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Sample records for species detection spectroscopy

  1. DNA-based species detection capabilities using laser transmission spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, A. R.; Barnes, M. A.; Li, F.; Egan, S. P.; Tanner, C. E.; Ruggiero, S. T.; Feder, J. L.; Lodge, D. M.

    2013-01-01

    Early detection of invasive species is critical for effective biocontrol to mitigate potential ecological and economic damage. Laser transmission spectroscopy (LTS) is a powerful solution offering real-time, DNA-based species detection in the field. LTS can measure the size, shape and number of nanoparticles in a solution and was used here to detect size shifts resulting from hybridization of the polymerase chain reaction product to nanoparticles functionalized with species-specific oligonucleotide probes or with the species-specific oligonucleotide probes alone. We carried out a series of DNA detection experiments using the invasive freshwater quagga mussel (Dreissena bugensis) to evaluate the capability of the LTS platform for invasive species detection. Specifically, we tested LTS sensitivity to (i) DNA concentrations of a single target species, (ii) the presence of a target species within a mixed sample of other closely related species, (iii) species-specific functionalized nanoparticles versus species-specific oligonucleotide probes alone, and (iv) amplified DNA fragments versus unamplified genomic DNA. We demonstrate that LTS is a highly sensitive technique for rapid target species detection, with detection limits in the picomolar range, capable of successful identification in multispecies samples containing target and non-target species DNA. These results indicate that the LTS DNA detection platform will be useful for field application of target species. Additionally, we find that LTS detection is effective with species-specific oligonucleotide tags alone or when they are attached to polystyrene nanobeads and with both amplified and unamplified DNA, indicating that the technique may also have versatility for broader applications. PMID:23015524

  2. Detection of peroxy species in ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chenery, D H

    1997-03-01

    Samples of gamma-sterilized ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) have been examined using infrared and Raman spectroscopies. Infrared spectra of microtomed sections of a thick segment of material exhibited carbonyl bands whose intensity was consistent with published data. Raman spectroscopy has been used for the first time to detect oxidized precursors to the commonly found carbonyl species. Gamma-sterilized plates examined as soon as possible after sterilization exhibited bands consistent with epoxide, alcohol and three different peroxy-containing species. The detection of these species in irradiated UHMWPE is reported for the first time and demonstrates that oxidation of this material proceeds via a gamma-induced free radical mechanism, as has been widely assumed. PMID:9061182

  3. CARS (coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy) detection of gaseous species for diamond deposition process

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, W.C.; Eckbreth, A.C. )

    1989-01-01

    In order to understand the complicated chemical and physical processes that occur during the deposition of hard face coatings such as diamond, diagnostics that are remote, nonintrusive and sensitive to potential chemical species are necessary. One particularly promising approach is coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) useful for measurements of temperature and species concentrations. Results to be described will include CARS measurements on a PACVD reactor used for depositing high quality diamond films. A mixture of acetylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) and Argon, tested over a range of total pressures down to 0.1 Torr, was used to calibrate the CARS system. With the existing CARS system, detectivity of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} to 5 mtorr was demonstrated. This paper describes details of the scanned narrowband colinear CARS system and examples of CARS spectra obtained for CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} species under rf PACVD diamond deposition conditions and also using an alternate filament assisted technique.

  4. Dynamic detection of species concentration and distribution in pre-combustion gases by laser spectroscopy of infrared absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Anhua; Aung, Kendrick

    2005-08-01

    This paper describes the development of spectrum computation and analysis for a single model and untunable laser spectroscopy to detect the species concentration and space distribution in pre-combustion gases. Absorption spectroscopy using infrared laser diode provides a dynamic, non-instructive, and in situ way to determine the concentration and distribution of the mixture of fuel gas and O2 in the pre-combustion gas stream. For species, wavelength suitable for absorption spectroscopy is determined using the spectra distributions of the species provided in HITRAN database. Inverse method and Abel algorithm are employed separately to retrieve the concentration of species and calculate the distribution of the measured gas. The results of the paper provide the foundation to develop a dynamic diagnostic instrument to monitor the state of gaseous species in hostile environments such as various industrial combustion systems.

  5. Isotopologue-Sensitive Detection Using Chirped-Pulse Ft-Mw Spectroscopy: Minor Species of Propofol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesarri, Alberto; Neill, Justin; Muckle, Matt; Shipman, Steven T.; Pate, Brooks H.; Suenram, Richard D.; Caminati, Walther

    2009-06-01

    The capabilities of chirped-pulse FT-microwave spectroscopy to achieve full-bandwidth (11 GHz) isotopologue-sensitive detection have been tested on the 13-heavy atoms molecule of propofol (2,6-diisopropylphenol). The analysis of the rotational spectrum using moderate signal averaging (10 k FIDs) had previously detected the presence of two conformers arising from the combined internal rotations of the hydroxyl and the two isopropyl groups. In the new experiment reported here 600 k FID's were coherently averaged, using three pulsed nozzle sources and reading multiple FIDs per sample injection cycle to reduce the total acquisition time and sample consumption. The new spectrum revealed a very large number of weak transitions, suggesting that full-band ^{13}C sensitivity had been surpassed. The new data have resulted in the assignment of a third conformer of propofol, followed by all twelve ^{13}C-monosubstituted species in natural abundance for the most stable conformer. The isotopic information confirmed the molecular structure for the preferred conformation of propofol, validating the ab initio predictions for this compound. The potential function for the OH internal rotation has been determined using a flexible model. A. Lesarri, S. T. Shipman, G. G. Brown, L. Alvarez-Valtierra, R. D. Suenram and B. H. Pate, 63^rd OSU Int. Symp. On Mol. Spectrosc., Columbus, OH, 2008, RH07 In the

  6. Detection of carotenoids present in blood of various animal species using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaqat, Maryam; Younus, Ayesha; Saleem, Muhammad; Rashid, Imaad; Yaseen, Maria; Jabeen, Saher

    Raman spectroscopy is simple stable powerful diagnostic tool for body fluids, tissues and other biomolecules. Human blood possesses different kind of carotenoids that play a key role for protecting the cells from damaging by different viral and bacterial diseases. Carotenoids are antioxidative components which are capable to overcome the attack of different free radicals and reactive oxygen species. Carotenoids are not prepared by human body, therefore it is recommended to eat carotenoids enrich vegetable foods. No standard data is available on the concentration of useful carotenoids component in non-vegetable consumed items. In present research work, Raman spectroscopy is used to compare various blood components like plasma, serum, carotenoids present in blood of different animal species like goat, sheep, cow and buffalo consumed by human. Especially beta carotene is investigated. The Raman shift ranges from 600-1700 cm-1 for samples. Different characteristic peaks of the blood components are found which are not characterized before in animal samples. Doctrate Student in Photonics Deparatment of Electrical Engineering.

  7. Comprehensive Detection and Discrimination of Campylobacter Species by Use of Confocal Micro-Raman Spectroscopy and Multilocus Sequence Typing

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaonan; Huang, Qian; Miller, William G.; Aston, D. Eric; Xu, Jie; Xue, Feng; Zhang, Hongwei; Rasco, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    A novel strategy for the rapid detection and identification of traditional and emerging Campylobacter strains based upon Raman spectroscopy (532 nm) is presented here. A total of 200 reference strains and clinical isolates of 11 different Campylobacter species recovered from infected animals and humans from China and North America were used to establish a global Raman spectroscopy-based dendrogram model for Campylobacter identification to the species level and cross validated for its feasibility to predict Campylobacter-associated food-borne outbreaks. Bayesian probability coupled with Monte Carlo estimation was employed to validate the established Raman classification model on the basis of the selected principal components, mainly protein secondary structures, on the Campylobacter cell membrane. This Raman spectroscopy-based typing technique correlates well with multilocus sequence typing and has an average recognition rate of 97.21%. Discriminatory power for the Raman classification model had a Simpson index of diversity of 0.968. Intra- and interlaboratory reproducibility with different instrumentation yielded differentiation index values of 4.79 to 6.03 for wave numbers between 1,800 and 650 cm−1 and demonstrated the feasibility of using this spectroscopic method at different laboratories. Our Raman spectroscopy-based partial least-squares regression model could precisely discriminate and quantify the actual concentration of a specific Campylobacter strain in a bacterial mixture (regression coefficient, >0.98; residual prediction deviation, >7.88). A standard protocol for sample preparation, spectral collection, model validation, and data analyses was established for the Raman spectroscopic technique. Raman spectroscopy may have advantages over traditional genotyping methods for bacterial epidemiology, such as detection speed and accuracy of identification to the species level. PMID:22740711

  8. Comprehensive detection and discrimination of Campylobacter species by use of confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy and multilocus sequence typing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaonan; Huang, Qian; Miller, William G; Aston, D Eric; Xu, Jie; Xue, Feng; Zhang, Hongwei; Rasco, Barbara A; Wang, Shuo; Konkel, Michael E

    2012-09-01

    A novel strategy for the rapid detection and identification of traditional and emerging Campylobacter strains based upon Raman spectroscopy (532 nm) is presented here. A total of 200 reference strains and clinical isolates of 11 different Campylobacter species recovered from infected animals and humans from China and North America were used to establish a global Raman spectroscopy-based dendrogram model for Campylobacter identification to the species level and cross validated for its feasibility to predict Campylobacter-associated food-borne outbreaks. Bayesian probability coupled with Monte Carlo estimation was employed to validate the established Raman classification model on the basis of the selected principal components, mainly protein secondary structures, on the Campylobacter cell membrane. This Raman spectroscopy-based typing technique correlates well with multilocus sequence typing and has an average recognition rate of 97.21%. Discriminatory power for the Raman classification model had a Simpson index of diversity of 0.968. Intra- and interlaboratory reproducibility with different instrumentation yielded differentiation index values of 4.79 to 6.03 for wave numbers between 1,800 and 650 cm(-1) and demonstrated the feasibility of using this spectroscopic method at different laboratories. Our Raman spectroscopy-based partial least-squares regression model could precisely discriminate and quantify the actual concentration of a specific Campylobacter strain in a bacterial mixture (regression coefficient, >0.98; residual prediction deviation, >7.88). A standard protocol for sample preparation, spectral collection, model validation, and data analyses was established for the Raman spectroscopic technique. Raman spectroscopy may have advantages over traditional genotyping methods for bacterial epidemiology, such as detection speed and accuracy of identification to the species level. PMID:22740711

  9. Trace species detection: Spectroscopy and molecular energy transfer at high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.A.

    1993-12-01

    Monitoring the concentration of trace species such as atomic and molecular free radicals is essential in forming predictive models of combustion processes. LIF-based techniques have the necessary sensitivity for concentration and temperature measurements but have limited accuracy due to collisional quenching in combustion applications. The goal of this program is to use spectroscopic and kinetic measurements to quantify nonradiative and collisional effects on LIF signals and to develop new background-free alternatives to LIF. The authors have measured the natural linewidth of several OH A-X (3,0) rotational transitions to determine predissociation lifetimes in the upper state, which were presumed to be short compared to quenching lifetimes, and as a result, quantitative predictions about the applicability of predissociation fluorescence methods at high pressures are made. The authors are investigating collisional energy transfer in the A-state of NO. Quenching rates which enable direct corrections to NO LIF quantum yields at high temperature were calculations. These quenching rates are now being used in studies of turbulence/chemistry interactions. The authors have measured the electric dipole moment {mu} of excited-state NO using Stark quantum-beat spectroscopy. {mu} is an essential input to a harpoon model which predicts quenching efficiencies for NO (A) by a variety of combustion-related species. The authors are developing new coherent multiphoton techniques for measurements of atomic hydrogen concentration in laboratory flames to avoid the quenching problems associated with previous multiphoton LIF schemes.

  10. Rapid molecular detection of invasive species in ballast and harbor water by integrating environmental DNA and light transmission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Egan, Scott P; Grey, Erin; Olds, Brett; Feder, Jeffery L; Ruggiero, Steven T; Tanner, Carol E; Lodge, David M

    2015-04-01

    Invasive species introduced via the ballast water of commercial ships cause enormous environmental and economic damage worldwide. Accurate monitoring for these often microscopic and morphologically indistinguishable species is challenging but critical for mitigating damages. We apply eDNA sampling, which involves the filtering and subsequent DNA extraction of microscopic bits of tissue suspended in water, to ballast and harbor water sampled during a commercial ship's 1400 km voyage through the North American Great Lakes. Using a lab-based gel electrophoresis assay and a rapid, field-ready light transmission spectroscopy (LTS) assay, we test for the presence of two invasive species: quagga (Dreissena bugensis) and zebra (D. polymorpha) mussels. Furthermore, we spiked a set of uninfested ballast and harbor samples with zebra mussel tissue to further test each assay's detection capabilities. In unmanipulated samples, zebra mussel was not detected, while quagga mussel was detected in all samples at a rate of 85% for the gel assay and 100% for the LTS assay. In the spiked experimental samples, both assays detected zebra mussel in 94% of spiked samples and 0% of negative controls. Overall, these results demonstrate that eDNA sampling is effective for monitoring ballast-mediated invasions and that LTS has the potential for rapid, field-based detection. PMID:25686279

  11. Fiber optic apparatus for detecting molecular species by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Angel, S.M.; Sharma, S.K.

    1987-11-30

    Optrode apparatus for detecting constituents of a fluid medium includes an optical fiber having a metal coating on at least a portion of a light transmissive core. The metal is one, such as silver, gold or copper, which enhances emission of Raman signal frequencies by molecules adsorbed on the surface of the coating when monochromatic probe light of a different frequency is scattered by such molecules and the metal coating is sufficiently thin to transmit light between the adsorbed molecules and the core of the fiber. Probe light is directed into one end of the fiber and a detector analyzes light emitted from the fiber for Raman frequencies that identify one or more particular molecular species. In one form, the optrode may function as a working electrode of an electrochemical cell while also serving to detect the products of oxidation or reduction reactions which occur at the electrode surface. 6 figs.

  12. Fiber optic apparatus for detecting molecular species by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Angel, S.M.; Sharma, S.K.

    1988-11-01

    Optrode apparatus for detecting constituents of a fluid medium includes an optical fiber having a metal coating on at least a portion of a light transmissive core. The metal is one, such as silver, gold or copper, which enhances emission of Raman signal frequencies by molecules adsorbed on the surface of the coating when monochromatic probe light of a different frequency is scattered by such molecules and the metal coating is sufficiently thin to transmit light between the absorbed molecules and the core of the fiber. Probe light is directed into one end of the fiber and a detector analyzes light emitted from the fiber for Raman frequencies that identify one or more particular molecular species. In one form, the optrode may function as a working electrode of an electrochemical cell while also serving to detect the products of oxidation or reduction reactions which occur at the electrode surface. 6 figs.

  13. A sensitive detection method for high resolution spectroscopy of trapped antihydrogen, hydrogen and other trapped species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz Cesar, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    A method for detection of the weak 1s-2s laser excitation of a few trapped antihydrogen atoms is described. It involves the typical antihydrogen trapping environment that combines a magnetic trap for the atoms as well as a Penning trap for its constituent particles. By photoionization of the excited state the photoion can be kept in a weak Penning trap and at a suitable time be ejected towards a charged particle detector such as a microchannel plate or a channel electron multiplier. Since it does not rely on annihilation, the method is also suitable for trapped hydrogen and may find application with other species when a weak transition to a metastable state is intended and only a few trapped atoms or molecules are available.

  14. Fiber optic apparatus for detecting molecular species by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Angel, Stanley M.; Sharma, Shiv K.

    1988-01-01

    Optrode apparatus for detecting constituents of a fluid medium includes an optical fiber (13, 13a to 13e) having a metal coating (22, 22a to 22e) on at least a portion of a light transmissive core (17, 17a to 17d). The metal is one, such as silver, gold or copper, which enhances emission of Raman signal frequencies by molecules adsorbed on the surface of the coating when monochromatic probe light of a different frequency is scattered by such molecules and the metal coating is sufficiently thin to transmit light between the absorbed molecules and the core of the fiber. Probe light is directed into one end of the fiber and a detector (16, 16d, 16e) analyzes light emitted from the fiber for Raman frequencies that identify one or more particular molecular species. In one form, the optrode (13e) may function as a working electrode of an electrochemical cell (53) while also serving to detect the products of oxidation or reduction reactions which occur at the electrode surface.

  15. Detection of Neutral Species in Silane Plasma Using Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Nobuhiro; Matsuda, Akihisa; Tanaka, Kazunobu; Kajiyama, Koichi; Moro, Norio; Sajiki, Kazuaki

    1983-01-01

    Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) has been employed for the first time to investigate silane (SiH4) glow-discharge plasma. By measuring ν1 vibrational line of silane as a function of position between the two electrodes, spatial distribution of silane (number density) in the (bulk) plasma has been determined for various gas pressures. It has been demonstrated that CARS is an excellent diagnostic tool for a chemically-active plasma such as silane-based glow discharge.

  16. Comprehensive detection and discrimination of campylobacter species using confocal micro-raman spectroscopy and multilocus sequence typing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel strategy for rapid identification and speciation of traditional and emerging Campylobacter strains based upon Raman spectroscopy (532 nm) is presented here. A total of 200 reference strains and clinical isolates of 11 different Campylobacter species recovered from infected animals and humans...

  17. Detection and quantification of multiple molecular species in mainstream cigarette smoke by continuous-wave terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigourd, Damien; Cuisset, Arnaud; Hindle, Francis; Matton, Sophie; Fertein, Eric; Bocquet, Robin; Mouret, Gaël

    2006-08-01

    Continuous-wave terahertz spectroscopy by photomixing is applied to the analysis of mainstream cigarette smoke. Using the wide tunability of the source, spectral signatures of hydrogen cyanide (HCN), carbon monoxide (CO), formaldehyde (H2CO), and water (H2O) have been observed from 500 to 2400GHz. The fine spectral purity allows direct concentration measurement from the pure rotational transitions of HCN and CO. The quantification of the measurement was validated by the means of a calibration gas containing CO. The potential of this technique for trace gas detection is demonstrated with an estimated detection limit of HCN equal to 9 parts in 106.

  18. Detection and Quantitative Analysis of Chemical Species in Hanford Tank Materials Using Raman Spectroscopy Technology: FY94Florida State University Raman Spectroscopy Report

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, F.R.

    1997-08-11

    This report provides a summary of work completed in FY-94 by FSU to develop and investigate the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy with Hanford tank waste materials. Raman performance impacts from sample morphology, including the effects of absorption, particle size, density, color and refractive index, are discussed. An algorithm for relative species concentration measurement from Raman data is presented. An Algorithm for applying Raman to tank waste core screening is presented and discussed. A library of absorption and Raman spectra are presented that support this work.

  19. Comparison of the detection characteristics of trace species using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser breakdown time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenzhen; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Yan, Junjie; Liu, Jiping

    2015-01-01

    The rapid and precise element measurement of trace species, such as mercury, iodine, strontium, cesium, etc. is imperative for various applications, especially for industrial needs. The elements mercury and iodine were measured by two detection methods for comparison of the corresponding detection features. A laser beam was focused to induce plasma. Emission and ion signals were detected using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser breakdown time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LB-TOFMS). Multi-photon ionization and electron impact ionization in the plasma generation process can be controlled by the pressure and pulse width. The effect of electron impact ionization on continuum emission, coexisting molecular and atomic emissions became weakened in low pressure condition. When the pressure was less than 1 Pa, the plasma was induced by laser dissociation and multi-photon ionization in LB-TOFMS. According to the experimental results, the detection limits of mercury and iodine in N2 were 3.5 ppb and 60 ppb using low pressure LIBS. The mercury and iodine detection limits using LB-TOFMS were 1.2 ppb and 9.0 ppb, which were enhanced due to different detection features. The detection systems of LIBS and LB-TOFMS can be selected depending on the condition of each application. PMID:25769051

  20. Comparison of the Detection Characteristics of Trace Species Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Laser Breakdown Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenzhen; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Yan, Junjie; Liu, Jiping

    2015-01-01

    The rapid and precise element measurement of trace species, such as mercury, iodine, strontium, cesium, etc. is imperative for various applications, especially for industrial needs. The elements mercury and iodine were measured by two detection methods for comparison of the corresponding detection features. A laser beam was focused to induce plasma. Emission and ion signals were detected using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser breakdown time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LB-TOFMS). Multi-photon ionization and electron impact ionization in the plasma generation process can be controlled by the pressure and pulse width. The effect of electron impact ionization on continuum emission, coexisting molecular and atomic emissions became weakened in low pressure condition. When the pressure was less than 1 Pa, the plasma was induced by laser dissociation and multi-photon ionization in LB-TOFMS. According to the experimental results, the detection limits of mercury and iodine in N2 were 3.5 ppb and 60 ppb using low pressure LIBS. The mercury and iodine detection limits using LB-TOFMS were 1.2 ppb and 9.0 ppb, which were enhanced due to different detection features. The detection systems of LIBS and LB-TOFMS can be selected depending on the condition of each application. PMID:25769051

  1. Short-lived species detection of nitrous acid by external-cavity quantum cascade laser based quartz-enhanced photoacoustic absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hongming; Maamary, Rabih; Gao, Xiaoming; Sigrist, Markus W.; Fertein, Eric; Chen, Weidong

    2015-03-01

    Spectroscopic detection of short-lived gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) at 1254.85 cm-1 was realized by off-beam coupled quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) in conjunction with an external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL). High sensitivity monitoring of HONO was performed within a very small gas-sample volume (of ˜40 mm3) allowing a significant reduction (of about 4 orders of magnitude) of air sampling residence time which is highly desired for accurate quantification of chemically reactive short-lived species. Calibration of the developed QEPAS-based HONO sensor was carried out by means of lab-generated HONO samples whose concentrations were determined by direct absorption spectroscopy involving a ˜109.5 m multipass cell and a distributed feedback QCL. A minimum detection limit (MDL) of 66 ppbv (1 σ) HONO was achieved at 70 mbar using a laser output power of 50 mW and 1 s integration time, which corresponded to a normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient of 3.6 × 10-8 cm-1 W/Hz1/2. This MDL was down to 7 ppbv at the optimal integration time of 150 s. The corresponding 1σ minimum detected absorption coefficient is ˜1.1 × 10-7 cm-1 (MDL ˜ 3 ppbv) in 1 s and ˜1.1 × 10-8 cm-1 (MDL ˜ 330 pptv) in 150 s, respectively, with 1 W laser power.

  2. Short-lived species detection of nitrous acid by external-cavity quantum cascade laser based quartz-enhanced photoacoustic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Hongming; Maamary, Rabih; Fertein, Eric; Chen, Weidong; Gao, Xiaoming; Sigrist, Markus W.

    2015-03-09

    Spectroscopic detection of short-lived gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) at 1254.85 cm{sup −1} was realized by off-beam coupled quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) in conjunction with an external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL). High sensitivity monitoring of HONO was performed within a very small gas-sample volume (of ∼40 mm{sup 3}) allowing a significant reduction (of about 4 orders of magnitude) of air sampling residence time which is highly desired for accurate quantification of chemically reactive short-lived species. Calibration of the developed QEPAS-based HONO sensor was carried out by means of lab-generated HONO samples whose concentrations were determined by direct absorption spectroscopy involving a ∼109.5 m multipass cell and a distributed feedback QCL. A minimum detection limit (MDL) of 66 ppbv (1 σ) HONO was achieved at 70 mbar using a laser output power of 50 mW and 1 s integration time, which corresponded to a normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient of 3.6 × 10{sup −8 }cm{sup −1} W/Hz{sup 1/2}. This MDL was down to 7 ppbv at the optimal integration time of 150 s. The corresponding 1σ minimum detected absorption coefficient is ∼1.1 × 10{sup −7 }cm{sup −1} (MDL ∼ 3 ppbv) in 1 s and ∼1.1 × 10{sup −8 }cm{sup −1} (MDL ∼ 330 pptv) in 150 s, respectively, with 1 W laser power.

  3. Spectroscopy of transient neutral species via negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, A.

    1991-12-01

    Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to study two types of transient neutral species: bound free radicals (NO{sub 2} and NO{sub 3}) and unstable neutral species ((IHI) and (FH{sub 2})). The negative ion time-of-flight photoelectron spectrometer used for these experiments is described in detail.

  4. Spectroscopy of transient neutral species via negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, A.

    1991-12-01

    Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to study two types of transient neutral species: bound free radicals (NO{sub 2} and NO{sub 3}) and unstable neutral species ([IHI] and [FH{sub 2}]). The negative ion time-of-flight photoelectron spectrometer used for these experiments is described in detail.

  5. HIV detection by optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Narahari V.; Doria, M.; Medina, Honorio

    2001-10-01

    Reliable and economical Human Immnodeficiency Virus (HIV) testing was achieved by optical absorption spectroscopy of the core of the hair in the range of 400 nm to 800 nm. In HIV+ patients, extra optical active material is deposited in the core and optical absorption spectra, recorded in polarized radiation reveal special features, which can be used for guidance, detection, monitoring and control.

  6. Photoacoustic spectroscopy for chemical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holthoff, Ellen L.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2012-06-01

    The Global War on Terror has made rapid detection and identification of chemical and biological agents a priority for Military and Homeland Defense applications. Reliable real-time detection of these threats is complicated by our enemy's use of a diverse range of materials. Therefore, an adaptable platform is necessary. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is a useful monitoring technique that is well suited for trace detection of gaseous media. This method routinely exhibits detection limits at the parts-per-billion (ppb) or sub-ppb range. The versatility of PAS also allows for the investigation of solid and liquid analytes. Current research utilizes quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) in combination with an air-coupled solid-phase photoacoustic cell design for the detection of condensed phase material films deposited on a surface. Furthermore, variation of the QCL pulse repetition rate allows for identification and molecular discrimination of analytes based solely on photoacoustic spectra collected at different film depths.

  7. Resonant cavity spectroscopy of radical species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, Grant

    2015-04-01

    Photo-oxidation in the troposphere is highly complex, being initiated by short lived radical species, in the daytime dominated by the hydroxyl radical, OH, with contributions from Cl atoms, and at night by either NO3 radicals or ozone. Chemical oxidation cycles, which couple OH, HO2 and peroxy (RO2) radical species, remove primary emitted trace species which are harmful to humans or to the wider environment. However, many of the secondary products produced by atmospheric photo-oxidation are also directly harmful, for example O3, NO2, acidic and multifunctional species, many of which are of low volatility and are able to partition effectively to the condensed phase, creating secondary organic aerosol (SOA), which contributes a significant fraction of tropospheric aerosol, with associated impacts on climate and human health. The accuracy of atmospheric models to predict these impacts necessarily requires accurate knowledge of the chemical oxidative cycling. Two of the simplest intermediates are the hydroperoxy radical, HO2, and the smallest and dominant organic peroxy radical, CH3O2, formed directly by the reactions of OH with CO/O2 and CH4/O2, respectively, and indirectly following the oxidation of larger VOCs. OH, HO2 and RO2 (collectively known as ROx) are rapidly cycled, being at the centre of tropospheric oxidation, and hence are some of the best targets for models to compare with field data. The reaction of HO2 and RO2 with NO constitutes the only tropospheric in-situ source of O3. Despite their importance, neither HO2 nor CH3O2 is measured directly in the atmosphere. HO2 is only measured indirectly following its conversion to OH and CH3O2 is not measured at all. Typically only the sum of RO2 radicals is measured, making no distinction between different organic peroxy radicals. This contribution will detail recent studies using (i) optical feedback cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy with both quantum and inter-band cascade lasers in the mid-IR, and (ii

  8. Laser spectroscopy and dynamics of transient species

    SciTech Connect

    Clouthier, D.J.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to study the vibrational and electronic spectra and excited state dynamics of a number of transient sulfur and oxygen species. A variety of supersonic jet techniques, as well as high resolution FT-IR and intracavity dye laser spectroscopy, have been applied to these studies.

  9. Detection and quantitative analysis of chemical species in Hanford tank materials using Raman spectroscopy technology: FY94, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Vickers, T.J.; Mann, C.

    1995-09-12

    This report provides a summary of work completed in FY-94 by FSU to develop and investigate the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy with Hanford tank waste materials. Raman performance impacts from sample morphology, including the effects of absorption, particle size, density, color and refractive index, are discussed. An algorithm for relative species concentration measurement from Raman data is presented. An Algorithm for applying Raman to tank waste core screening is presented and discussed. A library of absorption and Raman spectra are presented that support this work.

  10. Detection of Nitric Oxide by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been used in a number of ways to study nitric oxide chemistry and biology. As an intrinsically stable and relatively unreactive diatomic free radical, the challenges for detecting this species by EPR are somewhat different than those for transient radical species. This review gives a basic introduction to EPR spectroscopy and discusses its uses to assess and quantify nitric oxide formation in biological systems. PMID:20304044

  11. Photothermal deflection spectroscopy and detection

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, W. B.; Amer, Nabil M.; Boccara, A. C.; Fournier, D.

    1981-04-15

    The theory for a sensitive spectroscopy based on the photothermal deflection of a laser beam is developed. We consider cw and pulsed cases of both transverse and collinear photothermal deflection spectroscopy for solids, liquids, gases, and thin films. The predictions of the theory are experimentally verified, its implications for imaging and microscopy are given, and the sources of noise are analyzed. The sensitivity and versatility of photothermal deflection spectroscopy are compared with thermal lensing and photoacoustic spectroscopy.

  12. Effective Strategy for Conformer-Selective Detection of Short-Lived Excited State Species: Application to the IR Spectroscopy of the N1H Keto Tautomer of Guanine.

    PubMed

    Asami, Hiroya; Tokugawa, Munefumi; Masaki, Yoshiaki; Ishiuchi, Shun-Ichi; Gloaguen, Eric; Seio, Kohji; Saigusa, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Masaaki; Sekine, Mitsuo; Mons, Michel

    2016-04-14

    The ultrafast deactivation processes in the excited state of biomolecules, such as the most stable tautomers of guanine, forbid any state-of-the-art gas phase spectroscopic studies on these species with nanosecond lasers. This drawback can be overcome by grafting a chromophore having a long-lived excited state to the molecule of interest, allowing thus a mass-selective detection by nanosecond R2PI and therefore double resonance IR/UV conformer-selective spectroscopic studies. The principle is presently demonstrated on the keto form of a modified 9-methylguanine, for which the IR/UV double resonance spectrum in the C═O stretch region, reported for the first time, provides evidence for extensive vibrational couplings within the guanine moiety. Such a successful strategy opens up a route to mass-selective IR/UV spectroscopic investigations on molecules exhibiting natural chromophores having ultrashort-lived excited states, such as DNA bases, their complexes as well as peptides containing short-lived aromatic residues. PMID:26990184

  13. Laser spectroscopy of chemically reactive species

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ming; Sears, T.J.

    1993-02-01

    We report the observation of stimulated emission pumping spectra in the NCO radical formed in a supersonic free jet expansion by the reaction between photolytically generated CN radicals and O{sub 2}. The spectra give rotationally resolved information on high lying vibrational levels that are difficult or impossible to detect by conventional single photon spectroscopic techniques. These new data provide detailed insight into the Renner-Teller, spin-orbit and Fermi-resonance coupling in the molecule. They also provide a solid basis for future state-selected chemical and dynamical studies involving this important radical species.

  14. Estimating species richness: The importance of heterogeneity in species detectability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boulinier, T.; Nichols, J.D.; Sauer, J.R.; Hines, J.E.; Pollock, K.H.

    1998-01-01

    Estimating species richness (i.e. the actual number of species present in a given area) is a basic objective of many field studies carried out in community ecology and is also of crucial concern when dealing with the conservation and management of biodiversity. In most studies, the total number of species recorded in an area at a given time is taken as a measure of species richness. Here we use a capture-recapture approach to species richness estimation with North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data in order to estimate species detectability and thus gain insight about its importance. We carried out analyses on all survey routes of four states, Arizona, Maryland, North Dakota, and Wisconsin, in two years, 1970 and 1990. These states were chosen to provide contrasting habitats, bird species composition and survey quality. We investigated the effect of state, year and observer ability on the proportions of different models selected, and on estimates of detectability and species richness. Our results indicate that model Mh, which assumes heterogeneous detection probability among species, is frequently appropriate for estimating species richness from BBS data. Species detectability varied among states and was higher for the more skilled observers. These results emphasize the need to take into account potential heterogeneities in detectability among species in studies of factors affecting species richness.

  15. Raman and photothermal spectroscopies for explosive detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finot, Eric; Brulé, Thibault; Rai, Padmnabh; Griffart, Aurélien; Bouhélier, Alexandre; Thundat, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    Detection of explosive residues using portable devices for locating landmine and terrorist weapons must sat- isfy the application criteria of high reproducibility, specificity, sensitivity and fast response time. Vibrational spectroscopies such as Raman and infrared spectroscopies have demonstrated their potential to distinguish the members of the chemical family of more than 30 explosive materials. The characteristic chemical fingerprints in the spectra of these explosives stem from the unique bond structure of each compound. However, these spectroscopies, developed in the early sixties, suffer from a poor sensitivity. On the contrary, MEMS-based chemical sensors have shown to have very high sensitivity lowering the detection limit down to less than 1 picogram, (namely 10 part per trillion) using sensor platforms based on microcantilevers, plasmonics, or surface acoustic waves. The minimum amount of molecules that can be detected depends actually on the transducer size. The selectivity in MEMS sensors is usually realized using chemical modification of the active surface. However, the lack of sufficiently selective receptors that can be immobilized on MEMS sensors remains one of the most critical issues. Microcantilever based sensors offer an excellent opportunity to combine both the infrared photothermal spectroscopy in their static mode and the unique mass sensitivity in their dynamic mode. Optical sensors based on localized plasmon resonance can also take up the challenge of addressing the selectivity by monitoring the Surface Enhanced Raman spectrum down to few molecules. The operating conditions of these promising localized spectroscopies will be discussed in terms of reliability, compactness, data analysis and potential for mass deployment.

  16. DETECTION OF PATHOGENS BY FLOURESCENCE SPECTROSCOPY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract This study was performed as a preliminary study for rapid detection of food bone pathogens by fluorescence spectroscopy. E coli, Salmonella and Campylobactor which are the most commonly found in food were used in this study. Bacteria were grown in agar plate and diluted in saline and prepa...

  17. Correlation Spectroscopy of Minor Species: Signal Purification and Distribution Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, T A; Kwon, Y; Yin, E; Hollars, C; Camarero, J A; Barsky, D

    2006-06-21

    We are performing experiments that use fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to monitor the movement of an individual donor-labeled sliding clamp protein molecule along acceptor-labeled DNA. In addition to the FRET signal sought from the sliding clamp-DNA complexes, the detection channel for FRET contains undesirable signal from free sliding clamp and free DNA. When multiple fluorescent species contribute to a correlation signal, it is difficult or impossible to distinguish between contributions from individual species. As a remedy, we introduce ''purified FCS'' (PFCS), which uses single molecule burst analysis to select a species of interest and extract the correlation signal for further analysis. We show that by expanding the correlation region around a burst, the correlated signal is retained and the functional forms of FCS fitting equations remain valid. We demonstrate the use of PFCS in experiments with DNA sliding clamps. We also introduce ''single molecule FCS'', which obtains diffusion time estimates for each burst using expanded correlation regions. By monitoring the detachment of weakly-bound 30-mer DNA oligomers from a single-stranded DNA plasmid, we show that single molecule FCS can distinguish between bursts from species that differ by a factor of 5 in diffusion constant.

  18. Infrared Spectroscopy of Halogenated Species for Atmospheric Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Jeremy J.

    2014-06-01

    Fluorine- and chlorine-containing molecules in the atmosphere are very strong greenhouse gases, meaning that even small amounts of these gases contribute significantly to the radiative forcing of climate. Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) are regulated by the 1987 Montreal Protocol because they deplete the ozone layer. Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), which do not deplete the ozone layer and are not regulated by the Montreal Protocol, have been introduced as replacements for CFCs and HCFCs. HFCs have global-warming potentials many times greater than carbon dioxide, and are increasing in the atmosphere at a very fast rate. Various satellite instruments monitor many of these molecules by detecting infrared radiation that has passed through the Earth's atmosphere. However, the quantification of their atmospheric abundances crucially requires accurate quantitative infrared spectroscopy. This talk will focus on new and improved laboratory spectroscopic measurements for a number of important halogenated species.

  19. Trace Explosive Detection using Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, Adam R; Van Neste, Charles W; Senesac, Larry R; Thundat, Thomas George; Finot, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Satisfying the conditions of high sensitivity and high selectivity using portable sensors that are also reversible is a challenge. Miniature sensors such as microcantilevers offer high sensitivity but suffer from poor selectivity due to the lack of sufficiently selective receptors. Although many of the mass deployable spectroscopic techniques provide high selectivity, they do not have high sensitivity. Here, we show that this challenge can be overcome by combining photothermal spectroscopy on a bimaterial microcantilever with the mass induced change in the cantilever's resonance frequency. Detection using adsorption-induced resonant frequency shift together with photothermal deflection spectroscopy shows extremely high selectivity with a subnanogram limit of detection for vapor phase adsorbed explosives, such as pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), and trinitrotoluene (TNT).

  20. Analog detection for cavity lifetime spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Harb, Charles C.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Spence, Thomas G.

    2003-01-01

    An analog detection system for determining a ring-down rate or decay rate 1/.tau. of an exponentially decaying ring-down beam issuing from a lifetime or ring-down cavity during a ring-down phase. Alternatively, the analog detection system determines a build-up rate of an exponentially growing beam issuing from the cavity during a ring-up phase. The analog system can be employed in continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CW CRDS) and pulsed CRDS (P CRDS) arrangements utilizing any type of ring-down cavity including ring-cavities and linear cavities.

  1. Analog detection for cavity lifetime spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Harb, Charles C.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Spence, Thomas G.

    2001-05-15

    An analog detection system for determining a ring-down rate or decay rate 1/.tau. of an exponentially decaying ring-down beam issuing from a lifetime or ring-down cavity during a ring-down phase. Alternatively, the analog detection system determines a build-up rate of an exponentially growing beam issuing from the cavity during a ring-up phase. The analog system can be employed in continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CW CRDS) and pulsed CRDS (P CRDS) arrangements utilizing any type of ring-down cavity including ring-cavities and linear cavities.

  2. Occlusal caries detection using polarized Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita, I.; Bulou, A.

    2008-02-01

    The tooth enamel, because of its hydroxyapatite composition, must present a Raman spectrum with strong polarization anisotropy. Carious lesions of the enamel will produce an alteration of local symmetry and will increase much more scattering of light. This will reduce the anisotropy of the Raman spectra. Because of the difference between high sensitivity to polarization of the 959 cm -1 Raman peak in sound enamel and low sensitivity in carried enamel, Raman polarized spectroscopy could be a useful method to early detect teeth caries.

  3. Detection of Endolithes Using Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumas, S.; Dutil, Y.; Joncas, G.

    2009-12-01

    On Earth, the Dry Valleys of Antarctica provide the closest martian-like environment for the study of extremophiles. Colonies of bacterias are protected from the freezing temperatures, the drought and UV light. They represent almost half of the biomass of those regions. Due to their resilience, endolithes are one possible model of martian biota. We propose to use infrared spectroscopy to remotely detect those colonies even if there is no obvious sign of their presence. This remote sensing approach reduces the risk of contamination or damage to the samples.

  4. Microorganisms detection on substrates using QCL spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla-Jiménez, Amira C.; Ortiz-Rivera, William; Castro-Suarez, John R.; Ríos-Velázquez, Carlos; Vázquez-Ayala, Iris; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2013-05-01

    Recent investigations have focused on the improvement of rapid and accurate methods to develop spectroscopic markers of compounds constituting microorganisms that are considered biological threats. Quantum cascade lasers (QCL) systems have revolutionized many areas of research and development in defense and security applications, including his area of research. Infrared spectroscopy detection based on QCL was employed to acquire mid infrared (MIR) spectral signatures of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), Escherichia coli (Ec) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (Se), which were used as biological agent simulants of biothreats. The experiments were carried out in reflection mode on various substrates such as cardboard, glass, travel baggage, wood and stainless steel. Chemometrics statistical routines such as principal component analysis (PCA) regression and partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were applied to the recorded MIR spectra. The results show that the infrared vibrational techniques investigated are useful for classification/detection of the target microorganisms on the types of substrates studied.

  5. Covariance Spectroscopy Applied to Nuclear Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Trainham, R., Tinsley, J., Keegan, R., Quam, W.

    2011-09-01

    Covariance spectroscopy is a method of processing second order moments of data to obtain information that is usually absent from average spectra. In nuclear radiation detection it represents a generalization of nuclear coincidence techniques. Correlations and fluctuations in data encode valuable information about radiation sources, transport media, and detection systems. Gaining access to the extra information can help to untangle complicated spectra, uncover overlapping peaks, accelerate source identification, and even sense directionality. Correlations existing at the source level are particularly valuable since many radioactive isotopes emit correlated gammas and neutrons. Correlations also arise from interactions within detector systems, and from scattering in the environment. In particular, correlations from Compton scattering and pair production within a detector array can be usefully exploited in scenarios where direct measurement of source correlations would be unfeasible. We present a covariance analysis of a few experimental data sets to illustrate the utility of the concept.

  6. Explosives detection using quantum cascade laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Suarez, John R.; Pollock, Yadira S.; Hernandez-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2013-05-01

    An infrared spectroscopy based explosives detection system using a quantum cascade laser (QCL) as excitation source was used to record mid infrared spectral signals of highly energetic materials (HEM) deposited on real world substrates such as travel baggage, cardboard and wood. The HEMs used were nitroaromatic military explosive trinitrotoluene (TNT), aliphatic nitrate ester pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) and aliphatic nitramine hexahydrotrinitrotriazine (RDX). Various deposition methods including sample smearing, spin coating, spray deposition and partial immersion were evaluated for preparing samples and standards used as part of the study. Chemometrics statistical routines such as principal component analysis (PCA) regression with various preprocessing steps were applied to the recorded infrared spectra of explosives deposited as trace contaminants on target substrates. The results show that the dispersive infrared vibrational technique investigated using QCL is useful for detection of HEMs in the types of substrates studied.

  7. Detecting changes during pregnancy with Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargis, Elizabeth; Robertson, Kesha; Al-Hendy, Ayman; Reese, Jeff; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2010-02-01

    Preterm labor is the second leading cause of neonatal mortality and leads to a myriad of complications like delayed development and cerebral palsy. Currently, there is no way to accurately predict preterm labor, making its prevention and treatment virtually impossible. While there are some at-risk patients, over half of all preterm births do not fall into any high-risk category. This study seeks to predict and prevent preterm labor by using Raman spectroscopy to detect changes in the cervix during pregnancy. Since Raman spectroscopy has been used to detect cancers in vivo in organs like the cervix and skin, it follows that spectra will change over the course of pregnancy. Previous studies have shown that fluorescence decreased during pregnancy and increased during post-partum exams to pre-pregnancy levels. We believe significant changes will occur in the Raman spectra obtained during the course of pregnancy. In this study, Raman spectra from the cervix of pregnant mice and women will be acquired. Specific changes that occur due to cervical softening or changes in hormonal levels will be observed to understand the likelihood that a female mouse or a woman will enter labor.

  8. FT-Raman spectroscopy of lichen species from the Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holder, J. M.; Edwards, H. G. M.; Wynn-Williams, D. D.

    1998-06-01

    In this investigation, FT-Raman spectroscopy has been utilized to characterize pigments and chemicals produced by Antarctic lichens, which have been exposed to increasing levels of UV-B radiation and other environmental conditions. The presence of calcium oxalate in some lichen species has also been confirmed spectroscopically.

  9. Thermal Hyperspectral Remote Sensing for Plant Species and Stress Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlerf, M.; Rock, G.; Ullah, S.; Gerhards, M.; Udelhoven, T.; Skidmore, A. K.

    2014-12-01

    Thermal infrared (TIR) spectroscopy offers a novel opportunity for measuring emissivity spectra of natural surfaces. Emissivity spectra are not directly measured, they first have to be retrieved from the raw measurements. Once retrieved, the spectra can be used, for example, to discriminate plant species or to detect plant stress. Knowledge of plant species distribution is essential for the sustainable management of ecosystems. Remote sensing of plant species has so far mostly been limited to data in the visible and near-infrared where, however, different species often reveal similar reflectance curves. Da Luz and Crowley showed in a recent paper that in the TIR plants indeed have distinct spectral features. Also with a certain species, subtle changes of emissivity in certain wavebands may occur, when biochemical compounds change due to osmotic adjustment induced by water stress. Here we show, that i) emissive imaging spectroscopy allows for reliable and accurate retrieval of plant emissivity spectra, ii) emissivity spectra are well suited to discriminate plant species, iii) a reduction in stomatal conductance (caused by stress) changes the thermal infrared signal. For 13 plant species in the laboratory and for 8 plant species in a field setup emissivity spectra were retrieved. A comparison shows, that for most species the shapes of the emissivity curves agree quite well, but that clear offsets between the two types of spectra exist. Discrimination analysis revealed that based on the lab spectra, 13 species could be distinguished with an average overall classification accuracy of 92% using the 6 best spectral bands. For the field spectra (8 species), a similar high OAA of 89% was achieved. Species discrimination is likely to be possible due to variations in the composition of the superficial epidermal layer of plant leaves and in internal chemical concentrations producing unique emissivity features. However, to date, which spectral feature is responsible for which

  10. Detection of uranium using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chinni, Rosemarie C; Cremers, David A; Radziemski, Leon J; Bostian, Melissa; Navarro-Northrup, Claudia

    2009-11-01

    The goal of this work is a detailed study of uranium detection by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for application to activities associated with environmental surveillance and detecting weapons of mass destruction (WMD). The study was used to assist development of LIBS instruments for standoff detection of bulk radiological and nuclear materials and these materials distributed as contaminants on surfaces. Uranium spectra were analyzed under a variety of different conditions at room pressure, reduced pressures, and in an argon atmosphere. All spectra displayed a high apparent background due to the high density of uranium lines. Time decay curves of selected uranium lines were monitored and compared to other elements in an attempt to maximize detection capabilities for each species in the complicated uranium spectrum. A survey of the LIBS uranium spectra was conducted and relative emission line strengths were determined over the range of 260 to 800 nm. These spectra provide a guide for selection of the strongest LIBS analytical lines for uranium detection in different spectral regions. A detection limit for uranium in soil of 0.26% w/w was obtained at close range and 0.5% w/w was achieved at a distance of 30 m. Surface detection limits were substrate dependent and ranged from 13 to 150 microg/cm2. Double-pulse experiments (both collinear and orthogonal arrangements) were shown to enhance the uranium signal in some cases. Based on the results of this work, a short critique is given of the applicability of LIBS for the detection of uranium residues on surfaces for environmental monitoring and WMD surveillance. PMID:19891832

  11. Nanoscale NMR spectroscopy and imaging of multiple nuclear species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devience, Stephen J.; Pham, Linh M.; Lovchinsky, Igor; Sushkov, Alexander O.; Bar-Gill, Nir; Belthangady, Chinmay; Casola, Francesco; Corbett, Madeleine; Zhang, Huiliang; Lukin, Mikhail; Park, Hongkun; Yacoby, Amir; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provide non-invasive information about multiple nuclear species in bulk matter, with wide-ranging applications from basic physics and chemistry to biomedical imaging. However, the spatial resolution of conventional NMR and MRI is limited to several micrometres even at large magnetic fields (>1 T), which is inadequate for many frontier scientific applications such as single-molecule NMR spectroscopy and in vivo MRI of individual biological cells. A promising approach for nanoscale NMR and MRI exploits optical measurements of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centres in diamond, which provide a combination of magnetic field sensitivity and nanoscale spatial resolution unmatched by any existing technology, while operating under ambient conditions in a robust, solid-state system. Recently, single, shallow NV centres were used to demonstrate NMR of nanoscale ensembles of proton spins, consisting of a statistical polarization equivalent to ˜100-1,000 spins in uniform samples covering the surface of a bulk diamond chip. Here, we realize nanoscale NMR spectroscopy and MRI of multiple nuclear species (1H, 19F, 31P) in non-uniform (spatially structured) samples under ambient conditions and at moderate magnetic fields (˜20 mT) using two complementary sensor modalities.

  12. Benchtop energetics: Detection of hyperthermal species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossum, Emily C.; Molek, Christopher D.; Lewis, William K.; Fajardo, Mario

    2012-03-01

    We present a novel scheme for monitoring the transition between deflagration and "detonation-like" behavior of small-scale explosive samples subjected to shock stimuli. The intended geometry for this setup incorporates a laser-driven-flyer impact technique to generate a pure mechanical input. However, we report results here using a simplified geometry for purposes of evaluating the time-of-flight mass spectrometric (TOFMS) diagnostics using direct laser ablation of solid aluminum and of an aluminum mirror coated with a small amount (~1 μg) of PETN. This manuscript presents the TOFMS detection of fast aluminum atoms (>10 km/s) resulting from laser ablation, confirming our ability to detect hyperthermal species. Preliminary results from pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) experiments reveal a transition from species consistent with deflagration (primarily NO2) at low laser fluence, to those consistent with detonation-like events (N2, CO, CO2) at higher laser fluence. At this time, due to several unknown parameters in the current setup, we will not posit the exact physical details which cause this transition (e.g. shock pressures, temperatures, etc.). However, these results indicate that such a transition can be detected using the Benchtop Energetics TOFMS diagnostics setup, where future, more controlled and/or characterized energetic events may lead to better understanding of initiation/ignition thresholds of candidate materials.

  13. Detection of vapor phase mercury species by laser fluorescence methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Xiaomei

    Several mercury species emissions have been identified in off-gases from industrial processes. At present, there is no commercial continuous emission monitoring (CEM) technique or instrumentation to reliably monitor volatile mercury species emissions from industrial stacks. Conventional measurement methods, such as cold vapor trap based techniques for elemental mercury, have difficulty in achieving both high sensitivity and the fast time resolution required for real-time monitoring. This doctoral research work gives a systematic study of potential methods for real-time trace detection of volatile elemental mercury and mercury compounds in industrial stack gases. It is based on laser-induced fluorescence techniques; photofragment fluorescence spectroscopy for detection of volatile mercury compounds, and resonance fluorescence for detection of elemental mercury. The capabilities and limitations of these detection techniques are investigated in this dissertation. Detection of mercury compounds is a challenge since they are non-fluorescent. With photofragment fluorescence spectroscopy, target compound concentrations are related to the fluorescence intensity from an excited fragment. In this doctoral research work, low concentrations of mercuric bromide vapor in an atmospheric pressure flow cell are irradiated by a focused laser beam at 222nm. Photofragment fluorescence is monitored at 253.7nm. Two detection schemes, Charge Coupled Device (CCD) and photomultiplier tube (PMT), are applied for the measurement of photofragment fluorescence. The performances of these two systems are compared in the dissertation. A supersonic jet is combined with resonance fluorescence for detection of elemental mercury vapor. With test gas expanded into a vacuum, fluorescence quenching and spectral broadening are reduced. In the experiment, the gas jet is crossed with a laser beam at 253.7nm to excite atomic fluorescence, which is distinguished from the elastic background by time gating

  14. Trace vapour detection at room temperature using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chou, Alison; Radi, Babak; Jaatinen, Esa; Juodkazis, Saulius; Fredericks, Peter M

    2014-04-21

    A miniaturized flow-through system consisting of a gold coated silicon substrate based on enhanced Raman spectroscopy has been used to study the detection of vapour from model explosive compounds. The measurements show that the detectability of the vapour molecules at room temperature depends sensitively on the interaction between the molecule and the substrate. The results highlight the capability of a flow system combined with Raman spectroscopy for detecting low vapour pressure compounds with a limit of detection of 0.2 ppb as demonstrated by the detection of bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, a common polymer additive emitted from a commercial polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubing at room temperature. PMID:24588003

  15. Operational Tree Species Mapping in a Diverse Tropical Forest with Airborne Imaging Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Baldeck, Claire A; Asner, Gregory P; Martin, Robin E; Anderson, Christopher B; Knapp, David E; Kellner, James R; Wright, S Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Remote identification and mapping of canopy tree species can contribute valuable information towards our understanding of ecosystem biodiversity and function over large spatial scales. However, the extreme challenges posed by highly diverse, closed-canopy tropical forests have prevented automated remote species mapping of non-flowering tree crowns in these ecosystems. We set out to identify individuals of three focal canopy tree species amongst a diverse background of tree and liana species on Barro Colorado Island, Panama, using airborne imaging spectroscopy data. First, we compared two leading single-class classification methods--binary support vector machine (SVM) and biased SVM--for their performance in identifying pixels of a single focal species. From this comparison we determined that biased SVM was more precise and created a multi-species classification model by combining the three biased SVM models. This model was applied to the imagery to identify pixels belonging to the three focal species and the prediction results were then processed to create a map of focal species crown objects. Crown-level cross-validation of the training data indicated that the multi-species classification model had pixel-level producer's accuracies of 94-97% for the three focal species, and field validation of the predicted crown objects indicated that these had user's accuracies of 94-100%. Our results demonstrate the ability of high spatial and spectral resolution remote sensing to accurately detect non-flowering crowns of focal species within a diverse tropical forest. We attribute the success of our model to recent classification and mapping techniques adapted to species detection in diverse closed-canopy forests, which can pave the way for remote species mapping in a wider variety of ecosystems. PMID:26153693

  16. Operational Tree Species Mapping in a Diverse Tropical Forest with Airborne Imaging Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baldeck, Claire A.; Asner, Gregory P.; Martin, Robin E.; Anderson, Christopher B.; Knapp, David E.; Kellner, James R.; Wright, S. Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Remote identification and mapping of canopy tree species can contribute valuable information towards our understanding of ecosystem biodiversity and function over large spatial scales. However, the extreme challenges posed by highly diverse, closed-canopy tropical forests have prevented automated remote species mapping of non-flowering tree crowns in these ecosystems. We set out to identify individuals of three focal canopy tree species amongst a diverse background of tree and liana species on Barro Colorado Island, Panama, using airborne imaging spectroscopy data. First, we compared two leading single-class classification methods—binary support vector machine (SVM) and biased SVM—for their performance in identifying pixels of a single focal species. From this comparison we determined that biased SVM was more precise and created a multi-species classification model by combining the three biased SVM models. This model was applied to the imagery to identify pixels belonging to the three focal species and the prediction results were then processed to create a map of focal species crown objects. Crown-level cross-validation of the training data indicated that the multi-species classification model had pixel-level producer’s accuracies of 94–97% for the three focal species, and field validation of the predicted crown objects indicated that these had user’s accuracies of 94–100%. Our results demonstrate the ability of high spatial and spectral resolution remote sensing to accurately detect non-flowering crowns of focal species within a diverse tropical forest. We attribute the success of our model to recent classification and mapping techniques adapted to species detection in diverse closed-canopy forests, which can pave the way for remote species mapping in a wider variety of ecosystems. PMID:26153693

  17. Autofluorescence spectroscopy and imaging for cancer detection in the larynx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kan; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2009-11-01

    Autofluorescence imaging has shown high sensitivity for early diagnosis and detection of cancer in humans. However, it has a limitation in diagnostic specificity due to high false positive rates. In this work, we apply an integrated fluorescence spectroscopy and endoscopic imaging technique for real-time tissue measurements. The results show that the combined autofluorescence imaging and spectroscopy has the potential for improving laryngeal cancer diagnosis and detection.

  18. Strategies for Detection of Plasmodium species Gametocytes

    PubMed Central

    Javati, Sarah; Robinson, Leanne; Betuela, Inoni; Siba, Peter; Beck, Hans-Peter; Mueller, Ivo; Felger, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Carriage and density of gametocytes, the transmission stages of malaria parasites, are determined for predicting the infectiousness of humans to mosquitoes. This measure is used for evaluating interventions that aim at reducing malaria transmission. Gametocytes need to be detected by amplification of stage-specific transcripts, which requires RNA-preserving blood sampling. For simultaneous, highly sensitive quantification of both, blood stages and gametocytes, we have compared and optimized different strategies for field and laboratory procedures in a cross sectional survey in 315 5-9 yr old children from Papua New Guinea. qRT-PCR was performed for gametocyte markers pfs25 and pvs25, Plasmodium species prevalence was determined by targeting both, 18S rRNA genes and transcripts. RNA-based parasite detection resulted in a P. falciparum positivity of 24.1%; of these 40.8% carried gametocytes. P. vivax positivity was 38.4%, with 38.0% of these carrying gametocytes. Sensitivity of DNA-based parasite detection was substantially lower with 14.1% for P. falciparum and 19.6% for P. vivax. Using the lower DNA-based prevalence of asexual stages as a denominator increased the percentage of gametocyte-positive infections to 59.1% for P. falciparum and 52.4% for P. vivax. For studies requiring highly sensitive and simultaneous quantification of sexual and asexual parasite stages, 18S rRNA transcript-based detection saves efforts and costs. RNA-based positivity is considerably higher than other methods. On the other hand, DNA-based parasite quantification is robust and permits comparison with other globally generated molecular prevalence data. Molecular monitoring of low density asexual and sexual parasitaemia will support the evaluation of effects of up-scaled antimalarial intervention programs and can also inform about small scale spatial variability in transmission intensity. PMID:24312682

  19. Detection of toxic monofluoroacetate in Palicourea species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous plant species worldwide including some Palicourea (Rubiaceae), Tanaecium (Bignoniaceae), and Amorimia (Malpighiaceae) species in Brazil cause sudden death and are known to contain monofluoroacetate (MFA). Two species of Palicourea, P. aenofusca and P. marcgravii, cause sudden death and are...

  20. Differentiation of Leishmania species by FT-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, Josafá C.; Mittmann, Josane; Ferreira, Isabelle; Ferreira-Strixino, Juliana; Raniero, Leandro

    2015-05-01

    Leishmaniasis is a parasitic infectious disease caused by protozoa that belong to the genus Leishmania. It is transmitted by the bite of an infected female Sand fly. The disease is endemic in 88 countries Desjeux (2001) [1] (16 developed countries and 72 developing countries) on four continents. In Brazil, epidemiological data show the disease is present in all Brazilian regions, with the highest incidences in the North and Northeast. There are several methods used to diagnose leishmaniasis, but these procedures have many limitations, are time consuming, have low sensitivity, and are expensive. In this context, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis has the potential to provide rapid results and may be adapted for a clinical test with high sensitivity and specificity. In this work, FT-IR was used as a tool to investigate the promastigotes of Leishmaniaamazonensis, Leishmaniachagasi, and Leishmaniamajor species. The spectra were analyzed by cluster analysis and deconvolution procedure base on spectra second derivatives. Results: cluster analysis found four specific regions that are able to identify the Leishmania species. The dendrogram representation clearly indicates the heterogeneity among Leishmania species. The band deconvolution done by the curve fitting in these regions quantitatively differentiated the polysaccharides, amide III, phospholipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. L. chagasi and L. major showed a greater biochemistry similarity and have three bands that were not registered in L. amazonensis. The L. amazonensis presented three specific bands that were not recorded in the other two species. It is evident that the FT-IR method is an indispensable tool to discriminate these parasites. The high sensitivity and specificity of this technique opens up the possibilities for further studies about characterization of other microorganisms.

  1. Heterodyne-Detected Dispersed Vibrational Echo Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Kevin C.; Ganim, Ziad; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2009-11-01

    We develop heterodyned dispersed vibrational echo spectroscopy (HDVE) and demonstrate the new capabilities in biophysical applications. HDVE is a robust ultrafast technique that provides a characterization of the real and imaginary components of third-order nonlinear signals with high sensitivity and single-laser-shot capability and can be used to extract dispersed pump-probe and dispersed vibrational echo spectra. Four methods for acquiring HDVE phase and amplitude spectra were compared: Fourier transform spectral interferometry, a new phase modulation spectral interferometry technique, and combination schemes. These extraction techniques were demonstrated in the context of protein amide I spectroscopy. Experimental HDVE and heterodyned free induction decay amide I spectra were explicitly compared to conventional dispersed pump-probe, dispersed vibrational echo, and absorption spectra. The new capabilities of HDVE were demonstrated by acquiring single-shot spectra and melting curves of ubiquitin and concentration-dependent spectra of insulin suitable for extracting the binding constant for dimerization. The introduced techniques will prove particularly useful in transient experiments, studying irreversible reactions, and micromolar concentration studies of small proteins.

  2. Remote detection of explosives using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulton, Jack

    2011-05-01

    Stand-off detection of potentially hazardous small molecules at distances that allow the user to be safe has many applications, including explosives and chemical threats. The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division, with EYZtek, Inc. of Ohio, developed a prototype stand-off, eye-safe Raman spectrometer. With a stand-off distance greater than twenty meters and scanning optics, this system has the potential of addressing particularly difficult challenges in small molecule detection. An overview of the system design and desired application space is presented.

  3. Raman spectroscopy of human saliva for acute myocardial infarction detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Maowen; Chen, Yuanxiang; Wu, Shanshan; Huang, Wei; Lin, Jinyong; Weng, Guo-Xing; Chen, Rong

    2014-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a rapidly non-invasive technique with great potential for biomedical research. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy of human saliva for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) detection. Raman spectroscopy measurements were performed on two groups of saliva samples: one group from patients (n=30) with confirmed AMI and the other group from healthy controls (n=31). The diagnostic performance for differentiating AMI saliva from normal saliva was evaluated by multivariate statistical analysis. The combination of principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminate analysis (LDA) of the measured Raman spectra separated the spectral features of the two groups into two distinct clusters with little overlaps, rendering the sensitivity of 80.0% and specificity of 80.6%. The results from this exploratory study demonstrated that Raman spectroscopy of human saliva can serve as a potentially clinical tool for rapid AMI detection and screening.

  4. Laser spectroscopy of chemically reactive species. [NCO radical

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ming; Sears, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    We report the observation of stimulated emission pumping spectra in the NCO radical formed in a supersonic free jet expansion by the reaction between photolytically generated CN radicals and O[sub 2]. The spectra give rotationally resolved information on high lying vibrational levels that are difficult or impossible to detect by conventional single photon spectroscopic techniques. These new data provide detailed insight into the Renner-Teller, spin-orbit and Fermi-resonance coupling in the molecule. They also provide a solid basis for future state-selected chemical and dynamical studies involving this important radical species.

  5. Moisture detection in composites by terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, Paweł; Pałka, Norbert; Opoka, Szymon; Wandowski, Tomasz; Ostachowicz, Wiesław

    2015-07-01

    The application of Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymers (GFRP) in many branches of industry has been increasing steadily. Many research works focus on damage identification for structures made out of such materials. However, not only delaminations, cracks or other damage can have a negative influence of GFRP parts performance. Previous research proved that fluid absorption influences the mechanical performance of composites. GFRP parts can be contaminated by moisture or release agent during manufacturing, while fuel, hydraulic fluid and moisture ingression into the composite can be the in-service treats. In the reported research authors focus on moisture detection. There are numerous sources of moisture such as post manufacturing NDT inspection with ultrasonics coupled by water or exposition to moisture during transportation and in service. An NDT tool used for the research is a terahertz (THz) spectrometer. The device uses an electromagnetic radiation in the terahertz range (0.1-3 THz) and allows for reflection and transmission measurements. The spectrometer is equipped with moving table that allows for XY scanning of large objects such as GFRP panels. In the conducted research refractive indices were experimentally extracted from the materials of interest (water and GFRP). Time signals as well as C-scans were analysed for samples with moisture contamination. In order to be sure that the observed effects are related to moisture contamination reference measurements were conducted. The obtained results showed that the THz NDT technique can detect moisture hidden under a GFRP with multiple layers.

  6. Crack detection using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, Albert; Bell, Thomas M.; Rhodes, George W.

    1994-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for detecting crack-like flaws in components. A plurality of exciting frequencies are generated and applied to a component in a dry condition to obtain a first ultrasonic spectrum of the component. The component is then wet with a selected liquid to penetrate any crack-like flaws in the component. The plurality of exciting frequencies are again applied to the component and a second ultrasonic spectrum of the component is obtained. The wet and dry ultrasonic spectra are then analyzed to determine the second harmonic components in each of the ultrasonic resonance spectra and the second harmonic components are compared to ascertain the presence of crack-like flaws in the component.

  7. Crack detection using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, A.; Bell, T.M.; Rhodes, G.W.

    1994-10-04

    Method and apparatus are provided for detecting crack-like flaws in components. A plurality of exciting frequencies are generated and applied to a component in a dry condition to obtain a first ultrasonic spectrum of the component. The component is then wet with a selected liquid to penetrate any crack-like flaws in the component. The plurality of exciting frequencies are again applied to the component and a second ultrasonic spectrum of the component is obtained. The wet and dry ultrasonic spectra are then analyzed to determine the second harmonic components in each of the ultrasonic resonance spectra and the second harmonic components are compared to ascertain the presence of crack-like flaws in the component. 5 figs.

  8. Innovative design for early detection of invasive species

    EPA Science Inventory

    Non-native aquatic species impose significant ecological impacts and rising financial costs in marine and freshwater ecosystems worldwide. Early detection of invasive species, as they enter a vulnerable ecosystem, is critical to successful containment and eradication. ORD, at t...

  9. SPECIES-SPECIFIC DETECTION OF HYDROCARBON UTILIZING BACTERIA. (R825810)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rapid detection and quantitative assessment of specific microbial species in environmental samples is desirable for monitoring changes in ecosystems and for tracking natural or introduced microbial species during bioremediation of contaminated sites. In the interests of develo...

