Science.gov

Sample records for specific dna hybridization

  1. Sensitivity, Specificity, and the Hybridization Isotherms of DNA Chips

    PubMed Central

    Halperin, A.; Buhot, A.; Zhulina, E.B.

    2004-01-01

    Competitive hybridization, at the surface and in the bulk, lowers the sensitivity of DNA chips. Competitive surface hybridization occurs when different targets can hybridize with the same probe. Competitive bulk hybridization takes place when the targets can hybridize with free complementary chains in the solution. The effects of competitive hybridization on the thermodynamically attainable performance of DNA chips are quantified in terms of the hybridization isotherms of the spots. These relate the equilibrium degree of the hybridization to the bulk composition. The hybridization isotherm emerges as a Langmuir isotherm modified for electrostatic interactions within the probe layer. The sensitivity of the assay in equilibrium is directly related to the slope of the isotherm. A simpler description is possible, in terms of c50 values specifying the bulk composition corresponding to 50% hybridization at the surface. The effects of competitive hybridization are important for the quantitative analysis of DNA chip results, especially when used to study point mutations. PMID:14747310

  2. Rapid identification of Leishmania species by specific hybridization of kinetoplast DNA in cutaneous lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, D F; Pratt, D M

    1982-01-01

    Kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) was isolated from various species of the protozoic parasite Leishmania and analyzed by nucleic acid hybridization to detect species-related heterogeneity of kDNA. Purified DNA isolated from L. mexicana and L. braziliensis displayed no homology in nucleic acid hybridization studies. These results confirmed that rapid kDNA sequence change and evolution is occurring in New World species of Leishmania and suggested that such isolated kDNA could be used as a specific hybridization probe for the rapid identification of Leishmania species by using whole organisms. This work further demonstrates that such species-specific identification is feasible on isolated Leishmania promastigotes and, more important, directly on tissue touch blots derived from the cutaneous lesion. Thus, specific hybridization of isolated kDNA provides the basis for a rapid, accurate method for the diagnosis of human leishmaniasis directly from infected tissue. Images PMID:6960359

  3. Rapid identification of Leishmania species by specific hybridization of kinetoplast DNA in cutaneous lesions.

    PubMed

    Wirth, D F; Pratt, D M

    1982-11-01

    Kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) was isolated from various species of the protozoic parasite Leishmania and analyzed by nucleic acid hybridization to detect species-related heterogeneity of kDNA. Purified DNA isolated from L. mexicana and L. braziliensis displayed no homology in nucleic acid hybridization studies. These results confirmed that rapid kDNA sequence change and evolution is occurring in New World species of Leishmania and suggested that such isolated kDNA could be used as a specific hybridization probe for the rapid identification of Leishmania species by using whole organisms. This work further demonstrates that such species-specific identification is feasible on isolated Leishmania promastigotes and, more important, directly on tissue touch blots derived from the cutaneous lesion. Thus, specific hybridization of isolated kDNA provides the basis for a rapid, accurate method for the diagnosis of human leishmaniasis directly from infected tissue. PMID:6960359

  4. A Novel SERRS Sandwich-Hybridization Assay to Detect Specific DNA Target

    PubMed Central

    Gillet, Benjamin; Montagnac, Gilles; Daniel, Isabelle; Hänni, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we have applied Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering (SERRS) technology to the specific detection of DNA. We present an innovative SERRS sandwich-hybridization assay that allows specific DNA detection without any enzymatic amplification, such as is the case with Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). In some substrates, such as ancient or processed remains, enzymatic amplification fails due to DNA alteration (degradation, chemical modification) or to the presence of inhibitors. Consequently, the development of a non-enzymatic method, allowing specific DNA detection, could avoid long, expensive and inconclusive amplification trials. Here, we report the proof of concept of a SERRS sandwich-hybridization assay that leads to the detection of a specific chamois DNA. This SERRS assay reveals its potential as a non-enzymatic alternative technology to DNA amplification methods (particularly the PCR method) with several applications for species detection. As the amount and type of damage highly depend on the preservation conditions, the present SERRS assay would enlarge the range of samples suitable for DNA analysis and ultimately would provide exciting new opportunities for the investigation of ancient DNA in the fields of evolutionary biology and molecular ecology, and of altered DNA in food frauds detection and forensics. PMID:21655320

  5. Analysis of common mitochondrial DNA mutations by allele-specific oligonucleotide and Southern blot hybridization.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sha; Halberg, Michelle C; Floyd, Kristen C; Wang, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are clinically and genetically heterogeneous. There are a set of recurrent point mutations in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) that are responsible for common mitochondrial diseases, including MELAS (mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, stroke-like episodes), MERRF (myoclonic epilepsy and ragged red fibers), LHON (Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy), NARP (neuropathy, ataxia, retinitis pigmentosa), and Leigh syndrome. Most of the pathogenic mtDNA point mutations are present in the heteroplasmic state, meaning that the wild-type and mutant-containing mtDNA molecules are coexisting. Clinical heterogeneity may be due to the degree of mutant load (heteroplasmy) and distribution of heteroplasmic mutations in affected tissues. Additionally, Kearns-Sayre syndrome and Pearson syndrome are caused by large mtDNA deletions. In this chapter, we describe a multiplex PCR/allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) hybridization method for the screening of 13 common point mutations. This method allows the detection of low percentage of mutant heteroplasmy. In addition, a nonradioactive Southern blot hybridization protocol for the analysis of mtDNA large deletions is also described. PMID:22215554

  6. Competitive Metagenomic DNA Hybridization Identifies Host-Specific Microbial Genetic Markers in Cow Fecal Samples†

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, Orin C.; Santo Domingo, Jorge W.; Lamendella, Regina; Kelty, Catherine A.; Graham, James E.

    2006-01-01

    Several PCR methods have recently been developed to identify fecal contamination in surface waters. In all cases, researchers have relied on one gene or one microorganism for selection of host-specific markers. Here we describe the application of a genome fragment enrichment (GFE) method to identify host-specific genetic markers from fecal microbial community DNA. As a proof of concept, bovine fecal DNA was challenged against a porcine fecal DNA background to select for bovine-specific DNA sequences. Bioinformatic analyses of 380 bovine enriched metagenomic sequences indicated a preponderance of Bacteroidales-like regions predicted to encode membrane-associated and secreted proteins. Oligonucleotide primers capable of annealing to select Bacteroidales-like bovine GFE sequences exhibited extremely high specificity (>99%) in PCR assays with total fecal DNAs from 279 different animal sources. These primers also demonstrated a broad distribution of corresponding genetic markers (81% positive) among 148 different bovine sources. These data demonstrate that direct metagenomic DNA analysis by the competitive solution hybridization approach described is an efficient method for identifying potentially useful fecal genetic markers and for characterizing differences between environmental microbial communities. PMID:16751515

  7. Construction of Hypericin Gland-Specific cDNA Library via Suppression Subtractive Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rupesh Kumar; Hou, Weina; Franklin, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Hypericin, an important determinant of the pharmacological properties of the genus Hypericum, is considered as a major molecule for drug development. However, biosynthesis and accumulation of hypericin is not well understood. Identification of genes differentially expressed in tissues with and without hypericin accumulation is a useful strategy to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the development of the dark glands and hypericin biosynthesis. Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) is a unique method for PCR-based amplification of specific cDNA fragments that differ between a control (driver) and experimental (tester) transcriptome. This technique relies on the removal of dsDNA formed by hybridization between a control and test sample, thus eliminating cDNAs of similar abundance, and retaining differentially expressed or variable in sequence cDNAs. In our laboratory we applied this method to identify the genes involved in the development of dark glands and accumulation of hypericin in Hypericum perforatum. Here we describe the complete procedure for the construction of hypericin gland-specific subtracted cDNA library. PMID:27108327

  8. Quantitative genotyping of single-nucleotide polymorphisms by allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization on DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Rickert, Andreas M; Ballvora, Agim; Matzner, Ulrich; Klemm, Manfred; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2005-08-01

    Genotyping of SNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) has challenged the development of several novel techniques. Most of these methods have been introduced to discriminate binary SNPs in diploid species. In the present study, the quantitative genotyping of SNPs in natural DNA pools of a polyploid organism via DNA microarrays was analysed. Three randomly selected SNP loci were genotyped in the tetraploid species potato (Solanum tuberosum). For each SNP, 24 oligomers were designed, 12 with forward and 12 with reverse orientation. They contained the polymorphic site at one of the positions 11, 14 and 17. Several steps of optimizations were performed, including the 'materials' used and the establishment of hybridization conditions. Glass surfaces were either epoxy- or aldehyde-modified, and allele-specific oligonucleotides contained either SH or NH2 groups. Hybridization stringency conditions were established by varying the concentration of formamide in the hybridization buffer. For SNP BA213c14t7/403, the quantitative discrimination between all four different naturally occurring genotypes could be demonstrated. PMID:15847606

  9. A Xenopus zinc finger protein that specifically binds dsRNA and RNA-DNA hybrids.

    PubMed

    Finerty, P J; Bass, B L

    1997-08-15

    Proteins containing C2H2 type zinc finger motifs represent one of the largest classes of nucleic acid-binding proteins found in nature. We describe a novel zinc finger protein, dsRBP-ZFa, isolated by screening an expression library with dsRNA. The dsRBP-ZFa cDNA encodes a protein containing seven zinc finger motifs and an acidic C-terminal domain. Mobility shift experiments demonstrate that dsRBP-ZFa binds dsRNA and RNA-DNA hybrids with nanomolar dissociation constants and in a sequence independent manner. We also show that DNA and single stranded RNA fail to compete with dsRNA for binding suggesting dsRBP-ZFa prefers to bind an A-form helix. Using western analyses we have localized dsRBP-ZFa primarily to the nucleus of Xenopus laevis oocytes. The identification of dsRBP-ZFa provides the first example of a zinc finger protein that is specific for dsRNA. In addition, dsRBP-ZFa does not contain the previously described dsRNA binding motif, suggesting certain zinc fingers may provide an alternative way to recognize the A-form helix. PMID:9268652

  10. Chromosome-Specific DNA Repeats: Rapid Identification in Silico and Validation Using Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Joanne H.; Zeng, Hui; Lemke, Kalistyn H.; Polyzos, Aris A.; Weier, Jingly F.; Wang, Mei; Lawin-O’Brien, Anna R.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; O’Brien, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome enumeration in interphase and metaphase cells using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an established procedure for the rapid and accurate cytogenetic analysis of cell nuclei and polar bodies, the unambiguous gender determination, as well as the definition of tumor-specific signatures. Present bottlenecks in the procedure are a limited number of commercial, non-isotopically labeled probes that can be combined in multiplex FISH assays and the relatively high price and effort to develop additional probes. We describe a streamlined approach for rapid probe definition, synthesis and validation, which is based on the analysis of publicly available DNA sequence information, also known as “database mining”. Examples of probe preparation for the human gonosomes and chromosome 16 as a selected autosome outline the probe selection strategy, define a timeline for expedited probe production and compare this novel selection strategy to more conventional probe cloning protocols. PMID:23344021

  11. Species-Specific Detection of Vibrio anguillarum in Marine Aquaculture Environments by Selective Culture and DNA Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Picado, J.; Alsina, M.; Blanch, A. R.; Cerda, M.; Jofre, J.

    1996-01-01

    Methods for specific detection of Vibrio anguillarum in complex microbial communities within diverse marine aquaculture environments were evaluated. A system for the detection of culturable cells based on the combined use of a selective medium and a nonradioactively labeled oligodeoxynucleotide complementary to 16S rRNA was developed. Four hundred fourteen bacterial cultures were evaluated in order to assess the specificity of the method. When both the selective medium and the specific probe gave positive results, the cultures were always identified as V. anguillarum. The selectivity for colony hybridization was 1 V. anguillarum cell in 10,000 total bacterial cells in environmental samples. The utility of the method was also compared with detection by dot blot hybridization of either raw DNA purified from environmental samples or PCR-amplified DNA of 16S rRNA genes, using universal eubacterial primers. The post-PCR hybridization was more sensitive (8 x 10(sup2) cells) than direct hybridization of the whole purified DNA (10(sup6) cells). However, the selective medium-probe combined method was as sensitive as post-PCR hybridization, albeit more specific. PMID:16535233

  12. Chromosome specific DNA hybridization in suspension for flow cytometric detection of chimerism in bone marrow transplantation and leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Arkesteijn, G.J.A.; Erpelinck, S.L.A.; Martens, A.C.M.; Hagenbeek, A.

    1995-04-01

    Flow cytometry was used to measure the fluorescence intensity of nuclei that were subjected to fluorescent in situ hybridization in suspension with chromosome specific DNA probes. Paraformaldehyde-fixed nuclei were protein digested with trypsin and hybridized simultaneously with a biotin- and DIG labeled probe specific for chromosome 8 and the biotin labeled Y chromosome probe. Y chromosome positive or negative nuclei were sorted onto microscope slides and subsequently classified as being leukemic or not by fluorescence microscopy, on the basis of the presence of a trisomy for chromosome 8. A 120-fold enrichment could be achieved when 300 Y positive nuclei were sorted from a mixture originally containing 0.5% leukemia cells. Given the specificity of the flow cytometry and FISH procedure, the combination of the two methods can reach a lower detection level of 1 per 250,000. 23 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Development of species-specific hybridization probes for marine luminous bacteria by using in vitro DNA amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Wimpee, C.F.; Nadeau, T.L.; Nealson, K.H. )

    1991-05-01

    By using two highly conserved regions of the luxA gene as primers, polymerase chain reaction amplification methods were used to prepare species-specific probes against the luciferase gene from four major groups of marine luminous bacteria. Laboratory studies with test strains indicated that three of the four probes cross-reacted with themselves and with one or more of the other species at low stringencies but were specific for members of their own species at high stringencies. The fourth probe, generated from Vibrio harveyi DNA, a cross-reacted with DNAs from two closely related species, V. orientalis and V. vulnificus. When nonluminous cultures were tested with the species-specific probes, no false-positive results were observed, even at low stringencies. Two field isolates were correctly identified as Photobacterium phosphoreum by using the species-specific hybridization probes at high stringency. A mixed probe (four different hybridization probes) used at low stringency gave positive results with all of the luminous bacteria tested, including the terrestrial species Xenorhabdus luminescens, and the taxonomically distinct marine bacterial species Shewanella hanedai; minimal cross-hybridization with these species was seen at higher stringencies.

  14. Detection of Neospora from tissues of experimentally infected rhesus macaques by PCR and specific DNA probe hybridization.

    PubMed

    Ho, M S; Barr, B C; Tarantal, A F; Lai, L T; Hendrickx, A G; Marsh, A E; Sverlow, K W; Packham, A E; Conrad, P A

    1997-07-01

    Neospora is a newly recognized Toxoplasma-like cyst-forming coccidian parasite that causes abortion or congenital infections in naturally or experimentally infected animals. In this study, pregnant rhesus macaques were inoculated with culture-derived tachyzoites of a bovine Neospora isolate, and tissue samples from various major organs were collected from dams and fetuses for the detection of parasite DNA by using oligonucleotide primers COC-1 and COC-2 for PCR amplification of a conserved coccidial nuclear small-subunit rRNA gene sequence, and amplification products were confirmed by hybridization with a Neospora-specific DNA probe. PCR products were amplified from DNAs of different fetal monkey tissues, including brain, heart, lung, liver, spleen, skeletal muscle, skin, and placenta. In addition, Neospora DNA was amplified from the brain, heart, and lung tissues of infected rhesus macaque dams. The PCR and probe hybridization system may provide an effective method for the detection of Neospora infection in fetuses and dams from nonhuman primates and may be useful in determining the zoonotic potential of Neospora. PMID:9196184

  15. Chromosome painting in plants: in situ hybridization with a DNA probe from a specific microdissected chromosome arm of common wheat.

    PubMed Central

    Vega, M; Abbo, S; Feldman, M; Levy, A A

    1994-01-01

    We report here on the successful painting of a specific plant chromosome within its own genome. Isochromosomes for the long arm of chromosome 5 of the wheat B genome (5BL) were microdissected from first meiotic metaphase spreads of a monoisosomic 5BL line of the common wheat Triticum aestivum cv. Chinese Spring. The dissected isochromosomes were amplified by degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR in a single tube reaction. The amplified DNA was used as a complex probe mixture for fluorescent in situ hybridization on first meiotic metaphase spreads of lines carrying 5BL as a distinctive marker. Hybridization signals were observed, specifically, along the entire 5BL. In some of the cells, labeling was also detected in two bivalents, presumably those of the 5B "homoeologues" (partial homologues) found in common wheat (5A and 5D). The probe also revealed discrete domains in tapetal nuclei at interphase, further supporting the probe's high specificity. These data suggest that chromosome and homoeologous group-specific sequences are more abundant in 5BL than genome-specific sequences. Chromosome-painting probes, such as the one described here for 5BL, can facilitate the study of chromosome evolution in polyploid wheat. Images PMID:7991581

  16. Isolation of a Pseudomonas solanacearum-specific DNA probe by subtraction hybridization and construction of species-specific oligonucleotide primers for sensitive detection by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Seal, S E; Jackson, L A; Daniels, M J

    1992-01-01

    A subtraction hybridization technique was employed to make a library enriched for Pseudomonas solanacearum-specific sequences. One cloned fragment, PS2096, hybridized under stringent conditions to DNA of 82 P. solanacearum strains representing all subgroups of the species. Other plant-associated bacteria, including closely related species such as Pseudomonas capacia, Pseudomonas picketti, or Pseudomonas syzygii, did not hybridize to PS2096. A minimum number of between 4 x 10(5) and 4 x 10(6) P. solanacearum cells could routinely be detected with PS2096 labelled either with [32P]dCTP or with digoxigenin-11-dUTP. To improve the sensitivity of detection, PS2096 was sequenced to allow the construction of specific oligonucleotide primers to be used for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. After 50 cycles of amplification, 5 to 116 cells, depending on the strain, could reproducibly be detected by visualization of a 148-bp PCR product on an agarose gel. A preliminary field trial in Burundi with the probe and PCR primers has confirmed that they are sensitive tools for specifically detecting low-level infections of P. solanacearum in potato tubers. Images PMID:1482193

  17. COMPETITIVE METAGENOMIC DNA HYBRIDIZATION IDENTIFIES HOST-SPECIFIC GENETIC MARKERS IN HUMAN FECAL MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although recent technological advances in DNA sequencing and computational biology now allow scientists to compare entire microbial genomes, the use of these approaches to discern key genomic differences between natural microbial communities remains prohibitively expensive for mo...

  18. Development of genome-specific 5S rDNA markers in Brassica and related species for hybrid testing.

    PubMed

    La Mura, Maurizio; Norris, Carol; Sporle, Sue; Jayaweera, Dasuni; Greenland, Andy; Lee, David

    2010-08-01

    The Brassicaceae are targets for DNA manipulation to modify oil content and composition. However, any strategy for creating novel products using genetic modification or traditional breeding must take into account the potential for hybridization with other Brassica species, many of which are important sources of edible oils. In this study we have tested Brassica carinata, a possible target for oil modification, to establish whether it can cross with other Brassica species and related genera, and we have developed molecular DNA assays to confirm hybridization. PMID:20725152

  19. COMPETITIVE METAGENOMIC DNA HYBRIDIZATION IDENTIFIES HOST-SPECIFIC GENETIC MARKERS IN CATTLE FECAL SAMPLES - ABSTRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several PCR methods have recently been developed to identify fecal contamination in surface waters. In all cases, researchers have relied on one gene or one microorganism for selection of host specific markers. Here, we describe the application of a genome fragment enrichment met...

  20. COMPETITIVE METAGENOMIC DNA HYBRIDIZATION IDENTIFIES HOST-SPECIFIC MICROBIAL GENETIC MARKERS IN COW FECAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several PCR methods have recently been developed to identify fecal contamination in surface waters. In all cases, researchers have relied on one gene or one microorganism for selection of host specific markers. Here, we describe the application of a genome fragment enrichment met...

  1. Quantum dot-based isothermal chain elongation for fluorescence detection of specific DNA sequences via template-dependent surface-hybridization.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenqing; Lau, Choiwan; Lu, Jianzhong

    2012-04-01

    A new quantum dot-based method to detect specific sequences of DNA is proposed. The capture and reporter probes do not hybridize to each other, but in the presence of a template they can anneal to each other via the formation of a stable ternary complex. Because of the specific design of the capture and reporter probes, the 5' end of the template target DNA remains free to hybridize with another reporter. In this way, each capture DNA is an initiator strand that triggers a cascade of hybridization events between the target DNA and the reporter probe. This forms a superstructure, enhances base stacking, and produces a strong fluorescent signal. The introduction of T4 DNA ligase further stabilizes the superstructure and greatly increases the fluorescence intensity, and the detection limit is as low as 10 fM. This fluorescence method is advantageous over conventional techniques because of its excellent ability to discriminate single base-pair mismatches and single nucleotide gap or flap. This simple technique is promising for improving medical diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22343986

  2. Chromosome specific repetitive DNA sequences

    DOEpatents

    Moyzis, Robert K.; Meyne, Julianne

    1991-01-01

    A method is provided for determining specific nucleotide sequences useful in forming a probe which can identify specific chromosomes, preferably through in situ hybridization within the cell itself. In one embodiment, chromosome preferential nucleotide sequences are first determined from a library of recombinant DNA clones having families of repetitive sequences. Library clones are identified with a low homology with a sequence of repetitive DNA families to which the first clones respectively belong and variant sequences are then identified by selecting clones having a pattern of hybridization with genomic DNA dissimilar to the hybridization pattern shown by the respective families. In another embodiment, variant sequences are selected from a sequence of a known repetitive DNA family. The selected variant sequence is classified as chromosome specific, chromosome preferential, or chromosome nonspecific. Sequences which are classified as chromosome preferential are further sequenced and regions are identified having a low homology with other regions of the chromosome preferential sequence or with known sequences of other family me This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  3. Detection of virus-specific RNA in simian sarcoma-leukemia virus-infected cells in in situ hybridization to viral complementary DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, S L; Gallo, R C; Miller, N R

    1979-01-01

    An in situ molecular hybridization system which will detect retrovirus RNA in the cytoplasm of individual virus-infected cells has been developed. The technique was applied to cells infected with simian sarcoma-leukemia virus, where the virus-specific RNA was detected by hybridization to simian sarcoma-leukemia virus 3H-labeled complementary DNA. The system is useful for detecting viral RNA-containing cells in the presence of an excess of virus-negative cells and for determining which type of cell in a heterogenous population is expressing viral RNA. Images PMID:224220

  4. Fabrication of DNA/RNA Hybrids Through Sequence-Specific Scission of Both Strands by pcPNA-S1 Nuclease Combination.

    PubMed

    Futai, Kazuki; Sumaoka, Jun; Komiyama, Makoto

    2016-05-01

    By combining two strands of pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acid (pcPNA) with S1 nuclease, a tool for site-selective and dual-strand scission of DNA/RNA hybrids has been developed. Both of the DNA and the RNA strands in the hybrids are hydrolyzed at desired sites to provide unique sticky ends. The scission fragments are directly ligated with other DNA/RNA hybrids by using T4 DNA ligase, resulting in the formation of desired recombinant DNA/RNA hybrids. PMID:27057646

  5. DNA probe specific for Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Grimont, P A; Grimont, F; Desplaces, N; Tchen, P

    1985-01-01

    A procedure for preparing a DNA probe to be used in the specific detection of Legionella pneumophila by dot or colony hybridization has been devised. When total DNA from L. pneumophila was used as a radioactive probe, cross-hybridization occurred with DNA from many other species belonging to various families (including Legionellaceae, Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, and Vibrionaceae). Cross-hybridizing restriction fragments in L. pneumophila ATCC 33152 DNA were identified on Southern blots. When unlabeled DNA from strain ATCC 33152 was cleaved by endonuclease BamHI, the DNA fragments cross-hybridizing with the labeled DNA from all of the other species and genera tested (or with Escherichia coli 16 + 23 S RNA) had a size of 21.4 and 16.2 kilobase pairs (major bands) and 28.0, 12.8, and 10.1 kilobase pairs (minor bands). BamHI restriction fragments of L. pneumophila DNA deprived of the cross-hybridizing fragments were pooled and used as a probe for the detection of L. pneumophila. This probe proved to be specific for L. pneumophila in colony and dot hybridization. It can potentially be used for the detection of L. pneumophila in clinical and water samples. The procedure described can be readily applied to the preparation of probes specific for phylogenetically isolated bacterial species other than L. pneumophila. Images PMID:3980693

  6. Sequencing mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms by hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Chee, M.S.; Lockhart, D.J.; Hubbell, E.

    1994-09-01

    We have investigated the use of DNA chips for genetic analysis, using human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) as a model. The DNA chips are made up of ordered arrays of DNA oligonucleotide probes, synthesized on a glass substrate using photolithographic techniques. The synthesis site for each different probe is specifically addressed by illumination of the substrate through a photolithographic mask, achieving selective deprotection Nucleoside phosphoramidites bearing photolabile protecting groups are coupled only to exposed sites. Repeated cycles of deprotection and coupling generate all the probes in parallel. The set of 4{sup N} N-mer probes can be synthesized in only 4N steps. Any subset can be synthesized in 4N steps. Any subset can be synthesized in 4N or fewer steps. Sequences amplified from the D-loop region of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were fluorescently labelled and hybridized to DNA chips containing probes specific for mtDNA. Each nucleotide of a 1.3 kb region spanning the D loop is represented by four probes on the chip. Each probe has a different base at the position of interest: together they comprise a set of A, C, G and T probes which are otherwise identical. In principle, only one probe-target hybrid will be a perfect match. The other three will be single base mismatches. Fluorescence imaging of the hybridized chip allows quantification of hybridization signals. Heterozygous mixtures of sequences can also be characterized. We have developed software to quantitate and interpret the hybridization signals, and to call the sequence automatically. Results of sequence analysis of human mtDNAs will be presented.

  7. Molecular Mechanisms in Morpholino-DNA Surface Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ping; Wang, Kang; Liu, Yatao; Shepard, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic nucleic acid mimics provide opportunity for redesigning the specificity and affinity of hybridization with natural DNA or RNA. Such redesign is of great interest for diagnostic applications where it can enhance the desired signal against a background of competing interactions. This report compares hybridization of DNA analyte strands with morpholinos (MOs), which are uncharged nucleic acid mimics, to the corresponding DNA-DNA case in solution and on surfaces. In solution, MO-DNA hybridization is found to be independent of counterion concentration, in contrast to DNA-DNA hybridization. On surfaces, when immobilized MO or DNA “probe” strands hybridize with complementary DNA “targets” from solution, both the MO-DNA and DNA-DNA processes depend on ionic strength but exhibit qualitatively different behaviors. At lower ionic strengths, MO-DNA surface hybridization exhibits hallmarks of kinetic limitations when separation between hybridized probe sites becomes comparable to target dimensions, whereas extents of DNA-DNA surface hybridization are instead consistent with limits imposed by buildup of surface (Donnan) potential. The two processes also fundamentally differ at high ionic strength, under conditions when electrostatic effects are weak. Here, variations in probe coverage have a much diminished impact on MO-DNA than on DNA-DNA hybridization for similarly crowded surface conditions. These various observations agree with a structural model of MO monolayers in which MO-DNA duplexes segregate to the buffer interface while unhybridized probes localize near the solid support. A general perspective is presented on using uncharged DNA analogues, which also include compounds such as peptide nucleic acids (PNA), in surface hybridization applications. PMID:20572663

  8. In situ molecular hybridization for detection of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus DNA by using strand-specific probes: identification of target cells for viral replication in cell cultures and in mink kits with virus-induced interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Alexandersen, S; Bloom, M E; Wolfinbarger, J; Race, R E

    1987-01-01

    Strand-specific hybridization probes were utilized in in situ molecular hybridization specifically to localize replicative form DNA of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV). Throughout in vitro infection, duplex replicative form DNA of ADV was located in the cell nuclei. Single-stranded virion DNA and capsid proteins were present in the nuclei early in infection, but were later translocated to the cytoplasm. In neonatal mink, ADV causes acute interstitial pneumonia, and replicative forms of viral DNA were found predominantly in alveolar type II cells of the lung. Viral DNA was also found in other organs, but strand-specific probes made it possible to show that most of this DNA represented virus sequestration. In addition, glomerular immune complexes containing intact virions were detected, suggesting that ADV virions may have a role in the genesis of ADV-induced glomerulonephritis. Images PMID:3037104

  9. Hybridization and Selective Release of DNA Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, N R; Baker, B; Piggott, T; Maberry, S; Hara, C M; DeOtte, J; Benett, W; Mukerjee, E; Dzenitis, J; Wheeler, E K

    2011-11-29

    DNA microarrays contain sequence specific probes arrayed in distinct spots numbering from 10,000 to over 1,000,000, depending on the platform. This tremendous degree of multiplexing gives microarrays great potential for environmental background sampling, broad-spectrum clinical monitoring, and continuous biological threat detection. In practice, their use in these applications is not common due to limited information content, long processing times, and high cost. The work focused on characterizing the phenomena of microarray hybridization and selective release that will allow these limitations to be addressed. This will revolutionize the ways that microarrays can be used for LLNL's Global Security missions. The goals of this project were two-fold: automated faster hybridizations and selective release of hybridized features. The first study area involves hybridization kinetics and mass-transfer effects. the standard hybridization protocol uses an overnight incubation to achieve the best possible signal for any sample type, as well as for convenience in manual processing. There is potential to significantly shorten this time based on better understanding and control of the rate-limiting processes and knowledge of the progress of the hybridization. In the hybridization work, a custom microarray flow cell was used to manipulate the chemical and thermal environment of the array and autonomously image the changes over time during hybridization. The second study area is selective release. Microarrays easily generate hybridization patterns and signatures, but there is still an unmet need for methodologies enabling rapid and selective analysis of these patterns and signatures. Detailed analysis of individual spots by subsequent sequencing could potentially yield significant information for rapidly mutating and emerging (or deliberately engineered) pathogens. In the selective release work, optical energy deposition with coherent light quickly provides the thermal energy to

  10. Automated DNA electrophoresis, hybridization and detection

    SciTech Connect

    Zapolski, E.J.; Gersten, D.M.; Golab, T.J.; Ledley, R.S.

