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Sample records for species host-parasite relationships

  1. Nocardia species: host-parasite relationships.

    PubMed Central

    Beaman, B L; Beaman, L

    1994-01-01

    The nocardiae are bacteria belonging to the aerobic actinomycetes. They are an important part of the normal soil microflora worldwide. The type species, Nocardia asteroides, and N. brasiliensis, N. farcinica, N. otitidiscaviarum, N. nova, and N. transvalensis cause a variety of diseases in both normal and immunocompromised humans and animals. The mechanisms of pathogenesis are complex, not fully understood, and include the capacity to evade or neutralize the myriad microbicidal activities of the host. The relative virulence of N. asteroides correlates with the ability to inhibit phagosome-lysosome fusion in phagocytes; to neutralize phagosomal acidification; to detoxify the microbicidal products of oxidative metabolism; to modify phagocyte function; to grow within phagocytic cells; and to attach to, penetrate, and grow within host cells. Both activated macrophages and immunologically specific T lymphocytes constitute the major mechanisms for host resistance to nocardial infection, whereas B lymphocytes and humoral immunity do not appear to be as important in protecting the host. Thus, the nocardiae are facultative intracellular pathogens that can persist within the host, probably in a cryptic form (L-form), for life. Silent invasion of brain cells by some Nocardia strains can induce neurodegeneration in experimental animals; however, the role of nocardiae in neurodegenerative diseases in humans needs to be investigated. Images PMID:8055469

  2. The host-parasite relationship in neosporosis.

    PubMed

    Hemphill, A

    1999-01-01

    Neospora caninum is an apicomplexan parasite which invades many different cell types and tissues. It causes neosporosis, namely stillbirth and abortion in cattle and neuromuscular disease in dogs, and has been found in several other animal species. N. caninum is closely related to Toxoplasma gondii, and controversial opinions exist with respect to its phylogenetical status. Initially, two stages of N. caninum had been identified, namely asexually proliferating tachyzoites and bradyzoites. The sexually produced stage of this parasite, oocysts containing sporozoites, has been found only recently. In order to answer the many open questions regarding its basic biology and its relationship with the host, a number of diagnostic tools have been developed. These techniques are based on the detection of antibodies against parasites in body fluids, the direct visualization of the parasite within tissue samples by immunohistochemistry, or the specific amplification of parasite DNA by PCR. Other studies have been aiming at the identification of specific antigenic components of N. caninum, and the molecular and functional characterization of these antigens with respect to the cell biology of the parasite. Clearly, molecular approaches will also be used increasingly to elucidate the immunological and pathogenetic events during infection, but also to prepare potential new immunotherapeutic tools for future vaccination against N. caninum infection. PMID:10214690

  3. Phylogeny, host-parasite relationship and zoogeography

    PubMed Central

    1999-01-01

    Phylogeny is the evolutionary history of a group or the lineage of organisms and is reconstructed based on morphological, molecular and other characteristics. The genealogical relationship of a group of taxa is often expressed as a phylogenetic tree. The difficulty in categorizing the phylogeny is mainly due to the existence of frequent homoplasies that deceive observers. At the present time, cladistic analysis is believed to be one of the most effective methods of reconstructing a phylogenetic tree. Excellent computer program software for phylogenetic analysis is available. As an example, cladistic analysis was applied for nematode genera of the family Acuariidae, and the phylogenetic tree formed was compared with the system used currently. Nematodes in the genera Nippostrongylus and Heligmonoides were also analyzed, and the validity of the reconstructed phylogenetic trees was observed from a zoogeographical point of view. Some of the theories of parasite evolution were briefly reviewed as well. Coevolution of parasites and humans was discussed with special reference to the evolutionary relationship between Enterobius and primates. PMID:10634036

  4. Host-parasite relationship in cystic echinococcosis: an evolving story.

    PubMed

    Siracusano, Alessandra; Delunardo, Federica; Teggi, Antonella; Ortona, Elena

    2012-01-01

    The larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus causes cystic echinococcosis, a neglected infectious disease that constitutes a major public health problem in developing countries. Despite being under constant barrage by the immune system, E. granulosus modulates antiparasite immune responses and persists in the human hosts with detectable humoral and cellular responses against the parasite. In vitro and in vivo immunological approaches, together with molecular biology and immunoproteomic technologies, provided us exciting insights into the mechanisms involved in the initiation of E. granulosus infection and the consequent induction and regulation of the immune response. Although the last decade has clarified many aspects of host-parasite relationship in human cystic echinococcosis, establishing the full mechanisms that cause the disease requires more studies. Here, we review some of the recent developments and discuss new avenues in this evolving story of E. granulosus infection in man. PMID:22110535

  5. Host-Parasite Interactions in Some Fish Species

    PubMed Central

    Khan, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    Host-parasite interactions are complex, compounded by factors that are capable of shifting the balance in either direction. The host's age, behaviour, immunological status, and environmental change can affect the association that is beneficial to the host whereas evasion of the host's immune response favours the parasite. In fish, some infections that induce mortality are age and temperature dependent. Environmental change, especially habitat degradation by anthropogenic pollutants and oceanographic alterations induced by climatic, can influence parasitic-host interaction. The outcome of these associations will hinge on susceptibility and resistance. PMID:22900144

  6. Host-parasite interactions: Marine bivalve molluscs and protozoan parasites, Perkinsus species.

    PubMed

    Soudant, Philippe; E Chu, Fu-Lin; Volety, Aswani

    2013-10-01

    This review assesses and examines the work conducted to date concerning host and parasite interactions between marine bivalve molluscs and protozoan parasites, belonging to Perkinsus species. The review focuses on two well-studied host-parasite interaction models: the two clam species, Ruditapes philippinarum and R. decussatus, and the parasite Perkinsus olseni, and the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, and the parasite Perkinsus marinus. Cellular and humoral defense responses of the host in combating parasitic infection, the mechanisms (e.g., antioxidant enzymes, extracellular products) employed by the parasite in evading host defenses as well as the role of environmental factors in modulating the host-parasite interactions are described. PMID:23871855

  7. Superinfection reconciles host-parasite association and cross-species transmission.

    PubMed

    Haven, James; Park, Andrew William

    2013-12-01

    Parasites are either dedicated to a narrow host range, or capable of exploiting a wide host range. Understanding how host ranges are determined is very important for public health, as well as wildlife, plant, livestock and agricultural diseases. Our current understanding of host-parasite associations hinges on co-evolution, which assumes evolved host preferences (host specialization) of the parasite. Despite the explanatory power of this framework, we have only a vague understanding of why many parasites routinely cross the host species' barrier. Here we introduce a simple model demonstrating how superinfection (in a heterogeneous community) can promote host-parasite association. Strikingly, the model illustrates that strong host-parasite association occurs in the absence of host specialization, while still permitting cross-species transmission. For decades, host specialization has been foundational in explaining the maintenance of distinct parasites/strains in host species. We argue that host specializations may be exaggerated, and can occur as a byproduct (not necessarily the cause) of host-parasite associations. PMID:24161558

  8. Host-parasite relationships in flatfish (Pleuronectiformes)--the relative importance of host biology, ecology and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Marques, J F; Santos, M J; Teixeira, C M; Batista, M I; Cabral, H N

    2011-01-01

    The extent to which host biology, ecology and phylogeny determine the diversity of macroparasite assemblages has been investigated in recent years in several taxa, including fish. However, consensus has not been reached probably as a result of data being collected from different sources, different temporal scales or host and parasite biogeography and phylogeny having greater influence than expected. The present study evaluates the relative importance of 27 biological, ecological and phylogenetic characteristics of 14 flatfish species on the diversity of their ecto- and endoparasite assemblages, comprising a total of 53 taxa. Redundancy analyses were applied to the mean abundance of each parasite taxa infecting each host and to the richness, taxonomic distinctness and variance in taxonomic distinctness calculated for each assemblage within each host. Only a few host characteristics contributed significantly to the observed patterns: host distribution was more important in determining the type and mean abundance of ectoparasites present in an assemblage, whereas diversity of these assemblages were mainly related to the host's maximum size. Endoparasite mean abundance and diversity were mostly influenced by the number of food items ingested and by the presence of Crustacea and Polychaeta in the diet. However, the sympatric occurrence of related hosts also played an important role in the diversity values found in macroparasite assemblages. Results showed that a host characteristic has different importance according to the host-parasite relationship being examined, suggesting an important role for host-parasite co-evolution on the diversity of extant macroparasite assemblages. PMID:20819241

  9. Inferring host-parasite relationships using stable isotopes: implications for disease transmission and host specificity.

    PubMed

    Stapp, Paul; Salkeld, Daniel J

    2009-11-01

    Identifying the roles of different hosts and vectors is a major challenge in the study of the ecology of diseases caused by multi-host pathogens. Intensive field studies suggested that grasshopper mice (Onychomys leucogaster) help spread the bacterium that causes plague (Yersinia pestis) in prairie dog colonies by sharing fleas with prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus); yet conclusive evidence that prairie dog fleas (Oropsylla hirsuta) feed on grasshopper mice is lacking. Using stable nitrogen isotope analysis, we determined that many blood-engorged O. hirsuta collected from wild grasshopper mice apparently contained blood meals of prairie dogs. These results suggest that grasshopper mice may be infected with Y. pestis via mechanisms other than flea feeding, e.g., early phase or mechanical transmission or scavenging carcasses, and raise questions about the ability of grasshopper mice to maintain Y. pestis in prairie dog colonies during years between plague outbreaks. They also indicate that caution may be warranted when inferring feeding relationships based purely on the occurrence of fleas or other haematophagous ectoparasites on hosts. Stable-isotope analysis may complement or provide a useful alternative to immunological or molecular techniques for identifying hosts of cryptically feeding ectoparasites, and for clarifying feeding relationships in studies of host-parasite interactions. PMID:19967881

  10. A new feather mite species of the genus Neumannella Trouessart, 1916 (Analgoidea, Dermoglyphidae) from the Red-winged Tinamou Rhynchotus rufescens (Temminck, 1815) (Aves, Tinamiformes) with remarks to the evolution of host-parasite associations of the genus.

    PubMed

    Dabert, Jacek

    2014-06-01

    Neumannella skorackii, a new species of the feather mite family Dermoglyphidae (Acari, Astigmata) is described from the Red-winged Tinamou Rhynchotus rufescens (Temminck, 1815) (Aves, Tinamiformes) from Paraguay and a key to all known species of the genus is provided. The phylogenetic relationships (MP analysis of 25 morphological characters) between Neumannella species along with the evolutionary history of host-parasite associations revealed by Jungle reconciliation method are reconstructed. Relatively low cospeciation contribution to the recent host-parasite associations is discovered. PMID:24827087

  11. The Dialogue of the Host-Parasite Relationship: Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    de Morais, Carlos Gustavo Vieira; Castro Lima, Ana Karina; dos Santos, Rosiane Freire; Da-Silva, Silvia Amaral Gonçalves; Dutra, Patrícia Maria Lourenço

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular protozoa Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi and the causative agents of Leishmaniasis and Chagas disease, respectively, belong to the Trypanosomatidae family. Together, these two neglected tropical diseases affect approximately 25 million people worldwide. Whether the host can control the infection or develops disease depends on the complex interaction between parasite and host. Parasite surface and secreted molecules are involved in triggering specific signaling pathways essential for parasite entry and intracellular survival. The recognition of the parasite antigens by host immune cells generates a specific immune response. Leishmania spp. and T. cruzi have a multifaceted repertoire of strategies to evade or subvert the immune system by interfering with a range of signal transduction pathways in host cells, which causes the inhibition of the protective response and contributes to their persistence in the host. The current therapeutic strategies in leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis are very limited. Efficacy is variable, toxicity is high, and the emergence of resistance is increasingly common. In this review, we discuss the molecular basis of the host-parasite interaction of Leishmania and Trypanosoma cruzi infection and their mechanisms of subverting the immune response and how this knowledge can be used as a tool for the development of new drugs. PMID:26090399

  12. Batflies parasitic on some phyllostomid bats in southeastern Brazil: parasitism rates and host-parasite relationships.

    PubMed

    Komeno, C A; Linhares, A X

    1999-01-01

    Ectoparasitic batflies were studied on 12 species of phyllostomid bats, by making 35 nightly collections of bats using mist nets at the "Panga" Ecological Reservation near Uberlândia, State of Minas Gerais, southeastern Brazil, from August 1989 to July 1990. Eleven species of Streblidae and one of Nycteribiidae were collected on 12 species of bats. Prevalence of ectoparasitic flies was lower than those reported by other authors for the New World and may be the result of the lack of caves in the study area, causing bats to roost in less favorable locations, forming smaller colonies. The fly, Trichobius joblingi Wenzel, was found on Carollia perspicillata (Linnaeus), showing preference for adult male bats. This could be explained by the predominance of males in the bat colonies, and by the fact that females rest in isolation during the reproductive period making them less exposed to the parasites. The streblid flies, Aspidoptera falcata Wenzel and Megistopoda proxima (Séguy), were found on Sturnira lilium (Geoffroy). A. falcata occurred mainly on young and adult females, whereas M. proxima did not show any preferences relative to the reproductive condition of the host. Ecological factors are important in determining differential numbers of parasites occurring on the different sexes, ages and reproductive state of the hosts. PMID:10224519

  13. Cellular and immunological basis of the host-parasite relationship during infection with Neospora caninum.

    PubMed

    Hemphill, A; Vonlaufen, N; Naguleswaran, A

    2006-09-01

    Neospora caninum is an apicomplexan parasite that is closely related to Toxoplasma gondii, the causative agent of toxoplasmosis in humans and domestic animals. However, in contrast to T. gondii, N. caninum represents a major cause of abortion in cattle, pointing towards distinct differences in the biology of these two species. There are 3 distinct key features that represent potential targets for prevention of infection or intervention against disease caused by N. caninum. Firstly, tachyzoites are capable of infecting a large variety of host cells in vitro and in vivo. Secondly, the parasite exploits its ability to respond to alterations in living conditions by converting into another stage (tachyzoite-to-bradyzoite or vice versa). Thirdly, by analogy with T. gondii, this parasite has evolved mechanisms that modulate its host cells according to its own requirements, and these must, especially in the case of the bradyzoite stage, involve mechanisms that ensure long-term survival of not only the parasite but also of the host cell. In order to elucidate the molecular and cellular bases of these important features of N. caninum, cell culture-based approaches and laboratory animal models are being exploited. In this review, we will summarize the current achievements related to host cell and parasite cell biology, and will discuss potential applications for prevention of infection and/or disease by reviewing corresponding work performed in murine laboratory infection models and in cattle. PMID:16753081

  14. Avian coccidiosis: a disturbed host-parasite relationship to be restored.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Arno N

    2004-01-01

    The co-evolution of Eimeria and its host the domestic chicken has resulted in a delicate balance of mutual understanding and respect. This balance has been broken by the complete change of the environment in which the parasite was able to reproduce to such an extent that the host, stressed and weakened by heat, crowding and concurrent infections could not combat the shear numbers of organisms. The use of drugs to control the situation has been shown to only temporarily create relief. Resistance widely developed by the flexible genome of the parasite returned new drugs at a greater speed than they had been developed. Improved hygienic measures, better facility management and good understanding of epidemiology of the parasites spreading and proliferation seem the first and most promising set of tools to control the balance. Reduction of stock density may only provide any relief if this is done at a factor of 10 or higher and this is not a realistic measure in relation to the profit. Free-range chickens are an alternative if only animal welfare is at stake. However, in terms of prevalence of parasitic infections, such as coccidia, helminthes or ectoparasites, chickens do not seem to be better off (Permin et al., 2002). Immunological surveillance and the development of safe, effective and economical vaccines are further refinements that can be used to restore the relationship between parasite and host. Several live vaccines are effective and applied, but certainly have drawbacks in safety and production. New technology such as recombinant vectors together with a better understanding of the cell biology of the parasite from biological and genomic information should provide improved vaccines for the future. The strong genetically determined characteristics involved in the induction and maintenance of a sustainable protective immune response might turn out to be of decisive importance for the success of these strategies. The consequences for the physiology of the parasite

  15. An Historical Perspective on How Advances in Microscopic Imaging Contributed to Understanding the Leishmania Spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi Host-Parasite Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Florentino, P. T. V.; Real, F.; Bonfim-Melo, A.; Orikaza, C. M.; Ferreira, E. R.; Pessoa, C. C.; Lima, B. R.; Sasso, G. R. S.; Mortara, R. A.

    2014-01-01

    The literature has identified complex aspects of intracellular host-parasite relationships, which require systematic, nonreductionist approaches and spatial/temporal information. Increasing and integrating temporal and spatial dimensions in host cell imaging have contributed to elucidating several conceptual gaps in the biology of intracellular parasites. To access and investigate complex and emergent dynamic events, it is mandatory to follow them in the context of living cells and organs, constructing scientific images with integrated high quality spatiotemporal data. This review discusses examples of how advances in microscopy have challenged established conceptual models of the intracellular life cycles of Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi protozoan parasites. PMID:24877115

  16. Whipworm genome and dual-species transcriptome analyses provide molecular insights into an intimate host-parasite interaction

    PubMed Central

    Nichol, Sarah; Tracey, Alan; Holroyd, Nancy; Cotton, James A.; Stanley, Eleanor J.; Zarowiecki, Magdalena; Liu, Jimmy Z.; Huckvale, Thomas; Cooper, Philip J.; Grencis, Richard K.; Berriman, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Whipworms are common soil-transmitted helminths that cause debilitating chronic infections in man. These nematodes are only distantly related to Caenorhabditis elegans and have evolved to occupy an unusual niche, tunneling through epithelial cells of the large intestine. Here we present the genome sequences of the human-infective Trichuris trichiura and the murine laboratory model T. muris. Based on whole transcriptome analyses we identify many genes that are expressed in a gender- or life stage-specific manner and characterise the transcriptional landscape of a morphological region with unique biological adaptations, namely bacillary band and stichosome, found only in whipworms and related parasites. Using RNAseq data from whipworm-infected mice we describe the regulated Th1-like immune response of the chronically infected cecum in unprecedented detail. In silico screening identifies numerous potential new drug targets against trichuriasis. Together, these genomes and associated functional data elucidate key aspects of the molecular host-parasite interactions that define chronic whipworm infection. PMID:24929830

  17. Fasciola hepatica mucin-encoding gene: expression, variability and its potential relevance in host-parasite relationship.

    PubMed

    Cancela, Martín; Santos, Guilherme B; Carmona, Carlos; Ferreira, Henrique B; Tort, José Francisco; Zaha, Arnaldo

    2015-12-01

    Fasciola hepatica is the causative agent of fasciolosis, a zoonosis with significant impact both in human and animal health. Understanding the basic processes of parasite biology, especially those related to interactions with its host, will contribute to control F. hepatica infections and hence liver pathology. Mucins have been described as important mediators for parasite establishment within its host, due to their key roles in immune evasion. In F. hepatica, mucin expression is upregulated in the mammalian invasive newly excysted juvenile (NEJ) stage in comparison with the adult stage. Here, we performed sequencing of mucin cDNAs prepared from NEJ RNA, resulting in six different cDNAs clusters. The differences are due to the presence of a tandem repeated sequence of 66 bp encoded by different exons. Two groups of apomucins one with three and the other with four repeats, with 459 and 393 bp respectively, were identified. These cDNAs have open reading frames encoding Ser-Thr enriched proteins with an N-terminal signal peptide, characteristic of apomucin backbone. We cloned a 4470 bp gene comprising eight exons and seven introns that encodes all the cDNA variants identified in NEJs. By real time polymerase chain reaction and high-resolution melting approaches of individual flukes we infer that fhemuc-1 is a single-copy gene, with at least two different alleles. Our data suggest that both gene polymorphism and alternative splicing might account for apomucin variability in the fhemuc-1 gene that is upregulated in NEJ invasive stage. The relevance of this variation in host-parasite interplay is discussed. PMID:26440911

  18. Catoessa boscii (Crustacea, Isopoda, Cymothoidae) parasitic on Carangoides malabaricus (Pisces, Carangidae) from India. Taxonomy and host-parasite relationships.

    PubMed

    Trilles, Jean-Paul; Ravichandran, Samuthirapandian; Rameshkumar, Ganapathy

    2012-06-01

    Catoessa boscii (Bleeker, 1857) (Crustacea, Isopoda, Cymothoidae), is redescribed according to the type specimen observed by Schioedte and Meinert (1884) extant in the Rijksmuseum von Natuurlijke Historie, Leiden (RMNH) and from many additional specimens recently collected in India from Carangoides malabaricus (Pisces, Carangidae). This study allows an updating of the diagnosis of the genus Catoessa and of the species Catoessa boscii. Some parasite-host relationships were studied during the year. Prevalence and sex ratio of parasites varied according to the month, and the sex and size of hosts. PMID:22807055

  19. Host-parasite relationships as determinants of heavy metal concentrations in perch (Perca fluviatilis) and its intestinal parasite infection.

    PubMed

    Brázová, Tímea; Hanzelová, Vladimíra; Miklisová, Dana; Šalamún, Peter; Vidal-Martínez, Víctor M

    2015-12-01

    The concentrations of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn and their bioconcentration factors (BCFs) were determined in two intestinal parasites, an acanthocephalan, Acanthocephalus lucii, a tapeworm, Proteocephalus percae, present in the same host, the European perch (Perca fluviatilis, L.), in the heavily polluted Ružín reservoir in eastern Slovakia. The bioaccumulation of heavy metals in the fish organs and parasites was studied for acanthocephalan and tapeworm monoinfections or mixed infections by the two parasites and for the size of their parasitic infrapopulations. Bioconcentration factors (c[parasite]/c[muscle tissue]) showed that the concentrations of As, Ni, Pb and Zn were higher in mixed infections than in monoinfections. Negative correlations between heavy metal concentrations in perch organs and the parasites were found. For example, higher concentrations of Ni and Zn in both parasite species corresponded with lower metal concentrations in perch and hard roe. Likewise, significant negative relationships between metal concentrations in fish organs and number of parasites were noticed with lower levels of Pb in fish harbouring higher numbers of tapeworms. Similarly, in both parasite species the concentrations of some essential elements (Cr, Mn) were lower at high infection intensities compared to low intensities. Our study revealed that the differential concentration of heavy metals in perch organs was affected by the type of infection (mono- or mixed-infection), and needs to be considered in field ecotoxicological and parasitological studies as a potentially important factor influencing the pollutant concentrations in fish. PMID:26432028

  20. Phenotypic differences on the outcome of the host-parasite relationship: behavior of mice of the CBi stock in natural and experimental infections.

    PubMed

    Vasconi, M D; Malfante, P; Bassi, A; Giudici, C; Revelli, S; Di Masso, R; Font, M T; Hinrichsen, L

    2008-05-01

    Investigation of defined animal models may help to elucidate the role of the host genetic background in the development and establishment of a parasitic infection. Four lines of mice obtained by disruptive selection for body conformation (CBi+, CBi-, CBi/C and CBi/L) and the unselected control line CBi were examined in their response to different parasites to assess whether these distinct genotypes showed differences in their resistance to natural and experimental parasitosis. Protozoans (Trichomonas muris and Spironucleus muris) and nemathelminths (Syphacia obvelata and Aspiculurus tetraptera) were found naturally parasitizing the mice's intestines. CBi/C and CBi were the only genotypes in which T. muris was found. CBi- was least resistant to S. muris. The helminth parasitic burden showed differences between sexes within genotypes (males had a higher burden than females) and among genotypes (CBi/L males had the lowest burden). CBi/L animals were also most resistant to experimental challenge with Heligmosomoides polygyrus and Trypanosoma cruzi. Since all the animals examined shared a common habitat throughout the study and were equally exposed to infection, the phenotypic differences in the natural enteroparasitism herein described evince genetic differences among lines in the host-parasite relationship. This interpretation is further supported by the differences in the response to the experimental challenge to H. polygyrus and T. cruzi. PMID:18304738

  1. Ultrastructural study of host-parasite relationship and pathogenicity of Eimeria sp. infecting Libyan Jird (Meriones libycus) (Lichtenstein, 1828).

    PubMed

    Kassem, Hamed H; Nass, Sedigh Ahmed

    2013-04-01

    The relationship of Eimeria sp. and its host fat LibyanJird (Meriones libycus) was studied on an ultrastructural level. The host cellular organelles (nucleus, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and golgi apparatus) and the changes of its infected intestinal epithelial cells during the development of parasitic stages (schizogony and gamogony) were studied and compared with those non-infected cells. The ultrastructures of intravacuolar tubules and folds in the parasitophorous vacuole (P.V.) were described. These fine structures may involve in the transporttation of materials from the host cell to across the parasitovorous vacuole (P.V.). PMID:23697012

  2. Invertebrate host-parasite relationships: convergent evolution of a tropomyosin epitope between Schistosoma sp., Fasciola hepatica, and certain pulmonate snails.

    PubMed

    Weston, D; Allen, B; Thakur, A; LoVerde, P T; Kemp, W M

    1994-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) directed against Schistosoma mansoni tropomyosin isoform, SMTM (Xu et al. Experimental Parasitology 69, 373-392, 1989), were used to test for cross-reactivity with Biomphalaria glabrata antigens. One mAb (1F10) recognized antigens of 39, 41, and 80 kDa in a snail head/foot antigen preparation but not a hepatopancreas antigen preparation. Another mAb (1C1) cross-reacted with a 39-kDa antigen in the head/foot extract but not in the hepatopancreas extract. Epitope mapping revealed the 1F10 epitope to be between amino acids 135 and 188 of both Bg39 (Dissous et al. Molecular and Biochemical Parasitology 43, 245-256, 1990) and BgTMII (Weston and Kemp, Experimental Parasitology 76, 358-370, 1993), while the 1C1 epitope was located between amino acids 189 and 213 of BgTMII. Various invertebrate species, including members from Trematoda, Pulmonata, Annelida, and Arthropoda, were tested for cross-reactivity with the monoclonal antibodies. While the 1F10 mAb displayed broad invertebrate cross-reactivity, the 1C1 mAb cross-reactivity was restricted to schistosomes, F. hepatica, and the pulmonate snails B. glabrata and Physa sp. PMID:7512930

  3. A proteomic-based approach for the characterization of some major structural proteins involved in host-parasite relationships from the silkworm parasite Nosema bombycis (Microsporidia).

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Yang; Chambon, Christophe; Lu, Chang-De; Huang, Ke-Wei; Vivarès, Christian P; Texier, Catherine

    2007-05-01

    Nosema bombycis is the causative agent of the silkworm Bombyx mori pebrine disease which inflicts severe worldwide economical losses in sericulture. Little is known about host-parasite interactions at the molecular level for this spore-forming obligate intracellular parasite which belongs to the fungi-related Microsporidia phylum. Major microsporidian structural proteins from the spore wall (SW) and the polar tube (PT) are known to be involved in host invasion. We developed a proteomic-based approach to identify few N. bombycis proteins belonging to these cell structures. Protein extraction protocols were optimized and four N. bombycis spore protein extracts were compared by SDS-PAGE and 2-DE to establish complementary proteomic profiles. Three proteins were shown to be located at the parasite SW. Moreover, 17 polyclonal antibodies were raised against major N. bombycis proteins from all extracts, and three spots were shown to correspond to polar tube proteins (PTPs) by immunofluorescent assay and transmission electron microscopy immunocytochemistry on cryosections. Specific patterns for each PTP were obtained by MALDI-TOF-MS and MS/MS. Peptide sequence tags were deduced by de novo sequencing using Peaks Online and DeNovoX, then evaluated by MASCOT and SEQUEST searches. Identification parameters were higher than false-positive hits, strengthening our strategy that could be enlarged to a nongenomic context. PMID:17407187

  4. Empirical evaluation of neutral interactions in host-parasite networks.

    PubMed

    Canard, E F; Mouquet, N; Mouillot, D; Stanko, M; Miklisova, D; Gravel, D

    2014-04-01

    While niche-based processes have been invoked extensively to explain the structure of interaction networks, recent studies propose that neutrality could also be of great importance. Under the neutral hypothesis, network structure would simply emerge from random encounters between individuals and thus would be directly linked to species abundance. We investigated the impact of species abundance distributions on qualitative and quantitative metrics of 113 host-parasite networks. We analyzed the concordance between neutral expectations and empirical observations at interaction, species, and network levels. We found that species abundance accurately predicts network metrics at all levels. Despite host-parasite systems being constrained by physiology and immunology, our results suggest that neutrality could also explain, at least partially, their structure. We hypothesize that trait matching would determine potential interactions between species, while abundance would determine their realization. PMID:24642492

  5. Host-parasite relationships of monogeneans in gills of Astyanax altiparanae and Rhamdia quelen of the São Francisco Verdadeiro River, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferrari-Hoeinghaus, A P; Takemoto, R M; Oliveira, L C; Makrakis, M C; Baumgartner, G

    2006-12-01

    This study investigates the ecology of monogenean gill parasites of Aslyanax altiparanae Garutti & Britski, 2000 and Rhamdia quelen (Quoy & Gaimard, 1824) in a stretch of the Sao Francisco Verdadeiro River, Parana, Brazil. Statistical and ecological indices were used to examine observed levels of parasitism in relation to host and environmental characteristics. A. altiparance and R. quelen had infestation intensities of 2.8 and 23.1 parasites per fish, respectively. The only significant environmental influence was observed at the upstream station for R. quelen. For both host species, parasitized and non-parasitized individuals presented similar weight-ength relationships. Parasitized individuals had dispersed K,, values indicating abnormal conditions. The low levels of parasitism observed in this study suggest that the environment is relatively undisturbed. Additional studies should compare these two species and their respective parasites following completion of the hydroelectric headquarters planned for construction in this stretch of the Sao Francisco Verdoadeiro River. PMID:17285853

  6. Life cycle of Ornithodoros rostratus (Acari: Argasidae) under experimental conditions and comments on the host-parasite relationship in the Pantanal wetland region, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Carla Carolina Dias Uzedo; Faccini, João Luiz Horácio; Cançado, Paulo Henrique Duarte; Piranda, Eliane Mattos; Barros-Battesti, Darci Moraes; Leite, Romário Cerqueira

    2013-09-01

    The genus Ornithodoros is represented by 15 species in Brazil, on which no detailed life cycle studies have been published, except for O. talaje and O. mimon. The aim of the present study was to evaluate life cycle parameters of O. rostratus based on ticks collected in the Pantanal wetland region of the state of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, using domestic rabbits as experimental hosts. The periods of pre-attachment and feeding of the larvae lasted an average of 39 min (range 15-76 min). Five or six nymphal instars were found. The emergence of adults started with N3 in the following sequence: N3-two males; N4-13 males; N5-three males and 16 females; and N6-two females. Mean weight of N4 that molted to males was 31.7 ± 13.6 mg, whereas mean weight of N5 that molted to females was 100.1 ± 36.2 mg. The overall sex ratio was 1:1. Oviposition lasted 14 days, with a sharp decline beginning with the 7th day. The overall duration of the life cycle of O. rostratus ranged from approximately 66 to 136 days. Comments on the tick-host relationship in the Pantanal region are offered. PMID:23456605

  7. Host-parasite and phylogenetic relationships of Myxobolus filamentum sp. n. (Myxozoa: Myxosporea), a parasite of Brycon orthotaenia (Characiformes: Bryconidae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Naldoni, Juliana; Zatti, Suellen A; Capodifoglio, Kassia R H; Milanin, Tiago; Maia, Antonio A M; Silva, Marcia R M; Adriano, Edson A

    2015-01-01

    Myxobolus filamentum sp. n. was found infecting gill filaments of three of 39 Brycon orthotaenia Günther specimens examined (8%), which were taken from the river São Francisco in Minas Gerais state, Brazil. Plasmodia of the parasite were white and long, measuring 5 mm in lenght. Mature spores of M. filamentum sp. n. were oval from the frontal view and biconvex from the lateral view, measuring 7.5-9.7 µm (9.0 ± 0.3 µm) in length and 5.2-7.3 µm (6.2 ± 0.4 µm) in width. The polar capsules were elongated and equal in size, measuring 3.8-5.5 µm (4.7 ± 0.3 µm) in length and 1.3-2.2 µm (1.7 ± 0.1 µm) in width. The development of the parasite led to compression of the adjacent tissues and inflammatory infiltrate with granulocytic cells. Ultrastructural observation revealed that the plasmodia were delimited by two membranes, which had numerous and extensive pinocytotic channels extending into the wide ectoplasm zone. The plasmodial wall exhibited abundant villi-like projections and a thin layer of granular material prevented direct contact between the plasmodial wall and the host tissue. Phylogenetic analysis, based on 18S rDNA, showed M. filamentum sp. n. as a sister species of Myxobolus oliveirai Milanin, Eiras, Arana, Maia, Alves, Silva, Carriero, Ceccarelli et Adriano, 2010, a parasite of other fish species of the genus Brycon Müller et Troschel from South America. PMID:25960558

  8. The ecology, evolution, impacts and management of host-parasite interactions of marine molluscs.

    PubMed

    Coen, Loren D; Bishop, Melanie J

    2015-10-01

    Molluscs are economically and ecologically important components of aquatic ecosystems. In addition to supporting valuable aquaculture and wild-harvest industries, their populations determine the structure of benthic communities, cycling of nutrients, serve as prey resources for higher trophic levels and, in some instances, stabilize shorelines and maintain water quality. This paper reviews existing knowledge of the ecology of host-parasite interactions involving marine molluscs, with a focus on gastropods and bivalves. It considers the ecological and evolutionary impacts of molluscan parasites on their hosts and vice versa, and on the communities and ecosystems in which they are a part, as well as disease management and its ecological impacts. An increasing number of case studies show that disease can have important effects on marine molluscs, their ecological interactions and ecosystem services, at spatial scales from centimeters to thousands of kilometers and timescales ranging from hours to years. In some instances the cascading indirect effects arising from parasitic infection of molluscs extend well beyond the temporal and spatial scales at which molluscs are affected by disease. In addition to the direct effects of molluscan disease, there can be large indirect impacts on marine environments resulting from strategies, such as introduction of non-native species and selective breeding for disease resistance, put in place to manage disease. Much of our understanding of impacts of molluscan diseases on the marine environment has been derived from just a handful of intensively studied marine parasite-host systems, namely gastropod-trematode, cockle-trematode, and oyster-protistan interactions. Understanding molluscan host-parasite dynamics is of growing importance because: (1) expanding aquaculture; (2) current and future climate change; (3) movement of non-native species; and (4) coastal development are modifying molluscan disease dynamics, ultimately leading to

  9. Host parasite interactions in closed and open microbial cultivation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisman, T. I.; Pechurkin, N. S.

    The study addresses interaction of bacteria and phages in the host parasite system in batch and continuous cultures. The study system consists of the auxotrophic strain of Brevibacterium Brevibacterium sp. 22L and the bacteriophage of Brevibacterium sp., isolated from the soil by the enrichment method.Closed system. In the investigation of the relationship between the time of bacterial lysis and multiplicity of phage infection it has been found that at a lower phage amount per cell it takes a longer time for the lysis of the culture to become discernible. Another important factor determining cytolysis in liquid medium is the physiological state of bacterial population. Specific growth rate of bacteria at the moment of phage infection has been chosen as an indicator of the physiological state of bacteria. It has been shown that the shortest latent period and the largest output of the phage are observed during the logarithmic growth phase of bacteria grown under favorable nutrient conditions. In the stationary phase, bacterial cells become “a bad host” for the phage, whose reproduction rate decreases, and the lysis either slows down significantly or does not occur at all.Open system. It has been found that in continuous culture, the components of the host parasite system can coexist over a long period of time. After phage infection, the sizes of the both populations vary for some time and then the density of the host population reaches the level close to that of the uninfected culture. The phage population copies the variations in the density of the host population, but in antiphase. It has been proven that the bacterium becomes resistant to the phage rather soon. It has been supposed that primary resistance is of physiological origin, because the percentage of cells that have survived lysis about 0.2% of the initial bacterial population is too high for phage-resistant mutants. Bacteria and phages cultured over extended periods of time in the host parasite system

  10. A walk on the tundra: Host-parasite interactions in an extreme environment.

    PubMed

    Kutz, Susan J; Hoberg, Eric P; Molnár, Péter K; Dobson, Andy; Verocai, Guilherme G

    2014-08-01

    Climate change is occurring very rapidly in the Arctic, and the processes that have taken millions of years to evolve in this very extreme environment are now changing on timescales as short as decades. These changes are dramatic, subtle and non-linear. In this article, we discuss the evolving insights into host-parasite interactions for wild ungulate species, specifically, muskoxen and caribou, in the North American Arctic. These interactions occur in an environment that is characterized by extremes in temperature, high seasonality, and low host species abundance and diversity. We believe that lessons learned in this system can guide wildlife management and conservation throughout the Arctic, and can also be generalized to more broadly understand host-parasite interactions elsewhere. We specifically examine the impacts of climate change on host-parasite interactions and focus on: (I) the direct temperature effects on parasites; (II) the importance of considering the intricacies of host and parasite ecology for anticipating climate change impacts; and (III) the effect of shifting ecological barriers and corridors. Insights gained from studying the history and ecology of host-parasite systems in the Arctic will be central to understanding the role that climate change is playing in these more complex systems. PMID:25180164

  11. Cross-talk in host-parasite associations: What do past and recent proteomics approaches tell us?

    PubMed

    Chetouhi, Chérif; Panek, Johan; Bonhomme, Ludovic; ElAlaoui, Hicham; Texier, Catherine; Langin, Thierry; de Bekker, Charissa; Urbach, Serge; Demettre, Edith; Missé, Dorothée; Holzmuller, Philippe; Hughes, David P; Zanzoni, Andreas; Brun, Christine; Biron, David G

    2015-07-01

    A cross-talk in host-parasite associations begins when a host encounters a parasite. For many host-parasite relationships, this cross-talk has been taking place for hundreds of millions of years. The co-evolution of hosts and parasites, the familiar 'arms race' results in fascinating adaptations. Over the years, host-parasite interactions have been studied extensively from both the host and parasitic point of view. Proteomics studies have led to new insights into host-parasite cross-talk and suggest that the molecular strategies used by parasites attacking animals and plants share many similarities. Likewise, animals and plants use several common molecular tactics to counter parasite attacks. Based on proteomics surveys undertaken since the post-genomic era, a synthesis is presented on the molecular strategies used by intra- and extracellular parasites to invade and create the needed habitat for growth inside the host, as well as strategies used by hosts to counter these parasite attacks. Pitfalls in deciphering host-parasite cross-talk are also discussed. To conclude, helpful advice is given with regard to new directions that are needed to discover the generic and specific molecular strategies used by the host against parasite invasion as well as by the parasite to invade, survive, and grow inside their hosts, and to finally discover parasitic molecular signatures associated with their development. PMID:25913042

  12. A Few Good Reasons Why Species-Area Relationships Do Not Work for Parasites

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Several studies failed to find strong relationships between the biological and ecological features of a host and the number of parasite species it harbours. In particular, host body size and geographical range are generally only weak predictors of parasite species richness, especially when host phylogeny and sampling effort are taken into account. These results, however, have been recently challenged by a meta-analytic study that suggested a prominent role of host body size and range extent in determining parasite species richness (species-area relationships). Here we argue that, in general, results from meta-analyses should not discourage researchers from investigating the reasons for the lack of clear patterns, thus proposing a few tentative explanations to the fact that species-area relationships are infrequent or at least difficult to be detected in most host-parasite systems. The peculiar structure of host-parasite networks, the enemy release hypothesis, the possible discrepancy between host and parasite ranges, and the evolutionary tendency of parasites towards specialization may explain why the observed patterns often do not fit those predicted by species-area relationships. PMID:24895561

  13. Host-Parasite Relationship of Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae and Argasidae) and Feral Pigs (Sus scrofa) in the Nhecolândia Region of the Pantanal Wetlands in Mato Grosso do Sul

    PubMed Central

    Cançado, P. H. D.; Faccini, J. L. H.; Herrera, H. M.; Tavares, L. E. R.; Mourão, G. M.; Piranda, E. M.; Paes, R. C. S.; Ribeiro, C. C. D. U.; Borghesan, T. C.; Piacenti, A. K.; Kinas, M. A.; Santos, C. C.; Ono, T. M.; Paiva, F.

    2013-01-01

    Feral pigs (S. scrofa) were introduced to the Pantanal region around 200 years ago and the population appears to be in expansion. Its eradication is considered to be impossible. The population of feral pigs in the Pantanal wetlands is currently estimated at one million. Two scientific excursions were organized. The first was conducted during the dry season, when 21 feral pigs were captured and the second was during the wet season, when 23 feral pigs were captured. Ticks were collected and the oviposition and hatching process were studied to confirm the biological success of each tick species. Three tick species were found to be feeding on feral pigs: Amblyomma cajennense, A. parvum, and Ornithodoros rostratus. During the dry season, 178 adult A. cajennense were collected, contrasting with 127 A. cajennense specimens in the wet season. This suggests that the seasonality of these ticks in the Brazilian Pantanal wetlands could be different from other regions. The results indicate that A. parvum and A. cajennense are biologically successful parasites in relation to feral pigs. A. cajennense appears to have adapted to this tick-host relationship, as well as the areas where feral pigs are abundant, and could play a role in the amplification of this tick population. PMID:27335855

  14. Biological warfare: Microorganisms as drivers of host-parasite interactions.

    PubMed

    Dheilly, Nolwenn M; Poulin, Robert; Thomas, Frédéric

    2015-08-01

    Understanding parasite strategies for evasion, manipulation or exploitation of hosts is crucial for many fields, from ecology to medical sciences. Generally, research has focused on either the host response to parasitic infection, or the parasite virulence mechanisms. More recently, integrated studies of host-parasite interactions have allowed significant advances in theoretical and applied biology. However, these studies still provide a simplistic view of these as mere two-player interactions. Host and parasite are associated with a myriad of microorganisms that could benefit from the improved fitness of their partner. Illustrations of such complex multi-player interactions have emerged recently from studies performed in various taxa. In this conceptual article, we propose how these associated microorganisms may participate in the phenotypic alterations induced by parasites and hence in host-parasite interactions, from an ecological and evolutionary perspective. Host- and parasite-associated microorganisms may participate in the host-parasite interaction by interacting directly or indirectly with the other partner. As a result, parasites may develop (i) the disruptive strategy in which the parasite alters the host microbiota to its advantage, and (ii) the biological weapon strategy where the parasite-associated microorganism contributes to or modulates the parasite's virulence. Some phenotypic alterations induced by parasite may also arise from conflicts of interests between the host or parasite and its associated microorganism. For each situation, we review the literature and propose new directions for future research. Specifically, investigating the role of host- and parasite-associated microorganisms in host-parasite interactions at the individual, local and regional level will lead to a holistic understanding of how the co-evolution of the different partners influences how the other ones respond, both ecologically and evolutionary. The conceptual framework we

  15. Ultrastructure, development, and host-parasite relationship of a new species of the genus Pleistophora--a microsporidian parasite of the marine fish Epinephelus chlorostignei.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Ghaffar, Fathy; Bashtar, Abdel-Rahman; Mehlhorn, Heinz; Al-Rasheid, Khaled; Al-Olayan, Ebtsam; Koura, Eglal; Morsy, Kareem

    2009-12-01

    The life cycle of a new microsporidian of the genus Pleistophora is described. This parasite infects the epithelial cells of the gut and the peritoneal cavity of the Red Sea fish, Epinephelus chlorostignei. All stages develop within a special structure, the sporophorocyst, which is covered by a thick dense wall. This wall grows along with the growth of the parasites inside. Meronts are uni- to binucleate, which divide and constantly give rise to sporonts. During transition to sporonts, the cell border of the meronts increases its thickness, temporarily featuring thick irregular projections. Eventually, a uniform thick sporont wall is formed; then, the sporont cells detach themselves from the wall (future wall of the sporophorous vesicle, SPV) and start a series of divisions to produce sporoblasts. The SPV wall is compact, has no pores, and consists of two layers. Mature spores measure about 2.0 x 1.8 microm. They possess a polar filament with 20-28 coils, a posterior vacuole, and a polaroplast made up of an outer part of dense and closely spaced lamellae encircling an inner part of widely spaced lamellae. All morphological and ultrastructural features indicate that the described microsporidian parasite belongs to the genus Pleistophora. PMID:19844744

  16. Host-parasite relationship of Ceratomyxa puntazzi n. sp. (Myxozoa: Myxosporea) and sharpsnout seabream Diplodus puntazzo (Walbaum, 1792) from the Mediterranean with first data on ceratomyxid host specificity in sparids.

    PubMed

    Alama-Bermejo, G; Raga, J A; Holzer, A S

    2011-12-15

    Sparidae are economically important fishes to both, fisheries and aquaculture in the Mediterranean. Species diversification is an important strategy for the development of Mediterranean aquaculture. One of the species recently introduced is the sharpsnout seabream Diplodus puntazzo (Walbaum, 1792). During a parasitological study of fish from the Gulf of Valencia and the Mar Menor (Spain), myxozoan spores belonging to the genus Ceratomyxa were found in the gall bladder of D. puntazzo. A morphological description of the spores, which includes histology and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as molecular (SSU ribosomal DNA) data resulted in the erection of a new species, Ceratomyxa puntazzi n. sp. A histopathological study of C. puntazzi n. sp. infection in D. puntazzo showed that the parasite causes necrosis and loss of epithelial cells in the gall bladder, and provokes a pericholangitis in the liver tissue surrounding the bile ducts. Furthermore, molecular data obtained from C. puntazzi n. sp. and three other ceratomyxids from the closely related fish species Diplodus annularis L. and Sparus aurata L. which share the same habitat suggest that the genus Ceratomyxa is host-specific in sparids, which agrees with data previously obtained from Serranidae, Labridae and Pomacentridae, and that ceratomyxid species from sparids in the Mediterranean originated from a common ancestor. PMID:21680098

  17. Disease ecology across soil boundaries: effects of below-ground fungi on above-ground host-parasite interactions.

    PubMed

    Tao, Leiling; Gowler, Camden D; Ahmad, Aamina; Hunter, Mark D; de Roode, Jacobus C

    2015-10-22

    Host-parasite interactions are subject to strong trait-mediated indirect effects from other species. However, it remains unexplored whether such indirect effects may occur across soil boundaries and connect spatially isolated organisms. Here, we demonstrate that, by changing plant (milkweed Asclepias sp.) traits, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) significantly affect interactions between a herbivore (the monarch butterfly Danaus plexippus) and its protozoan parasite (Ophryocystis elektroscirrha), which represents an interaction across four biological kingdoms. In our experiment, AMF affected parasite virulence, host resistance and host tolerance to the parasite. These effects were dependent on both the density of AMF and the identity of milkweed species: AMF indirectly increased disease in monarchs reared on some species, while alleviating disease in monarchs reared on other species. The species-specificity was driven largely by the effects of AMF on both plant primary (phosphorus) and secondary (cardenolides; toxins in milkweeds) traits. Our study demonstrates that trait-mediated indirect effects in disease ecology are extensive, such that below-ground interactions between AMF and plant roots can alter host-parasite interactions above ground. In general, soil biota may play an underappreciated role in the ecology of many terrestrial host-parasite systems. PMID:26468247

  18. Habitat fragmentation alters the properties of a host-parasite network: rodents and their helminths in South-East Asia.

    PubMed

    Bordes, Frédéric; Morand, Serge; Pilosof, Shai; Claude, Julien; Krasnov, Boris R; Cosson, Jean-François; Chaval, Yannick; Ribas, Alexis; Chaisiri, Kittipong; Blasdell, Kim; Herbreteau, Vincent; Dupuy, Stéphane; Tran, Annelise

    2015-09-01

    1. While the effects of deforestation and habitat fragmentation on parasite prevalence or richness are well investigated, host-parasite networks are still understudied despite their importance in understanding the mechanisms of these major disturbances. Because fragmentation may negatively impact species occupancy, abundance and co-occurrence, we predict a link between spatiotemporal changes in habitat and the architecture of host-parasite networks. 2. For this, we used an extensive data set on 16 rodent species and 29 helminth species from seven localities of South-East Asia. We analysed the effects of rapid deforestation on connectance and modularity of helminth-parasite networks. We estimated both the degree of fragmentation and the rate of deforestation through the development of land uses and their changes through the last 20 to 30 years in order to take into account the dynamics of habitat fragmentation in our statistical analyses. 3. We found that rapid fragmentation does not affect helminth species richness per se but impacts host-parasite interactions as the rodent-helminth network becomes less connected and more modular. 4. Our results suggest that parasite sharing among host species may become more difficult to maintain with the increase of habitat disturbance. PMID:25777342

  19. Expanding the antimalarial toolkit: Targeting host-parasite interactions.

    PubMed

    Langhorne, Jean; Duffy, Patrick E

    2016-02-01

    Recent successes in malaria control are threatened by drug-resistant Plasmodium parasites and insecticide-resistant Anopheles mosquitoes, and first generation vaccines offer only partial protection. New research approaches have highlighted host as well as parasite molecules or pathways that could be targeted for interventions. In this study, we discuss host-parasite interactions at the different stages of the Plasmodium life cycle within the mammalian host and the potential for therapeutics that prevent parasite migration, invasion, intracellular growth, or egress from host cells, as well as parasite-induced pathology. PMID:26834158

  20. Host life history and host-parasite syntopy predict behavioural resistance and tolerance of parasites.

    PubMed

    Sears, Brittany F; Snyder, Paul W; Rohr, Jason R

    2015-05-01

    There is growing interest in the role that life-history traits of hosts, such as their 'pace-of-life', play in the evolution of resistance and tolerance to parasites. Theory suggests that, relative to host species that have high syntopy (local spatial and temporal overlap) with parasites, host species with low syntopy should have lower selection pressures for more constitutive (always present) and costly defences, such as tolerance, and greater reliance on more inducible and cheaper defences, such as behaviour. Consequently, we postulated that the degree of host-parasite syntopy, which is negatively correlated with host pace-of-life (an axis reflecting the developmental rate of tadpoles and the inverse of their size at metamorphosis) in our tadpole-parasitic cercarial (trematode) system, would be a negative and positive predictor of behavioural resistance and tolerance, respectively. To test these hypotheses, we exposed seven tadpole species to a range of parasite (cercarial) doses crossed with anaesthesia treatments that controlled for anti-parasite behaviour. We quantified host behaviour, successful and unsuccessful infections, and each species' reaction norm for behavioural resistance and tolerance, defined as the slope between cercarial exposure (or attempted infections) and anti-cercarial behaviours and mass change, respectively. Hence, tolerance is capturing any cost of parasite exposure. As hypothesized, tadpole pace-of-life was a significant positive predictor of behavioural resistance and negative predictor of tolerance, a result that is consistent with a trade-off between behavioural resistance and tolerance across species that warrants further investigation. Moreover, these results were robust to considerations of phylogeny, all possible re-orderings of the three fastest or slowest paced species, and various measurements of tolerance. These results suggest that host pace-of-life and host-parasite syntopy are powerful drivers of both the strength and type

  1. Using metabolomics to dissect host-parasite interactions.

    PubMed

    Kloehn, J; Blume, M; Cobbold, S A; Saunders, E C; Dagley, M J; McConville, M J

    2016-08-01

    Protozoan parasites have evolved diverse growth and metabolic strategies for surviving and proliferating within different extracellular and intracellular niches in their mammalian hosts. Metabolomic approaches, including high coverage metabolite profiling and (13)C/(2)H-stable isotope labeling, are increasingly being used to identify parasite metabolic pathways that are important for survival and replication in vivo. These approaches are highlighting new links between parasite carbon metabolism and the ability of different parasite stages to colonize specific niches or host cell types. They have also revealed novel metabolic regulatory mechanisms that are important for homeostasis and survival in potentially nutrient variable environments. These studies highlight the importance of parasite and host metabolism as determinants of host-parasite interactions. PMID:27200489

  2. Past, present and future of host-parasite co-extinctions.

    PubMed

    Strona, Giovanni

    2015-12-01

    Human induced ecosystem alterations and climate change are expected to drive several species to extinction. In this context, the attention of public opinion, and hence conservationists' efforts, are often targeted towards species having emotional, recreational and/or economical value. This tendency may result in a high number of extinctions happening unnoticed. Among these, many could involve parasites. Several studies have highlighted various reasons why we should care about this, that go far beyond the fact that parasites are amazingly diverse. A growing corpus of evidence suggests that parasites contribute much to ecosystems both in terms of biomass and services, and the seemingly paradoxical idea that a healthy ecosystem is one rich in parasites is becoming key to the whole concept of parasite conservation. Although various articles have covered different aspects of host-parasite co-extinctions, I feel that some important conceptual issues still need to be formally addressed. In this review, I will attempt at clarifying some of them, with the aim of providing researchers with a unifying conceptual framework that could help them designing future studies. In doing this, I will try to draw a more clear distinction between the (co-)evolutionary and the ecological dimensions of co-extinction studies, since the ongoing processes that are putting parasites at risk now operate at a scale that is extremely different from the one that has shaped host-parasite networks throughout million years of co-evolution. Moreover, I will emphasize how the complexity of direct and indirect effects of parasites on ecosystems makes it much challenging to identify the mechanisms possibly leading to co-extinction events, and to predict how such events will affect ecosystems in the long run. PMID:26835251

  3. Host age modulates within-host parasite competition.

    PubMed

    Izhar, Rony; Routtu, Jarkko; Ben-Ami, Frida

    2015-05-01

    In many host populations, one of the most striking differences among hosts is their age. While parasite prevalence differences in relation to host age are well known, little is known on how host age impacts ecological and evolutionary dynamics of diseases. Using two clones of the water flea Daphnia magna and two clones of its bacterial parasite Pasteuria ramosa, we examined how host age at exposure influences within-host parasite competition and virulence. We found that multiply-exposed hosts were more susceptible to infection and suffered higher mortality than singly-exposed hosts. Hosts oldest at exposure were least often infected and vice versa. Furthermore, we found that in young multiply-exposed hosts competition was weak, allowing coexistence and transmission of both parasite clones, whereas in older multiply-exposed hosts competitive exclusion was observed. Thus, age-dependent parasite exposure and host demography (age structure) could together play an important role in mediating parasite evolution. At the individual level, our results demonstrate a previously unnoticed interaction of the host's immune system with host age, suggesting that the specificity of immune function changes as hosts mature. Therefore, evolutionary models of parasite virulence might benefit from incorporating age-dependent epidemiological parameters. PMID:25994010

  4. Trade-offs and resource breadth processes as drivers of performance and specificity in a host-parasite system: a new integrative hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Rafael B P; Félix, Gabriel M F; Chaves, Anderson V; Lacorte, Gustavo A; Santos, Fabrício R; Braga, Érika M; Mello, Marco A R

    2016-02-01

    One of the unresolved issues in the ecology of parasites is the relationship between host specificity and performance. Previous studies tested this relationship in different systems and obtained all possible outcomes. This led to the proposal of two hypotheses to explain conflicting results: the trade-off and resource breadth hypotheses, which are treated as mutually exclusive in the literature and were corroborated by different studies. In the present study, we used an extensive database on avian malaria from Brazil and combined analyses based on specificity indices and network theory, in order to test which of those hypotheses might best explain our model system. Contrary to our expectations, there was no correlation between specificity and prevalence, which contradicts both hypotheses. In addition, we detected a strong modular structure in our host-parasite network and found that its modules were not composed of geographically close, but of phylogenetically close, host species. Based on our results, we reached the conclusion that trade-off and resource breadth hypotheses are not really mutually exclusive. As a conceptual solution we propose "The Integrative Hypothesis of Parasite Specialization", a novel theoretical model that explains the contradictory results found in our study and reported to date in the literature. PMID:26552015

  5. Ectoparasitism and stress hormones: strategy of host exploitation, common host-parasite history and energetics matter.

    PubMed

    St Juliana, Justin R; Khokhlova, Irina S; Wielebnowski, Nadja; Kotler, Burt P; Krasnov, Boris R

    2014-09-01

    Parasites are thought to have numerous negative effects on their hosts. These negative effects may be associated with stress in a host. We evaluated the effects of four species of flea ectoparasites (Parapulex chephrenis, Synosternus cleopatrae, Xenopsylla conformis and Xenopsylla ramesis) on non-specific responses of eight species of rodents (Meriones crassus, Gerbillus dasyurus, Gerbillus andersoni, Gerbillus pyramidum, Gerbillus nanus, Acomys cahirinus, Acomys russatus and Mesocricetus auratus) and measured faecal glucocorticoid metabolites concentrations (FGMC) produced by the hosts. We found no effect of body mass of an individual rodent on FGMCs. Parasitism by fleas with a 'stay on the host body' exploitation strategy was associated with higher host FGMCs than parasitism by fleas that spent most of their life 'off-host'. FGMCs among rodents infested by the same flea species were correlated positively with the phylogenetic distance of a given rodent from the principal host of this flea; changes in FGMCs were lower in the host species more closely related to the flea's principal host. Changes in FMGCs of a host while parasitized were correlated with a host's change in body mass, where hosts that lost more body mass had higher FGMCs. Our results suggest that ectoparasitism can be stressful to their hosts. However, the occurrence of parasite-induced stress seems to depend on the identity of both host and parasite species and the evolutionary history of a host-parasite association. To our knowledge, this is the first multispecies study to evaluate the effect of ectoparasites on glucocorticoid hormones in small mammals. PMID:24661039

  6. Host-parasite interactions that guide red blood cell invasion by malaria parasites

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Aditya S.; Egan, Elizabeth S.; Duraisingh, Manoj T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review Malaria is caused by the infection and proliferation of parasites from the genus Plasmodium in red blood cells (RBCs). A free Plasmodium parasite, or merozoite, released from an infected RBC must invade another RBC host cell to sustain a blood-stage infection. Here, we review recent advances on RBC invasion by Plasmodium merozoites, focusing on specific molecular interactions between host and parasite. Recent findings Recent work highlights the central role of host-parasite interactions at virtually every stage of RBC invasion by merozoites. Biophysical experiments have for the first time measured the strength of merozoite-RBC attachment during invasion. For P. falciparum, there have been many key insights regarding the invasion ligand PfRh5 in particular, including its influence on host species tropism, a co-crystal structure with its RBC receptor basigin, and its suitability as a vaccine target. For P. vivax, researchers identified the origin and emergence of the parasite from Africa, demonstrating a natural link to the Duffy-negative RBC variant in African populations. For the simian parasite P. knowlesi, zoonotic invasion into human cells is linked to RBC age, which has implications for parasitemia during an infection and thus malaria. Summary New studies of the molecular and cellular mechanisms governing RBC invasion by Plasmodium parasites have shed light on various aspects of parasite biology and host cell tropism; and indicate opportunities for malaria control. PMID:25767956

  7. Urbanization breaks up host-parasite interactions: a case study on parasite community ecology of rufous-bellied thrushes (Turdus rufiventris) along a rural-urban gradient.

    PubMed

    Calegaro-Marques, Cláudia; Amato, Suzana B

    2014-01-01

    Urbanization drastically alters natural ecosystems and the structure of their plant and animal communities. Whereas some species cope successfully with these environmental changes, others may go extinct. In the case of parasite communities, the expansion of urban areas has a critical effect by changing the availability of suitable substrates for the eggs or free-larval stages of those species with direct life cycles or for the range of hosts of those species with complex cycles. In this study we investigated the influence of the degree of urbanization and environmental heterogeneity on helminth richness, abundance and community structure of rufous-bellied thrushes (Turdus rufiventris) along a rural-urban gradient in the metropolitan region of Porto Alegre, State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. This common native bird species of southern Brazil hosts 15 endoparasite species at the study region. A total of 144 thrushes were collected with mist nets at 11 sites. The degree of urbanization and environmental heterogeneity were estimated by quantifying five landscape elements: buildings, woodlands, fields, bare lands, and water. Landscape analyses were performed at two spatial scales (10 and 100 ha) taking into account home range size and the potential dispersal distance of thrushes and their prey (intermediate hosts). Mean parasite richness showed an inverse relationship with the degree of urbanization, but a positive relationship with environmental heterogeneity. Changes in the structure of component communities along the rural-urban gradient resulted from responses to the availability of particular landscape elements that are compatible with the parasites' life cycles. We found that the replacement of natural environments with buildings breaks up host-parasite interactions, whereas a higher environmental (substrate) diversity allows the survival of a wider range of intermediate hosts and vectors and their associated parasites. PMID:25068271

  8. Urbanization Breaks Up Host-Parasite Interactions: A Case Study on Parasite Community Ecology of Rufous-Bellied Thrushes (Turdus rufiventris) along a Rural-Urban Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Calegaro-Marques, Cláudia; Amato, Suzana B.

    2014-01-01

    Urbanization drastically alters natural ecosystems and the structure of their plant and animal communities. Whereas some species cope successfully with these environmental changes, others may go extinct. In the case of parasite communities, the expansion of urban areas has a critical effect by changing the availability of suitable substrates for the eggs or free-larval stages of those species with direct life cycles or for the range of hosts of those species with complex cycles. In this study we investigated the influence of the degree of urbanization and environmental heterogeneity on helminth richness, abundance and community structure of rufous-bellied thrushes (Turdus rufiventris) along a rural-urban gradient in the metropolitan region of Porto Alegre, State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. This common native bird species of southern Brazil hosts 15 endoparasite species at the study region. A total of 144 thrushes were collected with mist nets at 11 sites. The degree of urbanization and environmental heterogeneity were estimated by quantifying five landscape elements: buildings, woodlands, fields, bare lands, and water. Landscape analyses were performed at two spatial scales (10 and 100 ha) taking into account home range size and the potential dispersal distance of thrushes and their prey (intermediate hosts). Mean parasite richness showed an inverse relationship with the degree of urbanization, but a positive relationship with environmental heterogeneity. Changes in the structure of component communities along the rural-urban gradient resulted from responses to the availability of particular landscape elements that are compatible with the parasites' life cycles. We found that the replacement of natural environments with buildings breaks up host-parasite interactions, whereas a higher environmental (substrate) diversity allows the survival of a wider range of intermediate hosts and vectors and their associated parasites. PMID:25068271

  9. A three-way perspective of stoichiometric changes on host-parasite interactions.

    PubMed

    Aalto, Sanni L; Decaestecker, Ellen; Pulkkinen, Katja

    2015-07-01

    Changes in environmental nutrients play a crucial role in driving disease dynamics, but global patterns in nutrient-driven changes in disease are difficult to predict. In this paper we use ecological stoichiometry as a framework to review host-parasite interactions under changing nutrient ratios, focusing on three pathways: (i) altered host resistance and parasite virulence through host stoichiometry (ii) changed encounter or contact rates at population level, and (iii) changed host community structure. We predict that the outcome of nutrient changes on host-parasite interactions depends on which pathways are modified, and suggest that the outcome of infection could depend on the overlap in stoichiometric requirements of the host and the parasite. We hypothesize that environmental nutrient enrichment alters infectivity dynamics leading to fluctuating selection dynamics in host-parasite coevolution. PMID:25978937

  10. Friendly competition: evidence for a dilution effect among competitors in a planktonic host-parasite system.

    PubMed

    Hall, Spencer R; Becker, Claes R; Simonis, Joseph L; Duffy, Meghan A; Tessier, Alan J; Cáceres, Carla E

    2009-03-01

    The "dilution effect" concept in disease ecology offers the intriguing possibility that clever manipulation of less competent hosts could reduce disease prevalence in populations of more competent hosts. The basic concept is straightforward: host species vary in suitability (competence) for parasites, and disease transmission decreases when there are more incompetent hosts interacting with vectors or removing free-living stages of a parasite. However, host species also often interact with each other in other ecological ways, e.g., as competitors for resources. The net result of these simultaneous, multiple interactions (disease dilution and resource competition) is challenging to predict. Nonetheless, we see the signature of both roles operating concurrently in a planktonic host-parasite system. We document pronounced spatiotemporal variation in the size of epidemics of a virulent fungus (Metschnikowia bicuspidata) in Midwestern U.S. lake populations of a dominant crustacean grazer (Daphnia dentifera). We show that some of this variation is captured by changes in structure of Daphnia assemblages. Lake-years with smaller epidemics were characterized by assemblages dominated by less suitable hosts ("diluters," D. pulicaria and D. retrocurva, whose suitabilties were determined in lab experiments and field surveys) at the start of epidemics. Furthermore, within a season, less suitable hosts increased as epidemics declined. These observations are consistent with a dilution effect. However, more detailed time series analysis (using multivariate autoregressive models) of three intensively sampled epidemics show the signature of a likely interaction between dilution and resource competition between these Daphnia species. The net outcome of this interaction likely promoted termination of these fungal outbreaks. Should this outcome always arise in "friendly competition" systems where diluting hosts compete with more competent hosts? The answers to this question lie at a

  11. Genome sequencing and comparative genomics of honey bee microsporidia, Nosema apis reveal novel insights into host-parasite interactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The microsporidia parasite Nosema contributes to the steep global decline of honey bees that are critical pollinators of food crops. There are two species of Nosema that have been found to infect honey bees, Nosema apis and N. ceranae. Genome sequencing of N. apis and comparative genome analysis with N. ceranae, a fully sequenced microsporidia species, reveal novel insights into host-parasite interactions underlying the parasite infections. Results We applied the whole-genome shotgun sequencing approach to sequence and assemble the genome of N. apis which has an estimated size of 8.5 Mbp. We predicted 2,771 protein- coding genes and predicted the function of each putative protein using the Gene Ontology. The comparative genomic analysis led to identification of 1,356 orthologs that are conserved between the two Nosema species and genes that are unique characteristics of the individual species, thereby providing a list of virulence factors and new genetic tools for studying host-parasite interactions. We also identified a highly abundant motif in the upstream promoter regions of N. apis genes. This motif is also conserved in N. ceranae and other microsporidia species and likely plays a role in gene regulation across the microsporidia. Conclusions The availability of the N. apis genome sequence is a significant addition to the rapidly expanding body of microsprodian genomic data which has been improving our understanding of eukaryotic genome diversity and evolution in a broad sense. The predicted virulent genes and transcriptional regulatory elements are potential targets for innovative therapeutics to break down the life cycle of the parasite. PMID:23829473

  12. Chironomids' Relationship with Aeromonas Species.

    PubMed

    Laviad, Sivan; Halpern, Malka

    2016-01-01

    Chironomids (Diptera: Chironomidae), also known as non-biting midges, are one of the most abundant groups of insects in aquatic habitats. They undergo a complete metamorphosis of four life stages of which three are aquatic (egg, larva, and pupa), and the adult emerges into the air. Chironomids serve as a natural reservoir of Aeromonas and Vibrio cholerae species. Here, we review existing knowledge about the mutual relations between Aeromonas species and chironomids. Using 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, we found that the prevalence of Aeromonas species in the insects' egg masses and larvae was 1.6 and 3.3% of the insects' endogenous microbiota, respectively. Aeromonas abundance per egg mass remained stable during a 6-month period of bacterial monitoring. Different Aeromonas species were isolated and some demonstrated the ability to degrade the insect's egg masses and to prevent eggs hatching. Chitinase was identified as the enzyme responsible for the egg mass degradation. Different Aeromonas species isolated from chironomids demonstrated the potential to protect their host from toxic metals. Aeromonas is a causative agent of fish infections. Fish are frequently recorded as feeding on chironomids. Thus, fish might be infected with Aeromonas species via chironomid consumption. Aeromonas strains are also responsible for causing gastroenteritis and wound infections in humans. Different virulence genes were identified in Aeromonas species isolated from chironomids. Chironomids may infest drinking water reservoirs, hence be the source of pathogenic Aeromonas strains in drinking water. Chironomids and Aeromonas species have a complicated mutual relationship. PMID:27242751

  13. Chironomids’ Relationship with Aeromonas Species

    PubMed Central

    Laviad, Sivan; Halpern, Malka

    2016-01-01

    Chironomids (Diptera: Chironomidae), also known as non-biting midges, are one of the most abundant groups of insects in aquatic habitats. They undergo a complete metamorphosis of four life stages of which three are aquatic (egg, larva, and pupa), and the adult emerges into the air. Chironomids serve as a natural reservoir of Aeromonas and Vibrio cholerae species. Here, we review existing knowledge about the mutual relations between Aeromonas species and chironomids. Using 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, we found that the prevalence of Aeromonas species in the insects’ egg masses and larvae was 1.6 and 3.3% of the insects’ endogenous microbiota, respectively. Aeromonas abundance per egg mass remained stable during a 6-month period of bacterial monitoring. Different Aeromonas species were isolated and some demonstrated the ability to degrade the insect’s egg masses and to prevent eggs hatching. Chitinase was identified as the enzyme responsible for the egg mass degradation. Different Aeromonas species isolated from chironomids demonstrated the potential to protect their host from toxic metals. Aeromonas is a causative agent of fish infections. Fish are frequently recorded as feeding on chironomids. Thus, fish might be infected with Aeromonas species via chironomid consumption. Aeromonas strains are also responsible for causing gastroenteritis and wound infections in humans. Different virulence genes were identified in Aeromonas species isolated from chironomids. Chironomids may infest drinking water reservoirs, hence be the source of pathogenic Aeromonas strains in drinking water. Chironomids and Aeromonas species have a complicated mutual relationship. PMID:27242751

  14. Existence of solutions for a host-parasite model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milner, Fabio Augusto; Patton, Curtis Allan

    2001-12-01

    The sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax has several gill ectoparasites. Diplectanum aequans (Plathelminth, Monogenea) is one of these species. Under certain demographic conditions, this flat worm can trigger pathological problems, in particular in fish farms. The life cycle of the parasite is described and a model for the dynamics of its interaction with the fish is described and analyzed. The model consists of a coupled system of ordinary differential equations and one integro-differential equation.

  15. Experimental Models to Study the Role of Microbes in Host-Parasite Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Megan A.; Dheilly, Nolwenn M.

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, parasitic infections have been primarily studied as interactions between the parasite and the host, leaving out crucial players: microbes. The recent realization that microbes play key roles in the biology of all living organisms is not only challenging our understanding of host-parasite evolution, but it also provides new clues to develop new therapies and remediation strategies. In this paper we provide a review of promising and advanced experimental organismal systems to examine the dynamic of host-parasite-microbe interactions. We address the benefits of developing new experimental models appropriate to this new research area and identify systems that offer the best promises considering the nature of the interactions among hosts, parasites, and microbes. Based on these systems, we identify key criteria for selecting experimental models to elucidate the fundamental principles of these complex webs of interactions. It appears that no model is ideal and that complementary studies should be performed on different systems in order to understand the driving roles of microbes in host and parasite evolution. PMID:27602023

  16. Experimental Models to Study the Role of Microbes in Host-Parasite Interactions.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Megan A; Dheilly, Nolwenn M

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, parasitic infections have been primarily studied as interactions between the parasite and the host, leaving out crucial players: microbes. The recent realization that microbes play key roles in the biology of all living organisms is not only challenging our understanding of host-parasite evolution, but it also provides new clues to develop new therapies and remediation strategies. In this paper we provide a review of promising and advanced experimental organismal systems to examine the dynamic of host-parasite-microbe interactions. We address the benefits of developing new experimental models appropriate to this new research area and identify systems that offer the best promises considering the nature of the interactions among hosts, parasites, and microbes. Based on these systems, we identify key criteria for selecting experimental models to elucidate the fundamental principles of these complex webs of interactions. It appears that no model is ideal and that complementary studies should be performed on different systems in order to understand the driving roles of microbes in host and parasite evolution. PMID:27602023

  17. Evidence of horizontal transfer of non-autonomous Lep1 Helitrons facilitated by host-parasite interactions

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xuezhu; Gao, Jingkun; Li, Fei; Wang, Jianjun

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal transfer (HT) of transposable elements has been recognized to be a major force driving genomic variation and biological innovation of eukaryotic organisms. However, the mechanisms of HT in eukaryotes remain poorly appreciated. The non-autonomous Helitron family, Lep1, has been found to be widespread in lepidopteran species, and showed little interspecific sequence similarity of acquired sequences at 3′ end, which makes Lep1 a good candidate for the study of HT. In this study, we describe the Lep1-like elements in multiple non-lepidopteran species, including two aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum and Aphis gossypii, two parasitoid wasps, Cotesia vestalis, and Copidosoma floridanum, one beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis, as well as two bracoviruses in parasitoid wasps, and one intracellular microsporidia parasite, Nosema bombycis. The patchy distribution and high sequence similarity of Lep1-like elements among distantly related lineages as well as incongruence of Lep1-like elements and host phylogeny suggest the occurrence of HT. Remarkably, the acquired sequences of both NbLep1 from N. bombycis and CfLep1 from C. floridanum showed over 90% identity with their lepidopteran host Lep1. Thus, our study provides evidence of HT facilitated by host-parasite interactions. Furthermore, in the context of these data, we discuss the putative directions and vectors of HT of Lep1 Helitrons. PMID:24874102

  18. Evidence of horizontal transfer of non-autonomous Lep1 Helitrons facilitated by host-parasite interactions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuezhu; Gao, Jingkun; Li, Fei; Wang, Jianjun

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal transfer (HT) of transposable elements has been recognized to be a major force driving genomic variation and biological innovation of eukaryotic organisms. However, the mechanisms of HT in eukaryotes remain poorly appreciated. The non-autonomous Helitron family, Lep1, has been found to be widespread in lepidopteran species, and showed little interspecific sequence similarity of acquired sequences at 3' end, which makes Lep1 a good candidate for the study of HT. In this study, we describe the Lep1-like elements in multiple non-lepidopteran species, including two aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum and Aphis gossypii, two parasitoid wasps, Cotesia vestalis, and Copidosoma floridanum, one beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis, as well as two bracoviruses in parasitoid wasps, and one intracellular microsporidia parasite, Nosema bombycis. The patchy distribution and high sequence similarity of Lep1-like elements among distantly related lineages as well as incongruence of Lep1-like elements and host phylogeny suggest the occurrence of HT. Remarkably, the acquired sequences of both NbLep1 from N. bombycis and CfLep1 from C. floridanum showed over 90% identity with their lepidopteran host Lep1. Thus, our study provides evidence of HT facilitated by host-parasite interactions. Furthermore, in the context of these data, we discuss the putative directions and vectors of HT of Lep1 Helitrons. PMID:24874102

  19. Host-Parasite Biology of Thripinema fuscum (Tylenchida: Allantonematidae) and Frankliniella fusca (Thysanoptera: Thripidae)

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Kelly; Funderburk, Joe; Boucias, Drion

    2005-01-01

    Thripinema fuscum is a natural enemy of Frankliniella fusca in peanut. Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the reproductive biology of T. fuscum as affected by gender and stage of development of the host and to determine the effects of parasitism on host longevity, fecundity, and mortality. The adult females of F. fusca were the most readily parasitized (P < 0.001) in the laboratory experiments followed by the second instars, the first instars, and the adult males. One generation of T. fuscum developed within the parasitized larvae and adults, with the males and females emerging only during the adult stage of the host. Parasitism did not cause mortality of the host. Parasitism affected male longevity (P < 0.001) but not female longevity. The adult female thrips that were parasitized as first or second instars did not lay eggs, and the adult females stopped laying eggs within 3 days of being parasitized. The female-to-male sex ratio of T. fuscum emerging from parasitized male and female F. fusca was 22 and 18 to 1, respectively. More T. fuscum emerged from female hosts than from male hosts (P < 0.001). More emerged from hosts parasitized as larvae compared with hosts parasitized as adults (P < 0.05). The intrinsic capacity of increase of T. fuscum ranged between 0.29 and 0.37 when parasitizing the adult males and females and between 0.18 and 0.21 when parasitizing the larval males and females. Percent parasitism of F. fusca was estimated in peanut fields. The flowers were the primary site for aggregation of the adults of F. fusca and for the free-living females of T. fuscum to parasitize new hosts. As under laboratory conditions, field parasitism of adult males was less than parasitism of adult females in 2001 and 2002 (P < 0.01 and 0.001, respectively). Our study indicates that T. fuscum is a potential biological control agent capable of suppressing F. fusca populations in peanut. PMID:19262837

  20. Host-parasite Red Queen dynamics with phase-locked rare genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Rabajante, Jomar F.; Tubay, Jerrold M.; Ito, Hiromu; Uehara, Takashi; Kakishima, Satoshi; Morita, Satoru; Yoshimura, Jin; Ebert, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between hosts and parasites have been hypothesized to cause winnerless coevolution, called Red Queen dynamics. The canonical Red Queen dynamics assume that all interacting genotypes of hosts and parasites undergo cyclic changes in abundance through negative frequency-dependent selection, which means that any genotype could become frequent at some stage. However, this prediction cannot explain why many rare genotypes stay rare in natural host-parasite systems. To investigate this, we build a mathematical model involving multihost and multiparasite genotypes. In a deterministic and controlled environment, Red Queen dynamics occur between two genotypes undergoing cyclic dominance changes, whereas the rest of the genotypes remain subordinate for long periods of time in phase-locked synchronized dynamics with low amplitude. However, introduction of stochastic noise in the model might allow the subordinate cyclic host and parasite types to replace dominant cyclic types as new players in the Red Queen dynamics. The factors that influence such evolutionary switching are interhost competition, specificity of parasitism, and degree of stochastic noise. Our model can explain, for the first time, the persistence of rare, hardly cycling genotypes in populations (for example, marine microbial communities) undergoing host-parasite coevolution. PMID:26973878

  1. Host-parasite interactions in closed and open microbial cultivation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisman, T. I.; Pechurkin, N. S.