  10. Ageing of resin from Pinus species assessed by infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Beltran, Victòria; Salvadó, Nati; Butí, Salvador; Pradell, Trinitat

    2016-06-01

    Resins obtained from Pinus genus species have been widely used in very different fields throughout history. As soon as the resins are secreted, molecular changes start altering their chemical, mechanical and optical properties. The ageing processes are complex, and the chemical and structural changes associated with resin degradation are not yet fully known. Many questions still remain open, for instance changes happening in pimaranes, one of the two diterpenoid constituents of the resin. A systematic study of the ageing process of Pinus resins is done through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) using chemical standards and complementing the obtained results with gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis when necessary. Moreover, long-term degradation processes are also investigated through the analysis of a selection of dated historical resins. This study overcomes the limitations of GC/MS and brings new information about the reactions and interactions between molecules during Pinus resin ageing processes. It also provides information about which bonds are affected and unaffected, and these can be used as specific markers of the degradation and of the resins themselves. Graphical Abstract Changes in the IR spectral features due to the Pinus resin ageing processes. PMID:27052772

  11. Differential mobility spectroscopy for chemical agent detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, M. Todd

    2006-05-01

    General Dynamics ATP (GDATP) and Sionex Corporation (Sionex) are carrying out a cooperative development for a handheld chemical agent detector, being called JUNO TM, which will have lower false positives, higher sensitivity, and improved interference rejection compared with presently available detectors. This enhanced performance is made possible by the use of a new principle of ion separation called Differential Mobility Spectrometry (DMS). The enhanced selectivity is provided by the field tunable nature of the Sionex differential mobility technology (microDMxTM) which forms the analytical heart of the JUNO system and enables fingerprinting of molecules by characterization of the ionized molecular behavior under multiple electric field conditions. This enhanced selectivity is valuable in addressing not only the traditional list of chemical warfare agents (CWA) but also the substantial list of Toxic Industrial Compounds (TICs) and Toxic Industrial Materials (TIMs) which may be released in warfare or terrorist situations. Experimental results showing the ability of the microDMx to reject interferences, detect and resolve live agents are presented. An additional breakthrough in the technology was realized by operating the device at a reduced pressure of around 0.5 atmospheres. This reduced pressure operation resulted in roughly doubling the spectrometers resolution over what has previously been reported [1]. Advances have also been made in power consumption and packaging leading to a device suitable for portable, handheld, applications. Experimental results illustrating the performance of the microDMx technology employed in JUNO are highlighted.

  12. Micro-Raman spectroscopy for meat type detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Biasio, M.; Stampfer, P.; Leitner, R.; Huck, C. W.; Wiedemair, V.; Balthasar, D.

    2015-06-01

    The recent horse meat scandal in Europe increased the demand for optical sensors that can identify meat type. Micro-Raman spectroscopy is a promising technique for the discrimination of meat types. Here, we present micro-Raman measurements of chicken, pork, turkey, mutton, beef and horse meat test samples. The data was analyzed with different combinations of data normalization and classification approaches. Our results show that Raman spectroscopy can discriminate between different meat types. Red and white meat are easily discriminated, however a sophisticated chemometric model is required to discriminate species within these groups.

  13. High sensitivity detection of NO2 employing off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy coupled with multiple line integrated spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Gottipaty N.; Karpf, Andreas

    2011-05-01

    We report on the development of a new sensor for NO2 with ultrahigh sensitivity of detection. This has been accomplished by combining off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) (which can provide large path lengths of the order of several km in a small volume cell) with multiple line integrated absorption spectroscopy (MLIAS) (where we integrate the absorption spectra over a large number of rotational-vibrational transitions of the molecular species to further improve the sensitivity). Employing an external cavity tunable quantum cascade laser operating in the 1601 - 1670 cm-1 range and a high-finesse optical cavity, the absorption spectra of NO2 over 100 transitions in the R-band have been recorded. From the observed linear relationship between the integrated absorption vs. concentration of NO2, we report an effective sensitivity of detection of 10 ppt for NO2. To the best of our knowledge, this is among the most sensitive levels of detection of NO2 to date. A sensitive sensor for the detection of NO2 will be helpful to monitor the ambient air quality, combustion emissions from the automobiles, power plants, aircraft and for the detection of nitrate based explosives (which are commonly used in improvised explosives (IEDs)). Additionally such a sensor would be valuable for the study of complex chemical reactions that undergo in the atmosphere resulting in the formation of photochemical smog, tropospheric ozone and acid rain.

  14. Double-pulse standoff laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for versatile hazardous materials detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottfried, Jennifer L.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Munson, Chase A.; Miziolek, Andrzej W.

    2007-12-01

    We have developed a double-pulse standoff laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (ST-LIBS) system capable of detecting a variety of hazardous materials at tens of meters. The use of a double-pulse laser improves the sensitivity and selectivity of ST-LIBS, especially for the detection of energetic materials. In addition to various metallic and plastic materials, the system has been used to detect bulk explosives RDX and Composition-B, explosive residues, biological species such as the anthrax surrogate Bacillus subtilis, and chemical warfare simulants at 20 m. We have also demonstrated the discrimination of explosive residues from various interferents on an aluminum substrate.

  15. Detection of flaws in hazelnuts using VIS/NIR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The feasibility of VIS/NIR spectroscopy for detection of flaws in hazelnut kernels was demonstrated. Feature datasets comprising raw absorbance values, raw absorbance Ratios (Abs['1] : Abs['2]) and Differences (Abs['1] – Abs['2]) for all possible pairs of wavelengths from 306.5 nm to 1710.9 nm were ...

  16. Evaluation of endogenous species involved in brain tumors using multiphoton photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Sudhir; Cullum, Brian M.

    2013-05-01

    It has been shown that using non-resonant multiphoton photoacoustic spectroscopy (NMPPAS), excised brain tumor (grade III astrocytoma) and healthy tissue can be differentiated from each other, even in neighboring biopsy samples[1, 2]. Because of this, this powerful technique offers a great deal of potential for use as a surgical guidance technique for tumor margining with up to cellular level spatial resolution[3]. NMPPAS spectra are obtained by monitoring the non-radiative relaxation pathways via ultrasonic detection, following two-photon excitation with light in the optical diagnostic window (740nm-1100nm). Based upon significant differences in the ratiometric absorption of the tissues following 970nm and 1100nm excitation, a clear classification of the tissue can be made. These differences are the result of variations in composition and oxidation state of certain endogenous biochemical species between healthy and malignant tissues. In this work, NADH, NAD+ and ATP were measured using NMPPAS in model gelatin tissue phantoms to begin to understand which species might be responsible for the observed spectral differences in the tissue. Each species was placed in specific pH environments to provide control over the ratio of oxidized to reduced forms of the species. Ratiometric analyses were then conducted to account for variability caused due to instrumental parameters. This paper will discuss the potential roles of each of the species for tumor determination and their contribution to the spectral signature.

  17. Gene Name Disambiguation Using Multi-Scope Species Detection.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Jui-Chen; Wei, Chih-Hsuan; Kao, Hung-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Species detection is an important topic in the text mining field. According to the importance of the research topics (e.g., species assignment to genes and document focus species detection), some studies are dedicated to an individual topic. However, no researcher to date has discussed species detection as a general problem. Therefore, we developed a multi-scope species detection model to identify the focus species for different scopes (i.e., gene mention, sentence, paragraph, and global scope of the entire article). Species assignment is one of the bottlenecks of gene name disambiguation. In our evaluation, recognizing the focus species of a gene mention in four different scopes improved the gene name disambiguation. We used the species cue words extracted from articles to estimate the relevance between an article and a species. The relevance score was calculated by our proposed entities frequency-augmented invert species frequency (EF-AISF) formula, which represents the importance of an entity to a species. We also defined a relation guide factor (RGF) to normalize the relevance score. Our method not only achieved better performance than previous methods but also can handle the articles that do not specifically mention a species. In the DECA corpus, we outperformed previous studies and obtained an accuracy of 88.22 percent. PMID:26355507

  18. Detection of Campylobacter species using monoclonal antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Colin R.; Lee, Alice; Stanker, Larry H.

    1999-01-01

    A panel of species specific monoclonal antibodies were raised to Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter lari. The isotypes, and cross-reactivity profiles of each monoclonal antibody against an extensive panel of micro- organisms, were determined.

  19. Automated species and strain identification of bacteria in complex matrices using FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzey, K. A.; Gardner, P. J.; Petrova, V. K.; Donnelly, C. W.; Petrucci, G. A.

    2008-04-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy provides a highly selective and reproducible means for the chemically-based discrimination of intact microbial cells which make the method valuable for large-scale screening of foods. The goals of the present study were to assess the effect of chemical interferents, such as food matrices, different sanitizing compounds and growth media, on the ability of the method to accurately identify and classify L. innocua, L. welshimeri, E. coli, S. cholerasuis, S. subterranea, E. sakazakii, and E. aerogenes. Moreover, the potential of FTIR spectroscopy for discrimination of L. innocua and L. welshimeri of different genotypes and the effect of growth phase on identification accuracy of L. innocua and L. welshimeri were tested. FTIR spectra were collected using two different sample presentation techniques - transmission and attenuated total reflection (ATR), and then analyzed using multivariate discriminant analysis based on the first derivative of the FTIR spectra with the unknown spectra assigned to the species group with the shortest Mahalanobis distance. The results of the study demonstrated 100% correct identification and differentiation of all bacterial strains used in this study in the presence of chemical interferents or food matrices, better than 99% identification rate in presence of media matrices, and 100% correct detection for specific bacteria in mixed flora species. Additionally, FTIR spectroscopy proved to be 100% accurate when differentiating between genotypes of L. innocua and L. welshimeri, with the classification accuracy unaffected by the growth stage. These results suggest that FTIR spectroscopy can be used as a valuable tool for identifying pathogenic bacteria in food and environmental samples.

  20. Single-Electron Detection and Spectroscopy via Relativistic Cyclotron Radiation.

    PubMed

    Asner, D M; Bradley, R F; de Viveiros, L; Doe, P J; Fernandes, J L; Fertl, M; Finn, E C; Formaggio, J A; Furse, D; Jones, A M; Kofron, J N; LaRoque, B H; Leber, M; McBride, E L; Miller, M L; Mohanmurthy, P; Monreal, B; Oblath, N S; Robertson, R G H; Rosenberg, L J; Rybka, G; Rysewyk, D; Sternberg, M G; Tedeschi, J R; Thümmler, T; VanDevender, B A; Woods, N L

    2015-04-24

    It has been understood since 1897 that accelerating charges must emit electromagnetic radiation. Although first derived in 1904, cyclotron radiation from a single electron orbiting in a magnetic field has never been observed directly. We demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radio-frequency spectrometer. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta electron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay end point, and this work demonstrates a fundamentally new approach to precision beta spectroscopy for future neutrino mass experiments. PMID:25955048

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance detection and spectroscopy of single proteins using quantum logic.

    PubMed

    Lovchinsky, I; Sushkov, A O; Urbach, E; de Leon, N P; Choi, S; De Greve, K; Evans, R; Gertner, R; Bersin, E; Müller, C; McGuinness, L; Jelezko, F; Walsworth, R L; Park, H; Lukin, M D

    2016-02-19

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the structural analysis of organic compounds and biomolecules but typically requires macroscopic sample quantities. We use a sensor, which consists of two quantum bits corresponding to an electronic spin and an ancillary nuclear spin, to demonstrate room temperature magnetic resonance detection and spectroscopy of multiple nuclear species within individual ubiquitin proteins attached to the diamond surface. Using quantum logic to improve readout fidelity and a surface-treatment technique to extend the spin coherence time of shallow nitrogen-vacancy centers, we demonstrate magnetic field sensitivity sufficient to detect individual proton spins within 1 second of integration. This gain in sensitivity enables high-confidence detection of individual proteins and allows us to observe spectral features that reveal information about their chemical composition. PMID:26847544

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance detection and spectroscopy of single proteins using quantum logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovchinsky, I.; Sushkov, A. O.; Urbach, E.; de Leon, N. P.; Choi, S.; De Greve, K.; Evans, R.; Gertner, R.; Bersin, E.; Müller, C.; McGuinness, L.; Jelezko, F.; Walsworth, R. L.; Park, H.; Lukin, M. D.

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the structural analysis of organic compounds and biomolecules but typically requires macroscopic sample quantities. We use a sensor, which consists of two quantum bits corresponding to an electronic spin and an ancillary nuclear spin, to demonstrate room temperature magnetic resonance detection and spectroscopy of multiple nuclear species within individual ubiquitin proteins attached to the diamond surface. Using quantum logic to improve readout fidelity and a surface-treatment technique to extend the spin coherence time of shallow nitrogen-vacancy centers, we demonstrate magnetic field sensitivity sufficient to detect individual proton spins within 1 second of integration. This gain in sensitivity enables high-confidence detection of individual proteins and allows us to observe spectral features that reveal information about their chemical composition.

  3. Monitoring programs need to take into account imperfect species detectability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kery, M.; Schmid, H.

    2004-01-01

    Biodiversiry monitoring is important to identify biological units in need of conservation and to check the effectiveness of conservation actions. Programs generally monitor species richness and its changes (trend). Usually, no correction is made for imperfect species detectability. Instead, it is assumed that each species present has the same probability of being recorded and that there is no difference in this detectability across space and time, e.g. among observers and habitats. Consequently, species richness is determined by enumeration as the sum of species recorded. In Switzerland, the federal government has recently launched a comprehensive program that aims at detecting changes in biodiversity at all levels of biological integration. Birds are an important part of that program. Since 1999, 23 visits per breeding season are made to each of >250 1 km2 squares to map the territories of all detected breeding bird species. Here, we analyse data from three squares to illustrate the use of capture-recapture models in monitoring to obtain detectability-corrected estimates of species richness and trend. Species detectability averaged only 85%. Hence an estimated 15% of species present remained overlooked even after three visits. Within a square, changes in detectability for different years were of the same magnitude when surveys were conducted by the same observer as when they were by different observers. Estimates of trend were usually biased and community turnover was overestimated when based on enumeration. Here we use bird data as an illustration of methods. However, species detectability for any taxon is unlikely ever to be perfect or even constant across categories to be compared. Therefore, monitoring programs should correct for species detectability.

  4. Evaluating species richness: biased ecological inference results from spatial heterogeneity in species detection probabilities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McNew, Lance B.; Handel, Colleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate estimates of species richness are necessary to test predictions of ecological theory and evaluate biodiversity for conservation purposes. However, species richness is difficult to measure in the field because some species will almost always be overlooked due to their cryptic nature or the observer's failure to perceive their cues. Common measures of species richness that assume consistent observability across species are inviting because they may require only single counts of species at survey sites. Single-visit estimation methods ignore spatial and temporal variation in species detection probabilities related to survey or site conditions that may confound estimates of species richness. We used simulated and empirical data to evaluate the bias and precision of raw species counts, the limiting forms of jackknife and Chao estimators, and multi-species occupancy models when estimating species richness to evaluate whether the choice of estimator can affect inferences about the relationships between environmental conditions and community size under variable detection processes. Four simulated scenarios with realistic and variable detection processes were considered. Results of simulations indicated that (1) raw species counts were always biased low, (2) single-visit jackknife and Chao estimators were significantly biased regardless of detection process, (3) multispecies occupancy models were more precise and generally less biased than the jackknife and Chao estimators, and (4) spatial heterogeneity resulting from the effects of a site covariate on species detection probabilities had significant impacts on the inferred relationships between species richness and a spatially explicit environmental condition. For a real dataset of bird observations in northwestern Alaska, the four estimation methods produced different estimates of local species richness, which severely affected inferences about the effects of shrubs on local avian richness. Overall, our results

  5. Label free detection of phospholipids by infrared absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Tahsin; Foster, Erick; Vigil, Genevieve; Khan, Aamir A.; Bohn, Paul; Howard, Scott S.

    2014-08-01

    We present our study on compact, label-free dissolved lipid sensing by combining capillary electrophoresis separation in a PDMS microfluidic chip online with mid-infrared (MIR) absorption spectroscopy for biomarker detection. On-chip capillary electrophoresis is used to separate the biomarkers without introducing any extrinsic contrast agent, which reduces both cost and complexity. The label free biomarker detection could be done by interrogating separated biomarkers in the channel by MIR absorption spectroscopy. Phospholipids biomarkers of degenerative neurological, kidney, and bone diseases are detectable using this label free technique. These phospholipids exhibit strong absorption resonances in the MIR and are present in biofluids including urine, blood plasma, and cerebrospinal fluid. MIR spectroscopy of a 12-carbon chain phosphatidic acid (PA) (1,2-dilauroyl-snglycero- 3-phosphate (sodium salt)) dissolved in N-methylformamide, exhibits a strong amide peak near wavenumber 1660 cm-1 (wavelength 6 μm), arising from the phosphate headgroup vibrations within a low-loss window of the solvent. PA has a similar structure to many important phospholipids molecules like phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), and phosphatidylserine (PS), making it an ideal molecule for initial proof-of-concept studies. This newly proposed detection technique can lead us to minimal sample preparation and is capable of identifying several biomarkers from the same sample simultaneously.

  6. Quantitative Detection of Combustion Species using Ultra-Violet Diode Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, J. S.; Peterson, K. A.

    2001-01-01

    Southwest Sciences is developing a new microgravity combustion diagnostic based on UV diode lasers. The instrument will allow absolute concentration measurements of combustion species on a variety of microgravity combustion platforms including the Space Station. Our approach uses newly available room temperature UV diode lasers, thereby keeping the instrument compact, rugged and energy efficient. The feasibility of the technique was demonstrated by measurement of CH radicals in laboratory flames. Further progress in fabrication technology of UV diode lasers at shorter wavelengths and higher power will result in detection of transient species in the deeper UV. High sensitivity detection of combustion radicals is provided with wavelength modulation absorption spectroscopy.

  7. Infrared Spectroscopy of Pollen Identifies Plant Species and Genus as Well as Environmental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Boris; Kohler, Achim

    2014-01-01

    Background It is imperative to have reliable and timely methodologies for analysis and monitoring of seed plants in order to determine climate-related plant processes. Moreover, impact of environment on plant fitness is predominantly based on studies of female functions, while the contribution of male gametophytes is mostly ignored due to missing data on pollen quality. We explored the use of infrared spectroscopy of pollen for an inexpensive and rapid characterization of plants. Methodology The study was based on measurement of pollen samples by two Fourier transform infrared techniques: single reflectance attenuated total reflectance and transmission measurement of sample pellets. The experimental set, with a total of 813 samples, included five pollination seasons and 300 different plant species belonging to all principal spermatophyte clades (conifers, monocotyledons, eudicots, and magnoliids). Results The spectroscopic-based methodology enables detection of phylogenetic variations, including the separation of confamiliar and congeneric species. Furthermore, the methodology enables measurement of phenotypic plasticity by the detection of inter-annual variations within the populations. The spectral differences related to environment and taxonomy are interpreted biochemically, specifically variations of pollen lipids, proteins, carbohydrates, and sporopollenins. The study shows large variations of absolute content of nutrients for congenital species pollinating in the same environmental conditions. Moreover, clear correlation between carbohydrate-to-protein ratio and pollination strategy has been detected. Infrared spectral database with respect to biochemical variation among the range of species, climate and biogeography will significantly improve comprehension of plant-environment interactions, including impact of global climate change on plant communities. PMID:24748390

  8. Detection of lateral composition modulation by magnetoexciton spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.D.; Millunchick, J.M.; Follstaedt, D.; Lee, S.; Reno, J.; Twesten, R.D.; Zhang, Y.; Mascerenhas, A.

    1997-07-10

    An experimental signature for detecting spontaneous lateral composition modulation in a (InAs){sub n}/(GaAs){sub m} short period superlattice on an InP substrate based on magnetoexciton spectroscopy described. The authors find by aligning the magnetic field in three crystallographic directions, one parallel to and the other two perpendicular to the composition modulation direction, that the magnetoexciton shifts are anisotropic and are a good indicator for the presence of composition modulation.

  9. A near-infrared spectroscopy routine for unambiguous identification of cryptic ant species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The identification of species – of importance for most biological disciplines – is not always straightforward as cryptic species present a hurdle for traditional species discrimination. Fibre-optic near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a rapid and cheap method for a wide range of different applicatio...

  10. Detecting diversity: emerging methods to estimate species diversity.

    PubMed

    Iknayan, Kelly J; Tingley, Morgan W; Furnas, Brett J; Beissinger, Steven R

    2014-02-01

    Estimates of species richness and diversity are central to community and macroecology and are frequently used in conservation planning. Commonly used diversity metrics account for undetected species primarily by controlling for sampling effort. Yet the probability of detecting an individual can vary among species, observers, survey methods, and sites. We review emerging methods to estimate alpha, beta, gamma, and metacommunity diversity through hierarchical multispecies occupancy models (MSOMs) and multispecies abundance models (MSAMs) that explicitly incorporate observation error in the detection process for species or individuals. We examine advantages, limitations, and assumptions of these detection-based hierarchical models for estimating species diversity. Accounting for imperfect detection using these approaches has influenced conclusions of comparative community studies and creates new opportunities for testing theory. PMID:24315534

  11. Can hyperspectral remote sensing detect species specific biochemicals?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Discrimination of a few plants scattered among many plants is a goal common to detection of agricultural weeds and invasive species. Detection of clandestinely grown Cannabis sativa L. is in many ways a special case of weed detection. Remote sensing technology provides an automated, computer based,...

  12. Trace aerosol detection and identification by dynamic photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sullenberger, R M; Clark, M L; Kunz, R R; Samuels, A C; Emge, D K; Ellzy, M W; Wynn, C M

    2014-12-15

    Dynamic photoacoustic spectroscopy (DPAS) is a high sensitivity technique for standoff detection of trace vapors. A field-portable DPAS system has potential as an early warning provider for gaseous-based chemical threats. For the first time, we utilize DPAS to successfully detect the presence of trace aerosols. Aerosol identification via long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) spectra is demonstrated. We estimate the sensitivity of our DPAS system to aerosols comprised of silica particles is comparable to that of SF(6) gas based on a signal level per absorbance unit metric for the two materials. The implications of these measurements are discussed. PMID:25607495

  13. Rapid approach to identify the presence of Arabica and Robusta species in coffee using 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Monakhova, Yulia B; Ruge, Winfried; Kuballa, Thomas; Ilse, Maren; Winkelmann, Ole; Diehl, Bernd; Thomas, Freddy; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2015-09-01

    NMR spectroscopy was used to verify the presence of Arabica and Robusta species in coffee. Lipophilic extracts of authentic roasted and green coffees showed the presence of established markers for Robusta (16-O-methylcafestol (16-OMC)) and for Arabica (kahweol). The integration of the 16-OMC signal (δ 3.165 ppm) was used to estimate the amount of Robusta in coffee blends with an approximate limit of detection of 1-3%. The method was successfully applied for the analysis of 77 commercial coffee samples (coffee pods, coffee capsules, and coffee beans). Furthermore, principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the spectra of lipophilic and aqueous extracts of 20 monovarietal authentic samples. Clusters of the two species were observed. NMR spectroscopy can be used as a rapid prescreening tool to discriminate Arabica and Robusta coffee species before the confirmation applying the official method. PMID:25842325

  14. An infrared spectroscopy method to detect ammonia in gastric juice.

    PubMed

    Giovannozzi, Andrea M; Pennecchi, Francesca; Muller, Paul; Balma Tivola, Paolo; Roncari, Silvia; Rossi, Andrea M

    2015-11-01

    Ammonia in gastric juice is considered a potential biomarker for Helicobacter pylori infection and as a factor contributing to gastric mucosal injury. High ammonia concentrations are also found in patients with chronic renal failure, peptic ulcer disease, and chronic gastritis. Rapid and specific methods for ammonia detection are urgently required by the medical community. Here we present a method to detect ammonia directly in gastric juice based on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The ammonia dissolved in biological liquid samples as ammonium ion was released in air as a gas by the shifting of the pH equilibrium of the ammonium/ammonia reaction and was detected in line by a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy system equipped with a gas cell for the quantification. The method developed provided high sensitivity and selectivity in ammonia detection both in pure standard solutions and in a simulated gastric juice matrix over the range of diagnostic concentrations tested. Preliminary analyses were also performed on real gastric juice samples from patients with gastric mucosal injury and with symptoms of H. pylori infection, and the results were in agreement with the clinicopathology information. The whole analysis, performed in less than 10 min, can be directly applied on the sample without extraction procedures and it ensures high specificity of detection because of the ammonia fingerprint absorption bands in the infrared spectrum. This method could be easily used with endoscopy instrumentation to provide information in real time and would enable the endoscopist to improve and integrate gastroscopic examinations. PMID:26377936

  15. Species of Redundancy in Visual Target Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-David, Boaz M.; Algom, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    We report a series of investigations into the effects of common names, physical identity, and physical similarity on visual detection time. The effect of these factors on the capacity of the system processing the signals was also examined. We used a redundant targets design with separate testing of the target-distractor (single target),…

  16. CURRENT METHODS FOR DETECTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current methods for detecting protozoa in water produce results that are highly variable. It is difficult to determine if the methods themselves, or the procedures for testing these methods, are the source of the variability. If testing procedures are responsible for high varia...

  17. Detection of early caries by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-07-01

    To improve sensitivity of dental caries detection by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis, it is proposed to utilize emission peaks in the ultraviolet. We newly focused on zinc whose emission peaks exist in ultraviolet because zinc exists at high concentration in the outer layer of enamel. It was shown that by using ratios between heights of an emission peak of Zn and that of Ca, the detection sensitivity and stability are largely improved. It was also shown that early caries are differentiated from healthy part by properly setting a threshold in the detected ratios. The proposed caries detection system can be applied to dental laser systems such as ones based on Er:YAG-lasers. When ablating early caries part by laser light, the system notices the dentist that the ablation of caries part is finished. We also show the intensity of emission peaks of zinc decreased with ablation with Er:YAG laser light.

  18. Photoacoustic spectroscopy for trace vapor detection and molecular discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holthoff, Ellen; Bender, John; Pellegrino, Paul; Fisher, Almon; Stoffel, Nancy

    2010-04-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is a useful monitoring technique that is well suited for trace gas detection. This method routinely exhibits detection limits at the parts-per-million (ppm) or parts-per-billion (ppb) level for gaseous samples. PAS also possesses favorable detection characteristics when the system dimensions are scaled to a microsystem design. Current research utilizes quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) in combination with micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS)-scale photoacoustic cell designs. This sensing platform has provided favorable detection limits for a standard nerve agent simulant. The objective of the present work is to demonstrate an extremely versatile MEMS-scale photoacoustic sensor system that is able to discriminate between different analytes of interest.

  19. Detection of water and its derivatives on individual nanoparticles using vibrational electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Crozier, Peter A; Aoki, Toshihiro; Liu, Qianlang

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the role of water, hydrate and hydroxyl species on nanoparticle surfaces and interfaces is very important in both physical and life sciences. Detecting the presence of oxygen-hydrogen species with nanometer resolution is extremely challenging at present. Here we show that the recently developed vibrational electron energy-loss spectroscopy using subnanometer focused electron beams can be employed to spectroscopically identify the local presence and variation of OH species on nanoscale surfaces. The hydrogen-oxygen fingerprint can be correlated with highly localized structural and morphological information obtained from electron imaging. Moreover, the current approach exploits the aloof beam mode of spectral acquisition which does not require direct electron irradiation of the sample thus greatly reducing beam damage to the OH bond. These findings open the door for using electron microscopy to probe local hydroxyl and hydrate species on nanoscale organic and inorganic structures. PMID:27423795

  20. Sensitive Multi-Species Emissions Monitoring: Infrared Laser-Based Detection of Trace-Level Contaminants.

    SciTech Connect

    Steill, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes our development of spectroscopic chemical analysis techniques and spectral modeling for trace-gas measurements of highly-regulated low-concentration species present in flue gas emissions from utility coal boilers such as HCl under conditions of high humidity. Detailed spectral modeling of the spectroscopy of HCl and other important combustion and atmospheric species such as H 2 O, CO 2 , N 2 O, NO 2 , SO 2 , and CH 4 demonstrates that IR-laser spectroscopy is a sensitive multi-component analysis strategy. Experimental measurements from techniques based on IR laser spectroscopy are presented that demonstrate sub-ppm sensitivity levels to these species. Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy is used to detect and quantify HCl at ppm levels with extremely high signal-to-noise even under conditions of high relative humidity. Additionally, cavity ring-down IR spectroscopy is used to achieve an extremely high sensitivity to combustion trace gases in this spectral region; ppm level CH 4 is one demonstrated example. The importance of spectral resolution in the sensitivity of a trace-gas measurement is examined by spectral modeling in the mid- and near-IR, and efforts to improve measurement resolution through novel instrument development are described. While previous project reports focused on benefits and complexities of the dual-etalon cavity ring-down infrared spectrometer, here details on steps taken to implement this unique and potentially revolutionary instrument are described. This report also illustrates and critiques the general strategy of IR- laser photodetection of trace gases leading to the conclusion that mid-IR laser spectroscopy techniques provide a promising basis for further instrument development and implementation that will enable cost-effective sensitive detection of multiple key contaminant species simultaneously.

  1. Static magnetic Faraday rotation spectroscopy combined with a differential scheme for OH detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weixiong; Deng, Lunhua; Qian, Xiaodong; Fang, Bo; Gai, Yanbo; Chen, Weidong; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Weijun

    2015-04-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) radical plays a critical role in atmospheric chemistry due to its high reactivity with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other trace gaseous species. Because of its very short life time and very low concentration in the atmosphere, interference-free high sensitivity in-situ OH monitoring by laser spectroscopy represents a real challenge. Faraday rotation spectroscopy (FRS) relies on the particular magneto-optic effect observed for paramagnetic species, which makes it capable of enhancing the detection sensitivity and mitigation of spectral interferences from diamagnetic species in the atmosphere. When an AC magnetic field is used, the Zeeman splitting of the molecular absorption line (and thus the magnetic circular birefringence) is modulated. This provides an 'internal modulation' of the sample, which permits to suppress the external noise like interference fringes. An alternative FRS detection scheme is to use a static magnetic field (DC-field) associated with laser wavelength modulation to effectively modulate the Zeeman splitting of the absorption lines. In the DC field case, wavelength modulation of the laser frequency can provide excellent performance compared to most of the sensing systems based on direct absorption and wavelength modulation spectroscopy. The dimension of the DC solenoid is not limited by the resonant frequency of the RLC circuit, which makes large dimension solenoid coil achievable and the absorption base length could be further increased. By employing a combination of the environmental photochemical reactor or smog chamber with multipass absorption cell, one can lower the minimum detection limit for high accuracy atmospheric chemistry studies. In this paper, we report on the development of a DC field based FRS in conjunction with a balanced detection scheme for OH radical detection at 2.8 μm and the construction of OH chemistry research platform which combined a large dimension superconducting magnetic coil with the

  2. Terahertz Spectroscopy for Chemical Detection and Burn Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbab, Mohammad Hassan

    Terahertz (THz) frequencies represent the last frontier of the electromagnetic spectrum to be investigated by scientists. One of the main attractions of investigating this frequency range is the richness of the spectral information that can be obtained using a Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy (THz-TDS) setup. Many large molecule chemicals and polymers have vibrational and rotational modes in the THz frequencies. Study of these resonance modes has revealed a wealth of new information about the intermolecular structure, and its transformation during crystallization or polymerization process. This information helps researchers develop new materials to address problems such as efficient energy conversion in polymer solar cells. Moreover, similar signature-like terahertz modes can be used for stand-off identification of substances or for nondestructive evaluation of defects in industrial applications. Finally, terahertz spectroscopy has the potential to provide a safe and non-ionizing imaging modality to study cellular and molecular events in biological and biomedical applications. The high sensitivity of terahertz waves to attenuation by both bound and free water molecules can also provides a source of signal contrast for many future biomedical imaging and diagnostic applications. In this dissertation, we aim to study and develop three such applications of terahertz spectroscopy, which form the three axes of our work: rough-surface scattering mediated stand-off detection of chemicals, characterization of burn injuries using terahertz radiation, and a new electrically tunable bandpass filter device incorporating nano-material transparent electrodes that can enable fast terahertz spectroscopy in the frequency domain.

  3. Botulinum neurotoxin serotypes detected by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Savage, Alison C; Buckley, Nicholas; Halliwell, Jennifer; Gwenin, Christopher

    2015-05-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin is one of the deadliest biological toxins known to mankind and is able to cause the debilitating disease botulism. The rapid detection of the different serotypes of botulinum neurotoxin is essential for both diagnosis of botulism and identifying the presence of toxin in potential cases of terrorism and food contamination. The modes of action of botulinum neurotoxins are well-established in literature and differ for each serotype. The toxins are known to specifically cleave portions of the SNARE proteins SNAP-25 or VAMP; an interaction that can be monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. This study presents a SNAP-25 and a VAMP biosensors for detecting the activity of five botulinum neurotoxin serotypes (A-E) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The biosensors are able to detect concentrations of toxins as low as 25 fg/mL, in a short time-frame compared with the current standard methods of detection. Both biosensors show greater specificity for their compatible serotypes compared with incompatible serotypes and denatured toxins. PMID:25954998

  4. Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotypes Detected by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Alison C.; Buckley, Nicholas; Halliwell, Jennifer; Gwenin, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin is one of the deadliest biological toxins known to mankind and is able to cause the debilitating disease botulism. The rapid detection of the different serotypes of botulinum neurotoxin is essential for both diagnosis of botulism and identifying the presence of toxin in potential cases of terrorism and food contamination. The modes of action of botulinum neurotoxins are well-established in literature and differ for each serotype. The toxins are known to specifically cleave portions of the SNARE proteins SNAP-25 or VAMP; an interaction that can be monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. This study presents a SNAP-25 and a VAMP biosensors for detecting the activity of five botulinum neurotoxin serotypes (A–E) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The biosensors are able to detect concentrations of toxins as low as 25 fg/mL, in a short time-frame compared with the current standard methods of detection. Both biosensors show greater specificity for their compatible serotypes compared with incompatible serotypes and denatured toxins. PMID:25954998

  5. Multimodal spectroscopy detects features of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šćepanović, Obrad R.; Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Miller, Arnold; Kong, Chae-Ryon; Volynskaya, Zoya; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Kramer, John R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Early detection and treatment of rupture-prone vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques is critical to reducing patient mortality associated with cardiovascular disease. The combination of reflectance, fluorescence, and Raman spectroscopy-termed multimodal spectroscopy (MMS)-provides detailed biochemical information about tissue and can detect vulnerable plaque features: thin fibrous cap (TFC), necrotic core (NC), superficial foam cells (SFC), and thrombus. Ex vivo MMS spectra are collected from 12 patients that underwent carotid endarterectomy or femoral bypass surgery. Data are collected by means of a unitary MMS optical fiber probe and a portable clinical instrument. Blinded histopathological analysis is used to assess the vulnerability of each spectrally evaluated artery lesion. Modeling of the ex vivo MMS spectra produce objective parameters that correlate with the presence of vulnerable plaque features: TFC with fluorescence parameters indicative of collagen presence; NC/SFC with a combination of diffuse reflectance β-carotene/ceroid absorption and the Raman spectral signature of lipids; and thrombus with its Raman signature. Using these parameters, suspected vulnerable plaques can be detected with a sensitivity of 96% and specificity of 72%. These encouraging results warrant the continued development of MMS as a catheter-based clinical diagnostic technique for early detection of vulnerable plaques.

  6. Detection of propofol concentrations in blood by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, M. S.; Gnyba, M.; UrniaŻ, R.; Myllylä, T. S.; Jedrzejewska-Szczerska, M.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we present a proof-of-concept of a Raman spectroscopy-based approach for measuring the content of propofol, a common anesthesia drug, in whole human blood, and plasma, which is intended for use during clinical procedures. This method utilizes the Raman spectroscopy as a chemically-sensitive method for qualitative detection of the presence of a drug and a quantitative determination of its concentration. A number of samples from different patients with added various concentrations of propofol IV solution were measured. This is most equivalent to a real in-vivo situation. Subsequent analysis of a set of spectra was carried out to extract qualitative and quantitative information. We conclude, that the changes in the spectra of blood with propofol, overlap with the most prominent lines of the propofol solution, especially at spectral regions: 1450 cm-1, 1250- 1260 cm-1, 1050 cm-1, 875-910 cm-1, 640 cm-1. Later, we have introduced a quantitative analysis program based on correlation matrix closest fit, and a LOO cross-validation. We have achieved 36.67% and 60% model precision when considering full spectra, or specified bands, respectively. These results prove the possibility of using Raman spectroscopy for quantitative detection of propofol concentrations in whole human blood.

  7. Minute Concentration Measurements of Simple Hydrocarbon Species Using Supercontinuum Laser Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jihyung; Traina, Nicholas; Halloran, Michael; Lee, Tonghun

    2016-06-01

    Minute concentration measurements of simple hydrocarbon gases are demonstrated using near-infrared supercontinuum laser absorption spectroscopy. Absorption-based gas sensors, particularly when combined with optical fiber components, can significantly enhance diagnostic capabilities to unprecedented levels. However, these diagnostic techniques are subject to limitations under certain gas sensing applications where interference and harsh conditions dominate. Supercontinuum laser absorption spectroscopy is a novel laser-based diagnostic technique that can exceed the above-mentioned limitations and provide accurate and quantitative concentration measurement of simple hydrocarbon species while maintaining compatibility with telecommunications-grade optical fiber components. Supercontinuum radiation generated using a highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber is used to probe rovibrational absorption bands of four hydrocarbon species using full-spectral absorption diagnostics. Absorption spectra of methane (CH4), acetylene (C2H2), and ethylene (C2H4) were measured in the near-infrared spectrum at various pressures and concentrations to determine the accuracy and feasibility of the diagnostic strategy. Absorption spectra of propane (C3H8) were subsequently probed between 1650 nm and 1700 nm, to demonstrate the applicability of the strategy. Measurements agreed very well with simulated spectra generated using the HITRAN database as well as with previous experimental results. Absorption spectra of CH4, C2H2, and C2H4 were then analyzed to determine their respective measurement accuracy and detection limit. Concentration measurements integrated from experimental results were in very good agreement with independent concentration measurements. Calculated detection limits of CH4, C2H2, and C2H4 at room temperature and atmospheric pressure are 0.1%, 0.09%, and 0.17%, respectively. PMID:27091905

  8. Resonance ionization spectroscopy measurement of the vapor pressure of several molecular species

    SciTech Connect

    Capelle, G.A.; Jessup, D.A.; Borella, H.M.; Franks, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    In recent years resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) has found increasing application to various problems involving detection of low levels of atomic, and more recently molecular, species. This work demonstrates the usefulness of RIS in measuring vapor pressure curves of molecular species at very low pressures. Specifically, the vapor pressures versus temperature relationship for rubidium iodide (RbI) and potassium iodide (KI) was measured by applying RIS to atomic Rb and K, using a two-laser system. A pulsed molecular nitrogen laser first dissociated the RbI to produce ground-state Rb atoms in the experimental cell. A flashlamp-pumped dye laser then ionized the Rb in a process wherein two photons of the same wavelength are absorbed, the first exciting Rb via an allowed transition to an upper state (5/sup 2/S/sub 1/2/ ..-->.. 6/sup 2//sub 1/2 or 3/2/) lying in energy slightly more than half the distance to the ionization limit, and the second photon ionizing the excited Rb. In the case of KI, an excimer-laser-pumped dye laser was used in a similar way. An applied dc electric field swept the photoelectrons to a proportional counter for subsequent amplification and detection. The photoelectron signal was then related back to RbI and KI concentrations.

  9. Accounting for Incomplete Species Detection in Fish Community Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    McManamay, Ryan A; Orth, Dr. Donald J; Jager, Yetta

    2013-01-01

    Riverine fish assemblages are heterogeneous and very difficult to characterize with a one-size-fits-all approach to sampling. Furthermore, detecting changes in fish assemblages over time requires accounting for variation in sampling designs. We present a modeling approach that permits heterogeneous sampling by accounting for site and sampling covariates (including method) in a model-based framework for estimation (versus a sampling-based framework). We snorkeled during three surveys and electrofished during a single survey in suite of delineated habitats stratified by reach types. We developed single-species occupancy models to determine covariates influencing patch occupancy and species detection probabilities whereas community occupancy models estimated species richness in light of incomplete detections. For most species, information-theoretic criteria showed higher support for models that included patch size and reach as covariates of occupancy. In addition, models including patch size and sampling method as covariates of detection probabilities also had higher support. Detection probability estimates for snorkeling surveys were higher for larger non-benthic species whereas electrofishing was more effective at detecting smaller benthic species. The number of sites and sampling occasions required to accurately estimate occupancy varied among fish species. For rare benthic species, our results suggested that higher number of occasions, and especially the addition of electrofishing, may be required to improve detection probabilities and obtain accurate occupancy estimates. Community models suggested that richness was 41% higher than the number of species actually observed and the addition of an electrofishing survey increased estimated richness by 13%. These results can be useful to future fish assemblage monitoring efforts by informing sampling designs, such as site selection (e.g. stratifying based on patch size) and determining effort required (e.g. number of

  10. Identification of meat species by using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bilge, Gonca; Velioglu, Hasan Murat; Sezer, Banu; Eseller, Kemal Efe; Boyaci, Ismail Hakki

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to identify meat species by using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Elemental composition differences between meat species were used for meat identification. For this purpose, certain amounts of pork, beef and chicken were collected from different sources and prepared as pellet form for LIBS measurements. The obtained LIBS spectra were evaluated with some chemometric methods, and meat species were qualitatively discriminated with principal component analysis (PCA) method with 83.37% ratio. Pork-beef and chicken-beef meat mixtures were also analyzed with partial least square (PLS) method quantitatively. Determination coefficient (R(2)) and limit of detection (LOD) values were found as 0.994 and 4.4% for pork adulterated beef, and 0.999 and 2.0% for chicken adulterated beef, respectively. In the light of the findings, it was seen that LIBS can be a valuable tool for quality control measurements of meat as a routine method. PMID:27179147

  11. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Investigation of the Nitrogen Species in Photoactive Perfluorophenylazide-Modified Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Zorn, Gilad; Liu, Li-Hong; Árnadóttir, Líney; Wang, Hui; Gamble, Lara J.; Castner, David G.; Yan, Mingdi

    2014-01-01

    X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) was used to characterize the nitrogen species in perfluorophenylazide (PFPA) self-assembled monolayers. PFPA chemistry is a novel immobilization method for tailoring the surface properties of materials. It is a simple route for the efficient immobilization of graphene, proteins, carbohydrates and synthetic polymers onto a variety of surfaces. Upon light irradiation, the azido group in PFPA is converted to a highly reactive singlet nitrene species that readily undergoes CH insertion and C=C addition reactions. Here, the challenge of characterizing the PFPA modified surfaces was addressed by detailed XPS experimental analyses. The three nitrogen peaks detected in the XPS N1s spectra were assigned to amine/amide (400.5 eV) and azide (402.1 and 405.6 eV) species. The observed 2:1 ratio of the areas from the 402.1 eV to 405.6 eV peaks suggests the assignment of the peak at 402.1 eV to the two outer nitrogen atoms in the azido group and assignment of the peak at 405.6 eV to the central nitrogen atom in the azido group. The azide decomposition as the function of x-ray exposure was also determined. Finally, XPS analyses were conducted on patterned graphene to investigate the covalent bond formation between the PFPA and graphene. This study provides strong evidence for the formation of covalent bonds during the PFPA photocoupling process. PMID:24535931

  12. Thz Spectroscopy of Acetaldehyde and Search of 13C Species in Orion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulès, L.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Ilyushin, V. V.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2012-06-01

    Acetaldehyde (CH_3CHO) is one of the high priority complex organic molecules for the astrophysical community. There is a lack of data concerning the 13C species since the measurements are limited to 40 GHz up to date. This molecule displays a large amplitude motion: the hindered rotation of the methyl group with respect to the rest of the molecule. The analysis is performed with RAM36 code which used the Rho Axis Method. Last year we presented the analysis of the millimeterwave spectra of the 13CH_3CHO species. We extended the analysis to the THz range of the vibrational ground state for both species. We are also analyzing the first torsional state (≈140 cm-1) for two reasons: first, this permits to remove correlation between parameters. Second, this state contribute to the partition function even at ISM temperature (100--150 K) since there is an influence on the column density determined in case of detection. The searches of these isotopomers are in progress in ORION. This work was supported by the CNES and the Action sur Projets de l'INSU, PCMI. This work was also done under the ANR-08-BLAN-0054. Kilb, R.W.; Lin, C.C.; and Wilson, E.B. J. Chem. Phys. 26, (1957) 1695 Ilyushin, V.V. et al J. Mol. Spectrosc. 259, (2010) 26 Margules, L. et al. FA07, 66th International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy (2011)

  13. Detection of explosives using THz time domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Châteauneuf, Marc; Dubois, Jacques; Allard, Jean-François; Houde, Daniel; Morris, Denis

    2007-06-01

    Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) are a major threat to Canadian and allies troups involved in peacekeeping and minor conflict operations and despite their relative low technology they represent a major challenge in terms of detection and countermeasures. In order to provide tools to detect these threats, Defence Research & Development Canada - Valcartier initiated a research project to the feasibility of using terahertz (THz) radiations to detect and identify the presence of commonly used explosives and concealed weapons in a standoff method. This paper presents the initial results of the first year of the project and the future directions. A compact THz time domain spectroscopy was developed to build a THz signature table of commonly used explosives.

  14. Spectral domain detection in low-coherence spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bosschaart, Nienke; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Faber, Dirk J.

    2012-01-01

    Low-coherence spectroscopy (LCS) offers the valuable possibility to measure quantitative and wavelength resolved optical property spectra within a tissue volume of choice that is controllable both in size and in depth. Until now, only time domain detection was investigated for LCS (tdLCS), but spectral domain detection offers a theoretical speed/sensitivity advantage over tdLCS. In this article, we introduce a method for spectral domain detection in LCS (sdLCS), with optimal sensitivity as a function of measurement depth. We validate our method computationally in a simulation and experimentally on a phantom with known optical properties. The attenuation, absorption and scattering coefficient spectra from the phantom that were measured by sdLCS agree well with the expected optical properties and the measured optical properties by tdLCS. PMID:23024918

  15. [Identification of Microalgae Species Using Visible/Near Infrared Transmission Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong-yan; Shao, Yong-ni; Jiang, Lu-lu; Guo, An-que; Pan, Jian; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    At present, the identification and classification of the microalgae and its biochemical analysis have become one of the hot spots on marine biology research. Four microalgae species, including Chlorella vulgaris, Chlorella pyrenoidosa, Nannochloropsis oculata, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, were chosen as the experimental materials. Using an established spectral acquisition system, which consists of a portable USB 4000 spectrometer having transmitting and receiving fiber bundles connected by a fiber optic probe, a halogen light source, and a computer, the Vis/NIR transmission spectral data of 120 different samples of the microalgae with different concentration gradients were collected, and the spectral curves of fourmicroalgae species were pre-processed by different pre-treatment methods (baseline filtering, convolution smoothing, etc. ). Based on the pre-treated effects, SPA was applied to select effective wavelengths (EWs), and the selected EWs were introduced as inputs to develop and compare PLS, Least Square Support Vector Machines (LS-SVM), Extreme Learning Machine (ELM)models, so as to explore the feasibility of using Vis/NIR transmission spectroscopy technology for the rapid identification of four microalgae species in situ. The results showed that: the effect of Savitzky-Golay smoothing was much better than the other pre-treatment methods. Six EWs selected in the spectraby SPA were possibly relevant to the content of carotenoids, chlorophyll in the microalgae. Moreover, the SPA-PLS model obtained better performance than the Full-Spectral-PLS model. The average prediction accuracy of three methods including SPA-LV-SVM, SPA-ELM, and SPA-PLS were 80%, 85% and 65%. The established method in this study may identify four microalgae species effectively, which provides a new way for the identification and classification of the microalgae species. The methodology using Vis/NIR spectroscopy with a portable optic probe would be applicable to a diverse range of microalgae

  16. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in tissue local necrosis detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cip, Ondrej; Buchta, Zdenek; Lesundak, Adam; Randula, Antonin; Mikel, Bretislav; Lazar, Josef; Veverkova, Lenka

    2014-03-01

    The recent effort leads to reliable imaging techniques which can help to a surgeon during operations. The fluorescence spectroscopy was selected as very useful online in vivo imaging method to organics and biological materials analysis. The presented work scopes to a laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique to detect tissue local necrosis in small intestine surgery. In first experiments, we tested tissue auto-fluorescence technique but a signal-to-noise ratio didn't express significant results. Then we applied a contrast dye - IndoCyanine Green (ICG) which absorbs and emits wavelengths in the near IR. We arranged the pilot experimental setup based on highly coherent extended cavity diode laser (ECDL) used for stimulating of some critical areas of the small intestine tissue with injected ICG dye. We demonstrated the distribution of the ICG exciter with the first file of shots of small intestine tissue of a rabbit that was captured by high sensitivity fluorescent cam.

  17. Single-electron detection and spectroscopy via relativistic cyclotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, David M.; Bradley, Rich; De Viveiros Souza Filho, Luiz A.; Doe, Peter J.; Fernandes, Justin L.; Fertl, M.; Finn, Erin C.; Formaggio, Joseph; Furse, Daniel L.; Jones, Anthony M.; Kofron, Jared N.; LaRoque, Benjamin; Leber, Michelle; MCBride, Lisa; Miller, M. L.; Mohanmurthy, Prajwal T.; Monreal, Ben; Oblath, Noah S.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rosenberg, Leslie; Rybka, Gray; Rysewyk, Devyn M.; Sternberg, Michael G.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; Thummler, Thomas; VanDevender, Brent A.; Woods, N. L.

    2015-04-01

    It has been understood since 1897 that accelerating charges should emit electromagnetic radiation. Cyclotron radiation, the particular form of radiation emitted by an electron orbiting in a magnetic field, was first derived in 1904. Despite the simplicity of this concept, and the enormous utility of electron spectroscopy in nuclear and particle physics, single-electron cyclotron radiation has never been observed directly. Here we demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radiofrequency spectrometer. We observe the cyclotron radiation emitted by individual electrons that are produced with mildly-relativistic energies by a gaseous radioactive source and are magnetically trapped. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta electron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay endpoint, and this work is a proof-of-concept for future neutrino mass experiments using this technique.

  18. Terahertz reflection spectroscopy for the detection of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy-Hoppa, Megan R.; Fitch, Michael J.; Osiander, Robert

    2008-02-01

    Terahertz (THz) technology has been demonstrated as a promising tool for detection of explosives and is being developed for aviation screening and sensing of improvised explosive devices. THz radiation is attractive for many applications due to its ability to penetrate through a wide range of dielectric materials including clothing, paper, cardboard, plastics, and wood. Of course, metals block THz waves as is the case for microwave, IR, and visible light. Our work has involved investigating the reflection spectroscopy of a variety of materials including explosives such as RDX and PETN, plastic explosive taggants such as DMDNB, and other organic materials. We have also investigated the changes of the reflection spectra in varying grades of sucrose. Spectral differences are observed between three grades of crystalline sugar in the region from 0.1 to 1 THz. By exploiting the unique spectral features, the discrimination capabilities of THz reflection spectroscopy points to the broad applicability of identifying a wide variety of materials.

  19. DNA Barcode Detects High Genetic Structure within Neotropical Bird Species

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Erika Sendra; Gonçalves, Priscila; Miyaki, Cristina Yumi; Baker, Allan J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Towards lower latitudes the number of recognized species is not only higher, but also phylogeographic subdivision within species is more pronounced. Moreover, new genetically isolated populations are often described in recent phylogenies of Neotropical birds suggesting that the number of species in the region is underestimated. Previous COI barcoding of Argentinean bird species showed more complex patterns of regional divergence in the Neotropical than in the North American avifauna. Methods and Findings Here we analyzed 1,431 samples from 561 different species to extend the Neotropical bird barcode survey to lower latitudes, and detected even higher geographic structure within species than reported previously. About 93% (520) of the species were identified correctly from their DNA barcodes. The remaining 41 species were not monophyletic in their COI sequences because they shared barcode sequences with closely related species (N = 21) or contained very divergent clusters suggestive of putative new species embedded within the gene tree (N = 20). Deep intraspecific divergences overlapping with among-species differences were detected in 48 species, often with samples from large geographic areas and several including multiple subspecies. This strong population genetic structure often coincided with breaks between different ecoregions or areas of endemism. Conclusions The taxonomic uncertainty associated with the high incidence of non-monophyletic species and discovery of putative species obscures studies of historical patterns of species diversification in the Neotropical region. We showed that COI barcodes are a valuable tool to indicate which taxa would benefit from more extensive taxonomic revisions with multilocus approaches. Moreover, our results support hypotheses that the megadiversity of birds in the region is associated with multiple geographic processes starting well before the Quaternary and extending to more recent geological periods

  20. Monolayer detection on flat metal surface via surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and sum frequency generation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Dawei; Chen, Jiao; He, Haibing; Zhang, Rongping; Chen, Wei; Lu, Xiaolin; Wang, Xinping; Xue, Gi

    2012-01-01

    Monolayer detection on metal surface requires ultra high sensitivity. Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy (SFG) and Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) are regarded as two powerful techniques with submolecular sensitivity to detect adsorbents on metal surface. However, in some cases it's still challenge to characterize molecules or groups with relatively high intramolecular symmetry, such as 4-Nitrothiophenol (4NTP), on flat metal surface even combining these two techniques. Basically, this is due to that 4NTP with para-substituted phenol groups is SFG insensitive while flat metal surface is unfavorable to yield strong SERS enhancement. In this concern, a simple and efficient method, silver mirror method, was employed to facilitate the detection of 4NTP SAM on flat gold surface. Silver nanopheres with diameters around 300 nm was fabricated through silver mirror reaction and in situ formed milky overlayer on top of 4NTP SAM adsorbed on gold surface. Significant enhancement on SERS signal can be achieved with such special assembly structure of the "metal-molecule-metal" system. Generally, the silver mirror method provided a complementary approach to facilitate the spectroscopic applications of molecule level detection on various metal surfaces in situ. PMID:22523987

  1. Characterization and Detection of Uranyl Ion Sorption on Silver Surfaces using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Retterer, Scott T; Wells, Sabrina M; Sepaniak, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The study of the chemical behavior of uranyl species and its rapid detection is of primary environmental and non-proliferation concern. Herein we report on a surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic study of uranyl ion (UO22+) sorption onto the thermally vapor deposited silver particle surface. The ability of vibrational spectroscopy to characterize surface phenomenon and the remarkable sensitivity of the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) have been introduced as an appropriate combination for the surface characterization and detection of UO22+ onto the silver surface. The appearance of symmetric stretching frequency of UO22+ around 700 cm-1 and the disappearance of the 854 cm-1 band is attributed to the development of a chemical bond between silver surface and uranyl species. The effects of temperature, solute-surface interaction time, and pH have been studied using silver modified polypropylene filter (PPF) substrates. Results show that under appropriate conditions, the concentration of uranyl ion as low as 20 ng/mL can be easily detected using the discussed SERS approach without any surface modification of silver nanoparticles. Moreover, an alteranative SERS approach of uranyl detection is demonstrated using nano-lithographically fabricated SERS substrates.

  2. Laser Based Techniques for Ultra Trace Isotope Production, Spectroscopy and Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, K.; Blaum, K; Geppert, C; Muller, P; Nortershauser, W.; Schmitt, Annette; Schumann, P; Trautmann, Norbert; Bushaw, Bruce A.

    2006-06-26

    A variety of research activities in the field of fundamental and applied nuclear physics has evolved in the last years using resonantly tuned radiation from powerful lasers. The technique of resonance ionization spectroscopy has delivered outstanding results and found broad acceptance in the last years as a particularly efficient and highly selective method for rare and exotic radioisotope studies. It is used for production, spectroscopy and detection of these species and provides complete isobaric, high isotopic and even some isomeric selection, which altogether is needed for on-line investigation of short lived species far off stability as well as for ultra trace determination. Good overall efficiency pushes the experimental limits of detection in elemental trace analysis down to below 106 atoms per sample, and additionally isotopic selectivity as high as 3 ? 1012 has been demonstrated. The widespread potential of resonance ionization techniques is discussed, focusing on the experimental arrangements for applications in selective on-line isotope production, spectroscopy of rare radioisotopes and ultra trace determination of radiotoxic isotopes like 238Pu to 244Pu, 135,137Cs, 89,90Sr or 41Ca in environmental, technical and biomedical samples.

  3. Pancreatic tumor margin detection by oblique incidence diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Chang, Cheng-Chung; Zou, Jun; Banerjee, Bhaskar; Kuczynski, John; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    In surgical treatment of pancreatic cancers, the effectiveness of the procedures largely depends on the ability to completely and precisely remove the malignant tumors. We present the ex-vivo use of oblique incidence diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (OIRDS) to detect and differentiate normal from neoplastic tissue. An OIRDS probe has been constructed to provide scattering and absorption information of the pancreatic tissue. To reveal the physiological origin of the difference in these optical signatures, the optical scattering coefficients were extracted along the pancreatic duct with 1-cm spacing. Experimental results show that OIDRS was able to successfully determinate the tumor margins based on the higher optical scattering on malignant tissue.

  4. Novel Nanoparticles for Ultrasensitive Detection and Spectroscopy. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, Shuming

    2003-06-23

    The long-term objective of this DOE project was to develop a new class of metal nanoparticles with novel optical properties for ultrasensitive detection and spectroscopy. The specific aims were (1) to prepare and screen colloidal silver and gold nanoparticles with novel optical properties; (2) to characterize the intrinsic size-dependent properties of these nanoparticles and to identify the factors responsible for efficient optical enhancement; (3) to determine the characteristics and origins of intermittent photon emission in single metal particles; and (4) to develop methodologies for enriching these novel particles and for fabricating thin nanoparticle films.

  5. Mid-infrared multi-mode absorption spectroscopy using interband cascade lasers for multi-species sensing.

    PubMed

    Northern, J H; O'Hagan, S; Fletcher, B; Gras, B; Ewart, P; Kim, C S; Kim, M; Merritt, C D; Bewley, W W; Canedy, C L; Abell, J; Vurgaftman, I; Meyer, J R

    2015-09-01

    An interband cascade laser (ICL) operating at 3.7 μm has been used to perform multimode absorption spectroscopy, MUMAS, at scan rates up to 10 kHz. Line widths of individual modes in the range 10-80 MHz were derived from isolated lines in the MUMAS signatures of HCl. MUMAS data for methane covering a spectral range of 30 nm yielded a detection level of 30 μbar·m for 1 s measurement time at 100 Hz. Simultaneous detection of methane, acetylene, and formaldehyde in a gas mixture containing all three species is reported. PMID:26368743

  6. Chromophore detection by fluorescence spectroscopy in tissue-like phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerussi, Albert E.; Fantini, Sergio; Maier, John S.; Mantulin, William W.; Gratton, Enrico

    1997-08-01

    In the near-infrared spectral region (700 - 900 nm) light penetrates a few centimeters into tissues and hemoglobin dominates the absorption. Consequently, in vivo near-infrared tissue absorption spectroscopy becomes difficult for endogenous compounds of biological interest other than hemoglobin. Exogenous chromophore detection by fluorescence spectroscopy has the potential to provide enhanced sensitivity and specificity for in vivo optical tissue spectroscopy, facilitating the study of many important metabolites in tissues other than hemoglobin. We have performed measurements of the dc fluorescence intensity generated by a fluorophore (rhodamine B) homogeneously dissolved inside a highly scattering tissue-simulating phantom (aqueous suspension of titanium-dioxide particles). The phantom was prepared with optical coefficients (absorption and reduced scattering) similar to those of tissue in the near-infrared; these coefficients were measured with a frequency-domain spectrometer. Measurable dc fluorescence intensity signals from 1 nM rhodamine concentrations inside the phantom are reported. Furthermore, we were able to resolve changes in rhodamine concentration on the order of 1% using the dc fluorescence intensity. This dc fluorescence sensitivity is characterized experimentally at two concentrations (55 and 360 nM) and over a range of source-detector separations. Other aspects of the sensitivity are discussed over a large range of concentrations using a fluorescence photon migration model.

  7. Supercontinuum spatial modulation spectroscopy: Detection and noise limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, M. P.; Vietmeyer, F.; Aleksiuk, D.; Kuno, M.

    2013-11-01

    Supercontinuum spatial modulation spectroscopy is a facile tool for conducting single molecule/particle extinction spectroscopy throughout the visible and near infrared (420-1100 nm). The technique's capabilities are benchmarked using individual Au nanoparticles (NPs) as a standard since they are well studied and display a prominent plasmon resonance in the visible. Extinction spectra of individual Au NPs with diameters (d) ranging from d ˜ 8 to 40 nm are resolved with extinction cross sections (σext) of σext ˜1 × 10-13-1 ×10-11 cm2. Corresponding signal-to-noise ratios range from ˜30 to ˜1400. The technique's limit of detection is determined to be 4.3 × 10-14 cm2 (4.3 nm2). To showcase supercontinuum spatial modulation spectroscopy's broader applicability, extinction spectra are acquired for other model systems, such as individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and CdSe nanowires. We show for the first time extinction spectra of individual (8,3) and (6,5) SWCNTs. For both chiralities, their E11 [(8,3) 1.30 eV (952 nm); (6,5) 1.26 eV (986 nm)] and E22 [(8,3) 1.86 eV (667 nm); (6,5) 2.19 eV (567 nm)] excitonic resonances are seen with corresponding cross sections of σext ˜ 10-13 cm2 μm-1.

  8. In-situ identification of meat from different animal species by shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowoidnich, Kay; Kronfeldt, Heinz-Detlef

    2012-05-01

    The identification of food products and the detection of adulteration are of global interest for food safety and quality control. We present a non-invasive in-situ approach for the differentiation of meat from selected animal species using microsystem diode laser based shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) at 671 nm and 785 nm. In that way, the fingerprint Raman spectra can be used for identification without a disturbing fluorescence background masking Raman signals often occurring in the investigation of biological samples. Two miniaturized SERDS measurement heads including the diode laser and all optical elements are fiber-optically coupled to compact laboratory spectrometers. To realize two slightly shifted excitation wavelengths necessary for SERDS the 671 nm laser (spectral shift: 0.7 nm, optical power: 50 mW) comprises two separate laser cavities each with a volume Bragg grating for frequency selection whereas the 785 nm light source (spectral shift: 0.5 nm, optical power: 110 mW) is a distributed feedback laser. For our investigations we chose the most consumed meat types in the US and Europe, i.e. chicken and turkey as white meat as well as pork and beef as red meat species. The applied optical powers were sufficient to detect meat Raman spectra with integration times of 10 seconds pointing out the ability for a rapid discrimination of meat samples. Principal components analysis was applied to the SERDS spectra to reveal spectral differences between the animals suitable for their identification. The results will be discussed with respect to specific characteristics of the analyzed meat species.

  9. An automatic detection software for differential reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuksel, Seniha Esen; Dubroca, Thierry; Hummel, Rolf E.; Gader, Paul D.

    2012-06-01

    Recent terrorist attacks have sprung a need for a large scale explosive detector. Our group has developed differential reflection spectroscopy which can detect explosive residue on surfaces such as parcel, cargo and luggage. In short, broad band ultra-violet and visible light is shone onto a material (such as a parcel) moving on a conveyor belt. Upon reflection off the surface, the light intensity is recorded with a spectrograph (spectrometer in combination with a CCD camera). This reflected light intensity is then subtracted and normalized with the next data point collected, resulting in differential reflection spectra in the 200-500 nm range. Explosives show spectral finger-prints at specific wavelengths, for example, the spectrum of 2,4,6, trinitrotoluene (TNT) shows an absorption edge at 420 nm. Additionally, we have developed an automated software which detects the characteristic features of explosives. One of the biggest challenges for the algorithm is to reach a practical limit of detection. In this study, we introduce our automatic detection software which is a combination of principal component analysis and support vector machines. Finally we present the sensitivity and selectivity response of our algorithm as a function of the amount of explosive detected on a given surface.

  10. Over-hydration detection in brain by magnetic induction spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, César A.; Pérez, María; Hevia, Nidiyare; Arámbula, Fernándo; Flores, Omar; Aguilar, Eliot; Hinojosa, Ivonne; Joskowicz, Leo; Rubinsky, Boris

    2010-04-01

    Detection and continuous monitoring of edema in the brain in early stages is useful for assessment of medical condition and treatment. We have proposed a solution in which the bulk measurements of the tissue electrical properties to detect edema or in general accumulation of fluids are made through measurement of the magnetic induction phase shift between applied and measured currents at different frequencies (Magnetic Induction Spectroscopy; MIS). Magnetic Resonant Imaging (MRI) has been characterized because its capability to detect different levels of brain tissue hydration by differences in diffusion-weighted (DW) sequences and it's involve apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). The objective of this study was to explore the viability to use measurements of the bulk tissue electrical properties to detect edema or in general accumulation of fluids by MIS. We have induced a transitory and generalized tissue over-hydration condition in ten volunteers ingesting 1.5 to 2 liters of water in ten minutes. Basal and over-hydration conditions were monitored by MIS and MRI. Changes in the inductive phase shift at certain frequencies were consistent with changes in the brain tissue hydration level observed by DW-ADC. The results suggest that MIS has the potential to detect pathologies associated to changes in the content of fluids in brain tissue such as edema and hematomas.

  11. Standoff detection of explosive molecules using nanosecond gated Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jin Hyuk; Cho, Soo Gyeong

    2013-06-01

    Recently, improvised explosive device (IED) has been a serious threat for many countries. One of the approaches to alleviate this threat is standoff detection of explosive molecules used in IEDs. Raman spectroscopy is a prospective method among many technologies under research to achieve this goal. It provides unique information of the target materials, through which the ingredients used in IEDs can be analyzed and identified. The main problem of standoff Raman spectroscopic detection is the large background noise hindering weak Raman signals from the target samples. Typical background noise comes from both ambient fluorescent lights indoor and sunlight outdoor whose intensities are usually much larger than that of Raman scattering from the sample. Under the proper condition using pulse laser and ICCD camera with nanosecond pulse width and gating technology, we succeed to separate and remove these background noises from Raman signals. For this experiment, we build an optical system for standoff detection of explosive molecules. We use 532 nm, 10 Hz, Q-switching Nd:YAG laser as light source, and ICCD camera triggered by laser Qswitching time with proper gate delay regarding the flight time of Raman from target materials. Our detection system is successfully applied to detect and identify more than 20 ingredients of IEDs including TNT, RDX, and HMX which are located 10 to 54 meters away from the system.

  12. Detection of organic contamination on surfaces by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyt, Jaco M.; Van Eesbeek, Marc; Van Papendrecht, G.

    2002-09-01

    Organic contamination control at ESA is based on the infrared spectroscopy method described in the PSS-01-705. The method is used to verify the organic contamination levels during integration and thermal vacuum tests. The detection limits are in the 10-8 g/cm2 range or below, depending on the equipment and sampling method. Quantification is performed with common space contaminants, with the possibility to include a new calibration standard when a specific contaminant is occurring more often. Sampling is done with witness sensors of 15 cm2 or infrared transparent windows to verify the cleanliness after specific events. When no witness sensor has been used, solvent compatible surfaces can be analyzed by a solvent wash or by wiping the surface using dry or wetted tissues. Calibration curves with detection limits are presented, with an examples of a contamination event found on a retrieved space hardware.