    1986-05-01

    A fully automated, computer controlled system for nucleic acid hybridization analysis has been devised and constructed. In practice, DNA is digested with restriction endonuclease enzyme(s) and loaded into the system by pipette; /sup 32/P-labelled nucleic acid probe(s) is loaded into the nine hybridization chambers. Instructions for all the steps in the automated process are specified by answering questions that appear on the computer screen at the start of the experiment. Subsequent steps are performed automatically. The system performs horizontal electrophoresis in agarose gel, fixed the fragments to a solid phase matrix, denatures, neutralizes, prehybridizes, hybridizes, washes, dries and detects the radioactivity according to the specifications given by the operator. The results, printed out at the end, give the positions on the matrix to which radioactivity remains hybridized following stringent washing.

  11. Signal enhancement in electronic detection of DNA hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentil, C.; Philippin, G.; Bockelmann, U.

    2007-01-01

    Electronic detection of the specific recognition between complementary DNA sequences is investigated. DNA probes are immobilized at different lateral positions on a Poly( L -lysine)-coated surface of an integrated silicon transistor array. Hybridization and field effect detection are done with the solid surface immersed in electrolyte solutions. Differential measurements are performed, where DNA hybridization leads to surface potential shifts between the transistors of the array. We experimentally show that these differential signals of hybridization can be enhanced significantly by changing the salt concentration between hybridization and detection.

  12. Hybrid lentivirus-phiC31-int-NLS vector allows site-specific recombination in murine and human cells but induces DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Grandchamp, Nicolas; Altémir, Dorothée; Philippe, Stéphanie; Ursulet, Suzanna; Pilet, Héloïse; Serre, Marie-Claude; Lenain, Aude; Serguera, Che; Mallet, Jacques; Sarkis, Chamsy

    2014-01-01

    Gene transfer allows transient or permanent genetic modifications of cells for experimental or therapeutic purposes. Gene delivery by HIV-derived lentiviral vector (LV) is highly effective but the risk of insertional mutagenesis is important and the random/uncontrollable integration of the DNA vector can deregulate the cell transcriptional activity. Non Integrative Lentiviral Vectors (NILVs) solve this issue in non-dividing cells, but they do not allow long term expression in dividing cells. In this context, obtaining stable expression while avoiding the problems inherent to unpredictable DNA vector integration requires the ability to control the integration site. One possibility is to use the integrase of phage phiC31 (phiC31-int) which catalyzes efficient site-specific recombination between the attP site in the phage genome and the chromosomal attB site of its Streptomyces host. Previous studies showed that phiC31-int is active in many eukaryotic cells, such as murine or human cells, and directs the integration of a DNA substrate into pseudo attP sites (pattP) which are homologous to the native attP site. In this study, we combined the efficiency of NILV for gene delivery and the specificity of phiC31-int for DNA substrate integration to engineer a hybrid tool for gene transfer with the aim of allowing long term expression in dividing and non-dividing cells preventing genotoxicity. We demonstrated the feasibility to target NILV integration in human and murine pattP sites with a dual NILV vectors system: one which delivers phiC31-int, the other which constitute the substrate containing an attB site in its DNA sequence. These promising results are however alleviated by the occurrence of significant DNA damages. Further improvements are thus required to prevent chromosomal rearrangements for a therapeutic use of the system. However, its use as a tool for experimental applications such as transgenesis is already applicable. PMID:24956106

  13. Genotyping of Trypanosoma cruzi Sublineage in Human Samples from a North-East Argentina Area by Hybridization with DNA Probes and Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)

    PubMed Central

    Diez, Cristina; Lorenz, Virginia; Ortiz, Silvia; Gonzalez, Verónica; Racca, Andrea; Bontempi, Iván; Manattini, Silvia; Solari, Aldo; Marcipar, Iván

    2010-01-01

    We have evaluated blood samples of chronic and congenital Trypanosoma cruzi-infected patients from the city of Reconquista located in the northeast of Argentina where no information was previously obtained about the genotype of infecting parasites. Fourteen samples of congenital and 19 chronical patients were analyzed by hybridization with DNA probes of minicircle hypervariable regions (mHVR). In congenital patients, 50% had single infections with TcIId, 7% single infections with TcIIe, 29% mixed infections with TcIId/e, and 7% had mixed infections with TcIId/b and 7% TcIId/b, respectively. In Chronical patients, 52% had single infections with TcIId, 11% single infections with TcIIe, 26% had mixed infections with TcIId/e, and 11% had non-identified genotypes. With these samples, we evaluated the minicircle lineage-specific polymerase chain reaction assay (MLS-PCR), which involves a nested PCR to HVR minicircle sequences and we found a correlation with hybridization probes of 96.4% for TcIId and 54.8% for TcIIe. PMID:20064998

  14. 1997 hybrid electric vehicle specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Sluder, S.; Larsen, R.; Duoba, M.

    1996-10-01

    The US DOE sponsors Advanced Vehicle Technology competitions to help educate the public and advance new vehicle technologies. For several years, DOE has provided financial and technical support for the American Tour de Sol. This event showcases electric and hybrid electric vehicles in a road rally across portions of the northeastern United States. The specifications contained in this technical memorandum apply to vehicles that will be entered in the 1997 American Tour de Sol. However, the specifications were prepared to be general enough for use by other teams and individuals interested in developing hybrid electric vehicles. The purpose of the specifications is to ensure that the vehicles developed do not present a safety hazard to the teams that build and drive them or to the judges, sponsors, or public who attend the competitions. The specifications are by no means the definitive sources of information on constructing hybrid electric vehicles - as electric and hybrid vehicles technologies advance, so will the standards and practices for their construction. In some cases, the new standards and practices will make portions of these specifications obsolete.

  15. Coulomb blockage of hybridization in two-dimensional DNA arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainrub, Arnold; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2002-10-01

    Experiments on DNA microarrays have revealed substantial differences in hybridization thermodynamics between DNA free in solution and surface tethered DNA. Here we develop a mean field model of the Coulomb effects in two-dimensional DNA arrays to understand the binding isotherms and thermal denaturation of the double helix. We find that the electrostatic repulsion of the assayed nucleic acid from the array of DNA probes dominates the binding thermodynamics, and thus causes the Coulomb blockage of the hybridization. The results explain, observed in DNA microarrays, the dramatic decrease of the hybridization efficiency and the thermal denaturation curve broadening as the probe surface density grows. We demonstrate application of the theory for evaluation and optimization of the sensitivity, specificity, and the dynamic range of DNA array devices.

  16. Cytomegalovirus in urine: detection of viral DNA by sandwich hybridization.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, M; Syvänen, A C; Oram, J; Söderlund, H; Ranki, M

    1984-12-01

    A cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific sandwich hybridization test was constructed by using two adjacent BamHI DNA fragments of CMV DNA as reagents. The fragments were cloned into two different vectors. One of the recombinants was attached to the filter, and the other was the labeled probe. When present in the sample, CMV DNA mediated labeling of the filter by hybridizing to both the filter-bound DNA and the probe. The sandwich hybridization test was applied for the detection of CMV DNA from urine. DNA was released from virus by 2% Sarkosyl, concentrated by 2-butanol extraction and isopropanol precipitation, denatured, and finally subjected to the sandwich hybridization test. As a result, 70 to 90% of the original viral DNA could be recovered and demonstrated by the quantitative hybridization reaction. Urine could be stored at room temperature in Sarkosyl for at least 2 days without affecting the detectability of CMV. The clinical applicability of the test was evaluated by studying urine samples from four infants excreting CMV. Sandwich hybridization demonstrated the presence of CMV DNA in all of the specimens. These contained originally 10(5) to 10(8) CMV DNA molecules per ml. PMID:6097598

  17. Electrical potential-assisted DNA hybridization. How to mitigate electrostatics for surface DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Tymoczko, Jakub; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Gebala, Magdalena

    2014-12-24

    Surface-confined DNA hybridization reactions are sensitive to the number and identity of DNA capture probes and experimental conditions such as the nature and the ionic strength of the electrolyte solution. When the surface probe density is high or the concentration of bulk ions is much lower than the concentration of ions within the DNA layer, hybridization is significantly slowed down or does not proceed at all. However, high-density DNA monolayers are attractive for designing high-sensitivity DNA sensors. Thus, circumventing sluggish DNA hybridization on such interfaces allows a high surface concentration of target DNA and improved signal/noise ratio. We present potential-assisted hybridization as a strategy in which an external voltage is applied to the ssDNA-modified interface during the hybridization process. Results show that a significant enhancement of hybridization can be achieved using this approach. PMID:25102381

  18. APPLICATION OF DNA-DNA COLONY HYBRIDIZATION TO THE DETECTION OF CATABOLIC GENOTYPES IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The application of preexisting DNA hybridization techniques was investigated for potential in determining populations of specific gene sequences in environmental samples. Cross-hybridizations among two degradative plasmids, TOL and NAH, and two cloning vehicles, pLAFRI and RSF101...

  19. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  20. DNA fluorescence shift sensor: a rapid method for the detection of DNA hybridization using silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shin Yong; Hairul Bahara, Nur Hidayah; Choong, Yee Siew; Lim, Theam Soon; Tye, Gee Jun

    2014-11-01

    DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (AgNC) are a class of subnanometer sized fluorophores with good photostability and brightness. It has been applied as a diagnostic tool mainly for deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) detection. Integration of DNA oligomers to generate AgNCs is interesting as varying DNA sequences can result in different fluorescence spectra. This allows a simple fluorescence shifting effect to occur upon DNA hybridization with the hybridization efficiency being a pronominal factor for successful shifting. The ability to shift the fluorescence spectra as a result of hybridization overcomes the issue of background intensities in most fluorescent based assays. Here we describe an optimized method for the detection of single-stranded and double-stranded synthetic forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) target by hybridization with the DNA fluorescence shift sensor. The system forms a three-way junction by successful hybridization of AgNC, G-rich strand (G-rich) to the target DNA, which generated a shift in fluorescence spectra with a marked increase in fluorescence intensity. The DNA fluorescence shift sensor presents a rapid and specific alternative to conventional DNA detection. PMID:25129336

  1. Label-free photoelectrochemical strategy for hairpin DNA hybridization detection on titanium dioxide electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Wu; Wang Geng; Jin Yan; Yao Xin; Hu Jianqiang; Li Jinghong

    2006-12-25

    A new photoelectrochemical strategy for hairpin DNA hybridization was devised, in which TiO{sub 2} served as the anchor and signal transducer, and no label or redox couples were required. Once the hybridization between hairpin DNA probe and target DNA occurred, the photocurrent would decrease, utilizing which the sequence of the target DNA could be identified. The sequence specificity experiment showed that one or more mismatches of DNA bases could be discriminated. This photoelectrochemical method would be a potential tool in DNA hybridization detection due to its great advantages: label-free, high sensitivity, specific recognition, low cost, and easy fabrication.

  2. Direct detection of DNA conformation in hybridization processes.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, George; Tsortos, Achilleas; Bender, Florian; Ferapontova, Elena E; Gizeli, Electra

    2012-02-21

    DNA hybridization studies at surfaces normally rely on the detection of mass changes as a result of the addition of the complementary strand. In this work we propose a mass-independent sensing principle based on the quantitative monitoring of the conformation of the immobilized single-strand probe and of the final hybridized product. This is demonstrated by using a label-free acoustic technique, the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D), and oligonucleotides of specific sequences which, upon hybridization, result in DNAs of various shapes and sizes. Measurements of the acoustic ratio ΔD/ΔF in combination with a "discrete molecule binding" approach are used to confirm the formation of straight hybridized DNA molecules of specific lengths (21, 75, and 110 base pairs); acoustic results are also used to distinguish between single- and double-stranded molecules as well as between same-mass hybridized products with different shapes, i.e., straight or "Y-shaped". Issues such as the effect of mono- and divalent cations to hybridization and the mechanism of the process (nucleation, kinetics) when it happens on a surface are carefully considered. Finally, this new sensing principle is applied to single-nucleotide polymorphism detection: a DNA hairpin probe hybridized to the p53 target gene gave products of distinct geometrical features depending on the presence or absence of the SNP, both readily distinguishable. Our results suggest that DNA conformation probing with acoustic wave sensors is a much more improved detection method over the popular mass-related, on/off techniques offering higher flexibility in the design of solid-phase hybridization assays. PMID:22248021

  3. DNA hybridization and ligation for directed colloidal assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyr, Margaret

    Colloidal assembly using DNA hybridization has been pursued as a means assemble non-conventional ordered colloidal structures. However, to date it is undetermined whether DNA hybridization can be used to achieve non-FCC colloidal crystals. Using microcontact printing techniques, we have fabricated covalently bound single stranded DNA (ssDNA) two-dimensional arrays on glass surfaces, which were used to direct the assembly of complementary DNA functionalized polystyrene colloids. Two of the hallmarks of DNA hybridization, sequence specificity and thermal reversibility, were demonstrated. Due to the periodicity of these arrays, laser diffraction was used to directly monitor these structures during assembly. To demonstrate the versatility of the 2D colloidal array assembled via DNA hybridization, a catalytic DNA sequence or DNAzyme was incorporated into the colloidal array system. By tethering the enzymatic strand to the patterned glass surface and the substrate strand to polystyrene colloids, we showed that the DNAzyme could prevent the assembly of the arrays when the required Pb2+ cofactor was provided. Attempts to assemble the colloid arrays and disassemble via the Pb2+-DNAzyme induced cleavage were unsuccessful, likely due to the incomplete cleavage of the multitude of hybridized linkages between each colloid and the surface. Since DNA is not only capable of catalyzing reactions, but also capable of being reacted upon by a variety of biological enzymes, we examined the use of DNA ligase as a means to control the assembly of DNA-functionalized colloids. A three-sequence linker system was used for the hybridization mediated assembly of colloids: one sequence was tethered to the surface of the glass slide or colloids, one was tethered to another colloid surface, and the linker sequence hybridizes simultaneously to both tethered sequences. Once hybridized, the two tethered fragments can be ligated using DNA ligase, resulting in a continuous sequence tethered on one end

  4. Methods for assessing DNA hybridization of PNA-TiO2 nanoconjugates

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Eric M. B.; Paunesku, Tatjana; Wu, AiGuo; Thurn, K. Ted; Haley, Benjamin; Clark, Jimmy; Priester, Taisa; Woloschak, Gayle E.

    2008-01-01

    We describe the synthesis of peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoconjugates and the several novel methods developed to investigate the DNA hybridization behaviors of these constructs. PNAs are synthetic DNA analogs resistant to degradation by cellular enzymes, which hybridize to single strand DNA (ssDNA) with higher affinity than DNA oligonucleotides, invade double strand DNA (dsDNA), and form different PNA-DNA complexes. Previously, we developed a DNA-TiO2 nanoconjugate capable of hybridizing to target DNA intracellularly in a sequence-specific manner, with the ability to cleave DNA when excited by electromagnetic radiation, but susceptible to degradation which may lower its intracellular targeting efficiency and retention time. PNA-TiO2 nanoconjugates described herein hybridize to target ssDNA, oligonucleotide dsDNA, and supercoiled plasmid DNA under physiological-like ionic and temperature conditions, enabling rapid and inexpensive, sequence-specific precipitation of nucleic acids in vitro. When modified by the addition of imaging agents or peptides, hybridization capabilities of PNA-TiO2 nanoconjugates are enhanced which provides essential benefits for numerous in vitro and in vivo applications. The series of experiments shown here could not be done with either TiO2-DNA nanoconjugates or PNAs alone, and the novel methods developed will benefit studies of numerous other nanoconjugate systems. PMID:18786502

  5. Genome-Wide Profiling of Yeast DNA:RNA Hybrid Prone Sites with DRIP-Chip

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Phoebe Y. T.; Luo, Zongli; Hamza, Akil; Kobor, Michael S.; Stirling, Peter C.; Hieter, Philip

    2014-01-01

    DNA:RNA hybrid formation is emerging as a significant cause of genome instability in biological systems ranging from bacteria to mammals. Here we describe the genome-wide distribution of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by DNA:RNA immunoprecipitation (DRIP) followed by hybridization on tiling microarray. These profiles show that DNA:RNA hybrids preferentially accumulated at rDNA, Ty1 and Ty2 transposons, telomeric repeat regions and a subset of open reading frames (ORFs). The latter are generally highly transcribed and have high GC content. Interestingly, significant DNA:RNA hybrid enrichment was also detected at genes associated with antisense transcripts. The expression of antisense-associated genes was also significantly altered upon overexpression of RNase H, which degrades the RNA in hybrids. Finally, we uncover mutant-specific differences in the DRIP profiles of a Sen1 helicase mutant, RNase H deletion mutant and Hpr1 THO complex mutant compared to wild type, suggesting different roles for these proteins in DNA:RNA hybrid biology. Our profiles of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci provide a resource for understanding the properties of hybrid-forming regions in vivo, extend our knowledge of hybrid-mitigating enzymes, and contribute to models of antisense-mediated gene regulation. A summary of this paper was presented at the 26th International Conference on Yeast Genetics and Molecular Biology, August 2013. PMID:24743342

  6. Genome-wide profiling of yeast DNA:RNA hybrid prone sites with DRIP-chip.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yujia A; Aristizabal, Maria J; Lu, Phoebe Y T; Luo, Zongli; Hamza, Akil; Kobor, Michael S; Stirling, Peter C; Hieter, Philip

    2014-04-01

    DNA:RNA hybrid formation is emerging as a significant cause of genome instability in biological systems ranging from bacteria to mammals. Here we describe the genome-wide distribution of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by DNA:RNA immunoprecipitation (DRIP) followed by hybridization on tiling microarray. These profiles show that DNA:RNA hybrids preferentially accumulated at rDNA, Ty1 and Ty2 transposons, telomeric repeat regions and a subset of open reading frames (ORFs). The latter are generally highly transcribed and have high GC content. Interestingly, significant DNA:RNA hybrid enrichment was also detected at genes associated with antisense transcripts. The expression of antisense-associated genes was also significantly altered upon overexpression of RNase H, which degrades the RNA in hybrids. Finally, we uncover mutant-specific differences in the DRIP profiles of a Sen1 helicase mutant, RNase H deletion mutant and Hpr1 THO complex mutant compared to wild type, suggesting different roles for these proteins in DNA:RNA hybrid biology. Our profiles of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci provide a resource for understanding the properties of hybrid-forming regions in vivo, extend our knowledge of hybrid-mitigating enzymes, and contribute to models of antisense-mediated gene regulation. A summary of this paper was presented at the 26th International Conference on Yeast Genetics and Molecular Biology, August 2013. PMID:24743342

  7. Conformational selection and induced fit for RNA polymerase and RNA/DNA hybrid backtracked recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian; Ye, Wei; Yang, Jingxu; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2015-01-01

    RNA polymerase catalyzes transcription with a high fidelity. If DNA/RNA mismatch or DNA damage occurs downstream, a backtracked RNA polymerase can proofread this situation. However, the backtracked mechanism is still poorly understood. Here we have performed multiple explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on bound and apo DNA/RNA hybrid to study backtracked recognition. MD simulations at room temperature suggest that specific electrostatic interactions play key roles in the backtracked recognition between the polymerase and DNA/RNA hybrid. Kinetics analysis at high temperature shows that bound and apo DNA/RNA hybrid unfold via a two-state process. Both kinetics and free energy landscape analyses indicate that bound DNA/RNA hybrid folds in the order of DNA/RNA contracting, the tertiary folding and polymerase binding. The predicted Φ-values suggest that C7, G9, dC12, dC15, and dT16 are key bases for the backtracked recognition of DNA/RNA hybrid. The average RMSD values between the bound structures and the corresponding apo ones and Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) P-test analyses indicate that the recognition between DNA/RNA hybrid and polymerase might follow an induced fit mechanism for DNA/RNA hybrid and conformation selection for polymerase. Furthermore, this method could be used to relative studies of specific recognition between nucleic acid and protein. PMID:26594643

  8. Preparation and characterization of imogolite/DNA hybrid hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Jiravanichanun, Nattha; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Kato, Kenichi; Kim, Jungeun; Horiuchi, Shin; Yah, Weng-On; Otsuka, Hideyuki; Takahara, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    Imogolite is one of the clay minerals contained in volcanic ash soils. The novel hybrid hydrogels were prepared from imogolite nanofibers and DNA by utilizing strong interaction between the aluminol groups on imogolite surface and phosphate groups of DNA. The hybrid hydrogels of imogolite and DNA were prepared in various feed ratios, and their physicochemical properties and molecular aggregation states were investigated in both dispersion and gel states. The maximum DNA content in the hybrid gels was shown in equivalent molar ratio of imogolite and DNA. The physical properties of the hybrid gels were changed by varying DNA blend ratios. In the dispersion state, the hybrid gels showed a fibrous structure of imogolite, whereas a continuous network structure was observed in pure imogolite, indicating that the hybrid with DNA enhanced the dispersion of imogolite. In the gel state, DNA and imogolite nanofibers formed a 3D network structure. PMID:22148683

  9. Process of labeling specific chromosomes using recombinant repetitive DNA

    DOEpatents

    Moyzis, R.K.; Meyne, J.

    1988-02-12

    Chromosome preferential nucleotide sequences are first determined from a library of recombinant DNA clones having families of repetitive sequences. Library clones are identified with a low homology with a sequence of repetitive DNA families to which the first clones respectively belong and variant sequences are then identified by selecting clones having a pattern of hybridization with genomic DNA dissimilar to the hybridization pattern shown by the respective families. In another embodiment, variant sequences are selected from a sequence of a known repetitive DNA family. The selected variant sequence is classified as chromosome specific, chromosome preferential, or chromosome nonspecific. Sequences which are classified as chromosome preferential are further sequenced and regions are identified having a low homology with other regions of the chromosome preferential sequence or with known sequences of other family members and consensus sequences of the repetitive DNA families for the chromosome preferential sequences. The selected low homology regions are then hybridized with chromosomes to determine those low homology regions hybridized with a specific chromosome under normal stringency conditions.

  10. DNA Hybridization: Nonradioactive Labeling Now Available for the Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Lenore Gardner

    1984-01-01

    The advantages of DNA hybridization procedures for classroom and clinical use can now be realized by the recent development of nonradioactive DNA labeling/detection procedures. These methods (which are described) can replace the use of isotopes in standard DNA hybridization procedures. (JN)

  11. Hybrid DNA materials for energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norwood, R. A.; Thomas, J.; Peyghambarian, N.; Wang, J.; Li, L.; Ouchen, F.; Grote, J. E.

    2010-08-01

    We investigate the dielectric and electrical properties of sol-gel/DNA-CTMA blends, with particular interest in capacitor applications in energy storage. Methacryloyloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MAPTMS) was the solgel precursor, and DNA-CTMA was blended in to the resulting sol-gel at various weight percentages. The blends were tested for their dielectric properties and dielectric breakdown strength; the 5% DNA blend was found to be optimal with a dielectric constant in the range of 7.5, while the breakdown strength was greater than 800 V/μm for 1 μm films and about 500 V/μm for 5μm films. Hybrid sol-gel/DNA-CTMA/barium titanate nanoparticle composites were also formulated and their dielectric properties measured. While a high dielectric constant was achieved (38), this came at the expense of a significantly reduced breakdown voltage (160V/μm). We discuss these results as well as other aspects of the dielectric and electrical properties of these blends.

  12. Hybrid magnetic nanoparticle/nanogold clusters and their distance-dependent metal-enhanced fluorescence effect via DNA hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GuThese Authors Contributed Equally To This Study., Xuefan; Wu, Youshen; Zhang, Lingze; Liu, Yongchun; Li, Yan; Yan, Yongli; Wu, Daocheng

    2014-07-01

    To improve the metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) effect of nanogolds (AuNPs) and accurately detect specific DNA sequences via DNA hybridization, novel hybrid magnetic nanoparticles/nanogold clusters (HMNCs) were designed based on finite-difference time-domain simulation results and prepared by using Fe3O4 and nanogolds. The nanogolds outside the HMNC were then conjugated with thiol-terminated DNA molecules, thus DNA modified-HMNCs (DNA-HMNCs) were obtained. The size distributions of these nanostructures were measured by a Malvern size analyzer, and their morphology was observed via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The ultraviolet (UV)-visible (vis) absorption spectra of the samples were recorded with a UV-2600 spectrophotometer. Fluorescence spectra and the MEF effect were recorded using a spectrophotofluorometer, and lifetimes were determined using a time-correlated single photon counting apparatus. The prepared HMNCs were stable in aqueous solutions and had an average diameter of 87 +/- 3.2 nm, with six to eight AuNPs around a single Fe3O4 nanoparticle. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) tagged DNA-HMNC conjugates exhibited a significant MEF effect and could accurately detect specific DNA sequences after DNA hybridization. This result indicates their various potential applications in sensors and biomedical fields.To improve the metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) effect of nanogolds (AuNPs) and accurately detect specific DNA sequences via DNA hybridization, novel hybrid magnetic nanoparticles/nanogold clusters (HMNCs) were designed based on finite-difference time-domain simulation results and prepared by using Fe3O4 and nanogolds. The nanogolds outside the HMNC were then conjugated with thiol-terminated DNA molecules, thus DNA modified-HMNCs (DNA-HMNCs) were obtained. The size distributions of these nanostructures were measured by a Malvern size analyzer, and their morphology was observed via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The ultraviolet (UV

  13. Male-specific DNA markers from African catfish (Clarias gariepinus).

    PubMed

    Kovács, B; Egedi, S; Bártfai, R; Orbán, L

    2000-01-01

    We searched for sex-specific DNA sequences in the male and female genomes of African catfish, Clarias gariepinus (Burchell, 1822) by comparative random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assays performed on pooled DNA samples. Two sex-linked RAPD markers were identified from the male DNA pool and confirmed on individual samples, showing good agreement with phenotypic sex. Both markers were isolated, cloned and characterized. The first marker (CgaY1) was nearly 2.6 kb long, while the length of second one (CgaY2) was 458 bp. Southern blot analysis with a CgaY1 probe showed strong hybridizing fragments only in males and not in females under stringent conditions, indicating the presence of multiple copies of CgaY1 in the male genome. When tested by zoo blot on the genomes of two closely related species from the Clariidae family, CgaY1 hybridized to the DNA of Heterobranchus longifilis and generated a faint male-specific band at low stringency. CgaY2 produced similar hybridization pattern in both sexes of C. gariepinus, C. macrocephalus and H. longifilis. Specific primers were designed to the sequences and the markers were amplified in multiplex PCR reactions together with a control band common to all individuals. This allowed for rapid, molecular sexing of the species on the basis of a simple three band (male) versus one band (female) pattern. According to our knowledge these are the first sex-specific DNA markers isolated from a siluroid fish species. PMID:11766847

  14. DNA Stains as Surrogate Nucleobases in Fluorogenic Hybridization Probes.

    PubMed

    Hövelmann, Felix; Seitz, Oliver

    2016-04-19

    The increasing importance assigned to RNA dynamics in cells and tissues calls for probe molecules that enable fluorescence microscopy imaging in live cells. To achieve this goal, fluorescence dyes are conjugated with oligonucleotides so as to provide strong emission upon hybridization with the target molecule. The impressive 10(3)-fold fluorescence intensification observed when DNA stains such as thiazole orange (TO) interact with double-stranded DNA is intriguing and prompted the exploration of oligonucleotide conjugates. However, nonspecific interactions of DNA stains with polynucleotides tend to increase background, which would affect the contrast achievable in live-cell imaging. This Account describes the development of DNA-stain-labeled hybridization probes that provide high signal-to-background. We focus on our contributions in context with related advances from other laboratories. The emphasis will be on the requirements of RNA imaging in live cells. To reduce background, intercalator dyes such as TO were appended to peptide nucleic acid (PNA), which is less avidly recognized by DNA stains than DNA/RNA. Constraining the TO dye as a nucleobase surrogate in "forced intercalation (FIT) probes" improved the target specificity, presumably by helping to prevent unspecific interactions. The enforcement of TO intercalation between predetermined base pairs upon formation of the probe-target duplex provided for high brightness and enabled match/mismatch selectivity beyond stringency of hybridization. We show examples that highlight the use of PNA FIT probes in the imaging of mRNA, miRNA, and lncRNA in living cells. The "FIT approach" was recently extended to DNA probes. Signal brightness can become limiting when low-abundance targets ought to be visualized over cellular autofluorescence. We discuss strategies that further the brightness of signaling by FIT probes. Multilabeling with identical dyes does not solve the brightness issue. To avoid self-quenching, we

  15. Dyes as bifunctional markers of DNA hybridization on surfaces and mutation detection.

    PubMed

    García-Mendiola, Tania; Cerro, María Ramos; López-Moreno, José María; Pariente, Félix; Lorenzo, Encarnación

    2016-10-01

    The interaction of small molecules with DNA has found diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In this work, we propose the use of two different dyes, in particular Azure A and Safranine, as bifunctional markers of on-surface DNA hybridization and potent tools for screening of specific gene mutations directly in real DNA PCR amplicons extracted from blood cells. By combining spectroscopic and electrochemical methods we demonstrate that both dyes can interact with single and double stranded DNA to a different extent, allowing reliable hybridization detection. From these data, we have also elucidated the nature of the interaction. We conclude that the binding mode is fundamentally intercalative with an electrostatic component. The dye fluorescence allows their use as nucleic acid stains for the detection of on-surfaces DNA hybridization. Its redox activity is exploited in the development of selective electrochemical DNA biosensors. PMID:27317997

  16. Label-free monitoring of individual DNA hybridization using SERS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Ji; Zeng, Jianbo; Zhao, Fusheng; Santos, Greggy M.; Lin, Steven Hsesheng; Raja, Balakrishnan; Strych, Ulrich; Willson, Richard C.; Shih, Wei-Chuan

    2015-03-01

    Sequence-specific detection of DNA hybridization at the single-molecule level has been instrumental and gradually become a ubiquitous tool in a wide variety of biological and biomedical applications such as clinical diagnostics, biosensors, and drug development. Label-free and amplification-free schemes are of particular interest because they could potentially provide in situ monitoring of individual hybridization events, which may lead to techniques for discriminating subtle variations due to single-base modification without stringency control or repetitive thermal cycling. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been widely used for molecular detection and identification by exploiting the localized surface plasmon resonance effect when the target molecules are near gold or silver nanostructures. However, effective and robust SERS assays have yet become a reality for trace detection. Recently, we have developed a SERS substrate by shaping nanoporous gold thin films into monolithic submicron disks, called nanoporous gold disks (NPGD). Here we demonstrate in situ monitoring of the same immobilized ssDNA molecules and their individual hybridization events.