    We studied interaction between bacteria and phages within a host-parasite system the members of the system being continuously and closely cultivated The objects of our research were auxotrophic strain Brevibacterium 22L and bacteriophage Brevibacterium sp strain A discovered in the soil of the Soviet Union Republic of Latvia using enrichment method 1 Closed system We investigated the dependence of bacteriolysis time upon the multiplicity of phage infection It was shown that reduction of phage amount by one bacterium leads to increase of marked lysis Another important factor determining cytolysis in fluid medium is the physiological state of bacterial population Specific growth rate of bacteria at the moment of phage infection was chosen as the index of the physiological state of bacteria It was revealed that the shortest latent period and the maximal phage burst is observed when the bacteria located in a favorable nutrient medium are in the logarithmic phase If the bacterial population has already passed from the logarithmic phase to the stationary one the cells become a bad host for phage reproduction and lysis occurs very slowly or even never starts at all 2 Open system In the process of continuous cultivation the members of the host-parasite system showed an ability to coexist over a long period of time After phage infection there were variations in the size of both populations and then the density of the host population reached the level close to that of the uninfected culture In this situation the phage population

  2. Involvement of apoptosis in host-parasite interactions in the zebra mussel.

    PubMed

    Minguez, Laëtitia; Brulé, Nelly; Sohm, Bénédicte; Devin, Simon; Giambérini, Laure

    2013-01-01

    The question of whether cell death by apoptosis plays a biological function during infection is key to understanding host-parasite interactions. We investigated the involvement of apoptosis in several host-parasite systems, using zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha as test organisms and their micro- and macroparasites. As a stress response associated with parasitism, heat shock proteins (Hsp) can be induced. In this protein family, Hsp70 are known to be apoptosis inhibitors. Mussels were diagnosed for their respective infections by standard histological methods; apoptosis was detected using the TUNEL methods on paraffin sections and Hsp70 by immunohistochemistry on cryosections. Circulating hemocytes were the main cells observed in apoptosis whereas infected tissues displayed no or few apoptotic cells. Parasitism by intracellular bacteria Rickettsiales-like and the trematode Bucephalus polymorphus were associated with the inhibition of apoptosis whereas ciliates Ophryoglena spp. or the trematode Phyllodistomum folium did not involve significant differences in apoptosis. Even if some parasites were able to modulate apoptosis in zebra mussels, we did not see evidence of any involvement of Hsp70 on this mechanism. PMID:23785455

  3. Involvement of Apoptosis in Host-Parasite Interactions in the Zebra Mussel

    PubMed Central

    Minguez, Laëtitia; Brulé, Nelly; Sohm, Bénédicte; Devin, Simon; Giambérini, Laure

    2013-01-01

    The question of whether cell death by apoptosis plays a biological function during infection is key to understanding host-parasite interactions. We investigated the involvement of apoptosis in several host-parasite systems, using zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha as test organisms and their micro- and macroparasites. As a stress response associated with parasitism, heat shock proteins (Hsp) can be induced. In this protein family, Hsp70 are known to be apoptosis inhibitors. Mussels were diagnosed for their respective infections by standard histological methods; apoptosis was detected using the TUNEL methods on paraffin sections and Hsp70 by immunohistochemistry on cryosections. Circulating hemocytes were the main cells observed in apoptosis whereas infected tissues displayed no or few apoptotic cells. Parasitism by intracellular bacteria Rickettsiales-like and the trematode Bucephalus polymorphus were associated with the inhibition of apoptosis whereas ciliates Ophryoglena spp. or the trematode Phyllodistomum folium did not involve significant differences in apoptosis. Even if some parasites were able to modulate apoptosis in zebra mussels, we did not see evidence of any involvement of Hsp70 on this mechanism. PMID:23785455

  4. Host-parasite Red Queen dynamics with phase-locked rare genotypes.

    PubMed

    Rabajante, Jomar F; Tubay, Jerrold M; Ito, Hiromu; Uehara, Takashi; Kakishima, Satoshi; Morita, Satoru; Yoshimura, Jin; Ebert, Dieter

    2016-03-01

    Interactions between hosts and parasites have been hypothesized to cause winnerless coevolution, called Red Queen dynamics. The canonical Red Queen dynamics assume that all interacting genotypes of hosts and parasites undergo cyclic changes in abundance through negative frequency-dependent selection, which means that any genotype could become frequent at some stage. However, this prediction cannot explain why many rare genotypes stay rare in natural host-parasite systems. To investigate this, we build a mathematical model involving multihost and multiparasite genotypes. In a deterministic and controlled environment, Red Queen dynamics occur between two genotypes undergoing cyclic dominance changes, whereas the rest of the genotypes remain subordinate for long periods of time in phase-locked synchronized dynamics with low amplitude. However, introduction of stochastic noise in the model might allow the subordinate cyclic host and parasite types to replace dominant cyclic types as new players in the Red Queen dynamics. The factors that influence such evolutionary switching are interhost competition, specificity of parasitism, and degree of stochastic noise. Our model can explain, for the first time, the persistence of rare, hardly cycling genotypes in populations (for example, marine microbial communities) undergoing host-parasite coevolution. PMID:26973878

  5. New Perspectives on Host-Parasite Interplay by Comparative Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analyses of Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sheng-Yue; Cui, Shu-Jian; Chi, Ming; Yan, Qing; Wang, Xin-Rong; Song, Huai-Dong; Xu, Xue-Nian; Wang, Ju-Jun; Zhang, Xiang-Lin; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Zhi-Qin; Xue, Chun-Liang; Brindley, Paul J; McManus, Donald P; Yang, Peng-Yuan; Feng, Zheng; Chen, Zhu; Han, Ze-Guang

    2006-01-01

    Schistosomiasis remains a serious public health problem with an estimated 200 million people infected in 76 countries. Here we isolated ~ 8,400 potential protein-encoding cDNA contigs from Schistosoma japonicum after sequencing circa 84,000 expressed sequence tags. In tandem, we undertook a high-throughput proteomics approach to characterize the protein expression profiles of a number of developmental stages (cercariae, hepatic schistosomula, female and male adults, eggs, and miracidia) and tissues at the host-parasite interface (eggshell and tegument) by interrogating the protein database deduced from the contigs. Comparative analysis of these transcriptomic and proteomic data, the latter including 3,260 proteins with putative identities, revealed differential expression of genes among the various developmental stages and sexes of S. japonicum and localization of putative secretory and membrane antigens, enzymes, and other gene products on the adult tegument and eggshell, many of which displayed genetic polymorphisms. Numerous S. japonicum genes exhibited high levels of identity with those of their mammalian hosts, whereas many others appeared to be conserved only across the genus Schistosoma or Phylum Platyhelminthes. These findings are expected to provide new insights into the pathophysiology of schistosomiasis and for the development of improved interventions for disease control and will facilitate a more fundamental understanding of schistosome biology, evolution, and the host-parasite interplay. PMID:16617374

  6. Cysticercus fasciolaris infection induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in rat liver: a strategy for host-parasite cross talk.

    PubMed

    Giri, Bikash Ranjan; Roy, Bishnupada

    2016-07-01

    Parasitic helminths have developed various strategies to induce or inhibit apoptosis in the cells of their host, thereby modulating the host's immune response and aiding dissemination to the host. Cysticercus fasciolaris, the larval form of Taenia taeniaeformis, parasitized different intermediate hosts like rats, rabbits, etc. and is cosmopolitan in distribution. In the present study, we have investigated host-parasite interactions and the resulting effect of C. fasciolaris in the liver of rat. Histology of the infected livers showed dilation and damages of hepatic cells near the parasite. Infected liver cells showed an increase in DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation compared to the normal liver. Acridine orange and ethidium bromide dual staining revealed the presence of apoptotic cells in the infected liver. The decline in the mitochondrial membrane potential in the infected liver suggested that the observed apoptosis is mitochondria mediated. Occurrence of an elevated level of active executioner caspases 3/7 in the infected rat liver further confirms the occurrence of apoptosis. Different antioxidant enzymes were also evaluated and revealed a notable decline in the level of glutathione and glutathione-S-transferase activity leading to the augmented generation of reactive oxygen species. Results of the present study revealed that C. fasciolaris infection leads to apoptosis in the liver of rats which may be a surviving strategy for the parasitic larvae. PMID:26987645

  7. Stem cell progeny contribute to the schistosome host-parasite interface

    PubMed Central

    Collins, James J; Wendt, George R; Iyer, Harini; Newmark, Phillip A

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomes infect more than 200 million of the world's poorest people. These parasites live in the vasculature, producing eggs that spur a variety of chronic, potentially life-threatening, pathologies exacerbated by the long lifespan of schistosomes, that can thrive in the host for decades. How schistosomes maintain their longevity in this immunologically hostile environment is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that somatic stem cells in Schistosoma mansoni are biased towards generating a population of cells expressing factors associated exclusively with the schistosome host-parasite interface, a structure called the tegument. We show cells expressing these tegumental factors are short-lived and rapidly turned over. We suggest that stem cell-driven renewal of this tegumental lineage represents an important strategy for parasite survival in the context of the host vasculature. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12473.001 PMID:27003592

  8. Aligning Microtomography Analysis with Traditional Anatomy for a 3D Understanding of the Host-Parasite Interface – Phoradendron spp. Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira-Costa, Luíza; Ceccantini, Gregório C. T.

    2016-01-01

    The complex endophytic structure formed by parasitic plant species often represents a challenge in the study of the host-parasite interface. Even with the large amounts of anatomical slides, a three-dimensional comprehension of the structure may still be difficult to obtain. In the present study we applied the High Resolution X-ray Computed Tomography (HRXCT) analysis along with usual plant anatomy techniques in order to compare the infestation pattern of two mistletoe species of the genus Phoradendron. Additionally, we tested the use of contrasting solutions in order to improve the detection of the parasite’s endophytic tissue. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show the three-dimensional structure of host-mistletoe interface by using HRXCT technique. Results showed that Phoradendron perrottetii growing on the host Tapirira guianensis forms small woody galls with a restricted endophytic system. The sinkers were short and eventually grouped creating a continuous interface with the host wood. On the other hand, the long sinkers of P. bathyoryctum penetrate deeply into the wood of Cedrela fissilis branching in all directions throughout the woody gall area, forming a spread-out infestation pattern. The results indicate that the HRXCT is indeed a powerful approach to understand the endophytic system of parasitic plants. The combination of three-dimensional models of the infestation with anatomical analysis provided a broader understanding of the host-parasite connection. Unique anatomic features are reported for the sinkes of P. perrottetii, while the endophytic tissue of P. bathyoryctum conformed to general anatomy observed for other species of this genus. These differences are hypothesized to be related to the three-dimensional structure of each endophytic system and the communication stablished with the host.

  9. Cystatins from filarial parasites: evolution, adaptation and function in the host-parasite relationship.

    PubMed

    Gregory, William F; Maizels, Rick M

    2008-01-01

    Cystatins, together with stefins and kininogens, are members of the cystatin superfamily of cysteine protease inhibitors (CPI) present across the animal and plant kingdoms. Their role in parasitic organisms may encompass both essential developmental processes and specific interactions with the parasite's vector and/or final host. We summarise information gathered on three cystatins from the human filarial nematode Brugia malayi (Bm-CPI-1, -2 and -3), and contrast them those expressed by other parasites and by the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Bm-CPI-2 differs from C. elegans cystatin, having acquired the additional function of inhibiting asparaginyl endopeptidase (AEP), in a manner similar to some human cystatins. Thus, we propose that Bm-CPI-2 and orthologues from related filarial parasites represent a new subset of nematode cystatins. Bm-CPI-1 and CPI-3 share only 25% amino acid identity with Bm-CPI-2, and lack an evolutionarily conserved glycine residue in the N-terminal region. These sequences group distantly from the other nematode cystatins, and represent a second novel subset of filarial cystatin-like genes. Expression analyses also show important differences between the CPI-2 and CPI-1/-3 groups. Bm-cpi-2 is expressed at all time points of the parasite life cycle, while Bm-cpi-1 and -3 expression is confined to the late stages of development in the mosquito vector, terminating within 48h of infection of the mammalian host. Hence, we hypothesise that CPI-2 has evolved to block mammalian proteases (including the antigen-processing enzyme AEP) while CPI-1 and -3 function in the milieu of the mosquito vector necessary for transmission of the parasite. PMID:18249028

  10. [Paleoparasitology: host-parasite relationship in a historical and paleoenvironmenal context].

    PubMed

    Bouchet-Bruyet, F

    2006-03-01

    Paleoparasitology of the ancient world has mainly concerned the study of latrine sediments, coprolites collected from mummified bodies or archeological strata, mostly preserved by natural conditions. The well-preserved conditions of helminth eggs have allowed paleoepideological approaches and application of immunological techniques for the detection of protozoan palaeoantigens. PMID:16568013

  11. Role of porcine serum haptoglobin in the host-parasite relationship of Taenia solium cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Navarrete-Perea, José; Toledano-Magaña, Yanis; De la Torre, Patricia; Sciutto, Edda; Bobes, Raúl José; Soberón, Xavier; Laclette, Juan Pedro

    2016-06-01

    Human and porcine cysticercosis is a parasitic disease caused by the larval stage (cysts) of the tapeworm Taenia solium. Cysts may live in several host tissues such as skeletal muscle or brain. We have previously described the presence of host haptoglobin (Hp) and hemoglobin (Hb) in different protein extracts of the T. solium cysts. Here, we report the binding of host Hp and Hb to a number of cyst proteins, evaluated through measuring electrophoretic and light absorbance changes. In the sera obtained from 18 cysticercotic pigs, Hp-Hb complexes were abundant, whereas free Hp was undetectable. In contrast, in the sera from non 18 cysticercotic pigs, Hp-Hb and free Hp were found. In the soluble protein fraction of cysts tissue, free Hp was detected showing a considerable Hb-binding ability, whereas in the vesicular fluid, Hp is mainly bound to Hb. Interestingly, assays carried out with the insoluble fraction of T. solium cysts tissue, showed binding of Hp and Hp-Hb in a saturable way, suggesting the existence of specific interactions. Our results suggested that the parasite can take advantage of the uptaken host Hp and Hb, either free or in complexes, as a source of iron or as a way to modulate the inflammatory response surrounding the T. solium cysts. PMID:27234210

  12. The review of "The Oestrid Flies: Biology, host-parasite relationships, impact and management"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Oestrid flies are a diverse group of parasitic insects whose larval forms are adapted for a parasitic life-style. Their armament of spines and mouth hooks, enables their migration within host tissues and provides for beastly images as depicted on the front cover of the book and within the text....

  13. Species-Area Relationships Are Controlled by Species Traits

    PubMed Central

    Franzén, Markus; Schweiger, Oliver; Betzholtz, Per-Eric

    2012-01-01

    The species-area relationship (SAR) is one of the most thoroughly investigated empirical relationships in ecology. Two theories have been proposed to explain SARs: classical island biogeography theory and niche theory. Classical island biogeography theory considers the processes of persistence, extinction, and colonization, whereas niche theory focuses on species requirements, such as habitat and resource use. Recent studies have called for the unification of these two theories to better explain the underlying mechanisms that generates SARs. In this context, species traits that can be related to each theory seem promising. Here we analyzed the SARs of butterfly and moth assemblages on islands differing in size and isolation. We tested whether species traits modify the SAR and the response to isolation. In addition to the expected overall effects on the area, traits related to each of the two theories increased the model fit, from 69% up to 90%. Steeper slopes have been shown to have a particularly higher sensitivity to area, which was indicated by species with restricted range (slope  = 0.82), narrow dietary niche (slope  = 0.59), low abundance (slope  = 0.52), and low reproductive potential (slope  = 0.51). We concluded that considering species traits by analyzing SARs yields considerable potential for unifying island biogeography theory and niche theory, and that the systematic and predictable effects observed when considering traits can help to guide conservation and management actions. PMID:22629384

  14. Stochastic environmental fluctuations drive epidemiology in experimental host-parasite metapopulations.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Alison B; Gonzalez, Andrew; Kaltz, Oliver

    2013-10-22

    Environmental fluctuations are important for parasite spread and persistence. However, the effects of the spatial and temporal structure of environmental fluctuations on host-parasite dynamics are not well understood. Temporal fluctuations can be random but positively autocorrelated, such that the environment is similar to the recent past (red noise), or random and uncorrelated with the past (white noise). We imposed red or white temporal temperature fluctuations on experimental metapopulations of Paramecium caudatum, experiencing an epidemic of the bacterial parasite Holospora undulata. Metapopulations (two subpopulations linked by migration) experienced fluctuations between stressful (5 °C) and permissive (23 °C) conditions following red or white temporal sequences. Spatial variation in temperature fluctuations was implemented by exposing subpopulations to the same (synchronous temperatures) or different (asynchronous temperatures) temporal sequences. Red noise, compared with white noise, enhanced parasite persistence. Despite this, red noise coupled with asynchronous temperatures allowed infected host populations to maintain sizes equivalent to uninfected populations. It is likely that this occurs because subpopulations in permissive conditions rescue declining subpopulations in stressful conditions. We show how patterns of temporal and spatial environmental fluctuations can impact parasite spread and host population abundance. We conclude that accurate prediction of parasite epidemics may require realistic models of environmental noise. PMID:23966645

  15. Discrimination of fish populations using parasites: Random Forests on a 'predictable' host-parasite system.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Del-Olmo, A; Montero, F E; Fernández, M; Barrett, J; Raga, J A; Kostadinova, A

    2010-10-01

    We address the effect of spatial scale and temporal variation on model generality when forming predictive models for fish assignment using a new data mining approach, Random Forests (RF), to variable biological markers (parasite community data). Models were implemented for a fish host-parasite system sampled along the Mediterranean and Atlantic coasts of Spain and were validated using independent datasets. We considered 2 basic classification problems in evaluating the importance of variations in parasite infracommunities for assignment of individual fish to their populations of origin: multiclass (2-5 population models, using 2 seasonal replicates from each of the populations) and 2-class task (using 4 seasonal replicates from 1 Atlantic and 1 Mediterranean population each). The main results are that (i) RF are well suited for multiclass population assignment using parasite communities in non-migratory fish; (ii) RF provide an efficient means for model cross-validation on the baseline data and this allows sample size limitations in parasite tag studies to be tackled effectively; (iii) the performance of RF is dependent on the complexity and spatial extent/configuration of the problem; and (iv) the development of predictive models is strongly influenced by seasonal change and this stresses the importance of both temporal replication and model validation in parasite tagging studies. PMID:20602856

  16. What is a pathogen? Toward a process view of host-parasite interactions

    PubMed Central

    Méthot, Pierre-Olivier; Alizon, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Until quite recently and since the late 19th century, medical microbiology has been based on the assumption that some micro-organisms are pathogens and others are not. This binary view is now strongly criticized and is even becoming untenable. We first provide a historical overview of the changing nature of host-parasite interactions, in which we argue that large-scale sequencing not only shows that identifying the roots of pathogenesis is much more complicated than previously thought, but also forces us to reconsider what a pathogen is. To address the challenge of defining a pathogen in post-genomic science, we present and discuss recent results that embrace the microbial genetic diversity (both within- and between-host) and underline the relevance of microbial ecology and evolution. By analyzing and extending earlier work on the concept of pathogen, we propose pathogenicity (or virulence) should be viewed as a dynamical feature of an interaction between a host and microbes. PMID:25483864

  17. Cancer and life-history traits: lessons from host-parasite interactions.

    PubMed

    Ujvari, Beata; Beckmann, Christa; Biro, Peter A; Arnal, Audrey; Tasiemski, Aurelie; Massol, Francois; Salzet, Michel; Mery, Frederic; Boidin-Wichlacz, Celine; Misse, Dorothee; Renaud, Francois; Vittecoq, Marion; Tissot, Tazzio; Roche, Benjamin; Poulin, Robert; Thomas, Frederic

    2016-04-01

    Despite important differences between infectious diseases and cancers, tumour development (neoplasia) can nonetheless be closely compared to infectious disease because of the similarity of their effects on the body. On this basis, we predict that many of the life-history (LH) responses observed in the context of host-parasite interactions should also be relevant in the context of cancer. Parasites are thought to affect LH traits of their hosts because of strong selective pressures like direct and indirect mortality effects favouring, for example, early maturation and reproduction. Cancer can similarly also affect LH traits by imposing direct costs and/or indirectly by triggering plastic adjustments and evolutionary responses. Here, we discuss how and why a LH focus is a potentially productive but under-exploited research direction for cancer research, by focusing our attention on similarities between infectious disease and cancer with respect to their effects on LH traits and their evolution. We raise the possibility that LH adjustments can occur in response to cancer via maternal/paternal effects and that these changes can be heritable to (adaptively) modify the LH traits of their offspring. We conclude that LH adjustments can potentially influence the transgenerational persistence of inherited oncogenic mutations in populations. PMID:26887797

  18. Gas Exchange Characteristics of the Sorghum-Striga Host-Parasite Association

    PubMed Central

    Press, Malcolm C.; Tuohy, Janet M.; Stewart, George R.

    1987-01-01

    Gas exchange characteristics are reported for both members of the sorghum-Striga host-parasite association. Both Striga hermonthica (Del.) Benth and Striga asiatica (L.) Kuntze had transpiration rates considerably in excess of those of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench, cv CSH1). Stomatal conductance in both Striga spp. showed little response to periods of darkness and moderate water stress. Low rates of net CO2 fixation and high rates of dark respiration led to no net daily (24 hours) C gain, and Striga would appear to be reliant on its host for photosynthate. Infection of sorghum plants with either S. hermonthica or S. asiatica reduced host photosynthetic capacity. Infected sorghum plants were also more prone to water stress, but reduced rates of CO2 fixation could not be accounted for in terms of lower stomatal conductance. Lower stomatal conductances were associated with an increase in water use efficiency (WUE) in uninfected sorghum; however, Striga-infected sorghum plants had lower WUE than those of uninfected plants. We suggest that Striga exerts a specific effect on processes affecting C acquisition in sorghum leaves. The water relations of S. hermonthica and S. asiatica are not characteristic of plants growing in semiarid environments and are more likely to reflect the nature of the parasitic life-style. Despite transfer of water and solutes from host to parasite, the reduction in C fixation observed in infected sorghum plants appears to be the major determinant of growth reductions observed in sorghum supporting Striga. PMID:16665527

  19. Numerical study of a three-state host-parasite system on the square lattice.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Takehisa; Konno, Norio; Masuda, Naoki

    2011-04-01

    We numerically study the phase diagram of a three-state host-parasite model on the square lattice motivated by population biology. The model is an extension of the contact process, and the three states correspond to an empty site, a host, and a parasite. We determine the phase diagram of the model by scaling analysis. In agreement with previous results, three phases are identified: the phase in which both hosts and parasites are extinct (S(0)), the phase in which hosts survive but parasites are extinct (S(01)), and the phase in which both hosts and parasites survive (S(012)). We argue that both the S(0)-S(01) and S(01)-S(012) boundaries belong to the directed percolation class. In this model, it has been suggested that an excessively large reproduction rate of parasites paradoxically extinguishes hosts and parasites and results in S(0). We show that this paradoxical extinction is a finite size effect; the corresponding parameter region is likely to disappear in the limit of infinite system size. PMID:21599235

  20. Hepatic tissue culture model for study of host-parasite interactions in alveolar echinococcosis.

    PubMed Central

    Jura, H; Bader, A; Hartmann, M; Maschek, H; Frosch, M

    1996-01-01

    An in vitro model for growth and differentiation of the metacestode tissue of the tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis is described. This model simulates the organotropism of the parasite toward the liver of the intermediate host. In the presence of collagen-embedded primary hepatocytes from rats and humans, which can be kept in culture for 2 to 3 months, the parasitic vesicles grew by exogenous budding and multiplied about 12-fold within 3 weeks. In contrast, without the hepatocytes, the metacestodes rapidly degenerated. Development of protoscolices was seen only in the presence of rat hepatocytes but not in coculture of the metacestodes with hepatocytes of human origin, thus reflecting the in vivo situation during infection of rodents and in alveolar echinococcosis in humans. The experiments indicated that growth of the metacestodes and development of protoscolices depended on soluble low-molecular-weight factors released by the hepatocytes. The in vitro-grown metacestodes did not differ morphologically from the larvae found in infected intermediate hosts, and their infectivity was completely maintained. This report describes the first in vitro model of alveolar echinococcosis and will be the basis for future studies on host-parasite interactions of this important zoonosis. PMID:8751888

  1. On the evolutionary ecology of host-parasite interactions: addressing the question with regard to bumblebees and their parasites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid-Hempel, Paul

    2001-05-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a major shift in the study of adaptive patterns and processes towards including the role of host-parasite interactions, informed by concepts from evolutionary ecology. As a consequence, a number of major questions have emerged. For example, how genetics affects host-parasite interactions, whether parasitism selects for offspring diversification, whether parasite virulence is an adaptive trait, and what constrains the use of the host's immune defences. Using bumblebees, Bombus spp, and their parasites as a model system, answers to some of these questions have been found, while at the same time the complexity of the interaction has led expectations away from simple theoretical models. In addition, the results have also led to the unexpected discovery of novel phenomena concerning, for instance, female mating strategies.

  2. Would species richness estimators change the observed species area relationship?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, Paulo A. V.; Hortal, Joaquín; Gabriel, Rosalina; Homem, Nídia

    2009-01-01

    We evaluate whether the description of the species area relationship (SAR) can be improved by using richness estimates instead of observed richness values. To do this, we use three independent datasets gathered with standardized survey methods from the native laurisilva forest of the Azorean archipelago, encompassing different distributional extent and biological groups: soil epigean arthropods at eight forest fragments in Terceira Island, canopy arthropods inhabiting Juniperus brevifolia at 16 forest fragments of six different islands, and bryophytes of seven forest fragments from Terceira and Pico islands. Species richness values were estimated for each forest fragment using seven non-parametric estimators (ACE, ICE, Chao1, Chao2, Jackknife1, Jackknife2 and Bootstrap; five in the case of bryophytes). These estimates were fitted to classical log-log species-area curves and the intercept, slope and goodness of fit of these curves were compared with those obtained from the observed species richness values to determine if significant differences appear in these parameters. We hypothesized that the intercepts would be higher in the estimated data sets compared with the observed data, as estimated richness values are typically higher than observed values. We found partial support for the hypothesis - intercepts of the SAR obtained from estimated richness values were significantly higher in the case of epigean arthropods and bryophyte datasets. In contrast, the slope and goodness of fit obtained with estimated values were not significantly different from those obtained from observed species richness in all groups, although a few small differences appeared. We conclude that, although little is gained using these estimators if data come from standardized surveys, their estimations could be used to analyze macroecological relationships with non-standardized observed data, provided that survey incompleteness and/or unevenness are also taken into account.

  3. Predator-dependent species-area relationships.

    PubMed

    Ryberg, Wade A; Chase, Jonathan M

    2007-10-01

    In addition to having a positive effect on species richness (species-area relationships [SARs]), habitat area can influence the presence of predators, which can indirectly influence prey richness. While these direct and indirect effects of area on richness occur simultaneously, no research has examined how predation might contribute to SAR variation. We extend MacArthur and Wilson's equilibrium theory of island biogeography by including predation-induced shifts in prey extinction and predict that predators will reduce slopes of prey SARs. We provide support for this with data from two insular ecosystems: orthopteran richness in Ozark glades (rocky herbaceous communities within a forested matrix) with and without insectivorous lizards and zooplankton richness in freshwater ponds with and without zooplanktivorous fishes. Our results emphasize that anthropogenic activities yield simultaneous changes in processes altering diversity and that it is critical that we understand how these components of anthropogenic change interact to impact diversity. PMID:17891741

  4. Modeling species-abundance relationships in multi-species collections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peng, S.; Yin, Z.; Ren, H.; Guo, Q.

    2003-01-01

    Species-abundance relationship is one of the most fundamental aspects of community ecology. Since Motomura first developed the geometric series model to describe the feature of community structure, ecologists have developed many other models to fit the species-abundance data in communities. These models can be classified into empirical and theoretical ones, including (1) statistical models, i.e., negative binomial distribution (and its extension), log-series distribution (and its extension), geometric distribution, lognormal distribution, Poisson-lognormal distribution, (2) niche models, i.e., geometric series, broken stick, overlapping niche, particulate niche, random assortment, dominance pre-emption, dominance decay, random fraction, weighted random fraction, composite niche, Zipf or Zipf-Mandelbrot model, and (3) dynamic models describing community dynamics and restrictive function of environment on community. These models have different characteristics and fit species-abundance data in various communities or collections. Among them, log-series distribution, lognormal distribution, geometric series, and broken stick model have been most widely used.

  5. Nylanderia deceptrix sp. n., a new species of obligately socially parasitic formicine ant (Hymenoptera, Formicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Messer, Steven J.; Cover, Stefan P.; LaPolla, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Obligately socially parasitic ants are social parasites that typically lack the sterile worker caste, and depend on the host species for survival and brood care. The genus Nylanderia has over 130 described species and subspecies, none of which, until this study, were known social parasites. Here we describe the first social parasite known in the genus, Nylanderia deceptrix. Aspects of the biology of the host species, Nylanderia parvula (Mayr 1870), and Nylanderia deceptrix are examined. The data from both the host and the parasite species are combined to better understand the host-parasite relationship. PMID:26865815

  6. Genetic relationships within and between Capsicum species.

    PubMed

    Ince, Ayşe Gul; Karaca, Mehmet; Onus, A Naci

    2010-02-01

    Genetic relationships were estimated among 24 accessions belonging to 11 species of Capsicum, using 2,760 RAPD markers based on touch-down polymerase chain reactions (Td-RAPD-PCR). These markers were implemented in analyses of principal coordinates, unweighted pair group mean average, and 2,000 bootstrap replications. The accessions were divided into four groups, corresponding to previously described Capsicum complexes: C. annuum complex (CA), C. baccatum complex (CB), C. pubescens complex (CP), and C. chacoense accessions (CA/B). Their overall mean genetic similarity index was 0.487 +/- 0.082, ranging from 0.88 to 0.32, based on Jaccard's coefficient. The highest genetic variation was observed among the accessions in CP; the accessions in CB had a low level of variation as judged from the standard deviations of the genetic similarity indices. Based on the Td-RAPD-PCR markers, the 24 accessions were divided into four major groups, three of which corresponded to the three distinct Capsicum complexes. Accessions of C. chacoense were found to be equally related to complexes CA, CB, and CP. PMID:19916044

  7. mRNA-Seq and microarray development for the Grooved carpet shell clam, Ruditapes decussatus: a functional approach to unravel host -parasite interaction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Grooved Carpet shell clam Ruditapes decussatus is the autochthonous European clam and the most appreciated from a gastronomic and economic point of view. The production is in decline due to several factors such as Perkinsiosis and habitat invasion and competition by the introduced exotic species, the manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum. After we sequenced R. decussatus transcriptome we have designed an oligo microarray capable of contributing to provide some clues on molecular response of the clam to Perkinsiosis. Results A database consisting of 41,119 unique transcripts was constructed, of which 12,479 (30.3%) were annotated by similarity. An oligo-DNA microarray platform was then designed and applied to profile gene expression in R. decussatus heavily infected by Perkinsus olseni. Functional annotation of differentially expressed genes between those two conditionswas performed by gene set enrichment analysis. As expected, microarrays unveil genes related with stress/infectious agents such as hydrolases, proteases and others. The extensive role of innate immune system was also analyzed and effect of parasitosis upon expression of important molecules such as lectins reviewed. Conclusions This study represents a first attempt to characterize Ruditapes decussatus transcriptome, an important marine resource for the European aquaculture. The trancriptome sequencing and consequent annotation will increase the available tools and resources for this specie, introducing the possibility of high throughput experiments such as microarrays analysis. In this specific case microarray approach was used to unveil some important aspects of host-parasite interaction between the Carpet shell clam and Perkinsus, two non-model species, highlighting some genes associated with this interaction. Ample information was obtained to identify biological processes significantly enriched among differentially expressed genes in Perkinsus infected versus non-infected gills. An

  8. Delta-Aminolevulinate-Induced Host-Parasite Porphyric Disparity for Selective Photolysis of Transgenic Leishmania in the Phagolysosomes of Mononuclear Phagocytes: a Potential Novel Platform for Vaccine Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Sujoy; Chang, Celia; Kolli, Bala Krishna; Sassa, Shigeru; Yousef, Malik; Showe, Michael; Showe, Louise

    2012-01-01

    Leishmania double transfectants (DTs) expressing the 2nd and 3rd enzymes in the heme biosynthetic pathway were previously reported to show neogenesis of uroporphyrin I (URO) when induced with delta-aminolevulinate (ALA), the product of the 1st enzyme in the pathway. The ensuing accumulation of URO in DT promastigotes rendered them light excitable to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in their cytolysis. Evidence is presented showing that the DTs retained wild-type infectivity to their host cells and that the intraphagolysosomal/parasitophorous vacuolar (PV) DTs remained ALA inducible for uroporphyrinogenesis/photolysis. Exposure of DT-infected cells to ALA was noted by fluorescence microscopy to result in host-parasite differential porphyrinogenesis: porphyrin fluorescence emerged first in the host cells and then in the intra-PV amastigotes. DT-infected and control cells differed qualitatively and quantitatively in their porphyrin species, consistent with the expected multi- and monoporphyrinogenic specificities of the host cells and the DTs, respectively. After ALA removal, the neogenic porphyrins were rapidly lost from the host cells but persisted as URO in the intra-PV DTs. These DTs were thus extremely light sensitive and were lysed selectively by illumination under nonstringent conditions in the relatively ROS-resistant phagolysosomes. Photolysis of the intra-PV DTs returned the distribution of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules and the global gene expression profiles of host cells to their preinfection patterns and, when transfected with ovalbumin, released this antigen for copresentation with MHC class I molecules. These Leishmania mutants thus have considerable potential as a novel model of a universal vaccine carrier for photodynamic immunotherapy/immunoprophylaxis. PMID:22307976

  9. Nucleic acid relationships among Acholeplasma species.

    PubMed Central

    Aulakh, G S; Stephens, E B; Rose, D L; Tully, J G; Barile, M F

    1983-01-01

    3H-labeled Acholeplasma DNA probes were generated in vitro by the nick-translation method and used to determine the nucleotide sequence homology among the type strains of the eight currently recognized species of Acholeplasma. Very little nucleotide sequence homology (less than or equal to 18%) was found among the eight species, with heteroduplexes showing at least 12% or more mismatching as determined by thermal elution midpoints. The small amount of nucleotide sequence homology among the eight species indicates that these species are quite distinct and are not closely related to each other genomically. PMID:6826524

  10. Draft genome sequence of the Daphnia pathogen Octosporea bayeri: insights into the gene content of a large microsporidian genome and a model for host-parasite interactions

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The highly compacted 2.9-Mb genome of Encephalitozoon cuniculi placed the microsporidia in the spotlight, encoding a mere 2,000 proteins and a highly reduced suite of biochemical pathways. This extreme level of reduction is not universal across the microsporidia, with genomes known to vary up to sixfold in size, suggesting that some genomes may harbor a gene content that is not as reduced as that of Enc. cuniculi. In this study, we present an in-depth survey of the large genome of Octosporea bayeri, a pathogen of Daphnia magna, with an estimated genome size of 24 Mb, in order to shed light on the organization and content of a large microsporidian genome. Results Using Illumina sequencing, 898 Mb of O. bayeri genome sequence was generated, resulting in 13.3 Mb of unique sequence. We annotated a total of 2,174 genes, of which 893 encodes proteins with assigned function. The gene density of the O. bayeri genome is very low on average, but also highly uneven, so gene-dense regions also occur. The data presented here suggest that the O. bayeri proteome is well represented in this analysis and is more complex that that of Enc. cuniculi. Functional annotation of O. bayeri proteins suggests that this species might be less biochemically dependent on its host for its metabolism than its more reduced relatives. Conclusions The combination of the data presented here, together with the imminent annotated genome of Daphnia magna, will provide a wealth of genetic and genomic tools to study host-parasite interactions in an interesting model for pathogenesis. PMID:19807911

  11. COMPLEX HOST-PARASITE SYSTEMS IN MARTES: IMPLICATIONS FOR CONSERVATION BIOLOGY OF ENDEMIC FAUNAS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Complex assemblages of hosts and parasites reveal insights about biogeography and ecology and inform us about processes which serve to structure faunal diversity and the biosphere in space and time. Exploring aspects of parasite diversity among martens (species of Martes) and other mustelids reveal...

  12. Atrazine reduces the transmission of an amphibian trematode by altering snail and ostracod host-parasite interactions.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Kyle D; Belden, Jason B; Bolek, Matthew G

    2016-04-01

    Trematodes are ubiquitous members of aquatic environments, have many functional roles in ecosystems, and can cause diseases in humans, livestock, and wild animals. Despite their importance and reports of parasite population declines, few studies have concurrently assessed the effects of aquatic contaminants on multiple hosts, multiple parasite life cycle stages, and on transmission-related host-parasite interactions. Here, we test the effects of environmentally relevant concentrations of the herbicide atrazine (0, 3, 30 μg/L) on the establishment and development of an amphibian trematode (Halipegus eccentricus) in a first-intermediate snail host (Physa acuta) and in a second-intermediate ostracod host (Cypridopsis sp.). Additionally, we test the interactive effects of atrazine and parasitism on snail and ostracod survival. Our results indicate that atrazine negatively affects trematode transmission by altering snail and ostracod host-parasite interactions. Although atrazine did not affect the survival of uninfected snails alone, atrazine acted synergistically with parasitism to reduce the longevity of infected snails. As a result, the number of cercariae (i.e., larval trematodes) produced by snails was 50.7 % (3 μg/L) and 14.9 % (30 μg/L) relative to controls. Atrazine exhibited direct negative effects on ostracod survival at 30 μg/L. However, when ostracods were also exposed to trematodes, the negative effects of atrazine on survival were diminished. Although infected ostracod survival remained high, trematode development was significantly reduced, resulting in reduced infectivity of metacercariae (i.e., nongravid adult cysts infective to definite host) to 32.2 % (3 μg/L) and 28.6 % (30 μg/L) relative to the controls. The combination of reduced cercaria production and reduced metacercarial infectivity in the 3 and 30 μg/L atrazine treatment groups reduced the net number of infective worms produced to 16.4 and 4.3 % (respectively) relative to the control

  13. Host-Parasite Interactions and Purifying Selection in a Microsporidian Parasite of Honey Bees.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiang; Chen, Yan Ping; Wang, Rui Wu; Cheng, Shang; Evans, Jay D

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the mechanisms of Nosema ceranae parasitism, we deep-sequenced both honey bee host and parasite mRNAs throughout a complete 6-day infection cycle. By time-series analysis, 1122 parasite genes were significantly differently expressed during the reproduction cycle, clustering into 4 expression patterns. We found reactive mitochondrial oxygen species modulator 1 of the host to be significantly down regulated during the entire infection period. Our data support the hypothesis that apoptosis of honey bee cells was suppressed during infection. We further analyzed genome-wide genetic diversity of this parasite by comparing samples collected from the same site in 2007 and 2013. The number of SNP positions per gene and the proportion of non-synonymous substitutions per gene were significantly reduced over this time period, suggesting purifying selection on the parasite genome and supporting the hypothesis that a subset of N. ceranae strains might be dominating infection. PMID:26840596

  14. Host-Parasite Interactions and Purifying Selection in a Microsporidian Parasite of Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qiang; Chen, Yan Ping; Wang, Rui Wu; Cheng, Shang; Evans, Jay D.

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the mechanisms of Nosema ceranae parasitism, we deep-sequenced both honey bee host and parasite mRNAs throughout a complete 6-day infection cycle. By time-series analysis, 1122 parasite genes were significantly differently expressed during the reproduction cycle, clustering into 4 expression patterns. We found reactive mitochondrial oxygen species modulator 1 of the host to be significantly down regulated during the entire infection period. Our data support the hypothesis that apoptosis of honey bee cells was suppressed during infection. We further analyzed genome-wide genetic diversity of this parasite by comparing samples collected from the same site in 2007 and 2013. The number of SNP positions per gene and the proportion of non-synonymous substitutions per gene were significantly reduced over this time period, suggesting purifying selection on the parasite genome and supporting the hypothesis that a subset of N. ceranae strains might be dominating infection. PMID:26840596

  15. Host-Parasite Interactions from the Inside: Plant Reproductive Ontogeny Drives Specialization in Parasitic Insects

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, Thomas; Gidoin, Cindy; von Aderkas, Patrick; Safrana, Jonathan; Candau, Jean-Noël; Chalon, Alain; Sondo, Marion; El Maâtaoui, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Host plant interactions are likely key drivers of evolutionary processes involved in the diversification of phytophagous insects. Granivory has received substantial attention for its crucial role in shaping the interaction between plants and their seed parasites, but fine-scale mechanisms explaining the role of host plant reproductive biology on specialization of seed parasites remain poorly described. In a comparative approach using plant histological techniques, we tested the hypotheses that different seed parasite species synchronize their life cycles to specific stages in seed development, and that the stage they target depends on major differences in seed development programs. In a pinaceous system, seed storage products are initiated before ovule fertilization and the wasps target the ovule’s nucellus during megagametogenesis, a stage at which larvae may benefit from the by-products derived from both secreting cells and dying nucellar cells. In a cupressaceous system, oviposition activity peaks later, during embryogenesis, and the wasps target the ovule’s megagametophyte where larvae may benefit from cell disintegration during embryogenesis. Our cytohistological approach shows for the first time how, despite divergent oviposition targets, different parasite species share a common strategy that consists of first competing for nutrients with developing plant structures, and then consuming these developed structures to complete their development. Our results support the prediction that seed developmental program is an axis for specialization in seed parasites, and that it could be an important parameter in models of their ecological and taxonomic divergence. This study provides the basis for further investigating the possibility of the link between plant ontogeny and pre-dispersal seed parasitism. PMID:26441311

  16. Cell Surface Proteomics Provides Insight into Stage-Specific Remodeling of the Host-Parasite Interface in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Shimogawa, Michelle M; Saada, Edwin A; Vashisht, Ajay A; Barshop, William D; Wohlschlegel, James A; Hill, Kent L

    2015-07-01

    African trypanosomes are devastating human and animal pathogens transmitted by tsetse flies between mammalian hosts. The trypanosome surface forms a critical host interface that is essential for sensing and adapting to diverse host environments. However, trypanosome surface protein composition and diversity remain largely unknown. Here, we use surface labeling, affinity purification, and proteomic analyses to describe cell surface proteomes from insect-stage and mammalian bloodstream-stage Trypanosoma brucei. The cell surface proteomes contain most previously characterized surface proteins. We additionally identify a substantial number of novel proteins, whose functions are unknown, indicating the parasite surface proteome is larger and more diverse than generally appreciated. We also show stage-specific expression for individual paralogs within several protein families, suggesting that fine-tuned remodeling of the parasite surface allows adaptation to diverse host environments, while still fulfilling universally essential cellular needs. Our surface proteome analyses complement existing transcriptomic, proteomic, and in silico analyses by highlighting proteins that are surface-exposed and thereby provide a major step forward in defining the host-parasite interface. PMID:25963835

  17. Host-parasite relatedness shown by protein fingerprinting in a brood parasitic bird.

    PubMed

    Andersson, M; Ahlund, M

    2000-11-21

    Brood parasitism as an alternative female breeding tactic is particularly common in ducks, where hosts often receive eggs laid by parasitic females of the same species and raise their offspring. Herein, we test several aspects of a kin selection explanation for this phenomenon in goldeneye ducks (Bucephala clangula) by using techniques of egg albumen sampling and statistical bandsharing analysis based on resampling. We find that host and primary parasite are indeed often related, with mean r = 0.13, about as high as between first cousins. Relatedness to the host is higher in nests where a parasite lays several eggs than in those where she lays only one. Returning young females parasitize their birth nestmates (social mothers or sisters, which are usually also their genetic mothers and sisters) more often than expected by chance. Such adult relatives are also observed together in the field more often than expected and for longer periods than other females. Relatedness and kin discrimination, which can be achieved by recognition of birth nestmates, therefore play a role in these tactics and probably influence their success. PMID:11050150

  18. Host-parasite coevolution induces selection for condition-dependent sex.

    PubMed

    Mostowy, R; Engelstädter, J

    2012-10-01

    Sex and recombination remain one of the biggest riddles of evolutionary biology. One of the most prominent hypotheses, the Red Queen Hypothesis, claims that sex has evolved as a means to efficiently create genotypes that are resistant against coevolving parasites. However, previous models of the Red Queen have assumed that all individuals are equally likely to engage in sexual reproduction, regardless of their infection status, an assumption that may not be true in reality. Here, we consider a population genetic model of a host population coevolving with a parasite population, where the parasites are haploid and the hosts either haploid or diploid. We assume that the probability to engage in sex may be different in infected and uninfected hosts and ascertain the success of different reproductive strategies with a modifier-gene approach. Our model shows that in the large majority of the parameter space, infection-dependent sex is more successful than infection-independent sex. We identify at least two reasons for this: (i) an immediate short-term advantage of breaking-down gene combinations of unfit individuals and (ii) a selfish spread of the condition-dependent modifiers, in analogy to the 'abandon-ship' effect in single species. In diploids, these effects are often powerful enough to overcome the detrimental effects of segregation. These results raise the intriguing question of why infection-induced sex is not more commonly observed in nature. PMID:22913382

  19. Host-parasite relationships and geographic distribution of Salmincola corpulentus (Copepoda: Lernaeopodidae) on bloater (Coregonus hoyi) stocks in Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowen, Charles A.; Stedman, Ralph M.

    1990-01-01

    Examination of the branchial cavities of 8347 adult bloaters (Coregonus hoyi) collected from seven locations in Lake Huron for parasitic copepods yielded only the lernaeopodid Salmincola corpulentus; its distribution was limited to bloaters collected in the southern two-thirds of the lake. The infections were highest off Au Sable Point and on Six Fathom Bank, where 12 and 22%, of the bloaters examined were infected, respectively. All copepods seen were sexually mature females. The dorsal anterior portion of the branchial rim was the preferred site of attachment. The prevalence of S. corpulentus increased with length of the bloaters, reaching a maximum of 40% in fish longer than 330 mm; none were seen in bloaters shorter than 182 mm. The mean intensity of S. corpulentus was unusually low (1.0–1.9) for a lernaeopodid copepod and the maximum number of copepods found on a single bloater was five. Prevalences of copepods differed significantly (P < 0.05) between bloaters collected at different geographic locations, suggesting that S. corpulentus may be of value in bloater stock determination.

  20. Recent advances in malaria parasite cultivation and their application to studies on host-parasite relationships: a review

    PubMed Central

    Trigg, P. I.

    1985-01-01

    The continuous cultivation of the erythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum was achieved in 1976 and techniques have now also been developed for continuous cultivation of these stages from P. knowlesi, P. fragile, P. inui, P. cynomolgi and P. berghei. The requisite conditions for successful cultivation are described. Gametes of certain isolates of P. falciparum can also now be produced in vitro and these are infective to mosquitos, leading to normal development of the parasite. The successful cultivation in vitro of the exoerythrocytic stages of P. berghei and P. vivax was achieved in 1981 and 1983, respectively. These cultures give rise to infective merozoites. There have been no significant advances in the in vitro cultivation of the sporogonic stages of malaria parasites for the last 15 years, although studies indicate that the in vitro cultivation of these stages from gamete to sporozoite stage is theoretically possible. The application of cultivation techniques to the study of parasite epidemiology is discussed. To date the major epidemiological impact has related to their use for measuring the incidence and spread of drug resistance. Applications to the study of the genetics of drug resistance, antigen production, development of tests for protective immunity, and drug development and screening are reviewed. PMID:3893779

  1. Host-parasite relationships in experimental airborne tuberculosis. II. Reproducible infection by means of an inoculum preserved at -70 C.

    PubMed

    Grover, A A; Kim, H K; Wiegeshaus, E H; Smith, D W

    1967-10-01

    The use of an inoculum preserved at low temperature for the infection of guinea pigs by the respiratory route was evaluated. In a preliminary study with Mycobacterium bovis (BCG), some of the conditions required for maximal recovery of viable cells stored at low temperature were examined. Survival of BCG was decreased by rapid freezing to -70 C and by storage at -20 C, but there was no decrease when BCG was frozen slowly and stored at -70 C or -196 C. In a subsequent study, the effect of storage at -70 C on viability and infectivity of M. tuberculosis (H37Rv) was considered. There was no loss of viability of H37Rv cells suspended in Dubos broth and stored 1 year at -70 C. This suspension showed no loss of infectivity as assessed by the number of primary pulmonary lesions initiated in guinea pigs. Constant viability and infectivity of a suspension stored at low temperature assures the reproducibility of the amount of infection and facilitates comparisons between experiments. This advantage, as well as others, of storage at low temperature are discussed. PMID:4964472

  2. Electron microscopic study on macrogametogenesis of Eimeria labbeana infecting the Egyptian wild doves and host-parasite relationship.

    PubMed

    Bashtar, A R; Abdel-Ghaffar, F A; Ahmed, A K

    1991-04-01

    The development of macrogametes of Eimeria labbeana was studied by electron microscopy in the epithelial cells of the villi at 96 hrs. post-infection. Appearance of young macrogamonts was characterized by the loss of the architecture of the apicomplexa (polar ring, rhoptries, micronemes, conoid, subpellicular microtubules), while the pellicle became only one unit membrane. This was associated by the formation of wall forming bodies II then I. Moreover, the mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi were increased in the cytoplasm. Amylopectin granules as well as lipid globules were greatly increased in mature macrogametes. Host cell reaction due to infection included enlargement and deformation of infected cells, hypertrophy of their nuclei, swollen and degeneration of mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and vacuolation of ground cytoplasm. These changes occur in both cells with and without parasite. PMID:2033300

  3. Species coexistence: macroevolutionary relationships and the contingency of historical interactions.

    PubMed

    Germain, Rachel M; Weir, Jason T; Gilbert, Benjamin

    2016-03-30

    Evolutionary biologists since Darwin have hypothesized that closely related species compete more intensely and are therefore less likely to coexist. However, recent theory posits that species diverge in two ways: either through the evolution of 'stabilizing differences' that promote coexistence by causing individuals to compete more strongly with conspecifics than individuals of other species, or through the evolution of 'fitness differences' that cause species to differ in competitive ability and lead to exclusion of the weaker competitor. We tested macroevolutionary patterns of divergence by competing pairs of annual plant species that differ in their phylogenetic relationships, and in whether they have historically occurred in the same region or different regions (sympatric versus allopatric occurrence). For sympatrically occurring species pairs, stabilizing differences rapidly increased with phylogenetic distance. However, fitness differences also increased with phylogenetic distance, resulting in coexistence outcomes that were unpredictable based on phylogenetic relationships. For allopatric species, stabilizing differences showed no trend with phylogenetic distance, whereas fitness differences increased, causing coexistence to become less likely among distant relatives. Our results illustrate the role of species' historical interactions in shaping how phylogenetic relationships structure competitive dynamics, and offer an explanation for the evolution of invasion potential of non-native species. PMID:27009226

  4. Disentangling sampling and ecological explanations underlying species-area relationships

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cam, E.; Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.; Sauer, J.R.; Alpizar-Jara, R.; Flather, C.H.

    2002-01-01

    We used a probabilistic approach to address the influence of sampling artifacts on the form of species-area relationships (SARs). We developed a model in which the increase in observed species richness is a function of sampling effort exclusively. We assumed that effort depends on area sampled, and we generated species-area curves under that model. These curves can be realistic looking. We then generated SARs from avian data, comparing SARs based on counts with those based on richness estimates. We used an approach to estimation of species richness that accounts for species detection probability and, hence, for variation in sampling effort. The slopes of SARs based on counts are steeper than those of curves based on estimates of richness, indicating that the former partly reflect failure to account for species detection probability. SARs based on estimates reflect ecological processes exclusively, not sampling processes. This approach permits investigation of ecologically relevant hypotheses. The slope of SARs is not influenced by the slope of the relationship between habitat diversity and area. In situations in which not all of the species are detected during sampling sessions, approaches to estimation of species richness integrating species detection probability should be used to investigate the rate of increase in species richness with area.

  5. Patterns of host-parasite adaptation in three populations of monarch butterflies infected with a naturally occurring protozoan disease: virulence, resistance, and tolerance.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Eleanore D; Li, Hui; Wang, Rebecca; Gowler, Camden; de Roode, Jacobus C

    2013-12-01

    Many studies have used host-parasite systems to study local adaptation, but few of these studies have found unequivocal evidence for adaptation. One potential reason is that most studies have focused on limited measures of host and parasite fitness that are generally assumed to be under negative frequency-dependent selection. We have used reciprocal cross-infection experiments to test for local adaptation in Hawaiian, south Floridian, and eastern North American populations of monarch butterflies and their protozoan parasites. Sympatric host-parasite combinations did not result in greater host or parasite fitness, as would be expected under coevolutionary dynamics driven by negative frequency-dependent selection. Instead, we found that Hawaiian hosts were more resistant and carried more infective and virulent parasites, which is consistent with theoretical predictions for virulence evolution and coevolutionary arms race dynamics. We also found that Hawaiian hosts were more tolerant, particularly of Hawaiian parasites, indicating that increased resistance does not preclude increased tolerance within a population and that hosts may be more tolerant of local parasites. We did not find a similar pattern in the south Floridian or eastern populations, possibly because host-parasite adaptation occurs within the context of a greater ecological community. PMID:24231547

  6. Trophic Relationships between the Parasitic Plant Species Phelipanche ramosa (L.) and Different Hosts Depending on Host Phenological Stage and Host Growth Rate.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Delphine; Gibot-Leclerc, Stéphanie; Girardin, Annette; Pointurier, Olivia; Reibel, Carole; Strbik, Florence; Fernández-Aparicio, Mónica; Colbach, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Phelipanche ramosa (L.) Pomel (branched broomrape) is a holoparasitic plant that reproduces on crops and also on weeds, which contributes to increase the parasite seed bank in fields. This parasite extracts all its nutrients at the host's expense so that host-parasite trophic relationships are crucial to determine host and parasite growth. This study quantified the intensity with which P. ramosa draws assimilates from its host and analyzed whether it varied with host species, host phenological stage and host growth rate. A greenhouse experiment was conducted on three host species: the crop species Brassica napus (L.) (oilseed rape) and two weed species, Capsella bursa-pastoris (L.) Medik. and Geranium dissectum (L.). Plants were grown with or without P. ramosa and under three light levels to modulate host growth rate. The proportion of host biomass loss due to parasitism by P. ramosa differed between host species (at host fructification, biomass loss ranged from 34 to 84%). B. napus and C. bursa-pastoris displayed a similar response to P. ramosa, probably because they belong to the same botanical family. The sensitivity to P. ramosa in each host species could be related to the precocity of P. ramosa development on them. Host compartments could be ranked as a function of their sensitivity to parasitism, with the reproductive compartment being the most severely affected, followed by stems and roots. The proportion of biomass allocated to leaves was not reduced by parasitism. The proportion of pathosystem biomass allocated to the parasite depended on host species. It generally increased with host stage progression but was constant across light induced-host growth rate, showing that P. ramosa adapts its growth to host biomass production. The rank order of host species in terms of sink strength differed from that in terms of host sensitivity. Finally, for B. napus, the biomass of individual parasite shoots decreased with increasing their number per host plant

  7. Species traits and the form of individual species-energy relationships.

    PubMed

    Evans, Karl L; Jackson, Sarah F; Greenwood, Jeremy J D; Gaston, Kevin J

    2006-07-22

    Environmental energy availability explains much of the spatial variation in species richness at regional scales. While numerous mechanisms that may drive such total species-energy relationships have been identified, knowledge of their relative contributions is scant. Here, we adopt a novel approach to identify these drivers that exploits the composite nature of species richness, i.e. its summation from individual species distributions. We construct individual species-energy relationships (ISERs) for each species in the British breeding avifauna using both solar (temperature) and productive energy metrics (normalized difference vegetation index) as measures of environmental energy availability. We use the slopes of these relationships and the resultant change in deviance, relative to a null model, as measures of their strength and use them as response variables in multiple regressions that use ecological traits as predictors. The commonest species exhibit the strongest ISERs, which is counter to the prediction derived from the more individuals hypothesis. There is no evidence that predatory species have stronger ISERs, which is incompatible with the suggestion that high levels of energy availability increase the length of the food chain allowing larger numbers of predators to exist. We find some evidence that species with narrow niche breadths have stronger ISERs, thus providing one of the few pieces of supportive evidence that high-energy availability promotes species richness by increasing the occurrence of specialist species that use a narrow range of resources. PMID:16790411

  8. Spatial autocorrelation and the scaling of species-environment relationships.

    PubMed

    De Knegt, H J; van Langevelde, F; Coughenour, M B; Skidmore, A K; de Boer, W F; Heitkönig, I M A; Knox, N M; Slotow, R; van der Waal, C; Prins, H H T

    2010-08-01

    Issues of residual spatial autocorrelation (RSA) and spatial scale are critical to the study of species-environment relationships, because RSA invalidates many statistical procedures, while the scale of analysis affects the quantification of these relationships. Although these issues independently are widely covered in the literature, only sparse attention is given to their integration. This paper focuses on the interplay between RSA and the spatial scaling of species-environment relationships. Using a hypothetical species in an artificial landscape, we show that a mismatch between the scale of analysis and the scale of a species' response to its environment leads to a decrease in the portion of variation explained by environmental predictors. Moreover, it results in RSA and biased regression coefficients. This bias stems from error-predictor dependencies due to the scale mismatch, the magnitude of which depends on the interaction between the scale of landscape heterogeneity and the scale of a species' response to this heterogeneity. We show that explicitly considering scale effects on RSA can reveal the characteristic scale of a species' response to its environment. This is important, because the estimation of species-environment relationships using spatial regression methods proves to be erroneous in case of a scale mismatch, leading to spurious conclusions when scaling issues are not explicitly considered. The findings presented here highlight the importance of examining the appropriateness of the spatial scales used in analyses, since scale mismatches affect the rigor of statistical analyses and thereby the ability to understand the processes underlying spatial patterning in ecological phenomena. PMID:20836467

  9. Long-term study of Sarcoptes scabiei infection in Norwegian red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) indicating host/parasite adaptation.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Rebecca K; Bornstein, Set; Handeland, Kjell

    2008-10-01

    The red fox (Vulpes vulpes) population, in Norway, was naïve to Sarcoptes scabiei prior to the late 1970s when this parasite was first recorded and a still ongoing epidemic started. During the course of this protracted epidemic some degree of host/parasite adaptation, with the occurrence of healthy antibody positive foxes, might be expected. In the present study the prevalence of sarcoptic mange and serologically identified S. scabiei exposure was investigated in 363 Norwegian red foxes, shot by hunters during two different study periods (1994-1995 and 2002-2005). The sarcoptic mange diagnosis was based upon the presence of clearly visible lesions in the skin of the cadaver with confirmatory demonstration of S. scabiei. The serodiagnosis was based on an indirect-ELISA. There was a significant decrease in prevalence of both mange cases and seropositive animals from the first to the second study period. Whilst the mange prevalence fell more than threefold, from 30.0% to 6.6%, the seroprevalence dropped less dramatically from 53.3% to 19.1%. The smaller decrease in seroprevalence compared to mange cases reflected a significantly higher ratio of seropositive-mange negative versus seropositive-mange positive foxes, during the second study period, 40:18, compared to the first, 14:18. These findings indicate that the red fox population is adapting to live with the parasite and that low-grade or sub-clinical infections, and even recoveries, occur amongst exposed foxes. Mange positive foxes had significantly poorer body condition than those without sarcoptic mange. No significant difference in body condition was seen between seropositive-mange negative versus seronegative-mange negative foxes. The ELISA sensitivity was found to be 95% and proved a useful tool for investigating the exposure to S. scabiei in wild foxes. This study is believed to be the first pointing to a long-term Sarcoptes/fox adaptation, combining long-term prevalence studies of clinical sarcoptic mange

  10. Spatial aggregation and the species-area relationship across scales.

    PubMed

    Grilli, Jacopo; Azaele, Sandro; Banavar, Jayanth R; Maritan, Amos

    2012-11-21

    There has been a considerable effort to understand and quantify the spatial distribution of species across different ecosystems. Relative species abundance (RSA), beta diversity and species-area relationship (SAR) are among the most used macroecological measures to characterize plants communities in forests. In this paper we introduce a simple phenomenological model based on Poisson cluster processes which allows us to exactly link RSA and beta diversity to SAR. The framework is spatially explicit and accounts for the spatial aggregation of conspecific individuals. Under the simplifying assumption of neutral theory, we derive an analytical expression for the SAR which reproduces tri-phasic behavior as sample area increases from local to continental scales, explaining how the tri-phasic behavior can be understood in terms of simple geometric arguments. We also find an expression for the endemic area relationship (EAR) and for the scaling of the RSA. PMID:22902426

  11. Invading species in the Eel River, California: Successes, failures, and relationships with resident species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, L.R.; Moyle, P.B.

    1997-01-01

    We examined invasions of non-native fishes into the Eel River, California. At least 16 species of fish have been introduced into the drainage which originally supported 12-14 fish species. Our study was prompted by the unauthorized introduction in 1979 of Sacramento squawfish, Ptychocheilus grandis, a large predatory cyprinid. From 1986 to 1990, we conducted growth and diet studies of squaw fish, conducted intensive surveys of the distribution and habitat associations of both native and introduced species, and examined the nature of species-habitat and interspecies relationships. We found no evidence for increased growth or expanded feeding habits, compared to native populations, of Sacramento squawfish as they invaded the Eel River drainage. Ten of the introduced species were well established, with four species limited to a reservoir and six species established in streams. The success or failure of introductions of stream species appeared to be a function of the ability of a species to survive the fluctuating, highly seasonal, flow regime. The present mixture of native and exotic species has not formed stable fish assemblages but it seems likely that four habitat-associated assemblages will develop. The overall effect of the successful species introductions has been to assemble a group of species, with some exceptions, that are native to and occur together in many California streams. The assemblages now forming are similar to those found in other California streams. The assemblage characterized by squawfish and suckers is likely to be resistant to invasion, in the absence of human caused habitat modifications.

  12. An empirical investigation of why species-area relationships overestimate species losses.

    PubMed

    De Camargo, Rafael X; Currie, David J

    2015-05-01

    It is generally assumed that, when natural habitat is converted to human-dominated land cover, such habitat is lost to its native species. Most literature assumes that species richness should vary as a function of remaining natural area, following the well-known species-area relationship (i.e., classic SAR). However, classic SARs have consistently overestimated species losses resulting from conversion of natural forested land cover to human-dominated landscapes. Moreover, richness is sometimes a peaked function of remaining natural habitat. Recent studies propose modified SAR models based on species' utilization of multiple habitat types, yet none fully explain a peaked species-area relationship. Here, we evaluate the responses of total avian richness, forest bird richness, and open-habitat bird richness to remaining natural land cover within 991 quadrats, each 100 km2, across southern Ontario, Canada. Total bird species richness peaks at roughly 50% natural land cover. Richness of forest birds varies as a classic power function of forested area. In contrast, richness of birds that prefer open habitats does not increase monotonically with either natural- or human-dominated land cover. Richness of open-habitat species can be predicted when we partition human-dominated land cover into an "available human-dominated" component and "lost" habitat. Disiinguishing three land-cover types (natural, available human-dominated, and lost) can thus permit accurate predictions of species richness in landscapes with differing levels of natural habitat conversion. PMID:26236839

  13. Species-area relationships in Mediterranean-climate plant communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeley, J.E.; Fotheringham, C.J.

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To determine the best-fit model of species-area relationships for Mediterranean-type plant communities and evaluate how community structure affects these species-area models. Location: Data were collected from California shrublands and woodlands and compared with literature reports for other Mediterranean-climate regions. Methods: The number of species was recorded from 1, 100 and 1000 m2 nested plots. Best fit to the power model or exponential model was determined by comparing adjusted r2 values from the least squares regression, pattern of residuals, homoscedasticity across scales, and semi-log slopes at 1-100 m2 and 100-1000 m2. Dominance-diversity curves were tested for fit to the lognormal model, MacArthur's broken stick model, and the geometric and harmonic series. Results: Early successional Western Australia and California shrublands represented the extremes and provide an interesting contrast as the exponential model was the best fit for the former, and the power model for the latter, despite similar total species richness. We hypothesize that structural differences in these communities account for the different species-area curves and are tied to patterns of dominance, equitability and life form distribution. Dominance-diversity relationships for Western Australian heathlands exhibited a close fit to MacArthur's broken stick model, indicating more equitable distribution of species. In contrast, Californian shrublands, both postfire and mature stands, were best fit by the geometric model indicating strong dominance and many minor subordinate species. These regions differ in life form distribution, with annuals being a major component of diversity in early successional Californian shrublands although they are largely lacking in mature stands. Both young and old Australian heathlands are dominated by perennials, and annuals are largely absent. Inherent in all of these ecosystems is cyclical disequilibrium caused by periodic fires. The potential for

  14. Genetic relationships among Heliconia (Heliconiaceae) species based on RAPD markers.

    PubMed

    Marouelli, L P; Inglis, P W; Ferreira, M A; Buso, G S C

    2010-01-01

    The family Heliconiaceae contains a single genus, Heliconia, with approximately 180 species of Neotropical origin. This genus was formerly allocated to the family Musaceae, but today forms its own family, in the order Zingiberales. The combination of inverted flowers, a single staminode and drupe fruits is an exclusive characteristic of Heliconia. Heliconias are cultivated as ornamental garden plants, and are of increasing importance as cut flowers. However, there are taxonomic confusions and uncertainties about the number of species and the relationships among them. Molecular studies are therefore necessary for better understanding of the species boundaries of these plants. We examined the genetic variability and the phylogenetic relationships of 124 accessions of the genus Heliconia based on RAPD markers. Phenetic and cladistic analyses, using 231 polymorphic RAPD markers, demonstrated that the genus Heliconia is monophyletic. Groupings corresponding to currently recognized species and some subgenera were found, and cultivars and hybrids were found to cluster with their parents. RAPD analysis generally agreed with morphological species classification, except for the position of the subgenus Stenochlamys, which was found to be polyphyletic. PMID:20645261

  15. Systematic relationships of five newly sequenced cervid species.

    PubMed

    Heckeberg, Nicola S; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Wörheide, Gert; Rössner, Gertrud E

    2016-01-01

    Cervid phylogenetics has been puzzling researchers for over 150 years. In recent decades, molecular systematics has provided new input for both the support and revision of the previous results from comparative anatomy but has led to only partial consensus. Despite all of the efforts to reach taxon-wide species sampling over the last two decades, a number of cervid species still lack molecular data because they are difficult to access in the wild. By extracting ancient DNA from museum specimens, in this study, we obtained partial mitochondrial cytochrome b gene sequences for Mazama bricenii, Mazama chunyi, Muntiacus atherodes, Pudu mephistophiles, and Rusa marianna, including three holotypes. These new sequences were used to enrich the existing mitochondrial DNA alignments and yielded the most taxonomically complete data set for cervids to date. Phylogenetic analyses provide new insights into the evolutionary history of these five species. However, systematic uncertainties within Muntiacus persist and resolving phylogenetic relationships within Pudu and Mazama remain challenging. PMID:27602278

  16. Systematic relationships of five newly sequenced cervid species

    PubMed Central

    Erpenbeck, Dirk; Wörheide, Gert

    2016-01-01

    Cervid phylogenetics has been puzzling researchers for over 150 years. In recent decades, molecular systematics has provided new input for both the support and revision of the previous results from comparative anatomy but has led to only partial consensus. Despite all of the efforts to reach taxon-wide species sampling over the last two decades, a number of cervid species still lack molecular data because they are difficult to access in the wild. By extracting ancient DNA from museum specimens, in this study, we obtained partial mitochondrial cytochrome b gene sequences for Mazama bricenii, Mazama chunyi, Muntiacus atherodes, Pudu mephistophiles, and Rusa marianna, including three holotypes. These new sequences were used to enrich the existing mitochondrial DNA alignments and yielded the most taxonomically complete data set for cervids to date. Phylogenetic analyses provide new insights into the evolutionary history of these five species. However, systematic uncertainties within Muntiacus persist and resolving phylogenetic relationships within Pudu and Mazama remain challenging. PMID:27602278

  17. Hemolytic and antimalarial effects of tight-binding glyoxalase 1 inhibitors on the host-parasite unit of erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Wezena, Cletus A.; Urscher, Miriam; Vince, Robert; More, Swati S.; Deponte, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Glyoxalases prevent the formation of advanced glycation end products by converting glycolysis-derived methylglyoxal to d-lactate with the help of glutathione. Vander Jagt and colleagues previously showed that erythrocytes release about thirty times more d-lactate after infection with the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Functional glyoxalases in the host-parasite unit might therefore be crucial for parasite survival. Here, we determined the antimalarial and hemolytic activity of two tight-binding glyoxalase inhibitors using infected and uninfected erythrocytes. In addition, we synthesized and analyzed a set of diester derivates of both tight-binding inhibitors resulting in up to threefold lower IC50 values and an altered methemoglobin formation and hemolytic activity depending on the type of ester. Inhibitor treatments of uninfected erythrocytes revealed an extremely slow inactivation of the host cell glyoxalase, irrespective of inhibitor modifications, and a potential dispensability of the host cell enzyme for parasite survival. Our study highlights the benefits and drawbacks of different esterifications of glutathione-derived inhibitors and demonstrates the suitability of glyoxalase inhibitors as a tool for deciphering the relevance and mode of action of different glyoxalase systems in a host-parasite unit. PMID:26972115

  18. Acetylcholinesterase activity in the host-parasite system of the cod Gadus morhua and acanthocephalan Echinorhynchus gadi from the southern Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Podolska, M; Nadolna, K; Szostakowska, B

    2014-02-15

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity measurement is widely used as a specific biomarker of neurotoxic effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate AChE activity in a host fish (the cod) and its acanthocephalan parasite Echinorhynchus gadi from the southern Baltic. AChE activity in hosts and parasites was inversely related: the highest cod AChE activity corresponded to the lowest E. gadi enzymatic activity and vice versa ("mirror effect"). This is the first report on the simultaneous application of this biomarker in cod and its acanthocephalan parasites. Results obtained for the host-parasite system are complementary and provide comprehensive information about the response of this biomarker. Analysis of the system allows for detection of a greater number of factors influencing AChE activity in the marine environment than separate analysis of the host and parasites. Thus, AChE activity measurement in a host-parasite system may be considered to be a promising tool for biomonitoring. PMID:24393378

  19. Hemolytic and antimalarial effects of tight-binding glyoxalase 1 inhibitors on the host-parasite unit of erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Wezena, Cletus A; Urscher, Miriam; Vince, Robert; More, Swati S; Deponte, Marcel

    2016-08-01

    Glyoxalases prevent the formation of advanced glycation end products by converting glycolysis-derived methylglyoxal to d-lactate with the help of glutathione. Vander Jagt and colleagues previously showed that erythrocytes release about thirty times more d-lactate after infection with the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Functional glyoxalases in the host-parasite unit might therefore be crucial for parasite survival. Here, we determined the antimalarial and hemolytic activity of two tight-binding glyoxalase inhibitors using infected and uninfected erythrocytes. In addition, we synthesized and analyzed a set of diester derivates of both tight-binding inhibitors resulting in up to threefold lower IC50 values and an altered methemoglobin formation and hemolytic activity depending on the type of ester. Inhibitor treatments of uninfected erythrocytes revealed an extremely slow inactivation of the host cell glyoxalase, irrespective of inhibitor modifications, and a potential dispensability of the host cell enzyme for parasite survival. Our study highlights the benefits and drawbacks of different esterifications of glutathione-derived inhibitors and demonstrates the suitability of glyoxalase inhibitors as a tool for deciphering the relevance and mode of action of different glyoxalase systems in a host-parasite unit. PMID:26972115

  20. Molecular classification and phylogenetic relationships of selected edible Basidiomycetes species.

    PubMed

    Avin, Farhat Ahmadi; Bhassu, Subha; Shin, Tan Yee; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2012-07-01

    Morphological identification of edible mushrooms can sometimes prove troublesome, because phenotypic variation in fungi can be affected by substrate and environmental factors. One of the most important problems for mushroom breeders is the lack of a systematic consensus tool to distinguish different species, which are sometimes morphologically identical. Basidiomycetes as one of the largest groups of edible mushrooms have become more important in recent times for their medicinal and nutritional properties. Partial rDNA sequences, including the Internal Transcribed Spacer I-5.8SrDNA-Internal Transcribed Spacer II, were used in this study for molecular identification and assessment of phylogenetic relationships between selected edible species of the Basidiomycetes. Phylogenetic trees showed five distinct clades; each clade belonging to a separate family group. The first clade included all the species belonging to the Pleurotaceae (Pleurotus spp.) family; similarly, the second, third, fourth, and fifth clades consist of species from the Agaricaceae (Agaricus sp.), Lyophllaceae (Hypsigygus sp.), Marasmiaceae (Lentinula edodes sp.) and Physalacriaceae (Flammulina velutipes sp.) families, respectively. Moreover, different species of each family were clearly placed in a distinct sub-cluster and a total of 13 species were taken for analysis. Species differentiation was re-confirmed by AMOVA analysis (among the populations: 99.67%; within: 0.33%), nucleotide divergence, haplotyping and P value. Polymorphism occurred throughout the ITS regions due to insertion-deletion and point mutations, and can be clearly differentiated within the families as well as genera. Moreover, this study proves that the sequence of the ITS region is a superior molecular DNA barcode for taxonomic identification of Basidiomycetes. PMID:22327649

  1. A revision of Platybothrium Linton, 1890 (Tetraphyllidea: Onchobothriidae), with a phylogenetic analysis and comments on host-parasite associations.