  13. Proximal and point detection of contaminated surfaces using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guicheteau, Jason A.; Christesen, Steven D.; Tripathi, Ashish; Emmons, Erik D.; Wilcox, Phillip G.; Emge, Darren K.; Pardoe, Ian J.; Fountain, Augustus W., III

    2011-11-01

    We are actively investigating the use of Raman spectroscopy for proximal standoff detection of chemicals and explosive materials on surfaces. These studies include Raman Chemical Imaging of contaminated fingerprints for forensic attribution and the assessments of commercial handheld or portable Raman instruments operating with near-infrared (IR) as well as ultraviolet (UV) laser excitation specifically developed for on-the-move reconnaissance of chemical contamination. As part of these efforts, we have measured the Raman cross sections of chemical agents, toxic industrial chemicals, and explosives from the UV to NIR. We have also measured and modeled the effect interrogation angle has on the Raman return from droplets on man-made surfaces. Realistic droplet distributions have been modeled and tested against variations in surface scan patterns and laser spot size for determining the optimum scan characteristics for detection of relevant surface contamination.

  14. Fast neutron transmission spectroscopy for illicit substance detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yule, T.J.; Micklich, B.J.; Fink, C.L.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1996-05-01

    Fast Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy (FNTS) is being investigated for detecting explosives in luggage and other small containers. It uses an accelerator to generate nanosecond-pulsed neutron beams that strike a target, producing a white source of neutrons. Elemental distributions along projections through the interrogated object are obtained by analyzing neutron transmission data. Tomographic reconstruction is used to determine the spatial variations of individual elemental densities. Elemental densities are combined in a detection algorithm that indicates presence or absence of explosives. The elemental unfolding and tomographic reconstruction algorithms have been validated by application to experimental data. System studies have been performed to study the operational characteristics and limitations of a FNTS system, and to determine the system`s sensitivity to several important parameters such as flight path length and position of the interrogated object.

  15. Detection Of Biochips By Raman And Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantarovich, Keren; Tsarfati, Inbal; Gheber, Levi A.; Haupt, Karsten; Bar, Ilana

    2010-08-01

    Biochips constitute a rapidly increasing research field driven by the versatility of sensing devices and the importance of their applications in the bioanalytical field, drug development, environmental monitoring, food analysis, etc. Common strategies used for creating biochips and for reading them have extensive limitations, motivating development of miniature biochips and label-free formats. To achieve these goals we combined the nano fountain pen method, for printing microscale features with Raman spectroscopy or surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for reading droplets of synthetic receptors. These receptors include molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs), which are obtained by polymerization of suitable functional and cross-linking monomers around molecular templates. MIPs are characterized by higher physical and chemical stability than biomacromolecules, and therefore are potentially very suitable as recognition elements for biosensors, or biochips. The monitored bands in the Raman and SERS spectra could be related to the taken up compound, allowing direct detection of the template, i.e., the β-blocking drug propranolol in the imprinted droplets, as well as imaging of individual and multiple dots in an array. This study shows that the combination of nanolithography techniques with SERS might open the possibility of miniaturized arrayed MIP sensors with label-free, specific and quantitative detection.

  16. TATP and TNT detection by mid-infrared transmission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, Johannes; Hildenbrand, Jürgen; Wöllenstein, Jürgen; Lambrecht, Armin

    2009-05-01

    Sensitive and fast detection of explosives remains a challenge in many threat scenarios. Fraunhofer IPM works on two different detection methods using mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy in combination with quantum cascade lasers (QCL). 1. stand-off detection for a spatial distance of several meters and 2. contactless extractive sampling for short distance applications. The extractive method is based on a hollow fiber that works as gas cell and optical waveguide for the QCL light. The samples are membranes contaminated with the explosives and real background. The low vapor pressure of TNT requires a thermal desorbtion to introduce gaseous TNT and TATP into the heated fiber. The advantage of the hollow fiber setup is the resulting small sample volume. This enables a fast gas exchange rate and fast detection in the second range. The presented measurement setup achieves a detection limit of around 58 ng TNT and 26 ng TATP for 1 m hollow fiber. TATP - an explosive with a very high vapor pressure in comparison to TNT or other explosives - shows potential for an adequate concentration in gas phase under normal ambient conditions and thus the possibility of an explosive detection using open path absorption of TATP at 8 μm wavelength. In order to lower the cross sensitivities or interferents with substances with an absorption in the wavelength range of the TATP absorption the probe volume is checked synchronously by a second QCL emitting beside the target absorption wavelength. In laboratory measurements a detection limit of 5 ppm*m TATP are achieved.

  17. Studies of ground-state dynamics in isolated species by ionization-detected stimulated Raman techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, P.M.

    1993-12-01

    First, the author aims to develop methods of nonlinear Raman spectroscopy for application in studies of sparse samples. Second, the author wishes to apply such methods to structural and dynamical studies of species (molecules, complexes, and clusters) in supersonic molecular beams. In the past year, the author has made progress in several areas. The first pertains to the application of mass-selective ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectroscopies (IDSRS) to the size-specific vibrational spectroscopy of solute-solvent{sub n} clusters. The second involves the application of IDSRS methods to studies of jet-cooled benzene clusters. The third pertains to the use of IDSRS methods in the study of intermolecular vibrational transitions in van der Waals complexes.

  18. High sensitivity and label-free detection of Enterovirus 71 by nanogold modified electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang-Yu; Li, Hsing-Yuan; Tseng, Shing-Hua; Cheng, Tsai-Mu; Chu, Hsueh-Liang; Yang, Jyh-Yuan; Chang, Chia-Ching

    2013-03-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71), which is the most fulminant and invasive species of enterovirus, can cause children neurologic complications and death within 2-3 days after fever and rash developed. Besides, EV71 has high sequence similarity with Coxsackie A 16 (CA16) that makes differential diagnosis difficult in clinic and laboratory. Since conventional viral diagnostic method cannot diagnose EV71 quickly and EV71 can transmit at low viral titer, the patients might delay in treatment. A quick, high sensitive, and high specific test for EV71 detection is pivotal. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) has been applied for detecting bio-molecules as biosensors recently. In this study, we try to build a detection platform for EV71 detection by nanogold modified EIS probe. The result shows that our probe can detect 3.6 VP1/50 μl (one EV71 particle has 60 VP1) in 3 minutes. The test can also distinguish EV71 from CA16 and lysozyme. Diagnosis of enterovirus 71 by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has the potential to apply in clinic.

  19. The relationship between species detection probability and local extinction probability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alpizar-Jara, R.; Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.; Sauer, J.R.; Pollock, K.H.; Rosenberry, C.S.

    2004-01-01

    In community-level ecological studies, generally not all species present in sampled areas are detected. Many authors have proposed the use of estimation methods that allow detection probabilities that are <1 and that are heterogeneous among species. These methods can also be used to estimate community-dynamic parameters such as species local extinction probability and turnover rates (Nichols et al. Ecol Appl 8:1213-1225; Conserv Biol 12:1390-1398). Here, we present an ad hoc approach to estimating community-level vital rates in the presence of joint heterogeneity of detection probabilities and vital rates. The method consists of partitioning the number of species into two groups using the detection frequencies and then estimating vital rates (e.g., local extinction probabilities) for each group. Estimators from each group are combined in a weighted estimator of vital rates that accounts for the effect of heterogeneity. Using data from the North American Breeding Bird Survey, we computed such estimates and tested the hypothesis that detection probabilities and local extinction probabilities were negatively related. Our analyses support the hypothesis that species detection probability covaries negatively with local probability of extinction and turnover rates. A simulation study was conducted to assess the performance of vital parameter estimators as well as other estimators relevant to questions about heterogeneity, such as coefficient of variation of detection probabilities and proportion of species in each group. Both the weighted estimator suggested in this paper and the original unweighted estimator for local extinction probability performed fairly well and provided no basis for preferring one to the other.

  20. Multimodal spectroscopy detects features of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque

    PubMed Central

    Šćepanović, Obrad R.; Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Miller, Arnold; Kong, Chae-Ryon; Volynskaya, Zoya; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Kramer, John R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Early detection and treatment of rupture-prone vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques is critical to reducing patient mortality associated with cardiovascular disease. The combination of reflectance, fluorescence, and Raman spectroscopy—termed multimodal spectroscopy (MMS)—provides detailed biochemical information about tissue and can detect vulnerable plaque features: thin fibrous cap (TFC), necrotic core (NC), superficial foam cells (SFC), and thrombus. Ex vivo MMS spectra are collected from 12 patients that underwent carotid endarterectomy or femoral bypass surgery. Data are collected by means of a unitary MMS optical fiber probe and a portable clinical instrument. Blinded histopathological analysis is used to assess the vulnerability of each spectrally evaluated artery lesion. Modeling of the ex vivo MMS spectra produce objective parameters that correlate with the presence of vulnerable plaque features: TFC with fluorescence parameters indicative of collagen presence; NC∕SFC with a combination of diffuse reflectance β-carotene∕ceroid absorption and the Raman spectral signature of lipids; and thrombus with its Raman signature. Using these parameters, suspected vulnerable plaques can be detected with a sensitivity of 96% and specificity of 72%. These encouraging results warrant the continued development of MMS as a catheter-based clinical diagnostic technique for early detection of vulnerable plaques. PMID:21280896

  1. Fully Automated Lipid Pool Detection Using Near Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wojakowski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Background. Detecting and identifying vulnerable plaque, which is prone to rupture, is still a challenge for cardiologist. Such lipid core-containing plaque is still not identifiable by everyday angiography, thus triggering the need to develop a new tool where NIRS-IVUS can visualize plaque characterization in terms of its chemical and morphologic characteristic. The new tool can lead to the development of new methods of interpreting the newly obtained data. In this study, the algorithm to fully automated lipid pool detection on NIRS images is proposed. Method. Designed algorithm is divided into four stages: preprocessing (image enhancement), segmentation of artifacts, detection of lipid areas, and calculation of Lipid Core Burden Index. Results. A total of 31 NIRS chemograms were analyzed by two methods. The metrics, total LCBI, maximal LCBI in 4 mm blocks, and maximal LCBI in 2 mm blocks, were calculated to compare presented algorithm with commercial available system. Both intraclass correlation (ICC) and Bland-Altman plots showed good agreement and correlation between used methods. Conclusions. Proposed algorithm is fully automated lipid pool detection on near infrared spectroscopy images. It is a tool developed for offline data analysis, which could be easily augmented for newer functions and projects. PMID:27610191

  2. Fully Automated Lipid Pool Detection Using Near Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pociask, Elżbieta; Jaworek-Korjakowska, Joanna; Malinowski, Krzysztof Piotr; Roleder, Tomasz; Wojakowski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Background. Detecting and identifying vulnerable plaque, which is prone to rupture, is still a challenge for cardiologist. Such lipid core-containing plaque is still not identifiable by everyday angiography, thus triggering the need to develop a new tool where NIRS-IVUS can visualize plaque characterization in terms of its chemical and morphologic characteristic. The new tool can lead to the development of new methods of interpreting the newly obtained data. In this study, the algorithm to fully automated lipid pool detection on NIRS images is proposed. Method. Designed algorithm is divided into four stages: preprocessing (image enhancement), segmentation of artifacts, detection of lipid areas, and calculation of Lipid Core Burden Index. Results. A total of 31 NIRS chemograms were analyzed by two methods. The metrics, total LCBI, maximal LCBI in 4 mm blocks, and maximal LCBI in 2 mm blocks, were calculated to compare presented algorithm with commercial available system. Both intraclass correlation (ICC) and Bland-Altman plots showed good agreement and correlation between used methods. Conclusions. Proposed algorithm is fully automated lipid pool detection on near infrared spectroscopy images. It is a tool developed for offline data analysis, which could be easily augmented for newer functions and projects. PMID:27610191

  3. Enhanced optical waveguide light mode spectroscopy via detection of fluorophore absorbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halter, Martin; Gabi, Michael; Textor, Marcus; Vörös, Janos; Grandin, H. Michelle

    2006-10-01

    A novel technique based on surface sensitive absorbance detection using an optical waveguide light mode spectroscopy (OWLS) instrument is presented. The proof of concept for this extension of a standard technique is demonstrated by painting an increasing number of ink lines on a waveguide, perpendicular to the light path, while monitoring the outcoupled light intensity. Furthermore, by the adsorption of poly(L-lysine)-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) as a model system with contents of 5%, 10%, 25%, and 50% labeled polymer, the in situ performance is demonstrated, and the absorbance signal is calibrated such that it can be converted into adsorbed mass. The simultaneous detection of labeled and label-free species allows for the study of complex experimental setups whereby monitoring of adsorption, desorption, and even exchange processes becomes possible. The sensitivity of the absorbance detection exceeds standard OWLS by one to two orders of magnitude.

  4. Root discrimination of closely related crop and weed species using FT MIR-ATR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Meinen, Catharina; Rauber, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Root discrimination of species is a pre-condition for studying belowground competition processes between crop and weed species. In this experiment, we tested Fourier transform mid-infrared (FT MIR)-attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectroscopy to discriminate roots of closely related crop and weed species grown in the greenhouse: maize/barnyard grass, barley/wild oat, wheat/blackgrass (Poaceae), and sugar beet/common lambsquarters (Chenopodiaceae). Fresh (moist) and dried root segments as well as ground roots were analyzed by FT MIR-ATR spectroscopy. Root absorption spectra showed species specific peak distribution and peak height. A clear separation according to species was not possible with fresh root segments. Dried root segments (including root basis, middle section, and root tip) of maize/barnyard grass and sugar beet/common lambsquarters formed completely separated species clusters. Wheat and blackgrass separated in species specific clusters when root tips were removed from cluster analysis. A clear separation of dried root segments according to species was not possible in the case of barley and wild oat. Cluster analyses of ground roots revealed a 100% separation of all tested crop and weed species combinations. Spectra grouped in Poaceae and Chenopodiaceae clusters. Within the Poaceae cluster, C3 and C4 species differed significantly in heterogeneity. Thus, root spectra reflected the degree of kinship. To quantify species proportion in root mixtures, a two- and a three-species model for species quantification in root mixtures of maize, barnyard grass, and wild oat was calculated. The models showed low standard errors of prediction (RMSEP) and high residual predictive deviation values in an external test set validation. Hence, FT MIR-ATR spectroscopy seems to be a promising tool for root research even between closely related plant species. PMID:26483799

  5. Remote detection of chemicals by millimeter-wave spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.; Raptis, A.C.

    1998-09-01

    This paper discusses the development and field testing of a remote chemical detection system that is based on millimeter-wave (mm-wave) spectroscopy. The mm-wave system is a monostatic swept-frequency radar that consists of a mm-wave sweeper, a hot-electron-bolometer detector, and a trihedral reflector. The chemical plume to be detected is situated between the transmitter/detector and the reflector. Millimeter-wave absorption spectra of chemicals in the plume are determined by measuring the swept-frequency radar return signals with and without the plume in the beam path. The problem of pressure broadening, which hampered open-path spectroscopy in the past, has been mitigated in this work by designing a fast sweeping source over a broad frequency range. The heart of the system is a Russian backward-wave oscillator (BWO) tube that can be tuned over 225--315 GHz. A mm-wave sweeper that includes the BWO tube was built to sweep the entire frequency range within 10 ms. The radar system was field-tested at the DOE Nevada Test Site at a standoff distance of 60 m. Methyl chloride was released from a wind tunnel that produced a 2-m diameter plume at its exit point. The mm-wave system detected methyl chloride plumes down to a concentration of 12 ppm. The measurement results agree well with model-fitted data. Remote or standoff sensing of airborne chemicals is gaining importance for arms control and treaty verification, intelligence collection, and environmental monitoring.

  6. Can Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Detect Species Specific Biochemicals ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderbilt, V. C.; Daughtry, C. S.

    2011-12-01

    Discrimination of a few plants scattered among many plants is a goal common to detection of agricultural weeds, invasive plant species and illegal Cannabis clandestinely grown outdoors, the subject of this research. Remote sensing technology provides an automated, computer based, land cover classification capability that holds promise for improving upon the existing approaches to Cannabis detection. In this research, we investigated whether hyperspectral reflectance of recently harvested, fully turgid Cannabis leaves and buds depends upon the concentration of the psychoactive ingredient Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) that, if present at sufficient concentration, presumably would allow species-specific identification of Cannabis.

  7. Investigating species co-occurrence patterns when species are detected imperfectly

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacKenzie, D.I.; Bailey, L.L.; Nichols, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    1. Over the last 30 years there has been a great deal of interest in investigating patterns of species co-occurrence across a number of locations, which has led to the development of numerous methods to determine whether there is evidence that a particular pattern may not have occurred by random chance. 2. A key aspect that seems to have been largely overlooked is the possibility that species may not always be detected at a location when present, which leads to 'false absences' in a species presence/absence matrix that may cause incorrect inferences to be made about co-occurrence patterns. Furthermore, many of the published methods for investigating patterns of species co-occurrence do not account for potential differences in the site characteristics that may partially (at least) explain non-random patterns (e.g. due to species having similar/different habitat preferences). 3. Here we present a statistical method for modelling co-occurrence patterns between species while accounting for imperfect detection and site characteristics. This method requires that multiple presence/absence surveys for the species be conducted over a reasonably short period of time at most sites. The method yields unbiased estimates of probabilities of occurrence, and is practical when the number of species is small (< 4). 4. To illustrate the method we consider data collected on two terrestrial salamander species, Plethodonjordani and members of the Plethodon glutinosus complex, collected in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, USA. We find no evidence that the species do not occur independently at sites once site elevation has been allowed for, although we find some evidence of a statistical interaction between species in terms of detectability that we suggest may be due to changes in relative abundances.

  8. Supercontinuum spatial modulation spectroscopy: Detection and noise limitations

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, M. P.; Vietmeyer, F.; Kuno, M.; Aleksiuk, D.

    2013-11-15

    Supercontinuum spatial modulation spectroscopy is a facile tool for conducting single molecule/particle extinction spectroscopy throughout the visible and near infrared (420–1100 nm). The technique's capabilities are benchmarked using individual Au nanoparticles (NPs) as a standard since they are well studied and display a prominent plasmon resonance in the visible. Extinction spectra of individual Au NPs with diameters (d) ranging from d ∼ 8 to 40 nm are resolved with extinction cross sections (σ{sub ext}) of σ{sub ext} ∼1 × 10{sup −13}–1 ×10{sup −11} cm{sup 2}. Corresponding signal-to-noise ratios range from ∼30 to ∼1400. The technique's limit of detection is determined to be 4.3 × 10{sup −14} cm{sup 2} (4.3 nm{sup 2}). To showcase supercontinuum spatial modulation spectroscopy's broader applicability, extinction spectra are acquired for other model systems, such as individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and CdSe nanowires. We show for the first time extinction spectra of individual (8,3) and (6,5) SWCNTs. For both chiralities, their E{sub 11} [(8,3) 1.30 eV (952 nm); (6,5) 1.26 eV (986 nm)] and E{sub 22} [(8,3) 1.86 eV (667 nm); (6,5) 2.19 eV (567 nm)] excitonic resonances are seen with corresponding cross sections of σ{sub ext} ∼ 10{sup −13} cm{sup 2} μm{sup −1}.

  9. Photoacoustic spectroscopy for trace vapor detection and standoff detection of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holthoff, Ellen L.; Marcus, Logan S.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2016-05-01

    The Army is investigating several spectroscopic techniques (e.g., infrared spectroscopy) that could allow for an adaptable sensor platform. Current sensor technologies, although reasonably sized, are geared to more classical chemical threats, and the ability to expand their capabilities to a broader range of emerging threats is uncertain. Recently, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), employed in a sensor format, has shown enormous potential to address these ever-changing threats. PAS is one of the more flexible IR spectroscopy variants, and that flexibility allows for the construction of sensors that are designed for specific tasks. PAS is well suited for trace detection of gaseous and condensed media. Recent research has employed quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) in combination with MEMS-scale photoacoustic cell designs. The continuous tuning capability of QCLs over a broad wavelength range in the mid-infrared spectral region greatly expands the number of compounds that can be identified. We will discuss our continuing evaluation of QCL technology as it matures in relation to our ultimate goal of a universal compact chemical sensor platform. Finally, expanding on our previously reported photoacoustic detection of condensed phase samples, we are investigating standoff photoacoustic chemical detection of these materials. We will discuss the evaluation of a PAS sensor that has been designed around increasing operator safety during detection and identification of explosive materials by performing sensing operations at a standoff distance. We investigate a standoff variant of PAS based upon an interferometric sensor by examining the characteristic absorption spectra of explosive hazards collected at 1 m.

  10. Phylogeny of cultivated and wild wheat species using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Pinar; Onde, Sertac; Severcan, Feride

    2015-01-01

    Within the last decade, an increasing amount of genetic data has been used to clarify the problems inherent in wheat taxonomy. The techniques for obtaining and analyzing these data are not only cumbersome, but also expensive and technically demanding. In the present study, we introduce infrared spectroscopy as a method for a sensitive, rapid and low cost phylogenetic analysis tool for wheat seed samples. For this purpose, 12 Triticum and Aegilops species were studied by Attenuated Total Reflection-Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis clearly revealed that the lignin band (1525-1505 cm-1) discriminated the species at the genus level. However, the species were clustered according to their genome commonalities when the whole spectra were used (4000-650 cm-1). The successful differentiation of Triticum and its closely related genus Aegilops clearly demonstrated the power of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy as a suitable tool for phylogenetic research.

  11. New approach on fluorescence spectroscopy for caries detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibst, Raimund; Paulus, Robert

    1999-05-01

    Today the diagnosis of caries is based mainly on examinations by visual inspection, dental probe or by x- rays. All methods are very limited when either initial or undermining caries have to be found. For initial caries promising results have been demonstrated by fluorescence spectroscopy with excitation wavelengths in the (ultra-)violet to green spectral region, especially 406 nm or 488 nm. In our investigations, we extended the considered excitation wavelength range into red. As expected, total fluorescence yield is decreasing with increasing wavelength, but this decrease is much more pronounced for sound compared to carious enamel or dentin. For 640 nm or 655 nm excitation for example, integral (λ>680nm) fluorescence intensity of cares can exceed that of healthy tissue by about one order of magnitude. This allows to detect caries by fluorescence intensity rather than by spectral analysis. On the basis of these results we have built up a system using a diode laser as light source, and a photo diode combined with a long pass filter as detector. It provides quantitatively reproducible measurements and detection even through sound enamel of 1 mm thickness. Clinical applications include detection of undermining caries and monitoring of the decay process.

  12. Faraday rotation echo spectroscopy and detection of quantum fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shao-Wen; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2014-01-01

    Central spin decoherence is useful for detecting many-body physics in environments and moreover, the spin echo control can remove the effects of static thermal fluctuations so that the quantum fluctuations are revealed. The central spin decoherence approach, however, is feasible only in some special configurations and often requires uniform coupling between the central spin and individual spins in the baths, which are very challenging in experiments. Here, by making analogue between central spin decoherence and depolarization of photons, we propose a scheme of Faraday rotation echo spectroscopy (FRES) for studying quantum fluctuations in interacting spin systems. The echo control of the photon polarization is realized by flipping the polarization with a birefringence crystal. The FRES, similar to spin echo in magnetic resonance spectroscopy, can suppress the effects of the static magnetic fluctuations and therefore reveal dynamical magnetic fluctuations. We apply the scheme to a rare-earth compound LiHoF4 and calculate the echo signal, which is related to the quantum fluctuations of the system. We observe enhanced signals at the phase boundary. The FRES should be useful for studying quantum fluctuations in a broad range of spin systems, including cold atoms, quantum dots, solid-state impurities, and transparent magnetic materials. PMID:24733086

  13. Novel micro-calorimetric spectroscopy for mine detection

    SciTech Connect

    Datskos, P.G. |; Rajic, S.; Egert, C.M.; Datskou, I.

    1998-03-01

    The authors have developed a novel micro-calorimetric spectroscopy technique that can be used in mine detection applications. In this technique target molecules are allowed to adsorb on the surface of sub-femtojoule sensitive micromechanical thermal detectors. The adsorption of molecules on the thermal detector surface causes a differential surface stress resulting in an initial trigger. By exposing each element in an array of thermal detectors to different photon wavelengths, an extremely sensitive and unique photothermal signature response can be obtained. The authors present their results on target chemicals adsorbed on the detector surface at sub-monolayer coverage levels. They will present infrared photothermal spectra for trace concentrations of diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP), and trinitrotoluene (TNT) over the wavelength region 2.5 to 14.5 microns. They found that in the wavelength region 2.5 to 14.5 microns the photothermal spectra of DIMP and TNT exhibit a number of peaks and are in excellent agreement with infrared absorption spectra found in the literature. Chemical detectors based on micro-calorimetric spectroscopy can be used to sensitively sense small number of molecules adsorbed on a thermal detector surface. The photothermal signature resulting from photon irradiation can be used for improved chemical characterization.

  14. New and Improved Infrared Spectroscopy of Halogen-Containing Species for ACE-FTS Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Jeremy J.

    2014-06-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier transform spectrometer (ACE-FTS), onboard the SCISAT-1 satellite, is a high-resolution (0.02 cm-1) instrument covering the 750-4400 cm-1 spectral region in solar occultation mode. Launched in August 2003, the ACE-FTS has been taking atmospheric measurements for over ten years. With long atmospheric pathlengths (˜300 km) and the sun as a radiation source, the ACE-FTS provides a low detection threshold for trace species in the atmosphere. In fact, it measures the vertical profiles of more molecules in the atmosphere than any other satellite instrument.

    Fluorine- and chlorine-containing molecules in the atmosphere are very strong greenhouse gases, meaning that even small amounts of these gases contribute significantly to the radiative forcing of climate. Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) are regulated by the 1987 Montreal Protocol because they deplete the ozone layer. Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), which do not deplete the ozone layer and are not regulated by the Montreal Protocol, have been introduced as replacements for CFCs and HCFCs. HFCs have global-warming potentials many times greater than carbon dioxide, and are increasing in the atmosphere at a very fast rate. The quantification of the atmospheric abundances of such molecules from measurements taken by the ACE-FTS and other satellite instruments crucially requires accurate quantitative infrared spectroscopy. HITRAN contains absorption cross section datasets for a number of these species, but many of them have minor deficiencies that introduce systematic errors into satellite retrievals. This talk will focus on new and improved laboratory measurements for a number of important halogenated species.

  15. Millimeter Wave Spectroscopy for Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, Konstantin; Chen, Shu; Afsar, Mohammed; Naber, Stephen

    2009-03-01

    Broad-band millimeter wave transmittance measurements of normal and tumorous (cancerous) human breast tissue samples have been acquired in--vitro by employing a free-space, quasi-optical spectrometer. Freshly excised breast tissues were prepared and preserved in 10% neutral-buffered formalin solution before testing. Significant differences in the transmittance profiles have been found between the normal and tumorous tissues. It has been found that despite the inhomogeneity and variable structure and composition of each single tissue, the tumorous specimens consistently manifest much higher absorption level of millimeter wave radiation than the normal ones. It has been shown that free space, quasi-optical spectrometer is capable of contributing valuable insights into the dielectric properties of normal and tumorous human breast tissues and aiding in further developments of millimeter wave spectroscopy and mammography for the breast cancer diagnostics and detection.

  16. Protocol for detection of nonsecular conversion through coherent nanooptical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krecik, Markus; Hein, Sven M.; Schoth, Mario; Richter, Marten

    2015-11-01

    The theoretical description of dynamics in open quantum systems becomes very demanding upon inclusion of non-Markovian effects. To simplify the computational implementation for density matrix equations of motion, the secular approximation is often applied. An experimental verification of its validity though remains difficult due to uncertainties in the system parameters and the absence of qualitatively distinct features. In this paper, we present the proposal for an experimental detection protocol sensitive to nonsecular processes neglected in the secular approximation. The protocol uses a combination of multidimensional coherent spectroscopy and nanoplasmonics. It allows for studies of nonsecular processes in various systems and provides a tool to experimentally verify the validity of the secular approximation. We apply this protocol to a system of CdSe/ZnS nanostructures and discuss the particular features originating from nonsecular processes on the resulting two-dimensional spectra.

  17. Detection of ethylene in smokers breath by laser photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giubileo, Gianfranco; Puiu, Adriana P.; Dumitras, Dan C.

    2004-07-01

    In the experiments reported in this paper small traces of ethylene down to ppb level have been detected by means of photoacoustic spectroscopy in the breath exhaled from humans. The method has been applied in studying how the concentration of the ethylene coming out from human lungs is modified after smoking. We followed up the evolution of ethylene concentration in the case of several people by monitoring the ethylene before and after smoking. In each case the first exhaled air sample was collected prior smoking the cigarette and compared with the samples collected after 30 minutes following the inhalation of cigarette smoke. In all the experiments a high value of ethylene concentration was found immediately after smoking. The experimental laser based photoacoustic system has been realized in ENEA Laboratories in Frascati, Italy.

  18. Development of an Early Warning Fire Detection System using Correlation Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goswami, K.; Voevodkin, G.; Rubstov, V.; Lieberman, R.; Piltch, N.

    2001-01-01

    Combustion byproducts are numerous. A few examples of the gaseous byproducts include carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, hydrogen chloride, hydrogen cyanide and ammonia. For detecting these chemical species, classic absorption spectroscopy has been used for many decades, but the sensitivity of steady-state methods is often unsuitable for the detection of trace compounds at the low levels (parts per million to parts per billion) appropriate for scientific purposes. This is particularly so for monitoring equipment, which must be compact and cost-effective, and which is often subjected to shock, vibration, and other environmental effects that can severely degrade the performance of high-sensitivity spectrometers in an aircraft. Steady-state techniques also suffer from a lack of specificity; the deconvolution of the spectra of complex mixtures is a laborious and error prone process. These problems are exacerbated in remote fiber-optic monitoring where, for practical reasons, the fundamental absorbance region of the spectrum (often between 3 and 8 microns) is inaccessible, and the low-strength, closely spaced, near-infrared overtone absorbance bands must be used. We circumvented these challenges by employing correlation spectroscopy, a variation of modulation spectroscopy.

  19. Characterization of gaseous species in scanning atmospheric rf plasma with transmission infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seong H.; Kim, Jeong Hoon; Kang, Bang-Kwon

    2008-01-15

    A scanning atmospheric radio-frequency (rf) plasma was analyzed with transmission infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The IR analyses were made for the plasmas used for hydrophobic coating deposition and superhydrophobic coating deposition processes. Since the rf plasma was generated in a small open space with a high gas flow rate in ambient air, the density of gas-phase molecules was very high and the plasma-generated reactive species seemed to undergo various reactions in the gas phase. So, the transmission IR spectra of the scanning atmospheric rf plasma were dominated by gas-phase reaction products, rather than plasma-generated intermediate species. In the CH{sub 4}/He plasma used for hydrophobic coating deposition, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, and a small amount of C{sub 2}H{sub 4} as well as CO were detected in transmission IR. The intensities of these peaks increased as the rf power increased. The CO formation is due to the activation of oxygen and water in the air. In the CF{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/He plasma used for deposition of superhydrophobic coatings, C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, CF{sub 3}H, COF{sub 2}, and HF were mainly detected. When the H{sub 2}/CF{sub 4} ratio was {approx}0.5, the consumption of CF{sub 4} was the highest. As the H{sub 2}/CF{sub 4} ratio increased higher, the C{sub 2}F{sub 6} production was suppressed while the CF{sub 3}H peak grew and the formation of CH{sub 4} were detected. In both CH{sub 4}/He and CF{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/He plasma systems, the undissociated feed gas molecules seem to be highly excited vibrationally and rotationally. The information on plasma-generated reactive species and their reactions was deduced from the distribution of these gas-phase reaction products.

  20. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for Alien Plant Species Detection and Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvořák, P.; Müllerová, J.; Bartaloš, T.; Brůna, J.

    2015-08-01

    Invasive species spread rapidly and their eradication is difficult. New methods enabling fast and efficient monitoring are urgently needed for their successful control. Remote sensing can improve early detection of invading plants and make their management more efficient and less expensive. In an ongoing project in the Czech Republic, we aim at developing innovative methods of mapping invasive plant species (semi-automatic detection algorithms) by using purposely designed unmanned aircraft (UAV). We examine possibilities for detection of two tree and two herb invasive species. Our aim is to establish fast, repeatable and efficient computer-assisted method of timely monitoring, reducing the costs of extensive field campaigns. For finding the best detection algorithm we test various classification approaches (object-, pixel-based and hybrid). Thanks to its flexibility and low cost, UAV enables assessing the effect of phenological stage and spatial resolution, and is most suitable for monitoring the efficiency of eradication efforts. However, several challenges exist in UAV application, such as geometrical and radiometric distortions, high amount of data to be processed and legal constrains for the UAV flight missions over urban areas (often highly invaded). The newly proposed UAV approach shall serve invasive species researchers, management practitioners and policy makers.

  1. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. 866.3402 Section 866.3402 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. 866.3402 Section 866.3402 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. 866.3402 Section 866.3402 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. 866.3402 Section 866.3402 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. 866.3402 Section 866.3402 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  6. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy with high detection sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, X. K.; Ling, H.; Lu, Y. F.

    2009-02-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) with spatial confinement and LIBS combined with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) have been investigated to improve the detection sensitivity and selectivity of LIBS. An obvious enhancement in the emission intensity of Al atomic lines was observed when a cylindrical wall was placed to spatially confine the plasma plumes. The maximum enhancement factor for the emission intensity of Al atomic lines was measured to be around 10. Assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions, the plasma temperatures are estimated to be in the range from 4000 to 5800 K. It shows that the plasma temperature increased by around 1000 K when the cylindrical confinement was applied. Fast imaging of the laser-induced Al plasmas shows that the plasmas were compressed into a smaller volume with a pipe presented. LIBS-LIF has been investigated to overcome the matrix effects in LIBS for the detection of trace uranium in solids. A wavelength-tunable laser with an optical parametric oscillator was used to resonantly excite the uranium atoms and ions within the plasma plumes generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Both atomic and ionic lines can be selected to detect their fluorescence lines. A uranium concentration of 462 ppm in a glass sample can be detected using this technique at an excitation wavelength of 385.96 nm for resonant excitation of U II and a fluorescence line wavelength of 409.01 nm from U II. The mechanism of spatial confinement effects and the influence of relevant operational parameters of LIBS-LIF are discussed.

  7. Explosives detection studies using Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, C.L.; Micklich, B.J.; Sagalovsky, L.; Smith, D.L.; Yule, T.J.

    1996-12-31

    Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy (FNTS) is being investigated for detection of explosives in luggage or air cargo. We present here the principle results of a two-year study of a few-view tomographic FNTS system using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP to simulate neutron transmission through simple luggage phantoms and Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves to determine system performance. Elemental distributions along projections through the interrogated object are obtained by analyzing MCNP generated neutron transmission data. Transmission data for few (3-5) angles and relatively coarse resolution ({approximately}2 cm) are used to create a tomographic reconstruction of elemental distributions within the object. The elemental unfolding and tomographic reconstruction algorithms and the concept of transmission-derived cross sections for use in elemental analysis have been validated by application to experimental data. Elemental distributions are combined in an explosives detection algorithm to provide an indication of the presence or absence of explosives. The algorithm in current use, termed the ``equivalent explosive`` algorithm, determines the quantity of explosive that can be formed using the measured amount of the constituent elements in each pixel. Reconstruction and explosives detection algorithms have been applied to a series of randomly packed suitcases to generated ROC that describe system performance in terms of the probability of detection and of false alarms. System studies have been performed to study the operational characteristics and limitations of a FNTS system, and to determine the system`s sensitivity to several important parameters such as neutron source reaction and incident particle energy, flight path length, and the position of the interrogated object.

  8. Acoustic wave detection of chemical species electrokinetically transported within a capillary tube.

    PubMed

    Li, Paul C H; Prasad, Ronald

    2003-06-01

    For the first time, we report the acoustic wave detection of chemical species being transported in a capillary tube to a region where acoustic coupling occurs. The measured parameter was a change in phase, which was originally only attributed to a change in solution density as the analyte passed by the detection region. Accordingly, we report the detection of change in phase as various chemical species (e.g. Cy5 dye, Cy5-derivatized glycine and underivatized glycine) were introduced into and migrated along a capillary tube through electrokinetic processes. To improve detection sensitivity, we modified various experimental parameters, such as run buffer concentration, capillary wall thickness and transducer frequency. Although acoustic wave detection was feasible, the peak width and detection limit were inadequate as compared to conventional detection methods for HPLC or CE. Nevertheless, the effects of various physical and chemical relaxation processes on acoustic wave absorption were discussed, and this has shed some light on explaining some observations, which cannot be explained by density differences alone. Accordingly, the acoustic wave method is suggested to investigate these processes, as studied in ultrasonic relaxation spectroscopy, in a flow system. PMID:12866892

  9. Determining the Sulfur species in the dispersants Corexit 9500A and 9527A applying S K-edge XANES spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovenkamp-Langlois, Lisa; Roy, Amitava

    2016-05-01

    The dispersants Corexit 9500A and 9527A were used extensively during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy was used to investigate the dispersants for the sulfur based components. The main sulfur containing component should be dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (DOSS). S K-edge XANES analysis shows that indeed the major sulfur species in both kinds of Corexit (9500A and 9527A) is sulfonic acid which is a part of DOSS. In addition some fraction of sulfone was detected.

  10. DNA microarrays for hybridization detection by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kick, Alfred; Bönsch, Martin; Katzschner, Beate; Voigt, Jan; Herr, Alexander; Brabetz, Werner; Jung, Martin; Sonntag, Frank; Klotzbach, Udo; Danz, Norbert; Howitz, Steffen; Mertig, Michael

    2010-12-15

    We report on the development of a new platform technology for the detection of genetic variations by means of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. TOPAS chips with integrated optics were exploited in combination with microfluidics. Within minutes, the detection of hybridization kinetics was achieved simultaneously at all spots of the DNA microarray. A nanoliter dispenser is used to deposit thiol-modified single-stranded probe DNA on the gold surface of the chips. We investigated the influence of different parameters on hybridization using model polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products. These PCR products comprised a single-stranded tag sequence being complementary to an anti-tag sequence of probes immobilized on the gold surface. The signals increased with increasing length of PCR products (60, 100 or 300 base pairs) as well as with their concentration. We investigated hybridizations on DNA microarrays comprising 90 spots of probe DNA with three different sequences. Furthermore, we demonstrate that sequences with possible hairpin structures significantly lower the binding rate, and thus, the SPR signals during hybridization. PMID:20729067

  11. Detection and Classification of Measurement Errors in Bioimpedance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Pita, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) measurement errors may be caused by parasitic stray capacitance, impedance mismatch, cross-talking or their very likely combination. An accurate detection and identification is of extreme importance for further analysis because in some cases and for some applications, certain measurement artifacts can be corrected, minimized or even avoided. In this paper we present a robust method to detect the presence of measurement artifacts and identify what kind of measurement error is present in BIS measurements. The method is based on supervised machine learning and uses a novel set of generalist features for measurement characterization in different immittance planes. Experimental validation has been carried out using a database of complex spectra BIS measurements obtained from different BIS applications and containing six different types of errors, as well as error-free measurements. The method obtained a low classification error (0.33%) and has shown good generalization. Since both the features and the classification schema are relatively simple, the implementation of this pre-processing task in the current hardware of bioimpedance spectrometers is possible. PMID:27362862

  12. Detecting concealed information using functional near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sai, Liyang; Zhou, Xiaomei; Ding, Xiao Pan; Fu, Genyue; Sang, Biao

    2014-09-01

    The present study focused on the potential application of fNIRS in the detection of concealed information. Participants either committed a mock crime or not and then were presented with a randomized series of probes (crime-related information) and irrelevants (crime-irrelevant information) in a standard concealed information test (CIT). Participants in the guilty group were instructed to conceal crime-related information they obtained from the mock crime, thus making deceptive response to the probes. Meanwhile, their brain activity to probes and irrelevants was recorded by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). At the group level, we found that probe items were associated with longer reaction times and greater activity in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and supplementary motor cortex than irrelevant items in the guilty group, but not in the innocent group. These findings provided evidence on neural correlates of recognition during a CIT. Finally, on the basis of the activity in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and supplementary motor cortex, the correct classification of guilty versus innocent participants was approximately 75 % and the combination of fNIRS and reaction time measures yielded a better classification rate of 83.3 %. These findings illustrate the feasibility and promise of using fNIRS to detect concealed information. PMID:24514911

  13. Detection and Classification of Measurement Errors in Bioimpedance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ayllón, David; Gil-Pita, Roberto; Seoane, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) measurement errors may be caused by parasitic stray capacitance, impedance mismatch, cross-talking or their very likely combination. An accurate detection and identification is of extreme importance for further analysis because in some cases and for some applications, certain measurement artifacts can be corrected, minimized or even avoided. In this paper we present a robust method to detect the presence of measurement artifacts and identify what kind of measurement error is present in BIS measurements. The method is based on supervised machine learning and uses a novel set of generalist features for measurement characterization in different immittance planes. Experimental validation has been carried out using a database of complex spectra BIS measurements obtained from different BIS applications and containing six different types of errors, as well as error-free measurements. The method obtained a low classification error (0.33%) and has shown good generalization. Since both the features and the classification schema are relatively simple, the implementation of this pre-processing task in the current hardware of bioimpedance spectrometers is possible. PMID:27362862

  14. Ex vivo peripheral nerve detection of rats by spontaneous Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Minamikawa, Takeo; Harada, Yoshinori; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    Nerve-sparing surgery is increasingly being applied to avoid functional deficits of the limbs and organs following surgery. Peripheral nerves that should be preserved are, however, sometimes misidentified due to similarity of shape and color to non-nerve tissues. To avoid misidentification of peripheral nerves, development of an in situ nerve detection method is desired. In this study, we report the label-free detection of ex vivo peripheral nerves of Wistar rats by using Raman spectroscopy. We obtained Raman spectra of peripheral nerves (myelinated and unmyelinated nerves) and their adjacent tissues of Wistar rats without any treatment such as fixation and/or staining. For the identification of tissue species and further analysis of spectral features, we proposed a principal component regression-based discriminant analysis with representative Raman spectra of peripheral nerves and their adjacent tissues. Our prediction model selectively detected myelinated nerves and unmyelinated nerves of Wistar rats with respective sensitivities of 95.5% and 88.3% and specificities of 99.4% and 93.5%. Furthermore, important spectral features for the identification of tissue species were revealed by detailed analysis of principal components of representative Raman spectra of tissues. Our proposed approach may provide a unique and powerful tool for peripheral nerve detection for nerve-sparing surgery in the future. PMID:26602842

  15. Molecular Detection of a Potentially Toxic Diatom Species

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Bidhan Chandra; Cimarelli, Lucia; Singh, Kumar Saurabh; Brandi, Letizia; Brandi, Anna; Puccinelli, Camilla; Marcheggiani, Stefania; Spurio, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    A few diatom species produce toxins that affect human and animal health. Among these, members of the Pseudo-nitzschia genus were the first diatoms unambiguously identified as producer of domoic acid, a neurotoxin affecting molluscan shell-fish, birds, marine mammals, and humans. Evidence exists indicating the involvement of another diatom genus, Amphora, as a potential producer of domoic acid. We present a strategy for the detection of the diatom species Amphora coffeaeformis based on the development of species-specific oligonucleotide probes and their application in microarray hybridization experiments. This approach is based on the use of two marker genes highly conserved in all diatoms, but endowed with sufficient genetic divergence to discriminate diatoms at the species level. A region of approximately 450 bp of these previously unexplored marker genes, coding for elongation factor 1-a (eEF1-a) and silicic acid transporter (SIT), was used to design oligonucleotide probes that were tested for specificity in combination with the corresponding fluorescently labeled DNA targets. The results presented in this work suggest a possible use of this DNA chip technology for the selective detection of A. coffeaeformis in environmental settings where the presence of this potential toxin producer may represent a threat to human and animal health. In addition, the same basic approach can be adapted to a wider range of diatoms for the simultaneous detection of microorganisms used as biomarkers of different water quality levels. PMID:25955528

  16. Temperature and multi-species measurements by supercontinuum absorption spectroscopy for IC engine applications.

    PubMed

    Werblinski, Thomas; Engel, Sascha R; Engelbrecht, Rainer; Zigan, Lars; Will, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    The first supercontinuum (SC) absorption spectroscopy measurements showing the feasibility of quantitative temperature evaluation are presented to the best of the authors' knowledge. Temperature and multi-species measurements were carried out at a detection rate of ~2 MHz in a high-temperature flow cell within a temperature range from 450 K to 750 K at 0.22 MPa, representing conditions during the suction and compression stroke in an internal combustion (IC) engine. The broadband SC pulses were temporally dispersed into fast wavelength sweeps, covering the overtone absorption bands 2ν(1), 2ν(3), ν(1) + ν(3) of H2O and 3ν(3) of CO2 in the near-infrared region from 1330 nm to 1500 nm. The temperature information is inferred from the peak ratio of a temperature sensitive (1362.42 nm) and insensitive (1418.91 nm) absorption feature in the ν(1) + ν(3) overtone bands of water. The experimental results are in very good agreement with theoretical intensity ratios calculated from absorption spectra based on HiTran data. PMID:23736618

  17. Coherent anti-stokes Raman spectroscopy system for point temperature and major species concentration measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.P.; Yueh, Fang-Yu

    1993-10-01

    The Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy system (CARS) has been developed as a laser-based, advanced, combustion-diagnostic technique to measure temperature and major species concentration. Principles of operation, description of the system and its capabilities, and operational details of this instrument are presented in this report.

  18. Modelling occurrence and abundance of species when detection is imperfect

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew; Nichols, J.D.; Kery, M.

    2005-01-01

    Relationships between species abundance and occupancy are of considerable interest in metapopulation biology and in macroecology. Such relationships may be described concisely using probability models that characterize variation in abundance of a species. However, estimation of the parameters of these models in most ecological problems is impaired by imperfect detection. When organisms are detected imperfectly, observed counts are biased estimates of true abundance, and this induces bias in stated occupancy or occurrence probability. In this paper we consider a class of models that enable estimation of abundance/occupancy relationships from counts of organisms that result from surveys in which detection is imperfect. Under such models, parameter estimation and inference are based on conventional likelihood methods. We provide an application of these models to geographically extensive breeding bird survey data in which alternative models of abundance are considered that include factors that influence variation in abundance and detectability. Using these models, we produce estimates of abundance and occupancy maps that honor important sources of spatial variation in avian abundance and provide clearly interpretable characterizations of abundance and occupancy adjusted for imperfect detection.

  19. Structure-property study of the Raman spectroscopy detection of fusaric acid and analogs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food security can benefit from the development of selective methods to detect toxins. Fusaric acid is a mycotoxin produced by certain fungi occasionally found in agricultural commodities. Raman spectroscopy allows selective detection of analytes associated with certain spectral characteristics relat...

  20. Laser Infrared Desorption Spectroscopy to Detect Complex Organic Molecules on Icy Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sollit, Luke S.; Beegle, Luther W.

    2008-01-01

    Laser Desorption-Infrared Spectroscopy (LD-IR) uses an IR laser pulse to desorb surface materials while a spectrometer measures the emission spectrum of the desorbed materials (Figure 1). In this example, laser desorption operates by having the incident laser energy absorbed by near surface material (10 microns in depth). This desorption produces a plume that exists in an excited state at elevated temperatures. A natural analog for this phenomenon can be observed when comets approach the sun and become active and individual molecular emission spectra can be observed in the IR [1,2,3,4,5]. When this occurs in comets, the same species that initially emit radiation down to the ground state are free to absorb it, reducing the amount of detectable emission features. The nature of our technique results in absorption not occurring, because the laser pulse could easily be moved away form the initial desorption plume, and still have better spatial resolution then reflectance spectroscopy. In reflectance spectroscopy, trace components have a relatively weak signal when compared to the entire active nature of the surface. With LDIR, the emission spectrum is used to identify and analyze surface materials.

  1. Detecting skin malignancy using elastic light scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canpolat, Murat; Akman, Ayşe; Çiftçioğlu, M. Akif; Alpsoy, Erkan

    2007-07-01

    We have used elastic light scattering spectroscopy to differentiate between malign and benign skin lesions. The system consists of a UV spectrometer, a single optical fiber probe and a laptop. The single optical fiber probe was used for both delivery and detection of white light to tissue and from the tissue. The single optical fiber probe received singly scattered photons rather than diffused photons in tissue. Therefore, the spectra are correlated with morphological differences of the cells. It has been shown that spectra of malign skin lesions are different than spectra of benign skin lesions. While slopes of the spectra taken on benign lesions or normal skin tissues were positive, slopes of the spectra taken on malign skin lesions tissues were negative. In vivo experiments were conducted on 20 lesions from 18 patients (11 men with mean age of 68 +/- 9 years and 7 women with mean age of 52 +/- 20 years) applied to the Department of Dermatology and Venerology. Before the biopsy, spectra were taken on the lesion and adjacent (approximately 1 cm distant) normal-appearing skin. Spectra of the normal skin were used as a control group. The spectra were correlated to the pathology results with sensitivity and specificity of 82% and 89%, respectively. Due to small diameter of fiber probe and limited number of sampling (15), some positive cases are missed, which is lowered the sensitivity of the system. The results are promising and could suggest that the system may be able to detect malignant skin lesion non-invasively and in real time.

  2. Remote detection of organics using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Demirgian, J.C.; Spurgash, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is an ideal technique for remote detection of organic emissions. There is an atmospheric window in the 1200 to 800 cm{sup {minus}1} region, which corresponds to the fingerprint'' region for organic molecules. Virtually all organic molecules have a unique absorption/emission pattern in the fingerprint region. A remote-passive FTIR relies on ambient emission of infrared energy from organics to obtain spectra. The instrumentation consists of inlet optics, and interferometer, a mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) detector, and an on-board computer. The transportable unit measures 40 cm by 50 cm and has been used to collect data while mounted on a helicopter or ground vehicle. Through the use of this FTIR combined with least squares software, it is possible to analyze qualitatively and quantitatively for organic vapors from either the air or ground. The data presented will include quantitative releases of common organics present in incinerator stacks, hazardous wastes, and illegal laboratories. Data will be presented for pure compounds, mixtures, and target analytes in the presence of interfering compounds. The sensitivity, reproducibility, and the potential of the technique will be discussed. 1 ref., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Detection of explosives with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian-Qian; Liu, Kai; Zhao, Hua; Ge, Cong-Hui; Huang, Zhi-Wen

    2012-12-01

    Our recent work on the detection of explosives by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is reviewed in this paper. We have studied the physical mechanism of laser-induced plasma of an organic explosive, TNT. The LIBS spectra of TNT under single-photon excitation are simulated using MATLAB. The variations of the atomic emission lines intensities of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen versus the plasma temperature are simulated too. We also investigate the time-resolved LIBS spectra of a common inorganic explosive, black powder, in two kinds of surrounding atmospheres, air and argon, and find that the maximum value of the O atomic emission line SBR of black powder occurs at a gate delay of 596 ns. Another focus of our work is on using chemometic methods such as principle component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) to distinguish the organic explosives from organic materials such as plastics. A PLS-DA model for classification is built. TNT and seven types of plastics are chosen as samples to test the model. The experimental results demonstrate that LIBS coupled with the chemometric techniques has the capacity to discriminate organic explosive from plastics.

  4. Near-infrared imaging spectroscopy for counterfeit drug detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Thomas; De Biasio, Martin; Leitner, Raimund

    2011-06-01

    Pharmaceutical counterfeiting is a significant issue in the healthcare community as well as for the pharmaceutical industry worldwide. The use of counterfeit medicines can result in treatment failure or even death. A rapid screening technique such as near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy could aid in the search for and identification of counterfeit drugs. This work presents a comparison of two laboratory NIR imaging systems and the chemometric analysis of the acquired spectroscopic image data. The first imaging system utilizes a NIR liquid crystal tuneable filter and is designed for the investigation of stationary objects. The second imaging system utilizes a NIR imaging spectrograph and is designed for the fast analysis of moving objects on a conveyor belt. Several drugs in form of tablets and capsules were analyzed. Spectral unmixing techniques were applied to the mixed reflectance spectra to identify constituent parts of the investigated drugs. The results show that NIR spectroscopic imaging can be used for contact-less detection and identification of a variety of counterfeit drugs.

  5. Optical heterodyne detection for cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, Marc D.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Zare, Richard N.

    2000-07-25

    A cavity ring-down system for performing cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) using optical heterodyne detection of a ring-down wave E.sub.RD during a ring-down phase or a ring-up wave E.sub.RU during a ring up phase. The system sends a local oscillator wave E.sub.LO and a signal wave E.sub.SIGNAL to the cavity, preferably a ring resonator, and derives an interference signal from the combined local oscillator wave E.sub.LO and the ring-down wave E.sub.RD (or ring-up wave E.sub.RU). The local oscillator wave E.sub.LO has a first polarization and the ring-down wave E.sub.RD has a second polarization different from the first polarization. The system has a combining arrangement for combining or overlapping local oscillator wave E.sub.LO and the ring-down wave E.sub.RD at a photodetector, which receives the interference signal and generates a heterodyne current I.sub.H therefrom. Frequency and phase differences between the waves are adjustable.

  6. Using electrical impedance spectroscopy to detect water in planetary regoliths.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, Suresh; Chin, Keith B; Buehler, Martin G; Anderson, Robert C

    2008-08-01

    We present data in examination of the utility of electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements for in situ surveys to determine the water content, distribution, and phase in unconsolidated planetary regolith. We conducted calibration experiments under conditions relevant to Mars: the concentration of electrolytes in solution was varied up to 1 M to simulate the effects of unsaturated dissolved minerals and brines. We also varied the water content of heterogeneous water/sand mixtures, made with these electrolytic solutions from 0.01 wt% to 10 wt%. Tests were performed at temperatures from +25 degrees C to -65 degrees C. Conductivity and dielectric permittivity calculated from the impedance measurements indicate an expected dependence on electrolyte concentration and relative independence from electrolyte type for both liquid water and water ice. Conductivity and calculated dielectric relaxation times for these aqueous solutions agree with existing data in the literature. The relative permittivity for heterogeneous water/sand mixtures is dominated by polarization effects for the electrode configuration used. However, the characteristic orientational relaxation of ice is still visible. The conductivity retains the strong dependence on electrolyte concentration, and the permittivity is still not affected by electrolyte type. A "universal" curve between conductivity and water content establishes detectability limits of <0.01 wt% and approximately 0.3 wt% for water/sand mixtures containing liquid water and ice, respectively. PMID:18752458

  7. Biophysical basis for noninvasive skin cancer detection using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xu; Moy, Austin J.; Markey, Mia K.; Fox, Matthew C.; Reichenberg, Jason S.; Tunnell, James W.

    2016-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy (RS) is proving to be a valuable tool for real time noninvasive skin cancer detection via optical fiber probe. However, current methods utilizing RS for skin cancer diagnosis rely on statistically based algorithms to provide tissue classification and do not elucidate the underlying biophysical changes of skin tissue. Therefore, we aim to use RS to explore skin biochemical and structural characteristics and then correlate the Raman spectrum of skin tissue with its disease state. We have built a custom confocal micro-Raman spectrometer system with an 830nm laser light. The high resolution capability of the system allows us to measure spectroscopic features from individual tissue components in situ. Raman images were collected from human skin samples from Mohs surgical biopsy, which were then compared with confocal laser scanning, two-photon fluorescence and hematoxylin and eosin-stained images to develop a linear model of skin tissue Raman spectra. In this model, macroscopic tissue spectra obtained from RS fiber probe were fit into a linear combination of individual basis spectra of primary skin constituents. The fit coefficient of the model explains the biophysical changes spanning a range of normal and various disease states. The model allows for determining parameters similar to that a pathologist is familiar reading and will be a significant guidance in developing RS diagnostic decision schemes.

  8. Rapid detection of Listeria monocytogenes in milk using confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy and chemometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junping; Xie, Xinfang; Feng, Jinsong; Chen, Jessica C; Du, Xin-jun; Luo, Jiangzhao; Lu, Xiaonan; Wang, Shuo

    2015-07-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a facultatively anaerobic, Gram-positive, rod-shape foodborne bacterium causing invasive infection, listeriosis, in susceptible populations. Rapid and high-throughput detection of this pathogen in dairy products is critical as milk and other dairy products have been implicated as food vehicles in several outbreaks. Here we evaluated confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy (785 nm laser) coupled with chemometric analysis to distinguish six closely related Listeria species, including L. monocytogenes, in both liquid media and milk. Raman spectra of different Listeria species and other bacteria (i.e., Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli) were collected to create two independent databases for detection in media and milk, respectively. Unsupervised chemometric models including principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis were applied to differentiate L. monocytogenes from Listeria and other bacteria. To further evaluate the performance and reliability of unsupervised chemometric analyses, supervised chemometrics were performed, including two discriminant analyses (DA) and soft independent modeling of class analogies (SIMCA). By analyzing Raman spectra via two DA-based chemometric models, average identification accuracies of 97.78% and 98.33% for L. monocytogenes in media, and 95.28% and 96.11% in milk were obtained, respectively. SIMCA analysis also resulted in satisfied average classification accuracies (over 93% in both media and milk). This Raman spectroscopic-based detection of L. monocytogenes in media and milk can be finished within a few hours and requires no extensive sample preparation. PMID:25863337

  9. REVIEW: Application of laser photothermal spectroscopy for standoff detection of trace explosive residues on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skvortsov, L. A.; Maksimov, E. M.

    2010-09-01

    Laser photothermal methods of standoff detection of trace explosive residues on surfaces are considered. The analysis is restricted to the most promising methods: photoacoustic spectroscopy, deflection spectroscopy, and IR photothermal imaging of objects under resonant irradiation. Particular attention is paid to the choice of radiation sources and detectors. Comparative analysis of the existing standoff detection methods for explosive particles on the object surface is performed. Prospects of laser photothermal spectroscopy in this field are discussed.

  10. Application of laser photothermal spectroscopy for standoff detection of trace explosive residues on surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Skvortsov, L A; Maksimov, E M

    2010-09-10

    Laser photothermal methods of standoff detection of trace explosive residues on surfaces are considered. The analysis is restricted to the most promising methods: photoacoustic spectroscopy, deflection spectroscopy, and IR photothermal imaging of objects under resonant irradiation. Particular attention is paid to the choice of radiation sources and detectors. Comparative analysis of the existing standoff detection methods for explosive particles on the object surface is performed. Prospects of laser photothermal spectroscopy in this field are discussed. (review)

  11. Distinction of three wood species by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Anmin; Zhou, Qun; Liu, Junliang; Fei, Benhua; Sun, Suqin

    2008-07-01

    Dalbergia odorifera T. Chen, Pterocarpus santalinus L.F. and Pterocarpus soyauxii are three kinds of the most valuable wood species, which are hard to distinguish. In this paper, differentiation of D. odorifera, P. santalinus and P. soyauxii was carried out by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), second derivative IR spectra and two-dimensional correlation infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy. The three woods have their characteristic peaks in conventional IR spectra. For example, D. odorifera has obvious absorption peaks at 1640 and 1612 cm -1; P. santalinus has only one peak at 1614 cm -1; and P. soyauxii has one peak at 1619 cm -1 and one shoulder peak at 1597 cm -1. To enhance spectrum resolution and amplify the differences between the IR spectra of different woods, the second derivative technology was adopted to examine the three wood samples. More differences could be observed in the region of 800-1700 cm -1. Then, the thermal perturbation is applied to distinguish different wood samples in an easier way, because of the spectral resolution being enhanced by the 2D correlation spectroscopy. In the region of 1300-1800 cm -1, D. odorifera has five auto-peaks at 1518, 1575, 1594, 1620 and 1667 cm -1; P. santalinus has four auto-peaks at 1469, 1518, 1627 and 1639 cm -1 and P. soyauxii has only two auto-peaks at 1627 and 1639 cm -1. It is proved that the 2D correlation IR spectroscopy can be a new method to distinguish D. odorifera, P. santalinus and P. soyauxii.

  12. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy: Ultrasensitive detection in clear and turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahari, Abdel Kader

    In this work, I describe the development of a simple, inexpensive, and powerful alternative technique to detect and analyze, without enrichment, extremely low concentrations of cells, bacteria, viruses, and protein aggregates in turbid fluids for clinical and biotechnological applications. The anticipated applications of this technique are many. They range from the determination of the somatic cell count in milk for the dairy industry, to the enumeration and characterization of microorganisms in environmental microbiology and the food industry, and to the fast and ultrasensitive detection of protein aggregates for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases in clinical medicine. A prototype instrument has been built and allowed the detection and quantification of particles down to a few per milliliter in short scanning times. It consists of a small microscope that has a horizontal geometry and a mechanical instrument that holds a cylindrical cuvette (1 cm in diameter) with two motors that provide a rotational and a slower vertical inversion motions. The illumination focus is centered about 200 mum from the wall of the cuvette inside the sample. The total volume that is explored is large (˜1ml/min for bright particles). The data is analyzed with a correlation filter program based on particle passage pattern recognition. I will also describe further work on improving the sensitivity of the technique, expanding it for multiple-species discrimination and enumeration, and testing the prototype device in actual clinical and biotechnological applications. The main clinical application of this project seeks to establish conditions and use this new technique to quantify and size-analyze oligomeric complexes of the Alzheimer's disease beta-peptide in cerebrospinal fluid and other body fluids as a molecular biomarker for persons at risk of Alzheimer's disease dementia. The technology could potentially be extended to the diagnosis and therapeutic

  13. Characterisation Of Polysacharides And Lipids From Selected Green Algae Species By FTIR-ATR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartošová, Alica; Blinová, Lenka; Gerulová, Kristína

    2015-06-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used in this study to identify and determine spectral features of Chromochloris zofingiensis (Dönz) Fucíková et L.A. Lewis (SAG 211-14, Gottingen, Germany), Acutodesmus obliguus (Turpin) Hegewald (SAG 276-1, Gottingen, Germany) and Chlorella sorokiniana (K. Brandt) Pröschold et Darienko (SAG 211-40c, Gottingen, Germany). Polysaccharides and lipids from these three algae species were determined using Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) with ATR accessory with diamante crystal in spectral range from 400 - 4000 cm-1 and resolution 4.

  14. [Evaluation of Malassezia species by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Ergin, Cağrı; Vuran, M Emre; Gök, Yaşar; Ozdemir, Durmuş; Karaarslan, Aydın; Kaleli, Ilknur; Zorbozan, Orçun; Kabay, Nilgün; Con, Ahmet Hilmi

    2011-10-01

    Malassezia species which are lipophilic exobasidiomycetes fungi, have been accepted as members of normal cutaneous flora as well as causative agent of certain skin diseases. In routine microbiology laboratory, species identification based on phenotypic characters may not yield identical results with taxonomic studies. Lipophilic and lipid-dependent Malassezia yeasts require lipid-enriched complex media. For this reason, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy analysis focused on lipid window may be useful for identification of Malassezia species. In this study, 10 different standard Malassezia species (M.dermatis CBS 9145, M.furfur CBS 7019, M.japonica CBS 9432, M.globosa CBS 7966, M.nana CBS 9561, M.obtusa CBS 7876, M.pachydermatis CBS 1879, M.slooffiae CBS 7956, M.sympodialis CBS 7222 and M.yamatoensis CBS 9725) which are human pathogens, have been analyzed by FT-IR spectroscopy following standard cultivation onto modified Dixon agar medium. Results showed that two main groups (M1; M.globosa, M.obtusa, M.sympodialis, M.dermatis, M.pachydermatis vs, M2; M.furfur, M.japonica, M.nana, M.slooffiae, M.yamatoensis) were discriminated by whole spectra analysis. M.obtusa in M1 by 1686-1606 cm-1 wavenumber ranges and M.japonicum in M2 by 2993-2812 cm-1 wavenumber ranges were identified with low level discrimination power. Discriminatory areas for species differentiation of M1 members as M.sympodialis, M.globosa and M.pachydermatis and M2 members as M.furfur and M.yamatoensis could not be identified. Several spectral windows analysis results revealed that FT-IR spectroscopy was not sufficient for species identification of culture grown Malassezia species. PMID:22090301

  15. Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy Study of Hydrous Species in Soda Lime Silica Float Glass.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiawei; Banerjee, Joy; Pantano, Carlo G; Kim, Seong H

    2016-06-21

    It is generally accepted that the mechanical properties of soda lime silica (SLS) glass can be affected by the interaction between sodium ions and hydrous species (silanol groups and water molecules) in its surface region. While the amount of these hydrous species can be estimated from hydrogen profiles and infrared spectroscopy, their chemical environment in the glass network is still not well understood. This work employed vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy to investigate the chemical environment of hydrous species in the surface region of SLS float glass. SLS float glass shows sharp peaks in the OH stretching vibration region in SFG spectra, while the OH stretch peaks of glasses that do not have leachable sodium ions and the OH peaks of water molecules in condensed phases are normally broad due to fast hydrogen bonding dynamics. The hydrous species responsible for the sharp SFG peaks for the SLS float glass were found to be thermodynamically more stable than physisorbed water molecules, did not exchange with D2O, and were associated with the sodium concentration gradient in the dealkalized subsurface region. These results suggested that the hydrous species reside in static solvation shells defined by the silicate network with relatively slow hydrogen bonding dynamics, compared to physisorbed water layers on top of the glass surface. A putative radial distribution of the hydrous species within the SLS glass network was estimated based on the OH SFG spectral features, which could be compared with theoretical distributions calculated from computational simulations. PMID:27254814

  16. Ion scattering and electron spectroscopy of the chemical species at a HF-prepared Si(211) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Jaime-Vasquez, M.; Martinka, M.; Groenert, M.; Dinan, J.

    2006-01-16

    The species and the nature of their chemical bonds at the surface of a hydrogen-terminated Si(211) wafer were characterized using temperature desorption spectroscopy, ion scattering spectroscopy, and electron spectroscopy. The surface region is dominated by monohydride species with dihydrides present in small amounts. Fluorine is distributed across the top layer as largely a physisorbed species to the Si substrate. Low-energy {sup 3}He{sup +} ions remove the H and F species with only minimal damage to the underlying region.