  17. Microfluidic platform for isolating nucleic acid targets using sequence specific hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingjing; Morabito, Kenneth; Tang, Jay X.; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2013-01-01

    The separation of target nucleic acid sequences from biological samples has emerged as a significant process in today's diagnostics and detection strategies. In addition to the possible clinical applications, the fundamental understanding of target and sequence specific hybridization on surface modified magnetic beads is of high value. In this paper, we describe a novel microfluidic platform that utilizes a mobile magnetic field in static microfluidic channels, where single stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules are isolated via nucleic acid hybridization. We first established efficient isolation of biotinylated capture probe (BP) using streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. Subsequently, we investigated the hybridization of target ssDNA with BP bound to beads and explained these hybridization kinetics using a dual-species kinetic model. The number of hybridized target ssDNA molecules was determined to be about 6.5 times less than that of BP on the bead surface, due to steric hindrance effects. The hybridization of target ssDNA with non-complementary BP bound to bead was also examined, and non-specific hybridization was found to be insignificant. Finally, we demonstrated highly efficient capture and isolation of target ssDNA in the presence of non-target ssDNA, where as low as 1% target ssDNA can be detected from mixture. The microfluidic method described in this paper is significantly relevant and is broadly applicable, especially towards point-of-care biological diagnostic platforms that require binding and separation of known target biomolecules, such as RNA, ssDNA, or protein. PMID:24404041

  18. Detection of hemolytic Listeria monocytogenes by using DNA colony hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, A.R.; Wentz, B.A.; Hill, W.E.

    1987-09-01

    A fragment of about 500 base pairs of the beta-hemolysin gene from Listeria monocytogenes was used to screen different bacterial strains by DNA colony hybridization. The cells in the colonies were lysed by microwaves in the presence of sodium hydroxide. Of 52 different strains of Listeria species screened, only the DNA from beta-hemolytic (CAMP-positive) strains of L. monocytogenes hybridized with this probe.

  19. DNA/DNA in situ hybridization with enzyme linked probes

    SciTech Connect

    Grillo, S.; Mosher, M.; Charles, P.; Henry, S.; Taub, F.

    1987-05-01

    A non-radioactive in situ nucleic acid hybridization method which requires no antibodies, haptens, avidin or biotin intermediateries is presented. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labeled nucleic acid probes are hybridized in situ for 2 hours or less, followed by brief washing of hybridized cells and the direct detection of in situ hybrids with diaminobenzidine (DAB). Application of this method to the detection of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) in human cells is shown.

  20. Hairpin DNA Switch for Ultrasensitive Spectrophotometric Detection of DNA Hybridization Based on Gold Nanoparticles and Enzyme Signal Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Youyu; Tang, Zhiwen; Wang, Jun; Wu, Hong; Maham, Aihui; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-08-01

    A novel DNA detection platform based on a hairpin-DNA switch, nanoparticles, and enzyme signal amplification for ultrasensitive detection of DNA hybridization has been developed in this work. In this DNA assay, a “stem-loop” DNA probe dually labeled with a thiol at its 5’ end and a biotin at its 3’ end, respectively, was used. This probe was immobilized on the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) anchored by a protein, globulin, on a 96-well microplate. In the absence of target DNA, the immobilized probe with the stem-loop structure shields the biotin from being approached by a bulky horseradish peroxidase linked-avidin (avidin-HRP) conjugate due to the steric hindrance. However, in the presence of target DNA, the hybridization between the hairpin DNA probe and the target DNA causes significant conformational change of the probe, which forces biotin away from the surface of AuNPs. As a result, the biotin becomes accessible by the avidin-HRP, and the target hybridization event can be sensitively detected via the HRP catalyzed substrate 3, 3', 5, 5'-tetramethylbenzidine using spectrophometric method. Some experimental parameters governing the performance of the assay have been optimized. At optimal conditions, this DNA assay can detect DNA at the concentration of femtomolar level by means of a signal amplification strategy based on the combination of enzymes and nanoparticles. This approach also has shown excellent specificity to distinguish single-base mismatches of DNA targets because of the intrinsic high selectivity of the hairpin DNA probe.

  1. Applications of Strand-Specific in situ Hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, E.H.; Meyne, J.; Bailey, S.M.; Quigley, D.; Smith, L.; Tennyson, R.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is used to determine the location of specific DNA sequences on chromosomes. It is an effective tool in genomic mapping and is finding increasing use in medical diagnosis. A ''strand-specific'' version of FISH has been developed in the Life Sciences Division of LANL. The new procedure, named CO-FISH, reveals not only location but also the 5'-to-3'direction of a target sequence, such as the sense strand of a gene. This project was designed to investigate applications of the new technique. Strand-specific FISH was found to be useful and informative for genomic mapping of repetitive DNA sequences. The method provide a valuable new tool for investigating the mechanisms of aneuploidy inducing agents and the cytogenetic phenomena called lateral asymmetry. Finally, using strand-specific FISH, the authors were able to detect certain types of chromosome aberrations (isochromosomes, inversions and Robertsonian translocations) that can be difficult to observe with standard techniques.

  2. Voltammetric detection of sequence-selective DNA hybridization related to Toxoplasma gondii in PCR amplicons.

    PubMed

    Gokce, Gultekin; Erdem, Arzum; Ceylan, Cagdas; Akgöz, Muslum

    2016-03-01

    This work describes the single-use electrochemical DNA biosensor technology developed for voltammetric detection of sequence selective DNA hybridization related to important human and veterinary pathogen; Toxoplasma gondii. In the principle of electrochemical label-free detection assay, the duplex of DNA hybrid formation was detected by measuring guanine oxidation signal occured in the presence of DNA hybridization. The biosensor design consisted of the immobilization of an inosine-modified (guanine-free) probe onto the surface of pencil graphite electrode (PGE), and the detection of the duplex formation in connection with the differential pulse voltammetry(DPV) by measuring the guanine signal. Toxoplasma gondii capture probe was firstly immobilized onto the surface of the activated PGE by wet adsorption. The extent of hybridization at PGE surface between the probe and the target was then determined by measuring the guanine signal observed at +1.0V. The electrochemical monitoring of optimum DNA hybridization has been performed in the target concentration of 40µg/mL in 50min of hybridization time. The specificity of the electrochemical biosensor was then tested using non-complementary, or mismatch short DNA sequences. Under the optimum conditions, the guanine oxidation signal indicating full hybridization was measured in various target concentration from 0.5 to 25µg/mL and a detection limit was found to be 1.78µg/mL. This single-use biosensor platform was successfully applied for the voltammetric detection of DNA hybridization related to Toxoplasma gondii in PCR amplicons. PMID:26717837

  3. Characterization of two DNA probes specific for Serpulina hyodysenteriae.

    PubMed Central

    Sotiropoulos, C; Smith, S C; Coloe, P J

    1993-01-01

    Two DNA probes, one 1.1- and one 0.75-kb probe, specific for Serpulina hyodysenteriae were isolated from a genomic library generated from virulent S. hyodysenteriae 5380. These probes are highly specific and react with all S. hyodysenteriae strains tested. Under stringent conditions, the DNA probes did not react with the nonpathogenic species Serpulina innocens or with other species of enteric bacteria, including Escherichia coli. Both probes are able to detect S. hyodysenteriae in colony blot hybridizations, and when applied to fecal specimens, they can detect 10(4) S. hyodysenteriae cells in 0.1 g of seeded fecal matter. Both probes can detect S. hyodysenteriae in fecal specimens from swine with clinical signs of swine dysentery after experimental challenge and from swine from a herd with an acute outbreak of swine dysentery. These probes have application as a diagnostic tool in veterinary microbiology. Images PMID:8349750

  4. Sequence-specific DNA nicking endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuang-yong

    2015-08-01

    A group of small HNH nicking endonucleases (NEases) was discovered recently from phage or prophage genomes that nick double-stranded DNA sites ranging from 3 to 5 bp in the presence of Mg2+ or Mn2+. The cosN site of phage HK97 contains a gp74 nicking site AC↑CGC, which is similar to AC↑CGR (R=A/G) of N.ϕGamma encoded by Bacillus phage Gamma. A minimal nicking domain of 76 amino acid residues from N.ϕGamma could be fused to other DNA binding partners to generate chimeric NEases with new specificities. The biological roles of a few small HNH endonucleases (HNHE, gp74 of HK97, gp37 of ϕSLT, ϕ12 HNHE) have been demonstrated in phage and pathogenicity island DNA packaging. Another group of NEases with 3- to 7-bp specificities are either natural components of restriction systems or engineered from type IIS restriction endonucleases. A phage group I intron-encoded HNH homing endonucleases, I-PfoP3I was found to nick DNA sites of 14-16 bp. I-TslI encoded by T7-like ΦI appeared to nick DNA sites with a 9-bp core sequence. DNA nicking and labeling have been applied to optical mapping to aid genome sequence assembly and detection of large insertion/deletion mutations in genomic DNA of cancer cells. Nicking enzyme-mediated amplification reaction has been applied to rapid diagnostic testing of influenza A and B in clinical setting and for construction of DNA-based Boolean logic gates. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-ribonucleoprotein complex consisting of engineered Cas9 nickases in conjunction with tracerRNA:crRNA or a single-guide RNA have been successfully used in genome modifications. PMID:26352356

  5. Highly specific detection of genetic modification events using an enzyme-linked probe hybridization chip.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M Z; Zhang, X F; Chen, X M; Chen, X; Wu, S; Xu, L L

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme-linked probe hybridization chip utilizes a method based on ligase-hybridizing probe chip technology, with the principle of using thio-primers for protection against enzyme digestion, and using lambda DNA exonuclease to cut multiple PCR products obtained from the sample being tested into single-strand chains for hybridization. The 5'-end amino-labeled probe was fixed onto the aldehyde chip, and hybridized with the single-stranded PCR product, followed by addition of a fluorescent-modified probe that was then enzymatically linked with the adjacent, substrate-bound probe in order to achieve highly specific, parallel, and high-throughput detection. Specificity and sensitivity testing demonstrated that enzyme-linked probe hybridization technology could be applied to the specific detection of eight genetic modification events at the same time, with a sensitivity reaching 0.1% and the achievement of accurate, efficient, and stable results. PMID:26345863

  6. Dynamic Modulation of DNA Hybridization Using Allosteric DNA Tetrahedral Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Song, Ping; Li, Min; Shen, Juwen; Pei, Hao; Chao, Jie; Su, Shao; Aldalbahi, Ali; Wang, Lihua; Shi, Jiye; Song, Shiping; Wang, Lianhui; Fan, Chunhai; Zuo, Xiaolei

    2016-08-16

    The fixed dynamic range of traditional biosensors limits their utility in several real applications. For example, viral load monitoring requires the dynamic range spans several orders of magnitude; whereas, monitoring of drugs requires extremely narrow dynamic range. To overcome this limitation, here, we devised tunable biosensing interface using allosteric DNA tetrahedral bioprobes to tune the dynamic range of DNA biosensors. Our strategy takes the advantage of the readily and flexible structure design and predictable geometric reconfiguration of DNA nanotechnology. We reconfigured the DNA tetrahedral bioprobes by inserting the effector sequence into the DNA tetrahedron, through which, the binding affinity of DNA tetrahedral bioprobes can be tuned. As a result, the detection limit of DNA biosensors can be programmably regulated. The dynamic range of DNA biosensors can be tuned (narrowed or extended) for up to 100-fold. Using the regulation of binding affinity, we realized the capture and release of biomolecules by tuning the binding behavior of DNA tetrahedral bioprobes. PMID:27435955

  7. Building a Phylogenetic Tree of the Human and Ape Superfamily Using DNA-DNA Hybridization Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Caroline Alexander

    2004-01-01

    The study describes the process of DNA-DNA hybridization and the history of its use by Sibley and Alquist in simple, straightforward, and interesting language that students easily understand to create their own phylogenetic tree of the hominoid superfamily. They calibrate the DNA clock and use it to estimate the divergence dates of the various…

  8. Identification of Lactobacillus UFV H2B20 (probiotic strain) using DNA-DNA hybridization

    PubMed Central

    de Magalhães, J.T.; Uetanabaro, A.P. T.; de Moraes, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    Sequence analyses of the 16S rDNA gene and DNA-DNA hybridization tests were performed for identification of the species of the probiotic Lactobacillus UFV H2b20 strain. Using these two tests, we concluded that this strain, originally considered Lact. acidophilus, should be classified as Lact. delbrueckii. PMID:24031263

  9. Biochemical construction and selection of hybrid plasmids containing specific segments of the Escherichia coli genome.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, L; Carbon, J

    1975-01-01

    Using a poly(dA-dT) "connector" method, a population of annealed hybrid circular DNAs was constructed in vitro; each hybrid DNA circle containing one full-length molecule of poly(dT)-tailed DNA from E1 colicinogenic factor (Col E1) fragmented by EcoRI endonuclease annealed to any one of a collection of poly(dA)-tailed linear DNA fragments of the entire E. coli genome. This annealed, but unligated, hybrid DNA was used to transform several different auxotrophic mutants of E. coli, and by direct selection, bacterial clones were isolated which contained specific hybrid plasmids. In this manner, bacterial strains containing Col E1 hybrid plasmids carrying the entire tryptophan operon or the arabinsoe and leucine operons were isolated. The methods described should allow the molecular cloning of any portion of the E. coli genome by selection from a pool of DNA molecules containing at least several hundred different hybrids representing the entire bacterial genome. Images PMID:1105581

  10. Colloidal Au-enhanced surface plasmon resonance imaging: application in a DNA hybridization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manera, M. G.; Spadavecchia, J.; Taurino, A.; Rella, R.

    2010-03-01

    The detection of the DNA hybridization mechanism using monodispersed gold nanoparticles as labels is an interesting alternative to increase the sensitivity of the SPR imaging technique. DNA-modified Au nanoparticles (DNA-Au NPs) containing single-stranded (ss) portions of DNA were prepared by monitoring their monolayer formation by UV-vis spectroscopy. The hybridization process between specific thio-oligonucleotides immobilized on the DNA-Au NPs and the corresponding complementary strands is reported and compared with the traditional hybridization process on properly self-assembled thin gold films deposited on glass substrates. A remarkable signal amplification is observed, following the incorporation of colloidal Au into a SPR biosensing experiment, resulting in an increased SPR response to DNA-DNA interactions. In particular Fusarium thiolated DNA (5'HS poly(T)15ATC CCT CAA AAA CTG CCG CT-3) and trichothecenes complementary DNA (5'-AGC GGC AGT TTT TGA GGG AT-3') sequences have been explored due to their possible application to agro-industry for the control of food quality.

  11. The kinetics of force-dependent hybridization and strand-peeling of short DNA fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, ZhouJie; Yuan, GuoHua; Zhai, WeiLi; Yan, Jie; Chen, Hu

    2016-08-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) carries the genetic information in all living organisms. It consists of two interwound single-stranded (ss) strands, forming a double-stranded (ds) DNA with a right-handed double-helical conformation. The two strands are held together by highly specific basepairing interactions and are further stabilized by stacking between adjacent basepairs. A transition from a dsDNA to two separated ssDNA is called melting and the reverse transition is called hybridization. Applying a tensile force to a dsDNA can result in a particular type of DNA melting, during which one ssDNA strand is peeled away from the other. In this work, we studied the kinetics of strand-peeling and hybridization of short DNA under tensile forces. Our results show that the force-dependent strand-peeling and hybridization can be described with a simple two-state model. Importantly, detailed analysis of the force-dependent transition rates revealed that the transition state consists of several basepairs dsDNA.

  12. Comparing Charge Transport in Oligonucleotides: RNA:DNA Hybrids and DNA Duplexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanhui; Artés, Juan M; Qi, Jianqing; Morelan, Ian A; Feldstein, Paul; Anantram, M P; Hihath, Joshua

    2016-05-19

    Understanding the electronic properties of oligonucleotide systems is important for applications in nanotechnology, biology, and sensing systems. Here the charge-transport properties of guanine-rich RNA:DNA hybrids are compared to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) duplexes with identical sequences. The conductance of the RNA:DNA hybrids is ∼10 times higher than the equivalent dsDNA, and conformational differences are determined to be the primary reason for this difference. The conductance of the RNA:DNA hybrids is also found to decrease more rapidly than dsDNA when the length is increased. Ab initio electronic structure and Green's function-based density of states calculations demonstrate that these differences arise because the energy levels are more spatially distributed in the RNA:DNA hybrid but that the number of accessible hopping sites is smaller. These combination results indicate that a simple hopping model that treats each individual guanine as a hopping site is insufficient to explain both a higher conductance and β value for RNA:DNA hybrids, and larger delocalization lengths must be considered. PMID:27145167

  13. Simulation-Guided DNA Probe Design for Consistently Ultraspecific Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J. Sherry; Zhang, David Yu

    2015-01-01

    Hybridization of complementary sequences is one of the central tenets of nucleic acid chemistry; however, the unintended binding of closely related sequences limits the accuracy of hybridization-based approaches for analyzing nucleic acids. Thermodynamics-guided probe design and empirical optimization of reaction conditions have been used to enable discrimination of single nucleotide variants, but typically these approaches provide only an approximate 25-fold difference in binding affinity. Here we show that simulations of the binding kinetics are both necessary and sufficient to design nucleic acid probe systems with consistently high specificity as they enable the discovery of an optimal combination of thermodynamic parameters. Simulation-guided probe systems designed against 44 different target single nucleotide variants sequences showed between 200- and 3000-fold (median 890) higher binding affinity than their corresponding wildtype sequences. As a demonstration of the usefulness of this simulation-guided design approach we developed probes which, in combination with PCR amplification, we use to detect low concentrations of variant alleles (1%) in human genomic DNA. PMID:26100802

  14. Imaging Specific Genomic DNA in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baohui; Guan, Juan; Huang, Bo

    2016-07-01

    The three-dimensional organization of the genome plays important roles in regulating the functional output of the genome and even in the maintenance of epigenetic inheritance and genome stability. Here, we review and compare a number of newly developed methods-especially those that utilize the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat)-Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) system-that enable the direct visualization of specific, endogenous DNA sequences in living cells. We also discuss the practical considerations in implementing the CRISPR imaging technique to achieve sufficient signal-to-background levels, high specificity, and high labeling efficiency. These DNA labeling methods enable tracking of the copy number, localization, and movement of genomic elements, and we discuss the potential applications of these methods in understanding the searching and targeting mechanism of the Cas9-sgRNA complex, investigating chromosome organization, and visualizing genome instability and rearrangement. PMID:27145877

  15. Optical fibre-based detection of DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Hine, Anna V; Chen, Xianfeng; Hughes, Marcus D; Zhou, Kaiming; Davies, Edward; Sugden, Kate; Bennion, Ian; Zhang, Lin

    2009-04-01

    A dual-peak LPFG (long-period fibre grating), inscribed in an optical fibre, has been employed to sense DNA hybridization in real time, over a 1 h period. One strand of the DNA was immobilized on the fibre, while the other was free in solution. After hybridization, the fibre was stripped and repeated detection of hybridization was achieved, so demonstrating reusability of the device. Neither strand of DNA was fluorescently or otherwise labelled. The present paper will provide an overview of our early-stage experimental data and methodology, examine the potential of fibre gratings for use as biosensors to monitor both nucleic acid and other biomolecular interactions and then give a summary of the theory and fabrication of fibre gratings from a biological standpoint. Finally, the potential of improving signal strength and possible future directions of fibre grating biosensors will be addressed. PMID:19290879

  16. DNA hybridization and phosphinothricin acetyltransferase gene sequence detection based on zirconia/nanogold film modified electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Yang, Tao; Jiang, Chen; Jiao, Kui

    2008-05-01

    This study reports a novel electrochemical DNA biosensor based on zirconia (ZrO 2) and gold nanoparticles (NG) film modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). NG was electrodeposited onto the glassy carbon electrode at 1.5 V, and then zirconia thin film on the NG/GCE was fabricated by cyclic voltammetric method (CV) in an aqueous electrolyte of ZrOCl 2 and KCl at a scan rate of 20 mV/s. DNA probes were attached onto the ZrO 2/NG/GCE due to the strong binding of the phosphate group of DNA with the zirconia film and the excellent biocompatibility of nanogold with DNA. CV and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used to characterize the modification of the electrode and the probe DNA immobilization. The electrochemical response of the DNA hybridization was measured by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) using methylene blue (MB) as the electroactive indicator. After the hybridization of DNA probe (ssDNA) with the complementary DNA (cDNA), the cathodic peak current of MB decreased obviously. The difference of the cathodic peak currents of MB between before and after the hybridization of the probe DNA was used as the signal for the detection of the target DNA. The sequence-specific DNA of phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) gene in the transgenic plants was detected with a detection range from 1.0 × 10 -10 to 1.0 × 10 -6 mol/L, and a detection limit of 3.1 × 10 -11 mol/L.

  17. A novel fluorescent reagent for recognition of triplex DNA with high specificity and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zongbao; Zhang, Huimi; Ma, Xiaoming; Lin, Zhenyu; Zhang, Lan; Chen, Guonan

    2015-11-21

    A fluorescent agent (DMT) was screened for recognizing triplex DNA with a specific and selective characteristic, which was embedded into the triplex DNA structure. The triplex DNA was firstly formed by a complementary target sequence through two distinct and sequential events. The conditions including pH and hybridization time, fluorescent agent concentration and embedding time were optimized in the experiment. Under the optimum conditions, the fluorescence signal was enhanced up to 9-fold in comparison with the DMT embedding into the ssDNA, dsDNA and G-quadruplexes. Under the same fluorescence conditions, the changes of the fluorescence signal were also investigated by several kinds of base mismatched DNAs in the experiment. The results showed that our biosensor provided excellent discrimination efficiency toward the perfectly mismatched target DNA with no formation of triplex DNA. We preliminarily deduced the mechanism of the fluorescent reagent for recognizing triplex DNA with high specificity and selectivity. PMID:26456316

  18. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy of DNA-Carbon Nanotube Hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarotski, Dzmitry; Kilina, Svetlana; Talin, Alec; Balatsky, Alexander; Tretiak, Sergei; Taylor, Antoinette

    2009-03-01

    Production of carbon nanotube-based (CNT) devices holds a great promise for bringing the size of electronic circuits down to molecular scales. Recently, yet another step has been made towards achieving this goal by developing a new method for metal-semiconductor CNT separation, which relies on wrapping the CNT with ssDNA molecule[1]. Though it was shown that the outcome of the separation process strongly depends on the DNA sequence, further investigations have to be conducted to determine detailed structure of the hybrids and their electronic properties. Here, we use STM to characterize structural and electronic properties of the CNT-DNA hybrids and compare experimental results to theoretical calculations. STM images reveal 3.3 nm DNA coiling period, which agrees very well with the theoretical predictions. Additional width modulations with characteristic lengths of 1.9 and 2.6 nm are observed along the molecule itself. Although scanning tunneling microscopy confirms the presence of DNA in the hybrid and visualizes its structure, further experimental work is required to reveal the dependence of electronic properties of hybrids on their internal structure. [1] M. Zheng et al., Science 302, 1545 (2004).

  19. Method for nucleic acid hybridization using single-stranded DNA binding protein

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1996-01-01

    Method of nucleic acid hybridization for detecting the presence of a specific nucleic acid sequence in a population of different nucleic acid sequences using a nucleic acid probe. The nucleic acid probe hybridizes with the specific nucleic acid sequence but not with other nucleic acid sequences in the population. The method includes contacting a sample (potentially including the nucleic acid sequence) with the nucleic acid probe under hybridizing conditions in the presence of a single-stranded DNA binding protein provided in an amount which stimulates renaturation of a dilute solution (i.e., one in which the t.sub.1/2 of renaturation is longer than 3 weeks) of single-stranded DNA greater than 500 fold (i.e., to a t.sub.1/2 less than 60 min, preferably less than 5 min, and most preferably about 1 min.) in the absence of nucleotide triphosphates.

  20. Post-hybridization recovery of membrane filter-bound DNA for enzymatic DNA amplification.

    PubMed

    Chong, K Y; Chen, C M; Choo, K B

    1993-04-01

    We describe here a simple and rapid method for enzymatic DNA amplification using DNA template recovered from membrane filters previously used in hybridization analysis. This is done by first solubilizing membrane pieces carrying DNA of interest in dimethyl sulfoxide, followed by isopropanol precipitation and polymerase chain reaction amplification. The source of membrane-bound DNA successfully tested includes plasmid and human leukocyte DNA and DNA immobilized on bacterial colony filters and plaque lifts. The sensitivity of the procedure is such that DNA recovered from 0.5 microgram of filter-bound total human DNA was enough for PCR amplification of a 0.3-kb fragment. Our protocol will be useful for recycling of scarce DNA samples for cloning and sequencing purposes. PMID:8476600

  1. Genome-wide DNA hypomethylation and RNA:DNA hybrid accumulation in Aicardi–Goutières syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yoong Wearn; Sanz, Lionel A; Xu, Xiaoqin; Hartono, Stella R; Chédin, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Aicardi–Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a severe childhood inflammatory disorder that shows clinical and genetic overlap with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). AGS is thought to arise from the accumulation of incompletely metabolized endogenous nucleic acid species owing to mutations in nucleic acid-degrading enzymes TREX1 (AGS1), RNase H2 (AGS2, 3 and 4), and SAMHD1 (AGS5). However, the identity and source of such immunogenic nucleic acid species remain undefined. Using genome-wide approaches, we show that fibroblasts from AGS patients with AGS1-5 mutations are burdened by excessive loads of RNA:DNA hybrids. Using MethylC-seq, we show that AGS fibroblasts display pronounced and global loss of DNA methylation and demonstrate that AGS-specific RNA:DNA hybrids often occur within DNA hypomethylated regions. Altogether, our data suggest that RNA:DNA hybrids may represent a common immunogenic form of nucleic acids in AGS and provide the first evidence of epigenetic perturbations in AGS, furthering the links between AGS and SLE. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08007.001 PMID:26182405

  2. Kinetic Mechanisms in Morpholino-DNA Surface Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yatao; Irving, Damion; Qiao, Wanqiong; Ge, Dongbiao

    2011-01-01

    Morpholinos (MOs) are DNA analogues whose uncharged nature can bring fundamental advantages to surface hybridization technologies such as DNA microarrays, by using MOs as the immobilized, or “probe”, species. Advancement of MO-based diagnostics, however, is challenged by limited understanding of the surface organization of MO molecules and of how this organization impacts hybridization kinetics and thermodynamics. The present study focuses on hybridization kinetics between monolayers of MO probes and DNA targets as a function of the instantaneous extent of hybridization (i.e. duplex coverage), total probe coverage, and ionic strength. Intriguingly, these experiments reveal distinct kinetic stages, none of which are consistent with Langmuir kinetics. The initial stage, in which duplex coverage remains relatively sparse, indicates confluence of two effects: blockage of target access to unhybridized probes by previously formed duplexes, and deactivation of the solid support due to consumption of probe molecules. This interpretation is consistent with a surface organization in which unhybridized MO probes localize near the solid support, underneath a layer of MO-DNA duplexes. As duplex coverage builds, provided saturation is not reached first, the initial stage can transition to an unusual regime characterized by near independence of hybridization rate on duplex coverage, followed by a prolonged approach to equilibrium. The possible origins of these more complex latter behaviors are discussed. Comparison with published data for DNA and peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes is carried out to look for universal trends in kinetics. This comparison reveals qualitative similarities when comparable surface organization of probes is expected. In addition, MO monolayers are found capable of a broad range of reactivities that span reported values for PNA and DNA probes. PMID:21699181

  3. Kinetic mechanisms in morpholino-DNA surface hybridization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yatao; Irving, Damion; Qiao, Wanqiong; Ge, Dongbiao; Levicky, Rastislav

    2011-08-01

    Morpholinos (MOs) are DNA analogues whose uncharged nature can bring fundamental advantages to surface hybridization technologies such as DNA microarrays, by using MOs as the immobilized, or "probe", species. Advancement of MO-based diagnostics, however, is challenged by limited understanding of the surface organization of MO molecules and of how this organization impacts hybridization kinetics and thermodynamics. The present study focuses on hybridization kinetics between monolayers of MO probes and DNA targets as a function of the instantaneous extent of hybridization (i.e., duplex coverage), total probe coverage, and ionic strength. Intriguingly, these experiments reveal distinct kinetic stages, none of which are consistent with Langmuir kinetics. The initial stage, in which duplex coverage remains relatively sparse, indicates confluence of two effects: blockage of target access to unhybridized probes by previously formed duplexes and deactivation of the solid support due to consumption of probe molecules. This interpretation is consistent with a surface organization in which unhybridized MO probes localize near the solid support, underneath a layer of MO-DNA duplexes. As duplex coverage builds, provided saturation is not reached first, the initial stage can transition to an unusual regime characterized by near independence of hybridization rate on duplex coverage, followed by a prolonged approach to equilibrium. The possible origins of these more complex latter behaviors are discussed. Comparison with published data for DNA and peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes is carried out to look for universal trends in kinetics. This comparison reveals qualitative similarities when comparable surface organization of probes is expected. In addition, MO monolayers are found capable of a broad range of reactivities that span reported values for PNA and DNA probes. PMID:21699181

  4. Multiplexed DNA sequencing and diagnostics by hybridization with enriched stable isotope labels

    SciTech Connect

    Arlinghaus, H.F.; Kwoka, M.N.; Guo, X.Q.; Jacobson, K.B.

