A significant reduction in their numbers can compromise the immune system, causing a higher risk for the development of infections which could jeopardize the success of the mission. Although there are no specific countermeasures utilized for the ARS resulting from exposure to space radiation(s), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been proposed as a countermeasure for the low number of neutrophils caused by SPE radiation, but so far no countermeasure exists for a reduced number of circulating lymphocytes. The present study demonstrates that orally administered fructose significantly increases the number of peripheral lymphocytes reduced by exposure of mice to 2 Gy of gamma- or SPE-like proton radiation, making it a potential countermeasure for this biological end-point. PMID:25360417

  3. Toxicological screening of human plasma by on-line SPE-HPLC-DAD: identification and quantification of acidic and neutral drugs.

    PubMed

    Mut, Ludmila; Grobosch, Thomas; Binscheck-Domaß, Torsten; Frenzel, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    A multi-analyte screening method for the quantification of 50 acidic/neutral drugs in human plasma based on on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE)-HPLC with photodiode array detection (DAD) was developed, validated and applied for clinical investigation. Acetone and methanol for protein precipitation, three different SPE materials (two electro-neutral, one strong anion-exchange, one weak cation-exchange) for on-line extraction, five HPLC-columns [one C18 (GeminiNX), two phenyl-hexyl (Gemini C6 -Phenyl, Kinetex Phenyl-Hexyl) and two pentafluorophenyl (LunaPFP(2), KinetexPFP)] for analytical separation were tested. For sample pre-treatment, acetone in the ratio 1:2 (plasma:acetone) showed a better baseline and fewer matrix peaks in the chromatogram than methanol. Only the strong anion-exchanger SPE cartridge (StrataX-A, pH 6) allowed the extraction of salicylic acid. Analytical separation was carried out on a Gemini C6 -Phenyl column (150 × 4.6 mm, 3 µm) using gradient elution with acetonitrile-water 90:10 (v/v) and phosphate buffer (pH 2.3). Linear calibration curves with correlation coefficients r ≥ 0.9950/0.9910 were obtained for 46/four analytes. Additionally, this method allows the quantification of 23 analytes for therapeutic drug monitoring. Limits of quantitation ranged from 0.1 (amobarbital) to 23 mg/L (salicylic acid). Inter-/intra-day precisions of quality control samples (low/high) were better than 13% and accuracy (bias) ranged from -14 to 10%. A computer-assisted database was created for automated detection of 223 analytes of toxicological interests. Four cases of multi-drug intoxications are presented. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26147870

  4. A Compact Laboratory Spectro-Goniometer (CLabSpeG) to Assess the BRDF of Materials. Presentation, Calibration and Implementation on Fagus sylvatica L. Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Biliouris, Dimitrios; Verstraeten, Willem W.; Dutré, Phillip; van Aardt, Jan A.N.; Muys, Bart; Coppin, Pol

    2007-01-01

    The design and calibration of a new hyperspectral Compact Laboratory Spectro-Goniometer (CLabSpeG) is presented. CLabSpeG effectively measures the bidirectional reflectance Factor (BRF) of a sample, using a halogen light source and an Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) spectroradiometer. The apparatus collects 4356 reflectance data readings covering the spectrum from 350 nm to 2500 nm by independent positioning of the sensor, sample holder, and light source. It has an azimuth and zenith resolution of 30 and 15 degrees, respectively. CLabSpeG is used to collect BRF data and extract Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) data of non-isotropic vegetation elements such as bark, soil, and leaves. Accurate calibration has ensured robust geometric accuracy of the apparatus, correction for the conicality of the light source, while sufficient radiometric stability and repeatability between measurements are obtained. The bidirectional reflectance data collection is automated and remotely controlled and takes approximately two and half hours for a BRF measurement cycle over a full hemisphere with 125 cm radius and 2.4 minutes for a single BRF acquisition. A specific protocol for vegetative leaf collection and measurement was established in order to investigate the possibility to extract BRDF values from Fagus sylvatica L. leaves under laboratory conditions. Drying leaf effects induce a reflectance change during the BRF measurements due to the laboratory illumination source. Therefore, the full hemisphere could not be covered with one leaf. Instead 12 BRF measurements per leaf were acquired covering all azimuth positions for a single light source zenith position. Data are collected in radiance format and reflectance is calculated by dividing the leaf cycle measurement with a radiance cycle of a Spectralon reference panel, multiplied by a Spectralon reflectance correction factor and a factor to correct for the conical effect of the light source. BRF results of measured leaves are presented.

  5. Activation of TLR5 induces podocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xu; Huang, Haiting; You, Yanwu; Tang, Chunrong; Gu, Xiangjun; Huang, Meiying; Tan, Junhua; Wang, Jie

    2016-03-01

    The apoptosis plays a critical role in a number of inflammatory disorders. Bacterial infection is one of the causes inducing apoptosis. This study aims to investigate the mechanism by which activation of TLR5 induces podocyte apoptosis. In this study, a podocyte cell line was cultured in RPMI1640 medium. The expression of TLR5 was assessed by real-time PCR and Western blotting. The Fas ligand gene transcription was assessed by immunoprecipitation and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. The results showed that the expression of TLR5 was observed in the podocytes at both mRNA and protein levels. Exposure to TLR5 ligand, flagellin, induced Fas ligand expression and podocyte apoptosis. p300, one of the histone acetyltransferases, mediated the Fas ligand gene transcription in podocytes. In conclusion, TLR5 activation plays an important role in the induction of podocyte apoptosis. Copyright 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26914743

  6. Apoptosis inversely correlates with rabies virus neurotropism.

    PubMed

    Thoulouze, Maria-Isabel; Lafage, Mireille; Yuste, Victor J; Kroemer, Guido; Susin, Santos A; Israel, Nicole; Lafon, Monique

    2003-12-01

    We report that non-neurotropic rabies virus (RV) strains, currently used to immunize wildlife against rabies, induces not only a caspase-dependent apoptosis in the human lymphoblastoid Jurkat T cell line (Jurkat-vect), but also a caspase-independent pathway. Cell redistribution of the apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) was observed in Jurkat-vect infected with RV vaccine strain. Bcl-2 overproduction in Jurkat T cells (Jurkat-Bcl-2) abolished both caspase activation and AIF distribution. In contrast, strain of neurotropic RV did not induce apoptosis. The inverse correlation of the induction of apoptosis and the capacity of a virus strain to invade the brain suggests that blockage of apoptosis could be a strategy selected by neurotropic virus to favor its progression through the nervous system. PMID:15033799

  7. Apoptosis inducers in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Billard, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is characterized by a typical defect in apoptosis and is still an incurable disease. Numerous apoptosis inducers have been described. These synthetic compounds and natural products (mainly derived from plants) display antileukemic properties in vitro and in vivo and some have even been tested in the clinic in CLL. They act through several different mechanisms. Most of them involve proteins of the Bcl-2 family, which are the key regulators in triggering the mitochondrial pathway of caspase-dependent apoptosis. Thus, the Mcl-1/Noxa axis appeared as a target. Here I overview natural and synthetic apoptosis inducers and their mechanisms of action in CLL cells. Opportunities for developing novel, apoptosis-based therapeutics are presented. PMID:24525395

  8. Induction of apoptosis by Shiga toxins

    PubMed Central

    Tesh, Vernon L

    2010-01-01

    Shiga toxins comprise a family of structurally and functionally related protein toxins expressed by Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 and multiple serotypes of Escherichia coli. While the capacity of Shiga toxins to inhibit protein synthesis by catalytic inactivation of eukaryotic ribosomes has been well described, it is also apparent that Shiga toxins trigger apoptosis in many cell types. This review presents evidence that Shiga toxins induce apoptosis of epithelial, endothelial, leukocytic, lymphoid and neuronal cells. Apoptotic signaling pathways activated by the toxins are reviewed with an emphasis on signaling mechanisms that are shared among different cell types. Data suggesting that Shiga toxins induce apoptosis through the endoplasmic reticulum stress response and clinical evidence demonstrating apoptosis in humans infected with Shiga toxin-producing bacteria are briefly discussed. The potential for use of Shiga toxins to induce apoptosis in cancer cells is briefly reviewed. PMID:20210553

  9. Identification of small molecules that induce apoptosis in a Myc-dependent manner and inhibit Myc-driven transformation

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Hao; Henriksson, Marie

    2006-01-01

    The Myc transcription factor plays a central role in the regulation of cell cycle progression, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and cellular transformation. Myc is a potent oncoprotein that is deregulated in a wide variety of human tumors and is therefore an attractive target for novel cancer therapies. Using a cellular screening approach, we have identified low-molecular-weight compounds, Myc pathway response agents (MYRAs), that induce apoptosis in a c-Myc-dependent manner and inhibit Myc-driven cellular transformation. MYRA-A inhibits Myc transactivation and interferes with the DNA-binding activity of Myc family proteins but has no effect on the E-box-binding protein USF. In contrast, MYRA-B induces Myc-dependent apoptosis without affecting Myc transactivation or Myc/Max DNA binding. Our data show that cellular screening assays can be a powerful strategy for the identification of candidate substances that modulate the Myc pathway. These compounds can be useful tools for studying Myc function and may also be of therapeutic potential as leads for drug development. PMID:16606833

  10. Critical role of ARID3B in the expression of pro-apoptotic p53-target genes and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Pratama, Endrawan; Tian, Xiaohui; Lestari, Widya; Iseki, Sachiko; Ichwan, Solachuddin J A; Ikeda, Masa-Aki

    ARID3A and ARID3B are transcriptional targets of p53. Recently, it has been reported that ARID3A plays a critical role in the transcriptional activation of pro-arrest p21 in response to DNA damage. However, the role of ARID3B in the p53 regulatory pathway remains poorly understood. Here we show that ARID3A and ARID3B specifically bind to putative ARID3-binding sites in p53 target genes in vitro and in vivo. ARID3B and, to a lesser extent, ARID3A silencing blocked transcriptional activation of pro-apoptotic p53 target genes, such as PUMA, PIG3, and p53. Furthermore, ectopic ARID3B, to a lesser extent, ARID3A expression activated the pro-apoptotic gene expression, and only ARID3B induced apoptosis. Finally, ARID3B but not ARID3A silencing blocked apoptosis induction following DNA damage. These results indicated that, although ARID3B and ARID3A share overlapping functions, ARID3B play a key role in the expression of pro-apoptotic p53-target genes and apoptosis. PMID:26519881

  11. Autophagy and apoptosis: where do they meet?

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Subhadip; Panda, Prashanta Kumar; Sinha, Niharika; Das, Durgesh Nandini; Bhutia, Sujit Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Autophagy and apoptosis are two important cellular processes with complex and intersecting protein networks; as such, they have been the subjects of intense investigation. Recent advances have elucidated the key players and their molecular circuitry. For instance, the discovery of Beclin-1's interacting partners has resulted in the identification of Bcl-2 as a central regulator of autophagy and apoptosis, which functions by interacting with both Beclin-1 and Bax/Bak respectively. When localized to the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, Bcl-2 inhibits autophagy. Cellular stress causes the displacement of Bcl-2 from Beclin-1 and Bax, thereby triggering autophagy and apoptosis, respectively. The induction of autophagy or apoptosis results in disruption of complexes by BH3-only proteins and through post-translational modification. The mechanisms linking autophagy and apoptosis are not fully defined; however, recent discoveries have revealed that several apoptotic proteins (e.g., PUMA, Noxa, Nix, Bax, XIAP, and Bim) modulate autophagy. Moreover, autophagic proteins that control nucleation and elongation regulate intrinsic apoptosis through calpain- and caspase-mediated cleavage of autophagy-related proteins, which switches the cellular program from autophagy to apoptosis. Similarly, several autophagic proteins are implicated in extrinsic apoptosis. This highlights a dual cellular role for autophagy. On one hand, autophagy degrades damaged mitochondria and caspases, and on the other hand, it provides a membrane-based intracellular platform for caspase processing in the regulation of apoptosis. In this review, we highlight the crucial factors governing the crosstalk between autophagy and apoptosis and describe the mechanisms controlling cell survival and cell death. PMID:24415198

  12. Proneurotrophins, seizures, and neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Wilma J

    2010-06-01

    Neurons respond to numerous factors in their environment that influence their survival and function during development and in the mature brain. Among these factors, the neurotrophins have been shown to support neuronal survival and function, acting primarily through the Trk family of receptor tyrosine kinases. However, recent studies have established that the uncleaved neurotrophin precursors, the proneurotrophins, can be secreted and induce apoptosis via the p75 neurotrophin receptor, suggesting that the balance of secreted mature and proneurotrophins has a critical impact on neuronal survival or death. Epileptic seizures elicit increases in both proneurotrophin secretion and p75(NTR) expression, shifting the balance of these factors toward signaling cell death. This review will discuss the evidence that this ligand-receptor system plays an important role in neuronal loss following seizures. PMID:20360602

  13. Photo-protection by 3-bromo-4, 5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde against ultraviolet B-induced oxidative stress in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Yu Jae; Piao, Mei Jing; Zhang, Rui; Choi, Yung Hyun; Chae, Sungwook; Hyun, Jin Won

    2012-09-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation leads to epidermal damage and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in skin cells, including keratinocytes. Therefore, the photo-protective effect of 3-bromo-4, 5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (BDB) against UVB was assessed in human HaCaT keratinocytes exposed to UVB radiation in vitro. BDB restored cell viability, which decreased upon exposure to UVB radiation. BDB exhibited scavenging activity against 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals, intracellular ROS induced by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) or UVB radiation, the superoxide anion generated by the xanthine/xanthine oxidase system, and the hydroxyl radical generated by the Fenton reaction (FeSO(4)+H(2)O(2)). Moreover, BDB absorbed UVB and decreased injury resulting from UVB-induced oxidative stress to lipids, proteins and DNA. Finally, BDB reduced UVB-induced apoptosis, as exemplified by fewer apoptotic bodies and a reduction in DNA fragmentation. Taken together, these results suggest that BDB protects human keratinocytes against UVB-induced oxidative stress by scavenging ROS and absorbing UVB rays, thereby reducing injury to cellular components. PMID:22795593

  14. Apoptosis induced by bovine ephemeral fever virus.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia J; Shih, Wen L; Yu, Feng L; Liao, Ming H; Liu, Hung J

    2004-12-15

    The potential significance of bovine ephemeral fever virus (BEFV)-induced apoptosis and involved viral molecules was fully unknown. In the present study, evidence is provided demonstrating that bovine ephemeral fever virus induces apoptosis in several cell lines. Five types of assays for apoptosis were used in examining BEFV-infected cells. (1) Assay for DNA fragmentation, (2) nuclear staining with acridine orange, (3) ELISA detection of cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragment, (4) terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end labelling (TUNEL) assay of BEFV-infected cells, (5) observation of blebbing of the plasma membrane and the formation of apoptotic bodies of apoptic cells by scanning electron microscope. The level of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in BEFV-infected cells was increased significantly after 20-25 h post-infection. Caspases-2, -3, -4, -6, -8, -9, and -10 were activated in BEFV-infected BHK-21 cells. To determine further whether BEFV-induced apoptosis was caspase-dependent, the effect of the tripeptide pan-ICE (caspase) inhibitor N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethyketone on the inhibition of apoptosis in BEFV-infected BHK-21 cells, was investigated. Apoptosis could be blocked by the caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-fmk), indicating that BEFV induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in cultured cells. PMID:15542140

  15. Honey and Apoptosis in Human Gastric Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Aida; Somi, Mohammad H; Safaiyan, Abdolrasoul; Modaresi, Jabiz; Ostadrahimi, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    Background: Gastric cancer is the fourth most common malignancy in the world. Honey is a complex mixture of special biological active constituents. Honey possesses antioxidant and antitumor properties. Nutritional studies have indicated that consumption of honey modulates the risk of developing gastric cancer. On the other hand, apoptosis has been reported to play a decisive role in precancerous changes. Our chief study was conducted to assess the relationship between consumption of honey and apoptosis in human gastric mucosa. Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 98 subjects over 18 years old, referred to two hospitals in Tabriz, Iran. Subjects were undergone an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, 62 subjects were finally enrolled. Honey consumption was assessed by a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and apoptosis was detected by TUNEL technique. We tested polynomial curve to find the best fit between honey consumption and apoptosis. Results: A positive relation between honey consumption and apoptosis was found (P=0.024). Our results indicated that the final and the best fit curve was: apoptosis = 1.714+1.648(honey amount) - 0.533(honey amount)2 +1.833×10-5(honey amount)7. Conclusion: Honey consumption had positive effects on gastric cancer by inducing apoptosis in gastric mucosa. PMID:24688918

  16. Assessment of constituents in Allium by multivariate data analysis, high-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition assay and HPLC-SPE-NMR.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jeppe S; Nyberg, Nils T; Staerk, Dan

    2014-10-15

    Bulbs and leaves of 35 Allium species and cultivars bought or collected in 2010-2012 were investigated with multivariate data analysis, high-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition assays and HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR with the aim of exploring the potential of Allium as a future functional food for management of type 2 diabetes. It was found that 30 out of 106 crude extracts showed more than 80% inhibition of the α-glucosidase enzyme at a concentration of 40mg/mL (dry sample) or 0.4g/mL (fresh sample). High-resolution α-glucosidase biochromatograms of these extracts allowed fast identification of three analytes with α-glucosidase inhibitory activity, and subsequent HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR experiments allowed identification of these as N-p-coumaroyloctopamine, N-p-coumaroyltyramine, and quercetin. The distribution of these three compounds was mapped for all samples by HPLC-ESI-HRMS. Unsupervised principal component analysis of samples from 2012 indicated that a major difference between fresh material and dried material is the increased amount of quercetin, a known α-glucosidase inhibitor. PMID:24837940

  17. The SpeX Prism Library: 1000+ low-resolution, near-infrared spectra of ultracool M, L, T and Y dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgasser, Adam J.

    The SpeX Prism Library (SPL) is a uniform compilation of low-resolution (λ/Δλ ≈ 75-120), near-infrared (0.8--2.5 μm) spectra spanning a decade of observations with the IRTF SpeX spectrograph. Primarily containing ultracool M, L, T and Y dwarfs, this spectral library has been used in over 100 publications to date, facilitating a broad range of science on low mass stars, exoplanets, high redshift sources and instrument/survey design. I summarize the contents of the SPL and highlight a few of the key scientific results that have made use of this resource, as well as applications in education, outreach and art. I also outline the future plans of the SPL, which include a reanalysis of early data, better integration and dissemination of source and spectral metadata, conversion to Virtual Observatory formats, development of a Python software package for community analysis, and a design for a node-based visual programming platform that can facilitate citizen science and project-based learning in stellar spectroscopy. http://www.browndwarfs.org/spexprism

  18. Monolithic poly (SPE-co-BVPE) capillary columns as a novel hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography stationary phase for the separation of polar analytes.

    PubMed

    Foo, Hsiao Ching; Heaton, James; Smith, Norman W; Stanley, Shawn

    2012-10-15

    A novel hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) stationary phase was prepared by the co-polymerisation of zwitterionic N,N'-dimethyl-N-methacryloxyethyl-N-(3-sulfopropyl) ammonium betaine (SPE) and the crosslinker 1,2-bis(p-vinylphenyl) ethane (BVPE) in the presence of the porogens, toluene and methanol. Monolithic columns were produced by carrying out the α,α'-azoisobutyronitrile (AIBN) initiated reaction for 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 h inside a 200 μm i.d. fused silica capillary at 75°C (water bath). The optimum polymerisation time was shown to be 2 h, as this resulted in good porosity, due to enlarged flow-channels and the presence of a higher proportion of mesopores provided a relatively larger surface area than the other columns. The chromatographic properties of the optimised poly (SPE-co-BVPE) monolithic column were evaluated with test mixtures containing both basic and neutral compounds in the HILIC gradient separation mode. This produced relatively sharp peaks (average peak width at half height=0.1 min) with average asymmetry factors of 1.4 and baseline resolution was obtained for all the compounds. Using the isocratic separation of the test mixture, the number of theoretical plates (N) per metre calculated was between 26,888 and 35,930 by using average values obtained for triplicate injections of the compounds thiourea, toluene and acrylamide. PMID:23141347

  19. Chemical Explosion Experiments to Improve Nuclear Test Monitoring [Developing a New Paradigm for Nuclear Test Monitoring with the Source Physics Experiments (SPE)

    SciTech Connect

    Snelson, Catherine M.; Abbott, Robert E.; Broome, Scott T.; Mellors, Robert J.; Patton, Howard J.; Sussman, Aviva J.; Townsend, Margaret J.; Walter, William R.

    2013-07-02

    A series of chemical explosions, called the Source Physics Experiments (SPE), is being conducted under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to develop a new more physics-based paradigm for nuclear test monitoring. Currently, monitoring relies on semi-empirical models to discriminate explosions from earthquakes and to estimate key parameters such as yield. While these models have been highly successful monitoring established test sites, there is concern that future tests could occur in media and at scale depths of burial outside of our empirical experience. This is highlighted by North Korean tests, which exhibit poor performance of a reliable discriminant, mb:Ms (Selby et al., 2012), possibly due to source emplacement and differences in seismic responses for nascent and established test sites. The goal of SPE is to replace these semi-empirical relationships with numerical techniques grounded in a physical basis and thus applicable to any geologic setting or depth.

  20. Measurement of bisphenol A, bisphenol A ß-d-glucuronide, genistein, and genistein 4′-ß-d-glucuronide via SPE and HPLC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Coughlin, Janis L.; Winnik, Bozena

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a synthetic industrial reactant used in the production of polycarbonate plastics, and genistein is a natural phytoestrogen abundant in the soybean. Current studies investigating the endocrinedisrupting effects of concomitant exposures to BPA and genistein have warranted the development of an analytical method for the simultaneous measurement of BPA and genistein, as well as their primary metabolites, bisphenol A ß-d-glucuronide (BPA gluc) and genistein 4′-ß-d-glucuronide (genistein gluc), respectively. All four analytes were extracted from rat plasma via solid phase extraction (SPE). Three SPE cartridges and four elution schemes were tested. Plasma extraction using Bond Elut Plexa cartridges with sequential addition of ethyl acetate, methanol, and acetonitrile yielded optimal average recoveries of 98.1±1.8% BPA, 94.9±8.0% genistein, 91.4±6.1% BPA gluc, and 103±6.1% genistein gluc. Identification and quantification of the four analytes were performed by a validated HPLC-MS/MS method using electrospray ionization and selective reaction monitoring. This novel analytical method should be applicable to the measurement of BPA, genistein, BPA gluc, and genistein gluc in urine, cultures, and tissue following in vivo exposures. While reports of the determination of BPA and genistein independently exist, the simultaneous optimized extraction and detection of BPA, genistein, BPA gluc, and genistein gluc have not previously been reported. PMID:21667348

  1. Simultaneous determination of isoflavones and resveratrols for adulteration detection of soybean and peanut oils by mixed-mode SPE LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Ma, Fei; Li, Peiwu; Li, Guangming; Zhang, Liangxiao; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Wen; Wang, Xiupin

    2015-06-01

    To ensure authenticity of vegetable oils, isoflavones (genistein, genistin, daidzein and daidzin) and resveratrols (cis-resveratrol and trans-resveratrol) were selected as the putative markers for adulteration of soybean and peanut oils. Firstly, mixed mode solid-phase extraction coupled with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (mixed-mode SPE LC-MS/MS) method was developed to analyze isoflavones and resveratrols in vegetable oils. The concentration of marker compounds in vegetable oils were 0.08-1.47mgkg(-1) for daidzein, ND-78.9μgkg(-1) for daidzin, 0.40-5.89mgkg(-1) for genistein, 1.2-114.9μgkg(-1) for genistin, 3.1-85.0μgkg(-1) for trans-resveratrol and 1.9-51.0μgkg(-1) for cis-resveratrol, which are compatible with the raw materials for oil press. Additionally, the applicability of this method has been successfully tested in thirteen vegetable oils from the market. Mixed-mode SPE LC-MS/MS method can simultaneously detect isoflavones and resveratrols in vegetable oils and assess adulteration and quality of soybean and peanut oils. PMID:25624257

  2. Chemical Explosion Experiments to Improve Nuclear Test Monitoring [Developing a New Paradigm for Nuclear Test Monitoring with the Source Physics Experiments (SPE)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Snelson, Catherine M.; Abbott, Robert E.; Broome, Scott T.; Mellors, Robert J.; Patton, Howard J.; Sussman, Aviva J.; Townsend, Margaret J.; Walter, William R.

    2013-07-02

    A series of chemical explosions, called the Source Physics Experiments (SPE), is being conducted under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to develop a new more physics-based paradigm for nuclear test monitoring. Currently, monitoring relies on semi-empirical models to discriminate explosions from earthquakes and to estimate key parameters such as yield. While these models have been highly successful monitoring established test sites, there is concern that future tests could occur in media and at scale depths of burial outside of our empirical experience. This is highlighted by North Korean tests, which exhibit poormore » performance of a reliable discriminant, mb:Ms (Selby et al., 2012), possibly due to source emplacement and differences in seismic responses for nascent and established test sites. The goal of SPE is to replace these semi-empirical relationships with numerical techniques grounded in a physical basis and thus applicable to any geologic setting or depth.« less

  3. Bioanalytical method development for quantification of ulifloxacin, fenbufen and felbinac in rat plasma by solid-phase extraction (SPE) and HPLC with PDA detection.

    PubMed

    Ferrone, Vincenzo; Carlucci, Maura; Palumbo, Paola; Carlucci, Giuseppe

    2016-05-10

    A procedure based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) followed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with PDA detection has been developed for the analysis of multiple drugs in rat plasma. The analytes evaluated were ulifloxacin, fenbufen and felbinac. Eight different solid phase extraction cartridges were tested to evaluate their applicability for the isolation of drugs from rat plasma. Comparison were recovery of different drugs and reproducibility. The samples were analyzed by HPLC using a Kinetex C18 EVO column and acetonitrile-10mM ammonium acetate-methanol as the mobile phase under gradient elution conditions. SPE combined with HPLC-PDA allowed the determination of drugs over a linear range of 0.05-15μg/mL for ulifloxacin while 0.5-50μg/mL for felbinac and fenbufen, with limit of detection at 0.05 for ulifloxacin and 0.5 for felbinac and fenbufen. Bond Elut Plexa sorbent was found to provide the most effective clean-up, removing the greatest amount of interfering substance and simultaneously ensuring analyte recoveries higher than 93.54% with relative standard deviation (RSD) <10%. The method was applied with good accuracy and precision in the determination of ulifloxacin, fenbufen and felbinac in rat plasma obtained from rats treated with selected drugs. This method permits its application to pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies of these analytes and will facilitate detailed investigations on the interactions between new fluoroquinolones and fenbufen. PMID:26898973

  4. Rapid determination of memantine in human plasma by using nanoring carboxyl-functionalized paramagnetic molecularly imprinted polymer d-μ-SPE and UFLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Hai-Wen; Xia, Lei; Gong, Li-Min; Ruan, Lie-Min; Zhao, Yong-Gang

    2015-06-01

    A novel, simple, and sensitive method based on the use of dispersive micro-solid-phase extraction (d-μ-SPE) procedure combined with ultra-fast liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (UFLC-MS/MS) for the determination of memantine (ME) was developed and validated over the linearity range 0.05-10.0 µg/L with 100 μL of human plasma using memantine-D6 (ME-D6) as the internal standard. The novel nanoring carboxyl-functionalized paramagnetic molecularly imprinted polymer (NR-CF-Mag-MIP) was synthesized by ultrasound-assisted suspension polymerization, using ME as a template molecule, methacrylic acid as a functional monomer, and divinylbenzene as a cross-linking agent. The NR-CF-Mag-MIP was used as the d-μ-SPE sorbent to extract ME from human plasma samples. The obtained results demonstrated the higher extraction capacity of NR-CF-Mag-MIP with recoveries between 97.6 and 101%. The limits of quantification (LOQs) for ME was 0.015 µg/L. Validation results on linearity, specificity, accuracy, precision, and stability, as well as on application to the analysis of samples taken up to 480 h after oral administration of 20 mg (two 10 mg capsules) of ME in healthy volunteers demonstrated the applicability to bioequivalence studies. PMID:25209851

  5. Elevated urinary levels of carcinogenic N-nitrosamines in patients with urinary tract infections measured by isotope dilution online SPE LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chiung-Wen; Shih, Ying-Ming; Liu, Hung-Hsin; Chiang, Yi-Chen; Chen, Chih-Ming; Chao, Mu-Rong

    2016-06-01

    N-nitrosamines (NAms) are well-documented for their carcinogenic potential. Human exposure to NAms may arise from the daily environment and endogenous formation via the reaction of secondary amines with nitrites or from bacteria infection. We describe the use of isotope dilution online solid-phase extraction (SPE) LC-MS/MS to quantify nine NAms in human urine. This method was validated and further applied to healthy subjects and patients with urinary tract infection (UTI). N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N-nitrosomethylethylamine (NMEA), N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR) and N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR) were analyzed with an APCI source, while N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP), N-nitrosodi-n-propylamine (NDPA), N-nitrosodibutylamine (NDBA) and N-nitrosodiphenylamine (NDPhA) were quantified with an ESI source, due to their effect on the sensitivity and chromatography. NDMA was the most abundant N-nitrosamine, while NDPhA was firstly identified in human. UTI patients had three to twelve-fold higher concentrations for NDMA, NPIP, NDEA, NMOR and NDBA in urine than healthy subjects, and the NAms were significantly decreased after antibiotics treatment. NDMA concentrations were also significantly correlated with the pH value, leukocyte esterase activity or nitrite in urines of UTI patients. Our findings by online SPE LC-MS/MS method evidenced that UTI patients experienced various NAms exposures, especially the potent carcinogen NDMA, which was likely induced by bacteria infection. PMID:26937867

  6. Eosinophil-specific deletion of IκBα in mice reveals a critical role of NF-κB–induced Bcl-xL for inhibition of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Christian; Willebrand, Ralf; Huber, Silke; Rupec, Rudolf A.; Wu, Davina; Locksley, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils are associated with type 2 immune responses to allergens and helminths. They release various proinflammatory mediators and toxic proteins on activation and are therefore considered proinflammatory effector cells. Eosinophilia is promoted by the cytokines interleukin (IL)-3, IL-5, and granulocyte macrophage–colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and can result from enhanced de novo production or reduced apoptosis. In this study, we show that only IL-5 induces differentiation of eosinophils from bone marrow precursors, whereas IL-5, GM-CSF, and to a lesser extent IL-3 promote survival of mature eosinophils. The receptors for these cytokines use the common β chain, which serves as the main signaling unit linked to signal transducer and activator of transcription 5, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathways. Inhibition of NF-κB induced apoptosis of in vitro cultured eosinophils. Selective deletion of IκBα in vivo resulted in enhanced expression of Bcl-xL and reduced apoptosis during helminth infection. Retroviral overexpression of Bcl-xL promoted survival, whereas pharmacologic inhibition of Bcl-xL in murine or human eosinophils induced rapid apoptosis. These results suggest that therapeutic strategies targeting Bcl-xL in eosinophils could improve health conditions in allergic inflammatory diseases. PMID:25862560

  7. The tumor suppressor DAL-1/4.1B and protein methylation cooperate in inducing apoptosis in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Newsham, Irene F

    2006-01-01

    Background DAL-1 (Differentially Expressed in Adenocarcinoma of the Lung)/4.1B is a member of the protein 4.1 superfamily that has been shown to suppress growth in lung, breast and brain tumor cells. In the case of the caspase-3 deficient MCF-7 breast cancer cells, this growth suppression has been shown to be partially mediated by the induction of apoptosis. However the exact mechanism of action of DAL-1/4.1B is unknown. Recently, protein arginine N-methyltransferase 3 (PRMT3) was identified as a DAL-1/4.1B interacting protein. Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) posttranslationally methylate the arginine residues of proteins, a modification which has been implicated in the regulation of multiple cellular processes including nuclear-cytoplasmic transport, signal transduction, and transcription. Results To investigate the role of protein methylation in cell death induced by DAL-1/4.1B, DAL-1/4.1B-inducible MCF-7 cells were examined for apoptosis and caspase activation in the absence and presence of the protein methylation inhibitor adenosine dialdehyde (AdOX). Flow cytometry analysis revealed that apoptosis was primarily associated with the activation of caspase 8, and inhibition of this activation blocked the ability of DAL-1/4.1B to induce cell death. Conclusion These results suggest that protein methylation cooperates with DAL-1/4.1B-associated caspase 8-specific activation to induce apoptosis in breast cancer cells. PMID:16420693