  17. Biomimetic/Optical Sensors for Detecting Bacterial Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, Margie; Ksendzov, Alexander; Yen, Shiao-Pin; Ryan, Margaret; Lazazzera, Beth

    2006-01-01

    Biomimetic/optical sensors have been proposed as means of real-time detection of bacteria in liquid samples through real-time detection of compounds secreted by the bacteria. Bacterial species of interest would be identified through detection of signaling compounds unique to those species. The best-characterized examples of quorum-signaling compounds are acyl-homoserine lactones and peptides. Each compound, secreted by each bacterium of an affected species, serves as a signal to other bacteria of the same species to engage in a collective behavior when the population density of that species reaches a threshold level analogous to a quorum. A sensor according to the proposal would include a specially formulated biomimetic film, made of a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP), that would respond optically to the signaling compound of interest. The MIP film would be integrated directly onto an opticalwaveguide- based ring resonator for optical readout. Optically, the sensor would resemble the one described in Chemical Sensors Based on Optical Ring Resonators (NPO-40601), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 10 (October 2005), page 32. MIPs have been used before as molecular- recognition compounds, though not in the manner of the present proposal. Molecular imprinting is an approach to making molecularly selective cavities in a polymer matrix. These cavities function much as enzyme receptor sites: the chemical functionality and shape of a cavity in the polymer matrix cause the cavity to bind to specific molecules. An MIP matrix is made by polymerizing monomers in the presence of the compound of interest (template molecule). The polymer forms around the template. After the polymer solidifies, the template molecules are removed from the polymer matrix by decomplexing them from their binding sites and then dissolving them, leaving cavities that are matched to the template molecules in size, shape, and chemical functionality. The cavities thus become molecular-recognition sites

  18. Challenging near infrared spectroscopy discriminating ability for counterfeit pharmaceuticals detection.

    PubMed

    Storme-Paris, I; Rebiere, H; Matoga, M; Civade, C; Bonnet, P-A; Tissier, M H; Chaminade, P

    2010-01-25

    This study was initiated by the laboratories and control department of the French Health Products Safety Agency (AFSSAPS) as part of the fight against the public health problem of rising counterfeit and imitation medicines. To test the discriminating ability of Near InfraRed Spectroscopy (NIRS), worse cases scenarios were first considered for the discrimination of various pharmaceutical final products containing the same Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) with different excipients, such as generics of proprietary medicinal products (PMP). Two generic databases were explored: low active strength hard capsules of Fluoxetine and high strength tablets of Ciprofloxacin. Then 4 other cases involving suspicious samples, counterfeits and imitations products were treated. In all these cases, spectral differences between samples were studied, giving access to API or excipient contents information, and eventually allowing manufacturing site identification. A chemometric background is developed to explain the optimisation methodology, consisting in the choices of appropriate pretreatments, algorithms for data exploratory analyses (unsupervised Principal Component Analysis), and data classification (supervised cluster analysis, and Soft Independent Modelling of Class Analogy). Results demonstrate the high performance of NIRS, highlighting slight differences in formulations, such as 2.5% (w/w) in API strength, 1.0% (w/w) in excipient and even coating variations (<1%, w/w) with identical contents, approaching the theoretical limits of NIRS sensitivity. All the different generic formulations were correctly discriminated and foreign PMP, constituted of formulations slightly different from the calibration ones, were also all discriminated. This publication addresses the ability of NIRS to detect counterfeits and imitations and presents the NIRS as an ideal tool to master the global threat of counterfeit drugs. PMID:20103090

  19. Spectroscopy and detectability of liquid brines on mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massé, M.; Beck, P.; Schmitt, B.; Pommerol, A.; McEwen, A.; Chevrier, V.; Brissaud, O.; Séjourné, A.

    2014-03-01

    Recent geomorphological observations as well as chemical and thermodynamic studies demonstrate that liquid water should be stable today on the Martian surface at some times of the day. In Martian conditions, brines would be particularly more stable than pure water because salts can depress the freezing point and lower the evaporation rate of water. Despite this evidence, no clear spectral signature of liquid has been observed so far by the hyperspectral imaging spectrometers OMEGA and CRISM. However, past spectral analysis lacks a good characterization of brines' spectral signatures. This study thus aims to determine how liquid brines can be detected on Mars by spectroscopy. In this way, laboratory experiments were performed for reproducing hydration and dehydration cycles of various brines while measuring their spectral signatures. The resulting spectra first reveal a very similar spectral evolution for the various brine types and pure water, with the main difference observed at the end of the dehydration with the crystallization of various hydrated minerals from brines. The main characteristic of this spectral behavior is an important decoupling between the evolution of albedo and hydration bands depths. During most of the wetting/drying processes, spectra usually display a low albedo associated with shallow water absorption band depths. Strong water absorption band depth and high albedo are respectively only observed when the surface is very wet and when the surface is very dry. These experiments can thus explain why the currently active Martian features attributed to the action of a liquid are only associated with low albedo and very weak spectral signatures. Hydration experiments also reveal that deliquescence occurs easily even at low temperature and moderate soil water vapor pressure and could thus cause seasonal darkening on Mars. These experiments demonstrate that the absence of water absorptions in CRISM in the middle afternoon does not rule out water

  20. Remote Pulsed Laser Raman Spectroscopy System for Detecting Qater, Ice, and Hydrous Minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Christopher S.; Abedin, M. Nuraul; Sharma, Shiv K.; Misra, Anupam K.; Ismail, Syed; Singh, Upendra; Refaat, Tamer F.; Elsayed-Ali, Hani; Sandford, Steve

    2006-01-01

    For exploration of planetary surfaces, detection of water and ice is of great interest in supporting existence of life on other planets. Therefore, a remote Raman spectroscopy system was demonstrated at NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration with University of Hawaii for detecting ice-water and hydrous minerals on planetary surfaces. In this study, a 532 nm pulsed laser is utilized as an excitation source to allow detection in high background radiation conditions. The Raman scattered signal is collected by a 4-inch telescope positioned in front of a spectrograph. The Raman spectrum is analyzed using a spectrograph equipped with a holographic super notch filter to eliminate Rayleigh scattering, and a holographic transmission grating that simultaneously disperses two spectral tracks onto the detector for higher spectral range. To view the spectrum, the spectrograph is coupled to an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD), which allows detection of very weak Stokes line. The ICCD is operated in gated mode to further suppress effects from background radiation and long-lived fluorescence. The sample is placed at 5.6 m from the telescope, and the laser is mounted on the telescope in a coaxial geometry to achieve maximum performance. The system was calibrated using the spectral lines of a Neon lamp source. To evaluate the system, Raman standard samples such as calcite, naphthalene, acetone, and isopropyl alcohol were analyzed. The Raman evaluation technique was used to analyze water, ice and other hydrous minerals and results from these species are presented.

  1. Absorption spectroscopy of oxygen, carbon dioxide and water species for applications in combustion diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Anhua

    Laser absorption spectroscopy has been a useful tool applied in combustion diagnostics because of its capability to measure the species' concentration, particularly to measure concentration, temperature, and pressure simultaneously. These measurements provide the necessary information for dynamic combustion control. Due to its advantages such as fast response, non-intrusive nature and applicability under harsh environment like high temperature and high pressure, absorption laser spectroscopy makes it possible to monitor combustion system on-line and in situ. Since its development for more than thirty years, laser spectroscopy has matured, and the novel and advanced laser sensors have pushed it to be applied fast. On the other hand, industry still needs cheaper and more operable spectroscopy, which becomes an important consideration in the development and application of modern laser spectroscopy. This study presents an instrumental structure including the algorithm of the spectrum computation and the hardware configuration. The algorithm applied the central maximum value of the spectrum to simplify the computation. The whole calculation was done extensively using Beer-Lambert theory and HITRAN database which makes it efficient and applicable. This research conducted the simulations of high temperature species, such as CO2, H2O to carry out the algorithm, which were compared with published data. Also, this research designed and performed the experiments of measuring oxygen and its mixture with Helium by using a 760 nm diode laser and a 655 nm Helium/Neon laser sensor with fixed wavelength structures. The results of this research also conclude the following: (1) extensive literature survey, field research and laboratory work; (2) studying the significant theories and experimental methods of the laser spectroscopy; (3) developing efficient and simplified algorithm for spectrum calculation; (4) simulating high temperature species H2O and CO2; (5) designing and building

  2. Modelling plant species distribution in alpine grasslands using airborne imaging spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pottier, Julien; Malenovský, Zbyněk; Psomas, Achilleas; Homolová, Lucie; Schaepman, Michael E.; Choler, Philippe; Thuiller, Wilfried; Guisan, Antoine; Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

    2014-01-01

    Remote sensing using airborne imaging spectroscopy (AIS) is known to retrieve fundamental optical properties of ecosystems. However, the value of these properties for predicting plant species distribution remains unclear. Here, we assess whether such data can add value to topographic variables for predicting plant distributions in French and Swiss alpine grasslands. We fitted statistical models with high spectral and spatial resolution reflectance data and tested four optical indices sensitive to leaf chlorophyll content, leaf water content and leaf area index. We found moderate added-value of AIS data for predicting alpine plant species distribution. Contrary to expectations, differences between species distribution models (SDMs) were not linked to their local abundance or phylogenetic/functional similarity. Moreover, spectral signatures of species were found to be partly site-specific. We discuss current limits of AIS-based SDMs, highlighting issues of scale and informational content of AIS data. PMID:25079495

  3. Remote detection of trace effluents using Resonance Raman spectroscopy: Field results and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Chen, C.L.

    1995-10-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) possesses many characteristics that are important for detecting, identifying and monitoring chemical effluents. Raman scattering is a coherent, inelastic, two-photon scattering process where an exciting photon of energy h{nu} promotes a molecule to a virtual level and the subsequently emitted photon is shifted in frequency in accordance with the rotational-vibrational structure of the irradiated species, thereby providing a unique fingerprint of the molecule. Under resonance enhancement, the Raman scattering cross-sections have been observed to increase up to 6 orders of magnitude above the normal scattering cross-sections, thereby providing the practical basis for a remote chemical sensor. Some of the other advantages that a Raman sensor possesses are: (1) very high selectivity (chemical specific fingerprints), (2) independence of the spectral fingerprint on the excitation wavelength (ability to monitor in the solar blind region), (3) chemical mixture fingerprints are the sum of its individual components (no spectral cross-talk), (4) near independence of the Raman fingerprint to its physical state (very similar spectra for gas, liquid, solid or solutions), (5) no absolute calibration is necessary because all Raman signals observed from a given species can be compared with the Raman signal for N{sub 2}, whose concentration is known very accurately, and (6) insensitivity of the Raman signature to environmental conditions (no quenching, or interference from water vapor). In this presentation, the technology of resonance Raman spectroscopy as applied to the detection of narcotics production activities will be presented along with some recent experimental results.

  4. New Borrelia species detected in ixodid ticks in Oromia, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Kumsa, Bersissa; Socolovschi, Cristina; Raoult, Didier; Parola, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Little is known about Borrelia species transmitted by hard ticks in Ethiopia. The present study was conducted from November 2011 through March 2014 to address the occurrence and molecular identity of these bacteria in ixodid ticks infesting domestic animals in Oromia, Ethiopia. A total of 767 ixodid ticks collected from domestic animals were screened for Borrelia DNA by quantitative (q) real-time PCR followed by standard PCR and sequencing to identify the species. Overall, 3.8% (29/767) of the tested ticks were positive for Borrelia DNA, including 8/119 (6.7%) Amblyomma cohaerens, 1/42 (2.4%) Am. gemma, 3/53 (5.7%) Am. variegatum, 5/22 (22.7%) Amblyomma larvae, 3/60 (5%) Amblyomma nymphs, 2/139 (1.4%) Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) decoloratus, 2/31 (6.4%) Rh. decoloratus nymphs, and 5/118 (4.2%) Rh. pulchellus using 16S genus-specific qPCR. The prevalence of Borrelia DNA was significantly higher in genus Amblyomma (20/298, 6.7%) than in the genus Rhipicephalus (9/417, 2.1%) ticks (P=0.001). Sequencing of PCR products from the flaB and 16S rRNA genes of Borrelia spp. from Amblyomma ticks showed the presence of a new species between the relapsing fever and Lyme disease groups. However, Borrelia sp. detected in Rhipicephalus ticks clustered with B. theileri/B. lonestari. The human pathogenicity of the Borrelia sp. detected in Amblyomma ticks from Ethiopia has not yet been investigated, whereas the Borrelia sp. detected in Rhipicephalus ticks in our study is the causative agent of bovine borreliosis in cattle and may have veterinary importance in different parts of Ethiopia. Furthermore, the detection of previously unrecognized Borrelia species in Amblyomma and Rhipicephalus ticks in Ethiopia generates additional questions concerning the bacterial fauna in hard ticks and will prompt researchers to perform detailed studies for better understanding of ixodid ticks associated bacteria. PMID:25843811

  5. Study of the metabolism of flucytosine in Aspergillus species by sup 19 F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chouini-Lalanne, N.; Malet-Martino, M.C.; Martino, R.; Michel, G. )

    1989-11-01

    The metabolism of flucytosine (5FC) in two Aspergillus species (Aspergillus fumigatus and A. niger) was investigated by 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In intact mycelia, 5FC was found to be deaminated to 5-fluorouracil and then transformed into fluoronucleotides; the catabolite alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine was also detected in A. fumigatus. Neither 5-fluoroorotic acid nor 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine-5'-monophosphate was detected in perchloric acid extracts after any incubation with 5FC. 5FC, 5-fluorouracil, and the classical fluoronucleotides 5-fluorouridine-5'-mono-, di-, and triphosphates were identified in the acid-soluble pool. Two hydrolysis products of 5-fluorouracil incorporated into RNA, 5-fluorouridine-2'-monophosphate and 5-fluorouridine-3'-monophosphate, were found in the acid-insoluble pool. No significant differences in the metabolic transformation of 5FC were noted in the two species of Aspergillus. The main pathway of 5FC metabolism in the two species of Aspergillus studied is thus the biotransformation into ribofluoronucleotides and the subsequent incorporation of 5-fluorouridine-5'-triphosphate into RNA.

  6. Reversal electron attachment ionizer for detection of trace species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernius, Mark T. (Inventor); Chutjian, Ara (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An in-line reversal electron, high-current ionizer capable of focusing a beam of electrons to a reversal region and executing a reversal of said electrons, such that the electrons possess zero kinetic energy at the point of reversal, may be used to produce both negative and positive ions. A sample gas is introduced at the point of electron reversal for low energy electron-(sample gas) molecule attachment with high efficiency. The attachment process produces negative ions from the sample gas, which includes species present in trace (minute) amounts. These ions are extracted efficiently and directed to a mass analyzer where they may be detected and identified. The generation and detection of positive ions is accomplished in a similar fashion with minimal adjustment to potentials applied to the apparatus.

  7. Methods for Detection of Mitochondrial and Cellular Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Mitochondrial and cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in both physiological and pathological processes. Different ROS, such as superoxide (O2•−), hydrogen peroxide, and peroxynitrite (ONOO•−), stimulate distinct cell-signaling pathways and lead to diverse outcomes depending on their amount and subcellular localization. A variety of methods have been developed for ROS detection; however, many of these methods are not specific, do not allow subcellular localization, and can produce artifacts. In this review, we will critically analyze ROS detection and present advantages and the shortcomings of several available methods. Recent Advances: In the past decade, a number of new fluorescent probes, electron-spin resonance approaches, and immunoassays have been developed. These new state-of-the-art methods provide improved selectivity and subcellular resolution for ROS detection. Critical Issues: Although new methods for HPLC superoxide detection, application of fluorescent boronate-containing probes, use of cell-targeted hydroxylamine spin probes, and immunospin trapping have been available for several years, there has been lack of translation of these into biomedical research, limiting their widespread use. Future Directions: Additional studies to translate these new technologies from the test tube to physiological applications are needed and could lead to a wider application of these approaches to study mitochondrial and cellular ROS. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 372–382. PMID:22978713

  8. Laser photoacoustic spectroscopy helps fight terrorism: High sensitivity detection of chemical Warfare Agent and explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, C. K. N.

    2008-01-01

    Tunable laser photoacoustic spectroscopy is maturing rapidly in its applications to real world problems. One of the burning problems of the current turbulent times is the threat of terrorist acts against civilian population. This threat appears in two distinct forms. The first is the potential release of chemical warfare agents (CWA), such as the nerve agents, in a crowded environment. An example of this is the release of Sarin by Aum Shinrikyo sect in a crowded Tokyo subway in 1995. An example of the second terrorist threat is the ever-present possible suicide bomber in crowded environment such as airports, markets and large buildings. Minimizing the impact of both of these threats requires early detection of the presence of the CWAs and explosives. Photoacoustic spectroscopy is an exquisitely sensitive technique for the detection of trace gaseous species, a property that Pranalytica has extensively exploited in its CO2 laser based commercial instrumentation for the sub-ppb level detection of a number of industrially important gases including ammonia, ethylene, acrolein, sulfur hexafluoride, phosphine, arsine, boron trichloride and boron trifluoride. In this presentation, I will focus, however, on our recent use of broadly tunable single frequency high power room temperature quantum cascade lasers (QCL) for the detection of the CWAs and explosives. Using external grating cavity geometry, we have developed room temperature QCLs that produce continuously tunable single frequency CW power output in excess of 300 mW at wavelengths covering 5 μm to 12 μm. I will present data that show a CWA detection capability at ppb levels with false alarm rates below 1:108. I will also show the capability of detecting a variety of explosives at a ppb level, again with very low false alarm rates. Among the explosives, we have demonstrated the capability of detecting homemade explosives such as triacetone triperoxide and its liquid precursor, acetone which is a common household

  9. Physiological and pathophysiological reactive oxygen species as probed by EPR spectroscopy: the underutilized research window on muscle ageing.

    PubMed

    A Abdel-Rahman, Engy; Mahmoud, Ali M; Khalifa, Abdulrahman M; Ali, Sameh S

    2016-08-15

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) play crucial roles in triggering, mediating and regulating physiological and pathophysiological signal transduction pathways within the cell. Within the cell, ROS efflux is firmly controlled both spatially and temporally, making the study of ROS dynamics a challenging task. Different approaches have been developed for ROS assessment; however, many of these assays are not capable of direct identification or determination of subcellular localization of different ROS. Here we highlight electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy as a powerful technique that is uniquely capable of addressing questions on ROS dynamics in different biological specimens and cellular compartments. Due to their critical importance in muscle functions and dysfunction, we discuss in some detail spin trapping of various ROS and focus on EPR detection of nitric oxide before highlighting how EPR can be utilized to probe biophysical characteristics of the environment surrounding a given stable radical. Despite the demonstrated ability of EPR spectroscopy to provide unique information on the identity, quantity, dynamics and environment of radical species, its applications in the field of muscle physiology, fatiguing and ageing are disproportionately infrequent. While reviewing the limited examples of successful EPR applications in muscle biology we conclude that the field would greatly benefit from more studies exploring ROS sources and kinetics by spin trapping, protein dynamics by site-directed spin labelling, and membrane dynamics and global redox changes by spin probing EPR approaches. PMID:26801204

  10. Detection of Bacillus spores within 15 minutes by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shende, Chetan; Inscore, Frank; Huang, Hermes; Farquharson, Stuart; Sengupta, Atanu

    2012-06-01

    Since the distribution of Bacillus anthracis causing spores through the US Postal System, there has been a persistent fear that biological warfare agents (BWAs) will be used by terrorists against our military abroad and our civilians at home. Despite the substantial effort to develop BWA analyzers, they remain either too slow, produce high falsealarm rates, lack sensitivity, or cannot be fielded. Consequently there remains a need for a portable analyzer that can overcome these limitations as expressed at the 2011 Biological Weapons Convention. To meet this need we have been developing a sample system that selectively binds BWAs and produce surface-enhanced Raman (SER) spectra using portable Raman spectrometers. Here we describe the use of a short peptide ligand functionalized on silver nanoparticles to selectively capture Bacillus cereus spores (a surrogate of B. anthracis) and their subsequent detection by SER spectroscopy. This technique was used to specifically detect B. cereus spores over closely related species like B. subtilis belonging to the same genus within 15 minutes. Sensitivity of the method was demonstrated by detecting 104 B. cereus spores/mL of water. The technology, once developed should prove invaluable for rapid monitoring of BWAs, which will immensely help first responders and emergency personnel in implementing appropriate counter measures.

  11. Melamine detection using phase-shift fiber-loop ring-down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinlei; Wang, Xinhui; Chen, Ke; Mao, Xuefeng; Peng, Wei; Yu, Qingxu

    2014-12-01

    Melamine is an illegal adulteration in milk, infant formula and pet food. Its misuse is toxic to humans and animals, so rapid and reliable screening methods for melamine detection are essential. In this paper, a phase-shift fiber-loop ring-down spectroscopy (PS-FLRDS)-based system is developed and evaluated for the detection and quantification of melamine. In the PS-FLRDS technique, an intensity-modulated continuous-wave (CW) laser is used as the light source, and a phase shift between the incident and emitted light of the fiber loop is introduced due to losses caused by the fiber loop and absorbing sample. By measuring this phase shift, one can readily obtain the concentration information of the measured species. Phase shifts of melamine solutions with different concentrations are measured and the experimental results show that there is a good linear relationship between the phase shift and the melamine concentration in low concentration range and a detection limit of 0.03 mg/mL has been achieved.

  12. Cavity Enhanced absorption spectroscopy with an Optical Comb: Detection of atmospheric radicals in the near UV.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méjean, G.; Kassi, S.; Romanini, D.

    2009-04-01

    The atmospheric chemistry community suffers a lack of fast, reliable and space resolved measurement for a wide set of very reactive molecules (e.g. radicals such as OH, NO3, BrO, IO, etc.). Due to their high reactivity, these molecules largely control the lifetime and concentration of numerous key atmospheric species. The concentrations of radicals are extremely low (ppbv or less) and highly variable in time and space. Measuring their concentration is often extremely laborious, expensive and requires heavy equipment (chemical sampling and treatment followed by mass spectrometry and/or chromatography). We recently introduced an optical spectroscopy technique based on a femtosecond laser oscillator, "Mode-Locked Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy", that we propose to develop into an instrument for in situ measurement of local concentration of traces of reactive molecules [1-3]. We have already demonstrated the possibility of measuring part in 1E12 by volume concentrations of radicals of high atmospheric interest, such as IO or BrO [4], as needed for monitoring these species in the environment. We apply cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the near UV range using a frequency-doubled Ti:Sa modelocked femtosecond laser. Efficient broadband injection of a high finesse cavity is obtained by matching this optical frequency-comb source to the comb of cavity transmission resonances. A grating spectrograph and a detector array disperse and detect the spectrum transmitted by the cavity carrying the absorption features of intracavity molecules. IO traces were obtained by mixing together controlled flows of gaseous iodine and ozone inside a high finesse cavity (F~6000). A Chameleon Ultra II ML-Laser (gracefully lent during 1 month by Coherent Inc.) was frequency doubled to address an absorption band of IO at 436 nm. A locking scheme allowed the cavity transmission to be smooth and stable. The transmitted light was dispersed using a high resolution (0.07nm) grating

  13. Quantitative degenerate four-wave mixing spectroscopy: Probes for molecular species

    SciTech Connect

    Farrow, R.; Rakestraw, D.; Paul, P.; Lucht, R.; Danehy, P.; Friedman-Hill, E.; Germann, G.

    1993-12-01

    Resonant degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) is currently the subject of intensive investigation as a sensitive diagnostic tool for molecular species. DFWM has the advantage of generating a coherent (beam-like) signal which results in null-background detection and provides excellent immunity to background-light interference. Since multiple one-photon resonances are involved in the signal generation process, the DFWM technique can allow sensitive detection of molecules via electronic, vibrational or rotational transitions. These properties combine to make DFWM a widely applicable diagnostic technique for the probing of molecular species. The authors are conducting fundamental and applied investigations of DFWM for quantitative measurements of trace species in reacting gases. During the past year, efforts have been focussed in two areas: (1) understanding the effects of collisional processes on the DFWM signal generation process, and (2) exploring the applicability of infrared DFWM to detect polyatomic molecules via rovibrational transitions.

  14. Detection of iron corrosion by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui; Wu, Di-bo; Zhan, Hong-lei; Sun, Qing; Zhao, Kun

    2015-11-01

    The iron tablets, which were exposed in salt spray with different periods, were investigated in the 0.2~2.0 THz using reflection-type terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) in vacuum environment at room temperature. The sample signals are attenuated in comparison to the reference signals with increasing the corrosion time. The THz spectroscopy peak EP and reflectivity (R) of samples strongly depended on corrosion time t with EP ∝ t-1 and R ∝ t-1. The THz characteristics of iron sheets in salt spray indicate that reflection THz-TDS will contribute to the development of non-destructive testing of corrosion in pipelines.

  15. Detecting and Segregating Black Tip-Damaged Wheat Kernels Using Visible and Near Infrared Spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Detection of individual wheat kernels with black tip symptom (BTS) and black tip damage (BTD) was demonstrated using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) and silicon light-emitting-diode (LED) based instruments. The two instruments tested, a single kernel near-infrared spectroscopy instrume...

  16. The detection of amoxicillin medicines by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Kun; Li, Zeren; Liu, Qiao

    2011-11-01

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) is a new spectroscopic technique, which improve a good complement for other spectroscopic techniques and has broad application prospects in the biomedical field. In this paper, a terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system is set up. Using this system, the amoxicillin drugs are detected, and the spectrum are analyzed.

  17. The detection of amoxicillin medicines by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Kun; Li, Zeren; Liu, Qiao

    2012-03-01

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) is a new spectroscopic technique, which improve a good complement for other spectroscopic techniques and has broad application prospects in the biomedical field. In this paper, a terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system is set up. Using this system, the amoxicillin drugs are detected, and the spectrum are analyzed.

  18. Human pathogenic Cryptosporidium species bioanalytical detection method with single oocyst detection capability.

    PubMed

    Connelly, John T; Nugen, Sam R; Borejsza-Wysocki, Wlodek; Durst, Richard A; Montagna, Richard A; Baeumner, Antje J

    2008-05-01

    A bioanalytical detection method for specific detection of viable human pathogenic Cryptosporidium species, C. parvum, C. hominis, and C. meleagridis is described. Oocysts were isolated from water samples via immunomagnetic separation, and mRNA was extracted with oligo-dT magnetic beads, amplified using nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA), and then detected in a nucleic acid hybridization lateral flow assay. The amplified target sequence employed was hsp70 mRNA, production of which is stimulated via a brief heat shock. The described method was capable of detecting one oocyst in 10 μL using flow-cytometer-counted samples. Only viable oocysts were detected, as confirmed using 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole and propidium iodide (DAPI/PI) staining. The detection system was challenged by detecting oocysts in the presence of large numbers of common waterborne microorganisms and packed pellet material filtered from environmental water samples. When the method was compared with EPA Method 1622 for C. parvum detection, highly comparable results were obtained. Since the described detection system yields unambiguous results within 4.5 h, it is an ideal method for monitoring the safety of drinking water. PMID:18311563

  19. From Traditional Resource to Global Commodities:-A Comparison of Rhodiola Species Using NMR Spectroscopy-Metabolomics and HPTLC.

    PubMed

    Booker, Anthony; Zhai, Lixiang; Gkouva, Christina; Li, Shuyuan; Heinrich, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The fast developing international trade of products based on traditional knowledge and their value chains has become an important aspect of the ethnopharmacological debate. The structure and diversity of value chains and their impact on the phytochemical composition of herbal medicinal products, as well as the underlying government policies and regulations, have been overlooked in the debate about quality problems in transnational trade. Rhodiola species, including Rhodiola rosea L. and Rhodiola crenulata (Hook. f. & Thomson) H. Ohba, are used as traditional herbal medicines. Faced with resource depletion and environment destruction, R. rosea and R. crenulata are becoming endangered, making them more economically valuable to collectors and middlemen, and also increasing the risk of adulteration and low quality. Rhodiola products have been subject to adulteration and we recently assessed 39 commercial products for their composition and quality. However, the range of Rhodiola species potentially implicated has not been assessed. Also, the ability of selected analytical techniques in differentiating these species is not known yet. Using a strategy previously developed by our group, we compare the phytochemical differences among Rhodiola raw materials available on the market to provide a practical method for the identification of different Rhodiola species from Europe and Asia and the detection of potential adulterants. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy coupled with multivariate analysis software and high performance thin layer chromatography techniques were used to analyse the samples. Rosavin and rosarin were mainly present in R. rosea but also in Rosea sachalinensis Borris. 30% of the Rhodiola samples purchased from the Chinese market were adulterated by other Rhodiola spp. The utilization of a combined platform based on (1)H-NMR and HPTLC methods resulted in an integrated analysis of different Rhodiola species. We identified adulteration at the earliest stage

  20. Detecting Counterfeit Antimalarial Tablets by Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Counterfeit antimalarial drugs are found in many developing countries, but it is challenging to differentiate between genuine and fakes due to their increasing sophistication. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a powerful tool in pharmaceutical forensics, and we tested this technique for discrim...

  1. Molecular oxygen detection using frequency modulation diode laser spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Liang-Guo; Sachse, Glen

    1990-01-01

    A high-sensitivity spectroscopic measurement of O2 using two-tone frequency modulation spectroscopy with a GaAlAs diode laser is presented. An oxygen sensor based on this technique would be non-intrusive, compact and possess high sensitivity and fast time response.

  2. Observation of halogen species in the Amundsen Gulf, Arctic, by active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pöhler, Denis; Vogel, Leif; Friess, Udo; Platt, Ulrich

    2010-04-13

    In the polar tropospheric boundary layer, reactive halogen species (RHS) are responsible for ozone depletion as well as the oxidation of elemental mercury and dimethyl sulphide. After polar sunrise, air masses enriched in reactive bromine cover areas of several million square kilometers. Still, the source and release mechanisms of halogens are not completely understood. We report measurements of halogen oxides performed in the Amundsen Gulf, Arctic, during spring 2008. Active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) measurements were set up offshore, several kilometers from the coast, directly on the sea ice, which was never done before. High bromine oxide concentrations were detected frequently during sunlight hours with a characteristic daily cycle showing morning and evening maxima and a minimum at noon. The, so far, highest observed average mixing ratio in the polar boundary layer of 41 pmol/mol (equal to pptv) was detected. Only short sea ice contact is required to release high amounts of bromine. An observed linear decrease of maximum bromine oxide levels with ambient temperature during sunlight, between -24 degrees C and -15 degrees C, provides indications on the conditions required for the emission of RHS. In addition, the data indicate the presence of reactive chlorine in the Arctic boundary layer. In contrast to Antarctica, iodine oxide was not detected above a detection limit of 0.3 pmol/mol. PMID:20160121

  3. Observation of halogen species in the Amundsen Gulf, Arctic, by active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pöhler, Denis; Vogel, Leif; Frieß, Udo; Platt, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    In the polar tropospheric boundary layer, reactive halogen species (RHS) are responsible for ozone depletion as well as the oxidation of elemental mercury and dimethyl sulphide. After polar sunrise, air masses enriched in reactive bromine cover areas of several million square kilometers. Still, the source and release mechanisms of halogens are not completely understood. We report measurements of halogen oxides performed in the Amundsen Gulf, Arctic, during spring 2008. Active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) measurements were set up offshore, several kilometers from the coast, directly on the sea ice, which was never done before. High bromine oxide concentrations were detected frequently during sunlight hours with a characteristic daily cycle showing morning and evening maxima and a minimum at noon. The, so far, highest observed average mixing ratio in the polar boundary layer of 41 pmol/mol (equal to pptv) was detected. Only short sea ice contact is required to release high amounts of bromine. An observed linear decrease of maximum bromine oxide levels with ambient temperature during sunlight, between -24 °C and -15 °C, provides indications on the conditions required for the emission of RHS. In addition, the data indicate the presence of reactive chlorine in the Arctic boundary layer. In contrast to Antarctica, iodine oxide was not detected above a detection limit of 0.3 pmol/mol. PMID:20160121

  4. FT-Raman spectroscopy of the Candelaria and Pyxine lichen species: A new molecular structural study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Rafaella F.; Ferreira, Gilson R.; Spielmann, Adriano A.; Edwards, Howell G. M.; de Oliveira, Luiz Fernando C.

    2015-12-01

    In this work the chemistry of the lichens Candelaria fibrosa and Pyxine coccifera have been investigated for the first time using FT-Raman spectroscopy with the help of quantum mechanical DFT calculations to support spectral band assignments. The non-destructive spectral vibrational analysis provided evidence for the presence of pulvinic acid derivatives and conjugated polyenes, which probably belong to a carotenoid with characteristic signatures at ca. 1003, 1158 and 1525 cm-1 assigned respectively to δ(C-CH3), ν(C-C) and ν(Cdbnd C) modes. The identification of features arising from chiodectonic acid in the Pyxine species and calycin and pulvinic dilactone pigments in C. fibrosa were assisted by the quantum mechanical DFT calculations. Raman spectroscopy can provide important spectroscopic data for the identification of the biomarker spectral signatures nondestructively for these lichen pigments without the need for chemical extraction processes.

  5. Detection and Classification of Individual Airborne Microparticles using Laser Ablation Mass Spectroscopy and Multivariate Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gieray, R.A.; Lazar, A.; Parker, E.P.; Ramsey, J. M.; Reilly, P.T.A.; Rosenthal, S.E.; Trahan, M.W.; Wagner, J.S.; Whitten, W.B.

    1999-04-27

    We are developing a method for the real-time analysis of airborne microparticles based on laser ablation mass spectroscopy. Airborne particles enter an ion trap mass spectrometer through a differentially-pumped inlet, are detected by light scattered from two CW laser beams, and sampled by a 10 ns excimer laser pulse at 308 nm as they pass through the center of the ion trap electrodes. After the laser pulse, the stored ions are separated by conventional ion trap methods. In this work thousands of positive and negative ion spectra were collected for eighteen different species: six bacteria, six pollen, and six particulate samples. The data were then averaged and analyzed using the Multivariate Patch Algorithm (MPA), a variant of traditional multivariate anal ysis. The MPA correctly identified all of the positive ion spectra and 17 of the 18 negative ion spectra. In addition, when the average positive and negative spectra were combined the MPA correctly identified all 18 species. Finally, the MPA is also able to identify the components of computer synthesized mixtures of the samples studied

  6. Species determination - Can we detect and quantify meat adulteration?

    PubMed

    Ballin, Nicolai Z; Vogensen, Finn K; Karlsson, Anders H

    2009-10-01

    Proper labelling of meat products is important to help fair-trade, and to enable consumers to make informed choices. However, it has been shown that labelling of species, expressed as weight/weight (w/w), on meat product labels was incorrect in more than 20% of cases. Enforcement of labelling regulations requires reliable analytical methods. Analytical methods are often based on protein or DNA measurements, which are not directly comparable to labelled meat expressed as w/w. This review discusses a wide range of analytical methods with focus on their ability to quantify and their limits of detection (LOD). In particular, problems associated with a correlation from quantitative DNA based results to meat content (w/w) are discussed. The hope is to make researchers aware of the problems of expressing DNA results as meat content (w/w) in order to find better alternatives. One alternative is to express DNA results as genome/genome equivalents. PMID:20416768

  7. Near Infrared Spectroscopy Facilitates Rapid Identification of Both Young and Mature Amazonian Tree Species

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Carla; Costa, Flávia Regina Capellotto; Camargo, José Luís Campana; Durgante, Flávia Machado; Vicentini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Precise identification of plant species requires a high level of knowledge by taxonomists and presence of reproductive material. This represents a major limitation for those working with seedlings and juveniles, which differ morphologically from adults and do not bear reproductive structures. Near-infrared spectroscopy (FT-NIR) has previously been shown to be effective in species discrimination of adult plants, so if young and adults have a similar spectral signature, discriminant functions based on FT-NIR spectra of adults can be used to identify leaves from young plants. We tested this with a sample of 419 plants in 13 Amazonian species from the genera Protium and Crepidospermum (Burseraceae). We obtained 12 spectral readings per plant, from adaxial and abaxial surfaces of dried leaves, and compared the rate of correct predictions of species with discriminant functions for different combinations of readings. We showed that the best models for predicting species in early developmental stages are those containing spectral data from both young and adult plants (98% correct predictions of external samples), but even using only adult spectra it is still possible to attain good levels of identification of young. We obtained an average of 75% correct identifications of young plants by discriminant equations based only on adults, when the most informative wavelengths were selected. Most species were accurately predicted (75–100% correct identifications), and only three had poor predictions (27–60%). These results were obtained despite the fact that spectra of young individuals were distinct from those of adults when species were analyzed individually. We concluded that FT-NIR has a high potential in the identification of species even at different ontogenetic stages, and that young plants can be identified based on spectra of adults with reasonable confidence. PMID:26312996

  8. Detection of bacterial endospores by means of ultrafast coherent Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestov, Dmitry Sergeyevich

    This work is devoted to formulation and development of a laser spectroscopic technique for rapid detection of biohazards, such as Bacillus anthracis spores. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is used as an underlying process for active retrieval of species-specific characteristics of an analyte. Vibrational modes of constituent molecules are Raman-excited by a pair of ultrashort, femtosecond laser pulses, and then probed through inelastic scattering of a third, time-delayed laser field. We first employ the already known time-resolved CARS technique. We apply it to the spectroscopy of easy-to-handle methanol-water mixtures, and then continue building our expertise on solutions of dipicolinic acid (DPA) and its salts, which happen to be marker molecules for bacterial spores. Various acquisition schemes are evaluated, and the preference is given to multi-channel frequency-resolved detection, when the whole CARS spectrum is recorded as a function of the probe pulse delay. We demonstrate a simple detection algorithm that manages to differentiate DPA solution from common interferents. We investigate experimentally the advantages and disadvantages of near-resonant probing of the excited molecular coherence, and finally observe the indicative backscattered CARS signal from DPA and NaDPA powders. The possibility of selective Raman excitation via pulse shaping of the preparation pulses is also demonstrated. The analysis of time-resolved CARS experiments on powders and B. subtilis spores, a harmless surrogate for B. anthracis, facilitates the formulation of a new approach, where we take full advantage of the multi-channel frequency-resolved acquisition and spectrally discriminate the Raman-resonant CARS signal from the background due to other instantaneous four-wave mixing (FWM) processes. Using narrowband probing, we decrease the magnitude of the nonresonant FWM, which is further suppressed by the timing of the laser pulses. The devised technique, referred to as

  9. Modeling species occurrence dynamics with multiple states and imperfect detection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacKenzie, D.I.; Nichols, J.D.; Seamans, M.E.; Gutierrez, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent extensions of occupancy modeling have focused not only on the distribution of species over space, but also on additional state variables (e.g., reproducing or not, with or without disease organisms, relative abundance categories) that provide extra information about occupied sites. These biologist-driven extensions are characterized by ambiguity in both species presence and correct state classification, caused by imperfect detection. We first show the relationships between independently published approaches to the modeling of multistate occupancy. We then extend the pattern-based modeling to the case of sampling over multiple seasons or years in order to estimate state transition probabilities associated with system dynamics. The methodology and its potential for addressing relevant ecological questions are demonstrated using both maximum likelihood (occupancy and successful reproduction dynamics of California Spotted Owl) and Markov chain Monte Carlo estimation approaches (changes in relative abundance of green frogs in Maryland). Just as multistate capture-recapture modeling has revolutionized the study of individual marked animals, we believe that multistate occupancy modeling will dramatically increase our ability to address interesting questions about ecological processes underlying population-level dynamics. ?? 2009 by the Ecological Society of America.

  10. Identification of different species of Bacillus isolated from Nisargruna Biogas Plant by FTIR, UV-Vis and NIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S. B.; Bhattacharya, K.; Nayak, S.; Mukherjee, P.; Salaskar, D.; Kale, S. P.

    2015-09-01

    Definitive identification of microorganisms, including pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria, is extremely important for a wide variety of applications including food safety, environmental studies, bio-terrorism threats, microbial forensics, criminal investigations and above all disease diagnosis. Although extremely powerful techniques such as those based on PCR and microarrays exist, they require sophisticated laboratory facilities along with elaborate sample preparation by trained researchers. Among different spectroscopic techniques, FTIR was used in the 1980s and 90s for bacterial identification. In the present study five species of Bacillus were isolated from the aerobic predigester chamber of Nisargruna Biogas Plant (NBP) and were identified to the species level by biochemical and molecular biological (16S ribosomal DNA sequence) methods. Those organisms were further checked by solid state spectroscopic absorbance measurements using a wide range of electromagnetic radiation (wavelength 200 nm to 25,000 nm) encompassing UV, visible, near Infrared and Infrared regions. UV-Vis and NIR spectroscopy was performed on dried bacterial cell suspension on silicon wafer in specular mode while FTIR was performed on KBr pellets containing the bacterial cells. Consistent and reproducible species specific spectra were obtained and sensitivity up to a level of 1000 cells was observed in FTIR with a DTGS detector. This clearly shows the potential of solid state spectroscopic techniques for simple, easy to implement, reliable and sensitive detection of bacteria from environmental samples.

  11. Detection of liquid hazardous molecules using linearly focused Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Soo Gyeong; Chung, Jin Hyuk

    2013-05-01

    In security, it is an important issue to analyze hazardous materials in sealed bottles. Particularly, prompt nondestructive checking of sealed liquid bottles in a very short time at the checkpoints of crowded malls, stadiums, or airports is of particular importance to prevent probable terrorist attack using liquid explosives. Aiming to design and fabricate a detector for liquid explosives, we have used linearly focused Raman spectroscopy to analyze liquid materials in transparent or semi-transparent bottles without opening their caps. Continuous lasers with 532 nm wavelength and 58 mW/130 mW beam energy have been used for the Raman spectroscopy. Various hazardous materials including flammable liquids and explosive materials have successfully been distinguished and identified within a couple of seconds. We believe that our technique will be one of suitable methods for fast screening of liquid materials in sealed bottles.

  12. Noninvasive detection of gas exchange rate by near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guodong; Mao, Zongzhen; Wang, Bangde

    2008-12-01

    In order to study the relationship among the oxygen concentration in skeletal muscle tissues and the heart rate (HR), oxygen uptake (VO2), respiratory exchange ratio (RER) during incremental running exercises on a treadmill, a near-infrared spectroscopy muscle oxygen monitor system is employed to measure the relative change in muscle oxygenation, with the heart rate, oxygen uptake, production of carbon dioxide (VCO2) and respiratory exchange ratio are recorded synchronously. The results indicate parameters mentioned above present regular changes during the incremental exercise. High correlations are discovered between relative change of oxy-hemoglobin concentration and heart rate, oxygen uptake, respiratory exchange ratio at the significance level (P=0.01). This research might introduce a new measurement technology and/or a novel biological monitoring parameter to the evaluation of physical function status, control the training intensity, estimation of the effectiveness of exercise. Keywords: near-infrared spectroscopy; muscle oxygen concentration; heart rate; oxygen uptake; respiratory exchange ratio.

  13. Detection of drugs of abuse by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    West, Matthew J; Went, Michael J

    2011-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy can provide rapid, sensitive, non-destructive analysis of a variety of drug types (e.g. amphetamines, alkaloids, designer drugs, and date rape drugs). This review concentrates on developments in the past 15 years. It considers identification and quantification of drugs of abuse in different types of forensic evidence, including bulk street drugs as well as traces found in drinks, on fibres/clothing, in fingerprints, on fingernails, on bank notes, and in body fluids. PMID:21960539

  14. Frequency Modulation Spectroscopy Modeling for Remote Chemical Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.

    2000-09-30

    Frequency modulation (FM) spectroscopy techniques show promise for active infrared remote chemical sensing. FM spectroscopy techniques have reduced sensitivity to optical and electronic noise, and are relatively immune to the effects of various electronic and mechanical drifts. FM systems are responsive to sharp spectral features and can therefore reduce the effects of spectral clutter due to interfering chemicals in the plume or in the atmosphere. The relatively high modulation frequencies used for FM also reduces the effects of albedo (reflectance) and plume variations. Conventional differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems are performance limited by the noise induced by speckle. Analysis presented in this report shows that FM based sensors may reduce the effects of speckle by one to two orders of magnitude. This can result in reduced dwell times and faster area searches, as well as reducing various forms of spatial clutter. FM systems will require a laser system that is continuously tunable at relatively high frequencies (0.1 to 20 MHz). One promising candidate is the quantum-cascade (QC) laser [1, 2]. The QC laser is potentially capable of power levels on the order of 1 Watt and frequency tuning on the order of 3 - 6 GHz, which is the performance level required for FM spectroscopy based remote sensing. In this report we describe a high-level numerical model for an FM spectroscopy based remote sensing system, and application to two unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV) scenarios. A Predator scenario operating at a slant range of 6.5 km with a 10 cm diameter telescope, and a Global Hawk scenario operating at a range of 30 km with a 20 cm diameter telescope, has been assumed to allow estimation of the performance of potential FM systems.

  15. Time-resolved spectroscopy of the intrinsic fluorescence of nucleic acid species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Malcolm; Hart, Lucas P.; Ho, Paul S.; Ballini, Jean-Pierre; Vigny, Paul

    1990-05-01

    Polarization and lifetime studies have shown that the fluorescence from nucleic acid species is complex, both at the individual chromophore level and because of the effect of stacking interactions on the electronic states. Recent work aimed at elucidating some aspects of this behavior by decay analysis and time-resolved spectroscopy is surveyed. Experimental work has been carried out using the ACO synchrotron at LURE, France) with time-correlated single photon counting, or a frequency-doubled N2-pumped dye laser, pulse width 700 ps, with fast-gated (100 ps width) analog detection and signal averaging. Decay curves are treated by global analysis using the Marquardt non-linear least-squares algorithm (synchrotron data) or the SPLMOD program (EMBO), which carries out a non-linear leastsquares minimization using cubic splines, for the laser data. Resolution of the decay data gives a model-based estimate of the number of components and their lifetimes. This information is then used to deconvolute timewindowed spectra (time-delayed spectra) into the time-resolved spectra. It is a particular feature of the combination of delayed photon counting with the continuous wavelength distribution of pulsed synchrotron radiation that excitation spectra correlating with emissions of different lifetimes can be obtained by uninterrupted repetitive scanning over a wide range of exciting wavelengths, in the present work from 230 nm to 354 urn. Such time-delayed excitation spectra can also be deconvoluted into components corresponding to the various time-resolved emission spectra. Examples of these three types of information viz resolved lifetimes, time-resolved emission spectra and their excitation spectra are presented and discussed for the following systems. I. adenosine; 6N, 6N-dimethyladenosine; protonated adenosine; this work shows the role of rotamers in the excited state behavior of this chromophore and demonstrates the forbidden nature of the lowest excited state. II. d(AT); d

  16. Coded spectroscopy for ethanol detection in diffuse, fluorescent media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCain, Scott Thomas

    Optical sensing in the visible and near-infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum has many useful applications. One particularly interesting one is the non-invasive analysis of tissue since a high penetration depth is possible. With the use of Raman spectroscopy, a high degree of chemical specificity is available with laser powers that are harmless to living tissue. Such systems, however, are plagued by the low efficiency of the Raman scattering process by molecules and the intense background fluorescence from some biological materials. To address these drawbacks, we have investigated the use of coded spectroscopy to make Raman spectroscopy more feasible in routine use. By coding the input aperture of a dispersive spectrometer, throughput gains of 10-100 are possible over a traditional slit spectrometer. The theory, design, and performance characteristics of this static aperture coding will be discussed in this thesis. In addition, by coding the excitation light sources one can filter out the shifting Raman signals from the stationary fluorescent background. The theory and implementation of an expectation maximization algorithm for Raman signal reconstruction will be analyzed. In addition, the design of a multi-excitation, coded-aperture Raman spectrometer will be described, which uses both of the coding mechanisms described.

  17. Sensing atmospheric reactive species using light emitting diode by incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hongming; Wu, Tao; Wang, Guishi; Zhao, Weixiong; Fertein, Eric; Coeur, Cécile; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong

    2016-05-16

    We overview our recent progress in the developments and applications of light emitting diode-based incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (LED-IBBCEAS) techniques for real-time optical sensing chemically reactive atmospheric species (HONO, NO3, NO2) in intensive campaigns and in atmospheric simulation chamber. New application of optical monitoring of NO3 concentration-time profile for study of the NO3-initiated oxidation process of isoprene in a smog chamber is reported. PMID:27409951

  18. New sensitive agents for detecting singlet oxygen by electron spin resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, T; Sakurai, K; Oi, T; Obara, H; Ohya, H; Kamada, H

    1999-05-01

    Free radicals are well-established transient intermediates in chemical and biological processes. Singlet oxygen, though not a free radical, is also a fairly common reactive chemical species. It is rare that singlet oxygen is studied with the electron spin resonance (ESR) technique in biological systems, because there are few suitable detecting agents. We have recently researched some semiquinone radicals. Specifically, our focus has been on bipyrazole derivatives, which slowly convert to semiquinone radicals in DMSO solution in the presence of potassium tert-butoxide and oxygen. These bipyrazole derivatives are dimers of 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one and have anti-ischemic activities and free radical scavenging properties. In this work, we synthesized a new bipyrazole derivative, 4,4'-bis(1p-carboxyphenyl-3-methyl-5-hydroxyl)-pyrazole, DRD156. The resulting semiquinone radical, formed by reaction with singlet oxygen, was characterized by ESR spectroscopy. DRD156 gave no ESR signals from hydroxyl radical, superoxide, and hydrogen peroxide. DRD156, though, gives an ESR response with hypochlorite. This agent, nevertheless, has a much higher ability to detect singlet oxygen than traditional agents with the ESR technique. PMID:10381208

  19. Monitoring and trace detection of hazardous waste and toxic chemicals using resonance Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J. III; Dougherty, D.R.; Chen, C.L.

    1993-04-01

    Raman scattering is a coherent, inelastic, two-photon process, which shifts the frequency of an outgoing photon according to the vibrational structure of the irradiated species, thereby providing a unique fingerprint of the molecule. When involving an allowed electronic transition (resonance Raman), this scattering cross section can be enhanced by 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 6} and provides the basis for a viable technique that can monitor and detect trace quantities of hazardous wastes and toxic chemicals. Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) possesses many of the ideal characteristics for monitoring and detecting of hazardous waste and toxic chemicals. Some of these traits are: (1) very high selectivity (chemical specific fingerprints); (2) independence from the excitation wavelength (ability to monitor in the solar blind region); (3) chemical mixture fingerprints are the sum of its individual components (no spectral cross-talk); (4) near independence of the Raman fingerprint to its physical state (very similar spectra for gas, liquid, solid and solutions -- either bulk or aerosols); and (5) insensitivity of the Raman signature to environmental conditions (no quenching). Data from a few chemicals will be presented which illustrate these features. In cases where background fluorescence accompanies the Raman signals, an effective frequency modulation technique has been developed, which can completely eliminate this interference.

  20. Monitoring and trace detection of hazardous waste and toxic chemicals using resonance Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J. III; Dougherty, D.R.; Chen, C.L.

    1993-01-01

    Raman scattering is a coherent, inelastic, two-photon process, which shifts the frequency of an outgoing photon according to the vibrational structure of the irradiated species, thereby providing a unique fingerprint of the molecule. When involving an allowed electronic transition (resonance Raman), this scattering cross section can be enhanced by 10[sup 4] to 10[sup 6] and provides the basis for a viable technique that can monitor and detect trace quantities of hazardous wastes and toxic chemicals. Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) possesses many of the ideal characteristics for monitoring and detecting of hazardous waste and toxic chemicals. Some of these traits are: (1) very high selectivity (chemical specific fingerprints); (2) independence from the excitation wavelength (ability to monitor in the solar blind region); (3) chemical mixture fingerprints are the sum of its individual components (no spectral cross-talk); (4) near independence of the Raman fingerprint to its physical state (very similar spectra for gas, liquid, solid and solutions -- either bulk or aerosols); and (5) insensitivity of the Raman signature to environmental conditions (no quenching). Data from a few chemicals will be presented which illustrate these features. In cases where background fluorescence accompanies the Raman signals, an effective frequency modulation technique has been developed, which can completely eliminate this interference.

  1. Early detection and differentiation of venous and arterial occlusion in skin flaps using visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and autofluorescence spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Caigang; Chen, Shuo; Chui, Christopher Hoe-Kong; Tan, Bien-Keem; Liu, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Our previous preclinical study demonstrated that both visible diffuse reflectance and autofluorescence spectroscopy, each of which yields a different set of physiological information, can predict skin flap viability with high accuracy in a MacFarlane rat dorsal skin flap model. In this report, we further evaluated our technique for the early detection and differentiation of venous occlusion and arterial occlusion in a rat groin flap model. We performed both diffuse reflectance and autofluorescence measurements on the skin flap model and statistically differentiated between flaps with and without occlusions as well as between flaps with venous occlusion and those with arterial occlusion based on these non-invasive optical measurements. Our preliminary results suggested that visible diffuse reflectance and autofluorescence spectroscopy can be potentially used clinically to detect both venous and arterial occlusion and differentiate one from the other accurately at an early time point. PMID:26977363

  2. Early detection and differentiation of venous and arterial occlusion in skin flaps using visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and autofluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Caigang; Chen, Shuo; Chui, Christopher Hoe-Kong; Tan, Bien-Keem; Liu, Quan

    2016-02-01

    Our previous preclinical study demonstrated that both visible diffuse reflectance and autofluorescence spectroscopy, each of which yields a different set of physiological information, can predict skin flap viability with high accuracy in a MacFarlane rat dorsal skin flap model. In this report, we further evaluated our technique for the early detection and differentiation of venous occlusion and arterial occlusion in a rat groin flap model. We performed both diffuse reflectance and autofluorescence measurements on the skin flap model and statistically differentiated between flaps with and without occlusions as well as between flaps with venous occlusion and those with arterial occlusion based on these non-invasive optical measurements. Our preliminary results suggested that visible diffuse reflectance and autofluorescence spectroscopy can be potentially used clinically to detect both venous and arterial occlusion and differentiate one from the other accurately at an early time point. PMID:26977363

  3. Detection of atmospheric trace gas species by DOAS gas-analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiko, Pavel P.; Smirnov, Sergey S.; Samokhvalov, Ignatii V.

    2014-11-01

    A differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) gas-analyzer was successfully tested. A high pressure 150-W Xe arc lamp was employed as a light source This system consisted of a coaxial telescope, a spectrometer, an analyzer and retroreflector. In order to record the spectra, a monochrometer with a grating and photodiode array was adopted. Gas analyzer spectral data bank includes more than 30 moleculas absorbed in UV spectral region. The measured absorption spectra were evaluated by using a least-squares fit to determine the average mixing ratio of each species in the atmosphere. A number of air pollutants concentrations: SO2, NO2, O3, etc were trace measured. Minimally detected concentration on pathlength 400 m is the unit of ppb at the time of accumulation of 2 min. The results of the field test measurements of pollutants in Tomsk are presented.

  4. Detection and differentiation of bacterial spores in a mineral matrix by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and chemometrical data treatment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) has been used as analytical tool in chemistry for many years. In addition, FTIR can also be applied as a rapid and non-invasive method to detect and identify microorganisms. The specific and fingerprint-like spectra allow - under optimal conditions - discrimination down to the species level. The aim of this study was to develop a fast and reproducible non-molecular method to differentiate pure samples of Bacillus spores originating from different species as well as to identify spores in a simple matrix, such as the clay mineral, bentonite. Results We investigated spores from pure cultures of seven different Bacillus species by FTIR in reflection or transmission mode followed by chemometrical data treatment. All species investigated (B. atrophaeus, B. brevis, B. circulans, B. lentus, B. megaterium, B. subtilis, B. thuringiensis) are typical aerobic soil-borne spore formers. Additionally, a solid matrix (bentonite) and mixtures of benonite with spores of B. megaterium at various wt/wt ratios were included in the study. Both hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis of the spectra along with multidimensional scaling allowed the discrimination of different species and spore-matrix-mixtures. Conclusions Our results show that FTIR spectroscopy is a fast method for species-level discrimination of Bacillus spores. Spores were still detectable in the presence of the clay mineral bentonite. Even a tenfold excess of bentonite (corresponding to 2.1 × 1010 colony forming units per gram of mineral matrix) still resulted in an unambiguous identification of B. megaterium spores. PMID:21756333

  5. A near-infrared spectroscopy routine for unambiguous identification of cryptic ant species

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Herbert C.; Peskoller, Andrea; Moder, Karl; Dowell, Floyd E.; Arthofer, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Species identification—of importance for most biological disciplines—is not always straightforward as cryptic species hamper traditional identification. Fibre-optic near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a rapid and inexpensive method of use in various applications, including the identification of species. Despite its efficiency, NIRS has never been tested on a group of more than two cryptic species, and a working routine is still missing. Hence, we tested if the four morphologically highly similar, but genetically distinct ant species Tetramorium alpestre, T. caespitum, T. impurum, and T. sp. B, all four co-occurring above 1,300 m above sea level in the Alps, can be identified unambiguously using NIRS. Furthermore, we evaluated which of our implementations of the three analysis approaches, partial least squares regression (PLS), artificial neural networks (ANN), and random forests (RF), is most efficient in species identification with our data set. We opted for a 100% classification certainty, i.e., a residual risk of misidentification of zero within the available data, at the cost of excluding specimens from identification. Additionally, we examined which strategy among our implementations, one-vs-all, i.e., one species compared with the pooled set of the remaining species, or binary-decision strategies, worked best with our data to reduce a multi-class system to a two-class system, as is necessary for PLS. Our NIRS identification routine, based on a 100% identification certainty, was successful with up to 66.7% of unambiguously identified specimens of a species. In detail, PLS scored best over all species (36.7% of specimens), while RF was much less effective (10.0%) and ANN failed completely (0.0%) with our data and our implementations of the analyses. Moreover, we showed that the one-vs-all strategy is the only acceptable option to reduce multi-class systems because of a minimum expenditure of time. We emphasise our classification routine using fibre

  6. A near-infrared spectroscopy routine for unambiguous identification of cryptic ant species.

    PubMed

    Kinzner, Martin-Carl; Wagner, Herbert C; Peskoller, Andrea; Moder, Karl; Dowell, Floyd E; Arthofer, Wolfgang; Schlick-Steiner, Birgit C; Steiner, Florian M

    2015-01-01

    Species identification-of importance for most biological disciplines-is not always straightforward as cryptic species hamper traditional identification. Fibre-optic near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a rapid and inexpensive method of use in various applications, including the identification of species. Despite its efficiency, NIRS has never been tested on a group of more than two cryptic species, and a working routine is still missing. Hence, we tested if the four morphologically highly similar, but genetically distinct ant species Tetramorium alpestre, T. caespitum, T. impurum, and T. sp. B, all four co-occurring above 1,300 m above sea level in the Alps, can be identified unambiguously using NIRS. Furthermore, we evaluated which of our implementations of the three analysis approaches, partial least squares regression (PLS), artificial neural networks (ANN), and random forests (RF), is most efficient in species identification with our data set. We opted for a 100% classification certainty, i.e., a residual risk of misidentification of zero within the available data, at the cost of excluding specimens from identification. Additionally, we examined which strategy among our implementations, one-vs-all, i.e., one species compared with the pooled set of the remaining species, or binary-decision strategies, worked best with our data to reduce a multi-class system to a two-class system, as is necessary for PLS. Our NIRS identification routine, based on a 100% identification certainty, was successful with up to 66.7% of unambiguously identified specimens of a species. In detail, PLS scored best over all species (36.7% of specimens), while RF was much less effective (10.0%) and ANN failed completely (0.0%) with our data and our implementations of the analyses. Moreover, we showed that the one-vs-all strategy is the only acceptable option to reduce multi-class systems because of a minimum expenditure of time. We emphasise our classification routine using fibre-optic NIRS

  7. Species profiles in solid propellant flames using absorption and emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderhoff, J.A. )

    1991-03-01

    A windowed strand burner with a propellant feed mechanism has been used to characterize the steady-state burning of two composite propellants, M-30 and HMXI, at moderate pressure. Both emission and absorption spectroscopy have yielded profile data on three important combustion species: OH, NH, and CN. Relative appearances of these three species are inferred from emission intensity profiles, and absolute concentration profiles are calculated from the absorption data. This is the first absolute determination of these combustion intermediates in a propellant flame. The concentration measurements for OH indicate that the propellant flame temperatures are about 200 and 100 K below adiabatic for M-30 and HMXI, respectively. A maximum value of 43 ppm NH is found for the M-30 propellant flame. Fluctuations in the flame front of HMXI compromised the determination of maximum concentrations for NH and CN.

  8. Application of resonance Raman spectroscopy as a nuclear proliferation detection technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J. III; Chen, C.L.; Dougherty, D.R.

    1993-03-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) potentially possesses many of the characteristics of an ideal verification technology. Some of these ideal traits are: very high selectivity and specificity to allow the deconvolution of a mixture of the chemicals of interest, high sensitivity in order to measure a species at trace levels, high reliability and long-term durability, applicability to a wide range of chemicals capability for sensing in a variety of environmental conditions, independence of the physical state of the chemical capability for quantitative analysis, and finally, but no less important capability for full signal development within seconds. In this presentation, the potential of RRS as a detection/identification technology for chemicals pertinent to nuclear materials production and processing will be assessed. A review of the basic principles behind this technique, both theoretical and experimental, will be discussed along with some recent results obtained in this laboratory. Raman scattering is a coherent, inelastic, two-photon scattering process where an exciting photon of energy hv promotes a molecule to a virtual level and the subsequently emitted photon is shifted in frequency in accordance with the rotational-vibrational structure of the irradiated species, therefore providing a unique fingerprint of the molecule. The enhancement of a Raman signal occurs when the excitation frequency is isoenergetic with an allowed electronic transition. Under resonance conditions, scattering cross-sections have been enhanced up to 6 orders of magnitude, thereby allowing the measurement of resonance Raman spectra from concentrations as dilute as 20 ppb for PAHs (with the potential of pptr). In detection/verification programs, this condition translates to increased sensitivity (ppm/ppb) and increased probing distance (m/km).

  9. Application of resonance Raman spectroscopy as a nuclear proliferation detection technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J. III; Chen, C.L.; Dougherty, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) potentially possesses many of the characteristics of an ideal verification technology. Some of these ideal traits are: very high selectivity and specificity to allow the deconvolution of a mixture of the chemicals of interest, high sensitivity in order to measure a species at trace levels, high reliability and long-term durability, applicability to a wide range of chemicals capability for sensing in a variety of environmental conditions, independence of the physical state of the chemical capability for quantitative analysis, and finally, but no less important capability for full signal development within seconds. In this presentation, the potential of RRS as a detection/identification technology for chemicals pertinent to nuclear materials production and processing will be assessed. A review of the basic principles behind this technique, both theoretical and experimental, will be discussed along with some recent results obtained in this laboratory. Raman scattering is a coherent, inelastic, two-photon scattering process where an exciting photon of energy hv promotes a molecule to a virtual level and the subsequently emitted photon is shifted in frequency in accordance with the rotational-vibrational structure of the irradiated species, therefore providing a unique fingerprint of the molecule. The enhancement of a Raman signal occurs when the excitation frequency is isoenergetic with an allowed electronic transition. Under resonance conditions, scattering cross-sections have been enhanced up to 6 orders of magnitude, thereby allowing the measurement of resonance Raman spectra from concentrations as dilute as 20 ppb for PAHs (with the potential of pptr). In detection/verification programs, this condition translates to increased sensitivity (ppm/ppb) and increased probing distance (m/km).

  10. [Quantitative Detection of Chinese Cabbage Clubroot Based on FTIR Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-ping; Chai, A-li; Shi, Yan-xia; Xie, Xue-wen; Li, Bao-ju

    2015-05-01

    Clubroot, caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae, is considered the most devastating soilborne disease in Brassica crops. It has emerged as a serious disease threatening the cruciferous crop production industry in China. Nowadays, the detection techniques for P. brassicae are laborious, time-consuming and low sensitivity. Rapid and effective detection methods are needed. The objective of this study is to develop a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) technique for detection of P. brassicae effectively and accurately. FTIR and Real-time PCR techniques were applied in quantitative detection of P. brassicae. Chinese cabbages were inoculated with P. brassicae. By analyzing the FTIR spectra of P. brassicae, infected clubroots and healthy roots, three specific bands 1 105, 1 145 and 1 228 cm-1 were selected. According to the correlation between the peak areas at these sensitive bands and Real-time PCR Ct value, quantitative evaluation model of P. brassicae was established based on FTIR y=34. 17 +12. 24x - 9. 81x2 - 6. 05x3, r=0. 98 (p<0. 05). To validate accuracy of the model, 10 clubroot samples were selected randomly from field, and detected by FTIR spectrum model, the results showed that the average error is 1. 60%. This demonstrated that the FTIR technology is an available one for the quantitative detection of P. brassicae in clubroot, and it provides a new method for quantitative and quickly detection of Chinese cabbage clubroot. PMID:26415436

  11. Detection of monofluoroacetate in Palicourea and Amorimia species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous plant species worldwide including Palicourea marcgravii and Tanaecium bilabiatum in Brazil cause sudden death and are known to contain monofluoroacetate (MFA). Other species in Brazil including some species traditionally assigned to Mascagnia but now properly called Amorimia species and ot...

  12. Poly(dimethylsiloxane) microlens array integrated with microfluidic channel for fluorescence spectroscopy detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rujihan, Suparat; Damrongsak, Badin; Kittidachachan, Pattareeya

    2013-06-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy detection has been commonly used in chemical and biochemical applications as it provides a good reliability and high sensitivity. Commercially available fluorescence spectroscopy system is typically bulky and expensive, hence making it inconvenience for on-site measurement which requires portable systems. However, the drawback of small devices is that it has a low detection volume, resulting in low fluorescence signal. In this paper, we report a microfluidic channel implemented with a microlens array for enhancing the performance of fluorescence spectroscopy detection. The microlens array was used to focus an excitation light onto the microchannel, thus expecting the increase in fluorescence detection signal. Both microchannels and microlens arrays were individually fabricated from poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using low-cost printed-circuit-board master molds. The fabrication and characterization of PDMS-based microlens arrays are discussed. In short, the microlens in plano-convex shape was designed with diameters of 700, 800 and 900 microns. The fabricated microlens arrays were characterized for radius of curvatures, SAGs and focal lengths. The plano-convex microlens array was then integrated into a microfluidic system in order to investigate the overall performance of fluorescence spectroscopy detection. Experiments were conducted with two fluorescence dyes, i.e. Rhodamine 6G and Coumarin 153. The preliminary results revealed that the PDMS microlens array implemented on the designed system shows potential for improving excitation and emission light intensity and, as a consequence, signal to background ratio of the fluorescence spectroscopy detection.