    PubMed

    Healy, Claire J

    2003-10-01

    A revision of Platybothrium Linton, 1890 is presented, based on available type and voucher material, as well as extensive new collections from elasmobranchs belonging to the Carcharhinidae (requiem sharks) and Sphyrnidae (hammerhead sharks). All 10 nominal Platybothrium species are treated or redescribed herein. Four of these 10 nominal species, in addition to one former member of Dicranobothrium Euzet, 1953, are considered valid members of Platybothrium. Five new Platybothrium species are described: P. angelbahiense n. sp. ex Carcharhinus leucas, P. coshtaprum n. sp. ex C. plumbeus, P. jondoeorum n. sp. ex Negaprion acutidens and C. melanopterus, P. kirstenae n. sp. ex C. obscurus, and P. tantulum n. sp. ex Sphyrna lewini and S. zygaena. Sixty-three morphological characters were employed in cladistic analyses of nine Platybothrium species and five outgroup species. Coding and analysis strategies were varied to assess the effects of coding inapplicable characters as missing or as a separate character state, and of excluding characters for which data are missing in more than 10% of the taxa. The analysis in which inapplicable characters were coded as a separate character state and no characters were excluded produced the best-supported and most conservative estimate of the interrelationships of Platybothrium spp. Platybothrium appears to be a monophyletic assemblage, with the most basal species being P. spinulifera Southwell, 1912. The group of species possessing an accessory piece between the hooks forms a clade within the genus. Species lacking an accessory piece, which had previously been placed in Dicranobothrium Euzet, 1953, do not appear to be each other's closest relatives; thus, Dicranobothrium is considered a synonym of Platybothrium. An examination of host associations indicated that Platybothrium species are broadly distributed among, and entirely restricted to, carcharhinid and sphyrnid shark species. Most Platybothrium species exhibit oioxenous host

  2. [Sympatric Speciation of the Plague Microbe Yersinia pestis: Monohostal Specialization in the Host-Parasite Marmot-Flea (Marmota sibirica-Oropsylla silantiewi) System].

    PubMed

    Suntsov, V V

    2016-01-01

    An ecological scenario of the origin of the plague microbe that is interpreted in the light of modern Darwinism (synthetic theory of evolution) is presented. It is shown that the plague microbe emerged from a clone of the psychrophilic saprozoonotic pseudotuberculosis microbe Yersinia pseudotuberculosis O:1b in the mountain steppe landscapes of Central Asia in the Sartan time, 22000-15000 years ago, in the monohostal Mongolian marmot (Marmota sibirica)-flea (Oropsylla silantiewi) host-parasite system. It was noted that the evolutionary process described corresponds to the sympatric form of speciation by transition ofthe clone of migrant founders to a new, already-existing ecological niche. It was established that monohostal specialization of the plague microbe was made possible due to heterothermia (5-37 degrees C) of marmots in the hibernation period. The factors of the speciation process--isolation, the struggle for existence, and natural selection--were analyzed. PMID:27396172

  3. Translational Control of UIS4 Protein of the Host-Parasite Interface Is Mediated by the RNA Binding Protein Puf2 in Plasmodium berghei Sporozoites

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Patrícia A. G. C.; Guerreiro, Ana; Santos, Jorge M.; Braks, Joanna A. M.; Janse, Chris J.; Mair, Gunnar R.

    2016-01-01

    UIS4 is a key protein component of the host-parasite interface in the liver stage of the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei and required for parasite survival after invasion. In the infectious sporozoite, UIS4 protein has variably been shown to be translated but also been reported to be translationally repressed. Here we show that uis4 mRNA translation is regulated by the P. berghei RNA binding protein Pumilio-2 (PbPuf2 or Puf2 from here on forward) in infectious salivary gland sporozoites in the mosquito vector. Using RNA immunoprecipitation we show that uis4 mRNA is bound by Puf2 in salivary gland sporozoites. In the absence of Puf2, uis4 mRNA translation is de-regulated and UIS4 protein expression upregulated in salivary gland sporozoites. Here, using RNA immunoprecipitation, we reveal the first Puf2-regulated mRNA in this parasite. PMID:26808677

  4. Determinants of parasite species richness on small taxonomical and geographical scales: Lamellodiscus monogeneans of northwestern Mediterranean sparid fish.

    PubMed

    Desdevises, Y

    2006-09-01

    Determinants of parasite species richness have been investigated in a host-parasite system comprising fish of the family Sparidae and their monogenean gill ectoparasites of the genus Lamellodiscus. This study was carried out on a small geographical scale in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea. Host phylogenetic relationships were taken into account by phylogenetic eigenvector regression which required the reconstruction of a phylogenetic tree for the sparid fish species using mtDNA sequences. Several ecological variables potentially acting on Lamellodiscus species richness were considered. Host body size and host migratory behaviour appeared to be the main determinants of parasite species richness in this system. It is concluded that structuring of monogenean communities is controlled more by ecological than evolutionary factors. PMID:16923265

  5. Trichobilharzia anseri n. sp. (Schistosomatidae: Digenea), a new visceral species of avian schistosomes isolated from greylag goose (Anser anser L.) in Iceland and France.

    PubMed

    Jouet, D; Kolářová, L; Patrelle, C; Ferté, H; Skírnisson, K

    2015-08-01

    Parasitological investigations carried out on birds in Iceland and France highlight the presence of four species of avian schistosomes from greylag geese (Anser anser L.): the european nasal species Trichobilharzia regenti and three visceral species, among which an unknown species isolated from blood vessels of the large intestine and liver. Morphological and molecular analyzes of different parasite stages (eggs, adults) revealed new species of Trichobilharzia genus – Trichobilharzia anseri sp. nov. Studies on host-parasite relationship under natural conditions, showed that the life-cycle includes the snail Radix balthica (syn. R. peregra) as intermediate host. The cercariae, already isolated in Iceland from two ponds of the Reykjavik capital area – the Family park and Tjörnin Lake – are the same as those isolated in 1999 by Kolářová et al. during the first study on Icelandic parasitic agents of cercarial dermatitis. PMID:26070888

  6. Ecological and developmental dynamics of a host-parasite system involving a sea anemone and two ctenophores.

    PubMed

    Reitzel, Adam M; Sullivan, James C; Brown, Briana K; Chin, Diana W; Cira, Emily K; Edquist, Sara K; Genco, Brandon M; Joseph, Oliver C; Kaufman, Christian A; Kovitvongsa, Kathryn; Muñoz, Martha M; Negri, Tiffany L; Taffel, Jonathan R; Zuehlke, Robert T; Finnerty, John R

    2007-12-01

    The lined sea anemone Edwardsiella lineata has evolved a derived parasitic life history that includes a novel body plan adapted for life inside its ctenophore hosts. Reputedly its sole host is the sea walnut, Mnemiopsis leidyi, a voracious planktivore and a seasonally abundant member of many pelagic ecosystems. However, we have observed substantially higher E. lineata prevalence in a second ctenophore species, the ctenophore predator Beroë ovata. The interplay among these 3 species has important conservation consequences as M. leidyi introductions are thought to be responsible for the severe depletion of numerous commercial fisheries in the Mediterranean basin, and both E. lineata and B. ovata have been proposed as biological controls for invasive M. leidyi. Over a 3-yr period (2004-2006), we collected 8,253 ctenophores from Woods Hole, Massachusetts, including M. leidyi, B. ovata, and a third ctenophore, Pleurobrachia pileus, and we recorded E. lineata infection frequencies, parasite load, and parasite location. We also conducted laboratory experiments to determine the likely mechanisms for parasite introduction and the effect of each host on parasite development. We observed peak E. lineata infection frequencies of 0% in P. pileus, 59% in M. leidyi, and 100% in B. ovata, suggesting that B. ovata could be an important natural host for E. lineata. However, in laboratory experiments, E. lineata larvae proved far more successful at infecting M. leidyi than B. ovata, and E. lineata parasites excised from M. leidyi exhibited greater developmental competence than parasites excised from B. ovata. Although we show that E. lineata is efficiently transferred from M. leidyi to B. ovata when the latter preys upon the former, we conclude that E. lineata larvae are not well adapted for parasitizing the latter species and that the E. lineata parasite is not well adapted for feeding in B. ovata; these developmental and ecological factors underlie the host specificity of this

  7. Relationship among Lepista species determined by CAPS and RAPD.

    PubMed

    Stott, Karen; Desmerger, Christophe; Holford, Paul

    2005-02-01

    To determine the relationship of Australian members of the genus Lepista with those from other parts of the world, genetic variation of isolates representing 27 accessions was assayed by cleaved amplified polymorphic sequences (CAPS) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). CAPS and RAPD identified eight and seven groups, respectively. CAPS Groups 1 and 2 and RAPD Group 1 consisted of French and Australian accessions classified as morphospecies L. nuda. CAPS Group 3 and RAPD Groups 2 and 2A consisted of mostly Australian isolates identified as L. sordida var. sordida or L. sordida var. umbonata. Isolates earlier identified as morphospecies L. sp. were also placed in CAPS Group 3 and RAPD Group 2A indicating that these isolates are L. sordida var. sordida. In addition, three smaller groups were distinguished. A French isolate of L. sordida var. sordida was placed in distinctly separate CAPS and RAPD groups to Australian L. sordida var. sordida Groups 4,4 respectively. A French isolate of L. sordida var. aianthina was placed in CAPS and RAPD Groups 3,3. An accession of L. saeva was placed in CAPS Group 6 and RAPD Group 5, separate from other isolates. RAPD Groups 6 and 7 consist, respectively, of Greek and American accessions of L. nuda that were only distantly related to the Australian and French accessions of this morphospecies: CAPS also separated these isolates from each other and from all other isolates. The data suggest that the classification of morphospecies and varieties within Lepista cannot be determined on the basis of morphology alone. The Greek and American accessions of L. nuda are separated from the French and Australian accessions and may not be L. nuda. Similarly, the Australian accessions currently classified as L. sordida var. sordida together with the accessions of L. sordida var. umbonata are distinct from the French accessions of L. sordida var. sordida suggesting that Australian isolates may represent a new species or variety. Further

  8. Trichinella: differing effects of antigens from encapsulated and non-encapsulated species on in vitro nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Andrade, M Amparo; Siles-Lucas, Mar; López-Abán, Julio; Nogal-Ruiz, Juan José; Pérez-Arellano, José Luis; Martínez-Fernández, Antonio R; Muro, Antonio

    2007-01-19

    Trichinellosis is a cosmopolitan zoonotic disease affecting a wide variety of animals, including man. Non-encapsulated and encapsulated species diverge with respect to their developmental strategies. Little is known at the molecular level about parasite-derived mediators responsible for host muscle cell transformation occurring during trichinellosis. In this context, host-parasite relationships in Trichinella-infected animals could be related to different host-immune and cell mediators, e.g. nitric oxide (NO). Here, we investigate the stimulatory/inhibitory role of L1 antigens from four encapsulated (T. spiralis, T. britovi, T. nelsoni and T. nativa) and one non-encapsulated (T. pseudospiralis) Trichinella species on NO production from rat macrophages in vitro. Our results demonstrate that encapsulated and non-encapsulated Trichinella species differ in their capacity to stimulate the secretion of NO from host macrophages. Biological significance of these differences should be further assessed in the available experimental models. PMID:16959431

  9. Digenean fauna in raptors from northeastern Argentina, with the description of a new species of Strigea (Digenea: Strigeidae).

    PubMed

    Drago, Fabiana B; Lunaschi, Lía I; Draghi, Regina

    2014-01-01

    The digenean fauna of six species of falconiform birds from northeastern Argentina is reported and a new species and several new hosts and geographical records are presented. Strigea proteolytica n. sp. (Strigeidae) is described from Buteogallus urubitinga and distinguished from their congeners by the combination of the following characters: plump body, conspicuous proteolytic gland, forebody with scarce vitelline glands, copulatory bursa with a well developed muscular ring (Ringnapf), and absence of true neck region in hindbody. Six previously known species are breifly described: Strigea falconis brasiliana Szidat, 1929 (Strigeidae) from Milvago chimachima and Caracara plancus; Neodiplostomum travassosi Dubois, 1937 from Buteogallus meridionalis; Tylodelphys brevis Drago & Lunaschi, 2008 and Posthodiplostomum macrocotyle Dubois, 1937 (Diplostomidae) from Busarellus nigricollis; Spaniometra variolaris (Fuhrmann, 1904) (Cyclocoelidae) and Megalophallus deblocki Kostadinova, Vaucher & Gibson, 2006 (Microphallidae) from Rostrhamus sociabilis. Literature records and information on distribution and host-parasite relationships is presented. PMID:24872182

  10. Immunodominance: a new hypothesis to explain parasite escape and host/parasite equilibrium leading to the chronic phase of Chagas' disease?

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, M M; Alencar, B C G de; Claser, C; Tzelepis, F

    2009-03-01

    Intense immune responses are observed during human or experimental infection with the digenetic protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The reasons why such immune responses are unable to completely eliminate the parasites are unknown. The survival of the parasite leads to a parasite-host equilibrium found during the chronic phase of chagasic infection in most individuals. Parasite persistence is recognized as the most likely cause of the chagasic chronic pathologies. Therefore, a key question in Chagas' disease is to understand how this equilibrium is established and maintained for a long period. Understanding the basis for this equilibrium may lead to new approaches to interventions that could help millions of individuals at risk for infection or who are already infected with T. cruzi. Here, we propose that the phenomenon of immunodominance may be significant in terms of regulating the host-parasite equilibrium observed in Chagas' disease. T. cruzi infection restricts the repertoire of specific T cells generating, in some cases, an intense immunodominant phenotype and in others causing a dramatic interference in the response to distinct epitopes. This immune response is sufficiently strong to maintain the host alive during the acute phase carrying them to the chronic phase where transmission usually occurs. At the same time, immunodominance interferes with the development of a higher and broader immune response that could be able to completely eliminate the parasite. Based on this, we discuss how we can interfere with or take advantage of immunodominance in order to provide an immunotherapeutic alternative for chagasic individuals. PMID:19287899

  11. Hookworm SCP/TAPS protein structure--A key to understanding host-parasite interactions and developing new interventions.

    PubMed

    Osman, Asiah; Wang, Conan K; Winter, Anja; Loukas, Alex; Tribolet, Leon; Gasser, Robin B; Hofmann, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    SCP/TAPS proteins are a diverse family of molecules in eukaryotes, including parasites. Despite their abundant occurrence in parasite secretomes, very little is known about their functions in parasitic nematodes, including blood-feeding hookworms. Current information indicates that SCP/TAPS proteins (called Ancylostoma-secreted proteins, ASPs) of the canine hookworm, Ancylostoma caninum, represent at least three distinct groups of proteins. This information, combined with comparative modelling, indicates that all known ASPs have an equatorial groove that binds extended structures, such as peptides or glycans. To elucidate structure-function relationships, we explored the three-dimensional crystal structure of an ASP (called Ac-ASP-7), which is highly up-regulated in expression in the transition of A. caninum larvae from a free-living to a parasitic stage. The topology of the N-terminal domain is consistent with pathogenesis-related proteins, and the C-terminal extension that resembles the fold of the Hinge domain. By anomalous diffraction, we identified a new metal binding site in the C-terminal extension of the protein. Ac-ASP-7 is in a monomer-dimer equilibrium, and crystal-packing analysis identified a dimeric structure which might resemble the homo-dimer in solution. The dimer interaction interface includes a novel binding site for divalent metal ions, and is proposed to serve as a binding site for proteins involved in the parasite-host interplay at the molecular level. Understanding this interplay and the integration of structural and functional data could lead to the design of new approaches for the control of parasitic diseases, with biotechnological outcomes. PMID:22120067

  12. Exploring the host parasitism of the migratory plant-parasitic nematode Ditylenchus destuctor by expressed sequence tags analysis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Huan; Gao, Bing-li; Kong, Ling-an; Yu, Qing; Huang, Wen-kun; He, Xu-feng; Long, Hai-bo; Peng, De-liang

    2013-01-01

    The potato rot nematode, Ditylenchus destructor, is a very destructive nematode pest on many agriculturally important crops worldwide, but the molecular characterization of its parasitism of plant has been limited. The effectors involved in nematode parasitism of plant for several sedentary endo-parasitic nematodes such as Heterodera glycines, Globodera rostochiensis and Meloidogyne incognita have been identified and extensively studied over the past two decades. Ditylenchus destructor, as a migratory plant parasitic nematode, has different feeding behavior, life cycle and host response. Comparing the transcriptome and parasitome among different types of plant-parasitic nematodes is the way to understand more fully the parasitic mechanism of plant nematodes. We undertook the approach of sequencing expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from a mixed stage cDNA library of D. destructor. This is the first study of D. destructor ESTs. A total of 9800 ESTs were grouped into 5008 clusters including 3606 singletons and 1402 multi-member contigs, representing a catalog of D. destructor genes. Implementing a bioinformatics' workflow, we found 1391 clusters have no match in the available gene database; 31 clusters only have similarities to genes identified from D. africanus, the most closely related species to D. destructor; 1991 clusters were annotated using Gene Ontology (GO); 1550 clusters were assigned enzyme commission (EC) numbers; and 1211 clusters were mapped to 181 KEGG biochemical pathways. 22 ESTs had similarities to reported nematode effectors. Interestedly, most of the effectors identified in this study are involved in host cell wall degradation or modification, such as 1,4-beta-glucanse, 1,3-beta-glucanse, pectate lyase, chitinases and expansin, or host defense suppression such as calreticulin, annexin and venom allergen-like protein. This result implies that the migratory plant-parasitic nematode D. destructor secrets similar effectors to those of sedentary

  13. Assessing the Effects of Climate on Host-Parasite Interactions: A Comparative Study of European Birds and Their Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Anders Pape; Merino, Santiago; Soler, Juan José; Antonov, Anton; Badás, Elisa P.; Calero-Torralbo, Miguel A.; de Lope, Florentino; Eeva, Tapio; Figuerola, Jordi; Flensted-Jensen, Einar; Garamszegi, Laszlo Z.; González-Braojos, Sonia; Gwinner, Helga; Hanssen, Sveinn Are; Heylen, Dieter; Ilmonen, Petteri; Klarborg, Kurt; Korpimäki, Erkki; Martínez, Javier; Martínez-de la Puente, Josue; Marzal, Alfonso; Matthysen, Erik; Matyjasiak, Piotr; Molina-Morales, Mercedes; Moreno, Juan; Mousseau, Timothy A.; Nielsen, Jan Tøttrup; Pap, Péter László; Rivero-de Aguilar, Juan; Shurulinkov, Peter; Slagsvold, Tore; Szép, Tibor; Szöllősi, Eszter; Török, Janos; Vaclav, Radovan; Valera, Francisco; Ziane, Nadia

    2013-01-01

    Background Climate change potentially has important effects on distribution, abundance, transmission and virulence of parasites in wild populations of animals. Methodology/Principal Finding Here we analyzed paired information on 89 parasite populations for 24 species of bird hosts some years ago and again in 2010 with an average interval of 10 years. The parasite taxa included protozoa, feather parasites, diptera, ticks, mites and fleas. We investigated whether change in abundance and prevalence of parasites was related to change in body condition, reproduction and population size of hosts. We conducted analyses based on the entire dataset, but also on a restricted dataset with intervals between study years being 5–15 years. Parasite abundance increased over time when restricting the analyses to datasets with an interval of 5–15 years, with no significant effect of changes in temperature at the time of breeding among study sites. Changes in host body condition and clutch size were related to change in temperature between first and second study year. In addition, changes in clutch size, brood size and body condition of hosts were correlated with change in abundance of parasites. Finally, changes in population size of hosts were not significantly related to changes in abundance of parasites or their prevalence. Conclusions/Significance Climate change is associated with a general increase in parasite abundance. Variation in laying date depended on locality and was associated with latitude while body condition of hosts was associated with a change in temperature. Because clutch size, brood size and body condition were associated with change in parasitism, these results suggest that parasites, perhaps mediated through the indirect effects of temperature, may affect fecundity and condition of their hosts. The conclusions were particularly in accordance with predictions when the restricted dataset with intervals of 5–15 years was used, suggesting that short

  14. Exploring the Host Parasitism of the Migratory Plant-Parasitic Nematode Ditylenchus destuctor by Expressed Sequence Tags Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Huan; Gao, Bing-li; Kong, Ling-an; Yu, Qing; Huang, Wen-kun; He, Xu-feng; Long, Hai-bo; Peng, De-liang

    2013-01-01

    The potato rot nematode, Ditylenchus destructor, is a very destructive nematode pest on many agriculturally important crops worldwide, but the molecular characterization of its parasitism of plant has been limited. The effectors involved in nematode parasitism of plant for several sedentary endo-parasitic nematodes such as Heterodera glycines, Globodera rostochiensis and Meloidogyne incognita have been identified and extensively studied over the past two decades. Ditylenchus destructor, as a migratory plant parasitic nematode, has different feeding behavior, life cycle and host response. Comparing the transcriptome and parasitome among different types of plant-parasitic nematodes is the way to understand more fully the parasitic mechanism of plant nematodes. We undertook the approach of sequencing expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from a mixed stage cDNA library of D. destructor. This is the first study of D. destructor ESTs. A total of 9800 ESTs were grouped into 5008 clusters including 3606 singletons and 1402 multi-member contigs, representing a catalog of D. destructor genes. Implementing a bioinformatics' workflow, we found 1391 clusters have no match in the available gene database; 31 clusters only have similarities to genes identified from D. africanus, the most closely related species to D. destructor; 1991 clusters were annotated using Gene Ontology (GO); 1550 clusters were assigned enzyme commission (EC) numbers; and 1211 clusters were mapped to 181 KEGG biochemical pathways. 22 ESTs had similarities to reported nematode effectors. Interestedly, most of the effectors identified in this study are involved in host cell wall degradation or modification, such as 1,4-beta-glucanse, 1,3-beta-glucanse, pectate lyase, chitinases and expansin, or host defense suppression such as calreticulin, annexin and venom allergen-like protein. This result implies that the migratory plant-parasitic nematode D. destructor secrets similar effectors to those of sedentary

  15. MOLECULAR PHYLOGENETIC RELATIONSHIPS AMONG DIABROTICA SPECIES (ACCESSION NO. AF195196)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn rootworms of the genus Diabrotica (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) are the most serious pest of corn in midwestern United States. Despite their economic importance, phylogenetic relationships within the genus remain unclear. Phylogenetic analysis of five Diabrotica was undertaken using DNA sequences...

  16. Haemonchus contortus P-Glycoproteins Interact with Host Eosinophil Granules: A Novel Insight into the Role of ABC Transporters in Host-Parasite Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Issouf, Mohamed; Guégnard, Fabrice; Koch, Christine; Le Vern, Yves; Blanchard-Letort, Alexandra; Che, Hua; Beech, Robin N.; Kerboeuf, Dominique; Neveu, Cedric

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils are one of the major mammalian effector cells encountered by helminths during infection. In the present study, we investigated the effects of eosinophil granule exposure on the sheep parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus as a model. H. contortus eggs exposed to eosinophil granule products showed increased rhodamine 123 efflux and this effect was not due to loss of egg integrity. Rh123 is known to be a specific P-glycoprotein (Pgp) substrate and led to the hypothesis that in addition to their critical role in xenobiotic resistance, helminth ABC transporters such as Pgp may also be involved in the detoxification of host cytotoxic products. We showed by quantitative RT-PCR that, among nine different H. contortus Pgp genes, Hco-pgp-3, Hco-pgp-9.2, Hco-pgp-11 and, Hco-pgp-16 were specifically up-regulated in parasitic life stages suggesting a potential involvement of these Pgps in the detoxification of eosinophil granule products. Using exsheathed L3 larvae that mimic the first life stage in contact with the host, we demonstrated that eosinophil granules induced a dose dependent overexpression of Hco-pgp-3 and the closely related Hco-pgp-16. Taken together, our results provide the first evidence that a subset of helminth Pgps interact with, and could be involved in the detoxification of, host products. This opens the way for further studies aiming to explore the role of helminth Pgps in the host-parasite interaction, including evasion of the host immune response. PMID:24498376

  17. Molecular relationships between closely related strains and species of nematodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, M. H.; Wall, S. M.; Luehrsen, K. R.; Fox, G. E.; Hecht, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    Electrophoretic comparisons have been made for 24 enzymes in the Bergerac and Bristol strains of Caenorhabditis elegans and the related species, Caenorhabditis briggsae. No variation was detected between the two strains of C. elegans. In contrast, the two species, C. elegans and C. briggsae exhibited electrophoretic differences in 22 of 24 enzymes. A consensus 5S rRNA sequence was determined for C. elegans and found to be identical to that from C. briggsae. By analogy with other species with relatively well established fossil records it can be inferred that the time of divergence between the two nematode species is probably in the tens of millions of years. The limited anatomical evolution during a time period in which proteins undergo extensive changes supports the hypothesis that anatomical evolution is not dependent on overall protein changes.

  18. SPECIES CONCEPTS AND RELATIONSHIPS IN WILD AND CULTIVATED POTATOES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wild and cultivated potatoes (Solanum section Petota) present challenges to taxonomists arising from lack of clearly defined morphological character differences among many species, phenotypic plasticity, a range of ploidy levels from diploid to hexaploid, and hybrid speciation and introgression. Tax...

  19. Evolutionary relationships within the Phytophthora cactorum species complex in Europe.

    PubMed

    Pánek, Matěj; Fér, Tomáš; Mráček, Jaroslav; Tomšovský, Michal

    2016-01-01

    The Phytophthora cactorum species complex in Europe is composed of P. cactorum, Phytophthora hedraiandra, and a hybrid species Phytophthora × serendipita. Evolutionary analyses using the amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) method were carried out on 133 isolates from 19 countries. The AFLP data were complemented by sequence analysis of three genes (ITS region of ribosomal RNA gene, phenolic acid decarboxylase - Pheca I, and Cytochrome oxidase - Cox I), morphometric analysis and cardinal temperature data. The high proportion of clonal genotypes, low gene flow among groups, which was defined by the structure analysis, and low Nei's gene diversity confirms the homothallic life cycle of the groups. On the other hand, the ITS, Cox I and Pheca I sequence data support occasional hybridization between species. The structure K = 5 grouping revealed two groups of hybrid origin (C2 and F). While the C2 group resembles P. × serendipita, the F group includes Finnish isolates characterized by high oogonial abortion rates and slow growth. The morphological characters routinely used in identification of Phytophthora species are not useful for delimitation of species from the P. cactorum complex. Therefore, we discuss the status of P. hedraiandra as a separate species. The epitypification of P. cactorum is proposed. PMID:27268244

  20. Do non-native plant species affect the shape of productivity-diversity relationships?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drake, J.M.; Cleland, E.E.; Horner-Devine, M. C.; Fleishman, E.; Bowles, C.; Smith, M.D.; Carney, K.; Emery, S.; Gramling, J.; Vandermast, D.B.; Grace, J.B.

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between ecosystem processes and species richness is an active area of research and speculation. Both theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted in numerous ecosystems. One finding of these studies is that the shape of the relationship between productivity and species richness varies considerably among ecosystems and at different spatial scales, though little is known about the relative importance of physical and biological mechanisms causing this variation. Moreover, despite widespread concern about changes in species' global distributions, it remains unclear if and how such large-scale changes may affect this relationship. We present a new conceptual model of how invasive species might modulate relationships between primary production and species richness. We tested this model using long-term data on relationships between aboveground net primary production and species richness in six North American terrestrial ecosystems. We show that primary production and abundance of non-native species are both significant predictors of species richness, though we fail to detect effects of invasion extent on the shapes of the relationship between species richness and primary production.

  1. Estimating species - area relationships by modeling abundance and frequency subject to incomplete sampling.

    PubMed

    Yamaura, Yuichi; Connor, Edward F; Royle, J Andrew; Itoh, Katsuo; Sato, Kiyoshi; Taki, Hisatomo; Mishima, Yoshio

    2016-07-01

    Models and data used to describe species-area relationships confound sampling with ecological process as they fail to acknowledge that estimates of species richness arise due to sampling. This compromises our ability to make ecological inferences from and about species-area relationships. We develop and illustrate hierarchical community models of abundance and frequency to estimate species richness. The models we propose separate sampling from ecological processes by explicitly accounting for the fact that sampled patches are seldom completely covered by sampling plots and that individuals present in the sampling plots are imperfectly detected. We propose a multispecies abundance model in which community assembly is treated as the summation of an ensemble of species-level Poisson processes and estimate patch-level species richness as a derived parameter. We use sampling process models appropriate for specific survey methods. We propose a multispecies frequency model that treats the number of plots in which a species occurs as a binomial process. We illustrate these models using data collected in surveys of early-successional bird species and plants in young forest plantation patches. Results indicate that only mature forest plant species deviated from the constant density hypothesis, but the null model suggested that the deviations were too small to alter the form of species-area relationships. Nevertheless, results from simulations clearly show that the aggregate pattern of individual species density-area relationships and occurrence probability-area relationships can alter the form of species-area relationships. The plant community model estimated that only half of the species present in the regional species pool were encountered during the survey. The modeling framework we propose explicitly accounts for sampling processes so that ecological processes can be examined free of sampling artefacts. Our modeling approach is extensible and could be applied to a

  2. Plant Trait-Species Abundance Relationships Vary with Environmental Properties in Subtropical Forests in Eastern China

    PubMed Central

    Yan, En-Rong; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Chang, Scott X.; Wang, Xi-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how plant trait-species abundance relationships change with a range of single and multivariate environmental properties is crucial for explaining species abundance and rarity. In this study, the abundance of 94 woody plant species was examined and related to 15 plant leaf and wood traits at both local and landscape scales involving 31 plots in subtropical forests in eastern China. Further, plant trait-species abundance relationships were related to a range of single and multivariate (PCA axes) environmental properties such as air humidity, soil moisture content, soil temperature, soil pH, and soil organic matter, nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) contents. At the landscape scale, plant maximum height, and twig and stem wood densities were positively correlated, whereas mean leaf area (MLA), leaf N concentration (LN), and total leaf area per twig size (TLA) were negatively correlated with species abundance. At the plot scale, plant maximum height, leaf and twig dry matter contents, twig and stem wood densities were positively correlated, but MLA, specific leaf area, LN, leaf P concentration and TLA were negatively correlated with species abundance. Plant trait-species abundance relationships shifted over the range of seven single environmental properties and along multivariate environmental axes in a similar way. In conclusion, strong relationships between plant traits and species abundance existed among and within communities. Significant shifts in plant trait-species abundance relationships in a range of environmental properties suggest strong environmental filtering processes that influence species abundance and rarity in the studied subtropical forests. PMID:23560114

  3. Plant trait-species abundance relationships vary with environmental properties in subtropical forests in eastern china.

    PubMed

    Yan, En-Rong; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Chang, Scott X; Wang, Xi-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how plant trait-species abundance relationships change with a range of single and multivariate environmental properties is crucial for explaining species abundance and rarity. In this study, the abundance of 94 woody plant species was examined and related to 15 plant leaf and wood traits at both local and landscape scales involving 31 plots in subtropical forests in eastern China. Further, plant trait-species abundance relationships were related to a range of single and multivariate (PCA axes) environmental properties such as air humidity, soil moisture content, soil temperature, soil pH, and soil organic matter, nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) contents. At the landscape scale, plant maximum height, and twig and stem wood densities were positively correlated, whereas mean leaf area (MLA), leaf N concentration (LN), and total leaf area per twig size (TLA) were negatively correlated with species abundance. At the plot scale, plant maximum height, leaf and twig dry matter contents, twig and stem wood densities were positively correlated, but MLA, specific leaf area, LN, leaf P concentration and TLA were negatively correlated with species abundance. Plant trait-species abundance relationships shifted over the range of seven single environmental properties and along multivariate environmental axes in a similar way. In conclusion, strong relationships between plant traits and species abundance existed among and within communities. Significant shifts in plant trait-species abundance relationships in a range of environmental properties suggest strong environmental filtering processes that influence species abundance and rarity in the studied subtropical forests. PMID:23560114

  4. A Rapid Approach to Modeling Species-Habitat Relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Geoffrey M.; Breinger, David R.; Stolen, Eric D.

    2005-01-01

    A growing number of species require conservation or management efforts. Success of these activities requires knowledge of the species' occurrence pattern. Species-habitat models developed from GIS data sources are commonly used to predict species occurrence but commonly used data sources are often developed for purposes other than predicting species occurrence and are of inappropriate scale and the techniques used to extract predictor variables are often time consuming and cannot be repeated easily and thus cannot efficiently reflect changing conditions. We used digital orthophotographs and a grid cell classification scheme to develop an efficient technique to extract predictor variables. We combined our classification scheme with a priori hypothesis development using expert knowledge and a previously published habitat suitability index and used an objective model selection procedure to choose candidate models. We were able to classify a large area (57,000 ha) in a fraction of the time that would be required to map vegetation and were able to test models at varying scales using a windowing process. Interpretation of the selected models confirmed existing knowledge of factors important to Florida scrub-jay habitat occupancy. The potential uses and advantages of using a grid cell classification scheme in conjunction with expert knowledge or an habitat suitability index (HSI) and an objective model selection procedure are discussed.

  5. Vector-host-parasite inter-relationships in leishmaniasis. IV. Electrophoretic studies on proteins of four vertebrate bloods with and without Leishmania infantum or L. major.

    PubMed

    Daba, S; Mansour, N S; Youssef, F G; Shanbaky, N M; el Sawaf, B M

    1997-12-01

    Fifty five protein bands with relative mobilities of 8,954 to 245,471 kilo Daltons (kD) were electrophoretically separated from 12 feeding media of blood from 4 natural vertebrate hosts of Phlebotomus langeroni. The feeding media included human, dog (Canis familiaris), rat (Rattus rattus) and turkey (Melagris gallopava) bloods without or with Leishmania infantum or L. major promastigotes. Protein bands were identical among the feeding media of one host's blood but varied in number (24-28 bands) and relative mobilities among the various hosts' blood. Some protein fractions were common among the various hosts blood, others were only present in two or three hosts' blood and some were restricted to one host blood and were unique for each host. This study provides data which may help in understanding why blood from different natural hosts may variably influence the life cycle of Leishmania parasite in the sand fly gut. PMID:9425823

  6. FINE STRUCTURAL STUDY ON EMERIA SP. INFECTING THE LIBYAN JIRDS (MERIONES LIBYCUS) IN SAUDI ARABIA: MEROGONY, MACROGAMETOGENESIS AND HOST-PARASITE RELATIONSHIP.

    PubMed

    Alanazi, Abdullah D; Alanazi, Ashraf E Said; El-Kabbany, Amira I

    2015-08-01

    Ultrastructural characteristics of merogony and the development of mature merozoits and macrogametogensis of Eimeria sp. infecting the Libyan jird were investigated. Mono and binucleated schizonts were detected. Developed merozoites showed all the apicomplexan architecture (Pellicle, conoid, rhoptries, micronemes ... etc). Transformation into macrogametes were studied. Early macrogamonts characterized by the loss of all apicomblexan characters and the appearance of wall-forming bodies were the first indication for macrogametogenesis. As development precepded, two types of wall forming bodies (I, II) were clearly detected. Cell organelles including amylopectin granules and lipid globules were greatly increased in mature macrogametes. Young oocyst (zygote) with double-layer oocyst wall were also detected. Host cell reaction due to infection included hypertrophy of the infected host cell, enlargement, deformation and displacement of the host cell nucleus. Swollen and degeneration of mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and cytoplasmic vacuolation of the host cell. All parasite stages were enclosed in parasitophorous vacuole limited by unit membrane. Extended damage effect appeared in some neighboring host cell indicating the secretion of some toxins by the parasite. PMID:26485841

  7. The relationship between species detection probability and local extinction probability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alpizar-Jara, R.; Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.; Sauer, J.R.; Pollock, K.H.; Rosenberry, C.S.

    2004-01-01

    In community-level ecological studies, generally not all species present in sampled areas are detected. Many authors have proposed the use of estimation methods that allow detection probabilities that are <1 and that are heterogeneous among species. These methods can also be used to estimate community-dynamic parameters such as species local extinction probability and turnover rates (Nichols et al. Ecol Appl 8:1213-1225; Conserv Biol 12:1390-1398). Here, we present an ad hoc approach to estimating community-level vital rates in the presence of joint heterogeneity of detection probabilities and vital rates. The method consists of partitioning the number of species into two groups using the detection frequencies and then estimating vital rates (e.g., local extinction probabilities) for each group. Estimators from each group are combined in a weighted estimator of vital rates that accounts for the effect of heterogeneity. Using data from the North American Breeding Bird Survey, we computed such estimates and tested the hypothesis that detection probabilities and local extinction probabilities were negatively related. Our analyses support the hypothesis that species detection probability covaries negatively with local probability of extinction and turnover rates. A simulation study was conducted to assess the performance of vital parameter estimators as well as other estimators relevant to questions about heterogeneity, such as coefficient of variation of detection probabilities and proportion of species in each group. Both the weighted estimator suggested in this paper and the original unweighted estimator for local extinction probability performed fairly well and provided no basis for preferring one to the other.

  8. Molecular analysis of phylogenetic relationships among Myrmecophytic macaranga species (Euphorbiaceae).

    PubMed

    Blattner, F R; Weising, K; Bänfer, G; Maschwitz, U; Fiala, B

    2001-06-01

    Many species of the paleotropical pioneer tree genus Macaranga Thou. (Euphorbiaceae) live in association with ants. Various types of mutualistic interactions exist, ranging from the attraction of unspecific ant visitors to obligate myrmecophytism. In the latter, nesting space and food bodies are exchanged for protection by highly specific ant partners (mainly species of the myrmicine genus Crematogaster). As a first step toward elucidating the coevolution of ant-plant interactions in the Macaranga-Crematogaster system, we have initiated a molecular investigation of the plant partners' phylogeny. Nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences were analyzed for 73 accessions from 47 Macaranga species, representing 17 sections or informally described species groups. Three accessions from the putative sister taxon Mallotus Lour, were included as outgroups. Cladograms of the ITS data revealed Macaranga to be nested within Mallotus. ITS sequences are highly similar within section Pachystemon s.str., suggesting a relatively recent and rapid radiation of obligate myrmecophytes within this section. Forty-three accessions, mainly of ant-inhabited species, were additionally investigated by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and microsatellite-primed PCR (MP-PCR) techniques. Phenetic analysis of RAPD and MP-PCR banding profiles generally confirmed the ITS results. Best resolutions for individual clades were obtained when ITS and RAPD/MP-PCR data were combined into a single matrix and analyzed phenetically. The combined analysis suggests multiple (four) rather than a single evolutionary origin of myrmecophytism, at least one reversal from obligate myrmecophytism to nonmyrmecophytism, and one loss of mutualistic specifity. PMID:11399144

  9. Using codispersion analysis to quantify and understand spatial patterns in species-environment relationships.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Hannah L; Case, Bradley S; Zimmerman, Jess K; Thompson, Jill; Myers, Jonathan A; Ellison, Aaron M

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of spatial patterns in species-environment relationships can provide new insights into the niche requirements and potential co-occurrence of species, but species abundance and environmental data are routinely collected at different spatial scales. Here, we investigate the use of codispersion analysis to measure and assess the scale, directionality and significance of complex relationships between plants and their environment in large forest plots. We applied codispersion analysis to both simulated and field data on spatially located tree species basal area and environmental variables. The significance of the observed bivariate spatial associations between the basal area of key species and underlying environmental variables was tested using three null models. Codispersion analysis reliably detected directionality (anisotropy) in bivariate species-environment relationships and identified relevant scales of effects. Null model-based significance tests applied to codispersion analyses of forest plot data enabled us to infer the extent to which environmental conditions, tree sizes and/or tree spatial positions underpinned the observed basal area-environment relationships, or whether relationships were a result of other unmeasured factors. Codispersion analysis, combined with appropriate null models, can be used to infer hypothesized ecological processes from spatial patterns, allowing us to start disentangling the possible drivers of plant species-environment relationships. PMID:27037819

  10. Individual species-area relationship of woody plant communities in a heterogeneous subtropical monsoon rainforest.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Han; Lin, Yi-Ching; Wiegand, Thorsten; Nakazawa, Takefumi; Su, Sheng-Hsin; Hsieh, Chih-Hao; Ding, Tzung-Su

    2015-01-01

    The spatial structure of species richness is often characterized by the species-area relationship (SAR). However, the SAR approach rarely considers the spatial variability of individual plants that arises from species interactions and species' habitat associations. Here, we explored how the interactions of individual plants of target species influence SAR patterns at a range of neighborhood distances. We analyzed the data of 113,988 woody plants of 110 species from the Fushan Forest Dynamics Plot (25 ha), northern Taiwan, which is a subtropical rainforest heavily influenced by typhoons. We classified 34 dominant species into 3 species types (i.e., accumulator, repeller, or no effect) by testing how the individual species-area relationship (i.e., statistics describing how neighborhood species richness changes around individuals) of target species departs (i.e., positively, negatively, or with no obvious trend) from a null model that accounts for habitat association. Deviation from the null model suggests that the net effect of species' interactions increases (accumulate) or decreases (repel) neighborhood species richness. We found that (i) accumulators were dominant at small interaction distances (<10-30 m); (ii) the detection of accumulator species was lower at large interaction distances (>30 m); (iii) repellers were rarely detected; and (iv) large-sized and abundant species tended to be accumulators. The findings suggest that positive species interactions have the potential to accumulate neighborhood species richness, particularly through size- and density-dependent mechanisms. We hypothesized that the frequently disturbed environment of this subtropical rainforest (e.g., typhoon-driven natural disturbances such as landslides, soil erosion, flooding, and windthrow) might create the spatial heterogeneity of species richness and promote positive species interactions. PMID:25884405

  11. Resolving Evolutionary Relationships in Closely Related Species with Whole-Genome Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Nater, Alexander; Burri, Reto; Kawakami, Takeshi; Smeds, Linnéa; Ellegren, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Using genetic data to resolve the evolutionary relationships of species is of major interest in evolutionary and systematic biology. However, reconstructing the sequence of speciation events, the so-called species tree, in closely related and potentially hybridizing species is very challenging. Processes such as incomplete lineage sorting and interspecific gene flow result in local gene genealogies that differ in their topology from the species tree, and analyses of few loci with a single sequence per species are likely to produce conflicting or even misleading results. To study these phenomena on a full phylogenomic scale, we use whole-genome sequence data from 200 individuals of four black-and-white flycatcher species with so far unresolved phylogenetic relationships to infer gene tree topologies and visualize genome-wide patterns of gene tree incongruence. Using phylogenetic analysis in nonoverlapping 10-kb windows, we show that gene tree topologies are extremely diverse and change on a very small physical scale. Moreover, we find strong evidence for gene flow among flycatcher species, with distinct patterns of reduced introgression on the Z chromosome. To resolve species relationships on the background of widespread gene tree incongruence, we used four complementary coalescent-based methods for species tree reconstruction, including complex modeling approaches that incorporate post-divergence gene flow among species. This allowed us to infer the most likely species tree with high confidence. Based on this finding, we show that regions of reduced effective population size, which have been suggested as particularly useful for species tree inference, can produce positively misleading species tree topologies. Our findings disclose the pitfalls of using loci potentially under selection as phylogenetic markers and highlight the potential of modeling approaches to disentangle species relationships in systems with large effective population sizes and post

  12. Resolving Evolutionary Relationships in Closely Related Species with Whole-Genome Sequencing Data.

    PubMed

    Nater, Alexander; Burri, Reto; Kawakami, Takeshi; Smeds, Linnéa; Ellegren, Hans

    2015-11-01

    Using genetic data to resolve the evolutionary relationships of species is of major interest in evolutionary and systematic biology. However, reconstructing the sequence of speciation events, the so-called species tree, in closely related and potentially hybridizing species is very challenging. Processes such as incomplete lineage sorting and interspecific gene flow result in local gene genealogies that differ in their topology from the species tree, and analyses of few loci with a single sequence per species are likely to produce conflicting or even misleading results. To study these phenomena on a full phylogenomic scale, we use whole-genome sequence data from 200 individuals of four black-and-white flycatcher species with so far unresolved phylogenetic relationships to infer gene tree topologies and visualize genome-wide patterns of gene tree incongruence. Using phylogenetic analysis in nonoverlapping 10-kb windows, we show that gene tree topologies are extremely diverse and change on a very small physical scale. Moreover, we find strong evidence for gene flow among flycatcher species, with distinct patterns of reduced introgression on the Z chromosome. To resolve species relationships on the background of widespread gene tree incongruence, we used four complementary coalescent-based methods for species tree reconstruction, including complex modeling approaches that incorporate post-divergence gene flow among species. This allowed us to infer the most likely species tree with high confidence. Based on this finding, we show that regions of reduced effective population size, which have been suggested as particularly useful for species tree inference, can produce positively misleading species tree topologies. Our findings disclose the pitfalls of using loci potentially under selection as phylogenetic markers and highlight the potential of modeling approaches to disentangle species relationships in systems with large effective population sizes and post

  13. Estimating species – area relationships by modeling abundance and frequency subject to incomplete sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yamaura, Yuichi; Connor, Edward F.; Royle, Andy; Itoh, Katsuo; Sato, Kiyoshi; Taki, Hisatomo; Mishima, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Models and data used to describe species–area relationships confound sampling with ecological process as they fail to acknowledge that estimates of species richness arise due to sampling. This compromises our ability to make ecological inferences from and about species–area relationships. We develop and illustrate hierarchical community models of abundance and frequency to estimate species richness. The models we propose separate sampling from ecological processes by explicitly accounting for the fact that sampled patches are seldom completely covered by sampling plots and that individuals present in the sampling plots are imperfectly detected. We propose a multispecies abundance model in which community assembly is treated as the summation of an ensemble of species-level Poisson processes and estimate patch-level species richness as a derived parameter. We use sampling process models appropriate for specific survey methods. We propose a multispecies frequency model that treats the number of plots in which a species occurs as a binomial process. We illustrate these models using data collected in surveys of early-successional bird species and plants in young forest plantation patches. Results indicate that only mature forest plant species deviated from the constant density hypothesis, but the null model suggested that the deviations were too small to alter the form of species–area relationships. Nevertheless, results from simulations clearly show that the aggregate pattern of individual species density–area relationships and occurrence probability–area relationships can alter the form of species–area relationships. The plant community model estimated that only half of the species present in the regional species pool were encountered during the survey. The modeling framework we propose explicitly accounts for sampling processes so that ecological processes can be examined free of sampling artefacts. Our modeling approach is extensible and could be applied

  14. Phylogenetic relationships of species of genus Arachis based on genic sequences.

    PubMed

    He, Guohao; Barkley, Noelle A; Zhao, Yongli; Yuan, Mei; Prakash, C S

    2014-06-01

    The genus Arachis (Fabaceae), which originated in South America, consists of 80 species. Based on morphological traits and cross-compatibility among the species, the genus is divided into nine taxonomic sections. Arachis is the largest section including the economically valuable cultivated peanut (A. hypogaea). Seven genic sequences were utilized to better understand the phylogenetic relationships between species of genus Arachis. Our study displayed four clades of species of Arachis. Arachis triseminata was genetically isolated from all other species of Arachis studied, and it formed the basal clade with A. retusa and A. dardani from the most ancient sections Extranervosae and Heteranthae, respectively. Species of section Arachis formed a separated single clade from all other species, within which species having B and D genome clustered in one subgroup and three species characterized with an A genome grouped together in another subgroup. A divergent clade including species from five sections was sister to the clade of section Arachis. Between the sister clades and the basal clade there was a clade containing species from the more advanced sections. Phylogenetic relationships of all the species of Arachis using multiple genic sequences were similar to the phylogenies produced with single-copy genes. PMID:25211395

  15. Genetic relationships among some hawthorn (Crataegus spp.) species and genotypes.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Kadir Ugurtan; Yanar, Makbule; Ercisli, Sezai; Sahiner, Hatice; Taskin, Tuncer; Zengin, Yasar

    2010-10-01

    The genus Crataegus is well distributed in Turkey as a wild plant, with numerous, inherently variable species and genotypes. RAPD markers were used to study 17 hawthorn genotypes belonging to Crataegus monogyna ssp. monogyna Jacq (2 genotypes), C. monogyna ssp. azarella Jacq (1), Crataegus pontica K.Koch (3), Crataegus orientalis var. orientalis Pallas Ex Bieb (3), Crataegus pseudoheterophylla Pojark (1), Crataegus aronia var. dentata Browicz (1), C. aronia var. aronia Browicz (4), and Crateagus x bornmuelleri Zabel (2). The 10 RAPD primers produced 72 polymorphic bands (88% polymorphism). A dendrogram based on Jaccard's index included four major groups and one outgroup according to taxa. The lowest genetic variability was observed within C. aronia var. aronia genotypes. The study demonstrated that RAPD analysis is efficient for genotyping wild-grown hawthorns. PMID:20640884

  16. The relationship of selenium tolerance and speciation in Lecythidaceae species.

    PubMed

    Németh, Anikó; García Reyes, Juan Francisco; Kosáry, Judit; Dernovics, Mihály

    2013-12-01

    Comparative study of selenium (Se) speciation in hyperaccumulator plants offers an interesting challenge from the analytical point of view. In our study the application of a sophisticated sample clean-up procedure and the combination of elemental and molecular mass spectrometric methods led to the identification of several new selenocompounds. The difference between the Se speciation of the primary accumulator Lecythis minor and the secondary accumulator Bertholletia excelsa confirmed the current opinion that the speciation pattern in hyperaccumulator plants is principally related to the mechanism of accumulation and not to taxonomy. The most abundant new selenocompounds were found to be the derivatives of selenohomocysteine (SeHCy) and selenomethionine (SeMet), including fatty acid metabolism related compounds. A series of SeHCy derived species containing multiple Se atoms (>2) was also detected and their structures were validated by the synthesis of their S-Se analogues. PMID:24136350

  17. Comment on "Worldwide evidence of a unimodal relationship between productivity and plant species richness".

    PubMed

    Tredennick, Andrew T; Adler, Peter B; Grace, James B; Harpole, W Stanley; Borer, Elizabeth T; Seabloom, Eric W; Anderson, T Michael; Bakker, Jonathan D; Biederman, Lori A; Brown, Cynthia S; Buckley, Yvonne M; Chu, Chengjin; Collins, Scott L; Crawley, Michael J; Fay, Philip A; Firn, Jennifer; Gruner, Daniel S; Hagenah, Nicole; Hautier, Yann; Hector, Andy; Hillebrand, Helmut; Kirkman, Kevin; Knops, Johannes M H; Laungani, Ramesh; Lind, Eric M; MacDougall, Andrew S; McCulley, Rebecca L; Mitchell, Charles E; Moore, Joslin L; Morgan, John W; Orrock, John L; Peri, Pablo L; Prober, Suzanne M; Risch, Anita C; Schütz, Martin; Speziale, Karina L; Standish, Rachel J; Sullivan, Lauren L; Wardle, Glenda M; Williams, Ryan J; Yang, Louie H

    2016-01-29

    Fraser et al. (Reports, 17 July 2015, p. 302) report a unimodal relationship between productivity and species richness at regional and global scales, which they contrast with the results of Adler et al. (Reports, 23 September 2011, p. 1750). However, both data sets, when analyzed correctly, show clearly and consistently that productivity is a poor predictor of local species richness. PMID:26823418

  18. Comment on "Worldwide evidence of a unimodal relationship between productivity and plant species richness"

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tredennick, Andrew T; Adler, Peter B.; Grace, James B.; Harpole, W Stanley; Borer, Elizabeth T.; Seabloom, Eric W.; Anderson, T. Michael; Bakker, Jonathan D.; Biederman, Lori A.; Brown, Cynthia S.; Buckley, Yvonne M.; Chu, Cheng-Jin; Collins, Scott L.; Crawley, Michael J.; Fay, Philip A.; Firn, Jennifer; Gruner, Daniel S.; Hagenah, Nicole; Hautier, Yann; Hector, Andy; Hillebrand, Helmut; Kirkman, Kevin P.; Knops, Johannes M. H.; Laungani, Ramesh; Lind, Eric M.; MacDougall, Andrew S.; McCulley, Rebecca L.; Mitchell, Charles E.; Moore, Joslin L.; Morgan, John W.; Orrock, John L.; Peri, Pablo L.; Prober, Suzanne M.; Risch, Anita C.; Schuetz, Martin; Speziale, Karina L.; Standish, Rachel J.; Sullivan, Lauren L.; Wardle, Glenda M.; Williams, Ryan J.; Yang, Louie H.

    2016-01-01

    Fraser et al. (Reports, 17 July 2015, p. 302) report a unimodal relationship between productivity and species richness at regional and global scales, which they contrast with the results of Adler et al. (Reports, 23 September 2011, p. 1750). However, both data sets, when analyzed correctly, show clearly and consistently that productivity is a poor predictor of local species richness.

  19. Individual Species-Area Relationship of Woody Plant Communities in a Heterogeneous Subtropical Monsoon Rainforest

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Cheng-Han; Lin, Yi-Ching; Wiegand, Thorsten; Nakazawa, Takefumi; Su, Sheng-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    The spatial structure of species richness is often characterized by the species-area relationship (SAR). However, the SAR approach rarely considers the spatial variability of individual plants that arises from species interactions and species’ habitat associations. Here, we explored how the interactions of individual plants of target species influence SAR patterns at a range of neighborhood distances. We analyzed the data of 113,988 woody plants of 110 species from the Fushan Forest Dynamics Plot (25 ha), northern Taiwan, which is a subtropical rainforest heavily influenced by typhoons. We classified 34 dominant species into 3 species types (i.e., accumulator, repeller, or no effect) by testing how the individual species-area relationship (i.e., statistics describing how neighborhood species richness changes around individuals) of target species departs (i.e., positively, negatively, or with no obvious trend) from a null model that accounts for habitat association. Deviation from the null model suggests that the net effect of species’ interactions increases (accumulate) or decreases (repel) neighborhood species richness. We found that (i) accumulators were dominant at small interaction distances (<10–30 m); (ii) the detection of accumulator species was lower at large interaction distances (>30 m); (iii) repellers were rarely detected; and (iv) large-sized and abundant species tended to be accumulators. The findings suggest that positive species interactions have the potential to accumulate neighborhood species richness, particularly through size- and density-dependent mechanisms. We hypothesized that the frequently disturbed environment of this subtropical rainforest (e.g., typhoon-driven natural disturbances such as landslides, soil erosion, flooding, and windthrow) might create the spatial heterogeneity of species richness and promote positive species interactions. PMID:25884405

  20. Complementary models of tree species-soil relationships in old-growth temperate forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, Alison; Perakis, Steven S.

    2011-01-01

    Ecosystem level studies identify plant soil feed backs as important controls on soil nutrient availability,particularly for nitrogen and phosphorus. Although site and species specific studies of tree species soil relationships are relatively common,comparatively fewer studies consider multiple coexisting speciesin old-growth forests across a range of sites that vary underlying soil fertility. We characterized patterns in forest floor and mineral soil nutrients associated with four common tree species across eight undisturbed old-growth forests in Oregon, USA, and used two complementary conceptual models to assess tree species soil relationships. Plant soil feedbacks that could reinforce sitelevel differences in nutrient availability were assessed using the context dependent relationships model, where by relative species based differences in each soil nutrient divergedorconvergedas nutrient status changed across sites. Tree species soil relationships that did not reflect strong feedbacks were evaluated using a site independent relationships model, where by forest floor and surface mineral soil nutrient tools differed consistently by tree species across sites,without variation in deeper mineral soils. We found that theorganically cycled elements carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus exhibited context-dependent differences among species in both forest floor and mineral soil, and most of ten followed adivergence model,where by species differences were greatest at high-nutrient sites. These patterns are consistent with the oryemphasizing biotic control of these elements through plant soil feedback mechanisms. Site independent species differences were strongest for pool so if the weather able cations calcium, magnesium, potassium,as well as phosphorus, in mineral soils. Site independent species differences in forest floor nutrients we reattributable too nespecies that displayed significant greater forest floor mass accumulation. Our finding confirmed that site-independent and

  1. The relationship between species diversity and genetic structure in the rare Picea chihuahuana tree species community, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Simental-Rodríguez, Sergio Leonel; Quiñones-Pérez, Carmen Zulema; Moya, Daniel; Hernández-Tecles, Enrique; López-Sánchez, Carlos Antonio; Wehenkel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Species diversity and genetic diversity, the most basic elements of biodiversity, have long been treated as separate topics, although populations evolve within a community context. Recent studies on community genetics and ecology have suggested that genetic diversity is not completely independent of species diversity. The Mexican Picea chihuahuana Martínez is an endemic species listed as "Endangered" on the Red List. Forty populations of Chihuahua spruce have been identified. This species is often associated with tree species of eight genera in gallery forests. This rare Picea chihuahuana tree community covers an area no more than 300 ha and has been subject of several studies involving different topics such as ecology, genetic structure and climate change. The overall aim of these studies was to obtain a dataset for developing management tools to help decision makers implement preservation and conservation strategies. However, this unique forest tree community may also represent an excellent subject for helping us to understand the interplay between ecological and evolutionary processes in determining community structure and dynamics. The AFLP technique and species composition data were used together to test the hypothesis that species diversity is related to the adaptive genetic structure of some dominant tree species (Picea chihuahuana, Pinus strobiformis, Pseudotsuga menziesii and Populus tremuloides) of the Picea chihuahuana tree community at fourteen locations. The Hill numbers were used as a diversity measure. The results revealed a significant correlation between tree species diversity and genetic structure in Populus tremuloides. Because the relationship between the two levels of diversity was found to be positive for the putative adaptive AFLP detected, genetic and species structures of the tree community were possibly simultaneously adapted to a combination of ecological or environmental factors. The present findings indicate that interactions between

  2. The Relationship between Species Diversity and Genetic Structure in the Rare Picea chihuahuana Tree Species Community, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Simental-Rodríguez, Sergio Leonel; Quiñones-Pérez, Carmen Zulema; Moya, Daniel; Hernández-Tecles, Enrique; López-Sánchez, Carlos Antonio; Wehenkel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Species diversity and genetic diversity, the most basic elements of biodiversity, have long been treated as separate topics, although populations evolve within a community context. Recent studies on community genetics and ecology have suggested that genetic diversity is not completely independent of species diversity. The Mexican Picea chihuahuana Martínez is an endemic species listed as “Endangered” on the Red List. Forty populations of Chihuahua spruce have been identified. This species is often associated with tree species of eight genera in gallery forests. This rare Picea chihuahuana tree community covers an area no more than 300 ha and has been subject of several studies involving different topics such as ecology, genetic structure and climate change. The overall aim of these studies was to obtain a dataset for developing management tools to help decision makers implement preservation and conservation strategies. However, this unique forest tree community may also represent an excellent subject for helping us to understand the interplay between ecological and evolutionary processes in determining community structure and dynamics. The AFLP technique and species composition data were used together to test the hypothesis that species diversity is related to the adaptive genetic structure of some dominant tree species (Picea chihuahuana, Pinus strobiformis, Pseudotsuga menziesii and Populus tremuloides) of the Picea chihuahuana tree community at fourteen locations. The Hill numbers were used as a diversity measure. The results revealed a significant correlation between tree species diversity and genetic structure in Populus tremuloides. Because the relationship between the two levels of diversity was found to be positive for the putative adaptive AFLP detected, genetic and species structures of the tree community were possibly simultaneously adapted to a combination of ecological or environmental factors. The present findings indicate that interactions

  3. Timing major conflict between mitochondrial and nuclear genes in species relationships of Polygonia butterflies (Nymphalidae: Nymphalini)

    PubMed Central

    Wahlberg, Niklas; Weingartner, Elisabet; Warren, Andrew D; Nylin, Sören

    2009-01-01

    Background Major conflict between mitochondrial and nuclear genes in estimating species relationships is an increasingly common finding in animals. Usually this is attributed to incomplete lineage sorting, but recently the possibility has been raised that hybridization is important in generating such phylogenetic patterns. Just how widespread ancient and/or recent hybridization is in animals and how it affects estimates of species relationships is still not well-known. Results We investigate the species relationships and their evolutionary history over time in the genus Polygonia using DNA sequences from two mitochondrial gene regions (COI and ND1, total 1931 bp) and four nuclear gene regions (EF-1α, wingless, GAPDH and RpS5, total 2948 bp). We found clear, strongly supported conflict between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences in estimating species relationships in the genus Polygonia. Nodes at which there was no conflict tended to have diverged at the same time when analyzed separately, while nodes at which conflict was present diverged at different times. We find that two species create most of the conflict, and attribute the conflict found in Polygonia satyrus to ancient hybridization and conflict found in Polygonia oreas to recent or ongoing hybridization. In both examples, the nuclear gene regions tended to give the phylogenetic relationships of the species supported by morphology and biology. Conclusion Studies inferring species-level relationships using molecular data should never be based on a single locus. Here we show that the phylogenetic hypothesis generated using mitochondrial DNA gives a very different interpretation of the evolutionary history of Polygonia species compared to that generated from nuclear DNA. We show that possible cases of hybridization in Polygonia are not limited to sister species, but may be inferred further back in time. Furthermore, we provide more evidence that Haldane's effect might not be as strong a process in

  4. Predicting Species-environment Relationships with Functional Traits for the Understory Flora of Wisconsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ash, J.; Li, D.; Johnson, S.; Rogers, D. A.; Waller, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the processes that structure species' abundance patterns is a central problem in ecology, both for explaining current species' distributions and predicting future changes. Environmental gradients affect species' distribution patterns with these responses likely depending on species' functional traits. Thus, tracking shifts in species' traits can provide insight into the mechanisms by which species respond to dynamic environmental conditions. We examined how functional traits are associated with long-term changes in the distribution and abundance of understory plants in Wisconsin forests over the last 50+ years. We relied on detailed surveys and resurveys of the same Wisconsin forest plots, data on 12 functional traits, and site-level environmental variables including soil and climate conditions. We then related changes in the abundance of 293 species across a network of 249 sites to these environmental variables and explored whether functional traits served to predict these relationships using multilevel models. Species abundance patterns were strongly related to variation in environmental conditions among sites, but species appear to be responding to distinct sets of environmental variables. Functional traits only weakly predicted these species-environment relationships, limiting our ability to generalize these results to other systems. Nonetheless, understanding how traits interact with environmental gradients to structure species distribution patterns helps us to disentangle the drivers of ecological change across diverse landscapes.

  5. Bat flies (Diptera: Streblidae, Nycteribiidae) parasitic on bats (Mammalia: Chiroptera) at Parque Estadual da Cantareira, São Paulo, Brazil: parasitism rates and host-parasite associations.

    PubMed

    Bertola, Patrícia Beloto; Aires, Caroline Cotrim; Favorito, Sandra Elisa; Graciolli, Gustavo; Amaku, Marcos; Pinto-da-Rocha, Ricardo

    2005-02-01

    A total of 443 bat flies belonging to the families Nycteribiidae and Strelidae, were collected on 22 species of bats (Molossidae, Phyllostomidae, and Vespertilionidae) from Parque Estadual da Cantareira (São Paulo, Brazil), between January, 2000 and January, 2001. Eighteen new occurrences of bat flies were recorded on Anoura geoffroyi (Anastrebla caudiferae), Glossophaga soricina (A. caudiferae), Sturnira lilium (Trichobius phyllostomae, T. furmani, and Paraeuctenodes similis), Artibeus lituratus (A. caudiferae), A. fimbriatus (Megistopoda proxima), A. obscurus (Metelasmus pseudopterus), Myotis nigricans (M. proxima, M. aranea, Paratrichobius longicrus), M. ruber (Anatrichobius passosi, Joblingia sp.), M. levis (A. passosi), M. albescens (A. passosi, Basilia andersoni), and Histiotus velatus (M. aranea). Seven new occurrences were recorded for the state of São Paulo, increasing the range for T. tiptoni, T. furmani, M. proxima, Aspidoptera falcata, A. caudiferae, A. modestini and B. andersoni. The relationships between parasitism and host sex, reproductive stage, age hyperparasitism by fungi are discussed. PMID:15867959

  6. Phylogenetic relationships among Staphylococcus species and refinement of cluster groups based on multilocus data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Estimates of relationships among Staphylococcus species have been hampered by poor and inconsistent resolution of phylogenies based largely on single gene analyses incorporating only a limited taxon sample. As such, the evolutionary relationships and hierarchical classification schemes among species have not been confidently established. Here, we address these points through analyses of DNA sequence data from multiple loci (16S rRNA gene, dnaJ, rpoB, and tuf gene fragments) using multiple Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic approaches that incorporate nearly all recognized Staphylococcus taxa. Results We estimated the phylogeny of fifty-seven Staphylococcus taxa using partitioned-model Bayesian and maximum likelihood analysis, as well as Bayesian gene-tree species-tree methods. Regardless of methodology, we found broad agreement among methods that the current cluster groups require revision, although there was some disagreement among methods in resolution of higher order relationships. Based on our phylogenetic estimates, we propose a refined classification for Staphylococcus with species being classified into 15 cluster groups (based on molecular data) that adhere to six species groups (based on phenotypic properties). Conclusions Our findings are in general agreement with gene tree-based reports of the staphylococcal phylogeny, although we identify multiple previously unreported relationships among species. Our results support the general importance of such multilocus assessments as a standard in microbial studies to more robustly infer relationships among recognized and newly discovered lineages. PMID:22950675

  7. Species area relationships in mediterranean-climate plant communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeley, J.E.; Fotheringham, C.J.

    2003-01-01

    SUMMARY: Polychlorinated biphenyls constitute a group of chlorine-bearing compounds of industrial origin that have permeated the natural environment throughout the world. Their chemical structure resembles that of some of the organochlorine pesticides. They are troublesome interferences in gas chromatographic analysis of these pesticides. Although methods have been developed to overcome analytical problems, measurements of quantity still are only approximate. Special studies in the United States, Netherlands, and Great Britain have traced PCB's to industrial effluent, but other possible sources have not been followed. Their use in paints, cartons, and insulating fluids suggests that environmental pollution may be from many different sources. PCB's are present in fish and wildlife in many countries of the world. Quantities are higher in animals living near industrial areas. PCB's build up in biological food chains with increases of tens to thousands of times from lower to higher organisms. Experimental studies have shown that PCB's have a toxicity to mallards, pheasants, bobwhite quail, coturnix quail, red-winged blackbirds, starlings, cowbirds, and grackles that is of the same order as the toxicity of DDE to these species. Overt signs of poisoning also are similar to those caused by compounds of the DDT group. Toxic effects of DDE and Aroclor 1254 to coturnix chicks were additive, but not synergistic. PCB's containing higher percentages of chlorine are more toxic to birds than those containing lower percentages. PCB's of foreign manufacture contained contaminants to an extent that greatly increased their toxicity Aroclor 1242. Statistical evaluations of the role that different chemicals may play in thinning of eggshells of brown pelicans show that DDE residues correlate better with shell thinning than do residues of dieldrin or PCB's. Studies of the effects of PCB's in the environment are as yet insufficient for well-rounded conclusions. The evidence available

  8. [Genetic relationships among Far Eastern species of the family Araliacea inferred by RAPD analysis].

    PubMed

    Zhuravlev, Iu N; Artiukova, E V; Kozyrenko, M M; Reunova, G D

    2003-01-01

    A molecular genetic study of Far Eastern species of the family Araliaceae by means of RAPD analysis was conducted. Using 21 primers we assessed variability at 595 loci. Based on matrices of genetic distances D, dendrograms of genetic relationships among eleven species of six genera of this family were constructed. Our results suggest that Acanthopanax sessiliflorus and Eleutherococcus senticosus belong to different genera, Aralia cordata and A. continentalis are different species, and A. elata and A. mandshurica probably cannot be regarded as distinct species. Genetic similarity of Far Eastern A. cordata and American A. hispida is shown. PMID:12624934

  9. A generalized approach to the modeling of the species-area relationship.

    PubMed

    Conceição, Katiane Silva; Ulrich, Werner; Diniz, Carlos Alberto Ribeiro; Rodrigues, Francisco Aparecido; de Andrade, Marinho Gomes

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a statistical generalized species-area model (GSAM) to represent various patterns of species-area relationship (SAR), which is one of the fundamental patterns in ecology. The approach enables the generalization of many preliminary models, as power-curve model, which is commonly used to mathematically describe the SAR. The GSAM is applied to simulated data set of species diversity in areas of different sizes and a real-world data of insects of Hymenoptera order has been modeled. We show that the GSAM enables the identification of the best statistical model and estimates the number of species according to the area. PMID:25171161

  10. Revisiting spatial scale in the productivity-species richness relationship: fundamental issues and global change implications.

    PubMed

    McBride, Paul D; Cusens, Jarrod; Gillman, Len N

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between net primary productivity (NPP) and species richness has been the subject of long-running debate. A changing climate gives added impetus to resolving this debate, as it becomes increasingly necessary to predict biodiversity responses that might arise from shifts in productivity or its climatic correlates. It has become increasingly clear that at small scales productivity-species richness relationships (PSRs) are variable, while at macro scales relationships are typically positive. We demonstrate the importance of explicitly considering scale in discussions on PSRs even at large scales by showing that distinct patterns emerge in a global dataset of terrestrial ecoregions when ecoregions are binned into size classes. At all sizes, PSRs in ecoregions are positive, but the strength of the PSR scales positively with ecoregion size. In small ecoregions (10(3)-10(4) km(2)), factors correlating with productivity play only a minor role in species richness patterns, while in large ecoregions (>10(5) km(2)), NPP modelled from remotely sensed data is able to explain most of the variation in species richness. Better understanding the effects of scale on PSRs contributes to the debate on the relationship between species richness and productivity, which in turn allows us to better predict how both long- and short-term biodiversity patterns and ecosystem functioning might be altered under global change scenarios. This gives focus on future research to clarify causal pathways between species richness and productivity with appropriate attention to scale as an important focusing element. PMID:25249265

  11. Estimating extinction from species--area relationships: why the numbers do not add up.

    PubMed

    He, Fangliang; Hubbell, Stephen

    2013-09-01

    Researchers commonly use species-area relationships (SAR) to estimate extinction rates caused by habitat loss by reversing the SAR, extrapolating backward from area to calculate expected species loss. We have previously shown that the backward SAR method considerably overestimates extinction rates due to a previously unrecognized sampling artifact. Jacob Bock Axelsen, Uri Roll, Lewi Stone, and Andrew Solow recently argued that the backward SAR method is correct and the method does not overestimate extinction rates. In this paper, we further elaborate and clarify our previous results. We show that the backward SAR method gives the correct extinction rate only under a strict complementary-area sampling design, which is not used in practice because it requires knowing which species are endemic to the area of destroyed habitat, or the number of species in the complementary area. Because of this problem, researchers substitute a power-law model for the SAR in the backward SAR equation. However, this substitution violates the backward SAR method's requirement for complementary sampling. With this model substitution, the backward SAR equation is no longer correct, except in the special case of randomly distributed species. For the complementary sampling or random distribution of species, the first individual of a species to be encountered and the last individual to be encountered to lose the species are exchangeable (or the same individual). But this is not the case for other sampling designs or if species are not randomly distributed and explains why the backward SAR method fails to correctly estimate extinction rates. Our proofs and results are general and explain the widely recognized overestimation of extinction by the backward SAR method. We suggest future directions for developing general theory for estimating species extinction from species-area relationships. Until then, however, the backward SAR method should not be used to estimate species extinction in practice

  12. Testing for effects of climate change on competitive relationships and coexistence between two bird species

    PubMed Central

    Stenseth, Nils Chr.; Durant, Joël M.; Fowler, Mike S.; Matthysen, Erik; Adriaensen, Frank; Jonzén, Niclas; Chan, Kung-Sik; Liu, Hai; De Laet, Jenny; Sheldon, Ben C.; Visser, Marcel E.; Dhondt, André A.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is expected to have profound ecological effects, yet shifts in competitive abilities among species are rarely studied in this context. Blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) and great tits (Parus major) compete for food and roosting sites, yet coexist across much of their range. Climate change might thus change the competitive relationships and coexistence between these two species. Analysing four of the highest-quality, long-term datasets available on these species across Europe, we extend the textbook example of coexistence between competing species to include the dynamic effects of long-term climate variation. Using threshold time-series statistical modelling, we demonstrate that long-term climate variation affects species demography through different influences on density-dependent and density-independent processes. The competitive interaction between blue tits and great tits has shifted in one of the studied sites, creating conditions that alter the relative equilibrium densities between the two species, potentially disrupting long-term coexistence. Our analyses show that long-term climate change can, but does not always, generate local differences in the equilibrium conditions of spatially structured species assemblages. We demonstrate how long-term data can be used to better understand whether (and how), for instance, climate change might change the relationships between coexisting species. However, the studied populations are rather robust against competitive exclusion. PMID:25904659

  13. Leaf economics spectrum-productivity relationships in intensively grazed pastures depend on dominant species identity.

    PubMed

    Mason, Norman W H; Orwin, Kate; Lambie, Suzanne; Woodward, Sharon L; McCready, Tiffany; Mudge, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Plant functional traits are thought to drive variation in primary productivity. However, there is a lack of work examining how dominant species identity affects trait-productivity relationships. The productivity of 12 pasture mixtures was determined in a 3-year field experiment. The mixtures were based on either the winter-active ryegrass (Lolium perenne) or winter-dormant tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea). Different mixtures were obtained by adding forb, legume, and grass species that differ in key leaf economics spectrum (LES) traits to the basic two-species dominant grass-white clover (Trifolium repens) mixtures. We tested for correlations between community-weighted mean (CWM) trait values, functional diversity, and productivity across all plots and within those based on either ryegrass or tall fescue. The winter-dormant forb species (chicory and plantain) had leaf traits consistent with high relative growth rates both per unit leaf area (high leaf thickness) and per unit leaf dry weight (low leaf dry matter content). Together, the two forb species achieved reasonable abundance when grown with either base grass (means of 36% and 53% of total biomass, respectively, with ryegrass tall fescue), but they competed much more strongly with tall fescue than with ryegrass. Consequently, they had a net negative impact on productivity when grown with tall fescue, and a net positive effect when grown with ryegrass. Strongly significant relationships between productivity and CWM values for LES traits were observed across ryegrass-based mixtures, but not across tall fescue-based mixtures. Functional diversity did not have a significant positive effect on productivity for any of the traits. The results show dominant species identity can strongly modify trait-productivity relationships in intensively grazed pastures. This was due to differences in the intensity of competition between dominant species and additional species, suggesting that resource-use complementarity is a

  14. Relationships of wild and domesticated rices (Oryza AA genome species) based upon whole chloroplast genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Wambugu, Peterson W; Brozynska, Marta; Furtado, Agnelo; Waters, Daniel L; Henry, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Rice is the most important crop in the world, acting as the staple food for over half of the world's population. The evolutionary relationships of cultivated rice and its wild relatives have remained contentious and inconclusive. Here we report on the use of whole chloroplast sequences to elucidate the evolutionary and phylogenetic relationships in the AA genome Oryza species, representing the primary gene pool of rice. This is the first study that has produced a well resolved and strongly supported phylogeny of the AA genome species. The pan tropical distribution of these rice relatives was found to be explained by long distance dispersal within the last million years. The analysis resulted in a clustering pattern that showed strong geographical differentiation. The species were defined in two primary clades with a South American/African clade with two species, O glumaepatula and O longistaminata, distinguished from all other species. The largest clade was comprised of an Australian clade including newly identified taxa and the African and Asian clades. This refined knowledge of the relationships between cultivated rice and the related wild species provides a strong foundation for more targeted use of wild genetic resources in rice improvement and efforts to ensure their conservation. PMID:26355750

  15. Species-energy relationship in the deep sea: A test using the Quaternary fossil record

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, G.; Cronin, T. M.; Roy, K.