  8. RSF1 is a positive regulator of NF-κB-induced gene expression required for ovarian cancer chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yeong-In; Ahn, Ji-Hye; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Shih, Ie-Ming; Choi, Jung-Hye

    2014-04-15

    Overexpression or amplification of the RSF1 gene has been associated with poor prognosis in various human cancers, including ovarian cancer. In previous work, RSF1 was identified as an amplified gene that facilitated the development of paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancer. In the present study, we further demonstrated that RSF1 expression inversely correlated with paclitaxel response in patients with ovarian cancer and the mouse xenograft model. In addition, RSF1-overexpressing paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines were found to express elevated levels of genes regulated by NF-κB, including some involved with the evasion of apoptosis (CFLAR, XIAP, BCL2, and BCL2L1) and inflammation (PTGS2). In addition, ectopic expression of RSF1 using Tet-off inducible SKOV3 cells significantly enhanced NF-κB-dependent gene expression and transcriptional activation of NF-κB. An RSF1 knockdown using short hairpin RNAs suppressed these same pathways. Moreover, pretreatment with NF-κB inhibitors or downregulation of NF-κB-regulated gene expression considerably enhanced paclitaxel sensitivity in RSF1-overexpressing OVCAR3 and/or RSF1-induced SKOV3 cells. A coimmunoprecipitation assay revealed that RSF1 interacts with NF-κB and CREB-binding protein, a ubiquitous coactivator for NF-κB. Recruitment of RSF1 to the NF-κB binding element in the PTGS2 and XIAP promoters was demonstrated by the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Furthermore, hSNF2H, a well-known binding partner of RSF1, was partially involved in the interaction between RSF1 and NF-κB. Taken together, these data suggest that RSF1 may function as a coactivator for NF-κB, consequently augmenting expression of genes necessary for the development of chemoresistance in ovarian cancer cells. PMID:24566868

  9. RSF1 Is a Positive Regulator of NF-?BInduced Gene Expression Required for Ovarian Cancer Chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yeong-In; Ahn, Ji-Hye; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Shin, Ie-Ming; Choi, Jung-Hye

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression or amplification of the RSF1 gene has been associated with poor prognosis in various human cancers, including ovarian cancer. In previous work, RSF1 was identified as an amplified gene that facilitated the development of paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancer. In the present study, we further demonstrated that RSF1 expression inversely correlated with paclitaxel response in patients with ovarian cancer and the mouse xenograft model. In addition, RSF1-overexpressing paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines were found to express elevated levels of genes regulated by NF-?B, including some involved with the evasion of apoptosis (CFLAR, XIAP, BCL2, and BCL2L1) and inflammation (PTGS2). In addition, ectopic expression of RSF1 using Tet-off inducible SKOV3 cells significantly enhanced NF-?Bdependent gene expression and transcriptional activation of NF-?B. An RSF1 knockdown using short hairpin RNAs suppressed these same pathways. Moreover, pretreatment with NF-?B inhibitors or downregulation of NF-?Bregulated gene expression considerably enhanced paclitaxel sensitivity in RSF1-overexpressing OVCAR3 and/or RSF1-induced SKOV3 cells. A coimmunoprecipitation assay revealed that RSF1 interacts with NF-?B and CREB-binding protein, a ubiquitous coactivator for NF-?B. Recruitment of RSF1 to the NF-?B binding element in the PTGS2 and XIAP promoters was demonstrated by the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Furthermore, hSNF2H, a well-known binding partner of RSF1, was partially involved in the interaction between RSF1 and NF-?B. Taken together, these data suggest that RSF1 may function as a coactivator for NF-?B, consequently augmenting expression of genes necessary for the development of chemoresistance in ovarian cancer cells. PMID:24566868

  10. Effects of ginseng saponins isolated from red ginseng on ultraviolet B-induced skin aging in hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Gon; Sumiyoshi, Maho; Sakanaka, Masahiro; Kimura, Yoshiyuki

    2009-01-01

    It is well-known that chronic ultraviolet B (UVB) exposure at low-dose causes skin photoaging including increases in skin thickness and wrinkle formation and reduction in skin elasticity. This study examined the effects of total saponins and ginsenoside Rb(1) isolated from Red Ginseng roots on skin thickness, elasticity, and wrinkle formation caused by long-term, low-dose UVB irradiation in hairless mice. The topical application of total ginseng saponins (10 pg or 100 ng/mouse) and ginsenoside Rb(1) (100 fg, 10 pg, or 1 ng/mouse) significantly inhibited increases in skin thickness and wrinkle formation and the reduction in skin elasticity induced by long-term UVB irradiation. Furthermore, we examined the histological effects of total saponins and ginsenoside Rb(1) in the skin of UVB-irradiated hairless mice. The increases in apoptotic, Ki-67-, and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine-positive cells induced by UVB exposure were prevented by the topical application of total saponins and ginsenoside Rb(1). Furthermore, total saponins and ginsenoside Rb(1) prevented the disruption of collagen fibers induced by the long-term UVB irradiation. Ginsenoside Rb(1) (100 fg, 10 pg, and 1 ng/ml) increased the Bcl-2 expression level in UVB-treated human keratinocytes. The protective effect of ginsenoside Rb(1) on UVB-mediated apoptosis may be due to the up-regulation of Bcl-2 expression. These results suggest that the protective effect of ginsenoside Rb(1) on skin photoaging induced by chronic UVB exposure may be due to the increase in collagen synthesis and/or the inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase expression in dermal fibroblasts. PMID:19041641

  11. Quantification of Apoptosis in Mouse Atherosclerotic Lesions.

    PubMed

    Figg, Nichola L; Bennett, Martin R

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a key process occurring in atherosclerosis, both in humans and in animal models. Apoptosis occurs in all cell types studied thus far, and thus lineage marking is often necessary. Apoptosis should be ascertained using a combination of morphological features and activation of specific pathways (e.g., terminal UTP nick end labeling-TUNEL). Both TUNEL and cryptic epitope antibodies (e.g., cleaved caspase 3) can be used, although they will often give different frequencies. Apoptotic frequency but not rate can be estimated from these methods, as we do not know the timing of apoptosis or how much of the process is marked by each method. We describe the morphological and immunohistochemical methods used in our laboratory to detect apoptotic cells in animal and human atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:26445790

  12. Does exercise really induce lymphocyte apoptosis?

    PubMed

    Navalta, James Wilfred; McFarlin, Brian Keith; Lyons, Thomas Scott

    2010-01-01

    While the stress associated with acute exercise has been reported to induce significant lymphocyte apoptosis, not all investigations have confirmed this finding. Regardless of animal or human subjects, exercise-induced lymphocyte apoptosis may be induced via an external receptor-mediated pathway, or internally via the mitochondria through an oxidative-mediated pathway. On the other hand, investigators reporting no effect of acute exercise on lymphocyte apoptosis speculate that cell death may be dissociated from these pathways, and explain exercise lymphocytopenia by selective migration of the lymphocytes back into the lymphoid pools. Discrepancies may be due to sensitivity issues related to the methodology used to assess cell death. Limitations to various methods used to evaluate exercise-induced lymphocyte apoptosis are detailed, and considerations for a new technique are outlined. PMID:20036894

  13. Autophagy and apoptosis in liver injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kewei

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a primary characteristic in the pathogenesis of liver disease. Hepatic apoptosis is regulated by autophagic activity. However, mechanisms mediating their interaction remain to be determined. Basal level of autophagy ensures the physiological turnover of old and damaged organelles. Autophagy also is an adaptive response under stressful conditions. Autophagy can control cell fate through different cross-talk signals. A complex interplay between hepatic autophagy and apoptosis determines the degree of hepatic apoptosis and the progression of liver disease as demonstrated by pre-clinical models and clinical trials. This review summarizes recent advances on roles of autophagy that plays in pathophysiology of liver. The autophagic pathway can be a novel therapeutic target for liver disease. PMID:25927598

  14. Regulation of apoptosis by peroxisome proliferators.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Ruth A; Michel, Cecile; Coyle, Beth; Freathy, Caroline; Cain, Kelvin; Boitier, Eric

    2004-04-01

    Peroxisome proliferators (PPs) constitute a large and chemically diverse family of non-genotoxic rodent hepatocarcinogens that activate the PP-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha). In order to investigate the hypothesis that PPs elicit their carcinogenic effects through the suppression of apoptosis, we established an in vitro assay for apoptosis using both primary rat hepatocytes and the FaO rat hepatoma cell line. Apoptosis was induced by transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFbeta1), the physiological negative regulator of liver growth. In this system, PPs could suppress both spontaneous and TGFbeta1-induced apoptosis. In order to understand the mechanisms of this regulation of apoptosis, we conducted microarray analysis followed by pathway-specific gene clustering in TGFbeta1-treated cells. After treatment, 76 genes were up-regulated and 185 were down-regulated more than 1.5-fold. Cluster analysis of up-regulated genes revealed three clusters, A-C. Cluster A (4h) was associated with 12% apoptosis and consisted of genes mainly of the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix such as troponin and the proteoglycan SDC4. In cluster B (8h; 25% apoptosis), there were many pro- and anti-apoptotic genes such as XIAP, BAK1 and BAD, whereas at 16h (40% apoptosis) the regulated genes were mainly those of the cellular stress pathways such as the genes implicated in the activation of the transcription factor NFkappab. Genes found down-regulated in response to TGFbeta1 were mainly those associated with oxidative stress and several genes implicated in glutathione production and maintenance. Thus, TGFbeta1 may induce apoptosis via a down regulation of oxidant defence leading to the generation of reactive oxygen species. The ability of PPs to impact on these apoptosis pathways remains to be determined. To approach this question, we have developed a technique using laser capture microdissection of livers treated with the PP, clofibric acid coupled with gene expression array analysis. Results show that some of the key steps of the LCM process had an impact on the gene profiles generated. However, this did not preclude accurate determination of a PP-specific molecular signature. Thus, the choice of appropriate controls will ensure that meaningful gene expression analyses can be performed on tissue microdissected from the foci generated in clofibric acid treated livers. These data will allow the identification of specific genes that are regulated by PPs leading to changes in apoptosis and ultimately to tumours. PMID:15093246

  15. Apoptosis and the antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rauch, J; Subang, R; D'Agnillo, P; Koh, J S; Levine, J S

    2000-09-01

    The target of many antiphospholipid autoantibodies (APA) has been shown to be a complex between anionic phospholipid (PL) and the plasma protein beta 2-glycoprotein I (beta 2-GPI), but the identity of the natural target(s) and/or immunogen for APA in vivo remains undetermined. The anionic PL of cell membranes represent important potential targets and immunogenes for APA. Although anionic PL are normally absent from the extracellular surface of cell membranes, they redistribute from the inner to the outer leaflet during apoptosis. We and others have shown that beta 2-GPI binds selectively to the surface of apoptotic, but not viable, cells, and that the binding of beta 2-GPI to the surface of apoptotic cells generates an epitope recognized by APA from patients with both primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this review, we discuss recent findings, which suggest not only that apoptotic cell-bound beta 2-GPI is injected by non-intravenous routes. We also review briefly the potential role of oxidation in generating epitopes responsible for the recognition and induction of APA. Taken together, we believe that the available evidence supports a role for apoptotic cells as far as targets of APA and possible players in the induction of APA. PMID:10968916

  16. Determination of pesticide residues in fish tissues by modified QuEChERS method and dual-d-SPE clean-up coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Molina-Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Cieslik, Ewa; Cieslik, Iwona; Walkowska, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to modify the Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe (QuEChERS) method for the determination of organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides in fatty animal matrices such as fish muscle tissues of carp and sturgeon collected from Carp Valley, Lesser Poland. Pesticides extraction effectiveness was evaluated at 0.030 mg kg(-1) spiking level and efficiency of the dispersive-solid-phase extraction (d-SPE) clean-up step was evaluated by comparison testing two different d-SPE clean-up stages, first the addition of the d-SPE sorbent combination (PSA + SAX + NH2), and secondly the addition of C18 after extracts enrichment with the d-SPE sorbent combination (PSA + SAX + NH2), introducing a novel concept of clean-up named dual-d-SPE clean-up. Analysis of pesticide residues was performed by Gas Chromatography Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry (GC/Q-MS) working in selected-ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Linear relation was observed from 0 to 200 ng mL(-1) and determination coefficient R(2) > 0.997 in all instances for all target analytes. Better recoveries and cleanliness of extracts in both samples, carp and sturgeon tissues, were obtained after C18 addition during the dual-d-SPE clean-up step. Recoveries were in the range 70-120%, with relative standard deviation lower than 10% at 0.030 mg kg(-1) spiking level for most pesticides. LODs ranged 0.001-0.003 mg kg(-1), while LOQs ranged 0.004-0.009 mg kg(-1). The proposed method was successfully applied analyzing pesticide residues in real carp and sturgeon muscle samples; detectable pesticide residues were observed, but in all of the cases contamination level was lower than the default maximum residue levels (MRLs) set by the European Union (EU), Regulation (EC) N 396/2005. PMID:25074831

  17. Mitochondrial Ceramide and the Induction of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Siskind, Leah J.

    2007-01-01

    In most cell types, a key event in apoptosis is the release of proapoptotic intermembrane space proteins from mitochondria to the cytoplasm. In general, it is the release of these intermembrane space proteins that is responsible for the activation of caspases and DNases that are responsible for the execution of apoptosis. The mechanism for the increased permeability of the mitochondrial outer membrane during the induction phase of apoptosis is currently unknown and highly debated. This review will focus on one such proposed mechanism, namely, the formation of ceramide channels in the mitochondrial outer membrane. Ceramides are known to play a major regulatory role in apoptosis by inducing the release of proapoptotic proteins from the mitochondria. As mitochondria are known to contain the enzymes responsible for the synthesis and hydrolysis of ceramide, there exists a mechanism for regulating the level of ceramide in mitochondria. In addition, mitochondrial ceramide levels have been shown to be elevated prior to the induction phase of apoptosis. Ceramide has been shown to form large protein permeable channels in planar phospholipid and mitochondrial outer membranes. Thus, ceramide channels are good candidates for the pathway with which proapoptotic proteins are released from mitochondria during the induction phase of apoptosis. PMID:16167171

  18. Effective application of freezing lipid precipitation and SCX-SPE for determination of pyrrolizidine alkaloids in high lipid foodstuffs by LC-ESI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Soo Hwan; Kim, Min-Sun; Kim, Sang Hoon; Park, Hyun Mee; Pyo, Heesoo; Lee, Yong Moon; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Hong, Jongki

    2015-06-15

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are naturally occurring plant toxins associated with serious hepatic disease in humans and animals. In this study, rapid and sensitive analytical method was developed for the determination of 9 toxic PAs in popularly high lipid foodstuffs by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). PAs in lipid foodstuff were effectively purified by freezing lipid precipitation (FLP) and strong cation exchange (SCX)-solid-phase extraction (SPE). Especially, FLP could easily remove the large amounts of triacylglycerols in the lipid sample extract and effectively combine with SPE cleanup. During the FLP procedure, over 77% of the lipids in the foodstuff extracts were rapidly eliminated without any significant loss of the PAs with over 81% recovery. The elimination efficiency of lipids by FLP was tested with LC-atmospheric chemical ionization (APCI)-MS. For further purification, SCX-SPE cartridge could successfully purify PAs from the remaining interfering substances by the variation pH with 5% NH4OH in methanol. For precise quantification and confirmation of PAs in complicate sample matrices, appropriate transition ions in LC-MS/MS-multiple-ion reaction monitoring (MRM) mode were selected on the basis of MS/MS fragmentation pathways of PAs. The established analytical method was validated in terms of the linearity, limits of detection (LOD), and quantification (LOQ), precision, and accuracy. The method was deemed satisfactory by inter- and intra-day validation and exhibited both high accuracy and precision (relative standard deviation<11.06%). Overall limits of detection and quantitation of PAs were approximately 0.06-0.60ng/mL at a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 3 and were about 0.20-1.99ng/mL at a S/N of 10 for all foodstuffs. The established method was successfully applied for the monitoring of toxic PAs in several types of high lipid foodstuffs such as soybeans, seed oil, milk, and margarine. PMID:25958321

  19. Fully automated trace level determination of parent and alkylated PAHs in environmental waters by online SPE-LC-APPI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Cesar E; Wang, Chengtao; Gardinali, Piero R

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous compounds that enter the environment from natural and anthropogenic sources, often used as markers to determine the extent, fate, and potential effects on natural resources after a crude oil accidental release. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) after liquid-liquid extraction (LLE+GC-MS) has been extensively used to isolate and quantify both parent and alkylated PAHs. However, it requires labor-intensive extraction and cleanup steps and generates large amounts of toxic solvent waste. Therefore, there is a clear need for greener, faster techniques with enough reproducibility and sensitivity to quantify many PAHs in large numbers of water samples in a short period of time. This study combines online solid-phase extraction followed by liquid chromatography (LC) separation with dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) and tandem MS detection, to provide a one-step protocol that detects PAHs at low nanograms per liter with almost no sample preparation and with a significantly lower consumption of toxic halogenated solvents. Water samples were amended with methanol, fortified with isotopically labeled PAHs, and loaded onto an online SPE column, using a large-volume sample loop with an auxiliary LC pump for sample preconcentration and salt removal. The loaded SPE column was connected to an UPLC pump and analytes were backflushed to a Thermo Hypersil Green PAH analytical column where a 20-min gradient separation was performed at a variable flow rate. Detection was performed by a triple-quadrupole MS equipped with a gas-phase dopant delivery system, using 1.50 mL of chlorobenzene dopant per run. In contrast, LLE+GC-MS typically use 150 mL of organic solvents per sample, and methylene chloride is preferred because of its low boiling point. However, this solvent has a higher environmental persistence than chlorobenzene and is considered a carcinogen. The automated system is capable of performing injection, online SPE, inorganic species removal, LC separation, and MS/MS detection in 28 min. Selective reaction monitoring was used to detect 28 parent PAHs and 15 families of alkylated PAHs. The methodology is comparable to traditional GC-MS and was tested with surface seawater, rainwater runoff, and a wastewater treatment plant effluent. Positive detections above reporting limits are described. The virtual absence of sample preparation could be particularly advantageous for real-time monitoring of discharge events that introduce PAHs into environmental compartments, such as accidental releases of petroleum derivates and other human-related events. This work covers optimization of APPI detection and SPE extraction efficiency, a comparison with LLE+GC-MS in terms of sensitivity and chromatographic resolution, and examples of environmental applications. PMID:24217946

  20. Development, validation, and uncertainty measurement of multi-residue analysis of organochlorine and organophosphorus pesticides using pressurized liquid extraction and dispersive-SPE techniques.

    PubMed

    Sanyal, Doyeli; Rani, Anita; Alam, Samsul; Gujral, Seema; Gupta, Ruchi

    2011-11-01

    Simple and efficient multi-residue analytical methods were developed and validated for the determination of 13 organochlorine and 17 organophosphorous pesticides from soil, spinach and eggplant. Techniques namely accelerated solvent extraction and dispersive SPE were used for sample preparations. The recovery studies were carried out by spiking the samples at three concentration levels (1 limit of quantification (LOQ), 5 LOQ, and 10 LOQ). The methods were subjected to a thorough validation procedure. The mean recovery for soil, spinach and eggplant were in the range of 70-120% with median CV (%) below 10%. The total uncertainty was evaluated taking four main independent sources viz., weighing, purity of the standard, GC calibration curve and repeatability under consideration. The expanded uncertainty was well below 10% for most of the pesticides and the rest fell in the range of 10-20%. PMID:21210211

  1. HPLC-SPE-NMR characterization of major metabolites in Salvia fruticosa Mill. extract with antifungal potential: relevance of carnosic acid, carnosol, and hispidulin.

    PubMed

    Exarchou, Vassiliki; Kanetis, Loukas; Charalambous, Zenovia; Apers, Sandra; Pieters, Luc; Gekas, Vassilis; Goulas, Vlasios

    2015-01-21

    Plant pathogenic fungi are considered of significant economic importance for adversely affecting both quantitatively and qualitatively fresh and processed produce. Extracts of Salvia fruticosa were initially screened for their antifungal activity, and the ethyl acetate fraction, being the most active, was further analyzed using HPLC-SPE-NMR hyphenation. The methoxylated flavones hispidulin, salvigenin, and cirsimaritin and the diterpenes carnosic acid, carnosol, and 12-methoxycarnosic acid were identified as the major components of the extract. In addition, the concentration levels of all identified components were determined using q-NMR. The antifungal activity of the crude extract and selected phytochemicals was estimated against the fungal species Aspergillus tubingensis, Botrytis cinerea, and Penicillium digitatum. The estimated MIC and MFC values of the ethyl acetate extract of S. fruticosa, as well as three of its major constituents, carnosic acid, carnosol, and hispidulin, support their antifungal activity, especially against B. cinerea and P. digitatum, suggesting their potential use in food and agricultural systems. PMID:25537192

  2. Quantitation of Chloramphenicol and Nitrofuran Metabolites in Aquaculture Products Using Microwave-Assisted Derivatization, Automated SPE, and LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Veach, Brian T; Baker, Chris A; Kibbey, John H; Fong, Andrew; Broadaway, Bryanna J; Drake, Connie P

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a rapid and robust method utilizing microwave-assisted derivatization, automated SPE, and LC-MS/MS for the quantitation and confirmation of chloramphenicol (CAP) and nitrofuran metabolites in various aquaculture matrixes. The use of equipment presented in this work allowed extractions to be completed on average within 6 h, with quantitation accuracy ranging from 89 to 107% and RSD≤8.3%. The demonstrated detection limits for all the nitrofuran metabolites of interest in three different matrixes were ≤0.06 ng/g, with a quantitation limit of ≤0.2 ng/g. Additionally, the method exhibited a CAP detection limit for all matrixes≤0.01 ng/g and an LOQ of ≤0.03 ng/g. PMID:26025616

  3. CASPASE CONTROL: PROTAGONISTS OF CANCER CELL APOPTOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Fiandalo, M.V.; Kyprianou, N.

    2013-01-01

    Emergence of castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer is due to activation of survival pathways, including apoptosis suppression and anoikis resistance, and increased neovascularization. Thus targeting of apoptotic players is of critical significance in prostate cancer therapy since loss of apoptosis and resistance to anoikis are critical in aberrant malignant growth, metastasis and conferring therapeutic failure. The majority of therapeutic agents act through intrinsic mitochondrial, extrinsic death receptor pathways or endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways to induce apoptosis. Current therapeutic strategies target restoring regulatory molecules that govern the pro-survival pathways such as PTEN which regulates AKT activity. Other strategies focus on reactivating the apoptotic pathways either by down-regulating anti-apoptotic players such as BCL-2 or by up-regulating pro-apoptotic protein families, most notably, the caspases. Caspases are a family of cystine proteases which serve critical roles in apoptotic and inflammatory signaling pathways. During tumorigenesis, significant loss or inactivation of lead members in the caspase family leads to impairing apoptosis induction, causing a dramatic imbalance in the growth dynamics, ultimately resulting in aberrant growth of human cancers. Recent exploitation of apoptosis pathways towards re-instating apoptosis induction via caspase re-activation has provided new molecular platforms for the development of therapeutic strategies effective against advanced prostate cancer as well as other solid tumors. This review will discuss the current cellular landscape featuring the caspase family in tumor cells and their activation via pharmacologic intervention towards optimized anti-cancer therapeutic modalities. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled “Apoptosis: Four Decades Later”. PMID:23070001

  4. Training-induced apoptosis in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Boffi, F M; Cittar, J; Balskus, G; Muriel, M; Desmaras, E

    2002-09-01

    Apoptosis or programmed cell death is a genetically controlled response of cells to commit suicide and is associated with DNA fragmentation or laddering. The common inducers of apoptosis include Ca2+i and oxygen free radicals/oxidative stress, which are also implicated in the pathogenesis of exercise-induced myopathies. To examine training-induced apoptosis, Thoroughbred horses were subjected to 3 months training programme on a treadmill. At the end of the training programme venous blood samples were taken for a creatine kinase (CK) assay. In addition, muscle biopsy samples were obtained for a membrane lipid peroxidation measurement by malondialdehyde (MDA) assay and for apoptosis detection. Apoptosis was studied by visualising the apoptotic myocytes on the paraffin sections by the modified TUNEL method. DNA laddering was evaluated by subjecting the DNA obtained from the biopsies to 1.5% agarose gel electrophoresis. There was a significant increase (P<0.05) of protein-bound MDA, and a nonsignificant trend (P = 0.14) for the control group to have higher levels of CK compared to the trained group. Under light microscopy, percentage of the TUNEL positive cells was higher (P<0.001) in the training group. This result was corroborated with the findings of DNA fragmentation by gel electrophoresis, which showed higher ladders of DNA band at the same group. In conclusion, these results clearly demonstrate that there is training-induced apoptosis in skeletal muscle. It is probable that apoptosis allows the work/recovery/rebound/supercompensation cycle, when unaccustomed muscle cells activate programmed cell death and are replaced by new and stronger cells, which is the mechanism for training-induced increases in fitness. PMID:12405700

  5. Flagellin delays spontaneous human neutrophil apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Gabriela V; Petracca, Yanina; Fuxman Bass, Juan I; Rumbo, Martín; Nahmod, Karen A; Gabelloni, Maria L; Vermeulen, Mónica E; Matteo, Mario J; Geffner, Jorge R; Trevani, Analia S

    2010-07-01

    Neutrophils are short-lived cells that rapidly undergo apoptosis. However, their survival can be regulated by signals from the environment. Flagellin, the primary component of the bacterial flagella, is known to induce neutrophil activation. In this study we examined the ability of flagellin to modulate neutrophil apoptosis. Neutrophils cultured for 12 and 24 h in the presence of flagellin from Salmonella typhimurium at concentrations found in pathological situations underwent a marked prevention of apoptosis. In contrast, Helicobacter pylori flagellin did not affect neutrophil survival, suggesting that Salmonella flagellin exerts the antiapoptotic effect by interacting with TLR5. The delaying in apoptosis mediated by Salmonella flagellin was coupled to higher expression levels of the antiapoptotic protein Mcl-1 and lower levels of activated caspase-3. Analysis of the signaling pathways indicated that Salmonella flagellin induced the activation of the p38 and ERK1/2 MAPK pathways as well as the PI3K/Akt pathway. Furthermore, it also stimulated IkappaBalpha degradation and the phosphorylation of the p65 subunit, suggesting that Salmonella flagellin also triggers NF-kappaB activation. Moreover, the pharmacological inhibition of ERK1/2 pathway and NF-kappaB activation partially prevented the antiapoptotic effects exerted by flagellin. Finally, the apoptotic delaying effect exerted by flagellin was also evidenced when neutrophils were cultured with whole heat-killed S. typhimurium. Both a wild-type and an aflagellate mutant S. typhimurium strain promoted neutrophil survival; however, when cultured in low bacteria/neutrophil ratios, the flagellate bacteria showed a higher capacity to inhibit neutrophil apoptosis, although both strains showed a similar ability to induce neutrophil activation. Taken together, our results indicate that flagellin delays neutrophil apoptosis by a mechanism partially dependent on the activation of ERK1/2 MAPK and NF-kappaB. The ability of flagellin to delay neutrophil apoptosis could contribute to perpetuate the inflammation during infections with flagellated bacteria. PMID:20368700

  6. Chondrocyte Apoptosis in the Pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a highly-regulated, active process of cell death involved in development, homeostasis and aging. Dysregulation of apoptosis leads to pathological states, such as cancer, developmental anomalies and degenerative diseases. Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common chronic joint disease in the elderly population, is characterized by progressive destruction of articular cartilage, resulting in significant disability. Because articular cartilage depends solely on its resident cells, the chondrocytes, for the maintenance of extracellular matrix, the compromising of chondrocyte function and survival would lead to the failure of the articular cartilage. The role of subchondral bone in the maintenance of proper cartilage matrix has been suggested as well, and it has been proposed that both articular cartilage and subchondral bone interact with each other in the maintenance of articular integrity and physiology. Some investigators include both articular cartilage and subchondral bone as targets for repairing joint degeneration. In late-stage OA, the cartilage becomes hypocellular, often accompanied by lacunar emptying, which has been considered as evidence that chondrocyte death is a central feature in OA progression. Apoptosis clearly occurs in osteoarthritic cartilage; however, the relative contribution of chondrocyte apoptosis in the pathogenesis of OA is difficult to evaluate, and contradictory reports exist on the rate of apoptotic chondrocytes in osteoarthritic cartilage. It is not clear whether chondrocyte apoptosis is the inducer of cartilage degeneration or a byproduct of cartilage destruction. Chondrocyte death and matrix loss may form a vicious cycle, with the progression of one aggravating the other, and the literature reveals that there is a definite correlation between the degree of cartilage damage and chondrocyte apoptosis. Because current treatments for OA act only on symptoms and do not prevent or cure OA, chondrocyte apoptosis would be a valid target to modulate cartilage degeneration. PMID:26528972

  7. Ellagic acid plays a protective role against UV-B-induced oxidative stress by up-regulating antioxidant components in human dermal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Beomyeol; Lee, Su Hee; Lim, Hye-Won

    2016-01-01

    Ellagic acid (EA), an antioxidant polyphenolic constituent of plant origin, has been reported to possess diverse pharmacological properties, including anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor and immunomodulatory activities. This work aimed to clarify the skin anti-photoaging properties of EA in human dermal fibroblasts. The skin anti-photoaging activity was evaluated by analyzing the reactive oxygen species (ROS), matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), total glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity levels as well as cell viability in dermal fibroblasts under UV-B irradiation. When fibroblasts were exposed to EA prior to UV-B irradiation, EA suppressed UV-B-induced ROS and proMMP-2 elevation. However, EA restored total GSH and SOD activity levels diminished in fibroblasts under UV-B irradiation. EA had an up-regulating activity on the UV-B-reduced Nrf2 levels in fibroblasts. EA, at the concentrations used, was unable to interfere with cell viabilities in both non-irradiated and irradiated fibroblasts. In human dermal fibroblasts, EA plays a defensive role against UV-B-induced oxidative stress possibly through an Nrf2-dependent pathway, indicating that this compound has potential skin antiphotoaging properties. PMID:27162481

  8. UV-B Induced Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species Promotes Formation of BFA-Induced Compartments in Cells of Arabidopsis Root Apices.

    PubMed

    Yokawa, Ken; Kagenishi, Tomoko; Baluška, František

    2015-01-01

    UV-B radiation is an important part of the electromagnetic spectrum emitted by the sun. For much of the period of biological evolution organisms have been exposed to UV radiation, and have developed diverse mechanisms to cope with this potential stress factor. Roots are usually shielded from exposure to UV by the surrounding soil, but may nevertheless be exposed to high energy radiation on the soil surface. Due to their high sensitivity to UV-B radiation, plant roots need to respond rapidly in order to minimize exposure on the surface. In addition to root gravitropism, effective light perception by roots has recently been discovered to be essential for triggering negative root phototropism in Arabidopsis. However, it is not fully understood how UV-B affects root growth and phototropism. Here, we report that UV-B induces rapid generation of reactive oxygen species which in turn promotes the formation of BFA-induced compartments in the Arabidopsis root apex. During unilateral UV-B irradiation of roots changes in auxin concentration on the illuminated side have been recorded. In conclusion, UV-B-induced and ROS-mediated stimulation of vesicle recycling promotes root growth and induces negative phototropism. PMID:26793199

  9. A CDKN2-like polymorphism in Xiphophorus LG V is associated with UV-B-induced melanoma formation in platyfish-swordtail hybrids.