  13. A NIR spectroscopy-based efficient approach to detect fraudulent additions within mixtures of dried porcini mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Casale, Monica; Bagnasco, Lucia; Zotti, Mirca; Di Piazza, Simone; Sitta, Nicola; Oliveri, Paolo

    2016-11-01

    Boletus edulis and allied species (BEAS), known as "porcini mushrooms", represent almost the totality of wild mushrooms placed on the Italian market, both fresh and dehydrated. Furthermore, considerable amounts of these dried fungi are imported from China. The presence of Tylopilus spp. and other extraneous species (i.e., species edible but not belonging to BEAS) within dried porcini mushrooms - mainly from those imported from China and sold in Italy - may represent an evaluable problem from a commercial point of view. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) as a rapid and effective alternative to classical methods for identifying extraneous species within dried porcini batches and detecting related commercial frauds. To this goal, 80 dried fungi including BEAS, Tylopilus spp., and Boletus violaceofuscus were analysed by NIRS. For each sample, 3 different parts of the pileus (pileipellis, flesh and hymenium) were analysed and a low-level strategy for data fusion, consisting of combining the signals obtained by the different parts before data processing, was applied. Then, NIR spectra were used to develop reliable and efficient class-models using a novel method, partial least squares density modelling (PLS-DM), and the two most commonly used class-modelling techniques, UNEQ and SIMCA. The results showed that NIR spectroscopy coupled with chemometric class-modelling technique can be suggested as an effective analytical strategy to check the authenticity of dried BEAS mushrooms. PMID:27591669

  14. Apparatus and method for noninvasive particle detection using doppler spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2016-05-31

    An apparatus and method for noninvasively detecting the presence of solid particulate matter suspended in a fluid flowing through a pipe or an oil and gas wellbore are described. Fluid flowing through a conduit containing the particulate solids is exposed to a fixed frequency (>1 MHz) of ultrasonic vibrations from a transducer attached to the outside of the pipe. The returning Doppler frequency shifted signal derived from the scattering of sound from the moving solid particles is detected by an adjacent transducer. The transmitted signal and the Doppler signal are combined to provide sensitive particulate detection. The magnitude of the signal and the Doppler frequency shift are used to determine the particle size distribution and the velocity of the particles. Measurement of the phase shift between the applied frequency and the detected Doppler shifted may be used to determine the direction of motion of the particles.

  15. Shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy at multiple wavelengths for in-situ meat species differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowoidnich, Kay; Kronfeldt, Heinz-Detlef

    2012-09-01

    Two miniaturized Raman measurement heads containing microsystem diode lasers emitting at 783 and 671 nm suitable for shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) were applied for the non-invasive in situ differentiation of selected meat species. This allows using the fingerprint characteristics of Raman spectra without a disturbing fluorescence background. At 783 nm, two emission lines with a spectral shift of 0.5 nm (7 cm-1) and optical powers of up to 110 mW were realized. For 671 nm excitation, the spectral shift amounts to 0.6 nm (12 cm-1) and optical powers of up to 40 mW were obtained. In both cases, meat Raman spectra could be recorded with integration times of 10 s. The investigations were carried out using selected cuts from the most commonly consumed meat species in the US and Europe, i.e. beef, pork, chicken, and turkey. A principal components analysis of the SERDS spectra revealed a clear separation of the meat species into four distinct groups for both excitation wavelengths. This classification is based on the myoglobin content and gradual differences of protein Raman band intensities and positions. The results demonstrate the potential of SERDS as rapid and non-destructive screening method for the discrimination of selected meat species.

  16. A parameter selection for Raman spectroscopy-based detection of chemical contaminants in food powders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raman spectroscopy technique has proven to be a reliable method for detection of chemical contaminants in food ingredients and products. To detect each contaminant particle in a food sample, it is important to determine the effective depth of penetration of laser through the food sample and the corr...

  17. Coherence specific signal detection via chiral pump-probe spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Holdaway, David I H; Collini, Elisabetta; Olaya-Castro, Alexandra

    2016-05-21

    We examine transient circular dichroism (TRCD) spectroscopy as a technique to investigate signatures of exciton coherence dynamics under the influence of structured vibrational environments. We consider a pump-probe configuration with a linearly polarized pump and a circularly polarized probe, with a variable angle θ between the two directions of propagation. In our theoretical formalism the signal is decomposed in chiral and achiral doorway and window functions. Using this formalism, we show that the chiral doorway component, which beats during the population time, can be isolated by comparing signals with different values of θ. As in the majority of time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy, the overall TRCD response shows signatures of both excited and ground state dynamics. However, we demonstrate that the chiral doorway function has only a weak ground state contribution, which can generally be neglected if an impulsive pump pulse is used. These findings suggest that the pump-probe configuration of optical TRCD in the impulsive limit has the potential to unambiguously probe quantum coherence beating in the excited state. We present numerical results for theoretical signals in an example dimer system. PMID:27208941

  18. Impedance spectroscopy for the detection and identification of unknown toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggs, B. C.; Plopper, G. E.; Paluh, J. L.; Phamduy, T. B.; Corr, D. T.; Chrisey, D. B.

    2012-06-01

    Advancements in biological and chemical warfare has allowed for the creation of novel toxins necessitating a universal, real-time sensor. We have used a function-based biosensor employing impedance spectroscopy using a low current density AC signal over a range of frequencies (62.5 Hz-64 kHz) to measure the electrical impedance of a confluent epithelial cell monolayer at 120 sec intervals. Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells were grown to confluence on thin film interdigitated gold electrodes. A stable impedance measurement of 2200 Ω was found after 24 hrs of growth. After exposure to cytotoxins anthrax lethal toxin and etoposide, the impedance decreased in a linear fashion resulting in a 50% drop in impedance over 50hrs showing significant difference from the control sample (~20% decrease). Immunofluorescent imaging showed that apoptosis was induced through the addition of toxins. Similarities of the impedance signal shows that the mechanism of cellular death was the same between ALT and etoposide. A revised equivalent circuit model was employed in order to quantify morphological changes in the cell monolayer such as tight junction integrity and cell surface area coverage. This model showed a faster response to cytotoxin (2 hrs) compared to raw measurements (20 hrs). We demonstrate that herein that impedance spectroscopy of epithelial monolayers serves as a real-time non-destructive sensor for unknown pathogens.

  19. Detection of hazardous chemicals using field-portable Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Cherylyn W.; Harvey, Scott D.; Wright, Bob W.

    2003-07-01

    A major challenge confronting emergency response, border control, and other security-related functions is the accurate, rapid, and safe identification of potentially hazardous chemicals outside a laboratory environment. Raman spectroscopy is a rapid, non-intrusive technique that can be used to confidently identify many classes of hazardous and potentially explosive compounds based on molecular vibration information. Advances in instrumentation now allow reliable field - portable measurements to be made. Before the Raman technique can be effectively applied and be accepted within the scientific community, realistic studies must be performed to develop methods, define limitations, and rigorously evaluate its effectiveness. Examples of a variety of chemicals (including neat and diluted chemical warfare [CW] agents, a CW agent precursor, a biological warfare (BW)-related compound, an illicit drug, and explosives) identified using Raman spectroscopy in various types of containers and on surfaces are given, as well as results from a blind field test of 29 unknown samples which included CW agent precursors and/or degradation products, solvents associated with CW agent production, pesticides, explosives, and BW toxins (mostly mycotoxins). Additionally, results of experimental studies to evaluate the analysis of flammable organic solvents, propellants, military explosives, mixtures containing military explosives, shock-sensitive explosives, and gun powders are described with safety guidelines. Spectral masks for screening unknown samples for explosives and nerve agents are given.

  20. Detection of Molecular Oxygen at Low Concentrations Using Quartz Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pohlkötter, Andreas; Köhring, Michael; Willer, Ulrike; Schade, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Molecular oxygen is detected at low concentrations using photoacoustic spectroscopy despite its unfavorable photoacoustic properties. The system consists of a seed laser diode, a tapered amplifier and a quartz tuning fork based spectrophone, thus employing quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS). With this system a detection limit of 13 ppm is reached with a compact and long term stable setup. Further improvement of the detection limit is possible by adding suitable gases to the sample gas that promote the radiationless de-excitation of the oxygen molecules. PMID:22163666

  1. Detection of molecular oxygen at low concentrations using quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pohlkötter, Andreas; Köhring, Michael; Willer, Ulrike; Schade, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Molecular oxygen is detected at low concentrations using photoacoustic spectroscopy despite its unfavorable photoacoustic properties. The system consists of a seed laser diode, a tapered amplifier and a quartz tuning fork based spectrophone, thus employing quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS). With this system a detection limit of 13 ppm is reached with a compact and long term stable setup. Further improvement of the detection limit is possible by adding suitable gases to the sample gas that promote the radiationless de-excitation of the oxygen molecules. PMID:22163666

  2. Linearity of Air-Biased Coherent Detection for Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianwu; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Wrisberg, Emil Astrup; Denning, Emil Vosmar; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2016-06-01

    The performance of air-biased coherent detection (ABCD) in a broadband two-color laser-induced air plasma system for terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) has been investigated. Fundamental parameters of the ABCD detection, including signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), dynamic range (DR), and linearity of detection have been characterized. Moreover, the performance of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and an avalanche photodiode (APD) as photodetector in the ABCD have been compared. We have observed nonlinear behavior of PMT detector, which leads to artificial gain factor in TDS spectroscopy. The APD turns out to have superior linearity and three times higher dynamic compared to the PMT.

  3. Detection of trace concentrations of helium and argon in gas mixtures by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNaghten, E. D.; Parkes, A. M.; Griffiths, B. C.; Whitehouse, A. I.; Palanco, S.

    2009-10-01

    We report what we believe to be the first demonstration of the detection of trace quantities of helium and argon in binary and ternary gas mixtures with nitrogen by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Although significant quenching of helium transitions due to collisional deactivation of excited species was observed, it was found that losses in analytical sensitivity could be minimized by increasing the laser irradiance and decreasing the pressure at which the analyses were performed. In consequence, limits of detection of parts-per-million and tens of parts-per-million and linear dynamic ranges of several orders of magnitude in analyte concentration were obtained. The results of this study suggest that LIBS may have potential applications in the detection of other noble gases at trace concentrations.

  4. Selective Detection of Crystalline Cellulose in Plant Cell Walls with Sum-Frequency-Generation (SFG) Vibration Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnette, Anna L.; Bradley, Laura C.; Veres, Brandon D.; Schreiner, Edward P.; Park, Yong Bum; Park, Junyeong; Park, Sunkyu; Kim, Seong H.

    2011-07-11

    The selective detection of crystalline cellulose in biomass was demonstrated with sum-frequency-generation (SFG) vibration spectroscopy. SFG is a second-order nonlinear optical response from a system where the optical centrosymmetry is broken. In secondary plant cell walls that contain mostly cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin with varying concentrations, only certain vibration modes in the crystalline cellulose structure can meet the noninversion symmetry requirements. Thus, SFG can be used to detect and analyze crystalline cellulose selectively in lignocellulosic biomass without extraction of noncellulosic species from biomass or deconvolution of amorphous spectra. The selective detection of crystalline cellulose in lignocellulosic biomass is not readily achievable with other techniques such as XRD, solid-state NMR, IR, and Raman analyses. Therefore, the SFG analysis presents a unique opportunity to reveal the cellulose crystalline structure in lignocellulosic biomass.

  5. Evaluating RNAlater® as a preservative for using near-infrared spectroscopy to predict Anopheles gambiae age and species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mosquito age and species identification is a crucial determinant of the efficacy of vector control programs. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has previously been applied successfully to rapidly, non-destructively, and simultaneously determine the age and species of freshly anesthetized African mala...

  6. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy detection of heavy metal in water based on graphite conch method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunlong; Liu, Jianguo; Zhao, Nanjing; Shi, Huan; Liu, Lituo; Ma, Mingjun; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Dong; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Yujun; Liu, Wenqing

    2012-10-01

    The laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy emission characteristics of trace heavy metal lead in water is studied based on graphite conch method, with a 1064nm wavelength Nd: YAG laser as excitation source, the echelle spectrometer and ICCD detector are used for spectral separation and high sensitive detection with high resolution and wide spectral range. The delay time 900ns and gate time 1600ns are determined in the experiment. The calibration curve of Pb is plotted based on the different concentration measurement results, and a limit of detection of 0.0138mg / L is obtained for Pb in water. Graphite conch method effectively overcomes the current problems on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy detection of heavy metal in water. The detection limits and stability are improved. The reference data is provided for further study on the fast measurement of trace heavy metals in water by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique.

  7. Feasibility Study of Using Short Wave Infrared Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (SWIR-CRDS) for Biological Agent Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Aker, Pam M.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Williams, Richard M.; Valentine, Nancy B.

    2007-10-01

    This project focused on determining the feasibility of using short wave infrared (SWIR) cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) as a means for real-time detection of biological aerosols. The first part of the project involved identifying biological agent signatures that could be detected with SWIR CRDS. After an exhaustive search of the open literature it was determined that whole biological spores and/or cells would not be good candidates for direct SWIR CRDS probing because they have no unique SWIR signatures. It was postulated that while whole cells or spores are not good candidates for SWIR CRDS detection, their pyrolysis break-down products might be. A literature search was then conducted to find biological pyrolysis products with low molecular weights and high symmetry since these species most likely would have overtone and combination vibrational bands that can be detected in the SWIR. It was determined that pyrrole, pyridine and picolinamide were good candidates for evaluation. These molecules are formed when proteins and porphyrins, proteins and dipicolinic acid, and dipicolinic acid are pyrolyzed, respectively. The second part of the project involved measuring quantitative SWIR spectra of pyrrole, pyridine and picolinamide in PNNL’s FTIR Spectroscopy Laboratory. Spectral information about these molecules, in the vapor phase is sparse – there were only a few prior studies that measured line positions and no information on absorption cross sections. Absorption cross sections are needed in order to estimate the SWIR CRDS detection sensitivity, and line position determines what type of laser will be needed for the sensor. The results of the spectroscopy studies allowed us to estimate the SWIR CRDS detection sensitivity for pyrrole to be 3 x 1012 molec cm-3 or 0.1 ppmv, and for pyridine it was 1.5 x 1015 molec cm-3 or 0.6 ppmv. These detection sensitivity limits are close what we have measured for ammonia. Given these detection limits we then estimated the

  8. Broadband cavity ringdown spectroscopy for sensitive and rapid molecular detection.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Michael J; Moll, Kevin D; Jones, R Jason; Safdi, Benjamin; Ye, Jun

    2006-03-17

    We demonstrate highly efficient cavity ringdown spectroscopy in which a broad-bandwidth optical frequency comb is coherently coupled to a high-finesse optical cavity that acts as the sample chamber. 125,000 optical comb components, each coupled into a specific longitudinal cavity mode, undergo ringdown decays when the cavity input is shut off. Sensitive intracavity absorption information is simultaneously available across 100 nanometers in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. Real-time, quantitative measurements were made of the trace presence, the transition strengths and linewidths, and the population redistributions due to collisions and the temperature changes for molecules such as C2H2, O2, H2O, and NH3. PMID:16543457

  9. Modelling community dynamics based on species-level abundance models from detection/nondetection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yamaura, Yuichi; Royle, J. Andrew; Kuboi, Kouji; Tada, Tsuneo; Ikeno, Susumu; Makino, Shun'ichi

    2011-01-01

    1. In large-scale field surveys, a binary recording of each species' detection or nondetection has been increasingly adopted for its simplicity and low cost. Because of the importance of abundance in many studies, it is desirable to obtain inferences about abundance at species-, functional group-, and community-levels from such binary data. 2. We developed a novel hierarchical multi-species abundance model based on species-level detection/nondetection data. The model accounts for the existence of undetected species, and variability in abundance and detectability among species. Species-level detection/nondetection is linked to species- level abundance via a detection model that accommodates the expectation that probability of detection (at least one individuals is detected) increases with local abundance of the species. We applied this model to a 9-year dataset composed of the detection/nondetection of forest birds, at a single post-fire site (from 7 to 15 years after fire) in a montane area of central Japan. The model allocated undetected species into one of the predefined functional groups by assuming a prior distribution on individual group membership. 3. The results suggest that 15–20 species were missed in each year, and that species richness of communities and functional groups did not change with post-fire forest succession. Overall abundance of birds and abundance of functional groups tended to increase over time, although only in the winter, while decreases in detectabilities were observed in several species. 4. Synthesis and applications. Understanding and prediction of large-scale biodiversity dynamics partly hinge on how we can use data effectively. Our hierarchical model for detection/nondetection data estimates abundance in space/time at species-, functional group-, and community-levels while accounting for undetected individuals and species. It also permits comparison of multiple communities by many types of abundance-based diversity and similarity

  10. Study of radicals, clusters and transition state species by anion photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, D.W.

    1994-08-01

    Free radicals, elemental and van der Waals clusters and transition state species for bimolecular chemical reactions are investigated using anion photoelectron spectroscopy. Several low-lying electronic states of ozone have been identified via photoelectron spectroscopy of O{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. A characterization of these states is important to models for atmospheric ozone reaction kinetics. The fluoroformyloxyl radical, FCO{sub 2}, has been investigated, providing vibrational frequencies and energies for two electronic states. The technique has also been employed to make the first direct observation and characterization of the NNO{sub 2} molecule. Several electronic states are observed for this species which is believed to play a role as a reactive intermediate in the N + NO{sub 2} reaction. The experimental results for all three of these radicals are supplemented by ab initio investigations of their molecular properties. The clusters investigations include studies of elemental carbon clusters (C{sub 2}{sup {minus}} {minus} C{sub 11}{sup {minus}}), and van der Waals clusters (X{sup {minus}}(CO{sub 2}){sub n}, X = I, Br, Cl; n {le} 13 and I{sup {minus}} (N{sub 2}O){sub n=1--11}). Primarily linear clusters are observed for the smaller carbon clusters, while the spectra of the larger clusters contain contribution from cyclic anion photodetachment. Very interesting ion-solvent interactions are observed in the X{sup {minus}}(CO{sub 2})n clusters. The transition state regions for several bimolecular chemical reactions have also been investigated by photodetachment of a negative ion precursor possessing a geometry similar to that of the transition state species. These spectra show features which are assigned to motions of the unstable neutral complex existing between reactants and products.

  11. Remote tree species identification in a diverse tropical forest using airborne imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldeck, C.; Asner, G. P.; Kellner, J. R.; Martin, R.; Anderson, C.; Knapp, D. E.

    2013-12-01

    Plant species identification and mapping based on remotely-sensed spectral signatures is a challenging task with the potential to contribute enormously to ecological studies. This task is especially difficult in highly diverse ecosystems such as tropical forests, and for these ecosystems it may be more strategic to direct efforts to identifying crowns of a focal species. We used imaging spectrometer data collected by the Carnegie Airborne Observatory over Barro Colorado Island, Panama, to develop classification models for the identification of tree crowns belonging to selected focal species. We explored alternative methods for detecting crowns of focal species, which included binary, one-class, and biased support vector machines (SVM). Best performance was given by binary and biased SVM, with poor performance observed for one-class SVM. Binary and biased SVM were able to identify crowns of focal species with classification sensitivity and specificity of 87-91% and 89-94%, respectively. The main tradeoff between binary and biased SVM is that construction of binary SVM requires a far greater amount of training data while biased SVM is more difficult to parameterize. Our results show that with sufficient training data, focal species can be mapped with a high degree of accuracy, in terms of both sensitivity and specificity, in this diverse tropical forest.

  12. Effective localized collection and identification of airborne species through electrodynamic precipitation and SERS-based detection

    PubMed Central

    Lin, En-Chiang; Fang, Jun; Park, Se-Chul; Johnson, Forrest W.; Jacobs, Heiko O.

    2013-01-01

    Various nanostructured sensor designs currently aim to achieve or claim single molecular detection by a reduction of the active sensor size. However, a reduction of the sensor size has the negative effect of reducing the capture probability considering the diffusion-based analyte transport commonly used. Here we introduce and apply a localized programmable electrodynamic precipitation concept as an alternative to diffusion. The process provides higher collection rates of airborne species and detection at lower concentration. As an example, we compare an identical nanostructured surfaced-enhanced Raman spectroscopy sensor with and without localized delivery and find that the sensitivity and detection time is improved by at least two orders of magnitudes. Localized collection in an active-matrix array-like fashion is also tested, yielding hybrid molecular arrays on a single chip over a broad range of molecular weights, including small benzenethiol (110.18 Da) and 4-fluorobenzenethiol (128.17 Da), or large macromolecules such as anti-mouse IgG (~150 kDa). PMID:23535657

  13. Electrochemical-surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (E-SERS) of uric acid: a potential rapid diagnostic method for early preeclampsia detection.

    PubMed

    Goodall, Barbara L; Robinson, Ashley M; Brosseau, Christa L

    2013-02-01

    An increased level of uric acid in urine and plasma is indicative of the development of preeclampsia, a hypertensive disorder that can occur during pregnancy. The preliminary steps towards developing a rapid tool for early diagnosis of preeclampsia using electrochemical SERS (E-SERS) for the detection of uric acid in urine are presented herein. Characterization of the uric acid species was completed using cyclic voltammetry, UV spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and electrochemical surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (E-SERS). E-SERS was capable of easily detecting uric acid directly at concentrations <1 mM in urine simulant, without the need for costly enzymes and bulky equipment, and thus demonstrates promise as a rapid point-of-care diagnostic tool for detection of early onset preeclampsia in developing nation settings. PMID:23187309

  14. Nondestructive detection of infested chestnuts based on NIR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insect feeding is a significant postharvest problem for processors of Chestnuts (Castanea sativa, Miller). In most cases, damage from insects is 'hidden', i.e. not visually detectable on the fruit surface. Consequently, traditional sorting techniques, including manual sorting, are generally inadequa...

  15. Raman-spectroscopy-based chemical contaminant detection in milk powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Sagar; Chao, Kuanglin; Qin, Jianwei; Kim, Moon S.

    2015-05-01

    Addition of edible and inedible chemical contaminants in food powders for purposes of economic benefit has become a recurring trend. In recent years, severe health issues have been reported due to consumption of food powders contaminated with chemical substances. This study examines the effect of spatial resolution used during spectral collection to select the optimal spatial resolution for detecting melamine in milk powder. Sample depth of 2mm, laser intensity of 200mw, and exposure time of 0.1s were previously determined as optimal experimental parameters for Raman imaging. Spatial resolution of 0.25mm was determined as the optimal resolution for acquiring spectral signal of melamine particles from a milk-melamine mixture sample. Using the optimal resolution of 0.25mm, sample depth of 2mm and laser intensity of 200mw obtained from previous study, spectral signal from 5 different concentration of milk-melamine mixture (1%, 0.5%, 0.1%, 0.05%, and 0.025%) were acquired to study the relationship between number of detected melamine pixels and corresponding sample concentration. The result shows that melamine concentration has a linear relation with detected number of melamine pixels with correlation coefficient of 0.99. It can be concluded that the quantitative analysis of powder mixture is dependent on many factors including physical characteristics of mixture, experimental parameters, and sample depth. The results obtained in this study are promising. We plan to apply the result obtained from this study to develop quantitative detection model for rapid screening of melamine in milk powder. This methodology can also be used for detection of other chemical contaminants in milk powders.

  16. Identification of Yersinia enterocolitica at the Species and Subspecies Levels by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kuhm, Andrea Elisabeth; Suter, Daniel; Felleisen, Richard; Rau, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica and other Yersinia species, such as Y. pseudotuberculosis, Y. bercovieri, and Y. intermedia, were differentiated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) combined with artificial neural network analysis. A set of well defined Yersinia strains from Switzerland and Germany was used to create a method for FT-IR-based differentiation of Yersinia isolates at the species level. The isolates of Y. enterocolitica were also differentiated by FT-IR into the main biotypes (biotypes 1A, 2, and 4) and serotypes (serotypes O:3, O:5, O:9, and “non-O:3, O:5, and O:9”). For external validation of the constructed methods, independently obtained isolates of different Yersinia species were used. A total of 79.9% of Y. enterocolitica sensu stricto isolates were identified correctly at the species level. The FT-IR analysis allowed the separation of all Y. bercovieri, Y. intermedia, and Y. rohdei strains from Y. enterocolitica, which could not be differentiated by the API 20E test system. The probability for correct biotype identification of Y. enterocolitica isolates was 98.3% (41 externally validated strains). For correct serotype identification, the probability was 92.5% (42 externally validated strains). In addition, the presence or absence of the ail gene, one of the main pathogenicity markers, was demonstrated using FT-IR. The probability for correct identification of isolates concerning the ail gene was 98.5% (51 externally validated strains). This indicates that it is possible to obtain information about genus, species, and in the case of Y. enterocolitica also subspecies type with a single measurement. Furthermore, this is the first example of the identification of specific pathogenicity using FT-IR. PMID:19617388

  17. Identification of Yersinia enterocolitica at the species and subspecies levels by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kuhm, Andrea Elisabeth; Suter, Daniel; Felleisen, Richard; Rau, Jörg

    2009-09-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica and other Yersinia species, such as Y. pseudotuberculosis, Y. bercovieri, and Y. intermedia, were differentiated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) combined with artificial neural network analysis. A set of well defined Yersinia strains from Switzerland and Germany was used to create a method for FT-IR-based differentiation of Yersinia isolates at the species level. The isolates of Y. enterocolitica were also differentiated by FT-IR into the main biotypes (biotypes 1A, 2, and 4) and serotypes (serotypes O:3, O:5, O:9, and "non-O:3, O:5, and O:9"). For external validation of the constructed methods, independently obtained isolates of different Yersinia species were used. A total of 79.9% of Y. enterocolitica sensu stricto isolates were identified correctly at the species level. The FT-IR analysis allowed the separation of all Y. bercovieri, Y. intermedia, and Y. rohdei strains from Y. enterocolitica, which could not be differentiated by the API 20E test system. The probability for correct biotype identification of Y. enterocolitica isolates was 98.3% (41 externally validated strains). For correct serotype identification, the probability was 92.5% (42 externally validated strains). In addition, the presence or absence of the ail gene, one of the main pathogenicity markers, was demonstrated using FT-IR. The probability for correct identification of isolates concerning the ail gene was 98.5% (51 externally validated strains). This indicates that it is possible to obtain information about genus, species, and in the case of Y. enterocolitica also subspecies type with a single measurement. Furthermore, this is the first example of the identification of specific pathogenicity using FT-IR. PMID:19617388

  18. Element selective detection of molecular species applying chromatographic techniques and diode laser atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kunze, K; Zybin, A; Koch, J; Franzke, J; Miclea, M; Niemax, K

    2004-12-01

    Tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (DLAAS) combined with separation techniques and atomization in plasmas and flames is presented as a powerful method for analysis of molecular species. The analytical figures of merit of the technique are demonstrated by the measurement of Cr(VI) and Mn compounds, as well as molecular species including halogen atoms, hydrogen, carbon and sulfur. PMID:15561625

  19. Effort and Potential Efficiencies for Aquatic Non-native Species Early Detection

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript is based on the early aquatic non-native species detection research in the Duluth-Superior harbor. The problem of early detection is essentially that of a "needle in a haystack" - to detect a newly arrived and presumably rare non-native species with a high probabi...

  20. Cervical cancer detection based on serum sample Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    González-Solís, José Luis; Martínez-Espinosa, Juan Carlos; Torres-González, Luis Adolfo; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Palomares-Anda, Pascual

    2014-05-01

    The use of Raman spectroscopy to analyze the biochemical composition of serum samples and hence distinguish between normal and cervical cancer serum samples was investigated. The serum samples were obtained from 19 patients who were clinically diagnosed with cervical cancer, 3 precancer, and 20 healthy volunteer controls. The imprint was put under an Olympus microscope, and around points were chosen for Raman measurement.All spectra were collected at a Horiba Jobin-Yvon LabRAM HR800 Raman Spectrometer with a laser of 830-nm wavelength and 17-mW power irradiation. Raw spectra were processed by carrying out baseline correction, smoothing, and normalization to remove noise, florescence, and shot noise and then analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA). The control serum spectrum showed the presence of higher amounts of carotenoids indicated by peaks at 1,002, 1,160, and 1,523 cm(-1)and intense peaks associated with protein components at 754, 853, 938, 1,002, 1,300-1,345, 1,447, 1,523, 1,550, 1,620, and 1,654 cm(-1). The Raman bands assigned to glutathione (446, 828, and 1,404 cm(-1)) and tryptophan (509, 1,208, 1,556, 1,603, and 1,620 cm(-1)) in cervical cancer were higher than those of control samples, suggesting that their presence may also play a role in cervical cancer. Furthermore, weak bands in the control samples attributed to tryptophan (545, 760, and 1,174 cm(-1)) and amide III (1,234-1,290 cm(-1)) seem to disappear and decrease in the cervical cancer samples, respectively. It is shown that the serum samples from patients with cervical cancer and from the control group can be discriminated with high sensitivity and specificity when the multivariate statistical methods of PCA is applied to Raman spectra. PCA allowed us to define the wavelength differences between the spectral bands of the control and cervical cancer groups by confirming that the main molecular differences among the control and cervical cancer samples were glutathione, tryptophan,

  1. Preliminary Work to Alma: Submillimeter Wave Spectroscopy of ^{18}O and D Species of Methyl Formate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulès, L.; Motiyenko, R.; Huet, T. R.; Møllendal, H.; Guillemin, J.-C.; Demyk, K.; Carvajal, M.; Kleiner, I.; Coudert, L. H.

    2009-06-01

    New radiotelescopes, working in the submillimeter range, will be operating in the next few years: ALMA, Herschel, and SOFIA. A large amount of laboratory work is required in order to account for the increased resolution and accuracy needed to analyze the numerous data which will be obtained with these new instruments. There is a strong interest of the astrophysical community in isotopic species for two main reasons: (i) Their detection provides us with key information about interstellar chemical modeling, especially for complex organic molecules, like methyl formate, as their formation mechanisms is not well understood yet. (ii) They are responsible for a large fraction of U-lines and their assignments are necessary to allow the detection of new species. In this context we continue a systematic study of the isotopic species of methyl formate (HCOOCH_3) initiated with H^{13}COOCH_3. Our next investigation of HCOO^{13}CH_3 allowed us the detection of 500 lines in Orion. The treatment of the data concerning methyl formate is not obvious due to the internal rotation of the methyl group. This treatment is different in case of a symmetric (CH_3) or an asymmetric (CHD_2) rotor part. We will report here on recent results obtained for DCOOCH_3, HCOOCHD_2, HC^{18}OOCH_3, and HCO^{18}OCH_3. [2] Willaert, Møllendal, Alekseev, et al. J. Mol. Struct. 795 (2006) [3] Carvajal, Margules, Tercero, et al. Astron. Astrophys. (2009) in press

  2. Detection of atmospheric pollutants by pulsed photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Miruna; Pascu, Mihail-Lucian; Staicu, Angela

    1998-07-01

    Pulsed laser photoacoustic detection of NO2 and SO2 is reported. The laser source is a pulsed molecular nitrogen laser emitting at 337.1 nm. The average energy per pulse is about 350 (mu) J and the pulse duration 10 nsec. For detection we used a piezoelectric transducer (TUSIM-N.I.M.P., resonance frequency 4 MHz) and an electret condenser microphone (Trevi EM 27). The photoacoustic cell was a nonresonant one, with a cylindrical shape. The laser beam was centered along the cylinder axis. Linear dependence of the photoacoustic signal on pollutant pressure was obtained. This linearity is in a good agreement with theoretical considerations. The photoacoustic signal was measured for pollutants pressure between 1 torr and 100 torr for NO2 and between 35 torr and 100 torr for SO2.

  3. Tunable Diode Laser Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy for Detection of Potassium under Optically Thick Conditions.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhechao; Steinvall, Erik; Ghorbani, Ramin; Schmidt, Florian M

    2016-04-01

    Potassium (K) is an important element related to ash and fine-particle formation in biomass combustion processes. In situ measurements of gaseous atomic potassium, K(g), using robust optical absorption techniques can provide valuable insight into the K chemistry. However, for typical parts per billion K(g) concentrations in biomass flames and reactor gases, the product of atomic line strength and absorption path length can give rise to such high absorbance that the sample becomes opaque around the transition line center. We present a tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (TDLAAS) methodology that enables accurate, calibration-free species quantification even under optically thick conditions, given that Beer-Lambert's law is valid. Analyte concentration and collisional line shape broadening are simultaneously determined by a least-squares fit of simulated to measured absorption profiles. Method validation measurements of K(g) concentrations in saturated potassium hydroxide vapor in the temperature range 950-1200 K showed excellent agreement with equilibrium calculations, and a dynamic range from 40 pptv cm to 40 ppmv cm. The applicability of the compact TDLAAS sensor is demonstrated by real-time detection of K(g) concentrations close to biomass pellets during atmospheric combustion in a laboratory reactor. PMID:26938713

  4. Quantitative detection of astaxanthin and cantaxanthin in Atlantic salmon by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; Gellermann, Werner

    2006-02-01

    Two major carotenoids species found in salmonids muscle tissues are astaxanthin and cantaxanthin. They are taken up from fish food and are responsible for the attractive red-orange color of salmon filet. Since carotenoids are powerful antioxidants and biomarkers of nutrient consumption, they are thought to indicate fish health and resistance to diseases in fish farm environments. Therefore, a rapid, accurate, quantitative optical technique for measuring carotenoid content in salmon tissues is of economic interest. We demonstrate the possibility of using fast, selective, quantitative detection of astaxanthin and cantaxanthin in salmon muscle tissues, employing resonance Raman spectroscopy. Analyzing strong Raman signals originating from the carbon-carbon double bond stretch vibrations of the carotenoid molecules under blue laser excitation, we are able to characterize quantitatively the concentrations of carotenoids in salmon muscle tissue. To validate the technique, we compared Raman data with absorption measurements of carotenoid extracts in acetone. A close correspondence was observed in absorption spectra for tissue extract in acetone and a pure astaxanthin solution. Raman results show a linear dependence between Raman and absorption data. The proposed technique holds promise as a method of rapid screening of carotenoid levels in fish muscle tissues and may be attractive for the fish farm industry to assess the dietary status of salmon, risk for infective diseases, and product quality control.

  5. Protein-Ligand Binding Detected by Terahertz Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knab, J.; Chen, J. Y.; Mader, M.; Markelz, A.

    2004-03-01

    Established measures of protein flexibility through the B-factor use time intensive and facility limited techniques such as X-ray crystallography, NMR structure analysis and inelastic neutron scattering. We demonstrate a novel technique that may be used for determination of ligand binding for proteins as well as a measure of protein flexibility. Using the method of terahertz (THz) time domain spectroscopy, we measured the far infrared dielectric response as a function of the binding of N (1-4)-acetylglucosamine (NAG) to hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL). Vibrational modes associated with tertiary structure conformational motions lay in the THz frequency range. The THz dielectric response reflects the density and amplitude of these normal modes through dipole coupling. Transmission measurements on thin films show that while there is no change in the real part of the refractive index as a function of binding, there is a decrease in the absorbance for the HEWL+NAG thin films relative to HEWL films. This decrease can be attributed to a reduction in the flexibility of the protein with binding. These results are compared to calculated absorbance spectra.

  6. Chemical agent detection by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Stuart; Gift, Alan; Maksymiuk, Paul; Inscore, Frank E.; Smith, Wayne W.; Morrisey, Kevin; Christesen, Steven D.

    2004-03-01

    In the past decade, the Unites States and its allies have been challenged by a different kind of warfare, exemplified by the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. Although suicide bombings are the most often used form of terror, military personnel must consider a wide range of attack scenarios. Among these is the intentional poisoning of water supplies to obstruct military operations in Afghanistan and Iraq. To counter such attacks, the military is developing portable analyzers that can identify and quantify potential chemical agents in water supplies at microgram per liter concentrations within 10 minutes. To aid this effort we have been investigating the value of a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy based portable analyzer. In particular we have been developing silver-doped sol-gels to generate SER spectra of chemical agents and their hydrolysis products. Here we present SER spectra of several chemical agents measured in a generic tap water. Repeat measurements were performed to establish statistical error associated with SERS obtained using the sol-gel coated vials.

  7. The Role of Spectroscopy Versus Detection for Border Security

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.

    2008-06-15

    Countries around the world are deploying radiation portal monitor (RPM) systems and other radiation detection instrumentation to interdict the illegal shipment of radioactive material crossing international borders. These efforts include deployments in the U.S. and in a number of other countries by governments and international organizations. Because of their high efficiency for gamma-ray detection, most deployed RPM systems are based on plastic scintillators. Such systems, however, are largely non-spectroscopic in capability. Fully capable spectroscopic portal monitor systems are undergoing engineering development for deployment in the future. The ability to identify the detected radionuclides may allow improved operational handling of radiation alarms, particularly those arising from the normal cargo stream of naturally occurring radioactive material, commercial radioactive sources, and individuals treated with medical radiopharmaceuticals. The goal for improved RPM systems is to increase the sensitivity to threats while reducing the impact that nuisance alarms have on operations. This paper considers the roles for spectroscopic and non-spectroscopic systems for safeguards and border security.

  8. Invasive species information networks: Collaboration at multiple scales for prevention, early detection, and rapid response to invasive alien species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, A.; Jarnevich, C.; Madsen, J.; Westbrooks, R.; Fournier, C.; Mehrhoff, L.; Browne, M.; Graham, J.; Sellers, E.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate analysis of present distributions and effective modeling of future distributions of invasive alien species (IAS) are both highly dependent on the availability and accessibility of occurrence data and natural history information about the species. Invasive alien species monitoring and detection networks (such as the Invasive Plant Atlas of New England and the Invasive Plant Atlas of the MidSouth) generate occurrence data at local and regional levels within the United States, which are shared through the US National Institute of Invasive Species Science. The Inter-American Biodiversity Information Network's Invasives Information Network (I3N), facilitates cooperation on sharing invasive species occurrence data throughout the Western Hemisphere. The I3N and other national and regional networks expose their data globally via the Global Invasive Species Information Network (GISIN). International and interdisciplinary cooperation on data sharing strengthens cooperation on strategies and responses to invasions. However, limitations to effective collaboration among invasive species networks leading to successful early detection and rapid response to invasive species include: lack of interoperability; data accessibility; funding; and technical expertise. This paper proposes various solutions to these obstacles at different geographic levels and briefly describes success stories from the invasive species information networks mentioned above. Using biological informatics to facilitate global information sharing is especially critical in invasive species science, as research has shown that one of the best indicators of the invasiveness of a species is whether it has been invasive elsewhere. Data must also be shared across disciplines because natural history information (e.g. diet, predators, habitat requirements, etc.) about a species in its native range is vital for effective prevention, detection, and rapid response to an invasion. Finally, it has been our

  9. Direct molecule-specific glucose detection by Raman spectroscopy based on photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuan; Zhang, Alissa Y; Wheeler, Damon A; Bond, Tiziana C; Gu, Claire; Li, Yat

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the first step toward the development of a glucose biosensor based on Raman spectroscopy and a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) probe. Historically, it has been very challenging to detect glucose directly by Raman spectroscopy due to its inherently small Raman scattering cross-section. In this work, we report the first quantitative glucose Raman detection in the physiological concentration range (0-25 mM) with a low laser power (2 mW), a short integration time (30 s), and an extremely small sampling volume (~50 nL) using the highly sensitive liquid-filled PCF probe. As a proof of concept, we also demonstrate the molecular specificity of this technique in the presence of a competing sugar, such as fructose. High sensitivity, flexibility, reproducibility, low cost, small sampling volume, and in situ remote sensing capability make PCF a very powerful platform for potential glucose detection based on Raman spectroscopy. PMID:22120042

  10. Detection of Nitric Oxide by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Spin-Trapping with Iron-Dithiocarbamates.

    PubMed

    Maia, Luisa B; Moura, José J G

    2016-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is the ideal methodology to identify radicals (detection and characterization of molecular structure) and to study their kinetics, in both simple and complex biological systems. The very low concentration and short life-time of NO and of many other radicals do not favor its direct detection and spin-traps are needed to produce a new and persistent radical that can be subsequently detected by EPR spectroscopy.In this chapter, we present the basic concepts of EPR spectroscopy and of some spin-trapping methodologies to study NO. The "strengths and weaknesses" of iron-dithiocarbamates utilization, the NO traps of choice for the authors, are thoroughly discussed and a detailed description of the method to quantify the NO formation by molybdoenzymes is provided. PMID:27094413

  11. Detection of mechanical and disease stresses in citrus plants by fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belasque, J., Jr.; Gasparoto, M. C. G.; Marcassa, L. G.

    2008-04-01

    We have investigated the detection of mechanical and disease stresses in citrus plants (Citrus limonia [L.] Osbeck) using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Due to its economic importance we have chosen to investigate the citrus canker disease, which is caused by the Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri bacteria. Mechanical stress was also studied because it plays an important role in the plant's infection by such bacteria. A laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy system, composed of a spectrometer and a 532 nm10 mW excitation laser was used to perform fluorescence spectroscopy. The ratio of two chlorophyll fluorescence bands allows us to detect and discriminate between mechanical and disease stresses. This ability to discriminate may have an important application in the field to detect citrus canker infected trees.

  12. Species identification of airborne molds and its significance for the detection of indoor pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Fradkin, A.; Tobin, R.S.; Tario, S.M.; Tucic-Porretta, M.; Malloch, D.

    1987-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate species composition and prevalence of culturable particles of airborne fungi in 27 homes in Toronto, Canada. Its major objective is to examine the significance of species identification for the detection of indoor pollution.

  13. Multi-species sensing using multi-mode absorption spectroscopy with mid-infrared interband cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hagan, S.; Northern, J. H.; Gras, B.; Ewart, P.; Kim, C. S.; Kim, M.; Merritt, C. D.; Bewley, W. W.; Canedy, C. L.; Vurgaftman, I.; Meyer, J. R.

    2016-06-01

    The application of an interband cascade laser, ICL, to multi-mode absorption spectroscopy, MUMAS, in the mid-infrared region is reported. Measurements of individual mode linewidths of the ICL, derived from the pressure dependence of lineshapes in MUMAS signatures of single, isolated, lines in the spectrum of HCl, were found to be in the range 10-80 MHz. Multi-line spectra of methane were recorded using spectrally limited bandwidths, of approximate width 27 cm-1, defined by an interference filter, and consist of approximately 80 modes at spectral locations spanning the 100 cm-1 bandwidth of the ICL output. Calibration of the methane pressures derived from MUMAS data using a capacitance manometer provided measurements with an uncertainty of 1.1 %. Multi-species sensing is demonstrated by the simultaneous detection of methane, acetylene and formaldehyde in a gas mixture. Individual partial pressures of the three gases are derived from best fits of model MUMAS signatures to the data with an experimental error of 10 %. Using an ICL, with an inter-mode interval of ~10 GHz, MUMAS spectra were recorded at pressures in the range 1-10 mbar, and, based on the data, a potential minimum detection limit of the order of 100 ppmv is estimated for MUMAS at atmospheric pressure using an inter-mode interval of 80 GHz.

  14. Fast label-free detection of Legionella spp. in biofilms by applying immunomagnetic beads and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kusić, Dragana; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Legionellae colonize biofilms, can form a biofilm by itself and multiply intracellularly within the protozoa commonly found in water distribution systems. Approximately half of the known species are pathogenic and have been connected to severe multisystem Legionnaires' disease. The detection methods for Legionella spp. in water samples are still based on cultivation, which is time consuming due to the slow growth of this bacterium. Here, we developed a cultivation-independent, label-free and fast detection method for legionellae in a biofilm matrix based on the Raman spectroscopic analysis of isolated single cells via immunomagnetic separation (IMS). A database comprising the Raman spectra of single bacterial cells captured and separated from the biofilms formed by each species was used to build the identification method based on a support vector machine (SVM) discriminative classifier. The complete method allows the detection of Legionella spp. in 100 min. Cross-reactivity of Legionella spp. specific immunomagnetic beads to the other studied genera was tested, where only small cell amounts of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli compared to the initial number of cells were isolated by the immunobeads. Nevertheless, the Raman spectra collected from isolated non-targeted bacteria were well-discriminated from the Raman spectra collected from isolated Legionella cells, whereby the Raman spectra of the independent dataset of Legionella strains were assigned with an accuracy of 98.6%. In addition, Raman spectroscopy was also used to differentiate between isolated Legionella species. PMID:26915495

  15. Early Alzheimer's Disease Neuropathology Detected by Proton MR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Melissa E.; Przybelski, Scott A.; Lesnick, Timothy G.; Liesinger, Amanda M.; Spychalla, Anthony; Zhang, Bing; Gunter, Jeffrey L.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Knopman, David S.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Jack, Clifford R.; Dickson, Dennis W.

    2014-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) is sensitive to early neurodegenerative processes associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although 1H-MRS metabolite ratios of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA)/creatine (Cr), NAA/myoinositol (mI), and mI/Cr measured in the posterior cingulate gyrus reveal evidence of disease progression in AD, pathologic underpinnings of the 1H-MRS metabolite changes in AD are unknown. Pathologically diagnosed human cases ranging from no likelihood to high likelihood AD (n = 41, 16 females and 25 males) who underwent antemortem 1H-MRS of the posterior cingulate gyrus at 3 tesla were included in this study. Immunohistochemical evaluation was performed on the posterior cingulate gyrus using antibodies to synaptic vesicles, hyperphosphorylated tau (pTau), neurofibrillary tangle conformational-epitope (cNFT), amyloid-β, astrocytes, and microglia. The slides were digitally analyzed using Aperio software, which allows neuropathologic quantification in the posterior cingulate gray matter. MRS and pathology associations were adjusted for time from scan to death. Significant associations across AD and control subjects were found between reduced synaptic immunoreactivity and both NAA/Cr and NAA/mI in the posterior cingulate gyrus. Higher pTau burden was associated with lower NAA/Cr and NAA/mI. Higher amyloid-β burden was associated with elevated mI/Cr and lower NAA/mI ratios, but not with NAA/Cr. 1H-MRS metabolite levels reveal early neurodegenerative changes associated with AD pathology. Our findings support the hypothesis that a decrease in NAA/Cr is associated with loss of synapses and early pTau pathology, but not with amyloid-β or later accumulation of cNFT pathology in the posterior cingulate gyrus. In addition, elevation of mI/Cr is associated with the occurrence of amyloid-β plaques in AD. PMID:25471565

  16. The detection of oral cancer using differential pathlength spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterenborg, H. J. C. M.; Kanick, S.; de Visscher, S.; Witjes, M.; Amelink, A.

    2010-02-01

    The development of optical techniques for non-invasive diagnosis of cancer is an ongoing challenge to biomedical optics. For head and neck cancer we see two main fields of potential application 1) Screening for second primaries in patients with a history of oral cancer. This requires imaging techniques or an approach where a larger area can be scanned quickly. 2) Distinguishing potentially malignant visible primary lesions from benign ones. Here fiberoptic point measurements can be used as the location of the lesion is known. This presentation will focus on point measurement techniques. Various techniques for point measurements have been developed and investigated clinically for different applications. Differential Pathlength Spectroscopy is a recently developed fiberoptic point measurement technique that measures scattered light in a broad spectrum. Due to the specific fiberoptic geometry we measure only scattered photons that have travelled a predetermined pathlength. This allows us to analyse the spectrum mathematically and translate the measured curve into a set of parameters that are related to the microvasculature and to the intracellular morphology. DPS has been extensively evaluated on optical phantoms and tested clinically in various clinical applications. The first measurements in biopsy proven squamous cell carcinoma showed significant changes in both vascular and morphological parameters. Measurements on thick keratinized lesions however failed to generate any vascular signatures. This is related to the sampling depth of the standard optical fibers used. Recently we developed a fiberoptic probe with a ~1 mm sampling depth. Measurements on several leukoplakias showed that with this new probe we sample just below the keratin layer and can obtain vascular signatures. The results of a first set of clinical measurements will be presented and the significance for clinical diagnostics will be discussed.

  17. Multitemporal spectroscopy for crop stress detection using band selection methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewes, Thorsten; Franke, Jonas; Menz, Gunter

    2008-08-01

    A fast and precise sensor-based identification of pathogen infestations in wheat stands is essential for the implementation of site-specific fungicide applications. Several works have shown possibilities and limitations for the detection of plant stress using spectral sensor data. Hyperspectral data provide the opportunity to collect spectral reflectance in contiguous bands over a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Individual phenomena like the light absorption of leaf pigments can be examined in detail. The precise knowledge of stress-dependent shifting in certain spectral wavelengths provides great advantages in detecting fungal infections. This study focuses on band selection techniques for hyperspectral data to identify relevant and redundant information in spectra regarding a detection of plant stress caused by pathogens. In a laboratory experiment, five 1 sqm boxes with wheat were multitemporarily measured by a ASD Fieldspec® 3 FR spectroradiometer. Two stands were inoculated with Blumeria graminis - the pathogen causing powdery mildew - and one stand was used to simulate the effect of water deficiency. Two stands were kept healthy as control stands. Daily measurements of the spectral reflectance were taken over a 14-day period. Three ASD Pro Lamps were used to illuminate the plots with constant light. By applying band selection techniques, the three types of different wheat vitality could be accurately differentiated at certain stages. Hyperspectral data can provide precise information about pathogen infestations. The reduction of the spectral dimension of sensor data by means of band selection procedures is an appropriate method to speed up the data supply for precision agriculture.

  18. Optical spectroscopy for the detection of ischemic tissue injury

    DOEpatents

    Demos, Stavros; Fitzgerald, Jason; Troppmann, Christoph; Michalopoulou, Andromachi

    2009-09-08

    An optical method and apparatus is utilized to quantify ischemic tissue and/or organ injury. Such a method and apparatus is non-invasive, non-traumatic, portable, and can make measurements in a matter of seconds. Moreover, such a method and apparatus can be realized through optical fiber probes, making it possible to take measurements of target organs deep within a patient's body. Such a technology provides a means of detecting and quantifying tissue injury in its early stages, before it is clinically apparent and before irreversible damage has occurred.

  19. Detection of explosive materials by differential reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Rolf E.; Fuller, Anna M.; Schöllhorn, Claus; Holloway, Paul H.

    2006-06-01

    It is shown that traces of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) display strong and distinct structures in differential reflectograms, near 420 and 250nm. These characteristic peaks are not observed from moth balls, nail polish, polyvinyl chloride, starch, soap, paper, epoxy, aspirin, polycarbonate, aspartame, polystyrene, polyester, fertilizer, or sugar, to mention a few substances which may be in or on a suitcase. The described technique for detection of TNT is fast, inexpensive, reliable, and portable and does not require contact with the surveyed substance. Moreover, we have developed a curve recognition program for field applications of the technique. The origin of the spectra is discussed.

  20. Detection of Different DNA Animal Species in Commercial Candy Products.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Colmenero, Marta; Martínez, Jose Luis; Roca, Agustín; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2016-03-01

    Candy products are consumed all across the world, but there is not much information about their composition. In this study we have used a DNA-based approach for determining the animal species occurring in 40 commercial candies of different types. We extracted DNA and performed PCR amplification, cloning and sequencing for obtaining species-informative DNA sequences. Eight species were identified including fish (hake and anchovy) in 22% of the products analyzed. Bovine and porcine were the most abundant appearing in 27 samples each one. Most products contained a mixture of species. Marshmallows (7), jelly-types, and gummies (20) contained a significantly higher number of species than hard candies (9). We demonstrated the presence of DNA animal species in candy product which allow consumers to make choices and prevent allergic reaction. PMID:26807698

  1. Standoff detection of explosive materials by differential reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Anna M.; Hummel, Rolf E.; Schöllhorn, Claus; Holloway, Paul H.

    2006-10-01

    It is shown that 2, 4, 6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT) displays strong and distinct structures in differential reflectograms, near 420 nm and 250 nm. These characteristic peaks are not observed from approximately two dozen organic and inorganic substances which we tested and which may be in or on a suitcase. This exclusivity infers an ideal technique for explosives detection in mass transit and similar locations. The described technique for detection of explosives is fast, inexpensive, reliable, portable, and is applicable from some distance, that is, it does not require contact with the surveyed substance. Moreover, we have developed a curve discrimination program for field applications of the technique. Other explosives such as 1, 3, 5-trinitro-1, 3, 5 triazacyclohexane (RDX), 1, 3, 5, 7-Tetranitro-1, 3, 5, 7- tetraazacyclooctane (HMX), 2, 4, 6, N-Tetranitro-N-methylaniline (Tetryl), Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), and nitroglycerin have also been investigated and demonstrate similar, but unique, characteristic spectra. The technique utilizes near-ultraviolet to visible light reflected from two spots on the same sample surface yielding a differential reflectogram corresponding to the absorption of the sample. The origin of the spectra is attributed to the highest occupied molecular orbital to lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (HOMO-LUMO) transitions of the respective explosive molecule. Experiments using transmission spectrophotometry have also been performed to compliment and confirm the specific transitions. The results are supported by computer modeling of the molecular orbitals that yield UV and visible transitions.

  2. Detection of propranolol in pharmaceutical formulations by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotardo, Mara Andréia; Tognolli, João Olímpio; Pezza, Helena Redigolo; Pezza, Leonardo

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes an analytical reflectometric method that has an objective not only the industrial quality control but also to detect possible falsifications and/or adulterations of propranolol in pharmaceutical formulations. The method is based on the diffuse reflectance measurements of the colored product (III) of the spot test reaction between propranolol hydrochloride (I) and 2,6-dichloroquinone-4-chloroimide (II) using filter paper as solid support. Spot test conditions have been investigated using experimental design in order to identify and optimize the critical factors. The factors evaluated were DCQ concentration, propranolol solvent and DCQ solvent. The best reaction conditions were achieved with the addition of 30 μL of propranolol solution in ethanol 35% (v/v) and 30 μL of DCQ solution at 70 mg mL -1 in acetone, in this order. All reflectance measurements were carried out at 500 nm and the linear range was from 8.45 × 10 -4 to 8.45 × 10 -2 mol L -1 ( r = 0.998). The limit of detection was 1.01 × 10 -4 mol L -1. No interference was observed from the assessed excipients and drugs. The method was applied to determine propranolol in commercial brands of pharmaceuticals. The results obtained by the proposed method were favorably compared with those given by the British Pharmacopoeia procedure.

  3. Organ transplant tissue rejection: detection and staging by fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacAulay, Calum E.; Whitehead, Peter D.; McManus, Bruce; Zeng, Haishan; Wilson-McManus, Janet; MacKinnon, Nick; Morgan, David C.; Dong, Chunming; Gerla, Paul; Kenyon, Jennifer

    1998-07-01

    Patients receiving heart or other organ transplants usually require some level of anti-rejection drug therapy, most commonly cyclosporine. The rejection status of the organ must be monitored to determine the optimal anti-rejection drug therapy. The current method for monitoring post-transplant rejection status of heart transplant patients consists of taking biopsies from the right ventricle. In this work we have developed a system employing optical and signal-processing techniques that will allow a cardiologist to measure spectral changes associated with tissue rejection using an optical catheter probe. The system employs time gated illumination and detection systems to deal with the dynamic signal acquisition problems associated with in vivo measurements of a beating heart. Spectral data processing software evaluates and processes the data to produce a simple numerical score. Results of measurements made on 100 excised transplanted isograft and allograft rat hearts have demonstrated the ability of the system to detect the presence of rejection and to accurately correlate the spectroscopic results with the ISHLT (International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation) stage of rejection determined by histopathology. In vivo measurements using a pig transplant model are now in process.

  4. Application of SERS spectroscopy for detection of trace components in urinary deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucetaite, Milda; Velicka, Martynas; Tamosaityte, Sandra; Sablinskas, Valdas

    2014-03-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy can be a useful tool in regard to disease diagnosis and prevention. Advantage of SERS over conventional Raman spectroscopy is its significantly increased signal (up to factor of 106-108) which allows detection of trace amounts of substances in the sample. So far, this technique is successfully used for analysis of food, pieces of art and various biochemical/biomedical samples. In this work, we survey the possibility of applying SERS spectroscopy for detection of trace components in urinary deposits. Early discovery together with the identification of the exact chemical composition of urinary sediments could be crucial for taking appropriate preventive measures that inhibit kidney stone formation or growth processes. In this initial study, SERS spectra (excitation wavelength - 1064 nm) of main components of urinary deposits (calcium oxalate, uric acid, cystine, etc.) were recorded by using silver (Ag) colloid. Spectra of 10-3-10-5 M solutions were obtained. While no/small Raman signal was detected without the Ag colloid, characteristic peaks of the substances could be clearly separated in the SERS spectra. This suggests that even small amounts of the components could be detected and taken into account while determining the type of kidney stone forming in the urinary system. We found for the first time that trace amounts of components constituting urinary deposits could be detected by SERS spectroscopy. In the future study, the analysis of centrifuged urine samples will be carried out.

  5. Strategies for Detecting Organic Liquids on Soils Using Mid-Infrared Reflection Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, Neal B.; Gassman, Paul L.; Blake, Thomas A.

    2008-06-25

    Stand-off monitoring for chemical spills can provide timely information for clean-up efforts and mid-infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy is one approach being investigated. Anomaly and target detection strategies were examined for detection of four different low-volatility organic liquids on two different soil types. Several preprocessing and signal weighting strategies were studied. Anomaly detection for C-H bands was very good using second derivative preprocessing and provided similar performance to target detection approaches such as generalized least squares (GLS) and partial least squares (PLS) with detections at soil loads of approximately 0.6 to 1.5 mg/cm2. Good performance was also found for detection of P=O, O–H and C=O bands but the optimal strategy varied. The simplicity and generality of anomaly detection is attractive, however target detection provides more capability for classification.

  6. Spatial Resolution of Combined Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy with Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy for Atomic Oxygen Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Makoto; Nakajima, Daisuke

    2015-09-01

    For developments of thermal protection system, atomic oxygen plays important role. However, its measurement method has not been established because the pressure in front of TPS test materials is as high as a few kPa. Our group proposed combined wavelength modulation and integrated output spectroscopies based on the forbidden transition at OI 636 nm to measure the ground-state number densities. In this study, WM-ICOS system is developed and applied to a microwave oxygen plasma to evaluate measurable region. As a result, the estimated number density by ICOS could be measured as low as 1021 m21. For the condition, WM-ICOS was applied. The signal to noise ratio of the 2f signal was 40.4. Then, the sensitivity was improved about 26. This result corresponding to the measurement limit of the partial atomic oxygen pressure of 250 Pa. The sensitivity of WM-ICOS was found to enough to diagnose the shock layer in high enthalpy flows. However, the spatial resolution was as large as 8 mm. The size of the beam pattern depends on the cavity length, robust ness of the cavity and accuracy of the cavity alignment. In this presentation, the relationship among these parameters will be discussed.

  7. Radiation detection system for portable gamma-ray spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S.; Howard, Douglas E.; Wong, James L.; Jessup, James L.; Bianchini, Greg M.; Miller, Wayne O.

    2006-06-20

    A portable gamma ray detection apparatus having a gamma ray detector encapsulated by a compact isolation structure having at least two volumetrically-nested enclosures where at least one is a thermal shield. The enclosures are suspension-mounted to each other to successively encapsulate the detector without structural penetrations through the thermal shields. A low power cooler is also provided capable of cooling the detector to cryogenic temperatures without consuming cryogens, due to the heat load reduction by the isolation structure and the reduction in the power requirements of the cooler. The apparatus also includes a lightweight portable power source for supplying power to the apparatus, including to the cooler and the processing means, and reducing the weight of the apparatus to enable handheld operation or toting on a user's person.

  8. Thz Spectroscopy of 13C Isotopic Species of a "weed": Acetaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulès, L.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2011-06-01

    Our studies of the isotopic species of 13C and D isotopologues of methyl formate (HCOOCH_3), have allowed the detection of more than 600 lines in Orion. This confirms that many observed U-lines are coming from isotopic species of one of the most abundant molecules in space. Since its first detection in 1976 in SgrB2 and in Orion A, acetaldehyde (CH_3CHO) was detected in many other numerous objects. If its deuterated species (CD_3CHO and CH_3CDO) have been previously studied in the millimeterwave range, the data concerning the 13C species are limited to few lines measured in 1957 up to 40 GHz. In this context we decided to study the 13C species of acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde molecule displays a large amplitude motion: the hindered rotation of the methyl group with respect to the rest of the molecule. The analysis is performed with the Rho Axis Method. Recent versions of the codes include high orders term in order to reproduce the observed frequencies for large quantum numbers values as J-values as high as 70a,b,. Measurements and analysis of the rotational spectra of 13C isotopic species are in progress in Lille with a solid-state submillimetre-wave spectrometer (50-950 GHz), the first results will be presented. This work is supported by the contract ANR-08-BLAN-0054 and by the Programme National de Physico-Chimie du Milieu Interstellaire (PCMI-CNRS). Carvajal, M.; Margulès, L.; Tercero, B.; et al.A&A 500, (2009) 1109 Margulès, L.; Huet, T. R.; Demaison J.; et al.,ApJ 714, (2010) 1120. Ikeda, M.; Ohishi, M.; Nummelin, A.; et al., ApJ, 560, (2001) 792 Kleiner, I.; Lopez, J.-C.; Blanco, S.; et al.J. Mol. Spectrosc. 197, (1999) 275 Elkeurti M.; Coudert, L. H.; Medvedev, I. R.; et al.J. Mol. Spectrosc. 263, (2010) 145 Kilb, R.W.; Lin, C.C.; and Wilson, E.B.J. Chem. Phys. 26, (1957) 1695 Kleiner, I. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 260, (2010) 1 Ilyushin, V.V.; Kryvda, A; and Alekseev, E;J. Mol. Spectrosc. 255, (2009) 32

  9. Label-free detection and characterization of the binding of hemagglutinin protein and broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies using terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yiwen; Zhong, Junlan; Zhang, Cunlin; Zuo, Jian; Pickwell-MacPherson, Emma

    2015-03-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) is the main surface glycoprotein of the influenza A virus. The H9N2 subtype influenza A virus is recognized as the most possible pandemic strain as it has crossed the species barrier, infecting swine and humans. We use terahertz spectroscopy to study the hydration shell formation around H9 subtype influenza A virus's HA protein (H9 HA) as well as the detection of antigen binding of H9 HA with the broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody. We observe a remarkable concentration dependent nonlinear response of the H9 HA, which reveals the formation process of the hydration shell around H9 HA molecules. Furthermore, we show that terahertz dielectric properties of the H9 HA are strongly affected by the presence of the monoclonal antibody F10 and that the terahertz dielectric loss tangent can be used to detect the antibody binding at lower concentrations than the standard ELISA test.

  10. Instant Typing Is Essential to Detect Transmission of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Klebsiella Species

    PubMed Central

    Voor in 't holt, Anne F.; Severin, Juliëtte A.; Goessens, Wil H. F.; te Witt, René; Vos, Margreet C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Infections with multidrug-resistant (MDR) microorganisms are an increasing threat to hospitalized patients. Although rapid typing of MDR microorganisms is required to apply targeted prevention measures, technical barriers often prevent this. We aimed to assess whether extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Klebsiella species are transmitted between patients and whether routine, rapid typing is needed. Methods For 43 months, the clonality of all ESBL-producing Klebsiella isolates from patients admitted to Erasmus MC University Medical Center in Rotterdam, the Netherlands was assessed with Raman spectroscopy. A cluster was defined as n ≥2 patients who had identical isolates. Primary patients were the first patients in each cluster. Secondary patients were those identified with an isolate clonally related to the isolate of the primary patient. Results Isolates from 132 patients were analyzed. We identified 17 clusters, with 17 primary and 56 secondary patients. Fifty-nine patients had a unique isolate. Patients (n = 15) in four out of the 17 clusters were epidemiologically related. Ten of these 15 patients developed an infection. Conclusions Clonal outbreaks of ESBL-producing Klebsiella species were detected in our hospital. Theoretically, after Raman spectroscopy had detected a cluster of n ≥2, six infections in secondary patients could have been prevented. These findings demonstrate that spread of ESBL-producing Klebsiella species occurs, even in a non-outbreak setting, and underscore the need for routine rapid typing of these MDR bacteria. PMID:26317428

  11. Regional patterns in proportion of bird species detected in the North American Breeding Bird Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sauer, J.R.; Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.; Boulinier, T.; Flather, C.H.; Kendall, W.L.

    2001-01-01

    Counts from the North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) underestimate species richness. We use capture-recapture methods to estimate species richness from BBS count data collected in 1996 and show that detection probabilities demonstrate clear regional patterns. Capture-recapture methods should be used to estimate species richness from count data, and failure to use estimation procedures for species richness could result in biased estimates of spatial change in species richness.

  12. Thermal Infrared Spectroscopy of Atmospheric Species Critical to Radiative Forcing of Earth's Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasunas, J. C., Jr.; Kostiuk, T.; Livengood, T. A.; Hewagama, T.; Kolasinski, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Thermal-infrared (from about 6 to 100 or more microns wavelength), emission-mode Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) systems acquire radiometric spectra for diurnal diagnostics of atmospheric properties. We have been funded through NASA's Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program (PIDDP) to develop CIRS-lite as a lightweight successor to the Goddard-developed Cassini CIRS FTS currently operating in Saturn orbit. CIRS-lite also has promise for Earth science due to its modest mass, power and volume requirements and novel technical capabilities. For Earth, CIRS-lite supports the characterization of climate radiative forcing, including trace species measurements such as methane. Detection capability beyond the typical limit of HgCdTe focal planes (about 16 microns wavelength) enables a more complete characterization of the greenhouse effect. As for trace-species quantification, a beyond-HgCdTe focal plane permits characterization of water without overlapping lines from other species, enabling better measurements of these other species such as methane at wavelengths reachable by HgCdTe.