    1997-04-15

    A new DNA diagnostic and sequencing system has been developed that uses time-of-flight resonance ionization mass spectrometry (TOF-RIMS) to provide a rapid method of analyzing stable isotope-labeled oligonucleotides in form 1 sequencing by hybridization (SBH). With form 1, the DNA is immobilized on a nylon membrane and enriched isotope-labeled individual oligonucleotide probes are free to seek out complementary DNAs during hybridization. The major advantage of this new approach is that multiple oligonucleotides can be labeled with different enriched isotopes and can all be simultaneously hybridized to the genosensor matrix. The probes can then be simultaneously detected with TOF-RIMS with high selectivity, sensitivity, and efficiency. By using isotopically enriched tin labels, up to 10 labeled oligonucleotides could be examined in a single hybridization to the DNA matrix. Greater numbers of labels are available if rare earth isotopes are employed. In the present study, matrices containing three different DNAs were prepared and simultaneously hybridized with two different probes under a variety of conditions. The results show that DNAs, immobilized on nylon surfaces, can be specifically hybridized to probes labeled with different enriched tin isotopes. Discrimination between complementary and noncomplementary sites of better than 100 was obtained in multiplexed samples. 34 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Competitive Assays of Label-Free DNA Hybridization with Single-Molecule Fluorescence Imaging Detection.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Eric M; Manhart, Michael W; Harris, Joel M

    2016-06-21

    Single-molecule imaging of fluorescently labeled biomolecules is a powerful technique for measuring association interactions; however, care must be taken to ensure that the fluorescent labels do not influence the system being probed. Label-free techniques are needed to understand biomolecule interactions free from the influence of an attached label, but these techniques often lack sensitivity and specificity. To solve these challenges, we have developed a competitive assay that uses single-molecule detection to track the population of unlabeled target single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) hybridized with probe DNA immobilized at a glass interface by detecting individual duplexes with a fluorescently labeled "tracer" ssDNA. By labeling a small fraction (<0.2%) of target molecules, the "tracer" DNA tracks the available probe DNA sites without significant competition with the unlabeled target population. Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is a good read-out scheme for competitive assays, as it is sufficiently sensitive to detect tracer DNA on substrates with relatively low densities of probe DNA, ∼10(-3) of a monolayer, so that steric interactions do not hinder DNA hybridization. Competitive assays are used to measure the association constant of complementary strand DNA hybridization of 9- and 10-base pair targets, where the tracer assay predicts the same association constant as a traditional displacement competitive assay. This methodology was used to compare the Ka of hybridization for identical DNA strands differing only by the presence of a fluorescent label tethered to the 5' end of the solution-phase target. The addition of the fluorescent label significantly stabilizes the DNA duplex by 3.6 kJmol(-1), adding more stability than an additional adenine-thymine base-pairing interaction, 2.7 kJmol(-1). This competitive tracer assay could be used to screen a number of labeled and unlabeled target DNA strands to measure the impact of fluorescent labeling on duplex stability

  6. ESI-MS Investigation of an Equilibrium between a Bimolecular Quadruplex DNA and a Duplex DNA/RNA Hybrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birrento, Monica L.; Bryan, Tracy M.; Samosorn, Siritron; Beck, Jennifer L.

    2015-07-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) conditions were optimized for simultaneous observation of a bimolecular qDNA and a Watson-Crick base-paired duplex DNA/RNA hybrid. The DNA sequence used was telomeric DNA, and the RNA contained the template for telomerase-mediated telomeric DNA synthesis. Addition of RNA to the quadruplex DNA (qDNA) resulted in formation of the duplex DNA/RNA hybrid. Melting profiles obtained using circular dichroism spectroscopy confirmed that the DNA/RNA hybrid exhibited greater thermal stability than the bimolecular qDNA in solution. Binding of a 13-substituted berberine ( 1) derivative to the bimolecular qDNA stabilized its structure as evidenced by an increase in its stability in the mass spectrometer, and an increase in its circular dichroism (CD) melting temperature of 10°C. The DNA/RNA hybrid did not bind the ligand extensively and its thermal stability was unchanged in the presence of ( 1). The qDNA-ligand complex resisted unfolding in the presence of excess RNA, limiting the formation of the DNA/RNA hybrid. Previously, it has been proposed that DNA secondary structures, such as qDNA, may be involved in the telomerase mechanism. DNA/RNA hybrid structures occur at the active site of telomerase. The results presented in the current work show that if telomeric DNA was folded into a qDNA structure, it is possible for a DNA/RNA hybrid to form as is required during template alignment. The discrimination of ligand ( 1) for binding to the bimolecular qDNA over the DNA/RNA hybrid positions it as a useful compound for probing the role(s), if any, of antiparallel qDNA in the telomerase mechanism.

  7. DNA-DNA hybridization assay for detection of Salmonella spp. in foods.

    PubMed Central

    Fitts, R; Diamond, M; Hamilton, C; Neri, M

    1983-01-01

    We have developed a DNA-DNA hybridization test for the presence of Salmonella spp. in foods. This test requires an initial pre-enrichment of food samples in nutrient broth but does not require selective enrichment. Samples of food cultures are collected on membrane filters and assayed by molecular hybridization to labeled probes. The probes consist of DNA sequences which are unique to the genus Salmonella and are widely distributed in the genus. A diverse panel of foods was assayed successfully by this methodology. Images PMID:6360046

  8. DNA microarrays for hybridization detection by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kick, Alfred; Bönsch, Martin; Katzschner, Beate; Voigt, Jan; Herr, Alexander; Brabetz, Werner; Jung, Martin; Sonntag, Frank; Klotzbach, Udo; Danz, Norbert; Howitz, Steffen; Mertig, Michael

    2010-12-15

    We report on the development of a new platform technology for the detection of genetic variations by means of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. TOPAS chips with integrated optics were exploited in combination with microfluidics. Within minutes, the detection of hybridization kinetics was achieved simultaneously at all spots of the DNA microarray. A nanoliter dispenser is used to deposit thiol-modified single-stranded probe DNA on the gold surface of the chips. We investigated the influence of different parameters on hybridization using model polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products. These PCR products comprised a single-stranded tag sequence being complementary to an anti-tag sequence of probes immobilized on the gold surface. The signals increased with increasing length of PCR products (60, 100 or 300 base pairs) as well as with their concentration. We investigated hybridizations on DNA microarrays comprising 90 spots of probe DNA with three different sequences. Furthermore, we demonstrate that sequences with possible hairpin structures significantly lower the binding rate, and thus, the SPR signals during hybridization. PMID:20729067

  9. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoflakes as inherently electroactive labels for DNA hybridization detection.

    PubMed

    Loo, Adeline Huiling; Bonanni, Alessandra; Ambrosi, Adriano; Pumera, Martin

    2014-10-21

    The detection of specific DNA sequences plays a critical role in the areas of medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, drug discovery and food safety. This has therefore become a strong driving force behind the ever-increasing demand for simple, cost-effective, highly sensitive and selective DNA biosensors. In this study, we report for the first time, a novel approach for the utilization of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes, a member of the transition metal dichalcogenides family, in the detection of DNA hybridization. Herein, molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes serve as inherently electroactive labels, with the inherent oxidation peak exploited as the analytical signal. The principle of detection is based on the differential affinity of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes towards single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA. The employment of transition metal dichalcogenide nanomaterials for sensing and biosensing purposes represents an upcoming research area which holds great promise. Hence, our findings are anticipated to have significant contributions towards the fabrication of future DNA biosensors. PMID:25177907

  10. Highly sensitive electrochemical biosensor based on nonlinear hybridization chain reaction for DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Jia, Liping; Shi, Shanshan; Ma, Rongna; Jia, Wenli; Wang, Huaisheng

    2016-06-15

    In the present work we demonstrated an ultrasensitive detection platform for specific DNA based on nonlinear hybridization chain reaction (HCR) by triggering chain-branching growth of DNA dendrimers. HCR was initiated by target DNA (tDNA) and finally formed dendritic structure by self-assembly. The electrochemical signal was drastically enhanced by capturing multiple catalytic peroxidase with high-ordered growth. Electrochemical signals were obtained by measuring the reduction current of oxidized 3, 3', 5, 5'-tetramethylbenzidine sulfate (TMB), which was generated by HRP in the presence of H2O2. This method exhibited ultrahigh sensitivity to tDNA with detection limit of 0.4fM. Furthermore, the biosensor was also capable of discriminating single-nucleotide difference among concomitant DNA sequences. PMID:26872213

  11. Co-Localization of Multiple Antigens and Specific DNA

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Marcus; Wacker, Karin; Hickey, William F.; Ringelstein, Erich B.; Kiefer, Reinhard

    2000-01-01

    Co-localization of proteins and nucleic acid sequences by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry is frequently difficult as the process necessary to detect the target structure of one technique may negatively affect the target of the other. Morphological impairment may also limit the application of the two techniques on sensitive tissue. To overcome these problems we developed a method to perform in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry on semithin sections of methyl methacrylate-embedded tissue. Microwave-stimulated antigen retrieval, signal amplification by catalyzed reporter deposition, and fluorescent dyes were used for both techniques, yielding high sensitivity and excellent morphological preservation compared to conventional paraffin sections. Co-localization of in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry signals with high morphological resolution was achieved on single sections as well as on adjacent multiple serial sections, using computerized image processing. The latter allowed for the co-localization of multiple antigens and a specific DNA sequence at the same tissue level. The method was successfully applied to radiation bone marrow chimeric rats created by transplanting wild-type Lewis rat bone marrow into TK-tsa transgenic Lewis rats, in an attempt to trace and characterize TK-tsa transgenic cells. It also proved useful in the co-localization of multiple antigens in peripheral nerve biopsies. PMID:11106556

  12. DNA sequence copy number analysis by Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH)

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkel, D.; Kallioniemi, A.; Kallioniemi, O.; Waldman, F.; Sudar, D.; Gray, I. ); Rutovitz, D.; Piper, I. )

    1993-01-01

    Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) uses the kinetics of in situ hybridization to compare the copy numbers of different DNA sequences within the same genome and the copy numbers of the same sequences among different genomes. In a typical application genomic DNA from a tumor and from normal cells are differentially labeled and simultaneously hybridized to normal metaphase chromosomes, and detected with different fluorochromes. Properly registered images of each fluorochrome are obtained using a microscope equipped with multi-band filters and a CCD camera. Digital image analysis permits measurement of intensity ratio profiles along each of the target chromosomes. Studies of cells with known aberrations indicate that the intensity ratio at each position is proportional to the ratio of the copy numbers of the sequences that bind there in the tumor and normal genomes. Analytical challenges posed by the need to efficiently obtain copy number karyotypes are discussed.

  13. The illusion of specific capture: surface and solution studies of suboptimal oligonucleotide hybridization

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hybridization based assays and capture systems depend on the specificity of hybridization between a probe and its intended target. A common guideline in the construction of DNA microarrays, for instance, is that avoiding complementary stretches of more than 15 nucleic acids in a 50 or 60-mer probe will eliminate sequence specific cross-hybridization reactions. Here we present a study of the behavior of partially matched oligonucleotide pairs with complementary stretches starting well below this threshold complementarity length – in silico, in solution, and at the microarray surface. The modeled behavior of pairs of oligonucleotide probes and their targets suggests that even a complementary stretch of sequence 12 nt in length would give rise to specific cross-hybridization. We designed a set of binding partners to a 50-mer oligonucleotide containing complementary stretches from 6 nt to 21 nt in length. Results Solution melting experiments demonstrate that stable partial duplexes can form when only 12 bp of complementary sequence are present; surface hybridization experiments confirm that a signal close in magnitude to full-strength signal can be obtained from hybridization of a 12 bp duplex within a 50mer oligonucleotide. Conclusions Microarray and other molecular capture strategies that rely on a 15 nt lower complementarity bound for eliminating specific cross-hybridization may not be sufficiently conservative. PMID:23445545

  14. Coarse-grained DNA modeling: Hybridization and ionic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinckley, Daniel M.

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is a biopolymer of enormous significance in living systems. The utility of DNA in such systems is derived from the programmable nature of DNA and its unique mechanical properties. Recently, material scientists have harnessed these properties in order to create systems that spontaneous self-assemble on the nanoscale. Both biologists and material scientists are hindered by an incomplete understanding of the physical interactions that together govern DNA's behavior. Computer simulations, especially those at the coarse-grained (CG) level, can potentially complete this understanding by resolving details indiscernible with current experimental techniques. In this thesis, we advance the state-of-the-art of DNA CG simulations by first reviewing the relevant theory and the evolution of CG DNA models since their inception. Then we present 3SPN.2, an improved CG model for DNA that should provide new insights into biological and nanotechnological systems which incorporate DNA. We perform forward flux sampling simulations in order to examine the effect of sequence, oligomer length, and ionic strength on DNA oligomer hybridization. Due to the limitations inherent in continuum treatments of electrostatic interactions in biological systems, we generate a CG model of biological ions for use with 3SPN.2 and other CG models. Lastly, we illustrate the potential of 3SPN.2 and CG ions by using the models in simulations of viral capsid packaging experiments. The models and results described in this thesis will be useful in future modeling efforts that seek to identify the fundamental physics that govern behavior such as nucleosome positioning, DNA hybridization, and DNA nanoassembly.

  15. Electrochemical DNA Hybridization Sensors Based on Conducting Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md. Mahbubur; Li, Xiao-Bo; Lopa, Nasrin Siraj; Ahn, Sang Jung; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Conducting polymers (CPs) are a group of polymeric materials that have attracted considerable attention because of their unique electronic, chemical, and biochemical properties. This is reflected in their use in a wide range of potential applications, including light-emitting diodes, anti-static coating, electrochromic materials, solar cells, chemical sensors, biosensors, and drug-release systems. Electrochemical DNA sensors based on CPs can be used in numerous areas related to human health. This review summarizes the recent progress made in the development and use of CP-based electrochemical DNA hybridization sensors. We discuss the distinct properties of CPs with respect to their use in the immobilization of probe DNA on electrode surfaces, and we describe the immobilization techniques used for developing DNA hybridization sensors together with the various transduction methods employed. In the concluding part of this review, we present some of the challenges faced in the use of CP-based DNA hybridization sensors, as well as a future perspective. PMID:25664436

  16. Rapid genomic DNA changes in allotetraploid fish hybrids.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Ye, L H; Liu, Q Z; Peng, L Y; Liu, W; Yi, X G; Wang, Y D; Xiao, J; Xu, K; Hu, F Z; Ren, L; Tao, M; Zhang, C; Liu, Y; Hong, Y H; Liu, S J

    2015-06-01

    Rapid genomic change has been demonstrated in several allopolyploid plant systems; however, few studies focused on animals. We addressed this issue using an allotetraploid lineage (4nAT) of freshwater fish originally derived from the interspecific hybridization of red crucian carp (Carassius auratus red var., ♀, 2n=100) × common carp (Cyprinus carpio L., ♂, 2n=100). We constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library from allotetraploid hybrids in the 20th generation (F20) and sequenced 14 BAC clones representing a total of 592.126 kb, identified 11 functional genes and estimated the guanine-cytosine content (37.10%) and the proportion of repetitive elements (17.46%). The analysis of intron evolution using nine orthologous genes across a number of selected fish species detected a gain of 39 introns and a loss of 30 introns in the 4nAT lineage. A comparative study based on seven functional genes among 4nAT, diploid F1 hybrids (2nF1) (first generation of hybrids) and their original parents revealed that both hybrid types (2nF1 and 4nAT) not only inherited genomic DNA from their parents, but also demonstrated rapid genomic DNA changes (homoeologous recombination, parental DNA fragments loss and formation of novel genes). However, 4nAT presented more genomic variations compared with their parents than 2nF1. Interestingly, novel gene fragments were found for the iqca1 gene in both hybrid types. This study provided a preliminary genomic characterization of allotetraploid F20 hybrids and revealed evolutionary and functional genomic significance of allopolyploid animals. PMID:25669608

  17. Identification of Lotus rhizobia by direct DNA hybridization of crushed root nodules

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.E.; Bjourson, A.J.; Thompson, J.K.

    1987-07-01

    Hybridization of crushed Lotus pedunculatus root nodules with /sup 32/P-labeled total genomic DNA probes was used to identify Rhizobium loti and Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lotus rhizobia). Probes always hybridized with homologous target DNA and frequency with DNAs of other strains from the same genus. Intergeneric hybridization did not occur. Results were comparable to those from colony hybridization.

  18. Multilayer DNA origami packed on hexagonal and hybrid lattices.

    PubMed

    Ke, Yonggang; Voigt, Niels V; Gothelf, Kurt V; Shih, William M

    2012-01-25

    "Scaffolded DNA origami" has been proven to be a powerful and efficient approach to construct two-dimensional or three-dimensional objects with great complexity. Multilayer DNA origami has been demonstrated with helices packing along either honeycomb-lattice geometry or square-lattice geometry. Here we report successful folding of multilayer DNA origami with helices arranged on a close-packed hexagonal lattice. This arrangement yields a higher density of helical packing and therefore higher resolution of spatial addressing than has been shown previously. We also demonstrate hybrid multilayer DNA origami with honeycomb-lattice, square-lattice, and hexagonal-lattice packing of helices all in one design. The availability of hexagonal close-packing of helices extends our ability to build complex structures using DNA nanotechnology. PMID:22187940

  19. Gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) mediated electrochemical DNA biosensor for DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Topkaya, Seda Nur

    2015-02-15

    In this study, an electrochemical biosensor system for the detection of DNA hybridization by using gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) modified electrodes was developed. Electrochemical behavior of GelMA modified Pencil Graphite Electrode (PGE) that serve as a functional platform was investigated by using Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and compared with those of the bare PGE. Hybridization was achieved in solution phase and guanine oxidation signal changes were evaluated. The decrease in the guanine oxidation peak currents at around +1.0 V was used as an indicator for the DNA hybridization. Also, more interestingly GelMA intrinsic oxidation peaks at around +0.7 V changed substantially by immobilization of different oligonucleotides such as probe, hybrid and control sequences to the electrode surface. It is the first study of using GelMA as a part of an electrochemical biosensor system. The results are very promising in terms of using GelMA as a new DNA hybridization indicator. Additionally, GelMA modified electrodes could be useful for detecting ultra low quantity of oligonucleotides by providing mechanical support to the bio-recognition layer. The detection limit of this method is at present 10(-12)mol. Signal suppressions were increased from 50% to 93% for hybrid with using GelMA when it was compared to bare electrode which facilitates the hybridization detection. PMID:25286352

  20. Physical localisation of repetitive DNA sequences in Alstroemeria: karyotyping of two species with species-specific and ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Kamstra, S A; Kuipers, A G; De Jeu, M J; Ramanna, M S; Jacobsen, E

    1997-10-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to localise two species-specific repetitive DNA sequences, A001-I and D32-13, and two highly conserved 25S and 5S rDNA sequences on the metaphase chromosomes of two species of Alstroemeria. The Chilean species, Alstroemeria aurea (2n = 16), has abundant constitutive heterochromatin, whereas the Brazilian species, Alstroemeria inodora, has hardly any heterochromatin. The A. aurea specific A001-I probe hybridized specifically to the C-band regions on all chromosomes. The FISH patterns on A. inodora chromosomes using species-specific probe D32-13 resembled the C-banding pattern and the A001-I pattern on A. aurea chromosomes. There were notable differences in number and distribution of rDNA sites between the two species. The 25S rDNA probe revealed 16 sites in A. aurea that closely colocalised with A001-I sites and 12 in A. inodora that were predominantly detected in the centromeric regions. FISH karyotypes of the two Alstroemeria species were constructed accordingly, enabling full identification of all individual chromosomes. These FISH karyotypes will be useful for monitoring the chromosomes of both Alstroemeria species in hybrids and backcross derivatives. PMID:9352644

  1. Fabrication of Uniform DNA-Conjugated Hydrogel Microparticles via Replica Molding for Facile Nucleic Acid Hybridization Assays

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Christina L.; Choi, Chang-Hyung; Lin, Yan; Lee, Chang-Soo; Yi, Hyunmin

    2010-01-01

    We identify and investigate several critical parameters in the fabrication of single-stranded DNA conjugated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) microparticles based on replica molding (RM) for highly uniform and robust nucleic acid hybridization assays. The effects of PEG-diacrylate, probe DNA, and photoinitiator concentrations on the overall fluorescence and target DNA penetration depth upon hybridization are examined. Fluorescence and confocal microscopy results illustrate high conjugation capacity of probe and target DNA, femtomole sensitivity, and sequence specificity. Combined these findings demonstrate a significant step toward simple, robust, and scalable procedures to manufacture highly uniform and high capacity hybridization assay particles in a well-controlled manner by exploiting many advantages that the batch processing-based RM technique offers. We envision that the results presented here may be readily applied to rapid and high throughput hybridization assays for a wide variety of applications in bioprocess monitoring, food safety, and biological threat detection. PMID:20527819

  2. Fabrication of uniform DNA-conjugated hydrogel microparticles via replica molding for facile nucleic acid hybridization assays.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Christina L; Choi, Chang-Hyung; Lin, Yan; Lee, Chang-Soo; Yi, Hyunmin

    2010-07-01

    We identify and investigate several critical parameters in the fabrication of single-stranded DNA conjugated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) microparticles based on replica molding (RM) for highly uniform and robust nucleic acid hybridization assays. The effects of PEG-diacrylate, probe DNA, and photoinitiator concentrations on the overall fluorescence and target DNA penetration depth upon hybridization are examined. Fluorescence and confocal microscopy results illustrate high conjugation capacity of the probe and target DNA, femtomole sensitivity, and sequence specificity. Combined, these findings demonstrate a significant step toward simple, robust, and scalable procedures to manufacture highly uniform and high-capacity hybridization assay particles in a well-controlled manner by exploiting many advantages that the batch processing-based RM technique offers. We envision that the results presented here may be readily applied to rapid and high-throughput hybridization assays for a wide variety of applications in bioprocess monitoring, food safety, and biological threat detection. PMID:20527819

  3. ATP-Responsive DNA-Graphene Hybrid Nanoaggregates for Anticancer Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Ran; Jiang, Tianyue; Sun, Wujin; Gu, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Stimuli-triggered drug delivery systems are primarily focused on the applications of the tumor microenvironmental or cellular physiological cues to enhance the release of drugs at the target site. In this study, we applied adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP), the primary “energy molecule”, as a trigger for enhanced release of preloaded drugs responding to the intracellular ATP concentration that is significantly higher than the extracellular level. A new ATP-responsive anticancer drug delivery strategy utilizing DNA-graphene crosslinked hybrid nanoaggregates as carriers was developed for controlled release of doxorubicin (DOX), which consists of graphene oxide (GO), two single-stranded DNA (ssDNA, denoted as DNA1 and DNA2) and ATP aptamer. The single-stranded DNA1 and DNA2 together with the ATP aptamer serve as the linkers upon hybridization for controlled assembly of the DNA-GO nanoaggregates, which effectively inhibited the release of DOX from the GO nanosheets. In the presence of ATP, the responsive formation of the ATP/ATP aptamer complex causes the dissociation of the aggregates, which promoted the release of DOX in the environment with a high ATP concentration such as cytosol compared with that in the ATP-deficient extracellular fluid. This supports the development of a novel ATP-responsive platform for targeted on-demand delivery of anticancer drugs inside specific cells. PMID:25736497

  4. Chimeric DNA methyltransferases target DNA methylation to specific DNA sequences and repress expression of target genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fuyang; Papworth, Monika; Minczuk, Michal; Rohde, Christian; Zhang, Yingying; Ragozin, Sergei; Jeltsch, Albert

    2007-01-01

    Gene silencing by targeted DNA methylation has potential applications in basic research and therapy. To establish targeted methylation in human cell lines, the catalytic domains (CDs) of mouse Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b DNA methyltransferases (MTases) were fused to different DNA binding domains (DBD) of GAL4 and an engineered Cys2His2 zinc finger domain. We demonstrated that (i) Dense DNA methylation can be targeted to specific regions in gene promoters using chimeric DNA MTases. (ii) Site-specific methylation leads to repression of genes controlled by various cellular or viral promoters. (iii) Mutations affecting any of the DBD, MTase or target DNA sequences reduce targeted methylation and gene silencing. (iv) Targeted DNA methylation is effective in repressing Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection in cell culture with the viral titer reduced by at least 18-fold in the presence of an MTase fused to an engineered zinc finger DBD, which binds a single site in the promoter of HSV-1 gene IE175k. In short, we show here that it is possible to direct DNA MTase activity to predetermined sites in DNA, achieve targeted gene silencing in mammalian cell lines and interfere with HSV-1 propagation. PMID:17151075

  5. Use of synthetic oligonucleotides for genomic DNA dot hybridization to split the DQw3 haplotype.

    PubMed Central

    Martell, M; Le Gall, I; Millasseau, P; Dausset, J; Cohen, D

    1988-01-01

    Comparison of two different HLA-DQ beta gene sequences from two DR4 individuals, probably corresponding to DQw3.2 (DQR4) and DQw3.1 (DQR5) specificities, has shown several nucleotide variations. Eight oligonucleotides (24 bases long), derived from these polymorphic areas, have been synthesized. Each oligonucleotide was hybridized to BamHI-digested DNA samples from eight families with HLA-DR4 individuals. Four polymorphic BamHI fragments were detected. Two of eight oligonucleotides gave a single signal (8.9 kilobases) on DQw3.2-positive haplotypes. We used one of these oligonucleotides in a genomic DNA dot hybridization and detected a hybridization signal only in DQw3.2-positive individuals. A very simple test like this allows the screening of a large population sample within a very short period. Images PMID:2895927

  6. Human DNA ligase III bridges two DNA ends to promote specific intermolecular DNA end joining

    PubMed Central

    Kukshal, Vandna; Kim, In-Kwon; Hura, Gregory L.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Tainer, John A.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian DNA ligase III (LigIII) functions in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA metabolism. In the nucleus, LigIII has functional redundancy with DNA ligase I whereas LigIII is the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and is essential for the survival of cells dependent upon oxidative respiration. The unique LigIII zinc finger (ZnF) domain is not required for catalytic activity but senses DNA strand breaks and stimulates intermolecular ligation of two DNAs by an unknown mechanism. Consistent with this activity, LigIII acts in an alternative pathway of DNA double strand break repair that buttresses canonical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and is manifest in NHEJ-defective cancer cells, but how LigIII acts in joining intermolecular DNA ends versus nick ligation is unclear. To investigate how LigIII efficiently joins two DNAs, we developed a real-time, fluorescence-based assay of DNA bridging suitable for high-throughput screening. On a nicked duplex DNA substrate, the results reveal binding competition between the ZnF and the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domain, one of three domains constituting the LigIII catalytic core. In contrast, these domains collaborate and are essential for formation of a DNA-bridging intermediate by adenylated LigIII that positions a pair of blunt-ended duplex DNAs for efficient and specific intermolecular ligation. PMID:26130724

  7. Detection of herpes simplex virus-specific DNA sequences in latently infected mice and in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Efstathiou, S; Minson, A C; Field, H J; Anderson, J R; Wildy, P

    1986-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-specific DNA sequences have been detected by Southern hybridization analysis in both central and peripheral nervous system tissues of latently infected mice. We have detected virus-specific sequences corresponding to the junction fragment but not the genomic termini, an observation first made by Rock and Fraser (Nature [London] 302:523-525, 1983). This "endless" herpes simplex virus DNA is both qualitatively and quantitatively stable in mouse neural tissue analyzed over a 4-month period. In addition, examination of DNA extracted from human trigeminal ganglia has shown herpes simplex virus DNA to be present in an "endless" form similar to that found in the mouse model system. Further restriction enzyme analysis of latently infected mouse brainstem and human trigeminal DNA has shown that this "endless" herpes simplex virus DNA is present in all four isomeric configurations. Images PMID:3003377

  8. Automated hybridization/imaging device for fluorescent multiplex DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Robert B.; Kimball, Alvin W.; Gesteland, Raymond F.; Ferguson, F. Mark; Dunn, Diane M.; Di Sera, Leonard J.; Cherry, Joshua L.

    1995-01-01

    A method is disclosed for automated multiplex sequencing of DNA with an integrated automated imaging hybridization chamber system. This system comprises an hybridization chamber device for mounting a membrane containing size-fractionated multiplex sequencing reaction products, apparatus for fluid delivery to the chamber device, imaging apparatus for light delivery to the membrane and image recording of fluorescence emanating from the membrane while in the chamber device, and programmable controller apparatus for controlling operation of the system. The multiplex reaction products are hybridized with a probe, then an enzyme (such as alkaline phosphatase) is bound to a binding moiety on the probe, and a fluorogenic substrate (such as a benzothiazole derivative) is introduced into the chamber device by the fluid delivery apparatus. The enzyme converts the fluorogenic substrate into a fluorescent product which, when illuminated in the chamber device with a beam of light from the imaging apparatus, excites fluorescence of the fluorescent product to produce a pattern of hybridization. The pattern of hybridization is imaged by a CCD camera component of the imaging apparatus to obtain a series of digital signals. These signals are converted by the controller apparatus into a string of nucleotides corresponding to the nucleotide sequence an automated sequence reader. The method and apparatus are also applicable to other membrane-based applications such as colony and plaque hybridization and Southern, Northern, and Western blots.

  9. Automated hybridization/imaging device for fluorescent multiplex DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, R.B.; Kimball, A.W.; Gesteland, R.F.; Ferguson, F.M.; Dunn, D.M.; Di Sera, L.J.; Cherry, J.L.

    1995-11-28

    A method is disclosed for automated multiplex sequencing of DNA with an integrated automated imaging hybridization chamber system. This system comprises an hybridization chamber device for mounting a membrane containing size-fractionated multiplex sequencing reaction products, apparatus for fluid delivery to the chamber device, imaging apparatus for light delivery to the membrane and image recording of fluorescence emanating from the membrane while in the chamber device, and programmable controller apparatus for controlling operation of the system. The multiplex reaction products are hybridized with a probe, the enzyme (such as alkaline phosphatase) is bound to a binding moiety on the probe, and a fluorogenic substrate (such as a benzothiazole derivative) is introduced into the chamber device by the fluid delivery apparatus. The enzyme converts the fluorogenic substrate into a fluorescent product which, when illuminated in the chamber device with a beam of light from the imaging apparatus, excites fluorescence of the fluorescent product to produce a pattern of hybridization. The pattern of hybridization is imaged by a CCD camera component of the imaging apparatus to obtain a series of digital signals. These signals are converted by the controller apparatus into a string of nucleotides corresponding to the nucleotide sequence an automated sequence reader. The method and apparatus are also applicable to other membrane-based applications such as colony and plaque hybridization and Southern, Northern, and Western blots. 9 figs.