    PubMed

    Nairn, R S; Kazianis, S; McEntire, B B; Della Coletta, L; Walter, R B; Morizot, D C

    1996-11-12

    The genetic basis of spontaneous melanoma formation in spotted dorsal (Sd) Xiphophorus platyfish-swordtail hybrids has been studied for decades, and is adequately explained by a two-gene inheritance model involving a sex-linked oncogene, Xmrk, and an autosomal tumor suppressor, DIFF. The Xmrk oncogene encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase related to EGFR; the nature of the DIFF tumor suppressor gene is unknown. We analyzed the gentic basis of UV-B-induced melanoma formation in closely related, spotted side platyfish-swordtail hybrids, which carry a different sex-linked pigment pattern locus, Sp. We UV-irradiated spotted side Xiphophorus platyfish-swordtail backcross hybrids to induce melanomas at frequencies 6-fold higher than occur spontaneously in unirradiated control animals. To identify genetic determinants of melanoma susceptibility in this UV-inducible Xiphophorus model, we genotyped individual animals from control and UV-irradiated experimental regimes using allozyme and DNA restriction fragment length polymorphisms and tested for joint segregation of genetic markers with pigmentation phenotype and UV-induced melanoma formation. Joint segregation results show linkage of a CDKN2-like DNA polymorphism with UV-B-induced melanoma formation in these hybrids. The CDKN2-like polymorphism maps to Xiphophorus linkage group V and exhibits recombination fractions with ES1 and MDH2 allozyme markers consistent with previous localization of the DIFF tumor suppressor locus. Our results indicate that the CDKN2-like sequence we have cloned and mapped is a candidate for the DIFF tumor suppressor gene. PMID:8917541

  10. UV-B Induced Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species Promotes Formation of BFA-Induced Compartments in Cells of Arabidopsis Root Apices

    PubMed Central

    Yokawa, Ken; Kagenishi, Tomoko; Baluška, František

    2016-01-01

    UV-B radiation is an important part of the electromagnetic spectrum emitted by the sun. For much of the period of biological evolution organisms have been exposed to UV radiation, and have developed diverse mechanisms to cope with this potential stress factor. Roots are usually shielded from exposure to UV by the surrounding soil, but may nevertheless be exposed to high energy radiation on the soil surface. Due to their high sensitivity to UV-B radiation, plant roots need to respond rapidly in order to minimize exposure on the surface. In addition to root gravitropism, effective light perception by roots has recently been discovered to be essential for triggering negative root phototropism in Arabidopsis. However, it is not fully understood how UV-B affects root growth and phototropism. Here, we report that UV-B induces rapid generation of reactive oxygen species which in turn promotes the formation of BFA-induced compartments in the Arabidopsis root apex. During unilateral UV-B irradiation of roots changes in auxin concentration on the illuminated side have been recorded. In conclusion, UV-B-induced and ROS-mediated stimulation of vesicle recycling promotes root growth and induces negative phototropism. PMID:26793199

  11. Heat shock protein 90 associates with monarch-1 and regulates its ability to promote degradation of NF-kappaB-inducing kinase.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Janelle C; Lich, John D; Aziz, Ramy K; Kotb, Malak; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2007-11-01

    Monarch-1/NLRP12 is expressed in myeloid cells and functions as a negative regulator of inflammation by inducing proteasome-mediated degradation of NF-kappaB-inducing kinase. Monarch-1 is a member of the CATERPILLER gene family, also known as the nucleotide-binding domain leucine-rich repeat gene family. This family shares strong structural homology to major immune regulators expressed in lower organisms, including plants. In plants, these disease-resistance proteins (R proteins) sense pathogenic insult and initiate a protective response to limit pathogen growth. To perform this role, many R proteins require the highly conserved chaperone molecule, heat shock protein (Hsp) 90. Using a two-dimensional gel/mass spectrometry system, we detected the association of the nucleotide-binding domain leucine-rich repeat protein Monarch-1 with heat shock proteins. Further analysis indicates that analogous to plant R proteins, Hsp90 is required for Monarch-1 activity. In human monocytes, Monarch-1 associates with Hsp90, and these complexes are sensitive to treatment with specific Hsp90 inhibitors. Disruption of these complexes results in rapid degradation of Monarch-1 via the proteasome and prevents Monarch-1-induced proteolysis of NF-kappaB-inducing kinase. This demonstrates that Hsp90 is a critical regulator of Monarch-1 anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:17947705

  12. Two novel zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) as sorbents for solid-phase extraction (SPE) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huiping; Liu, Shengquan; Chen, Chunyan; Wang, Jianping; Zou, Ying; Lin, Lihua; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2014-11-21

    In this work, two novel zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF) materials, ZIF-7 and ZIF-11, were firstly introduced as solid-phase extraction (SPE) sorbents for PAHs efficient extraction and highly sensitive analysis in environmental water samples with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with fluorescence detection. ZIF-7 and ZIF-11 were successfully synthesized and characterized with SEM, FTIR, XRD and water contact angels, exhibiting unique and excellent stability, spatial structure and chemical composition, promising for environmental PAHs efficient enrichment through hydrophobic, π-π and π-complexation interactions. The topology effect on PAHs extraction was compared between ZIF-7 and ZIF-11, considering they have the same composition in metal ion (Zn(2+)) and organic linker, but differing spatial structures: ZIF-7 has a cubic structure, while ZIF-11 is a rhombic dodecahedron. At last, ZIF-11 with markedly better extraction efficiencies was selected for subsequent analysis. Under optimum extraction conditions such as sample volume, extraction time, desorption conditions, volume of organic modifier and salt concentration, a robust and highly efficient method based on ZIF-11 as a novel SPE sorbent has been successfully developed for environmental PAHs analysis. Satisfactory precision and accuracy ranging from 1-2.4 × 10(3) ng L(-1) as well as ultrasensitive detection limits of 0.08-1.6 ng L(-1) have been successfully achieved. Moreover, ZIF-11 extraction also exhibited high recoveries of 82.4-112.7% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) being less than 9% for PAHs in the environmental water samples. Therefore, our novel, convenient and efficient extraction method based on ZIF-11 as a sorbent is promising for applications in future trace-level environmental PAHs analyses. PMID:25209546

  13. Outcompeting GC for the detection of legacy chlorinated pesticides: online-SPE UPLC APCI/MSMS detection of endosulfans at part per trillion levels.

    PubMed

    Quinete, Natalia; Wang, Jian; Fernandez, Adolfo; Castro, Joffre; Gardinali, Piero R

    2013-07-01

    Endosulfan, the last remaining organochlorine pesticide, has been the subject of a number of international regulations and restriction/banning action plans worldwide. Occurrence of endosulfan residues in South Florida environments has been widely described in the literature for more than two decades. This work describes a selective, sensitive, and fast online solid-phase extraction (SPE) method coupled with liquid chromatography separation and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for the determination of endosulfan isomers and endosulfan sulfate in water samples at low part per trillion levels with very little sample preparation. A negative atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source was carefully optimized to produce reproducible spectra of the target compounds with no adduct ion formation. Selected reaction monitoring transitions were monitored and quantitation was performed against a per-deuterated internal standard β-endosulfan (d4). The automated online SPE clean-up was performed using only 20 mL of untreated water sample prior to LC-MS/MS analysis. The method was capable of separating and quantifying endosulfan within a 24-min run using acetonitrile and water as mobile phases and presenting statistically calculated method detection limits of 3, 10, and 7 ng/L for endosulfan sulfate, α-endosulfan, and β-endosulfan, respectively. In addition, a QuEChERS method was successfully developed and applied for endosulfan determination in sediments/soils, floating and submerged algal mats, and small fish. Minimal matrix effects were observed in all matrices analyzed and recoveries for all analytes ranged from 50-144 %. The developed methodology was applied to monitor the occurrence and to assess the potential transport of endosulfan in the Loveland Slough watershed, an area adjacent to Everglades National Park showing long-term contamination with endosulfans. PMID:23386002

  14. Targeting the Apoptosis Pathway in Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Shadia; Wang, Rui; Gandhi, Varsha

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is a cell death program that is well-orchestrated for normal tissue homeostasis and for removal of damaged, old, or infected cells. It is regulated by intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. The intrinsic pathway responds to signals such as ultraviolet radiation or DNA damage and activates “executioner” caspases through a mitochondria-dependent pathway. The extrinsic pathway is activated by death signals induced, for example, by an infection that activates the immune system or receptor-mediated pathways. The extrinsic pathway signals also cascade down to executioner caspases that cleave target proteins and lead to cell death. Strict control of cellular apoptosis is important for the hematopoietic system as it has a high turnover rate. However, the apoptosis program is often deregulated in hematologic malignancies leading to the accumulation of malignant cells. Therefore, apoptosis pathways have been identified for development of anticancer therapeutics. We review here the proteins that have been targeted for anticancer drug development in hematologic malignancies. These include BCL-2 family proteins, death ligands and receptors, inhibitor of apoptosis family proteins, and caspases. Except for caspase activators, drugs that target each of these classes of proteins have advanced into clinical trials. PMID:24295132

  15. BASP1 Promotes Apoptosis in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Niño, Maria Dolores; Sanz, Ana Belen; Lorz, Corina; Gnirke, Andrea; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Nair, Viji; Egido, Jesus; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta

    2010-01-01

    Apoptosis contributes to the development of diabetic nephropathy (DN), but the mechanisms that lead to diabetes-induced cell death are not fully understood. Here, we combined a functional genomics screen for cDNAs that induce apoptosis in vitro with transcriptional profiling of renal biopsies from patients with DN. Twelve of the 138 full-length cDNAs that induced cell death in human embryonic kidney cells matched upregulated mRNA transcripts in tissue from human DN. Confirmatory screens identified induction of BASP1 in tubular cross sections of human DN tissue. In vitro, apoptosis-inducing conditions such as serum deprivation, high concentrations of glucose, and proinflammatory cytokines increased BASP1 mRNA and protein in human tubular epithelial cells. In normal cells, BASP1 localized to the cytoplasm, but in apoptotic cells, it colocalized with actin in the periphery. Overexpression of BASP1 induced cell death with features of apoptosis; conversely, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of BASP1 protected tubular cells from apoptosis. Supporting possible involvement of BASP1 in renal disease other than DN, we also observed significant upregulation of renal BASP1 in spontaneously hypertensive rats and a trend toward increased tubulointerstitial BASP1 mRNA in human hypertensive nephropathy. In summary, a combined functional genomics approach identified BASP1 as a proapoptotic factor in DN and possibly also in hypertensive nephropathy. PMID:20110383

  16. Measuring Apoptosis by Microscopy and Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Hollville, Emilie; Martin, Seamus J

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis is a mode of programmed cell death that plays an important role during development and in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Numerous physiological as well as pathological stimuli trigger apoptosis such as engagement of Fas, TRAIL, or TNF receptors, growth factor deprivation, hypoxia, or exposure to cytotoxic drugs. Apoptosis is coordinated from within by members of the caspase family of cysteine proteases that, upon activation, trigger a series of morphological changes including cell shrinkage, extensive plasma membrane blebbing, chromatin condensation, DNA hydrolysis, and nuclear fragmentation. These dramatic structural and biochemical alterations result not only in the controlled dismantling of the cell, but also in the efficient recognition and removal of apoptotic cells by phagocytes. Necrosis, which is typically nonprogrammed or imposed upon the cell by overwhelming membrane or organelle damage, is characterized by rapid plasma membrane rupture followed by organelle and cell swelling. Necrosis is often provoked by infectious agents or a severe departure from physiological conditions. This unit describes protocols for the measurement of apoptosis and for distinguishing apoptosis from necrosis. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:26836509

  17. Sodium nitroprusside induces apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qian; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2013-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by a slowly progressing degradation of the matrix and destruction of articular cartilage. Apoptosis of chondrocyte is accounted for the mechanism of OA. Nitric oxide (NO), as a stimulus, has been shown to induce chondrocyte apoptosis by activating the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), increasing the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and the level of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), inhibiting the proteoglycan synthesis and type II collagen expression. In this study, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was administered to be the NO donor to explore the mechanism of NO-induced apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes obtained from six weeks old New Zealand rabbits. CCK-8 assay revealed the inhibitory effect of SNP on cell viability. We used flow cytometry (FCM) to assess the form of cell death by Annexin-V/propidium iodide (PI) double staining, and evaluate the change of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). We found that the SNP induced chondrocyte apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner and an observable reduction of ΔΨm. In conclusion, our findings indicate that SNP induces apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes via a mitochondria-mediated pathway.

  18. NMR exposure sensitizes tumor cells to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ghibelli, L; Cerella, C; Cordisco, S; Clavarino, G; Marazzi, S; De Nicola, M; Nuccitelli, S; D'Alessio, M; Magrini, A; Bergamaschi, A; Guerrisi, V; Porfiri, L M

    2006-03-01

    NMR technology has dramatically contributed to the revolution of image diagnostic. NMR apparatuses use combinations of microwaves over a homogeneous strong (1 Tesla) static magnetic field. We had previously shown that low intensity (0.3-66 mT) static magnetic fields deeply affect apoptosis in a Ca2+ dependent fashion (Fanelli et al., 1999 FASEBJ., 13;95-102). The rationale of the present study is to examine whether exposure to the static magnetic fields of NMR can affect apoptosis induced on reporter tumor cells of haematopoietic origin. The impressive result was the strong increase (1.8-2.5 fold) of damage-induced apoptosis by NMR. This potentiation is due to cytosolic Ca2+ overload consequent to NMR-promoted Ca2+ influx, since it is prevented by intracellular (BAPTA-AM) and extracellular (EGTA) Ca2+ chelation or by inhibition of plasma membrane L-type Ca2+ channels. Three-days follow up of treated cultures shows that NMR decrease long term cell survival, thus increasing the efficiency of cytocidal treatments. Importantly, mononuclear white blood cells are not sensitised to apoptosis by NMR, showing that NMR may increase the differential cytotoxicity of antitumor drugs on tumor vs normal cells. This strong, differential potentiating effect of NMR on tumor cell apoptosis may have important implications, being in fact a possible adjuvant for antitumor therapies. PMID:16528477

  19. Liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometric bioanalysis using normal-phase columns with aqueous/organic mobile phases - a novel approach of eliminating evaporation and reconstitution steps in 96-well SPE.

    PubMed

    Naidong, Weng; Shou, Wilson Z; Addison, Thomas; Maleki, Saber; Jiang, Xiangyu

    2002-01-01

    Bioanalytical methods using automated 96-well solid-phase extraction (SPE) and liquid chromatography with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry. SPE methods typically require manual steps of drying of the eluates and reconstituting of the analytes with a suitable injection solvent possessing elution strength weaker than the mobile phase. In this study, we demonstrated a novel approach of eliminating these two steps in 96-well SPE by using normal-phase LC/MS/MS methods with low aqueous/high organic mobile phases, which consisted of 70-95% organic solvent, 5-30% water, and small amount of volatile acid or buffer. While the commonly used SPE elution solvents (i.e. acetonitrile and methanol) have stronger elution strength than a mobile phase on reversed-phase chromatography, they are weaker elution solvents than a mobile phase for normal-phase LC/MS/MS and therefore can be injected directly. Analytical methods for a range of polar pharmaceutical compounds, namely, omeprazole, metoprolol, fexofenadine, pseudoephedrine as well as rifampin and its metabolite 25-desacetyl-rifampin, in biological fluids, were developed and optimized based on the foregoing principles. As a result of the time saving, a batch of 96 samples could be processed in one hour. These bioanalytical LC/MS/MS methods were validated according to "Guidance for Industry - Bioanalytical Method Validation" recommended by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of the United States. PMID:12362389

  20. Apoptosis in Drosophila: which role for mitochondria?

    PubMed

    Clavier, Amandine; Rincheval-Arnold, Aurore; Colin, Jessie; Mignotte, Bernard; Guénal, Isabelle

    2016-03-01

    It is now well established that the mitochondrion is a central regulator of mammalian cell apoptosis. However, the importance of this organelle in non-mammalian apoptosis has long been regarded as minor, mainly because of the absence of a crucial role for cytochrome c in caspase activation. Recent results indicate that the control of caspase activation and cell death in Drosophila occurs at the mitochondrial level. Numerous proteins, including RHG proteins and proteins of the Bcl-2 family that are key regulators of Drosophila apoptosis, constitutively or transiently localize in mitochondria. These proteins participate in the cell death process at different levels such as degradation of Diap1, a Drosophila IAP, production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species or stimulation of the mitochondrial fission machinery. Here, we review these mitochondrial events that might have their counterpart in human. PMID:26679112

  1. Lipid Metabolism, Apoptosis and Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chunfa; Freter, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Lipid metabolism is regulated by multiple signaling pathways, and generates a variety of bioactive lipid molecules. These bioactive lipid molecules known as signaling molecules, such as fatty acid, eicosanoids, diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid, lysophophatidic acid, ceramide, sphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol-3 phosphate, and cholesterol, are involved in the activation or regulation of different signaling pathways. Lipid metabolism participates in the regulation of many cellular processes such as cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, survival, apoptosis, inflammation, motility, membrane homeostasis, chemotherapy response, and drug resistance. Bioactive lipid molecules promote apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway by modulating mitochondrial membrane permeability and activating different enzymes including caspases. In this review, we discuss recent data in the fields of lipid metabolism, lipid-mediated apoptosis, and cancer therapy. In conclusion, understanding the underlying molecular mechanism of lipid metabolism and the function of different lipid molecules could provide the basis for cancer cell death rationale, discover novel and potential targets, and develop new anticancer drugs for cancer therapy. PMID:25561239

  2. Apoptosis: role in myeloid cell development.

    PubMed

    Sarvothaman, Shilpa; Undi, Ram Babu; Pasupuleti, Satya Ratan; Gutti, Usha; Gutti, Ravi Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Hematopoiesis is the process that generates blood cells in an organism from the pluripotent stem cells. Hematopoietic stem cells are characterized by their ability to undergo self-renewal and differentiation. The self-renewing ability ensures that these pluripotent cells are not depleted from the bone marrow niche. A proper balance between cell death and cell survival is necessary to maintain a homeostatic condition, hence, apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is an essential step in hematopoiesis. Recent studies, however, have introduced a new aspect to this process, citing the significance of the apoptosis mediator, caspase, in cell development and differentiation. Extensive research has been carried out to study the possible role of caspases and other apoptosis related factors in the developmental processes. This review focuses on the various apoptotic factors involved in the development and differentiation of myeloid lineage cells: erythrocytes, megakaryocytes, and macrophages. PMID:26157776

  3. Noninvasive imaging of apoptosis in cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Korngold, Ethan Chauncey; Jaffer, Farouc Amin; Weissleder, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular imaging have permitted the noninvasive imaging of apoptosis, a critical process underlying the pathogenesis of many diseases of the cardiovascular system including atherosclerotic vascular disease, myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury, chronic heart failure, myocarditis, and cardiac allograft rejection. Multiple molecular targets including phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and caspases have been targeted by a variety of imaging agents and modalities such as nuclear scintigraphy, PET, MRI, and fluorescent and bioluminescent imaging. Translationally, methods utilizing radiolabeled annexin V have proven promising in several clinical trials of ischemia-reperfusion injury and cardiac allograft rejection. New approaches using novel molecular imaging agents show great potential for the ability to image apoptosis in the research and clinical setting. Ultimately the ability to detect apoptosis noninvasively would help to identify patients for emerging anti-apoptotic therapies and guide clinical management with the aim of maximal myocardial preservation. PMID:18074226

  4. Apoptosis: role in myeloid cell development

    PubMed Central

    Sarvothaman, Shilpa; Undi, Ram Babu; Pasupuleti, Satya Ratan; Gutti, Usha

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoiesis is the process that generates blood cells in an organism from the pluripotent stem cells. Hematopoietic stem cells are characterized by their ability to undergo self-renewal and differentiation. The self-renewing ability ensures that these pluripotent cells are not depleted from the bone marrow niche. A proper balance between cell death and cell survival is necessary to maintain a homeostatic condition, hence, apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is an essential step in hematopoiesis. Recent studies, however, have introduced a new aspect to this process, citing the significance of the apoptosis mediator, caspase, in cell development and differentiation. Extensive research has been carried out to study the possible role of caspases and other apoptosis related factors in the developmental processes. This review focuses on the various apoptotic factors involved in the development and differentiation of myeloid lineage cells: erythrocytes, megakaryocytes, and macrophages. PMID:26157776

  5. Control of apoptosis by Drosophila DCAF12.

    PubMed

    Hwangbo, Dae-Sung; Biteau, Benoit; Rath, Sneha; Kim, Jihyun; Jasper, Heinrich

    2016-05-01

    Regulated Apoptosis (Programmed Cell Death, PCD) maintains tissue homeostasis in adults, and ensures proper growth and morphogenesis of tissues during development of metazoans. Accordingly, defects in cellular processes triggering or executing apoptotic programs have been implicated in a variety of degenerative and neoplastic diseases. Here, we report the identification of DCAF12, an evolutionary conserved member of the WD40-motif repeat family of proteins, as a new regulator of apoptosis in Drosophila. We find that DCAF12 is required for Diap1 cleavage in response to pro-apoptotic signals, and is thus necessary and sufficient for RHG (Reaper, Hid, and Grim)-mediated apoptosis. Loss of DCAF12 perturbs the elimination of supernumerary or proliferation-impaired cells during development, and enhances tumor growth induced by loss of neoplastic tumor suppressors, highlighting the wide requirement for DCAF12 in PCD. PMID:26972874

  6. Downregulation of Reactive Oxygen Species in Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Chul-Ho; Joo, Sang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by diverse anti-cancer drugs or phytochemicals has been closely related with the induction of apoptosis in cancers. Also, the downregulation of ROS by these chemicals has been found to block initiation of carcinogenesis. Therefore, modulation of ROS by phytochemicals emerges as a crucial mechanism to regulate apoptosis in cancer prevention or therapy. This review summarizes the current understanding of the selected chemical compounds and related cellular components that modulate ROS during apoptotic process. Metformin, quercetin, curcumin, vitamin C, and other compounds have been shown to downregulate ROS in the cellular apoptotic process, and some of them even induce apoptosis in cancer cells. The cellular components mediating the downregulation of ROS include nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 antioxidant signaling pathway, thioredoxin, catalase, glutathione, heme oxygenase-1, and uncoupling proteins. The present review provides information on the relationship between these compounds and the cellular components in modulating ROS in apoptotic cancer cells. PMID:27051644

  7. Lipid metabolism, apoptosis and cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chunfa; Freter, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Lipid metabolism is regulated by multiple signaling pathways, and generates a variety of bioactive lipid molecules. These bioactive lipid molecules known as signaling molecules, such as fatty acid, eicosanoids, diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid, lysophophatidic acid, ceramide, sphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol-3 phosphate, and cholesterol, are involved in the activation or regulation of different signaling pathways. Lipid metabolism participates in the regulation of many cellular processes such as cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, survival, apoptosis, inflammation, motility, membrane homeostasis, chemotherapy response, and drug resistance. Bioactive lipid molecules promote apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway by modulating mitochondrial membrane permeability and activating different enzymes including caspases. In this review, we discuss recent data in the fields of lipid metabolism, lipid-mediated apoptosis, and cancer therapy. In conclusion, understanding the underlying molecular mechanism of lipid metabolism and the function of different lipid molecules could provide the basis for cancer cell death rationale, discover novel and potential targets, and develop new anticancer drugs for cancer therapy. PMID:25561239

  8. The role of intracellular oxidants in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Slater, A F; Nobel, C S; Orrenius, S

    1995-05-24

    Apoptotic cell death is a complex process whose biochemistry is poorly understood. Direct exposure of various cell types of oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide or lipid hydroperoxides can directly induce apoptosis, while in many experimental models pretreatment of cells with antioxidants has been shown to protect against this form of cell death. Recent experimental evidence suggests that multiple forms of thymocyte apoptosis can be inhibited by free radical spin traps, spin probes and thiol reductants, and that this inhibition correlates with a lower oxidative burden within the treated cells. Possible sites of production of these oxidants include mitochondrial electron transport and phospholipase A2-activated arachidonic acid metabolism, while intracellular targets may include redox sensitive transcription factors and inhibitory proteins that must be tagged for proteolysis before apoptosis can commence. PMID:7599226

  9. Apoptosis and Necrosis in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Guicciardi, Maria Eugenia; Malhi, Harmeet; Mott, Justin L.; Gores, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    Because of its unique function and anatomical location, the liver is exposed to a multitude of toxins and xenobiotics, including medications and alcohol, as well as to infection by hepatotropic viruses, and therefore, is highly susceptible to tissue injury. Cell death in the liver occurs mainly by apoptosis or necrosis, with apoptosis also being the physiologic route to eliminate damaged or infected cells and to maintain tissue homeostasis. Liver cells, especially hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, are particularly susceptible to death receptor-mediated apoptosis, given the ubiquitous expression of the death receptors in the organ. In a quite unique way, death receptor-induced apoptosis in these cells is mediated by both mitochondrial and lysosomal permeabilization. Signaling between the endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria promotes hepatocyte apoptosis in response to excessive free fatty acid generation during the metabolic syndrome. These cell death pathways are partially regulated by microRNAs. Necrosis in the liver is generally associated with acute injury (i.e., ischemia/reperfusion injury) and has been long considered an unregulated process. Recently, a new form of “programmed” necrosis (named necroptosis) has been described: the role of necroptosis in the liver has yet to be explored. However, the minimal expression of a key player in this process in the liver suggests this form of cell death may be uncommon in liver diseases. Because apoptosis is a key feature of so many diseases of the liver, therapeutic modulation of liver cell death holds promise. An updated overview of these concepts is given in this article. PMID:23720337

  10. Shikonin causes cell-cycle arrest and induces apoptosis by regulating the EGFR–NF-κB signalling pathway in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Rong; Li, You; Gao, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Shikonin, a naphthoquinone pigment isolated from the Chinese herbal Zicao, has been shown to exhibit antioxidant and anticancer effects. In the present study, we investigated the antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of shikonin on A431 cells and explored the underlying molecular mechanisms. In the present study, our results showed that shikonin significantly inhibited the growth of A431 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, and caused cell cycle arrest by upregulation of p21 and p27, and downregulation of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases. In addition, shikonin evidently induced apoptosis due to decreasing Bcl-2 expression, increasing Bax expression, activating caspase and inactivating NF-κB, while pretreatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor Z-Asp-CH2-DCB abrogated shikonin-induced apoptosis. Moreover, EGF could significantly increase the NF-κB DNA-binding activity and reversed the shikonin-induced inactivation of NF-κB. As anticipated AG1478 (EGFR inhibitor) and Bay11-7082 (NF-κB inhibitor) blocked EGF-reversed the inactivation of NF-κB induced by shikonin. Our data also showed that EGF could evidently reverse the shikonin-induced decreases in cell viability and increases in apoptosis. Then, the NF-κB inhibitors such as Bay11-7082, SN50, Helenalin and the EGFR inhibitor AG1478 and its downstream inhibitor such as PI3K inhibitor LY294002 and STAT3 inhibitor Stattic dramatically blocked EGF-reversed decreases in cell viability and increases in apoptosis induced by shikonin. Collectively, our findings indicated that shikonin inhibited cell growth and caused cell cycle arrest of the A431 cells through the regulation of apoptosis. Moreover, these effects were mediated at least partially by suppressing the activation of the EGFR–NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:25720435

  11. The NFκB-inducing kinase is essential for the developmental programming of skin-resident and IL-17-producing γδ T cells.

    PubMed

    Mair, Florian; Joller, Stefanie; Hoeppli, Romy; Onder, Lucas; Hahn, Matthias; Ludewig, Burkhard; Waisman, Ari; Becher, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    γδ T cells contribute to first line immune defense, particularly through their ability for rapid production of proinflammatory cytokines. The cytokine profile of γδ T cells is hard-wired already during thymic development. Yet, the molecular pathways underlying this phenomenon are incompletely understood. Here we show that signaling via the NFκB-inducing kinase (NIK) is essential for the formation of a fully functional γδ T cell compartment. In the absence of NIK, development of Vγ5(+) dendritic epidermal T cells (DETCs) was halted in the embryonic thymus, and impaired NIK function caused a selective loss of IL-17 expression by γδ T cells. Using a novel conditional mutant of NIK, we could show in vivo that NIK signaling in thymic epithelial cells is essential for the thymic hardwiring of γδ T cell cytokine production. PMID:26637788

  12. Apoptosis after reperfused myocardial infarction: Role of angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Jugdutt, Bodh I

    2004-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) plays a significant role in apoptosis after myocardial infarction (MI) and reperfused MI. Cumulative evidence suggests that Ang II is a major contributor to cardiomyocyte (CM) apoptosis and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction after acute reperfused MI and that apoptosis mediates a major portion of early LV dysfunction. Importantly, blockade of the Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) limits CM apoptosis and LV dysfunction after acute reperfused MI. Ang II type 2 receptor activation during AT1R blockade contributes to these beneficial effects. The role of Ang II and apoptosis in chronic LV remodelling, healing and post-MI heart failure is more complex and involves effects on the CMs, fibroblasts and vascular cells. The long-term effects of agents targeting apoptosis after reperfused MI, including AT1R blockade, on apoptosis in different cell types, windows of enhanced apoptosis and the appropriate timing of therapy need to be considered. PMID:19641712

  13. Effects of ophiopogonin B on the proliferation and apoptosis of SGC-7901 human gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, WEIYUE; ZHANG, QIAOYAN; JIANG, YIPING; LI, FENG; XIN, HAILIANG

    2016-01-01

    Ophiopogonin B (OP-B) is a bioactive component of Radix Ophiopogon japonicus, which is often used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat cancer. The present study aimed to investigate the antitumor activity of OP-B in gastric cancer. Cell Counting kit-8, flow cytometry with Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate, Hoechst staining, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) detection, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay were used to detect the biological function of SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells. The results demonstrated that high concentrations of OP-B (5, 10 and 20 μmol/l) exerted potent antiproliferative effects on SGC-7901 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, apoptotic rates were increased and cell morphology was altered following treatment with OP-B. In addition, OP-B-induced apoptosis of SGC-7901 cells was associated with loss of MMP and increased ROS generation. Western blotting indicated that treatment with OP-B increased the protein expression levels of caspase-3 and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein, whereas the expression levels of Bcl-2 and the phosphorylation levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinases 1/2 were decreased. These results suggest that OP-B may be considered a potential inhibitor of gastric cancer progression, and may be used as an alternative compound for its treatment. PMID:27121658

  14. Ultraviolet-B-Induced Stomatal Closure in Arabidopsis Is Regulated by the UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 Photoreceptor in a Nitric Oxide-Dependent Mechanism1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Tossi, Vanesa; Lamattina, Lorenzo; Jenkins, Gareth I.; Cassia, Raúl O.

    2014-01-01

    UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) signaling involves CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1, the ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5) transcription factor, and the closely related HY5 HOMOLOG. Some UV-B responses mediated by UVR8 are also regulated by nitric oxide (NO), a bioactive molecule that orchestrates a wide range of processes in plants. In this study, we investigated the participation of the UVR8 pathway and its interaction with NO in UV-B-induced stomatal movements in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Stomata in abaxial epidermal strips of Arabidopsis ecotype Landsberg erecta closed in response to increasing UV-B fluence rates, with maximal closure after 3-h exposure to 5.46 μmol m–2 s–1 UV-B. Both hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and NO increased in response to UV-B, and stomatal closure was maintained by NO up to 24 h after the beginning of exposure. Stomata of plants expressing bacterial NO dioxygenase, which prevents NO accumulation, did not close in response to UV-B, although H2O2 still increased. When the uvr8-1 null mutant was exposed to UV-B, stomata remained open, irrespective of the fluence rate. Neither NO nor H2O2 increased in stomata of the uvr8-1 mutant. However, the NO donor S-nitrosoglutathione induced closure of uvr8-1 stomata to the same extent as in the wild type. Experiments with mutants in UVR8 signaling components implicated CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1, HY5, and HY5 HOMOLOG in UV-B-induced stomatal closure. This research provides evidence that the UVR8 pathway regulates stomatal closure by a mechanism involving both H2O2 and NO generation in response to UV-B exposure. PMID:24586043

  15. p38-NF-?B-promoted mitochondria-associated apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest in norcantharidin-treated HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiu; Li, Jian-Chun; Jiang, Yuan-Yuan; Xia, Ming-Yu; Tashiro, Shin-Ichi; Onodera, Satoshi; Ikejima, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Previous study proved that norcantharidin (NCTD) could exert its anticancer activity in a variety of malignant cell lines, including human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells. In this study, we found that NCTD-activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK)-nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NF-?B) signaling pathway induced mitochondrial apoptotic pathway activation and G2/M cell cycle arrest in HeLa cells. NCTD-induced mitochondria-associated apoptosis was concomitant with the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential (??(m)), translocation of Bax, down-regulation of Bcl-2 expression, and release of cytochrome c. NCTD-led G2/M cell-cycle arrest was associated with the up-regulated p21 and p-cdc25c expression and the down-regulated cyclin B and cdc2 expression. Treatment of the cells with p38 inhibitor SB203580 and NF-?B inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) showed that p38 functioned upstream of NF-?B, while augmented apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were induced in response to NCTD with NF-?B activation. Intriguingly, NF-?B had a negative feedback regulatory effect on p38 activation. Moreover, NCTD-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were significantly blocked by SB203580 and PDTC but not by pifithrin-? (p53 inhibitor). Therefore, p38-NF-?B induced mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and G2/M cell cycle arrest in NCTD-treated HeLa cells. PMID:23281704

  16. Myocardial apoptosis in heart disease: does the emperor have clothes?

    PubMed

    Jose Corbalan, J; Vatner, Dorothy E; Vatner, Stephen F

    2016-05-01

    Since the discovery of a novel mechanism of cell death that differs from traditional necrosis, i.e., apoptosis, there have been numerous studies concluding that increased apoptosis augments myocardial infarction and heart failure and that limiting apoptosis protects the heart. Importantly, the vast majority of cells in the heart are non-myocytes with only roughly 30 % myocytes, yet almost the entire field studying apoptosis in the heart has disregarded non-myocyte apoptosis, e.g., only 4.7 % of 423 studies on myocardial apoptosis in the past 3 years quantified non-myocyte apoptosis. Accordingly, we reviewed the history of apoptosis in the heart focusing first on myocyte apoptosis, followed by the history of non-myocyte apoptosis in myocardial infarction and heart failure. Apoptosis of several of the major non-myocyte cell types in the heart (cardiac fibroblasts, endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, macrophages and leukocytes) may actually be responsible for affecting the severity of myocardial infarction and heart failure. In summary, even though it is now known that the majority of apoptosis in the heart occurs in non-myocytes, very little work has been done to elucidate the mechanisms by which non-myocyte apoptosis might be responsible for the adverse effects of apoptosis in myocardial infarction and heart failure. The goal of this review is to provide an impetus for future work in this field on non-myocyte apoptosis that will be required for a better understanding of the role of apoptosis in the heart. PMID:27043720

  17. A novel method for detection of apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zagariya, Alexander M.

    2012-04-15

    There are two different Angiotensin II (ANG II) peptides in nature: Human type (ANG II) and Bovine type (ANG II*). These eight amino acid peptides differ only at position 5 where Valine is replaced by Isoleucine in the Bovine type. They are present in all species studied so far. These amino acids are different by only one atom of carbon. This difference is so small, that it will allow any of ANG II, Bovine or Human antibodies to interact with all species and create a universal method for apoptosis detection. ANG II concentrations are found at substantially higher levels in apoptotic, compared to non-apoptotic, tissues. ANG II accumulation can lead to DNA damage, mutations, carcinogenesis and cell death. We demonstrate that Bovine antiserum can be used for universal detection of apoptosis. In 2010, the worldwide market for apoptosis detection reached the $20 billion mark and significantly increases each year. Most commercially available methods are related to Annexin V and TUNNEL. Our new method based on ANG II is more widely known to physicians and scientists compared to previously used methods. Our approach offers a novel alternative for assessing apoptosis activity with enhanced sensitivity, at a lower cost and ease of use.