  13. Gastroenteric cancers detection by Raman spectroscopy of human serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Lin, Junxiu

    2003-06-01

    To investigate the spectral specialities of stomach cancer serum for diagnosis, fluorescence and Raman spectra of normal, stomach cancer, esophagus cancer and atophic gastritis sera were measured in the visible region in this study. All spectra except esophagus cancer were characterized by three sharp peaks. The intensity of each peak was different in different spectrum. After sampels were radiated by laser, fluorescence weakened along wiht red shift of its band center, and spectral changes of normal and stomach cancer cases were different from other samples. It was also observed that spectral changes of atophic gastritis were very similar with stomach cancer after radiated by laser, however, there are still some distinctions that can be used to differentiate them from each other. A notable difference is that the relative intensity of peak C excited by 488.0nm is higher than excited by 514.5nm in spectrum of stomach cancer, whereas lower in other cases. We utilized it as a criterion and got an accuracy of 80.77% in stomach cancer detection.

  14. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy based-on interferon-gamma detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guan-Wei; Kuo, Yi-Ching; Tsai, Pei-I.; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2014-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an ancient disease constituted a long-term menace to public health. According to World Health Organization (WHO), mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infected nearly a third of people of the world. There is about one new TB occurrence every second. Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is associated with susceptibility to TB, and interferongamma release assays (IGRA) is considered to be the best alternative of tuberculin skin test (TST) for diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). Although significant progress has been made with regard to the design of enzyme immunoassays for IFN-γ, adopting this assay is still labor-intensive and time-consuming. To alleviate these drawbacks, we used IFN-γ antibody to facilitate the detection of IFN-γ. An experimental verification on the performance of IGRA was done in this research. We developed two biosensor configurations, both of which possess high sensitivity, specificity, and rapid IFN-γ diagnoses. The first is the electrochemical method. The second is a circular polarization interferometry configuration, which incorporates two light beams with p-polarization and s-polarization states individually along a common path, a four photo-detector quadrature configuration to arrive at a phase modulated ellipsometer. With these two methods, interaction between IFN-γ antibody and IFN-γ were explored and presented in detail.

  15. Drop coating deposition Raman spectroscopy of blood plasma for the detection of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengpeng; Chen, Changshui; Deng, Xiaoyuan; Mao, Hua; Jin, Shaoqin

    2015-03-01

    We have recently applied the technique of drop coating deposition Raman (DCDR) spectroscopy for colorectal cancer (CRC) detection using blood plasma. The aim of this study was to develop a more convenient and stable method based on blood plasma for noninvasive CRC detection. Significant differences are observed in DCDR spectra between healthy (n = 105) and cancer (n = 75) plasma from 15 CRC patients and 21 volunteers, particularly in the spectra that are related to proteins, nucleic acids, and β-carotene. The multivariate analysis principal components analysis and the linear discriminate analysis, together with leave-one-out, cross validation were used on DCDR spectra and yielded a sensitivity of 100% (75/75) and specificity of 98.1% (103/105) for detection of CRC. This study demonstrates that DCDR spectroscopy of blood plasma associated with multivariate statistical algorithms has the potential for the noninvasive detection of CRC. PMID:25756306

  16. High-sensitivity detection of trace gases using dynamic photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynn, Charles M.; Palmacci, Stephen; Clark, Michelle L.; Kunz, Roderick R.

    2014-02-01

    Lincoln Laboratory of Massachusetts Institute of Technology has developed a technique known as dynamic photoacoustic spectroscopy (DPAS) that could enable remote detection of trace gases via a field-portable laser-based system. A fielded DPAS system has the potential to enable rapid, early warning of airborne chemical threats. DPAS is a new form of photoacoustic spectroscopy that relies on a laser beam swept at the speed of sound to amplify an otherwise weak photoacoustic signal. We experimentally determine the sensitivity of this technique using trace quantities of SF6 gas. A clutter-limited sensitivity of ˜100 ppt is estimated for an integration path of 0.43 m. Additionally, detection at ranges over 5 m using two different detection modalities is demonstrated: a parabolic microphone and a laser vibrometer. Its utility in detecting ammonia emanating from solid samples in an ambient environment is also demonstrated.

  17. Drop coating deposition Raman spectroscopy of blood plasma for the detection of colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengpeng; Chen, Changshui; Deng, Xiaoyuan; Mao, Hua; Jin, Shaoqin

    2015-03-01

    We have recently applied the technique of drop coating deposition Raman (DCDR) spectroscopy for colorectal cancer (CRC) detection using blood plasma. The aim of this study was to develop a more convenient and stable method based on blood plasma for noninvasive CRC detection. Significant differences are observed in DCDR spectra between healthy (n=105) and cancer (n=75) plasma from 15 CRC patients and 21 volunteers, particularly in the spectra that are related to proteins, nucleic acids, and β-carotene. The multivariate analysis principal components analysis and the linear discriminate analysis, together with leave-one-out, cross validation were used on DCDR spectra and yielded a sensitivity of 100% (75/75) and specificity of 98.1% (103/105) for detection of CRC. This study demonstrates that DCDR spectroscopy of blood plasma associated with multivariate statistical algorithms has the potential for the noninvasive detection of CRC.

  18. Hyperspectral image analysis for standoff trace detection using IR laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, J.; Fuchs, F.; Hugger, S.; Ostendorf, R.; Butschek, L.; Yang, Q.; Dreyhaupt, A.; Grahmann, J.; Wagner, J.

    2016-05-01

    In the recent past infrared laser backscattering spectroscopy using Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCL) emitting in the molecular fingerprint region between 7.5 μm and 10 μm proved a highly promising approach for stand-off detection of dangerous substances. In this work we present an active illumination hyperspectral image sensor, utilizing QCLs as spectral selective illumination sources. A high performance Mercury Cadmium Telluride (MCT) imager is used for collection of the diffusely backscattered light. Well known target detection algorithms like the Adaptive Matched Subspace Detector and the Adaptive Coherent Estimator are used to detect pixel vectors in the recorded hyperspectral image that contain traces of explosive substances like PETN, RDX or TNT. In addition we present an extension of the backscattering spectroscopy technique towards real-time detection using a MOEMS EC-QCL.

  19. Deep Raman spectroscopy for the non-invasive standoff detection of concealed chemical threat agents.

    PubMed

    Izake, Emad L; Cletus, Biju; Olds, William; Sundarajoo, Shankaran; Fredericks, Peter M; Jaatinen, Esa

    2012-05-30

    Deep Raman spectroscopy has been utilized for the standoff detection of concealed chemical threat agents from a distance of 15 m under real life background illumination conditions. By using combined time and space resolved measurements, various explosive precursors hidden in opaque plastic containers were identified non-invasively. Our results confirm that combined time and space resolved Raman spectroscopy leads to higher selectivity towards the sub-layer over the surface layer as well as enhanced rejection of fluorescence from the container surface when compared to standoff spatially offset Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra that have minimal interference from the packaging material and good signal-to-noise ratio were acquired within 5 s of measurement time. A new combined time and space resolved Raman spectrometer has been designed with nanosecond laser excitation and gated detection, making it of lower cost and complexity than picosecond-based laboratory systems. PMID:22608458

  20. Propylene on Pt(111)I. Characterization of surface species by infra-red spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaera, Francisco; Chrysostomou, Demetrius

    2000-06-01

    The adsorption of propylene on Pt(111) single-crystal surfaces was characterized by reflection-absorption infra-red spectroscopy (RAIRS). The uptake of propylene on the surface at 90 K results in the development of at least four adsorption species as a function of coverage. Significant rehybridization of the CC double bond of propylene takes place at low coverages, so the molecule primarily interacts with the metal via two σ metalcarbon bonds. Below half-saturation, the molecule mainly bonds through the central carbon atom, but at higher coverage, the CC bond becomes flat, and the terminal methyl group tilts towards a more vertical orientation. Further dosing of propylene after saturation of the di-σ state leads to the build-up of a flat π-bonded second layer. Ultimately, a layer of condensed propylene could be grown on the surface under the vacuum conditions of the experiment as long as the temperature was kept below 80 K. Annealing of the low-temperature propylene-saturated Pt(111) surface first induces the desorption of the weakly held π species, and later, between 230 and 250 K, to the dehydrogenation and rearrangement of the remaining di-σ species to propylidyne (Pt 3CCH 2CH 3). The details of the conversion of propylene to propylidyne change somewhat with the conditions under which this transformation is carried out, and appear to involve a stable and identifiable intermediate [2-propyl, CH 3CH(Pt)CH 3, and/or propylidene, Pt 2CHCH 2CH 3]. Propylene π-bonding is also possible on propylidyne-saturated Pt(111) surfaces under vacuum.

  1. Chemical species of sulfur in prostate cancer cells studied by XANES spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czapla, Joanna; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Lekki, Janusz; Dulińska-Litewka, Joanna; Steininger, Ralph; Göttlicher, Jörg

    2013-12-01

    The role of sulfur in prostate cancer progression may be significant for understanding the process of carcinogenesis. This work, based on X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy, is focused on determination of sulfur chemical species occurring in prostate cancer cell lines. The experimental material consisted of four commercially available cell lines: three from metastasized prostate cancer (PC3, LNCaP, and DU145) and one, used as a control, from the non-tumourigenic peripheral zone of the prostate (PZ-HPV-7). The experiment was performed at the SUL-X beamline of the synchrotron radiation source ANKA, Karlsruhe (Germany). The K-edge XANES spectra of sulfur were analyzed by deconvolution in order to establish sulfur species that occur in prostate cancer cells and to find out whether there are any differences in their content between various cell lines. Experimental spectra were fitted in two ways: with two Gaussian peaks and one arctangent step function, and additionally by a Linear Combination Fit with spectra of reference compounds in order to obtain quantitative chemical information. All fitting procedures were performed with the Athena code (Ravel and Newville, 2005) and the results of deconvolution were used to determine the fraction of each sulfur form. The results of data analysis showed that cell lines from different metastasis had different ratio of reduced to oxidized sulfur species. The LCF analysis demonstrated that the highest content of GSH, one of the most important sulfur-bearing compounds in cells, was observed in DU145 cells. These findings may confirm the hypothesis of changes in redox balance in case of cancer initiation and progression.

  2. Fluid Properties Measurements Using Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy with First Harmonic Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shin-Juh (Inventor); Silver, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An apparatus and method for monitoring gas velocity, temperature, and pressure in combustion systems and flow devices, in particular at inlets and isolators of scramjet engines. The invention employs wavelength modulation spectroscopy with first harmonic detection and without the need to scan the full absorption spectra.

  3. Detection of viruses: atomic force microscopy and surface enhanced raman spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper demonstrated the capability of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to function effectively as ultra-sensitive readout tools for chip-scale platforms designed for pathogen detection in complex biological media. AFM allows direct (i.e. label-free) vi...

  4. Reflectance spectroscopy detects management and landscape differences in soil carbon and nitrogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many studies document the successful calibration of visible and near infrared (VNIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) to various soil properties. However, few studies have reported on the use of VNIR DRS to detect treatment differences in controlled experiments. Therefore, our objective in thi...

  5. NEAR INFRARED IMAGING SPECTROSCOPY FOR DETECTING NEW AND OLD BRUISES ON APPLES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to investigate the potential of near-infrared (NIR) imaging spectroscopy for detecting new and old bruises on apple fruit in the spectral region between 900 nm and 1700 nm. Experiments were conducted to acquire hyperspectral image cubes from Red Delicious and Gold...

  6. Stand-off detection of explosives and precursors using compressive sensing Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svanqvist, Mattias; Glimtoft, Martin; Ågren, Matilda; Nordberg, Markus; Östmark, Henric

    2016-05-01

    We present initial results on the performance of a compressive sensing setup for Raman imaging spectroscopy for standoff trace explosives detection. Hyperspectral image reconstruction is demonstrated under low signal conditions and successful spatial separation of substances with close lying Raman peaks is shown.

  7. Surface enhanced raman spectroscopy technique in rapid detection of live and dead salmonella cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many research proved that Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) can detect pathogens rapidly and accurately. In this study, a silver metal substrate was used for the selected common food pathogen Salmonella typhimurium bacteria. Nano silver rods were deposited on a thin titanium coating over t...

  8. Investigation of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy for hemozoin detection in malaria diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Keren; Xiong, Aoli; Yuen, Clement; Preiser, Peter; Liu, Quan

    2016-03-01

    We report two methods of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for hemozoin detection in malaria infected human blood. In the first method, silver nanoparticles were synthesized separately and then mixed with lysed blood; while in the second method, silver nanoparticles were synthesized directly inside the parasites of Plasmodium falciparum.

  9. Detection biases yield misleading patterns of species persistence and colonization in fragmented landscapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruiz-Gutierrez, Viviana; Zipkin, Elise F.

    2011-01-01

    Species occurrence patterns, and related processes of persistence, colonization and turnover, are increasingly being used to infer habitat suitability, predict species distributions, and measure biodiversity potential. The majority of these studies do not account for observational error in their analyses despite growing evidence suggesting that the sampling process can significantly influence species detection and subsequently, estimates of occurrence. We examined the potential biases of species occurrence patterns that can result from differences in detectability across species and habitat types using hierarchical multispecies occupancy models applied to a tropical bird community in an agricultural fragmented landscape. Our results suggest that detection varies widely among species and habitat types. Not incorporating detectability severely biased occupancy dynamics for many species by overestimating turnover rates, producing misleading patterns of persistence and colonization of agricultural habitats, and misclassifying species into ecological categories (i.e., forest specialists and generalists). This is of serious concern, given that most research on the ability of agricultural lands to maintain current levels of biodiversity by and large does not correct for differences in detectability. We strongly urge researchers to apply an inferential framework which explicitly account for differences in detectability to fully characterize species-habitat relationships, correctly guide biodiversity conservation in human-modified landscapes, and generate more accurate predictions of species responses to future changes in environmental conditions.

  10. Proportional counter device for detecting electronegative species in an air sample

    DOEpatents

    Allman, S.L.; Chen, F.C.; Chen, C.H.

    1994-03-08

    Apparatus for detecting an electronegative species comprises an analysis chamber, an inlet communicating with the analysis chamber for admitting a sample containing the electronegative species and an ionizable component, a radioactive source within the analysis chamber for emitting radioactive energy for ionizing a component of the sample, a proportional electron detector within the analysis chamber for detecting electrons emitted from the ionized component, and a circuit for measuring the electrons and determining the presence of the electronegative species by detecting a reduction in the number of available electrons due to capture of electrons by the electronegative species. 2 figures.

  11. Proportional counter device for detecting electronegative species in an air sample

    DOEpatents

    Allman, Steve L.; Chen, Fang C.; Chen, Chung-Hsuan

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus for detecting an electronegative species comprises an analysis chamber, an inlet communicating with the analysis chamber for admitting a sample containing the electronegative species and an ionizable component, a radioactive source within the analysis chamber for emitting radioactive energy for ionizing a component of the sample, a proportional electron detector within the analysis chamber for detecting electrons emitted from the ionized component, and a circuit for measuring the electrons and determining the presence of the electronegative species by detecting a reduction in the number of available electrons due to capture of electrons by the electronegative species.

  12. Evaluation of morphological and chemical aspects of different wood species by spectroscopy and thermal methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Maria-Cristina; Popescu, Carmen-Mihaela; Lisa, Gabriela; Sakata, Yusaku

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study is to find the most convenient procedure to make an easy differentiation between various kinds of wood. The wood samples used were: fir (Acer alba), poplar (Populus tremula), lime (Tillia cordata), sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus), sweet cherry (Prunus avium), hornbeam (Carpinus betulus), walnut (Juglans regia), beech (Fagus sylvatica), oak (Quercus robur). The methods of investigation used were FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetry. By FT-IR spectroscopy, was observed that the ratio values of lignin/carbohydrate IR bands for wood decreases with increasing the average wood density, showing a decrease in lignin content. Also, the calculated values of lignin percentage from the FT-IR spectra are in very good correlation with the values from literature. Following the deconvolution process of the X-ray diffraction patterns, it was found that the degree of crystallinity, the apparent lateral crystallite size, the proportion of crystallite interior chains and cellulose fraction tend to increase with increasing of the wood density. Thermal analysis is able to give information about degradation temperatures for the principal components of different wood samples. The shape of DTG curves depends on the wood species that cause the enlargement of the peaks or the maxima of the decomposition step varies at larger or smaller temperatures ranges. The temperatures and weight loss percentage are particular for each kind of wood. This study showed that analytical methods used have the potential to be important sources of information for a quick evaluation of the chemical composition of wood samples.

  13. Unsupervised corpus distillation for represented indicator measurement on focus species detection.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chih-Hsuan; Kao, Hung-Yu

    2013-01-01

    The gene ambiguity with the highest dimension is the species with which an entity is associated in biomedical text mining. Furthermore, one of the bottlenecks in gene normalisation is focus species detection. This study presents a method which is robust for all types of articles, particularly those without explicit species mentions. Since our method requires a training corpus, we developed an iterative distillation method to extend the corpus. Unsupervised corpus is therefore helpful for the detection of focus species. In experiments, the proposed method achieved a high accuracy of 85.64% and 84.32% in datasets with and without species mentions respectively. PMID:24400519

  14. Multiplex PCR assay for the detection of five meat species forbidden in Islamic foods.

    PubMed

    Ali, Md Eaqub; Razzak, Md Abdur; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abd; Rahman, Md Mahfujur; Amin, Md Al; Rashid, Nur Raifana Abd; Asing

    2015-06-15

    Food falsification has direct impact on public health, religious faith, fair-trades and wildlife. For the first time, here we described a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for the accurate identification of five meat species forbidden in Islamic foods in a single assay platform. Five pairs of species-specific primers were designed targeting mitochondrial ND5, ATPase 6, and cytochrome b genes to amplify 172, 163, 141, 129 and 108 bp DNA fragments from cat, dog, pig, monkey and rat meats, respectively. All PCR products were identified in gel-images and electrochromatograms obtained from Experion Bioanalyzer. Species-specificity checking against 15 important meat and fish and 5 plant species detected no cross-species amplification. Screening of target species in model and commercial meatballs reflected its application to detect target species in process foods. The assay was tested to detect 0.01-0.02 ng DNA under raw states and 1% suspected meats in meatball formulation. PMID:25660879

  15. Near-infrared spectroscopy as a complementary age grading and species identification tool for African malaria vectors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was recently applied to age-grade and differentiate laboratory reared Anopheles gambiae sensu strico and Anopheles arabiensis sibling species of Anopheles gambiae sensu lato. In this study, we report further on the accuracy of this tool in simultaneously estimating ...

  16. Non-destructive state detection for quantum logic spectroscopy of molecular ions.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Fabian; Wan, Yong; Heip, Jan C; Gebert, Florian; Shi, Chunyan; Schmidt, Piet O

    2016-02-25

    Precision laser spectroscopy of cold and trapped molecular ions is a powerful tool in fundamental physics--used, for example, in determining fundamental constants, testing for their possible variation in the laboratory, and searching for a possible electric dipole moment of the electron. However, the absence of cycling transitions in molecules poses a challenge for direct laser cooling of the ions, and for controlling and detecting their quantum states. Previously used state-detection techniques based on photodissociation or chemical reactions are destructive and therefore inefficient, restricting the achievable resolution in laser spectroscopy. Here, we experimentally demonstrate non-destructive detection of the quantum state of a single trapped molecular ion through its strong Coulomb coupling to a well controlled, co-trapped atomic ion. An algorithm based on a state-dependent optical dipole force changes the internal state of the atom according to the internal state of the molecule. We show that individual quantum states in the molecular ion can be distinguished by the strength of their coupling to the optical dipole force. We also observe quantum jumps (induced by black-body radiation) between rotational states of a single molecular ion. Using the detuning dependence of the state-detection signal, we implement a variant of quantum logic spectroscopy of a molecular resonance. Our state-detection technique is relevant to a wide range of molecular ions, and could be applied to state-controlled quantum chemistry and to spectroscopic investigations of molecules that serve as probes for interstellar clouds. PMID:26855427

  17. Detection of alpha and betacoronaviruses in multiple Iberian bat species.

    PubMed

    Falcón, Ana; Vázquez-Morón, Sonia; Casas, Inmaculada; Aznar, Carolina; Ruiz, Guillermo; Pozo, Francisco; Perez-Breña, Pilar; Juste, Javier; Ibáñez, Carlos; Garin, Inazio; Aihartza, Joxerra; Echevarría, Juan E

    2011-10-01

    Bat coronaviruses (CoV) are putative precursors of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) CoV and other CoV that crossed the species barrier from zoonotic reservoirs into the human population. To determine the presence and distribution of CoV in Iberian bats, 576 individuals of 26 different bat species were captured in 13 locations in Spain. We report for the first time the presence of 14 coronaviruses in 9 Iberian bat species. Phylogenetic analysis of a conserved CoV genome region (RdRp gene) shows a wide diversity and distribution of alpha and betacoronavirus in Spain. Interestingly, although some of these viruses are related to other European BatCoV, or to Asian CoV, some of the viruses found in Spain cluster in new groups of α and β CoV. PMID:21766197

  18. Detection of Explosives Using Differential Laser-Induced Perturbation Spectroscopy with a Raman-based Probe.

    PubMed

    Oztekin, Erman K; Burton, Dallas J; Hahn, David W

    2016-04-01

    Explosives detection is carried out with a novel spectral analysis technique referred to as differential laser-induced perturbation spectroscopy (DLIPS) on thin films of TNT, RDX, HMX, and PETN. The utility of Raman spectroscopy for detection of explosives is enhanced by inducing deep ultraviolet laser perturbation on molecular structures in combination with a differential Raman sensing scheme. Principal components analysis (PCA) is used to quantify the DLIPS method as benchmarked against a traditional Raman scattering probe, and the related photo-induced effects on the molecular structure of the targeted explosives are discussed in detail. Finally, unique detection is observed with TNT samples deposited on commonly available background substrates of nylon and polyester. Overall, the data support DLIPS as a noninvasive method that is promising for screening explosives in real-world environments and backgrounds. PMID:26865581

  19. Raman spectroscopy as a screening tool for ancient life detection on Mars.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Craig P; Marshall, Alison Olcott

    2014-12-13

    The search for sp(2)-bonded carbonaceous material is one of the major life detection strategies of the astrobiological exploration programmes of National Aeronautics and Space Administration and European Space Agency (ESA). The ESA ExoMars rover scheduled for launch in 2018 will include a Raman spectrometer with the goal of detecting sp(2)-bonded carbonaceous material as potential evidence of ancient life. However, sp(2)-bonded carbonaceous material will yield the same Raman spectra of well-developed G and D bands whether they are synthesized biologically or non-biologically. Therefore, the origin and source of sp(2)-bonded carbonaceous material cannot be elucidated by Raman spectroscopy alone. Here, we report the combined approach of Raman spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry biomarker analysis to Precambrian sedimentary rocks, which taken together, provides a promising new methodology for readily detecting and rapidly screening samples for immature organic material amenable to successful biomarker analysis. PMID:25368343

  20. Real-time detection of concealed chemical hazards under ambient light conditions using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cletus, Biju; Olds, William; Fredericks, Peter M; Jaatinen, Esa; Izake, Emad L

    2013-07-01

    Current concerns regarding terrorism and international crime highlight the need for new techniques for detecting unknown and hazardous substances. A novel Raman spectroscopy-based technique, spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS), was recently devised for noninvasively probing the contents of diffusely scattering and opaque containers. Here, we demonstrate a modified portable SORS sensor for detecting concealed substances in-field under different background lighting conditions. Samples including explosive precursors, drugs, and an organophosphate insecticide (chemical warfare agent surrogate) were concealed inside diffusely scattering packaging including plastic, paper, and cloth. Measurements were carried out under incandescent and fluorescent light as well as under daylight to assess the suitability of the probe for different real-life conditions. In each case, it was possible to identify the substances against their reference Raman spectra in less than 1 min. The developed sensor has potential for rapid detection of concealed hazardous substances in airports, mail distribution centers, and customs checkpoints. PMID:23692353

  1. Detection of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide using a miniaturised fibre-optic spectroscopy system and the ambient sunlight.

    PubMed

    Morales, J A; Walsh, J E

    2005-07-01

    A miniaturised fibre-optic spectrometer based system is presented for direct detection of one of the major atmospheric pollutants, nitrogen dioxide, by absorption spectroscopy using the ambient sunlight as light source. The detection system consists of a 10 cm collimator assembly, a fibre-optic cable and a portable diode-array spectrometer. The absorbance spectrum of the open-path is calculated using a reference spectrum recorded when the nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentration in the atmosphere is low. The relative concentration of the pollutant is calculated normalising the detected spectra and subtracting the background broadband spectrum from the specific NO2 absorbance features, since the broadband spectrum changes according to atmospheric conditions and solar intensity. Wavelengths between 400 and 500 nm are used in order to maximise sensitivity and to avoid interference from other species. Calibration is carried out using Tedlar sample bags of known concentration of the pollutant. A commercial differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) system is used as a reference standard detection system to compare the results with the new system. Results show that detection of NO2 at typical urban atmospheric levels has been achieved using an inexpensive field based fibre-optic spectrometer and a readily available, easy to align, light source. In addition the new system can be used to get a semi-quantitative estimation of the nitrogen dioxide concentration within errors of 20%. While keeping the typical benefits of open-path techniques, the new system has important advantages over them such as cost, simplicity and portability. PMID:15911394

  2. Comparison of two strategies for detection of reactive oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Weidong; Zhou, Yuanshu; Gu, Yueqing

    2014-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a clinically approved treatment that was applied to oncology , dermatology, and ophthalmology. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a important role in the efficacy of PDT. Online monitoring of reactive oxygen species is the key to understand effect of PDT treatment. We used Fluorescence probes DPBF and luminescent probe luminal to measure the ROS in cells. And we revaluate the relationship between the amount of light and cell survival. There is strongly correlated between the amount of light and cell kill.

  3. Short communication: rapid detection of milk fat adulteration with vegetable oil by fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ntakatsane, M P; Liu, X M; Zhou, P

    2013-04-01

    This study assessed the potential application of fluorescence spectroscopy in detecting adulteration of milk fat with vegetable oil and characterizing the samples according to the source of the fat. Pure butterfat was adulterated with different vegetable oils at various concentrations (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, and 40%). Nonfat and reduced-fat milk were also adulterated with vegetable oils to simulate full-fat milk (3.2%). The 2- and 3-dimensional front-face fluorescence spectroscopy and gas chromatography were used to obtain the fluorescence spectra and fatty acid profile, respectively. Principal component analysis and 3-way partial least squares regression analysis were applied to analyze the data. The pure and adulterated samples were discriminated based on the total concentration of saturated fatty acids and unsaturated fatty acids, and also on the 3 major fluorophores: tryptophan, tocopherols, and riboflavin. Fluorescence spectroscopy was able to detect up to 5% of adulteration of vegetable oil into the butterfat. The saturated fatty acids showed higher predictability than the unsaturated fatty acids (R(2) = 0.73-0.92 vs. 0.20-0.65, respectively). The study demonstrated the high potential of fluorescence spectroscopy to rapidly detect adulteration of milk fat with vegetable oil, and discriminate commercial butter and milk according to the source of the fat. PMID:23415535

  4. Detection of metanil yellow contamination in turmeric using FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Sagar; Chao, Kuanglin; Qin, Jianwei; Kim, Moon; Schmidt, Walter; Chan, Dian

    2016-05-01

    Turmeric is well known for its medicinal value and is often used in Asian cuisine. Economically motivated contamination of turmeric by chemicals such as metanil yellow has been repeatedly reported. Although traditional technologies can detect such contaminants in food, high operational costs and operational complexities have limited their use to the laboratory. This study used Fourier Transform Raman Spectroscopy (FT-Raman) and Fourier Transform - Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) to identify metanil yellow contamination in turmeric powder. Mixtures of metanil yellow in turmeric were prepared at concentrations of 30%, 25%, 20%, 15%, 10%, 5%, 1% and 0.01% (w/w). The FT-Raman and FT-IR spectral signal of pure turmeric powder, pure metanil yellow powder and the 8 sample mixtures were obtained and analyzed independently to identify metanil yellow contamination in turmeric. The results show that FT-Raman spectroscopy and FT-IR spectroscopy can detect metanil yellow mixed with turmeric at concentrations as low as 1% and 5%, respectively, and may be useful for non-destructive detection of adulterated turmeric powder.

  5. Erythrocyte membrane analysis for type II diabetes detection using Raman spectroscopy in high-wavenumber region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jinyong; Zeng, Yongyi; Lin, Juqiang; Wang, Jing; Li, Ling; Huang, Zufang; Li, Buhong; Zeng, Haishan; Chen, Rong

    2014-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy was employed to detect lipid variation occurring in type II diabetic erythrocyte membrane (EM) without using exogenous reagents. In high-wavenumber (HW) region, significant Raman spectral differences between diabetic and normal EM are observed at 2850, 2873, 2885, 2935, and 2965 cm-1, which are mainly related to lipid in EM. Based on principal component analysis, the diagnostic accuracy of HW region for diabetes detection is 98.8%, which is much higher than that of low-wavenumber region (82.9%). The results suggest that EM HW Raman region has great promise for the reagent-free and non-invasive detection of type II diabetes.

  6. Quantitative elemental detection of size-segregated particles using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen Zhen; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Kuwahara, Masakazu; Taira, Takuya; Zhang, Xiao Bo; Yan, Jun Jie; Liu, Ji Ping; Watanabe, Hiroaki; Kurose, Ryoichi

    2013-09-01

    In order to simulate coal combustion and develop optimal and stable boiler control systems in real power plants, it is imperative to obtain the detailed information in coal combustion processes as well as to measure species contents in fly ash, which should be controlled and analyzed for enhancing boiler efficiency and reducing environmental pollution. The fly ash consists of oxides (SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, CaO, and so on), unburned carbon, and other minor elements. Recently laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique has been applied to coal combustion and other industrial fields because of the fast response, high sensitivity, real-time and non-contact features. In these applications it is important to measure controlling factors without any sample preparation to maintain the real-time measurement feature. The relation between particle content and particle diameter is also one of the vital researches, because compositions of particles are dependent on their diameter. In this study, we have detected the contents of size-segregated particles using LIBS. Particles were classified by an Anderson cascade impactor and their contents were measured using the output of 1064 nm YAG laser, a spectrograph and an ICCD camera. The plasma conditions such as plasma temperature are dependent on the size of particles and these effects must be corrected to obtain quantitative information. The plasma temperature was corrected by the emission intensity ratio from the same atom. Using this correction method, the contents of particles can be measured quantitatively in fixed experimental parameters. This method was applied to coal and fly ash from a coal-fired burner to measure unburned carbon and other contents according to the particle diameter. The acquired results demonstrate that the LIBS technique is applicable to measure size-segregated particle contents in real time and this method is useful for the analysis of coal combustion and its control because of its sensitive and

  7. [Application of near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to the detection and identification of transgenic corn].

    PubMed

    Rui, Yu-kui; Luo, Yun-bo; Huang, Kun-lun; Wang, Wei-min; Zhang, Lu-da

    2005-10-01

    With the rapid development of the GMO, more and more GMO food has been pouring into the market. Much attention has been paid to GMO labeling under the controversy of GMO safety. Transgenic corns and their parents were scanned by continuous wave of near infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy range of 12000-4000 cm(-1); the resolution was 4 cm(-1); scanning was carried out for 64 times; BP algorithm was applied for data processing. The GMO food was easily resolved. Near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is unpolluted and inexpensive compared with PCR and ELISA, so it is a very promising detection method for GMO food. PMID:16395887

  8. Detecting the formation of single-walled carbon nanotube rings by photoabsorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hida, Akira; Suzuki, Takayuki; Ishibashi, Koji

    2016-08-01

    Photoabsorption spectroscopy was conducted on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) during the formation of ring structures. The absorption bands observed before starting the formation gradually shifted while broadening in the middle. When they finally disappeared, it was found, via atomic force microscopy observations, that almost all SWNTs were transformed into rings. The spectral changes were assumed to be due to the changes in the electronic states of SWNTs. This idea was supported by the results of an investigation using a scanning tunneling microscope. It could be said that photoabsorption spectroscopy is useful for detecting ring formation in situ.

  9. Characterization of Phosphorus Species in Biosolids and Manures Using XANES Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shober,A.; Hesterberg, D.; Sims, J.; Gardner, S.

    2006-01-01

    Received for publication March 10, 2006. Identification of the chemical P species in biosolids or manures will improve our understanding of the long-term potential for P loss when these materials are land applied. The objectives of this study were to determine the P species in dairy manures, poultry litters, and biosolids using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and to determine if chemical fractionation techniques can provide useful information when interpreted based on the results of more definitive P speciation studies. Our XANES fitting results indicated that the predominant forms of P in organic P sources included hydroxylapatite, PO{sub 4} sorbed to Al hydroxides, and phytic acid in lime-stabilized biosolids and manures; hydroxylapatite, PO{sub 4} sorbed on ferrihydrite, and phytic acid in lime- and Fe-treated biosolids; and PO{sub 4} sorbed on ferrihydrite, hydroxylapatite, {beta}-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP), and often PO{sub 4} sorbed to Al hydroxides in Fe-treated and digested biosolids. Strong relationships existed between the proportions of XANES PO{sub 4} sorbed to Al hydroxides and NH{sub 4}Cl- + NH{sub 4}F-extractable P, XANES PO{sub 4} sorbed to ferrihydrite + phytic acid and NaOH-extractable P, and XANES hydroxylapatite + {beta}-TCP and dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB)- + H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-extractable P ({gamma}{sup 2} = 0.67 [P = 0.01], 0.78 [P = 0.01], and 0.89 [P = 0.001], respectively). Our XANES fitting results can be used to make predictions about long-term solubility of P when biosolids and manures are land applied. Fractionation techniques indicate that there are differences in the forms of P in these materials but should be interpreted based on P speciation data obtained using more advanced analytical tools.

  10. Predicting the geographic distribution of a species from presence-only data subject to detection errors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorazio, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Several models have been developed to predict the geographic distribution of a species by combining measurements of covariates of occurrence at locations where the species is known to be present with measurements of the same covariates at other locations where species occurrence status (presence or absence) is unknown. In the absence of species detection errors, spatial point-process models and binary-regression models for case-augmented surveys provide consistent estimators of a species’ geographic distribution without prior knowledge of species prevalence. In addition, these regression models can be modified to produce estimators of species abundance that are asymptotically equivalent to those of the spatial point-process models. However, if species presence locations are subject to detection errors, neither class of models provides a consistent estimator of covariate effects unless the covariates of species abundance are distinct and independently distributed from the covariates of species detection probability. These analytical results are illustrated using simulation studies of data sets that contain a wide range of presence-only sample sizes. Analyses of presence-only data of three avian species observed in a survey of landbirds in western Montana and northern Idaho are compared with site-occupancy analyses of detections and nondetections of these species.

  11. Identification and quantification of oxygen species adsorbed on Pt(111) single-crystal and polycrystalline Pt electrodes by photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wakisaka, Mitsuru; Suzuki, Hirokazu; Mitsui, Satoshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masahiro

    2009-02-17

    We have positively identified oxygen species on Pt(111) single-crystal and polycrystalline Pt electrodes in N2-purged 0.1 M HF solution by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with an electrochemical cell. Four oxygen species (Oad, OHad, and two types of water molecules) were distinguished. The binding energies of each species were nearly constant over the whole potential region and independent of the single- or polycrystalline electrodes. The coverages, however, varied considerably and were dependent on the electrode potential. We have for the first time demonstrated clear differences in the surface oxidation processes for Pt(111) and polycrystalline Pt electrodes. PMID:19152331

  12. Detection and quantification of poliovirus infection using FTIR spectroscopy and cell culture

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In a globalized word, prevention of infectious diseases is a major challenge. Rapid detection of viable virus particles in water and other environmental samples is essential to public health risk assessment, homeland security and environmental protection. Current virus detection methods, especially assessing viral infectivity, are complex and time-consuming, making point-of-care detection a challenge. Faster, more sensitive, highly specific methods are needed to quantify potentially hazardous viral pathogens and to determine if suspected materials contain viable viral particles. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy combined with cellular-based sensing, may offer a precise way to detect specific viruses. This approach utilizes infrared light to monitor changes in molecular components of cells by tracking changes in absorbance patterns produced following virus infection. In this work poliovirus (PV1) was used to evaluate the utility of FTIR spectroscopy with cell culture for rapid detection of infective virus particles. Results Buffalo green monkey kidney (BGMK) cells infected with different virus titers were studied at 1 - 12 hours post-infection (h.p.i.). A partial least squares (PLS) regression method was used to analyze and model cellular responses to different infection titers and times post-infection. The model performs best at 8 h.p.i., resulting in an estimated root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV) of 17 plaque forming units (PFU)/ml when using low titers of infection of 10 and 100 PFU/ml. Higher titers, from 103 to 106 PFU/ml, could also be reliably detected. Conclusions This approach to poliovirus detection and quantification using FTIR spectroscopy and cell culture could potentially be extended to compare biochemical cell responses to infection with different viruses. This virus detection method could feasibly be adapted to an automated scheme for use in areas such as water safety monitoring and medical diagnostics. PMID

  13. Quantitative Detection of Pharmaceuticals Using a Combination of Paper Microfluidics and Wavelength Modulated Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Derek; Mazilu, Michael; Dholakia, Kishan

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has proven to be an indispensable technique for the identification of various types of analytes due to the fingerprint vibration spectrum obtained. Paper microfluidics has also emerged as a low cost, easy to fabricate and portable approach for point of care testing. However, due to inherent background fluorescence, combining Raman spectroscopy with paper microfluidics is to date an unmet challenge in the absence of using surface enhanced mechanisms. We describe the first use of wavelength modulated Raman spectroscopy (WMRS) for analysis on a paper microfluidics platform. This study demonstrates the ability to suppress the background fluorescence of the paper using WMRS and the subsequent implementation of this technique for pharmaceutical analysis. The results of this study demonstrate that it is possible to discriminate between both paracetamol and ibuprofen, whilst, also being able to detect the presence of each analyte quantitatively at nanomolar concentrations. PMID:25938464

  14. Spatially offset Raman spectroscopy for explosives detection through difficult (opaque) containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskall, Guy T.; Bonthron, Stuart; Crawford, David

    2013-10-01

    With the continuing threat to aviation security from homemade explosive devices, the restrictions on taking a volume of liquid greater than 100 ml onto an aircraft remain in place. From January 2014, these restrictions will gradually be reduced via a phased implementation of technological screening of Liquids, Aerosols and Gels (LAGs). Raman spectroscopy offers a highly sensitive, and specific, technique for the detection and identification of chemicals. Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS), in particular, offers significant advantages over conventional Raman spectroscopy for detecting and recognizing contents within optically challenging (Raman active) containers. Containers vary enormously in their composition; glass type, plastic type, thickness, reflectance, and pigmentation are all variable and cause an infinite range of absorbances, fluorescence backgrounds, Rayleigh backscattered laser light, and container Raman bands. In this paper we show that the data processing chain for Cobalt Light Systems' INSIGHT100 bottlescanner is robust to such variability. We discuss issues of model selection for the detection stage and demonstrate an overall detection rate across a wide range of threats and containers of 97% with an associated false alarm rate of 0.1% or lower.

  15. Removal of Species Constraints in Antibody Detection

    PubMed Central

    Basile, Alison Jane; Biggerstaff, Brad J.; Kosoy, Olga L.; Junna, Shilpa R.; Panella, Nicholas A.; Powers, Ann M.; Stark, Lillian M.; Nemeth, Nicole M.

    2010-01-01

    Serum antibodies from myriad species, particularly birds, can provide key information regarding the transmission and the expansion of the territory of emerging pathogens. Expedient antibody analysis is constrained by a lack of species-specific reagents, a deficiency potentially highlighted by the recent swine-origin influenza A virus (H1N1) outbreak. Available methodologies present difficulties that discourage thorough serologic monitoring of potential disease vectors or hosts. Rapid high-throughput procedures that combined serum amine labeling via biotinylation, contaminant removal, and microsphere-based immunoassays for antibodies to three arboviruses were developed. Agent-specific adaptations of this simple format should facilitate expanded surveillance and diagnostic capabilities regarding pathogens of human and veterinary importance. PMID:19923570

  16. Development of Multiplex PCR for Simultaneous Detection of Three Pathogenic Shigella Species

    PubMed Central

    RANJBAR, Reza; AFSHAR, Davoud; MEHRABI TAVANA, Ali; NAJAFI, Ali; POURALI, Fatemeh; SAFIRI, Zahra; SOROURI ZANJANI, Rahim; JONAIDI JAFARI, Nematollah

    2014-01-01

    Background: Shigella species are among the common causes of bacterial diarrhoeal diseases. Traditional detection methods are time-consuming resulting in delay in treatment and control of Shigella infections thus there is a need to develop molecular methods for rapid and simultaneous detection of Shigella spp. In this study a rapid multiplex PCR were developed for simultaneous detection of three pathogenic Shigella species. Methods: For detection of Shigella spp., a pair of primers was used to replicate a chromosomal sequence. Three other sets of primers were also designed to amplify the target genes of three most common species of Shigella in Iran including S. sonnei, S. flexneri and S. boydii. The multiplex PCR assay was optimized for simultaneous detection and differentiation of three pathogenic Shigella species. The assay specificity was investigated by testing different strains of Shigella and other additional strains belonging to non Shigella species, but responsible for foodborne diseases. Results: The Shigella genus specific PCR yielded the expected DNA band of 159 bp in all tested strains belonging to four Shigella species. The standard and multiplex PCR assays also produced the expected fragments of 248 bp, 503 bp, and 314 bp, for S. boydii, S. sonnei and S. flexneri, respectively. Each species-specific primer pair did not show any cross-reactivity. Conclusion: Both standard and multiplex PCR protocols had a good specificity. They can provide a valuable tool for the rapid and simultaneous detection and differentiation of three most prevalent Shigella species in Iran. PMID:26171358

  17. Fast and sensitive method for detecting volatile species in liquids.

    PubMed

    Trimarco, Daniel B; Pedersen, Thomas; Hansen, Ole; Chorkendorff, Ib; Vesborg, Peter C K

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a novel apparatus for extracting volatile species from liquids using a "sniffer-chip." By ultrafast transfer of the volatile species through a perforated and hydrophobic membrane into an inert carrier gas stream, the sniffer-chip is able to transport the species directly to a mass spectrometer through a narrow capillary without the use of differential pumping. This method inherits features from differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS) and membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS), but brings the best of both worlds, i.e., the fast time-response of a DEMS system and the high sensitivity of a MIMS system. In this paper, the concept of the sniffer-chip is thoroughly explained and it is shown how it can be used to quantify hydrogen and oxygen evolution on a polycrystalline platinum thin film in situ at absolute faradaic currents down to ∼30 nA. To benchmark the capabilities of this method, a CO-stripping experiment is performed on a polycrystalline platinum thin film, illustrating how the sniffer-chip system is capable of making a quantitative in situ measurement of <1% of a monolayer of surface adsorbed CO being electrochemically stripped off an electrode at a potential scan-rate of 50 mV s(-1). PMID:26233407

  18. Fast and sensitive method for detecting volatile species in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimarco, Daniel B.; Pedersen, Thomas; Hansen, Ole; Chorkendorff, Ib; Vesborg, Peter C. K.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a novel apparatus for extracting volatile species from liquids using a "sniffer-chip." By ultrafast transfer of the volatile species through a perforated and hydrophobic membrane into an inert carrier gas stream, the sniffer-chip is able to transport the species directly to a mass spectrometer through a narrow capillary without the use of differential pumping. This method inherits features from differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS) and membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS), but brings the best of both worlds, i.e., the fast time-response of a DEMS system and the high sensitivity of a MIMS system. In this paper, the concept of the sniffer-chip is thoroughly explained and it is shown how it can be used to quantify hydrogen and oxygen evolution on a polycrystalline platinum thin film in situ at absolute faradaic currents down to ˜30 nA. To benchmark the capabilities of this method, a CO-stripping experiment is performed on a polycrystalline platinum thin film, illustrating how the sniffer-chip system is capable of making a quantitative in situ measurement of <1 % of a monolayer of surface adsorbed CO being electrochemically stripped off an electrode at a potential scan-rate of 50 mV s-1.

  19. Label-Free Toxin Detection by Means of Time-Resolved Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Changhoon; Takhistov, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The real-time detection of trace concentrations of biological toxins requires significant improvement of the detection methods from those reported in the literature. To develop a highly sensitive and selective detection device it is necessary to determine the optimal measuring conditions for the electrochemical sensor in three domains: time, frequency and polarization potential. In this work we utilized a time-resolved electrochemical impedance spectroscopy for the detection of trace concentrations of Staphylococcus enterotoxin B (SEB). An anti-SEB antibody has been attached to the nano-porous aluminum surface using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane/glutaraldehyde coupling system. This immobilization method allows fabrication of a highly reproducible and stable sensing device. Using developed immobilization procedure and optimized detection regime, it is possible to determine the presence of SEB at the levels as low as 10 pg/mL in 15 minutes. PMID:22315560

  20. Species-Specific Detection and Identification of Fusarium Species Complex, the Causal Agent of Sugarcane Pokkah Boeng in China

    PubMed Central

    Que, Youxiong; Wang, Jihua; Comstock, Jack C.; Wei, Jinjin; McCord, Per H.; Chen, Baoshan; Chen, Rukai; Zhang, Muqing

    2014-01-01

    Background Pokkah boeng disease caused by the Fusarium species complex results in significant yield losses in sugarcane. Thus, the rapid and accurate detection and identification of the pathogen is urgently required to manage and prevent the spreading of sugarcane pokkah boeng. Methods A total of 101 isolates were recovered from the pokkah boeng samples collected from five major sugarcane production areas in China throughout 2012 and 2013. The causal pathogen was identified by morphological observation, pathogenicity test, and phylogenetic analysis based on the fungus-conserved rDNA-ITS. Species-specific TaqMan real-time PCR and conventional PCR methods were developed for rapid and accurate detection of the causal agent of sugarcane pokkah boeng. The specificity and sensitivity of PCR assay were also evaluated on a total of 84 isolates of Fusarium from China and several isolates from other fungal pathogens of Sporisorium scitamineum and Phoma sp. and sugarcane endophyte of Acremonium sp. Result Two Fusarium species (F. verticillioides and F. proliferatum) that caused sugarcane pokahh boeng were identified by morphological observation, pathogenicity test, and phylogenetic analysis. Species-specific TaqMan PCR and conventional PCR were designed and optimized to target their rDNA-ITS regions. The sensitivity of the TaqMan PCR was approximately 10 pg of fungal DNA input, which was 1,000-fold over conventional PCR, and successfully detected pokkah boeng in the field-grown sugarcane. Conclusions/Significance This study was the first to identify two species, F. verticillioides and F. proliferatum, that were causal pathogens of sugarcane pokkah boeng in China. It also described the development of a species-specific PCR assay to detect and confirm these pathogens in sugarcane plants from mainland China. This method will be very useful for a broad range of research endeavors as well as the regulatory response and management of sugarcane pokkah boeng. PMID:25141192

  1. [Progress in Application of Two-Dimensional Correlation Spectroscopy for Detection of Food Quality].

    PubMed

    Yang, Ren-jie; Yang, Yan-rong; Liu, Hai-xue; Dong, Gui-mei; Du, Yan-hong; Shan, Hui-yong; Zhang, Wei-yu

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, the food safety and quality has always been a serious issue. Therefore, it is urgent to develop a rapid and widely available method to determine the quality of food. Due to high spectral resolution, good spectral selectivity and good ability of spectrogram analysis, the technology of two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectroscopy is an effective method for solving three major problems encountered by the conventional one-dimensional (1D) spectrum: low selectivity of the spectra, difficulty in extracting the information of the spectral feature and difficulty in spectrogram analysis. Therefore, 2D correlation spectroscopy, which is suited to distinguish similar samples hardly distinguished by the conventional 1D spectroscopy, has been successfully applied in many complex biological systems. The developmental process, the experimental way to obtain spectrum, the fundamental mathematical principle and the properties of 2D correlation spectroscopy were introduced in this paper. At the same time, it is pointed out that the origin of weak characteristic bands of substance can be verified in terms of the positive or negative corss peaks in synchronous 2D correlation spectrum combined with the existence or inexistence of corss peaks in asynchronous 2D correlation spectrum. The application of 2D near-infrared, mid-infrared, fluorescence, and raman correlation spectroscopy in the detection of food quality and adulteration, concentrated specifically on diary product, wine, oil, meat, honey, and rice were reviewed. Finally, the limitations and future development prospects were pointed out. PMID:26672279

  2. Identification of different oxygen species in oxide nanostructures with (17)O solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Wu, Xin-Ping; Zheng, Sujuan; Zhao, Li; Li, Lei; Shen, Li; Gao, Yuxian; Xue, Nianhua; Guo, Xuefeng; Huang, Weixin; Gan, Zhehong; Blanc, Frédéric; Yu, Zhiwu; Ke, Xiaokang; Ding, Weiping; Gong, Xue-Qing; Grey, Clare P; Peng, Luming

    2015-02-01

    Nanostructured oxides find multiple uses in a diverse range of applications including catalysis, energy storage, and environmental management, their higher surface areas, and, in some cases, electronic properties resulting in different physical properties from their bulk counterparts. Developing structure-property relations for these materials requires a determination of surface and subsurface structure. Although microscopy plays a critical role owing to the fact that the volumes sampled by such techniques may not be representative of the whole sample, complementary characterization methods are urgently required. We develop a simple nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) strategy to detect the first few layers of a nanomaterial, demonstrating the approach with technologically relevant ceria nanoparticles. We show that the (17)O resonances arising from the first to third surface layer oxygen ions, hydroxyl sites, and oxygen species near vacancies can be distinguished from the oxygen ions in the bulk, with higher-frequency (17)O chemical shifts being observed for the lower coordinated surface sites. H2 (17)O can be used to selectively enrich surface sites, allowing only these particular active sites to be monitored in a chemical process. (17)O NMR spectra of thermally treated nanosized ceria clearly show how different oxygen species interconvert at elevated temperature. Density functional theory calculations confirm the assignments and reveal a strong dependence of chemical shift on the nature of the surface. These results open up new strategies for characterizing nanostructured oxides and their applications. PMID:26601133

  3. Identification of different oxygen species in oxide nanostructures with 17O solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Wu, Xin-Ping; Zheng, Sujuan; Zhao, Li; Li, Lei; Shen, Li; Gao, Yuxian; Xue, Nianhua; Guo, Xuefeng; Huang, Weixin; Gan, Zhehong; Blanc, Frédéric; Yu, Zhiwu; Ke, Xiaokang; Ding, Weiping; Gong, Xue-Qing; Grey, Clare P.; Peng, Luming

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured oxides find multiple uses in a diverse range of applications including catalysis, energy storage, and environmental management, their higher surface areas, and, in some cases, electronic properties resulting in different physical properties from their bulk counterparts. Developing structure-property relations for these materials requires a determination of surface and subsurface structure. Although microscopy plays a critical role owing to the fact that the volumes sampled by such techniques may not be representative of the whole sample, complementary characterization methods are urgently required. We develop a simple nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) strategy to detect the first few layers of a nanomaterial, demonstrating the approach with technologically relevant ceria nanoparticles. We show that the 17O resonances arising from the first to third surface layer oxygen ions, hydroxyl sites, and oxygen species near vacancies can be distinguished from the oxygen ions in the bulk, with higher-frequency 17O chemical shifts being observed for the lower coordinated surface sites. H217O can be used to selectively enrich surface sites, allowing only these particular active sites to be monitored in a chemical process. 17O NMR spectra of thermally treated nanosized ceria clearly show how different oxygen species interconvert at elevated temperature. Density functional theory calculations confirm the assignments and reveal a strong dependence of chemical shift on the nature of the surface. These results open up new strategies for characterizing nanostructured oxides and their applications. PMID:26601133

  4. Simultaneous species concentration and temperature measurements using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy with direct spectrum matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGann, Brendan J.

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is used to simultaneously measure hydrocarbon fuel concentration and temperature in high temperature, high speed, compressible, and reacting flows, a regime in which LIBS has not been done previously. Emission spectra from the plasma produced from a focused laser pulse is correlated in the combustion region of a model scramjet operating in supersonic wind tunnel. A 532 nm Nd:YAG laser operating at 10 Hz is used to induce break-down. The emissions are captured during a 10 ns gate time approximately 75 ns after the first arrival of photons at the measurement location in order to minimize the measurement uncertainty in the turbulent, compressible, high-speed, and reacting environment. Three methods of emission detection are used and a new backward scattering direction method is developed that is beneficial in reducing the amount of optical access needed to perform LIBS measurements. Measurements are taken in the model supersonic combustion and the ignition process is shown to be highly dependent on fuel concentration and gas density as well as combustion surface temperature, concentration gradient, and flow field. Direct spectrum matching method is developed and used for quantitative measurements. In addition, a comprehensive database of spectra covering the fuel concentrations and gas densities found in the wind tunnel of Research Cell 19 at Wright Patterson Air Force Base is created which can be used for further work.

  5. Detection of denatonium benzoate (bitrex) remnants in noncommercial alcoholic beverages by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowski, Andrzej; Czerwicka, Małgorzata; Smulko, Janusz; Stepnowski, Piotr

    2014-09-01

    Illegal alcoholic beverages are often introduced into market using cheap technical alcohol, which is contaminated by denatonium benzoate (Bitrex) of very small concentration. Bitrex is the most bitter chemical compound and has to be removed before alcohol consumption. The home-made methods utilize sodium hypochlorite to disintegrate particles of denatonium benzoate in alcohol and to remove bitter taste before trading. In this experimental studies, we propose a novel method that detects in a fast way the remnants of denatonium benzoate in dubious alcohol samples by Raman spectroscopy. This method applies a portable Raman spectrometer of excitation wavelength 785 nm and utilizes the effect of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to recognize the suspected alcoholic beverages. High effectiveness (over 98%) of YES/NO classification of the investigated samples was observed when the nonlinear algorithm support vector machine (SVM) was exploited at carefully adjusted detection parameters. The method can identify illicit alcohol within minutes. PMID:24661259

  6. Detection of Osteogenic Differentiation by Differential Mineralized Matrix Production in Mesenchymal Stromal Cells by Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, He-Guei; Chiang, Hui-Hua Kenny; Lee, Oscar Kuang-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) hold great potential in skeletal tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. However, conventional methods that are used in molecular biology to evaluate osteogenic differentiation of MSCs require a relatively large amount of cells. Cell lysis and cell fixation are also required and all these steps are time-consuming. Therefore, it is imperative to develop a facile technique which can provide real-time information with high sensitivity and selectivity to detect the osteogenic maturation of MSCs. In this study, we use Raman spectroscopy as a biosensor to monitor the production of mineralized matrices during osteogenic induction of MSCs. In summary, Raman spectroscopy is an excellent biosensor to detect the extent of maturation level during MSCs-osteoblast differentiation with a non-disruptive, real-time and label free manner. We expect that this study will promote further investigation of stem cell research and clinical applications. PMID:23734254

  7. Accelerated Detection of Viral Particles by Combining AC Electric Field Effects and Micro-Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tomkins, Matthew Robert; Liao, David Shiqi; Docoslis, Aristides

    2015-01-01

    A detection method that combines electric field-assisted virus capture on antibody-decorated surfaces with the “fingerprinting” capabilities of micro-Raman spectroscopy is demonstrated for the case of M13 virus in water. The proof-of-principle surface mapping of model bioparticles (protein coated polystyrene spheres) captured by an AC electric field between planar microelectrodes is presented with a methodology for analyzing the resulting spectra by comparing relative peak intensities. The same principle is applied to dielectrophoretically captured M13 phage particles whose presence is indirectly confirmed with micro-Raman spectroscopy using NeutrAvidin-Cy3 as a labeling molecule. It is concluded that the combination of electrokinetically driven virus sampling and micro-Raman based signal transduction provides a promising approach for time-efficient and in situ detection of viruses. PMID:25580902

  8. In vivo optical spectroscopy for improved detection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, William R.; Wilson, Robert H.; Lee, Seung Yup; Chandra, Malavika; McKenna, Barbara; Simeone, Diane; Scheiman, James; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma has a five-year survival rate of less than 6%. This low survival rate is attributed to the lack of accurate detection methods, which limits diagnosis to late-stage disease. Here, an in vivo pilot study assesses the feasibility of optical spectroscopy to improve clinical detection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. During surgery on 6 patients, we collected spectrally-resolved reflectance and fluorescence in vivo. Site-matched in vivo and ex vivo data agreed qualitatively and quantitatively. Quantified differences between adenocarcinoma and normal tissues in vivo were consistent with previous results from a large ex vivo data set. Thus, optical spectroscopy is a promising method for the improved diagnosis of pancreatic cancer in vivo. PMID:24466472

  9. Excited-state transient of vanadyl uroporphyrin I detected by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Alden, R.G.; Sparks, L.D.; Ondrias, M.R. ); Crawford, B.A.; Shelnutt, J.A. )

    1990-02-22

    Transient Raman spectroscopy has been used to investigate excited states of vanadyl uroporphyrin I (VOUroP) in both monomeric and dimeric forms. Uroporphyrins are water-soluble porphyrins with propionic and acetic acid groups substituted at the {beta}-pyrrole carbon positions. Monomeric VOUroP in aqueous solution is known to be six-coordinate with a ligand trans to the oxo ligand. Upon dimerization, the sixth ligand site is inaccessible, and a five-coordinate species is observed. At high laser fluence, an excited-state transient is formed in the monomeric species. Raman spectra of this species are most consistent with an {sup 2}A{sub 1u} (a{sub 1u}({pi}) {yields} d{sub xy}) charge-transfer state. In contrast, dimeric VOUroP shows little evidence of an excited state in the transient Raman spectra during a 10-ns laser pulse.

  10. Detection of human colonic adenoma by laser-induced autofluorescence integrated with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Guilin; Lu, Haibao; Zhang, Yangde; Yan, Shuhua; Chen, Zhifeng

    2000-10-01

    A combined in vivo measurement system integrating laser- induced autofluorescence (LIAF) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) measurement was developed and investigated for detecting colonic adenoma. The system could work with regular endoscopy examination. A three- layer backpropagating neural network (BNN) was built to differentiate the two tissue classes. The preliminary results gave the mean predictive accuracy, sensitivity and specificity better than either of the two methods used alone.

  11. Differential detection of transposable elements between Saccharum species

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Marislane Carvalho Paz; Silva, Jéssica Naiana; Almeida, Cícero

    2013-01-01

    Cultivars of sugarcane (Saccharum) are hybrids between species S. officinarum (x = 10, 2n = 8x = 80) and S. spontaneum (x = 8, 2n = 5 – 16x = 40 – 128). These accessions have 100 to 130 chromosomes, 80–85% of which are derived from S. officinarum, 10–15% from S. spontaneum, and 5–10% are possible recombinants between the two genomes. The aim of this study was to analyze the repetition of DNA sequences in S. officinarum and S. spontaneum. For this purpose, genomic DNA from S. officinarum was digested with restriction enzymes and the fragments cloned. Sixty-eight fragments, approximately 500 bp, were cloned, sequenced and had their identity analyzed in NCBI, and in the rice, maize, and sorghum genome databases using BLAST. Twelve clones containing partial transposable elements, one single-copy control, one DNA repetitive clone control and two genome controls were analyzed by DNA hybridization on membrane, using genomic probes from S. officinarum and S. spontaneum. The hybridization experiment revealed that six TEs had a similar repetitive DNA pattern in the genomes of S. officinarum and S. spontaneum, while six TEs were more abundant in the genome of S. officinarum. We concluded that the species S. officinarum and S. spontaneum have differential accumulation LTR retrotransposon families, suggesting distinct insertion or modification patterns. PMID:24130449

  12. Trace species concentration and temperature measurements at high pressure using laser-induced grating spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.S.; DeBarber, P.A.; Cummings, E.B.; Hornung, H.G.

    1995-12-31

    Ongoing development by NASA and engine manufacturers of the next generation of aircraft engines for civil transport calls for combustors that will operate at pressures up to 60 atm and 2,000 K. Diagnostic measurements of this combustion environment are required to address the many engineering and modeling questions. While a variety of laser-based optical techniques have been developed over the last 20 years to detect trace species in reacting flows, few measurements have been made at pressures above 10 atm. Here, the authors have recorded laser-induced grating signals from mixtures of NO{sub x} and air over a pressure range extending from less than 100 kPa (1 atm) to 10 MPa (100 atm). Signals generated from concentrations of NO{sub 2} at the part-per-million level have been successfully detected with high signal-to-noise ratios. The measurements were made using the technique of laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA). Analysis of the acquired data was made using a comprehensive theory which includes the hydrodynamic response of the fluid and finite beam-size effects. The observed pressure dependence of the peak amplitude signals is consistent with the theory. Additionally, least squares fits between the theory and the temporally resolved signal yield accurate values of the local sound speed and thermal diffusivity. Determination of the local sound speed provides a measurement of the local temperature.

  13. Detection of simulants and degradation products of chemical warfare agents by vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Pesante, Orlando; Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C.; Primera-Pedrozo, Oliva M.; Ortiz, William; Soto-Feliciano, Yadira M.; Nieves, Deborah E.; Ramirez, Michael L.; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2007-04-01

    This work was focused in the measurement of spectroscopic signatures of Chemical Warfare Agent Simulants (CWAS) and degradation products of chemical agents using vibrational spectroscopy for the generation of spectroscopic libraries. The chemicals studied were: DMMP, DIMP, 2-CEES, 2-BAET, 1,4-thioxane, thiodiglycol sulfoxide, dihexylamine, cyclohexylamine, among others. Raman microscopy experiments were performed at different excitation wavelengths that spanned from NIR at 1064 and 785 nm to the VIS at 532, 514.5 and 488 nm and even the deep ultraviolet region at 244 nm. For the compounds studied the optimum excitation lines were 488 nm and 532 nm with a laser power of 25 mW. Among the most prominent bands were at these incident wavelengths were located ca. 652 and 1444 cm-1. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy in liquid and gas phase and Fiber Optics Coupled-Grazing Angle Probe-FTIR (FOCGAP- FTIR) were used to characterize the spectroscopic signature of target threat agents. The surface experiments were performed at detection levels of about 1 μg/cm2 suggest that limits of detection (LOD) achievable could be as low as nanograms/cm2. Remote sensing experiments were performed using a telescope coupled with a Raman spectrophotometer as a function of power and acquisition time. Characterization of compounds by vibrational spectroscopy and the early stages of the transition from the lab based experiments to remote detection experiments will be presented.

  14. Nanoscale surface charge detection in epoxy resin materials using electrostatic force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Khoury, D.; Arinero, R.; Laurentie, J. C.; Castellon, J.

    2016-03-01

    Electrostatic force spectroscopy (EFS) operated in a conventional force gradient detection method allows determining local surface charges in epoxy samples. This is made possible through a detailed analysis of gradient versus DC voltage curves. The parabolic dependence of these curves is closely related to the charge density. Both maximum and origin-ordinate are key data from which it is possible to extract quantitative information on the detected charge. The study is based on the combined use of numerical and analytical simulations of the probe sample interaction. Excellent sensitivities to very low surface charge densities are reported.

  15. Ultrasensitive detection of waste products in water using fluorescence emission cavity-enhanced spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bixler, Joel N; Cone, Michael T; Hokr, Brett H; Mason, John D; Figueroa, Eleonora; Fry, Edward S; Yakovlev, Vladislav V; Scully, Marlan O

    2014-05-20

    Clean water is paramount to human health. In this article, we present a technique for detection of trace amounts of human or animal waste products in water using fluorescence emission cavity-enhanced spectroscopy. The detection of femtomolar concentrations of urobilin, a metabolic byproduct of heme metabolism that is excreted in both human and animal waste in water, was achieved through the use of an integrating cavity. This technique could allow for real-time assessment of water quality without the need for expensive laboratory equipment. PMID:24799690

  16. Doppler spectroscopy as a path to the detection of Earth-like planets.

    PubMed

    Mayor, Michel; Lovis, Christophe; Santos, Nuno C

    2014-09-18

    Doppler spectroscopy was the first technique used to reveal the existence of extrasolar planetary systems hosted by solar-type stars. Radial-velocity surveys led to the detection of a rich population of super-Earths and Neptune-type planets. The numerous detected systems revealed a remarkable diversity. Combining Doppler measurements with photometric observations of planets transiting their host stars further provides access to the planet bulk density, a first step towards comparative exoplanetology. The development of new high-precision spectrographs and space-based facilities will ultimately lead us to characterize rocky planets in the habitable zone of our close stellar neighbours. PMID:25230654

  17. Ultrafast Spectroscopy with Photocurrent Detection: Watching Excitonic Optoelectronic Systems at Work

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    While ultrafast spectroscopy with photocurrent detection was almost unknown before 2012, in the last 3 years, a number of research groups from different fields have independently developed ultrafast electric probe approaches and reported promising pilot studies. Here, we discuss these recent advances and provide our perspective on how photocurrent detection successfully overcomes many limitations of all-optical methods, which makes it a technique of choice when device photophysics is concerned. We also highlight compelling existing problems and research questions and suggest ways for further development, outlining the potential breakthroughs to be expected in the near future using photocurrent ultrafast optical probes. PMID:26711855

  18. Ultrasensitive detection of waste products in water using fluorescence emission cavity-enhanced spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bixler, Joel N.; Cone, Michael T.; Hokr, Brett H.; Mason, John D.; Figueroa, Eleonora; Fry, Edward S.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2014-01-01

    Clean water is paramount to human health. In this article, we present a technique for detection of trace amounts of human or animal waste products in water using fluorescence emission cavity-enhanced spectroscopy. The detection of femtomolar concentrations of urobilin, a metabolic byproduct of heme metabolism that is excreted in both human and animal waste in water, was achieved through the use of an integrating cavity. This technique could allow for real-time assessment of water quality without the need for expensive laboratory equipment. PMID:24799690

  19. Ultrasensitive detection of atmospheric constituents by supersonic molecular beam, multiphoton ionization, mass spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Syage, J A; Pollard, J E; Cohen, R B

    1987-09-01

    An ultrasensitive detection method for atmospheric monitoring has been developed based on the technique of supersonic molecular beam, resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization, and time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (MB/REMPI/TOFMS). Several organophosphonate and organosulfide compounds, representing simulants to a class of toxic compounds, were studied. Detection levels as low as 300 ppt (dimethyl sulfide) were obtained. Single-vibronic-level REMPI of the cooled molecules in conjunction with TOFMS provided selectivity of ~10(4) against chemically similar compounds in humid air expansions. The fragment ions formed by REMPI excitation are shown for diisopropyl methylphosphonate to depend strongly on the resonant intermediate state of the neutral molecule. PMID:20490096

  20. Detection of nitric oxide in exhaled air using cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medrzycki, R.; Wojtas, J.; Rutecka, B.; Bielecki, Z.