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about the processes regulating species richness in deep-sea communities. Here we take advantage of natural experiments involving climate change to test whether predictions of the species-energy hypothesis hold in the deep sea. In addition, we test for the relationship between temperature and species richness predicted by a recent model based on biochemical kinetics of metabolism. Using the deep-sea fossil record of benthic foraminifera and statistical meta-analyses of temperature-richness and productivity-richness relationships in 10 deep-sea cores, we show that temperature but not productivity is a significant predictor of species richness over the past c. 130 000 years. Our results not only show that the temperature-richness relationship in the deep-sea is remarkably similar to that found in terrestrial and shallow marine habitats, but also that species richness tracks temperature change over geological time, at least on scales of c. 100 000 years. Thus, predicting biotic response to global climate change in the deep sea would require better understanding of how temperature regulates the occurrences and geographical ranges of species. ??2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  16. Relationships of wild and domesticated rices (Oryza AA genome species) based upon whole chloroplast genome sequences

    PubMed Central

    Wambugu, Peterson W.; Brozynska, Marta; Furtado, Agnelo; Waters, Daniel L.; Henry, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Rice is the most important crop in the world, acting as the staple food for over half of the world’s population. The evolutionary relationships of cultivated rice and its wild relatives have remained contentious and inconclusive. Here we report on the use of whole chloroplast sequences to elucidate the evolutionary and phylogenetic relationships in the AA genome Oryza species, representing the primary gene pool of rice. This is the first study that has produced a well resolved and strongly supported phylogeny of the AA genome species. The pan tropical distribution of these rice relatives was found to be explained by long distance dispersal within the last million years. The analysis resulted in a clustering pattern that showed strong geographical differentiation. The species were defined in two primary clades with a South American/African clade with two species, O glumaepatula and O longistaminata, distinguished from all other species. The largest clade was comprised of an Australian clade including newly identified taxa and the African and Asian clades. This refined knowledge of the relationships between cultivated rice and the related wild species provides a strong foundation for more targeted use of wild genetic resources in rice improvement and efforts to ensure their conservation. PMID:26355750

  17. Species-environment relationships and vegetation patterns: Effects of spatial scale and tree life-stage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, T.J.; Bachand, R.R.; Onami, Y.; Binkley, D.

    1998-01-01

    Do relationships between species and environmental gradients strengthen or weaken with tree life-stage (i.e., small seedlings, large seedlings, saplings, and mature trees)? Strengthened relationships may lead to distinct forest type boundaries, or weakening connections could lead to gradual ecotones and heterogeneous forest landscapes. We quantified the changes in forest dominance (basal area of tree species by life-stage) and environmental factors (elevation, slope, aspect, intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), summer soil moisture, and soil depth and texture) across 14 forest ecotones (n = 584, 10 m x 10 m plots) in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, U.S.A. Local, ecotone-specific species-environment relationships, based on multiple regression techniques, generally strengthened from the small seedling stage (multiple R2 ranged from 0.00 to 0.26) to the tree stage (multiple R2 ranged from 0.20 to 0.61). At the landscape scale, combined canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) among species and for all tree life-stages suggested that the seedlings of most species became established in lower-elevation, drier sites than where mature trees of the same species dominated. However, conflicting evidence showed that species-environment relationships may weaken with tree life-stage. Seedlings were only found in a subset of plots (habitats) occupied by mature trees of the same species. At the landscape scale, CCA results showed that species-environment relationships weakened somewhat from the small seedling stage (86.4% of the variance explained by the first two axes) to the tree stage (76.6% of variance explained). The basal area of tree species co-occurring with Pinus contorta Doug. ex. Loud declined more gradually than P. contorta basal area declined across ecotones, resulting in less-distinct forest type boundaries. We conclude that broad, gradual ecotones and heterogeneous forest landscapes are created and maintained by: (1) sporadic establishment

  18. What we don't recognize can hurt us: a plea for awareness about cryptic species.

    PubMed

    de León, Gerardo Pérez-Ponce; Nadler, Steven A

    2010-04-01

    We conducted an extensive literature review on studies that have used DNA sequences to detect cryptic species of parasites during the last decade. Each literature citation that included the term "cryptic" or "sibling" species was analyzed to determine the approach used by the author(s). Reports were carefully filtered to retain only those that recognized the existence of cryptic species centered on the use of DNA sequences. Based on analysis of these papers, we comment on the different ways that parasite cryptic species are discovered in studies focusing on different aspects of the host-parasite relationship, or disciplines, within parasitology. We found a lack of methodological and theoretical uniformity in the discipline for finding and delimiting cryptic species, and we draw attention to the need for standardizing these approaches. We suggest that cryptic species, in the strict sense, are always provisionally cryptic, in that the possibility does exist that new morphological studies or techniques will reveal previously unknown diagnostic structural differences which will permit rapid and practical morphological diagnosis. To avoid future taxonomic confusion, we recommend that parasitologists describe (and formally name) cryptic species following standard taxonomic practice. PMID:19925040

  19. Taxonomic relationship among seven species of groupers (genus Epinephelus; family Serranidae) as revealed by RAPD fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Govindaraju, G S; Jayasankar, P

    2004-01-01

    Phenotypic identification of groupers of the genus Epinephelus is based on color patterns and a suite of morphologic characters. However, these characters often show intraspecific variations and differences between juveniles and adults of the same species. The present work is an attempt to study and ratify the status of Epinephelus spp. using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis based on samples drawn from southeast and southwest coasts of India. The RAPD fingerprints generated in Epinephelus diacanthus, E. areolatus, E. chlorostigma, E. bleekeri, E. coioides, E. tauvina, and E. malabaricus with 4 primers (OPA 01, OPA 07, OPF 08, and OPF 10) were consistent, reproducible, and yielded species-specific diagnostic markers in all the species. A total of 59 RAPD loci in the size range of 70 to 4500 bp were produced from all 4 arbitrary primers. An unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) dendogram was constructed based on genetic distance values to show the genetic relationships among the 7 species. All the individuals of each species formed monophyletic species clusters. The mean intraspecies genetic distance value (0.305) was significantly lower than the interspecies value (0.365). Epinephelus malabaricus was most distantly related to E. diacanthus and E. bleekeri. The genetic relationship was very close among E. coioides, E. tauvina, and E. malabaricus and also between E. chlorostigma and E. bleekeri. Within-species genetic polymorphism was highest in E. chlorostigma (49.15%) and lowest in E. tauvina (25.42%). PMID:15136913

  20. Relationship of Productivity to Species Richness in the Xinjiang Temperate Grassland

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between species richness (SR) and aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) is still a central and debated issue in community ecology. Previous studies have often emphasized the relationship of alpha diversity (number of species identity) to the mean ANPP with respect to the SR-ANPP relationship while neglecting the contribution of beta diversity (dissimilarity in species composition) to the mean ANPP and to the stability of ANPP (coefficient of ANPP: CV of ANPP). In this study, we used alpha and beta diversity, mean ANPP and the CV of ANPP collected from 159 sites and belonging to three vegetation types in the Xinjiang temperate grassland to first examine their trends along climatic factors and among different vegetation types and then test the relationship among alpha (beta) diversity and mean ANPP and the CV of ANPP. Our results showed that in the Xinjiang temperate grasslands, alpha diversity was positively and linearly correlated with MAP but unimodally correlated with MAT. Meanwhile, beta diversity was unimodally correlated with MAP but linearly correlated with MAT. Relative to desert steppe, meadow steppe and typical steppe had the highest alpha and beta diversity, respectively. Except for ANPP exhibiting a quadratic relationship with MAP, no significant relationship was found among ANPP, the CV of ANPP and climatic factors. ANPP and the CV of ANPP also exhibited no apparent patterns in variation among different vegetation types. Our results further showed that mean ANPP was closely associated with alpha diversity. Both linear and unimodal relationships were detected between alpha diversity and mean ANPP, but their particular form was texture-dependent. Meanwhile, the CV of ANPP was positively correlated with beta diversity. Our results indicated that in addition to incorporating alpha diversity and mean ANPP, incorporating beta diversity and the CV of ANPP could expand our understanding of the SR-ANPP relationship. PMID:27100676

  1. Comparing differences in species sensitivity to toxicants: Phenotypic plasticity versus concentration-response relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Kammenga, J.E.; Riksen, J.A.G.

    1996-09-01

    The comparison of species sensitivity to toxicants is classically derived from differences in the concentration-response relationships of a sensitive trait such as reproduction. The authors tested this general concept by conceiving the concentration-response relationship as a plastic response to a range of discrete environments. Using a demographic model based on life-cycle experiments for two nematode species (Plectus acuminatus and Heterocephalobus pauciannulatus) they related copper-induced plasticity in reproduction to changes in fitness, which was defined as the population growth rate. Daily reproduction (n{sub t}) in P. acuminatus was more sensitive to copper (EC20 = 48 {micro}M) than in H. pauciannulatus (EC20 = 138 {micro}M). However, the relationship between plasticity in n{sub t} and fitness showed that for both species, fitness was reduced with 5%. These findings imply that P. acuminatus and H. pauciannulatus are equally susceptible to toxicant-induced changes in n{sub t} despite their differences in EC20 values for reproduction. It may be concluded that differences in susceptibility of species to toxicants are not only determined by the effect on sensitive traits but also by the relationship between plasticity in this trait and fitness.

  2. Comment on "Worldwide evidence of a unimodal relationship between productivity and plant species richness"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fraser et al. (Reports, 17 July 2015, p. 302) report a unimodal relationship between productivity and species richness at regional and global scales, which they contrast with the results of Adler et al. (Reports, 23 September 2011, p. 1750). However, both data sets, when analyzed correctly, show cl...

  3. A multi-gene phylogeny provides additional insight into the relationships between several Ascosphaera species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ascosphaera fungi are highly associated with social and solitary bees. This genus includes an important group of bee pathogens, the chalkbrood fungi, and thus proper identification of species and an understanding of their relationships are important. However, Ascosphaera spp. are often unculturable...

  4. Genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships among sugarcane and related species determined from microsatellite DNA data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships were assessed among 105 clones of commercial sugarcane hybrids and related Saccharum species using 22 microsatellite (SSR) DNA markers. These included 17 sugarcane cultivars from the U.S. mainland, 23 S. officinarum clones, 16 S. robustum clones, 15 ...

  5. Phylogenetic Relationships of Japanese Auritibicen Species (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Cryptotympanini) Inferred from Mitochondrial and Nuclear Gene Sequences.

    PubMed

    Sota, Teiji; Kojima, Takanori; Lee, Young June; Lin, Chung-Ping

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the phylogenetic relationships and divergence times within the genus Auritibicen(Cicadidae: Cicadinae: Cryptotympanini), analyzing five Japanese species (A. japonicus, A. bihamatus,A. kyushyuensis, A. esakii and A. flammatus) and three species from East Asian mainland and Taiwan (A. atrofasciatus, A. intermedius and A. chujoi) using mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) and nuclear elongation factor 1-alpha (EF-1a) gene sequences. Although the EF-1a gene tree did not resolve the relationships among these Auritibicen species, the trees based on COI gene and the combined data set showed that Japanese taxa comprised three distinct lineages: the individual species A. flammatus and A. bihamatus, and the A. japonicus group, comprising A. japonicus, A. esakii and A. kyushyuensis from Japan and A. intermedius from Korea. In A. kyushyuensis, which comprises three populations in Kyushu, western Honshu and Shikoku, the specimens from western Honshu and Shikoku were closely related to each other, but not to the specimen from Kyushu; instead, they were sister to the Korean A. intermedius. The incongruence between the gene tree and species tree necessitates further population genetic and morphological studies to confirm the classification and species status of the western Honshu and Shikoku populations of A. kyushyuensis, which were originally described as two independent species. Divergence time estimation suggested that the most recent common ancestor of Auritibicen species studied dated back to the late Pliocene and that the species of the A. japonicus group diverged during the mid Pleistocene. Thus, the Pleistocene climatic fluctuation may have promoted the divergence of the Auritibicen species. PMID:27498799

  6. Integration of non-indigenous species within the interspecific abundance-occupancy relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigal, François; Whittaker, Robert J.; Triantis, Kostas A.; Borges, Paulo A. V.

    2013-04-01

    There is a broad consensus that habitat disturbance and introduction of non-indigenous species may dramatically modify community structure, particularly in insular ecosystems. However, it is less clear whether emergent macroecological patterns are similarly affected. The positive interspecific abundance-occupancy relationship (IAOR) is one of the most pervasive macroecological patterns, yet has rarely been analyzed for oceanic island assemblages. We use an extensive dataset for arthropods from six islands within the Azorean archipelago to test: (1) whether indigenous and non-indigenous species are distributed differently within the IAOR; and (2) to the extent that they are, can differences can be attributed to two indices of disturbance. We implemented modeling averaged methods using five of the most common IAOR models to derive an averaged IAOR fit for each island. After testing if species colonization status (indigenous versus non-indigenous) may explain the residuals of the IAOR, we identified true negative and positive outliers and tested the effect of colonization status on the likelihood of a species being a positive or negative outlier. We found that the indigenous and non-indigenous species are randomly distributed on both sides of the overall IAOR. Only for Flores Island, were non-indigenous species more aggregated than indigenous species. We were unable to detect a meaningful relationship between deviation from the IAOR and disturbance, despite the undoubted impact of both severe habitat loss and non-indigenous species on these oceanic islands. Our results show that the non-indigenous species have been integrated alongside indigenous species in the contemporary Azorean arthropod communities such that they are mostly undetectable by the study of the IAOR.

  7. Species richness - Energy relationships and dung beetle diversity across an aridity and trophic resource gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tshikae, B. Power; Davis, Adrian L. V.; Scholtz, Clarke H.

    2013-05-01

    Understanding factors that drive species richness and turnover across ecological gradients is important for insect conservation planning. To this end, we studied species richness - energy relationships and regional versus local factors that influence dung beetle diversity in game reserves along an aridity and trophic resource gradient in the Botswana Kalahari. Dung beetle species richness, alpha diversity, and abundance declined with increasing aridity from northeast to southwest and differed significantly between dung types (pig, elephant, cattle, sheep) and carrion (chicken livers). Patterns of between-study area species richness on ruminant dung (cattle, sheep) differed to other bait types. Patterns of species richness between bait types in two southwest study areas differed from those in four areas to the northeast. Regional species turnover between study areas was higher than local turnover between bait types. Patterns of southwest to northeast species loss showed greater consistency than northeast to southwest losses from larger assemblages. Towards the southwest, similarity to northeast assemblages declined steeply as beta diversity increased. High beta diversity and low similarity at gradsect extremes resulted from two groups of species assemblages showing either northeast or southwest biogeographical centres. The findings are consistent with the energy hypothesis that indicates insect species richness in lower latitudes is indirectly limited by declining water variables, which drive reduced food resources (lower energy availability) represented, here, by restriction of large mammals dropping large dung types to the northeast and dominance of pellet dropping mammals in the arid southwest Kalahari. The influence of theoretical causal mechanisms is discussed.

  8. The phylogenetic relationships of Caulobacter, Asticcacaulis and Brevundimonas species and their taxonomic implications.

    PubMed

    Sly, L I; Cox, T L; Beckenham, T B

    1999-04-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among the species of Caulobacter, Asticcacaulis and Brevundimonas were studied by comparison of their 16S rDNA sequences. The analysis of almost complete sequences confirmed the early evolutionary divergence of the freshwater and marine species of Caulobacter reported previously [Stahl, D. A., Key, R., Flesher, B. & Smit, J. (1992). J Bacteriol 174, 2193-2198]. The freshwater species formed two distinct clusters. One cluster contained the species Caulobacter bacteroides, Caulobacter crescentus, Caulobacter fusiformis and Caulobacter henricii. C. bacteroides and C. fusiformis are very closely related (sequence identity 99.8%). The second cluster was not exclusive and contained the specis Caulobacter intermedius, Caulobacter subvibrioides and Caulobacter variabilis, as well as Brevundimonas diminuta and Brevundimonas vesicularis. The marine species Caulobacter halobacteroides and Caulobacter maris were very closely related, with a sequence identity of 99.7%. These two species were most closely but distantly related to the marine hyphal/budding bacteria Hyphomonas jannaschiana and Hirschia baltica, which formed a deep phylogenetic line with Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodobacter capsulatus. Caulobacter leidyia is unrelated to the other species of Caulobacter and belongs to the alpha-4 subclass of the Proteobacteria, forming a distinct cluster with Asticcacaulis excentricus and Asticcacaulis biprosthecium. The taxonomic implications of the polyphyletic nature of the genus Caulobacter and the absence of a type culture for the type species of the genus Caulobacter vibrioides, are discussed. PMID:10319468

  9. The Relationship between Parasite Fitness and Host Condition in an Insect - Virus System

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Michelle; Myers, Judith H.

    2014-01-01

    Research in host-parasite evolutionary ecology has demonstrated that environmental variation plays a large role in mediating the outcome of parasite infection. For example, crowding or low food availability can reduce host condition and make them more vulnerable to parasite infection. This observation that poor-condition hosts often suffer more from parasite infection compared to healthy hosts has led to the assumption that parasite productivity is higher in poor-condition hosts. However, the ubiquity of this negative relationship between host condition and parasite fitness is unknown. Moreover, examining the effect of environmental variation on parasite fitness has been largely overlooked in the host-parasite literature. Here we investigate the relationship between parasite fitness and host condition by using a laboratory experiment with the cabbage looper Trichoplusia ni and its viral pathogen, AcMNPV, and by surveying published host-parasite literature. Our experiments demonstrated that virus productivity was positively correlated with host food availability and the literature survey revealed both positive and negative relationships between host condition and parasite fitness. Together these data demonstrate that contrary to previous assumptions, parasite fitness can be positively or negatively correlated with host fitness. We discuss the significance of these findings for host-parasite population biology. PMID:25208329

  10. Individual-area relationship best explains goose species density in wetlands.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Jia, Qiang; Prins, Herbert H T; Cao, Lei; de Boer, Willem Fred

    2015-01-01

    Explaining and predicting animal distributions is one of the fundamental objectives in ecology and conservation biology. Animal habitat selection can be regulated by top-down and bottom-up processes, and is mediated by species interactions. Species varying in body size respond differently to top-down and bottom-up determinants, and hence understanding these allometric responses to those determinants is important for conservation. In this study, using two differently sized goose species wintering in the Yangtze floodplain, we tested the predictions derived from three different hypotheses (individual-area relationship, food resource and disturbance hypothesis) to explain the spatial and temporal variation in densities of two goose species. Using Generalized Linear Mixed Models with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique, we demonstrated that goose density was positive correlated with patch area size, suggesting that the individual area-relationship best predicts differences in goose densities. Moreover, the other predictions, related to food availability and disturbance, were not significant. Buffalo grazing probably facilitated greater white-fronted geese, as the number of buffalos was positively correlated to the density of this species. We concluded that patch area size is the most important factor determining the density of goose species in our study area. Patch area size is directly determined by water levels in the Yangtze floodplain, and hence modifying the hydrological regimes can enlarge the capacity of these wetlands for migratory birds. PMID:25996502

  11. Species traits and environmental conditions govern the relationship between biodiversity effects across trophic levels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spooner, D.E.; Vaughn, C.C.; Galbraith, H.S.

    2012-01-01

    Changing environments can have divergent effects on biodiversity-ecosystem function relationships at alternating trophic levels. Freshwater mussels fertilize stream foodwebs through nutrient excretion, and mussel species-specific excretion rates depend on environmental conditions. We asked how differences in mussel diversity in varying environments influence the dynamics between primary producers and consumers. We conducted field experiments manipulating mussel richness under summer (low flow, high temperature) and fall (moderate flow and temperature) conditions, measured nutrient limitation, algal biomass and grazing chironomid abundance, and analyzed the data with non-transgressive overyielding and tripartite biodiversity partitioning analyses. Algal biomass and chironomid abundance were best explained by trait-independent complementarity among mussel species, but the relationship between biodiversity effects across trophic levels (algae and grazers) depended on seasonal differences in mussel species' trait expression (nutrient excretion and activity level). Both species identity and overall diversity effects were related to the magnitude of nutrient limitation. Our results demonstrate that biodiversity of a resource-provisioning (nutrients and habitat) group of species influences foodweb dynamics and that understanding species traits and environmental context are important for interpreting biodiversity experiments. ?? 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  12. Potential Global-Local Inconsistency in Species-Area Relationships Fitting

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xubin; Zhang, Xiuling; Wang, Feng; Zhu, Shuifang

    2016-01-01

    The Species-Area Relationship (SAR) has been widely employed to assess species diversity and predict species extinction. Thus far, although many functions were proposed to fit SAR based on field observations or simulation results, the shape of SAR curve has been debated extensively over decades. Here we uncover a potential global-local inconsistency in SARs fitting simulation blocked by the limitation of large area sampling before. The results indicated that power and logarithm SAR formulas were good for the fitting if the sampling area range is not large which is also the practical sampling interval in the field. However, for the logarithm SAR fitting, a sigmoid curve occurred in the log10 Area−Number of Species plane, and for the power SAR fitting, the curve is convex instead of a straight line as assumed when linear regression was applied. In conclusion, neither the power SAR nor the logarithm SAR fitted to simulated data is linear at large sampling range as commonly assumed in previous studies, no matter the distribution of species abundance is log-normal or negative-binomial, which unmasks the global-local inconsistency in SARs fitting. Thus, misestimates of total number of species or other derivation parameters can occur if the fitted relationship is extrapolated beyond the range of the small and intermediate sampling size. PMID:27625662

  13. Potential Global-Local Inconsistency in Species-Area Relationships Fitting.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xubin; Zhang, Xiuling; Wang, Feng; Zhu, Shuifang

    2016-01-01

    The Species-Area Relationship (SAR) has been widely employed to assess species diversity and predict species extinction. Thus far, although many functions were proposed to fit SAR based on field observations or simulation results, the shape of SAR curve has been debated extensively over decades. Here we uncover a potential global-local inconsistency in SARs fitting simulation blocked by the limitation of large area sampling before. The results indicated that power and logarithm SAR formulas were good for the fitting if the sampling area range is not large which is also the practical sampling interval in the field. However, for the logarithm SAR fitting, a sigmoid curve occurred in the log10 Area-Number of Species plane, and for the power SAR fitting, the curve is convex instead of a straight line as assumed when linear regression was applied. In conclusion, neither the power SAR nor the logarithm SAR fitted to simulated data is linear at large sampling range as commonly assumed in previous studies, no matter the distribution of species abundance is log-normal or negative-binomial, which unmasks the global-local inconsistency in SARs fitting. Thus, misestimates of total number of species or other derivation parameters can occur if the fitted relationship is extrapolated beyond the range of the small and intermediate sampling size. PMID:27625662

  14. Individual-Area Relationship Best Explains Goose Species Density in Wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Herbert H. T.; Cao, Lei; de Boer, Willem Fred

    2015-01-01

    Explaining and predicting animal distributions is one of the fundamental objectives in ecology and conservation biology. Animal habitat selection can be regulated by top-down and bottom-up processes, and is mediated by species interactions. Species varying in body size respond differently to top-down and bottom-up determinants, and hence understanding these allometric responses to those determinants is important for conservation. In this study, using two differently sized goose species wintering in the Yangtze floodplain, we tested the predictions derived from three different hypotheses (individual-area relationship, food resource and disturbance hypothesis) to explain the spatial and temporal variation in densities of two goose species. Using Generalized Linear Mixed Models with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique, we demonstrated that goose density was positive correlated with patch area size, suggesting that the individual area-relationship best predicts differences in goose densities. Moreover, the other predictions, related to food availability and disturbance, were not significant. Buffalo grazing probably facilitated greater white-fronted geese, as the number of buffalos was positively correlated to the density of this species. We concluded that patch area size is the most important factor determining the density of goose species in our study area. Patch area size is directly determined by water levels in the Yangtze floodplain, and hence modifying the hydrological regimes can enlarge the capacity of these wetlands for migratory birds. PMID:25996502

  15. Species-area relationships are modulated by trophic rank, habitat affinity, and dispersal ability.

    PubMed

    van Noordwijk, C G E; Verberk, Wilco C E P; Turin, Hans; Heijerman, Theodoor; Alders, Kees; Dekoninck, Wouter; Hannig, Karsten; Regan, Eugenie; McCormack, Stephen; Brown, Mark J F; Remke, Eva; Siepel, Henk; Berg, Matty P; Bonte, Dries

    2015-02-01

    In the face of ongoing habitat fragmentation, species-area relationships (SARs) have gained renewed interest and are increasingly used to set conservation priorities. An important question is how large habitat areas need to be to optimize biodiversity conservation. The relationship between area and species richness is explained by colonization-extinction dynamics, whereby smaller sites harbor smaller populations, which are more prone to extinction than the larger populations sustained by larger sites. These colonization-extinction dynamics are predicted to vary with trophic rank, habitat affinity, and dispersal ability of the species. However, empirical evidence for the effect of these species characteristics on SARs remains inconclusive. In this study we used carabid beetle data from 58 calcareous grassland sites to investigate how calcareous grassland area affects species richness and activity density for species differing in trophic rank, habitat affinity, and dispersal ability. In addition, we investigated how SARs are affected by the availability of additional calcareous grassland in the surrounding landscape. Beetle species richness and activity density increased with calcareous grassland area for zoophagous species that are specialists for dry grasslands and, to a lesser extent, for zoophagous habitat generalists. Phytophagous species and zoophagous forest and wet-grassland specialists were not affected by calcareous grassland area. The dependence of species on large single sites increased with decreasing dispersal ability for species already vulnerable to calcareous grassland area. Additional calcareous grassland in the landscape had a positive effect on local species richness of both dry-grassland specialists and generalists, but this effect was restricted to a few hundred meters. Our results demonstrate that SARs are affected by trophic rank, habitat affinity, and dispersal ability. These species characteristics do not operate independently, but should be

  16. Wood Chemical Composition in Species of Cactaceae: The Relationship between Lignification and Stem Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Canché-Escamilla, Gonzalo; Soto-Hernández, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    In Cactaceae, wood anatomy is related to stem morphology in terms of the conferred support. In species of cacti with dimorphic wood, a unique process occurs in which the cambium stops producing wide-band tracheids (WBTs) and produces fibers; this is associated with the aging of individuals and increases in size. Stem support and lignification have only been studied in fibrous tree-like species, and studies in species with WBTs or dimorphic wood are lacking. In this study, we approach this process with a chemical focus, emphasizing the role of wood lignification. We hypothesized that the degree of wood lignification in Cactaceae increases with height of the species and that its chemical composition varies with wood anatomy. To test this, we studied the chemical composition (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin content) in 13 species (2 WBTs wood, 3 dimorphic, and 8 fibrous) with contrasting growth forms. We also analyzed lignification in dimorphic and fibrous species to determine the chemical features of WBTs and fibers and their relationship with stem support. The lignin contents were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. We found that 11 species have a higher percentage (>35%) of lignin in their wood than other angiosperms or gymnosperms. The lignin chemical composition in fibrous species is similar to that of other dicots, but it is markedly heterogeneous in non-fibrous species where WBTs are abundant. The lignification in WBTs is associated with the resistance to high water pressure within cells rather than the contribution to mechanical support. Dimorphic wood species are usually richer in syringyl lignin, and tree-like species with lignified rays have more guaiacyl lignin. The results suggest that wood anatomy and lignin distribution play an important role in the chemical composition of wood, and further research is needed at the cellular level. PMID:25880223

  17. Phylogenetic Relationships among Asian species of Petaurista (Rodentia, Sciuridae), Inferred from Mitochondrial Cytochrome b Gene Sequences.

    PubMed

    Oshida, T; Lin, L K; Masuda, R; Yoshida, M C

    2000-01-01

    To elucidate the phylogenetic relationships among four species belonging to the genus Petaurista (P. alborufus castaneus, P. alborufus lena, P. leucogenys leucogenys, P. leucogenys nikkonis, P. petaurista melanotus, and P. philippensis grandis), we investigated the partial sequences (1,068 bp) of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene for these giant flying squirrels. Phylogenetic trees (NJ, MP, and ML trees) constructed from cytochrome b sequences indicated that P. leucogenys was grouped independently with other species, and that P. philippensis was most closely related to P. petaurista with 99-100% bootstrap values. In addition, two subspecies of P. alborufus did not form a single clade: P. alborufus castaneus from China was most distantly related to the other species, whereas P. alborufus lena from Taiwan was closely related to P. petaurista and P. philippensis with 82-90% bootstrap values. This result suggests that it is reasonable to regard P. alborufus lena as a distinct species from P. alborufus castaneus. PMID:18494567

  18. Species-environment relationships and potential for distribution modelling in coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snickars, M.; Gullström, M.; Sundblad, G.; Bergström, U.; Downie, A.-L.; Lindegarth, M.; Mattila, J.

    2014-01-01

    Due to increasing pressure on the marine environment there is a growing need to understand species-environment relationships. To provide background for prioritising among variables (predictors) for use in distribution models, the relevance of predictors for benthic species was reviewed using the coastal Baltic Sea as a case-study area. Significant relationships for three response groups (fish, macroinvertebrates, macrovegetation) and six predictor categories (bottom topography, biotic features, hydrography, wave exposure, substrate and spatiotemporal variability) were extracted from 145 queried peer-reviewed field-studies covering three decades and six subregions. In addition, the occurrence of interaction among predictors was analysed. Hydrography was most often found in significant relationships, had low level of interaction with other predictors, but also had the most non-significant relationships. Depth and wave exposure were important in all subregions and are readily available, increasing their applicability for cross-regional modelling efforts. Otherwise, effort to model species distributions may prove challenging at larger scale as the relevance of predictors differed among both response groups and regions. Fish and hard bottom macrovegetation have the largest modelling potential, as they are structured by a set of predictors that at the same time are accurately mapped. A general importance of biotic features implies that these need to be accounted for in distribution modelling, but the mapping of most biotic features is challenging, which currently lowers the applicability. The presence of interactions suggests that predictive methods allowing for interactive effects are preferable. Detailing these complexities is important for future distribution modelling.

  19. Higher photosynthetic capacity and different functional trait scaling relationships in erect bryophytes compared with prostrate species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Liu, Xin; Bao, Weikai

    2016-02-01

    Ecophysiological studies of bryophytes have generally been conducted at the shoot or canopy scale. However, their growth forms are diverse, and knowledge of whether bryophytes with different shoot structures have different functional trait levels and scaling relationships is limited. We collected 27 bryophyte species and categorised them into two groups based on their growth forms: erect and prostrate species. Twenty-one morphological, nutrient and photosynthetic traits were quantified. Trait levels and bivariate trait scaling relationships across species were compared between the two groups. The two groups had similar mean values for shoot mass per area (SMA), light saturation point and mass-based nitrogen (N(mass)) and phosphorus concentrations. Erect bryophytes possessed higher values for mass-based chlorophyll concentration (Chl(mass)), light-saturated assimilation rate (A(mass)) and photosynthetic nitrogen/phosphorus use efficiency. N(mass), Chl(mass) and A(mass) were positively related, and these traits were negatively associated with SMA. Furthermore, the slope of the regression of N(mass) versus Chl(mass) was steeper for erect bryophytes than that for prostrate bryophytes, whereas this pattern was reversed for the relationship between Chl(mass) and A(mass). In conclusion, erect bryophytes possess higher photosynthetic capacities than prostrate species. Furthermore, erect bryophytes invest more nitrogen in chloroplast pigments to improve their light-harvesting ability, while the structure of prostrate species permits more efficient light capture. This study confirms the effect of growth form on the functional trait levels and scaling relationships of bryophytes. It also suggests that bryophytes could be good models for investigating the carbon economy and nutrient allocation of plants at the shoot rather than the leaf scale. PMID:26552378

  20. Phylogenetic relationships within the Callicebus cupreus species group (Pitheciidae: Primates): Biogeographic and taxonomic implications.

    PubMed

    Hoyos, Manuel; Bloor, Paul; Defler, Thomas; Vermeer, Jan; Röhe, Fabio; Farias, Izeni

    2016-09-01

    The genus Callicebus (Thomas, 1903) is one of the most diverse of Neotropical primate genera and the only extant member of the Callicebinae subfamily. It has a widespread distribution from Colombia to Brazil, Bolivia, Peru and northern Paraguay. Coat colouring and colour pattern vary substantially within the genus, and this has led to the description of numerous species and subspecies, as well as numerous species groups. However, a lack of molecular phylogenetic analyses on the genus means that phylogenetic relationships and biogeographic history of species are poorly understood. Here, we examined phylogenetic relationships and patterns of diversification within the Callicebus cupreus species Group (sensu Kobayashi, 1995) using complete mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b gene sequence. Analyses indicate that the Callicebus cupreus Group underwent recent and extensive diversification. The common ancestor appears to have emerged some 2.3 million years ago (Ma) from a centre of origin in the western Amazon region, followed by diversification of the group between about 1.5 and 1.2Ma. Phylogenetic analyses were able to recover most previously described species (including the recently described Colombian endemic Callicebus caquetensis). However, there are some notable inconsistences between the obtained phylogeny and current taxonomy. Some previously recognized taxa were not separated by our data (e.g., Callicebus caligatus and Callicebus dubius), while currently unrecognized species diversity was uncovered within C. cupreus in the form of two divergent lineages: one of which exhibited greater phylogenetic similarity to species from the C. moloch Group. Based on the present study, we challenge current taxonomic arrangements for the C. cupreus species Group and call for a thorough taxonomic revision within the genus Callicebus. PMID:27235549

  1. Phylogenetic relationships in European Ceriporiopsis species inferred from nuclear and mitochondrial ribosomal DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Tomšovský, Michal; Menkis, Audrius; Vasaitis, Rimvydas

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this work was to clarify taxonomy and examine evolutionary relationships within European Ceriporiopsis species using a combined analysis of the large subunit (nLSU) nuclear rRNA and small subunit (mtSSU) mitochondrial rRNA gene sequences. Data from the ITS region were applied to enhance the view of the phylogenetic relationships among different species. The studied samples grouped into four complex clades, suggesting that the genus Ceriporiopsis is polyphyletic. The generic type Ceriporiopsis gilvescens formed a separate group together with Ceriporiopsis guidella and Phlebia spp. in the phlebioid clade. In this clade, the closely related species Ceriporiopsis resinascens and Ceriporiopsis pseudogilvescens grouped together with Ceriporiopsis aneirina. C. resinascens and C. pseudogilvescens have identical LSU and SSU sequences but differ in ITS. Ceriporiopsis pannocincta also fell in the phlebioid clade, but showed closer proximity to Gloeoporus dichrous than to C. gilvescens or C. aneirina-C. pseudogilvescens-C. resinascens group. Another clade was composed of a Ceriporiopsis balaenae-Ceriporiopsis consobrina group and was found to be closely related to Antrodiella and Frantisekia, with the overall clade highly reminiscent of the residual polyporoid clade. The monotypic genus Pouzaroporia, erected in the past for Ceriporiopsis subrufa due to its remarkable morphological differences, also fell within the residual polyporoid clade. Ceriporiopsis subvermispora held an isolated position from the other species of the genus. Therefore, the previously proposed name Gelatoporia subvermispora has been adopted for this species. Physisporinus rivulosus appeared unrelated to two other European Physisporinus species. Moreover, Ceriporiopsis (=Skeletocutis) jelicii grouped in a separate clade, distinct from Ceriporiopsis species. Finally, the ITS data demonstrated the proximity of some Ceriporiopsis species (Ceriporiopsis portcrosensis and Ceriporiopsis

  2. Morphometric Relationship, Phylogenetic Correlation, and Character Evolution in the Species-Rich Genus Aphis (Hemiptera: Aphididae)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyojoong; Lee, Wonhoon; Lee, Seunghwan

    2010-01-01

    Background The species-rich genus Aphis consists of more than 500 species, many of them host-specific on a wide range of plants, yet very similar in general appearance due to convergence toward particular morphological types. Most species have been historically clustered into four main phenotypic groups (gossypii, craccivora, fabae, and spiraecola groups). To confirm the morphological hypotheses between these groups and to examine the characteristics that determine them, multivariate morphometric analyses were performed using 28 characters measured/counted from 40 species. To infer whether the morphological relationships are correlated with the genetic relationships, we compared the morphometric dataset with a phylogeny reconstructed from the combined dataset of three mtDNA and one nuclear DNA regions. Principal Findings Based on a comparison of morphological and molecular datasets, we confirmed morphological reduction or regression in the gossypii group unlike in related groups. Most morphological characteristics of the gossypii group were less variable than for the other groups. Due to these, the gossypii group could be morphologically well separated from the craccivora, fabae, and spiraecola groups. In addition, the correlation of the rates of evolution between morphological and DNA datasets was highly significant in their diversification. Conclusions The morphological separation between the gossypii group and the other species-groups are congruent with their phylogenetic relationships. Analysis of trait evolution revealed that the morphological traits found to be significant based on the morphometric analyses were confidently correlated with the phylogeny. The dominant patterns of trait evolution resulting in increased rates of short branches and temporally later evolution are likely suitable for the modality of Aphis speciation because they have adapted species-specifically, rapidly, and more recently on many different host plants. PMID:20657654

  3. Using species-area relationships to inform baseline conservation targets for the deep North East Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Foster, Nicola L; Foggo, Andrew; Howell, Kerry L

    2013-01-01

    Demands on the resources of the deep-sea have increased in recent years. Consequently, the need to create and implement a comprehensive network of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) to help manage and protect these resources has become a global political priority. Efforts are currently underway to implement MPA networks in the deep North East Atlantic. To ensure these networks are effective, it is essential that baseline information be available to inform the conservation planning process. Using empirical data, we calculated conservation targets for sessile benthic invertebrates in the deep North East Atlantic for consideration during the planning process. We assessed Species-Area Relationships across two depth bands (200-1100 m and 1100-1800 m) and nine substrata. Conservation targets were predicted for each substratum within each depth band using z-values obtained from fitting a power model to the Species-Area Relationships of observed and estimated species richness (Chao1). Results suggest an MPA network incorporating 10% of the North East Atlantic's deep-sea area would protect approximately 58% and 49% of sessile benthic species for the depth bands 200-1100 m and 1100-1800 m, respectively. Species richness was shown to vary with substratum type indicating that, along with depth, substratum information needs to be incorporated into the conservation planning process to ensure the most effective MPA network is implemented in the deep North East Atlantic. PMID:23527053

  4. Using Species-Area Relationships to Inform Baseline Conservation Targets for the Deep North East Atlantic

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Nicola L.; Foggo, Andrew; Howell, Kerry L.

    2013-01-01

    Demands on the resources of the deep-sea have increased in recent years. Consequently, the need to create and implement a comprehensive network of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) to help manage and protect these resources has become a global political priority. Efforts are currently underway to implement MPA networks in the deep North East Atlantic. To ensure these networks are effective, it is essential that baseline information be available to inform the conservation planning process. Using empirical data, we calculated conservation targets for sessile benthic invertebrates in the deep North East Atlantic for consideration during the planning process. We assessed Species-Area Relationships across two depth bands (200–1100 m and 1100–1800 m) and nine substrata. Conservation targets were predicted for each substratum within each depth band using z-values obtained from fitting a power model to the Species-Area Relationships of observed and estimated species richness (Chao1). Results suggest an MPA network incorporating 10% of the North East Atlantic’s deep-sea area would protect approximately 58% and 49% of sessile benthic species for the depth bands 200–1100 m and 1100–1800 m, respectively. Species richness was shown to vary with substratum type indicating that, along with depth, substratum information needs to be incorporated into the conservation planning process to ensure the most effective MPA network is implemented in the deep North East Atlantic. PMID:23527053

  5. Species richness-environment relationships of European arthropods at two spatial grains: habitats and countries.

    PubMed

    Entling, Martin H; Schweiger, Oliver; Bacher, Sven; Espadaler, Xavier; Hickler, Thomas; Kumschick, Sabrina; Woodcock, Ben A; Nentwig, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    We study how species richness of arthropods relates to theories concerning net primary productivity, ambient energy, water-energy dynamics and spatial environmental heterogeneity. We use two datasets of arthropod richness with similar spatial extents (Scandinavia to Mediterranean), but contrasting spatial grain (local habitat and country). Samples of ground-dwelling spiders, beetles, bugs and ants were collected from 32 paired habitats at 16 locations across Europe. Species richness of these taxonomic groups was also determined for 25 European countries based on the Fauna Europaea database. We tested effects of net primary productivity (NPP), annual mean temperature (T), annual rainfall (R) and potential evapotranspiration of the coldest month (PET(min)) on species richness and turnover. Spatial environmental heterogeneity within countries was considered by including the ranges of NPP, T, R and PET(min). At the local habitat grain, relationships between species richness and environmental variables differed strongly between taxa and trophic groups. However, species turnover across locations was strongly correlated with differences in T. At the country grain, species richness was significantly correlated with environmental variables from all four theories. In particular, species richness within countries increased strongly with spatial heterogeneity in T. The importance of spatial heterogeneity in T for both species turnover across locations and for species richness within countries suggests that the temperature niche is an important determinant of arthropod diversity. We suggest that, unless climatic heterogeneity is constant across sampling units, coarse-grained studies should always account for environmental heterogeneity as a predictor of arthropod species richness, just as studies with variable area of sampling units routinely consider area. PMID:23029288

  6. Species Richness-Environment Relationships of European Arthropods at Two Spatial Grains: Habitats and Countries

    PubMed Central

    Entling, Martin H.; Schweiger, Oliver; Bacher, Sven; Espadaler, Xavier; Hickler, Thomas; Kumschick, Sabrina; Woodcock, Ben A.; Nentwig, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    We study how species richness of arthropods relates to theories concerning net primary productivity, ambient energy, water-energy dynamics and spatial environmental heterogeneity. We use two datasets of arthropod richness with similar spatial extents (Scandinavia to Mediterranean), but contrasting spatial grain (local habitat and country). Samples of ground-dwelling spiders, beetles, bugs and ants were collected from 32 paired habitats at 16 locations across Europe. Species richness of these taxonomic groups was also determined for 25 European countries based on the Fauna Europaea database. We tested effects of net primary productivity (NPP), annual mean temperature (T), annual rainfall (R) and potential evapotranspiration of the coldest month (PETmin) on species richness and turnover. Spatial environmental heterogeneity within countries was considered by including the ranges of NPP, T, R and PETmin. At the local habitat grain, relationships between species richness and environmental variables differed strongly between taxa and trophic groups. However, species turnover across locations was strongly correlated with differences in T. At the country grain, species richness was significantly correlated with environmental variables from all four theories. In particular, species richness within countries increased strongly with spatial heterogeneity in T. The importance of spatial heterogeneity in T for both species turnover across locations and for species richness within countries suggests that the temperature niche is an important determinant of arthropod diversity. We suggest that, unless climatic heterogeneity is constant across sampling units, coarse-grained studies should always account for environmental heterogeneity as a predictor of arthropod species richness, just as studies with variable area of sampling units routinely consider area. PMID:23029288

  7. Scale Dependence in the Species-Discharge Relationship for Fishes of the Southeastern U.S.A.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Species-discharge relationships (SDR) are aquatic analogues of species-area relationships, and are increasingly used in both basic research and conservation planning. SDR studies are often limited, however, by two shortcomings. First, they do not determine whether the reported ...

  8. Genetic relationship among Labisia pumila (Myrsinaceae) species based on ISSR-PCR.

    PubMed

    Karimi, E; Jaafar, H Z E; Aziz, M A; Taheri, S; AzadiGonbad, R

    2014-01-01

    The genus Labisia (Myrsinaceae) is a popular medicinal plant in Malaysia. We examined the genetic relationship among three varieties of L. pumila var. pumila, L. pumila var. alata, L. pumila var. lanceolata and Labisia paucifolia using an ISSR assay. Fifty-eight primers were tested, among which 18 gave reliable polymorphic banding patterns; these yielded 264 polymorphic markers. A similarity matrix was used to construct a dendrogram, and a principal component plot was developed to examine genetic relationships among varieties. Jaccard's similarity coefficient among species ranged from 0.09 to 0.14. At a similarity of 0.117%, species were divided into two main clusters. The mean value of the observed number of alleles, the effective number of alleles, mean Nei's gene diversity, and Shannon's information index were 1.98, 1.64, 0.38, and 0.57, respectively. PMID:24841662

  9. Relationships among 3 Kochia species based on PCR-generated molecular sequences and molecular cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Lee, B S; Kim, M Y; Wang, R R-C; Waldron, B L

    2005-12-01

    Forage kochia (Kochia prostrata ssp. virescens 'Immigrant' is native to the arid and semiarid regions of central Eurasia. It was introduced into the United States in 1966 as PI 314929 and released as a perennial forage shrub in 1984. Kochia americana is a perennial native to the United States, whereas Kochia scorparia is an introduced annual species that became a weed. To assess both the breeding potential and the possibility of genetic contamination, relationships among the 3 Kochia species were analyzed using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers, sequence tagged site (STS) marker sequences of the chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase gene (ndhF), genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), and multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (MC-FISH). Seventy decamer random primers yielded 458 polymorphic bands from 9 plants of K. americana, 20 plants of K. prostrata, and 7 plants of K. scoparia. Fifty-four and 55 species-specific RAPD markers were identified for K. americana and K. prostrata, whereas 80 RAPD markers were specific to K. scoparia. Based on the presence or absence of informative RAPD markers, the 3 species always grouped into 3 distinct clusters in a NTSYSpc2.01b-generated dendrogram. The same relationships were found among the 3 Kochia species based on ndhF DNA sequence divergence. Using a set of 7 STS markers that can identify each Kochia species, we did not find a single interspecific hybrid from artificial hybridizations among the 3 Kochia species. In GISH studies, chromosomes of 1 species fluoresced in green only when they were probed by genomic DNA of the same species. Cross-hybridization by genomic DNA of another species was not observed. In FISH studies using pTa71 (for 18S-5.8S-26S rDNAs) and pScT7 (for 5S rDNA) as probes, there were 1, 1 and 3 pTa71 sites and 2, 1, and 1 pScT7 sites in each haplome of K. prostrata, K. americana, and K. scoparia, respectively. It is concluded that these 3 Kochia species are so genomically distinct that gene

  10. Relationships of the Woody Medicago Species (Section Dendrotelis) Assessed by Molecular Cytogenetic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Rosato, Marcela; Castro, Mercedes; Rosselló, Josep A.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims The organization of rDNA genes in the woody medic species from the agronomically important Medicago section Dendrotelis was analysed to gain insight into their taxonomic relationships, to assess the levels of infraspecific variation concerning ribosomal loci in a restricted and fragmented insular species (M. citrina) and to assess the nature of its polyploidy. Methods Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used for physical mapping of 5S and 45S ribosomal DNA genes in the three species of section Dendrotelis (M. arborea, M. citrina, M. strasseri) and the related M. marina from section Medicago. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) was used to assess the genomic relationships of the polyploid M. citrina with the putatively related species from section Dendrotelis. Key Results The diploid (2n = 16) M. marina has a single 45S and two 5S rDNA loci, a pattern usually detected in previous studies of Medicago diploid species. However, polyploid species from section Dendrotelis depart from expectations. The tetraploid species (2n = 32) M. arborea and M. strasseri have one 45S rDNA locus and two 5S rDNA loci, whereas in the hexaploid (2n = 48) M. citrina four 45S rDNA and five 5S rDNA loci have been detected. No single chromosome of M. citrina was uniformly labelled after using genomic probes from M. arborea and M. strasseri. Instead, cross-hybridization signals in M. citrina were restricted to terminal chromosome arms and NOR regions. Conclusions FISH results support the close taxonomic interrelationship between M. arborea and M. strasseri. In these tetraploid species, NOR loci have experienced a diploidization event through physical loss of sequences, a cytogenetic feature so far not reported in other species of the genus. The high number of rDNA loci and GISH results support the specific status for the hexaploid M. citrina, and it is suggested that this species is not an autopolyploid derivative of M. arborea or M. strasseri. Further, molecular

  11. Exploring the relationship between species discrimination and plant functional types with hyperspectral remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, K. L.; Roberts, D. A.; Dennison, P. E.; Alonzo, M.

    2012-12-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing data has been used extensively to map vegetation function and to classify plant functional types (PFTs) and species. Still, room remains to explore how these two exercises are related. Species-specific variations can hinder the broader applicability of models, and likewise, the role of functional differences in species discrimination has only recently been conceptually framed. The relationship between our ability to discriminate species with hyperspectral data and how species are grouped into plant functional types bears examination. Here we present an exploratory data analysis of this relationship using hyperspectral data acquired by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) for approximately 56 plant species over five ecosystems. We address three main research questions: 1) How spectrally separable are species overall?; 2) Which wavelengths and functional indices/features best discriminate species and do these relate to functional differences?; and 3) What optical functional types appear to exist across species? Reflectance spectra from each site were extracted from areas of known species dominance, and a suite of vegetation indices and spectral feature parameters (e.g., red edge wavelength) were calculated. Reflectance data and index/feature data were used separately in analyses. Classification via Canonical Discriminant Analysis (CDA) was used to reduce data dimensionality and determine spectral separability across all species. The resulting kappa coefficient represents overall class separability, and the error matrix contains information on which pairs of species were more or less separable. The importance of individual variables to species discrimination was evaluated using the total structure coefficients for each function. These allowed us to identify the information a function carries that is useful for discrimination. We also calculated the potency index, a measure of the total contribution of each variable

  12. Evolutionary relationships of Drosophila mojavensis geographic host races and their sister species Drosophila arizonae.

    PubMed

    Reed, L K; Nyboer, M; Markow, T A

    2007-03-01

    The cactophilic Drosophila mojavensis species group living in the deserts and dry tropical forests of the southwestern United States and Mexico provides a valuable system for studies in diversification and speciation. Rigorous studies of the relationships between host races of D. mojavensis and the relationships among the members of the species group (D. mojavensis, Drosophila arizona, and Drosophila navojoa) are lacking. We used mitochondrial CO1 sequence data to address the phylogenetics and population genetics of this species group. In this study we have found that the sister species D. mojavensis and D. arizonae share no mitochondrial haplotypes and thus show no evidence for recent introgression. We estimate the divergence time between D. mojavensis and D. arizonae to be between 1.91 and 2.97 million years ago. D. arizonae shows little structure in our population genetic analyses but there is phylogenetic differentiation between southeastern and northern populations of D. arizonae. Drosophila mojavensis shows significant population and phylogenetic structure across the four geographic regions of its distribution. The mitochondrial data support an origin of D. mojavensis on the mainland with early differentiation into the populations now found in the Mojave Desert and the Mainland Sonoran Desert and later colonization of the Baja Peninsula, in contrast to previous models. Also, the sister clade to D. mojavensis/D. arizonae includes D. navojoa and Drosophila huaylasi. By defining the genetic relationships among these populations, we provide a foundation for more sophisticated hypothesis testing regarding the timing of early speciation events and host switches in this species group. PMID:17305857

  13. Resolution of inter and intra-species relationships of the West Indian fruit fly Anastrepha obliqua.

    PubMed

    Scally, M; Into, F; Thomas, D B; Ruiz-Arce, R; Barr, N B; Schuenzel, E L

    2016-08-01

    The West Indian fruit fly, Anastrepha obliqua (Diptera: Tephritidae), is an economically important pest that inhabits areas of South and Central America, Mexico and the Caribbean with occasional infestations in the southern United States. We examine intra-specific relationships within A. obliqua as well as interspecific relationships to other Anastrepha species using a multi-locus data set comprising nine loci (seven nuclear, two mitochondrial) with 105 operational taxonomic units. The results based on a concatenated set of nuclear loci strongly support the monophyly of A. obliqua and most of the other species previously identified by morphology. A split between Peruvian A. obliqua samples and those from other locations was also identified. These results contrast with prior findings of relationships within A. obliqua based on mitochondrial data, as we found a marked discrepancy between nuclear and mitochondrial loci. These analyses suggest that introgression, particularly between A. obliqua and fraterculus species, may be one explanation for the discrepancy and the high mitochondrial diversity reported for A. obliqua could be the result of incomplete lineage sorting. PMID:27126185

  14. Universal species-area and endemics-area relationships at continental scales.

    PubMed

    Storch, David; Keil, Petr; Jetz, Walter

    2012-08-01

    Despite the broad conceptual and applied relevance of how the number of species or endemics changes with area (the species-area and endemics-area relationships (SAR and EAR)), our understanding of universality and pervasiveness of these patterns across taxa and regions has remained limited. The SAR has traditionally been approximated by a power law, but recent theories predict a triphasic SAR in logarithmic space, characterized by steeper increases in species richness at both small and large spatial scales. Here we uncover such universally upward accelerating SARs for amphibians, birds and mammals across the world’s major landmasses. Although apparently taxon-specific and continent-specific, all curves collapse into one universal function after the area is rescaled by using the mean range sizes of taxa within continents. In addition, all EARs approximately follow a power law with a slope close to 1, indicating that for most spatial scales there is roughly proportional species extinction with area loss. These patterns can be predicted by a simulation model based on the random placement of contiguous ranges within a domain. The universality of SARs and EARs after rescaling implies that both total and endemic species richness within an area, and also their rate of change with area, can be estimated by using only the knowledge of mean geographic range size in the region and mean species richness at one spatial scale. PMID:22722856

  15. Plant ecology. Worldwide evidence of a unimodal relationship between productivity and plant species richness.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Lauchlan H; Pither, Jason; Jentsch, Anke; Sternberg, Marcelo; Zobel, Martin; Askarizadeh, Diana; Bartha, Sandor; Beierkuhnlein, Carl; Bennett, Jonathan A; Bittel, Alex; Boldgiv, Bazartseren; Boldrini, Ilsi I; Bork, Edward; Brown, Leslie; Cabido, Marcelo; Cahill, James; Carlyle, Cameron N; Campetella, Giandiego; Chelli, Stefano; Cohen, Ofer; Csergo, Anna-Maria; Díaz, Sandra; Enrico, Lucas; Ensing, David; Fidelis, Alessandra; Fridley, Jason D; Foster, Bryan; Garris, Heath; Goheen, Jacob R; Henry, Hugh A L; Hohn, Maria; Jouri, Mohammad Hassan; Klironomos, John; Koorem, Kadri; Lawrence-Lodge, Rachael; Long, Ruijun; Manning, Pete; Mitchell, Randall; Moora, Mari; Müller, Sandra C; Nabinger, Carlos; Naseri, Kamal; Overbeck, Gerhard E; Palmer, Todd M; Parsons, Sheena; Pesek, Mari; Pillar, Valério D; Pringle, Robert M; Roccaforte, Kathy; Schmidt, Amanda; Shang, Zhanhuan; Stahlmann, Reinhold; Stotz, Gisela C; Sugiyama, Shu-ichi; Szentes, Szilárd; Thompson, Don; Tungalag, Radnaakhand; Undrakhbold, Sainbileg; van Rooyen, Margaretha; Wellstein, Camilla; Wilson, J Bastow; Zupo, Talita

    2015-07-17

    The search for predictions of species diversity across environmental gradients has challenged ecologists for decades. The humped-back model (HBM) suggests that plant diversity peaks at intermediate productivity; at low productivity few species can tolerate the environmental stresses, and at high productivity a few highly competitive species dominate. Over time the HBM has become increasingly controversial, and recent studies claim to have refuted it. Here, by using data from coordinated surveys conducted throughout grasslands worldwide and comprising a wide range of site productivities, we provide evidence in support of the HBM pattern at both global and regional extents. The relationships described here provide a foundation for further research into the local, landscape, and historical factors that maintain biodiversity. PMID:26185249

  16. Impact of curve construction and community dynamics on the species-time relationship.

    PubMed

    Carey, Susan; Ostling, Annette; Harte, John; del Moral, Roger

    2007-09-01

    The species-time relationship (STR) describes how the species richness of a community increases with the time span over which the community is observed. This temporal scaling provides insight into theoretical questions on species diversity patterns as well as applied questions on the appropriate time scale for biodiversity assessments. To better understand STRs, we discuss the methods used to construct STRs in the literature and derive the impact of curve construction on STR properties. Using vegetation data from Mount St. Helens, Washington, USA, we illustrate the sensitivity of the STR to construction under colonization-dominated dynamics. This study highlights the importance of considering the type of STR when interpreting, comparing, and applying STRs, particularly in disturbed or successional systems. PMID:17918393

  17. [Sequence variation of mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and phylogenetic relationships among twelve species of Charadriiformes].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Fang; Wang, Xiang; Yuan, Xiao-Dong; Tang, Min-Qian; Li, Yu-Xiang; Guo, Yu-Mei; Li, Qing-Wei

    2003-05-01

    Studies of the phylogenetic relationships of the Charadriiformes have been largely based on conservative morphological characters. During the past 10 years, many studies on the evolutionary biology of birds adopted phylogenetic information obtained from mitochondrial DNA, but few work on the Charadriiformes has been reported to date. Therefore, phylogenetic relationships and classification of the Charadriiformes remains controversial. In this study, we try to shed light on these relationships via DNA sequence analysis of the mitochondrial Cyt b gene in 12 species of Charadriiformes. It was a preliminary study of the origin and evolution of the species by using nucleotide sequence data. Using the well-known PCR techniques, the complete mitochondrial Cyt b gene sequences were amplified and sequenced respectively from Charadrius mongolus, Charadrius alexandrinus, Numenius madagascariensis, Numenius arquat, Numenius phaeopus, Tringa totanus, Tringa glareola, Xenus cineres, Arenaria interpres, Calidris tenuirostris, Recurvirostra avosetts and Haematopus ostralensis. The 1143 bp long DNA sequences of the gene from these species were obtained, in which 381 variable sites were identified without insertions or deletions. The nucleic acid sequence variation of the mitochondrial Cyt b gene was 5.16%-16.01% among these species. Phylogenetic trees constructed using the NJ method, MP method and ML method with Ciconia ciconia as the outgroup indicate that the 12 species of Charadriiformes examined in this study are clustered in two major clades. The first clade includes T. totanus, T. glareola, A. interpres, C. tenuirostris, X. cineres, N. madagascariensis, N. arquata and N. phaeopus. The second one includes C. mongolus, C. alexandrinus, R. avosetts and H. ostralensis. Our molecular data show that the phylogenetic relationships among species of Scolopacidae are consistent with the classification based on morphological studies; R. avosetts and H. ostralensis are relatively closer

  18. Multifaceted diversity-area relationships reveal global hotspots of mammalian species, trait and lineage diversity

    PubMed Central

    Mazel, Florent; Guilhaumon, François; Mouquet, Nicolas; Devictor, Vincent; Gravel, Dominique; Renaud, Julien; Cianciaruso, Marcus Vinicius; Loyola, Rafael Dias; Diniz-Filho, José Alexandre Felizola; Mouillot, David; Thuiller, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    Aim To define biome-scale hotspots of phylogenetic and functional mammalian biodiversity (PD and FD, respectively) and compare them to ‘classical’ hotspots based on species richness (SR) only. Location Global Methods SR, PD & FD were computed for 782 terrestrial ecoregions using distribution ranges of 4616 mammalian species. We used a set of comprehensive diversity indices unified by a recent framework that incorporates the species relative coverage in each ecoregion. We build large-scale multifaceted diversity-area relationships to rank ecoregions according to their levels of biodiversity while accounting for the effect of area on each diversity facet. Finally we defined hotspots as the top-ranked ecoregions. Results While ignoring species relative coverage led to a relative good congruence between biome top ranked SR, PD and FD hotspots, ecoregions harboring a rich and abundantly represented evolutionary history and functional diversity did not match with top ranked ecoregions defined by species richness. More importantly PD and FD hotspots showed important spatial mismatches. We also found that FD and PD generally reached their maximum values faster than species richness as a function of area. Main conclusions The fact that PD/FD reach faster their maximal value than SR may suggest that the two former facets might be less vulnerable to habitat loss than the latter. While this point is expected, it is the first time that it is quantified at global scale and should have important consequences in conservation. Incorporating species relative coverage into the delineation of multifaceted hotspots of diversity lead to weak congruence between SR, PD and FD hotspots. This means that maximizing species number may fail at preserving those nodes (in the phylogenetic or functional tree) that are relatively abundant in the ecoregion. As a consequence it may be of prime importance to adopt a multifaceted biodiversity perspective to inform conservation strategies at global

  19. Parasitism of Ground Beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) by a New Species of Hairworm (Nematomorpha: Gordiida) in Arctic Canada.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Crystal M; Hanelt, Ben; Buddle, Christopher M

    2016-06-01

    The host-parasite associations between ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) and hairworms (Nematomorpha: Gordiida) collected from the Arctic (an understudied and ecologically important region) is described. Carabids and their parasites were collected from 12 sites spanning the 3 northernmost ecoclimatic zones of Canada (north boreal, subarctic, and high Arctic) using standardized methods. The beetles and hairworms were identified using traditional morphological approaches. Seven beetle species are recorded as hosts: Amara alpina, Pterostichus caribou, Pterostichus brevicornis, Pterostichus tareumiut, Pterostichus haematopus, Patrobus septentrionis, and Notiophilus borealis. All represent new host records (increasing the known North American host list from 14 to 21), and this is the first record of hairworm infection in the genus Notiophilus. Beetles from Banks Island, Northwest Territory, were infected in high numbers (11-19% per sampling period) and were used as an ecological case study. There was no significant relationship between infection status and host species, body size, or sex. Beetles collected in yellow pan traps and in wet habitats were more likely to be infected, likely due to water-seeking behavior induced by the parasites. Morphological examinations indicate that the hairworms collected from all locations represent a single, new species of Gordionus, making it only the sixth hairworm species and the third species of that genus found in Canada. Hosts are unknown for all other Canadian (and 1 Alaskan) Gordionus species. PMID:26959639

  20. Mitochondrial genome sequences reveal evolutionary relationships of the Phytophthora 1c clade species.

    PubMed

    Lassiter, Erica S; Russ, Carsten; Nusbaum, Chad; Zeng, Qiandong; Saville, Amanda C; Olarte, Rodrigo A; Carbone, Ignazio; Hu, Chia-Hui; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Samaniego, Jose A; Thorne, Jeffrey L; Ristaino, Jean B

    2015-11-01

    Phytophthora infestans is one of the most destructive plant pathogens of potato and tomato globally. The pathogen is closely related to four other Phytophthora species in the 1c clade including P. phaseoli, P. ipomoeae, P. mirabilis and P. andina that are important pathogens of other wild and domesticated hosts. P. andina is an interspecific hybrid between P. infestans and an unknown Phytophthora species. We have sequenced mitochondrial genomes of the sister species of P. infestans and examined the evolutionary relationships within the clade. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the P. phaseoli mitochondrial lineage is basal within the clade. P. mirabilis and P. ipomoeae are sister lineages and share a common ancestor with the Ic mitochondrial lineage of P. andina. These lineages in turn are sister to the P. infestans and P. andina Ia mitochondrial lineages. The P. andina Ic lineage diverged much earlier than the P. andina Ia mitochondrial lineage and P. infestans. The presence of two mitochondrial lineages in P. andina supports the hybrid nature of this species. The ancestral state of the P. andina Ic lineage in the tree and its occurrence only in the Andean regions of Ecuador, Colombia and Peru suggests that the origin of this species hybrid in nature may occur there. PMID:25754775

  1. Relationships among environmental variables and distribution of tree species at high elevation in the Olympic Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodward, Andrea

    1998-01-01

    Relationships among environmental variables and occurrence of tree species were investigated at Hurricane Ridge in Olympic National Park, Washington, USA. A transect consisting of three plots was established down one north-and one south-facing slope in stands representing the typical elevational sequence of tree species. Tree species included subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa), Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), mountain hemlock (Tsuga mertensiana), and Pacific silver fir (Abies amabilis). Air and soil temperature, precipitation, and soil moisture were measured during three growing seasons. Snowmelt patterns, soil carbon and moisture release curves were also determined. The plots represented a wide range in soil water potential, a major determinant of tree species distribution (range of minimum values = -1.1 to -8.0 MPa for Pacific silver fir and Douglas-fir plots, respectively). Precipitation intercepted at plots depended on topographic location, storm direction and storm type. Differences in soil moisture among plots was related to soil properties, while annual differences at each plot were most often related to early season precipitation. Changes in climate due to a doubling of atmospheric CO2 will likely shift tree species distributions within, but not among aspects. Change will be buffered by innate tolerance of adult trees and the inertia of soil properties.

  2. Clues on Syntenic Relationship among Some Species of Oryzomyini and Akodontini Tribes (Rodentia: Sigmodontinae).

    PubMed

    Suárez, Pablo; Nagamachi, Cleusa Yoshiko; Lanzone, Cecilia; Malleret, Matias Maximiliano; O'Brien, Patricia Caroline Mary; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm Andrew; Pieczarka, Julio Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Sigmodontinae rodents represent one of the most diverse and complex components of the mammalian fauna of South America. Among them most species belongs to Oryzomyini and Akodontini tribes. The highly specific diversification observed in both tribes is characterized by diploid complements, which vary from 2n = 10 to 86. Given this diversity, a consistent hypothesis about the origin and evolution of chromosomes depends on the correct establishment of synteny analyzed in a suitable phylogenetic framework. The chromosome painting technique has been particularly useful for identifying chromosomal synteny. In order to extend our knowledge of the homeological relationships between Akodontini and Oryzomyini species, we analyzed the species Akodon montensis (2n = 24) and Thaptomys nigrita (2n = 52) both from the tribe Akodontini, with chromosome probes of Hylaeamys megacephalus (2n = 54) of the tribe Oryzomyini. The results indicate that at least 12 of the 26 autosomes of H. megacephalus show conserved synteny in A. montensis and 14 in T. nigrita. The karyotype of Akodon montensis, as well as some species of the Akodon cursor species group, results from many chromosomal fusions and therefore the syntenic associations observed probably represent synapomorphies. Our finding of a set of such associations revealed by H. megacephalus chromosome probes (6/21; 3/25; 11/16/17; and, 14/19) provides phylogenetic information for both tribes. An extension of these observations to other members of Akodontini and Oryzomyini tribes should improve our knowledge about chromosome evolution in both these groups. PMID:26642204

  3. Mitochondrial genome sequences reveal evolutionary relationships of the Phytophthora Ic clade species

    PubMed Central

    Lassiter, Erica S.; Russ, Carsten; Nusbaum, Chad; Zeng, Qiandong; Saville, Amanda; Olarte, Rodrigo; Carbone, Ignazio; Hu, Chia-Hui; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Samaniego, Jose A; Thorne, Jeffrey L.; Ristaino, Jean B.

    2015-01-01

    Phytophthora infestans is one of the most destructive plant pathogens of potato and tomato globally. The pathogen is closely related to four other Phytophthora species including P. phaseoli, P. ipomoeae, P. mirabilis, and P. andina that are important pathogens of other wild and domesticated hosts. P. andina is an interspecific hybrid between P. infestans and an unknown Phytophthora species. We have sequenced mitochondrial genomes of the sister species of P. infestans in order to resolve the evolutionary relationships within the clade. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the P. phaseoli mitochondrial lineage is basal within the clade. P. mirabilis and P. ipomoeae are sister lineages and share a common ancestor with the Ic mitochondrial lineage of P. andina. These lineages in turn are sister to the P. infestans and P. andina Ia mitochondrial lineages. The P. andina Ic lineage diverged much earlier than the P. andina Ia mitochondrial lineage and P. infestans. The presence of two mitochondrial lineages in P. andina supports the hybrid nature of this species. The ancestral state of the P. andina Ic lineage in the tree and its occurrence only in the Andean regions of Ecuador, Colombia and Peru suggests further sampling in the Americasis warranted to understand the distribution of this species hybrid in nature. PMID:25754775

  4. Clues on Syntenic Relationship among Some Species of Oryzomyini and Akodontini Tribes (Rodentia: Sigmodontinae)

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, Pablo; Nagamachi, Cleusa Yoshiko; Lanzone, Cecilia; Malleret, Matias Maximiliano; O’Brien, Patricia Caroline Mary; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm Andrew; Pieczarka, Julio Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Sigmodontinae rodents represent one of the most diverse and complex components of the mammalian fauna of South America. Among them most species belongs to Oryzomyini and Akodontini tribes. The highly specific diversification observed in both tribes is characterized by diploid complements, which vary from 2n = 10 to 86. Given this diversity, a consistent hypothesis about the origin and evolution of chromosomes depends on the correct establishment of synteny analyzed in a suitable phylogenetic framework. The chromosome painting technique has been particularly useful for identifying chromosomal synteny. In order to extend our knowledge of the homeological relationships between Akodontini and Oryzomyini species, we analyzed the species Akodon montensis (2n = 24) and Thaptomys nigrita (2n = 52) both from the tribe Akodontini, with chromosome probes of Hylaeamys megacephalus (2n = 54) of the tribe Oryzomyini. The results indicate that at least 12 of the 26 autosomes of H. megacephalus show conserved synteny in A. montensis and 14 in T. nigrita. The karyotype of Akodon montensis, as well as some species of the Akodon cursor species group, results from many chromosomal fusions and therefore the syntenic associations observed probably represent synapomorphies. Our finding of a set of such associations revealed by H. megacephalus chromosome probes (6/21; 3/25; 11/16/17; and, 14/19) provides phylogenetic information for both tribes. An extension of these observations to other members of Akodontini and Oryzomyini tribes should improve our knowledge about chromosome evolution in both these groups. PMID:26642204

  5. Ecological Relationships of Meso-Scale Distribution in 25 Neotropical Vertebrate Species

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, Lincoln José; Norris, Darren; de Oliveira, Tadeu Gomes; Michalski, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrates are a vital ecological component of Amazon forest biodiversity. Although vertebrates are a functionally important part of various ecosystem services they continue to be threatened by anthropogenic impacts throughout the Amazon. Here we use a standardized, regularly spaced arrangement of camera traps within 25km2 to provide a baseline assessment of vertebrate species diversity in a sustainable use protected area in the eastern Brazilian Amazon. We examined seasonal differences in the per species encounter rates (number of photos per camera trap and number of cameras with photos). Generalized linear models (GLMs) were then used to examine the influence of five variables (altitude, canopy cover, basal area, distance to nearest river and distance to nearest large river) on the number of photos per species and on functional groups. GLMs were also used to examine the relationships between large predators [Jaguar (Panthera onca) and Puma (Puma concolor)] and their prey. A total of 649 independent photos of 25 species were obtained from 1,800 camera trap days (900 each during wet and dry seasons). Only ungulates and rodents showed significant seasonal differences in the number of photos per camera. The number of photos differed between seasons for only three species (Mazama americana, Dasyprocta leporina and Myoprocta acouchy) all of which were photographed more (3 to 10 fold increase) during the wet season. Mazama americana was the only species where a significant difference was found in occupancy, with more photos in more cameras during the wet season. For most groups and species variation in the number of photos per camera was only explained weakly by the GLMs (deviance explained ranging from 10.3 to 54.4%). Terrestrial birds (Crax alector, Psophia crepitans and Tinamus major) and rodents (Cuniculus paca, Dasyprocta leporina and M. acouchy) were the notable exceptions, with our GLMs significantly explaining variation in the distribution of all species

  6. Morphological and Molecular Characterization of a New Trichuris Species (Nematoda- Trichuridae), and Phylogenetic Relationships of Trichuris Species of Cricetid Rodents from Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Robles, María del Rosario; Cutillas, Cristina; Panei, Carlos Javier; Callejón, Rocío

    2014-01-01

    Populations of Trichuris spp. isolated from six species of sigmodontine rodents from Argentina were analyzed based on morphological characteristics and ITS2 (rDNA) region sequences. Molecular data provided an opportunity to discuss the phylogenetic relationships among the Trichuris spp. from Noth and South America (mainly from Argentina). Trichuris specimens were identified morphologically as Trichuris pardinasi, T. navonae, Trichuris sp. and Trichuris new species, described in this paper. Sequences analyzed by Maximum Parsimony, Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian inference methods showed four main clades corresponding with the four different species regardless of geographical origin and host species. These four species from sigmodontine rodents clustered together and separated from Trichuris species isolated from murine and arvicoline rodents (outgroup). Different genetic lineages observed among Trichuris species from sigmodontine rodents which supported the proposal of a new species. Moreover, host distribution showed correspondence with the different tribes within the subfamily Sigmodontinae. PMID:25393618

  7. Aspidodera kinsellai n. sp. (Nematoda: Heterakoidea) from nine-banded armadillos in Middle America with notes on phylogeny and host-parasite biogeography.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, F Agustín; Carreno, Ramón A; Gardner, Scott L

    2013-12-01

    Aspidodera kinsellai n. sp. (Heterakoidea: Aspidoderidae) from the 9-banded armadillo, Dasypus novemcinctus , is herein described. This nematode occurs from Costa Rica north through central Mexico where it can be found causing co-infections with Aspidodera sogandaresi . Aspidodera kinsellai n. sp. can be discriminated from this and all other species in the family based on 3 key features, including (1) conspicuous lateral grooves with no lateral alae starting immediately after the hood and terminating at the cloacal/anal region; (2) long hoods in both male (360 μm) and female (401 μm), and (3) a relatively long (152 μm) terminal spine or terminus that gradually tapers to a point from the last pair of papillae. This is the 18th recognized species of the family and the 3rd in the genus present outside of South America. A phylogenetic analysis of the species in the genus with the use of the mitochondrial partial genes cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1 (cox1), the ribosomal large subunit (rrnL), and the internal transcriber spacer (ITS) shows that 2 species of Aspidodera may have entered into North America from the south via 2 independent events. PMID:23909482

  8. The relationship between species richness and community biomass: the importance of environmental variables

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gough, L.; Grace, J.B.; Taylor, K.L.

    1994-01-01

    Several studies have used plant community biomass to predict species richness with varying success. In this study we examined the relationship between species richness and biomass for 36 marsh communities from two different watersheds. In addition, we measured several environmental variables and estimated the potential richness (the total number of species known to be able to occur in a community type) for each community. Above ground living and dead biomass combined was found to be weakly correlated with species richness (R2=0.02). Instead, a multiple regression model based on elevation (R2=0.47), salinity (R2=0.30), soil organic matter (R2=0.18), and biomass was able to explain 82% of the variance in species richness. It was found that environmental conditions could explain 89% of the variation in potential richness. Biomass had no relation to potential richness. When used as a predictor variable, potential richness was found to explain 72% of the variation in realized (observed) richness and biomass explained an addition 9% of the variance in realized richness. This finding suggests that realized richness in our system was controlled primarily by environmental regulation of potential richness and secondarily by biomass (as an indicator of competition). Further examination of the data revealed that when sites exposed to extreme environmental conditons were eliminated from the analysis, biomass became the primary predictor of realized richness and potential richness was of secondary importance. We conclude that community biomass has a limited capacity to predict species richness across a broad range of habitat conditions. Of particular importance is the inability of biomass to indicate the effect of environmental factors and evolutionary history on the potential species richness at a site.