  18. Apoptosis drives cancer cells proliferate and metastasize

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui-An; Li, Qin-Long; Li, Zeng-Shan; Zheng, Ping-Ju; Zhang, Hui-Zhong; Huang, Xiao-Feng; Chi, Su-Min; Yang, An-Gang; Cui, Rutao

    2013-01-01

    Cancer has been considered to be the result of accumulated gene mutations, which result in uncontrolled cell proliferations for a long time. Cancers are also regarded to be capable of immune evasion. Furthermore, resistance to apoptosis was recognized as an important trait of cancer in the last score of years. However, there are numerous paradoxical issues in this whole set of theory. For example, there is no known set of genes of which mutations are responsible for human cancers. As for the trait of ‘resistance to apoptosis’, the fact is that cancer has increased frequency of apoptosis. The more malignant the tumour is, the more apoptosis shows. In this study, we propose a new theory that apoptosis plays a key role in the malignant progression and metastasis of cancer. The growth of tumour is the difference between tumour cell proliferation and attrition plus the hyperplastic growth of stroma. Increased and unpreventable death caused by innate or environmental factors such as ischaemia and inflammation drives the tumour cells to proliferate relentlessly, move to new lands to establish colonies. In short, increased cell death is the origin of malignancy. PMID:23305095

  19. THE ROLE OF APOPTOSIS IN NEUROTOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Apoptosis, a form of programmed cell death, occurs in the nervous system throughout development, but with a preponderance of cell death occurring during the prenatal and perinatal periods. Aberrant periods of increased or decreased cell death, induced by toxicants in air, water,...

  20. Techniques to Distinguish Apoptosis from Necroptosis.

    PubMed

    Feoktistova, Maria; Wallberg, Fredrik; Tenev, Tencho; Geserick, Peter; Leverkus, Martin; Meier, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    The processes by which cells die are as tightly regulated as those that govern cell growth and proliferation. Recent studies of the molecular pathways that regulate and execute cell death have uncovered a plethora of signaling cascades that lead to distinct modes of cell death, including "apoptosis," "necrosis," "autophagic cell death," and "mitotic catastrophe." Cells can readily switch from one form of death to another; therefore, it is vital to have the ability to monitor the form of death that cells are undergoing. A number of techniques are available that allow the detection of cell death and when combined with either knockdown approaches or inhibitors of specific signaling pathways, such as caspase or RIP kinase pathways, they allow the rapid dissection of divergent cell death pathways. However, techniques that reveal the end point of cell death cannot reconstruct the sequence of events that have led to death; therefore, they need to be complemented with methods that can distinguish all forms of cell death. Apoptotic cells frequently undergo secondary necrosis under in vitro culture conditions; therefore, novel methods relying on high-throughput time-lapse fluorescence video microscopy are necessary to provide temporal resolution to cell death events. Further, visualizing the assembly of multiprotein signaling hubs that can execute apoptosis or necroptosis helps to explore the underlying processes. Here we introduce a suite of techniques that reliably distinguish necrosis from apoptosis and secondary necrosis, and that enable investigation of signaling platforms capable of instructing apoptosis or necroptosis. PMID:27037077

  1. Effect of hyaluronic acid on chondrocyte apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Barreto, Ronald Bispo; Sadigursky, David; de Rezende, Marcia Uchoa; Hernandez, Arnaldo José

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the percentage of apoptotic cells in a contusion model of osteoarthritis (OA) and to assess whether intra-articular injection of high doses of hyaluronic acid (HA) immediately after trauma reduces chondrocyte apoptosis. METHODS: Forty knees from adult rabbits were impacted thrice with a 1 kg block released through a 1 meter tall cylinder (29.4 Joules). Subsequently, 2 mL of HA was injected in one knee and 2 mL saline in the contra-lateral knee. Medication were administered twice a week for 30 days, when animals were sacrificed. Specimens were prepared for optical microscopy exam and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase end labeling assay (TUNEL). RESULTS: The apoptosis rate in the contusion model was 68.01% (± 19.73%), a higher rate than previously described. HA significantly reduced the rate of apoptosis to 53.52% (± 18.09) (p <0.001). CONCLUSION: Intra-articular HA administration started immediately after trauma reduces impact-induced chondrocyte apoptosis rates in rabbits. Level of Evidence I, Experimental Study. PMID:27069407

  2. Biophotonic probing of macromolecular transformations during apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Pliss, Artem; Kuzmin, Andrey N.; Kachynski, Aliaksandr V.; Prasad, Paras N.

    2010-01-01

    We introduce here multiplex nonlinear optical imaging as a powerful tool for studying the molecular organization and its transformation in cellular processes, with the specific example of apoptosis. Apoptosis is a process of self-initiated cell death, critically important for physiological regulation and elimination of genetic disorders. Nonlinear optical microscopy, combining the coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF), has been used for analysis of spatial distribution of major types of biomolecules: proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids in the cells while monitoring their changes during apoptosis. CARS imaging revealed that in the nuclei of proliferating cells, the proteins are distributed nearly uniformly, with local accumulations in several nuclear structures. We have found that this distribution is abruptly disrupted at the onset of apoptosis and is transformed to a progressively irregular pattern. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) studies indicate that pronounced aggregation of proteins in the nucleoplasm of apoptotic cells coincides with a gradual reduction in their mobility. PMID:20615987

  3. Fluorescence spectroscopy to assess apoptosis in myocardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranji, Mahsa; Matsubara, Muneaki; Grosso, Michael A.; Jaggard, Dwight L.; Chance, Britton; Gorman, Robert C.; Gorman, Joseph H., III

    2007-02-01

    Apoptosis induced mitochondrial destruction and dysfunction has been shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of both acute cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury and chronic myocardial infarction-induced ventricular remodeling. Unfortunately this understanding has not translated into effective therapeutic strategies for either condition-mostly due to an inability to assess mitochondrial dysfunction/apoptosis effectively in humans. All current measures of apoptosis are pseudo-quantitative and require invasive tissue biopsy. Our group has developed an optical, non-tissue destructive catheter based device that allows the quantitative regional assessment of this pathological process in vivo. This instrument has been designed to acquire fluorescence signals of intrinsic mitochondrial fluorophores, Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NAD) and Flavoprotein (FP). The normalized ratio of these fluorophores (FP/FP+NADH) called the redox ratio, is an indicator of the in vivo mitochondrial dysfunction. 1-3 We have demonstrated in a rabbit reperfusion model of apoptotic myocyte injury that this redox ratio is drastically increased which is consistent with profound apoptosis-induced "unhinging" of the mitochondrial respiratory function.

  4. Yield and depth Estimation of Selected NTS Nuclear and SPE Chemical Explosions Using Source Equalization by modeling Local and Regional Seismograms (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, C. K.; Roman-nieves, J. I.; Woods, M. T.

    2013-12-01

    Source parameters of nuclear and chemical explosions are often estimated by matching either the corner frequency and spectral level of a single event or the spectral ratio when spectra from two events are available with known source parameters for one. In this study, we propose an alternative method in which waveforms from two or more events can be simultaneously equalized by setting the differential of the processed seismograms at one station from any two individual events to zero. The method involves convolving the equivalent Mueller-Murphy displacement source time function (MMDSTF) of one event with the seismogram of the second event and vice-versa, and then computing their difference seismogram. MMDSTF is computed at the elastic radius including both near and far-field terms. For this method to yield accurate source parameters, an inherent assumption is that green's functions for the any paired events from the source to a receiver are same. In the frequency limit of the seismic data, this is a reasonable assumption and is concluded based on the comparison of green's functions computed for flat-earth models at various source depths ranging from 100m to 1Km. Frequency domain analysis of the initial P wave is, however, sensitive to the depth phase interaction, and if tracked meticulously can help estimating the event depth. We applied this method to the local waveforms recorded from the three SPE shots and precisely determined their yields. These high-frequency seismograms exhibit significant lateral path effects in spectrogram analysis and 3D numerical computations, but the source equalization technique is independent of any variation as long as their instrument characteristics are well preserved. We are currently estimating the uncertainty in the derived source parameters assuming the yields of the SPE shots as unknown. We also collected regional waveforms from 95 NTS explosions at regional stations ALQ, ANMO, CMB, COR, JAS LON, PAS, PFO and RSSD. We are currently employing a station based analysis using the equalization technique to estimate depth and yields of many relative to those of the announced explosions; and to develop their relationship with the Mw and Mo for the NTS explosions.

  5. An on-line SPE-HPLC method for effective sample preconcentration and determination of fenoxycarb and cis, trans-permethrin in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Šatínský, Dalibor; Naibrtová, Linda; Fernández-Ramos, Carolina; Solich, Petr

    2015-09-01

    A new on-line SPE-HPLC method using fused-core columns for on-line solid phase extraction and large volume sample injection for increasing the sensitivity of detection was developed for the determination of insecticides fenoxycarb and cis-, trans-permethrin in surface waters. The separation was carried out on fused-core column Phenyl-Hexyl (100×4.6 mm), particle size 2.7 µm with mobile phase acetonitrile:water in gradient mode at flow rate 1.0 mL min(-1), column temperature 45°C. Large volume sample injection (1500 µL) to the extraction dimension using short precolumn Ascentis Express RP C-18 (5×4.6 mm); fused-core particle size 2.7 µm allowed effective sample preconcentration and efficient ballast sample matrix removal. The washing mobile phase consisting of a mixture of acetonitrile:water; 30:70, (v/v) was pumped at flow rate of 0.5 mL min(-1) through the extraction precolumn to the waste. Time of the valve switch for transferring the preconcentrated sample zone from the extraction to the separation column was set at 3rd min. Elution of preconcentrated insecticides from the extraction precolumn and separation on the analytical column was performed in gradient mode. Linear gradient elution started from 40% of acetonitrile at time of valve switch from SPE column (3rd min) to 95% of acetonitrile at 7th min. Synthetic dye sudan I was chosen as an internal standard. UV detection at wavelength 225 nm was used and the method reached the limits of detection (LOD) at ng mL(-1) levels for both insecticides. The method showing on-line sample pretreatment and preconcentration with highly sensitive determination of insecticides was applied for monitoring of fenoxycarb and both permethrin isomers in different surface water samples in Czech Republic. The time of whole analysis including on-line extraction, interferences removal, chromatography separation and system equilibration was less than 8 min. PMID:26003701

  6. NIK promotes tissue destruction independently of the alternative NF-κB pathway through TNFR1/RIP1-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Boutaffala, L; Bertrand, M J M; Remouchamps, C; Seleznik, G; Reisinger, F; Janas, M; Bénézech, C; Fernandes, M T; Marchetti, S; Mair, F; Ganeff, C; Hupalowska, A; Ricci, J-E; Becher, B; Piette, J; Knolle, P; Caamano, J; Vandenabeele, P; Heikenwalder, M; Dejardin, E

    2015-12-01

    NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK) is well-known for its role in promoting p100/NF-κB2 processing into p52, a process defined as the alternative, or non-canonical, NF-κB pathway. Here we reveal an unexpected new role of NIK in TNFR1-mediated RIP1-dependent apoptosis, a consequence of TNFR1 activation observed in c-IAP1/2-depleted conditions. We show that NIK stabilization, obtained by activation of the non-death TNFRs Fn14 or LTβR, is required for TNFα-mediated apoptosis. These apoptotic stimuli trigger the depletion of c-IAP1/2, the phosphorylation of RIP1 and the RIP1 kinase-dependent assembly of the RIP1/FADD/caspase-8 complex. In the absence of NIK, the phosphorylation of RIP1 and the formation of RIP1/FADD/caspase-8 complex are compromised while c-IAP1/2 depletion is unaffected. In vitro kinase assays revealed that recombinant RIP1 is a bona fide substrate of NIK. In vivo, we demonstrated the requirement of NIK pro-death function, but not the processing of its substrate p100 into p52, in a mouse model of TNFR1/LTβR-induced thymus involution. In addition, we also highlight a role for NIK in hepatocyte apoptosis in a mouse model of virus-induced TNFR1/RIP1-dependent liver damage. We conclude that NIK not only contributes to lymphoid organogenesis, inflammation and cell survival but also to TNFR1/RIP1-dependent cell death independently of the alternative NF-κB pathway. PMID:26045047

  7. High-resolution bioactivity profiling combined with HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR: α-Glucosidase inhibitors and acetylated ellagic acid rhamnosides from Myrcia palustris DC. (Myrtaceae).

    PubMed

    Wubshet, Sileshi G; Moresco, Henrique H; Tahtah, Yousof; Brighente, Inês M C; Staerk, Dan

    2015-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is an endocrine metabolic disease with a worldwide prevalence of more than 8%, and an expected increase close to 50% in the next 15-20years. T2D is associated with severe and life-threatening complications like retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy, and cardiovascular diseases, and therefore improved drug leads or functional foods containing α-glucosidase inhibitors are needed for management of blood glucose. In this study, leaves of Myrcia palustris were investigated by high-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition profiling combined with HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR. This led to identification of casuarinin, myricetin 3-O-β-d-(6″-galloyl)galactopyranoside, kaempferol 3-O-β-d-galactopyranoside, myricetin, and quercetin as α-glucosidase inhibitors. In addition, four acetylated ellagic acid rhamnosides, i.e., 4-O-(2″,4″-O-diacetyl-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl)ellagic acid, 4-O-(2″,3″-O-diacetyl-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl)ellagic acid, 4-O-(3″,4″-O-diacetyl-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl)ellagic acid, and 4-O-(2″,3″,4″-O-triacetyl-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl)ellagic acid were identified. PMID:25935545

  8. Optimization and validation of a simple and fast method for the determination of fungicides in must and wine samples by SPE and GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Lagunas-Allué, Laura; Sanz-Asensio, Jesús; Martínez-Soria, Maria-Teresa

    2012-01-01

    A rapid, simple, and low-cost method based on SPE was optimized and validated for simultaneous determination of eight fungicides belonging to different chemical classes in must and wine. The method involves extraction of 10 mL of must or wine samples with a C18 cartridge using 5 mL of dichloromethane as the elution solvent. Separation and final determination of the fungicides (vinclozolin, dichlofluanid, penconazol, captan, quinoxyfen, fluquinconazol, boscalid, and pyraclostrobin) was performed by GC coupled to single quadrupole MS. Recoveries at 10, 50, and 100 microg/L were between 71 and 106% in both matrixes for the fungicides evaluated. The calculated LOQ ranged from 1.5 to 3.4 microg/L in must and 1.1 to 3.8 microg/L in wine. Matrix effects observed for wine and must samples were overcome by using matrix-matched calibration. The developed method was linear at concentrations within the tested interval, with coefficients of determination higher than 0.999. The expanded uncertainties at 10 microg/L were <20% for all analytes. Intralaboratory precision in terms of the Horwitz ratio of the fungicides evaluated was below 0.5, suggesting the ruggedness of the method. The proposed method was applied to determine fungicide residues in must samples obtained from red grapes treated with two new commercial formulations, as well as in their corresponding final wines. PMID:23175987

  9. Preparation of molecularly imprinted polymers using theanine as dummy template and its application as SPE sorbent for the determination of eighteen amino acids in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fengling; Wang, Jing; Zhu, Lijun; Tan, Lanlan; Feng, Guanglin; Liu, Shaomin; Dai, Ya; Wang, Hua

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a novel dummy template molecularly imprinted polymer (DMIP) based on a vinyl-SiO2 microspheres surface for the simultaneous selective recognition and enrichment of 18 amino acids was prepared via a surface molecular imprinting technique using theanine as a dummy template. Compared to the imprinted polymers prepared using traditional polymerization techniques, the obtained DMIPs exhibited a regular spherical shape and were relatively monodisperse. The maximal sorption capacity (Qmax) of the resulting DMIPs for the 18 amino acids was up to 1444.3mgg(-1). A kinetic binding study showed that the sorption capacity reached 85.40% of Qmax in 25min and sorption equilibrium at 30min. The imprint factors of the sorbents ranged from 2.86 to 6.9 for the 18 amino acids, which indicated that the DMIP sorbents have high selectivity. An HPLC-UV method for the simultaneous determination of 18 amino acids in tobacco and tobacco smoke was developed using the DMIPs as sorbents for solid phase extraction (SPE) in the sample pretreatment procedure. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the materials had enrichment factors of up to 200 for the amino acids, and the recoveries of the 18 amino acids in tobacco smoke were in the range from 79% to 104% with relative standard deviations of less than 7.4%. It indicated that the obtained DMIP sorbents could specifically recognize the amino acids from complicated samples. PMID:26838422

  10. High-resolution hyaluronidase inhibition profiling combined with HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR for identification of anti-necrosis constituents in Chinese plants used to treat snakebite.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yueqiu; Staerk, Dan; Nielsen, Mia N; Nyberg, Nils; Jäger, Anna K

    2015-11-01

    Inhibition of the necrotizing hyaluronidase, phospholipase A2 and protease enzymes in four snake venoms by crude water and ethanol extracts of 88 plant species used against snakebites in traditional Chinese medicine was measured. High-resolution hyaluronidase inhibition profiles were constructed for the 22 plants showing highest hyaluronidase inhibition, and the results were used to guide subsequent structural analysis towards specific hyaluronidase inhibitors. Structural analysis was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography, high-resolution mass spectrometry, solid-phase extraction and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, i.e., HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR. This allowed identification of four non-tannin inhibitors, i.e., lansiumamide B (6) from Clausena excavata Burm.f., myricetin 3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (7) from Androsace umbellata (Lour.) Merr., and vitexin (8) and 4',7-dihydroxy-5-methoxyflavone-8-C-β-D-glucopyranoside (9) from Oxalis corniculata L. Absolute configuration of 2,3-dihydroxy-N-methyl-3-phenyl-N-[(Z)-styryl]propanamide (1) was determined using the Mosher method, which revealed two enantiomers, i.e., (2S,3R)-2,3-dihydroxy-N-methyl-3-phenyl-N-[(Z)-styryl]propanamide and (2R,3S)-2,3-dihydroxy-N-methyl-3-phenyl-N-[(Z)-styryl]propanamide with a ratio of 7:3. PMID:26386983

  11. Simultaneous determination of 30 hormones illegally added to anti-ageing functional foods using UPLC-MS/MS coupled with SPE clean-up.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoqin; Xi, Cunxian; Tang, Bobin; Wang, Guomin; Chen, Dongdong; Peng, Tao; Mu, Zhaode

    2014-01-01

    A novel analytical method employing solid-phase extraction (SPE) coupled with ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) was developed for the simultaneous determination of 30 hormones in anti-ageing functional foods (capsules, powders and tablets). The analytes were extracted with acetic acid-acetonitrile (1-99 v/v), methanol and acetone, respectively. The extract was purified using a combined column, followed by analyte detection with electrospray ionisation in positive- or negative-ion modes. The results indicated that the 30 compounds had good linear correlations in the range of 1-1000 μg kg⁻¹, and the correlation coefficients were above 0.99. The limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) were 0.03-2 and 0.1-5 μg kg⁻¹, respectively. The average recovery of 30 compounds at the three spiked levels varied from 74.7% to 124.1%, and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was 2.4-15.0%. This method was applied to the analysis of hormones in 14 real samples of which seven hormones (such as estrone, dienestrol) were detected in four samples, but the remainder of the hormones were not detected. The developed method is sensitive, efficient, reliable and applicable to real samples. PMID:25188907

  12. SpeX SPECTROSCOPY OF UNRESOLVED VERY LOW MASS BINARIES. I. IDENTIFICATION OF 17 CANDIDATE BINARIES STRADDLING THE L DWARF/T DWARF TRANSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Burgasser, Adam J.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Cushing, Michael; Looper, Dagny L.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Reid, I. Neill

    2010-02-20

    We report the identification of 17 candidate brown dwarf binaries whose components straddle the L dwarf/T dwarf transition. These sources were culled from a large near-infrared spectral sample of L and T dwarfs observed with the Infrared Telescope Facility SpeX spectrograph. Candidates were selected on the basis of spectral ratios which segregate known (resolved) L dwarf/T dwarf pairs from presumably single sources. Composite templates, constructed by combining 13,581 pairs of absolute flux-calibrated spectra, are shown to provide statistically superior fits to the spectra of our 17 candidates as compared to single templates. Ten of these candidates appear to have secondary components that are significantly brighter than their primaries over the 1.0-1.3 {mu}m band, indicative of rapid condensate depletion at the L dwarf/T dwarf transition. Our results support prior indications of enhanced multiplicity amongst early-type T dwarfs; 53% +- 7% of the T0-T4 dwarfs in our spectral sample are found to be either resolved or unresolved (candidate) pairs, although this is consistent with an intrinsic (volume complete) brown dwarf binary fraction of only 15%. If verified, this sample of spectral binaries more than doubles the number of known L dwarf/T dwarf transition pairs, enabling a broader exploration of this poorly understood phase of brown dwarf atmospheric evolution.

  13. Novel magnetic SPE method based on carbon nanotubes filled with cobalt ferrite for the analysis of organochlorine pesticides in honey and tea.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhuo; Liu, Miao; Li, Gongke

    2013-10-01

    A novel magnetic SPE method based on magnetic cobalt ferrite filled carbon nanotubes (MFCNTs) coupled with GC with electron capture detection was developed to determine organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in tea and honey samples. The MFCNTs were prepared through the capillarity of carbon nanotubes for drawing mixed cobalt and iron nitrates solution into their inner cavity followed by heating to 550°C under Ar to form the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. SEM images provided visible evidence of the filled cobalt ferrite nanoparticles in the multiwalled nanotubes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated no adhesion of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles and metal salts on the outer surface of the MFCNTs. Eight OCPs were extracted with the MFCNTs. The enrichment factors were in the range of 52-68 for eight OCPs. The LODs for the eight OCPs were in the range of 1.3-3.6 ng/L. The recoveries of the OCPs for honey and tea samples were 83.2-128.7 and 72.6-111.0%, respectively. The RSDs for these samples were below 6.8%. The new method is particularly suited to extract nonpolar and weakly polar analytes from a complex matrix and could potentially be extended to other target analytes. PMID:23926126

  14. Development of a targeted method for twenty-three metabolites related to polyphenol gut microbial metabolism in biological samples, using SPE and UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Gasperotti, Mattia; Masuero, Domenico; Guella, Graziano; Mattivi, Fulvio; Vrhovsek, Urska

    2014-10-01

    An increasing number of studies have concerned the profiling of polyphenol microbial metabolites, especially in urine or plasma, but only a few have regarded their accurate quantification. This study reports on a new ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method with electrospray ionisation (UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS) using a simple clean-up step with solid phase extraction (SPE) and validation on different biological matrices. The method was tested with spiked samples of liver, heart, kidneys, brain, blood and urine. The purification procedure, after the evaluation of three different cartridges, makes it possible to obtain cleaner samples and better quantification of putative trace metabolites, especially related to dietary studies, with concentrations below ng/g in tissue and for urine and blood, starting from ng/ml. Limits of detection and linear range were also assessed using mixed polyphenol metabolite standards. Short chromatographic separation was carried out for 23 target compounds related to the polyphenol microbial metabolism, coupled with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer for their accurate quantification. By analysing different spiked biological samples we were able to test metabolite detection in the matrix and validate the overall recovery of the method, from purification to quantification. The method developed can be successfully applied and is suitable for high-throughput targeted metabolomics analysis related to nutritional intervention, or the study of the metabolic mechanism in response to a polyphenol-rich diet. PMID:25059152

  15. Determination of parent and substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in high-fat salmon using a modified QuEChERS extraction, dispersive SPE and GC-MS

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Norman D.; Wilson, Glenn R.; Anderson, Kim A.

    2011-01-01

    A fast and easy modified QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, rugged and safe) extraction method has been developed and validated for determination of 33 parent and substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in high-fat smoked salmon that greatly enhances analyte recovery compared to traditional QuEChERS procedures. Sample processing includes extraction of PAHs into a solution of ethyl acetate, acetone and iso-octane followed by cleanup with dispersive SPE and analysis by GC-MS in SIM mode. Method performance was assessed in spike recovery experiments (500 ng/g wet weight) in three commercially available smoked salmon with 3 – 11% fat. Recoveries of some 2, 3 and 5-ring PAHs were improved 50 – 200% over traditional methods, while average recovery across all PAHs was improved 67%. Method precision was good with replicate extractions typically yielding relative standard deviations < 10% and detection limits were in the low ng/g range. With this method, a single analyst could extract and cleanup ≥ 60 samples for PAH analysis in an 8 hour work day. PMID:21732651

  16. An Optimized High Throughput Clean-Up Method Using Mixed-Mode SPE Plate for the Analysis of Free Arachidonic Acid in Plasma by LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wan; Qin, Suzi; Li, Linsen; Chen, Xiaohua; Wang, Qunjie; Wei, Junfu

    2015-01-01

    A high throughput sample preparation method was developed utilizing mixed-mode solid phase extraction (SPE) in 96-well plate format for the determination of free arachidonic acid in plasma by LC-MS/MS. Plasma was mixed with 3% aqueous ammonia and loaded into each well of 96-well plate. After washing with water and methanol sequentially, 3% of formic acid in acetonitrile was used to elute arachidonic acid. The collected fraction was injected onto a reversed phase column at 30°C with mobile phase of acetonitrile/water (70 : 30, v/v) and detected by LC-MS/MS coupled with electrospray ionization (ESI) in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The calibration curve ranged from 10 to 2500 ng/mL with sufficient linearity (r2 = 0.9999). The recoveries were in the range of 99.38% to 103.21% with RSD less than 6%. The limit of detection is 3 ng/mL. PMID:25873969

  17. 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid derivatives of inositol from dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) root characterised using LC-SPE-NMR and LC-MS techniques.

    PubMed

    Kenny, O; Smyth, T J; Hewage, C M; Brunton, N P; McLoughlin, P

    2014-02-01

    The combination of hyphenated techniques, LC-SPE-NMR and LC-MS, to isolate and identify minor isomeric compounds from an ethyl acetate fraction of Taraxacum officinale root was employed in this study. Two distinct fractions of 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid derivatives of inositol were isolated and characterised by spectroscopic methods. The (1)H NMR spectra and MS data revealed two groups of compounds, one of which were derivatives of the di-4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid derivative of the inositol compound tetrahydroxy-5-[2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)acetyl] oxycyclohexyl-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl) acetate, while the other group consisted of similar tri-substituted inositol derivatives. For both fractions the derivatives of inositols vary in the number of 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid groups present and their position and geometry on the inositol ring. In total, three di-substituted and three tri-substituted 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid inositol derivates were identified for the first time along with a further two previously reported di-substituted inositol derivatives. PMID:24359632

  18. Occurrence of polar organic contaminants in the dissolved water phase of the Danube River and its major tributaries using SPE-LC-MS(2) analysis.

    PubMed

    Loos, Robert; Locoro, Giovanni; Contini, Serafino

    2010-04-01

    Polar water-soluble organic contaminants were analysed in the dissolved liquid water phase of river water samples from the Danube River and its major tributaries (within the Joint Danube Survey 2). Analyses were performed by solid-phase extraction (SPE) followed by triple-quadrupole liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS(2)). In total, 34 different polar organic compounds were screened. Focus was given on pharmaceutical compounds (such as ibuprofen, diclofenac, sulfamethoxazole, carbamazepine), pesticides and their degradation products (e.g. bentazone, 2,4-D, mecoprop, atrazine, terbutylazine, desethylterbutylazine), perfluorinated acids (PFOS; PFOA), and endocrine disrupting compounds (nonylphenol, NPE(1)C, bisphenol A, estrone). The most relevant polar compounds identified in the Danube River basin in terms of frequency of detection, persistency, and concentration levels were 1H-benzotriazole (median concentration 185 ng/L), caffeine (87 ng/L), tolyltriazole (73 ng/L), nonylphenoxy acetic acid (49 ng/L), carbamazepine (33 ng/L), 4-nitrophenol (29 ng/L), 2,4-dinitrophenol (19 ng/L), PFOA (17 ng/L), sulfamethoxazole (16 ng/L), desethylatrazine (11 ng/L), and 2,4-D (10 ng/L). The highest contamination levels were found in the area around Budapest and in the tributary rivers Arges (Romania), Timok (Bulgaria), Rusenski Lom (Bulgaria), and Velika Morava (Serbia). PMID:20074769

  19. Analysis of anti-inflammatory, analgesic, stimulant and antidepressant drugs in purified water from wastewater treatment plants using SPE-LC tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Afonso-Olivares, Cristina; Sosa-Ferrera, Zoraida; Santana-Rodríguez, José J

    2012-01-01

    This work presents an effective sample preparation method for the evaluation of seven pharmaceutical compounds belonging to different therapeutic classes in purified water from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The target compounds include caffeine (stimulant), nicotine (stimulant), atenolol (beta blocker), metamizole (anti-inflammatory and analgesic), fluoxetine (antidepressant), paraxanthine (stimulant) and clofibric acid (lipid regulator). Solid-phase extraction (SPE) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) were selected as extraction and detection techniques, respectively. A detailed study of the experimental conditions of extraction was performed. Under optimal conditions, recoveries obtained were in the range of 21% to 100%, and the relative standard deviations were below 12%. The detection and quantification limits of the method were in the range 2.2-97.4 and 21.1-324.7 ng L(-1), respectively. The developed method was successfully applied to evaluate the presence of these pharmaceutical compounds in wastewaters samples from wastewater treatment plants located on the Gran Canaria Island (Spain). Most of the compounds were detected at concentrations up to 12.31 μg L(-1) in the WWTP influents that were studied. PMID:22423996

  20. SpeX spectroscopy of unresolved very low mass binaries. II. Identification of 14 candidate binaries with late-M/early-L and T dwarf components

    SciTech Connect

    Bardalez Gagliuffi, Daniella C.; Burgasser, Adam J.; Nicholls, Christine P.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Looper, Dagny L.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Cruz, Kelle; West, Andrew A.; Gizis, John E.; Metchev, Stanimir

    2014-10-20

    Multiplicity is a key statistic for understanding the formation of very low mass (VLM) stars and brown dwarfs. Currently, the separation distribution of VLM binaries remains poorly constrained at small separations (≤1 AU), leading to uncertainty in the overall binary fraction. We approach this problem by searching for late-M/early-L plus T dwarf spectral binaries whose combined light spectra exhibit distinct peculiarities, allowing for separation-independent identification. We define a set of spectral indices designed to identify these systems, and we use a spectral template fitting method to confirm and characterize spectral binary candidates from a library of 815 spectra from the SpeX Prism Spectral Libraries. We present 11 new binary candidates, confirm 3 previously reported candidates, and rule out 2 previously identified candidates, all with primary and secondary spectral types in the range M7-L7 and T1-T8, respectively. We find that subdwarfs and blue L dwarfs are the primary contaminants in our sample and propose a method for segregating these sources. If confirmed by follow-up observations, these systems may add to the growing list of tight separation binaries, whose orbital properties may yield further insight into brown dwarf formation scenarios.