    2013-07-01

    The article describes an application one of the most sensitive optoelectronic method - Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy in investigation of nitric oxide in exhaled breath. Measurement of nitric oxide concentration in exhaled breath is a quantitative, non-invasive, simple, and safe method of respiratory inflammation and asthma diagnosis. For detection of nitric oxide by developed optoelectronic sensor the vibronic molecular transitions were used. The wavelength ranges of these transitions are situated in the infrared spectral region. A setup consists of the optoelectronic nitric oxide sensor integrated with sampling and sample conditioning unit. The constructed detection system provides to measure nitric oxide in a sample of 0-97% relative humidity.

  1. Noninvasive detection of intracerebral hemorrhage using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennes, Hans-Juergen; Lott, Carsten; Windirsch, Michael; Hanley, Daniel F.; Boor, Stephan; Brambrink, Ansgar; Dick, Wolfgang

    1998-01-01

    Intracerebral Hemorrhage (IH) is an important cause of secondary brain injury in neurosurgical patients. Early identification and treatment improve neurologic outcome. We have tested Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) as an alternative noninvasive diagnostic tool compared to CT-Scans to detect IH. We prospectively studied 212 patients with neurologic symptoms associated with intracranial pathology before performing a CT-scan. NIRS signals indicated pathologies in 181 cases (sensitivity 0.96; specificity 0.29). In a subgroup of subdural hematomas NIRS detected 45 of 46 hematomas (sensitivity 0.96; specificity 0.79). Identification of intracerebral hemorrhage using NIRS has the potential to allow early treatment, thus possibly avoiding further injury.

  2. Noninvasive detection of intracerebral hemorrhage using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennes, Hans J.; Lott, C.; Windirsch, Michael; Hanley, Daniel F.; Boor, Stephan; Brambrink, Ansgar; Dick, Wolfgang

    1997-12-01

    Intracerebral Hemorrhage (IH) is an important cause of secondary brain injury in neurosurgical patients. Early identification and treatment improve neurologic outcome. We have tested Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) as an alternative noninvasive diagnostic tool compared to CT-Scans to detect IH. We prospectively studied 212 patients with neurologic symptoms associated with intracranial pathology before performing a CT-scan. NIRS signals indicated pathologies in 181 cases (sensitivity 0.96; specificity 0.29). In a subgroup of subdural hematomas NIRS detected 45 of 46 hematomas (sensitivity 0.96; specificity 0.79). Identification of intracerebral hemorrhage using NIRS has the potential to allow early treatment, thus possibly avoiding further injury.

  3. In Vivo and Ex Vivo Transcutaneous Glucose Detection Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ke

    Diabetes mellitus is widely acknowledged as a large and growing health concern. The lack of practical methods for continuously monitoring glucose levels causes significant difficulties in successful diabetes management. Extensive validation work has been carried out using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for in vivo glucose sensing. This dissertation details progress made towards a Raman-based glucose sensor for in vivo, transcutaneous glucose detection. The first presented study combines spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) with SERS (SESORS) to explore the possibility of in vivo, transcutaneous glucose sensing. A SERS-based glucose sensor was implanted subcutaneously in Sprague-Dawley rats. SERS spectra were acquired transcutaneously and analyzed using partial least-squares (PLS). Highly accurate and consistent results were obtained, especially in the hypoglycemic range. Additionally, the sensor demonstrated functionality at least17 days after implantation. A subsequent study further extends the application of SESORS to the possibility of in vivo detection of glucose in brain through skull. Specifically, SERS nanoantennas were buried in an ovine tissue behind a bone with 8 mm thickness and detected by using SESORS. In addition, quantitative detection through bones by using SESORS was also demonstrated. A device that could measure glucose continuously as well as noninvasively would be of great use to patients with diabetes. The inherent limitation of the SESORS approach may prevent this technique from becoming a noninvasive method. Therefore, the prospect of using normal Raman spectroscopy for glucose detection was re-examined. Quantitative detection of glucose and lactate in the clinically relevant range was demonstrated by using normal Raman spectroscopy with low power and short acquisition time. Finally, a nonlinear calibration method called least-squares support vector machine regression (LS-SVR) was investigated for analyzing spectroscopic

  4. Neural networks improve brain cancer detection with Raman spectroscopy in the presence of light artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jermyn, Michael; Desroches, Joannie; Mercier, Jeanne; St-Arnaud, Karl; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Petrecca, Kevin; Leblond, Frederic

    2016-03-01

    It is often difficult to identify cancer tissue during brain cancer (glioma) surgery. Gliomas invade into areas of normal brain, and this cancer invasion is frequently not detected using standard preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This results in enduring invasive cancer following surgery and leads to recurrence. A hand-held Raman spectroscopy is able to rapidly detect cancer invasion in patients with grade 2-4 gliomas. However, ambient light sources can produce spectral artifacts which inhibit the ability to distinguish between cancer and normal tissue using the spectral information available. To address this issue, we have demonstrated that artificial neural networks (ANN) can accurately classify invasive cancer versus normal brain tissue, even when including measurements with significant spectral artifacts from external light sources. The non-parametric and adaptive model used by ANN makes it suitable for detecting complex non-linear spectral characteristics associated with different tissues and the confounding presence of light artifacts. The use of ANN for brain cancer detection with Raman spectroscopy, in the presence of light artifacts, improves the robustness and clinical translation potential for intraoperative use. Integration with the neurosurgical workflow is facilitated by accounting for the effect of light artifacts which may occur, due to operating room lights, neuronavigation systems, windows, or other light sources. The ability to rapidly detect invasive brain cancer under these conditions may reduce residual cancer remaining after surgery, and thereby improve patient survival.

  5. Detecting cell-adhesive sites in extracellular matrix using force spectroscopy mapping

    PubMed Central

    Chirasatitsin, Somyot; Engler, Adam J

    2010-01-01

    The cell microenvironment is composed of extracellular matrix (ECM), which contains specific binding sites that allow the cell to adhere to its surroundings. Cells employ focal adhesion proteins, which must be able to resist a variety of forces to bind to ECM. Current techniques for detecting the spatial arrangement of these adhesions, however, have limited resolution and those that detect adhesive forces lack sufficient spatial characterization or resolution. Using a unique application of force spectroscopy, we demonstrate here the ability to determine local changes in the adhesive property of a fibronectin substrate down to the resolution of the fibronectin antibody-functionalized tip diameter, ~20 nm. To verify the detection capabilities of force spectroscopy mapping (FSM), changes in loading rate and temperature were used to alter the bond dynamics and change the adhesion force. Microcontact printing was also used to pattern fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated fibronectin in order to mimic the discontinuous adhesion domains of native ECM. Fluorescent detection was used to identify the pattern while FSM was used to map cell adhesion sites in registry with the initial fluorescent image. The results show that FSM can be used to detect the adhesion domains at high resolution and may subsequently be applied to native ECM with randomly distributed cell adhesion sites. PMID:21152375

  6. Total internal reflection photoacoustic spectroscopy for the detection of β-hematin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Sudduth, Amanda S. M.; Samson, Edward B.; Whiteside, Paul J. D.; Bhattacharyya, Kiran D.; Viator, John A.

    2012-06-01

    Evanescent field sensing methods are currently used to detect many different types of disease markers and biologically important chemicals such as the HER2 breast cancer receptor. Hinoue et al. used Total Internal Reflection Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (TIRPAS) as a method of using the evanescent field to detect an optically opaque dye at a sample interface. Although their methods were successful at detecting dyes, the results at that time did not show a very practical spectroscopic technique, which was due to the less than typical sensitivity of TIRPAS as a spectroscopy modality given the low power (~1 to 2 W) lasers being used. Contrarily, we have used an Nd:YAG laser with a five nanosecond pulse that gives peak power of 1 MW coupled with the TIRPAS system to increase the sensitivity of this technique for biological material sensing. All efforts were focused on the eventual detection of the optically absorbing material, hemozoin, which is created as a byproduct of a malarial infection in blood. We used an optically analogous material, β-hematin, to determine the potential for detection in the TIRPAS system. In addition, four properties which control the sensitivity were investigated to increase understanding about the sensor's function as a biosensing method.

  7. Total internal reflection photoacoustic spectroscopy for the detection of β-hematin

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Sudduth, Amanda S. M.; Samson, Edward B.; Whiteside, Paul J. D.; Bhattacharyya, Kiran D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Evanescent field sensing methods are currently used to detect many different types of disease markers and biologically important chemicals such as the HER2 breast cancer receptor. Hinoue et al. used Total Internal Reflection Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (TIRPAS) as a method of using the evanescent field to detect an optically opaque dye at a sample interface. Although their methods were successful at detecting dyes, the results at that time did not show a very practical spectroscopic technique, which was due to the less than typical sensitivity of TIRPAS as a spectroscopy modality given the low power (∼1 to 2 W) lasers being used. Contrarily, we have used an Nd:YAG laser with a five nanosecond pulse that gives peak power of 1 MW coupled with the TIRPAS system to increase the sensitivity of this technique for biological material sensing. All efforts were focused on the eventual detection of the optically absorbing material, hemozoin, which is created as a byproduct of a malarial infection in blood. We used an optically analogous material, β-hematin, to determine the potential for detection in the TIRPAS system. In addition, four properties which control the sensitivity were investigated to increase understanding about the sensor’s function as a biosensing method. PMID:22734742

  8. Detection of four important Eimeria species by multiplex PCR in a single assay.

    PubMed

    You, Myung-Jo

    2014-06-01

    The oocysts of some of the recognized species of chicken coccidiosis are difficult to distinguish morphologically. Diagnostic laboratories are increasingly utilizing DNA-based technologies for the specific identification of Eimeria species. This study reports a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay based on internal transcribed spacer-1 (ITS-1) for the simultaneous diagnosis of the Eimeria tenella, Eimeria acervulina, Eimeria maxima, and Eimeria necatrix species, which infect domestic fowl. Primer pairs specific to each species were designed in order to generate a ladder of amplification products ranging from 20 to 25 bp, and a common optimum annealing temperature for these species was determined to be 52.5 °C. Sensitivity tests were performed for each species, showing a detection threshold of 1-5 pg. All the species were amplified homogeneously, and a homogenous band ladder was observed, indicating that the assay permitted the simultaneous detection of all the species in a single-tube reaction. In the phylogenic study, there was a clear species clustering, which was irrespective of geographical location, for all the ITS-1 sequences used. This multiplex PCR assay represents a rapid and potential cost-effective diagnostic method for the detection of some key Eimeria species that infect domestic fowl. PMID:24495953

  9. Guided conversion to enhance cation detection in water using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Yuan; Li Ying; Wu Jianglai; Zhong Shilei; Zheng Ronger

    2010-05-01

    A novel approach, named guided conversion enhancement, has been established to improve the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) sensitivity of cation detection in water. Two processes were involved in this approach: the main part was replacement reaction that converted the cations in water to solid granules on the surface of an immersed metallic sheet; the other was electric assistance that increased local cation concentration and strengthened the reaction. With the aid of replacement reaction and an electric field, a detection limit of 16 ppb was achieved for copper cation (Cu{sup 2+}) detection in a water solution of CuSO4. The obtained results suggest that this approach has significant potential to be developed as an effective method for underwater cation detection.

  10. Next generation hazard detection via ultrafast coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, John J.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2013-05-01

    Multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (MCARS) is used to detect an explosive precursor material and two chemical warfare simulants. The spectral bandwidth of the femtosecond laser pulse used in these studies is sufficient to coherently and simultaneously drive all the vibrational modes in the molecule of interest. The research performed here demonstrates that MCARS has the capability to detect an explosive precursor (e.g., acetone) and hazardous materials, such as dimethyl methylphosphonate and 2-chloroethyl methyl sulfide (a sarin and a mustard gas chemical warfare simulant, respectively), with high specificity. Evidence shows that MCARS is capable of overcoming common the sensitivity limitations of spontaneous Raman scattering, thus allowing for the detection of the target material in milliseconds with standard USB spectrometers as opposed to seconds with intensified spectrometers. The exponential increase in the number of scattered photons suggests that the MCARS technique may be capable of overcoming range detection challenges common to spontaneous Raman scattering.

  11. Laser-induced fluorescence-cued, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy biological-agent detection

    SciTech Connect

    Hybl, John D.; Tysk, Shane M.; Berry, Shaun R.; Jordan, Michael P

    2006-12-01

    Methods for accurately characterizing aerosols are required for detecting biological warfare agents. Currently, fluorescence-based biological agent sensors provide adequate detection sensitivity but suffer from high false-alarm rates. Combining single-particle fluorescence analysis with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) provides additional discrimination and potentially reduces false-alarm rates. A transportable UV laser-induced fluorescence-cued LIBS test bed has been developed and used to evaluate the utility of LIBS for biological-agent detection. Analysis of these data indicates that LIBS adds discrimination capability to fluorescence-based biological-agent detectors.However, the data also show that LIBS signatures of biological agent simulants are affected by washing. This may limit the specificity of LIBS and narrow the scope of its applicability in biological-agent detection.

  12. Terahertz spectroscopy and detection of brain tumor in rat fresh-tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, S.; Fukushi, Y.; Kubota, O.; Itsuji, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Ouchi, T.

    2015-03-01

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy and imaging of biomedical samples is expected to be an important application of THz analysis techniques. Identification and localization of tumor tissue, imaging of biological samples, and analysis of DNA by THz spectroscopy have been reported. THz time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) is useful for obtaining the refractive index over a broad frequency range. However, THz-TDS spectra of fresh tissue samples are sensitive to procedures such as sample preparation, and a standardized measurement protocol is required. Therefore, in this work, we establish a protocol for measurements of THz spectra of fresh tissue and demonstrate reliable detection of rat brain tumor tissue. We use a reflection THz-TDS system to measure the refractive index spectra of the samples mounted on a quartz plate. The tissue samples were measured immediately after sectioning to avoid sample denaturalization during storage. Special care was taken in THz data processing to eliminate parasitic reflections and reduce noise. The error level in our refractive index measurements was as low as 0.02 in the frequency range 0.8-1.5 THz. With increasing frequency, the refractive index in the tumor and normal regions monotonically decreased, similarly to water, and it was 0.02 higher in the tumor regions. The spectral data suggest that the tumor regions have higher water content. Hematoxylin-eosin stained images showed that increased cell density was also responsible for the observed spectral features. A set of samples from 10 rats showed consistent results. Our results suggest that reliable tumor detection in fresh tissue without pretreatment is possible with THz spectroscopy measurements. THz spectroscopy has the potential to become a real-time in vivo diagnostic method.

  13. Classification of change detection and change blindness from near-infrared spectroscopy signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hirokazu; Katura, Takusige

    2011-08-01

    Using a machine-learning classification algorithm applied to near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) signals, we classify a success (change detection) or a failure (change blindness) in detecting visual changes for a change-detection task. Five subjects perform a change-detection task, and their brain activities are continuously monitored. A support-vector-machine algorithm is applied to classify the change-detection and change-blindness trials, and correct classification probability of 70-90% is obtained for four subjects. Two types of temporal shapes in classification probabilities are found: one exhibiting a maximum value after the task is completed (postdictive type), and another exhibiting a maximum value during the task (predictive type). As for the postdictive type, the classification probability begins to increase immediately after the task completion and reaches its maximum in about the time scale of neuronal hemodynamic response, reflecting a subjective report of change detection. As for the predictive type, the classification probability shows an increase at the task initiation and is maximal while subjects are performing the task, predicting the task performance in detecting a change. We conclude that decoding change detection and change blindness from NIRS signal is possible and argue some future applications toward brain-machine interfaces.

  14. Raman spectroscopy-based detection of chemical contaminants in food powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Kuanglin; Dhakal, Sagar; Qin, Jianwei; Kim, Moon; Bae, Abigail

    2016-05-01

    Raman spectroscopy technique has proven to be a reliable method for qualitative detection of chemical contaminants in food ingredients and products. For quantitative imaging-based detection, each contaminant particle in a food sample must be detected and it is important to determine the necessary spatial resolution needed to effectively detect the contaminant particles. This study examined the effective spatial resolution required for detection of maleic acid in tapioca starch and benzoyl peroxide in wheat flour. Each chemical contaminant was mixed into its corresponding food powder at a concentration of 1% (w/w). Raman spectral images were collected for each sample, leveled across a 45 mm x 45 mm area, using different spatial resolutions. Based on analysis of these images, a spatial resolution of 0.5mm was selected as effective spatial resolution for detection of maleic acid in starch and benzoyl peroxide in flour. An experiment was then conducted using the 0.5mm spatial resolution to demonstrate Raman imaging-based quantitative detection of these contaminants for samples prepared at 0.1%, 0.3%, and 0.5% (w/w) concentrations. The results showed a linear correlation between the detected numbers of contaminant pixels and the actual concentrations of contaminant.

  15. Novel PCR Assays Complement Laser Biosensor-Based Method and Facilitate Listeria Species Detection from Food

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang-Pyo; Singh, Atul K.; Bai, Xingjian; Leprun, Lena; Bhunia, Arun K.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop the Listeria species-specific PCR assays based on a house-keeping gene (lmo1634) encoding alcohol acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (Aad), previously designated as Listeria adhesion protein (LAP), and compare results with a label-free light scattering sensor, BARDOT (bacterial rapid detection using optical scattering technology). PCR primer sets targeting the lap genes from the species of Listeria sensu stricto were designed and tested with 47 Listeria and 8 non-Listeria strains. The resulting PCR primer sets detected either all species of Listeria sensu stricto or individual L. innocua, L. ivanovii and L. seeligeri, L. welshimeri, and L. marthii without producing any amplified products from other bacteria tested. The PCR assays with Listeria sensu stricto-specific primers also successfully detected all species of Listeria sensu stricto and/or Listeria innocua from mixed culture-inoculated food samples, and each bacterium in food was verified by using the light scattering sensor that generated unique scatter signature for each species of Listeria tested. The PCR assays based on the house-keeping gene aad (lap) can be used for detection of either all species of Listeria sensu stricto or certain individual Listeria species in a mixture from food with a detection limit of about 104 CFU/mL. PMID:26371000

  16. Intracavity OptoGalvanic Spectroscopy not suitable for ambient level radiocarbon detection.

    PubMed

    Paul, Dipayan; Meijer, Harro A J

    2015-09-01

    IntraCavity OptoGalvanic Spectroscopy as a radiocarbon detection technique was first reported by the Murnick group at Rutgers University, Newark, NJ, in 2008. This technique for radiocarbon detection was presented with tremendous potentials for applications in various fields of research. Significantly cheaper, this technique was portrayed as a possible complementary technique to the more expensive and complex accelerator mass spectrometry. Several groups around the world started developing this technique for various radiocarbon related applications. The IntraCavity OptoGalvanic Spectroscopy setup at the University of Groningen was constructed in 2012 in close collaboration with the Murnick group for exploring possible applications in the fields of radiocarbon dating and atmospheric monitoring. In this paper we describe a systematic evaluation of the IntraCavity OptoGalvanic Spectroscopy setup at Groningen for radiocarbon detection. Since the IntraCavity OptoGalvanic Spectroscopy setup was strictly planned for dating and atmospheric monitoring purposes, all the initial experiments were performed with CO2 samples containing contemporary levels and highly depleted levels of radiocarbon. Because of recurring failures in differentiating the two CO2 samples, with the radiocarbon concentration 3 orders of magnitude apart, CO2 samples containing elevated levels of radiocarbon were prepared in-house and experimented with. All results obtained thus far at Groningen are in sharp contrast to the results published by the Murnick group and rather support the results put forward by the Salehpour group at Uppsala University. From our extensive test work, we must conclude that the method is unsuited for ambient level radiocarbon measurements, and even highly enriched CO2 samples yield insignificant signal. PMID:26252648

  17. The use of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the detection of drug intoxication.

    PubMed

    Komoroski, E M; Komoroski, R A; Valentine, J L; Pearce, J M; Kearns, G L

    2000-04-01

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy as a method for drug analysis has the advantages of reduced pre-analytical preparation time and the potential to detect and quantitate drug conjugates and metabolites simultaneously. NMR was investigated as a method to screen for organic substances (and metabolites) in 25 patients who presented to the Emergency Department with clinical indications of a drug overdose. Urine specimens were examined by 1H NMR spectroscopy at 300 MHz and the results compared with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) results. There was a 56% concordance (14 of 25 samples) between NMR and GC-MS. NMR identified acetaminophen, ibuprofen, aspirin, valproate, carbamazepine, and pseudoephedrine as parent compounds or metabolites. For a patient for whom GC-MS results were negative, NMR strongly suggested the presence of erythromycin. NMR was most successful in identifying analgesics and antiepileptic drugs (sensitivity 83-100%). In 10 patients, signals from 1,2-propanediol, a common vehicle for some pediatric medications, were observed by NMR spectroscopy. NMR had 0% sensitivity in identifying tricyclic antidepressants and antipsychotic drugs. In these samples, GC-MS detected a variety of compounds, including tricyclic antidepressants and their metabolites and chlorpromazine. In addition, other substances that had not been disclosed as having been ingested, such as caffeine, diphenhydramine, and nicotine, were detected by GC-MS. NMR spectroscopy represents an emerging supplementary analytical technique that is applicable to a wide range of possible intoxicants and to the evaluation of the intoxicated patient, particularly when larger amounts of the intoxicant (> 200 mg) are ingested. PMID:10774537

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF A REAL-TIME FLUORESCENCE RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER (FRET) PCR TO DETECT ARCOBACTER SPECIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A real-time PCR targeting the gyrase A subunit gene outside the quinolone resistance-determining region has been developed to detect Arcobacter species. The species identification was made by probe hybridization and melting curve analysis, using the Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer technology...

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF A REAL-TIME FLUORESCENCE RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER PCR TO DETECT ARCOBACTER SPECIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A real-time PCR targeting the gyrase A subunit gene outside the quinolone resistance-determining region has been developed to detect Arcobacter species. The species identification was made by probe hybridization and melting curve analysis, using Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer technology. D...

  20. Benthic macroinvertebrate surveys in Chequamegon Bay in support of invasive species early detection research

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation describes the impetus and approach for MED invasive species early detection research generally and presents preliminary results concerning benthic composition and non-native species found in the 2013 Chequamegon Bay survey. The audience is a group of researchers...

  1. Invasive species change detection using artificial neural networks and CASI hyperspectral imagery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For monitoring and controlling the extent and intensity of an invasive species, a direct multi-date image classification method was applied in invasive species (saltcedar) change detection in the study area of Lovelock, Nevada. With multi-date Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI) hyperspec...

  2. Metabolic responses of eukaryotic microalgae to environmental stress limit the ability of FT-IR spectroscopy for species identification

    PubMed Central

    Driver, Thomas; Bajhaiya, Amit K.; Allwood, J. William; Goodacre, Royston; Pittman, Jon K.; Dean, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy is a robust method for macromolecular analysis and differentiation of microorganisms. However, most studies are performed in controlled conditions and it is unclear whether this tool is appropriate for the identification of eukaryotic microalgae species from variable environments. In order to address this, nine closely-related species of marine and freshwater microalgae were grown under controlled (non-stressed) and variable (non-stressed and stressed) conditions, including nutrient-stressed and wastewater-stressed conditions. Following optimization of data processing methods, FT-IR spectra from all species and conditions were compared. The substantial metabolic changes that were caused by nutrient starvation restricted the ability of FT-IR spectroscopy to differentiate the microalgal species grown under variable conditions efficiently. Comparison of unsupervised and supervised multivariate data analysis methods found that principal component-discriminant function analysis was able best to differentiate between some species under controlled conditions but still gave poor differentiation under variable environmental conditions. PMID:26839765

  3. Estimating site occupancy and species detection probability parameters for terrestrial salamanders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, L.L.; Simons, T.R.; Pollock, K.H.

    2004-01-01

    Recent, worldwide amphibian declines have highlighted a need for more extensive and rigorous monitoring programs to document species occurrence and detect population change. Abundance estimation methods, such as mark-recapture, are often expensive and impractical for large-scale or long-term amphibian monitoring. We apply a new method to estimate proportion of area occupied using detection/nondetection data from a terrestrial salamander system in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Estimated species-specific detection probabilities were all <1 and varied among seven species and four sampling methods. Time (i.e., sampling occasion) and four large-scale habitat characteristics (previous disturbance history, vegetation type, elevation, and stream presence) were important covariates in estimates of both proportion of area occupied and detection probability. All sampling methods were consistent in their ability to identify important covariates for each salamander species. We believe proportion of area occupied represents a useful state variable for large-scale monitoring programs. However, our results emphasize the importance of estimating detection and occupancy probabilities rather than using an unadjusted proportion of sites where species are observed where actual occupancy probabilities are confounded with detection probabilities. Estimated detection probabilities accommodate variations in sampling effort; thus comparisons of occupancy probabilities are possible among studies with different sampling protocols.

  4. Detection and Identification of Gastrointestinal Lactobacillus Species by Using Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis and Species-Specific PCR Primers

    PubMed Central

    Walter, J.; Tannock, G. W.; Tilsala-Timisjarvi, A.; Rodtong, S.; Loach, D. M.; Munro, K.; Alatossava, T.

    2000-01-01

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of DNA fragments obtained by PCR amplification of the V2-V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene was used to detect the presence of Lactobacillus species in the stomach contents of mice. Lactobacillus isolates cultured from human and porcine gastrointestinal samples were identified to the species level by using a combination of DGGE and species-specific PCR primers that targeted 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region or 16S rRNA gene sequences. The identifications obtained by this approach were confirmed by sequencing the V2-V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene and by a BLAST search of the GenBank database. PMID:10618239

  5. Aspects of the Application of Cavity Enhanced Spectroscopy to Nitrogen Oxides Detection

    PubMed Central

    Wojtas, Jacek; Mikolajczyk, Janusz; Bielecki, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    This article presents design issues of high-sensitive laser absorption spectroscopy systems for nitrogen oxides (NOx) detection. Examples of our systems and their investigation results are also described. The constructed systems use one of the most sensitive methods, cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS). They operate at different wavelength ranges using a blue—violet laser diode (410 nm) as well as quantum cascade lasers (5.27 μm and 4.53 μm). Each of them is configured as a one or two channel measurement device using, e.g., time division multiplexing and averaging. During the testing procedure, the main performance features such as detection limits and measurements uncertainties have been determined. The obtained results are 1 ppb NO2, 75 ppb NO and 45 ppb N2O. For all systems, the uncertainty of concentration measurements does not exceed a value of 13%. Some experiments with explosives are also discussed. A setup equipped with a concentrator of explosives vapours was used. The detection method is based either on the reaction of the sensors to the nitrogen oxides directly emitted by the explosives or on the reaction to the nitrogen oxides produced during thermal decomposition of explosive vapours. For TNT, PETN, RDX and HMX a detection limit better than 1 ng has been achieved. PMID:23752566

  6. [Preliminary research on insect damage detection in pecans using terahertz spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Wei-Li; Zhao, Chun-Jiang; Zhang, Bao-Hua

    2014-05-01

    Pecan is an important nut in US, however, the inner insect influences pecan's quality a lot. To realize the nondestructive detection of insect damage in American pecans rapidly and efficiently, preliminary research on insect damage detection in pecans was conducted based on terahertz spectroscopy. Firstly, a set of native pecan nuts were collected and were manually sliced with a thickness of about 1, 2 and 3 mm and with a size of about 2 cm(length) X 1 cm(width) for every pecan nutmeat; Pecan shell and inner separator were also cut into the same size. Secondly, the absorption spectra of the nutmeat slices, shell, and inner separator were collected using THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) developed by a group of researchers at Oklahoma State University, and the spectral characteristic of the slices was analyzed. Thirdly, the absorption spectra of the alive manduca sexta and dry pecan weevil were collected, and due to the high contents in the insects, very obvious spectral characteristics were found. Finally, the transmission experiment was conducted with the whole pecans. The results from the preliminary study show a potential application of THz technology for insect damage detection. This research provides a reference for further understanding terahertz and exploring sample preparation methods, test methods, data acquisition and optical parameters calculation methods, and developing nondestructive detection system for insect damage in American pecans based on terahertz technology. PMID:25095406

  7. Laser photoacoustic spectroscopy for trace level detection of actinides in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Doxtader, M.M.; Maroni, V.A.; Beitz, J.V.; Heaven, M.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper we examine the utility of the laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) technique for elucidating the chemical behavior of species present in the near-field environment of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) repository. We briefly review the existing basis for interpreting actinide spectra at low concentrations, and describe our initial experiments. These experiments include development and demonstration of the methodology under optimum conditions, e.g., stable, well-characterized solutions of holmium; and application of the technique to conditions relevant to the repository, including studies performed with uranium in synthetic groundwater and at elevated temperatures.

  8. Reflective mesoscopic spectroscopy for noninvasive detection of reflective index alternations at nano-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yuanhao; Ding, Zhihua

    2011-01-01

    Cancer has been one of the most serious threats to human life. However, there is no substantial improvement in overall treatment of cancer patients. One of the key reasons is the unavailability of convenient method to detect cellular alterations in ultra-early stage of carcinogenesis processes, where genetic aberrations at nano-scale have not yet resulted in histological changes. In this paper, we described an optical method based on reflective mesoscopic spectroscopy for ultra-early cancer detection. According to mesoscopic light transport theory, photons propagating in one dimension (1D) within a weakly disordered medium have the non-self-averaging effect. Reflected signal after 1D propagating is sensitive to any length scale of refractive index fluctuations due to multiple interferences of light waves travelling along 1D trajectory. The principle of mesoscopic spectroscopy for perceiving reflective index fluctuations at length scale of nanometers is introduced. A system for the measurement of reflective mesoscopic spectroscopy based on spatial-incoherence broadband source and spectrometer is established. Simulations on light propagation in cell-emulating model with controlled refractive index distribution are done by finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) approach.

  9. Potential and limits of Raman spectroscopy for carotenoid detection in microorganisms: implications for astrobiology.

    PubMed

    Jehlička, Jan; Edwards, Howell G M; Osterrothová, Kateřina; Novotná, Julie; Nedbalová, Linda; Kopecký, Jiří; Němec, Ivan; Oren, Aharon

    2014-12-13

    In this paper, it is demonstrated how Raman spectroscopy can be used to detect different carotenoids as possible biomarkers in various groups of microorganisms. The question which arose from previous studies concerns the level of unambiguity of discriminating carotenoids using common Raman microspectrometers. A series of laboratory-grown microorganisms of different taxonomic affiliation was investigated, such as halophilic heterotrophic bacteria, cyanobacteria, the anoxygenic phototrophs, the non-halophilic heterotrophs as well as eukaryotes (Ochrophyta, Rhodophyta and Chlorophyta). The data presented show that Raman spectroscopy is a suitable tool to assess the presence of carotenoids of these organisms in cultures. Comparison is made with the high-performance liquid chromatography approach of analysing pigments in extracts. Direct measurements on cultures provide fast and reliable identification of the pigments. Some of the carotenoids studied are proposed as tracers for halophiles, in contrast with others which can be considered as biomarkers of other genera. The limits of application of Raman spectroscopy are discussed for a few cases where the current Raman spectroscopic approach does not allow discriminating structurally very similar carotenoids. The database reported can be used for applications in geobiology and exobiology for the detection of pigment signals in natural settings. PMID:25368348

  10. Early detection of emerging street drugs by near infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Risoluti, R; Materazzi, S; Gregori, A; Ripani, L

    2016-06-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRs) is spreading as the tool of choice for fast and non-destructive analysis and detection of different compounds in complex matrices. This paper investigated the feasibility of using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy coupled to chemometrics calibration to detect new psychoactive substances in street samples. The capabilities of this approach in forensic chemistry were assessed in the determination of new molecules appeared in the illicit market and often claimed to contain "non-illegal" compounds, although exhibiting important psychoactive effects. The study focused on synthetic molecules belonging to the classes of synthetic cannabinoids and phenethylamines. The approach was validated comparing results with officials methods and has been successfully applied for "in site" determination of illicit drugs in confiscated real samples, in cooperation with the Scientific Investigation Department (Carabinieri-RIS) of Rome. The achieved results allow to consider NIR spectroscopy analysis followed by chemometrics as a fast, cost-effective and useful tool for the preliminary determination of new psychoactive substances in forensic science. PMID:27130135

  11. Potential and limits of Raman spectroscopy for carotenoid detection in microorganisms: implications for astrobiology

    PubMed Central

    Jehlička, Jan; Edwards, Howell G. M.; Osterrothová, Kateřina; Novotná, Julie; Nedbalová, Linda; Kopecký, Jiří; Němec, Ivan; Oren, Aharon

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, it is demonstrated how Raman spectroscopy can be used to detect different carotenoids as possible biomarkers in various groups of microorganisms. The question which arose from previous studies concerns the level of unambiguity of discriminating carotenoids using common Raman microspectrometers. A series of laboratory-grown microorganisms of different taxonomic affiliation was investigated, such as halophilic heterotrophic bacteria, cyanobacteria, the anoxygenic phototrophs, the non-halophilic heterotrophs as well as eukaryotes (Ochrophyta, Rhodophyta and Chlorophyta). The data presented show that Raman spectroscopy is a suitable tool to assess the presence of carotenoids of these organisms in cultures. Comparison is made with the high-performance liquid chromatography approach of analysing pigments in extracts. Direct measurements on cultures provide fast and reliable identification of the pigments. Some of the carotenoids studied are proposed as tracers for halophiles, in contrast with others which can be considered as biomarkers of other genera. The limits of application of Raman spectroscopy are discussed for a few cases where the current Raman spectroscopic approach does not allow discriminating structurally very similar carotenoids. The database reported can be used for applications in geobiology and exobiology for the detection of pigment signals in natural settings. PMID:25368348

  12. Detection of coronaviruses in bats of various species in Italy.

    PubMed

    Lelli, Davide; Papetti, Alice; Sabelli, Cristiano; Rosti, Enrica; Moreno, Ana; Boniotti, Maria B

    2013-11-01

    Bats are natural reservoirs for many mammalian coronaviruses, which have received renewed interest after the discovery of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) CoV in humans. This study describes the identification and molecular characterization of alphacoronaviruses and betacoronaviruses in bats in Italy, from 2010 to 2012. Sixty-nine faecal samples and 126 carcasses were tested using pan-coronavirus RT-PCR. Coronavirus RNAs were detected in seven faecal samples and nine carcasses. A phylogenetic analysis of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase sequence fragments aided in identifying two alphacoronaviruses from Kuhl's pipistrelle (Pipistrellus kuhlii), three clade 2b betacoronaviruses from lesser horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus hipposideros), and 10 clade 2c betacoronaviruses from Kuhl's pipistrelle, common noctule (Nyctalus noctula), and Savi's pipistrelle (Hypsugo savii). This study fills a substantive gap in the knowledge on bat-CoV ecology in Italy, and extends the current knowledge on clade 2c betacoronaviruses with new sequences obtained from bats that have not been previously described as hosts of these viruses. PMID:24184965

  13. Detection of Coronaviruses in Bats of Various Species in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Lelli, Davide; Papetti, Alice; Sabelli, Cristiano; Rosti, Enrica; Moreno, Ana; Boniotti, Maria B.

    2013-01-01

    Bats are natural reservoirs for many mammalian coronaviruses, which have received renewed interest after the discovery of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) CoV in humans. This study describes the identification and molecular characterization of alphacoronaviruses and betacoronaviruses in bats in Italy, from 2010 to 2012. Sixty-nine faecal samples and 126 carcasses were tested using pan-coronavirus RT-PCR. Coronavirus RNAs were detected in seven faecal samples and nine carcasses. A phylogenetic analysis of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase sequence fragments aided in identifying two alphacoronaviruses from Kuhl’s pipistrelle (Pipistrellus kuhlii), three clade 2b betacoronaviruses from lesser horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus hipposideros), and 10 clade 2c betacoronaviruses from Kuhl’s pipistrelle, common noctule (Nyctalus noctula), and Savi’s pipistrelle (Hypsugo savii). This study fills a substantive gap in the knowledge on bat-CoV ecology in Italy, and extends the current knowledge on clade 2c betacoronaviruses with new sequences obtained from bats that have not been previously described as hosts of these viruses. PMID:24184965

  14. Fluorescent probes for the selective detection of chemical species inside mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zheng; Xu, Lin

    2016-01-21

    During the last few years, the preparation of novel fluorescent probes for the selective detection of chemical species inside mitochondria has attracted considerable attention because of their wide applications in chemistry, biology, and medical science. This feature article focuses on the recent advances in the design principles and recognition mechanisms of these kinds of fluorescent probes. In addition, their applications for the detection of reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide, reactive sulfur species (RSS), thioredoxin (Trx), metal ions, anions, etc. in the mitochondrion is discussed as well. PMID:26621071

  15. Early detection monitoring of aquatic invasive species: Measuring performance success in a Lake Superior pilot network

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement, Annex 6 calls for a U.S.-Canada, basin-wide aquatic invasive species early detection network by 2015. The objective of our research is to explore survey design strategies that can improve detection efficiency, and to develop performance me...

  16. Early Detection Rapid Response Program Targets New Noxious Weed Species in Washington State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreas, Jennifer E.; Halpern, Alison D.; DesCamp, Wendy C.; Miller, Timothy W.

    2015-01-01

    Early detection, rapid response is a critical component of invasive plant management. It can be challenging, however, to detect new invaders before they become established if landowners cannot identify species of concern. In order to increase awareness, eye-catching postcards were developed in Washington State as part of a noxious weed educational…

  17. Early Detection Monitoring Approaches for Exotic Aquatic Species in Great Lakes Harbors and Embayments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aquatic invasive species pose a significant ecological and economic threat in the Great Lakes basin. Early detection of invaders is desirable so as to allow for a timely management response, raising the question of how to accomplish this detection in a consistent, cost-effective...

  18. Sampling design for early detection of aquatic invasive species in Great Lakes ports

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluated a pilot adaptive monitoring program for aquatic invasive species (AIS) early detection in Lake Superior. The monitoring program is designed to detect newly-introduced fishes, and encompasses the lake’s three major ports (Duluth-Superior, Sault Ste. Marie, Thund...

  19. Label-free detection of Phytophthora ramorum using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Sezin; Schwenkbier, Lydia; Pollok, Sibyll; Weber, Karina; Cialla-May, Dana; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we report on a novel approach for the label-free and species-specific detection of the plant pathogen Phytophthora ramorum from real samples using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In this context, we consider the entire analysis chain including sample preparation, DNA isolation, amplification and hybridization on SERS substrate-immobilized adenine-free capture probes. Thus, the SERS-based detection of target DNA is verified by the strong spectral feature of adenine which indicates the presence of hybridized target DNA. This property was realized by replacing adenine moieties in the species-specific capture probes with 2-aminopurine. In the case of the matching capture and target sequence, the characteristic adenine peak serves as an indicator for specific DNA hybridization. Altogether, this is the first assay demonstrating the detection of a plant pathogen from an infected plant material by label-free SERS employing DNA hybridization on planar SERS substrates consisting of silver nanoparticles. PMID:26393411

  20. Rapid Detection of Melamine in Milk Using Immunological Separation and Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiyuan; Feng, Shaolong; Hu, Yaxi; Sheng, Wei; Zhang, Yan; Yuan, Shifang; Zeng, Haishan; Wang, Shuo; Lu, Xiaonan

    2015-06-01

    We integrated immunological separation and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to detect melamine in milk. Antimelamine was produced by New Zealand white rabbits following the injection with melamine hapten-ovalbumin immunogen. Melamine was separated from milk by binding to the converted protein G-antimelamine complex. After releasing antimelamine and melamine from the complex, the eluents were deposited directly onto the silver dendrite SERS-active substrate for spectral collection. Multivariate statistical analysis including unsupervised principal component analysis and supervised soft independent modeling of class analogy validated the feasibility of applying this method to detect trace levels of melamine in milk. The limit of detection can be as low as 0.79×10(-3) mmol/L. The overall analysis can be completed in 20 min, thus, it is a high-throughput technique to screen for melamine in milk samples. PMID:25920520

  1. Dual-beam wavelength modulation spectroscopy for sensitive detection of water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Chang, Jun; Wei, Wei; Zhu, Cunguang; Tian, Changbin

    2014-09-01

    A technique was reported for sensitive detection of water vapor based on dual-beam wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS). Particular attention was focused on the problem of laser power variation (LPV) and residual amplitude modulation (RAM), which accounted for the absorption profile's distortion during application of WMS. Impact from LPV and RAM was eliminated by photocurrent normalization through a balanced ratiometric detector, which was a dual-beam technique with shot noise-level performance. When consideration of distortion was required, this could enormously simplify the spectra analysis procedure. In the experiment symmetry of the WMS, profile had gotten an improvement by a factor of about 102 compared with traditional single-beam method. During the application test of water vapor detection, the detected amplitude of WMS was well proportional to water vapor concentration ranging from 25 to 1,048 ppmv and the sensitivity was achieved to be 52 ppbv for just a 10-cm optical path length.

  2. Dual-beam wavelength modulation spectroscopy for sensitive detection of water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Chang, Jun; Wei, Wei; Zhu, Cunguang; Tian, Changbin

    2014-12-01

    A technique was reported for sensitive detection of water vapor based on dual-beam wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS). Particular attention was focused on the problem of laser power variation (LPV) and residual amplitude modulation (RAM), which accounted for the absorption profile's distortion during application of WMS. Impact from LPV and RAM was eliminated by photocurrent normalization through a balanced ratiometric detector, which was a dual-beam technique with shot noise-level performance. When consideration of distortion was required, this could enormously simplify the spectra analysis procedure. In the experiment symmetry of the WMS, profile had gotten an improvement by a factor of about 102 compared with traditional single-beam method. During the application test of water vapor detection, the detected amplitude of WMS was well proportional to water vapor concentration ranging from 25 to 1,048 ppmv and the sensitivity was achieved to be 52 ppbv for just a 10-cm optical path length.

  3. Towards optical fibre based Raman spectroscopy for the detection of surgical site infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Alex J.; Koziej, Lukasz; Williams, Huw D.; Elson, Daniel S.; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2016-03-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are common post-surgical complications that remain significant clinical problems, as they are associated with substantial mortality and morbidity. As such, there is significant interest in the development of minimally invasive techniques that permit early detection of SSIs. To this end, we are applying a compact, clinically deployable Raman spectrometer coupled to an optical fibre probe to the study of bacteria, with the long term goal of using Raman spectroscopy to detect infection in vivo. Our system comprises a 785 nm laser diode for excitation and a commercial (Ocean Optics, Inc.) Raman spectrometer for detection. Here we discuss the design, optimisation and validation of this system, and describe our first experiences interrogating bacterial cells (Escherichia coli) in vitro.

  4. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy detection and classification of biological aerosols.

    PubMed

    Hybl, John D; Lithgow, Gregg A; Buckley, Steven G

    2003-10-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is examined as a potential method for detecting airborne biological agents. A spectrally broadband LIBS system was used for laboratory measurements on some common biological agent simulants. These measurements were compared to those of common, naturally occurring biological aerosol components (pollen and fungal spores) to determine the potential of LIBS for discriminating biological agents from natural background aerosols. A principal components analysis illustrates that linear combinations of the detected atomic lines, which are present in different ratios in each of the samples tested, can be used to discriminate biological agent simulants from other biological matter. A more sensitive, narrowband LIBS instrument was used to demonstrate the detection of single simulant (Bg) particles in the size range 1-5 microns. Ca, Mg, and Na, which are present in varying concentrations between 0.3 and 11% (by mass) in the Bg particles, were observed in single particles using LIBS. PMID:14639747

  5. Raman spectroscopy detects melanoma and the tissue surrounding melanoma using tissue-engineered melanoma models

    PubMed Central

    Yorucu, Ceyla; Lau, Katherine; Mittar, Shweta; Green, Nicola H.; Raza, Ahtasham; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur; MacNeil, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Invasion of melanoma cells from the primary tumor involves interaction with adjacent tissues and extracellular matrix. The extent of this interaction is not fully understood. In this study Raman spectroscopy was applied to cryo-sections of established 3D models of melanoma in human skin. Principal component analysis was used to investigate differences between the tumor and normal tissue and between the peri-tumor area and the normal skin. Two human melanoma cells lines A375SM and C8161 were investigated and compared in 3D melanoma models. Changes were found in protein conformations and tryptophan configurations across the entire melanoma samples, in tyrosine orientation and in more fluid lipid packing only in tumor dense areas, and in increased glycogen content in the peri-tumor areas of melanoma. Raman spectroscopy revealed changes around the perimeter of a melanoma tumor as well as detecting differences between the tumor and the normal tissue. PMID:27158185

  6. High-throughput single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy using parallel detection

    PubMed Central

    Michalet, X.; Colyer, R. A.; Scalia, G.; Kim, T.; Levi, Moran; Aharoni, Daniel; Cheng, Adrian; Guerrieri, F.; Arisaka, Katsushi; Millaud, Jacques; Rech, I.; Resnati, D.; Marangoni, S.; Gulinatti, A.; Ghioni, M.; Tisa, S.; Zappa, F.; Cova, S.; Weiss, S.

    2011-01-01

    Solution-based single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful new experimental approach with applications in all fields of natural sciences. The basic concept of this technique is to excite and collect light from a very small volume (typically femtoliter) and work in a concentration regime resulting in rare burst-like events corresponding to the transit of a single-molecule. Those events are accumulated over time to achieve proper statistical accuracy. Therefore the advantage of extreme sensitivity is somewhat counterbalanced by a very long acquisition time. One way to speed up data acquisition is parallelization. Here we will discuss a general approach to address this issue, using a multispot excitation and detection geometry that can accommodate different types of novel highly-parallel detector arrays. We will illustrate the potential of this approach with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and single-molecule fluorescence measurements obtained with different novel multipixel single-photon counting detectors. PMID:21625288

  7. Near Infrared Spectroscopy Detection and Quantification of Herbal Medicines Adulterated with Sibutramine.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Neirivaldo Cavalcante; Honorato, Ricardo Saldanha; Pimentel, Maria Fernanda; Garrigues, Salvador; Cervera, Maria Luisa; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2015-09-01

    There is an increasing demand for herbal medicines in weight loss treatment. Some synthetic chemicals, such as sibutramine (SB), have been detected as adulterants in herbal formulations. In this study, two strategies using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy have been developed to evaluate potential adulteration of herbal medicines with SB: a qualitative screening approach and a quantitative methodology based on multivariate calibration. Samples were composed by products commercialized as herbal medicines, as well as by laboratory adulterated samples. Spectra were obtained in the range of 14,000-4000 per cm. Using PLS-DA, a correct classification of 100% was achieved for the external validation set. In the quantitative approach, the root mean squares error of prediction (RMSEP), for both PLS and MLR models, was 0.2% w/w. The results prove the potential of NIR spectroscopy and multivariate calibration in quantifying sibutramine in adulterated herbal medicines samples. PMID:26260573

  8. Proton MR spectroscopy-detectable major neurotransmitters of the brain: biology and possible clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, N; Renshaw, P F

    2012-04-01

    Neurotransmitters are chemical substances that, by definition, allow communication between neurons and permit most neuronal-glial interactions in the CNS. Approximately 80% of all neurons use glutamate, and almost all interneurons use GABA. A third neurotransmitter, NAAG, modulates glutamatergic neurotransmission. Concentration changes in these molecules due to defective synthetic machinery, receptor expression, or errors in their degradation and metabolism are accepted causes of several neurologic disorders. Knowledge of changes in neurotransmitter concentrations in the brain can add useful information in making a diagnosis, helping to pick the right drug of treatment, and monitoring patient response to drugs in a more objective manner. Recent advances in (1)H-MR spectroscopy hold promise in providing a more reliable in vivo detection of these neurotransmitters. In this article, we summarize the essential biology of 3 major neurotransmitters: glutamate, GABA, and NAAG. Finally we illustrate possible applications of (1)H-MR spectroscopy in neuroscience research. PMID:22207303

  9. Detection of biological analytes using nanomechanical infrared spectroscopy with a nanoporous microcantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongkyu; Kim, Seonghwan; Thundat, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    The highly sensitive nanoporous cantilever beam without immobilized receptors was combined with highly selective mid-infrared (IR) spectroscopy for molecular recognition of analytes using characteristic molecular vibrations. Unlike conventional IR spectroscopy, in addition, the detection sensitivity and resolution are drastically enhanced by combining high power tunable quantum cascade laser with a nanoporous cantilever having large surface area, low modulus, and nanowell structures. Further, analytes can be easily loaded on the porous microcantilever without receptor due to nanowells. In addition, orthogonal signals, variations in the mass and IR spectrum, provide more reliable and quantitative results including physical as well as chemical information of samples. We have used this technique to rapidly identify single and double stranded DNA.

  10. High field electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy under ultrahigh vacuum conditions—A multipurpose machine to study paramagnetic species on well defined single crystal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocker, J.; Cornu, D.; Kieseritzky, E.; Seiler, A.; Bondarchuk, O.; Hänsel-Ziegler, W.; Risse, T.; Freund, H.-J.

    2014-08-01

    A new ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer operating at 94 GHz to investigate paramagnetic centers on single crystal surfaces is described. It is particularly designed to study paramagnetic centers on well-defined model catalysts using epitaxial thin oxide films grown on metal single crystals. The EPR setup is based on a commercial Bruker E600 spectrometer, which is adapted to ultrahigh vacuum conditions using a home made Fabry Perot resonator. The key idea of the resonator is to use the planar metal single crystal required to grow the single crystalline oxide films as one of the mirrors of the resonator. EPR spectroscopy is solely sensitive to paramagnetic species, which are typically minority species in such a system. Hence, additional experimental characterization tools are required to allow for a comprehensive investigation of the surface. The apparatus includes a preparation chamber hosting equipment, which is required to prepare supported model catalysts. In addition, surface characterization tools such as low energy electron diffraction (LEED)/Auger spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption (TPD), and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) are available to characterize the surfaces. A second chamber used to perform EPR spectroscopy at 94 GHz has a room temperature scanning tunneling microscope attached to it, which allows for real space structural characterization. The heart of the UHV adaptation of the EPR experiment is the sealing of the Fabry-Perot resonator against atmosphere. To this end it is possible to use a thin sapphire window glued to the backside of the coupling orifice of the Fabry Perot resonator. With the help of a variety of stabilization measures reducing vibrations as well as thermal drift it is possible to accumulate data for a time span, which is for low temperature measurements only limited by the amount of liquid helium. Test measurements show that the system can detect paramagnetic

  11. High field electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy under ultrahigh vacuum conditions—A multipurpose machine to study paramagnetic species on well defined single crystal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rocker, J.; Cornu, D.; Kieseritzky, E.; Hänsel-Ziegler, W.; Freund, H.-J.; Seiler, A.; Bondarchuk, O.

    2014-08-01

    A new ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer operating at 94 GHz to investigate paramagnetic centers on single crystal surfaces is described. It is particularly designed to study paramagnetic centers on well-defined model catalysts using epitaxial thin oxide films grown on metal single crystals. The EPR setup is based on a commercial Bruker E600 spectrometer, which is adapted to ultrahigh vacuum conditions using a home made Fabry Perot resonator. The key idea of the resonator is to use the planar metal single crystal required to grow the single crystalline oxide films as one of the mirrors of the resonator. EPR spectroscopy is solely sensitive to paramagnetic species, which are typically minority species in such a system. Hence, additional experimental characterization tools are required to allow for a comprehensive investigation of the surface. The apparatus includes a preparation chamber hosting equipment, which is required to prepare supported model catalysts. In addition, surface characterization tools such as low energy electron diffraction (LEED)/Auger spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption (TPD), and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) are available to characterize the surfaces. A second chamber used to perform EPR spectroscopy at 94 GHz has a room temperature scanning tunneling microscope attached to it, which allows for real space structural characterization. The heart of the UHV adaptation of the EPR experiment is the sealing of the Fabry-Perot resonator against atmosphere. To this end it is possible to use a thin sapphire window glued to the backside of the coupling orifice of the Fabry Perot resonator. With the help of a variety of stabilization measures reducing vibrations as well as thermal drift it is possible to accumulate data for a time span, which is for low temperature measurements only limited by the amount of liquid helium. Test measurements show that the system can detect paramagnetic

  12. Early detection of potentially invasive invertebrate species in Mytilus galloprovincialis Lamarck, 1819 dominated communities in harbours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preda, Cristina; Memedemin, Daniyar; Skolka, Marius; Cogălniceanu, Dan

    2012-12-01

    Constanţa harbour is a major port on the western coast of the semi-enclosed Black Sea. Its brackish waters and low species richness make it vulnerable to invasions. The intensive maritime traffic through Constanţa harbour facilitates the arrival of alien species. We investigated the species composition of the mussel beds on vertical artificial concrete substrate inside the harbour. We selected this habitat for study because it is frequently affected by fluctuating levels of temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen, and by accidental pollution episodes. The shallow communities inhabiting it are thus unstable and often restructured, prone to accept alien species. Monthly samples were collected from three locations from the upper layer of hard artificial substrata (maximum depth 2 m) during two consecutive years. Ten alien macro-invertebrate species were inventoried, representing 13.5% of the total number of species. Two of these alien species were sampled starting the end of summer 2010, following a period of high temperatures that triggered hypoxia, causing mass mortalities of benthic organisms. Based on the species accumulation curve, we estimated that we have detected all benthic alien species on artificial substrate from Constanţa harbour, but additional effort is required to detect all the native species. Our results suggest that monitoring of benthic communities at small depths in harbours is a simple and useful tool in early detection of potentially invasive alien species. The selected habitat is easily accessible, the method is low-cost, and the samples represent reliable indicators of alien species establishment.

  13. Analytical optimization of nanocomposite surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy/scattering detection in microfluidic separation devices.

    PubMed

    Connatser, R Maggie; Cochran, Malcolm; Harrison, Robert J; Sepaniak, Michael J

    2008-04-01

    Adding vibrational spectroscopies to the arsenal of detection modes for microfluidics (mufluidics) offers benefits afforded by structurally descriptive identification of separated electrophoretic bands. We have previously applied surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) detection with nanocomposite metal-elastomer substrates as a detection mode in mufluidic channels. To create these mufluidic-SERS devices, silver-PDMS substrate regions are integrated into the architecture of a separation chip fabricated from PDMS or glass. Herein, we investigate analytical figures of merit for integrated mufluidic-SERS devices by implementing improvements in fluidic and SERS substrate fabrication as well as data collection strategies. Improvements are achieved by chemical modification of the PDMS channel, increasing effective detection efficiency by minimizing analyte partitioning into nonsensing walls rendering more analyte available to the metallized cover slide of channels and also by uniquely fabricating deep channels that have larger volume to SERS surface area ratios than conventional channels. A method is developed to exploit the inherent concentration profile of analyte material within an electrophoretic band in order to extend the linear dynamic range of detection on the SERS nanostructured surface. This is accomplished by spatially interrogating the Gaussian concentration profile of said bands. The subtleties of this technique give insight into the analytical utility of SERS detection in general. Finally, SERS substrates uniquely created via electron beam lithography with controllable morphologies are integrated into mufluidic-SERS devices to prove feasibility of such a coupling for future work. A separation of endocrine disrupting chemicals in a hybrid SERS nanocomposite-glass device is the capstone of this work. PMID:18386301

  14. Ultrasensitive detection of genetically modified plants by fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junfeng; Xing, Da; Chen, Tongsheng; Liu, Jinfeng

    2006-09-01

    In this study, a novel method for the direct detection of GMP without amplified by the general method of PCR is firstly presented and proved by experiments. In our method, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, cleaving nucleic acid by restriction endonuclease and two nucleic acid probe hybridization techniques are combined to distinguish the caulifiower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and determine whether samples contain genetically modified components. The detection principle is as follows: firstly two restriction endonucleases FOKI and BsrDlare used to cleave the genomic DNA and the 169bp fragments of CaMV 35S promoter are retrieved; secondly, two nucleic acid probes labeled by Rhodamine Green and y5 dyes respectively hybridize with cleaved 169bp fragments of CaMV 35S promoter; thirdly, the hybridization products simultaneously with two dye-labeled probes are detected by fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy and GMP is distinguished. As the detection and analysis by FCS can be performed at the level of single molecule, there is no need for any type of amplification. Genetically modified tobaccos are measured by this method. The results indicate this method can detect CaMV 35S promoter of GMP exactly and the sensitivity can be down to 3.47X10 -10M. Because no any type of amplification is involved, this method can avoid the non-specffic amplification and false-positive problems of PCR, Due to its high-sensitivity, simplicity, reliability and little need for sample amounts, this method promises to be a highly effective detection method for GMP.

  15. Specificity and Strain-Typing Capabilities of Nanorod Array-Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy for Mycoplasma pneumoniae Detection

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Kelley C.; Benitez, Alvaro J.; Ratliff, Amy E.; Crabb, Donna M.; Sheppard, Edward S.; Winchell, Jonas M.; Dluhy, Richard A.; Waites, Ken B.; Atkinson, T. Prescott; Krause, Duncan C.

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a cell wall-less bacterial pathogen of the human respiratory tract that accounts for > 20% of all community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). At present the most effective means for detection and strain-typing is quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), which can exhibit excellent sensitivity and specificity but requires separate tests for detection and genotyping, lacks standardization between available tests and between labs, and has limited practicality for widespread, point-of-care use. We have developed and previously described a silver nanorod array-surface enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (NA-SERS) biosensing platform capable of detecting M. pneumoniae with statistically significant specificity and sensitivity in simulated and true clinical throat swab samples, and the ability to distinguish between reference strains of the two main genotypes of M. pneumoniae. Furthermore, we have established a qualitative lower endpoint of detection for NA-SERS of < 1 genome equivalent (cell/μl) and a quantitative multivariate detection limit of 5.3 ± 1 cells/μl. Here we demonstrate using partial least squares- discriminatory analysis (PLS-DA) of sample spectra that NA-SERS correctly identified M. pneumoniae clinical isolates from globally diverse origins and distinguished these from a panel of 12 other human commensal and pathogenic mycoplasma species with 100% cross-validated statistical accuracy. Furthermore, PLS-DA correctly classified by strain type all 30 clinical isolates with 96% cross-validated accuracy for type 1 strains, 98% cross-validated accuracy for type 2 strains, and 90% cross-validated accuracy for type 2V strains. PMID:26121242

  16. Molecular detection of Rickettsia, Coxiella and Rickettsiella DNA in three native Australian tick species.

    PubMed

    Vilcins, Inger-Marie E; Old, Julie M; Deane, Elizabeth

    2009-11-01

    Three Australian native animal species yielded 60 samples composed of three indigenous ticks. Hosts included twelve koalas, two echidnas and one wombat from Victoria, and ticks were of the species Ixodes tasmani (n = 42), Bothriocroton concolor (n = 8) and B. auruginans (n = 10), respectively. PCR screening and sequencing detected a species of Coxiella, sharing closest sequence identity to C. burnetii (>98%), in all B. auruginans, as well as a species of Rickettsia, matching closest to R. massiliae, in 70% of the same samples. A genotype sharing closest similarity to Rickettsia bellii (>99%) was identified in three female B. concolor collected from one of the echidnas. Three samples of I. tasmani, taken from three koalas, yielded different genotypes of Rickettsiella. These results represent the first detection of the three genera in each tick species and identify a high level of previously undetected bacterial diversity in Australian ticks. PMID:19296229

  17. Stand-off spectroscopy for the detection of chemical warfare agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clewes, Rhea J.; Howle, Chris R.; Stothard, David J. M.; Dunn, Malcolm H.; Robertson, Gordon; Miller, William; Malcolm, Graeme; Maker, Gareth; Cox, Rick; Williams, Brad; Russell, Matt

    2012-10-01

    The most desirable configuration for detection of toxic chemicals utilises the maximum distance between detector and hazard. This approach minimises the contamination of equipment or personnel. Where the target chemical is an involatile liquid, indirect detection of the liquid contamination is made difficult by inherently low vapour pressure. In this instance, direct detection of the chemical hazard is the best approach. Recent technology developments have allowed spectroscopic systems to provide multiple options for the stand-off detection of involatile chemical warfare agents (CWAs). Two different stand-off spectroscopic systems, based upon IR absorption and Raman spectroscopic techniques are described here. The Negative Contrast Imager (NCI) is based upon an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) source comprising a Q-switched intracavity MgO:PPLN crystal. This crystal has a fanned grating design and wavelength tuning is achieved by translating the PPLN crystal within the 1064 nm pump beam. This approach enables the production of shortwave and midwave IR radiation (1.5 - 1.8 μm and 2.6 - 3.8 μm, respectively), which is scanned across the scene of interest. Target materials that have an absorption feature commensurate with the wavelength of incoming radiation reduce the intensity of returned signal, resulting in dark pixels in the acquired image. This method enables location and classification of the target material. Stand-off Raman spectroscopy allows target chemicals to be identified at range through comparison of the acquired signature relative to a spectral database. In this work, we used a Raman system based upon a 1047 nm Nd:YLF laser source and a proprietary InGaAsP camera system. Utilisation of a longer excitation wavelength than most conventional stand-off detection systems (e.g. 532 or 785 nm) enables reduction of fluorescence from both the surface and the deposited chemicals, thereby revealing the Raman spectrum. NCI and Raman spectroscopy are able to

  18. Estimating species occurrence, abundance, and detection probability using zero-inflated distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wenger, S.J.; Freeman, Mary C.

    2008-01-01

    Researchers have developed methods to account for imperfect detection of species with either occupancy (presence-absence) or count data using replicated sampling. We show how these approaches can be combined to simultaneously estimate occurrence, abundance, and detection probability by specifying a zero-inflated distribution for abundance. This approach may be particularly appropriate when patterns of occurrence and abundance arise from distinct processes operating at differing spatial or temporal scales. We apply the model to two data sets: (1) previously published data for a species of duck, Anas platyrhynchos, and (2) data for a stream fish species, Etheostoma scotti. We show that in these cases, an incomplete-detection zero-inflated modeling approach yields a superior fit to the data than other models. We propose that zero-inflated abundance models accounting for incomplete detection be considered when replicate count data are available.

  19. Near-infrared Raman spectroscopy to detect the calcification of the annular mitral valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Rick; Otero, E. P.; Costa, M. S.; Villaverde, Antonio G. J. B.; Pomerarantzeff, P. M.; Pacheco, Marcos T. T.

    2004-10-01

    Cardiac valves are subjected to high repetitive mechanical stresses, particularly at the hinge points of the cusps and leaflets due to the over 40 millions cardiac cycles per year. These delicate structures can suffer cumulative lesions, complicated by the deposition of calcium phosphate mineral, which may lead to clinically important disease. Near Infrared Raman Spectroscopy gives important information about biological tissues composition and it is being used for diagnosis of some pathologies. The aim of this work was to detect trough the use of the Raman Spectroscopy technique the mitral annular calcification. A Ti:sapphire laser operating at the near infrared wavelength of 785 nm was used for the excitation of the valve samples and the Raman radiation was detected by an optical spectrometer with a CCD liquid nitrogen cooled detector. In all, ten samples of normal and pathologic tissues were studied. They were approximately squared with the lateral size of 5 mm. It was observed that the Raman spectrum of the calcified mitral valve showed different behavior, when compared to normal tissues. Results indicate that this technique could be used to detect the deposition of the calcium phosphate mineral over the mitral valve.

  20. Heavy Metal Detection in Soils by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Using Hemispherical Spatial Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Deshuo; Zhao, Nanjing; Ma, Mingjun; Wang, Yin; Hu, Li; Yu, Yang; Fang, Li; Liu, Wenqing

    2015-08-01

    Spatial confinement has great potential for Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) instruments after it has been proven that it has the ability to enhance the LIBS signal strength and repeatability. In order to achieve in-situ measurement of heavy metals in farmland soils by LIBS, a hemispherical spatial confinement device is designed and used to collect plasma spectra, in which the optical fibers directly collect the breakdown spectroscopy of the soil samples. This device could effectively increase the stability of the spectrum intensity of soil. It also has other advantages, such as ease of installation, and its small and compact size. The relationship between the spectrum intensity and the laser pulse energy is studied for this device. It is found that the breakdown threshold is 160 cm-2, and when the laser fluence increases to 250 J/cm2, the spectrum intensity reaches its maximum. Four different kinds of laser pulse energy were set up and in each case the limits of detection of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn were calculated. The results show that when the laser pulse fluence was 2.12 GW/cm2, we obtained the smallest limits of detection of these heavy metals, which are all under 10 mg/kg. This device can satisfy the needs of heavy metal in-situ detection, and in the next step it will be integrated into a portable LIBS instrument.

  1. Detecting Damage in Composite Material Using Nonlinear Elastic Wave Spectroscopy Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meo, Michele; Polimeno, Umberto; Zumpano, Giuseppe

    2008-05-01

    Modern aerospace structures make increasing use of fibre reinforced plastic composites, due to their high specific mechanical properties. However, due to their brittleness, low velocity impact can cause delaminations beneath the surface, while the surface may appear to be undamaged upon visual inspection. Such damage is called barely visible impact damage (BVID). Such internal damages lead to significant reduction in local strengths and ultimately could lead to catastrophic failures. It is therefore important to detect and monitor damages in high loaded composite components to receive an early warning for a well timed maintenance of the aircraft. Non-linear ultrasonic spectroscopy methods are promising damage detection and material characterization tools. In this paper, two different non-linear elastic wave spectroscopy (NEWS) methods are presented: single mode nonlinear resonance ultrasound (NRUS) and nonlinear wave modulation technique (NWMS). The NEWS methods were applied to detect delamination damage due to low velocity impact (<12 J) on various composite plates. The results showed that the proposed methodology appear to be highly sensitive to the presence of damage with very promising future NDT and structural health monitoring applications.