  9. Mixed Species Flock, Nest Height, and Elevation Partially Explain Avian Haemoparasite Prevalence in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    González, Angie D.; Matta, Nubia E.; Ellis, Vincenzo A.; Miller, Eliot T.; Ricklefs, Robert E.; Gutiérrez, H. Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The high avian biodiversity present in the Neotropical region offers a great opportunity to explore the ecology of host-parasite relationships. We present a survey of avian haemoparasites in a megadiverse country and explore how parasite prevalences are related to physical and ecological host characteristics. Using light microscopy, we documented the presence of haemoparasites in over 2000 individuals belonging to 246 species of wild birds, from nine localities and several ecosystems of Colombia. We analysed the prevalence of six avian haemoparasite taxa in relation to elevation and the following host traits: nest height, nest type, foraging strata, primary diet, sociality, migratory behaviour, and participation in mixed species flocks. Our analyses indicate significant associations between both mixed species flocks and nest height and Haemoproteus and Leucocytozoon prevalence. The prevalence of Leucocytozoon increased with elevation, whereas the prevalence of Trypanosoma and microfilariae decreased. Plasmodium and Haemoproteus prevalence did not vary significantly with elevation; in fact, both parasites were found up to 3300m above sea level. The distribution of parasite prevalence across the phylogeny of bird species included in this study showed little host phylogenetic signal indicating that infection rates in this system are evolutionarily labile. Vector distribution as well as the biology of transmission and the maintenance of populations of avian haemoparasites deserve more detailed study in this system. PMID:24950223

  10. Natural history and morphology of the hoverfly Pseudomicrodon biluminiferus and its parasitic relationship with ants nesting in bromeliads.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Volker S; Morales, Mírian N; Marinoni, Luciane; Kamke, Rafael; Steiner, Josefina; Zillikens, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The syrphid subfamily Microdontinae is characterized by myrmecophily of their immature stages, i.e., they develop in ant nests. Data on natural history of microdontines are scarce, especially in the Neotropics. Based on fieldwork in southern Brazil, this study provided new data on development and ecology of the hoverfly Pseudomicrodon biluminiferus (Hull) (Diptera: Syrphidae) as well as the first morphological descriptions of male genitalia, larvae, and pupa. Immature specimens were specifically found in colonies of the ant species Crematogaster limata Smith (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) found in rosettes of the bromeliad species Aechmea lindenii (E. Morren) Baker (Poales: Bromeliaceae) and A. nudicaulis (L.) Grisebach. Third instar larvae were observed preying on ant larvae, revealing the parasitic nature of P. biluminiferus. In this and several other aspects, the natural history of P. biluminiferus is similar to that of Holarctic microdontine species. Exceptions include: (i) indications that adults of P. biluminiferus outlast the winter months (in contrast to 3(rd)instar larvae in Holarctic species) and (ii) P. biluminiferus' relationship with bromeliads. The importance of bromeliads for this host-parasite system is evaluated in this paper. The single occurrence of another, unidentified microdontine species' pupae in a nest of the ant species Camponotus melanoticus Emery (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) is reported. PMID:25373185

  11. Phylogenetic relationships among Spanish Barbus species (Pisces, Cyprinidae) shown by RAPD markers.

    PubMed

    Callejas, C; Ochando, M D

    2002-07-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were used to estimate the population structure and phylogenetic relationships among the eight species of the genus Barbus that inhabit the Iberian Peninsula. Ten random oligodecamers were used to amplify DNA from 232 fish sampled from 15 populations. A total of 270 markers were detected that revealed low levels of genetic variability. The conclusions of cluster analysis indicate two main branches and three well-differentiated groups: north-eastern, Mediterranean and Atlantic. This clustering mainly reflects the evolutionary history of the genus, which is closely related to the paleogeography of the Iberian Peninsula. The contribution and application of these results to the conservation of the species, to their taxonomic status and to the process of colonization of the Iberian Peninsula by the genus Barbus are discussed. PMID:12080368

  12. Nuclear DNA Content Variation and Species Relationships in the Genus Lupinus (Fabaceae)

    PubMed Central

    NAGANOWSKA, BARBARA; WOLKO, BOGDAN; ŚLIWIŃSKA, ELWIRA; KACZMAREK, ZYGMUNT

    2003-01-01

    The 2C nuclear DNA content has been estimated by flow cytometry in 18 species and botanical forms of the genus Lupinus (family Fabaceae), using propidium iodide as a fluorescent dye. They represented distinct infrageneric taxonomic groups and differed in somatic chromosome numbers. Estimated 2C DNA values ranged from 0·97 pg in L. princei to 2·44 pg in L. luteus, which gives a more than 2·5-fold variation. Statistical analysis of the data obtained resulted in a grouping that supports the generally accepted taxonomic classification of the Old World lupins. The rough-seeded L. princei turned out to be an interesting exception, getting closer to smooth-seeded species. Results of DNA content analyses are discussed with regards to the phylogenetic relationships among the Old World lupins and some aspects of the evolution of the genus. PMID:12853281

  13. Thiazolidinedione-8 Alters Symbiotic Relationship in C. albicans-S. mutans Dual Species Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Mark; Ginsburg, Isaac; Al-Quntar, Abed; Steinberg, Doron

    2016-01-01

    The small molecule, thiazolidinedione-8 (S-8) was shown to impair biofilm formation of various microbial pathogens, including the fungus Candida albicans and Streptococcus mutans. Previously, we have evaluated the specific molecular mode of S-8 action against C. albicans biofilm-associated pathogenicity. In this study we investigated the influence of S-8 on dual species, C. albicans-S. mutans biofilm. We show that in the presence of S-8 a reduction of the co-species biofilm formation occurred with a major effect on C. albicans. Biofilm biomass and exopolysaccharide (EPS) production were significantly reduced by S-8. Moreover, the agent caused oxidative stress associated with a strong induction of reactive oxygen species and hydrogen peroxide uptake inhibition by a mixed biofilm. In addition, S-8 altered symbiotic relationship between these species by a complex mechanism. Streptococcal genes associated with quorum sensing (QS) (comDE and luxS), EPS production (gtfBCD and gbpB), as well as genes related to protection against oxidative stress (nox and sodA) were markedly upregulated by S-8. In contrast, fungal genes related to hyphae formation (hwp1), adhesion (als3), hydrophobicity (csh1), and oxidative stress response (sod1, sod2, and cat1) were downregulated in the presence of S-8. In addition, ywp1 gene associated with yeast form of C. albicans was induced by S-8, which is correlated with appearance of mostly yeast cells in S-8 treated dual species biofilms. We concluded that S-8 disturbs symbiotic balance between C. albicans and S. mutans in dual species biofilm. PMID:26904013

  14. Thiazolidinedione-8 Alters Symbiotic Relationship in C. albicans-S. mutans Dual Species Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Mark; Ginsburg, Isaac; Al-Quntar, Abed; Steinberg, Doron

    2016-01-01

    The small molecule, thiazolidinedione-8 (S-8) was shown to impair biofilm formation of various microbial pathogens, including the fungus Candida albicans and Streptococcus mutans. Previously, we have evaluated the specific molecular mode of S-8 action against C. albicans biofilm-associated pathogenicity. In this study we investigated the influence of S-8 on dual species, C. albicans-S. mutans biofilm. We show that in the presence of S-8 a reduction of the co-species biofilm formation occurred with a major effect on C. albicans. Biofilm biomass and exopolysaccharide (EPS) production were significantly reduced by S-8. Moreover, the agent caused oxidative stress associated with a strong induction of reactive oxygen species and hydrogen peroxide uptake inhibition by a mixed biofilm. In addition, S-8 altered symbiotic relationship between these species by a complex mechanism. Streptococcal genes associated with quorum sensing (QS) (comDE and luxS), EPS production (gtfBCD and gbpB), as well as genes related to protection against oxidative stress (nox and sodA) were markedly upregulated by S-8. In contrast, fungal genes related to hyphae formation (hwp1), adhesion (als3), hydrophobicity (csh1), and oxidative stress response (sod1, sod2, and cat1) were downregulated in the presence of S-8. In addition, ywp1 gene associated with yeast form of C. albicans was induced by S-8, which is correlated with appearance of mostly yeast cells in S-8 treated dual species biofilms. We concluded that S-8 disturbs symbiotic balance between C. albicans and S. mutans in dual species biofilm. PMID:26904013

  15. Relationships between functional traits and inorganic nitrogen acquisition among eight contrasting European grass species

    PubMed Central

    Grassein, Fabrice; Lemauviel-Lavenant, Servane; Lavorel, Sandra; Bahn, Michael; Bardgett, Richard D.; Desclos-Theveniau, Marie; Laîné, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds and Aims Leaf functional traits have been used as a basis to categoize plants across a range of resource-use specialization, from those that conserve available resources to those that exploit them. However, the extent to which the leaf functional traits used to define the resource-use strategies are related to root traits and are good indicators of the ability of the roots to take up nitrogen (N) are poorly known. This is an important question because interspecific differences in N uptake have been proposed as one mechanism by which species’ coexistence may be determined. This study therefore investigated the relationships between functional traits and N uptake ability for grass species across a range of conservative to exploitative resource-use strategies. Methods Root uptake of NH4+ and NO3–, and leaf and root functional traits were measured for eight grass species sampled at three grassland sites across Europe, in France, Austria and the UK. Species were grown in hydroponics to determine functional traits and kinetic uptake parameters (Imax and Km) under standardized conditions. Key Results Species with high specific leaf area (SLA) and shoot N content, and low leaf and root dry matter content (LDMC and RDMC, respectively), which are traits associated with the exploitative syndrome, had higher uptake and affinity for both N forms. No trade-off was observed in uptake between the two forms of N, and all species expressed a higher preference for NH4+. Conclusions The results support the use of leaf traits, and especially SLA and LDMC, as indicators of the N uptake ability across a broad range of grass species. The difficulties associated with assessing root properties are also highlighted, as root traits were only weakly correlated with leaf traits, and only RDMC and, to a lesser extent, root N content were related to leaf traits. PMID:25471096

  16. The relationship between total cholinesterase activity and mortality in four butterfly species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bargar, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between total cholinesterase activity (TChE) and mortality in four butterfly species (great southern white [Ascia monuste], common buckeye [Junonia coenia], painted lady [Vanessa cardui], and julia butterflies [Dryas julia]) was investigated. Acute contact toxicity studies were conducted to evaluate the response (median lethal dose [LD50] and TChE) of the four species following exposure to the organophosphate insecticide naled. The LD50 for these butterflies ranged from 2.3 to 7.6 μg/g. The average level of TChE inhibition associated with significant mortality ranged from 26 to 67%, depending on the species. The lower bounds of normal TChE activity (2 standard deviations less than the average TChE for reference butterflies) ranged from 8.4 to 12.3 μM/min/g. As a percentage of the average reference TChE activity for the respective species, the lower bounds were similar to the inhibition levels associated with significant mortality, indicating there was little difference between the dose resulting in significant TChE inhibition and that resulting in mortality.

  17. New flux based dose-response relationships for ozone for European forest tree species.

    PubMed

    Büker, P; Feng, Z; Uddling, J; Briolat, A; Alonso, R; Braun, S; Elvira, S; Gerosa, G; Karlsson, P E; Le Thiec, D; Marzuoli, R; Mills, G; Oksanen, E; Wieser, G; Wilkinson, M; Emberson, L D

    2015-11-01

    To derive O3 dose-response relationships (DRR) for five European forest trees species and broadleaf deciduous and needleleaf tree plant functional types (PFTs), phytotoxic O3 doses (PODy) were related to biomass reductions. PODy was calculated using a stomatal flux model with a range of cut-off thresholds (y) indicative of varying detoxification capacities. Linear regression analysis showed that DRR for PFT and individual tree species differed in their robustness. A simplified parameterisation of the flux model was tested and showed that for most non-Mediterranean tree species, this simplified model led to similarly robust DRR as compared to a species- and climate region-specific parameterisation. Experimentally induced soil water stress was not found to substantially reduce PODy, mainly due to the short duration of soil water stress periods. This study validates the stomatal O3 flux concept and represents a step forward in predicting O3 damage to forests in a spatially and temporally varying climate. PMID:26164201

  18. Relationship between nutritional composition of plant species and infestation levels of thrips.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alison S Scott; Simmonds, Monique S J; Blaney, Walter M

    2002-12-01

    Levels of soluble protein and carbohydrate (raffinose, sucrose, glucose, and fructose) in leaves from a selection of plant species were measured to determine if a relationship existed between these nutrients and infestation by Frankliniella occidentalis and Heliothrips haemorrhoidalis. Most species of host plant examined contained a higher proportion of protein than carbohydrates, and overall, leaves from species of plants that supported populations of thrips had greater levels of protein than leaves from nonhost species. New leaves and flowers that supported F. occidentalis contained high levels of carbohydrate and protein. The quantity of protein in leaves at the top of the tree, Peumus boldus, was greater than in leaves from lower levels, and the amount of feeding damage accrued by H. haemorrhoidalis was greater on the upper foliage than lower foliage. Oviposition by H. haenmorrhoidalis was positively correlated to levels of protein in host plants but not to levels of carbohydrates. Overall, levels of soluble protein in plants influenced their susceptibility to thrips more than levels of carbohydrates. PMID:12564789

  19. The relationship between total cholinesterase activity and mortality in four butterfly species.

    PubMed

    Bargar, Timothy A

    2012-09-01

    The relationship between total cholinesterase activity (TChE) and mortality in four butterfly species (great southern white [Ascia monuste], common buckeye [Junonia coenia], painted lady [Vanessa cardui], and julia butterflies [Dryas julia]) was investigated. Acute contact toxicity studies were conducted to evaluate the response (median lethal dose [LD50] and TChE) of the four species following exposure to the organophosphate insecticide naled. The LD50 for these butterflies ranged from 2.3 to 7.6 µg/g. The average level of TChE inhibition associated with significant mortality ranged from 26 to 67%, depending on the species. The lower bounds of normal TChE activity (2 standard deviations less than the average TChE for reference butterflies) ranged from 8.4 to 12.3 µM/min/g. As a percentage of the average reference TChE activity for the respective species, the lower bounds were similar to the inhibition levels associated with significant mortality, indicating there was little difference between the dose resulting in significant TChE inhibition and that resulting in mortality. PMID:22740147

  20. Relationship between photosynthetic phosphorus-use efficiency and foliar phosphorus fractions in tropical tree species

    PubMed Central

    Hidaka, Amane; Kitayama, Kanehiro

    2013-01-01

    How plants develop adaptive strategies to efficiently use nutrients on infertile soils is an important topic in plant ecology. It has been suggested that, with decreasing phosphorus (P) availability, plants increase photosynthetic P-use efficiency (PPUE) (i.e., the ratio of instantaneous photosynthetic carbon assimilation rate per unit foliar P). However, the mechanism to increase PPUE remains unclear. In this study, we tested whether high PPUE is explained by an optimized allocation of P in cells among P-containing biochemical compounds (i.e., foliar P fractions). We investigated the relationships among mass-based photosynthetic carbon assimilation rate (Amass), PPUE, total foliar P concentration, and foliar P fractions in 10 tree species in two tropical montane rain forests with differing soil P availability (five species on sedimentary soils and five species on P-poorer ultrabasic serpentine soils) on Mount Kinabalu, Borneo. We chemically fractionated foliar P into the following four fractions: metabolic P, lipid P, nucleic acid P, and residual P. Amass was positively correlated with the concentrations of total foliar P and of metabolic P across 10 tree species. Mean Amass and mean concentrations of total foliar P and of each foliar P fraction were lower on the P-poorer ultrabasic serpentine soils than on the sedimentary soils. There was a negative relationship between the proportion of metabolic P per total P and the proportion of lipid P per total P. PPUE was positively correlated with the ratio of metabolic P to lipid P. High PPUE is explained by the net effect of a relatively greater investment of P into P-containing metabolites and a relatively lesser investment into phospholipids in addition to generally reduced concentrations of all P fractions. We conclude that plants optimize the allocation of P among foliar P fractions for maintaining their productivity and growth and for reducing demand for P as their adaptation to P-poor soils. PMID:24455122

  1. Relationship between photosynthetic phosphorus-use efficiency and foliar phosphorus fractions in tropical tree species.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Amane; Kitayama, Kanehiro

    2013-12-01

    How plants develop adaptive strategies to efficiently use nutrients on infertile soils is an important topic in plant ecology. It has been suggested that, with decreasing phosphorus (P) availability, plants increase photosynthetic P-use efficiency (PPUE) (i.e., the ratio of instantaneous photosynthetic carbon assimilation rate per unit foliar P). However, the mechanism to increase PPUE remains unclear. In this study, we tested whether high PPUE is explained by an optimized allocation of P in cells among P-containing biochemical compounds (i.e., foliar P fractions). We investigated the relationships among mass-based photosynthetic carbon assimilation rate (A mass), PPUE, total foliar P concentration, and foliar P fractions in 10 tree species in two tropical montane rain forests with differing soil P availability (five species on sedimentary soils and five species on P-poorer ultrabasic serpentine soils) on Mount Kinabalu, Borneo. We chemically fractionated foliar P into the following four fractions: metabolic P, lipid P, nucleic acid P, and residual P. A mass was positively correlated with the concentrations of total foliar P and of metabolic P across 10 tree species. Mean A mass and mean concentrations of total foliar P and of each foliar P fraction were lower on the P-poorer ultrabasic serpentine soils than on the sedimentary soils. There was a negative relationship between the proportion of metabolic P per total P and the proportion of lipid P per total P. PPUE was positively correlated with the ratio of metabolic P to lipid P. High PPUE is explained by the net effect of a relatively greater investment of P into P-containing metabolites and a relatively lesser investment into phospholipids in addition to generally reduced concentrations of all P fractions. We conclude that plants optimize the allocation of P among foliar P fractions for maintaining their productivity and growth and for reducing demand for P as their adaptation to P-poor soils. PMID:24455122

  2. What is the form of the productivity-animal-species-richness relationship? A critical review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cusens, Jarrod; Wright, Shane D; McBride, Paul D; Gillman, Len N

    2012-10-01

    The nature of the relationship between productivity and species richness has remained controversial for at least two decades. Recently authors have favored the suggestion that the form of this relationship is highly variable and scale dependent. However, this conclusion is not universally accepted. Here we present the results of a meta-analysis of animal productivity-species-richness relationships (PSRR) in terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. Initially, 374 separate cases from 273 published studies were identified as potential tests of the animal PSRR. After critically assessing each study, 115 cases were accepted as robust tests of the relationship, and of these 95 had data available for formal meta-analysis. Contrary to expectation, we found no support for the form of the relationship being scale dependent; positive relationships predominated at all scales (geographical extents and grains). Furthermore, positive relationships were the most common form of the animal PSRR in both terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems and among vertebrates, invertebrates, homeotherms and poikilotherms. Therefore, our results also contrast with previous reviews that suggest no particular form of the PSRR is predominant. We demonstrate that the method used for classifying the form of PSRRs is critical to the result and that previous reviews may have been too liberal toward classifying the form of relationships as unimodal. The tendency for positive relationships between productivity and species richness across diverse animal taxa has important implications for understanding the mechanisms behind the latitudinal gradient in species richness. PMID:23185885

  3. Species limits and relationships within Otidea inferred from multiple gene phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Hansen, K; Olariaga, I

    2015-12-01

    nodes. We argue to use the three-gene dataset to retrieve the maximum support for the higher-level relationships in Otidea, but still utilise the signal from the RPB1 for the delimitation and relationships of closely related species. From the four gene regions utilised, EF-1α and RPB1 have the strongest species recognition power, and with higher amplification success EF-1α may serve as the best secondary barcoding locus for Otidea (with ITS being a primary). The phylogeny from the three- and four-gene datasets is fully resolved and strongly supported in all branches but one. Two major clades, as part of six inclusive clades A-F, are identified - and ten subclades within these: A) O. platyspora and O. alutacea subclades, and B) O. papillata, O. leporina, O. tuomikoskii, O. cantharella, O. formicarum, O. unicisa, O. bufonia-onotica and O. concinna subclades. Morphological features in Otidea appear to be fast evolving and prone to shifts, and are poor indicators of higher-level relationships. Nevertheless, a conspicuous spore ornament is a synapomorphy for the O. unicisa subclade (/Otideopsis); all other species in Otidea have smooth or verruculose (in SEM) spores. Exclusively pale to bright yellow apothecia and straight to curved, broadly clavate to distinctly capitate paraphyses are synapomorphies for a restricted O. concinna subclade (/Flavoscypha). The curved to hooked apices of the paraphyses is suggested to be a symplesiomorphic trait for the genus. The reaction of resinous exudates on the outermost excipular cells that coalesce into amber drops in Melzer's reagent is likely an ancestral state for clade B. We estimate that Otidea consists of 47 species worldwide, based on all available information (including morphology, ITS or LSU sequences, and literature descriptions). Three fifths of the species occur in Europe, with 20 species recognised as endemic. At least 14 species occur in North America and 17 in Asia, with eight and ten species considered endemic to each

  4. Studies on genome relationship and species-specific PCR marker for Dasypyrum breviaristatum in Triticeae.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zu-Jun; Liu, Cheng; Feng, Juan; Li, Guang-Rong; Zhou, Jian-Ping; Deng, Ke-Jun; Ren, Zheng-Long

    2006-12-01

    Dasypyrum breviaristatum and nine related species in Triticeae were analyzed using the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique, in order to understand the genetic relationship and to develop species specific markers. The genome relationship dendrogram shows that D. breviaristatum and D. villosum could not be grouped together, indicating that D. breviaristatum was unlikely to be directly derived from D. villosum, while D. breviaristatum was closest to Thinopyrum intermedium, which implied that they might have similar breeding behaviors when introducing their chromatins into wheat. A D. breviaristatum genome specific RAPD product of 1182bp, was cloned and designated as pDb12H. Sequence analysis revealed that pDb12H was strongly homologuos to a long terminal repeat (LTR) Sabrina retrotransposon newly reported in Hordeum. The pDb12H was converted into a PCR based marker, which allows effectively monitoring the D. breviaristatum chromatin introgression into wheat. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) suggested that pDb12H was specifically hybridized throughout all D. breviaristatum chromosomes arms except for the terminal and centromeric regions, which can be used to characterize wheat -D. breviaristatum chromosome translocation. The genomes repetitive element will also be useful to study gene interactions between the wheat and alien genomes after the polyploidization. PMID:17362333

  5. Study of phylogenetic relationship of Turkish species of Klasea (Asteraceae) based on ISSR amplification

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Bekir; Duran, Ahmet; Şeker, Meryem; Çetin, Özlem; Martin, Esra

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Klasea is a taxonomically complex genus in which there are many problems, mostly with Klasea kotschyi and Klasea hakkiarica. It is challenging to differentiate the genera based on morphological characters alone. Revision studies performed on the basis of molecular data obtained from studies conducted in recent years have made the phylogenetic relationships and systematic positions of the taxa more apparent and reliable. In this study, Klasea, Serratula, Jurinea and Centaurea species native to Turkey, were collected from different localities of Anatolia and DNA was isolated from the collected samples. The data were analyzed ordination analyses including UPGMA and PCA using NTSYSpc 2.1. The infrageneric and intergeneric phylogenetic relationships between Klasea and other related genera were also characterized. The Klasea species were grouped into three clusters. It was determined that taxa Klasea kotschyi and Klasea hakkiarica are separate but closely related. Moreover, it was observed that the Klasea lasiocephala a separate group within the genera. Clearly the genera Klasea, Serratula, Jurinea and Centaurea are phylogenetically differentiated on the dendogram. PMID:26491384

  6. A host-parasite list of the haematozoa of domestic poultry in sub-Saharan Africa and the isolation of Plasmodium durae Herman from turkeys and francolins in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Huchzermeyer, F W

    1993-03-01

    An annotated host-parasite list of the blood parasites of domestic poultry in sub-Saharan Africa is presented. This list contains the haematozoa found in domestic waterfowl (ducks, geese and muscovies) and phasianids (turkey, fowl and peafowl). In South Africa Plasmodium durae was isolated from 4 out of 8 backyard turkeys, from 3 out of 26 Swainson's francolins and from 1 redwing francolin, but not from 20 helmeted guineafowls and 9 greywing francolins. This points at Swainson's and redwing francolins as being the main natural hosts of P. durae in South Africa. The increase in the period of prepatency after intramuscular subinoculation as compared with the intravenous route was found to correspond to that of a 1,000 fold dilution of an intravenous inoculum of parasitized blood. This delay was not due to an intervening cycle of exoerythrocytic schizogony, but to large numbers of the injected erythrocytes apparently not finding their way into the circulation of the new host. PMID:8332314

  7. Species specific amino acid sequence-protein local structure relationships: An analysis in the light of a structural alphabet.

    PubMed

    de Brevern, Alexandre G; Joseph, Agnel Praveen

    2011-05-01

    Protein structure analysis and prediction methods are based on non-redundant data extracted from the available protein structures, regardless of the species from which the protein originates. Hence, these datasets represent the global knowledge on protein folds, which constitutes a generic distribution of amino acid sequence-protein structure (AAS-PS) relationships. In this study, we try to elucidate whether the AAS-PS relationship could possess specificities depending on the specie. For this purpose, we have chosen three different species: Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Plasmodium falciparum and Arabidopsis thaliana. We analyzed the AAS-PS behaviors of the proteins from these three species and compared it to the "expected" distribution of a classical non-redundant databank. With the classical secondary structure description, only slight differences in amino acid preferences could be observed. With a more precise description of local protein structures (Protein Blocks), significant changes could be highlighted. S. cerevisiae's AAS-PS relationship is close to the general distribution, while striking differences are observed in the case of A. thaliana. P. falciparum is the most distant one. This study presents some interesting view-points on AAS-PS relationship. Certain species exhibit unique preferences for amino acids to be associated with protein local structural elements. Thus, AAS-PS relationships are species dependent. These results can give useful insights for improving prediction methodologies which take the species specific information into account. PMID:21333657

  8. Novel relationships among ten fish model species revealed based on a phylogenomic analysis using ESTs.

    PubMed

    Steinke, Dirk; Salzburger, Walter; Meyer, Axel

    2006-06-01

    The power of comparative phylogenomic analyses also depends on the amount of data that are included in such studies. We used expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from fish model species as a proof of principle approach in order to test the reliability of using ESTs for phylogenetic inference. As expected, the robustness increases with the amount of sequences. Although some progress has been made in the elucidation of the phylogeny of teleosts, relationships among the main lineages of the derived fish (Euteleostei) remain poorly defined and are still debated. We performed a phylogenomic analysis of a set of 42 of orthologous genes from 10 available fish model systems from seven different orders (Salmoniformes, Siluriformes, Cypriniformes, Tetraodontiformes, Cyprinodontiformes, Beloniformes, and Perciformes) of euteleostean fish to estimate divergence times and evolutionary relationships among those lineages. All 10 fish species serve as models for developmental, aquaculture, genomic, and comparative genetic studies. The phylogenetic signal and the strength of the contribution of each of the 42 orthologous genes were estimated with randomly chosen data subsets. Our study revealed a molecular phylogeny of higher-level relationships of derived teleosts, which indicates that the use of multiple genes produces robust phylogenies, a finding that is expected to apply to other phylogenetic issues among distantly related taxa. Our phylogenomic analyses confirm that the euteleostean superorders Ostariophysi and Acanthopterygii are monophyletic and the Protacanthopterygii and Ostariophysi are sister clades. In addition, and contrary to the traditional phylogenetic hypothesis, our analyses determine that killifish (Cyprinodontiformes), medaka (Beloniformes), and cichlids (Perciformes) appear to be more closely related to each other than either of them is to pufferfish (Tetraodontiformes). All 10 lineages split before or during the fragmentation of the supercontinent Pangea in the

  9. Relationships among Sarcocystis species transmitted by New World opossums (Didelphis spp.).

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, B M; Lindsay, D S; Dubey, J P

    2001-02-26

    At least three species of Sarcocystis (S. neurona, S. falcatula, S. speeri) have recently been shown to use opossums of the genus Didelphis as their definitive host. In order to evaluate the evolutionary relationships among Sarcocystis spp. isolates from the Americas, and to determine whether organisms representing the same parasite lineages are transmitted north and south of the Panamanian isthmus, we inferred the phylogenetic relationships from nucleotide sequence variation in parasites isolated from three opossum species (D. virginiana, D. albiventris, D. marsupialis). In particular, we used variation in the 25/396 marker to compare several isolates from Brazil, Argentina, and the United States to each other and to cloned S. neurona and S. falcatula whose morphology and host affinities have been defined in the laboratory. S. neurona was identified from a Brazilian D. albiventris, as well as from North American D. virginiana. Parasites resembling the Cornell isolate of S. falcatula are transmitted both south and north of the Panamanian isthmus by D. albiventris and D. virginiana, respectively. Distinct attributes at two genetic loci differentiated a Brazilian isolate of S. falcatula from all other known parasite lineages. We confirm S. neurona as the causative agent of recently reported neurologic disease in Southern sea otters, Enhydra lutris nereis. And we found that S. speeri could not be compared to the other opossum-derived Sarcocystis isolates on the basis of nucleotide variation at the 25/396 locus. The widespread distribution of certain species of Sarcocystis may derive from their ability to parasitize migratory bird hosts in their intermediate stage. PMID:11223194

  10. Relationship between the surface coverage of spectator species and the rate of electrocatalytic reactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Strmcnik, D. S.; Rebec, P.; Gaberscek, M.; Tripkovic, D.; Stamenkovic, V.; Lucas, C.; Markovic, N. M.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Chicago; National Inst. of Chemistry; Univ. of Liverpool

    2007-12-20

    Relationships between the surface coverage of spectator (blocking) species and the rate of the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR), the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and the bulk oxidation of dissolved CO on Pt(100) and Pt(111) single crystals in acidic electrolytes has been probed by cyclic voltammetry, in situ surface X-ray scattering (SXS), and ex situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) techniques. It is shown that the surface coverage by spectator species during the HOR and the ORR are the same as for the corresponding coverage obtained in the inert (Ar-saturated) environment. This observation is consistent with the proposition that the availability of active sites for H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} is determined almost entirely by the coverage of adsorbates from the supporting electrolyte and not by the active intermediates. Related electrochemical-SXS studies undertaken for bulk CO oxidation reveal that the maximum rate above the ignition potential is reached on a surface that is covered by {approx}90% of an ordered CO adlayer. The nature of the active sites in this case is determined by a combination of electrochemical and STM results. It is found that the active sites in this potential region are steps, which appear to be active sites for OH adsorption. To get insight into the relationship between the diffusion-limiting current and the surface coverage by the inactive CO adlayer, we introduce the concept of a partially blocked electrode surface with active and inactive areas. On the basis of the calculations and experimental results, it is proposed that the active sites for given electrochemical reactions on Pt electrodes are arrays of adsorbate-free nanoscale patches embedded in an inactive adlayer of nonreactive molecular species.

  11. Community maturity, species saturation and the variant diversity- productivity relationships in grasslands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guo, Q.; Shaffer, T.; Buhl, T.

    2006-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the relationship between plant diversity and productivity is critical for advancing our understanding of ecosystem functioning and for achieving success in habitat restoration efforts. However, effects and interactions of diversity, succession and biotic invasions on productivity remain elusive. We studied newly established communities in relation to preexisting homogeneous vegetation invaded by exotic plants in the northern Great Plains, USA, at four study sites for 3 years. We observed variant diversity-productivity relationships for the seeded communities (generally positive monotonic at three sites and non-monotonic at the other site) but no relationships for the resident community or the seeded and resident communities combined at all sites and all years. Community richness was enhanced by seeding additional species but productivity was not. The optimal diversity (as indicated by maximum productivity) changed among sites and as the community developed. The findings shed new light on ecosystem functioning of biodiversity under different conditions and have important implications for restoration. ?? 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  12. Relationships among the A Genomes of Triticum L. species as evidenced by SSR markers, in Iran.

    PubMed

    Ehtemam, Mohammad Hosein; Rahiminejad, Mohammad Reza; Saeidi, Hojjatollah; Tabatabaei, Badraldin Ebrahim Sayed; Krattinger, Simon G; Keller, Beat

    2010-01-01

    The relationships among 55 wheat accessions (47 accessions collected from Iran and eight accessions provided by the Institute of Plant Biology of the University of Zurich, Switzerland) belonging to eight species carrying A genome (Triticum monococcum L., T. boeoticum Boiss., T. urartu Tumanian ex Gandilyan, T. durum Desf., T. turgidum L., T. dicoccum Schrank ex Schübler, T. dicoccoides (Körn. ex Asch. & Graebner) Schweinf. and T. aestivum L.) were evaluated using 31 A genome specific microsatellite markers. A high level of polymorphism was observed among the accessions studied (PIC = 0.77). The highest gene diversity was revealed among T. durum genotypes, while the lowest genetic variation was found in T. dicoccoides accessions. The analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed a significant genetic variance (75.56%) among these accessions, representing a high intra-specific genetic diversity within Triticum taxa in Iran. However, such a variance was not observed among their ploidy levels. Based on the genetic similarity analysis, the accessions collected from Iran were divided into two main groups: diploids and polyploids. The genetic similarity among the diploid and polyploid species was 0.85 and 0.89 respectively. There were no significant differences in A genome diversity from different geographic regions. Based on the genetic diversity analyses, we consider there is value in a greater sampling of each species in Iran to discover useful genes for breeding purposes. PMID:21151440

  13. Relationships among the A Genomes of Triticum L. Species as Evidenced by SSR Markers, in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ehtemam, Mohammad Hosein; Rahiminejad, Mohammad Reza; Saeidi, Hojjatollah; Tabatabaei, Badraldin Ebrahim Sayed; Krattinger, Simon G.; Keller, Beat

    2010-01-01

    The relationships among 55 wheat accessions (47 accessions collected from Iran and eight accessions provided by the Institute of Plant Biology of the University of Zurich, Switzerland) belonging to eight species carrying A genome (Triticum monococcum L., T. boeoticum Boiss., T. urartu Tumanian ex Gandilyan, T. durum Desf., T. turgidum L., T. dicoccum Schrank ex Schübler, T. dicoccoides (Körn. ex Asch. & Graebner) Schweinf. and T. aestivum L.) were evaluated using 31 A genome specific microsatellite markers. A high level of polymorphism was observed among the accessions studied (PIC = 0.77). The highest gene diversity was revealed among T. durum genotypes, while the lowest genetic variation was found in T. dicoccoides accessions. The analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed a significant genetic variance (75.56%) among these accessions, representing a high intra-specific genetic diversity within Triticum taxa in Iran. However, such a variance was not observed among their ploidy levels. Based on the genetic similarity analysis, the accessions collected from Iran were divided into two main groups: diploids and polyploids. The genetic similarity among the diploid and polyploid species was 0.85 and 0.89 respectively. There were no significant differences in A genome diversity from different geographic regions. Based on the genetic diversity analyses, we consider there is value in a greater sampling of each species in Iran to discover useful genes for breeding purposes. PMID:21151440

  14. Molecular Epidemiology of Novel Pathogen “Brachyspira hampsonii” Reveals Relationships between Diverse Genetic Groups, Regions, Host Species, and Other Pathogenic and Commensal Brachyspira Species

    PubMed Central

    Mirajkar, Nandita S.; Bekele, Aschalew Z.; Chander, Yogesh Y.

    2015-01-01

    Outbreaks of bloody diarrhea in swine herds in the late 2000s signaled the reemergence of an economically significant disease, swine dysentery, in the United States. Investigations confirmed the emergence of a novel spirochete in swine, provisionally designated “Brachyspira hampsonii,” with two genetically distinct clades. Although it has since been detected in swine and migratory birds in Europe and North America, little is known about its genetic diversity or its relationships with other Brachyspira species. This study characterizes B. hampsonii using a newly developed multilocus sequence typing (MLST) approach and elucidates the diversity, distribution, population structure, and genetic relationships of this pathogen from diverse epidemiological sources globally. Genetic characterization of 81 B. hampsonii isolates, originating from six countries, with our newly established MLST scheme identified a total of 20 sequence types (STs) belonging to three clonal complexes (CCs). B. hampsonii showed a heterogeneous population structure with evidence of microevolution locally in swine production systems, while its clustering patterns showed associations with its epidemiological origins (country, swine production system, and host species). The close genetic relatedness of B. hampsonii isolates from different countries and host species highlights the importance of strict biosecurity control measures. A comparative analysis of 430 isolates representing seven Brachyspira species (pathogens and commensals) from 19 countries and 10 host species depicted clustering by microbial species. It revealed the close genetic relatedness of B. hampsonii with commensal Brachyspira species and also provided support for the two clades of B. hampsonii to be considered a single species. PMID:26135863

  15. Molecular Epidemiology of Novel Pathogen "Brachyspira hampsonii" Reveals Relationships between Diverse Genetic Groups, Regions, Host Species, and Other Pathogenic and Commensal Brachyspira Species.

    PubMed

    Mirajkar, Nandita S; Bekele, Aschalew Z; Chander, Yogesh Y; Gebhart, Connie J

    2015-09-01

    Outbreaks of bloody diarrhea in swine herds in the late 2000s signaled the reemergence of an economically significant disease, swine dysentery, in the United States. Investigations confirmed the emergence of a novel spirochete in swine, provisionally designated "Brachyspira hampsonii," with two genetically distinct clades. Although it has since been detected in swine and migratory birds in Europe and North America, little is known about its genetic diversity or its relationships with other Brachyspira species. This study characterizes B. hampsonii using a newly developed multilocus sequence typing (MLST) approach and elucidates the diversity, distribution, population structure, and genetic relationships of this pathogen from diverse epidemiological sources globally. Genetic characterization of 81 B. hampsonii isolates, originating from six countries, with our newly established MLST scheme identified a total of 20 sequence types (STs) belonging to three clonal complexes (CCs). B. hampsonii showed a heterogeneous population structure with evidence of microevolution locally in swine production systems, while its clustering patterns showed associations with its epidemiological origins (country, swine production system, and host species). The close genetic relatedness of B. hampsonii isolates from different countries and host species highlights the importance of strict biosecurity control measures. A comparative analysis of 430 isolates representing seven Brachyspira species (pathogens and commensals) from 19 countries and 10 host species depicted clustering by microbial species. It revealed the close genetic relatedness of B. hampsonii with commensal Brachyspira species and also provided support for the two clades of B. hampsonii to be considered a single species. PMID:26135863

  16. Dynamic relationships between body size, species richness, abundance, and energy use in a shallow marine epibenthic faunal community

    PubMed Central

    Labra, Fabio A; Hernández-Miranda, Eduardo; Quiñones, Renato A

    2015-01-01

    We study the temporal variation in the empirical relationships among body size (S), species richness (R), and abundance (A) in a shallow marine epibenthic faunal community in Coliumo Bay, Chile. We also extend previous analyses by calculating individual energy use (E) and test whether its bivariate and trivariate relationships with S and R are in agreement with expectations derived from the energetic equivalence rule. Carnivorous and scavenger species representing over 95% of sample abundance and biomass were studied. For each individual, body size (g) was measured and E was estimated following published allometric relationships. Data for each sample were tabulated into exponential body size bins, comparing species-averaged values with individual-based estimates which allow species to potentially occupy multiple size classes. For individual-based data, both the number of individuals and species across body size classes are fit by a Weibull function rather than by a power law scaling. Species richness is also a power law of the number of individuals. Energy use shows a piecewise scaling relationship with body size, with energetic equivalence holding true only for size classes above the modal abundance class. Species-based data showed either weak linear or no significant patterns, likely due to the decrease in the number of data points across body size classes. Hence, for individual-based size spectra, the SRA relationship seems to be general despite seasonal forcing and strong disturbances in Coliumo Bay. The unimodal abundance distribution results in a piecewise energy scaling relationship, with small individuals showing a positive scaling and large individuals showing energetic equivalence. Hence, strict energetic equivalence should not be expected for unimodal abundance distributions. On the other hand, while species-based data do not show unimodal SRA relationships, energy use across body size classes did not show significant trends, supporting energetic

  17. Dynamic relationships between body size, species richness, abundance, and energy use in a shallow marine epibenthic faunal community.

    PubMed

    Labra, Fabio A; Hernández-Miranda, Eduardo; Quiñones, Renato A

    2015-01-01

    We study the temporal variation in the empirical relationships among body size (S), species richness (R), and abundance (A) in a shallow marine epibenthic faunal community in Coliumo Bay, Chile. We also extend previous analyses by calculating individual energy use (E) and test whether its bivariate and trivariate relationships with S and R are in agreement with expectations derived from the energetic equivalence rule. Carnivorous and scavenger species representing over 95% of sample abundance and biomass were studied. For each individual, body size (g) was measured and E was estimated following published allometric relationships. Data for each sample were tabulated into exponential body size bins, comparing species-averaged values with individual-based estimates which allow species to potentially occupy multiple size classes. For individual-based data, both the number of individuals and species across body size classes are fit by a Weibull function rather than by a power law scaling. Species richness is also a power law of the number of individuals. Energy use shows a piecewise scaling relationship with body size, with energetic equivalence holding true only for size classes above the modal abundance class. Species-based data showed either weak linear or no significant patterns, likely due to the decrease in the number of data points across body size classes. Hence, for individual-based size spectra, the SRA relationship seems to be general despite seasonal forcing and strong disturbances in Coliumo Bay. The unimodal abundance distribution results in a piecewise energy scaling relationship, with small individuals showing a positive scaling and large individuals showing energetic equivalence. Hence, strict energetic equivalence should not be expected for unimodal abundance distributions. On the other hand, while species-based data do not show unimodal SRA relationships, energy use across body size classes did not show significant trends, supporting energetic

  18. Relationships between pigment composition variation and reflectance for plant species from a coastal savannah in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ustin, Susan L.; Sanderson, Eric W.; Grossman, Yaffa; Hart, Quinn J.

    1993-01-01

    Advances in imaging spectroscopy have indicated that remotely sensed reflectance measurements of the plant canopy may be used to identify and qualify some classes of canopy biochemicals; however, the manner in which differences in biochemical compositions translate into differences is not well understood. Most frequently, multiple linear regression routines have been used to correlate narrow band reflectance values with measured biochemical concentrations. Although some success has been achieved with such methods for given data sets, the bands selected by multiple regression are not consistent between data sets, nor is it always clear what physical or biological basis underlies the correlation. To examine the relationship between biochemical concentration and leaf reflectance signal we chose to focus on the visible spectrum where the primary biochemical absorbances are due to photosynthetic pigments. Pigments provide a range of absorbance features, occur over a range of concentrations in natural samples, and are ecophysiologically important. Concentrations of chlorophyll, for example, have been strongly correlated to foliar nitrogen levels within a species and to photosynthetic capacity across many species. In addition pigments effectively absorb most of the photosynthetically active radiation between 400-700 nm, a spectral region for which silicon detectors have good signal/noise characteristics. Our strategy has been to sample a variety of naturally occurring species to measure leaf reflectance and pigment compositions. We hope to extend our understanding of pigment reflectance effects to interpret small overlapping absorbances of other biochemicals in the infrared region. For this reason, selected samples were also tested to determine total nitrogen, crude protein, cellulose, and lignin levels. Leaf reflectance spectra measured with AVIRIS bandwidths and wavelengths were compared between species and within species and for differences between seasons, for changes

  19. Genetic Relationships of Aglaonema Species and Cultivars Inferred from AFLP Markers

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, JIANJUN; DEVANAND, PACHANOOR S.; NORMAN, DAVID J.; HENNY, RICHARD J.; CHAO, CHIH‐CHENG T.

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims Aglaonema is an important ornamental foliage plant genus, but genetic relationships among its species and cultivars have not been reported. This study analysed genetic relatedness of 54 cultivars derived from nine species using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. • Methods Initially, 48 EcoRI + 2/MseI + 3 primer set combinations were screened, from which six primer sets that showed clear scoreable and highly polymorphic fragments were selected and used for AFLP reactions. AFLP fragments were scored and entered into a binary data matrix as discrete variables. Jaccard’s coefficient of similarity was calculated for all pair‐wise comparisons among the 54 cultivars, and a dendrogram was constructed by the unweighted pair‐group method using the arithmetic average (UPGMA). • Key Results The number of AFLP fragments generated per primer set ranged from 59 to 112 with fragment sizes varying from 50 to 565 bp. A total of 449 AFLP fragments was detected, of which 314 were polymorphic (70 %). All cultivars were clearly differentiated by their AFLP fingerprints. The 54 cultivars were divided into seven clusters; cultivars within each cluster generally share similar morphological characteristics. Cluster I contains 35 cultivars, most of them are interspecific hybrids developed mainly from A. commutatum, A. crispum or A. nitidum. However, Jaccard’s similarity coefficients among these hybrids are 0·84 or higher, suggesting that these popular hybrid cultivars are genetically much closer than previously thought. This genetic similarity may imply that A. nitidum and A. crispum are likely progenitors of A. commutatum. • Conclusions Results of this study demonstrate the efficiency and ease of using AFLP markers for investigating genetic relationships of ornamental foliage plants, a group usually propagated vegetatively. The AFLP markers developed will help future Aglaonema cultivar identification, germplasm conservation and

  20. Reactive Oxygen Species and Aging in Caenorhabditis elegans: Causal or Casual Relationship?

    PubMed

    Van Raamsdonk, Jeremy Michael; Hekimi, Siegfried

    2010-12-15

    The free radical theory of aging proposes a causal relationship between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and aging. While it is clear that oxidative damage increases with age, its role in the aging process is uncertain. Testing the free radical theory of aging requires experimentally manipulating ROS production or detoxification and examining the resulting effects on lifespan. In this review, we examine the relationship between ROS and aging in the genetic model organism Caenorhabditis elegans, summarizing experiments using long-lived mutants, mutants with altered mitochondrial function, mutants with decreased antioxidant defenses, worms treated with antioxidant compounds, and worms exposed to different environmental conditions. While there is frequently a negative correlation between oxidative damage and lifespan, there are many examples in which they are uncoupled. Neither is resistance to oxidative stress sufficient for a long life nor are all long-lived mutants more resistant to oxidative stress. Similarly, sensitivity to oxidative stress does not necessarily shorten lifespan and is in fact compatible with long life. Overall, the data in C. elegans indicate that oxidative damage can be dissociated from aging in experimental situations. PMID:20568954

  1. Relationships of sedimented diatom species (Bacillariophyceae) to environmental gradients in dilute northern New England lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.S.; Davis, R.B. ); Ford, M.S. )

    1993-06-01

    Limnological gradients of small, oligotrophic, and low conductance lakes in northern New England were defined by principal components analysis; relationships of sedimented diatom species to the gradients were investigated by correlation analysis. Diatom distributions were most strongly related to the gradient of pH and alkalinity and the covarying variables, conductance, Mg, Ca, total Al, and exchangeable Al. Weaker relationships to lake morphology, dissolved organic carbon and water color, altitude and marine aerosol inputs, and the distinctive water chemistry of some New Hampshire lakes were also present. Results for 16 taxa of importance in the authors' studies of lake acidity are given in detail and are compared to results from other regions of eastern North America. Planktonic taxa were absent below pH 5.5, with the exception of the long form of Asterionella ralfsii var. americana Korn. The two forms of this taxon differed ecologically: the long form ([ge] 45 [mu]m) had an abundance weighted mean (AWM) pH 5.53 and occurred mostly in lakes that were deep relative to transparency; the short form (< 45 [mu]m) had an AWM pH 4.90 and occurred in lakes that were shallow relative to transparency. The ecological advantage of a [open quotes]splitter[close quotes] approach to diatom taxonomy was demonstrated by examination of other taxa as well, including Tabellaria flocculosa (Roth) Kuetz. These results have important implications for paleolimnological interpretations. 66 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Beneath the veil: Plant growth form influences the strength of species richness-productivity relationships in forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberle, B.; Grace, J.B.; Chase, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Species richness has been observed to increase with productivity at large spatial scales, though the strength of this relationship varies among functional groups. In forests, canopy trees shade understorey plants, and for this reason we hypothesize that species richness of canopy trees will depend on macroclimate, while species richness of shorter growth forms will additionally be affected by shading from the canopy. In this study we test for differences in species richness-productivity relationships (SRPRs) among growth forms (canopy trees, shrubs, herbaceous species) in small forest plots. Location: We analysed 231 plots ranging from 34.0?? to 48.3?? N latitude and from 75.0?? to 124.2?? W longitude in the United States. Methods: We analysed data collected by the USDA Forest Inventory and Analysis program for plant species richness partitioned into different growth forms, in small plots. We used actual evapotranspiration as a macroclimatic estimate of regional productivity and calculated the area of light-blocking tissue in the immediate area surrounding plots for an estimate of the intensity of local shading. We estimated and compared SRPRs for different partitions of the species richness dataset using generalized linear models and we incorporated the possible indirect effects of shading using a structural equation model. Results: Canopy tree species richness increased strongly with regional productivity, while local shading primarily explained the variation in herbaceous plant richness. Shrub species richness was related to both regional productivity and local shading. Main conclusions: The relationship between total forest plant species richness and productivity at large scales belies strong effects of local interactions. Counter to the pattern for overall richness, we found that understorey herbaceous plant species richness does not respond to regional productivity gradients, and instead is strongly influenced by canopy density, while shrub species

  3. Phylogenetic relationships of three hymenolepidid species inferred from nuclear ribosomal and mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, M; Agatsuma, T; Kurosawa, T; Ito, A

    1997-12-01

    Three hymenolepidid tapeworms, Hymenolepis diminuta, H. nana and H. microstoma, are commonly maintained in laboratory rodents and used in many experimental model systems of tapeworm infections. We examined partial sequences from the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) gene and nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) sequences to infer phylogenetic relationships of the 3 hymenolepidid species. Parts of the CO1 gene and ITS2 were amplified by PCR and sequenced directly. The CO1 gene sequence obtained was the same in length (391 bp) among all specimens. In the case of ITS2, however, several insertions and deletions were detected (671-741 bp) not only among species but also between an American isolate and a Japanese isolate of H. diminuta. Percentage nucleotide differences between H. diminuta and H. microstoma, or H. diminuta and H. nana were 16.6-18.2% for the CO1 gene and 21.3-22.9% for ITS2. The differences in both sequences between H. microstoma and H. nana were about 14%. Phylogenetic trees inferred from both of the nucleotide sequences showed similar topology, and suggest that H. diminuta may have diverged from the common ancestral line the earliest, and that H. nana is closer to H. microstoma than to H. diminuta. PMID:9488878

  4. Species-function relationships shape ecological properties of the human gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Vieira-Silva, Sara; Falony, Gwen; Darzi, Youssef; Lima-Mendez, Gipsi; Garcia Yunta, Roberto; Okuda, Shujiro; Vandeputte, Doris; Valles-Colomer, Mireia; Hildebrand, Falk; Chaffron, Samuel; Raes, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent progress, the organization and ecological properties of the intestinal microbial ecosystem remain under-investigated. Here, using a manually curated metabolic module framework for (meta-)genomic data analysis, we studied species-function relationships in gut microbial genomes and microbiomes. Half of gut-associated species were found to be generalists regarding overall substrate preference, but we observed significant genus-level metabolic diversification linked to bacterial life strategies. Within each genus, metabolic consistency varied significantly, being low in Firmicutes genera and higher in Bacteroides. Differentiation of fermentable substrate degradation potential contributed to metagenomic functional repertoire variation between individuals, with different enterotypes showing distinct saccharolytic/proteolytic/lipolytic profiles. Finally, we found that module-derived functional redundancy was reduced in the low-richness Bacteroides enterotype, potentially indicating a decreased resilience to perturbation, in line with its frequent association to dysbiosis. These results provide insights into the complex structure of gut microbiome-encoded metabolic properties and emphasize the importance of functional and ecological assessment of gut microbiome variation in clinical studies. PMID:27573110

  5. Tests of ecogeographical relationships in a non-native species: what rules avian morphology?

    PubMed

    Cardilini, Adam P A; Buchanan, Katherine L; Sherman, Craig D H; Cassey, Phillip; Symonds, Matthew R E

    2016-07-01

    The capacity of non-native species to undergo rapid adaptive change provides opportunities to research contemporary evolution through natural experiments. This capacity is particularly true when considering ecogeographical rules, to which non-native species have been shown to conform within relatively short periods of time. Ecogeographical rules explain predictable spatial patterns of morphology, physiology, life history and behaviour. We tested whether Australian populations of non-native starling, Sturnus vulgaris, introduced to the country approximately 150 years ago, exhibited predicted environmental clines in body size, appendage size and heart size (Bergmann's, Allen's and Hesse's rules, respectively). Adult starlings (n = 411) were collected from 28 localities from across eastern Australia from 2011 to 2012. Linear models were constructed to examine the relationships between morphology and local environment. Patterns of variation in body mass and bill surface area were consistent with Bergmann's and Allen's rules, respectively (small body size and larger bill size in warmer climates), with maximum summer temperature being a strongly weighted predictor of both variables. In the only intraspecific test of Hesse's rule in birds to date, we found no evidence to support the idea that relative heart size will be larger in individuals which live in colder climates. Our study does provide evidence that maximum temperature is a strong driver of morphological adaptation for starlings in Australia. The changes in morphology presented here demonstrate the potential for avian species to make rapid adaptive changes in relation to a changing climate to ameliorate the effects of heat stress. PMID:26936361

  6. Relationship between Reproductive Allocation and Relative Abundance among 32 Species of a Tibetan Alpine Meadow: Effects of Fertilization and Grazing

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Kechang; Schmid, Bernhard; Choler, Philippe; Du, Guozhen

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding the relationship between species traits and species abundance is an important goal in ecology and biodiversity science. Although theoretical studies predict that traits related to performance (e.g. reproductive allocation) are most directly linked to species abundance within a community, empirical investigations have rarely been done. It also remains unclear how environmental factors such as grazing or fertilizer application affect the predicted relationship. Methodology We conducted a 3-year field experiment in a Tibetan alpine meadow to assess the relationship between plant reproductive allocation (RA) and species relative abundance (SRA) on control, grazed and fertilized plots. Overall, the studied plant community contained 32 common species. Principal Findings At the treatment level, (i) RA was negatively correlated with SRA on control plots and during the first year on fertilized plots. (ii) No negative RA–SRA correlations were observed on grazed plots and during the second and third year on fertilized plots. (iii) Seed size was positively correlated with SRA on control plots. At the plot level, the correlation between SRA and RA were not affected by treatment, year or species composition. Conclusions/Significance Our study shows that the performance-related trait RA can negatively affect SRA within communities, which is possibly due to the tradeoffs between clonal growth (for space occupancy) and sexual reproduction. We propose that if different species occupy different positions along these tradeoffs it will contribute to biodiversity maintenance in local communities or even at lager scale. PMID:22536385

  7. Chromosomal relationships of Simulium armoricanum and its undescribed sister species in the Simulium vernum species group (Diptera: Simuliidae).

    PubMed

    Adler, Peter H; Belqat, Boutaïna; González, Josefina Garrido; Pérez, Alexandre Justo; Seitz, Gunther

    2016-01-01

    The banding sequence of the polytene chromosomes of Simulium armoricanum Doby & David from England, Portugal, and Spain was resolved relative to the standard map for the S. vernum group. The species is characterized by 11 fixed inversions, one nearly fixed inversion, and three common polymorphisms. The sister species of S. armoricanum is proposed as a formally undescribed species discovered in samples from Portugal. It shares one unique inversion with S. armoricanum, but otherwise differs by eight fixed or nearly fixed rearrangements. Simulium armoricanum and its newly discovered sister species, informally referred to as Simulium 'IL-8', are members of a larger clade of Palearctic species defined by a small pericentric inversion in chromosome III. Among the simuliid species occupying the same streams with S. armoricanum was the first record, chromosomally confirmed, of S. aureum Fries sensu stricto in Portugal. Successful chromosomal analysis of samples of S. armoricanum 17 years after initial fixation demonstrates the importance of storing cytologically fixed larvae at subzero temperatures. PMID:27470716

  8. Are parasite richness and abundance linked to prey species richness and individual feeding preferences in fish hosts?

    PubMed

    Cirtwill, Alyssa R; Stouffer, Daniel B; Poulin, Robert; Lagrue, Clément

    2016-01-01

    Variations in levels of parasitism among individuals in a population of hosts underpin the importance of parasites as an evolutionary or ecological force. Factors influencing parasite richness (number of parasite species) and load (abundance and biomass) at the individual host level ultimately form the basis of parasite infection patterns. In fish, diet range (number of prey taxa consumed) and prey selectivity (proportion of a particular prey taxon in the diet) have been shown to influence parasite infection levels. However, fish diet is most often characterized at the species or fish population level, thus ignoring variation among conspecific individuals and its potential effects on infection patterns among individuals. Here, we examined parasite infections and stomach contents of New Zealand freshwater fish at the individual level. We tested for potential links between the richness, abundance and biomass of helminth parasites and the diet range and prey selectivity of individual fish hosts. There was no obvious link between individual fish host diet and helminth infection levels. Our results were consistent across multiple fish host and parasite species and contrast with those of earlier studies in which fish diet and parasite infection were linked, hinting at a true disconnect between host diet and measures of parasite infections in our study systems. This absence of relationship between host diet and infection levels may be due to the relatively low richness of freshwater helminth parasites in New Zealand and high host-parasite specificity. PMID:26573385

  9. Phylogenetic relationships in the Niviventer-Chiromyscus complex (Rodentia, Muridae) inferred from molecular data, with description of a new species.

    PubMed

    Balakirev, Alexander E; Abramov, Alexei V; Rozhnov, Viatcheslav V

    2014-01-01

    Based on molecular data for mitochondrial (Cyt b, COI) and nuclear (IRBP, GHR) genes, and morphological examinations of museum specimens, we examined diversity, species boundaries, and relationships within and between the murine genera Chiromyscus and Niviventer. Phylogenetic patterns recovered demonstrate that Niviventer sensu lato is not monophyletic but instead includes Chiromyscuschiropus, the only previously recognized species of Chiropus. To maintain the genera Niviventer and Chiropus as monophyletic lineages, the scope and definition of the genus Chiromyscus is revised to include at least three distinct species: Chiromyscuschiropus (the type species of Chiromyscus), Chiromyscuslangbianis (previously regarded as a species of Niviventer), and a new species, described in this paper under the name Chiromyscusthomasi sp. n. PMID:25493050

  10. Phylogenetic relationships in the Niviventer-Chiromyscus complex (Rodentia, Muridae) inferred from molecular data, with description of a new species

    PubMed Central

    Balakirev, Alexander E.; Abramov, Alexei V.; Rozhnov, Viatcheslav V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Based on molecular data for mitochondrial (Cyt b, COI) and nuclear (IRBP, GHR) genes, and morphological examinations of museum specimens, we examined diversity, species boundaries, and relationships within and between the murine genera Chiromyscus and Niviventer. Phylogenetic patterns recovered demonstrate that Niviventer sensu lato is not monophyletic but instead includes Chiromyscus chiropus, the only previously recognized species of Chiropus. To maintain the genera Niviventer and Chiropus as monophyletic lineages, the scope and definition of the genus Chiromyscus is revised to include at least three distinct species: Chiromyscus chiropus (the type species of Chiromyscus), Chiromyscus langbianis (previously regarded as a species of Niviventer), and a new species, described in this paper under the name Chiromyscus thomasi sp. n. PMID:25493050

  11. RELATIONSHIPS OF ALIEN PLANT SPECIES ABUNDANCE TO RIPARIAN VEGETATION, ENVIRONMENT, AND DISTURBANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riparian ecosystems are often invaded by alien species. We evaluated vegetation, environment, and disturbance conditions and their interrelationships with alien species abundance along reaches of 29 streams in eastern Oregon, USA. Using flexible-BETA clustering, indicator species...

  12. Prevalence and beta diversity in avian malaria communities: host species is a better predictor than geography.

    PubMed

    Scordato, Elizabeth S C; Kardish, Melissa R

    2014-11-01

    Patterns of diversity and turnover in macroorganism communities can often be predicted from differences in habitat, phylogenetic relationships among species and the geographical scale of comparisons. In this study, we asked whether these factors also predict diversity and turnover in parasite communities. We studied communities of avian malaria in two sympatric, ecologically similar, congeneric host species at three different sites. We asked whether parasite prevalence and community structure varied with host population, host phylogeography or geographical distance. We used PCR to screen birds for infections and then used Bayesian methods to determine phylogenetic relationships among malaria strains. Metrics of both community and phylogenetic beta diversity were used to examine patterns of malaria strain turnover between host populations, and partial Mantel tests were used determine the correlation between malaria beta diversity and geographical distance. Finally, we developed microsatellite markers to describe the genetic structure of host populations and assess the relationship between host phylogeography and parasite beta diversity. We found that different genera of malaria parasites infect the two hosts at different rates. Within hosts, parasite communities in one population were phylogenetically clustered, but there was otherwise no correlation between metrics of parasite beta diversity and geographical or genetic distance between host populations. Patterns of parasite turnover among host populations are consistent with malaria transmission occurring in the winter rather than on the breeding grounds. Our results indicate greater turnover in parasite communities between different hosts than between different study sites. Differences in host species, as well as transmission location and vector ecology, seem to be more important in structuring malaria communities than the distance-decay relationships frequently found in macroorganisms. Determining the factors

  13. Molecular systematics of pinniped hookworms (Nematoda: Uncinaria): species delimitation, host associations and host-induced morphometric variation.

    PubMed

    Nadler, Steven A; Lyons, Eugene T; Pagan, Christopher; Hyman, Derek; Lewis, Edwin E; Beckmen, Kimberlee; Bell, Cameron M; Castinel, Aurelie; Delong, Robert L; Duignan, Padraig J; Farinpour, Cher; Huntington, Kathy Burek; Kuiken, Thijs; Morgades, Diana; Naem, Soraya; Norman, Richard; Parker, Corwin; Ramos, Paul; Spraker, Terry R; Berón-Vera, Bárbara

    2013-12-01

    host species representing the more recent host-parasite association. Intraspecific host-induced size differences are inconsistent with the exclusive use of morphometrics to delimit and diagnose species of Uncinaria from pinnipeds. PMID:24162075

  14. Antennal phenotype of Triatoma dimidiata populations and its relationship with species of phyllosoma and protracta complexes.

    PubMed

    Catalá, S; Sachetto, C; Moreno, M; Rosales, R; Salazar-Schetrino, P M; Gorla, D

    2005-09-01

    Triatoma dimidiata (Latreille 1811) Reduviidae Triatominae is the main vector of Chagas disease in several countries of Latin America. As for other vector species, the characterization of T. dimidiata subpopulations within particular geographical regions or occupying different habitats could help in better planning of vector control actions. A first objective in this study was to evaluate the antennal phenotype as a phenetic marker to characterize populations of T. dimidiata collected in different geographic areas and domestic and sylvatic habitats. A second objective was to evaluate the phenetic relationships of T. dimidiata with other species of the phyllosoma complex: longipennis, pallidipennis, and phyllosoma. The antennal sensilla of T. dimidiata specimens collected in Mexico, Central America, and Colombia were analyzed and compared with the antennal sensilla of T. longipennis, T. pallidipennis, and T. phyllosoma. T. barberi was used as an outgroup in the analysis. For each specimen, the ventral side of the three distal segments of the antennae was drawn, identifying and counting four types of sensilla. In T. dimidiata, univariate and multivariate analysis showed differences between sexes, among populations collected in different habitats within the same region, and among populations collected in different geographic regions. Two types of antennal sensilla showed a latitudinal variation. Domestic specimens showed intermediate characteristics of the antennal phenotype, between sylvatic cave- and sylvatic forest-collected specimens. The antennal phenotypes show high similarities among T. pallidipennis, T. phyllosoma, and T. longipennis, with a better differentiation of T. pallidipennis. T. dimidiata is separated from the other members of the complex by a similar distance to T. barberi, of the protracta complex. PMID:16363154

  15. Sequencing of transcriptomes from two Miscanthus species reveals functional specificity in rhizomes, and clarifies evolutionary relationships

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Miscanthus is a promising biomass crop for temperate regions. Despite the increasing interest in this plant, limited sequence information has constrained research into its biology, physiology, and breeding. The whole genome transcriptomes of M. sinensis and M. sacchariflorus presented in this study may provide good resources to understand functional compositions of two important Miscanthus genomes and their evolutionary relationships. Results For M. sinensis, a total of 457,891 and 512,950 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were produced from leaf and rhizome tissues, respectively, which were assembled into 12,166 contigs and 89,648 singletons for leaf, and 13,170 contigs and 112,138 singletons for rhizome. For M. sacchariflorus, a total of 288,806 and 267,952 ESTs from leaf and rhizome tissues, respectively, were assembled into 8,732 contigs and 66,881 singletons for leaf, and 8,104 contigs and 63,212 singletons for rhizome. Based on the distributions of synonymous nucleotide substitution (Ks), sorghum and Miscanthus diverged about 6.2 million years ago (MYA), Saccharum and Miscanthus diverged 4.6 MYA, and M. sinensis and M. sacchariflorus diverged 1.5 MYA. The pairwise alignment of predicted protein sequences from sorghum-Miscanthus and two Miscanthus species found a total of 43,770 and 35,818 nsSNPs, respectively. The impacts of striking mutations found by nsSNPs were much lower between sorghum and Miscanthus than those between the two Miscanthus species, perhaps as a consequence of the much higher level of gene duplication in Miscanthus and resulting ability to buffer essential functions against disturbance. Conclusions The ESTs generated in the present study represent a significant addition to Miscanthus functional genomics resources, permitting us to discover some candidate genes associated with enhanced biomass production. Ks distributions based on orthologous ESTs may serve as a guideline for future research into the evolution of Miscanthus species

  16. Relationship between microbial communities and mercury species in the seawater of the Central Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zivkovic, Igor; Horvat, Milena; Kotnik, Joze; Fajon, Vesna; Solic, Mladen; Kanduc, Tjasa

    2016-04-01

    The structure of the microbial food web and its role in biogeochemical processes in marine ecosystems may vary noticeably and depend on environmental trophic status. Importance of picoplankton makes them an essential component for understanding the food web dynamics in marine systems. These small organisms dominate the photosynthetic biomass and primary production in oligotrophic waters like the Adriatic Sea. One of the hypotheses of research is that the factors that enable scavenging nutrients at low concentrations also promote accumulation of contaminants in the biomass of microorganisms. Biologically mediated reactions can transform mercury species and facilitate their entrance into the marine food web in which it bioaccumulates in the form of methylmercury (MeHg). In order to establish relationship between Hg and microbial species, we performed samplings in the Central Adriatic Sea. Samplings were conducted during oceanographic cruises aboard the research vessel Bios Dva from March 2014 to December 2015. Research was constrained to transect from the island of Vis to the Bay of Kastela. Non-filtered water samples were collected for determination of methylmercury (MeHg), total mercury (THg), dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM), and microbial species in Adriatic coastal and open waters. In the pristine environment of the island of Vis, THg concentrations are the lowest and range from 0.14-1.10 ng/L. Mercury contamination from chlor-alkali industrial waters in the Bay of Kastela is observed through the highest THg concentrations (up to 5.58 ng/L). DGM always shows higher values in more contaminated areas (31.8-351 pg/L) than in the pristine environment (22.1-245 pg/L). MeHg concentrations vary, but the highest values are usually found in the Bay of Kastela (up to 34.3 pg/L). Number of picoeukaryotes is the highest in the Bay of Kastela (0.44×106-31.8×106/L) which has been affected by industrial and civil effluents from the surrounding cities. The lowest number is

  17. Phylogenetic relationships of twenty Gymnothorax species based on cytochrome b sequence data.

    PubMed

    Du, M; Yin, S W; Niu, B Z

    2016-01-01

    To study the phylogenetic relationships of the genus Gymnothorax (moray eels) distributed in South China Sea, polymerase chain reactions were performed, and the amplification products were sequenced by cloning into the PMD18T-vector (TaKaRa). The entire gene sequences encoding cytochrome b (1140 bp) for 16 Gymnothorax (G. flavimarginatus, G. meleagris, G. undulates, G. reticularis, G. reevesi, G. melanospilus, G. rueppeliae, G. javanicus, G. chilospilus, G. pseudothyrsoideus, G. fimbriatus, G. hepaticus, G. berndti, G. curostus, G. favagineus, and G. margaritophorus) were obtained. Four additional Gymnothorax sequences from GenBank were also included. The nucleotide composition, genetic distances, and base substitution saturation analysis were calculated using the MEGA 5.0 Software. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using maximum-parsimony, maximum-likelihood (ML), and neighbor-joining (NJ). The results were as follows: 1) base-substitution saturation analysis suggested that both in third codon positions, and the full-length cytochrome b data set, Ts are not saturated, but Tv substitutions may be saturated, 2) the genus Gymnothorax, native to the South China Sea, is divided into four distinct clades, with two clades in the NJ and ML trees, and 3) according to our experimental data, G. melanospilus (Bleeker, 1855) and G. favagineus (Bloch and Schneider, 1801) are the same species. PMID:27323052

  18. Phylogenetic relationships among Vairimorpha and Nosema species (Microspora) based on ribosomal RNA sequence data.

    PubMed

    Baker, M D; Vossbrinck, C R; Maddox, J V; Undeen, A H

    1994-09-01

    A portion (approximately 350 nucleotides) of the large subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) 5' to the 580 region (Escherichia coli numbering) was sequenced using the reverse transcriptase dideoxy method and compared for several species of Nosema and Vairimorpha. Comparison among Nosema species suggests that this genus is composed of several unrelated groups. The group which includes the type species, Nosema bombycis, consists of closely related species found primarily in Lepidoptera. Other Nosema species sequenced (Nosema kingi, Nosema algerae, and Nosema locustae) do not appear to be closely related to each other or to the lepidopteran Nosema group. Comparison among the Vairimorpha species indicates that two distinct but very closely related groups exist. The Lymantria group consists of species isolated from the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, while the Vairimorpha necatrix group consists of species isolated from other Lepidoptera. Intergeneric comparison of the sequence data suggests that the lepidopteran Nosema species are closely related to the Vairimorpha species. PMID:7963643

  19. New species of the spider genera Aysenia and Aysenoides from Chile and Argentina: description and phylogenetic relationships (Araneae: Anyphaenidae, Amaurobioidinae).

    PubMed

    Laborda, Alvaro; Ramírez, Martín J; Pizarro-Araya, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    New spider species of the genera Aysenia Tullgren and Aysenoides Ramírez are described and their phylogenetic relationships discussed. The new species Aysenia paposo, from the coastal desert in northern Chile is sister to Aysenia araucana Ramírez. The diagnosis of Aysenia araucana is updated and new somatic variability is reported for the species. We present new records for other species of Aysenia and Aysenoides. The new species Aysenoides simoi, from temperate forests in Chile and adjacent Argentina is sister to Aysenoides nahuel. The phylogenetic analysis confirmed the monophyly of both genera. The support values of the genera are relatively high, but some internal branches show low support values. The genus Aysenia is supported by three synapomorphies, two of these from leg spination and one from the male genitalia. Aysenoides is supported by three synapomorphies from male and female genitalia. PMID:25277558

  20. Species decline and extinction: synergy of infectious disease and Allee effect?

    PubMed

    Thieme, Horst R; Dhirasakdanon, Thanate; Han, Zhun; Trevino, Roy

    2009-03-01

    Host-parasite models with density-dependent (mass action) incidence and a critical Allee effect in host growth can explain both species decline and disappearance (extinction). The behaviour of the model is consistent with both the novel pathogen hypothesis and the endemic pathogen hypothesis for chytridiomycosis. Mathematically, the transition from decline to disappearance is mediated by a Hopf bifurcation and is marked by the occurrence of a heteroclinic orbit. The Hopf bifurcation is supercritical if intra-specific host competition increases with host density at a large power and subcritical if the power is small. In the supercritical case, host-parasite coexistence can be at equilibrium or periodic; in the subcritical case it is only at equilibrium. PMID:22880836

  1. [Molecular phylogenetic relationships among species in Oxya serville(Orthoptera: Catantopidae) based on random amplified polymorphic DNA(RAPD)].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Zhen; Ma, En-Bo; Guo, Ya-Ping

    2003-06-01

    The molecular phylogenetic relationships of five species of Oxya Audient-serville including O. chinensis, O. brachyptera, O. agavisa, O. japonica and O. intricata were studied with RAPD. Genomic DNA of forty-one individuals were amplified with eight oligonucleotide (10 mer) primers which were previously selected, the specifical bands occured in all them, a total of 96 clear and reproducible bands (rang from 200-2500 bp) were generated, 95 of which were polymorphic band, the only one band (850 bp) which was amplified with S362 was common to five species of Oxya. The obtaining segments of individual primer were between 8-16, the average was 12. A molecular phylogenetic tree based on was constructed Euclidean distance among five species of rice grasshopper by between-groups linkage method, the result indicated O. chinensis was closely related to O. brachyptera, the genetic relationship of O. japonica and O. agavisa was also close, whereas O. intricata had far phylogenetic relationship with them. The results of dendrogram were consistent with the previous conclusion of morphologic classification and cytotaxonomy, and suggested RAPD was suitable for analysis of phylogenetic relationships among species of Oxya. PMID:12939798

  2. Relationship between Maximum Leaf Photosynthesis, Nitrogen Content and Specific Leaf Area in Balearic Endemic and Non‐endemic Mediterranean Species

    PubMed Central

    GULÍAS, JAVIER; FLEXAS, JAUME; MUS, MAURICI; CIFRE, JOSEP; LEFI, ELKADRI; MEDRANO, HIPÓLITO

    2003-01-01

    Gas exchange parameters, leaf nitrogen content and specific leaf area (SLA) were measured in situ on 73 C3 and five C4 plant species in Mallorca, west Mediterranean, to test whether species endemic to the Balearic Islands differed from widespread, non‐endemic Mediterranean species and crops in their leaf traits and trait inter‐relationships. Endemic species differed significantly from widespread species and crops in several parameters; in particular, photosynthetic capacity, on an area basis (A), was 20 % less in endemics than in non‐endemics. Similar differences between endemics and non‐endemics were found in parameters such as SLA and leaf nitrogen content per area (Na). Nevertheless, most of the observed differences were found only within the herbaceous deciduous species. These could be due to the fact that most of the non‐endemic species within this group have adapted to ruderal areas, while none of the endemics occupies this kind of habitat. All the species—including the crops—showed a positive, highly significant correlation between photosynthetic capacity on a mass basis (Am), leaf nitrogen content on a mass basis (Nm) and SLA. However, endemic species had a lower Am for any given SLA and Nm. Hypotheses are presented to explain these differences, and their possible role in reducing the distribution of many endemic Balearic species is discussed. PMID:12805082

  3. Sequence heterogeneity and phylogenetic relationships between the copia retrotransposon in Drosophila species of the repleta and melanogaster groups

    PubMed Central

    De Almeida, Luciane M; Carareto, Claudia MA

    2006-01-01

    Although the retrotransposon copia has been studied in the melanogaster group of Drosophila species, very little is known about copia dynamism and evolution in other groups. We analyzed the occurrence and heterogeneity of the copia 5'LTR-ULR partial sequence and their phylogenetic relationships in 24 species of the repleta group of Drosophila. PCR showed that copia occurs in 18 out of the 24 species evaluated. Sequencing was possible in only eight species. The sequences showed a low nucleotide diversity, which suggests selective constraints maintaining this regulatory region over evolutionary time. On the contrary, the low nucleotide divergence and the phylogenetic relationships between the D. willistoni/Zaprionus tuberculatus/melanogaster species subgroup suggest horizontal transfer. Sixteen transcription factor binding sites were identified in the LTR-ULR repleta and melanogaster consensus sequences. However, these motifs are not homologous, neither according to their position in the LTR-ULR sequences, nor according to their sequences. Taken together, the low motif homologies, the phylogenetic relationship and the great nucleotide divergence between the melanogaster and repleta copia sequences reinforce the hypothesis that there are two copia families. PMID:16954045

  4. Nematode community structure of forest woodlots. I. Relationships based on similarity coefficients of nematode species.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S R; Ferris, V R; Ferris, J M

    1972-07-01

    Associations among nematode communities were studied in 18 Indiana mixed-hardwood stands of varying composition, soils, physiography, and past management practices. All sites were sampled in April, July, and October of 1968 and 1969. A total of 175 species representing eight orders were found, with 18 species occurring in all 18 sites, and approximately half the total species occurring in more than 50% of the sites. Taxonomic similarity, based on nematode species composition, was determined for the woodlots by means of a resemblance equation. Woodlots containing similar nematode species also showed similarities in dominant tree species and in soil types. Sites that had undergone major disturbances were the most dissimilar. PMID:19319263

  5. Relationship between DDE concentrations and laying sequence in eggs of two passerine species.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, K D; Skipper, S L; Cobb, G P; McMurry, S T

    2004-10-01

    Passerine eggs make useful biomonitors of environmental pollutants. Among passerines, it is not known whether organochlorine contaminants in eggs within the same clutch are independent observations or follow a laying order effect. Intraclutch variation of DDE (1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis[(p-chlorophenyl)]ethylene) concentrations was studied in eggs collected from prothonotary warblers (Protonotaria citrea) and European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) nesting on National Priority List sites in lower Alabama and central Colorado, respectively. All 209 eggs collected for this study contained detectable levels of DDE. Mean concentration of DDE across all prothonotary warbler eggs (mean 8.71 microg/g +/- 1.19, n = 20) was almost two orders of magnitude greater than mean concentrations of DDE in all starling eggs (mean 0.70 microg/g +/- 0.06, n = 189). In both species, there was a large amount of variability among individual eggs of the same clutch and no significant relationship between laying order and DDE concentration. Variation among eggs laid in the same sequential order was high and effectively masked any potential trends in laying order effect. We hypothesized that the variability was caused by the spatial heterogeneity of DDE on our study sites, the nature of egg development within a female passerine, or a combination of these factors. Investigators focusing on lipophilic contaminants should exercise caution when making inferences about contaminant concentrations in an entire clutch of passerine eggs after the collection and analysis of a single egg because our data show that DDE levels in a single egg collected for analysis do not consistently reflect DDE levels in the eggs remaining in the nest. PMID:15386134

  6. Species Adaptive Strategies and Leaf Economic Relationships across Serpentine and Non-Serpentine Habitats on Lesbos, Eastern Mediterranean

    PubMed Central

    Adamidis, George C.; Kazakou, Elena; Fyllas, Nikolaos M.; Dimitrakopoulos, Panayiotis G.