  1. Biomarkers of Chondrocyte Apoptosis and Autophagy in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Weinberg, Annelie Martina; Al-Wasiyah, Mohammad K.; Alqahtani, Mohammed H.; Mobasheri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Cell death with morphological and molecular features of apoptosis has been detected in osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage, which suggests a key role for chondrocyte death/survival in the pathogenesis of OA. Identification of biomarkers of chondrocyte apoptosis may facilitate the development of novel therapies that may eliminate the cause or, at least, slow down the degenerative processes in OA. The aim of this review was to explore the molecular markers and signals that induce chondrocyte apoptosis in OA. A literature search was conducted in PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar using the keywords chondrocyte death, apoptosis, osteoarthritis, autophagy and biomarker. Several molecules considered to be markers of chondrocyte apoptosis will be discussed in this brief review. Molecular markers and signalling pathways associated with chondroycte apoptosis may turn out to be therapeutic targets in OA and approaches aimed at neutralizing apoptosis-inducing molecules may at least delay the progression of cartilage degeneration in OA. PMID:26334269

  2. miR-30b, Down-Regulated in Gastric Cancer, Promotes Apoptosis and Suppresses Tumor Growth by Targeting Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, En-Dong; Li, Na; Li, Bo-Sheng; Li, Wei; Zhang, Wei-Jun; Mao, Xu-Hu; Guo, Gang; Zou, Quan-Ming; Xiao, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignant diseases worldwide. Emerging evidence has shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) are associated with tumor development and progression. Our previous studies have revealed that H. pylori infection was able to induce the altered expression of miR-30b in gastric epithelial cells. However, little is known about the potential role of miR-30b in gastric cancer. Methods We analyzed the expression of miR-30b in gastric cancer cell lines and human gastric cancer tissues. We examined the effect of miR-30b mimics on the apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in vitro by flow cytometry (FCM) and caspase-3/7 activity assays. Nude mouse xenograft model was used to determine whether miR-30b is involved in tumorigenesis of gastric cancer. The target of miR-30b was identified by bioinformatics analysis, luciferase assay and Western blot. Finally, we performed the correlation analysis between miR-30b and its target expression in gastric cancer. Results miR-30b was significantly down-regulated in gastric cancer cells and human gastric cancer tissues. Enforced expression of miR-30b promoted the apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in vitro, and miR-30b could significantly inhibit tumorigenicity of gastric cancer by increasing the apoptosis proportion of cancer cells in vivo. Moreover, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) was identified as the potential target of miR-30b, and miR-30b level was inversely correlated with PAI-1 expression in gastric cancer. In addition, silencing of PAI-1 was able to phenocopy the effect of miR-30b overexpression on apoptosis regulation of cancer cells, and overexpression of PAI-1 could suppressed the effect of promoting cell apoptosis by miR-30b, indicating PAI-1 is potentially involved in miR-30b-induced apoptosis on cancer cells. Conclusion miR-30b may function as a novel tumor suppressor gene in gastric cancer by targeting PAI-1 and regulating the apoptosis of cancer cells. miR-30b could serve as a potential biomarker and therapeutic target against gastric cancer. PMID:25170877

  3. Dual high-resolution α-glucosidase and radical scavenging profiling combined with HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR for identification of minor and major constituents directly from the crude extract of Pueraria lobata.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bingrui; Kongstad, Kenneth T; Qinglei, Sun; Nyberg, Nils T; Jäger, Anna K; Staerk, Dan

    2015-02-27

    The crude methanol extract of Pueraria lobata was investigated by dual high-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition and radical scavenging profiling combined with hyphenated HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR. Direct analysis of the crude extract without preceding purification was facilitated by combining chromatograms from two analytical-scale HPLC separations of 120 and 600 μg on-column, respectively. High-resolution α-glucosidase and radical scavenging profiles were obtained after microfractionation of the eluate in 96-well microplates. This allowed full bioactivity profiling of individual peaks in the HPLC chromatogram of the crude methanol extract. Subsequent HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR analysis allowed identification of 21 known compounds in addition to two new compounds, i.e., 3'-methoxydaidzein 8-C-[α-D-apiofuranosyl-(1→6)]-β-D-glucopyranoside and 6″-O-malonyl-3'-methoxydaidzin, as well as an unstable compound tentatively identified as 3'-de-O-methylpuerariafuran. PMID:25679337

  4. Cellular apoptosis in the cardiorenal axis.

    PubMed

    Virz, Grazia Maria; Clementi, Anna; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    Cardiomyocyte apoptosis plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of heart failure. It may be induced by different stimuli, and it seems to be perpetuated by oxidative stress and inflammation. In this scenario, heart failure may trigger various cell-mediated and humoral pathways affecting distant organs, such as kidneys, contributing to higher therapeutic costs, morbidity and mortality. The term Cardiorenal Syndromes describes this condition and represents an important model for exploring the pathophysiology of cardiac and renal dysfunction. In this review, we have analyzed the mechanisms of organ interaction and the role of apoptosis in heart-kidney crosstalk, in particular its role in the pathogenesis of the different types of Cardiorenal Syndromes. PMID:26852141

  5. THE CONSEQUENCES OF APOPTOSIS IN AUTOIMMUNITY

    PubMed Central

    Lleo, Ana; Selmi, Carlo; Invernizzi, Pietro; Podda, Mauro; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2008-01-01

    The clearance of apoptotic cells is a highly regulated mechanism, normally associated with anti-inflammatory response. During early stages of apoptosis the cell is promptly recognized and engulfed by professional phagocytes or tissue cells to avoid the outflow of intracellular content and limit the immunological reaction against released antigens. However, increasing evidences suggest that impairment in the uptake of apoptotic cell debris is linked to the development of autoimmunity. In fact, autoantigens have been demonstrated to be content within apoptotic bodies and apoptotic cells seems to be critical in the presentation of antigens, activation of innate immunity and regulation of macrophage cytokine secretion. We herein review the known mechanisms for regulating the uptake of the products of apoptosis in the development of autoimmunity. PMID:18513925

  6. Sustained adenosine exposure causes lung endothelial apoptosis: a possible contributor to cigarette smoke-induced endothelial apoptosis and lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Sakhatskyy, Pavlo; Newton, Julie; Shamirian, Paul; Hsiao, Vivian; Curren, Sean; Gabino Miranda, Gustavo Andres; Pedroza, Mesias; Blackburn, Michael R.; Rounds, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of emphysema. Cigarette smoke (CS) causes lung EC apoptosis and emphysema. In this study, we show that CS exposure increased lung tissue adenosine levels in mice, an effect associated with increased lung EC apoptosis and the development of emphysema. Adenosine has a protective effect against apoptosis via adenosine receptor-mediated signaling. However, sustained elevated adenosine increases alveolar cell apoptosis in adenosine deaminase-deficient mice. We established an in vitro model of sustained adenosine exposure by incubating lung EC with adenosine in the presence of an adenosine deaminase inhibitor, deoxycoformicin. We demonstrated that sustained adenosine exposure caused lung EC apoptosis via nucleoside transporter-facilitated intracellular adenosine uptake, subsequent activation of p38 and JNK in mitochondria, and ultimately mitochondrial defects and activation of the mitochondria-mediated intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Our results suggest that sustained elevated adenosine may contribute to CS-induced lung EC apoptosis and emphysema. Our data also reconcile the paradoxical effects of adenosine on apoptosis, demonstrating that prolonged exposure causes apoptosis via nucleoside transporter-mediated intracellular adenosine signaling, whereas acute exposure protects against apoptosis via activation of adenosine receptors. Inhibition of adenosine uptake may become a new therapeutic target in treatment of CS-induced lung diseases. PMID:23316066

  7. The role of apoptosis in blepharoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Şahlı, E; Hoşal, B M; Zilelioğlu, G; Dinçer, N; Tezel, G G

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to evaluate the role of apoptosis in the pathogenesis of blepharoptosis. Patients and methods Forty-five eyelids of 43 consecutive patients (16 female, 27 males) that underwent levator resection surgery for ptosis correction were included in the study. Twenty-six of the eyelids had congenital myogenic ptosis and 19 had aponeurotic ptosis. Levator palpebrae superioris function and height of the vertical palpebral fissure were measured in all patients. After levator resection surgery, the distal part of the levator aponeurosis was fixed and sent for evaluation. Apoptotic cells were detected using Apop Tag Plus Peroxidase In Situ Apoptosis Detection Kit. Results The mean levator palpebrae superioris function was 8.4 mm (range 5–10 mm) in congenital ptosis group and 12.1 mm (range 10–17 mm) in the aponeurotic ptosis group. The mean height of the vertical palpebral fissure in patients with congenital ptosis and aponeurotic ptosis were 6.5 mm (range 5–9 mm) and 6.1 mm (3–9 mm), respectively. The mean apoptotic index of congenital ptosis and aponeurotic ptosis were 27.3 (16–39) and 29.8 (18–41), respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between congenital and aponeurotic ptosis groups in a mean apoptotic index (P<0.05). Apoptotic index was not correlated with age, levator palpebrae superioris function, palpebral fissure height, and lid crease height in two groups. Conclusion We found no statistically significant difference between two subtypes of blepharoptosis regarding apoptosis. According to this study, apoptosis seems to have no significant role in the development of aponeurotic blepharoptosis. PMID:23598678

  8. Autophagy and apoptosis dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Ghavami, Saeid; Shojaei, Shahla; Yeganeh, Behzad; Ande, Sudharsana R; Jangamreddy, Jaganmohan R; Mehrpour, Maryam; Christoffersson, Jonas; Chaabane, Wiem; Moghadam, Adel Rezaei; Kashani, Hessam H; Hashemi, Mohammad; Owji, Ali A; Łos, Marek J

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy and apoptosis are basic physiologic processes contributing to the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Autophagy encompasses pathways that target long-lived cytosolic proteins and damaged organelles. It involves a sequential set of events including double membrane formation, elongation, vesicle maturation and finally delivery of the targeted materials to the lysosome. Apoptotic cell death is best described through its morphology. It is characterized by cell rounding, membrane blebbing, cytoskeletal collapse, cytoplasmic condensation, and fragmentation, nuclear pyknosis, chromatin condensation/fragmentation, and formation of membrane-enveloped apoptotic bodies, that are rapidly phagocytosed by macrophages or neighboring cells. Neurodegenerative disorders are becoming increasingly prevalent, especially in the Western societies, with larger percentage of members living to an older age. They have to be seen not only as a health problem, but since they are care-intensive, they also carry a significant economic burden. Deregulation of autophagy plays a pivotal role in the etiology and/or progress of many of these diseases. Herein, we briefly review the latest findings that indicate the involvement of autophagy in neurodegenerative diseases. We provide a brief introduction to autophagy and apoptosis pathways focusing on the role of mitochondria and lysosomes. We then briefly highlight pathophysiology of common neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's diseases, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Then, we describe functions of autophagy and apoptosis in brain homeostasis, especially in the context of the aforementioned disorders. Finally, we discuss different ways that autophagy and apoptosis modulation may be employed for therapeutic intervention during the maintenance of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24211851

  9. Resistance of Actin to Cleavage during Apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qizhong; Wei, Tie; Lees-Miller, Susan; Alnemri, Emad; Watters, Dianne; Lavin, Martin F.

    1997-01-01

    A small number of cellular proteins present in the nucleus, cytosol, and membrane fraction are specifically cleaved by the interleukin-1β -converting enzyme (ICE)-like family of proteases during apoptosis. Previous results have demonstrated that one of these, the cytoskeletal protein actin, is degraded in rat PC12 pheochromocytoma cells upon serum withdrawal. Extracts from etoposide-treated U937 cells are also capable of cleaving actin. It was assumed that cleavage of actin represented a general phenomenon, and a mechanism coordinating proteolytic, endonucleolytic, and morphological aspects of apoptosis was proposed. We demonstrate here that actin is resistant to degradation in several different human cells induced to undergo apoptosis in response to a variety of stimuli, including Fas ligation, serum withdrawal, cytotoxic T-cell killing, and DNA damage. On the other hand, cell-free extracts from these cells and the ICE-like protease CPP32 were capable of cleaving actin in vitro. We conclude that while actin contains cleavage sites for ICE-like proteases, it is not degraded in vivo in human cells either because of lack of access of these proteases to actin or due to the presence of other factors that prevent degradation.

  10. Lithium protects ethanol-induced neuronal apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Jin . E-mail: jizhong@iupui.edu; Yang Xianlin; Yao Weiguo; Lee Weihua

    2006-12-01

    Lithium is widely used for the treatment of bipolar disorder. Recent studies have demonstrated its neuroprotective effect. Ethanol is a potent neurotoxin that is particularly harmful to the developing nervous system. In this study, we evaluated lithium's neuroprotection against ethanol-induced apoptosis. Transient exposure of infant mice to ethanol caused apoptotic cell death in brain, which was prevented significantly by administering a low dose of lithium 15 min later. In cultured cerebellar granule neurons, ethanol-induced apoptosis and activation of caspase-3/9, both of which were prevented by lithium. However, lithium's protection is not mediated by its commonly known inhibition of glycogen synthase3{beta}, because neither ethanol nor lithium has significant effects on the phosphorylation of Akt (ser473) or GSK3{beta} (ser9). In addition, the selective GSK-3{beta} inhibitor SB-415286 was unable to prevent ethanol-induced apoptosis. These data suggest lithium may be used as a potential preventive measure for ethanol-induced neurological deficits.

  11. Alcohol and Apoptosis: Friends or Foes?

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Ana; Chawla, Karan; Umoh, Nsini A.; Cousins, Valerie M.; Ketegou, Assama; Reddy, Madhumati G.; AlRubaiee, Mustafa; Haddad, Georges E.; Burke, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse causes 79,000 deaths stemming from severe organ damage in the United States every year. Clinical manifestations of long-term alcohol abuse on the cardiac muscle include defective contractility with the development of dilated cardiomyopathy and low-output heart failure; which has poor prognosis with less than 25% survival for more than three years. In contrast, low alcohol consumption has been associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, however the mechanism of this phenomenon remains elusive. The aim of this study was to determine the significance of apoptosis as a mediating factor in cardiac function following chronic high alcohol versus low alcohol exposure. Adult rats were provided 5 mM (low alcohol), 100 mM (high alcohol) or pair-fed non-alcohol controls for 4–5 months. The hearts were dissected, sectioned and stained with cresyl violet or immunohistochemically for caspase-3, a putative marker for apoptosis. Cardiomyocytes were isolated to determine the effects of alcohol exposure on cell contraction and relaxation. High alcohol animals displayed a marked thinning of the left ventricular wall combined with elevated caspase-3 activity and decreased contractility. In contrast, low alcohol was associated with increased contractility and decreased apoptosis suggesting an overall protective mechanism induced by low levels of alcohol exposure. PMID:26610584

  12. Role of nuclear bodies in apoptosis signalling.

    PubMed

    Krieghoff-Henning, Eva; Hofmann, Thomas G

    2008-11-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs) are dynamic macromolecular multiprotein complexes that recruit and release a plethora of proteins. A considerable number of PML NB components play vital roles in apoptosis, senescence regulation and tumour suppression. The molecular basis by which PML NBs control these cellular responses is still just beginning to be understood. In addition to PML itself, numerous further tumour suppressors including transcriptional regulator p53, acetyl transferase CBP (CREB binding protein) and protein kinase HIPK2 (homeodomain interacting protein kinase 2) are recruited to PML NBs in response to genotoxic stress or oncogenic transformation and drive the senescence and apoptosis response by regulating p53 activity. Moreover, in response to death-receptor activation, PML NBs may act as nuclear depots that release apoptotic factors, such as the FLASH (FLICE-associated huge) protein, to amplify the death signal. PML NBs are also associated with other nuclear domains including Cajal bodies and nucleoli and share apoptotic regulators with these domains, implying crosstalk between NBs in apoptosis regulation. In conclusion, PML NBs appear to regulate cell death decisions through different, pathway-specific molecular mechanisms. PMID:18680765

  13. Control of apoptosis by asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Hatzold, Julia; Conradt, Barbara

    2008-04-01

    Asymmetric cell division and apoptosis (programmed cell death) are two fundamental processes that are important for the development and function of multicellular organisms. We have found that the processes of asymmetric cell division and apoptosis can be functionally linked. Specifically, we show that asymmetric cell division in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is mediated by a pathway involving three genes, dnj-11 MIDA1, ces-2 HLF, and ces-1 Snail, that directly control the enzymatic machinery responsible for apoptosis. Interestingly, the MIDA1-like protein GlsA of the alga Volvox carteri, as well as the Snail-related proteins Snail, Escargot, and Worniu of Drosophila melanogaster, have previously been implicated in asymmetric cell division. Therefore, C. elegans dnj-11 MIDA1, ces-2 HLF, and ces-1 Snail may be components of a pathway involved in asymmetric cell division that is conserved throughout the plant and animal kingdoms. Furthermore, based on our results, we propose that this pathway directly controls the apoptotic fate in C. elegans, and possibly other animals as well. PMID:18399720

  14. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces neuronal apoptosis in HIV-encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yoshiharu; Koyanagi, Yoshio; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2003-03-01

    Neuronal loss is, frequently found in brains of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-encephalopathy. Extensive apoptosis of neurons is probably involved in the development of HIV-encephalopathy. The present study was designed to investigate the mechanism of neuronal apoptosis. For this purpose, we examined autopsy brains of two patients with HIV-encephalopathy. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells and active forms of caspase-3- and -8-positive cells, including neurons, were found in the perivascular regions of the brains. In these regions, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)+ macrophages were also observed. We also examined brains of HIV-1-infected mouse model inoculated with human cells. In these brains, TUNEL+ neurons were also found in the perivascular region, the site where infiltrated HIV-1-infected and TRAIL-expressing macrophages were observed. Using an in vitro-culture system, we also demonstrated that the HIV-1-infected monocyte-derived macrophages preferentially expressed TRAIL and that the addition of HIV-1-infected macrophages or human TRAIL-overexpressing mouse cells to cultured mouse primary neurons/glia resulted in neuronal apoptosis. Our results suggest the involvement of TRAIL expressed on HIV-1-infected macrophages in the induction of neuronal apoptosis in infected brain. PMID:12715915

  15. UV-B-induced formation of reactive oxygen species and oxidative damage of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp.: protective effects of ascorbic acid and N-acetyl-L-cysteine.

    PubMed

    He, Yu-Ying; Hder, Donat P

    2002-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in the oxidative damage of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. caused by UV-B (280-315 nm) radiation. UV-B-induced overproduction of ROS as well as the oxidative stress was detected in vivo by using the ROS-sensitive probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and fluorometric analysis of DNA unwinding (FADU) methods were adapted to measure lipid peroxidation and DNA strand breaks in Anabaena sp. Moderate UV-B radiation causes an increase of ROS production, enhanced lipid peroxidation and DNA strand breaks, yielding a significantly decreased survival. In contrast, the supplementation of UV-A in our work only showed a significant increase in total ROS levels and DNA strand breaks while no significant effect on lipid peroxidation, chlorophyll bleaching or survival was observed. The presence of ascorbic acid and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) reversed the oxidative stress and protected the organisms from chlorophyll bleaching and the damage of photosynthetic apparatus induced by UV-B significantly, resulting in a considerably higher survival rate. Ascorbic acid also exhibited a significant protective effect on lipid peroxidation and DNA strand breaks while NAC did not show a substantial effect. These results suggest that ascorbic acid exhibited significantly higher protective efficiency with respect to DNA strand breaks and survival than NAC while NAC appears to be especially effective in defending the photosynthetic apparatus from oxidative damage. PMID:11897511

  16. Activin B induces human endometrial cancer cell adhesion, migration and invasion by up-regulating integrin ?3 via SMAD2/3 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Siyuan; Klausen, Christian; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Zhu, Hua; Leung, Peter C.K.

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the fourth most common female cancer and the most common gynecological malignancy. Although it comprises only ~10% of all endometrial cancers, the serous histological subtype accounts for ~40% of deaths due to its aggressive behavior and propensity to metastasize. Histopathological studies suggest that elevated expression of activin/inhibin ?B subunit is associated with reduced survival in non-endometrioid endometrial cancers (type II, mostly serous). However, little is known about the specific roles and mechanisms of activin (?B dimer) in serous endometrial cancer growth and progression. In the present study, we examined the biological functions of activin B in type II endometrial cancer cell lines, HEC-1B and KLE. Our results demonstrate that treatment with activin B increases cell migration, invasion and adhesion to vitronectin, but does not affect cell viability. Moreover, we show that activin B treatment increases integrin ?3 mRNA and protein levels via SMAD2/3-SMAD4 signaling. Importantly, siRNA knockdown studies revealed that integrin ?3 is required for basal and activin B-induced cell migration, invasion and adhesion. Our results suggest that activin B-SMAD2/3-integrin ?3 signaling could contribute to poor patient survival by promoting the invasion and/or metastasis of type II endometrial cancers. PMID:26384307

  17. Investigation of epothilone B-induced cell death mechanisms in human epithelial cancer cells -in consideration of combined treatment with ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Tonja; Kriesen, Stephan; Neels, Oliver; Hildebrandt, Guido; Manda, Katrin

    2015-07-01

    Epothilone B was shown to have promising chemo- and radiosensitizing effects on cells, but the mechanisms underlying cell death remain ambiguous. The aim of the study was to examine selected cell death pathways on the basis of FaDu and A549 cells. Western blot analyses were used for investigation of specific apoptotic markers. Immunofluorescence imaging and flow cytometry were utilized for examination of cell death mechanisms. DNA-staining was used for studying influence of epothilone B on micronucleus rate. We showed that epothilone B can initiate cell death via apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe, but induction of cell death was cell type specific. PMID:25919223

  18. Determination of six phthalic acid esters in orange juice packaged by PVC bottle using SPE and HPLC-UV: application to the migration study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhiyong; Wei, Danyi; Wang, Meili; Wang, Sui

    2010-10-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic assay is described for the determination of six phthalic acid esters (PAEs) in orange juice packaged in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) bottle. Samples were extracted by solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges and separated by a C₁₈ column. The calibration curves were all linear with a correlation coefficient r > 0.9900. The limits of detection for the assay ranged from 2.6 to 13.8 ng/mL. Expressed as the within- and between-day coefficient of variation (CV), precision was 1.4-13.4% and 1.9-13.3%, respectively, and relative errors were 7.6-12.8% and -9.0-14.2%, respectively. The recovery ranged from 76.8 to 112.3% with the CV from 0.3 to 11.3%. The proposed methodology was applied for studing the migration of the selected PAEs into orange juice packaged in PVC bottle. Di-ethyl phthalate (DEP) and di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) were detected in the orange juice without the other four PAEs. Concentrations would increase with the storage time and reach up to 0.385 μg/mL and 0.662 μg/mL, respectively, when the expiration date arrived. The level of DEHP was about 110 times higher than the limiting one in drink water (6 ppb) regulated by U.S. EPA. Results suggest that PVC plasticized by DEHP should not be used as the packaging material for orange juice. PMID:20875239

  19. Validation and uncertainties evaluation of an isotope dilution-SPE-LC-MS/MS for the quantification of drug residues in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Brieudes, V; Lardy-Fontan, S; Lalere, B; Vaslin-Reimann, S; Budzinski, H

    2016-01-01

    The present work describes the development and validation of a reference method conducted at the French National Institute of Metrology (LNE) for the quantitative determination of psychoactive compounds in the dissolved fraction of surface waters. More specifically an isotope dilution-SPE-LC-MS/MS based method has been implemented for the characterization of a broad range of analytes belonging to different classes of psychotropic drugs such as benzodiazepines, antidepressants, stimulants, opiates and opioids, anticonvulsants, anti-dementia drugs, analgesics as well as the anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac in the low ng L(-1) range of concentration. Full validation of the method was performed following procedures described by the French standard NF T90-210. Limits of quantification between 0.14 and 3.54 ng L(-1) were obtained. Method recoveries from 71 to 123% were observed with standard deviation below 10% in intermediate precision conditions. Accuracy was determined for every compound: measurement errors were between -4 and +1% and standard deviations in intermediate precision conditions were included within a 1-9% interval. Finally, measurement uncertainties were evaluated following the Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM). Expanded uncertainties (k=2) ranged from 2% for carbamazepine, EDDP (2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine) and venlafaxine to 17% for diazepam. The validated method was implemented to Seine river surface waters demonstrating its fitness for purpose. All compounds were detected and 22 out of 25 analytes were quantified. More specifically, measured concentration ranged from 0.39 ng L(-1) for MDMA (3,4-methylene-dioxy-N-methylamphetamine) to 182 ng L(-1) for gabapentine. PMID:26695245

  20. Quantitative determination of opioids in whole blood using fully automated dried blood spot desorption coupled to on-line SPE-LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Verplaetse, Ruth; Henion, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are well known, widely used painkillers. Increased stability of opioids in the dried blood spot (DBS) matrix compared to blood/plasma has been described. Other benefits provided by DBS techniques include point-of-care collection, less invasive micro sampling, more economical shipment, and convenient storage. Current methodology for analysis of micro whole blood samples for opioids is limited to the classical DBS workflow, including tedious manual punching of the DBS cards followed by extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) bioanalysis. The goal of this study was to develop and validate a fully automated on-line sample preparation procedure for the analysis of DBS micro samples relevant to the detection of opioids in finger prick blood. To this end, automated flow-through elution of DBS cards was followed by on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) and analysis by LC-MS/MS. Selective, sensitive, accurate, and reproducible quantitation of five representative opioids in human blood at sub-therapeutic, therapeutic, and toxic levels was achieved. The range of reliable response (R(2)  ≥0.997) was 1 to 500 ng/mL whole blood for morphine, codeine, oxycodone, hydrocodone; and 0.1 to 50 ng/mL for fentanyl. Inter-day, intra-day, and matrix inter-lot accuracy and precision was less than 15% (even at lower limits of quantitation (LLOQ) level). The method was successfully used to measure hydrocodone and its major metabolite norhydrocodone in incurred human samples. Our data support the enormous potential of DBS sampling and automated analysis for monitoring opioids as well as other pharmaceuticals in both anti-doping and pain management regimens. PMID:26607771

  1. SpeB proteolysis with imaged capillary isoelectric focusing for the characterization of domain-specific charge heterogeneities of reference and biosimilar Rituximab.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zichuan; Perrault, Ronel; Zhao, Yun; Ding, Julia

    2016-05-01

    The charge variations of therapeutic monoclonal antibody reveal important information of the post-translational modifications that may potentially impact the potency and safety of pharmaceutical products, especially during the evaluation of biosimilarity of therapeutic proteins. In this work, a novel SpeB-based proteolysis strategy coupling with imaged capillary isoelectric focusing was developed for the determination of domain-specific charge heterogeneities of innovator and generic Rituximab drug products from United States, European and Indian markets. It was observed that innovator Rituximab from the United States and Europe share highly similar peak distributions and charge heterogeneities with 26.2-26.6% Fc/2, 28.9-29.3% LC and 44.4-44.5% Fd peak areas detected, respectively, while multiple basic variations of Fc/2 and less acidic LC and Fd species were found from generic Rituximab from India with 20.9% Fc/2, 32.3% LC and 46.9% Fd peak areas detected. It was also demonstrated that structural changes caused by Carboxypeptidase B treatment and deamidation study at pH extremes could be sensitively captured with the established method, with the results further indicating that the generic product's basic variations of Fc/2 were un-cleaved Lysine residues, while the lack of certain acidic peaks on LC and Fd probably was due to the lower level of deamidation. This new strategy could become a useful tool to reveal domain-specific charge heterogeneities profiles of a variety of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in regulated environments. PMID:27038651

  2. Solvent-assisted dispersive micro-SPE by using aminopropyl-functionalized magnetite nanoparticle followed by GC-PID for quantification of parabens in aqueous matrices.

    PubMed

    Abbasghorbani, Maryam; Attaran, Abdolmohammad; Payehghadr, Mahmood

    2013-01-01

    In this research, solvent-assisted dispersive micro-SPE was introduced as a simple modified technique for the determination of parabens in water and cosmetic samples. Aminopropyl-functionalized magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) were successfully synthesized and applied. GC with photoionization detector was used for the separation and detection of parabens. In this method, hexylacetate (15 μL) as a solvent and aminopropyl-functionalized MNPs (5 μg) as a sorbent were added to an aqueous sample (10 mL) and then the sample was sonicated. Dispersed magnetite was collected in the bottom of the conical tube by using a strong magnet and then ACN was added as a desorption solvent. Forty microliters of this solvent was transferred into a microvial and then acetic anhydride and pyridine were added, thus derivatization was performed by acetic anhydride. After evaporation, 1 μL of derivatized sample was injected into a gas chromatograph for analysis. Several important parameters, such as kind of organic solvent, desorption solvent and volume, amount of aminopropyl-functionalized MNPs and effect of salt addition were investigated. Under optimum conditions, the limits of detection achieved were between 50 and 300 ng/L, with RSDs (n = 5) lower than 8%. Under the optimum conditions, the enrichment factors ranged from 217 to 1253 and the extraction recoveries ranged from 10 to 62%. The recoveries were obtained for the analytes in river water and mouthwash solution and hand cream in the range of 87-103%. The advantages of proposed method are simplicity of operation, rapidity, high extraction yields, and environmental friendly character. PMID:23197331

  3. Schisandrin B inhibits cell growth and induces cellular apoptosis and autophagy in mouse hepatocytes and macrophages: implications for its hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Jin, Hua; Hu, Chengbin; He, Zhi-Xu; Yu, Zhi-Ling; Ko, Kam-Ming; Yang, Tianxin; Zhang, Xueji; Pan, Si-Yuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    A number of drugs and herbal compounds have been documented to cause hepatoxicity. Schisandrin B (Sch B) is an active dibenzocyclooctadiene isolated from Schisandrae fructus, with a wide array of pharmacological activities. However, the potential hepatotoxicity of Sch B is a major safety concern, and the underlying mechanism for Sch B-induced liver toxic effects is not fully elucidated. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the liver toxic effects and the molecular mechanisms of Sch B in mouse liver and macrophage cells. The results have shown that Sch B exhibits potent grow inhibitory, proapoptotic, and proautophagic effects in AML-12 and RAW 264.7 cells. Sch B markedly arrested cells in G1 phase in both cell lines, accompanied by the down-regulation of cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and cyclin D1 and up-regulation of p27 Kip1 and checkpoint kinase 1. Furthermore, Sch B markedly increased the apoptosis of AML-12 and RAW 264.7 cells with a decrease in the expression of B-cell lymphoma-extra-large and (Bcl-xl) B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), but an increase in the expression of B-cell lymphoma 2-associated X protein (Bax). Sch B promoted the cleavage of caspase 3 and poly-adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase (PARP) in both cell lines. Additionally, Sch B significantly induced autophagy of AML-12 and RAW 264.7 cells. Sch B inhibited the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, as indicated by their altered phosphorylation, contributing to the proautophagic effect of Sch B. Taken together, our findings show that the inducing effects of Sch B on cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and autophagy may contribute to its liver toxic effects, which might provide a clue for the investigation of the molecular toxic targets and underlying mechanisms for Sch B-induced hepatotoxicity in herbal consumers. More studies are warranted to fully delineate the underlying mechanisms, efficacy, and safety of Sch B for clinical use. PMID:25926716

  4. Self-consumption: the interplay of autophagy and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Mariño, Guillermo; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Baehrecke, Eric H.; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy and apoptosis control the turnover of organelles and proteins within cells, and of cells within organisms, respectively, and many stress pathways sequentially elicit autophagy, and apoptosis within the same cell. Generally autophagy blocks the induction of apoptosis, and apoptosis-associated caspase activation shuts off the autophagic process. However, in special cases, autophagy or autophagy-relevant proteins may help to induce apoptosis or necrosis, and autophagy has been shown to degrade the cytoplasm excessively, leading to ‘autophagic cell death’. The dialogue between autophagy and cell death pathways influences the normal clearance of dying cells, as well as immune recognition of dead cell antigens. Therefore, the disruption of the relationship between autophagy and apoptosis has important pathophysiological consequences. PMID:24401948

  5. The actin cytoskeleton as a sensor and mediator of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Desouza, Melissa; Gunning, Peter W.; Stehn, Justine R.