  2. Rapid and highly sensitive detection of Enterovirus 71 by using nanogold-enhanced electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hsing-Yuan; Tseng, Shing-Hua; Cheng, Tsai-Mu; Chu, Hsueh-Liang; Lu, Yu-Ning; Wang, Fang-Yu; Tsai, Li-Yun; Shieh, Juo-Yu; Yang, Jyh-Yuan; Juan, Chien-Chang; Tu, Lung-Chen; Chang, Chia-Ching

    2013-07-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection is an emerging infectious disease causing neurological complications and/or death within two to three days after the development of fever and rash. A low viral titre in clinical specimens makes the detection of EV71 difficult. Conventional approaches for detecting EV71 are time consuming, poorly sensitive, or complicated, and cannot be used effectively for clinical diagnosis. Furthermore, EV71 and Coxsackie virus A16 (CA16) may cross react in conventional assays. Therefore, a rapid, highly sensitive, specific, and user-friendly test is needed. We developed an EV71-specific nanogold-modified working electrode for electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in the detection of EV71. Our results show that EV71 can be distinguished from CA16, Herpes simplex virus, and lysozyme, with the modified nanogold electrode being able to detect EV71 in concentrations as low as 1 copy number/50 μl reaction volume, and the duration between sample preparation and detection being 11 min. This detection platform may have the potential for use in point-of-care diagnostics.

  3. Detection of tire tread particles using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochazka, David; Bilík, Martin; Prochazková, Petra; Klus, Jakub; Pořízka, Pavel; Novotný, Jan; Novotný, Karel; Ticová, Barbora; Bradáč, Albert; Semela, Marek; Kaiser, Jozef

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this paper is a study of the potential of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for detection of tire tread particles. Tire tread particles may represent pollutants; simultaneously, it is potentially possible to exploit detection of tire tread particles for identification of optically imperceptible braking tracks at locations of road accidents. The paper describes the general composition of tire treads and selection of an element suitable for detection using the LIBS method. Subsequently, the applicable spectral line is selected considering interferences with lines of elements that might be present together with the detected particles, and optimization of measurement parameters such as incident laser energy, gate delay and gate width is performed. In order to eliminate the matrix effect, measurements were performed using 4 types of tires manufactured by 3 different producers. An adhesive tape was used as a sample carrier. The most suitable adhesive tape was selected from 5 commonly available tapes, on the basis of their respective LIBS spectra. Calibration standards, i.e. an adhesive tape with different area content of tire tread particles, were prepared for the selected tire. A calibration line was created on the basis of the aforementioned calibration standards. The linear section of this line was used for determination of the detection limit value applicable to the selected tire. Considering the insignificant influence of matrix of various types of tires, it is possible to make a simple recalculation of the detection limit value on the basis of zinc content in a specific tire.

  4. [The error analysis and experimental verification of laser radar spectrum detection and terahertz time domain spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Tao; Li, Jing-Wen; Sun, Zhi-Hui

    2010-03-01

    Terahertz waves (THz, T-ray) lie between far-infrared and microwave in electromagnetic spectrum with frequency from 0.1 to 10 THz. Many chemical agent explosives show characteristic spectral features in the terahertz. Compared with conventional methods of detecting a variety of threats, such as weapons and chemical agent, THz radiation is low frequency and non-ionizing, and does not give rise to safety concerns. The present paper summarizes the latest progress in the application of terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) to chemical agent explosives. A kind of device on laser radar detecting and real time spectrum measuring was designed which measures the laser spectrum on the bases of Fourier optics and optical signal processing. Wedge interferometer was used as the beam splitter to wipe off the background light and detect the laser and measure the spectrum. The result indicates that 10 ns laser radar pulse can be detected and many factors affecting experiments are also introduced. The combination of laser radar spectrum detecting, THz-TDS, modern pattern recognition and signal processing technology is the developing trend of remote detection for chemical agent explosives. PMID:20496663

  5. Species-specific optical genosensors for the detection of mycotoxigenic Fusarium fungi in food samples.

    PubMed

    Peltomaa, Riikka; Vaghini, Silvia; Patiño, Belén; Benito-Peña, Elena; Moreno-Bondi, María C

    2016-09-01

    Plant-pathogenic Fusarium species, Fusarium verticillioides and Fusarium proliferatum, are the major producers of fumonisins which are one of the most common mycotoxins found in maize. Herein, we report the development of specific and sensitive genosensors for detecting these two closely related Fusarium species in food samples. The sensors are based on species-specific capture and detection probes, which bind to the intergenic spacer region of rDNA (IGS). Oligonucleotide functionalized magnetic microbeads are used to capture the target DNA which is then detected using biotinylated detection probes and a streptavidin-coupled label. The developed genosensors had detection limits of 1.8 pM and 3.0 pM for F. proliferatum and F. verticillioides, respectively, using synthetic DNA targets. Furthermore, the biosensors were used to analyze natural fungal contamination of commercial maize samples. After amplification of the genomic DNA the sensors detected the presence of the fungi, in accordance with previous results obtained with PCR. No cross-reactivity between F. verticillioides and F. proliferatum, or other fungi species tested, was observed. The developed biosensors can provide a valuable tool to evaluate the potential for mycotoxin contamination in conditions where detection of mycotoxins directly is challenging. PMID:27543032

  6. Mid-Infrared Pumped Laser-Induced Thermal Grating Spectroscopy for Detection of Acetylene in the Visible Spectral Range.

    PubMed

    Sahlberg, Anna-Lena; Kiefer, Johannes; Aldén, Marcus; Li, Zhongshan

    2016-06-01

    We present mid-infrared laser-induced thermal grating spectroscopy (IR-LITGS) using excitation radiation around 3 µm generated by a simple broadband optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Acetylene as a typical small hydrocarbon molecule is used as an example target species. A mid-infrared broadband OPO pumped by the fundamental output of a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser was used to generate the pump beams, with pulse energies of 6-10 mJ depending on the wavelength. The line width of the OPO idler beam was ∼5 cm(-1), which is large enough to cover up to six adjacent acetylene lines. The probe beam was the radiation of a 532 nm cw solid state laser with 190 mW output power. Signals were generated in atmospheric pressure gas flows of N2, air, CO2 and Ar with small admixtures of C2H2 A detection limit of less than 300 ppm was found for a point measurement of C2H2 diluted in N2 As expected, the oscillation frequency of the IR-LITGS signal was found to have a large dependency on the buffer gas, which allows determination of the speed of sound. Moreover, the results reveal a very strong collisional energy exchange between C2H2 and CO2 compared to the other gases. This manifests as significant local heating. In summary, the MIR-LITGS technique enables spectroscopy of fundamental vibrational transitions in the infrared via detection in the visible spectral range. PMID:27091904

  7. Chemometric Analysis of Multiple Species of Bacillus Bacterial Endospores Using Infrared Spectroscopy: Discrimination to the Strain Level

    SciTech Connect

    Forrester, Joel B.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Su, Yin-Fong; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2009-09-28

    Previous work using infrared spectroscopy has shown potential for rapid discrimination between bacteria in either their sporulated or vegetative states, as well as between bacteria and other common interferents. For species within one physiological state, however, distinction is far more challenging, and requires chemometrics. In the current study, we have narrowed the field of study by eliminating the confounding issues of vegetative cells as well as growth media and focused on using IR spectra to distinguish between different species all in the sporulated state. Using principal component analysis (PCA) and a classification method based upon similarity measurements, we demonstrate a successful identification rate to the species level of 85% for Bacillus spores grown and sporulated in a glucose broth medium.

  8. Rapid detection of chlorpyrifos pesticide residue concentration in agro-product using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Sagar; Peng, Yankun; Li, Yongyu; Chao, Kuanglin; Qin, Jianwei; Zhang, Leilei; Xu, Tianfeng

    2014-05-01

    Different chemicals are sprayed in fruits and vegetables before and after harvest for better yield and longer shelf-life of crops. Cases of pesticide poisoning to human health are regularly reported due to excessive application of such chemicals for greater economic benefit. Different analytical technologies exist to detect trace amount of pesticides in fruits and vegetables, but are expensive, sample destructive, and require longer processing time. This study explores the application of Raman spectroscopy for rapid and non-destructive detection of pesticide residue in agricultural products. Raman spectroscopy with laser module of 785 nm was used to collect Raman spectral information from the surface of Gala apples contaminated with different concentrations of commercially available organophosphorous (48% chlorpyrifos) pesticide. Apples within 15 days of harvest from same orchard were used in this study. The Raman spectral signal was processed by Savitzky-Golay (SG) filter for noise removal, Multiplicative Scatter Correction (MSC) for drift removal and finally polynomial fitting was used to eliminate the fluorescence background. The Raman spectral peak at 677 cm-1 was recognized as Raman fingerprint of chlorpyrifos. Presence of Raman peak at 677 cm-1 after fluorescence background removal was used to develop classification model (presence and absence of pesticide). The peak intensity was correlated with actual pesticide concentration obtained using Gas Chromatography and MLR prediction model was developed with correlation coefficient of calibration and validation of 0.86 and 0.81 respectively. Result shows that Raman spectroscopy is a promising tool for rapid, real-time and non-destructive detection of pesticide residue in agro-products.

  9. Cross-species outlier detection reveals different evolutionary pressures between sister species

    PubMed Central

    Cullingham, Catherine I; Cooke, Janice E K; Coltman, David W

    2014-01-01

    Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) and jack pine (Pinus banksiana) hybridize in western Canada, an area of recent mountain pine beetle range expansion. Given the heterogeneity of the environment, and indications of local adaptation, there are many unknowns regarding the response of these forests to future outbreaks. To better understand this we aim to identify genetic regions that have adaptive potential. We used data collected on 472 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci from 576 tree samples collected across 13 lodgepole pine-dominated sites and four jack pine-dominated sites. We looked at the relationship of genetic diversity with the environment, and we identified candidate loci using both frequency-based (arlequin and bayescan) and correlation-based (matsam and bayenv) methods. We found contrasting relationships between environmental variation and genetic diversity for the species. While we identified a number of candidate outliers (34 in lodgepole pine, 25 in jack pine, and 43 interspecific loci), we did not find any loci in common between lodgepole and jack pine. Many of the outlier loci identified were correlated with environmental variation. Using rigorous criteria we have been able to identify potential outlier SNPs. We have also found evidence of contrasting environmental adaptations between lodgepole and jack pine which could have implications for beetle spread risk. PMID:24942459

  10. Sensitivity and accuracy of DNA based methods used to describe aquatic communities for early detection of invasive fish species

    EPA Science Inventory

    For biomonitoring efforts aimed at early detection of aquatic invasive species (AIS), the ability to detect rare individuals is key and requires accurate species level identification to maintain a low occurrence probability of non-detection errors (failure to detect a present spe...

  11. Raman Spectroscopy as a Potential Tool for Detection of Brucella spp. in Milk

    PubMed Central

    Meisel, Susann; Stöckel, Stephan; Elschner, Mandy; Melzer, Falk; Popp, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Detection of Brucella, causing brucellosis, is very challenging, since the applied techniques are mostly time-demanding and not standardized. While the common detection system relies on the cultivation of the bacteria, further classical typing up to the biotype level is mostly based on phenotypic or genotypic characteristics. The results of genotyping do not always fit the existing taxonomy, and misidentifications between genetically closely related genera cannot be avoided. This situation gets even worse, when detection from complex matrices, such as milk, is necessary. For these reasons, the availability of a method that allows early and reliable identification of possible Brucella isolates for both clinical and epidemiological reasons would be extremely useful. We evaluated micro-Raman spectroscopy in combination with chemometric analysis to identify Brucella from agar plates and directly from milk: prior to these studies, the samples were inactivated via formaldehyde treatment to ensure a higher working safety. The single-cell Raman spectra of different Brucella, Escherichia, Ochrobactrum, Pseudomonas, and Yersinia spp. were measured to create two independent databases for detection in media and milk. Identification accuracies of 92% for Brucella from medium and 94% for Brucella from milk were obtained while analyzing the single-cell Raman spectra via support vector machine. Even the identification of the other genera yielded sufficient results, with accuracies of >90%. In summary, micro-Raman spectroscopy is a promising alternative for detecting Brucella. The measurements we performed at the single-cell level thus allow fast identification within a few hours without a demanding process for sample preparation. PMID:22660699

  12. Raman spectroscopy as a potential tool for detection of Brucella spp. in milk.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Susann; Stöckel, Stephan; Elschner, Mandy; Melzer, Falk; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    2012-08-01

    Detection of Brucella, causing brucellosis, is very challenging, since the applied techniques are mostly time-demanding and not standardized. While the common detection system relies on the cultivation of the bacteria, further classical typing up to the biotype level is mostly based on phenotypic or genotypic characteristics. The results of genotyping do not always fit the existing taxonomy, and misidentifications between genetically closely related genera cannot be avoided. This situation gets even worse, when detection from complex matrices, such as milk, is necessary. For these reasons, the availability of a method that allows early and reliable identification of possible Brucella isolates for both clinical and epidemiological reasons would be extremely useful. We evaluated micro-Raman spectroscopy in combination with chemometric analysis to identify Brucella from agar plates and directly from milk: prior to these studies, the samples were inactivated via formaldehyde treatment to ensure a higher working safety. The single-cell Raman spectra of different Brucella, Escherichia, Ochrobactrum, Pseudomonas, and Yersinia spp. were measured to create two independent databases for detection in media and milk. Identification accuracies of 92% for Brucella from medium and 94% for Brucella from milk were obtained while analyzing the single-cell Raman spectra via support vector machine. Even the identification of the other genera yielded sufficient results, with accuracies of >90%. In summary, micro-Raman spectroscopy is a promising alternative for detecting Brucella. The measurements we performed at the single-cell level thus allow fast identification within a few hours without a demanding process for sample preparation. PMID:22660699

  13. IR/THz Double Resonance Spectroscopy Approach for Remote Chemical Detection at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Elizabeth A.; Phillips, Dane J.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Everitt, Henry O.

    2013-06-01

    A remote sensing methodology based on infrared/terahertz (IR/THz) double resonance (DR) spectroscopy is shown to overcome limitations traditionally associated with either IR or THz spectroscopic approaches for detecting trace gases in an atmosphere. The applicability of IR/THz DR spectroscopy is explored by estimating the IR and THz power requirements for detecting a 100 part-per-million-meter cloud of methyl fluoride, methyl chloride, or methyl bromide at ranges up to 1km in three atmospheric windows below 0.3 THz. These prototypical molecules are used to ascertain the dependence of the DR signal-to-noise ratio on IR and THz beam power. A line-tunable CO_2 laser with 100 ps pulse duration generates a DR signature in four rotational transitions on a time scale commensurate with collisional relaxations caused by atmospheric N_2 and O_2. A continuous wave THz beam is frequency tuned to probe one of these rotational transitions so that laser-induced absorption variations in the analyte cloud are detected as temporal power fluctuations synchronized with the laser pulses. A combination of molecule-specific physics and scenario-dependent atmospheric conditions are used to predict the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for detecting an analyte as a function of cloud column density. A methodology is presented by which the optimal IR/THz pump/probe frequencies are identified. These estimates show the potential for low concentration chemical detection in a challenging atmospheric scenario with currently available or near term hardware components.

  14. Detection and quantification of hogwash oil in soybean oils using low-cost spectroscopy and chemometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, A. G.; Ciaccheri, L.; Mencaglia, A. A.; Cichelli, A.; Xing, J.; Yang, X.; Sun, W.; Yuan, L.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents the detection and quantification of hogwash oil in soybean oils by means of absorption spectroscopy. Three types of soybean oils were adulterated with different concentrations of hogwash oil. The spectra were measured in the visible band using a white LED and a low-cost spectrometer. The measured spectra were processed by means of multivariate analysis to distinguish the adulteration and, for each soybean oil, to quantify the adulterant concentration. Then the visible spectra were sliced into two bands for modeling a simple setup made of two LEDs only. The successful results indicate potentials for implementing a smartphone-compatible device for self-assessment of soybean oil quality.

  15. Measurement of Oxygen A Band Line Parameters by Using Modulation Spectroscopy with Higher Harmonic Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dharamsi, Amin

    1999-01-01

    Wavelength modulation spectroscopy is used to demonstrate that extremely weak absorption lines can be measured even when these lines suffer from interference from the wings of adjacent stronger lines. It is shown that the use of detection at several harmonics allows such interference to be examined clearly and conveniently. The results of experimental measurements on a weak magnetic dipole driven, spin-forbidden line in the oxygen A band, which experiences interference from the wings of a pair of adjacent lines towards the blue and red regions of line center, are presented. A comparison of the experimental results to theory is given.

  16. Detection of dilute organic acids in water by inelastic tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skarlatos, Y.; Barker, R. C.; Haller, G. L.; Yelon, A.

    1974-01-01

    Study of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) spectra obtained from junctions exposed to dilute solutions of organic molecules in both liquid and vapor phases. The results indicate that it is possible in principle to detect the presence and to measure the concentration of at least some organic molecules in dilute aqueous solution by means of the IETS technique. Some fine points pertaining to the application of this technique are discussed, and it is pointed out that through appropriate refinements IETS may become a valuable tool for analytical water chemistry.

  17. Detection and cloaking of molecular objects in coherent nanostructures using inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fransson, J; Manoharan, H C; Balatsky, A V

    2010-05-12

    We address quantum invisibility in the context of electronics in nanoscale quantum structures. We make use of the freedom of design that quantum corrals provide and show that quantum mechanical objects can be hidden inside the corral, with respect to inelastic electron scattering spectroscopy in combination with scanning tunneling microscopy, and we propose a design strategy. A simple illustration of the invisibility is given in terms of an elliptic quantum corral containing a molecule, with a local vibrational mode, at one of the foci. Our work has implications to quantum information technology and presents new tools for nonlocal quantum detection and distinguishing between different molecules. PMID:20402523

  18. Transient absorption spectroscopy detection of sensitized delayed fluorescence in chiral benzophenone/naphthalene systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonancía, Paula; Jiménez, M. Consuelo; Miranda, Miguel A.

    2011-10-01

    Transient absorption spectroscopy has proven to be a powerful tool to investigate the formation and decay of excited singlet states upon triplet-triplet annihilation, following T-T energy transfer from a selectively excited sensitizer. Thus, upon selective excitation of benzophenone (BZP) by laser flash photolysis (LFP) at λ = 355 nm in the presence of naphthalene (NPT), a negative band centered at 340 nm has been detected, with growth and decay in the microsecond timescale. It has been assigned to the P-type NPT delayed-fluorescence. In the case of chiral BZP/NPT systems, stereodifferentiation has been observed in the kinetics of the involved photophysical processes.

  19. Non-gated laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in bulk water by position-selective detection

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Ye; Xue, Boyang; Song, Jiaojian; Lu, Yuan; Zheng, Ronger

    2015-09-14

    Temporal and spatial evolutions of the laser-induced plasma in bulk water are investigated using fast imaging and emission spectroscopic techniques. By tightly focusing a single-pulse nanosecond Nd: YAG laser beam into the bulk water, we generate a strongly expanded plasma with high reproducibility. Such a strong expanding plasma enables us to obtain well-resolved spectral lines by means of position-selective detection; hence, the time-gated detector becomes abdicable. The present results suggest not only a possible non-gated approach for underwater laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy but also give an insight into the plasma generation and expansion in bulk water.

  20. Portable fluorescence spectroscopy platform for Huanglongbing (HLB) citrus disease in situ detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mota, Alessandro D.; Rossi, Giuliano; de Castro, Guilherme Cunha; Ortega, Tiago A.; de Castro N., Jarbas C.

    2014-02-01

    In this work, the development of a portable fluorescence spectroscopy platform for Huanglongbing (HLB) citrus disease in situ detection is presented. The equipment consists of an excitation blue LED light source, a commercial miniature spectrometer and embedded software. Measurements of healthy, HLB-symptomatic and HLB-asymptomatic citrus leafs were performed. Leafs were excited with the blue LED and their fluorescence spectra collected. Embedded electronics and software were responsible for the spectrum processing and classification via partial least squares regression. Global success rates above 80% and 100% distinction of healthy and HLB-symptomatic leafs were obtained.

  1. Optical-fiber-based laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for detection of early caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-06-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system targeting for the in vivo analysis of tooth enamel is described. The system is planned to enable real-time analysis of teeth during laser dental treatment by utilizing a hollow optical fiber that transmits both Q-switched Nd:YAG laser light for LIBS and infrared Er:YAG laser light for tooth ablation. The sensitivity of caries detection was substantially improved by expanding the spectral region under analysis to ultraviolet (UV) light and by focusing on emission peaks of Zn in the UV region. Subsequently, early caries were distinguished from healthy teeth with accuracy rates above 80% in vitro.

  2. Nanofluidic Biosensing for β-amyloid Detection Using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS)

    PubMed Central

    Chou, I-Hsien; Benford, Melodie; Beier, Hope T.; Coté, Gerard L.; Wang, Miao; Jing, Nan; Kameoka, Jun; Good, Theresa A.

    2008-01-01

    Trace detection of the conformational transition of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) from a predominantly α-helical structure to β-sheet could have a large impact in understanding and diagnosing Alzheimer’s disease. We demonstrate how a novel nanofluidic biosensor using a controlled, reproducible surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy active site was developed to observe Aβ in different conformational states during the Aβ self-assembly process as well as to distinguish Aβ from confounder proteins commonly found in cerebral spinal fluid. PMID:18489171

  3. Standoff Time-Resolved Laser-Based Spectroscopy Tools for Sample Characterization and Biosignature Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasda, P. J.; Acosta-Maeda, T.; Lucey, P. G.; Misra, A. K.; Sharma, S. K.; Taylor, J.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Mars2020 rover will be searching for signs of past habitability and past life on Mars. Additionally, the rover mission will prepare a cache of highly significant samples for a future sample return mission. NASA requires these samples to be well characterized; the instruments on the rover must be capable of fine-scale in situ mineralogical or elemental analysis with emphasis on biosignature detection or characterization. We have been developing multiple standoff laser-based instruments at the University of Hawaii, Manoa that are capable of fine-scale in situ chemical analysis and biosignatures detection. By employing a time-resolved spectroscopy, we can perform elemental analysis with Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), mineral and organic analysis with Raman spectroscopy, and biosignature detection with Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF). Each of these techniques share the same optics and detection equipment, allowing us to integrate them into a single, compact instrument. High time-resolution (~100 ns/pulse) is the key to this instrument; with it, the detector only records data when the signal is the brightest. Spectra can be taken during the day, LIBS can be measured without a plasma light background, and the Raman signal can be separated from the mineral fluorescence signal. Since bio-organics have very short fluorescence lifetimes, the new instrument can be used to unambiguously detect bio-organics. The prototype uses a low power (0.5 mJ/pulse) 532 nm laser with a detection limit of < 30 ppm of organics in a sample of Antarctica Dry Valley soil measured from 8 m. Another LIF instrument under development in our lab, called the Biofinder, takes advantage of the extremely intense fluorescence signal produced by organics by using a wide laser spot and a camera to produce LIF images of wide area (25 cm area from 2 m distance with 2 mm/pixel resolution). The Biofinder can quickly assess the area around the rover (at 10 frames/s) by imaging sample

  4. Image spectroscopy and stable isotopes elucidate functional dissimilarity between native and nonnative plant species in the aquatic environment.

    PubMed

    Santos, Maria J; Hestir, Erin L; Khanna, Shruti; Ustin, Susan L

    2012-02-01

    • Nonnative species may change ecosystem functionality at the expense of native species. Here, we examine the similarity of functional traits of native and nonnative submersed aquatic plants (SAP) in an aquatic ecosystem. • We used field and airborne imaging spectroscopy and isotope ratios of SAP species in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California (USA) to assess species identification, chlorophyll (Chl) concentration, and differences in photosynthetic efficiency. • Spectral separability between species occurs primarily in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions, which is associated with morphological and physiological differences. Nonnatives had significantly higher Chl, carotene, and anthocyanin concentrations than natives and had significantly higher photochemical reflectance index (PRI) and δ(13) C values. • Results show nonnative SAPs are functionally dissimilar to native SAPs, having wider leaf blades and greater leaf area, dense and evenly distributed vertical canopies, and higher pigment concentrations. Results suggest that nonnatives also use a facultative C(4) -like photosynthetic pathway, allowing efficient photosynthesis in high-light and low-light environments. Differences in plant functionality indicate that nonnative SAPs have a competitive advantage over native SAPs as a result of growth form and greater light-use efficiency that promotes growth under different light conditions, traits affecting system-wide species distributions and community composition. PMID:22126662

  5. Tree species mapping in tropical forests using multi-temporal imaging spectroscopy: Wavelength adaptive spectral mixture analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somers, B.; Asner, G. P.

    2014-09-01

    The use of imaging spectroscopy for florisic mapping of forests is complicated by the spectral similarity among co-existing species. Here we evaluated an alternative spectral unmixing strategy combining a time series of EO-1 Hyperion images and an automated feature selection in Multiple Endmember Spectral Mixture Analysis (MESMA). The temporal analysis provided a way to incorporate species phenology while feature selection indicated the best phenological time and best spectral feature set to optimize the separability between tree species. Instead of using the same set of spectral bands throughout the image which is the standard approach in MESMA, our modified Wavelength Adaptive Spectral Mixture Analysis (WASMA) approach allowed the spectral subsets to vary on a per pixel basis. As such we were able to optimize the spectral separability between the tree species present in each pixel. The potential of the new approach for floristic mapping of tree species in Hawaiian rainforests was quantitatively assessed using both simulated and actual hyperspectral image time-series. With a Cohen's Kappa coefficient of 0.65, WASMA provided a more accurate tree species map compared to conventional MESMA (Kappa = 0.54; p-value < 0.05. The flexible or adaptive use of band sets in WASMA provides an interesting avenue to address spectral similarities in complex vegetation canopies.

  6. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) detection of active oxygen species and organic phases in Martian soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Fun-Dow; Kim, Soon Sam; Liang, Ranty H.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of active oxygen species (O(-), O2(-), O3(-)) and other strong oxidants (Fe2O3 and Fe3O4) was invoked in interpretations of the Viking biological experiments and a model was also suggested for Martian surface chemistry. The non-biological interpretations of the biological results gain futher support as no organic compounds were detected in the Viking pyrolysis-gas chromatography mass spectrometer (GCSM) experiments at concentrations as low as 10 ppb. Electron spin resonance (ESR) measures the absorption of microwaves by a paramagnetic and/or ferromagnetic center in the presence of an external field. In many instances, ESR has the advantage of detailed submicroscopic identification of the transient species and/or unstable reaction intermediates in their environments. Since the higly active oxygen species (O(-), O2(-), O3(-), and R-O-O(-)) are all paramagnetic in nature, they can be readily detected in native form by the ESR method. Active oxygen species likely to occur in the Martian surface samples were detected by ESR in UV-irradiated samples containing MgO. A miniaturized ESR spectrometer system can be developed for the Mars Rover Sample Return Mission. The instrument can perform the following in situ Martian samples analyses: detection of active oxygen species; characterization of Martian surface chemistry and photooxidation processes; and searching for organic compounds in the form of free radicals preserved in subsoils, and detection of microfossils with Martian carbonate sediments.

  7. Feasibility of Valence-to-Core X-ray Emission Spectroscopy for Tracking Transient Species

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopies, when combined in laser-pump, X-ray-probe measurement schemes, can be powerful tools for tracking the electronic and geometric structural changes that occur during the course of a photoinitiated chemical reaction. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is considered an established technique for such measurements, and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) of the strongest core-to-core emission lines (Kα and Kβ) is now being utilized. Flux demanding valence-to-core XES promises to be an important addition to the time-resolved spectroscopic toolkit. In this paper we present measurements and density functional theory calculations on laser-excited, solution-phase ferrocyanide that demonstrate the feasibility of valence-to-core XES for time-resolved experiments. We discuss technical improvements that will make valence-to-core XES a practical pump–probe technique. PMID:26568779

  8. Detection of Babesia and Anaplasma species in rabbits from Texas and Georgia, USA.

    PubMed

    Yabsley, Michael J; Romines, Janean; Nettles, Victor F

    2006-01-01

    Rabbits have been shown to harbor a suite of zoonotic organisms, including a Babesia species, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum. In this study, we conducted a molecular survey for various tick-borne pathogens in three species of rabbits from Texas and Georgia. Of 18 black-tailed jackrabbits (Lepus californicus) tested from Texas, six (28%) were polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive for Babesia, and nucleotide sequencing revealed two distinct species or strains. Two jackrabbits were infected with a Babesia species or strain (Babesia sp. A) that was nearly identical (99.9%) to a piroplasm previously detected in humans from Washington state, and the remaining four jackrabbits were infected with a Babesia species (Babesia sp. B) that was most similar (99.7%) to a Babesia species detected in cottontail rabbits from Massachusetts and humans from Kentucky and Missouri. Eleven (61%) black-tailed jackrabbits were positive for A. bovis, and one was positive for A. phagocytophilum. Two of four desert cottontails (Sylvilagus audubonii) from Texas were positive for the Babesia sp. B, and one desert cottontail each was positive for A. bovis and A. phagocytophilum. One of these desert cottontails was coinfected with the Babesia sp. B and A. phagocytophilum, and five jackrabbits were coinfected with Babesia species and A. bovis. Of 19 eastern cottontails (S. floridanus) from Georgia, only one (5.3%) was positive for A. phagocytophilum, and three (15.8%) were positive for A. bovis. No rabbits from Texas or Georgia were positive for Borrelia species. The only tick species detected on the Texas and Georgia rabbits was the rabbit tick, Haemaphysalis leporispalustris. These data extend the geographic and host range of these pathogens, and because both the Babesia species and A. phagocytophilum are potential zoonotic pathogens, it is important to be aware that these organisms are enzootic in parts of the southern United States. PMID:16584322

  9. Ultrasensitive, real-time trace gas detection using a high-power, multimode diode laser and cavity ringdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Karpf, Andreas; Qiao, Yuhao; Rao, Gottipaty N

    2016-06-01

    We present a simplified cavity ringdown (CRD) trace gas detection technique that is insensitive to vibration, and capable of extremely sensitive, real-time absorption measurements. A high-power, multimode Fabry-Perot (FP) diode laser with a broad wavelength range (Δλlaser∼0.6  nm) is used to excite a large number of cavity modes, thereby reducing the detector's susceptibility to vibration and making it well suited for field deployment. When detecting molecular species with broad absorption features (Δλabsorption≫Δλlaser), the laser's broad linewidth removes the need for precision wavelength stabilization. The laser's power and broad linewidth allow the use of on-axis cavity alignment, improving the signal-to-noise ratio while maintaining its vibration insensitivity. The use of an FP diode laser has the added advantages of being inexpensive, compact, and insensitive to vibration. The technique was demonstrated using a 1.1 W (λ=400  nm) diode laser to measure low concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in zero air. A sensitivity of 38 parts in 1012 (ppt) was achieved using an integration time of 128 ms; for single-shot detection, 530 ppt sensitivity was demonstrated with a measurement time of 60 μs, which opens the door to sensitive measurements with extremely high temporal resolution; to the best of our knowledge, these are the highest speed measurements of NO2 concentration using CRD spectroscopy. The reduced susceptibility to vibration was demonstrated by introducing small vibrations into the apparatus and observing that there was no measurable effect on the sensitivity of detection. PMID:27411209

  10. Detection of canine skin and subcutaneous tumors by visible and near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cugmas, Blaž; Plavec, Tanja; Bregar, Maksimilijan; Naglič, Peter; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan; Bürmen, Miran

    2015-03-01

    Cancer is the main cause of canine morbidity and mortality. The existing evaluation of tumors requires an experienced veterinarian and usually includes invasive procedures (e.g., fine-needle aspiration) that can be unpleasant for the dog and the owner. We investigate visible and near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) as a noninvasive optical technique for evaluation and detection of canine skin and subcutaneous tumors ex vivo and in vivo. The optical properties of tumors and skin were calculated in a spectrally constrained manner, using a lookup table-based inverse model. The obtained optical properties were analyzed and compared among different tumor groups. The calculated parameters of the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients were subsequently used for detection of malignant skin and subcutaneous tumors. The detection sensitivity and specificity of malignant tumors ex vivo were 90.0% and 73.5%, respectively, while corresponding detection sensitivity and specificity of malignant tumors in vivo were 88.4% and 54.6%, respectively. The obtained results show that the DRS is a promising noninvasive optical technique for detection and classification of malignant and benign canine skin and subcutaneous tumors. The method should be further investigated on tumors with common origin.

  11. Rapid Detection of Pathogenic Bacteria from Fresh Produce by Filtration and Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaomeng; Han, Caiqin; Chen, Jing; Huang, Yao-Wen; Zhao, Yiping

    2016-04-01

    The detection of Salmonella Poona from cantaloupe cubes and E. coli O157:H7 from lettuce has been explored by using a filtration method and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) based on vancomycin-functionalized silver nanorod array substrates. It is found that with a two-step filtration process, the limit of detection (LOD) of Salmonella Poona from cantaloupe cubes can be as low as 100 CFU/mL in less than 4 h, whereas the chlorophyll in the lettuce causes severe SERS spectral interference. To improve the LOD of lettuce, a three-step filtration method with a hydrophobic filter is proposed. The hydrophobic filter can effectively eliminate the interferences from chlorophyll and achieve a LOD of 1000 CFU/mL detection of E. coli O157:H7 from lettuce samples within 5 h. With the low LODs and rapid detection time, the SERS biosensing platform has demonstrated its potential as a rapid, simple, and inexpensive means for pathogenic bacteria detection from fresh produce.

  12. High repetition rate laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using acousto-optically gated detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pořízka, Pavel; Klessen, Benjamin; Kaiser, Jozef; Gornushkin, Igor; Panne, Ulrich; Riedel, Jens

    2014-07-01

    This contribution introduces a new type of setup for fast sample analysis using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The novel design combines a high repetition rate laser (up to 50 kHz) as excitation source and an acousto-optical modulator (AOM) as a fast switch for temporally gating the detection of the emitted light. The plasma radiation is led through the active medium of the AOM where it is diffracted on the transient ultrasonic Bragg grid. The diffracted radiation is detected by a compact Czerny-Turner spectrometer equipped with a CCD line detector. Utilizing the new combination of high repetition rate lasers and AOM gated detection, rapid measurements with total integration times of only 10 ms resulted in a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.13 wt.% for magnesium in aluminum alloys. This short integration time corresponds to 100 analyses/s. Temporal gating of LIP radiation results in improved LODs and consecutively higher sensitivity of the LIBS setup. Therefore, an AOM could be beneficially utilized to temporally detect plasmas induced by high repetition rate lasers. The AOM in combination with miniaturized Czerny-Turner spectrometers equipped with CCD line detectors and small footprint diode pumped solid state lasers results in temporally gateable compact LIBS setups.

  13. High repetition rate laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using acousto-optically gated detection

    SciTech Connect

    Pořízka, Pavel; Kaiser, Jozef

    2014-07-15

    This contribution introduces a new type of setup for fast sample analysis using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The novel design combines a high repetition rate laser (up to 50 kHz) as excitation source and an acousto-optical modulator (AOM) as a fast switch for temporally gating the detection of the emitted light. The plasma radiation is led through the active medium of the AOM where it is diffracted on the transient ultrasonic Bragg grid. The diffracted radiation is detected by a compact Czerny-Turner spectrometer equipped with a CCD line detector. Utilizing the new combination of high repetition rate lasers and AOM gated detection, rapid measurements with total integration times of only 10 ms resulted in a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.13 wt.% for magnesium in aluminum alloys. This short integration time corresponds to 100 analyses/s. Temporal gating of LIP radiation results in improved LODs and consecutively higher sensitivity of the LIBS setup. Therefore, an AOM could be beneficially utilized to temporally detect plasmas induced by high repetition rate lasers. The AOM in combination with miniaturized Czerny-Turner spectrometers equipped with CCD line detectors and small footprint diode pumped solid state lasers results in temporally gateable compact LIBS setups.

  14. Detection of canine skin and subcutaneous tumors by visible and near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cugmas, Blaž; Plavec, Tanja; Bregar, Maksimilijan; Naglič, Peter; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan; Bürmen, Miran

    2015-03-01

    Cancer is the main cause of canine morbidity and mortality. The existing evaluation of tumors requires an experienced veterinarian and usually includes invasive procedures (e.g., fine-needle aspiration) that can be unpleasant for the dog and the owner. We investigate visible and near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) as a noninvasive optical technique for evaluation and detection of canine skin and subcutaneous tumors ex vivo and in vivo. The optical properties of tumors and skin were calculated in a spectrally constrained manner, using a lookup table-based inverse model. The obtained optical properties were analyzed and compared among different tumor groups. The calculated parameters of the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients were subsequently used for detection of malignant skin and subcutaneous tumors. The detection sensitivity and specificity of malignant tumors ex vivo were 90.0% and 73.5%, respectively, while corresponding detection sensitivity and specificity of malignant tumors in vivo were 88.4% and 54.6%, respectively. The obtained results show that the DRS is a promising noninvasive optical technique for detection and classification of malignant and benign canine skin and subcutaneous tumors. The method should be further investigated on tumors with common origin. PMID:25751030

  15. DARK MATTER SUBSTRUCTURE DETECTION USING SPATIALLY RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY OF LENSED DUSTY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hezaveh, Yashar; Holder, Gilbert; Dalal, Neal; Kuhlen, Michael; Marrone, Daniel; Murray, Norman; Vieira, Joaquin

    2013-04-10

    We investigate how strong lensing of dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) by foreground galaxies can be used as a probe of dark matter halo substructure. We find that spatially resolved spectroscopy of lensed sources allows dramatic improvements to measurements of lens parameters. In particular, we find that modeling of the full, three-dimensional (angular position and radial velocity) data can significantly facilitate substructure detection, increasing the sensitivity of observables to lower mass subhalos. We carry out simulations of lensed dusty sources observed by early ALMA (Cycle 1) and use a Fisher matrix analysis to study the parameter degeneracies and mass detection limits of this method. We find that even with conservative assumptions, it is possible to detect galactic dark matter subhalos of {approx}10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} with high significance in most lensed DSFGs. Specifically, we find that in typical DSFG lenses, there is a {approx}55% probability of detecting a substructure with M > 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} with more than 5{sigma} detection significance in each lens, if the abundance of substructure is consistent with previous lensing results. The full ALMA array, with its significantly enhanced sensitivity and resolution, should improve these estimates considerably. Given the sample of {approx}100 lenses provided by surveys such as the South Pole Telescope, our understanding of dark matter substructure in typical galaxy halos is poised to improve dramatically over the next few years.

  16. Rapid detection of acetamiprid in foods using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS).

    PubMed

    Wijaya, Wisiani; Pang, Shintaro; Labuza, Theodore P; He, Lili

    2014-04-01

    Acetamiprid is a neonicotinoid pesticide that is commonly used in modern farming. Acetamiprid residue in food commodities can be a potential harm to human and has been implicated in the honey bee hive die off crisis. In this study, we developed rapid, simple, and sensitive methods to detect acetamiprid in apple juice and on apple surfaces using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). No pretreatment of apple juice sample was performed. A simple surface swab method was used to recover acetamiprid from the apple surface. Samples were incubated with silver dendrites for several minutes and SERS spectra were taken directly from the silver surface. Detection of a set of 5 apple juice samples can be done within 10 min. The swab-SERS method took 15 min for a set of 5 samples. Resulting spectral data were analyzed using principal component analysis. The highest acetamiprid peak at 634 cm(-1) was used to detect and quantify the amount of acetamiprid spiked in 1:1 water-methanol solvent, apple juice, and on apple surface. The SERS method was able to successfully detect acetamiprid at 0.5 μg/mL (0.5 ppm) in solvent, 3 μg/mL (3 ppm) in apple juice, and 0.125 μg/cm(2) on apple surfaces. The SERS methods provide simple, rapid, and sensitive ways to detect acetamiprid in beverages and on the surfaces of thick skinned fruits and vegetables. PMID:24620941

  17. Distribution of Anopheles culicifacies and Detection of its Sibling Species E from Madhya Pradesh: Central India

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ajay Kumar; Tyagi, Varun; Singh, Sompal; Veer, Vijay; Agrawal, Om Prakash; Sukumaran, Devanathan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anopheles culicifacies is an important vector of malaria in Southeast Asia, contributing to almost 70% of malaria cases in India. It exists as a complex of five morphologically indistinguishable species A, B, C, D and E with varied geographical distribution patterns. In India, 8% of the total population of Madhya Pradesh (Central India) contributes about 30% of total malaria cases, 60% of total falciparum cases and 50% of malaria deaths. An. culicifacies is the major malaria vector in this state. Vector control mainly relies on the proper identification and distribution of vector species exists in a particular area. The present study was carried out to identify the distribution of An. culicifacies sibling species in certain endemic district of Central India, Madhya Pradesh. Methods: The An. culicifacies mosquitoes collected from the study districts were identified morphologically. The genomic DNA was isolated from the mosquitoes and subjected to Allele specific PCR targeting D3 domain of 28S ribosomal DNA. Results: The mean prevalence of An. culicifacies during the study period was in the range of 8–120 per man per hour (PMH). From the study areas species B was identified from Jabalpur, Chindwara and Hoshangabad, Species C from Hoshangabad only, Species D from Narsinghpur and Khandwa and sibling species E from Mandla, Chindwara and Hoshangabad respectively. Conclusion: This is the first report to detect species E from Madhya Pradesh region which necessitate for reconsideration of species distribution of each An. culicifacies sibling species that would enable to develop required vector control strategies. PMID:26114132

  18. Optically multiplexed multi-gas detection using quantum cascade laser photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Anadi; Prasanna, Manu; Lane, Michael; Go, Rowel; Dunayevskiy, Ilya; Tsekoun, Alexei; Patel, C Kumar N

    2008-09-20

    We report high-throughput, nondispersive optical multiplexing of laser beams using a scanning galvanometer. We have utilized this technique for multispecies trace-gas detection using multiple quantum cascade laser photoacoustic spectroscopy. We demonstrate switching from one laser to another in less than 1 s, a performance level needed for a comprehensive multispecies sensor, and a high signal-to-noise ratio detection of five gaseous components, NH(3), NO(2), dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP, a simulant for nerve agents), acetone, and ethylene glycol, in a room air gas mixture containing approximately 3 ppb of NH(3), approximately 8 ppb of NO(2), approximately 20 ppb of DMMP, approximately 30 ppb of acetone, and approximately 40 ppb of ethylene glycol. PMID:18806847

  19. Single-shot detection of bacterial endospores via coherent Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pestov, Dmitry; Wang, Xi; Ariunbold, Gombojav O.; Murawski, Robert K.; Sautenkov, Vladimir A.; Dogariu, Arthur; Sokolov, Alexei V.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in coherent Raman spectroscopy hold exciting promise for many potential applications. For example, a technique, mitigating the nonresonant four-wave-mixing noise while maximizing the Raman-resonant signal, has been developed and applied to the problem of real-time detection of bacterial endospores. After a brief review of the technique essentials, we show how extensions of our earlier experimental work [Pestov D, et al. (2007) Science 316:265–268] yield single-shot identification of a small sample of Bacillus subtilis endospores (≈104 spores). The results convey the utility of the technique and its potential for “on-the-fly” detection of biohazards, such as Bacillus anthracis. The application of optimized coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering scheme to problems requiring chemical specificity and short signal acquisition times is demonstrated. PMID:18184801

  20. High sensitive detection of nitric oxide using laser induced photoacoustic spectroscopy at 213 nm.

    PubMed

    Gondal, Mohammed A; Khalil, Ahmed Asaad I; Al-Suliman, Noura

    2012-08-10

    Trace level detection of nitric oxide (NO) is of great interest for a wide range of applications such as environment and human health. For this purpose, a high sensitive sensor based photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) principle has been developed at our laboratory for detection of NO at very low concentration (ppbV). For optimization of the PAS signal and to achieve higher sensitivity, parametric dependence investigation was carried out where PAS signal dependence on NO gas pressure, cell geometry, buffer gas (Ar, N2, He), and laser pulse energy used three PAS cells developed locally. The best sensitivity achieved with three cells was 41, 11, 20 ppbv, respectively. It is worth reporting that the best PAS signal to noise ratio was achieved by using a cylindrical cell having three acoustic filters and argon as a buffer gas. PMID:22885587

  1. Density Detection of Aligned Nanowire Arrays Using Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Wenfeng; Wang, Xin; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, JiaQi; Zhao, Kun

    2016-12-01

    A rapid technique is necessary to quantitatively detect the density of nanowire (NW) and nanotube arrays in one-dimensional devices which have been identified as useful building blocks for nanoelectronics, optoelectronics, biomedical devices, etc. Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy was employed in this research to detect the density of aligned Ni NW arrays. The transmitted amplitude of THz peaks and optical thickness of NW arrays was found to be the effective parameters to analyze the density change of NW arrays. Owing to the low multiple scattering and high order of Ni NW arrays, a linear relationship was observed for the transmitted amplitude and optical thickness regarding NW density, respectively. Therefore, THz technique may be used as a promising tool to characterize the density of one-dimensional structures in the large-scale integrated nanodevice fabrication. PMID:27431495

  2. Single-pulse underwater laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy with nongated detection scheme.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ayumu; Tamura, Ayaka; Fukami, Kazuhiro; Ogata, Yukio H; Sakka, Tetsuo

    2013-04-16

    We investigated spatially resolved emission spectra of Al atoms in a very small (∼0.1 mm) laser ablation plasma produced by a single long-pulse (∼100 ns) irradiation of an Al target in water. The spectral feature varied considerably, depending on the position to be measured. The density of the plasma periphery was low enough to neglect the self-absorption effect, even when resonance lines were observed. By properly selecting the position, we successfully obtained well-resolved spectral lines even without time-gated detection. This suggests that time-gating is not necessary anymore in the practical applications of underwater laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy when employing spatially resolved detection system. PMID:23534375

  3. Evaluation of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for explosive residue detection.

    PubMed

    De Lucia, Frank C; Gottfried, Jennifer L; Miziolek, Andrzej W

    2009-01-19

    Recently laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been investigated as a potential technique for trace explosive detection. Typically LIBS is performed using nanosecond laser pulses. For this work, we have investigated the use of femtosecond laser pulses for explosive residue detection at two different fluences. Femtosecond laser pulses have previously been shown to provide several advantages for laser ablation and other LIBS applications. We have collected LIBS spectra of several bulk explosives and explosive residues at different pulse durations and energies. In contrast to previous femtosecond LIBS spectra of explosives, we have observed atomic emission peaks for the constituent elements of explosives - carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen. Preliminary results indicate that several advantages attributed to femtosecond pulses are not realized at higher laser fluences. PMID:19158854

  4. Superhydrophobicity, plasmonics and Raman spectroscopy for few/single molecule detection down to attomolar concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, G.; Gentile, F.; De Angelis, F.; Coluccio, M. L.; Liberale, C.; Proietti Zaccaria, R.; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2012-10-01

    Few/single molecule detection is of great importance in fields including biomedicine, safety and eco-pollution in relation to rare and dangerous chemicals. Superhydrophobic surfaces incorporated with the nanoplasmonic structure enable this device to overcome the diffusion limit of molecules dissolved in water with the concentration down to 10 attomolar. In this paper demonstrated the fabrication of hydrophobic surfaces using optical lithography/reactive ion etching and its application to overcome the diffusion limit. Various experiments such as contact angle measurements, SEM, fluorescence, Raman and FTIR absorption spectroscopy were performed which indicate that utilizing this device it could be possible to perform the measurements for the sample with extremely low dilution. The major application of this novel family of devices would be the early detection of tumors or other important pathologies, with incredible advances in medicine.

  5. Serum albumin analysis for type II diabetes detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jinyong; Cao, Gang; Lin, Juqiang; Liu, Nenrong; Liao, Fadian; Ruan, Qiuyong; Wu, Shanshan; Huang, Zufang; Li, Ling; Chen, Rong

    2014-09-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy combined with membrane electrophoresis (ME) was firstly employed to detect albumin variation in type II diabetic development. Albumin was first purified from human serum by ME and then mixed with silver nanoparticles to perform SERS spectral analysis. SERS spectra were obtained from blood albumin samples of 20 diabetic patients and 19 healthy volunteers. Subtle but discernible changes in the acquired mean spectra of the two groups were observed. Tentative assignment of albumin SERS bands indicated specific structural changes of albumin molecule with diabetic development. Meanwhile, PCA-LDA diagnostic algorithms were employed to classify the two kinds of albumin SERS spectra, yielding the diagnostic sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 94.7%. The results from this exploratory study demonstrated that the EM-SERS method in combination with multivariate statistical analysis has great potential for the label-free detection of albumin variation for improving type II diabetes screening.

  6. Detection and identification of explosive RDX by THz diffuse reflection spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Bo; Chen, Yunqing; Bastiaans, Glenn J; Zhang, X-C

    2006-01-01

    The reflection spectrum of the explosive RDX was acquired from a diffuse reflection measurement using a THz time-domain spectroscopy system in combination with a diffuse reflectance accessory. By applying the Kramers-Kronig transform to the reflection spectrum, the absorption spectrum (0.2-1.8 THz) was obtained. It agrees with the result from a transmission measurement and distinguishes RDX from other materials. The effect of the reference spectrum was examined by using both a Teflon pellet and a copper plate as references. The strong absorption of RDX at 0.82 THz allowed it to be identified by the diffuse reflection measurement even when the RDX sample was covered with certain optically opaque materials. Our investigation demonstrates that THz technique is capable of detecting and identifying hidden RDX-related explosives in a diffuse reflection mode, which is crucial for the standoff detection in the real world applications. PMID:19503355

  7. Dental caries detection by optical spectroscopy: a polarized Raman approach with fibre-optic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, A. C.-T.; Choo-Smith, L.-P.; Werner, J.; Hewko, M.; Sowa, M. G.; Dong, C.; Cleghorn, B.

    2006-09-01

    Incipient dental caries lesions appear as white spots on the tooth surface; however, accurate detection of early approximal lesions is difficult due to limited sensitivity of dental radiography and other traditional diagnostic tools. A new fibre-optic coupled spectroscopic method based on polarized Raman spectroscopy (P-RS) with near-IR laser excitation is introduced which provides contrast for detecting and characterizing incipient caries. Changes in polarized Raman spectra are observed in PO 4 3- vibrations arising from hydroxyapatite of mineralized tooth tissue. Demineralization-induced morphological/orientational alteration of enamel crystallites is believed to be responsible for the reduction of Raman polarization anisotropy observed in the polarized Raman spectra of caries lesions. Supporting evidence obtained by polarized Raman spectral imaging is presented. A specially designed fibre-optic coupled setup for simultaneous measurement of parallel- and cross-polarized tooth Raman spectra is demonstrated in this study.

  8. Saliva analysis combining membrane protein purification with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for nasopharyngeal cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shangyuan; Lin, Duo; Lin, Juqiang; Huang, Zufang; Chen, Guannan; Li, Yongzeng; Huang, Shaohua; Zhao, Jianhua; Chen, Rong; Zeng, Haishan

    2014-02-01

    A method for saliva analysis combining membrane protein purification with silver nanoparticle-based surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for non-invasive nasopharyngeal cancer detection was present in this paper. In this method, cellulose acetate membrane was used to obtain purified whole proteins from human saliva while removing other native saliva constituents and exogenous substances. The purified proteins were mixed with silver nanoparticle for SERS analysis. A diagnostic accuracy of 90.2% can be achieved by principal components analysis combined with linear discriminate analysis, for saliva samples obtained from patients with nasopharyngeal cancer (n = 62) and healthy volunteers (n = 30). This exploratory study demonstrated the potential for developing non-invasive, rapid saliva SERS analysis for nasopharyngeal cancer detection.

  9. Rapid detection of pesticide residue in apple based on Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongyu; Sun, Yunyun; Peng, Yankun; Dhakal, Sagar; Chao, Kuanglin; Liu, Qiaoqiao

    2012-05-01

    The potential of Raman spectroscopy in the analysis of low concentration organic contaminants on apples' surface was evidenced in this study. Chlorpyrifos, an organophosphorus pesticide, was used as a probe for this purpose. The characteristic peaks of fingerprints of pesticide on an aluminum substrate and apple fruit cuticle without pesticide residue were acquired first. Then a concentration range of chlorpyrifos (commercial products at 40%) solutions were made using deionised and distilled water. Single 100 μL droplets of the chlorpyrifos solutions were placed gently on apple fruit cuticles and left to dry before analysis. Through comparative analysis of the Raman spectra data collected, 341, 632 and 1237cm-1 were identified to detect the chlorpyrifos pesticide residue on apple surface. Based on the relationship between the Raman intensity of the most prominent peak at around 632cm-1 and the pesticide concentrations, the limit of detection of ordinary Raman spectrum for chlorpyrifos was estimated to be 48ppm.

  10. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance and Thermal Activation Spectroscopy Study of Organic Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Chang-Hwan Kim

    2003-12-12

    Organic electronic materials are a new class of emerging materials. Organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) are the most promising candidates for future flat panel display technologies. The photophysical characterization is the basic research step one must follow to understand this new class of materials and devices. The light emission properties are closely related to the transport properties of these materials. The objective of this dissertation is to probe the relation between transport and photophysical properties of organic semiconductors. The transport characteristics were evaluated by using thermally stimulated current and thermally stimulated luminescence techniques. The photoluminescence detected magnetic resonance and photoluminescence quantum yield studies provide valuable photophysical information on this class of materials. OLEDs are already in the market. However, detailed studies on the degradation mechanisms are still lacking. Since both optically detected magnetic resonance and thermal activation spectroscopy probe long-lived defect-related states in organic semiconductors, the combined study generates new insight on the OLED operation and degradation mechanisms.

  11. Density Detection of Aligned Nanowire Arrays Using Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Wenfeng; Wang, Xin; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, JiaQi; Zhao, Kun

    2016-07-01

    A rapid technique is necessary to quantitatively detect the density of nanowire (NW) and nanotube arrays in one-dimensional devices which have been identified as useful building blocks for nanoelectronics, optoelectronics, biomedical devices, etc. Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy was employed in this research to detect the density of aligned Ni NW arrays. The transmitted amplitude of THz peaks and optical thickness of NW arrays was found to be the effective parameters to analyze the density change of NW arrays. Owing to the low multiple scattering and high order of Ni NW arrays, a linear relationship was observed for the transmitted amplitude and optical thickness regarding NW density, respectively. Therefore, THz technique may be used as a promising tool to characterize the density of one-dimensional structures in the large-scale integrated nanodevice fabrication.

  12. Sensitive and Instantaneous Molecular Detection from Broadband Cavity-Enhanced Dual Comb Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, B.; Ozawa, A.; Jacquey, M.; Jacquet, P.; Guelachvili, G.; Udem, T.; Holzwarth, R.; Kobayashi, Y.; Hänsch, T. W.; Picqué, N.

    2010-06-01

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that the precisely spaced spectral lines of a laser frequency comb can be harnessed for new techniques of multi-heterodyne Fourier transform spectroscopy (also called dual-comb spectroscopy) of molecules. In one such experiment, an absorbing molecular gas was placed inside an optical cavity that is matched to the laser resonator so that it is resonant for each comb line. The sensitivity for weak absorption is much enhanced, as in cavity ring-down spectroscopy. The light transmitted by the cavity is superimposed on a second frequency comb with slightly different repetition frequency. A single fast photodetector then produces an output signal with a comb of radio frequencies due to interference between pairs of optical comb lines. The optical spectrum is thus effectively mapped into the radio frequency regime, where it becomes accessible to fast digital signal processing. Experimental proof-of-principle is carried out in the near-infrared 1 μm region. An Yb-doped fiber frequency comb is coherently coupled to a passive resonator with a finesse of 1200, resulting in an effective interaction length between the light and the gas enhanced to 880m. The weak 3ν1 band of ammonia is rotationally resolved for the first time to our knowledge. Recording times of 18 μs are enough to span 220 cm-1 with a resolution of 0.15 cm-1. The signal to noise ratio of 380 leads to a minimum-detectable-absorption coefficient αmin of 3×10-8 cm-1 . B. Bernhardt, A. Ozawa, P. Jacquet, M. Jacquey, Y. Kobayashi, T. Udem, R. Holzwarth, G. Guelachvili, T.W. Hänsch, N. Picqué, Cavity-enhanced dual-comb spectroscopy, Nature Photonics 4, 55-57 (2010),

  13. Parallel NMR spectroscopy with simultaneous detection of (1) H and (19) F nuclei.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Helena; Kupče, Ēriks

    2016-07-01

    Recording NMR signals of several nuclear species simultaneously by using parallel receivers provides more information from a single measurement and at the same time increases the measurement sensitivity per unit time. Here we present a comprehensive series of the most frequently used NMR experiments modified for simultaneous direct detection of two of the most sensitive NMR nuclei - (1) H and (19) F. We hope that the presented material will stimulate interest in and further development of this technique. PMID:27021630

  14. Assessment of environmental DNA for detecting presence of imperiled aquatic amphibian species in isolated wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mckee, Anna; Calhoun, Daniel L.; Barichivich, William J.; Spear, Stephen F.; Goldberg, Caren S.; Glenn, Travis C

    2015-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) is an emerging tool that allows low-impact sampling for aquatic species by isolating DNA from water samples and screening for DNA sequences specific to species of interest. However, researchers have not tested this method in naturally acidic wetlands that provide breeding habitat for a number of imperiled species, including the frosted salamander (Ambystoma cingulatum), reticulated flatwoods salamanders (Ambystoma bishopi), striped newt (Notophthalmus perstriatus), and gopher frog (Lithobates capito). Our objectives for this study were to develop and optimize eDNA survey protocols and assays to complement and enhance capture-based survey methods for these amphibian species. We collected three or more water samples, dipnetted or trapped larval and adult amphibians, and conducted visual encounter surveys for egg masses for target species at 40 sites on 12 different longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) tracts. We used quantitative PCRs to screen eDNA from each site for target species presence. We detected flatwoods salamanders at three sites with eDNA but did not detect them during physical surveys. Based on the sample location we assumed these eDNA detections to indicate the presence of frosted flatwoods salamanders. We did not detect reticulated flatwoods salamanders. We detected striped newts with physical and eDNA surveys at two wetlands. We detected gopher frogs at 12 sites total, three with eDNA alone, two with physical surveys alone, and seven with physical and eDNA surveys. We detected our target species with eDNA at 9 of 11 sites where they were present as indicated from traditional surveys and at six sites where they were not detected with traditional surveys. It was, however, critical to use at least three water samples per site for eDNA. Our results demonstrate eDNA surveys can be a useful complement to traditional survey methods for detecting imperiled pond-breeding amphibians. Environmental DNA may be particularly useful in situations

  15. Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy and Kinetics of Butoxy Isomerization: Detection of the {A}- {XCAVITY Ringdown Spectroscopy and Kinetics of Butoxy Isomerization: Detection of the {A}- {X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprague, Matthew K.; Okumura, Mitchio; Sander, Stanley P.

    2011-06-01

    Alkoxy radicals are atmospherically important species, playing a direct role in the HO_x and NO_x cycles that affect tropospheric air pollution. Alkoxy radicals that can form a six membered transition state can isomerize into a hydroxyalkyl radical. In the presence of O_2, a rapid association reaction occurs, forming a hydroxyalkylperoxy radical. The n-butoxy radical is the smallest alkoxy to undergo isomerization, forming the γ-hydroxybutylperoxy radical (HOC_4H_8OO). Direct detection of HOC_4H_8OO opens the door to measuring alkoxy reaction kinetics with higher precision than previous end product studies. In this talk, we report the first detection of the tilde{A}-tilde{X} electronic spectrum of the HOC_4H_8OO radical. The spectrum is similar in shape to the tilde{A}-tilde{X} spectrum of n-butyl peroxy: a broad spectroscopic band due to the multiple molecular conformers that are present. We also use the tilde{A}-tilde{X} band to measure the alkoxy isomerization kinetics relative to the alkoxy radical's reaction with O_2, similar to the previous kinetics studies. R. Atkinson, D. L. Baulch, R. A. Cox, J. N. Crowley, R. F. Hampson, R. G. Hynes, M. E. Jenkin, M. J. Rossi, and J. Troe J. Atmos. Chem. and Phys. 2006, 6, 3625. B. G. Glover and T. A. Miller. J. Phys. Chem. A 2005, 109, 11191.

  16. Detection of neuroinflammation through the retina by means of Raman spectroscopy and multivariate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marro, Monica; Taubes, Alice; Villoslada, Pablo; Petrov, Dmitri

    2012-06-01

    Retinal nervous tissue sustains a substantial damage during the autoimmune inflammatory processes characteristic for Multiple Sclerosis (MS). The damage can be characterized non-surgically by Raman Spectroscopy, a non-invasive optical imaging technology. We used non-resonant near-infrared Raman spectrosocopy to create a spectral library of eight pivotal biomolecules known to be involved in neuroinflammation: Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucliotide (NADH), Flavin Adenine Nucleotide (FAD), Lactate, Cytochrome C, Glutamate, N-Acetyl- Aspartate (NAA), Phosphotidylcholine, with Advanced Glycolization End Products (AGEs) analyzed as a reference. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of 50 spectra taken of murine retinal tissue culture undergoing an inflammatory response and healthy controls was used in order to characterize the molecular makeup of the inflammation. The loading plots revealed a heavy influence of peaks related to Glutamate, NADH, and Phosphotidylcholine to inflammation-related spectral changes. Partial Least Squares - Discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was performed to create a multivariate classifier for the spectral diagnosis of neuroinflammed tissue and yielded a diagnostic sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 100%. We demonstrate then the effectiveness of combining Raman spectroscopy with PCA and PLS-DA statistical techniques to detect and monitor neuroinflamation in retina. With this technique Glutamate, NAA and NADH are detected in retina tissue as signs for neuroinflammation.

  17. Aptamer-based biosensor for label-free detection of ethanolamine by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liang, Gang; Man, Yan; Jin, Xinxin; Pan, Ligang; Liu, Xinhui

    2016-09-14

    A label-free sensing assay for ethanolamine (EA) detection based on G-quadruplex-EA binding interaction is presented by using G-rich aptamer DNA (Ap-DNA) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The presence of K(+) induces the Ap-DNA to form a K(+)-stabilized G-quadruplex structure which provides binding sites for EA. The sensing mechanism was further confirmed by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and EIS measurement. As a result, the charge transfer resistance (RCT) is strongly increased as demonstrated by using the ferro/ferricyanide ([Fe(CN)6](3-/4-)) as a redox probe. Under the optimized conditions, a linear relationship between ΔRCT and EA concentration was obtained over the range of 0.16 nM and 16 nM EA, with a detection limit of 0.08 nM. Interference by other selected chemicals with similar structure was negligible. Analytical results of EA spiked into tap water and serum by the sensor suggested the assay could be successfully applied to real sample analysis. With the advantages of high sensitivity, selectivity and simple sensor construction, this method is potentially suitable for the on-site monitoring of EA contamination. PMID:27566359

  18. Rapid detection of talcum powder in tea using FT-IR spectroscopy coupled with chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoli; Zhang, Yuying; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigated the feasibility of Fourier transform infrared transmission (FT-IR) spectroscopy to detect talcum powder illegally added in tea based on chemometric methods. Firstly, 210 samples of tea powder with 13 dose levels of talcum powder were prepared for FT-IR spectra acquirement. In order to highlight the slight variations in FT-IR spectra, smoothing, normalize and standard normal variate (SNV) were employed to preprocess the raw spectra. Among them, SNV preprocessing had the best performance with high correlation of prediction (RP = 0.948) and low root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP = 0.108) of partial least squares (PLS) model. Then 18 characteristic wavenumbers were selected based on a hybrid of backward interval partial least squares (biPLS) regression, competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (CARS) algorithm and successive projections algorithm (SPA). These characteristic wavenumbers only accounted for 0.64% of the full wavenumbers. Following that, 18 characteristic wavenumbers were used to build linear and nonlinear determination models by PLS regression and extreme learning machine (ELM), respectively. The optimal model with RP = 0.963 and RMSEP = 0.137 was achieved by ELM algorithm. These results demonstrated that FT-IR spectroscopy with chemometrics could be used successfully to detect talcum powder in tea. PMID:27468701

  19. Rapid detection of talcum powder in tea using FT-IR spectroscopy coupled with chemometrics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoli; Zhang, Yuying; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigated the feasibility of Fourier transform infrared transmission (FT-IR) spectroscopy to detect talcum powder illegally added in tea based on chemometric methods. Firstly, 210 samples of tea powder with 13 dose levels of talcum powder were prepared for FT-IR spectra acquirement. In order to highlight the slight variations in FT-IR spectra, smoothing, normalize and standard normal variate (SNV) were employed to preprocess the raw spectra. Among them, SNV preprocessing had the best performance with high correlation of prediction (RP = 0.948) and low root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP = 0.108) of partial least squares (PLS) model. Then 18 characteristic wavenumbers were selected based on a hybrid of backward interval partial least squares (biPLS) regression, competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (CARS) algorithm and successive projections algorithm (SPA). These characteristic wavenumbers only accounted for 0.64% of the full wavenumbers. Following that, 18 characteristic wavenumbers were used to build linear and nonlinear determination models by PLS regression and extreme learning machine (ELM), respectively. The optimal model with RP = 0.963 and RMSEP = 0.137 was achieved by ELM algorithm. These results demonstrated that FT-IR spectroscopy with chemometrics could be used successfully to detect talcum powder in tea. PMID:27468701

  20. Towards a low-cost mobile subcutaneous vein detection solution using near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Juric, Simon; Flis, Vojko; Debevc, Matjaz; Holzinger, Andreas; Zalik, Borut

    2014-01-01

    Excessive venipunctures are both time- and resource-consuming events, which cause anxiety, pain, and distress in patients, or can lead to severe harmful injuries. We propose a low-cost mobile health solution for subcutaneous vein detection using near-infrared spectroscopy, along with an assessment of the current state of the art in this field. The first objective of this study was to get a deeper overview of the research topic, through the initial team discussions and a detailed literature review (using both academic and grey literature). The second objective, that is, identifying the commercial systems employing near-infrared spectroscopy, was conducted using the PubMed database. The goal of the third objective was to identify and evaluate (using the IEEE Xplore database) the research efforts in the field of low-cost near-infrared imaging in general, as a basis for the conceptual model of the upcoming prototype. Although the reviewed commercial devices have demonstrated usefulness and value for peripheral veins visualization, other evaluated clinical outcomes are less conclusive. Previous studies regarding low-cost near-infrared systems demonstrated the general feasibility of developing cost-effective vein detection systems; however, their limitations are restricting their applicability to clinical practice. Finally, based on the current findings, we outline the future research direction. PMID:24883388