    2014-01-01

    Shifts in species' traits across contrasting environments have the potential to influence ecosystem functioning. Plant communities on unusually harsh soils may have unique responses to environmental change, through the mediating role of functional plant traits. We conducted a field study comparing eight functional leaf traits of seventeen common species located on both serpentine and non-serpentine environments on Lesbos Island, in the eastern Mediterranean. We focused on species' adaptive strategies across the two contrasting environments and investigated the effect of trait variation on the robustness of core ‘leaf economic’ relationships across local environmental variability. Our results showed that the same species followed a conservative strategy on serpentine substrates and an exploitative strategy on non-serpentine ones, consistent with the leaf economic spectrum predictions. Although considerable species-specific trait variability emerged, the single-trait responses across contrasting environments were generally consistent. However, multivariate-trait responses were diverse. Finally, we found that the strength of relationships between core ‘leaf economic’ traits altered across local environmental variability. Our results highlight the divergent trait evolution on serpentine and non-serpentine communities and reinforce other findings presenting species-specific responses to environmental variation. PMID:24800835

  7. Molecular phylogenetic relationships of some common sweetlips (Haemulidae: Plectorhynchinae) and the synonyms controversy of two Plectorhinchus species.

    PubMed

    Liang, Rishen; Wang, Chao; Zou, Qing; Zhou, Aiguo; Zhou, Meng

    2016-05-01

    Molecular phylogenetic topologies from 40 individuals of 17 sweetlips were constructed based on the mitochondrial cytochrome b (cyt b) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) genes. All phylogenetic results strongly revealed the division of the sweetlips into three morphological distinct groups. Group I: sweetlips with colorful patterns, Group II and Group III: species with uniformly dark patterns. The relationships of those morphologically confused Plectorhinchus species were well-resolved in the phylogenetic results. We also confirmed that the genus Diagramma was placed inside the colorful Plectorhinchus groups, suggesting close relationship of Diagramma within Plectorhinchus. Additionally, we found that two species, P. orientalis and P. vittatus, which were traditionally considered as synonyms for oriental sweetlips, which were suggested to be two distinct species. Sequence divergence also revealed a great genetic variation between P. orientalis and P. vittatus (6.0% in Cyt b and 7.4% in COI), which was largely greater than the species diagnosis divergence value (2%) suggested by Hebert et al. This new finding suggested P. orientalis and P. vittatus might be two distinct species and should not be placed as synonyms. PMID:25484173

  8. Mitochondrial DNA variation and phylogenetic relationships among five tuna species based on sequencing of D-loop region.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Girish; Kocour, Martin; Kunal, Swaraj Priyaranjan

    2016-05-01

    In order to assess the DNA sequence variation and phylogenetic relationship among five tuna species (Auxis thazard, Euthynnus affinis, Katsuwonus pelamis, Thunnus tonggol, and T. albacares) out of all four tuna genera, partial sequences of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop region were analyzed. The estimate of intra-specific sequence variation in studied species was low, ranging from 0.027 to 0.080 [Kimura's two parameter distance (K2P)], whereas values of inter-specific variation ranged from 0.049 to 0.491. The longtail tuna (T. tonggol) and yellowfin tuna (T. albacares) were found to share a close relationship (K2P = 0.049) while skipjack tuna (K. pelamis) was most divergent studied species. Phylogenetic analysis using Maximum-Likelihood (ML) and Neighbor-Joining (NJ) methods supported the monophyletic origin of Thunnus species. Similarly, phylogeny of Auxis and Euthynnus species substantiate the monophyly. However, results showed a distinct origin of K. pelamis from genus Thunnus as well as Auxis and Euthynnus. Thus, the mtDNA D-loop region sequence data supports the polyphyletic origin of tuna species. PMID:25329285

  9. Relationship Between Photochemical Quenching and Non-Photochemical Quenching in Six Species of Cyanobacteria Reveals Species Difference in Redox State and Species Commonality in Energy Dissipation

    PubMed Central

    Misumi, Masahiro; Katoh, Hiroshi; Tomo, Tatsuya; Sonoike, Kintake

    2016-01-01

    Although the photosynthetic reaction center is well conserved among different cyanobacterial species, the modes of metabolism, e.g. respiratory, nitrogen and carbon metabolism and their mutual interaction, are quite diverse. To explore such uniformity and diversity among cyanobacteria, here we compare the influence of the light environment on the condition of photosynthetic electron transport through Chl fluorescence measurement of six cyanobacterial species grown under the same photon flux densities and at the same temperature. In the dark or under weak light, up to growth light, a large difference in the plastoquinone (PQ) redox condition was observed among different cyanobacterial species. The observed difference indicates that the degree of interaction between respiratory electron transfer and photosynthetic electron transfer differs among different cyanobacterial species. The variation could not be ascribed to the phylogenetic differences but possibly to the light environment of the original habitat. On the other hand, changes in the redox condition of PQ were essentially identical among different species at photon flux densities higher than the growth light. We further analyzed the response to high light by using a typical energy allocation model and found that ‘non-regulated’ thermal dissipation was increased under high-light conditions in all cyanobacterial species tested. We assume that such ‘non-regulated’ thermal dissipation may be an important ‘regulatory’ mechanism in the acclimation of cyanobacterial cells to high-light conditions. PMID:26712847

  10. Studies on the life history and development of Cuterebra polita (Diptera: Cuterebridae) in four species of rodents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Capelle, K.J.

    1970-01-01

    Cuterebra polita Coquillett is a primary parasite of the pocket gopher, Thomomys talpoides, in the western United States. It also occurs secondarily in other wild rodents that come into close contact with pocket gophers.Field studies disclosed pursuit, mating, and ovipositing at an aggregation site near Monte Cristo, Utah. Eggs were individually attached to fibrous roots suspended from the roof of shallow gopher burrows. This refinement of the host-parasite relationship has not previously been described for other North American cuterebrids.In the laboratory, 3 gravid females produced 186-357 viable eggs; about 85% were induced to hatch or hatched spontaneously after 12 days. Dissection of 1 of the females revealed another 886 eggs, for a total of 1243.Larvae were artificially introduced and developed in deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), domestic mice (Mus musculus), hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus), and meadow voles (Microtus montanus). The domestic rabbit (Orystolagus cuniculus) appeared refractory. The rate and success of development in the 4 rodent species was variable, but terminal larval development averaged about 22 days. Warbles appeared after 8 days in the rodents, and the majority of the cysts occurred in the posterior dorsal region.On the basis of larval characteristics, C. polita and C. thomomuris appear to be independent, valid species, though they share a common host.

  11. Phylogenetic relationships of species of genus Arachis based on geneic sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Arachis (Fabaceae), which originated in South America, consists of 80 species. Based on morphological traits and cross-compatibility among the species, the genus is divided into nine taxonomic sections, one of which, Arachis is the largest section including 30 wild species and the economic...

  12. Food and feeding relationships of three sympatric slickhead species (Pisces: Alepocephalidae) from northeastern Chatham Rise, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. R. L.; Breen, B. B.

    2013-09-01

    The food and feeding relationships of mid-slope slickheads in New Zealand waters are little known compared with those from the northern hemisphere. This study examines the feeding relationships of three common slickhead species from approximately 1000 m on Chatham Rise, New Zealand: Alepocephalus antipodianus (Parrot, 1948), A. australis (Barnard, 1923), and Xenodermichthys copei (Gill, 1884). The Alepocephalus species were predominantly benthopelagic feeders with a small benthic component to their diets. Alepocephalus australis fed on pelagic tunicates, notably Pyrosoma atlanticum Péron, 1804. Alepocephalus antipodianus fed on fish and pelagic tunicates, and also crustaceans. Xenodermichthys copei fed primarily on crustaceans. Considerable material was recovered from the intestines of all three species, and much of it was identifiable and only partially digested, including the remains of pelagic tunicates. There was little dietary overlap between the stomach contents of the three slickhead species indicating a degree of niche partitioning. Intestinal contents differed from stomach contents in weight, but not in number of items for all three species. The composition of stomach and intestinal contents differed for A. australis, but not for A. antipodianus or X. copei, which suggests that intestinal contents could be potentially useful in lieu of stomach content. There was a high level of overlap between the intestinal contents of A. antipodianus and A. australis, suggesting a possible closer dietary relationship between these two species than that indicated by stomach contents alone. Despite limitations in sample size and spatial and temporal coverage, the results from this study indicate that the three slickhead species could play an important role in the structuring of the demersal community at mid-slope depths on northeastern Chatham Rise.

  13. Roles of Spatial Scale and Rarity on the Relationship between Butterfly Species Richness and Human Density in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mecenero, Silvia; Altwegg, Res; Colville, Jonathan F.; Beale, Colin M.

    2015-01-01

    Wildlife and humans tend to prefer the same productive environments, yet high human densities often lead to reduced biodiversity. Species richness is often positively correlated with human population density at broad scales, but this correlation could also be caused by unequal sampling effort leading to higher species tallies in areas of dense human activity. We examined the relationships between butterfly species richness and human population density at five spatial resolutions ranging from 2' to 60' across South Africa. We used atlas-type data and spatial interpolation techniques aimed at reducing the effect of unequal spatial sampling. Our results confirm the general positive correlation between total species richness and human population density. Contrary to our expectations, the strength of this positive correlation did not weaken at finer spatial resolutions. The patterns observed using total species richness were driven mostly by common species. The richness of threatened and restricted range species was not correlated to human population density. None of the correlations we examined were particularly strong, with much unexplained variance remaining, suggesting that the overlap between butterflies and humans is not strong compared to other factors not accounted for in our analyses. Special consideration needs to be made regarding conservation goals and variables used when investigating the overlap between species and humans for biodiversity conservation. PMID:25915899

  14. Genetic relationship among eurasian and american larix species based on allozymes

    PubMed

    Semerikov; Lascoux

    1999-07-01

    Genetic variation at 16 allozyme loci was studied in both American (Larix occidentalis Nutt., L. laricina (Du Roi) C. Koch, L. lyallii Parl.) and Eurasian (L. sibirica Ledeb., L. gmelinii Rupr., L. olgensis A. Henry, L. kaempferi (Lamb.) Carr. (=L. leptolepis (Sieb. et Zucc.) Endl.), L. kamtschatica (Rupr.) Carr. and L. decidua (Mill. )) larch species. Species with a limited range, such as L. olgensis and L. lyallii, had lower genetic variation than species with a wider range. Population differentiation within species was of the same order of magnitude among species. The resulting phylogeny indicates a clear separation between American and Eurasian species. This result is in agreement with recent palaeontological findings that suggest that gene flow between American and Eurasian species has been unlikely since the last glaciation. PMID:10447704

  15. A new species of Dracoderes (Kinorhyncha: Dracoderidae) from Korea provides further support for a dracoderid-homalorhagid relationship.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Vibe G; Rho, Hyun Soo; Kim, Dongsung; Sørensen, Martin V

    2013-01-01

    A new kinorhynch species, Dracoderes nidhug nov. sp., is described from the East Sea, at 160 m depth, off Uljin, Korea. The new species is the fourth that can be assigned to the genus, and is recognized by the presence of dorsal spines on segments 3 to 9 (alternatingly displaced to more paradorsal positions on segments 3 to 8), subdorsal tubules on segment 2, lateroventral tubules on segments 2, 5 and 10, and lateral accessory tubules on segment 8. The new species shows two longitudinal, intracuticular markings on the ventral side of segment 1, which could be interpret as rudimentary plate joints, corresponding to the articulations found on the sternal plates of segment 1 in species of Pycnophyes and Kinorhynchus. The finding brings further support to a closer relationship between Dracoderes and homalorhagid kinorhynchs. PMID:25243279

  16. Phylogenetic Relationships and Species Delimitation in Pinus Section Trifoliae Inferrred from Plastid DNA

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-León, Sergio; Gernandt, David S.; Pérez de la Rosa, Jorge A.; Jardón-Barbolla, Lev

    2013-01-01

    Recent diversification followed by secondary contact and hybridization may explain complex patterns of intra- and interspecific morphological and genetic variation in the North American hard pines (Pinus section Trifoliae), a group of approximately 49 tree species distributed in North and Central America and the Caribbean islands. We concatenated five plastid DNA markers for an average of 3.9 individuals per putative species and assessed the suitability of the five regions as DNA bar codes for species identification, species delimitation, and phylogenetic reconstruction. The ycf1 gene accounted for the greatest proportion of the alignment (46.9%), the greatest proportion of variable sites (74.9%), and the most unique sequences (75 haplotypes). Phylogenetic analysis recovered clades corresponding to subsections Australes, Contortae, and Ponderosae. Sequences for 23 of the 49 species were monophyletic and sequences for another 9 species were paraphyletic. Morphologically similar species within subsections usually grouped together, but there were exceptions consistent with incomplete lineage sorting or introgression. Bayesian relaxed molecular clock analyses indicated that all three subsections diversified relatively recently during the Miocene. The general mixed Yule-coalescent method gave a mixed model estimate of only 22 or 23 evolutionary entities for the plastid sequences, which corresponds to less than half the 49 species recognized based on morphological species assignments. Including more unique haplotypes per species may result in higher estimates, but low mutation rates, recent diversification, and large effective population sizes may limit the effectiveness of this method to detect evolutionary entities. PMID:23936218

  17. Flume experiments elucidate relationships between microbial genetics, nitrogen species and hydraulics in controlling nitrous oxide production in the hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quick, A. M.; Farrell, T. B.; Reeder, W. J.; Feris, K. P.; Tonina, D.; Benner, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    The hyporheic zone is a potentially important producer of nitrous oxide, a powerful greenhouse gas. The location and magnitude of nitrous oxide generation within the hyporheic zone involves complex interactions between multiple nitrogen species, redox conditions, microbial communities, and hydraulics. To better understand nitrous oxide generation and emissions from streams, we conducted large-scale flume experiments in which we monitored pore waters along hyporheic flow paths within stream dune structures. Measured dissolved oxygen, ammonia, nitrate, nitrite, and dissolved nitrous oxide showed distinct spatial relationships reflecting redox changes along flow paths. Denitrifying genes (nosZ, nirS, and nirK), determined using qPCR, were spatially associated with abundances of nitrogen species. Using residence times along a flow path, clear trends in oxygen conditions, genes encoding for microbial catalysis, and nitrogen species were observed. Hotspots of targeted genes correlated with hotspots for conversion of nitrogen species, including nitrous oxide production and conversion to dinitrogen. Trends were apparent regardless of dune size, allowing for the possibility to apply observed relationships to multiple streambed morphologies. Relating streambed morphology and loading of nitrogen species allows for prediction of nitrous oxide production in the hyporheic zone.

  18. Spatial Distribution of Dorylaimid and Mononchid Nematodes from Southeast Iberian Peninsula: Chorological Relationships among Species

    PubMed Central

    Liébanas, G.; Peña-Santiago, R.; Real, R.; Márquez, A. L.

    2002-01-01

    The spatial distribution of 138 Dorylaimid and Mononchid species collected in a natural area from the Southeast Iberian Peninsula was studied. A chorological classification was used to examine distribution patterns shared by groups of species. Eighty species were classified into 14 collective and 16 individual chorotypes. The geographical projections of several collective chorotypes are illustrated along with their corresponding distribution maps. The importance of this analysis to nematological study is briefly discussed. PMID:19265962

  19. Chromosomal evolution of Arvicolinae (Cricetidae, Rodentia). III. Karyotype relationships of ten Microtus species.

    PubMed

    Lemskaya, Natalia A; Romanenko, Svetlana A; Golenishchev, Feodor N; Rubtsova, Nadezhda V; Sablina, Olga V; Serdukova, Natalya A; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Fu, Beiyuan; Yiğit, Nuri; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Yang, Fengtang; Graphodatsky, Alexander S

    2010-06-01

    The genus Microtus consists of 65 extant species, making it one of the rodentia genera with the highest number of species. The extreme karyotype diversification in Microtus has made them an ideal species group for comparative cytogenetics and cytotaxonomy. Conventional comparative cytogenetic studies in Microtus have been based mainly on chromosomal banding patterns; the number of Microtus species examined by molecular cytogenetics-cross-species chromosome painting-is limited. In this study, we used whole chromosome painting probes of the field vole Microtus agrestis to detect regions of homology in the karyotypes of eight Microtus species. For almost all investigated species, species-specific associations of conserved chromosomal segments were revealed. Analysis of data obtained here and previously published data allowed us to propose that the ancestral Microtus species had a 2n = 54 karyotype, including two associations of field vole chromosomal segments (MAG 1/17 and 2/8). Further mapping of the chromosome rearrangements onto a molecular phylogenetic tree allows the reconstruction of a karyotype evolution pathway in the Microtus genus. PMID:20379801

  20. Response to Comment on "Worldwide evidence of a unimodal relationship between productivity and plant species richness".

    PubMed

    Pither, Jason; Fraser, Lauchlan H; Jentsch, Anke; Sternberg, Marcelo; Zobel, Martin; Cahill, James; Beierkuhnlein, Carl; Bartha, Sándor; Bennett, Jonathan A; Boldgiv, Bazartseren; Brown, Leslie R; Cabido, Marcelo; Campetella, Giandiego; Carlyle, Cameron N; Chelli, Stefano; Csergő, Anna Mária; Diaz, Sandra; Enrico, Lucas; Ensing, David; Fidelis, Alessandra; Garris, Heath W; Henry, Hugh A L; Höhn, Maria; Klironomos, John; Koorem, Kadri; Lawrence-Lodge, Rachael; Manning, Peter; Mitchell, Randall J; Moora, Mari; Pillar, Valério D; Stotz, Gisela C; Sugiyama, Shu-ichi; Szentes, Szilárd; Tungalag, Radnaakhand; Undrakhbold, Sainbileg; Wellstein, Camilla; Zupo, Talita

    2016-01-29

    Tredennick et al. criticize one of our statistical analyses and emphasize the low explanatory power of models relating productivity to diversity. These criticisms do not detract from our key findings, including evidence consistent with the unimodal constraint relationship predicted by the humped-back model and evidence of scale sensitivities in the form and strength of the relationship. PMID:26823419

  1. Species relationships in the genus Agrostis based on flow cytometry and MITE-display molecular markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is estimated that there are between 150 and 200 species of Agrostis, and interspecific hybridization is a proven method for improving cultivated Agrostis species. The pool of publicly available Agrostis germplasm, available through the National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS), represents 17% of th...

  2. Molecular characterization of diversity and relationships within and among seven cultivated species of Prunus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analysis of genetic variability and differentiation within and among seven cultivated species and seven wild species of Prunus using amplified fragment length polymorphism revealed four well-supported groups corresponding to the four sections Amygdalus, Armeniaca, Cerasus and Prunophora described wi...

  3. Influence of Nutrient Stress on the Relationships between PAM Measurements and Carbon Incorporation in Four Phytoplankton Species

    PubMed Central

    Napoléon, Camille; Raimbault, Virginie; Claquin, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Two methods of measuring primary production, modulated fluorimetry (PAM) and the traditional carbon incorporation method (13C), were compared in four phytoplankton species, two diatoms (Pseudo-nitzschia pungens and Asterionellopsis glacialis), and two dinoflagellates (Heterocapsa sp and Karenia mikimotoï), under N (nitrogen), P (phosphorus) and Si (silicon) limited semi-continuous culture. N and Si-limited cultures showed relatively high quantum efficiency of the PSII (Fv/Fm) values, confirming that Fv/Fm is not a good proxy for nutrient stress in balanced systems, whereas P limitation had a drastic effect on many physiological parameters. In all species, the physiological capacity of phytoplankton cells to acclimate to nutrient limitations led to changes in the cellular biochemical composition and the structure of the photosynthetic apparatus. The observed physiological responses were species and nutrient specific. The values of the chlorophyll-specific absorption cross section (a*) increased with nutrient limitation due to package effect, while the carbon/Chl a ratio was higher under N and P limitations. In diatoms, Si limitation did not affect photosynthesis confirming the uncoupling between Si and carbon metabolisms. In all four species and under all treatments, significant relationships were found between photosynthetic activities, ETRChl (electron transport rate) and PChl (carbon fixation rate) estimated using PAM measurements and 13C incorporation, showing that the fluorescence technique can reliably be used to estimate carbon fixation by phytoplankton. The relationship between ETRChl and PChl can be described by the shape and the slope of the curve (ΦC.e). Linear relationships were found for dinoflagellates and P. pungens under all treatments. A decrease in ΦC.e was observed under N and P limitation probably due to structural damage to the photosynthetic apparatus. A. glacialis showed a logarithmic relationship in N and P limited conditions, due to the

  4. Relationships between chemical properties of larval media and development of two Stomoxys species (Diptera: Muscidae) from Reunion Island.

    PubMed

    Gilles, J; David, J F; Lecomte, P; Tillard, E

    2008-02-01

    The development of two cattle pests, Stomoxys calcitrans L. and Stomoxys niger niger Macquart (Diptera: Muscidae), was studied in the laboratory using seven potential larval media from a dairy farm on Reunion Island. The media were six types of cattle feed and an old manure medium. Egg-to-adult survival, duration of development, and adult live weight at emergence were determined for both fly species on each medium. The media were analyzed for pH, nitrogen, organic matter, and structural compounds (cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin). For S. calcitrans, immature survival was significantly higher on sugarcane leaves, Rhodes grass, and elephant grass; for S. niger, survival was significantly higher on the same substrates plus sugarcane tops. These substrates were characterized by slightly acid pH values (range, 5.4-6.0). In both species, there were significant bell-shape relationships between immature survival and substrate pH. The developmental time of both fly species was significantly shorter on Rhodes grass, Rhodes grass hay, and elephant grass. These substrates were characterized by high cellulose contents and low soluble organic fractions. In both species, there were significant linear relationships between developmental time and cellulose content of substrates. Similarly, there were significant linear relationships between adult live weight and cellulose content of substrates. The C:N ratio of the most favorable substrates was highly variable. Although the relationships revealed in this study do not establish causation, it is suggested that pH and cellulose content may have direct and indirect effects on Stomoxys development. PMID:18348795

  5. The relationships of Odontotrema (Odontotremataceae) and the resurrected Sphaeropezia (Stictidaceae)--new combinations and three new Sphaeropezia species.

    PubMed

    Baloch, Elisabeth; Gilenstam, Gunnar; Wedin, Mats

    2013-01-01

    Odontotremataceae is polyphyletic and constitutes two distantly related clades, the true Odontotremataceae and a segregate group within Stictidaceae including "Odontotrema" cassiopes, "O." diffindens, lichenicolous "Odontotrema" species and "Bryodiscus" arctoalpinus. Sphaeropezia here is accepted as the name for this latter group. An updated phylogeny of the Stictidaceae based on mtSSU, nuLSU and the protein coding gene RPB2 is presented together with a taxonomic revision of Swedish taxa of Odontotrema and Sphaeropezia. Bryodiscus and Lethariicola are synonymized under Sphaeropezia, and three new Sphaeropezia species are described: the lignicolous S. capreae, the fungicolous S. lyckselensis and the lichenicolous S. mycoblasti. The new species are distinguished from other species by molecular and morphological characters, and substrate preferences. The new combinations Sphaeropezia arctoalpina, S. cassiopes, S. grimmiae, S. hepaticarum, S. melaneliae, S. ochrolechiae and S. thamnoliae are proposed. The morphology of these species was studied in detail. We further propose to combine the remaining lichenicolous Odontotrema species, exept O. stereocaulicola, in Sphaeropezia based on their close relationship to the studied lichenicolous taxa. These additional new combinations include Sphaeropezia bryoriae, S. cucularis, S. figulina, S. intermedia, S. japewiae, S. lecanorae, S. navarinoi, S. pertusariae, S. rhizocarpicola, S. santessonii, and S. sipei. A lectotype is designated for the name Odontotrema diffindens Nyl. PMID:23233516

  6. Chloroplast genes as genetic markers for inferring patterns of change, maternal ancestry and phylogenetic relationships among Eleusine species

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Renuka; Agrawal, Nitin; Tandon, Rajesh; Raina, Soom Nath

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of phylogenetic relationships is an important component of any successful crop improvement programme, as wild relatives of the crop species often carry agronomically beneficial traits. Since its domestication in East Africa, Eleusine coracana (2n = 4x = 36), a species belonging to the genus Eleusine (x = 8, 9, 10), has held a prominent place in the semi-arid regions of India, Nepal and Africa. The patterns of variation between the cultivated and wild species reported so far and the interpretations based upon them have been considered primarily in terms of nuclear events. We analysed, for the first time, the phylogenetic relationship between finger millet (E. coracana) and its wild relatives by species-specific chloroplast deoxyribonucleic acid (cpDNA) polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR–RFLP) and chloroplast simple sequence repeat (cpSSR) markers/sequences. Restriction fragment length polymorphism of the seven amplified chloroplast genes/intergenic spacers (trnK, psbD, psaA, trnH–trnK, trnL–trnF, 16S and trnS–psbC), nucleotide sequencing of the chloroplast trnK gene and chloroplast microsatellite polymorphism were analysed in all nine known species of Eleusine. The RFLP of all seven amplified chloroplast genes/intergenic spacers and trnK gene sequences in the diploid (2n = 16, 18, 20) and allotetraploid (2n = 36, 38) species resulted in well-resolved phylogenetic trees with high bootstrap values. Eleusine coracana, E. africana, E. tristachya, E. indica and E. kigeziensis did not show even a single change in restriction site. Eleusine intermedia and E. floccifolia were also shown to have identical cpDNA fragment patterns. The cpDNA diversity in Eleusine multiflora was found to be more extensive than that of the other eight species. The trnK gene sequence data complemented the results obtained by PCR–RFLP. The maternal lineage of all three allotetraploid species (AABB, AADD) was the same, with E. indica being

  7. Start codon targeted (SCoT) and target region amplification polymorphism (TRAP) for evaluating the genetic relationship of Dendrobium species.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shangguo; He, Refeng; Yang, Sai; Chen, Zhe; Jiang, Mengying; Lu, Jiangjie; Wang, Huizhong

    2015-08-10

    Two molecular marker systems, start codon targeted (SCoT) and target region amplification polymorphism (TRAP), were used for genetic relationship analysis of 36 Dendrobium species collected from China. Twenty-two selected SCoT primers produced 337 loci, of which 324 (96%) were polymorphic, whereas 13 TRAP primer combinations produced a total of 510 loci, with 500 (97.8%) of them being polymorphic. An average polymorphism information content of 0.953 and 0.983 was detected using the SCoT and TRAP primers, respectively, showing that a high degree of genetic diversity exists among Chinese Dendrobium species. The partition of clusters in the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean dendrogram and principal coordinate analysis plot based on the SCoT and TRAP markers was similar and clustered the 36 Dendrobium species into four main groups. Our results will provide useful information for resource protection and will also be useful to improve the current Dendrobium breeding programs. Our results also demonstrate that SCoT and TRAP markers are informative and can be used to evaluate genetic relationships between Dendrobium species. PMID:25936992

  8. Antigenic relationship between the animal and human pathogen Pythium insidiosum and nonpathogenic Pythium species.

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, L; Kaufman, L; Standard, P

    1987-01-01

    Identification of the newly named pathogenic oomycete Pythium insidiosum and its differentiation from other Pythium species by morphologic criteria alone can be difficult and time-consuming. Antigenic analysis by fluorescent-antibody and immunodiffusion precipitin techniques demonstrated that the P. insidiosum isolates that cause pythiosis in dogs, horses, and humans are identical and that they were distinguishable from other Pythium species by these means. The immunologic data agreed with the morphologic data. This indicated that the animal and human isolates belonged to a single species, P. insidiosum. Fluorescent-antibody and immunodiffusion reagents were developed for the specific identification of P. insidiosum. PMID:3121666

  9. Leaf photosynthesis/respiration relationships of different tree species in the northwestern part of Russia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pridacha, V.; Sazonova, T.; Olchev, A.

    2012-04-01

    Measurements of leaf photosynthesis, respiration and stomatal conductance of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst), Silver (Betula pendula Roth), White (Betula pubescens) and Karelian (Betula pendula var. carelica) birches were provided using the portable photosynthesis system LI-6400 (Li-Cor, USA) on the experimental plots of the Forest research Institute of Karelian Research Center of RAS in Petrozavodsk, Russia. LI-6400 allows to provide the measurements of photosynthesis and respiration rates of individual leaves at various PAR, temperatures, humidity and concentration of CO2 in the measuring chamber. During the field campaigns in 2011 the CO2 and light response curves of photosynthesis of leaves under different air temperatures as well as the temperature response functions of dark respiration (Rd) of the leaves of different species were estimated. The measuring program is include also the measurements of nitrogen content in leaves. The method suggested by Sharkey et al (2007) was used to estimate the maximal velocity of Rubisco for carboxylation (Vcmax), the rate of electron transport at light saturation (Jmax), photorespiratory compensation point as well as the rate of use of triose phosphates (TPU) that characterizes the availability of internal inorganic phosphates (Ci) in leaves for Calvin's cycle. It was assumed that the initial slope of the relationship between leaf photosynthesis rate and CO2 concentration in sub-stomatal air space (Ci < 200 ppm) can be considered as an area of Rubisco limitation of photosynthesis. The upper part of CO2 response curve from approximately 300 ppm and higher is influenced by, first of all, the rate of regeneration of RuBP, and after that by availability of inorganic phosphate in leaves. The temperature dependences of Vcmax, Jmax and TPU were estimated using the statistical analysis of Vcmax and Jmax data set using equations suggested by Medlin et al (2002). Temperature dependence function of TPU was derived using

  10. Strongylus asini (Nematoda, Strongyloidea): genetic relationships with other Strongylus species determined by ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Hung, G C; Jacobs, D E; Krecek, R C; Gasser, R B; Chilton, N B

    1996-12-01

    Genomic DNA was isolated from adult Strongylus asini collected from zebra. The second ribosomal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) was amplified and sequenced using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based techniques. The DNA sequence was compared with previously published data for 3 related Strongylus species. A PCR-linked restriction fragment length polymorphism method allowed the 4 species to be differentiated unequivocally. The ITS-2 sequence of S. asini was found to be more similar to those of S. edentatus (87.1%) and S. equinus (95.3%) than to that of S vulgaris (73.9%). This result confirms that S. Asini and S vulgaris represent separate species and supports the retention of the 4 species within 1 genus. PMID:9024894

  11. Mosquitoes of Anopheles hyrcanus (Diptera, Culicidae) Group: Species Diagnostic and Phylogenetic Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Khrabrova, Natalia V.; Andreeva, Yulia V.; Sibataev, Anuarbek K.; Alekseeva, Svetlana S.; Esenbekova, Perizat A.

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report the results of study of Anopheles species in Primorsk and Khabarovsk regions of Russia. Three species of the Anopheles hyrcanus group: An. kleini, An. pullus, and An. lesteri were identified by molecular taxonomic diagnostics for the first time in Russia. Surprisingly, An. sinensis, which earlier was considered the only species of Anopheles in Russian Far East, was not observed. We analyzed nucleotide variation in the 610-bp fragment of the 5′ end of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) region. All species possessed a distinctive set of COI sequences. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree was constructed for members of the hyrcanus group. The examined Anopheles hyrcanus group members could be divided into two major subgroups: subgroup 1 (An. hyrcanus and An. pullus) and subgroup 2 (An. sinensis, An. kleini, and An. lesteri), which were found to be monophyletic. PMID:26149867

  12. Taxonomy and phylogenetic relationships of nine species of Hypocrea with anamorphs assignable to Trichoderma section Hypocreanum

    PubMed Central

    Overton, Barrie E.; Stewart, Elwin L.; Geiser, David M.

    2006-01-01

    Morphological studies and phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequences from the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of the nuclear ribosomal gene repeat, a partial sequence of RNA polymerase II subunit (rpb2), and a partial sequence of the large exon of tef1 (LEtef1) were used to investigate the taxonomy and systematics of nine Hypocrea species with anamorphs assignable to Trichoderma sect. Hypocreanum. Hypocrea corticioides and H. sulphurea are reevaluated. Their Trichoderma anamorphs are described and the phylogenetic positions of these species are determined. Hypocrea sulphurea and H. subcitrina are distinct species based on studies of the type specimens. Hypocrea egmontensis is a facultative synonym of the older name H. subcitrina. Hypocrea with anamorphs assignable to Trichoderma sect. Hypocreanum formed a well-supported clade. Five species with anamorphs morphologically similar to sect. Hypocreanum, H. avellanea, H. parmastoi, H. megalocitrina, H. alcalifuscescens, and H. pezizoides, are not located in this clade. Protocrea farinosa belongs to Hypocrea s.s. PMID:18490989

  13. Taxonomy and phylogenetic relationships of nine species of Hypocrea with anamorphs assignable to Trichoderma section Hypocreanum.

    PubMed

    Overton, Barrie E; Stewart, Elwin L; Geiser, David M

    2006-01-01

    Morphological studies and phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequences from the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of the nuclear ribosomal gene repeat, a partial sequence of RNA polymerase II subunit (rpb2), and a partial sequence of the large exon of tef1 (LEtef1) were used to investigate the taxonomy and systematics of nine Hypocrea species with anamorphs assignable to Trichoderma sect. Hypocreanum. Hypocrea corticioides and H. sulphurea are reevaluated. Their Trichoderma anamorphs are described and the phylogenetic positions of these species are determined. Hypocrea sulphurea and H. subcitrina are distinct species based on studies of the type specimens. Hypocrea egmontensis is a facultative synonym of the older name H. subcitrina. Hypocrea with anamorphs assignable to Trichoderma sect. Hypocreanum formed a well-supported clade. Five species with anamorphs morphologically similar to sect. Hypocreanum, H. avellanea, H. parmastoi, H. megalocitrina, H. alcalifuscescens, and H. pezizoides, are not located in this clade. Protocrea farinosa belongs to Hypocrea s.s. PMID:18490989

  14. Ohio USA stoneflies (Insecta, Plecoptera): species richness estimation, distribution of functional niche traits, drainage affiliations, and relationships to other states

    PubMed Central

    DeWalt, R. Edward; Cao, Yong; Tweddale, Tari; Grubbs, Scott A.; Hinz, Leon; Pessino, Massimo; Robinson, Jason L.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Ohio is an eastern USA state that historically was >70% covered in upland and mixed coniferous forest; about 60% of it glaciated by the Wisconsinan glacial episode. Its stonefly fauna has been studied in piecemeal fashion until now. The assemblage of Ohio stoneflies was assessed from over 4,000 records accumulated from 18 institutions, new collections, and trusted literature sources. Species richness totaled 102 with estimators Chao2 and ICE Mean predicting 105.6 and 106.4, respectively. Singletons and doubletons totaled 18 species. All North American families were represented with Perlidae accounted for the highest number of species at 34. The family Peltoperlidae contributed a single species. Most species had univoltine–fast life cycles with the vast majority emerging in summer, although there was a significant component of winter stoneflies. Nine United States Geological Survey hierarchical drainage units level 6 (HUC6) were used to stratify specimen data. Species richness was significantly related to the number of unique HUC6 locations, but there was no relationship with HUC6 drainage area. A nonparametric multidimensional scaling analysis found that larger HUC6s in the western part of the state had similar assemblages with lower species richness that were found to align with more savanna and wetland habitat. Other drainages having richer assemblages were aligned with upland deciduous and mixed coniferous forests of the east and south where slopes were higher. The Ohio assemblage was most similar to the well–studied fauna of Indiana (88 spp.) and Kentucky (108 spp.), two neighboring states. Many rare species and several high quality stream reaches should be considered for greater protection. PMID:22539876

  15. Introduction beyond a species range: a relationship between population origin, adaptive potential and plant performance

    PubMed Central

    Volis, S; Ormanbekova, D; Yermekbayev, K; Song, M; Shulgina, I

    2014-01-01

    The adaptive potential of a population defines its importance for species survival in changing environmental conditions such as global climate change. Very few empirical studies have examined adaptive potential across species' ranges, namely, of edge vs core populations, and we are unaware of a study that has tested adaptive potential (namely, variation in adaptive traits) and measured performance of such populations in conditions not currently experienced by the species but expected in the future. Here we report the results of a Triticum dicoccoides population study that employed transplant experiments and analysis of quantitative trait variation. Two populations at the opposite edges of the species range (1) were locally adapted; (2) had lower adaptive potential (inferred from the extent of genetic quantitative trait variation) than the two core populations; and (3) were outperformed by the plants from the core population in the novel environment. The fact that plants from the species arid edge performed worse than plants from the more mesic core in extreme drought conditions beyond the present climatic envelope of the species implies that usage of peripheral populations for conservation purposes must be based on intensive sampling of among-population variation. PMID:24690758

  16. Ultrastructural and genetic diversity studies of two Sclerocollum (Acanthocephala) species infecting Siganid and Lutianid fishes from the Red Sea, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abdou, Nahed E; Mahfouz, Magdy E

    2006-12-01

    Little is known about the distribution of Acanthocephala in local waters. A survey was carried out on the commercially important herbivorous Siganid fish, Siganus rivulatus and S. luridus, as well as Lutianid fish Centropristisfilamentosus inhabiting the Red Sea to determine the prevalence of Acanthocephala parasites. One hundred and thirteen fish were examined. The infection rates of S. rivulatus and S. luridus with Sclerocollum rubrimaris Schmidt and Paperna 1978 (Rhadinorhynchidae: Gorgorhynchinae) were 59 % & 33%, respectively. Meanwhile, 59% of C. filamentosus were found infected by Sclerocollum sp. The abundance, host-parasite relationships and microhabitat of S. rubrimaris were investigated and discussed. SEM was the employed to investigate the differences between the two species of Sclerocollum. For accurate estimation of genetic diversity of these species, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) genomic fingerprinting was proposed, using four different random primers. SEM studies showed that the two examined species differ in the length of proboscis hooks, the number of longitudinal rows of hooks on proboscis, distance between the bases of hooks and in egg size. The trunk surface of Sclerocollum sp. had minute, scale-like spines that were arranged in oblique lines whereas the trunk surface of S. rubrimaris had small pores and sclerotised plates on its anterior portion. RAPD primers revealed 52 amplification products and species-specific markers were identified. The deduced phenogram comprised two main clusters each includes one of the examined Sclerocollum species. Results indicated that RAPD markers are useful for the assessment of genetic diversity between the investigated Sclerocollum species which concur with SEM outcome. PMID:17153712

  17. Determination of inter- and intra-species genetic relationships among six Eucalyptus species based on inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR).

    PubMed

    Balasaravanan, T; Chezhian, P; Kamalakannan, R; Ghosh, M; Yasodha, R; Varghese, M; Gurumurthi, K

    2005-10-01

    Eucalyptus is the most economically important hardwood plantation tree cultivated in tropical and subtropical countries. Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers were used to evaluate genetic relationships within and between individuals of six Eucalyptus species. A total of 583 loci (265 to 1535 bp) were amplified from 149 individuals belonging to the six Eucalyptus species using seven ISSR primers (two to three nucleotide repeats anchored with one or two nucleotides at the 3' or 5' region). The ISSR fragments indicated significant polymorphism and genetic diversity among the individuals. Cluster analysis and principal component analysis revealed the occurrence of wide genetic diversity among populations of E. tereticornis Sm., E. camaldulensis Dehnh. and E. urophylla S.T. Blake and narrow genetic diversity among populations of E. citriodora Hook. and E. grandis W. Hill ex Maiden. Genetic diversity was high in E. tereticornis Sm. (47.27%) and low in E. citriodora (18.64%). Maximum Nei's genetic identity (0.897) was observed between E. camaldulensis and E. tereticornis species, whereas maximum genetic diversity (0.286) was found between individuals of E. citriodora and E. grandis. PMID:16076778

  18. Mapping invasive species and spectral mixture relationships with neotropical woody formations in southeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, Cibele H.; Roberts, Dar A.; Almeida, Teodoro I. R.; Souza Filho, Carlos R.

    2015-10-01

    Biological invasion substantially contributes to the increasing extinction rates of native vegetative species. The remote detection and mapping of invasive species is critical for environmental monitoring. This study aims to assess the performance of a Multiple Endmember Spectral Mixture Analysis (MESMA) applied to imaging spectroscopy data for mapping Dendrocalamus sp. (bamboo) and Pinus elliottii L. (slash pine), which are invasive plant species, in a Brazilian neotropical landscape within the tropical Brazilian savanna biome. The work also investigates the spectral mixture between these exotic species and the native woody formations, including woodland savanna, submontane and alluvial seasonal semideciduous forests (SSF). Visible to Shortwave Infrared (VSWIR) imaging spectroscopy data at one-meter spatial resolution were atmospherically corrected and subset into the different spectral ranges (VIS-NIR1: 530-919 nm; and NIR2-SWIR: 1141-2352 nm). The data were further normalized via continuum removal (CR). Multiple endmember selection methods, including Interactive Endmember Selection (IES), Endmember average root mean square error (EAR), Minimum average spectral angle (MASA) and Count-based (CoB) (collectively called EMC), were employed to create endmember libraries for the targeted vegetation classes. The performance of the MESMA was assessed at the pixel and crown scales. Statistically significant differences (α = 0.05) were observed between overall accuracies that were obtained at various spectral ranges. The infrared region (IR) was critical for detecting the vegetation classes using spectral data. The invasive species endmembers exhibited spectral patterns in the IR that were not observed in the native formations. Bamboo was characterized as having a high green vegetation (GV) fraction, lower non-photosynthetic vegetation (NPV) and a low shade fraction, while pine exhibited higher NPV and shade fractions. The invasive species showed a statistically

  19. Phylogenetic relationships among Neoechinorhynchus species (Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae) from North-East Asia based on molecular data.

    PubMed

    Malyarchuk, Boris; Derenko, Miroslava; Mikhailova, Ekaterina; Denisova, Galina

    2014-02-01

    Phylogenetic and statistical analyses of DNA sequences of two genes, cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (cox 1) of the mitochondrial DNA and 18S subunit of the nuclear ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA), was used to characterize Neoechinorhynchus species from fishes collected in different localities of North-East Asia. It has been found that four species can be clearly recognized using molecular markers-Neoechinorhynchus tumidus, Neoechinorhynchus beringianus, Neoechinorhynchus simansularis and Neoechinorhynchus salmonis. 18S sequences ascribed to Neoechinorhynchus crassus specimens from North-East Asia were identical to those of N. tumidus, but differed substantially from North American N. crassus. We renamed North-East Asian N. crassus specimens to N. sp., although the possibility that they represent a subspecies of N. tumidus cannot be excluded, taking into account a relatively small distance between cox 1 sequences of North-East Asian specimens of N. crassus and N. tumidus. Maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference analyses were performed for phylogeny reconstruction. All the phylogenetic trees showed that North-East Asian species of Neoechinorhynchus analyzed in this study represent independent clades, with the only exception of N. tumidus and N. sp. for 18S data. Phylogenetic analysis has shown that the majority of species sampled (N. tumidus+N. sp., N. simansularis and N. beringianus) are probably very closely related, while N. salmonis occupies separate position in the trees, possibly indicating a North American origin of this species. PMID:24064255

  20. Phylogenetic relationships between Bacillus species and related genera inferred from 16s rDNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Wei Wang, Mi Sun

    2009-01-01

    Neighbor-joining, maximum-parsimony, minimum-evolution, maximum-likelihood and Bayesian trees constructed based on 16S rDNA sequences of 181 type strains of Bacillus species and related taxa manifested nine phylogenetic groups. The phylogenetic analysis showed that Bacillus was not a monophyletic group. B. subtilis was in Group 1. Group 4, 6 and 8 respectively consisted of thermophiles, halophilic or halotolerant bacilli and alkaliphilic bacilli. Group 2, 4 and 8 consisting of Bacillus species and related genera demonstrated that the current taxonomic system did not agree well with the 16S rDNA evolutionary trees. The position of Caryophanaceae and Planococcaceae in Group 2 suggested that they might be transferred into Bacillaceae, and the heterogeneity of Group 2 implied that some Bacillus species in it might belong to several new genera. Group 9 was mainly comprised of the genera (excluding Bacillus) of Bacillaceae, so some Bacillus species in Group 9: B. salarius, B. qingdaonensis and B. thermcloacae might not belong to Bacillus. Four Bacillus species, B. schlegelii, B. tusciae, B. edaphicus and B. mucilaginosus were clearly placed outside the nine groups. PMID:24031394

  1. Metabolic relationships between monogalactosyldiacylglycerol and digalactosyldiacylglycerol molecular species in Dunaliella salina

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, S.H.; Thompson, G.A. Jr.

    1987-06-05

    Dunaliella salina cells were pulse-labeled for 2 min with (/sup 14/C)palmitic acid, (/sup 14/C)oleic acid, or (/sup 14/C)lauric acid in order to trace the pathway of galactolipid biosynthesis and desaturation. Through the use of high performance liquid chromatography it was possible to follow the movement of radioactivity through many individual molecular species of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG) for periods of 24 h and, in some cases, as much as 120 h. Analysis of the fatty acid fluxes permitted us to refine current views regarding biosynthesis of the predominantly prokaryotic galactolipids. The initial D. salina MGDG molecular species, containing paired oleate and palmitate (18:1/16:0), can follow two metabolic routes. If the palmitoyl chain is desaturated to 16:1, the resulting 18:1/16:1 MGDG is subject to rapid further desaturation to varying degrees, and a part of these products is subsequently galactosylated to DGDG. Contrary to widely held opinions, these DGDG molecular species can themselves be further desaturated toward a 18:3/16:4 final product. In a separate series of reactions, a smaller portion of the nascent 18:1/16:0 MGDG is directly galactosylated to 18:1/16:0 DGDG. This molecular species can then be sequentially desaturated to 18:2/16:0 DGDG and 18:3/16:0 DGDG. However, there is only very limited desaturation of the palmitoyl group attached to these molecular species.

  2. Relationship between the Presence of Bartonella Species and Bacterial Loads in Cats and Cat Fleas (Ctenocephalides felis) under Natural Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Nachum-Biala, Yaarit

    2015-01-01

    Cats are considered the main reservoir of three zoonotic Bartonella species: Bartonella henselae, Bartonella clarridgeiae, and Bartonella koehlerae. Cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis) have been experimentally demonstrated to be a competent vector of B. henselae and have been proposed as the potential vector of the two other Bartonella species. Previous studies have reported a lack of association between the Bartonella species infection status (infected or uninfected) and/or bacteremia levels of cats and the infection status of the fleas they host. Nevertheless, to date, no study has compared the quantitative distributions of these bacteria in both cats and their fleas under natural conditions. Thus, the present study explored these relationships by identifying and quantifying the different Bartonella species in both cats and their fleas. Therefore, EDTA-blood samples and fleas collected from stray cats were screened for Bartonella bacteria. Bacterial loads were quantified by high-resolution melt real-time quantitative PCR assays. The results indicated a moderate correlation between the Bartonella bacterial loads in the cats and their fleas when both were infected with the same Bartonella species. Moreover, a positive effect of the host infection status on the Bartonella bacterial loads of the fleas was observed. Conversely, the cat bacterial loads were not affected by the infection status of their fleas. Our results suggest that the Bartonella bacterial loads of fleas are positively affected by the presence of the bacteria in their feline host, probably by multiple acquisitions/accumulation and/or multiplication events. PMID:26070666

  3. Genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationship in AA Oryza species as revealed by Rim2/Hipa CACTA transposon display.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon-Jae; Lee, Ju Kyong; Hong, Sung-Won; Park, Yong-Jin; McNally, Kenneth L; Kim, Nam-Soo

    2006-04-01

    CACTA is a class 2 transposon, that is very abundantly present in plant genomes. Using Rim2/Hipa CACTA transposon display (hereafter Rim2/Hipa-TD), we analyzed several A-genome diploid Oryza species that have a high distribution of the CACTA motifs. High levels of polymorphism were detected within and between the Oryza species. The African taxa, O. glaberrima and O. barthii, both showed lower levels of polymorphism than the Asian taxa, O. sativa, O. rufipogon, and O. nivara. However, O. longistaminata, another African taxon, showed levels of polymorphism that were similar to the Asian taxa. The Latin American taxon, O. glumaepatula, and the Australian taxon, O. meridionalis, exhibited intermediate levels of polymorphism between those of the Asian and African taxa. The lowest level of polymorphism was observed in O. glaberrima (32.1%) and the highest level of polymorphism was observed in O. rufipogon (95.7%). The phylogenetic tree revealed three major groups at the genetic similarity level of 0.409. The first group consisted of three Asian taxa, O. sativa, O. rufipogon and O. nivara. The second group consisted of three African taxa, O. glaberrima, O. barthii, O. longistaminata, and an American taxon, O. glumaepatula. The third group contained an Australian taxon, O. meridionalis. The clustering patterns of these species matched well with their geographical origins. Rim2/Hipa-TD appears to be a useful marker system for studying the genetic diversity and species relationships among the AA diploid Oryza species. PMID:16755133

  4. Species-area relationships as a tool for the conservation of benthic invertebrates in Italian coastal lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilhaumon, François; Basset, Alberto; Barbone, Enrico; Mouillot, David

    2012-12-01

    Over the recent decades, the preservation of coastal and estuarine waters has been recognised as a priority at national and international levels. At the European scale, the Water Framework Directive (WFD) was established with the aim to achieve a good ecological status of all significant water bodies by the year 2015. Among the descriptors used to define the ecological status of water bodies, taxonomic diversity (usually species richness) is a widespread metric employed across taxa and habitats. However, species richness is known to increase with area at a decelerating rate, producing the species-area relationship (SAR). Thus, removing the effect of area (even in case of low magnitude), is mandatory before comparing species richness between sites. Here we tested recently developed multi-model SARs as a standardisation tool for comparing benthic species richness (annelids, arthropods, molluscs and total species richness) in 18 Italian coastal lagoons with a surface area ranging from 0.19 to 552 km2, i.e. three orders of magnitude. However, the sampling effort was often incompletely described and certainly heterogeneous among the studies retrieved from the database. Therefore, we used the number of studies as a proxy for the sampling effort in each lagoon and estimated species richness from observed values using non-parametric occurrence-based estimators. We further corrected for bias that might be induced by sampling efforts being unrepresentative for the surface area of different lagoons. After applying these corrections, we estimated that c. 25-30% of species richness could be explained by surface area. We investigated the spatial congruence of species richness patterns across taxa and showed that molluscs could serve as a potential surrogate for total macro-invertebrate species richness. We further found that the intensity of conservation focus and the gradient of ecological status are decoupled in Italian coastal lagoons. More generally, our study pave the way

  5. Relationship between Seed Bank Expression, Adult Longevity and Aridity in Species of Chaetanthera (Asteraceae) in Central Chile

    PubMed Central

    ARROYO, M. T. K.; CHACON, P.; CAVIERES, L. A.

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Broad surveys have detected inverse relationships between seed and adult longevity and between seed size and adult longevity. However, low and unpredictable precipitation is also associated with seed bank (SB) expression in semi-arid and arid areas. The relationship between adult longevity, SB formation, seed mass and aridity is examined in annual and perennial herbs of Chaetanthera (Asteraceae) from the Chilean Mediterranean-type climate and winter-rainfall desert areas over a precipitation range of one order of magnitude. • Methods Seeds of 18 species and subtaxa (32 populations) were buried in field locations, and exhumed after two successive germination periods. Seeds not germinating in the field were tested in a growth chamber, and remnant intact seed tested for viability. Seed banks were classed as transient or persistent. The effect of life form, species, population and burial time on persistent SB size was assessed with factorial ANOVA. Persistent seed bank size was compared with the Martonne aridity index (shown to be a surrogate for inter-annual variation in precipitation) and seed size using linear regression. ANCOVA assessed the effect of life-form on SB size with aridity as covariate. • Key Results Three species had a transient SB and 15 a persistent SB. ANOVA revealed a significant effect of life-form on SB size with annuals having larger SB size and greater capacity to form a persistent SB than perennials. Significant inter-population variation in SB size was found in 64 % of cases. Seed mass was negatively correlated with persistent SB size. Persistent seed bank size was significantly correlated with the Martonne aridity index in the perennial and annual species, with species from more arid areas having larger persistent SBs. However, when aridity was considered as a covariate, ANCOVA revealed no significant differences between the annual and perennial herbs. • Conclusions Persistent seed bank size in Chaetanthera

  6. Sample size and the detection of a hump-shaped relationship between biomass and species richness in Mediterranean wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Espinar, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    Questions: What is the observed relationship between biomass and species richness across both spatial and temporal scales in communities of submerged annual macrophytes? Does the number of plots sampled affect detection of hump-shaped pattern? Location: Don??ana National Park, southwestern Spain. Methods: A total of 102 plots were sampled during four hydrological cycles. In each hydrological cycle, the plots were distributed randomly along an environmental flooding gradient in three contrasted microhabitats located in the transition zone just below the upper marsh. In each plot (0.5 m x 0.5 m), plant density and above- and below-ground biomass of submerged vegetation were measured. The hump-shaped model was tested by using a generalized linear model (GLM). A bootstrap procedure was used to test the effect of the number of plots on the ability to detect hump-shaped patterns. Result: The area exhibited low species density with a range of 1 - 9 species and low values of biomass with a range of 0.2 - 87.6 g-DW / 0.25 m2. When data from all years and all microhabitats were combined, the relationships between biomass and species richness showed a hump-shaped pattern. The number of plots was large enough to allow detection of the hump-shaped pattern across microhabitats but it was too small to confirm the hump-shaped pattern within each individual microhabitat. Conclusion: This study provides evidence of hump-shaped patterns across microhabitats when GLM analysis is used. In communities of submerged annual macrophytes in Mediterranean wetlands, the highest species density occurs in intermediate values of biomass. The bootstrap procedure indicates that the number of plots affects the detection of hump-shaped patterns. ?? IAVS; Opulus Press.

  7. Genome Size Variation and Species Relationships in Hieracium Sub-genus Pilosella (Asteraceae) as Inferred by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Suda, Jan; Krahulcová, Anna; Trávníček, Pavel; Rosenbaumová, Radka; Peckert, Tomáš; Krahulec, František

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Hieracium sub-genus Pilosella (hawkweeds) is a taxonomically complicated group of vascular plants, the structure of which is substantially influenced by frequent interspecific hybridization and polyploidization. Two kinds of species, ‘basic’ and ‘intermediate’ (i.e. hybridogenous), are usually recognized. In this study, genome size variation was investigated in a representative set of Central European hawkweeds in order to assess the value of such a data set for species delineation and inference of evolutionary relationships. Methods Holoploid and monoploid genome sizes (C- and Cx-values) were determined using propidium iodide flow cytometry for 376 homogeneously cultivated individuals of Hieracium sub-genus Pilosella, including 24 species (271 individuals), five recent natural hybrids (seven individuals) and experimental F1 hybrids from four parental combinations (98 individuals). Chromosome counts were available for more than half of the plant accessions. Base composition (proportion of AT/GC bases) was cytometrically estimated in 73 individuals. Key Results Seven different ploidy levels (2x–8x) were detected, with intraspecific ploidy polymorphism (up to four different cytotypes) occurring in 11 wild species. Mean 2C-values varied approx. 4·3-fold from 3·53 pg in diploid H. hoppeanum to 15·30 pg in octoploid H. brachiatum. 1Cx-values ranged from 1·72 pg in H. pilosella to 2·16 pg in H. echioides (1·26-fold). The DNA content of (high) polyploids was usually proportional to the DNA values of their diploid/low polyploid counterparts, indicating lack of processes altering genome size (i.e. genome down-sizing). Most species showed constant nuclear DNA amounts, exceptions being three hybridogenous taxa, in which introgressive hybridization was suggested as a presumable trigger for genome size variation. Monoploid genome sizes of hybridogenous species were always between the corresponding values of their putative parents. In addition

  8. Inoculum density relationships for infection of some Eastern forest species by Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this work were to establish inoculum density relationships between P. ramorum and selected hosts using detached leaf and whole plant inoculations. Knowledge of levels of initial inoculum needed to generate epidemics is needed for disease prediction and development of pest risk ass...

  9. Phylogenetic Relationships Among Cucurbit Species Used as Rootstocks for Grafting Watermelon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is an increased interest in the United States in grafting watermelon on cucurbit rootstocks to control soilborne diseases. Several cucurbit species including Lagenaria siceraria, Cucurbita spp. and Benincasa hispida (wax gourds) have been used in Asia as rootstocks for watermelon. In our pre...

  10. Remembrance of things past: modelling the relationship between species' abundances in living communities and death assemblages.

    PubMed

    Olszewski, Thomas D

    2012-02-23

    Accumulations of dead skeletal material are a valuable archive of past ecological conditions. However, such assemblages are not equivalent to living communities because they mix the remains of multiple generations and are altered by post-mortem processes. The abundance of a species in a death assemblage can be quantitatively modelled by successively integrating the product of an influx time series and a post-mortem loss function (a decay function with a constant half-life). In such a model, temporal mixing increases expected absolute dead abundance relative to average influx as a linear function of half-life and increases variation in absolute dead abundance values as a square-root function of half-life. Because typical abundance distributions of ecological communities are logarithmically distributed, species' differences in preservational half-life would have to be very large to substantially alter species' abundance ranks (i.e. make rare species common or vice-versa). In addition, expected dead abundances increase at a faster rate than their range of variation with increased time averaging, predicting greater consistency in the relative abundance structure of death assemblages than their parent living community. PMID:21653564

  11. High-throughput SNP-genotyping analysis of the relationships among Ponto-Caspian sturgeon species

    PubMed Central

    Rastorguev, Sergey M; Nedoluzhko, Artem V; Mazur, Alexander M; Gruzdeva, Natalia M; Volkov, Alexander A; Barmintseva, Anna E; Mugue, Nikolai S; Prokhortchouk, Egor B

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Legally certified sturgeon fisheries require population protection and conservation methods, including DNA tests to identify the source of valuable sturgeon roe. However, the available genetic data are insufficient to distinguish between different sturgeon populations, and are even unable to distinguish between some species. We performed high-throughput single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-genotyping analysis on different populations of Russian (Acipenser gueldenstaedtii), Persian (A. persicus), and Siberian (A. baerii) sturgeon species from the Caspian Sea region (Volga and Ural Rivers), the Azov Sea, and two Siberian rivers. We found that Russian sturgeons from the Volga and Ural Rivers were essentially indistinguishable, but they differed from Russian sturgeons in the Azov Sea, and from Persian and Siberian sturgeons. We identified eight SNPs that were sufficient to distinguish these sturgeon populations with 80% confidence, and allowed the development of markers to distinguish sturgeon species. Finally, on the basis of our SNP data, we propose that the A. baerii-like mitochondrial DNA found in some Russian sturgeons from the Caspian Sea arose via an introgression event during the Pleistocene glaciation. In the present study, the high-throughput genotyping analysis of several sturgeon populations was performed. SNP markers for species identification were defined. The possible explanation of the baerii-like mitotype presence in some Russian sturgeons in the Caspian Sea was suggested. PMID:24567827

  12. The Relationship between Gene Network Structure and Expression Variation among Individuals and Species.

    PubMed

    Sears, Karen E; Maier, Jennifer A; Rivas-Astroza, Marcelo; Poe, Rachel; Zhong, Sheng; Kosog, Kari; Marcot, Jonathan D; Behringer, Richard R; Cretekos, Chris J; Rasweiler, John J; Rapti, Zoi

    2015-08-01

    Variation among individuals is a prerequisite of evolution by natural selection. As such, identifying the origins of variation is a fundamental goal of biology. We investigated the link between gene interactions and variation in gene expression among individuals and species using the mammalian limb as a model system. We first built interaction networks for key genes regulating early (outgrowth; E9.5-11) and late (expansion and elongation; E11-13) limb development in mouse. This resulted in an Early (ESN) and Late (LSN) Stage Network. Computational perturbations of these networks suggest that the ESN is more robust. We then quantified levels of the same key genes among mouse individuals and found that they vary less at earlier limb stages and that variation in gene expression is heritable. Finally, we quantified variation in gene expression levels among four mammals with divergent limbs (bat, opossum, mouse and pig) and found that levels vary less among species at earlier limb stages. We also found that variation in gene expression levels among individuals and species are correlated for earlier and later limb development. In conclusion, results are consistent with the robustness of the ESN buffering among-individual variation in gene expression levels early in mammalian limb development, and constraining the evolution of early limb development among mammalian species. PMID:26317994

  13. The Relationship between Gene Network Structure and Expression Variation among Individuals and Species

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Karen E.; Maier, Jennifer A.; Rivas-Astroza, Marcelo; Poe, Rachel; Zhong, Sheng; Kosog, Kari; Marcot, Jonathan D.; Behringer, Richard R.; Rasweiler, John J.; Rapti, Zoi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Variation among individuals is a prerequisite of evolution by natural selection. As such, identifying the origins of variation is a fundamental goal of biology. We investigated the link between gene interactions and variation in gene expression among individuals and species using the mammalian limb as a model system. We first built interaction networks for key genes regulating early (outgrowth; E9.5–11) and late (expansion and elongation; E11-13) limb development in mouse. This resulted in an Early (ESN) and Late (LSN) Stage Network. Computational perturbations of these networks suggest that the ESN is more robust. We then quantified levels of the same key genes among mouse individuals and found that they vary less at earlier limb stages and that variation in gene expression is heritable. Finally, we quantified variation in gene expression levels among four mammals with divergent limbs (bat, opossum, mouse and pig) and found that levels vary less among species at earlier limb stages. We also found that variation in gene expression levels among individuals and species are correlated for earlier and later limb development. In conclusion, results are consistent with the robustness of the ESN buffering among-individual variation in gene expression levels early in mammalian limb development, and constraining the evolution of early limb development among mammalian species. PMID:26317994

  14. Examining phylogenetic relationships of Erwinia and Pantoea species using whole genome sequence data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yucheng; Qiu, Sai

    2015-11-01

    The genera Erwinia and Pantoea contain species that are devastating plant pathogens, non-pathogen epiphytes, and opportunistic human pathogens. However, some controversies persist in the taxonomic classification of these two closely related genera. The phylogenomic analysis of these two genera was investigated via a comprehensive analysis of 25 Erwinia genomes and 23 Pantoea genomes. Single-copy orthologs could be extracted from the Erwinia/Pantoea core-genome to reconstruct the Erwinia/Pantoea phylogeny. This tree has strong bootstrap support for almost all branches. We also estimated the in silico DNA-DNA hybridization (isDDH) and the average nucleotide identity (ANI) values between each genome; strains from the same species showed ANI values ≥96% and isDDH values >70%. These data confirm that whole genome sequence data provides a powerful tool to resolve the complex taxonomic questions of Erwinia/Pantoea, e.g. Pantoea agglomerans 299R was not clustered into a single group with other P. agglomerans strains, and the ANI values and isDDH values between them were <91% and around 43.8%, respectively. These data indicate P. agglomerans 299R should not be classified into the P. agglomerans species. In addition, another strain (Pantoea sp. At_9b) was identified that may represent a novel Pantoea species. We also evaluated the performance of six commonly used housekeeping genes (atpD, carA, gyrB, infB, recA, and rpoB) in phylogenetic inference. A single gene was not enough to obtain a reliable species tree, and it was necessary to use the multilocus sequence analysis of the six marker genes to recover the Erwinia/Pantoea phylogeny. PMID:26296376

  15. Phylogenetic relationships of Tectoribates: nymphal characters of new North American species place the genus in Tegoribatidae (Acari, Oribatida).

    PubMed

    Behan-Pelletier, Valerie M; Walter, David E

    2013-01-01

    Species in the oribatid mite genus Tectoribates are primarily Palaearctic and Neotropical, with scattered, unidentified records from North America. Herein, we describe 3 new Tectoribates species from dry forest and prairie habitats in North America: T. alcecampestris sp. nov., from Alberta, T. borealis sp. nov., from southern Alberta and Ontario, both on the basis of adults and nymphs, and T. campestris sp. nov., from dry grassland habitats in Ontario and Kansas, on the basis of adults. We provide a revised and expanded diagnosis for adults of Tectoribates. We assess relationships of Tectoribates, using characters of adults and newly discovered apheredermous, plicate immatures. We include observations on Pseudotectoribates which is closely related to Tectoribates. The closest relatives of these genera are hypothesised to be among the Tegoribatidae (Achipterioidea) rather than among the Achipteriidae (Achipterioidea), Oribatellidae (Oribatelloidea), or Ceratozetoidea, as suggested in previous classifications. Finally, we give a key to adults of the world fauna of Tectoribates. PMID:25113002

  16. First record of Bursaphelenchus rainulfi on pine trees from eastern China and its phylogenetic relationship with intro-genus species*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Li-qin; Li, Xu-qing; Zheng, Jing-wu

    2007-01-01

    Bursaphelenchus rainulfi isolated from dead pine trees in Zhejiang, China, is described and illustrated. It also provided some molecular characters of the Chinese population, including the PCR-RFLP and sequences of ITS region and D2-D3 expansion region of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene. Both the morphological characters and ITS-RFLP patterns match with the original description. The phylogenetic trees based on the 13 sequences of D2-D3 expansion region of the LSU rRNA gene and ITS region of Bursaphelenchus species were constructed, respectively, with the results showing the similar clades. The phylogenetic relationship based on the molecular data is similar to that with morphological characters. This is the first report of the species on pine wood in eastern China. PMID:17542063

  17. The humerus of Cryptotis colombiana and its bearing on the species? phylogenetic relationships (Soricomorpha: Soricidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodman, N.; Cuartas-Calle, C.A.; Delgado-V., C.A.

    2003-01-01

    The Colombian small-eared shrew, Cryptotis colombiana Woodman and Timm, was described from the Colombian Andes in 1993. Its original allocation to the Cryptotis nigrescens-group recently was questioned based on several cranial characters the species appeared to share with some members of the Cryptotis thomasi-group. We review characteristics of the C. nigrescens- and C. thomasi-groups, and we describe the humerus of C. colombiana and the humerus and manus of Cryptotis medellinia. The morphology of the humerus joins the suite of characters that supports the hypotheses that C. colombiana is not a member of the C. thomasi-group and that all remaining South American species form a cohesive, definable set that is probably monophyletic.

  18. Niche relationships within a guild of ungulate species in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, following release from artificial controls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, Francis J.; Norland, Jack E.

    1994-01-01

    Niche relationships and diet overlaps were compared among elk (Cervus elaphus), bison (Bison bison), bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), and pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americana) between 1967–1970 and 1986–1988, a period when total ungulate numbers nearly tripled on Yellowstone's northern range. Ungulate species ratios on Yellowstone's northern winter range during the latter period were 100 elk : 10 mule deer : 3 bison : 2 pronghorns : 1 bighorns. Elk numbers were positively correlated to bison, mule deer, and pronghorn numbers (r2 = 0.76, 0.97, and 0.48, respectively, P < 0.01). Few other changes in habitat use or habitat overlap occurred, and diets for only 2 of the 10 species pairs, elk-bighorn (Spearman's rank order coefficient (RHO) = 0.55, P < 0.05) and mule deer – pronghorn (RHO = 0.64, P < 0.05), were significantly associated with each other. Bison consumed more grass and fewer sedges, mule deer more fringed sage (Artemisia frigida) and more rabbit-brush (Chrysothamnus spp.), and bighorn sheep more grasses and fewer sedges, while pronghorns ate less saltsage (Atriplex nuttalli) but more big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) during 1986–1988 than during 1967–1970. Bison expanded their range and bison and bighorn sheep used a wider variety of habitats. We found little evidence of change in competitive interactions between ungulate species. A few diet and habitat overlaps increased, the opposite of the prediction from the competitive exclusion principle amongst species, suggesting that intraspecific competition was more important. Several explanations are proposed for the lack of changes in niche relationships during a period of near tripling in density of the ungulate guild.

  19. Relationship between Active Oxygen Species, Lipid Peroxidation, Necrosis, and Phytoalexin Production Induced by Elicitins in Nicotiana.

    PubMed Central

    Rusterucci, C.; Stallaert, V.; Milat, M. L.; Pugin, A.; Ricci, P.; Blein, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    Excised leaves of Nicotiana tabacum var Xanthi and Nicotiana rustica were treated with cryptogein and capsicein, basic and acidic elicitins, respectively. Both compounds induced leaf necrosis, the intensity of which depended on concentration and duration of treatment. N. tabacum var Xanthi was the most sensitive species and cryptogein was the most active elicitin. Lipid peroxidation in elicitin-treated Nicotiana leaves was closely correlated with the appearance of necrosis. Elicitin treatments induced a rapid and transient burst of active oxygen species (AOS) in cell cultures of both Nicotiana species, with the production by Xanthi cells being 6-fold greater than that by N. rustica. Similar maximum AOS production levels were observed with both elicitins, but capsicein required 10-fold higher concentrations than those of cryptogein. Phytoalexin production was lower in response to both elicitins in N. tabacum var Xanthi cells than in N. rustica cells, and capsicein was the most efficient elicitor of this response. In cryptogein-treated cell suspensions, phytoalexin synthesis was unaffected by diphenyleneiodonium, which inhibited AOS generation, nor was it affected by tiron or catalase, which suppressed AOS accumulation in the extracellular medium. These results suggest that AOS production, lipid peroxidation, and necrosis are directly related, whereas phytoalexin production depends on neither the presence nor the intensity of these responses. PMID:12226334

  20. Trophic Niche in a Raptor Species: The Relationship between Diet Diversity, Habitat Diversity and Territory Quality

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recent research reports that many populations of species showing a wide trophic niche (generalists) are made up of both generalist individuals and individuals with a narrow trophic niche (specialists), suggesting trophic specializations at an individual level. If true, foraging strategies should be associated with individual quality and fitness. Optimal foraging theory predicts that individuals will select the most favourable habitats for feeding. In addition, the “landscape heterogeneity hypothesis” predicts a higher number of species in more diverse landscapes. Thus, it can be predicted that individuals with a wider realized trophic niche should have foraging territories with greater habitat diversity, suggesting that foraging strategies, territory quality and habitat diversity are inter-correlated. This was tested for a population of common kestrels Falco tinnunculus. Diet diversity, territory occupancy (as a measure of territory quality) and habitat diversity of territories were measured over an 8-year period. Our results show that: 1) territory quality was quadratically correlated with habitat diversity, with the best territories being the least and most diverse; 2) diet diversity was not correlated with territory quality; and 3) diet diversity was negatively correlated with landscape heterogeneity. Our study suggests that niche generalist foraging strategies are based on an active search for different prey species within or between habitats rather than on the selection of territories with high habitat diversity. PMID:26047025

  1. The Leaf Size–Twig Size Spectrum of Temperate Woody Species Along an Altitudinal Gradient: An Invariant Allometric Scaling Relationship

    PubMed Central

    SUN, SHUCUN; JIN, DONGMEI; SHI, PEILI

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims The leaf size–twig size spectrum is one of the leading dimensions of plant ecological variation, and now it is under development. The purpose of this study was to test whether the relationship between leaf size and twig size is isometric or allometric, and to examine the relationship between plant allometric growth and life history strategies in the spectrum. • Methods Leaf and stem characters—including leaf and stem mass, total leaf area, individual leaf area, stem cross-sectional area, leaf number and stem length—at the twig level for 59 woody species were investigated along an altitudinal gradient on Changbaishan Mountain in the temperate zone of China. The environmental gradient ranges from temperate broad-leaved mixed forest at low altitude, to conifer forest at middle altitude, and to sub-alpine birch forest at high altitude. The scaling relationships between stem cross-sectional area and stem mass, stem mass and leaf mass, and leaf mass and leaf area at the twig level were simultaneously determined. • Key Results Twig cross-sectional area was found to have invariant allometric scaling relationships with the stem mass, leaf mass, total leaf area and individual leaf area, all with common slopes being significantly larger than 1, for three altitudinal-zoned vegetation types under investigation. However, leaf mass was found to be isometrically related to stem mass and leaf area along the environmental gradient. Based on the predictions of previous models, the exponent value of the relationship between twig cross-sectional area and total leaf area can be inferred to be 1·5, which falls between the confidence intervals of the relationship at each altitude, and between the confidence intervals of the common slope value (1·17–1·56) of this study. This invariant scaling relationship is assumed to result from the fractural network and/or developmental constraints of plants. The allometric constants (y-intercepts) of the

  2. Evidence for a new species of Anisakis Dujardin, 1845: morphological description and genetic relationships between congeners (Nematoda: Anisakidae).