    2012-01-01

    Apoptosis is an important biological process required for the removal of unwanted or damaged cells. Mounting evidence implicates the actin cytoskeleton as both a sensor and mediator of apoptosis. Studies also suggest that actin binding proteins (ABPs) significantly contribute to apoptosis and that actin dynamics play a key role in regulating apoptosis signaling. Changes in the organization of the actin cytoskeleton has been attributed to the process of malignant transformation and it is hypothesized that remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton may enable tumor cells to evade normal apoptotic signaling. This review aims to illuminate the role of the actin cytoskeleton in apoptosis by systematically analyzing how actin and ABPs regulate different apoptosis pathways and to also highlight the potential for developing novel compounds that target tumor-specific actin filaments. PMID:22880146

  6. Aspartame-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Horio, Yukari; Sun, Yongkun; Liu, Chuang; Saito, Takeshi; Kurasaki, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    Aspartame is an artificial sweetner added to many low-calorie foods. The safety of aspartame remains controversial even though there are many studies on its risks. In this study, to understand the physiological effects of trace amounts of artificial sweetners on cells, the effects of aspartame on apoptosis were investigated using a PC12 cell system. In addition, the mechanism of apoptosis induced by aspartame in PC12 cells and effects on apoptotic factors such as cytochrome c, apoptosis-inducing factor, and caspase family proteins were studied by Western blotting and RT-PCR. Aspartame-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, aspartame exposure increased the expressions of caspases 8 and 9, and cytochrome c. These results indicate that aspartame induces apoptosis mainly via mitochondrial pathway involved in apoptosis due to oxigen toxicity. PMID:24355796

  7. CD45 regulates apoptosis in peripheral T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhe; Dawes, Ritu; Petrova, Svetla; Beverley, Peter C L; Tchilian, Elma Z

    2006-06-01

    Programmed cell death (apoptosis) is a key mechanism for regulating lymphocyte numbers. Murine lymph node lymphocytes cultured in vitro without added stimuli show significant levels of apoptosis over 24 h, detectable by staining with Annexin V. CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes from transgenic (Tg) mice expressing single CD45RABC or CD45RO isoforms show increased apoptosis and the extent of apoptosis is inversely correlated with the level of CD45 expression. CD45 Tg cells exhibit phosphatidyl serine translocation and DNA oligonucleosome formation, and can be partially rescued from apoptosis by culture in caspase inhibitors or common gamma-chain-binding cytokines. We conclude that CD45 is an important regulator of spontaneous apoptosis in T lymphocytes and this mechanism may contribute to the disease associations reported for individuals expressing CD45 variant alleles. PMID:16621865

  8. Artesunate induces AIF-dependent apoptosis in A549 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen-juan; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2012-03-01

    Artesunate (ART), a semi-synthetic derivative of the sesquiterpene artemisinin extracted from the Chinese herb Artemisia annua, exerts a broad spectrum of clinical activity against human cancers. It has been shown that ART induces cancer cells death through apoptosis pathway. This study investigated whether ART treatment induced reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent cell death in the apoptosis fashion in human lung adenocarconoma A549 cell line and the proapoptotic protein apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) is involved in ART-induced apoptosis. Cells treated with ART exhibited typical apoptotic morphology as chromatin condensation, margination and shrunken nucleus. ART treatment also induced a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and AIF release from mitochondria. Silencing AIF can remarkable attenuated ART-induced apoptosis. Collectively, ART induces apoptosis by caspase-independent intrinsic pathway in A549 cells.

  9. Cyclin-dependent kinases regulate apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Sujoy; Ray, Ramesh M.; Johnson, Leonard R.

    2014-01-01

    Homeostasis of the gastrointestinal epithelium is dependent upon a balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis. Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are well known for their role in cell proliferation. Previous studies from our group have shown that polyamine-depletion of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) decreases cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) activity, increases p53 and p21Cip1 protein levels, induces G1 arrest, and protects cells from camptothecin (CPT)-induced apoptosis. Although emerging evidence suggests that members of the Cdk family are involved in the regulation of apoptosis, their roles directing apoptosis of IEC-6 cells are not known. In this study, we report that inhibition of Cdk1, 2, and 9 (with the broad range Cdk inhibitor, AZD5438) in proliferating IEC-6 cells triggered DNA damage, activated p53 signaling, inhibited proliferation, and induced apoptosis. By contrast, inhibition of Cdk2 (with NU6140) increased p53 protein and activity, inhibited proliferation, but had no effect on apoptosis. Notably, AZD5438 sensitized, whereas, NU6140 rescued proliferating IEC-6 cells from CPT-induced apoptosis. However, in colon carcinoma (Caco2) cells with mutant p53, treatment with either AZD5438 or NU6140 blocked proliferation, albeit more robustly with AZD5438. Both Cdk inhibitors induced apoptosis in Caco2 cells in a p53-independent manner. In serum starved quiescent IEC-6 cells, both AZD5438 and NU6140 decreased TNF- /CPT-induced activation of p53 and, consequently, rescued cells from apoptosis, indicating that sustained Cdk activity is required for apoptosis of quiescent cells. Furthermore, AZD5438 partially reversed the protective effect of polyamine depletion whereas NU6140 had no effect. Together, these results demonstrate that Cdks possess opposing roles in the control of apoptosis in quiescent and proliferating cells. In addition, Cdk inhibitors uncouple proliferation from apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:24242917

  10. Platelets induce apoptosis via membrane-bound FasL

    PubMed Central

    Schleicher, Rebecca I.; Reichenbach, Frank; Kraft, Peter; Kumar, Anil; Lescan, Mario; Todt, Franziska; Göbel, Kerstin; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Geisler, Tobias; Bauer, Axel; Olbrich, Marcus; Schaller, Martin; Wesselborg, Sebastian; O’Reilly, Lorraine; Meuth, Sven G.; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Gawaz, Meinrad; Li, Xuri; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Edlich, Frank

    2015-01-01

    After tissue injury, both wound sealing and apoptosis contribute to restoration of tissue integrity and functionality. Although the role of platelets (PLTs) for wound closure and induction of regenerative processes is well established, the knowledge about their contribution to apoptosis is incomplete. Here, we show that PLTs present the death receptor Fas ligand (FasL) on their surface after activation. Activated PLTs as well as the isolated membrane fraction of activated PLTs but not of resting PLTs induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in primary murine neuronal cells, human neuroblastoma cells, and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Membrane protein from PLTs lacking membrane-bound FasL (FasL△m/△m) failed to induce apoptosis. Bax/Bak-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis signaling in target cells was not required for PLT-induced cell death, but increased the apoptotic response to PLT-induced Fas signaling. In vivo, PLT depletion significantly reduced apoptosis in a stroke model and an inflammation-independent model of N-methyl-d-aspartic acid-induced retinal apoptosis. Furthermore, experiments using PLT-specific PF4Cre+ FasLfl/fl mice demonstrated a role of PLT-derived FasL for tissue apoptosis. Because apoptosis secondary to injury prevents inflammation, our findings describe a novel mechanism on how PLTs contribute to tissue homeostasis. PMID:26232171

  11. Bystander Macrophage Apoptosis after Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Deirdre M.; ten Bokum, Annemieke M. C.; O'Leary, Seonadh M.; O'Sullivan, Mary P.; Keane, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Human macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis may undergo apoptosis. Macrophage apoptosis contributes to the innate immune response against M. tuberculosis by containing and limiting the growth of mycobacteria and also by depriving the bacillus of its niche cell. Apoptosis of infected macrophages is well documented; however, bystander apoptosis of uninfected macrophages has not been described in the setting of M. tuberculosis. We observed that uninfected human macrophages underwent significant bystander apoptosis 48 and 96 h after they came into contact with macrophages infected with avirulent M. tuberculosis. The bystander apoptosis was significantly greater than the background apoptosis observed in uninfected control cells cultured for the same length of time. There was no evidence of the involvement of tumor necrosis factor alpha, Fas, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, transforming growth factor β, Toll-like receptor 2, or MyD88 in contact-mediated bystander apoptosis. This newly described phenomenon may further limit the spread of M. tuberculosis by eliminating the niche cells on which the bacillus relies. PMID:17954721

  12. Extensive apoptosis in a case of intractable infantile status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Koshi A.; Weidenheim, Karen; Legatt, Alan D.; Shifteh, Keivan; Abbott, I. Richmond; Mosh, Solomon L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary A previously healthy 8-month-old girl underwent epilepsy surgery for intractable focal seizures with secondary generalization that progressed to status epilepticus. The major neuropathologic finding was extensive apoptosis. Investigations did not reveal any etiology for the apoptosis or the seizures. This is the first report of apoptosis, without necrosis, in association with intractable status epilepticus in the developing human brain. The findings suggest that new treatment strategies targeted to prevent apoptosis may be useful in children with prolonged status epilepticus. PMID:19464149

  13. Role of PUMA in methamphetamine-induced neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuanxiang; Qincao, Litao; Xu, Jingtao; Du, Sihao; Huang, Enping; Liu, Chao; Lin, Zhoumeng; Xie, Wei-Bing; Wang, Huijun

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to methamphetamine (METH), a widely used illicit drug, has been shown to cause neuron apoptosis. p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) is a key mediator in neuronal apoptosis. This study aimed to examine the effects of PUMA in METH-induced neuronal apoptosis. We determined PUMA protein expression in PC12 cells and SH-SY5Y cells after METH exposure using western blot. We also observed the effect of METH on neuronal apoptosis after silencing PUMA expression with siRNA using TUNEL staining and flow cytometry. Additionally, to investigate possible mechanisms of METH-induced PUMA-mediated neuronal apoptosis, we measured the protein expression of apoptotic markers, including cleaved caspase-3, cleaved PARP, Bax, B-cell leukemia/lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) and cytochrome c (cyto c), after METH treatment with or without PUMA knockdown. Results showed that METH exposure induced cell apoptosis, increased PUMA protein levels, activated caspase-3 and PARP, elevated Bax and reduced Bcl-2 expression, as well as increased the release of cyto c from mitochondria to the cytoplasm in both PC12 and SH-SY5Y cells. All these effects were attenuated or reversed after silencing PUMA. A schematic depicting the role of PUMA in METH-induced mitochondrial apoptotic pathway was proposed. Our results suggest that PUMA plays an important role in METH-triggered apoptosis and it may be a potential target for ameliorating neuronal injury and apoptosis caused by METH. PMID:26524635

  14. Investigating interference with apoptosis induction by bacterial proteins.

    PubMed

    Niu, Hua; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    2014-01-01

    The modulation of host cell apoptosis by bacterial pathogens is critical for their intracellular survival. Several intracellular bacteria achieve this by secreting proteins that interact with apoptosis pathways to inhibit host cell apoptosis. Anaplasma phagocytophilum, which causes human granulocytic anaplasmosis, is such bacterium. The protein Ats-1, translocated from A. phagocytophilum by the bacterial type IV secretion system, localizes to host cell mitochondria, and interferes with apoptosis induction. In this chapter, we present a protocol applied to investigate an anti-apoptotic effect of Ats-1. PMID:25172281

  15. Research Advances on Pathways of Nickel-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongrui; Chen, Lian; Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Zuo, Zhicai; Deng, Junliang; Wang, Xun; Wu, Bangyuan

    2015-01-01

    High concentrations of nickel (Ni) are harmful to humans and animals. Ni targets a number of organs and produces multiple toxic effects. Apoptosis is important in Ni-induced toxicity of the kidneys, liver, nerves, and immune system. Apoptotic pathways mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Fas, and c-Myc participate in Ni-induced cell apoptosis. However, the exact mechanism of apoptosis caused by Ni is still unclear. Understanding the mechanism of Ni-induced apoptosis may help in designing measures to prevent Ni toxicity. PMID:26703593

  16. Apoptosis in the vasculature: mechanisms and functional importance

    PubMed Central

    Mallat, Ziad; Tedgui, Alain

    2000-01-01

    Apoptotic death has now been recognized in a number of common and threatening vascular diseases, including atherosclerosis. Interest in apoptosis research relates to the fact that apoptosis, in contrast to oncosis, is a highly regulated process of cell death which raises the hope for the development of specific therapeutic strategies to alter disease progression. This review summarizes the mechanisms involved in vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cell survival/apoptosis, and the potential roles of apoptotic death in atherosclerosis and restenosis. The potential effects of modulation of apoptosis in these diseases are also discussed. PMID:10882378

  17. Dysregulation of apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Fabregat, Isabel

    2009-02-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major health problem, being the sixth most common cancer world-wide. Dysregulation of the balance between proliferation and cell death represents a pro-tumorigenic principle in human hepatocarcinogenesis. This review updates the recent relevant contributions reporting molecular alterations for HCC that induce an imbalance in the regulation of apoptosis. Alterations in the expression and/or activation of p53 are frequent in HCC cells, which confer on them resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs. Many HCCs are also insensitive to apoptosis induced either by death receptor ligands, such as FasL or TRAIL, or by transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). Although the expression of some pro-apoptotic genes is decreased, the balance between death and survival is dysregulated in HCC mainly due to overactivation of anti-apoptotic pathways. Indeed, some molecules involved in counteracting apoptosis, such as Bcl-X(L), Mcl-1, c-IAP1, XIAP or survivin are over-expressed in HCC cells. Furthermore, some growth factors that mediate cell survival are up-regulated in HCC, as well as the molecules involved in the machinery responsible for cleavage of their pro-forms to an active peptide. The expression and/or activation of the JAK/STAT, PI3K/AKT and RAS/ERKs pathways are enhanced in many HCC cells, conferring on them resistance to apoptotic stimuli. Finally, recent evidence indicates that inflammatory processes, as well as the epithelial-mesenchymal transitions that occur in HCC cells to facilitate their dissemination, are related to cell survival. Therefore, therapeutic strategies to selectively inhibit anti-apoptotic signals in liver tumor cells have the potential to provide powerful tools to treat HCC. PMID:19195051

  18. Measuring and Modeling Apoptosis in Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Sabrina L.; Sorger, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    Cell death plays an essential role in the development of tissues and organisms, the etiology of disease, and the responses of cells to therapeutic drugs. Here we review progress made over the last decade in using mathematical models and quantitative, often single-cell, data to study apoptosis. We discuss the delay that follows exposure of cells to prodeath stimuli, control of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, switch-like activation of effector caspases, and variability in the timing and probability of death from one cell to the next. Finally, we discuss challenges facing the fields of biochemical modeling and systems pharmacology. PMID:21414484

  19. The DR6 protein from human herpesvirus-6B induces p53-independent cell cycle arrest in G{sub 2}/M

    SciTech Connect

    Schleimann, Mariane H.; Hoberg, Søren; Solhøj Hansen, Aida; Bundgaard, Bettina; Witt, Christoffer T.; Kofod-Olsen, Emil; Höllsberg, Per

    2014-03-15

    HHV-6B infection inhibits cell proliferation in G{sub 2}/M, but no protein has so far been recognized to exert this function. Here we identify the protein product of direct repeat 6, DR6, as an inhibitor of G{sub 2}/M cell-cycle progression. Transfection of DR6 reduced the total number of cells compared with mock-transfected cells. Lentiviral transduction of DR6 inhibited host cell DNA synthesis in a p53-independent manner, and this inhibition was DR6 dose-dependent. A deletion of 66 amino acids from the N-terminal part of DR6 prevented efficient nuclear translocation and the ability to inhibit DNA synthesis. DR6-induced accumulation of cells in G{sub 2}/M was accompanied by an enhanced expression of cyclin B1 that accumulated predominantly in the cytoplasm. Pull-down of cyclin B1 brought down pCdk1 with the inactivating phosphorylation at Tyr15. Together, DR6 delays cell cycle with an accumulation of cells in G{sub 2}/M and thus might be involved in HHV-6B-induced cell-cycle arrest. - Highlights: • HHV-6B-encoded DR6 protein inhibits cell proliferation. • DR6 inhibits host cell DNA synthesis independent of p53. • DR6 delays the cell cycle in G{sub 2}/M. • An N-terminal sequence is necessary for DR6 function. • DR6 induces cytoplasmic accumulation of cyclin B1.

  20. Catalytic subunits of the phosphatase calcineurin interact with NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK) and attenuate NIK-dependent gene expression.

    PubMed

    Shinzawa, Miho; Konno, Hiroyasu; Qin, Junwen; Akiyama, Nobuko; Miyauchi, Maki; Ohashi, Hiroyuki; Miyamoto-Sato, Etsuko; Yanagawa, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Taishin; Inoue, Jun-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor (NF)-κB-inducing kinase (NIK) is a serine/threonine kinase that activates NF-κB pathways, thereby regulating a wide variety of immune systems. Aberrant NIK activation causes tumor malignancy, suggesting a requirement for precise regulation of NIK activity. To explore novel interacting proteins of NIK, we performed in vitro virus screening and identified the catalytic subunit Aα isoform of serine/threonine phosphatase calcineurin (CnAα) as a novel NIK-interacting protein. The interaction of NIK with CnAα in living cells was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. Calcineurin catalytic subunit Aβ isoform (CnAβ) also bound to NIK. Experiments using domain deletion mutants suggested that CnAα and CnAβ interact with both the kinase domain and C-terminal region of NIK. Moreover, the phosphatase domain of CnAα is responsible for the interaction with NIK. Intriguingly, we found that TRAF3, a critical regulator of NIK activity, also binds to CnAα and CnAβ. Depletion of CnAα and CnAβ significantly enhanced lymphotoxin-β receptor (LtβR)-mediated expression of the NIK-dependent gene Spi-B and activation of RelA and RelB, suggesting that CnAα and CnAβ attenuate NF-κB activation mediated by LtβR-NIK signaling. Overall, these findings suggest a possible role of CnAα and CnAβ in modifying NIK functions. PMID:26029823

  1. miR-29b induces SOCS-1 expression by promoter demethylation and negatively regulates migration of multiple myeloma and endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Amodio, Nicola; Bellizzi, Dina; Leotta, Marzia; Raimondi, Lavinia; Biamonte, Lavinia; D’Aquila, Patrizia; Di Martino, Maria Teresa; Calimeri, Teresa; Rossi, Marco; Lionetti, Marta; Leone, Emanuela; Passarino, Giuseppe; Neri, Antonino; Giordano, Antonio; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes frequently occurs and may account for their inactivation in cancer cells. We previously demonstrated that miR-29b is a tumor suppressor microRNA (miRNA) that targets de novo DNA methyltransferases and reduces the global DNA methylation of multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Here, we provide evidence that epigenetic activity of miR-29b leads to promoter demethylation of suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 (SOCS-1), a hypermethylated tumor suppressor gene. Enforced expression of synthetic miR-29b mimics in MM cell lines resulted in SOCS-1 gene promoter demethylation, as assessed by Sequenom MassARRAY EpiTYPER analysis, and SOCS-1 protein upregulation. miR-29b-induced SOCS-1 demethylation was associated with reduced STAT3 phosphorylation and impaired NFκB activity. Downregulation of VEGF-A and IL-8 mRNAs could be detected in MM cells transfected with miR-29b mimics as well as in endothelial (HUVEC) or stromal (HS-5) cells treated with conditioned medium from miR-29b-transfected MM cells. Notably, enforced expression of miR-29b mimics increased adhesion of MM cells to HS-5 and reduced migration of both MM and HUVEC cells. These findings suggest that miR-29b is a negative regulator of either MM or endothelial cell migration. Finally, the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, which induces the expression of miR-29b, decreased global DNA methylation by a miR-29b-dependent mechanism and induced SOCS-1 promoter demethylation and protein upregulation. In conclusion, our data indicate that miR-29b is endowed with epigenetic activity and mediates previously unknown functions of bortezomib in MM cells. PMID:24091729

  2. Carboxyl terminus of HSC70-interacting protein (CHIP) down-regulates NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK) and suppresses NIK-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bijie; Shen, Hong; Chen, Zheng; Yin, Lei; Zan, Linsen; Rui, Liangyou

    2015-05-01

    Ser/Thr kinase NIK (NF-κB-inducing kinase) mediates the activation of the noncanonical NF-κB2 pathway, and it plays an important role in regulating immune cell development and liver homeostasis. NIK levels are extremely low in quiescent cells due to ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated degradation, and cytokines stimulate NIK activation through increasing NIK stability; however, regulation of NIK stability is not fully understood. Here we identified CHIP (carboxyl terminus of HSC70-interacting protein) as a new negative regulator of NIK. CHIP contains three N-terminal tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs), a middle dimerization domain, and a C-terminal U-box. The U-box domain contains ubiquitin E3 ligase activity that promotes ubiquitination of CHIP-bound partners. We observed that CHIP bound to NIK via its TPR domain. In both HEK293 and primary hepatocytes, overexpression of CHIP markedly decreased NIK levels at least in part through increasing ubiquitination and degradation of NIK. Accordingly, CHIP suppressed NIK-induced activation of the noncanonical NF-κB2 pathway. CHIP also bound to TRAF3, and CHIP and TRAF3 acted coordinately to efficiently promote NIK degradation. The TPR but not the U-box domain was required for CHIP to promote NIK degradation. In mice, hepatocyte-specific overexpression of NIK resulted in liver inflammation and injury, leading to death, and liver-specific expression of CHIP reversed the detrimental effects of hepatic NIK. Our data suggest that CHIP/TRAF3/NIK interactions recruit NIK to E3 ligase complexes for ubiquitination and degradation, thus maintaining NIK at low levels. Defects in CHIP regulation of NIK may result in aberrant NIK activation in the liver, contributing to live injury, inflammation, and disease. PMID:25792747

  3. An increase of granulosa cell apoptosis mediates aqueous neem (Azadirachta indica) leaf extract-induced oocyte apoptosis in rat

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Anima; Shrivastav, Tulsidas G; Chaube, Shail K

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Neem plant (Azadirachta indica) has been extensively used in Ayurvedic system of medicine for female fertility regulation for a long time, but its mechanism of action remains poorly understood. Hence, the present study was aimed to determine whether an increase of granulosa cell apoptosis is associated with aqueous neem leaf extract (NLE)-induced oocyte apoptosis. Materials and Methods: Sexually immature female rats of 20 days old were fed NLE (50 mg/day) for 10 days and then subjected to superovulation induction protocol. The morphological changes in cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs), rate of oocyte apoptosis, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), total nitrite, and cytochrome c concentrations, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cytochrome c, p53, Bcl2 and Bax expressions, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragmentation, and estradiol 17? level in granulosa cells collected from preovulatory COCs were analyzed. Results: Aqueous NLE increased H2O2 concentration and decreased catalase activity, increased iNOS expression and total nitrite concentration, increased p53, Bax, and p53 expressions but decreased Bcl2 expression, increased cytochrome c concentration and induced DNA fragmentation in granulosa cells. An increased granulosa cell apoptosis resulted in reduced estradiol 17? concentration and induced apoptosis in ovulated oocytes. Conclusion: We conclude that aqueous NLE-induced granulosa cell apoptosis through the mitochondria-mediated pathway, reduced estradiol 17? concentration and induced apoptosis in ovulated oocytes. Thus, granulosa cell apoptosis mediates NLE-induced oocyte apoptosis during female fertility regulation in rat. PMID:23776837

  4. FemtoSpeX: a versatile optical pump-soft X-ray probe facility with 100 fs X-ray pulses of variable polarization.

    PubMed

    Holldack, Karsten; Bahrdt, Johannes; Balzer, Andreas; Bovensiepen, Uwe; Brzhezinskaya, Maria; Erko, Alexei; Eschenlohr, Andrea; Follath, Rolf; Firsov, Alexander; Frentrup, Winfried; Le Guyader, Loïc; Kachel, Torsten; Kuske, Peter; Mitzner, Rolf; Müller, Roland; Pontius, Niko; Quast, Torsten; Radu, Ilie; Schmidt, Jan Simon; Schüssler-Langeheine, Christian; Sperling, Mike; Stamm, Christian; Trabant, Christoph; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Here the major upgrades of the femtoslicing facility at BESSY II (Khan et al., 2006) are reviewed, giving a tutorial on how elliptical-polarized ultrashort soft X-ray pulses from electron storage rings are generated at high repetition rates. Employing a 6 kHz femtosecond-laser system consisting of two amplifiers that are seeded by one Ti:Sa oscillator, the total average flux of photons of 100 fs duration (FWHM) has been increased by a factor of 120 to up to 10(6) photons s(-1) (0.1% bandwidth)(-1) on the sample in the range from 250 to 1400 eV. Thanks to a new beamline design, a factor of 20 enhanced flux and improvements of the stability together with the top-up mode of the accelerator have been achieved. The previously unavoidable problem of increased picosecond-background at higher repetition rates, caused by `halo' photons, has also been solved by hopping between different `camshaft' bunches in a dedicated fill pattern (`3+1 camshaft fill') of the storage ring. In addition to an increased X-ray performance at variable (linear and elliptical) polarization, the sample excitation in pump-probe experiments has been considerably extended using an optical parametric amplifier that supports the range from the near-UV to the far-IR regime. Dedicated endstations covering ultrafast magnetism experiments based on time-resolved X-ray circular dichroism have been either upgraded or, in the case of time-resolved resonant soft X-ray diffraction and reflection, newly constructed and adapted to femtoslicing requirements. Experiments at low temperatures down to 6 K and magnetic fields up to 0.5 T are supported. The FemtoSpeX facility is now operated as a 24 h user facility enabling a new class of experiments in ultrafast magnetism and in the field of transient phenomena and phase transitions in solids. PMID:25177998

  5. Evolution of the Animal Apoptosis Network

    PubMed Central

    Zmasek, Christian M.; Godzik, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The number of available eukaryotic genomes has expanded to the point where we can evaluate the complete evolutionary history of many cellular processes. Such analyses for the apoptosis regulatory networks suggest that this network already existed in the ancestor of the entire animal kingdom (Metazoa) in a form more complex than in some popular animal model organisms. This supports the growing realization that regulatory networks do not necessarily evolve from simple to complex and that the relative simplicity of these networks in nematodes and insects does not represent an ancestral state, but is the result of secondary simplifications. Network evolution is not a process of monotonous increase in complexity, but a dynamic process that includes lineage-specific gene losses and expansions, protein domain reshuffling, and emergence/reemergence of similar protein architectures by parallel evolution. Studying the evolution of such networks is a challenging yet interesting subject for research and investigation, and such studies on the apoptosis networks provide us with interesting hints of how these networks, critical in so many human diseases, have developed. PMID:23457257

  6. Mitochondria in human pluripotent stem cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    TeSlaa, Tara; Setoguchi, Kiyoko; Teitell, Michael A

    2016-04-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have great potential in regenerative medicine because they can differentiate into any cell type in the body. Genome integrity is vital for human development and for high fidelity passage of genetic information across generations through the germ line. To ensure genome stability, hPSCs maintain a lower rate of mutation than somatic cells and undergo rapid apoptosis in response to DNA damage and additional cell stresses. Furthermore, cellular metabolism and the cell cycle are also differentially regulated between cells in pluripotent and differentiated states and can aid in protecting hPSCs against DNA damage and damaged cell propagation. Despite these safeguards, clinical use of hPSC derivatives could be compromised by tumorigenic potential and possible malignant transformation from failed to differentiate cells. Since hPSCs and mature cells differentially respond to cell stress, it may be possible to specifically target undifferentiated cells for rapid apoptosis in mixed cell populations to enable safer use of hPSC-differentiated cells in patients. PMID:26828436

  7. Regulation of apoptosis by endoplasmic reticulum pathways.

    PubMed

    Breckenridge, David G; Germain, Marc; Mathai, Jaigi P; Nguyen, Mai; Shore, Gordon C

    2003-11-24

    Apoptotic programmed cell death pathways are activated by a diverse array of cell extrinsic and intrinsic signals, most of which are ultimately coupled to the activation of effector caspases. In many instances, this involves an obligate propagation through mitochondria, causing egress of critical proapoptotic regulators to the cytosol. Central to the regulation of the mitochondrial checkpoint is a complex three-way interplay between members of the BCL-2 family, which are comprised of an antiapoptotic subgroup including BCL-2 itself, and the proapoptotic BAX,BAK and BH3-domain-only subgroups. Constituents of all three of these BCL-2 classes, however, also converge on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an organelle whose critical contributions to apoptosis is only now becoming apparent. In addition to propagating death-inducing stress signals itself, the ER also contributes in a fundamental way to Fas-mediated apoptosis and to p53-dependent pathways resulting from DNA damage and oncogene expression. Mobilization of ER calcium stores can initiate the activation of cytoplasmic death pathways as well as sensitize mitochondria to direct proapoptotic stimuli. Additionally, the existence of BCL-2-regulated initiator procaspase activation complexes at the ER membrane has also been described. Here, we review the potential underlying mechanisms involved in these events and discuss pathways for ER-mitochondrial crosstalk pertinent to a number of cell death stimuli. PMID:14634622

  8. FAS Expression and Apoptosis in the Fish Parasite Ichthyophthirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fish that survive an infection by Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) develop antibodies that immobilize and kill Ich theronts. Apoptosis of I. multifiliis theronts was caused by cutaneous antibody from channel catfish immune to Ich. The mechanism for cutaneous antibody to induce apoptosis of theron...

  9. Constitutive apoptosis in equine peripheral blood neutrophils in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Brazil, Timothy J.; Dixon, Padraic M.; Haslett, Christopher; Murray, Joanna; McGorum, Bruce C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise constitutive apoptosis in equine peripheral blood neutrophils, including assessment of factors that potentially modulate neutrophil survival through alteration of the rate of constitutive apoptosis. Cells underwent spontaneous time-dependent constitutive apoptosis when aged in culture for up to 36 h, developing the structural and functional features of apoptosis observed in many cell types, including human neutrophils. Neutrophils undergoing apoptosis also had diminished zymosan activated serum (ZAS)-stimulated chemiluminescence, but maintained responsiveness to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). The constitutive rate of equine neutrophil apoptosis was promoted by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumour necrosis factor α and phagocytosis of opsonised ovine erythrocytes, while it was inhibited by dexamethasone and ZAS (a source of C5a). Formyl-Met-Leu-Phe, leukotriene B4, platelet activating factor and PMA had no demonstrable effect on equine neutrophil apoptosis. There was a difference between equine and human neutrophil apoptosis in response to LPS and the time-dependence of the response to dexamethasone. PMID:25239298

  10. Apoptosis in vascular smooth muscle cells: role of cell shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Orlov, S N; Dam, T V; Tremblay, J; Hamet, P

    1996-04-25

    Cell volume decrease is known to be one of the earliest steps of apoptosis in immune system cells. In this study, we compared the kinetics of apoptosis and cell volume adjustment in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) from the aorta of normotensive Brown-Norway (BN.1x) as well as spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats and in Mardin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. The transfer of VSMC to serum-deprived medium led to a transient cell volume decrease and to increased apoptosis. Both the cell volume decrease and apoptosis displayed faster kinetics in SHR than in BN.1x VSMC. Increased tonicity of serum-deprived medium by the addition of 200 mM mannitol augmented apoptosis in VSMC by 2.5- to 3-fold. In contrast to VSMC, neither apoptosis nor the cell volume of MDCK cells was affected by serum deprivation. Apoptosis in MDCK cells was also insensitive to tonicity of serum-deprived medium. There results demonstrate an initial volume decrease in VSMC undergoing apoptosis and suggest that this phenomenon is involved in triggering the apoptotic process. PMID:8630026

  11. Vibrio vulnificus Induces Macrophage Apoptosis In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kashimoto, Takashige; Ueno, Shunji; Hanajima, Miyuki; Hayashi, Hisae; Akeda, Yukihiro; Miyoshi, Shinichi; Hongo, Toshiharu; Honda, Takeshi; Susa, Nobuyuki

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we compared the apoptotic activities of clinical and environmental isolates of Vibrio vulnificus toward macrophages in vitro and in vivo. The clinical isolates induced apoptosis in macrophage-like cells in vitro and in macrophages in vivo. This suggests that macrophage apoptosis may be important for the clinical virulence of V. vulnificus. PMID:12496206

  12. Mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis induced by photofrin-PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yunxia; Xing, Da

    2007-05-01

    Apoptosis is an important cellular event that plays a key role in pathogeny and therapy of many diseases. The mechanisms of the initiation and regulation of PDT-induced apoptosis are complex. Some PDT-associated apoptosis pathways involved plasma membrane death receptors, mitochondria, lysosomes and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In order to determine the apoptosis pathway induced by Photofrin-PDT, we used fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique and probe SCAT3 to monitor the dynamics of caspase-3 activation after PDT treatment and also measured caspase-8 activity. With laser scanning confocal microscopy, we found that Photofrin were localized primarily in mitochondria, the primary targets of Photofrin-PDT. Formation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected within minutes after PDT treatment. This was followed by mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), cytochrome c release, caspase-9 activity, caspase-3 activity and apoptosis. After PDT treatment, caspase-3 was activated rapidly while caspase-8 remained inactivated. Our results indicated that PDT-induced apoptosis was initiated from mitochondria pathway and independent of caspase-8 activation. The activation of caspase-3 by PDT started 20 minutes after treatment and completed in about 15 minutes. PDT-induced apoptosis is directly initiated from mitochondria pathway and not involved in the death receptors-dependent pathway. Our results demonstrated that FRET could be an effective tool to determine PDT-induced apoptosis and other cell death mechanism.