  10. Using radiation hybrids to generate region-specific markers for human chromosome 9

    SciTech Connect

    Britt, D.E.; Mark, H.F.L.; Nebres, M.

    1994-09-01

    The production of sequence tagged sites and polymorphic markers is an important step in generating a physical map of the human genome and identifying loci involved in genetic diseases. Our work involves the physical mapping of the short arm of human chromosome 9, the site of at least one tumor supressor gene, as well as the locus involved in cartilage hair hypoplasia. Our goal is to increase the number of markers available for 9p, using a panel of radiation hybrids we have constructed and characterized. The hybrids were generated from a monochromosomal hybrid that contains human chromosome 9 marked with a retroviral vector. Radiation hybrids were produced that contain overlapping regions of the chromosome surrounding the site of retroviral integration. In order to generate markers specific for the short arm, Alu-PCR products from a radiation hybrid containing only 9p were cloned. Clones were mapped back to a subpanel of hybrids and grouped into intervals. By using a hybrid subpanel containing overlapping portions 9p, we are able to identify clones from defined regions. DNA from the clones was sequenced and this information used to generate sequence tagged sites. We have also developed a number of new polymorphic markers, taking advantage of the high degree of polymorphism of the 3{prime} end of each Alu sequence. For each polymorphic marker, a specific primer was designed from the cloned DNA and then paired with an Alu primer. These primer pairs were used to amplify DNA from unrelated individuals, in order to identify primer sets that detect useful polymorphisms. Both the STS and polymorphic markers will be extremely useful in the construction of a physical map of chromosome 9, and in the identification of genes on the short arm of the chromosome.

  11. Quantum dot monolayer for surface plasmon resonance signal enhancement and DNA hybridization detection.

    PubMed

    Ghrera, Aditya Sharma; Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Malhotra, Bansi Dhar

    2016-06-15

    We report results of studies relating to the fabrication of a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based nucleic acid sensor for quantification of DNA sequence specific to chronic myelogeneous leukemia (CML). The SPR disk surface has been modified with octadecanethiol self-assembled monolayer followed by deposition of the tri-n-octylphosphine oxide capped cadmium selenide quantum dots (QD) Langmuir monolayer. The deposition is performed via Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. For the sensor chip preparation, covalent immobilization of the thiol-terminated DNA probe sequence (pDNA) using displacement reaction is accomplished. This integrated SPR chip has been used to detect target complementary DNA concentration by monitoring the change in coupling angle via hybridization. It is revealed that this biosensor exhibits high sensitivity (0.7859 m(0)pM(-1)) towards complementary DNA and can be used to detect it in the concentration range, 180 pM to 5 pM with detection limit as 4.21 pM. The results of kinetic studies yield the values of hybridization and dissociation rate constants as 9.6 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) and 2.3 × 10(-2) s(-1), respectively, with the equilibrium constant for hybridization as 4.2 × 10(6) M(-1). PMID:26878485

  12. Probing DNA hybridization efficiency and single base mismatch by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng-Chun; Zhang, Xin; He, Nong-Yue; Lu, Zu-Hong; Chen, Zhen-Cheng

    2009-07-01

    We demonstrated the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to study DNA hybridization. Target DNA labeled with hexachloro-fluorescein (HEX) was hybridized to DNA arrays with four different probes. Each probe dot of the hybridized arrays was detected with XPS. The XPS Cl2p peak areas were found to decrease with an increase in mismatched bases in DNA probes. The Cl2p core-level peak area ratio of a probe perfectly matched to one, two and three base-mismatched probes accorded well with the results of conventional fluorescent imaging, which shows that XPS is a potential tool for analyzing DNA arrays. The DNA arrays' hybridization efficiency was assessed by the molar ratio of chlorine to phosphorus in a DNA strand, which was determined from the relevant XPS Cl2p and P2p core-level peak areas after hybridization. This could provide a new method to detect DNA hybridization efficiency. PMID:19282155

  13. Antibody specific for a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-07-11

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  14. Charge transfer through DNA/DNA duplexes and DNA/RNA hybrids: complex theoretical and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Kratochvílová, Irena; Vala, Martin; Weiter, Martin; Špérová, Miroslava; Schneider, Bohdan; Páv, Ondřej; Šebera, Jakub; Rosenberg, Ivan; Sychrovský, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Oligonucleotides conduct electric charge via various mechanisms and their characterization and understanding is a very important and complicated task. In this work, experimental (temperature dependent steady state fluorescence spectroscopy, time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy) and theoretical (Density Functional Theory) approaches were combined to study charge transfer processes in short DNA/DNA and RNA/DNA duplexes with virtually equivalent sequences. The experimental results were consistent with the theoretical model - the delocalized nature of HOMO orbitals and holes, base stacking, electronic coupling and conformational flexibility formed the conditions for more effective short distance charge transfer processes in RNA/DNA hybrids. RNA/DNA and DNA/DNA charge transfer properties were strongly connected with temperature affected structural changes of molecular systems - charge transfer could be used as a probe of even tiny changes of molecular structures and settings. PMID:23968861

  15. Ultrasensitive FRET-based DNA sensor using PNA/DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lan-Hee; Ahn, Dong June; Koo, Eunhae

    2016-12-01

    In the diagnosis of genetic diseases, rapid and highly sensitive DNA detection is crucial. Therefore, many strategies for detecting target DNA have been developed, including electrical, optical, and mechanical methods. Herein, a highly sensitive FRET based sensor was developed by using PNA (Peptide Nucleic Acid) probe and QD, in which red color QDs are hybridized with capture probes, reporter probes and target DNAs by EDC-NHS coupling. The hybridized probe with target DNA gives off fluorescent signal due to the energy transfer from QD to Cy5 dye in the reporter probe. Compared to the conventional DNA sensor using DNA probes, the DNA sensor using PNA probes shows higher FRET factor and efficiency due to the higher reactivity between PNA and target DNA. In addition, to elicit the effect of the distance between the donor and the acceptor, we have investigated two types of the reporter probes having Cy5 dyes attached at the different positions of the reporter probes. Results show that the shorter the distance between QDs and Cy5s, the stronger the signal intensity. Furthermore, based on the fluorescence microscopy images using microcapillary chips, the FRET signal is enhanced to be up to 276% times stronger than the signal obtained using the cuvette by the fluorescence spectrometer. These results suggest that the PNA probe system conjugated with QDs can be used as ultrasensitive DNA nanosensors. PMID:27612755

  16. Hybrid Pathogen DNA Detector:Users? Manual v1.5

    SciTech Connect

    Schikora, B; Hietala, S; Shi, L; Lee, L; Skowronski, E; Ardans, A

    2004-01-12

    The Hybrid Unit uses an advanced fluidic design to move very small reagent samples through many unit operations to complete complex molecular biology experiments. The primary use of this machine is to analyze a small liquid sample for the highly specific presence of select agents known to be used in bio-warfare. The Hybrid Unit is coupled with a Luminex bead detection unit for the multiplexing of many assays in one tube. Because of this, multiple controls can be included in each run to avoid false positives. The built-in flow through PCR unit amplifies specific DNA signatures and increases sensitivity, thereby limiting exposure of handlers to highly concentrated (and potentially hazardous, spore containing) sample volumes. The reproducible precision of the Hybrid Unit also gives confidence when a signal is given that detects an agent in a given sample.

  17. Preparation of genosensor for detection of specific DNA sequence of the hepatitis B virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honorato Castro, Ana C.; França, Erick G.; de Paula, Lucas F.; Soares, Marcia M. C. N.; Goulart, Luiz R.; Madurro, João M.; Brito-Madurro, Ana G.

    2014-09-01

    An electrochemical genosensor was constructed for detection of specific DNA sequence of the hepatitis B virus, based on graphite electrodes modified with poly(4-aminophenol) and incorporating a specific oligonucleotide probe. The modified electrode containing the probe was evaluated by differential pulse voltammetry, before and after incubation with the complementary oligonucleotide target. Detection was performed by monitoring oxidizable DNA bases (direct detection) or using ethidium bromide as indicator of the hybridization process (indirect detection). The device showed a detection limit for the oligonucleotide target of 2.61 nmol L-1. Indirect detection using ethidium bromide was promising in discriminating mismatches, which is a very desirable attribute for detection of disease-related point mutations. In addition, it was possible to observe differences between hybridized and non-hybridized surfaces by atomic force microscopy.

  18. rDNA genetic imbalance and nucleolar chromatin restructuring is induced by distant hybridization between Raphanus sativus and Brassica alboglabra.

    PubMed

    Long, Hong; Chen, Chunli; Wang, Bing; Feng, Yanni

    2015-01-01

    The expression of rDNA in hybrids inherited from only one progenitor refers to nucleolar dominance. The molecular basis for choosing which genes to silence remains unclear. We report genetic imbalance induced by distant hybridization correlates with formation of rDNA genes (NORs) in the hybrids between Raphanus sativus L. and Brassica alboglabra Bailey. Moreover, increased CCGG methylation of rDNA in F1 hybrids is concomitant with Raphanus-derived rDNA gene silencing and rDNA transcriptional inactivity revealed by nucleolar configuration restriction. Newly formed rDNA gene locus occurred through chromosomal in F1 hybrids via chromosomal imbalance. NORs are gained de novo, lost, and/or transposed in the new genome. Inhibition of methyltransferases leads to changes in nucleolar architecture, implicating a key role of methylation in control of nucleolar dominance and vital nucleolar configuration transition. Our findings suggest that gene imbalance and methylation-related chromatin restructuring is important for rDNA gene silencing that may be crucial for synthesis of specific proteins. PMID:25723542

  19. Molecular characterization of a bovine Y-specific DNA sequence conserved in taurine and zebu breeds.

    PubMed

    Alves, Beatriz C A; Mayer, Mário G; Taber, Anna Paula; Egito, Andréa A; Fagundes, Valéria; McElreavey, Ken; Moreira-Filho, Carlos A

    2006-06-01

    The identification of new bovine male-specific DNA sequences is of great interest because the bovine Y chromosome remains poorly characterized in terms of physical and genetic maps. Since taurine and zebu Y chromosomes are structurally different, the identification of Y-specific sequences present in both sub-species is particularly important: these sequences are of evolutionary significance and can be broadly used for embryo sexing. In this work, we initially used the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique to search for male-specific sequences present as monomorphic markers in genomic DNA from zebu and taurine bulls. A male-specific RAPD band was found to be present and highly conserved in both sub-species, as demonstrated by Southern blotting, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and DNA sequencing. In a previous work, a pair of primers derived from this marker was successfully used in taurine and zebu embryo sexing. PMID:17286047

  20. DNA methylation in placentas of interspecies mouse hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Schütt, Sabine; Florl, Andrea R; Shi, Wei; Hemberger, Myriam; Orth, Annie; Otto, Sabine; Schulz, Wolfgang A; Fundele, Reinald H

    2003-01-01

    Interspecific hybridization in the genus Mus results in several hybrid dysgenesis effects, such as male sterility and X-linked placental dysplasia (IHPD). The genetic or molecular basis for the placental phenotypes is at present not clear. However, an extremely complex genetic system that has been hypothesized to be caused by major epigenetic changes on the X chromosome has been shown to be active. We have investigated DNA methylation of several single genes, Atrx, Esx1, Mecp2, Pem, Psx1, Vbp1, Pou3f4, and Cdx2, and, in addition, of LINE-1 and IAP repeat sequences, in placentas and tissues of fetal day 18 mouse interspecific hybrids. Our results show some tendency toward hypomethylation in the late gestation mouse placenta. However, no differential methylation was observed in hyper- and hypoplastic hybrid placentas when compared with normal-sized littermate placentas or intraspecific Mus musculus placentas of the same developmental stage. Thus, our results strongly suggest that generalized changes in methylation patterns do not occur in trophoblast cells of such hybrids. PMID:14504229

  1. Energy storage specification requirements for hybrid-electric vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, A.F.

    1993-09-01

    A study has been made of energy storage unit requirements for hybrid-electric vehicles. The drivelines for these vehicles included both primary energy storage units and/or pulse power units. The primary energy storage units were sized to provide ``primary energy`` ranges up to 60 km. The total power capability of the drivelines were such that the vehicles had 0 to 100 km/h acceleration times of 10 to 12 s. The power density requirements for primary energy storage devices to be used in hybrid vehicles are much higher than that for devices to be used in electric vehicles. The energy density and power density requirements for pulse-power devices for hybrid vehicles, are not much different than those in an electric vehicle. The cycle life requirements for primary energy-storage units for hybrid vehicles are about double that for electric vehicles, because of the reduced size of the storage units in the hybrid vehicles. The cycle life for pulse-power devices for hybrid vehicles is about the same as for electric vehicles having battery load leveling. Because of the need for additional components in the hybrid driveline, the cost of the energy storage units in hybrid vehicles should be much less (at least a factor of two) than those in electric vehicles. There are no presently available energy storage units that meet all the specifications for hybrid vehicle applications, but ultracapacitors and bipolar lead-acid batteries are under development that have the potential for meeting them. If flywheel systems having a mechanical system energy density of 40 to 50 W{center_dot}h/kg and an electrical system power density of 2 to 3 kw/kg can be developed, they would have the potential of meeting specifications for primary storage and pulse power units.

  2. DNA hybridization activity of single-stranded DNA-conjugated gold nanoparticles used as probes for DNA detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kira, Atsushi; Matsuo, Kosuke; Nakajima, Shin-ichiro

    2016-02-01

    Colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) have potential applications in bio-sensing technologies as labels or signal enhancers. In order to meet demands for a development of biomolecular assays by a quantitative understanding of single-molecule, it is necessary to regulate accuracy of the NPs probes modified with biomolecules to optimize the characteristics of NPs. However, to our knowledge, there is little information about the structural effect of conjugated biomolecules to the NPs. In this study, we investigated the contribution of a density of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) conjugating gold NP to hybridization activity. Hybridization activity decreased in accordance with increases in the density of attached ssDNAs, likely due to electrostatic repulsion generated by negatively charged phosphate groups in the ssDNA backbone. These results highlight the importance of controlling the density of ssDNAs attached to the surface of NPs used as DNA detection probes.

  3. Improvement of DNA recognition through molecular imprinting: hybrid oligomer imprinted polymeric nanoparticles (oligoMIP NPs).

    PubMed

    Brahmbhatt, H; Poma, A; Pendergraff, H M; Watts, J K; Turner, N W

    2016-02-01

    High affinity and specific binding are cardinal properties of nucleic acids in relation to their biological function and their role in biotechnology. To this end, structural preorganization of oligonucleotides can significantly improve their binding performance, and numerous examples of this can be found in Nature as well as in artificial systems. Here we describe the production and characterization of hybrid DNA-polymer nanoparticles (oligoMIP NPs) as a system in which we have preorganized the oligonucleotide binding by molecular imprinting technology. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are cost-effective "smart" polymeric materials capable of antibody-like detection, but characterized by superior robustness and the ability to work in extreme environmental conditions. Especially in the nanoparticle format, MIPs are dubbed as one of the most suitable alternatives to biological antibodies due to their selective molecular recognition properties, improved binding kinetics as well as size and dispersibility. Nonetheless, there have been very few attempts at DNA imprinting in the past due to structural complexity associated with these templates. By introducing modified thymine bases into the oligonucleotide sequences, which allow establishing covalent bonds between the DNA and the polymer, we demonstrate that such hybrid oligoMIP NPs specifically recognize their target DNA, and that the unique strategy of incorporating the complementary DNA strands as "preorganized selective monomers" improves the recognition properties without affecting the NPs physical properties such as size, shape or dispersibility. PMID:26509192

  4. Preparation of covalently linked DNA-RNA hybrids and arabinocytidine containing DNA fragments.

    PubMed Central

    de Vroom, E; Roelen, H C; Saris, C P; Budding, T N; van der Marel, G A; van Boom, J H

    1988-01-01

    It will be demonstrated that 5'-O-DMT-N-acyl-deoxyribonucleosides, 5'-O-Lev-2'-O-MTHP-N-acyl-ribonucleosides and, also, 2'-O-MTHP-N-acyl-ara-cytidine can be coupled, via the hydroxybenzotriazole phosphotriester approach, to afford two types of DNA-RNA hybrids as well as ara-C containing DNA-fragments. The final removal of acid-labile DMT and MTHP groups could be effected by 1 h treatment with 80% acetic acid of the otherwise unprotected DNA-RNA hybrids. The same acidic hydrolysis did not result in complete removal of the 2'-O-MTHP group from the ara-C unit. Complete deblocking was accomplished after an additional 2 h aqueous HC1 (0.01 M; pH 2.00) treatment. PMID:2453027

  5. Chromosomal assignment of human DNA fingerprint sequences by simultaneous hybridization to arbitrarily primed PCR products from human/rodent monochromosome cell hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Jun; Sekiya, Takao; Navarro, J.M.

    1996-05-15

    We have developed a technique for the simultaneous chromosomal assignment of multiple human DNA sequences from DNA fingerprints obtained by the arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR). Radioactively labeled human AP-PCR products are hybridized to DNA fingerprints generated with the same arbitrary primer from human/rodent monochromosome cell hybrids after electroblotting to a nylong membrane. Human-specific hybridization bands in the human/rodent fingerprints unambiguously determine their chromosome of origin. We named this method simultaneous hybridization of arbitrarily primed PCR DNA fingerprinting products (SHARP). Using this approach, we determined the chromosomal origins of most major bands of human AP-PCR fingerprints obtained with two arbitrary primers. Altogether, the chromosomal localization of near 50 DNA fragments, comprehensive of all human chromosomes except chromosomes 21 and Y, was achieved in this simple manner. Chromosome assignment of fingerprint bands is essential for molecular karyotyping of cancer by AP-PCR DNA fingerprinting. The SHARP method provides a convenient and powerful tool for this purpose. 23 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. POU proteins bend DNA via the POU-specific domain.

    PubMed Central

    Verrijzer, C P; van Oosterhout, J A; van Weperen, W W; van der Vliet, P C

    1991-01-01

    POU proteins constitute a family of ubiquitous as well as cell type-specific transcription factors that share the conserved POU DNA binding domain. This domain consists of two distinct subdomains, a POU-specific domain and a POU homeodomain, that are both required for high affinity sequence-specific DNA binding. In a circular permutation assay, several POU proteins, including Oct-1, Oct-2A, Oct-6 and Pit-1, demonstrated a position dependent mobility of the protein-DNA complexes, suggesting induction of DNA bending. This was confirmed by detection of relative bend direction, using pre-bent DNA, and by enhanced ligase mediated cyclization. Bending was caused by interaction with the POU domain. By contrast, binding of the POU homeodomain did not distort the DNA structure, indicating that the POU-specific domain confers DNA bending. Images PMID:1915275

  7. [Use of photo-anchoring of DNA probes for fluorescent in situ hybridization].

    PubMed

    Nasedkina, T V; Mal'kov, R B; Fedorova, L I; Godovikova, T S; Kolpashchikov, D M; Poletaev, A I

    1998-01-01

    A possibility was investigated to use photo-crosslinking DNA probes for fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). DNA probes were modified by incorporating photonucleotides in these, containing a photoreactive group (tetrafluorobenzazid) and capable of making covalent bonds with the examined DNA, when irradiated in 300-330 nm region. The photonucleotide was incorporated into the probe either by nick-translation, or upon elongation of the hybridized probe by the Kljonow fragment. It has been shown that the DNA probe, cross-linking to a chromosome as a result of covalent bonds, is not removed from the place of hybridization under consequent denaturating washing, which makes it possible to carry out the following DNA hybridization with selective conservation of signals obtained due to previous hybridization. This peculiarity of photo-linking DNA probes makes it possible to use them for the two-step DNA hybridization. To demonstrate this, preparations of human chromosomes were investigated. On the first step, chromosomal DNA was hybridized by means of DNA probe having nucleotide sequences of centromeric regions of chromosomes 13 and 21, the probe being linked to chromosomal DNA by the photonucleotide. Following the denaturation treatment of the preparation, and after the second chromosomal DNA hybridization with cosmid DNA, containing chromosome 13 DNA nucleotide sequence, the signal in chromosome 13 centromeric region was retained to serve a marker of this chromosome, thus fascilitating its easier identification following the hybridization of its DNA with cosmic DNA. The denaturation stability of photo-crosslinking probes opens some new possibilities in technology of DNA in situ hybridization. PMID:9821246

  8. The effects of multiple probes on the hybridization of target DNA on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welling, Ryan C.; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    DNA microarrays have disruptive potential in many fields including genetics and medicine, but the technology has yet to find widespread clinical use due to poor reliability. Microarrays work on the principle of hybridization and can only be as dependable as this process is reliable. As such, a significant amount of theoretical research has been done to understand hybridization on surfaces on the molecular level. Previous simulations of a target strand with a single, surface-tethered probe molecule have yielded valuable insights, but such is an ideal system and little is known about the effects of multiple probes—a situation that more closely approximates the real system. This work uses molecular simulation to determine the specific differences in duplex stability between one, three, six, and nine tethered probes on a surface. The results show that it is more difficult for a single target to hybridize to a probe as the number of probes on the surface increases due to crowding effects; however, once hybridized, the duplex is more stable than when fewer probes are present. The data also indicate that hybridization of a target to a probe on the face of a group of probes is more stable than hybridization to probes at the edge or center locations. Taken as a whole, the results offer new insights into the cause of the poor reproducibility exhibited by microarrays.

  9. Sequence-Specific DNA Binding by a Short Peptide Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talanian, Robert V.; McKnight, C. James; Kim, Peter S.

    1990-08-01

    A recently described class of DNA binding proteins is characterized by the "bZIP" motif, which consists of a basic region that contacts DNA and an adjacent "leucine zipper" that mediates protein dimerization. A peptide model for the basic region of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 has been developed in which the leucine zipper has been replaced by a disulfide bond. The 34-residue peptide dimer, but not the reduced monomer, binds DNA with nanomolar affinity at 4^circC. DNA binding is sequence-specific as judged by deoxyribonuclease I footprinting. Circular dichroism spectroscopy suggests that the peptide adopts a helical structure when bound to DNA. These results demonstrate directly that the GCN4 basic region is sufficient for sequence-specific DNA binding and suggest that a major function of the GCN4 leucine zipper is simply to mediate protein dimerization. Our approach provides a strategy for the design of short sequence-specific DNA binding peptides.

  10. Denaturation, renaturation, and loss of DNA during in situ hybridization procedures.

    PubMed

    Raap, A K; Marijnen, J G; Vrolijk, J; van der Ploeg, M

    1986-05-01

    With the aim of optimizing in situ hybridization methods, alkaline, acid, and thermal denaturation procedures have been studied for their ability to separate the DNA strands of nuclear DNA and for the DNA losses they induce. Isolated methanol/acetic acid-fixed mouse liver nuclei have been used as a biological object. The results, obtained with acridine orange staining and microfluorometry, show that all denaturations studied lead to almost complete strand separation. Quantitative DNA staining and cytometry indicated that with heat and alkaline denaturation about 40% of the DNA is lost. Acid denaturation led to about 20% DNA loss. For the alkaline denaturation, the DNA retention could be improved to a 20% DNA loss by adding 70% ethanol to the denaturation medium. During hybridization, another 20% DNA loss occurs. When denatured nuclei are brought under annealing conditions, a rapid renaturation of a considerable fraction of the remaining DNA occurs. The extent of renaturation was dependent on the type of denaturation used. For the ethanolic alkaline denaturation, it was estimated to be 35%. Quantitative nonautoradiographic in situ hybridization experiments with acetylaminofluorene-modified mouse satellite DNA showed that alkaline denaturation procedures are superior to the heat and acid denaturation. As proven by acridine orange fluorescence measurements, hybridization conditions can be designed that permit DNA.RNA hybridization under in situ DNA.DNA denaturing conditions. These conditions should be very useful, especially for in situ hybridization with single-stranded RNA probes. PMID:3709305

  11. Cloning of a short HLA-DQ beta locus-specific cDNA probe: typing for DQw specificities.

    PubMed

    Sood, S K; McCusker, C T; Singal, D P

    1989-01-01

    A short HLA-DQ beta locus-specific (141 bp) probe was cloned from the full-length pII-beta-1 cDNA. Pst 1-digested genomic DNA from homozygous typing cell lines (HTC) was hybridized with this short DQ beta locus-specific, pDQ beta 141, probe. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns generated with this DQ beta locus-specific probe were compared with those obtained with the full-length (627 bp) DQ beta, pII-beta-1, probe. The results demonstrate that the RFLP patterns with the pDQ beta 141 probe were very simple, and no crossreacting DR beta and DX beta bands were observed. DQw1, 2, 3 and 4 specificities could each be identified by a single RFLP. PMID:2467193

  12. Locational diversity of alpha satellite DNA and intergeneric hybridization aspects in the Nomascus and Hylobates genera of small apes.

    PubMed

    Baicharoen, Sudarath; Miyabe-Nishiwaki, Takako; Arsaithamkul, Visit; Hirai, Yuriko; Duangsa-ard, Kwanruen; Siriaroonrat, Boripat; Domae, Hiroshi; Srikulnath, Kornsorn; Koga, Akihiko; Hirai, Hirohisa

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we discovered that alpha satellite DNA has unique and genus-specific localizations on the chromosomes of small apes. This study describes the details of alpha satellite localization in the genera Nomascus and Hylobates and explores their usefulness in distinguishing parental genome sets in hybrids between these genera. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to establish diagnostic criteria of alpha satellite DNA markers in discriminating small ape genomes. In particular we established the genus specificity of alpha satellite distribution in three species of light-cheeked gibbons (Nomascus leucogenys, N. siki, and N. gabriellae) in comparison to that of Hylobates lar. Then we determined the localization of alpha satellite DNA in a hybrid individual which resulted from a cross between these two genera. In Nomascus the alpha satellite DNA blocks were located at the centromere, telomere, and four interstitial regions. In Hylobates detectable amounts of alpha satellite DNA were seen only at centromeric regions. The differences in alpha satellite DNA locations between Nomascus and Hylobates allowed us to easily distinguish the parental chromosomal sets in the genome of intergeneric hybrid individuals found in Thai and Japanese zoos. Our study illustrates how molecular cytogenetic markers can serve as diagnostic tools to identify the origin of individuals. These molecular tools can aid zoos, captive breeding programs and conservation efforts in managing small apes species. Discovering more information on alpha satellite distribution is also an opportunity to examine phylogenetic and evolutionary questions that are still controversial in small apes. PMID:25290445

  13. Derivation of DNA probes for enumeration of a specific strain of Lactobacillus acidophilus in piglet digestive tract samples.

    PubMed Central

    Rodtong, S; Dobbinson, S; Thode-Andersen, S; McConnell, M A; Tannock, G W

    1993-01-01

    Four DNA probes were derived that hybridized specifically to DNA from Lactobacillus acidophilus O. The probes were constructed by randomly cloning lactobacillus DNA in plasmid vector pBR322. Two of the probes (pSR1 and pSR2) were composed of vector and plasmid DNA inserts (3.6 and 1.6 kb, respectively); the others (pSR3 and pSR4) were composed of vector and chromosomally derived inserts (6.9 and 1.4 kb, respectively). The probes were used to enumerate, by colony hybridization, strain O in digestive tract samples collected from piglets inoculated 24 hours previously with a culture of the strain. The probes did not hybridize to DNA from lactobacilli inhabiting the digestive tract of uninoculated piglets. Strain O made up about 10% of the total lactobacillus population of the pars esophagea and about 20% of the population in other digestive tract samples. Images PMID:8285690

  14. Highly sensitive DNA detection using cascade amplification strategy based on hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced metallization

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xu; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2014-01-01

    A novel highly sensitive colorimetric assay for DNA detection using cascade amplification strategy based on hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced metallization was established. The DNA modified superparamagnetic beads were demonstrated to capture and enrich the target DNA in the hybridization buffer or human plasma. The hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced silver metallization on the gold nanoparticles were used as cascade signal amplification for the detection of target DNA. The metalization of silver on the gold nanoparticles induced a significant colour change from red to yellow until black depending on the concentration of the target DNA, which could be recognized by naked eyes. This method showed a good specificity for the target DNA detection, with the capabilty to discriminate single-base-pair mismatched DNA mutation (single nucleotide polymorphism). Meanwhile, this approach exhibited an excellent anti-interference capability with the convenience of the magentic seperation and washing, which enabled its usage in complex biological systems such as human blood plasma. As an added benefit, the utilization of hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced metallization improved detection sensitivity down to 10 pM, which is about 100-fold lower than that of traditional unamplified homogeneous assays. PMID:25500528

  15. Rotating rod renewable microcolumns for automated, solid-phase DNA hybridization studies.

    PubMed

    Bruckner-Lea, C J; Stottlemyre, M S; Holman, D A; Grate, J W; Brockman, F J; Chandler, D P

    2000-09-01

    The development of a new temperature-controlled renewable microcolumn flow cell for solid-phase nucleic acid hybridization in an automated sequential injection system is described. The flow cell included a stepper motor-driven rotating rod with the working end cut to a 45 degrees angle. In one position, the end of the rod prevented passage of microbeads while allowing fluid flow; rotation of the rod by 180 degrees releases the beads. This system was used to rapidly test many hybridization and elution protocols to examine the temperature and solution conditions required for sequence-specific nucleic acid hybridization. Target nucleic acids labeled with a near-infrared fluorescent dye were detected immediately postcolumn during all column perfusion and elution steps using a flow-through fluorescence detector. Temperature control of the column and the presence of Triton X-100 surfactant were critical for specific hybridization. Perfusion of the column with complementary oligonucleotide (200 microL, 10 nM) resulted in hybridization with 8% of the DNA binding sites on the microbeads with a solution residence time of less than 1 s and a total sample perfusion time of 40 s. The use of the renewable column system for detection of an unlabeled PCR product in a sandwich assay was also demonstrated. PMID:10994975

  16. The application of magnetic bead hybridization for the recovery and STR amplification of degraded and inhibited forensic DNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; McCord, Bruce

    2011-06-01

    A common problem in the analysis of forensic DNA evidence is the presence of environmentally degraded and inhibited DNA. Such samples produce a variety of interpretational problems such as allele imbalance, allele dropout and sequence specific inhibition. In an attempt to develop methods to enhance the recovery of this type of evidence, magnetic bead hybridization has been applied to extract and preconcentrate DNA sequences containing short tandem repeat (STR) alleles of interest. In this work, genomic DNA was fragmented by heating, and sequences associated with STR alleles were selectively hybridized to allele-specific biotinylated probes. Each particular biotinylated probe-DNA complex was bound to streptavidin-coated magnetic beads using enabling enrichment of target DNA sequences. Experiments conducted using degraded DNA samples, as well as samples containing a large concentration of inhibitory substances, showed good specificity and recovery of missing alleles. Based on the favorable results obtained with these specific probes, this method should prove useful as a tool to improve the recovery of alleles from degraded and inhibited DNA samples. PMID:21706494

  17. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoflakes as inherently electroactive labels for DNA hybridization detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loo, Adeline Huiling; Bonanni, Alessandra; Ambrosi, Adriano; Pumera, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The detection of specific DNA sequences plays a critical role in the areas of medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, drug discovery and food safety. This has therefore become a strong driving force behind the ever-increasing demand for simple, cost-effective, highly sensitive and selective DNA biosensors. In this study, we report for the first time, a novel approach for the utilization of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes, a member of the transition metal dichalcogenides family, in the detection of DNA hybridization. Herein, molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes serve as inherently electroactive labels, with the inherent oxidation peak exploited as the analytical signal. The principle of detection is based on the differential affinity of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes towards single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA. The employment of transition metal dichalcogenide nanomaterials for sensing and biosensing purposes represents an upcoming research area which holds great promise. Hence, our findings are anticipated to have significant contributions towards the fabrication of future DNA biosensors.The detection of specific DNA sequences plays a critical role in the areas of medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, drug discovery and food safety. This has therefore become a strong driving force behind the ever-increasing demand for simple, cost-effective, highly sensitive and selective DNA biosensors. In this study, we report for the first time, a novel approach for the utilization of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes, a member of the transition metal dichalcogenides family, in the detection of DNA hybridization. Herein, molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes serve as inherently electroactive labels, with the inherent oxidation peak exploited as the analytical signal. The principle of detection is based on the differential affinity of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes towards single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA. The employment of transition metal dichalcogenide

  18. Nucleic Acid-Peptide Complex Phase Controlled by DNA Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieregg, Jeffrey; Lueckheide, Michael; Leon, Lorraine; Marciel, Amanda; Tirrell, Matthew

    When polyanions and polycations are mixed, counterion release drives formation of polymer-rich complexes that can either be solid (precipitates) or liquid (coacervates) depending on the properties of the polyelectrolytes. These complexes are important in many fields, from encapsulation of industrial polymers to membrane-free segregation of biomolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins. Condensation of long double-stranded DNA has been studied for several decades, but comparatively little attention has been paid to the polyelectrolyte behavior of oligonucleotides. We report here studies of DNA oligonucleotides (10 - 88 nt) complexed with polylysine (10 - 100 aa). Unexpectedly, we find that the phase of the resulting complexes is controlled by the hybridization state of the nucleic acid, with double-stranded DNA forming precipitates and single-stranded DNA forming coacervates. Stability increases with polyelectrolyte length and decreases with solution salt concentration, with complexes of the longer double-stranded polymers undergoing precipitate/coacervate/soluble transitions as ionic strength is increased. Mixing coacervates formed by complementary single-stranded oligonucleotides results in precipitate formation, raising the possibility of stimulus-responsive material design.