    PubMed

    Mattiucci, Simonetta; Nascetti, Giuseppe; Dailey, Murray; Webb, Stephen C; Barros, Nelio B; Cianchi, Rossella; Bullini, Luciano

    2005-07-01

    In the present study, a new biological species of Anisakis Dujardin, 1845, was detected in Kogia breviceps and K. sima from West Atlantic waters (coast of Florida) on the basis of 19 (nuclear) structural genes studied by multilocus allozyme electrophoresis. Fixed allele differences at 11 enzyme loci were found between specimens of both adults and larvae of the new species and the other Anisakis spp. tested. Reproductive isolation from A. brevispiculata Dollfus, 1968 was demonstrated by the lack of hybrid or recombinant genotypes in mixed infections in K. breviceps. Genetic distance of the new species from its closest relative, A. brevispiculata, was D(Nei)=0.79. The new species is morphologically different from the other species which have been genetically characterised and from the other Anisakis retained by Davey (1971) as valid or as species inquirendae: the name of Anisakis paggiae n. sp. is proposed for the new taxon. Anisakis Type II larvae (sensu Berland, 1961) from the European hake Merluccius merluccius in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean (Galician coast) and from the scabbard fish Aphanopus carbo in Central Atlantic waters (off Madeira), were identified as A. paggiae n. sp. Its genetic relationships with respect to the seven species previously characterised (A. simplex (Rudolphi, 1809) sensu stricto), A. pegreffii Campana-Rouget & Biocca, 1955, A. simplex, (A. typica (Diesing, 1860), A. ziphidarum Paggi et al., 1998, A. physeteris Baylis, 1923 and A. brevispiculata) were also inferred. Overall, a low genetic identity was detected at allozyme level between the eight Anisakis species. Interspecific genetic identity ranged from I(Nei)=0.68, between the sibling species of the A. simplex complex, to I(Nei)=0.00 (no alleles shared at the considered loci) when A. physeteris, A. brevispiculata and the new species were compared with the other species of the genus. Concordant topologies were obtained using both UPGMA and NJ tree analyses for the considered species

  3. On the relationship between the greenhouse effect, atmospheric photochemistry, and species distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callis, L. B.; Boughner, R. E.; Natarajan, M.

    1983-01-01

    The coupling that exists between infrared opacity changes and tropospheric (and to a lesser extent stratospheric) chemistry is explored in considerable detail, and the effects arising from various perturbations are examined. The studies are carried out with a fully coupled one-dimensional radiative-convective-photochemical model (RCP) that extends from the surface to 53.5 km and has the capability of calculating surface temperature changes due to both chemical and radiative perturbations. The model encompasses contemporary atmospheric chemistry and photochemistry involving the O(x), HO(x), NO(x), and Cl(x) species.

  4. [Population structure and environmental relationships of the tropical tree Nectandra rudis (Lauraceae), a rare species in western Mexico].

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Ramón Cuevas; Moya, Edmundo García; García, J Antonio Vázquez; López, Nora M Núñez

    2008-03-01

    Population structure and environmental relationships of the tropical tree Nectandra rudis (Lauraceae), a rare species in western Mexico. The tree N. rudis is a rare species from western Mexico of which community and population features are unknown. We studied a population in an altitudinal gradient, from 550-1,850 m above sea level in the Sierra de Manantlan, Jalisco, Mexico. We established four 60x48 m sample sites at vertical distances of 100 m along this altitudinal gradient. Within each plot, ten 100 m2 circular sub-sampling units were randomly located. At each unit, we recorded diameter at breast height (dbh) and tree height for all woody vegetation > or =2.5 cm dbh. Basal area, tree density, frequency, species richness and importance values per species and plot. We estimated the vertical structure (total tree height) and diameter( as M=5log(10)N) for all N. rudis individuals. A direct ordination through Canonical Correspondence Analysis was done, involving amongst other species, edaphic and environmental data matrices. The record of 44 N. rudis individuals, in seven out the 56 plots sampled, represents the most septentrional record for the species and the first in Western Mexico. Its density and basal area represented 4.5 % and 8.7 % respectively of the total estimated for the community. The greatest importance values were observed at 1 650 m above sea level. The population structure of N. rudis is structured into five diameter categories in an inverse "J" shaped distribution. This is a typical behavior observed to occur in the Lauraceae, which produces big seeds of short viability that germinate when there is high soil moisture content. The species tend to form dense seedling banks although only a reduced number of them are able to survive. Species richness varies from 27 to 39 at plot level; the greatest importance values for the plots on which N. rudis was found, corresponds to Urera verrucosa (Liebm.) V.W. Steinm., N. rudis, Ficus sp., Beilschmiedia

  5. The Relationships between Morphological Characteristics and Foraging Behavior in Four Selected Species of Shorebirds and Water Birds Utilizing Tropical Mudflats

    PubMed Central

    Norazlimi, Nor Atiqah; Ramli, Rosli

    2015-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the relationship between the physical morphology of shorebirds and water birds (i.e., Lesser adjutant (Leptoptilos javanicus), Common redshank (Tringa totanus), Whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus), and Little heron (Butorides striata)) and their foraging behavior in the mudflats area of Selangor, Peninsular Malaysia, from August 2013 to July 2014 by using direct observation techniques (using binoculars and a video recorder). The actively foraging bird species were watched, and their foraging activities were recorded for at least 30 seconds for up to a maximum of five minutes. A Spearman Rank Correlation highlighted a significant relationship between bill size and foraging time (R = 0.443, p < 0.05), bill size and prey size (R = −0.052, p < 0.05), bill size and probing depth (R = 0.42, p = 0.003), and leg length and water/mud depth (R = 0.706, p < 0.005). A Kruskal-Wallis Analysis showed a significant difference between average estimates of real probing depth of the birds (mm) and species (H = 15.96, p = 0.0012). Three foraging techniques were recorded: pause-travel, visual-feeding, and tactile-hunting. Thus, morphological characteristics of bird do influence their foraging behavior and strategies used when foraging. PMID:26345324

  6. Root structure-function relationships in 74 species: evidence of a root economics spectrum related to carbon economy.

    PubMed

    Roumet, Catherine; Birouste, Marine; Picon-Cochard, Catherine; Ghestem, Murielle; Osman, Normaniza; Vrignon-Brenas, Sylvain; Cao, Kun-Fang; Stokes, Alexia

    2016-05-01

    Although fine roots are important components of the global carbon cycle, there is limited understanding of root structure-function relationships among species. We determined whether root respiration rate and decomposability, two key processes driving carbon cycling but always studied separately, varied with root morphological and chemical traits, in a coordinated way that would demonstrate the existence of a root economics spectrum (RES). Twelve traits were measured on fine roots (diameter ≤ 2 mm) of 74 species (31 graminoids and 43 herbaceous and dwarf shrub eudicots) collected in three biomes. The findings of this study support the existence of a RES representing an axis of trait variation in which root respiration was positively correlated to nitrogen concentration and specific root length and negatively correlated to the root dry matter content, lignin : nitrogen ratio and the remaining mass after decomposition. This pattern of traits was highly consistent within graminoids but less consistent within eudicots, as a result of an uncoupling between decomposability and morphology, and of heterogeneity of individual roots of eudicots within the fine-root pool. The positive relationship found between root respiration and decomposability is essential for a better understanding of vegetation-soil feedbacks and for improving terrestrial biosphere models predicting the consequences of plant community changes for carbon cycling. PMID:26765311

  7. The Relationships between Morphological Characteristics and Foraging Behavior in Four Selected Species of Shorebirds and Water Birds Utilizing Tropical Mudflats.

    PubMed

    Norazlimi, Nor Atiqah; Ramli, Rosli

    2015-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the relationship between the physical morphology of shorebirds and water birds (i.e., Lesser adjutant (Leptoptilos javanicus), Common redshank (Tringa totanus), Whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus), and Little heron (Butorides striata)) and their foraging behavior in the mudflats area of Selangor, Peninsular Malaysia, from August 2013 to July 2014 by using direct observation techniques (using binoculars and a video recorder). The actively foraging bird species were watched, and their foraging activities were recorded for at least 30 seconds for up to a maximum of five minutes. A Spearman Rank Correlation highlighted a significant relationship between bill size and foraging time (R = 0.443, p < 0.05), bill size and prey size (R = -0.052, p < 0.05), bill size and probing depth (R = 0.42, p = 0.003), and leg length and water/mud depth (R = 0.706, p < 0.005). A Kruskal-Wallis Analysis showed a significant difference between average estimates of real probing depth of the birds (mm) and species (H = 15.96, p = 0.0012). Three foraging techniques were recorded: pause-travel, visual-feeding, and tactile-hunting. Thus, morphological characteristics of bird do influence their foraging behavior and strategies used when foraging. PMID:26345324

  8. Chromosomal evolution in Gekkonidae. I. Chromosome painting between Gekko and Hemidactylus species reveals phylogenetic relationships within the group.

    PubMed

    Trifonov, Vladimir A; Giovannotti, Massimo; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Wallduck, Margaret; Lovell, Frances; Rens, Willem; Parise-Maltempi, Patricia P; Caputo, Vincenzo; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A

    2011-10-01

    Geckos are a large group of lizards characterized by a rich variety of species, different modes of sex determination and diverse karyotypes. In spite of many unresolved questions on lizards' phylogeny and taxonomy, the karyotypes of most geckos have been studied by conventional cytogenetic methods only. We used flow-sorted chromosome-specific painting probes of Japanese gecko (Gekko japonicus), Mediterranean house gecko (Hemidactylus turcicus) and flat-tailed house gecko (Hemidactylus platyurus) to reveal homologous regions and to study karyotype evolution in seven gecko species (Gekko gecko, G. japonicus, G. ulikovskii, G. vittatus, Hemidactylus frenatus, H. platyurus and H. turcicus). Generally, the karyotypes of geckos were found to be conserved, but we revealed some characteristic rearrangements including both fissions and fusions in Hemidactylus. The karyotype of H. platyurus contained a heteromorphic pair in all female individuals, where one of the homologues had a terminal DAPI-negative and C-positive heterochromatic block that might indicate a putative sex chromosome. Among two male individuals studied, only one carried such a polymorphism, and the second one had none, suggesting a possible ZZ/ZW sex determination in some populations of this species. We found that all Gekko species have retained the putative ancestral karyotype, whilst the fission of the largest ancestral chromosome occurred in the ancestor of modern Hemidactylus species. Three common fissions occurred in the ancestor of Mediterranean house and flat-tailed house geckos, suggesting their sister group relationships. PCR-assisted mapping on flow-sorted chromosome libraries with conserved DMRT1 gene primers in G. japonicus indicates the localization of DMRT1 gene on chromosome 6. PMID:21987185

  9. Relationships among non-Acremonium sp. fungal endophytes in five grass species.

    PubMed Central

    An, Z Q; Siegel, M R; Hollin, W; Tsai, H F; Schmidt, D; Schardl, C L

    1993-01-01

    Many cool-season grasses (subfamily Pooideae) possess maternally transmitted fungal symbionts which cause no known pathology and often enhance the ecological fitness and biochemical capabilities of the grass hosts. The most commonly described endophytes are the Acremonium section Albo-lanosa spp. (Acremonium endophytes), which are conidial anamorphs (strictly asexual forms) of Epichloë typhina. Other endophytes which have been noted are a Gliocladium-like fungus in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) and a Phialophora-like fungus in tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.). Here, we report the identification of additional non-Acremonium sp. endophytes (herein designated p-endophytes) in three more grass species: Festuca gigantea, Festuca arizonica, and Festuca pratensis. In each grass species, the p-endophyte was cosymbiotic with an Acremonium endophyte. Serological analysis and sequence determinations of variable portions of their rRNA genes indicated that the two previously identified non-Acremonium endophytes are closely related to each other and to the newly identified p-endophytes. Therefore, the p-endophytes represent a second group of widely distributed grass symbionts. Images PMID:8517749

  10. Overwintering evergreen oaks reverse typical relationships between leaf traits in a species spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Harayama, Hisanori; Ishida, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    The leaf economics spectrum has given us a fundamental understanding of the species variations in leaf variables. Across plant species, tight correlations among leaf mass per area (LMA), mass-based nitrogen (Nm) and photosynthetic rate (Am) and leaf lifespan have been well known as trade-offs in leaf carbon economy. However, the regional or biome-level correlations may not be necessary to correspond with the global-scale analysis. Here, we show that almost all leaf variables in overwintering evergreen oaks in Japan were relatively well included within the evergreen-broadleaved trees in worldwide temperate forests, but Nm was more consistent with that in deciduous broadleaved trees. Contrary to the universal correlations, the correlation between Am and Nm among the evergreen oaks was negative and the correlation between Am and LMA disappeared. The unique performance was due to specific nitrogen allocation within leaves, i.e. the evergreen oaks with later leaf maturation had lower Nm but higher nitrogen allocation to photosynthetic enzymes within leaves, to enhance carbon gain against the delayed leaf maturation and the shortened photosynthetic period due to cold winters. Our data demonstrate that correlations between leaf variables in a local scale are occasionally different from averaged global-scale datasets, because of the constraints in each biome. PMID:27493781

  11. Overwintering evergreen oaks reverse typical relationships between leaf traits in a species spectrum.

    PubMed

    Harayama, Hisanori; Ishida, Atsushi; Yoshimura, Jin

    2016-07-01

    The leaf economics spectrum has given us a fundamental understanding of the species variations in leaf variables. Across plant species, tight correlations among leaf mass per area (LMA), mass-based nitrogen (N m) and photosynthetic rate (A m) and leaf lifespan have been well known as trade-offs in leaf carbon economy. However, the regional or biome-level correlations may not be necessary to correspond with the global-scale analysis. Here, we show that almost all leaf variables in overwintering evergreen oaks in Japan were relatively well included within the evergreen-broadleaved trees in worldwide temperate forests, but N m was more consistent with that in deciduous broadleaved trees. Contrary to the universal correlations, the correlation between A m and N m among the evergreen oaks was negative and the correlation between A m and LMA disappeared. The unique performance was due to specific nitrogen allocation within leaves, i.e. the evergreen oaks with later leaf maturation had lower N m but higher nitrogen allocation to photosynthetic enzymes within leaves, to enhance carbon gain against the delayed leaf maturation and the shortened photosynthetic period due to cold winters. Our data demonstrate that correlations between leaf variables in a local scale are occasionally different from averaged global-scale datasets, because of the constraints in each biome. PMID:27493781

  12. The Prevalence of Demodex Species and Its Relationship With the Metabolic Syndrome in Women of Malatya Province, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Enginyurt, Ozgur; Karaman, Ulku; Cetin, Feray; Ozer, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Demodex species are ectoparasites living in the hair follicles and sebaceous glands in human. Only two species, Demodex folliculorum and D. brevis were identified in human. While the D. folliculorum is settling in infundibular part of the hair follicles mostly, D. brevis settles into the sebaceous glands and ducts, which are deeper. These parasites live preferentially in hair follicles on the face and in the sebaceous glands, although they have also been reported to reside in seborrheic parts of the human body. The Demodex species have the highest rate on the face which has thesignificant number of sebaceous glands and sebum production in the skin. However, the rate of infestation increases with age in healthy skin. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Demodex species in healthy women and the relationship between the incidence of Demodex and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Patients and Methods: This study consisted of 151,498 women aged ≥ 20 years who reside in the central district of Malatya province, Turkey. In 5% confidence interval of sample size, while the design effect was 1.5 it was calculated as 552 individuals and while the design effect was 2 it was calculated as 736 individuals. The World Health Organization 30 cluster sampling method was used to select the samples. Women aged ≥ 20 years who were not pregnant or lactating were included in the study. From a total of 669 subjects included in this study, 90.89% of the largest sample was accessed. Results: Parasites were detected in 263 (39.3%) of 669 subjects and 3 of them were D. brevis. In chi-square analysis, nosignificant relationship was found between the incidence of the parasite, age, education level, occupation, marital status, family type, and MetS. However, a significant relationship was found between the diastolic pressure and those who fed with fatty foods and the incidence of parasite’s occurrence. Conclusions: According to the results of this study

  13. Repertoire, genealogy and genomic organization of cruzipain and homologous genes in Trypanosoma cruzi, T. cruzi-like and other trypanosome species.

    PubMed

    Lima, Luciana; Ortiz, Paola A; da Silva, Flávia Maia; Alves, João Marcelo P; Serrano, Myrna G; Cortez, Alane P; Alfieri, Silvia C; Buck, Gregory A; Teixeira, Marta M G

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, is a complex of genetically diverse isolates highly phylogenetically related to T. cruzi-like species, Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei and Trypanosoma dionisii, all sharing morphology of blood and culture forms and development within cells. However, they differ in hosts, vectors and pathogenicity: T. cruzi is a human pathogen infective to virtually all mammals whilst the other two species are non-pathogenic and bat restricted. Previous studies suggest that variations in expression levels and genetic diversity of cruzipain, the major isoform of cathepsin L-like (CATL) enzymes of T. cruzi, correlate with levels of cellular invasion, differentiation, virulence and pathogenicity of distinct strains. In this study, we compared 80 sequences of genes encoding cruzipain from 25 T. cruzi isolates representative of all discrete typing units (DTUs TcI-TcVI) and the new genotype Tcbat and 10 sequences of homologous genes from other species. The catalytic domain repertoires diverged according to DTUs and trypanosome species. Relatively homogeneous sequences are found within and among isolates of the same DTU except TcV and TcVI, which displayed sequences unique or identical to those of TcII and TcIII, supporting their origin from the hybridization between these two DTUs. In network genealogies, sequences from T. cruzi clustered tightly together and closer to T. c. marinkellei than to T. dionisii and largely differed from homologues of T. rangeli and T. b. brucei. Here, analysis of isolates representative of the overall biological and genetic diversity of T. cruzi and closest T. cruzi-like species evidenced DTU- and species-specific polymorphisms corroborating phylogenetic relationships inferred with other genes. Comparison of both phylogenetically close and distant trypanosomes is valuable to understand host-parasite interactions, virulence and pathogenicity. Our findings corroborate cruzipain as valuable target for drugs, vaccine

  14. Repertoire, Genealogy and Genomic Organization of Cruzipain and Homologous Genes in Trypanosoma cruzi, T. cruzi-Like and Other Trypanosome Species

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Luciana; Ortiz, Paola A.; da Silva, Flávia Maia; Alves, João Marcelo P.; Serrano, Myrna G.; Cortez, Alane P.; Alfieri, Silvia C.; Buck, Gregory A.; Teixeira, Marta M. G.

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, is a complex of genetically diverse isolates highly phylogenetically related to T. cruzi-like species, Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei and Trypanosoma dionisii, all sharing morphology of blood and culture forms and development within cells. However, they differ in hosts, vectors and pathogenicity: T. cruzi is a human pathogen infective to virtually all mammals whilst the other two species are non-pathogenic and bat restricted. Previous studies suggest that variations in expression levels and genetic diversity of cruzipain, the major isoform of cathepsin L-like (CATL) enzymes of T. cruzi, correlate with levels of cellular invasion, differentiation, virulence and pathogenicity of distinct strains. In this study, we compared 80 sequences of genes encoding cruzipain from 25 T. cruzi isolates representative of all discrete typing units (DTUs TcI-TcVI) and the new genotype Tcbat and 10 sequences of homologous genes from other species. The catalytic domain repertoires diverged according to DTUs and trypanosome species. Relatively homogeneous sequences are found within and among isolates of the same DTU except TcV and TcVI, which displayed sequences unique or identical to those of TcII and TcIII, supporting their origin from the hybridization between these two DTUs. In network genealogies, sequences from T. cruzi clustered tightly together and closer to T. c. marinkellei than to T. dionisii and largely differed from homologues of T. rangeli and T. b. brucei. Here, analysis of isolates representative of the overall biological and genetic diversity of T. cruzi and closest T. cruzi-like species evidenced DTU- and species-specific polymorphisms corroborating phylogenetic relationships inferred with other genes. Comparison of both phylogenetically close and distant trypanosomes is valuable to understand host-parasite interactions, virulence and pathogenicity. Our findings corroborate cruzipain as valuable target for drugs, vaccine

  15. Species delimitation and phylogenetic relationships of Chinese Leishmania isolates reexamined using kinetoplast cytochrome oxidase II gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Cao, De-Ping; Guo, Xian-Guang; Chen, Da-Li; Chen, Jian-Ping

    2011-07-01

    Leishmaniasis is a geographically widespread disease caused by protozoan parasites belonging to the genus Leishmania and transmitted by certain species of sand fly. This disease still remains endemic in China, especially in the west and northwest frontier regions. A recent ITS1 phylogeny of Chinese Leishmania isolates has challenged some aspects for their traditional taxonomy and cladistic hypotheses of their phylogeny. However, disagreement with respect to relationships within Chinese Leishmania isolates highlights the need for additional data and analyses. Here, we test the phylogenetic relationships among Chinese isolates and their relatives by analyzing kinetoplast cytochrome oxidase II (COII) gene sequences, including 14 Chinese isolates and three isolates from other countries plus 17 sequences retrieved from GenBank. The COII gene might have experienced little substitution saturation, and its evolutionary process was likely to have been stationary, reversible, and homogeneous. Both neighbor-joining and Bayesian analyses reveal a moderately supported group comprising ten newly determined isolates, which is closely related to Leishmania tarentolae and Endotrypanum monterogeii. In combination with genetic distance analysis as well as Bayesian hypothesis testing, this further corroborates the occurrence of an undescribed species of Leishmania. Our results also suggest that (1) isolate MHOM/CN/93/GS7 and isolate IPHL/CN/77/XJ771 are Leishmania donovani; (2) isolate MHOM/CN/84/JS1 is Leishmania tropica; (3) the status referring to an isolate MRHO/CN/62/GS-GER20 from a great gerbil in Gansu, China, as Leishmania gerbilli, formerly based on multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, is recognized; and (4) E. monterogeii is nested within the genus Leishmania, resulting in a paraphyletic Leishmania. In addition, the results of this study enrich our understanding of the heterogeneity and relationships of Chinese Leishmania isolates. PMID:21221640

  16. Diagenetic relationships between sulphur species and formation of pyrite in coals and Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Devic, G.; Pfendt, P.

    2007-07-01

    Based on the abundant minerals in a Miocene freshwater sequence of mixed sediments (pieces of coal in clays, sand stones and shales) alternating with coal layers, the following main sedimentation environments were distinguished: illite-montmorillonitic (I-M), calcitic (Ct) and coal-forming environment. Applying factor analyses to 16 geochemical parameters, an environmentally-specific early diagenetic connection between the sulphur transformation processes, amount of C{sub org} and precursor material species (C{sub 27}-C{sub 29}-steranes) was determined. It was found that the effects of limiting factors on S{sub pyr} formation depended on the hydrogeochemical conditions of individual sedimentation environments. Pyrite formation in coals depended directly on participation of higher plant precursor materials and/or on the total sulphur content in the system. In the MS, pyrite formation directly depended on total sulphur content, hydrogeological conditions and the amount of C{sub org}.

  17. Relationship between the adsorption species of cesium and radiocesium interception potential in soils and minerals: an EXAFS study.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qiaohui; Yamaguchi, Noriko; Tanaka, Masato; Tsukada, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Yoshio

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the radiocesium (RCs) interception potential (RIP), cation exchange capacity (CEC), total organic carbon (TOC) content, and adsorption species in soils and minerals by using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The RIP related to Cs(+) adsorption by frayed-edge site (FES) has often been used to measure the mobility and bioavailability of RCs in the environment. This study found that the presence of organic matter (OM) can reduce RIP to a certain extent. The adsorption amount (=Q(T)) in soil was obviously correlated to RIP at a small [Cs(+)] region, whereas a linear relationship between Q(T) and CEC was observed at a large [Cs(+)] region. Both the inner-sphere (IS) and outer-sphere (OS) complexes of Cs(+) were observed through EXAFS at a molecular scale. The linear correlation between log (RIP/CEC) and the ratio of the coordination number (CN) of IS (=CNIS) and OS (=CNOS) complexes noted as CNIS/(CNIS + CNOS) suggested that the ratio of CN is very sensitive to Cs(+) adsorption species with variable RIP and CEC. The adsorption species of Cs(+) in soil was mainly dependent on the clay mineral content of soil. RIP was affected not only by FES but also by other strong adsorption sites, such as the interlayers and cavities identified as the IS complex in EXAFS analysis. Findings indicated that the EXAFS approach is a powerful and efficient tool to explore the behavior of Cs(+) in a given environment. PMID:25201086

  18. Testing the utility of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 sequences for phylogenetic estimates of relationships between crane (Grus) species.

    PubMed

    Yu, D B; Chen, R; Kaleri, H A; Jiang, B C; Xu, H X; Du, W-X

    2011-01-01

    Morphology and biogeography are widely used in animal taxonomy. Recent study has suggested that a DNA-based identification system, using a 648-bp portion of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (CO1), also known as the barcoding gene, can aid in the resolution of inferences concerning phylogenetic relationships and for identification of species. However, the effectiveness of DNA barcoding for identifying crane species is unknown. We amplified and sequenced 894-bp DNA fragments of CO1 from Grus japonensis (Japanese crane), G. grus (Eurasian crane), G. monacha (hooded crane), G. canadensis (sandhill crane), G. leucogeranus (Siberian crane), and Balearica pavonina (crowned crane), along with those of 15 species obtained from GenBank and DNA barcoding, to construct four algorithms using Tringa stagnatilis, Scolopax rusticola, and T. erythropus as outgroups. The four phylum profiles showed good resolution of the major taxonomic groups. We concluded that reconstruction of the molecular phylogenetic tree can be helpful for classification and that CO1 sequences are suitable for studying the molecular evolution of cranes. Although support for several deeper branches was limited, CO1 data gave remarkably good separations, especially considering that our analysis was based on just a fragment of the gene and that CO1 has generally been viewed as useful only for resolving shallow divergences. PMID:22194213

  19. Relationship of species-specific filament levels to filamentous bulking in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jiangying; Lou, Inchio; de los Reyes, Francis L

    2004-04-01

    To examine the relationship between activated-sludge bulking and levels of specific filamentous bacteria, we developed a statistics-based quantification method for estimating the biomass levels of specific filaments using 16S rRNA-targeted fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes. The results of quantitative FISH for the filament Sphaerotilus natans were similar to the results of quantitative membrane hybridization in a sample from a full-scale wastewater treatment plant. Laboratory-scale reactors were operated under different flow conditions to develop bulking and nonbulking sludge and were bioaugmented with S. natans cells to stimulate bulking. Instead of S. natans, the filament Eikelboom type 1851 became dominant in the reactors. Levels of type 1851 filaments extending out of the flocs correlated strongly with the sludge volume index, and extended filament lengths of approximately 6 x 10(8) micro m ml(-1) resulted in bulking in laboratory-scale and full-scale activated-sludge samples. Quantitative FISH showed that high levels of filaments occurred inside the flocs in nonbulking sludge, supporting the "substrate diffusion limitation" hypothesis for bulking. The approach will allow the monitoring of incremental improvements in bulking control methods and the delineation of the operational conditions that lead to bulking due to specific filaments. PMID:15066840

  20. Sexual dimorphism in sister species of Leucoraja skate and its relationship to reproductive strategy and life history.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Christopher M; Rohlf, F James; Frisk, Michael G

    2016-03-01

    Instances of sexual dimorphism occur in a great variety of forms and manifestations. Most skates (Batoidea: Rajoidei) display some level of body shape dimorphism in which the pectoral fins of mature males develop to create a distinct bell-shaped body not found in females. This particular form of dimorphism is present in each of the sister species Leucoraja erinacea and Leucoraja ocellata, but differences between sexes are much greater in the former. In order to understand the nature and potential causes of pectoral dimorphism, we used geometric morphometrics to investigate allometry of fin shape in L. erinacea and L. ocellata and its relationship to the development of reproductive organs, based on previous work on the bonnethead shark, Sphyrna tiburo. We found that allometric trajectories of overall pectoral shape were different in both species of skate, but only L. erinacea varied significantly with respect to endoskeleton development. Male maturation was characterized by a number of sex-specific morphological changes, which appeared concurrently in developmental timing with elongation of cartilage-supported claspers. We suggest that external sexual dimorphism of pectoral fins in skates is a byproduct of skeletal growth needed for clasper development. Further, the magnitude of male shape change appears to be linked to the differential life histories of species. This work reports for the first time that pectoral dimorphism is a persistent feature in rajoid fishes, occurring in varying degrees across several genera. Lastly, our results suggest that pectoral morphology may be useful as a relative indicator of reproductive strategy in some species. PMID:26771079

  1. Periphyton photosynthesis as an indicator of effluent toxicity: Relationship to effects on animal test species

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    The use of freshwater and marine plants in effluent toxicity evaluations is uncommon despite the presence of test methods and recommendations for their use. It has been assumed that aquatic plants are less sensitive than animal test species and consequently, results from toxicity tests with invertebrates and fish have been used often as a surrogate data base. The study evaluated the ability of these animal toxicity tests to provide safe concentrations for in-stream periphyton. The toxicity of several samples of a treated municipal effluent were determined during a five-month period by monitoring short-term changes in periphyton photosynthesis (carbon-14 uptake) and by observing the effects on young production and survival of cultured daphnids and the fathead minnow. The effect levels from the various tests were compared. The effluent was seldom acutely toxic to Daphnia magna and the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) but it was consistently acutely and chronically toxic to Ceriodaphnia dubia. Chronic effect levels ranged between 17 and 71% effluent. Significant inhibition and stimulation of periphyton photosynthesis occurred at concentrations of 6 to 39% effluent. Periphyton photosynthesis was a more sensitive effect parameter than animal survival and in some cases than Ceriodaphnia reproductive performance. The results indicate that effluent toxicity tests conducted routinely with daphnids and fish may not be sufficient to predict effects on indigenous flora in receiving waters.

  2. Relationship between Extracellular Low-Molecular-Weight Thiols and Mercury Species in Natural Lake Periphytic Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Maxime; Planas, Dolors; Amyot, Marc

    2015-07-01

    The uptake of mercury by microorganisms is a key step in the production of methylmercury, a biomagnifiable toxin. Mercury complexation by low-molecular-weight (LMW) thiols can affect its bioavailability and thus the production of methylmercury. Freshwater biofilms were sampled in the summer using artificial Teflon substrates submerged for over a year to allow natural community colonization in the littoral zone of a Boreal Shield lake. Inside biofilms, concentrations of different extracellular thiol species (thioglycolic acid, l-cysteine-l-glycine, cysteine, and glutathione) were up to 3 orders of magnitude greater than in the surrounding water column, potentially more readily controlling mercury speciation than in the water column. All biofilm thiols except thioglycolic acid were highly correlated to chlorophyll a, likely indicating an algal origin. Extracellular total mercury represented 3 ± 1% of all biofilm mercury and was preferentially found in the capsular fraction. Levels of LMW thiols of presumed algal origins were highly correlated with total mercury in the mobile colloidal fraction of biofilms. We propose that periphytic phototrophic microorganisms such as algae likely affect the bioavailability of mercury through the exudation of LMW thiols, and thus they may play a key role in the production of methylmercury in biofilms. PMID:26011687

  3. Cryptic species of hairworm parasites revealed by molecular data and crowdsourcing of specimen collections.

    PubMed

    Hanelt, Ben; Schmidt-Rhaesa, Andreas; Bolek, Matthew G

    2015-01-01

    Recognizing cryptic species promotes a better understanding of biodiversity, systematics, evolutionary biology, and biogeography. When cryptic species are disease-causing organisms, such as parasites, their correct recognition has important implications for the study of epidemiology, disease ecology, and host-parasite relationships. Freshwater nematomorphs (Nematomorpha: Gordiida) or hairworms, are an enigmatic yet fascinating group of parasites that are known to manipulate host behavior to aid transition from the parasitic phase, within terrestrial insects, to the free-living aquatic stage. Hairworm taxonomy has been hampered by a paucity of informative diagnostic characters and it has long been suspected that this group contains numerous cryptic species. Study of single hairworm species over large geographical areas has been difficult due to extremely rare encounters and unreliable methods of collecting adult worms. Here we report that by using crowdsourcing, citizen scientists have collected and submitted samples of Gordius cf. robustus from throughout its range in North America making its genetic study possible. Combined with our own collections, we examined samples from 28 localities within the USA; despite the collection of numerous hairworms from Canada and Mexico, G. cf. robustus were not collected outside of the contiguous United States. Mitochondrial CO1 genetic distances revealed that specimens grouped into 8 clades separated by 8-24.3%. In addition, molecular evidence from mitochondrial (CO1 and cytB) and nuclear (partial 28S, ITS1, 5.8S and ITS2) DNA suggests that these 8 clades are distinct species and that this group of species is paraphyletic, since the North American species G. attoni and the European species G. aquaticus and G. balticus group among the G. robustus lineages. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between genetic (CO1) and geographic distance between the 8 Gordius species. This study demonstrates the value of involving the

  4. Ion toxicity and the development of a salinity toxicity relationship (STR) model for marine species

    SciTech Connect

    Tietge, J.E.; Mount, D.R.

    1994-12-31

    Salinity in effluents can cause acute toxicity to marine organisms. The toxicity of the water can be due to an excess or deficiency of common ions, which usually are not thought of as toxicants. In order to develop an understanding of this phenomenon, laboratory toxicity tests were conducted to determine the effects of single ion deficiency, single ion excess, multiple ion deficiency, multiple ion excess, and total salinity on survival of three common marine test organisms (Mysidopsis bahia, Cyprinidon variegatus, and Menidia beryllina). The ions which were manipulated in these studies were Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Ca{sup ++}, Mg{sup ++}, Sr{sup ++}, Cl{sup {minus}}, Br{sup {minus}}, SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}{minus}}, HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, and B{sub 4}O{sub 7}{sup {minus}{minus}}. Results indicate that Ca{sup ++} and K{sup +} are essential ions at normal salinities, since the deficiency of these two ions causes mortality. In contrast, the complete deficiency of Mg{sup ++}, Sr{sup ++}, B{sub 4}O{sub 7}{sup {minus}{minus}}, and HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} did not affect survival. The single ion excess studies demonstrated that K{sup +}, Ca{sup ++}, Mg{sup ++}, and B{sub 4}O{sub 7}{sup {minus}} were acutely toxic in excess at normal salinities. Total salinity studies determined the salinity tolerance range for each species, with upper and lower LC{sub 50}s for Mysidopsis bahia at 44 g/L and 8 g/L, for Cyprinidon variegatus at 73 g/L and < 0 g/L, and for Menidia beryllina at 45 g/L and < 0 g/L. These data will be used to develop a model to predict toxicity due to common ions.

  5. Relationship between reactive oxygen species and autophagy in dormant mouse blastocysts during delayed implantation

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyejin; Choi, Soyoung

    2014-01-01

    Objective Under estrogen deficiency, blastocysts cannot initiate implantation and enter dormancy. Dormant blastocysts live longer in utero than normal blastocysts, and autophagy has been suggested as a mechanism underlying the sustained survival of dormant blastocysts during delayed implantation. Autophagy is a cellular degradation pathway and a central component of the integrated stress response. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced within cells during normal metabolism, but their levels increase dramatically under stressful conditions. We investigated whether heightened autophagy in dormant blastocysts is associated with the increased oxidative stress under the unfavorable condition of delayed implantation. Methods To visualize ROS production, day 8 (short-term dormancy) and day 20 (long-term dormancy) dormant blastocysts were loaded with 1-µM 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2', 7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate, acetyl ester (CM-H2DCFDA). To block autophagic activation, 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and wortmannin were used in vivo and in vitro, respectively. Results We observed that ROS production was not significantly affected by the status of dormancy; in other words, both dormant and activated blastocysts showed high levels of ROS. However, ROS production was higher in the dormant blastocysts of the long-term dormancy group than in those of the short-term group. The addition of wortmannin to dormant blastocysts in vitro and 3-MA injection in vivo significantly increased ROS production in the short-term dormant blastocysts. In the long-term dormant blastocysts, ROS levels were not significantly affected by the treatment of the autophagy inhibitor. Conclusion During delayed implantation, heightened autophagy in dormant blastocysts may be operative as a potential mechanism to reduce oxidative stress. Further, ROS may be one of the potential causes of compromised developmental competence of long-term dormant blastocysts after implantation. PMID:25309857

  6. Phylogenetic Relationships and Genetic Variation in Longidorus and Xiphinema Species (Nematoda: Longidoridae) Using ITS1 Sequences of Nuclear Ribosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Weimin; Szalanski, Allen L.; Robbins, R. T.

    2004-01-01

    Genetic analyses using DNA sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA ITS1 were conducted to determine the extent of genetic variation within and among Longidorus and Xiphinema species. DNA sequences were obtained from samples collected from Arkansas, California and Australia as well as 4 Xiphinema DNA sequences from GenBank. The sequences of the ITS1 region including the 3' end of the 18S rDNA gene and the 5' end of the 5.8S rDNA gene ranged from 1020 bp to 1244 bp for the 9 Longidorus species, and from 870 bp to 1354 bp for the 7 Xiphinema species. Nucleotide frequencies were: A = 25.5%, C = 21.0%, G = 26.4%, and T = 27.1%. Genetic variation between the two genera had a maximum divergence of 38.6% between X. chambersi and L. crassus. Genetic variation among Xiphinema species ranged from 3.8% between X. diversicaudatum and X. bakeri to 29.9% between X. chambersi and X. italiae. Within Longidorus, genetic variation ranged from 8.9% between L. crassus and L. grandis to 32.4% between L. fragilis and L. diadecturus. Intraspecific genetic variation in X. americanum sensu lato ranged from 0.3% to 1.9%, while genetic variation in L. diadecturus had 0.8% and L. biformis ranged from 0.6% to 10.9%. Identical sequences were obtained between the two populations of L. grandis, and between the two populations of X. bakeri. Phylogenetic analyses based on the ITS1 DNA sequence data were conducted on each genus separately using both maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood analysis. Among the Longidorus taxa, 4 subgroups are supported: L. grandis, L. crassus, and L. elongatus are in one cluster; L. biformis and L. paralongicaudatus are in a second cluster; L. fragilis and L. breviannulatus are in a third cluster; and L. diadecturus is in a fourth cluster. Among the Xiphinema taxa, 3 subgroups are supported: X. americanum with X. chambersi, X. bakeri with X. diversicaudatum, and X. italiae and X. vuittenezi forming a sister group with X. index. The relationships observed in this study

  7. A Phylogenetic Analysis of 34 Chloroplast Genomes Elucidates the Relationships between Wild and Domestic Species within the Genus Citrus

    PubMed Central

    Carbonell-Caballero, Jose; Alonso, Roberto; Ibañez, Victoria; Terol, Javier; Talon, Manuel; Dopazo, Joaquin

    2015-01-01

    Citrus genus includes some of the most important cultivated fruit trees worldwide. Despite being extensively studied because of its commercial relevance, the origin of cultivated citrus species and the history of its domestication still remain an open question. Here, we present a phylogenetic analysis of the chloroplast genomes of 34 citrus genotypes which constitutes the most comprehensive and detailed study to date on the evolution and variability of the genus Citrus. A statistical model was used to estimate divergence times between the major citrus groups. Additionally, a complete map of the variability across the genome of different citrus species was produced, including single nucleotide variants, heteroplasmic positions, indels (insertions and deletions), and large structural variants. The distribution of all these variants provided further independent support to the phylogeny obtained. An unexpected finding was the high level of heteroplasmy found in several of the analyzed genomes. The use of the complete chloroplast DNA not only paves the way for a better understanding of the phylogenetic relationships within the Citrus genus but also provides original insights into other elusive evolutionary processes, such as chloroplast inheritance, heteroplasmy, and gene selection. PMID:25873589

  8. A Phylogenetic Analysis of 34 Chloroplast Genomes Elucidates the Relationships between Wild and Domestic Species within the Genus Citrus.

    PubMed

    Carbonell-Caballero, Jose; Alonso, Roberto; Ibañez, Victoria; Terol, Javier; Talon, Manuel; Dopazo, Joaquin

    2015-08-01

    Citrus genus includes some of the most important cultivated fruit trees worldwide. Despite being extensively studied because of its commercial relevance, the origin of cultivated citrus species and the history of its domestication still remain an open question. Here, we present a phylogenetic analysis of the chloroplast genomes of 34 citrus genotypes which constitutes the most comprehensive and detailed study to date on the evolution and variability of the genus Citrus. A statistical model was used to estimate divergence times between the major citrus groups. Additionally, a complete map of the variability across the genome of different citrus species was produced, including single nucleotide variants, heteroplasmic positions, indels (insertions and deletions), and large structural variants. The distribution of all these variants provided further independent support to the phylogeny obtained. An unexpected finding was the high level of heteroplasmy found in several of the analyzed genomes. The use of the complete chloroplast DNA not only paves the way for a better understanding of the phylogenetic relationships within the Citrus genus but also provides original insights into other elusive evolutionary processes, such as chloroplast inheritance, heteroplasmy, and gene selection. PMID:25873589

  9. Effective number of breeders, effective population size and their relationship with census size in an iteroparous species, Salvelinus fontinalis.

    PubMed

    Ruzzante, Daniel E; McCracken, Gregory R; Parmelee, Samantha; Hill, Kristen; Corrigan, Amelia; MacMillan, John; Walde, Sandra J

    2016-01-27

    The relationship between the effective number of breeders (Nb) and the generational effective size (Ne) has rarely been examined empirically in species with overlapping generations and iteroparity. Based on a suite of 11 microsatellite markers, we examine the relationship between Nb, Ne and census population size (Nc) in 14 brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) populations inhabiting 12 small streams in Nova Scotia and sampled at least twice between 2009 and 2015. Unbiased estimates of Nb obtained with individuals of a single cohort, adjusted on the basis of age at first maturation (α) and adult lifespan (AL), were from 1.66 to 0.24 times the average estimates of Ne obtained with random samples of individuals of mixed ages (i.e. [Formula: see text]). In turn, these differences led to adjusted Ne estimates that were from nearly five to 0.7 times the estimates derived from mixed-aged individuals. These differences translate into the same range of variation in the ratio of effective to census population size [Formula: see text] within populations. Adopting [Formula: see text] as the more precise and unbiased estimates, we found that these brook trout populations differ markedly in their effective to census population sizes (range approx. 0.3 to approx. 0.01). Using AgeNe, we then showed that the variance in reproductive success or reproductive skew varied among populations by a factor of 40, from Vk/k ≈ 5 to 200. These results suggest wide differences in population dynamics, probably resulting from differences in productivity affecting the intensity of competition for access to mates or redds, and thus reproductive skew. Understanding the relationship between Ne, Nb and Nc, and how these relate to population dynamics and fluctuations in population size, are important for the design of robust conservation strategies in small populations with overlapping generations and iteroparity. PMID:26817773

  10. Hemoparasites in a wild primate: Infection patterns suggest interaction of Plasmodium and Babesia in a lemur species.

    PubMed

    Springer, Andrea; Fichtel, Claudia; Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien; Leendertz, Fabian H; Kappeler, Peter M

    2015-12-01

    Hemoparasites can cause serious morbidity in humans and animals and often involve wildlife reservoirs. Understanding patterns of hemoparasite infections in natural populations can therefore inform about emerging disease risks, especially in the light of climate change and human disruption of natural ecosystems. We investigated the effects of host age, sex, host group size and season on infection patterns of Plasmodium sp., Babesia sp. and filarial nematodes in a population of wild Malagasy primates, Verreaux's sifakas (Propithecus verreauxi), as well as the effects of these infections on hematological variables. We tested 45 blood samples from 36 individuals and identified two species of Plasmodium, one species of Babesia and two species of filarial nematodes. Plasmodium spp. and Babesia sp. infections showed opposite patterns of age-dependency, with babesiosis being prevalent among young animals, while older animals were infected with Plasmodium sp. In addition, Babesia sp. infection was a statistically significant negative predictor of Plasmodium sp. infection. These results suggest that Plasmodium and Babesia parasites may interact within the host, either through cross-immunity or via resource competition, so that Plasmodium infections can only establish after babesiosis has resolved. We found no effects of host sex, host group size and season on hemoparasite infections. Infections showed high prevalences and did not influence hematological variables. This preliminary evidence supports the impression that the hosts and parasites considered in this study appear to be well-adapted to each other, resulting in persistent infections with low pathogenic and probably low zoonotic potential. Our results illustrate the crucial role of biodiversity in host-parasite relationships, specifically how within-host pathogen diversity may regulate the abundance of parasites. PMID:26767166

  11. No simple answers for ecological immunology: relationships among immune indices at the individual level break down at the species level in waterfowl

    PubMed Central

    Matson, Kevin D; Cohen, Alan A; Klasing, Kirk C; Ricklefs, Robert E; Scheuerlein, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Understanding immune function in the context of other life-history traits is crucial to understand the evolution of life histories, at both the individual and species levels. As the interest in assessing immune function for these comparative purposes grows, an important question remains unanswered: can immune function be broadly characterized using one or two simple measures? Often, interpretation of individual assays is ambiguous and relationships among different measures of immune function remain poorly understood. Thus, we employed five protocols to measure 13 variables of immune function in ten species of waterfowl (Anseriformes). All assays were based on a single blood sample subdivided into leukocyte (blood smear) and plasma (frozen until analysis) components. All assays were run using samples from every individual, and a nested analysis was used to partition variation/covariation at the levels of species and individuals within species. We detected positive correlations between functionally related measures of immunity within species, but these were absent from comparisons between species. A canonical correlation analysis revealed no significant relationships between the plasma and leukocyte assays at the levels of both individual and species, suggesting that these measures of immunity are neither competitive nor synergistic. We conclude that one measure of each assay type may be required to maximally characterize immune function in studies of a single species, while the same is not true in studies among species. PMID:16618674

  12. A study of the relationships of cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea) and its most closely related wild species using intron sequences and microsatellite markers

    PubMed Central

    Moretzsohn, Márcio C.; Gouvea, Ediene G.; Inglis, Peter W.; Leal-Bertioli, Soraya C. M.; Valls, José F. M.; Bertioli, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims The genus Arachis contains 80 described species. Section Arachis is of particular interest because it includes cultivated peanut, an allotetraploid, and closely related wild species, most of which are diploids. This study aimed to analyse the genetic relationships of multiple accessions of section Arachis species using two complementary methods. Microsatellites allowed the analysis of inter- and intraspecific variability. Intron sequences from single-copy genes allowed phylogenetic analysis including the separation of the allotetraploid genome components. Methods Intron sequences and microsatellite markers were used to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships in section Arachis through maximum parsimony and genetic distance analyses. Key Results Although high intraspecific variability was evident, there was good support for most species. However, some problems were revealed, notably a probable polyphyletic origin for A. kuhlmannii. The validity of the genome groups was well supported. The F, K and D genomes grouped close to the A genome group. The 2n = 18 species grouped closer to the B genome group. The phylogenetic tree based on the intron data strongly indicated that A. duranensis and A. ipaënsis are the ancestors of A. hypogaea and A. monticola. Intron nucleotide substitutions allowed the ages of divergences of the main genome groups to be estimated at a relatively recent 2·3–2·9 million years ago. This age and the number of species described indicate a much higher speciation rate for section Arachis than for legumes in general. Conclusions The analyses revealed relationships between the species and genome groups and showed a generally high level of intraspecific genetic diversity. The improved knowledge of species relationships should facilitate the utilization of wild species for peanut improvement. The estimates of speciation rates in section Arachis are high, but not unprecedented. We suggest these high rates may be linked to the

  13. Geographic trends in research output and citations in veterinary medicine: insight into global research capacity, species specialization, and interdisciplinary relationships

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bibliographic data can be used to map the research quality and productivity of a discipline. We hypothesized that bibliographic data would identify geographic differences in research capacity, species specialization, and interdisciplinary relationships within the veterinary profession that corresponded with demographic and economic indices. Results Using the SCImago portal, we retrieved veterinary journal, article, and citation data in the Scopus database by year (1996–2011), region, country, and publication in species-specific journals (food animal, small animal, equine, miscellaneous), as designated by Scopus. In 2011, Scopus indexed 165 journals in the veterinary subject area, an increase from 111 in 1996. As a percentage of veterinary research output between 1996 and 2010, Western Europe and North America (US and Canada) together accounted for 60.9% of articles and 73.0% of citations. The number of veterinary articles increased from 8815 in 1996 to 19,077 in 2010 (net increase 66.6%). During this time, publications increased by 21.0% in Asia, 17.2% in Western Europe, and 17.0% in Latin America, led by Brazil, China, India, and Turkey. The United States had the highest number of articles in species-specific journals. As a percentage of regional output, the proportion of articles in small animal and equine journals was highest in North America and the proportion of articles in food animal journals was highest in Africa. Based on principal component analysis, total articles were highly correlated with gross domestic product (based on World Bank data). The proportion of articles in small animal and equine journals was associated with gross national income, research and development, and % urban population, as opposed to the proportion of food animal articles, agricultural output, and % rural population. Co-citations linked veterinary medicine with medicine in the United States, with basic sciences in Eastern Europe and the Far East, and with agriculture

  14. Global coordination and standardisation in marine biodiversity through the World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS) and related databases.

    PubMed

    Costello, Mark J; Bouchet, Philippe; Boxshall, Geoff; Fauchald, Kristian; Gordon, Dennis; Hoeksema, Bert W; Poore, Gary C B; van Soest, Rob W M; Stöhr, Sabine; Walter, T Chad; Vanhoorne, Bart; Decock, Wim; Appeltans, Ward

    2013-01-01

    The World Register of Marine Species is an over 90% complete open-access inventory of all marine species names. Here we illustrate the scale of the problems with species names, synonyms, and their classification, and describe how WoRMS publishes online quality assured information on marine species. Within WoRMS, over 100 global, 12 regional and 4 thematic species databases are integrated with a common taxonomy. Over 240 editors from 133 institutions and 31 countries manage the content. To avoid duplication of effort, content is exchanged with 10 external databases. At present WoRMS contains 460,000 taxonomic names (from Kingdom to subspecies), 368,000 species level combinations of which 215,000 are currently accepted marine species names, and 26,000 related but non-marine species. Associated information includes 150,000 literature sources, 20,000 images, and locations of 44,000 specimens. Usage has grown linearly since its launch in 2007, with about 600,000 unique visitors to the website in 2011, and at least 90 organisations from 12 countries using WoRMS for their data management. By providing easy access to expert-validated content, WoRMS improves quality control in the use of species names, with consequent benefits to taxonomy, ecology, conservation and marine biodiversity research and management. The service manages information on species names that would otherwise be overly costly for individuals, and thus minimises errors in the application of nomenclature standards. WoRMS' content is expanding to include host-parasite relationships, additional literature sources, locations of specimens, images, distribution range, ecological, and biological data. Species are being categorised as introduced (alien, invasive), of conservation importance, and on other attributes. These developments have a multiplier effect on its potential as a resource for biodiversity research and management. As a consequence of WoRMS, we are witnessing improved communication within the

  15. Global Coordination and Standardisation in Marine Biodiversity through the World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS) and Related Databases

    PubMed Central

    Bouchet, Philippe; Boxshall, Geoff; Fauchald, Kristian; Gordon, Dennis; Hoeksema, Bert W.; Poore, Gary C. B.; van Soest, Rob W. M.; Stöhr, Sabine; Walter, T. Chad; Vanhoorne, Bart; Decock, Wim

    2013-01-01

    The World Register of Marine Species is an over 90% complete open-access inventory of all marine species names. Here we illustrate the scale of the problems with species names, synonyms, and their classification, and describe how WoRMS publishes online quality assured information on marine species. Within WoRMS, over 100 global, 12 regional and 4 thematic species databases are integrated with a common taxonomy. Over 240 editors from 133 institutions and 31 countries manage the content. To avoid duplication of effort, content is exchanged with 10 external databases. At present WoRMS contains 460,000 taxonomic names (from Kingdom to subspecies), 368,000 species level combinations of which 215,000 are currently accepted marine species names, and 26,000 related but non-marine species. Associated information includes 150,000 literature sources, 20,000 images, and locations of 44,000 specimens. Usage has grown linearly since its launch in 2007, with about 600,000 unique visitors to the website in 2011, and at least 90 organisations from 12 countries using WoRMS for their data management. By providing easy access to expert-validated content, WoRMS improves quality control in the use of species names, with consequent benefits to taxonomy, ecology, conservation and marine biodiversity research and management. The service manages information on species names that would otherwise be overly costly for individuals, and thus minimises errors in the application of nomenclature standards. WoRMS' content is expanding to include host-parasite relationships, additional literature sources, locations of specimens, images, distribution range, ecological, and biological data. Species are being categorised as introduced (alien, invasive), of conservation importance, and on other attributes. These developments have a multiplier effect on its potential as a resource for biodiversity research and management. As a consequence of WoRMS, we are witnessing improved communication within the

  16. Molecular and morphological description of Haemoproteus (Parahaemoproteus) bukaka (species nova), a haemosporidian associated with the strictly Australo-Papuan host subfamily Cracticinae.

    PubMed

    Goulding, W; Adlard, R D; Clegg, S M; Clark, N J

    2016-09-01

    Linking morphological studies with molecular phylogeny is important to understanding cryptic speciation and the evolution of host-parasite relationships. Haemosporidian parasites of the Australo-Papuan bird family Artamidae are relatively unstudied. Only one parasite species from the subfamily Cracticinae has been described, and this was based solely on morphological description. This is despite many Cracticinae species being easily observed and abundant over large ranges and in close proximity to human populations. We used morphological and molecular methods to describe a new Haemoproteus species (H. bukaka sp. nov.) from an endemic Butcherbird host (Cracticus louisiadensis) in a relatively unstudied insular area of high avian endemism (Papua New Guinea's Louisiade Archipelago). Phylogenetic reconstructions using parasite cyt-b gene sequences placed the proposed Haemoproteus bukaka sp. nov. close to other host-specialist Haemoproteus species that infect meliphagid honeyeater hosts in the region, e.g. H. ptilotis. Distinct morphological characters of this haemosporidian include macrogametocytes with characteristic large vacuoles opposing a subterminal nucleus on the host cell envelope. Among 27 sampled individuals, prevalence of H. bukaka sp.nov. was high (74 % infection rate) but strongly variable across four islands in the archipelago (ranging from 0 to 100 % prevalence). Parasitaemia levels were low across all infected individuals (0.1-0.6 %). We suspect host density may play a role in maintaining high prevalence given the close proximity and similar physical environments across islands. The findings are discussed in the context of the host genus Cracticus and theory relating to parasite-host evolution and its conservation implications in Papua New Guinea. PMID:27169863

  17. Phylogenetic relationships among Japanese species of the family Sciuridae (Mammalia, Rodentia), inferred from nucleotide sequences of mitochondrial 12S ribosomal RNA genes.

    PubMed

    Oshida, T; Masuda, R; Yoshida, M C

    1996-08-01

    In order to investigate phylogenetic relationships of the family Sciuridae living in Japan, we sequenced partial regions (379 bases) of mitochondrial 12S rRNA genes in six species of Japanese and other Asian squirrels. Phylogenetic trees constructed by sequence data indicated that two genera of flying squirrels (Petaurista and Pteromys) were clustered in a group distinct from non-flying squirrels, suggesting a possible monophyletic relationships of these flying squirrels. The evolutionary distance between the Japanese squirrel (Sciurus lis) from Honshu island and the Eurasian red squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris) from Hokkaido island was comparable to intraspecific distances of the remaining species examined. PMID:8940915

  18. Development of acute toxicity quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) and their use in linear alkylbenzene sulfonate species sensitivity distributions.

    PubMed

    Belanger, Scott E; Brill, Jessica L; Rawlings, Jane M; Price, Brad B

    2016-07-01

    Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate (LAS) is high tonnage and widely dispersed anionic surfactant used by the consumer products sector. A range of homologous structures are used in laundry applications that differ primarily on the length of the hydrophobic alkyl chain. This research summarizes the development of a set of acute toxicity QSARs (Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships) for fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and daphnids (Daphnia magna, Ceriodaphnia dubia) using accepted test guideline approaches. A series of studies on pure chain length LAS from C10 to C14 were used to develop the QSARs and the robustness of the QSARs was tested by evaluation of two technical mixtures of differing compositions. All QSARs were high quality (R(2) were 0.965-0.997, p < 0.0001). Toxicity normalization employing QSARs is used to interpret a broader array of tests on LAS chain length materials to a diverse group of test organisms with the objective of developing Species Sensitivity Distributions (SSDs) for various chain lengths of interest. Mixtures include environmental distributions measured from exposure monitoring surveys of wastewater effluents, various commercial mixtures, or specific chain lengths. SSD 5th percentile hazardous concentrations (HC5s) ranged from 0.129 to 0.254 mg/L for wastewater effluents containing an average of 11.26-12 alkyl carbons. The SSDs are considered highly robust given the breadth of species (n = 19), use of most sensitive endpoints from true chronic studies and the quality of the underlying statistical properties of the SSD itself. The data continue to indicate a low hazard to the environment relative to expected environmental concentrations. PMID:27105149

  19. Long- and short-term flooding effects on survival and sink-source relationships of swamp-adapted tree species.

    PubMed

    Angelov, M N; Sung, S J; Doong, R L; Harms, W R; Kormanik, P P; Black Jr, C C

    1996-05-01

    About 95% of swamp tupelo (Nyssa sylvatica var. biflora (Walt.) Sarg.) and sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) seedlings survived continuous root flooding for more than two years, whereas none of the swamp chestnut oak (Quercus michauxii Nutt.) and cherrybark oak (Q. falcata var. pagodifolia Ell.) seedlings survived one year of flooding. Death of oak seedlings occurred in phases associated with periods of major vegetative growth, e.g., after bud burst in spring, after summer stem elongation, and during the winter deciduous stage, suggesting that stored reserves and sources were inadequate to maintain the seedlings when vegetative sinks were forming. Additional evidence that flooding induced a source deficiency in oak was that leaves of flooded oak were 65 to 75% smaller than leaves of nonflooded oak. Flooded swamp tupelo seedlings had a normal leaf size and patchy stomatal opening compared with nonflooded seedlings. Flooding caused increases in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) specific activity in taproot cambial tissues and increases in starch concentrations of swamp tupelo seedlings that were reversed when seedlings were removed from flooding. Flooding had little effect on soluble sugar concentrations in swamp tupelo or sweetgum. In the long-term flood-dry-flood treatment, in which all species had survivors, upper canopy leaf photosynthetic rates were higher in all species during the dry period than in nonflooded controls, whereas their starch and soluble sugars concentrations were similar to those of nonflooded controls. Based on seedling survival and the sink-source relationships, the order of flood tolerance was: swamp tupelo > sweetgum > swamp chestnut oak > cherrybark oak. PMID:14871716

  20. [Lipids in the amphipod Talorchestia margaritae (Amphipoda: Talitridae) and its relationship with the ecology of the species].

    PubMed

    López, Sandra; Díaz, Yusbelly; Noris, Karem; Cabrera, Aivle

    2010-09-01

    T. margaritae, an endemic species inhabiting Venezuelan coasts, plays an important ecological role in plant and animal decomposition. To understand this issue in some animal groups, especially small ones, lipid composition analysis has been an interesting tool to describe their trophic relationships and food preferences. In order to assess this and visualize the components of their diet, we determined the lipid composition differences between males and females and among age classes in this species. Two sandy beaches were selected: Mangle Quemao and Las Mercedes de Paparo, from which sand samples of known volume were collected at the supralittoral area in 2007. Organisms were separated by age and sex classes, and their size, weight, density, biomass, total lipids (TL), lipid classes and fatty acid markers present in their tissues were determined. The sizes were similar for all age classes between the two locations, while the weights were higher for Mangle Quemao. The TL and lipid classes showed similar proportions between sexes, age classes and locations (TL: 3-5%; Phospholipids: 20-30%; Glycolipids: <1%; sterols: 4%). On the other hand, Triglycerides (TAG) were higher in Mangle Quemao, which may be related to the difference between the weights of two locations. The most abundant fatty acid biomarkers in the two studied sites were 16:0 and 18:1(n-9); this last one is characteristic of a carnivorous diet. The other nine markers were identified with changes in their distribution in organisms at Mangle Quemao and between males and females of both populations. Based on observed fatty acids markers we can assume T. margaritae as a generalist carnivore. Those populations were influenced by available food; inducing differences in weight, TAG proportion and markers diversity. PMID:20737842

  1. Molecular phylogenetic relationships between prostanoid-containing Okinawan soft coral ( Clavularia viridis) and nonprostanoid-containing Clavularia species based on ribosomal ITS sequence.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Shoko; Yasui, Kazuyuki; Watanabe, Kinzo; Wakabayashi, Takako; Tsuzuki, Mikio; Iguchi, Kazuo

    2003-01-01

    To study phylogenetic relationships among Okinawan soft corals of the genus Clavularia, the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer sequences of host corals and the 18S rDNA sequences of symbiotic algae were analyzed. The molecular phylogenetic trees of hosts showed that a prostanoid-containing species, Clavularia viridis, is deeply diverged from other species of Clavularia which do not biosynthesize the prostanoids as the main secondary metabolites. Comparison of their trees suggested poor phylogenetic concordance between hosts and symbionts. PMID:14719169

  2. Evidence that the negative relationship between seed mass and relative growth rate is not physiological but linked to species identity: a within-family analysis of Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Castro, Jorge; Reich, Peter B; Sánchez-Miranda, Angela; Guerrero, Juan D

    2008-07-01

    Seed mass and relative growth rate (RGR) are important determinants of early seedling growth, and hence seedling establishment. Although a positive interspecific relationship between seed mass and seedling dry mass is well established, much less is known about the relationships among seed mass, seedling mass and RGR within species. We examined relationships among seed mass, seedling mass and RGR within and among maternal plant lines of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.). To assess the effects of seed mass and maternal origin on RGR, individual seeds from two seed crops (years 2004 and 2005) of ten maternal plants growing under nursery conditions were weighed and then germinated. Seed mass was strongly determined by maternal plant, and seedling mass was largely determined by seed mass, with a positive correlation between these variables both across and within maternal plants. In contrast, RGR was weakly related to seed mass, with no consistent pattern in the sign of the relationship. It is well known that species differ in RGR and that RGR is related to seed mass across species. Lack of consistent evidence for this relationship within maternal lines, and for Scots pine overall, suggests that the relationship is not directly causal, but reflects consistent evolutionary covariation in these two physiologically independent traits. PMID:18450572

  3. Dihydro-β-agarofuran sesquiterpenes from celastraceae species as anti-tumour-promoting agents: Structure-activity relationship.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Marvin J; Jiménez, Ignacio A; Mendoza, Cristina R; Chavez-Sifontes, Marvin; Martinez, Morena L; Ichiishi, Eiichiro; Tokuda, Ryo; Tokuda, Harukuni; Bazzocchi, Isabel L

    2016-03-23

    Inhibition of tumour promotion in multistage chemical carcinogenesis is considered a promising strategy for cancer chemoprevention. In an ongoing investigation of bioactive secondary metabolites from Celastraceae species, five new dihydro-β-agarofuran sesquiterpenes (1-5), named Chiapens A-E, and seventeen known ones, were isolated from Maytenus chiapensis. Their structures were elucidated by extensive NMR spectroscopic and mass spectrometric techniques, and their absolute configurations were determined by circular dichroism studies, chemical correlations and biogenic means. The isolated compounds, along with twenty known sesquiterpenes, previously isolated from Zinowiewia costaricensis, have been tested for their inhibitory effects on Epstein-Barr virus early antigen (EBV-EA) activation induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorpol-13-acetate (TPA). Thirty three compounds from this series showed stronger effects than that of β-carotene, the reference inhibitor. The structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis revealed that the type of substituent, in particular at the C-1 position of the sesquiterpene scaffold, was able to modulate the anti-tumour promoting activity. Compounds 3, 6, and 33 showed significant effects in an in vivo two-stage mouse-skin carcinogenesis model. PMID:26854381

  4. Karyotype relationships of six bat species (Chiroptera, Vespertilionidae) from China revealed by chromosome painting and G-banding comparison.

    PubMed

    Ao, L; Gu, X; Feng, Q; Wang, J; O'Brien, P C M; Fu, B; Mao, X; Su, W; Wang, Y; Volleth, M; Yang, F; Nie, W

    2006-01-01

    The Vespertilionidae is the largest family in the order Chiroptera and has a worldwide distribution in the temperate and tropical regions. In order to further clarify the karyotype relationships at the lower taxonomic level in Vespertilionidae, genome-wide comparative maps have been constructed between Myotis myotis (MMY, 2n = 44) and six vesper bats from China: Myotis altarium (MAL, 2n = 44), Hypsugo pulveratus (HPU, 2n = 44), Nyctalus velutinus (NVE, 2n = 36), Tylonycteris robustula (TRO, 2n = 32), Tylonycteris sp. (TSP, 2n = 30)and Miniopterus fuliginosus (MFU, 2n = 46) by cross-species chromosome painting with a set of painting probes derived from flow-sorted chromosomes of Myotis myotis. Each Myotis myotis autosomal probe detected a single homologous chromosomal segment in the genomes of these six vesper bats except for MMY chromosome 3/4 paint which hybridized onto two chromosomes in the genome of M. fuliginosus. Our results show that Robertsonian translocation is the main mode of karyotype evolution in Vespertilionidae and that the addition of heterochromatic material also plays an important role in the karyotypic evolution of the genera Tylonycteris and Nyctalus. Two conserved syntenic associations (MMY9 + 23 and 18 + 19) could be the synapomorphic features for the genus Tylonycteris. The integration of our maps with the published maps has enabled us to deduce chromosomal homologies between human and these six vesper bats and provided new insight into the karyotype evolution of the family Vespertilionidae. PMID:17065796

  5. Relationships between soil water repellency and microbial community composition under different plant species in a Mediterranean semiarid forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, Elena; García-Orenes, Fuensanta; Bárcenas-Moreno, Gema; Jiménez-Pinilla, Patricia; Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Arcenegui, Victoria; Morugán-Coronado, Alicia; Mataix-Beneyto, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    It is generally well accepted that soil water repellency (SWR) can greatly influence the hydrology and the ecology of the forest soils (Doerr et al., 2000). However, little is known whether SWR may influence the soil microbial community. Its appearance is mainly influence by many soil physic- chemical parameters like: SOM content and its quality, pH, moisture, texture etc. However, it might also be influence by the presence or activity of microorganisms. Early studies suggest that SWR might be caused by substances produced by the activity of certain fungi species (Savage et al., 1969). Soil WR is normally characterized by a high spatial variability in persistence, with wettable and water repellent patches (Lozano et al., 2013). Changes at the microsite scale (such as the presence of soil water repellent patches) might be reflected in the microbial community structure). In the current study we have analysed how SWR influence the microbial community in soil samples with a range of water repellency persistence under different plant species (P. halepensis, Q. rotundifolia, C. albidus and R officinalis) in a Mediterranean forest. The microbial community was determined through phospholipids fatty acids (PLFA). The relationships between microbiological community structure and other different soil properties like pH, Glomalin Related Soil Protein and Soil Organic Matter content were also studied. Different statistical analyses were used: Principal Component Analysis (PCA), ANOVA, Redundancy Analysis (RA) and Pearson correlations. The highest concentrations of PLFA were found in water repellent samples. PCA showed that microorganism composition was more dependent of the severity of SWR than the type of plant species. In the RA, SWR was the only significant factor (p<0.05) to explain PLFA data distribution. The biomarker of Actinobacteria microbial group was the only biomarker directly related to SWR, therefore it can be concluded that this particular group is mainly

  6. Croatian aquatic dance flies (Diptera: Empididae: Clinocerinae and Hemerodromiinae): species diversity, distribution and relationship to surrounding countries.

    PubMed

    Ivković, Marija; Gračan, Romana; Horvat, Bogdan

    2013-01-01

    A checklist of aquatic Empididae (dance flies) from Croatia (36 species in subfamily Clinocerinae and 14 species in subfamily Hemerodromiinae) is presented, including information related to the Ecoregions in which species were found and specific species traits. Clinocerinae are represented by five genera, with Wiedemannia Zetterstedt being most species rich (20 species) and Clinocerella Engel least numerous with only one species. In Hemerodromiinae there are 8 species of Chelifera Macquart and 6 species and Hemerodromia Meigen. In addition, a discussion related to the species included and excluded from the list is provided. Most species are univoltine with adults emerging in Spring and Summer, although Kowarzia barbatula Mik and Wiedemannia (Eucelidia) zetterstedti (Fallén) are present throughout the year and Wiedemannia (Chamaedipsia) aequilobata Mandaron occurrs in Winter. The Croatian species assemblage is similar to the well-studied fauna of neighboring Slovenia (63 spp.). It is recommended that some rare species and the streams they inhabit should be considered for greater protection. PMID:26473217

  7. Digenean species diversity in teleost fishes from the Gulf of Gabes, Tunisia (Western Mediterranean)

    PubMed Central

    Derbel, H.; Châari, M.; Neifar, L.

    2012-01-01

    This study is the first attempt to survey the diversity of fish digeneans in the Gulf of Gabes (southern coast of Tunisia). A total of 779 fishes belonging to 32 species were sampled. 53 species of Digenea belonging to 15 families were recorded. Among these species, 24 are reported for the first time from the coast of Tunisia. We report one new host record, Lecithochirium sp. from Sardinella aurita. The Hemiuridae is the dominant family. A host-parasite list is presented with the information on the prevalence, abundance and mean intensity of each species collected. The diversity of Digenea is compared with other localities in the Mediterranean Sea and the northern east of Tunisia. The Gulf of Gabes shows the lowest diversity linked to the anthropogenic activities and impact of exotic species. The use of Digenea as indicators of the state of the ecosystem is discussed. PMID:22550623

  8. Host associations and evolutionary relationships of avian blood parasites from West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Beadell, Jon S.; Covas, Rita; Gebhard, Christina; Ishtiaq, Farah; Melo, Martim; Schmidt, Brian K.; Perkins, Susan L.; Graves, Gary R.; Fleischer, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    The host specificity of blood parasites recovered from a survey of 527 birds in Cameroon and Gabon was examined at several levels within an evolutionary framework. Unique mitochondrial lineages of Haemoproteus were recovered from an average of 1.3 host species (maximum = 3) and 1.2 host families (maximum = 3) while lineages of Plasmodium were recovered from an average of 2.5 species (maximum = 27) and 1.6 families (maximum = 9). Averaged within genera, lineages of both Plasmodium and Haemoproteus were constrained in their host distribution relative to random expectations. However, while several individual lineages within both genera exhibited significant host constraint, host breadth varied widely among related lineages, particularly within the genus Plasmodium. Several lineages of Plasmodium exhibited extreme generalist host-parasitism strategies while other lineages appeared to have been constrained to certain host families over recent evolutionary history. Sequence data from two nuclear genes recovered from a limited sample of Plasmodium parasites indicated that, at the resolution of this study, inferences regarding host breadth were unlikely to be grossly affected by the use of parasite mitochondrial lineages as a proxy for biological species. The use of divergent host-parasitism strategies among closely related parasite lineages suggests that host range is a relatively labile character. Since host specificity may also influence parasite virulence, these results argue for considering the impact of haematozoa on avian hosts on a lineage-specific basis. PMID:18713636

  9. [Ant diversity (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) from capões in Brazilian Pantanal: relationship between species richness and structural complexity].

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Michele M; Fernandes, Wedson D; Leal, Inara R

    2006-01-01

    Species richness of epigeic ants was surveyed in forest islands named capões of Brazilian Pantanal and related with their structural complexity. The ants were collected using pitfall traps in 28 capões from Rio Negro Farm, in Aquidauana municipality, Mato-Grosso do Sul state, Brazil. The structural complexity of capões was evaluated by measuring vegetation density and litter quantity near the pit-fall traps. Seventy-one species, distributed in 26 genera and seven sub-families were found. Ectatomma edentatum Roger (Formicidae: Ectatomminae) and one species of Pheidole were the most frequent species. Species richness was positively correlated only with herbaceous vegetation density of capões, supporting the idea that the increase in environmental heterogeneity diminishes species competition, allowing species co-occurrence. PMID:17273701

  10. Species boundaries and phylogenetic relationships between Atlanto-Mediterranean shallow-water and deep-sea coral associated Hexadella species (Porifera, Ianthellidae).

    PubMed

    Reveillaud, Julie; Remerie, Thomas; van Soest, Rob; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Cárdenas, Paco; Derycke, Sofie; Xavier, Joana R; Rigaux, Annelien; Vanreusel, Ann

    2010-07-01

    Coral reefs constitute the most diverse ecosystem of the marine realm and an increasing number of studies are focusing on coral species boundaries, distribution, and on processes that control species ranges. However, less attention has been paid to coral associated species. Deep-sea sponges dominate cold-water coral ecosystems, but virtually nothing is known about their molecular diversity. Moreover, species boundaries based on morphology may sometimes be inadequate, since sponges have few diagnostic characters. In this study, we investigated the molecular diversity within the genus Hexadella (Porifera, Demospongiae, Verongida, Ianthellidae) from the European shallow-water environment to the deep-sea coral ecosystems. Three molecular markers were used: one mitochondrial (COI) and two nuclear gene fragments (28S rDNA and the ATPS intron). Phylogenetic analyses revealed deeply divergent deep-sea clades congruent across the mitochondrial and nuclear markers. One clade contained specimens from the Irish, the Scottish, and the Norwegian margins and the Greenland Sea (Hexadella dedritifera) while another clade contained specimens from the Ionian Sea, the Bay of Biscay, and the Irish margin (H. cf. dedritifera). Moreover, these deeply divergent deep-sea clades showed a wide distribution suggesting a connection between the reefs. The results also point to the existence of a new deep-sea species (Hexadella sp.) in the Mediterranean Sea and of a cryptic shallow-water species (Hexadella cf. pruvoti) in the Gorringe Bank. In contrast, low genetic differentiation between H. cf. dedritifera and H. pruvoti from the Mediterranean Sea was observed. All Hexadella racovitzai specimens from the Mediterranean Sea (shallow and deep) to the Atlantic formed a monophyletic group. PMID:20382244

  11. Length-weight relationships and condition factor of the eaglebeak pacu Ossubtus xinguense Jégu, 1992 (Characiformes, Serrasalmidae), an endangered species from Rio Xingu rapids, northern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Andrade, M C; Jesus, A J S; Giarrizzo, T

    2015-08-01

    This study reports on the length-weight relationships and condition factor for the endangered rheophilic fish Ossubtus xinguense Jégu from Rio Xingu rapids. This species is threatened by construction of the third largest hydroelectric in the world, the Belo Monte dam close to the city of Altamira, northern Brazil. Specimens were collected in the dry season between July 2012 and September 2012. Male specimens have body length larger than females, atypical in serrasalmid fishes, and different length-weight relationships were found between adult and juvenile specimens. This study presents the first biological characteristics for O. xinguense. PMID:26691082

  12. First amplification of Eimeria hessei DNA from the lesser horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus hipposideros) and its phylogenetic relationships with Eimeria species from other bats and rodents.

    PubMed

    Afonso, Eve; Baurand, Pierre-Emmanuel; Tournant, Pierline; Capelli, Nicolas

    2014-04-01

    Although coccidian parasites of the genus Eimeria are among the best-documented parasites in bats, few Eimeria species found in bats have been characterised using molecular tools, and none of the characterised species are found in European countries. Phylogenetic relationships of Eimeria species that parasitise bats and rodents can be related to the morphology of oocysts, independently from host range, suggesting that these species are derived from common ancestors. In the present study, we isolated a partial sequence of the Eimeria hessei 18S rRNA gene from the lesser horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus hipposideros), a European bat species. Droppings from lesser horseshoe bats were collected from 11 maternity roosts located in France that were positive for the presence of the parasite. Through morphological characterisation, the oocysts detected in the lesser horseshoe bat droppings were confirmed to be E. hessei. The unique E. hessei sequence obtained through molecular analysis belonged to a clade that includes both rodent and bat Eimeria species. However, the E. hessei oocysts isolated from the bat droppings did not show morphological similarities to rodent Eimeria species. PMID:24594259

  13. Revealing the secret lives of cryptic species: Examining the phylogenetic relationships of echinostome parasites in North America.