  13. FAS EXPRESSION AND APOPTOSIS IN THE FISH PARASITE ICHTHYOPHTHIRIUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fish that survive an infection by Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) develop antibodies that immobilize and kill Ich theronts. Apoptosis of I. multifiliis theronts was caused by cutaneous antibody from channel catfish immune to Ich. The mechanism for cutaneous antibody to induce apoptosis of theron...

  14. P53 Regulates Rapid Apoptosis in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Setoguchi, Kiyoko; TeSlaa, Tara; Koehler, Carla M; Teitell, Michael A

    2016-04-10

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are sensitive to DNA damage and undergo rapid apoptosis compared to their differentiated progeny cells. Here, we explore the underlying mechanisms for the increased apoptotic sensitivity of hPSCs that helps to determine pluripotent stem cell fate. Apoptosis was induced by exposure to actinomycin D, etoposide, or tunicamycin, with each agent triggering a distinct apoptotic pathway. We show that hPSCs are more sensitive to all three types of apoptosis induction than are lineage-non-specific, retinoic-acid-differentiated hPSCs. Also, Bax activation and pro-apoptotic mitochondrial intermembrane space protein release, which are required to initiate the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis pathway, are more rapid in hPSCs than in retinoic-acid-differentiated hPSCs. Surprisingly, Bak and not Bax is essential for actinomycin-D-induced apoptosis in human embryonic stem cells. Finally, P53 is degraded rapidly in an ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent pathway in hPSCs at steady state but quickly accumulates and induces apoptosis when Mdm2 function is impaired. Rapid degradation of P53 ensures the survival of healthy hPSCs but avails these cells for immediate apoptosis upon cellular damage by P53 stabilization. Altogether, we provide an underlying, interconnected molecular mechanism that primes hPSCs for quick clearance by apoptosis to eliminate hPSCs with unrepaired genome alterations and preserves organismal genomic integrity during the early critical stages of human embryonic development. PMID:26239243

  15. Interplay of autophagy and apoptosis during PRRSV infection of Marc145 cell.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuaifeng; Zhou, Ao; Wang, Jiaxing; Zhang, Shujun

    2016-04-01

    Autophagy and apoptosis play essential roles 'in virus infection. Our study was performed to investigate the interplay between autophagy and apoptosis in PRRSV replication. In our present study, autophagy and apoptosis were induced by PRRSV infection. Viral replication was dampened/attenuated by autophagy deficient and potentiated by apoptosis inhibition. Furthermore, PRRSV replication was restored by apoptosis inhibition in autophagy deficient cells. Taken together, our findings unveil the functional relationship between autophagy and apoptosis during PRRSV replication. PMID:26774368

  16. Embryo apoptosis identification: Oocyte grade or cleavage stage?

    PubMed Central

    Bakri, Noraina Mohd; Ibrahim, Siti Fatimah; Osman, Nurul Atikah; Hasan, Nurhaslina; Jaffar, Farah Hanan Fathihah; Rahman, Zulaiha Abdul; Osman, Khairul

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a programed cell death that is vital for tissue homeostasis. However, embryo apoptosis had been known to be related to embryo fragmentation which should be avoided in in vitro fertilization (IVF). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship of embryo apoptosis with the grade of immature oocytes and cleavage stage of in vitro produced (IVP) cattle embryos. This study consisted of 345 oocytes collected through ovary slicing. Immature oocytes were graded as A, B and C. This grading was based on cumulus cell thickness and compactness. All oocytes then underwent an in vitro maturation (IVM) procedure. An IVF was done 24 h after IVM culture. Prior to staining, stage of cleaved embryos was determined and classified as either 2, 4, 8 or >8-cell embryo stage. Apoptosis status of cleaved IVP embryos was determined by using annexin V-FITC staining technique at 48 and 72 h post insemination (hpi). Apoptosis status for each embryo was classified as either early or late. The result showed that there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) of apoptosis status among grade A, B and C embryos. All grades of oocytes showed embryo apoptosis where 1.5% late apoptosis for grade A, 4.5% and 10.4% of early and late apoptosis for grade B and grade C. Early apoptosis was not seen in grade A embryo. We also noted no significant difference (p > 0.05) of apoptosis status between 2, 4, 8 and >8-cell embryo stage. Early apoptosis was also not seen in >8-cell stage. Even though there were no differences in apoptosis expression between the three classes, the cleavage rate of grade A oocytes was significantly higher (p < 0.01) than grade B and grade C. In conclusion, the apoptosis expression in the embryo can occur regardless of the oocyte quality and the cleavage stage of the embryo produced. PMID:26858565

  17. Embryo apoptosis identification: Oocyte grade or cleavage stage?

    PubMed

    Bakri, Noraina Mohd; Ibrahim, Siti Fatimah; Osman, Nurul Atikah; Hasan, Nurhaslina; Jaffar, Farah Hanan Fathihah; Rahman, Zulaiha Abdul; Osman, Khairul

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis is a programed cell death that is vital for tissue homeostasis. However, embryo apoptosis had been known to be related to embryo fragmentation which should be avoided in in vitro fertilization (IVF). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship of embryo apoptosis with the grade of immature oocytes and cleavage stage of in vitro produced (IVP) cattle embryos. This study consisted of 345 oocytes collected through ovary slicing. Immature oocytes were graded as A, B and C. This grading was based on cumulus cell thickness and compactness. All oocytes then underwent an in vitro maturation (IVM) procedure. An IVF was done 24 h after IVM culture. Prior to staining, stage of cleaved embryos was determined and classified as either 2, 4, 8 or >8-cell embryo stage. Apoptosis status of cleaved IVP embryos was determined by using annexin V-FITC staining technique at 48 and 72 h post insemination (hpi). Apoptosis status for each embryo was classified as either early or late. The result showed that there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) of apoptosis status among grade A, B and C embryos. All grades of oocytes showed embryo apoptosis where 1.5% late apoptosis for grade A, 4.5% and 10.4% of early and late apoptosis for grade B and grade C. Early apoptosis was not seen in grade A embryo. We also noted no significant difference (p > 0.05) of apoptosis status between 2, 4, 8 and >8-cell embryo stage. Early apoptosis was also not seen in >8-cell stage. Even though there were no differences in apoptosis expression between the three classes, the cleavage rate of grade A oocytes was significantly higher (p < 0.01) than grade B and grade C. In conclusion, the apoptosis expression in the embryo can occur regardless of the oocyte quality and the cleavage stage of the embryo produced. PMID:26858565

  18. High level calcineurin activity predisposes neuronal cells to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Asai, A; Qiu, J h; Narita, Y; Chi, S; Saito, N; Shinoura, N; Hamada, H; Kuchino, Y; Kirino, T

    1999-11-26

    Calcineurin is a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase that is abundantly expressed in several specific areas of the brain, which are exceptionally vulnerable to stroke, epilepsy, and neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we assessed the effects of high level activity of calcineurin on neuronal cells. Virus-mediated high level constitutive activity of calcineurin rendered neuronal cells susceptible to apoptosis induced by serum reduction or by a brief exposure to calcium ionophore. Adenovirus-mediated, high level forced activity of calcineurin induced cytochrome c/caspase-3-dependent apoptosis in neurons. Preincubation with the calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporin A and FK506 reduced susceptibility to apoptosis. High level constitutive expression of Bcl-2 or CrmA or incubation with a specific caspase-3 inhibitor inhibited the calcineurin-induced apoptosis. These data indicate that high level constitutive activity of calcineurin predisposes neuronal cells to cytochrome c/caspase-3 dependent apoptosis even under sublethal conditions. PMID:10567426

  19. Lobaplatin inhibits growth of gastric cancer cells by inducing apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Chu-Yang; Lin, Xiao-Lin; Tian, Lei; Ye, Ming; Yang, Xin-Ying; Xiao, Xiu-Ying

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the anti-cancer effect of lobaplatin on human gastric cancer cells, and to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms. METHODS: The human gastric cancer cell lines MKN-28, AGS and MKN-45 were used. The cytotoxicity of lobaplatin was detected using an MTS cell proliferation assay. Flow cytometry was used to detect cell apoptosis using Annexin V-FITC Apoptosis Detection Kit. The expression of apoptosis-regulated genes was examined at the protein level using Western blot. RESULTS: Lobaplatin inhibited the proliferation of human gastric cancer cells and induced apoptosis, which may be associated with the up-regulation of Bax expression, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, p53 expression and the reduction of Bcl-2 expression. CONCLUSION: The cytotoxicity of lobaplatin may be due to its ability of inducing apoptosis of gastric cancer cells, which would support the potential use of lobaplatin for the therapy of gastric cancer. PMID:25516654

  20. Role of apoptosis in colon cancer biology, therapy, and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Yu, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Deregulation of apoptosis is a hallmark of human cancer and contributes to therapeutic resistance. Recent advances in cancer genomics reveal a myriad of alterations in key pathways that directly or indirectly increase tumor cell survival. This review will outline the pathways of apoptosis in mammalian cells, and highlight the common alterations of apoptosis regulators found in colon cancer, the role of apoptosis and underlying mechanisms in colon cancer treatment and prevention, including recent advances on investigational agents, such as kinase inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors, HSP90 inhibitors, BH3 mimetics, TRAIL, and IAP antagonists. Topics will also include novel concepts, as well as opportunities and challenges for drug discovery and combination therapy by exploring cancer-specific genetic defects, and therefore selective induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. Although the emphasis is on colon cancer, the main theme and many of the aspects are applicable to other solid tumors. PMID:24273467

  1. Physiological significance of apoptosis in animal virus infection.

    PubMed

    Koyama, A H; Fukumori, T; Fujita, M; Irie, H; Adachi, A

    2000-07-01

    In contrast to insect viruses, animal viruses can produce considerable amounts of progeny virus in cells undergoing apoptosis. Nevertheless, viruses in general have acquired the ability to escape apoptosis of infected cells. These facts indicate that the role of apoptosis in virus infection is different in insect virus and animal virus, although both viruses need to avoid apoptosis of the infected cells for a viral life cycle in nature. In animal virus infection, the primary role of apoptosis is considered not to be a premature lysis of the infected cells (and the following abortion of virus multiplication) but to allow the dying cells to be phagocytosed by macrophages. This phagocytosis is able to prevent dysregulated inflammatory reactions at the site of virus infection and to initiate a specific immune response against the infected virus. PMID:10967291

  2. UXT plays dual opposing roles on SARM-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Sethurathinam, Shalini; Singh, Laishram Pradeepkumar; Panneerselvam, Porkodi; Byrne, Bernadette; Ding, Jeak Ling

    2013-10-11

    Apoptosis is a vital defense mechanism for the clearance of infected cells. Ubiquitously expressed transcript (UXT), which exists in two isoforms (V1 and V2), interact with both apoptotic and cellular proteins. By yeast two-hybrid analysis, we found that UXT interacts with SARM (sterile α and HEAT armadillo motif-containing protein). Since SARM is a TLR adaptor which induces intrinsic apoptosis following immune activation, we were prompted to query whether UXT and SARM might co-regulate apoptosis. We found that the UXT isoforms elicit dual opposing regulatory effects on SARM-induced apoptosis; while UXT V1, co-expressed with SARM, caused a reduction in caspase 8 activity, UXT V2 strongly increased caspase 8 activity and enhanced SARM-induced apoptosis by activating the extrinsic pathway and depolarizing the mitochondria. PMID:24021647

  3. Tumors Acquire Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein (IAP)-mediated Apoptosis Resistance through Altered Specificity of Cytosolic Proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Xu; Lei, Lu; Glas, Rickard

    2003-01-01

    Many tumors overexpress members of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family. IAPs contribute to tumor cell apoptosis resistance by the inhibition of caspases, and are degraded by the proteasome to allow further progression of apoptosis. Here we show that tumor cells can alter the specificity of cytosolic proteolysis in order to acquire apoptosis resistance, which promotes formation of rapidly growing tumors. Survival of tumor cells with low proteasomal activity can occur in the presence of high expression of Tri-peptidyl-peptidase II (TPP II), a large subtilisin-like peptidase that complements proteasomal activity. We find that this state leaves tumor cells unable of effectively degrading IAPs, and that cells in this state form rapidly growing tumors in vivo. We also find, in studies of apoptosis resistant cells derived from large in vivo tumors, that these have acquired an altered peptidase activity, with up-regulation of TPP II activity and decreased proteasomal activity. Importantly, we find that growth of subcutaneous tumors is limited by maintenance of the apoptosis resistant phenotype. The apoptosis resistant phenotype was reversed by increased expression of Smac/DIABLO, an antagonist of IAP molecules. Our data suggest a reversible mechanism in regulation of apoptosis resistance that drives tumor progression in vivo. These data are relevant in relation to the multitude of therapy-resistant clinical tumors that have increased levels of IAP molecules. PMID:12810691

  4. Cytotoxic activity and apoptosis induction by gaillardin.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, Maryam Hamzeloo; Naghibi, Farzaneh; Atoofi, Azadeh; Rezaie, Mitra Asgharian; Irani, Mahboobeh; Mosaddegh, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    Cytotoxic activity of gaillardin, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from Inula oculus-christi L. (Asteraceae), was assessed in the human breast adenocarcinoma cell line MCF-7, human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG-2, human non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line A-549, and human colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT-29, resulting in IC50 values of 6.37, 6.20, 4.76, and 1.81 microg/mL, respectively, in the microculture tetrazolium-formazan MTT assay. In vitro apoptosis-inducing properties of gaillardin were also evaluated in MCF-7 cells with the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. The results suggest gaillardin as a candidate for further studies in cancer therapy PMID:23819305

  5. Cellular and Nuclear Degradation during Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    He, Bin; Lu, Nan; Zhou, Zheng

    2009-01-01

    Apoptosis ensures quick death and quiet clearance of unwanted or damaged cells, without inducing much, if any, immunological responses from the organism. In metazoan organisms, apoptotic cells are swiftly engulfed by other cells. The degradation of cellular content is initiated in apoptotic cells and completed within engulfing cells. In apoptotic cells, caspase-mediated proteolysis cleaves protein substrates into fragments; nuclear DNA is partially degraded into nucleosomal units; and autophagy potentially contributes to apoptotic-cell removal. In engulfing cells, specific signaling pathways promote the sequential fusion of intracellular vesicles with phagosomes and lead to the complete degradation of apoptotic cells in an acidic environment. Phagocytic receptors that initiate the engulfment of apoptotic cells play an additional and critical role in initiating phagosome maturation through activating these signaling pathways. Here we highlight recent discoveries made in invertebrate models and mammalian systems, focusing on the molecular mechanisms that regulate the efficient degradation of apoptotic cells. PMID:19781927

  6. LFG: a candidate apoptosis regulatory gene family.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lan; Smith, Temple F; Goldberger, Gabriel

    2009-11-01

    The expanding wealth of human, model and other organism's genomic data has allowed the identification of a distinct gene family of apoptotic related genes. Most of these genes are currently unannotated or have been subsumed under two questionably related gene families in the past. For example the transmembrane Bax inhibitor 1 (BI1) motif family has been reported to play a role in apoptosis and to consist of at least seven mammalian protein genes, GRINA, BI1, Lfg/FAIM2, Ghitm, RESC1/Tmbim1, GAAP/Tmbim4, and Tmbm1b. However, a detailed sequence and phylogenetic analysis shows that only five of these form a clear and unique protein family. This now provides information for understanding and investigating the biological roles of these proteins across a wide range of tissues in model organisms. The evolutionary relationships among these genes provide a powerful prospective for extrapolating to human conditions. PMID:19784873

  7. Quercetin-induced apoptosis prevents EBV infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Minjung; Son, Myoungki; Ryu, Eunhyun; Shin, Yu Su; Kim, Jong Gwang; Kang, Byung Woog; Sung, Gi-Ho; Cho, Hyosun; Kang, Hyojeung

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human gamma-1 herpesvirus that establishes a lifelong latency in over 90% of the world's population. During latency, virus exists predominantly as a chromatin-associated, multicopy episome in the nuclei of a variety of tumor cells derived from B cells, T cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and epithelial cells. Licorice is the root of Glycyrrhiza uralensis or G. glabra that has traditionally cultivated in eastern part of Asia. Licorice was reported to have anti-viral, anti-inflammatory, anti-atopic, hepatoprotective, anti-neurodegenerative, anti-tumor, anti-diabetic effects and so forth. Quercetin and isoliquiritigenin are produced from licorice and highly similar in molecular structure. They have diverse bioactive effects such as antiviral activity, anti-asthmatic activity, anti-cancer activity, anti-inflammation activity, monoamine-oxidase inhibitor, and etc. To determine anti-EBV and anti-EBVaGC (Epstein-Barr virus associated gastric carcinoma) effects of licorice, we investigated antitumor and antiviral effects of quercetin and isoliquiritigenin against EBVaGC. Although both quercetin and isoliquiritigenin are cytotoxic to SNU719 cells, quercetin induced more apoptosis in SNU719 cells than isoliquiritigenin, more completely eliminated DNMT1 and DNMT3A expressions than isoliquiritigenin, and more strongly affects the cell cycle progression of SNU719 than isoliquiritigenin. Both quercetin and isoliquiritigenin induce signal transductions to stimulate apoptosis, and induce EBV gene transcription. Quercetin enhances frequency of F promoter use, whereas isoliquiritigenin enhances frequency of Q promoter use. Quercetin reduces EBV latency, whereas isoliquiritigenin increases the latency. Quercetin increases more the EBV progeny production, and inhibits more EBV infection than isoliquiritigenin. These results indicate that quercetin could be a promising candidate for antiviral and antitumor agents against EBV and human gastric carcinoma. PMID:26059439

  8. Apoptosis and the systolic dysfunction in congestive heart failure. Story of apoptosis interruptus and zombie myocytes.

    PubMed

    Narula, J; Arbustini, E; Chandrashekhar, Y; Schwaiger, M

    2001-02-01

    Although previously it was believed that apoptosis could not occur in the terminally differentiated tissue, such as adult heart muscle cells, recent studies in endomyocardial biopsies from patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and in explanted hearts from patients with end-stage heart failure undergoing cardiac transplantation have demonstrated histologic evidence of apoptosis. Whereas neurohormonal activation during heart failure leads to compensatory hemodynamic alterations, coupled with ventricular dilatation, it induces transcription factors and myocyte hypertrophy. Persistent growth stimulation in terminally differentiated cells may lead paradoxically to apoptotic cell death. The apoptosis in cardiomyopathic hearts is associated with cytochrome c release from mitochondria to cytoplasm and activation of proteolytic caspase-8 and -3. Although the caspases are duly processed, the fragmentation of the nuclear proteins (including DNA) is completed less frequently, and only a variable degree of fragmentation of cytoplasmic proteins (including contractile proteins) is observed. It is hypothesized that release of cytochrome c from mitochondria should interfere with energy production and lead to functional impairment and variable loss of contractile proteins in a living heart muscle cell should contribute to systolic dysfunction. Because a nuclear blueprint is retained, however, the dysfunctional cell may continue to exist and in favorable conditions, such as with LVAD support, the apoptotic process may subside. Potential feasibility of reversal of heart failure should renew efforts to develop more targeted pharmaceutical intervention within the apoptotic cascade and allow newer paradigm for the management of heart failure. PMID:11787805

  9. Ginsenoside compound K induces apoptosis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells via activation of apoptosis-inducing factor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) has a high incidence rate in Southern China. Although there are conventional therapies, the side effects and toxicities are not always tolerable for patients. Recently, the tumoricidal effect of ginsenosides on different cancer cells has been studied. This study aims to investigate the anti-cancer effect of ginsenosides on NPC cells and their underlying mechanism. Methods The cytotoxicity of ginsenosides on NPC cell line HK-1 was measured by MTT assay. Apoptosis was detected by propidium iodide staining followed by flow cytometry. A xenograft tumor model was established by injecting nude mice with HK-1 cells. The activation of caspases and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) were evaluated by Western blot analysis. Nuclear translocation of AIF was also studied by immunofluorescence staining. Mitochondrial membrane potential was measured by JC-1 dye using flow cytometry. Results Four ginsenosides, 20 (S)-Rh2, compound K (CK), panaxadiol (PD) and protopanaxadiol (PPD), induced apoptotic cell death in HK-1 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. CK inhibited HK-1 xenograft tumor growth most extensively and depleted mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization and induced translocation of AIF from cytoplasm to nucleus in HK-1 cells. In addition, depletion of AIF by siRNA abolished CK-induced HK-1 cell death. Conclusion Ginsenoside CK-induced apoptosis of HK-1 cells was mediated by the mitochondrial pathway and could significantly inhibit tumor growth in vivo. PMID:24690317

  10. Parkia javanica Extract Induces Apoptosis in S-180 Cells via the Intrinsic Pathway of Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Patra, Kartick; Jana, Samarjit; Sarkar, Arnab; Karmakar, Subrata; Jana, Jagannath; Gupta, Mradu; Mukherjee, Gopeswar; De, Utpal Chandra; Mandal, Deba Prasad; Bhattacharjee, Shamee

    2016-01-01

    Parkia javanica is a leguminous tree, various parts of which are used as food and folklore medicine by the ethnic groups of northeastern India. The present study investigates the in vitro and in vivo anticancer effect of aqueous methanol extract of P. javanica fruit (PJE). HPLC analysis was done to establish the fingerprint chromatogram of PJE and its in vitro radical scavenging activity was measured. PJE caused significant cytotoxicity in sarcoma-180 (S-180), A549, AGS, and MDA-MB435S cancer cells in vitro. Exploration of the mechanistic details in S-180 cells suggested that the reduced cell viability was mediated by induction of apoptosis. Increased expression of proapoptotic proteins such as p53, p21, Bax/Bcl2, cytochrome c (Cyt c), caspase 9, and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and decrease in proliferative and antiapoptotic markers (Ki-67, Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen [PCNA], Bcl-2) validated the anticancer effect of PJE. A decline in the relative fluorescence emission upon staining S-180 cells with Rhodamine 123 (Rh 123), enhanced expression of cytosolic Cyt c and mitochondrial Bax, and inhibition of apoptosis in the presence of caspase-9 inhibitor in PJE-treated cells indicated intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Liver function test and hepatic antioxidant enzymes demonstrated non-toxicity of PJE. Finally, the detection of PJE in sera by HPLC confirmed its bioavailability. PMID:27144503

  11. Reanalysis of Uranus' cloud scattering properties from IRTF/SpeX observations using a self-consistent scattering cloud retrieval scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, P. G. J.; Tice, D. S.; Fletcher, L. N.; Barstow, J. K.; Teanby, N. A.; Orton, G. S.; Davis, G. R.

    2015-04-01

    We have developed a new retrieval approach to modelling near-infrared spectra of Uranus that represents a significant improvement over previous modelling methods. We reanalysed IRTF/SpeX observations of Uranus observed in 2009 covering the wavelength range 0.8-1.8 μm and reported by Tice et al. (Tice, D.S., Irwin, P.G.J., Fletcher, L.N., Teanby, N.A., Hurley, J., Orton, G.S., Davis, G.R. [2013]. Icarus 223, 684-698). By retrieving the imaginary refractive index spectra of cloud particles we are able to consistently define the real part of the refractive index spectra, through a Kramers-Kronig analysis, and thus determine self-consistent extinction cross-section, single-scattering and phase-function spectra for the clouds and hazes in Uranus' atmosphere. We tested two different cloud-modelling schemes used in conjunction with the temperature/methane profile of Baines et al. (Baines, K.H., Mickelson, M.E., Larson, L.E., Ferguson, D.W. [1995]. Icarus 114, 328-340), a reanalysis of the Voyager-2 radio-occultation observations performed by Sromovsky, Fry and Kim (Sromovsky, L.A., Fry, P.M., Kim, J.H. [2011]. Icarus 215, 292-312), and a recent determination from Spitzer (Orton, G.S., Fletcher, L.N., Moses, J.I., Mainzer, A.K., Hines, D., Hammel, H.B., Martin-Torres, F.J., Burgdorf, M., Merlet, C., Line, M.R. [2014]. Icarus 243, 494-513). We find that both cloud-modelling schemes represent the observed centre-of-disc spectrum of Uranus well, and both require similar cloud scattering properties of the main cloud residing at ∼2 bars. However, a modified version of the Sromovsky, Fry and Kim (2011) model, with revised spectral properties of the lowest cloud layer, fits slightly better at shorter wavelengths and is more consistent with the expected vertical position of Uranus' methane cloud. We find that the bulk of the reflected radiance from Uranus arises from a thick cloud at approximately the 2 bar level, composed of particles that are significantly more absorbing at wavelengths λ > 1.0 μm than they are at shorter wavelengths λ < 1.0 μm. This spectral information provides a possible constraint on the identity of the main particle type, although we find that the scattering properties required are not consistent with any of the available laboratory data for pure NH3, NH4SH, or CH4 ice (all suspected of condensing in the upper troposphere). It is possible that the observed clouds are mixtures of tropospheric condensate mixed with photochemical products diffusing down from above, which masks their pure scattering features. Because there is no available laboratory data for pure H2S or PH3 ice (both of which might be present as well), they cannot be excluded as the cloud-forming species. We note, however, that their absorptive properties would have to be two orders of magnitude greater than the other measured ices at wavelengths greater than 1 μm to be consistent with our retrieval, which suggests that mixing with photochemical products may still be important.

  12. Protective Effect of Mangifera indica Linn., Cocos nucifera Linn., and Averrhoa carambola Linn. Extracts against Ultraviolet B-Induced Damage in Human Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Ronpirin, Chalinee; Pattarachotanant, Nattaporn; Tencomnao, Tewin

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the antioxidant activity of Mangifera indica Linn., Cocos nucifera Linn., and Averrhoa carambola Linn. and their biological effect on human keratinocytes affected by the ultraviolet B (UVB), a major cause of cell damage and skin cancer through induction of DNA damage, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and apoptosis. The richest antioxidant activity was found in ethanol fraction of M. indica (21.32 ± 0.66 mg QE/g dry weight), while the lowest one was found in aqueous fractions of M. indica and C. nucifera (1.76 ± 2.10 and 1.65 ± 0.38 mg QE/g dry weight, respectively). Ethanol and aqueous fractions of A. carambola (250 µg/mL) significantly reduced the number of apoptotic cells. The expression of cleaved caspase 3 in UVB-treated group was significantly greater than that in untreated group. Both fractions of A. carambola (50, 100, and 250 µg/mL) significantly decreased the expression of cleaved caspase 3. Regarding the induction of DNA repair, ethanol (100 and 250 µg/mL) and aqueous (50, 100 and 250 µg/mL) fractions of A. carambola significantly decreased the percentage of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD). Taken together, our results suggest that both fractions of A. carambola may be potentially developed for dermal applications. PMID:27057195

  13. Efficacy of PLGA-loaded apigenin nanoparticles in Benzo[a]pyrene and ultraviolet-B induced skin cancer of mice: mitochondria mediated apoptotic signalling cascades.

    PubMed

    Das, Sreemanti; Das, Jayeeta; Samadder, Asmita; Paul, Avijit; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2013-12-01

    Skin cancer is increasing at an alarming rate and becoming resistant to conventional chemotherapy necessitating improved drug delivery system. We loaded apigenin (Ap), a dietary flavonoid having anti-cancer property, with poly (lactic-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NAp) to explore if nano-encapsulation could enhance anti-carcinogenic effect against ultra-violet B (UVB) and Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) induced skin tumor and mitochondrial dysfunction in mice. Particle size, morphology and zeta potential of NAp were determined using dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy. Tumor incidence and multiplicity in UVB-BaP induced mice with/without NAp treatment were ascertained and their histolopathological sections and chromosomal aberrations were studied. ROS accumulation and mitochondrial functioning through relevant markers like mitochondrial transmembrane potential were analyzed. Mitochondrial volume changes/swelling, cytochrome c (cyt c) release, mRNA and protein expressions of Apaf-1, bax, bcl-2, cyt c, cleaved caspase-9 and 3 were studied. Results showed that NAp produced better effects than Ap, due to their smaller size, and faster mobility. NAp reduced tissue damage and frequency of chromosomal aberrations, increased ROS accumulation to mediate mitochondrial-apoptosis through modulation of several apoptotic markers and mitochondrial matrix swelling. NAp showed ameliorative potentials in combating skin cancer and therefore has greater prospect of use in therapeutic management of skin cancer. PMID:24120900

  14. Protective Effect of Mangifera indica Linn., Cocos nucifera Linn., and Averrhoa carambola Linn. Extracts against Ultraviolet B-Induced Damage in Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ronpirin, Chalinee; Pattarachotanant, Nattaporn

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the antioxidant activity of Mangifera indica Linn., Cocos nucifera Linn., and Averrhoa carambola Linn. and their biological effect on human keratinocytes affected by the ultraviolet B (UVB), a major cause of cell damage and skin cancer through induction of DNA damage, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and apoptosis. The richest antioxidant activity was found in ethanol fraction of M. indica (21.32 ± 0.66 mg QE/g dry weight), while the lowest one was found in aqueous fractions of M. indica and C. nucifera (1.76 ± 2.10 and 1.65 ± 0.38 mg QE/g dry weight, respectively). Ethanol and aqueous fractions of A. carambola (250 µg/mL) significantly reduced the number of apoptotic cells. The expression of cleaved caspase 3 in UVB-treated group was significantly greater than that in untreated group. Both fractions of A. carambola (50, 100, and 250 µg/mL) significantly decreased the expression of cleaved caspase 3. Regarding the induction of DNA repair, ethanol (100 and 250 µg/mL) and aqueous (50, 100 and 250 µg/mL) fractions of A. carambola significantly decreased the percentage of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD). Taken together, our results suggest that both fractions of A. carambola may be potentially developed for dermal applications. PMID:27057195

  15. Resveratrol enhances ultraviolet B-induced cell death through nuclear factor-{kappa}B pathway in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Preeti; Kalra, Neetu; Nigam, Nidhi; George, Jasmine; Ray, Ratan Singh; Hans, Rajendra K.; Prasad, Sahdeo; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2009-06-26

    Resveratrol has been reported to suppress cancer progression in several in vivo and in vitro models, whereas ultraviolet B (UVB), a major risk for skin cancer, is known to induce cell death in cancerous cells. Here, we investigated whether resveratrol can sensitize A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells to UVB-induced cell death. We examined the combined effect of UVB (30 mJ/cm{sup 2}) and resveratrol (60 {mu}M) on A431 cells. Exposure of A431 carcinoma cells to UVB radiation or resveratrol can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. However, the combination of resveratrol and UVB exposure was associated with increased proliferation inhibition of A431 cells compared with either agent alone. Furthermore, results showed that resveratrol and UVB treatment of A431 cells disrupted the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-{kappa}B) pathway by blocking phosphorylation of serine 536 and inactivating NF-{kappa}B and subsequent degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, which regulates the expression of survivin. Resveratrol and UVB treatment also decreased the phosphorylation of tyrosine 701 of the important transcription factor signal transducer activator of transcription (STAT1), which in turn inhibited translocation of phospho-STAT1 to the nucleus. Moreover, resveratrol/UVB also inhibited the metastatic protein LIMK1, which reduced the motility of A431 cells. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the combination of resveratrol and UVB act synergistically against skin cancer cells. Thus, resveratrol is a potential chemotherapeutic agent against skin carcinogenesis.