  19. Crowding-Induced Hybridization of Single DNA Hairpins.

    PubMed

    Baltierra-Jasso, Laura E; Morten, Michael J; Laflör, Linda; Quinn, Steven D; Magennis, Steven W

    2015-12-30

    It is clear that a crowded environment influences the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological molecules, but the complexity of this phenomenon demands the development of new experimental and theoretical approaches. Here we use two complementary single-molecule FRET techniques to show that the kinetics of DNA base pairing and unpairing, which are fundamental to both the biological role of DNA and its technological applications, are strongly modulated by a crowded environment. We directly observed single DNA hairpins, which are excellent model systems for studying hybridization, either freely diffusing in solution or immobilized on a surface under crowding conditions. The hairpins followed two-state folding dynamics with a closing rate increasing by 4-fold and the opening rate decreasing 2-fold, for only modest concentrations of crowder [10% (w/w) polyethylene glycol (PEG)]. These experiments serve both to unambiguously highlight the impact of a crowded environment on a fundamental biological process, DNA base pairing, and to illustrate the benefits of single-molecule approaches to probing the structure and dynamics of complex biomolecular systems. PMID:26654490

  20. [Determination of fetal sex by amplification of Y-chromosome-specific DNA].

    PubMed

    Huang, S Z

    1989-08-01

    This paper describes a rapid and highly sensitive method for determination of fetal sex. Y-chromosome-specific sequences as well as Alu-specific sequences were amplified with polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Then fetal sex was determined by comparison of the two amplified DNA sequences. Polymerase chain reaction can be performed on lysed amniotic fluid cells or chorionic villus samples or dried blood spots on filter paper blot without prior DNA extraction. The analysis of the amplified DNA was performed immediately by agarose gel electrophoresis without DNA hybridization with radioactive probe. By using this method, determination of sex was performed on 3 fetuses at risk for DMD, and on 2 fetuses at risk for hemophilia, prenatal detection was confirmed by examination of the neonates. PMID:2620273

  1. Synthetic Nucleotides as Probes of DNA Polymerase Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Jason M.; Beuning, Penny J.

    2012-01-01

    The genetic code is continuously expanding with new nucleobases designed to suit specific research needs. These synthetic nucleotides are used to study DNA polymerase dynamics and specificity and may even inhibit DNA polymerase activity. The availability of an increasing chemical diversity of nucleotides allows questions of utilization by different DNA polymerases to be addressed. Much of the work in this area deals with the A family DNA polymerases, for example, Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I, which are DNA polymerases involved in replication and whose fidelity is relatively high, but more recent work includes other families of polymerases, including the Y family, whose members are known to be error prone. This paper focuses on the ability of DNA polymerases to utilize nonnatural nucleotides in DNA templates or as the incoming nucleoside triphosphates. Beyond the utility of nonnatural nucleotides as probes of DNA polymerase specificity, such entities can also provide insight into the functions of DNA polymerases when encountering DNA that is damaged by natural agents. Thus, synthetic nucleotides provide insight into how polymerases deal with nonnatural nucleotides as well as into the mutagenic potential of nonnatural nucleotides. PMID:22720133

  2. The contribution of co-transcriptional RNA:DNA hybrid structures to DNA damage and genome instability

    PubMed Central

    Hamperl, Stephan; Cimprich, Karlene A.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate DNA replication and DNA repair are crucial for the maintenance of genome stability, and it is generally accepted that failure of these processes is a major source of DNA damage in cells. Intriguingly, recent evidence suggests that DNA damage is more likely to occur at genomic loci with high transcriptional activity. Furthermore, loss of certain RNA processing factors in eukaryotic cells is associated with increased formation of co-transcriptional RNA:DNA hybrid structures known as R-loops, resulting in double-strand breaks (DSBs) and DNA damage. However, the molecular mechanisms by which R-loop structures ultimately lead to DNA breaks and genome instability is not well understood. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the formation, recognition and processing of RNA:DNA hybrids, and discuss possible mechanisms by which these structures contribute to DNA damage and genome instability in the cell. PMID:24746923

  3. Quantitative hybridization to genomic DNA fractionated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Leach, T J; Glaser, R L

    1998-10-15

    Hybridization to genomic DNA fractionated by CHEF electrophoresis can vary >100-fold if the DNA is acid depurinated prior to Southern blotting. The level of hybridization is high or low depending on whether the molecule being analyzed migrates at a size coincident with or different from the size of the majority of genomic DNA in the sample, respectively. Techniques that avoid acid depurination including in-gel hybridizations and UV irradiation of DNA prior to blotting provide more accurate quantitative results. CHEF analysis of DNA molecules containing repetitive satellite sequences is particularly prone to this effect. PMID:9753752

  4. Sequence-specific fluorescent labeling of double-stranded DNA observed at the single molecule level

    PubMed Central

    Géron-Landre, Bénédicte; Roulon, Thibaut; Desbiolles, Pierre; Escudé, Christophe

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescent labeling of a short sequence of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) was achieved by ligating a labeled dsDNA fragment to a stem–loop triplex forming oligonucleotide (TFO). After the TFO has wound around the target sequence by ligand-induced triple helix formation, its extremities hybridize to each other, leaving a dangling single-stranded sequence, which is then ligated to a fluorescent dsDNA fragment using T4 DNA ligase. A non-repeated 15 bp sequence present on lambda DNA was labeled and visualized by fluorescence microscopy after DNA combing. The label was found to be attached at a specific position located at 4.2 ± 0.5 kb from one end of the molecule, in agreement with the location of the target sequence for triple helix formation (4.4 kb from one end). In addition, an alternative combing process was noticed in which a DNA molecule becomes attached to the combing slide from the label rather than from one of its ends. The method described herein provides a new tool for the detection of very short sequences of dsDNA and offers various perspectives in the micromanipulation of single DNA molecules. PMID:14530458

  5. DNA hybridization assay for detection of nucleopolyhedrovirus in whitemarked tussock moth (Orgyia leucostigma) larvae.

    PubMed

    Ebling, P M; Smith, P A; van Frankenhuyzen, K

    2001-01-01

    DNA dot-blot hybridization assays utilizing a horseradish peroxidase-labelled whole genomic DNA probe and enhanced chemiluminescence were conducted to quantify detection thresholds of nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) in whitemarked tussock moth (Orgyia leucostigma) larvae. The minimum detection thresholds for an aqueous suspension of occlusion bodies (OBs), OBs added to macerates of non-infected larvae and OBs in macerates of diseased larvae were 7.8 x 10(3), 7.8 x 10(3), and 1.5 x 10(3) OBs, respectively. Purified viral DNA was detected at a concentration of 1.6 x 10(-1) ng in a 20 microliters volume. The presence of pre-occluded viral nucleocapsids and DNA, inherent to infected larvae, improved the detection threshold five-fold compared with OBs alone. Larval tissues did not block the detection system utilized, nor did they bind non-specifically to the probe. Detection thresholds, upon sequential hybridization of the same membrane, on average deteriorated two-fold between the first and second hybridization and an additional six-fold between the second and third hybridization. NPV infection was detected two days post-inoculation (pi) in about one-third of the larvae examined and in almost all larvae three days pi. Microscopic analysis of stained larval smears missed NPV infection in almost all larvae two days pi and about two-thirds of the larvae three days pi. Results from the two methods of analysis were not comparable until four days pi. The detection system utilized is a reliable, efficient and simple method for the early detection of NPV infection in large numbers of larvae and may be used for further studies quantifying the role of this baculovirus in the ecology of whitemarked tussock moth populations. PMID:11455634

  6. FY02 CBNP Annual Report: Discovery of DNA Signature of Biothreat Detection Using Suppression Subtractive Hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, G L; Radnedge, L

    2002-11-19

    Our goal is to develop robust DNA signatures for rapid and specific DNA-based detection platforms that can be employed by CBNP to detect a wide range of potential agents. Our approach has resulted in highly specific DNA signatures for Yersina pestis, Bacillus anthracis and Brucella species. Furthermore, this approach can be applied to any genome (even uncharacterized ones), which facilitates DNA signature development for detection of newly emerging pathogens. We are using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) as a tool to define large DNA regions specific to multiple biothreat pathogens by comparing them to genomes of the most closely related organisms. This approach has become increasingly accurate as we continue to find new, distinctive strains and ever-closer near-neighbors. With the huge costs incurred by whole genome sequencing, it is not possible to sequence each new bacterial genome. However, it is completely practical to identify genome differences in the laboratory using SSH, and becomes especially useful when comparing new strains to previously sequenced genomes.

  7. Cloning and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 4-specific alpha satellite DNA sequence

    SciTech Connect

    D'Aiuto, L.; Marzella, R.; Archidiacono, N.; Rocchi, M. ); Antonacci, R. )

    1993-11-01

    The authors have isolated and characterized two human alphoid DNA clones: p4n1/4 and pZ4.1. Clone p4n1/4 identifies specifically the centromeric region of chromosome 4; pZ4.1 recognizes a subset of alphoid DNA shared by chromosomes 4 and 9. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments on metaphase spreads and Southern blotting analysis of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The genomic organization of both subsets was also investigated. Comparative mapping on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes was performed. p4n1/4 hybridizes to chimpanzee chromosomes 11 and 13, homologs of human chromosomes 9 and 2q, respectively. On gorilla metaphase spreads, p4n1/4 hybridizes exclusively to the centromeric region of chromosome 19, partially homologous to human chromosome 17. No hybridization signal was detected on chromosome 3 of both chimpanzee and gorilla, in both species homolog of human chromosome 4. Identical comparative mapping results were obtained using pZ4.1 probe, although the latter recognizes an alphoid subset distinct from the one recognized by p4n1/4. The implications of these results in the evolution of centromeric regions of primate chromosomes are discussed. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Evidence for and Localization of Vegetative Viral DNA Replication by Autoradiographic Detection of RNA·DNA Hybrids in Sections of Tumors Induced by Shope Papilloma Virus

    PubMed Central

    Orth, Gérard; Jeanteur, Philippe; Croissant, Odile

    1971-01-01

    The occurrence and localization of vegetative viral DNA replication was studied in sections of tumors induced by the rabbit Shope papilloma virus, in cottontail and domestic rabbit papillomas, in primary domestic rabbit carcinoma, and in transplantable VX2 carcinoma, by in situ hybridization of radioactive RNA complementary to viral DNA. Vegetative viral DNA replication and viral protein synthesis were compared by means of cytological hybridization and immunofluorescence techniques on adjacent frozen sections. Vegetative viral DNA replication is completely repressed in the proliferating cellular layers of these tumors, which suggests a provirus state of the viral genome, as in other cells transformed by oncogenic DNA viruses. Vegetative viral DNA replication is induced, after initiation of the keratinization, in cells of cottonail rabbit papillomas, where it is usually followed by viral protein synthesis; this illustrates the influence of the physiological state of the host cell on the control of viral functions. Vegetative viral DNA replication is deteced only in a few cells of domestic rabbit papillomas, at the end of the keratinization process; this observation provides indirect evidence that the DNA synthesis specifically induced in these tumors after the onset of keratinization reflects mostly the induction of cellular DNA synthesis. Images PMID:4331563

  9. Control of Rate-Bounded Hybrid Systems with Liveness Specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, Michael; Lin, Feng; Meyer, George

    1998-01-01

    In the present paper we examine the control problem for a class of composite hybrid machines (CHMs) that consist of concurrent operation (employing synchronous composition) of elementary hybrid machines (EHMs), that allows both signal sharing and event synchronization. A controller can then be coupled with the plant by means of synchronous composition. We confine our attention to controllers that interact with the system only through event synchronization. We present an initial investigation of synthesis of liveness controllers for hybrid machines. To this end we define open hybrid machines as systems that can interact with the environment through event synchronization and can be therefor be "driven" to their marked configuration by user (controller). Liveness specifications must be associated with timing constraints. We may require that for a specified time limit, every run reach a marked configuration within that time limit. Alternatively, a more relaxed specification may be that, for some (unspecified) global time bound, every run of the system reach a marked configuration within that time bound. Finally, the least restrictive liveness requirement is that every run reach a marked configuration within a finite time limit (but we do not insist on the existence of a global time bound for all runs).

  10. Identification of Brugia malayi in vectors with a species-specific DNA probe.

    PubMed

    Sim, B K; Mak, J W; Cheong, W H; Sutanto, I; Kurniawan, L; Marwoto, H A; Franke, E; Campell, J R; Wirth, D F; Piessens, W F

    1986-05-01

    We evaluated the potential value of a cloned sequence of genomic DNA of Brugia malayi as a species-specific probe. Clone pBm 15 reacted with all stages of 8 different geographic isolates of B. malayi and cross-hybridized with microfilariae of B. timori. It did not hybridize with Wuchereria bancrofti or with B. pahangi, W. kalimantani, Dirofilaria repens, Breinlia booliati or Cardiofilaria species, animal filariids that can be sympatric with B. malayi. P32-labeled clone pBm 15 correctly identified mosquitoes infected even with 1 infective larva of B. malayi. This specific DNA probe should be an invaluable tool to monitor control programs of Brugian filariasis. PMID:3518507

  11. Specific DNA probes for the identification of the fish pathogen, Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    León, G; Martinez, M A; Etchegaray, J P; Vera, M I; Figueroa, J; Krauskopf, M

    1994-03-01

    To obtain specific DNA probes for the identification of the fish pathogen, Renibacterium salmoninarum, a discriminatory recombinant DNA library was constructed using selective fragments of the bacterial genome. Three renibacterial clones, pMAM29, pMAM46 and pMAM77, containing 149, 73, and 154 bp respectively, were isolated and characterized. The specificity of the probes was confirmed by dot-blot and Southern hybridization analyses. Bacterial hybridization experiments revealed that pMAM29 discriminates the R. salmoninarum genome from that of other fish pathogens such as Aeromonas salmonicida, Yersinia ruckeri, Flexibacter columnaris, Lactobacillus piscicola, Vibrio ordalii, Vibrio anguillarum and Aeromonas hydrophila. Thus, this probe may provide a new means to diagnose bacterial kidney disease in asymptomatic fish and ova. PMID:24420936

  12. SELECTION OF INTERSPECIFIC SUGARCANE HYBRIDS USING MICROSATELLITE DNA MARKERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three types of species-specific DNA markers, namely, PCR, RAPD, and microsatellites, have been recently developed at the USDA-ARS, SRRC, Sugarcane Research Unit, Houma, Louisiana. Of these, the microsatellite markers are the most polymorphic and can produce distinctive fingerprints (or molecular al...

  13. Synthesis of hybrid bacterial plasmids containing highly repeated satellite DNA.

    PubMed

    Brutlag, D; Fry, K; Nelson, T; Hung, P

    1977-03-01

    Hybrid plasmid molecules containing tandemly repeated Drosophila satellite DNA were constructed using a modification of the (dA)-(dT) homopolymer procedure of Lobban and Kaiser (1973). Recombinant plasmids recovered after transformation of recA bacteria contained 10% of the amount of satellite DNA present in the transforming molecules. The cloned plasmids were not homogenous in size. Recombinant plasmids isolated from a single colony contained populations of circular molecules which varied both in the length of the satellite region and in the poly(dA)-(dt) regions linking satellite and vector. While subcloning reduced the heterogeneity of these plasmid populations, continued cell growth caused further variations in the size of the repeated regions. Two different simple sequence satellites of Drosophila melanogaster (1.672 and 1.705 g/cm3) were unstable in both recA and recBC hosts and in both pSC101 and pCR1 vectors. We propose that this recA-independent instability of tandemly repeated sequences is due to unequal intramolecular recombination events in replicating DNA molecules, a mechanism analogous to sister chromatid exchange in eucaryotes. PMID:403010

  14. Rotating Rod Renewable Microcolumns for Automated, Solid-Phase DNA Hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J. ); Stottlemyre, Mark R.; Holman, David A.; Grate, Jay W. ); Brockman, Fred J. ); Chandler, Darrell P.

    1999-12-01

    The development of a new temperature-controlled renewable microcolumn flow cell for solid-phase nucleic acid analysis in a sequential injection system is described. The flow cell includes a stepper motor-driven rotating rod with the working end cut to a 45 degree angle. In one position, the end of the rod prevents passage of microbeads while allowing fluid flow; rotation of the rod by 180 degrees release the beads. This system was used to rapidly test many hybridization and elution protocols to examine the temperature and solution conditions required for sequence specific nucleic acid hybridization. Target nucleic acids labeled with a near-infrared fluorescent dye were detected immediately post-column using a flow-through fluorescence detector, with a detection limit of 40 pM dye concentration at a flow rate of 5 mu l/s. Temperature control of the column and the presence of Triton X-100 surfactant were critical for specific hybridization. Perfusion of the column with complementary oligonucleotide (200 mu l, 10nM) resulted in hybridization with 8% of the DNA binding sites on the microbeads with a solution residence time of less than a second and a total sample perfusion time of 40 seconds. The use of the renewable column system for detection of an unlabeled PCR product in a sandwich assay was also demonstrated.

  15. A novel means to develop strain-specific DNA probes for detecting bacteria in the environment.

    PubMed Central

    Matheson, V G; Munakata-Marr, J; Hopkins, G D; McCarty, P L; Tiedje, J M; Forney, L J

    1997-01-01

    A simple means to develop strain-specific DNA probes for use in monitoring the movement and survival of bacteria in natural and laboratory ecosystems was developed. The method employed amplification of genomic DNA via repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) using primers specific for repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) elements, followed by cloning of the amplified fragments. The cloned fragments were screened to identify those which were strain specific, and these were used as probes for total genomic DNA isolated from microbial communities and subjected to rep-PCR. To evaluate the utility of the approach, we developed probes specific for Burkholderia cepacia G4 and used them to determine the persistence of the strain in aquifer sediment microcosms following bioaugmentation. Two of four probes tested were found to specifically hybridize to DNA fragments of the expected sizes in the rep-PCR fingerprint of B. cepacia G4 but not to 64 genetically distinct bacteria previously isolated from the aquifer. One of these probes, a 650-bp fragment, produced a hybridization signal when as few as 10 CFU of B. cepacia G4 were present in a mixture with 10(6) CFU nontarget strains, indicating that the sensitivity of these probes was comparable to those of other PCR-based detection methods. The probes were used to discriminate groundwater and microcosm samples that contained B. cepacia G4 from those which did not. False-positive results were obtained with a few samples, but these were readily identified by using hybridization to the second probe as a confirmation step. The general applicability of the method was demonstrated by constructing probes specific to three other environmental isolates. PMID:9212434

  16. Molecular structure of r/GCG/d/TATACGC/ - A DNA-RNA hybrid helix joined to double helical DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A. H.-J.; Fujii, S.; Rich, A.; Van Boom, J. H.; Van Der Marel, G. A.; Van Boeckel, S. A. A.

    1982-01-01

    The molecule r(GCG)d(TATACGC) is self-complementary and forms two DNA-RNA hybrid segments surrounding a central region of double helical DNA; its molecular structure has been solved by X-ray analysis. All three parts of the molecule adopt a conformation which is close to that seen in the 11-fold RNA double helix. The conformation of the ribonucleotides is partly determined by water molecules bridging between the ribose O2' hydroxyl group and cytosine O2. The hybrid-DNA duplex junction contains no structural discontinuities. However, the central DNA TATA sequence has some structural irregularities.

  17. DNA linking number change induced by sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Xiao, Yazhong; Liu, Chang; Li, Chenzhong; Leng, Fenfei

    2010-01-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins play a key role in many fundamental biological processes, such as transcription, DNA replication and recombination. Very often, these DNA-binding proteins introduce structural changes to the target DNA-binding sites including DNA bending, twisting or untwisting and wrapping, which in many cases induce a linking number change (ΔLk) to the DNA-binding site. Due to the lack of a feasible approach, ΔLk induced by sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins has not been fully explored. In this paper we successfully constructed a series of DNA plasmids that carry many tandem copies of a DNA-binding site for one sequence-specific DNA-binding protein, such as λ O, LacI, GalR, CRP and AraC. In this case, the protein-induced ΔLk was greatly amplified and can be measured experimentally. Indeed, not only were we able to simultaneously determine the protein-induced ΔLk and the DNA-binding constant for λ O and GalR, but also we demonstrated that the protein-induced ΔLk is an intrinsic property for these sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins. Our results also showed that protein-mediated DNA looping by AraC and LacI can induce a ΔLk to the plasmid DNA templates. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the protein-induced ΔLk does not correlate with the protein-induced DNA bending by the DNA-binding proteins. PMID:20185570

  18. Highly specific electronic signal transduction mediated by DNA/metal self-assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Dentinger, Paul M.; Pathak, Srikant

    2003-11-01

    Highly specific interactions between DNA could potentially be amplified if the DNA interactions were utilized to assemble large scale parts. Fluidic assembly of microsystem parts has the potential for rapid and accurate placement of otherwise difficult to handle pieces. Ideally, each part would have a different chemical interaction that allowed it to interact with the substrate only in specific areas. One easy way to obtain a multiple chemical permutations is to use synthetic DNA oligomers. Si parts were prepared using silicon-on-insulator technology microfabrication techniques. Several surface chemistry protocols were developed to react commercial oligonucleotides to the parts. However, no obvious assembly was achieved. It was thought that small defects on the surface did not allow the microparts to be in close enough proximity for DNA hybridization, and this was. in part, confirmed by interferometry. To assist in the hybridization, plastic, pliable parts were manufactured and a new chemistry was developed. However, assembly was still absent even with the application of force. It is presently thought that one of three mechanisms is preventing the assembly. The surfaces of the two solid substrates can not get in close enough proximity, the surface chemistry lacks sufficient density to keep the parts from separating, or DNA interactions in close proximity on solid substrates are forbidden. These possibilities are discussed in detail.

  19. Specific suppression of anti-DNA production in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Liebling, M.R.; Wong, C.; Radosevich, J.; Louie, J.S.

    1988-09-01

    To investigate the regulation of anti-DNA antibody production, we generated anti-DNA-specific suppressor cells by exposing normal human T cells and a small percentage of adherent cells to high concentrations of DNA. These cells suppressed the production of anti-DNA by both autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and allogeneic PBMC derived from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. Anti-DNA production was suppressed significantly more than anti-RNA, antitetanus, or total immunoglobulin production. Specific suppression was enhanced by increasing the numbers of DNA-primed CD8+ cells and was obliterated by irradiation of the DNA-primed cells. In contrast to T cells from normal individuals, T cells obtained from two intensively studied SLE patients were unable to generate specific suppressor cells for anti-DNA production in both autologous and allogeneic test systems. Despite this defect, these patients were still capable of generating specific suppressor cells for antibody production directed against an exogenous antigen, tetanus toxoid.

  20. Nonlinear dynamics of specific DNA-protein interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwiputra, D.; Hidayat, W.; Khairani, R.; Zen, F. P.

    2016-03-01

    Interactions between DNA binding protein and specific base pairs of nucleic acid is critical for biological process. We propose a new model of DNA-protein interactions to depict the dynamics of specific DNA-protein interactions. Hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) are, among the other intermolecular interactions in DNA, the most distinctive in term of specificity of molecular bonds. As H-bonds account for specificity, we only consider the dynamics affected by H-bonds between DNA base pairs and H-bonds connecting protein side chains and DNA. The H-bonds are modelled by Morse potentials and coupling terms in the Hamiltonian of coupled oscillators resembling a coupling between planar DNA chain and a protein molecule. In this paper we give a perturbative approach as an attempt for a soliton solution. The solution is in the form of nonlinear travelling wave having the amplitudes satisfying coupled nonlinear Schrodinger equations and is interpreted as the mediator for nonlocal transmittance of biological information in DNA.

  1. Global and gene specific DNA methylation changes during zebrafish development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA methylation is dynamic through the life of an organism. In this study, we measured the global and gene specific DNA methylation changes in zebrafish at different developmental stages. We found that the methylation percentage of cytosines was 11.75 ± 0.96% in 3.3 hour post fertilization (hpf) zeb...