    PubMed

    Detwiler, Jillian T; Bos, David H; Minchella, Dennis J

    2010-05-01

    The recognition of cryptic parasite species has implications for evolutionary and population-based studies of wildlife and human disease. Echinostome trematodes are a widely distributed, species-rich group of internal parasites that infect a wide array of hosts and are agents of disease in amphibians, mammals, and birds. We utilize genetic markers to understand patterns of morphology, host use, and geographic distribution among several species groups. Parasites from >150 infected host snails (Lymnaea elodes, Helisoma trivolvis and Biomphalaria glabrata) were sequenced at two mitochondrial genes (ND1 and CO1) and one nuclear gene (ITS) to determine whether cryptic species were present at five sites in North and South America. Phylogenetic and network analysis demonstrated the presence of five cryptic Echinostoma lineages, one Hypoderaeum lineage, and three Echinoparyphium lineages. Cryptic life history patterns were observed in two species groups, Echinostoma revolutum and Echinostoma robustum, which utilized both lymnaied and planorbid snail species as first intermediate hosts. Molecular evidence confirms that two species, E. revolutum and E. robustum, have cosmopolitan distributions while other species, E. trivolvis and Echinoparyphium spp., may be more geographically limited. The intra and interspecific variation detected in our study provides a genetic basis for seven species groups of echinostomes which will help accurately identify agents of disease as well as reveal cryptic aspects of trematode biology. PMID:20064622

  14. Phylogenetic relationships of Solanum series Conicibaccata and related species in Solanum section Petota inferred from five conserved ortholog sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solanum series Conicibaccata is the second largest series in sect. Petota, containing 40 species widely distributed from southern Mexico to central Bolivia. It contains diploids (2n = 2x = 24), tetraploids (2n = 4x = 48) and hexaploids (2n = 6x = 72), and a limited number of examined species have be...

  15. Relationship between the endophyte embellisia spp. and the toxic alkaloid swainsonine in major locoweed species (Astragalus and Oxytropis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Locoweeds (Astragalus and Oxytropis spp. which contain the toxic alkaloid swainsonine) cause widespread poisoning of livestock on western rangelands. There are 354 species of Astragalus and 22 species of Oxytropis in the US and Canada. Recently a fungal endophyte, Embellisia spp., was isolated fro...

  16. Genetic relationships between wild progenitor pear (Pyrus L.) species and local cultivars native to Georgia, South Caucasus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pyrus communis ssp. caucasica and P. salicifolia are among 11 species of Pyrus that are native to the country of Georgia. We have compared the genetic diversity of these, as well as other Georgian wild pear species and cultivars, to that of wild P. communis in the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm S...

  17. Complete mitochondrial genome of endangered Socorro Conure (Aratinga brevipes) - taxonomic position of the species and its relationship with Green Conure.

    PubMed

    Urantowka, Adam Dawid; Kroczak, Aleksandra Maria; Strzała, Tomasz

    2014-10-01

    Socorro Conure (Aratinga brevipes.Aratinga holochlora brevipes) is a parrot endemic to the Island of Socorro. According to some taxonomists the species is considered a subspecies of Green Conure (Aratinga holochlora). Some other classifications treat brevipes as a separate species based on relatively minor morphological differences between both species/subspecies. However, taxonomic position of Aratinga brevipes was never determined by molecular research. We sequenced full mitochondrial genome of the species and constructed phylogenetic tree using sequences of mitochondrial ND2 gene from A. brevipes and some other representatives of Conures group. Our results showed, that despite Aratinga brevipes is closely related to Aratinga holochlora, this Conure should be treated as a separate species. PMID:23815322

  18. Pachyseris inattesa sp. n. (Cnidaria, Anthozoa, Scleractinia): a new reef coral species from the Red Sea and its phylogenetic relationships

    PubMed Central

    Terraneo, Tullia I.; Berumen, Michael L.; Arrigoni, Roberto; Waheed, Zarinah; Bouwmeester, Jessica; Caragnano, Annalisa; Stefani, Fabrizio; Benzoni, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A new scleractinian coral species, Pachyseris inattesa sp. n., is described from the Red Sea. Despite a superficial resemblance with some species in the agariciid genus Leptoseris with which it has been previously confused, P. inattesa sp. n. has micro-morphological characters typical of the genus Pachyseris. This genus, once part of the Agariciidae, is comprised of five extant species and is widely distributed throughout the tropical Indo-Pacific. It is currently incertae sedis as a result of recent molecular analysis and appears to be closely related to the Euphylliidae. A molecular phylogenetic reconstruction including P. inattesa sp. n., the genus type species P. rugosa, and P. speciosa, all present in the Red Sea, was performed using the mitochondrial intergenic spacer between COI and 16S-rRNA. The results confirm that P. inattesa sp. n. is a monophyletic lineage closely related to the other Pachyseris species examined. PMID:25152672

  19. Southeast Asian mouth-brooding Betta fighting fish (Teleostei: Perciformes) species and their phylogenetic relationships based on mitochondrial COI and nuclear ITS1 DNA sequences and analyses

    PubMed Central

    Panijpan, Bhinyo; Kowasupat, Chanon; Laosinchai, Parames; Ruenwongsa, Pintip; Phongdara, Amornrat; Senapin, Saengchan; Wanna, Warapond; Phiwsaiya, Kornsunee; Kühne, Jens; Fasquel, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Fighting fish species in the genus Betta are found in several Southeast Asian countries. Depending on the mode of paternal care for fertilized eggs and hatchlings, various species of the betta fish are classified as mouth brooders or nest builders whose members in turn have been grouped according to their similarities mainly in morphology. The mouth brooders as well as some nest builders involved in the present study include fishes discovered and identified subsequent to previous reports on species groupings and their positions on phylogenetic trees based on DNA sequences that differ from those used by us in this study. From the mitochondrial COI gene and nuclear ITS1 gene sequences and more accurate analyses we conclude that the following members of the mouth-brooding pairs, named differently previously, are virtually identical, viz the Betta prima–Betta pallida pair and Betta ferox–Betta apollon pair. The Betta simplex, hitherto believed to be one species, could possibly be genetically split into 2 distinct species. In addition, several other established type-locality fishes could harbor cryptic species as judged by genetic differences. Assignments of fish species to groups reported earlier may have to be altered somewhat by the present genetic findings. We propose here a new Betta fish phylogenetic tree which, albeit being similar to the previous ones, is clearly different from them. Our gene-based evidence also leads to assignments of some fishes to new species groups and alters the positions of some species on the new phylogenetic tree, thus implying different ancestral relationships. PMID:25606468

  20. Southeast Asian mouth-brooding Betta fighting fish (Teleostei: Perciformes) species and their phylogenetic relationships based on mitochondrial COI and nuclear ITS1 DNA sequences and analyses.

    PubMed

    Panijpan, Bhinyo; Kowasupat, Chanon; Laosinchai, Parames; Ruenwongsa, Pintip; Phongdara, Amornrat; Senapin, Saengchan; Wanna, Warapond; Phiwsaiya, Kornsunee; Kühne, Jens; Fasquel, Frédéric

    2014-12-01

    Fighting fish species in the genus Betta are found in several Southeast Asian countries. Depending on the mode of paternal care for fertilized eggs and hatchlings, various species of the betta fish are classified as mouth brooders or nest builders whose members in turn have been grouped according to their similarities mainly in morphology. The mouth brooders as well as some nest builders involved in the present study include fishes discovered and identified subsequent to previous reports on species groupings and their positions on phylogenetic trees based on DNA sequences that differ from those used by us in this study. From the mitochondrial COI gene and nuclear ITS1 gene sequences and more accurate analyses we conclude that the following members of the mouth-brooding pairs, named differently previously, are virtually identical, viz the Betta prima-Betta pallida pair and Betta ferox-Betta apollon pair. The Betta simplex, hitherto believed to be one species, could possibly be genetically split into 2 distinct species. In addition, several other established type-locality fishes could harbor cryptic species as judged by genetic differences. Assignments of fish species to groups reported earlier may have to be altered somewhat by the present genetic findings. We propose here a new Betta fish phylogenetic tree which, albeit being similar to the previous ones, is clearly different from them. Our gene-based evidence also leads to assignments of some fishes to new species groups and alters the positions of some species on the new phylogenetic tree, thus implying different ancestral relationships. PMID:25606468

  1. The Relationship between Canopy Cover and Colony Size of the Wood Ant Formica lugubris - Implications for the Thermal Effects on a Keystone Ant Species

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Huei; Robinson, Elva J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Climate change may affect ecosystems and biodiversity through the impacts of rising temperature on species’ body size. In terms of physiology and genetics, the colony is the unit of selection for ants so colony size can be considered the body size of a colony. For polydomous ant species, a colony is spread across several nests. This study aims to clarify how climate change may influence an ecologically significant ant species group by investigating thermal effects on wood ant colony size. The strong link between canopy cover and the local temperatures of wood ant’s nesting location provides a feasible approach for our study. Our results showed that nests were larger in shadier areas where the thermal environment was colder and more stable compared to open areas. Colonies (sum of nests in a polydomous colony) also tended to be larger in shadier areas than in open areas. In addition to temperature, our results supported that food resource availability may be an additional factor mediating the relationship between canopy cover and nest size. The effects of canopy cover on total colony size may act at the nest level because of the positive relationship between total colony size and mean nest size, rather than at the colony level due to lack of link between canopy cover and number of nests per colony. Causal relationships between the environment and the life-history characteristics may suggest possible future impacts of climate change on these species. PMID:25551636

  2. Leaf Mass per Area (LMA) and Its Relationship with Leaf Structure and Anatomy in 34 Mediterranean Woody Species along a Water Availability Gradient.

    PubMed

    de la Riva, Enrique G; Olmo, Manuel; Poorter, Hendrik; Ubera, José Luis; Villar, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Leaf mass per area (LMA) is a morphological trait widely used as a good indicator of plant functioning (i.e. photosynthetic and respiratory rates, chemical composition, resistance to herbivory, etc.). The LMA can be broken down into the leaf density (LD) and leaf volume to area ratio (LVA or thickness), which in turn are determined by anatomical tissues and chemical composition. The aim of this study is to understand the anatomical and chemical characteristics related to LMA variation in species growing in the field along a water availability gradient. We determined LMA and its components (LD, LVA and anatomical tissues) for 34 Mediterranean (20 evergreen and 14 deciduous) woody species. Variation in LMA was due to variation in both LD and LVA. For both deciduous and evergreen species LVA variation was strongly and positively related with mesophyll volume per area (VA or thickness), but for evergreen species positive relationships of LVA with the VA of epidermis, vascular plus sclerenchyma tissues and air spaces were found as well. The leaf carbon concentration was positively related with mesophyll VA in deciduous species, and with VA of vascular plus sclerenchymatic tissues in evergreens. Species occurring at the sites with lower water availability were generally characterised by a high LMA and LD. PMID:26867213

  3. Leaf Mass per Area (LMA) and Its Relationship with Leaf Structure and Anatomy in 34 Mediterranean Woody Species along a Water Availability Gradient

    PubMed Central

    de la Riva, Enrique G.; Olmo, Manuel; Poorter, Hendrik; Ubera, José Luis; Villar, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Leaf mass per area (LMA) is a morphological trait widely used as a good indicator of plant functioning (i.e. photosynthetic and respiratory rates, chemical composition, resistance to herbivory, etc.). The LMA can be broken down into the leaf density (LD) and leaf volume to area ratio (LVA or thickness), which in turn are determined by anatomical tissues and chemical composition. The aim of this study is to understand the anatomical and chemical characteristics related to LMA variation in species growing in the field along a water availability gradient. We determined LMA and its components (LD, LVA and anatomical tissues) for 34 Mediterranean (20 evergreen and 14 deciduous) woody species. Variation in LMA was due to variation in both LD and LVA. For both deciduous and evergreen species LVA variation was strongly and positively related with mesophyll volume per area (VA or thickness), but for evergreen species positive relationships of LVA with the VA of epidermis, vascular plus sclerenchyma tissues and air spaces were found as well. The leaf carbon concentration was positively related with mesophyll VA in deciduous species, and with VA of vascular plus sclerenchymatic tissues in evergreens. Species occurring at the sites with lower water availability were generally characterised by a high LMA and LD. PMID:26867213

  4. Species-Level Phylogeny and Polyploid Relationships in Hordeum (Poaceae) Inferred by Next-Generation Sequencing and In Silico Cloning of Multiple Nuclear Loci

    PubMed Central

    Brassac, Jonathan; Blattner, Frank R.

    2015-01-01

    Polyploidization is an important speciation mechanism in the barley genus Hordeum. To analyze evolutionary changes after allopolyploidization, knowledge of parental relationships is essential. One chloroplast and 12 nuclear single-copy loci were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in all Hordeum plus six out-group species. Amplicons from each of 96 individuals were pooled, sheared, labeled with individual-specific barcodes and sequenced in a single run on a 454 platform. Reference sequences were obtained by cloning and Sanger sequencing of all loci for nine supplementary individuals. The 454 reads were assembled into contigs representing the 13 loci and, for polyploids, also homoeologues. Phylogenetic analyses were conducted for all loci separately and for a concatenated data matrix of all loci. For diploid taxa, a Bayesian concordance analysis and a coalescent-based dated species tree was inferred from all gene trees. Chloroplast matK was used to determine the maternal parent in allopolyploid taxa. The relative performance of different multilocus analyses in the presence of incomplete lineage sorting and hybridization was also assessed. The resulting multilocus phylogeny reveals for the first time species phylogeny and progenitor-derivative relationships of all di- and polyploid Hordeum taxa within a single analysis. Our study proves that it is possible to obtain a multilocus species-level phylogeny for di- and polyploid taxa by combining PCR with next-generation sequencing, without cloning and without creating a heavy load of sequence data. PMID:26048340

  5. Molecular phylogenetic relationships of the Liolaemus rothi complex and a new species of lizard from Auca Mahuida Volcano (Squamata: Liolaemini).

    PubMed

    Avila, Luciano Javier; Olave, Melisa; Perez, Cristian Hernan Fulvio; Perez, Daniel Roberto; Morando, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    A new species of lizard of the genus Liolaemus from Neuquén Province, western Argentina, is described. The new species is a member of the Liolaemus rothi species complex, and mitochondrial and nuclear molecular data show it as sister taxon of the clade composed of (L. hermannunezi (L. tromen + L. loboi)), differing in size, squamation, coloration, and sexual dimorphism from the other species of this group. Liolaemus sitesi sp. nov. has a dark body coloration with series of notched blotches on the dorsum, with bright spots, and a very iridescent yellow-green coloration in natural light. Liolaemus sitesi sp. nov. is found only in the Auca Mahuida volcano and is terrestrial, dwelling on the stony slopes with sandy soil between 1300 m and the volcano summit. PMID:24614465

  6. Relationship between carbon and water economies and drought-vulnerability in two coexistent iso- and anisohydric species.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Forner, Núria; Biel, Carmen; Savé, Robert; Martínez-Vilalta, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    Stomata control carbon and water fluxes between leaves and the atmosphere. Isohydry (i.e., strong regulation of leaf water potential, Ψl) is commonly linked to 'early' stomatal closure under drought, which in turn is believed to imply lower hydraulic risk at the expense of reduced carbon assimilation. Hence, the iso/anisohydric classification has been widely used to assess drought-resistance and mortality mechanisms across species, but the underlying assumptions have been rarely tested. These include a direct correspondence between iso/anisohydric Ψl regulation and stomatal behavior across species, and similar vulnerability to xylem embolism in iso- and anisohydric species. Our objective is to assess the physiological mechanisms underlying drought-resistance differences under controlled, experimental conditions between two coexistent Mediterranean forest species with contrasted drought-vulnerability in the field: the resistant Phillyrea latifolia (anisohydric) and vulnerable Quercus ilex (isohydric). We hypothesize that lower Ψl in P. latifolia will not necessarily be associated with narrower hydraulic safety margins or longer periods of positive gas exchange under drought. Isohydric behavior was confirmed in Q. ilex, but did not imply lower hydraulic impairment, due to lower resistance to xylem embolism in this species. We found similar temporal patterns of stomatal conductance and assimilation between species. If anything, the anisohydric P. latifolia tended to show lower assimilation rates than Q. ilex under extreme drought. The fact that P. latifolia was as carbon-constrained as Q. ilex was also indicated by similar growth rates and carbon reserves dynamics in both species. Despite similarities in carbon management between species, after two years with no water supply P. latifolia mortality was less than half of Q. ilex mortality by this time. Our study warns against making direct connections between Ψl regulation, stomatal behavior and the mechanisms of

  7. Evolutionary relationships of a new genus and three new species of Omomyid primates (Willwood Formation, Lower Eocene, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bown, T.M.

    1991-01-01

    Studies of new finds of omomyid primates from the lower Eocene Willwood Formation of northwest Wyoming reveal the presence of a new genus and two new species of anaptomorphines and a new species of omomyine. All were apparently short-lived immigrants into the Bighorn Basin. The new genus and speciesTatmanius szalayi is typified by a diminutive single-rooted p3 and a bilobed-rooted p4 with a crown smaller than ml. These traits were probably derived fromPseudotetonius and parallel similar conditions inTrogolemur andNannopithex. The new speciesArapahovius advena is the first occurrence ofArapahovius outside the Washakie Basin, where it appears to have also been a vagrant species.Steinius annectens, sp. nov., is larger than the olderSteinius vespertinus and strengthens the alliance between this genus and BridgerianOraorays carteri, although which species ofSteinius is closer toOmomys is not yet clear. The available evidence suggests a derivation ofOmomys (Omomyini) fromSteinius and all Washakiini from the anaptomorphineTeilhardina, which would indicate that Omomyinae were at least diphyletic. Preliminary evidence suggests that the geographic distributions of at least some Willwood omomyids correlate with paleosol distributions.

  8. Species delimitation and phylogenetic relationships in a genus of African weakly-electric fishes (Osteoglossiformes, Mormyridae, Campylomormyrus).

    PubMed

    Lamanna, Francesco; Kirschbaum, Frank; Ernst, Anja R R; Feulner, Philine G D; Mamonekene, Victor; Paul, Christiane; Tiedemann, Ralph

    2016-08-01

    African weakly-electric fishes (Mormyridae) are able to communicate through species-specific electric signals; this feature might have favoured the evolutionary radiation observed in this family (over 200 species) by acting as an effective pre-zygotic isolation mechanism. In the present study we used mitochondrial (cytb) and nuclear (rps7, scn4aa) markers in order to reconstruct a species-phylogeny and identify species boundaries for the genus Campylomormyrus, by applying inference methods based on the multispecies coalescent model. Additionally, we employed 16 microsatellite markers, landmark-based morphometric measurements, and electro-physiological analyses as independent lines of evidence to the results obtained from the sequence data. The results show that groups that are morphologically different are also significantly divergent at the genetic level, whereas morphologically similar groups, displaying dissimilar electric signals, do not show enough genetic diversity to be considered separate species. Furthermore, the data confirm the presence of a yet undescribed species within the genus Campylomormyrus. PMID:27143239

  9. Discovery of Trypanosomatid Parasites in Globally Distributed Drosophila Species

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, James Angus; James, Pamela M.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial parasites of animals include bacteria, viruses, and various unicellular eukaryotes. Because of the difficulty in studying these microorganisms in both humans and disease vectors, laboratory models are commonly used for experimental analysis of host-parasite interactions. Drosophila is one such model that has made significant contributions to our knowledge of bacterial, fungal, and viral infections. Despite this, less is known about other potential parasites associated with natural Drosophila populations. Here, we surveyed sixteen Drosophila populations comprising thirteen species from four continents and Hawaii and found that they are associated with an extensive diversity of trypanosomatids (Euglenozoa, Kinetoplastea). Phylogenetic analysis finds that Drosophila-associated trypanosomatids are closely related to taxa that are responsible for various types of leishmaniases and more distantly related to the taxa responsible for human African trypanosomiasis and Chagas disease. We suggest that Drosophila may provide a powerful system for studying the interactions between trypanosomatids and their hosts. PMID:23658617

  10. Intraspecific Relationships among Wood Density, Leaf Structural Traits and Environment in Four Co-Occurring Species of Nothofagus in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Sarah J.; Allen, Robert B.; Buxton, Rowan P.; Easdale, Tomás A.; Hurst, Jennifer M.; Morse, Christopher W.; Smissen, Rob D.; Peltzer, Duane A.

    2013-01-01

    Plant functional traits capture important variation in plant strategy and function. Recent literature has revealed that within-species variation in traits is greater than previously supposed. However, we still have a poor understanding of how intraspecific variation is coordinated among different traits, and how it is driven by environment. We quantified intraspecific variation in wood density and five leaf traits underpinning the leaf economics spectrum (leaf dry matter content, leaf mass per unit area, size, thickness and density) within and among four widespread Nothofagus tree species in southern New Zealand. We tested whether intraspecific relationships between wood density and leaf traits followed widely reported interspecific relationships, and whether variation in these traits was coordinated through shared responses to environmental factors. Sample sites varied widely in environmental variables, including soil fertility (25–900 mg kg–1 total P), precipitation (668–4875 mm yr–1), temperature (5.2–12.4 °C mean annual temperature) and latitude (41–46 °S). Leaf traits were strongly correlated with one another within species, but not with wood density. There was some evidence for a positive relationship between wood density and leaf tissue density and dry matter content, but no evidence that leaf mass or leaf size were correlated with wood density; this highlights that leaf mass per unit area cannot be used as a surrogate for component leaf traits such as tissue density. Trait variation was predicted by environmental factors, but not consistently among different traits; e.g., only leaf thickness and leaf density responded to the same environmental cues as wood density. We conclude that although intraspecific variation in wood density and leaf traits is strongly driven by environmental factors, these responses are not strongly coordinated among functional traits even across co-occurring, closely-related plant species. PMID:23527041

  11. Insights From Natural Host-Parasite Interactions: The Drosophila Model

    PubMed Central

    Keebaugh, Erin S.; Schlenke, Todd A.

    2013-01-01

    Immune responses against opportunistic pathogens have been extensively studied in Drosophila, leading to a detailed map of the genetics behind innate immunity networks including the Toll, Imd, Jak-Stat, and JNK pathways. However, immune mechanisms of other organisms, particularly plants, have primarily been investigated using natural pathogens. It was the use of natural pathogens in plant research that revealed the plant R/Avr system, a specialized immune response derived from antagonistic coevolution between plant immune proteins and their natural pathogens’ virulence proteins. Thus, we recommend that researchers begin to use natural Drosophila pathogens to identify novel immune mechanisms that may have arisen through antagonistic coevolution with common natural pathogens. In this review, we address the benefits of using natural pathogens in research, describe the known natural pathogens of Drosophila, and discuss exciting prospects for future research on select natural pathogens of Drosophila. PMID:23764256

  12. Inflammation and oxidative stress in vertebrate host-parasite systems.

    PubMed

    Sorci, Gabriele; Faivre, Bruno

    2009-01-12

    Innate, inflammation-based immunity is the first line of vertebrate defence against micro-organisms. Inflammation relies on a number of cellular and molecular effectors that can strike invading pathogens very shortly after the encounter between inflammatory cells and the intruder, but in a non-specific way. Owing to this non-specific response, inflammation can generate substantial costs for the host if the inflammatory response, and the associated oxygen-based damage, get out of control. This imposes strong selection pressure that acts to optimize two key features of the inflammatory response: the timing of activation and resolution (the process of downregulation of the response). In this paper, we review the benefits and costs of inflammation-driven immunity. Our aim is to emphasize the importance of resolution of inflammation as a way of maintaining homeostasis against oxidative stress and to prevent the 'horror autotoxicus' of chronic inflammation. Nevertheless, host immune regulation also opens the way to pathogens to subvert host defences. Therefore, quantifying inflammatory costs requires assessing (i) short-term negative effects, (ii) delayed inflammation-driven diseases, and (iii) parasitic strategies to subvert inflammation. PMID:18930878

  13. Phylogenetic and phenotypic relationships among Triatoma carcavalloi (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae) and related species collected in domiciles in Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Carlos Eduardo; Marcet, Paula L; Gumiel, Marcia; Takiya, Daniela Maeda; Cardozo-de-Almeida, Margareth; Pacheco, Raquel S; Lopes, Catarina Macedo; Dotson, Ellen M; Costa, Jane

    2009-12-01

    Triatoma carcavalloi is considered a rare Chagas disease vector often collected inside domiciles in Rio Grande do Sul State. In this Brazilian state, T. carcavalloi has been collected in the same ecotope (rock piles) with two other species (T. rubrovaria and T. circummaculata), with which it also shares morphological characteristics. Previous morphological studies placed T. carcavalloi in the same species complex ("infestans complex") and subcomplex ("rubrovaria subcomplex") as T. rubrovaria, whereas T. circummaculata was placed in the "circummaculata complex." The phylogeny of a group composed of 16 species of triatomines was reevaluated with the inclusion of T. carcavalloi by Bayesian analysis using mtDNA sequences of subunits 12S and 16S of the ribosomal RNA, and the cytochrome oxidase I (COI) genes. The phenotypic relationship among T. carcavalloi and related triatomines was also inferred from morphometrics. Phylogenetic results indicate that T. carcavalloi is a sister species of T. rubrovaria, and both were recovered as closely related to T. circummaculata. Morphometric studies confirmed the closeness among T. carcavalloi, T. rubrovaria, and T. circummaculata, prompting the placement of the latter species in the "infestans complex" and "rubrovaria subcomplex." PMID:20836820

  14. How Many Parasites Species a Frog Might Have? Determinants of Parasite Diversity in South American Anurans

    PubMed Central

    Campião, Karla Magalhães; Ribas, Augusto Cesar de Aquino; Morais, Drausio Honorio; da Silva, Reinaldo José; Tavares, Luiz Eduardo Roland

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in unveiling the dynamics of parasite infection. Understanding the interaction patterns, and determinants of host-parasite association contributes to filling knowledge gaps in both community and disease ecology. Despite being targeted as a relevant group for conservation efforts, determinants of the association of amphibians and their parasites in broad scales are poorly understood. Here we describe parasite biodiversity in South American amphibians, testing the influence of host body size and geographic range in helminth parasites species richness (PSR). We also test whether parasite diversity is related to hosts’ phylogenetic diversity. Results showed that nematodes are the most common anuran parasites. Host-parasite network has a nested pattern, with specialist helminth taxa generally associated with hosts that harbour the richest parasite faunas. Host size is positively correlated with helminth fauna richness, but we found no support for the association of host geographic range and PSR. These results remained consistent after correcting for uneven study effort and hosts’ phylogenic correlation. However, we found no association between host and parasite diversity, indicating that more diversified anuran clades not necessarily support higher parasite diversity. Overall, considering both the structure and the determinants of PRS in anurans, we conclude that specialist parasites are more likely to be associated with large anurans, which are the ones harbouring higher PSR, and that the lack of association of PSR with hosts’ clade diversification suggests it is strongly influenced by ecological and contemporary constrains. PMID:26473593

  15. Phylogenetic relationships among ten sole species (Soleidae, Pleuronectiformes) from the Gulf of Cadiz (Spain) based on mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Infante, Carlos; Catanese, Gaetano; Manchado, Manuel

    2004-01-01

    The entire sequence of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and 2 partial sequences of the ribosomal RNA12S and 16S genes have been used to study the molecular phylogeny in 10 species of soles belonging to the genera Solea, Monochirus, Microchirus, Dicologlossa, and Synaptura from the Atlantic waters of the Gulf of Cadiz (Spain). The results obtained by means of different phylogenetic analyses (maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony, and neighbor-joining) were quite similar, supporting the monophyly of the Solea species. Nevertheless, they favor the differentiation of Dicologlossa cuneata and Dicologlossa hexophthalma in 2 distinct genera, since the most closely related species to the last one is Microchirus azevia. The fact that M. azevia is also more closely linked to Monochirus hispidus than to its congeneric Microchirus boscanion argues in favor of a taxonomic reorganization of these genera. PMID:15747091

  16. Chromosomal evidence of species status and evolutionary relationships of the black fly Prosimulium petrosum (Diptera, Simuliidae) in Armenia

    PubMed Central

    Vlasov, Sergey; Harutyunova, Maria; Harutyunova, Karine; Adler, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The karyotype of Armenian populations of the black fly Prosimulium petrosum Rubtsov, 1955 was characterized and compared with that of all other chromosomally known Palearctic members of the Prosimulium hirtipes group. Analysis of the polytene chromosomes established that Prosimulium petrosum is most closely related to European populations of Prosimulium latimucro (Enderlein, 1925) with which it shares an identical fixed chromosomal banding sequence. Its validity as a species, separate from Prosimulium latimucro, is based on its unique sex-differential sections in the expanded centromere region of chromosome I, in agreement with the unique structural configuration of the hypostomal teeth of its larvae. Prosimulium petrosum and Prosimulium latimucro, therefore, are homosequential species, demonstrating the value of a combined chromosomal and morphological approach in determining species status. PMID:27186336

  17. Cross-species comparison of in vivo PK/PD relationships for second-generation antisense oligonucleotides targeting apolipoprotein B-100.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rosie Z; Lemonidis, Kristina M; Graham, Mark J; Matson, John E; Crooke, Rosanne M; Tribble, Diane L; Wedel, Mark K; Levin, Arthur A; Geary, Richard S

    2009-03-01

    The in vivo pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of 2'-O-(2-methoxyethyl) (2'-MOE) modified antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs), targeting apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100), were characterized in multiple species. The species-specific apoB antisense inhibitors demonstrated target apoB mRNA reduction in a drug concentration and time-dependent fashion in mice, monkeys, and humans. Consistent with the concentration-dependent decreases in liver apoB mRNA, reductions in serum apoB, and LDL-C, and total cholesterol were concurrently observed in animal models and humans. Additionally, the long duration of effect after cessation of dosing correlated well with the elimination half-life of 2'-MOE modified apoB ASOs studied in mice (t(1/2) congruent with 20 days) and humans (t(1/2) congruent with 30 days) following parental administrations. The plasma concentrations of ISIS 301012, observed in the terminal elimination phase of both mice and monkeys were in equilibrium with liver. The partition ratios between liver and plasma were similar, approximately 6000:1, across species, and thus provide a surrogate for tissue exposure in humans. Using an inhibitory E(max) model, the ASO liver EC(50s) were 101+/-32, 119+/-15, and 300+/-191 microg/g of ASO in high-fat-fed (HF) mice, transgenic mice containing the human apoB transgene, and monkeys, respectively. The estimated liver EC(50) in man, extrapolated from trough plasma exposure, was 81+/-122 microg/g. Therefore, extraordinary consistency of the exposure-response relationship for the apoB antisense inhibitor was observed across species, including human. The cross-species PK/PD relationships provide confidence in the use of pharmacology animal models to predict human dosing for second-generation ASOs targeting the liver. PMID:19056355

  18. Size relationships of different body parts in the three dipteran species Drosophila melanogaster, Ceratitis capitata and Musca domestica.

    PubMed

    Siomava, Natalia; Wimmer, Ernst A; Posnien, Nico

    2016-06-01

    Body size is an integral feature of an organism that influences many aspects of life such as fecundity, life span and mating success. Size of individual organs and the entire body size represent quantitative traits with a large reaction norm, which are influenced by various environmental factors. In the model system Drosophila melanogaster, pupal size and adult traits, such as tibia and thorax length or wing size, accurately estimate the overall body size. However, it is unclear whether these traits can be used in other flies. Therefore, we studied changes in size of pupae and adult organs in response to different rearing temperatures and densities for D. melanogaster, Ceratitis capitata and Musca domestica. We confirm a clear sexual size dimorphism (SSD) for Drosophila and show that the SSD is less uniform in the other species. Moreover, the size response to changing growth conditions is sex dependent. Comparison of static and evolutionary allometries of the studied traits revealed that response to the same environmental variable is genotype specific but has similarities between species of the same order. We conclude that the value of adult traits as estimators of the absolute body size may differ among species and the use of a single trait may result in wrong assumptions. Therefore, we suggest using a body size coefficient computed from several individual measurements. Our data is of special importance for monitoring activities of natural populations of the three dipteran flies, since they are harmful species causing economical damage (Drosophila, Ceratitis) or transferring diseases (Musca). PMID:27116604

  19. Mitochondrial DNA in North American Lygus (Hemiptera: Miridae) Species: Analysis of Intra-and Inter-specific Relationships

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Lygus is widely distributed in North America and Eurasia. The tarnished plant bug, Lygus Iineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois), is one of the most serious pest species within this genus. The pest is known to have over 350 different plant hosts. Inter-and intra-specific genetic diversity of Nort...

  20. Impact of deep coalescence and recombination on the estimation of phylogenetic relationships among species using AFLP markers.

    PubMed

    García-Pereira, María Jesús; Carvajal-Rodríguez, Antonio; Whelan, Simon; Caballero, Armando; Quesada, Humberto

    2014-07-01

    Deep coalescence and the nongenealogical pattern of descent caused by recombination have emerged as a common problem for phylogenetic inference at the species level. Here we use computer simulations to assess whether AFLP-based phylogenies are robust to the uncertainties introduced by these factors. Our results indicate that phylogenetic signal can prevail even in the face of extensive deep coalescence allowing recovering the correct species tree topology. The impact of recombination on tree accuracy was related to total tree depth and species effective population size. The correct tree topology could be recovered upon many simulation settings due to a trade-off between the conflicting signals resulting from intra-locus recombination and the benefits of the joint consideration of unlinked loci that better matched overall the true species tree. Errors in tree topology were not only determined by deep coalescence, but also by the timing of divergence and the tree-building errors arising from an insufficient number of characters. DNA sequences generally outperformed AFLPs upon any simulated scenario, but this difference in performance was nearly negligible when a sufficient number of AFLP characters were sampled. Our simulations suggest that the impact of deep coalescence and intra-locus recombination on the reliability of AFLP trees could be minimal for effective population sizes equal to or lower than 10,000 (typical of many vertebrates and tree plants) given tree depths above 0.02 substitutions per site. PMID:24631855

  1. Phylogenetic relationships among Octopodidae species in coastal waters of China inferred from two mitochondrial DNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Lü, Z M; Cui, W T; Liu, L Q; Li, H M; Wu, C W

    2013-01-01

    Octopus in the family Octopodidae (Mollusca: Cephalopoda) has been generally recognized as a "catch-all" genus. The monophyly of octopus species in China's coastal waters has not yet been studied. In this paper, we inferred the phylogeny of 11 octopus species (family Octopodidae) in China's coastal waters using nucleotide sequences of two mitochondrial DNA genes: cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and 16S rRNA. Sequence analysis of both genes revealed that the 11 species of Octopodidae fell into four distinct groups, which were genetically distant from one another and exhibited identical phylogenetic resolution. The phylogenies indicated strongly that the genus Octopus in China's coastal waters is also not monophyletic, and it is therefore clear that the Octopodidae systematics in this area requires major revision. It is demonstrated that partial sequence information of both the mitochondrial genes 16S rRNA and COI could be used as diagnostic molecular markers in the identification and resolution of the taxonomic ambiguity of Octopodidae species. PMID:24085437

  2. Fine-scale spatial variation in plant species richness and its relationship to environmental conditions in coastal marshlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mancera, J.E.; Meche, G.C.; Cardona-Olarte, P.P.; Castaneda-Moya, E.; Chiasson, R.L.; Geddes, N.A.; Schile, L.M.; Wang, H.G.; Guntenspergen, G.R.; Grace, J.B.

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that variations in environmental conditions play a major role in explaining variations in plant species richness at community and landscape scales. In this study, we considered the degree to which fine-scale spatial variations in richness could be related to fine-scale variations in abiotic and biotic factors. To examine spatial variation in richness, grids of 1 m(2) plots were laid out at five sites within a coastal riverine wetland landscape. At each site, a 5 x 7 array of plots was established adjacent to the river's edge with plots one meter apart. In addition to the estimation of species richness, environmental measurements included sediment salinity, plot microelevation, percent of plot recently disturbed, and estimated community biomass. Our analysis strategy was to combine the use of structural equation modeling (path modeling) with an assessment of spatial association. Mantel's tests revealed significant spatial autocorrelation in species richness at four of the five sites sampled, indicating that richness in a plot correlated with the richness of nearby plots. We subsequently considered the degree to which spatial autocorrelations in richness could be explained by spatial autocorrelations in environmental conditions. Once data were corrected for environmental correlations, spatial autocorrelation in residual species richness could not be detected at any site. Based on these results, we conclude that in this coastal wetland, there appears to be a fine-scale mapping of diversity to microgradients in environmental conditions.

  3. Chlordane components and metabolites in seven species of Arctic seabirds from the Northwater Polynya: relationships with stable isotopes of nitrogen and enantiomeric fractions of chiral components.

    PubMed

    Fisk, A T; Moisey, J; Hobson, K A; Karnovsky, N J; Norstrom, R J

    2001-01-01

    The Northwater Polynya (NOW) is a large area of year-round open water found in the high Arctic between Ellesmere Island and Greenland. NOW has high biological productivity compared with other arctic marine areas, and supports large populations of several seabird species. Seven species of seabirds, dovekie (Alle alle, DOVE), thick-billed murre (Uria lomvia, TBMU), black guillemot (Cepphus grylle, BLGU), black-legged kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla, BLKI), ivory gull (Pagophila eburnea, IVGU), glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus, GLGU) and northern fulmar (Fulmaris glacialis, NOFU) were collected in May and June 1998 to determine chlordane concentrations in liver and fat and to examine species differences, relationships with stable isotopes of nitrogen, and enantiomeric fractions (EFs) of chiral components. sigma CHLOR concentrations varied over an order of magnitude among species, from a low of 176 +/- 19 ng/g (lipid corrected) in TMBU liver to a high of 3190 +/- 656 ng/g (lipid corrected) in NOFU liver. Lipid-corrected concentrations of chlordane did not vary between sex for any species or between fat and liver except for the DOVE, that had fat concentrations that were significantly greater than the liver. delta 15N values described a significant percentage of the variability of concentrations for most chlordane components, although less than what has been reported for whole food chains. Slopes of delta 15N versus concentration of chlordane components and sigma CHLOR were similar with the exception of those which were metabolized (trans-chlordane) or formed through biotransformation (oxychlordane). The relative proportions of chlordane components in seabirds were related to phylogeny; the procellariid (NOFU) had the greatest percentage of oxychlordane (> 70%), followed by the larids (BLKI, IVGU and GLGU; 40-50%) and the alcids (DOVE and BLGU; 10-20%). The exception was TBMU, an alcid, where oxychlordane made up > 40% of its chlordane. EFs of chiral components failed to

  4. Sarcocystis clethrionomyelaphis Matuschka, 1986 (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) infecting the large oriental vole Eothenomys miletus (Thomas) (Cricetidae: Microtinae) and its phylogenetic relationships with other species of Sarcocystis Lankester, 1882.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun-Jie; Liu, Ting-Ting; Liu, Qiong; Esch, G W; Chen, Jin-Qing

    2015-07-01

    Sarcocystis clethrionomyelaphis Matuschka, 1986 was first identified in skeletal muscles of 47 (75.8%) of 62 large oriental voles Eothenomys miletus (Thomas) captured between March 2012 and May 2014 in Anning Prefecture of Yunnan Province (China). Sarcocyst walls were thick and possessed villous protrusions measuring 3.5-5.5 μm in length. Beauty rat snakes Elaphe taeniura (Cope) fed sarcocysts of the species shed sporulated oöcysts measuring 13-18×9-13 (16×12) μm with a prepatent period of 16 to 17 days. Phylogenetic analysis based on 18S rRNA gene sequences revealed a close relationship between S. clethrionomyelaphis and other colubrid-transmitted species of Sarcocystis Lankester, 1882. This is the first report identifying S. clethrionomyelaphis from its natural intermediate host. PMID:26063304

  5. Relationships of inside and outside bark diameters for young-growth mixed-conifer species in the Sierra Nevada. Forest Service research note (final). [Firs, cedars, pines

    SciTech Connect

    Dolph, K.L.

    1984-09-01

    The linear relationship of inside to outside bark diameter at breast height provides a basis for estimating diameter inside bark from diameter outside bark. Estimates of diameter inside bark and past diameter outside bark are useful in predicting growth and yield. During field seasons 1979-1982, data were obtained from stem analysis of 931 trees in young-growth stands of the mixed-conifer type on the westside Sierra Nevada of California. Species included were coast Douglas-fir, California white fir, incense-cedar, sugar pine, ponderosa pine, and Jeffrey pine. This note provides equations for estimating inside bark diameters, double bark thickness, and past outside bark diameters for each of the species studied.

  6. Exobasidium maculosum, a new species causing leaf and fruit spots on blueberry in the southeastern USA and its relationship with other Exobasidium spp. parasitic to blueberry and cranberry.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Marin Talbot; Turner, Ashley N; Brannen, Phillip M; Cline, William O; Richardson, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot of blueberry (Vaccinium section Cyanococcus) is an emerging disease that has rapidly increased in prevalence throughout the southeastern USA. To determine whether this disease is caused by a new species of Exobasidium, we studied the morphology and phylogenetic relationship of the causal fungus compared with other members of the genus, including the type species E. vaccinii and other species that parasitize blueberry and cranberry (V. macrocarpon). Both scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy were used for morphological characterization. For phylogenetic analyses, we sequenced the large subunit of the rDNA (LSU) from 10 isolates collected from leaf or fruit spots of rabbiteye blueberry (V. virgatum), highbush blueberry (V. corymbosum) and southern highbush blueberry (Vaccinium interspecific hybrid) from Georgia and North Carolina and six isolates from leaf spots of lowbush blueberry (V. angustifolium) from Maine and Nova Scotia, Canada. LSU was sequenced from isolates causing red leaf disease of lowbush blueberry and red leaf spot (E. rostrupii) and red shoot (E. perenne) of cranberry. In addition, LSU sequences from GenBank, including sequences with high similarity to the emerging parasite and from Exobasidium spp. parasitizing other Vaccinium spp. and related hosts, were obtained. All sequences were aligned and subjected to phylogenetic analyses. Results indicated that the emerging parasite in the southeastern USA differs morphologically and phylogenetically from other described species and is described herein as Exobasidium maculosum. Within the southeastern USA, clustering based on host species, host tissue type (leaf or fruit) or geographic region was not detected; however, leaf spot isolates from lowbush blueberry were genetically different and likely represent a unique species. PMID:24871592

  7. The relationship between visible light emission and species fraction of the hydrogen ion beams extracted from 2.45 GHz microwave discharge.

    PubMed

    Cortázar, O D; Megía-Macías, A; Tarvainen, O; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H

    2015-08-01

    The relationship between Balmer-α and Fulcher-band emissions with extracted H(+), H2(+), and H3(+) ions is demonstrated for a 2.45 GHz microwave discharge. Ion mass spectra and optical measurements of Balmer-α and Fulcher-band emissions have been obtained with a Wien Filter having an optical view-port on the plasma chamber axis. The beam of approximately 1 mA is analyzed for different plasma conditions simultaneously with the measurement of light emissions both with temporal resolution. The use of visible light emissions as a valuable diagnostic tool for monitoring the species fraction of the extracted beams is proposed. PMID:26329183

  8. The relationship between visible light emission and species fraction of the hydrogen ion beams extracted from 2.45 GHz microwave discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortázar, O. D.; Megía-Macías, A.; Tarvainen, O.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.

    2015-08-01

    The relationship between Balmer-α and Fulcher-band emissions with extracted H+, H2 + , and H3 + ions is demonstrated for a 2.45 GHz microwave discharge. Ion mass spectra and optical measurements of Balmer-α and Fulcher-band emissions have been obtained with a Wien Filter having an optical view-port on the plasma chamber axis. The beam of approximately 1 mA is analyzed for different plasma conditions simultaneously with the measurement of light emissions both with temporal resolution. The use of visible light emissions as a valuable diagnostic tool for monitoring the species fraction of the extracted beams is proposed.

  9. Redescription and phylogenetic relationships of Euparyphium capitaneum Dietz, 1909, the type-species of Euparyphium Dietz, 1909 (Digenea: Echinostomatidae).

    PubMed

    Kudlai, Olena; Tkach, Vasyl V; Pulis, Eric E; Kostadinova, Aneta

    2015-01-01

    Euparyphium capitaneum Dietz, 1909, the type-species of the genus Euparyphium Dietz, 1909, is described on the basis of material collected from the type-host Anhinga anhinga (L.) from Pascagoula River, which drains into the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico. Combination of light and scanning electron microscopy observations of freshly collected and properly fixed specimens in our study has allowed us to provide novel information on the morphology and topology of the reproductive systems and other morphological features of the species. A Bayesian inference analysis based on the newly-obtained partial sequence of the nuclear 28S rRNA gene for E. capitaneum and 24 previously published sequences from the superfamily Echinostomatoidea Looss, 1899 provided evidence supporting the distinct status of the genera Euparyphium and Isthmiophora Lühe, 1909. PMID:25557747

  10. Can parasites be indicators of free-living diversity? Relationships between species richness and the abundance of larval trematodes and of local benthos and fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hechinger, R.F.; Lafferty, K.D.; Huspeni, T.C.; Brooks, A.J.; Kuris, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Measuring biodiversity is difficult. This has led to efforts to seek taxa whose species richness correlates with the species richness of other taxa. Such indicator taxa could then reduce the time and cost of assessing the biodiversity of the more extensive community. The search for species richness correlations has yielded mixed results, however. This may be primarily because of the lack of functional relationships between the taxa studied. Trematode parasites are highly promising bioindicators. Diverse assemblages of larval trematode parasites are easily sampled in intermediate host snails. Through their life cycles these parasites are functionally coupled with the surrounding free-living diversity of vertebrate and invertebrate animals. It has been shown that larval trematodes in snails correlate positively with bird diversity and abundance. Here, we explore whether trematodes also correlate with standard measures of fishes, and large and small benthos, for 32 sites in three wetlands. We found associations between trematodes and benthic communities that were not consistent across wetlands. The associations were, however, consistently positive for large benthic species richness and density. Some of the contrasting associations between trematode and benthos may be explained by negative associations between large and small benthos. We found no associations with fish communities (probably because of the inadequacy of standard "snapshot" sampling methods for highly mobile fishes). The results support further exploration of trematodes as bioindicators of diversity and abundance of animal communities. ?? 2006 Springer-Verlag.

  11. Phylogeny and host-plant relationships of the Australian Myrtaceae leafmining moth genus Pectinivalva (Lepidoptera, Nepticulidae), with new subgenera and species

    PubMed Central

    Hoare, Robert J.B.; van Nieukerken, Erik J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The phylogeny of the mainly Australian nepticulid genus Pectinivalva Scoble, 1983 is investigated on the basis of morphology, and a division into three monophyletic subgenera is proposed on the basis of these results. These subgenera (Pectinivalva, Casanovula Hoare, subgen. n. and Menurella Hoare, subgen. n. ) are described and diagnosed, the described species of Pectinivalva are assigned to them, and representative new species are described in each: Pectinivalva (Pectinivalva) mystaconota Hoare, sp. n., Pectinivalva (Casanovula) brevipalpa Hoare, sp. n., Pectinivalva (Casanovula) minotaurus Hoare, sp. n., Pectinivalva (Menurella) scotodes Hoare, sp. n., Pectinivalva (Menurella) acmenae Hoare, sp. n., Pectinivalva (Menurella) xenadelpha Van Nieukerken & Hoare, sp. n., Pectinivalva (Menurella) quintiniae Hoare & Van Nieukerken, sp. n., and Pectinivalva (Menurella) tribulatrix Van Nieukerken & Hoare, sp. n. Pectinivalva (Menurella) quintiniae (from Quintinia verdonii, Paracryphiaceae) is the first known member of the genus with a host-plant not belonging to Myrtaceae. Pectinivalva (Menurella) xenadelpha from Mt Gunung Lumut, Kalimantan, Borneo, is the first pectinivalvine reported from outside Australia. Keys to the subgenera of Nepticulidae known from Australia, based on adults, male and female genitalia, and larvae, are presented. Host-plant relationships of Pectinivalva are discussed with relation to the phylogeny, and a list of known host-plants of Pectinivalva, including hosts of undescribed species, is presented. DNA barcodes are provided for most of the new and several unnamed species. PMID:23794827

  12. Trophic Relationships between the Parasitic Plant Species Phelipanche ramosa (L.) and Different Hosts Depending on Host Phenological Stage and Host Growth Rate

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Delphine; Gibot-Leclerc, Stéphanie; Girardin, Annette; Pointurier, Olivia; Reibel, Carole; Strbik, Florence; Fernández-Aparicio, Mónica; Colbach, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Phelipanche ramosa (L.) Pomel (branched broomrape) is a holoparasitic plant that reproduces on crops and also on weeds, which contributes to increase the parasite seed bank in fields. This parasite extracts all its nutrients at the host’s expense so that host–parasite trophic relationships are crucial to determine host and parasite growth. This study quantified the intensity with which P. ramosa draws assimilates from its host and analyzed whether it varied with host species, host phenological stage and host growth rate. A greenhouse experiment was conducted on three host species: the crop species Brassica napus (L.) (oilseed rape) and two weed species, Capsella bursa-pastoris (L.) Medik. and Geranium dissectum (L.). Plants were grown with or without P. ramosa and under three light levels to modulate host growth rate. The proportion of host biomass loss due to parasitism by P. ramosa differed between host species (at host fructification, biomass loss ranged from 34 to 84%). B. napus and C. bursa-pastoris displayed a similar response to P. ramosa, probably because they belong to the same botanical family. The sensitivity to P. ramosa in each host species could be related to the precocity of P. ramosa development on them. Host compartments could be ranked as a function of their sensitivity to parasitism, with the reproductive compartment being the most severely affected, followed by stems and roots. The proportion of biomass allocated to leaves was not reduced by parasitism. The proportion of pathosystem biomass allocated to the parasite depended on host species. It generally increased with host stage progression but was constant across light induced-host growth rate, showing that P. ramosa adapts its growth to host biomass production. The rank order of host species in terms of sink strength differed from that in terms of host sensitivity. Finally, for B. napus, the biomass of individual parasite shoots decreased with increasing their number per host plant

  13. Effect of Organic Matter Decomposition Level on Bacterial Species Diversity and Composition in Relationship to Pythium Damping-Off Severity

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, M. J.; Madden, L. V.; Hoitink, H. A. J.

    1993-01-01

    Rhizosphere bacteria were isolated from root tip segments of cucumber seedlings grown in a suppressive, slightly decomposed light-colored peat mix, a conducive, more decomposed dark-colored peat mix, and a suppressive dark peat mix amended with composted hardwood bark. The bacteria were identified by a gas chromatographic fatty acid methyl ester analysis. The total number of taxa recovered from a single root tip segment ranged from 9 to 18. No single taxon predominated on all root tip segments harvested from any of the mixes. The highest relative population density reached by a given taxon on any root tip segment was 45%. Hill's first and second diversity numbers, the modified Hill's ratio, and Hurlbert's rarefaction method, which were used as measures of species diversity, indicated that the organic matter decomposition level of the potting mixes did not affect bacterial species diversity. Bray-Curtis polar ordination and Dice resemblance functions, however, indicated that the organic matter decomposition level of a mix significantly influenced the composition of bacterial species in the rhizosphere. Pseudomonas spp. and other taxa capable of inducing suppression of pythium damping-off predominated in the suppressive mixes. These organisms were absent from the conducive mix, in which Arthrobacter and Bacillus spp. predominated. Although effective bacterial biocontrol agents were isolated from both the suppressive mixes and the conducive mix, the majority were isolated from the less decomposed suppressive mixes. Finally, the efficacy of strains was significantly greater in the slightly decomposed light peat mix than in the decomposed dark peat mix. Natural disease suppression within these mixes was associated with the organic matter decomposition level and the bacterial species compositions of the mixes. PMID:16349117

  14. Annual growth and environmental relationships of the invasive species Sargassum muticum and Undaria pinnatifida in the lagoon of Venice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfriso, A.; Facca, C.

    2013-09-01

    The growth and autoecology of two alien invasive species: Sargassum muticum and Undaria pinnatifida spreading in the Venice Lagoon were studied monthly, during one year, in two sites of different depth. S. muticum was present year-round and reached its largest size (485 cm) and maximum growth (8.33 cm d-1) at the deepest station. U. pinnatifida was present only from November to May, reaching the highest size (130 cm) in March-April in the shallow station with growth peaks of 2.32 cm d-1. The growth of both species was mainly regulated by water temperature, nutrient concentration, especially nitrogen, and water turbidity. The study highlights the different ecological role already observed for the two species: U. pinnatifida prefers eutrophic areas and is not present along the sea-coastline. Its total standing crop does not exceed 0.2 ktonnes fwt for all the Venice Lagoon. Conversely, S. muticum colonizes areas with a lower eutrophication level, such as the lagoon inlets, reaching a total lagoon standing crop of 4-6 ktonnes fwt.

  15. Genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationship among Tunisian cactus species (Opuntia) as revealed by random amplified microsatellite polymorphism markers.

    PubMed

    Bendhifi Zarroug, M; Baraket, G; Zourgui, L; Souid, S; Salhi Hannachi, A

    2015-01-01

    Opuntia ficus indica is one of the most economically important species in the Cactaceae family. Increased interest in this crop stems from its potential contribution to agricultural diversification, application in the exploitation of marginal lands, and utility as additional income sources for farmers. In Tunisia, O. ficus indica has been affected by drastic genetic erosion resulting from biotic and abiotic stresses. Thus, it is imperative to identify and preserve this germplasm. In this study, we focused on the use of random amplified microsatellite polymorphisms to assess genetic diversity among 25 representatives of Tunisian Opuntia species maintained in the collection of the National Institute of Agronomic Research of Tunisia. Seventy-two DNA markers were screened to discriminate accessions using 16 successful primer combinations. The high percentage of polymorphic band (100%), the resolving power value (5.68), the polymorphic information content (0.94), and the marker index (7.2) demonstrated the efficiency of the primers tested. Therefore, appropriate cluster analysis used in this study illustrated a divergence among the cultivars studied and exhibited continuous variation that occurred independently of geographic origin. O. ficus indica accessions did not cluster separately from the other cactus pear species, indicating that their current taxonomical classifications are not well aligned with their genetic variability or locality of origin. PMID:25730081

  16. Phylogenetic relationships of Albugo species (white blister rusts) based on LSU rDNA sequence and oospore data.

    PubMed

    Voglmayr, Hermann; Riethmüller, Alexandra

    2006-01-01

    Phylogenetic maximum parsimony and Bayesian analyses of 60 collections belonging to 12 species of Albugo (Peronosporales) and two species of Pythium (Pythiales) were performed using nuclear large subunit ribosomal DNA sequences containing the D1 and D2 regions. These data were supplemented with detailed light and scanning electron microscopical analyses of oospore morphology, and the morphological data of insufficiently studied taxa (e.g. A. caryophyllacearum, A. gomphrenae) are revised. Molecular data revealed two main clades: one containing the collections from hosts belonging to the Caryophyllales and Asteraceae, and the other containing the collections from hosts belonging to the Brassicaceae and Convolvulaceae. Separation into these two clades was also corroborated by oospore morphology. Whereas the Albugo collections from Caryophyllales did not form a monophyletic lineage, the collections originating from Brassicaceae, Convolvulaceae and Asteraceae each formed highly supported monophyletic clades. According to DNA sequence data and oospore morphology, the host genus Amaranthus harbors two distinct species, Albugo amaranthi and Albugo bliti. The DNA sequence data further indicate that Albugo candida and Albugo tragopogonis each may consist of several distinct lineages, but additional data need to be collected before further taxonomic conclusions can be made. PMID:16376066

  17. Functional relationships between leaf hydraulics and leaf economic traits in response to nutrient addition in subtropical tree species.

    PubMed

    Villagra, Mariana; Campanello, Paula I; Bucci, Sandra J; Goldstein, Guillermo

    2013-12-01

    Leaves can be both a hydraulic bottleneck and a safety valve against hydraulic catastrophic dysfunctions, and thus changes in traits related to water movement in leaves and associated costs may be critical for the success of plant growth. A 4-year fertilization experiment with nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) addition was done in a semideciduous Atlantic forest in northeastern Argentina. Saplings of five dominant canopy species were grown in similar gaps inside the forests (five control and five N + P addition plots). Leaf lifespan (LL), leaf mass per unit area (LMA), leaf and stem vulnerability to cavitation, leaf hydraulic conductance (K(leaf_area) and K(leaf_mass)) and leaf turgor loss point (TLP) were measured in the five species and in both treatments. Leaf lifespan tended to decrease with the addition of fertilizers, and LMA was significantly higher in plants with nutrient addition compared with individuals in control plots. The vulnerability to cavitation of leaves (P50(leaf)) either increased or decreased with the nutrient treatment depending on the species, but the average P50(leaf) did not change with nutrient addition. The P50(leaf) decreased linearly with increasing LMA and LL across species and treatments. These trade-offs have an important functional significance because more expensive (higher LMA) and less vulnerable leaves (lower P50(leaf)) are retained for a longer period of time. Osmotic potentials at TLP and at full turgor became more negative with decreasing P50(leaf) regardless of nutrient treatment. The K(leaf) on a mass basis was negatively correlated with LMA and LL, indicating that there is a carbon cost associated with increased water transport that is compensated by a longer LL. The vulnerability to cavitation of stems and leaves were similar, particularly in fertilized plants. Leaves in the species studied may not function as safety valves at low water potentials to protect the hydraulic pathway from water stress-induced cavitation

  18. Allometric relationships between seed mass and seedling characteristics reveal trade-offs for neotropical gap-dependent species.

    PubMed

    Daws, Matthew I; Ballard, Christopher; Mullins, Christopher E; Garwood, Nancy C; Murray, Brian; Pearson, Timothy R H; Burslem, David F R P

    2007-12-01

    A seed size-seed number trade-off exists because smaller seeds are produced in greater number but have a lower probability of establishment. This reduced establishment success of smaller-seeded species may be determined by biophysical constraints imposed by scaling rules. Root and shoot diameter, root growth extension rate (RGER) and shoot length at death for dark-grown seedlings are predicted to scale with the cube root of seed embryo and endosperm mass (m). We confirmed this expectation for ten neotropical gap-dependent tree species with an embryo and endosperm dry mass>1 mg. However, for nine smaller seeded species (m<1 mg) with photoblastic germination, root and shoot diameters were larger than expected, and consequently, RGER was slower than expected. The maximum shoot thrust of seedlings from seeds with masses>or=1 mg was comparable to the estimated force required to displace overlying litter, supporting the hypothesis that photoblastic behaviour only occurs in seeds with insufficient shoot thrust to displace overlying leaves. Using the model soil water, energy and transpiration to predict soil drying in small and large gaps, we showed that: (1) gaps that receive a significant amount of direct sunlight will dry more quickly than small gaps that do not, (2) compared to the wet-season, soil that is already dry at depth (i.e. the dry-season) will dry faster after rainfall (this drying would most likely kill seedlings from small seeds) and (3) even during the wet-season, dry periods of a few days in large gaps can kill shallow-rooted seedlings. We conclude that the smaller the seed, the more vulnerable its seedling would be to both covering by litter and soil drying because it can only emerge from shallow depths and has a slow RGER. Consequently, we suggest that these allometrically related factors contribute to the reduced establishment success of smaller-seeded species that underpins the seed size-seed number trade-off. PMID:17846798

  19. Milk from different species: Relationship between protein fractions and inflammatory response in infants affected by generalized epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Albenzio, M; Santillo, A; Ciliberti, M G; Figliola, L; Caroprese, M; Marino, R; Polito, A N

    2016-07-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of protein fractions from bovine, caprine, and ovine milk on production of cytokines and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) by cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMBC) from infants with generalized epilepsy. Bovine, caprine, and ovine bulk milks were pasteurized and analyzed for chemical composition. Then, PBMC were isolated from 10 patients with generalized epilepsy (5 males; mean age 33.6±5.4mo). Production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-10, IL-6, and IL-1β was studied in cultured PBMC (from infants with epilepsy and controls) stimulated by bovine, caprine, and ovine milk and casein and whey protein fractions, and levels of ROS and RNS were measured in the culture supernatant. The ability of PBMC to secrete cytokines in response to milk and protein fraction stimulation may predict the secretion of soluble factor TNF-α in the bloodstream of challenged patients. Bovine, caprine, and ovine bulk milks induced low-level production of IL-10 by cultured PBMC in at least 50% of cases; the same behavior was observed in both casein and whey protein fractions for all species studied. Bovine and ovine milk and their casein fractions induced production of lower levels of IL-1β in 80% of patients, whereas caprine milk and its casein fraction induced the highest levels in 80% of patients. The amount of IL-6 detected after stimulation of PBMC by milk and its fractions for all species was lower than that of other proinflammatory cytokines. In the bovine, total free radicals were higher in bulk milk and lower in the casein fraction, whereas the whey protein fraction showed an intermediate level; in caprine, ROS/RNS levels were not different among milk fractions, whereas ovine had higher levels for bulk milk and casein than the whey protein fraction. Lower levels of ROS/RNS detected in PBMC cultured with caprine milk fraction could be responsible for the lower levels of

  20. Genetic Relationship among Worldwide Strains of Xanthomonas Causing Canker in Citrus Species and Design of New Primers for Their Identification by PCR†

    PubMed Central

    Cubero, J.; Graham, J. H.

    2002-01-01

    Partial sequence analysis of the ribosomal operon in Xanthomonas axonopodis allowed discrimination among strains causing the A, B, and C types of citrus bacterial canker (CBC) and quantification of the relationship of these organisms with other species and pathovars in the same genus. Sets of primers based on sequence differences in the internally transcribed spacer and on a sequence from the plasmid gene pthA involved in virulence were designed for specific identification of xanthomonads causing CBC diseases. The two sets were validated with a collection of Xanthomonas strains associated with citrus species. The primer set based on ribosomal sequences had a high level of specificity for X. axonopodis pv. citri, whereas the set based on the pthA gene was universal for all types of CBC organisms. Moreover, the relationships among worldwide Xanthomonas strains causing CBC were analyzed by amplification of repetitive sequences (enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus and BOX elements). Under specific conditions, pathotypes of these Xanthomonas strains could be discerned, and subgroups of the pathotypes were identified. Subgroups of strains were associated with certain geographic areas of the world, and on this basis the origin of type A strains introduced into Florida could be inferred. PMID:11872476

  1. Seed reserve composition in 19 tree species of a tropical deciduous forest in Mexico and its relationship to seed germination and seedling growth

    PubMed Central

    Soriano, Diana; Orozco-Segovia, Alma; Márquez-Guzmán, Judith; Kitajima, Kaoru; Gamboa-de Buen, Alicia; Huante, Pilar

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The size and composition of seed reserves may reflect the ecological strategy and evolutionary history of a species and also temporal variation in resource availability. The seed mass and composition of seed reserves of 19 co-existing tree species were studied, and we examined how they varied among species in relation to germination and seedling growth rates, as well as between two years with contrasting precipitation (652 and 384 mm). Methods Seeds were collected from a tropical deciduous forest in the northwest of Mexico (Chamela Biological Station). The seed dry mass, with and without the seed coat, and the concentrations of lipids, nitrogen and non-structural carbohydrates for the seed minus seed coat were determined. The anatomical localization of these reserves was examined using histochemical analysis. The germination capacity, rate and lag time were determined. The correlations among these variables, and their relationship to previously reported seedling relative growth rates, were evaluated with and without phylogenetic consideration. Key Results There were interannual differences in seed mass and reserve composition. Seed was significantly heavier after the drier year in five species. Nitrogen concentration was positively correlated with seed coat fraction, and was significantly higher after the drier year in 12 species. The rate and lag time of germination were negatively correlated with each other. These trait correlations were also supported for phylogenetic independent contrasts. Principal component analysis supported these correlations, and indicated a negative association of seedling relative growth rate with seed size, and a positive association of germination rate with nitrogen and lipid concentrations. Conclusions Nitrogen concentration tended to be higher after the drier year and, while interannual variations in seed size and reserve composition were not sufficient to affect interspecific correlations among seed and seedling

  2. Variation of Basal EROD Activities in Ten Passerine Bird SpeciesRelationships with Diet and Migration Status

    PubMed Central

    Rainio, Miia J.; Kanerva, Mirella; Wahlberg, Niklas; Nikinmaa, Mikko; Eeva, Tapio

    2012-01-01

    Inter-specific differences in animal defence mechanisms against toxic substances are currently poorly understood. The ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) enzyme plays an important role in defence against toxic chemicals in a wide variety of animals, and it is an important biomarker for environmental contamination. We compared basal hepatic EROD activity levels among ten passerine species to see if there is inter-specific variation in enzyme activity, especially in relation to their diet and migration status. Migratory insectivores showed higher EROD activity compared to granivores. We hypothesize that the variable invertebrate diet of migratory insectivores contains a wider range of natural toxins than the narrower diet of granivores. This may have affected the evolution of mixed function oxidases (MFO) system and enzyme activities. We further tested whether metabolic rates or relative liver size were associated with the variation in detoxification capacity. We found no association between EROD activity and relative (per mass unit) basal metabolic rate (BMR). Instead, EROD activity and relative liver mass (% of body mass) correlated positively, suggesting that a proportionally large liver also functions efficiently. Our results suggest that granivores and non-migratory birds may be more vulnerable to environmental contaminants than insectivores and migratory birds. The diet and migration status, however, are phylogenetically strongly connected to each other, and their roles cannot be fully separated in our analysis with only ten passerine species. PMID:22479477

  3. Interspecies difference in placement of developing teeth and its relationship with cross-sectional geometry of the mandibular symphysis in four primate species including modern humans.

    PubMed

    Fukase, Hitoshi

    2012-02-01

    The form of the anthropoid mandibular symphysis has recently been addressed in association with spatial requirements for the forming anterior teeth. To evaluate potential relationships between the symphyseal shape and teeth further, the growth patterns of the symphyseal region and the positioning of the tooth crypts were examined using CT data, comparing four primate species (modern humans, chimpanzees, Japanese monkeys, and hamadryas baboons) with varied symphyseal curvature and tooth size. First, results showed that interspecies differences in overall mandibular shape including symphyseal inclination and bicanine width are consistently expressed throughout postnatal ontogeny, although local symphyseal configurations related to the superior transverse torus (STT) tended to change considerably during growth in chimpanzees. Second, the four species were found to exhibit differentiated formation positions of the incisor and canine crypts. In particular, I2 developed between I1 and C in humans with a broad bicanine space and small teeth, whereas it was positioned posterior to I1 and above C in the cercopithecines with an extremely narrow bicanine space. In chimpanzees, despite the large bicanine width, I1 and I2 grew with a large antero-posterior overlap owing to their large size. These results indicate that the dental positioning is determined in concert with the size balance of the available mandibular space and forming teeth. Finally, the positions/contours of I2 crypt were shown to correspond strongly with the STT across the taxa. This suggests that interspecies differences in symphyseal shape should be interpreted partially by the species-specific positional relationships of the developing anterior teeth. PMID:22120684

  4. Late Miocene diversification and phylogenetic relationships of the huge toads in the Rhinella marina (Linnaeus, 1758) species group (Anura: Bufonidae).

    PubMed

    Maciel, Natan Medeiros; Collevatti, Rosane Garcia; Colli, Guarino Rinaldi; Schwartz, Elisabeth Ferroni

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the phylogeny and biogeography of the Rhinella marina group, using molecular, morphological, and skin-secretion data, contributing to an understanding of Neotropical faunal diversification. The maximum-parsimony and Bayesian analyzes of the combined data recovered a monophyletic R. marina group. Molecular dating based on Bayesian inferences and fossil calibration placed the earliest phylogenetic split within the R. marina group at ∼ 10.47 MYA, in the late Miocene. Two rapid major diversifications occurred from Central Brazil, first northward (∼ 8.08 MYA) in late Miocene and later southward (∼ 5.17 MYA) in early Pliocene. These results suggest that barriers and dispersal routes created by the uplift of Brazilian Central Shield and climatic changes explain the diversification and current species distributions of the R. marina group. Dispersal-vicariance analyzes (DIVA) indicated that the two major diversifications of the R. marina group were due to vicariance, although eleven dispersals subsequently occurred. PMID:20813190

  5. Chemical exposure-response relationship between air pollutants and reactive oxygen species in the human respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Lakey, Pascale S J; Berkemeier, Thomas; Tong, Haijie; Arangio, Andrea M; Lucas, Kurt; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution can cause oxidative stress and adverse health effects such as asthma and other respiratory diseases, but the underlying chemical processes are not well characterized. Here we present chemical exposure-response relations between ambient concentrations of air pollutants and the production rates and concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of the human respiratory tract. In highly polluted environments, fine particulate matter (PM2.5) containing redox-active transition metals, quinones, and secondary organic aerosols can increase ROS concentrations in the ELF to levels characteristic for respiratory diseases. Ambient ozone readily saturates the ELF and can enhance oxidative stress by depleting antioxidants and surfactants. Chemical exposure-response relations provide a quantitative basis for assessing the relative importance of specific air pollutants in different regions of the world, showing that aerosol-induced epithelial ROS levels in polluted megacity air can be several orders of magnitude higher than in pristine rainforest air. PMID:27605301

  6. Chemical exposure-response relationship between air pollutants and reactive oxygen species in the human respiratory tract

    PubMed Central

    Lakey, Pascale S. J.; Berkemeier, Thomas; Tong, Haijie; Arangio, Andrea M.; Lucas, Kurt; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution can cause oxidative stress and adverse health effects such as asthma and other respiratory diseases, but the underlying chemical processes are not well characterized. Here we present chemical exposure-response relations between ambient concentrations of air pollutants and the production rates and concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of the human respiratory tract. In highly polluted environments, fine particulate matter (PM2.5) containing redox-active transition metals, quinones, and secondary organic aerosols can increase ROS concentrations in the ELF to levels characteristic for respiratory diseases. Ambient ozone readily saturates the ELF and can enhance oxidative stress by depleting antioxidants and surfactants. Chemical exposure-response relations provide a quantitative basis for assessing the relative importance of specific air pollutants in different regions of the world, showing that aerosol-induced epithelial ROS levels in polluted megacity air can be several orders of magnitude higher than in pristine rainforest air. PMID:27605301

  7. Carotenoid intake does not mediate a relationship between reactive oxygen species and bright colouration: experimental test in a lizard.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Mats; Wilson, Mark; Isaksson, Caroline; Uller, Tobias; Mott, Beth

    2008-04-01

    We performed experiments on male Australian painted dragon lizards (Ctenophorus pictus) to test the hypothesis that carotenoids can scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS), protecting the organism from oxidative stress, and that this capacity is reflected in skin colours involved in signalling. Subsequent to 4 weeks of carotenoid treatment we used flow cytometry to analyse unspecified ROS (H(2)O(2), singlet oxygen, superoxide and peroxynitrite level), hereafter termed ROS, and baseline superoxide specifically (bSO in peripheral blood cells). Mean background levels of ROS and bSO did not differ between carotenoid-treated and control males. bSO, which represents the superoxide level in un-manipulated blood, was negatively correlated with colour development in all males, regardless of carotenoid treatment. Thus, carotenoid intake does not reduce circulating levels of ROS or bSO, suggesting that carotenoids are inefficient antioxidants in vivo and, therefore, are unlikely to provide a direct link between oxidative stress and colouration. PMID:18375850

  8. Biosynthesis, Chemical Structure, and Structure-Activity Relationship of Orfamide Lipopeptides Produced by Pseudomonas protegens and Related Species.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zongwang; Geudens, Niels; Kieu, Nam P; Sinnaeve, Davy; Ongena, Marc; Martins, José C; Höfte, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Orfamide-type cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) are biosurfactants produced by Pseudomonas and involved in lysis of oomycete zoospores, biocontrol of Rhizoctonia and insecticidal activity against aphids. In this study, we compared the biosynthesis, structural diversity, in vitro and in planta activities of orfamides produced by rhizosphere-derived Pseudomonas protegens and related Pseudomonas species. Genetic characterization together with chemical identification revealed that the main orfamide compound produced by the P. protegens group is orfamide A, while the related strains Pseudomonas sp. CMR5c and CMR12a produce orfamide B. Comparison of orfamide fingerprints led to the discovery of two new orfamide homologs (orfamide F and orfamide G) in Pseudomonas sp. CMR5c. The structures of these two CLPs were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. Mutagenesis and complementation showed that orfamides determine the swarming motility of parental Pseudomonas sp. strain CMR5c and their production was regulated by luxR type regulators. Orfamide A and orfamide B differ only in the identity of a single amino acid, while orfamide B and orfamide G share the same amino acid sequence but differ in length of the fatty acid part. The biological activities of orfamide A, orfamide B, and orfamide G were compared in further bioassays. The three compounds were equally active against Magnaporthe oryzae on rice, against Rhizoctonia solani AG 4-HGI in in vitro assays, and caused zoospore lysis of Phytophthora and Pythium. Furthermore, we could show that orfamides decrease blast severity in rice plants by blocking appressorium formation in M. oryzae. Taken all together, our study shows that orfamides produced by P. protegens and related species have potential in biological control of a broad spectrum of fungal plant pathogens. PMID:27065956

  9. The relationship between leg stepping pattern and yaw torque oscillations in curve walking of two crayfish species

    PubMed

    Domenici; Schmitz; Jamon

    1999-11-01

    Curve walking in two species of crayfish, Procambarus clarkii and Astacus leptodactylus, was investigated to test whether the mechanism underlying curve walking is the synchronous action of a centrally pre-programmed leg tripod or whether it is the action of one principal leg that produces the main body yaw torque. Curve walking was induced by an optomotor visual stimulus, and the yaw torque produced by the tethered animals was measured in open-loop conditions. Our main results suggest that the yaw torque oscillations in both P. clarkii and A. leptodactylus are related to the movement of outer leg 4 (i.e. leg 4 on the outside of the turn). That is, the peaks in the yaw torque occur, on average, in synchrony with the power stroke of outer leg 4. When comparing the results of this open-loop experiment on P. clarkii with results previously obtained for curve walking in untethered individuals of the same species, we found a much higher variability in leg coordination in the open-loop situation. Similarly, here we did not find the same level of synchrony in the tripod (formed by outer leg 4 and inner legs 2 and 5) observed during untethered free walking. Therefore, we suggest that tethered conditions may diminish the need for stability and thus allow outer leg 4 to produce a body rotation regardless of the leg stepping configuration. The characteristics of leg 4 are in line with its major role in turning. According to previous studies, legs 4 provide the largest force and the largest step amplitude during walking, and their force includes both a pulling and a pushing component which can facilitate the control of turning. Although it is apparent that outer leg 4 is not the only leg that can produce an inward yaw torque, its major role in modulating the yaw torque suggests that there may be a specific, centrally generated control of outer leg 4 during curve walking in crayfish. PMID:10539955

  10. Biosynthesis, Chemical Structure, and Structure-Activity Relationship of Orfamide Lipopeptides Produced by Pseudomonas protegens and Related Species

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zongwang; Geudens, Niels; Kieu, Nam P.; Sinnaeve, Davy; Ongena, Marc; Martins, José C.; Höfte, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Orfamide-type cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) are biosurfactants produced by Pseudomonas and involved in lysis of oomycete zoospores, biocontrol of Rhizoctonia and insecticidal activity against aphids. In this study, we compared the biosynthesis, structural diversity, in vitro and in planta activities of orfamides produced by rhizosphere-derived Pseudomonas protegens and related Pseudomonas