  16. A systems-biological study on the identification of safe and effective molecular targets for the reduction of ultraviolet B-induced skin pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-Sung; Goh, Myeong-Jin; Kim, Junil; Choi, Tae-Jun; Kwang Lee, Hae; Joo Na, Yong; Cho, Kwang-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Melanogenesis is the process of melanin synthesis through keratinocytes-melanocytes interaction, which is triggered by the damaging effect of ultraviolet-B (UVB) rays. It is known that melanogenesis influences diverse cellular responses, including cell survival and apoptosis, via complex mechanisms of feedback and crosstalk. Therefore, an attempt to suppress melanin production by modulating the melanogenesis pathway may induce perturbations in the apoptotic balance of the cells in response to UVB irradiation, which results in various skin diseases such as melasma, vitiligo, and skin cancer. To identify such appropriate target strategies for the reduction of UVB-induced melanin synthesis, we reconstructed the melanogenesis signaling network and developed a Boolean network model. Mathematical simulations of the melanogenesis network model revealed that the inhibition of beta-catenin in the melanocytes effectively reduce melanin production while having minimal influence on the apoptotic balance of the cells. Exposing cells to a beta-catenin inhibitor decreased pigmentation but did not significantly change the B-cell Chronic lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma 2 expression, a potent regulator of apoptotic balance. Thus, our systems analysis suggests that the inhibition of beta-catenin may be the most appropriate target strategy for the reduction of UVB-induced skin pigmentation. PMID:25980672

  17. Probing of cancer cell apoptosis by SERS and LSCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jian; Gu, Huaimin

    2009-07-01

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) can provide information of internal structures and chemical components from different kinds of samples. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) can show morphologic information of samples by high-resolution optical images with different focal planes. In this paper, the dynamic variation of cancer cells (HELA cells) in the apoptosis was first studied by combining SERS and LSCM. After gold nanoparticles (GNPS) uptake, HELA cells were divided into two groups, and were respectively studied at six different time points of cell apoptosis period by SERS and LSCM. The LSCM images of HELA cells obtained at different time points were analyzed, and the morphology varieties of HELA cells apoptosis were obtained. It suggests that HELA cells apoptosis gradually in the apoptosis period until they died. In addition, Raman spectra of HELA cells measured at different time points were also compared. It shows that some Raman signal peaks shift, and FWHM of Raman peaks change too. The variation of internal structures and chemical constituents were analyzed according to the shifts and FWHM of the Raman peaks. The internal dynamic information and morphologic varieties from HELA cells apoptosis gained by combining SERS and LSCM will make us to understand cancer cell apoptosis throughly.

  18. Identification of apoptosis-related PLZF target genes

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardo, Maria Victoria; Yelo, Estefania; Gimeno, Lourdes; Campillo, Jose Antonio; Parrado, Antonio . E-mail: antonio.parrado@carm.es

    2007-07-27

    The PLZF gene encodes a BTB/POZ-zinc finger-type transcription factor, involved in physiological development, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. In this paper, we investigate proliferation, survival, and gene expression regulation in stable clones from the human haematopoietic K562, DG75, and Jurkat cell lines with inducible expression of PLZF. In Jurkat cells, but not in K562 and DG75 cells, PLZF induced growth suppression and apoptosis in a cell density-dependent manner. Deletion of the BTB/POZ domain of PLZF abrogated growth suppression and apoptosis. PLZF was expressed with a nuclear speckled pattern distinctively in the full-length PLZF-expressing Jurkat clones, suggesting that the nuclear speckled localization is required for PLZF-induced apoptosis. By microarray analysis, we identified that the apoptosis-inducer TP53INP1, ID1, and ID3 genes were upregulated, and the apoptosis-inhibitor TERT gene was downregulated. The identification of apoptosis-related PLZF target genes may have biological and clinical relevance in cancer typified by altered PLZF expression.

  19. Viruses, apoptosis, and neuroinflammation--a double-edged sword.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Peter G E

    2015-02-01

    Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is a fundamental and widespread cell biological process that is distinct from cell necrosis and can be induced by a wide variety of stimuli including viral infections. Apoptosis may occur via either the intrinsic or extrinsic pathways and confers several advantages to the virally infected host including the prevention of further viral propagation and the potential inhibition and resolution of inflammatory processes. Several viruses have been shown to have the capacity to induce apoptosis in susceptible cells including herpes simplex virus, Varicella-zoster virus, rabies virus, human immunodeficiency virus, and reovirus. Apoptosis has also been observed in human African trypanosomiasis which is an infection caused by a protozoan parasite. The mechanisms leading to apoptosis may differ depending on the type of infection. Apoptosis has been reported in several neurodegenerative diseases and also psychiatric disorders but the true clinical significance of such observations is not certain, and, though interesting, it is very difficult to ascribe causation in these conditions. The presence of inflammation in the central nervous system in any neurological condition, including those associated with a viral infection, is not necessarily an absolute marker of serious disease and the notion of 'good' versus 'bad' inflammation is considered to be valid in some circumstances. The precise relationship between viruses, apoptosis, and inflammation is viewed as a complex one requiring further investigation to unravel and understand its nature. PMID:25604493

  20. An inflammatory micro-environment promotes human adipocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Keuper, Michaela; Blüher, Matthias; Schön, Michael R; Möller, Peter; Dzyakanchuk, Anna; Amrein, Kurt; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Wabitsch, Martin; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela

    2011-06-01

    Obesity-associated macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue is responsible for both local and systemic inflammation. Recent findings suggest fat cell apoptosis as an initiator of macrophage recruitment. Here, we investigated the effects of an inflammatory micro-environment on fat cells using human THP-1 macrophages and SGBS adipocytes. Macrophage-secreted factors induced insulin resistance, inhibited insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation, and induced apoptosis of adipocytes. The apoptosis-inducing effect was even more pronounced in direct co-cultures of adipocytes and macrophages. Our data suggest a link between insulin resistance and apoptosis sensitivity. Accordingly, pharmacological and genetic inhibition of insulin signaling at the level of Akt2 sensitized adipocytes to apoptosis induction by macrophage-secreted factors. In conclusion, we describe here a novel interaction of macrophages and fat cells, i.e. induction of apoptosis. Our data suggest a feed-forward cycle in which macrophages further drive the inflammatory process by inducing insulin resistance and concomitant apoptosis of adipocytes. PMID:21501656

  1. Lysine methyltransferase Smyd2 suppresses p53-dependent cardiomyocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Sajjad, Amna; Novoyatleva, Tatyana; Vergarajauregui, Silvia; Troidl, Christian; Schermuly, Ralph T; Tucker, Haley O; Engel, Felix B

    2014-11-01

    Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is an essential physiological process for proper embryogenesis as well as for homeostasis during aging. In addition, apoptosis is one of the major mechanisms causing cell loss in pathophysiological conditions such as heart failure. Thus, inhibition of apoptosis is an important approach for preventive and therapeutic strategies. Here we show that the histone 3 lysine 4- and lysine 36-specific methyltransferase Smyd2 acts as an endogenous antagonistic player of p53-dependent cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Smyd2 protein levels were significantly decreased in cardiomyocytes upon cobalt chloride-induced apoptosis or myocardial infarction, while p53 expression was enhanced. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Smyd2 in cultured cardiomyocytes further enhanced cobalt chloride-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. In contrast, Smyd2 overexpression resulted in marked methylation of p53 and prevented its accumulation as well as apoptotic cell death in an Hsp90-independent manner. Moreover, overexpression, of Smyd2, but not Smyd2Y240F lacking a methyl transferase activity, significantly rescued CoCl2-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cardioblasts. Finally, Smyd2 cardiomyocyte-specific deletion in vivo promoted apoptotic cell death upon myocardial infarction, which correlated with enhanced expression of p53 and pro-apoptotic Bax. Collectively, our data indicate Smyd2 as a cardioprotective protein by methylating p53. PMID:25014164

  2. Apoptosis of cholangiocytes modulated by thioredoxin of carcinogenic liver fluke.

    PubMed

    Matchimakul, Pitchaya; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Suttiprapa, Sutas; Mann, Victoria H; Popratiloff, Anastas; Laha, Thewarach; Pimenta, Rafael N; Cochran, Christina J; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Sripa, Banchob; Brindley, Paul J

    2015-08-01

    Chronic infection with the food-borne liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, frequently induces cancer of the bile ducts, cholangiocarcinoma. Opisthorchiasis is endemic in Thailand, Lao PDR, Cambodia and Vietnam, where eating undercooked freshwater fish carrying the juvenile stage of this pathogen leads to human infection. Because inhibition of apoptosis facilitates carcinogenesis, this study investigated modulation by thioredoxin from O. viverrini of apoptosis of bile duct epithelial cells, cholangiocytes. Cells of a cholangiocyte line were incubated with the parasite enzyme after which they were exposed hydrogen peroxide. Oxidative stress-induced apoptosis was monitored using flow cytometry, growth in real time and imaging of living cells using laser confocal microscopy. Immunolocalization revealed liver fluke thioredoxin within cholangiocytes. Cells exposed to thioredoxin downregulated apoptotic genes in the mitogen activated protein kinases pathway and upregulated anti-apoptosis-related genes including apoptosis signaling kinase 1, caspase 9, caspase 8, caspase 3, survivin and others. Western blots of immunoprecipitates of cell lysates revealed binding of thioredoxin to apoptosis signaling kinase 1. Together the findings indicated that thioredoxin from O. viverrini inhibited oxidative stress-induced apoptosis of bile duct epithelial cells, which supports a role for this liver fluke oxidoreductase in opisthorchiasis-induced cholangiocarcinogenesis. PMID:26007234

  3. Retinoids induce Nur77-dependent apoptosis in mouse thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Beta; Tth, Katalin; Sarang, Zsolt; Garabuczi, va; Szondy, Zsuzsa

    2015-03-01

    Nur77 is a transcription factor, which plays a determinant role in mediating T cell receptor-induced cell death of thymocytes. In addition to regulation of transcription, Nur77 contributes to apoptosis induction by targeting mitochondria, where it can convert Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein into a proapoptotic molecule. Previous studies have demonstrated that retinoids are actively produced in the mouse thymus and can induce a transcription-dependent apoptosis in mouse thymocytes. Here we show that retinoic acids induce the expression of Nur77, and retinoid-induced apoptosis is completely dependent on Nur77, as retinoids were unable to induce apoptosis in Nur77 null thymocytes. In wild-type thymocytes retinoids induced enhanced expression of the apoptosis-related genes FasL, TRAIL, NDG-1, Gpr65 and Bid, all of them in a Nur77-dependent manner. The combined action of these proteins led to Caspase 8-dependent Bid cleavage in the mitochondria. In addition, we could demonstrate the Nur77-dependent induction of STAT1 leading to enhanced Bim expression, and the mitochondrial translocation of Nur77 leading to the exposure of the Bcl-2/BH3 domain. The retinoid-induced apoptosis was dependent on both Caspase 8 and STAT1. Our data together indicate that retinoids induce a Nur77-dependent cell death program in thymocytes activating the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. PMID:25576519

  4. Glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis of healthy and malignant lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lindsay K.; Cidlowski, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids exert a wide range of physiological effects, including the induction of apoptosis in lymphocytes. The progression of glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis is a multi-component process requiring contributions from both genomic and cytoplasmic signaling events. There is significant evidence indicating that the transactivation activity of the glucocorticoid receptor is required for the initiation of glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis. However, the rapid cytoplasmic effects of glucocorticoids may also contribute to the glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis-signaling pathway. Endogenous glucocorticoids shape the T-cell repertoire through both the induction of apoptosis by neglect during thymocyte maturation and the antagonism of T-cell receptor (TCR)-induced apoptosis during positive selection. Owing to their ability to induce apoptosis in lymphocytes, synthetic glucocorticoids are widely used in the treatment of haematological malignancies. Glucocorticoid chemotherapy is limited, however, by the emergence of glucocorticoid resistance. The development of novel therapies designed to overcome glucocorticoid resistance will dramatically improve the efficacy of glucocorticoid therapy in the treatment of haematological malignancies. PMID:20541659

  5. Redox Regulation of Apoptosis before and after Cytochrome C Release

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Quan; Crosby, Meredith; Almasan, Alex

    2005-01-01

    Programmed cell death, or apoptosis, is one of the most studied areas of modern biology. Apoptosis is a genetically regulated process, which plays an essential role in the development and homeostasis of higher organisms. Mitochondria, known to play a central role in regulating cellular metabolism, was found to be critical for regulating apoptosis induced under both physiological and pathological conditions. Mitochondria are a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) but they can also serve as its target during the apoptosis process. Release of apoptogenic factors from mitochondria, the best known of which is cytochrome c, leads to assembly of a large apoptosis-inducing complex called the apoptosome. Cysteine proteases (called caspases) are recruited to this complex and, following their activation by proteolytic cleavage, activate other caspases, which in turn target for specific cleavage a large number of cellular proteins. The redox regulation of apoptosis during and after cytochrome c release is an area of intense investigation. This review summarizes what is known about the biological role of ROS and its targets in apoptosis with an emphasis on its intricate connections to mitochondria and the basic components of cell death. PMID:16467897

  6. Role of Siglec-7 in Apoptosis in Human Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Kim Anh; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Palle, Sabine; Anselme-Bertrand, Isabelle; Arthaud, Charles-Antoine; Chavarin, Patricia; Pozzetto, Bruno; Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    Background Platelets participate in tissue repair and innate immune responses. Sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs) are well-characterized I-type lectins, which control apoptosis. Methodology/Principal Findings We characterized the expression of Siglec-7 in human platelets isolated from healthy volunteers using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Siglec-7 is primarily expressed on α granular membranes and colocalized with CD62P. Siglec-7 expression was increased upon platelet activation and correlated closely with CD62P expression. Cross-linking Siglec-7 with its ligand, ganglioside, resulted in platelet apoptosis without any significant effects on activation, aggregation, cell morphology by electron microscopy analysis or secretion. We show that ganglioside triggered four key pathways leading to apoptosis in human platelets: (i) mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) depolarization; (ii) elevated expression of pro-apoptotic Bax and Bak proteins with reduced expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein; (iii) phosphatidylserine exposure and (iv), microparticle formation. Inhibition of NAPDH oxidase, PI3K, or PKC rescued platelets from apoptosis induced by Siglec-7 recruitment, suggesting that the platelet receptors P2Y1 and GPIIbIIIa are essential for ganglioside-induced platelet apoptosis. Conclusions/Significance The present work characterizes the role of Siglec-7 and platelet receptors in regulating apoptosis and death. Because some platelet pathology involves apoptosis (idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and possibly storage lesions), Siglec-7 might be a molecular target for therapeutic intervention/prevention. PMID:25230315

  7. Roles of Apoptosis and Cellular Senescence in Cancer and Aging.

    PubMed

    Cerella, Claudia; Grandjenette, Cindy; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Cancer and aging are two similar processes representing the final outcome of timedependent accumulation of various irreversible dysfunctions, mainly caused by stress-induced DNA and cellular damages. Apoptosis and senescence are two types of cellular response to damages that are altered in both cancer and aging, albeit through different mechanisms. Carcinogenesis is associated with a progressive reduction in the ability of the cells to trigger apoptosis and senescence. In contrast, in aging tissues, there is an increased accumulation of senescent cells, and the nature of apoptosis deregulation varies depending on the tissue. Thus, the prevailing model suggests that apoptosis and cellular senescence function as two essential tumor-suppressor mechanisms, ensuring the health of the individual during early and reproductive stages of life, but become detrimental and promote aging later in life. The recent discovery that various anticancer agents, including canonical inducers of apoptosis, act also as inducers of cellular senescence indicates that pro-senescence strategies may have applications in cancer prevention therapy. Therefore, dissection of the mechanisms mediating the delicate balance between apoptosis and cellular senescence will be beneficial in the therapeutic exploitation of both processes in the development of future anticancer and anti-aging strategies, including minimizing the side effects of such strategies. Here, we provide an overview of the roles of apoptosis and cellular senescence in cancer and aging. PMID:25642721

  8. TRPV1 receptors mediate particulate matter-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Agopyan, N; Head, J; Yu, S; Simon, S A

    2004-03-01

    Exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) is a world-wide health problem mainly because it produces adverse cardiovascular and respiratory effects that frequently result in morbidity. Despite many years of epidemiological and basic research, the mechanisms underlying PM toxicity remain largely unknown. To understand some of these mechanisms, we measured PM-induced apoptosis and necrosis in normal human airway epithelial cells and sensory neurons from both wild-type mice and mice lacking TRPV1 receptors using Alexa Fluor 488-conjugated annexin V and propidium iodide labeling, respectively. Exposure of environmental PMs containing residual oil fly ash and ash from Mount St. Helens was found to induce apoptosis, but not necrosis, as a consequence of sustained calcium influx through TRPV1 receptors. Apoptosis was completely prevented by inhibiting TRPV1 receptors with capsazepine or by removing extracellular calcium or in sensory neurons from TRPV1(-/-) mice. Binding of either one of the PMs to the cell membrane induced a capsazepine-sensitive increase in cAMP. PM-induced apoptosis was augmented upon the inhibition of PKA. PKA inhibition on its own also induced apoptosis, thereby suggesting that this pathway may be endogenously protective against apoptosis. In summary, it was found that inhibiting TRPV1 receptors prevents PM-induced apoptosis, thereby providing a potential mechanism to reduce their toxicity. PMID:14633515

  9. miR-125b controls apoptosis and temozolomide resistance by targeting TNFAIP3 and NKIRAS2 in glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Haemmig, S; Baumgartner, U; Glück, A; Zbinden, S; Tschan, M P; Kappeler, A; Mariani, L; Vajtai, I; Vassella, E

    2014-01-01

    Diffusely infiltrating gliomas are among the most prognostically discouraging neoplasia in human. Temozolomide (TMZ) in combination with radiotherapy is currently used for the treatment of glioblastoma (GBM) patients, but less than half of the patients respond to therapy and chemoresistance develops rapidly. Epigenetic silencing of the O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) has been associated with longer survival in GBM patients treated with TMZ, but nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)-mediated survival signaling and TP53 mutations contribute significantly to TMZ resistance. Enhanced NF-κB is in part owing to downregulation of negative regulators of NF-κB activity, including Tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3) and NF-κB inhibitor interacting RAS-like 2 (NKIRAS2). Here we provide a novel mechanism independent of TP53 and MGMT by which oncogenic miR-125b confers TMZ resistance by targeting TNFAIP3 and NKIRAS2. GBM cells overexpressing miR-125b showed increased NF-κB activity and upregulation of anti-apoptotic and cell cycle genes. This was significantly associated with resistance of GBM cells to TNFα- and TNF-related inducing ligand-induced apoptosis as well as resistance to TMZ. Conversely, overexpression of anti-miR-125b resulted in cell cycle arrest, increased apoptosis and increased sensitivity to TMZ, indicating that endogenous miR-125b is sufficient to control these processes. GBM cells overexpressing TNFAIP3 and NKIRAS2 were refractory to miR-125b-induced apoptosis resistance as well as TMZ resistance, indicating that both genes are relevant targets of miR-125b. In GBM tissues, high miR-125b expression was significantly correlated with nuclear NF-κB confirming that miR-125b is implicated in NF-κB signaling. Most remarkably, miR-125b overexpression was clearly associated with shorter overall survival of patients treated with TMZ, suggesting that this microRNA is an important predictor of response to therapy. PMID:24901050

  10. Erdr1 Suppresses Murine Melanoma Growth via Regulation of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joohyun; Jung, Min Kyung; Park, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Kyung Eun; Cho, Daeho

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma, one of the aggressive cancers, is known to be resistant to chemotherapy. Because of its aggressive nature, effectively inducing apoptosis is necessary to treat melanoma. Erythroid differentiation regulator 1 (Erdr1) is known to be a stress-related survival factor exhibiting anti-cancer effects in several cancers. However, little is known about the functions and underlying mechanisms of Erdr1 so far. To demonstrate the effect of Erdr1 in melanoma apoptosis, recombinant murine Erdr1 was injected into mice implanted with B16F10 melanoma cells. In vivo tumor growth was significantly inhibited in mice injected with Erdr1 compared to the control. In addition, the tumor from Erdr1-injected mice showed an increased level of apoptosis. Accordingly, apoptosis-regulating factors including anti-apoptotic marker Bcl-2 and pro-apoptotic marker Bax in the tumor tissues were examined. As expected, the decreased level of Bcl-2 and increased level of Bax were detected in tumors within the mice injected with Erdr1. Based on the in vivo study, the role of Erdr1 in tumor apoptosis was further tested by incubating it with cells of the murine melanoma cell line B16F10. Erdr1-induced apoptosis in B16F10 cells was observed. Additionally, Erdr1 downregulated STAT3 activity, inhibiting apoptosis via regulation of the Bcl-2 family. Overall, data demonstrate that Erdr1 induced murine melanoma apoptosis through the regulation of Bcl-2 and Bax. These findings suggest that Erdr1 is a novel regulator of apoptosis in melanoma. PMID:26784177

  11. Characterization of radiation-induced Apoptosis in rodent cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Min; Chen, Changhu; Ling, C.C.

    1997-03-01

    For REC:myc(ch1), Rat1 and Rat1:myc{sub b} cells, we determined the events in the development of radiation-induced apoptosis to be in the following order: cell division followed by chromatin condensation, membrane blebbing, loss of adhesion and the uptake of vital dye. Experimental data which were obtained using {sup 4}He ions of well defined energies and which compared the dependence of apoptosis and clonogenic survival on {sup 4}He range strongly suggested that in our cells both apoptosis and loss of clonogenic survival resulted from radiation damage to the cell nucleus. Corroboratory evidence was that BrdU incorporation sensitized these cells to radiation-induced apoptosis. Comparing the dose response for apoptosis and the clonogenic survival curves for Rat1 and Rat1:myc{sub b} cells, we concluded that radiation-induced cell inactivation as assayed by clonogenic survival, and that a modified linear-quadratic model, proposed previously, modeled such a contribution effectively. In the same context, the selective increase in radiation-induced apoptosis. Comparing the dose response for apoptosis and the clonogenic survival curves for Rat1 and Rat1:myc{sub b} cells, we concluded that radiation-induced apoptosis contributed to the overall radiation-induced cell inactivation as assayed by clonogenic survival, and that a modified linear-quadratic model, proposed previously, modeled such a contribution effectively. In the same context, the selective increase in radiation-induced apoptosis during late S and G{sub 2} phases reduced the relative radioresistance observed for clonogenic survival during late S and G{sub 2} phases. 30 refs., 8 figs.

  12. Iron dysregulation combined with aging prevents sepsis-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Javadi, Pardis; Buchman, Timothy G.; Stromberg, Paul E.; Turnbull, Isaiah R.; Vyas, Dinesh; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Karl, Irene E.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2005-01-01

    Background Sepsis, iron loading and aging cause independent increases in gut epithelial and splenic apoptosis. It is unknown how their combination will affect apoptosis and systemic cytokine levels. Methods Hfe−/− mice (a murine homolog of hemochromatosis) abnormally accumulate iron in their tissues. Aged (24–26 months) or mature (16–18 months) Hfe−/− mice and wild type (WT) littermates were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) or sham laparotomy. Intestine, spleen, and blood were harvested 24 hours later and assessed for apoptosis and cytokine levels. Results Gut epithelial and splenic apoptosis were low in both aged septic and sham Hfe−/− mice, regardless of the amount of iron in their diet. Mature septic WT mice had increased apoptosis compared to age-matched sham WT mice. Mature septic Hfe−/− mice had similar levels of intestinal cell death to age-matched septic WT mice but higher levels of splenic apoptosis. Apoptosis was significantly lower in septic aged Hfe−/− mice than septic mature Hfe−/− animals. Interleukin-6 was elevated in septic aged Hfe−/− mice compared to sham mice. Conclusions Although sepsis, chronic iron dysregulation, and aging each increase gut and splenic apoptosis, their combination yields cell death levels similar to sham animals despite the fact that aged Hfe−/− mice are able to mount an inflammatory response following CLP and mature Hfe−/− mice have elevated sepsis-induced apoptosis. Combining sepsis with two risk factors that ordinarily increase cell death and increase mortality in CLP yields an apoptotic response that could not have been predicted based upon each element in isolation. PMID:15921699

  13. Apoptosis of circulating lymphocytes during pediatric cardiac surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocsi, J.; Pipek, M.; Hambsch, J.; Schneider, P.; Tárnok, A.

    2006-02-01

    There is a constant need for clinical diagnostic systems that enable to predict disease course for preventative medicine. Apoptosis, programmed cell death, is the end point of the cell's response to different induction and leads to changes in the cell morphology that can be rapidly detected by optical systems. We tested whether apoptosis of T-cells in the peripheral blood is useful as predictor and compared different preparation and analytical techniques. Surgical trauma is associated with elevated apoptosis of circulating leukocytes. Increased apoptosis leads to partial removal of immune competent cells and could therefore in part be responsible for reduced immune defence. Cardiovascular surgery with but not without cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) induces transient immunosuppression. Its effect on T-cell apoptosis has not been shown yet. Flow-cytometric data of blood samples from 107 children (age 3-16 yr.) who underwent cardiac surgery with (78) or without (29) CPB were analysed. Apoptotic T-lymphocytes were detected based on light scatter and surface antigen (CD45/CD3) expression (ClinExpImmunol2000;120:454). Results were compared to staining with CD3 antibodies alone and in the absence of antibodies. T-cell apoptosis rate was comparable when detected with CD45/CD3 or CD3 alone, however not in the absence of CD3. Patients with but not without CPB surgery had elevated lymphocyte apoptosis. T-cell apoptosis increased from 0.47% (baseline) to 0.97% (1 day postoperatively). In CPB patients with complication 1.10% significantly higher (ANOVA p=0.01) comparing to CPB patients without complications. Quantitation of circulating apoptotic cells based on light scatter seems an interesting new parameter for diagnosis. Increased apoptosis of circulating lymphocytes and neutrophils further contributes to the immune suppressive response to surgery with CPB. (Support: MP, Deutsche Herzstiftung, Frankfurt, Germany)

  14. Rapid screening of mycotoxins in liquid milk and milk powder by automated size-exclusion SPE-UPLC-MS/MS and quantification of matrix effects over the whole chromatographic run.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiupin; Li, Peiwu

    2015-04-15

    An automated, size-exclusion solid phase extraction (SPE)-UPLC-MS/MS protocol without pre-treatment of samples was developed to screen for four mycotoxins (OTA, ZEN, AFB1, and AFM1) in liquid milk and milk powder. Firstly, a mixed macropore-silica gel cartridge was established as a size-exclusion SPE column. The proposed methodology could be a candidate in green analytical chemistry because it saves on manpower and organic solvent. Permanent post-column infusion of mycotoxin standards was used to quantify matrix effects throughout the chromatographic run. Matrix-matched calibration could effectively compensate for matrix effects, which may be caused by liquid milk or milk powder matrix. Recovery of the four mycotoxins in fortified liquid milk was in the range 89-120% and RSD 2-9%. The LOD for the four mycotoxins in liquid milk and milk powder were 0.05-2 ng L(-1) and 0.25-10 ng kg(-1), respectively. The LOQ for the four mycotoxins in liquid milk and milk powder were 0.1-5 ng L(-1) and 0.5-25 ng kg(-1), respectively. PMID:25466104

  15. Emergence of the Epidemic Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strain USA300 Coincides with Horizontal Transfer of the Arginine Catabolic Mobile Element and speG-mediated Adaptations for Survival on Skin

    PubMed Central

    Planet, Paul J.; LaRussa, Samuel J.; Dana, Ali; Smith, Hannah; Xu, Amy; Ryan, Chanelle; Uhlemann, Anne-Catrin; Boundy, Sam; Goldberg, Julia; Narechania, Apurva; Kulkarni, Ritwij; Ratner, Adam J.; Geoghegan, Joan A.; Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis; Prince, Alice

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) is the largest genomic region distinguishing epidemic USA300 strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from other S. aureus strains. However, the functional relevance of ACME to infection and disease has remained unclear. Using phylogenetic analysis, we have shown that the modular segments of ACME were assembled into a single genetic locus in Staphylococcus epidermidis and then horizontally transferred to the common ancestor of USA300 strains in an extremely recent event. Acquisition of one ACME gene, speG, allowed USA300 strains to withstand levels of polyamines (e.g., spermidine) produced in skin that are toxic to other closely related S. aureus strains. speG-mediated polyamine tolerance also enhanced biofilm formation, adherence to fibrinogen/fibronectin, and resistance to antibiotic and keratinocyte-mediated killing. We suggest that these properties gave USA300 a major selective advantage during skin infection and colonization, contributing to the extraordinary evolutionary success of this clone. PMID:24345744

  16. Comprehensive Study of Volatile Compounds in Two Australian Rosé Wines: Aroma Extract Dilution Analysis (AEDA) of Extracts Prepared Using Solvent-Assisted Flavor Evaporation (SAFE) or Headspace Solid-Phase Extraction (HS-SPE).

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaming; Gambetta, Joanna M; Jeffery, David W

    2016-05-18

    Two rosé wines, representing a tropical and a fruity/floral style, were chosen from a previous study for further exploration by aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA) and quantitative analysis. Volatiles were extracted using either liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) followed by solvent-assisted flavor evaporation (SAFE) or a recently developed dynamic headspace (HS) sampling method utilizing solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges. AEDA was conducted using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry (GC-MS/O) and a total of 51 aroma compounds with a flavor dilution (FD) factor ≥3 were detected. Quantitative analysis of 92 volatiles was undertaken in both wines for calculation of odor activity values. The fruity and floral wine style was mostly driven by 2-phenylethanol, β-damascenone, and a range of esters, whereas 3-SHA and several volatile acids were seen as essential for the tropical style. When extraction methods were compared, HS-SPE was as efficient as SAFE for extracting most esters and higher alcohols, which were associated with fruity and floral characters, but it was difficult to capture volatiles with greater polarity or higher boiling point that may still be important to perceived wine aroma. PMID:27141971

  17. Edible seaweed as future functional food: Identification of α-glucosidase inhibitors by combined use of high-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition profiling and HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bingrui; Kongstad, Kenneth T; Wiese, Stefanie; Jäger, Anna K; Staerk, Dan

    2016-07-15

    Crude chloroform, ethanol and acetone extracts of nineteen seaweed species were screened for their antioxidant and α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Samples showing more than 60% α-glucosidase inhibitory activity, at a concentration of 1mg/ml, were furthermore investigated using high-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition profiling combined with high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR-bioassay/HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR). The results showed Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesicolosus to be rich in antioxidants, equaling a Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity of 135 and 108mMTroloxmg(-1) extract, respectively. HR-bioassay/HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR showed the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of A. nodosum, F. vesoculosus, Laminaria digitata, Laminaria japonica and Undaria pinnatifida to be caused by phlorotannins as well as fatty acids - with oleic acid, linoleic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid being the most potent with IC50 values of 0.069, 0.075 and 0.10mM, respectively, and showing a mixed-type inhibition mode. PMID:26948583

  18. Morphological and cytochemical determination of cell death by apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Sobel, Burton E.; Budd, Ralph C.

    2007-01-01

    Several modes of cell death are now recognized, including necrosis, apoptosis, and autophagy. Oftentimes the distinctions between these various modes may not be apparent, although the precise mode may be physiologically important. Accordingly, it is often desirable to be able to classify the mode of cell death. Apoptosis was originally defined by structural alterations in cells observable by transmitted light and electron microscopy. Today, a wide variety of imaging and cytochemical techniques are available for the investigation of apoptosis. This review will highlight many of these methods, and provide a critique on the advantages and disadvantages associated with them for the specific identification of apoptotic cells in culture and tissues. PMID:18000678

  19. Isatin derivatives with activity against apoptosis-resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Evdokimov, Nikolai M; Magedov, Igor V; McBrayer, Dominic; Kornienko, Alexander

    2016-03-15

    In a search of small molecules active against apoptosis-resistant cancer cells, a series of isatin-based heterocyclic compounds were synthesized and found to inhibit proliferation of cancer cell lines resistant to apoptosis. The synthesis of these compounds involved a condensation of commercially available, active methylene heterocycles with isatin proceeding in moderate to excellent yields. The heterocyclic scaffolds prepared in the current investigation appear to be a useful starting point for the development of agents to fight cancers with apoptosis resistance, and thus, associated with dismal prognoses. PMID:26883150

  20. Epithelial Cell Apoptosis in Recurrent Aphthous Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Al-Samadi, A; Drozd, A; Salem, A; Hietanen, J; Häyrinen-Immonen, R; Konttinen, Y T

    2015-07-01

    A recurrent aphthous ulcer (RAU) is a common inflammatory ulcerative lesion affecting oral mucosa. We studied the eventual