  2. DNA-melamine hybrid molecules: from self-assembly to nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Rina; Banerjee, Shib Shankar; Bhowmick, Anil K; Das, Prolay

    2015-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA-melamine hybrid molecular building blocks were synthesized using a phosphoramidation cross-coupling reaction with a zero linker approach. The self-assembly of the DNA-organic hybrid molecules was achieved by DNA hybridization. Following self-assembly, two distinct types of nanostructures in the form of linear chains and network arrays were observed. The morphology of the self-assembled nanostructures was found to depend on the number of DNA strands that were attached to a single melamine molecule. PMID:26199847

  3. Development of a specific biotinylated DNA probe for the detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, H; Qian, B; Despres, B; Kibenge, F S; Heaney, S B; Rainnie, D J

    1995-10-01

    A specific DNA probe for the identification of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), was developed from one of 3 clones pRS47, pRS49, and pRS26 of 5.1 kb, 5.3 kb, and 11.3 kb, respectively. The biotinylated pRS47/BamHI insert probe was tested on 3 dilutions of DNA extracted from 3 strains of R. salmoninarum and from 1 strain each of Arthrobacter protophormiae, Aeromonas salmonicida, Corynebacterium aquaticum, Carnobacterium piscicola, Listonella anguillarum, Micrococcus luteus, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Vibrio ordalii, and Yersinia ruckeri. In a dot blot assay, this probe hybridized only with the DNA from the R. salmoninarum strains. When used on kidney samples from fish challenged with R. salmoninarum, the dot blot hybridization assay with the probe was found to be as sensitive as culture. In a fluorescent antibody test, samples that were negative in culture and dot blot hybridization showed no more than one fluorescing cell in 50 microscopic fields examined. This DNA probe, therefore, has the potential for use in the diagnosis of BKD of fish. PMID:8548693

  4. Development of a specific biotinylated DNA probe for the detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed Central

    Hariharan, H; Qian, B; Despres, B; Kibenge, F S; Heaney, S B; Rainnie, D J

    1995-01-01

    A specific DNA probe for the identification of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), was developed from one of 3 clones pRS47, pRS49, and pRS26 of 5.1 kb, 5.3 kb, and 11.3 kb, respectively. The biotinylated pRS47/BamHI insert probe was tested on 3 dilutions of DNA extracted from 3 strains of R. salmoninarum and from 1 strain each of Arthrobacter protophormiae, Aeromonas salmonicida, Corynebacterium aquaticum, Carnobacterium piscicola, Listonella anguillarum, Micrococcus luteus, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Vibrio ordalii, and Yersinia ruckeri. In a dot blot assay, this probe hybridized only with the DNA from the R. salmoninarum strains. When used on kidney samples from fish challenged with R. salmoninarum, the dot blot hybridization assay with the probe was found to be as sensitive as culture. In a fluorescent antibody test, samples that were negative in culture and dot blot hybridization showed no more than one fluorescing cell in 50 microscopic fields examined. This DNA probe, therefore, has the potential for use in the diagnosis of BKD of fish. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:8548693

  5. DNA-sequence-specific erasers of epigenetic memory.

    PubMed

    Mozgova, Iva; Köhler, Claudia

    2016-05-27

    How epigenetic regulators find their specific targets remains a challenging question. Two parallel studies show that REF6, a plant H3K27me3 demethylase, binds a specific DNA motif via its zinc-finger domains and recruits the SWI/SNF-type ATPase BRAHMA, demonstrating a sequence-specific recruitment mechanism for a chromatin-modifying complex. PMID:27230685

  6. DNA-based hybridization chain reaction amplification for assaying the effect of environmental phenolic hormone on DNA methyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenning; Yin, Huanshun; Han, Yunxiang; Zhou, Yunlei; Ai, Shiyun

    2014-06-01

    In this work, a novel electrochemical protocol with signal amplification for determination of DNA methylation and methyltransferase activity using DNA-based hybridization chain reaction (HCR) was proposed. After the gold electrode was modified with dsDNA, it was treated with M.SssI MTase, HpaII endonuclease, respectively. And then the HCR was initiated by the target DNA and two hairpin helper DNAs, which lead to the formation of extended dsDNA polymers on the electrode surface. The signal was amplified by the labeled biotin on the hairpin probes. As a result, the streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase (S-ALP) conjugated on the electrode surface through the specific interaction between biotin and S-ALP. ALP could convert 1-naphthyl phosphate into 1-naphthol and the latter could be electrochemically oxidized, which was used to monitor the methylation event and MTase activity. The HCR assay presents good electrochemical responses for the determination of M.SssI MTase at a concentration as low as 0.0067 uni tmL(-1). Moreover, the effects of anti-cancer drug and environmental phenolic hormone on M.SssI MTase activity were also investigated. The results indicated that 5-fluorouracil and daunorubicin hydrochloride could inhibit the activity, and the opposite results were obtained with bisphenol A and nonylphenol. Therefore, this method can not only provide a platform to screen the inhibitors of DNA MTase and develop new anticancer drugs, but also offer a novel technique to investigate the possible carcinogenesis mechanism. PMID:24856396

  7. Precise and selective sensing of DNA-DNA hybridization by graphene/Si-nanowires diode-type biosensors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungkil; Park, Shin-Young; Kim, Sung; Lee, Dae Hun; Kim, Ju Hwan; Kim, Jong Min; Kang, Hee; Han, Joong-Soo; Park, Jun Woo; Lee, Hosun; Choi, Suk-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Single-Si-nanowire (NW)-based DNA sensors have been recently developed, but their sensitivity is very limited because of high noise signals, originating from small source-drain current of the single Si NW. Here, we demonstrate that chemical-vapor-deposition-grown large-scale graphene/surface-modified vertical-Si-NW-arrays junctions can be utilized as diode-type biosensors for highly-sensitive and -selective detection of specific oligonucleotides. For this, a twenty-seven-base-long synthetic oligonucleotide, which is a fragment of human DENND2D promoter sequence, is first decorated as a probe on the surface of vertical Si-NW arrays, and then the complementary oligonucleotide is hybridized to the probe. This hybridization gives rise to a doping effect on the surface of Si NWs, resulting in the increase of the current in the biosensor. The current of the biosensor increases from 19 to 120% as the concentration of the target DNA varies from 0.1 to 500 nM. In contrast, such biosensing does not come into play by the use of the oligonucleotide with incompatible or mismatched sequences. Similar results are observed from photoluminescence microscopic images and spectra. The biosensors show very-uniform current changes with standard deviations ranging ~1 to ~10% by ten-times endurance tests. These results are very promising for their applications in accurate, selective, and stable biosensing. PMID:27534818

  8. Precise and selective sensing of DNA-DNA hybridization by graphene/Si-nanowires diode-type biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jungkil; Park, Shin-Young; Kim, Sung; Lee, Dae Hun; Kim, Ju Hwan; Kim, Jong Min; Kang, Hee; Han, Joong-Soo; Park, Jun Woo; Lee, Hosun; Choi, Suk-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Single-Si-nanowire (NW)-based DNA sensors have been recently developed, but their sensitivity is very limited because of high noise signals, originating from small source-drain current of the single Si NW. Here, we demonstrate that chemical-vapor-deposition-grown large-scale graphene/surface-modified vertical-Si-NW-arrays junctions can be utilized as diode-type biosensors for highly-sensitive and -selective detection of specific oligonucleotides. For this, a twenty-seven-base-long synthetic oligonucleotide, which is a fragment of human DENND2D promoter sequence, is first decorated as a probe on the surface of vertical Si-NW arrays, and then the complementary oligonucleotide is hybridized to the probe. This hybridization gives rise to a doping effect on the surface of Si NWs, resulting in the increase of the current in the biosensor. The current of the biosensor increases from 19 to 120% as the concentration of the target DNA varies from 0.1 to 500 nM. In contrast, such biosensing does not come into play by the use of the oligonucleotide with incompatible or mismatched sequences. Similar results are observed from photoluminescence microscopic images and spectra. The biosensors show very-uniform current changes with standard deviations ranging ~1 to ~10% by ten-times endurance tests. These results are very promising for their applications in accurate, selective, and stable biosensing. PMID:27534818

  9. Sequence-specific purification of nucleic acids by PNA-controlled hybrid selection.

    PubMed

    Orum, H; Nielsen, P E; Jørgensen, M; Larsson, C; Stanley, C; Koch, T

    1995-09-01

    Using an oligohistidine peptide nucleic acids (oligohistidine-PNA) chimera, we have developed a rapid hybrid selection method that allows efficient, sequence-specific purification of a target nucleic acid. The method exploits two fundamental features of PNA. First, that PNA binds with high affinity and specificity to its complementary nucleic acid. Second, that amino acids are easily attached to the PNA oligomer during synthesis. We show that a (His)6-PNA chimera exhibits strong binding to chelated Ni2+ ions without compromising its native PNA hybridization properties. We further show that these characteristics allow the (His)6-PNA/DNA complex to be purified by the well-established method of metal ion affinity chromatography using a Ni(2+)-NTA (nitrilotriactic acid) resin. Specificity and efficiency are the touchstones of any nucleic acid purification scheme. We show that the specificity of the (His)6-PNA selection approach is such that oligonucleotides differing by only a single nucleotide can be selectively purified. We also show that large RNAs (2224 nucleotides) can be captured with high efficiency by using multiple (His)6-PNA probes. PNA can hybridize to nucleic acids in low-salt concentrations that destabilize native nucleic acid structures. We demonstrate that this property of PNA can be utilized to purify an oligonucleotide in which the target sequence forms part of an intramolecular stem/loop structure. PMID:7495562

  10. RNA∶DNA hybrids initiate quasi-palindrome-associated mutations in highly transcribed yeast DNA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nayun; Cho, Jang-Eun; Li, Yue C; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-11-01

    RNase H enzymes promote genetic stability by degrading aberrant RNA:DNA hybrids and by removing ribonucleotide monophosphates (rNMPs) that are present in duplex DNA. Here, we report that loss of RNase H2 in yeast is associated with mutations that extend identity between the arms of imperfect inverted repeats (quasi-palindromes or QPs), a mutation type generally attributed to a template switch during DNA synthesis. QP events were detected using frameshift-reversion assays and were only observed under conditions of high transcription. In striking contrast to transcription-associated short deletions that also are detected by these assays, QP events do not require Top1 activity. QP mutation rates are strongly affected by the direction of DNA replication and, in contrast to their elevation in the absence of RNase H2, are reduced when RNase H1 is additionally eliminated. Finally, transcription-associated QP events are limited by components of the nucleotide excision repair pathway and are promoted by translesion synthesis DNA polymerases. We suggest that QP mutations reflect either a transcription-associated perturbation of Okazaki-fragment processing, or the use of a nascent transcript to resume replication following a transcription-replication conflict. PMID:24244191

  11. A highly oriented hybrid microarray modified electrode fabricated by a template-free method for ultrasensitive electrochemical DNA recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Chu, Zhenyu; Dong, Xueliang; Jin, Wanqin; Dempsey, Eithne

    2013-10-01

    Highly oriented growth of a hybrid microarray was realized by a facile template-free method on gold substrates for the first time. The proposed formation mechanism involves an interfacial structure-directing force arising from self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) between gold substrates and hybrid crystals. Different SAMs and variable surface coverage of the assembled molecules play a critical role in the interfacial directing forces and influence the morphologies of hybrid films. A highly oriented hybrid microarray was formed on the highly aligned and vertical SAMs of 1,4-benzenedithiol molecules with rigid backbones, which afforded an intense structure-directing power for the oriented growth of hybrid crystals. Additionally, the density of the microarray could be adjusted by controlling the surface coverage of assembled molecules. Based on the hybrid microarray modified electrode with a large specific area (ca. 10 times its geometrical area), a label-free electrochemical DNA biosensor was constructed for the detection of an oligonucleotide fragment of the avian flu virus H5N1. The DNA biosensor displayed a significantly low detection limit of 5 pM (S/N = 3), a wide linear response from 10 pM to 10 nM, as well as excellent selectivity, good regeneration and high stability. We expect that the proposed template-free method can provide a new reference for the fabrication of a highly oriented hybrid array and the as-prepared microarray modified electrode will be a promising paradigm in constructing highly sensitive and selective biosensors.Highly oriented growth of a hybrid microarray was realized by a facile template-free method on gold substrates for the first time. The proposed formation mechanism involves an interfacial structure-directing force arising from self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) between gold substrates and hybrid crystals. Different SAMs and variable surface coverage of the assembled molecules play a critical role in the interfacial directing forces and

  12. An Engineered Kinetic Amplification Mechanism for Single Nucleotide Variant Discrimination by DNA Hybridization Probes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sherry Xi; Seelig, Georg

    2016-04-20

    Even a single-nucleotide difference between the sequences of two otherwise identical biological nucleic acids can have dramatic functional consequences. Here, we use model-guided reaction pathway engineering to quantitatively improve the performance of selective hybridization probes in recognizing single nucleotide variants (SNVs). Specifically, we build a detection system that combines discrimination by competition with DNA strand displacement-based catalytic amplification. We show, both mathematically and experimentally, that the single nucleotide selectivity of such a system in binding to single-stranded DNA and RNA is quadratically better than discrimination due to competitive hybridization alone. As an additional benefit the integrated circuit inherits the property of amplification and provides at least 10-fold better sensitivity than standard hybridization probes. Moreover, we demonstrate how the detection mechanism can be tuned such that the detection reaction is agnostic to the position of the SNV within the target sequence. in contrast, prior strand displacement-based probes designed for kinetic discrimination are highly sensitive to position effects. We apply our system to reliably discriminate between different members of the let-7 microRNA family that differ in only a single base position. Our results demonstrate the power of systematic reaction network design to quantitatively improve biotechnology. PMID:27010123

  13. Detection of hepatitis A virus in seeded estuarine samples by hybridization with cDNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Estes, M.K.; Metcalf, T.G.; Melnick, J.L

    1986-10-01

    The development and trials of a nucleic acid hybridization test for the detection of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in estuarine samples within 48 h are described. Approximately 10/sup 4/ physical particlels of HAV per dot could be detected. Test sensitivity was optimized by the consideration of hydbridization stringency, /sup 32/P energy level, probe concentration, and nucleic acid binding to filters. Test specificity was shown by a lack of cross-hybridization with other enteroviruses and unrelated nucleic acids. Potential false-positive reactions between bacterial DNA in samples and residual vector DNA contamination of purified nucleotide sequences in probes were eliminated by DNase treatment of samples. Humic acid at concentrations of up to 100 mg/liter caused only insignificant decreases in test sensitivity. Interference with hybridization by organic components of virus-containing eluates was removed by proteinase K digestion followed by phenol extraction and ethanol precipitation. The test is suitable for detecting naturally occurring HAV in samples from polluted estuarine environments.

  14. Molecular cytogenetics of Alstroemeria: identification of parental genomes in interspecific hybrids and characterization of repetitive DNA families in constitutive heterochromatin.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, A G; van Os, D P; de Jong, J H; Ramanna, M S

    1997-02-01

    The genus Alstroemeria consists of diploid (2n = 2x = 16) species originating mainly from Chile and Brazil. Most cultivars are triploid or tetraploid interspecific hybrids. C-banding of eight species revealed obvious differentiation of constitutive heterochromatin within the genus. The present study focused on the molecular (cyto)genetic background of this differentiation. Genomic slot-blot analysis demonstrated strong conservation of major parts of the genomes among six species. The chromosomes of A. aurea and A. ligtu, species with pronounced interstitial C-bands, were found to contain large amounts of highly repetitive and species-specific DNA. The variation in size, number and intensity of strongly probed bands of major repetitive DNA families observed in genomic Southern blots of Sau3A, HaeIII, and MseI digests indicated a strong correlation between variation in genomic DNA composition and different C-banding patterns among Alstroemeria species. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) revealed a clear distinction between parental chromosomes in the hybrids between Chilean and Brazilian species and also between Chilean species, as long as at least one of the parental species possessed prominent C-banding. Regarding the latter, discriminative hybridization resulted from highly repetitive species specific DNA in the heterochromatic chromosome regions of A. aurea and A. ligtu, and caused GISH banding patterns that coincided with the C-banding patterns. PMID:9088641

  15. Spatially localized generation of nucleotide sequence-specific DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Oh, D H; King, B A; Boxer, S G; Hanawalt, P C

    2001-09-25

    Psoralens linked to triplex-forming oligonucleotides (psoTFOs) have been used in conjunction with laser-induced two-photon excitation (TPE) to damage a specific DNA target sequence. To demonstrate that TPE can initiate photochemistry resulting in psoralen-DNA photoadducts, target DNA sequences were incubated with psoTFOs to form triple-helical complexes and then irradiated in liquid solution with pulsed 765-nm laser light, which is half the quantum energy required for conventional one-photon excitation, as used in psoralen + UV A radiation (320-400 nm) therapy. Target DNA acquired strand-specific psoralen monoadducts in a light dose-dependent fashion. To localize DNA damage in a model tissue-like medium, a DNA-psoTFO mixture was prepared in a polyacrylamide gel and then irradiated with a converging laser beam targeting the rear of the gel. The highest number of photoadducts formed at the rear while relatively sparing DNA at the front of the gel, demonstrating spatial localization of sequence-specific DNA damage by TPE. To assess whether TPE treatment could be extended to cells without significant toxicity, cultured monolayers of normal human dermal fibroblasts were incubated with tritium-labeled psoralen without TFO to maximize detectable damage and irradiated by TPE. DNA from irradiated cells treated with psoralen exhibited a 4- to 7-fold increase in tritium activity relative to untreated controls. Functional survival assays indicated that the psoralen-TPE treatment was not toxic to cells. These results demonstrate that DNA damage can be simultaneously manipulated at the nucleotide level and in three dimensions. This approach for targeting photochemical DNA damage may have photochemotherapeutic applications in skin and other optically accessible tissues. PMID:11572980

  16. Design and evaluation of Bacteroides DNA probes for the specific detection of human fecal pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Kreader, C.A.

    1995-04-01

    Because Bacteroides spp. are obligate anaerobes that dominate the human fecal flora, and because some species may live only in the human intestine, these bacteria might be useful to distinguish human from nonhuman sources of fecal pollution. To test this hypothesis, PCR primers specific for 16S rRNA gene sequences of Bacteroides distasonis, B. thetaiotaomicron, and B. vulgatus were designed. Hybridization with species-specific internal probes was used to detect the intended PCR products. Extracts from 66 known Bacteroides strains, representing 10 related species, were used to confirm the specificity of these PCR-hybridization assays. To test for specificity in feces, procedures were developed to prepare DNA of sufficient purity for PCR. Extracts of feces from 9 humans and 70 nonhumans (cats, dogs, cattle, hogs, horses, sheep, goats, and chickens) were each analyzed with and without an internal positive control to verify that PCR amplification was not inhibited by substances in the extract. In addition, serial dilutions from each extract that tested positive were assayed to estimate the relative abundance of target Bacteroides spp. in the sample. Depending on the primer-probe set used, either 78 or 67% of the human fecal extracts tested had high levels of target DNA. On the other hand, only 7 to 11% of the nonhuman extracts tested had similarly high levels of target DNA. An additional 12 to 20% of the nonhuman extracts had levels of target DNA that were 100- to 1,000-fold lower than those found in humans. Although the B. vulgatus probes detected high levels of their target DNA in most of the house pets, similarly high levels of target DNA were found only in a few individuals from other groups of nonhumans. Therefore, the results indicate that these probes can distinguish human from non human feces in many cases. 50 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Sequence specific generation of a DNA panhandle permits PCR amplification of unknown flanking DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, D H; Winistorfer, S C

    1992-01-01

    We present a novel method for the PCR amplification of unknown DNA that flanks a known segment directly from human genomic DNA. PCR requires that primer annealing sites be present on each end of the DNA segment that is to be amplified. In this method, known DNA is placed on the uncharacterized side of the sequence of interest via DNA polymerase mediated generation of a PCR template that is shaped like a pan with a handle. Generation of this template permits specific amplification of the unknown sequence. Taq (DNA) polymerase was used to form the original template and to generate the PCR product. 2.2 kb of the beta-globin gene, and 657 bp of the 5' flanking region of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene, were amplified directly from human genomic DNA using primers that initially flank only one side of the region amplified. This method will provide a powerful tool for acquiring DNA sequence information. Images PMID:1371352

  18. Colorimetric detection of DNA hybridization based on a dual platform of gold nanoparticles and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Thavanathan, Jeevan; Huang, Nay Ming; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2014-05-15

    The unique property of gold nanoparticles (Au NP) to induce colour change and the versatility of graphene oxides (GO) in surface modification makes them ideal in the application of colorimetric biosensor. Thus we developed a label free optical method to detect DNA hybridization through a visually observed colour change. The Au NP is conjugated to a DNA probe and is allowed to hybridize with the DNA target to the GO thus causing a change in colour from pinkish-red to purplish blue. Spectrophometry analysis gave a wavelength shift of 22 nm with 1 µM of DNA target. Sensitivity testing using serially diluted DNA conjugated GO showed that the optimum detection was at 63 nM of DNA target with the limit at 8 nM. This proves the possibility for the detection of DNA hybridization through the use of dual nanoparticle system by visual observation. PMID:24368225

  19. Remote electronic control of DNA hybridization through inductive coupling to an attached metal nanocrystal antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly; Schwartz, John J.; Santos, Aaron T.; Zhang, Shuguang; Jacobson, Joseph M.

    2002-01-01

    Increasingly detailed structural and dynamic studies are highlighting the precision with which biomolecules execute often complex tasks at the molecular scale. The efficiency and versatility of these processes have inspired many attempts to mimic or harness them. To date, biomolecules have been used to perform computational operations and actuation, to construct artificial transcriptional loops that behave like simple circuit elements and to direct the assembly of nanocrystals. Further development of these approaches requires new tools for the physical and chemical manipulation of biological systems. Biomolecular activity has been triggered optically through the use of chromophores, but direct electronic control over biomolecular `machinery' in a specific and fully reversible manner has not yet been achieved. Here we demonstrate remote electronic control over the hybridization behaviour of DNA molecules, by inductive coupling of a radio-frequency magnetic field to a metal nanocrystal covalently linked to DNA. Inductive coupling to the nanocrystal increases the local temperature of the bound DNA, thereby inducing denaturation while leaving surrounding molecules relatively unaffected. Moreover, because dissolved biomolecules dissipate heat in less than 50picoseconds (ref. 16), the switching is fully reversible. Inductive heating of macroscopic samples is widely used, but the present approach should allow extension of this concept to the control of hybridization and thus of a broad range of biological functions on the molecular scale.

  20. Transcriptome screen for fast evolving genes by Inter-Specific Selective Hybridization (ISSH)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Fast evolving genes are targets of an increasing panel of biological studies, from cancer research to population genetics and species specific adaptations. Yet, their identification and isolation are still laborious, particularly for non-model organisms. We developed a method, named the Inter-Specific Selective Hybridization (ISSH) method, for generating cDNA libraries enriched in fast evolving genes. It utilizes transcripts of homologous tissues of distinct yet related species. Experimental hybridization conditions are monitored in order to discard transcripts that do not find their homologous counterparts in the two species sets as well as transcripts that display a strong complementarity between the two species. Only heteroduplexes that disanneal at low stringency are used for constructing the resulting cDNA library. Results We demonstrate the efficiency of the ISSH method by generating a brain cDNA library enriched in fast evolving transcripts of a non-model catfish species as well as a control, non-enriched library. Our results indicate that the enriched library contains effectively more fast evolving sequences than the control library. Gene annotation analyses also indicate enrichment in genes with low expression levels and non-ubiquitously expressed genes, both categories encompassing the majority of fast evolving genes. Furthermore, most of the identified transcripts show higher sequence divergence between two closely related catfish species as compared to recognized fast evolving DNA markers. Conclusions The ISSH method offers a simple, inexpensive and efficient way to screen the transcriptome for isolating fast evolving genes. This method opens new opportunities in the investigation of biological mechanisms that include fast evolving genes, such as the evolution of lineage specific processes and traits responsible for species adaptation to their environment. PMID:20175901

  1. Hybridization chain reaction amplification for highly sensitive fluorescence detection of DNA with dextran coated microarrays.

    PubMed

    Chao, Jie; Li, Zhenhua; Li, Jing; Peng, Hongzhen; Su, Shao; Li, Qian; Zhu, Changfeng; Zuo, Xiaolei; Song, Shiping; Wang, Lianhui; Wang, Lihua

    2016-07-15

    Microarrays of biomolecules hold great promise in the fields of genomics, proteomics, and clinical assays on account of their remarkably parallel and high-throughput assay capability. However, the fluorescence detection used in most conventional DNA microarrays is still limited by sensitivity. In this study, we have demonstrated a novel universal and highly sensitive platform for fluorescent detection of sequence specific DNA at the femtomolar level by combining dextran-coated microarrays with hybridization chain reaction (HCR) signal amplification. Three-dimensional dextran matrix was covalently coated on glass surface as the scaffold to immobilize DNA recognition probes to increase the surface binding capacity and accessibility. DNA nanowire tentacles were formed on the matrix surface for efficient signal amplification by capturing multiple fluorescent molecules in a highly ordered way. By quantifying microscopic fluorescent signals, the synergetic effects of dextran and HCR greatly improved sensitivity of DNA microarrays, with a detection limit of 10fM (1×10(5) molecules). This detection assay could recognize one-base mismatch with fluorescence signals dropped down to ~20%. This cost-effective microarray platform also worked well with samples in serum and thus shows great potential for clinical diagnosis. PMID:26922047

  2. The minimal amount of starting DNA for Agilent's hybrid capture-based targeted massively parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jongsuk; Son, Dae-Soon; Jeon, Hyo-Jeong; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Park, Gahee; Ryu, Gyu Ha; Park, Woong-Yang; Park, Donghyun

    2016-01-01

    Targeted capture massively parallel sequencing is increasingly being used in clinical settings, and as costs continue to decline, use of this technology may become routine in health care. However, a limited amount of tissue has often been a challenge in meeting quality requirements. To offer a practical guideline for the minimum amount of input DNA for targeted sequencing, we optimized and evaluated the performance of targeted sequencing depending on the input DNA amount. First, using various amounts of input DNA, we compared commercially available library construction kits and selected Agilent's SureSelect-XT and KAPA Biosystems' Hyper Prep kits as the kits most compatible with targeted deep sequencing using Agilent's SureSelect custom capture. Then, we optimized the adapter ligation conditions of the Hyper Prep kit to improve library construction efficiency and adapted multiplexed hybrid selection to reduce the cost of sequencing. In this study, we systematically evaluated the performance of the optimized protocol depending on the amount of input DNA, ranging from 6.25 to 200 ng, suggesting the minimal input DNA amounts based on coverage depths required for specific applications. PMID:27220682

  3. Activation of different split functionalities on re-association of RNA-DNA hybrids.

    PubMed

    Afonin, Kirill A; Viard, Mathias; Martins, Angelica N; Lockett, Stephen J; Maciag, Anna E; Freed, Eric O; Heldman, Eliahu; Jaeger, Luc; Blumenthal, Robert; Shapiro, Bruce A

    2013-04-01

    Split-protein systems, an approach that relies on fragmentation of proteins with their further conditional re-association to form functional complexes, are increasingly used for various biomedical applications. This approach offers tight control of protein functions and improved detection sensitivity. Here we report a similar technique based on a pair of RNA-DNA hybrids that can be used generally for triggering different split functionalities. Individually, each hybrid is inactive but when two cognate hybrids re-associate, different functionalities are triggered inside mammalian cells. As a proof of concept, this work mainly focuses on the activation of RNA interference. However, the release of other functionalities (such as resonance energy transfer and RNA aptamer) is also shown. Furthermore, in vivo studies demonstrate a significant uptake of the hybrids by tumours together with specific gene silencing. This split-functionality approach presents a new route in the development of 'smart' nucleic acid-based nanoparticles and switches for various biomedical applications. PMID:23542902

  4. 5-bp Classical Satellite DNA Loci from Chromosome-1 Instability in Cervical Neoplasia Detected by DNA Breakage Detection/Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (DBD-FISH)

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I.; Ortíz-Hernández, Brenda L.; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I.; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Fernández, José Luis; López-Fernández, Carmen; Gosálvez, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the association between the progressive stages of cervical neoplasia and DNA damage in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 in cervical epithelium and in peripheral blood lymphocytes using DNA breakage detection/fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH). A hospital-based unmatched case-control study was conducted in 2011 with a sample of 30 women grouped according to disease stage and selected according to histological diagnosis; 10 with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LG-SIL), 10 with high-grade SIL (HG-SIL), and 10 with no cervical lesions, from the Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad of The Mexican Social Security Institute, IMSS, Mexico. Specific chromosome damage levels in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 were evaluated in cervical epithelium and peripheral blood lymphocytes using the DBD-FISH technique. Whole-genome DNA hybridization was used as a reference for the level of damage. Results of Kruskal-Wallis test showed a significant increase according to neoplastic development in both tissues. The instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 was evidenced using chromosome-orientation FISH. In conclusion, we suggest that the progression to malignant transformation involves an increase in the instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1. PMID:23429197

  5. Quantitative modeling of transcription factor binding specificities using DNA shape.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tianyin; Shen, Ning; Yang, Lin; Abe, Namiko; Horton, John; Mann, Richard S; Bussemaker, Harmen J; Gordân, Raluca; Rohs, Remo

    2015-04-14

    DNA binding specificities of transcription factors (TFs) are a key component of gene regulatory processes. Underlying mechanisms that explain the highly specific binding of TFs to their genomic target sites are poorly understood. A better understanding of TF-DNA binding requires the ability to quantitatively model TF binding to accessible DNA as its basic step, before additional in vivo components can be considered. Traditionally, these models were built based on nucleotide sequence. Here, we integrated 3D DNA shape information derived with a high-throughput approach into the modeling of TF binding specificities. Using support vector regression, we trained quantitative models of TF binding specificity based on protein binding microarray (PBM) data for 68 mammalian TFs. The evaluation of our models included cross-validation on specific PBM array designs, testing across different PBM array designs, and using PBM-trained models to predict relative binding affinities derived from in vitro selection combined with deep sequencing (SELEX-seq). Our results showed that shape-augmented models compared favorably to sequence-based models. Although both k-mer and DNA shape features can encode interdependencies between nucleotide positions of the binding site, using DNA shape features reduced the dimensionality of the feature space. In addition, analyzing the feature weights of DNA shape-augmented models uncovered TF family-specific structural readout mechanisms that were not revealed by the DNA sequence. As such, this work combines knowledge from structural biology and genomics, and suggests a new path toward understanding TF binding and genome function. PMID:25775564

  6. Controlling microarray DNA hybridization efficiency by probe-surface distance and external surface electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qamhieh, K.; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2015-03-01

    DNA microarrays are analytical devices designed to determine the composition of multicomponent solutions of nucleic acids, DNA or RNA. These devices are promising technology for diverse applications, including sensing, diagnostics, and drug/gene delivery. Here, we modify a hybridization adsorption isotherm to study the effects of probe-surface distance and the external electrostatic fields, on the oligonucleotide hybridization in microarray and how these effects are varies depending on surface probe density and target concentration. This study helps in our understanding on-surface hybridization mechanisms, and from it we can observe a significant effect of the probe-surface distance, and the external electrostatic fields, on the hybridization yield. In addition we present a simple new criteria to control the oligonucleotide hybridization efficiency by providing a chart illustrating the effects of all factors on the DNA-hybridization efficiency.

  7. Three dimensional dual labelled DNA fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis in fixed tissue sections

    PubMed Central

    Kernohan, Kristin D.; Bérubé, Nathalie G.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging studies demonstrate that three-dimensional organization of chromatin in the nucleus plays a vital role in regulating the genome. DNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is a common molecular technique used to visualize the location of DNA sequences. The vast majority of DNA FISH studies are conducted on cultured cells due to the technical difficulties encountered using fixed tissue sections. However, the use of cultured cells poses important limitations that could yield misleading results, making in vivo analysis a far superior approach. Here we present a protocol for multiplexed three dimensional DNA FISH in mouse brain sections, which is also applicable to other tissues. Paraffin-embedded tissues could be used but the embedding and preparation of the samples is time-consuming and often associated with poor antigenicity. To overcome this problem we:•developed a FISH technique using fixed, frozen cryosections;•provide specific instructions for tissue processing for proper fixation and freezing, including equilibration in sucrose gradients to maintain proper cellular structure;•include optimized permeabilization and washing steps to achieve specific signal and to limit background fluorescence in tissue sections. PMID:26150931

  8. Self-Assembled DNA Hydrogel Based on Enzymatically Polymerized DNA for Protein Encapsulation and Enzyme/DNAzyme Hybrid Cascade Reaction.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Binbin; He, Kaiyu; Zhu, Rong; Liu, Zhuoliang; Zeng, Shu; Huang, Yan; Nie, Zhou; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2016-09-01

    DNA hydrogel is a promising biomaterial for biological and medical applications due to its native biocompatibility and biodegradability. Herein, we provide a novel, versatile, and cost-effective approach for self-assembly of DNA hydrogel using the enzymatically polymerized DNA building blocks. The X-shaped DNA motif was elongated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) to form the building blocks, and hybridization between dual building blocks via their complementary TdT-polymerized DNA tails led to gel formation. TdT polymerization dramatically reduced the required amount of original DNA motifs, and the hybridization-mediated cross-linking of building blocks endows the gel with high mechanical strength. The DNA hydrogel can be applied for encapsulation and controllable release of protein cargos (for instance, green fluorescent protein) due to its enzymatic responsive properties. Moreover, this versatile strategy was extended to construct a functional DNAzyme hydrogel by integrating the peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme into DNA motifs. Furthermore, a hybrid cascade enzymatic reaction system was constructed by coencapsulating glucose oxidase and β-galactosidase into DNAzyme hydrogel. This efficient cascade reaction provides not only a potential method for glucose/lactose detection by naked eye but also a promising modular platform for constructing a multiple enzyme or enzyme/DNAzyme hybrid system. PMID:27526861

  9. The specific mitochondrial DNA polymorphism found in Klinefelter's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Haruna; Tun, Zaw; Young, David R; Ozawa, Hiroyasu; Yamazaki, Kentaro; Tanaka, Einosuke; Honda, Katsuya

    2002-09-20

    Hypervariable segments of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) (HV1 and HV2) were analyzed in Klinefelter's syndrome and compared to normal population data. One pair of samples consisting of a Japanese mother and affected son with Klinefelter's syndrome (involved in a criminal case), and seven unrelated DNA samples from Caucasian Klinefelter males (two involved in criminal cases and five diagnosed) were collected in Japan and the United States. The diagnosis of Klinefelter's syndrome was established previously by multiplex XY-STR typing detecting two X alleles and one Y allele in the samples. Haplotype analysis of the mtDNA sequence in Klinefelter males was found to be identical, unique, and specific, as it was not found in the normal population. Astonishingly, family data exhibited that the haplotype of the mtDNA in the son was apparently different from the mother's, suggesting that the mtDNA of Klinefelter male would not be inherited from mother to son. Our data indicate that possible interaction of the sex chromosome and the mtDNA exists, and suggests that the specific mtDNA haplotype could cause the abnormal cell to fertilize and reproduce itself. PMID:12237124

  10. Label-free detection of DNA hybridization and single point mutations in a nano-gap biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaffino, R. L.; Mir, M.; Samitier, J.

    2014-03-01

    We describe a conductance-based biosensor that exploits DNA-mediated long-range electron transport for the label-free and direct electrical detection of DNA hybridization. This biosensor platform comprises an array of vertical nano-gap biosensors made of gold and fabricated through standard photolithography combined with focused ion beam lithography. The nano-gap walls are covalently modified with short, anti-symmetric thiolated DNA probes, which are terminated by 19 bases complementary to both the ends of a target DNA strand. The nano-gaps are separated by a distance of 50nm, which was adjusted to fit the length of the DNA target plus the DNA probes. The hybridization of the target DNA closes the gap circuit in a switch on/off fashion, in such a way that it is readily detected by an increase in the current after nano-gap closure. The nano-biosensor shows high specificity in the discrimination of base-pair mismatching and does not require signal indicators or enhancing molecules. The design of the biosensor platform is applicable for multiplexed detection in a straightforward manner. The platform is well-suited to mass production, point-of-care diagnostics, and wide-scale DNA analysis applications.

  11. Blocking oligo--a novel approach for improving chip-based DNA hybridization efficiency.

    PubMed

    Tao, Sheng-ce; Gao, Hua-fang; Cao, Fei; Ma, Xue-mei; Cheng, Jing

    2003-08-01

    For most of the commonly used DNA chips, the probes are usually single-stranded oligonucleotides and the targets are double-stranded DNAs (dsDNAs). Only one strand of the DNA serves as the target while the other competes with the probes immobilized on the chip for the target and therefore is regarded as the interfering strand. In this report, a novel technique was developed for improving the hybridization efficiency on DNA chips by using blocking oligos, which is complimentary to the target interfering strand to reduce the influence of the interfering strand. The hybridization efficiency of dsDNA was much lower than that of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) when synthesized DNA targets were tested on the DNA chip. Blocking oligos can improve the hybridization efficiency of dsDNA to about 2/3 that of ssDNA. Blocking oligos have also been applied to PCR products of different lengths for hybridization. The hybridization efficiency with blocking oligos is about three times higher than that without blocking oligos. We have tested PCR products of 1054 and 435 bp using our blocking procedure, and the results are consistent. PMID:12944123

  12. T-Specific DNA Polymorphisms among Wild Mice from Israel and Spain

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, F.; Neufeld, E.; Ritte, U.; Klein, J.

    1988-01-01

    Lehrach and his coworkers have isolated a series of DNA probes that specifically hybridize with different regions of mouse chromosome 17 within the t complex. The probes display restriction fragment length polymorphisms, RFLPs, which are specific for the t haplotypes in all laboratory mouse strains tested thus far. Some of these probes have been used to test wild mice populations for these t-associated DNA forms. It is demonstrated that populations from Germany, Switzerland, Italy, Greece, Yugoslavia, Australia, Costa Rica, and Venezuela contain chromosomes in which all the tested DNA loci display the t-specific polymorphisms. The frequency of mice carrying these chromosomes is as high as 31%. Wild mice from Israel and Spain, on the other hand, carry chromosomes displaying t-specific DNA forms only at one or two of the probed loci, while the other loci carry the wild-type (+) forms. These chromosomes thus resemble the partial t haplotypes known from the study of laboratory mice. One possible interpretation of these findings is that these DNA polymorphisms contributed to the assembly of the complete t haplotypes and that these haplotypes may have originated in the Middle East. PMID:3165081

  13. Spatially localized generation of nucleotide sequence-specific DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dennis H.; King, Brett A.; Boxer, Steven G.; Hanawalt, Philip C.

    2001-01-01

    Psoralens linked to triplex-forming oligonucleotides (psoTFOs) have been used in conjunction with laser-induced two-photon excitation (TPE) to damage a specific DNA target sequence. To demonstrate that TPE can initiate photochemistry resulting in psoralen–DNA photoadducts, target DNA sequences were incubated with psoTFOs to form triple-helical complexes and then irradiated in liquid solution with pulsed 765-nm laser light, which is half the quantum energy required for conventional one-photon excitation, as used in psoralen + UV A radiation (320–400 nm) therapy. Target DNA acquired strand-specific psoralen monoadducts in a light dose-dependent fashion. To localize DNA damage in a model tissue-like medium, a DNA–psoTFO mixture was prepared in a polyacrylamide gel and then irradiated with a converging laser beam targeting the rear of the gel. The highest number of photoadducts formed at the rear while relatively sparing DNA at the front of the gel, demonstrating spatial localization of sequence-specific DNA damage by TPE. To assess whether TPE treatment could be extended to cells without significant toxicity, cultured monolayers of normal human dermal fibroblasts were incubated with tritium-labeled psoralen without TFO to maximize detectable damage and irradiated by TPE. DNA from irradiated cells treated with psoralen exhibited a 4- to 7-fold increase in tritium activity relative to untreated controls. Functional survival assays indicated that the psoralen–TPE treatment was not toxic to cells. These results demonstrate that DNA damage can be simultaneously manipulated at the nucleotide level and in three dimensions. This approach for targeting photochemical DNA damage may have photochemotherapeutic applications in skin and other optically accessible tissues. PMID:11572980

  14. Phylogenetic Analysis of Shewanella Strains by DNA Relatedness Derived from Whole Genome Microarray DNA-DNA Hybridization and Comparison with Other Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Liyou; Yi, T. Y.; Van Nostrand, Joy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Phylogenetic analyses were done for the Shewanella strains isolated from Baltic Sea (38 strains), US DOE Hanford Uranium bioremediation site [Hanford Reach of the Columbia River (HRCR), 11 strains], Pacific Ocean and Hawaiian sediments (8 strains), and strains from other resources (16 strains) with three out group strains, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Clostridium cellulolyticum, and Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus X514, using DNA relatedness derived from WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridizations, sequence similarities of 16S rRNA gene and gyrB gene, and sequence similarities of 6 loci of Shewanella genome selected from a shared gene list of the Shewanella strains with whole genome sequenced based on the average nucleotide identity of them (ANI). The phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences, and DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations of the tested Shewanella strains share exactly the same sub-clusters with very few exceptions, in which the strains were basically grouped by species. However, the phylogenetic analysis based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations dramatically increased the differentiation resolution at species and strains level within Shewanella genus. When the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations was compared to the tree based on the combined sequences of the selected functional genes (6 loci), we found that the resolutions of both methods are similar, but the clustering of the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WMGA hybridizations was clearer. These results indicate that WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridization is an idea alternative of conventional DNA-DNA hybridization methods and it is superior to the phylogenetics methods based on sequence similarities of single genes. Detailed analysis is being performed for the re-classification of the strains examined.

  15. Sequence-specific cleavage of single-stranded DNA: oligodeoxynucleotide-EDTA X Fe(II).

    PubMed Central

    Dreyer, G B; Dervan, P B

    1985-01-01

    The synthesis of a DNA hybridization probe 19 nucleotides in length, equipped with the metal chelator EDTA at C-5 of thymidine in position 10 (indicated by T*) is described. DNA-EDTA 1 has the sequence 5'-T-A-A-C-G-C-A-G-T*-C-A-G-G-C-A-C-C-G-T-3', which is complementary to a 19-nucleotide sequence in the plasmid pBR322. In the presence of Fe(II), O2, and dithiothreitol, DNA-EDTA 1 affords specific cleavage (25 degrees C, pH 7.4, 60 min) at its complementary sequence in a heat-denatured 167-base-pair restriction fragment. Cleavage occurs over a range of 16 nucleotides at the site of hybridization of 1, presumably due to a diffusible reactive species. No other cleavage sites are observed in the 167-base-pair restriction fragment. The procedure used to synthesize DNA-EDTA probes is based on the incorporation of a thymidine modified at C-5 with the triethyl ester of EDTA. By using routine phosphoramidite procedures, thymidine-EDTA can be incorporated into oligodeoxynucleotides of any desired length and sequence. Because the efficiency of the DNA cleavage reaction is dependent on the addition of both Fe(II) and reducing agent (dithiothreitol), the initiation of the cleavage reaction can be controlled. These DNA-EDTA X Fe(II) probes should be useful for the sequence-specific cleavage of single-stranded DNA (and most likely RNA) under mild conditions. Images PMID:3919391

  16. DNA hybridization in nanostructural molecular assemblies enables detection of gene mutations without a fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Tatsuo; Park, Lian-Chun; Shinohara, Toshimitsu; Goto, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a simple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) analysis utilizing DNA hybridization in nanostructural molecular assemblies. The novel technique enables the detection of a single-base mismatch in a DNA sequence without a fluorescent probe. This report describes for the first time that DNA hybridization occurs in the nanostructural molecular assemblies (termed reverse micelles) formed in an organic medium. The restricted nanospace in the reverse micelles amplifies the differences in the hybridization rate between mismatched and perfectly matched DNA probes. For a model system, we hybridized a 20-mer based on the p53 gene sequence to 20-mer complementary oligonucleotides with various types of mismatches. Without any DNA labeling or electrochemical apparatus, we successfully detected the various oligonucleotide mismatches by simply measuring the UV absorbance at 260 nm. PMID:14715007

  17. Characterization of Vibrio metschnikovii and Vibrio gazogenes by DNA-DNA hybridization and phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, J J; Hickman-Brenner, F W; Fanning, G R; Gordon, C M; Brenner, D J

    1988-01-01

    Vibrio metschnikovii and Vibrio gazogenes are two new Vibrio species that have been little studied. Thirteen strains of V. metschnikovii were highly related to the type strain, NCTC 8443, by DNA-DNA hybridization. Relatedness values were 83 to 90% at 60 degrees C and 75 to 84% at the more stringent 75 degrees C. Divergence values ranged from 0.7 to 1.9. Strains of V. metschnikovii were oxidase negative and did not reduce nitrate to nitrite. The other phenotypic characteristics agreed with published data. Twenty-three strains of V. gazogenes were isolated from salt marshes and marshy areas on the coast of North and South Carolina. A new medium, marine agar supplemented with an additional 2.5% agar, reduced the problem of swarming by marine Vibrio species and enhanced the isolation of V. gazogenes and other organisms. By DNA-DNA hybridization, 22 of 23 strains were 76% or more related to the type strain of V. gazogenes, ATCC 29988. However, four DNA hybridization subgroups were defined on the basis of divergence values and/or phenotype. Strains of DNA group 1 were more highly related to each other, and this group contained the type strain and six other strains. Strains of DNA group 2 were more highly related to each other, and this group contained reference strain ATCC 43942 and 14 other strains. Strains of DNA group 1 did not ferment melibiose or D-sorbitol (one strain was sorbitol positive), but strains of DNA group 2 fermented both sugars. A revised phenotypic description of V. gazogenes based on 24 strains was written on the basis of reactions (within 2 days of incubation) at 25 degrees C in media supplemented with Na+, K+, and Mg2+. Positive results (100% positive unless indicated) included motility; gas production during fermentation (96% at 2 days, 100% at 3 to 7 days); growth in nutrient broth with the addition of 1% NaCl (88%), 2% NaCl, 3.5% NaCl, 6% NaCl, 8% NaCl, and 10% NaCl (92%); dry red or orange colonies on marine agar; and fermentation of L

  18. Structure and DNA Hybridization Properties of Mixed Nucleic Acid/Maleimide-Ethylene Glycol Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee,C.; Nguyen, P.; Grainger, D.; Gamble, L.; Castner, D.

    2007-01-01

    The surface structure and DNA hybridization performance of thiolated single-strand DNA (HS-ssDNA) covalently attached to a maleimide-ethylene glycol disulfide (MEG) monolayer on gold have been investigated. Monolayer immobilization chemistry and surface coverage of reactive ssDNA probes were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. Orientation of the ssDNA probes was determined by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). Target DNA hybridization on the DNA-MEG probe surfaces was measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to demonstrate the utility of these probe surfaces for detection of DNA targets from both purified target DNA samples and complex biological mixtures such as blood serum. Data from complementary techniques showed that immobilized ssDNA density is strongly dependent on the spotted bulk DNA concentration and buffer ionic strength. Variation of the immobilized ssDNA density had a profound influence on the DNA probe orientation at the surface and subsequent target hybridization efficiency. With increasing surface probe density, NEXAFS polarization dependence results (followed by monitoring the N 1s {yields} {pi}* transition) indicate that the immobilized ssDNA molecules reorient toward a more upright position on the MEG monolayer. SPR assays of DNA targets from buffer and serum showed that DNA hybridization efficiency increased with decreasing surface probe density. However, target detection in serum was better on the 'high-density' probe surface than on the 'high-efficiency' probe surface. The amounts of target detected for both ssDNA surfaces were several orders of magnitude poorer in serum than in purified DNA samples due to nonspecific serum protein adsorption onto the sensing surface.

  19. DNA Markers Associated with General and Specific Cognitive Abilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrill, Stephen A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Data on specific cognitive abilities for 86 children ages 6 to 12 from an allelic association study found three DNA markers significantly associated with specific cognitive ability scales after the effects of general intelligence were removed. These preliminary results support the hierarchical model predicted by genetic research. (SLD)

  20. Advances in the theory and practice of DNA-hybridization as a systematic method.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, F H

    1994-01-01

    DNA hybridization continues in the 1990s to provide insight into phylogeny and evolution. The resilience of this 30-year-old distance technique may be attributed to its fundamental power as a comparative method, as well as to advances in our understanding of its operation and improvements in experimental design and data analysis. These attributes and advances, along with the assumptions and limitations of DNA hybridization, are discussed in this paper. Examples are provided of recent DNA hybridization studies of molecular, morphological, and behavioral systematics and evolution. PMID:7994110

  1. Self-assembly and hybridization mechanisms of DNA with cationic polythiophene.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Magnieto, Jenifer; Azene, Elias Gebremedhn; Knoops, Jérémie; Knippenberg, Stefan; Delcourt, Cécile; Thomas, Amandine; Richeter, Sébastien; Mehdi, Ahmad; Dubois, Philippe; Lazzaroni, Roberto; Beljonne, David; Clément, Sébastien; Surin, Mathieu

    2015-08-28

    The combination of DNA and π-conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs) represents a promising approach to develop DNA hybridization biosensors, with potential applications for instance in the detection of DNA lesions and single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Here we exploit the remarkable optical properties of a cationic poly[3-(6'-(trimethylphosphonium)hexyl)thiophene-2,5-diyl] (CPT) to decipher the self-assembly of DNA and CPT. The ssDNA/CPT complexes have chiroptical signatures in the CPT absorption region that are strongly dependent on the DNA sequence, which we relate to differences in supramolecular interactions between the thiophene monomers and the various nucleobases. By studying DNA-DNA hybridization and melting processes on preformed ssDNA/CPT complexes, we observe sequence-dependent mechanisms that can yield DNA-condensed aggregates. Heating-cooling cycles show that non-equilibrium mixtures can form, noticeably depending on the working sequence of the hybridization experiment. These results are of high importance for the use of π-conjugated polyelectrolytes in DNA hybridization biosensors and in polyplexes. PMID:26179509

  2. A highly specific and sensitive DNA probe derived from chromosomal DNA of Helicobacter pylori is useful for typing H. pylori isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Li, C; Ferguson, D A; Ha, T; Chi, D S; Thomas, E

    1993-01-01

    HindIII-digested DNA fragments derived from an EcoRI-digested 6.5-kb fragment of chromosomal DNA prepared from Helicobacter pylori ATCC 43629 (type strain) were cloned into the pUC19 vector. A 0.86-kb insert was identified as a potential chromosomal DNA probe. The specificity of the probe was evaluated by testing 166 non-H. pylori bacterial strains representing 38 genera and 91 species which included aerobic, anaerobic, and microaerophilic flora of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tracts. None of the 166 non-H. pylori strains hybridized with this probe (100% specificity), and the sensitivity of this probe was also 100% when H. pylori isolates from 72 patients with gastritis and with the homologous ATCC type strain were tested by dot blot hybridization. The capability of this probe for differentiating between strains of H. pylori was evaluated by Southern blot hybridization of HaeIII-digested chromosomal DNA from 68 clinical isolates and the homologous ATCC type strain of H. pylori. Fifty-one unique hybridization patterns were seen among the 69 strains tested, demonstrating considerable genotypic variation among H. pylori clinical isolates. We propose that this probe would be of significant value for conducting epidemiologic studies. Images PMID:8370744

  3. Probing of miniPEGγ-PNA-DNA Hybrid Duplex Stability with AFM Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Samrat; Armitage, Bruce A.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2016-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are synthetic polymers, the neutral peptide backbone of which provides elevated stability to PNA-PNA and PNA-DNA hybrid duplex. It was demonstrated that incorporation of diethylene glycol (miniPEG) at the γ position of the peptide backbone increased the thermal stability of the hybrid duplexes (Sahu, B. et al. (2011) Journal of Organic Chemistry 76, 5614-5627). Here, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) based single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) and dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) to test the strength and stability of the hybrid 10 bp duplex. This hybrid duplex consisted of miniPEGγ-PNA and DNA of the same length (γMPPNA-DNA), which we compared to a DNA duplex with a homologous sequence. AFM force spectroscopy data obtained at the same conditions showed that γMPPNA-DNA hybrid is more stable than the DNA counterpart, 65 ± 15 pN vs 47 ± 15 pN, respectively. The DFS measurements performed in a range of pulling speeds analyzed in the framework of the Bell-Evans approach yielded a dissociation constant, koff ∼ 0.030 ± 0.01 sec-1 for γMPPNA-DNA hybrid duplex vs. 0.375 ± 0.18 sec-1 for the DNA-DNA duplex suggesting that the hybrid duplex is much more stable. Correlating the high affinity of γMPPNA-DNA to slow dissociation kinetics is consistent with prior bulk characterization by surface plasmon resonance. Given the growing interest in γMPPNA as well as other synthetic DNA analogues, the use of single molecule experiments along with computational analysis of force spectroscopy data will provide direct characterization of various modifications as well as higher order structures such as triplexes and quadruplexes. PMID:26898903

  4. Probing of miniPEGγ-PNA-DNA Hybrid Duplex Stability with AFM Force Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Samrat; Armitage, Bruce A; Lyubchenko, Yuri L

    2016-03-15

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are synthetic polymers, the neutral peptide backbone of which provides elevated stability to PNA-PNA and PNA-DNA hybrid duplexes. It was demonstrated that incorporation of diethylene glycol (miniPEG) at the γ position of the peptide backbone increased the thermal stability of the hybrid duplexes (Sahu, B. et al. J. Org. Chem. 2011, 76, 5614-5627). Here, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) based single molecule force spectroscopy and dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) to test the strength and stability of the hybrid 10 bp duplex. This hybrid duplex consisted of miniPEGγ-PNA and DNA of the same length (γ(MP)PNA-DNA), which we compared to a DNA duplex with a homologous sequence. AFM force spectroscopy data obtained at the same conditions showed that the γ(MP)PNA-DNA hybrid is more stable than the DNA counterpart, 65 ± 15 pN vs 47 ± 15 pN, respectively. The DFS measurements performed in a range of pulling speeds analyzed in the framework of the Bell-Evans approach yielded a dissociation constant, koff ≈ 0.030 ± 0.01 s⁻¹ for γ(MP)PNA-DNA hybrid duplex vs 0.375 ± 0.18 s⁻¹ for the DNA-DNA duplex suggesting that the hybrid duplex is much more stable. Correlating the high affinity of γ(MP)PNA-DNA to slow dissociation kinetics is consistent with prior bulk characterization by surface plasmon resonance. Given the growing interest in γ(MP)PNA as well as other synthetic DNA analogues, the use of single molecule experiments along with computational analysis of force spectroscopy data will provide direct characterization of various modifications as well as higher order structures such as triplexes and quadruplexes. PMID:26898903

  5. A search for specificity in DNA-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Cruciani, G; Goodford, P J

    1994-06-01

    The GRID force field and a principal component analysis have been used in order to predict the interactions of small chemical groups with all 64 different triplet sequences of B-DNA. Factors that favor binding to guanine-cytosine base pairs have been identified, and a dictionary of ligand groups and their locations is presented as a guide to the design of specific DNA ligands. PMID:7918250

  6. DNA-directed mutations. Leading and lagging strand specificity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinden, R. R.; Hashem, V. I.; Rosche, W. A.

    1999-01-01

    The fidelity of replication has evolved to reproduce B-form DNA accurately, while allowing a low frequency of mutation. The fidelity of replication can be compromised, however, by defined order sequence DNA (dosDNA) that can adopt unusual or non B-DNA conformations. These alternative DNA conformations, including hairpins, cruciforms, triplex DNAs, and slipped-strand structures, may affect enzyme-template interactions that potentially lead to mutations. To analyze the effect of dosDNA elements on spontaneous mutagenesis, various mutational inserts containing inverted repeats or direct repeats were cloned in a plasmid containing a unidirectional origin of replication and a selectable marker for the mutation. This system allows for analysis of mutational events that are specific for the leading or lagging strands during DNA replication in Escherichia coli. Deletions between direct repeats, involving misalignment stabilized by DNA secondary structure, occurred preferentially on the lagging strand. Intermolecular strand switch events, correcting quasipalindromes to perfect inverted repeats, occurred preferentially during replication of the leading strand.

  7. Designing DNA interstrand lock for locus-specific methylation detection in a nanopore

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Insoon; Wang, Yong; Reagan, Corbin; Fu, Yumei; Wang, Michael X.; Gu, Li-Qun

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. Locus-specific DNA methylation can be used as biomarkers in various diseases including cancer. Many methods have been developed for genome-wide methylation analysis, but molecular diagnotics needs simple tools to determine methylation states at individual CpG sites in a gene fragment. In this report, we utilized the nanopore single-molecule sensor to investigate a base-pair specific metal ion/nucleic acids interaction, and explored its potential application in locus-specific DNA methylation analysis. We identified that divalent Mercury ion (Hg2+) can selectively bind a uracil-thymine mismatch (U-T) in a dsDNA. The Hg2+ binding creates a reversible interstrand lock, called MercuLock, which enhances the hybridization strength by two orders of magnitude. Such MercuLock cannot be formed in a 5-methylcytosine-thymine mismatch (mC-T). By nanopore detection of dsDNA stability, single bases of uracil and 5-methylcytosine can be distinguished. Since uracil is converted from cytosine by bisulfite treatment, cytosine and 5′-methylcytosine can be discriminated. We have demonstrated the methylation analysis of multiple CpGs in a p16 gene CpG island. This single-molecule assay may have potential in detection of epigenetic cancer biomarkers in biofluids, with an ultimate goal for early diagnosis of cancer. PMID:24135881

  8. Designing DNA interstrand lock for locus-specific methylation detection in a nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Insoon; Wang, Yong; Reagan, Corbin; Fu, Yumei; Wang, Michael X.; Gu, Li-Qun

    2013-10-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. Locus-specific DNA methylation can be used as biomarkers in various diseases including cancer. Many methods have been developed for genome-wide methylation analysis, but molecular diagnotics needs simple tools to determine methylation states at individual CpG sites in a gene fragment. In this report, we utilized the nanopore single-molecule sensor to investigate a base-pair specific metal ion/nucleic acids interaction, and explored its potential application in locus-specific DNA methylation analysis. We identified that divalent Mercury ion (Hg2+) can selectively bind a uracil-thymine mismatch (U-T) in a dsDNA. The Hg2+ binding creates a reversible interstrand lock, called MercuLock, which enhances the hybridization strength by two orders of magnitude. Such MercuLock cannot be formed in a 5-methylcytosine-thymine mismatch (mC-T). By nanopore detection of dsDNA stability, single bases of uracil and 5-methylcytosine can be distinguished. Since uracil is converted from cytosine by bisulfite treatment, cytosine and 5'-methylcytosine can be discriminated. We have demonstrated the methylation analysis of multiple CpGs in a p16 gene CpG island. This single-molecule assay may have potential in detection of epigenetic cancer biomarkers in biofluids, with an ultimate goal for early diagnosis of cancer.

  9. Influence of attachment strategy on the thermal stability of hybridized DNA on gold surfaces.

    PubMed

    Petty, Tyler J; Wagner, Caleb E; Opdahl, Aric

    2014-12-23

    The thermal stabilities of double-stranded DNA hybrids immobilized on gold surfaces are shown to be significantly affected by the conformation of the hybrid. To analyze this behavior, DNA probes were immobilized using attachment strategies where the nucleotides within the strand had varying levels of interactions with the gold substrate. The abilities of these probes to form double-stranded hybrids with solution DNA targets were evaluated by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) over a temperature range 25-60 °C. The measurements were used to construct thermal stability profiles for hybrids in each conformation. We observe that DNA hybrids formed with probe strands that interact extensively with the gold surface have stability profiles that are shifted lower by 5-10 °C compared to hybrids formed with end-tethered probes that have fewer interactions with the surface. The results provide an understanding of the experimental conditions in which these weaker DNA hybrids can form and show the additional complexity of evaluating denaturation profiles generated from DNA on surfaces. PMID:25457775

  10. DNA aptamer release from the DNA-SWNT hybrid by protein recognition.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Chang-Hyuk; Jung, Seungwon; Bae, Jaehyun; Kim, Gunn; Ihm, Jisoon; Lee, Junghoon

    2016-02-14

    Here we show the formation of the complex between a DNA aptamer and a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) and its reaction with its target protein. The aptamer, which is specifically bound with thrombin, the target protein in this study, easily wraps and disperses the SWNT by noncovalent π-π stacking. PMID:26763942

  11. Ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of DNA based on Zn²⁺ assistant DNA recycling followed with hybridization chain reaction dual amplification.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yong; Wang, Chunyan; Gao, Fenglei

    2015-01-15

    A new strategy to combine Zn(2+) assistant DNA recycling followed with hybridization chain reaction dual amplification was designed for highly sensitive electrochemical detection of target DNA. A gold electrode was used to immobilize molecular beacon (MB) as the recognition probe and perform the amplification procedure. In the presence of the target DNA, the hairpin probe 1 was opened, and the DNAzyme was liberated from the caged structure. The activated DNAzyme hybridized with the MB and catalyzed its cleavage in the presence of Zn(2+) cofactor and resulting in a free DNAzyme strand. Finally, each target-induced activated DNAzyme underwent many cycles triggering the cleavage of MB, thus forming numerous MB fragments. The MB fragments triggered the HCR and formed a long double-helix DNA structure. Because both H1 and H2 were labeled by biotin, a lot of SA-ALP was captured on the electrode surface, thus catalyzing a silver deposition process for electrochemical stripping analysis. This novel cascade signal amplification strategy can detect target DNA down to the attomolar level with a dynamic range spanning 6 orders of magnitude. This highly sensitive and specific assay has a great potential to become a promising DNA quantification method in biomedical research and clinical diagnosis. PMID:25128622

  12. Specificity of damage recognition and catalysis of DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Osman, R; Fuxreiter, M; Luo, N

    2000-05-01

    A common feature of DNA repair enzymes is their ability to recognize the damage independently of sequence in which they are found. The presence of a flipped out base inserted into the protein in several DNA-enzyme complexes suggests a contribution to enzyme specificity. Molecular simulations of damaged DNA indicate that the damage produces changes in DNA structure and changes the dynamics of DNA bending. The reduced bending force constant can be used by the enzyme to induce DNA bending and facilitate base flipping. We show that a thymine dimer (TD) containing DNA requires less energy to bend, lowering the barrier for base flipping. On the other hand, bending in DNA with U-G mismatch is affected only by a small amount and flipping is not enhanced significantly. T4 endonuclease V (endoV), which recognizes TD, utilizes the reduced barrier for flipping as a specific recognition element. In uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG), which recognizes U-G mismatches, base flipping is not enhanced and recognition is encoded in a highly specific binding pocket for the flipped base. Simulations of UDG and endoV in complex with damaged DNA provide insight into the essential elements of the catalytic mechanism. Calculations of pKas of active site residues in endoV and endoV-DNA complex show that the pKa, of the N-terminus is reduced from 8.01 to 6.52 while that of Glu-23 increases from 1.52 to 7.82. Thus, the key catalytic residues are in their neutral form. The simulations also show that Glu-23 is also H-bonded to O4' of the 5'-TD enhancing the nucleophilic attack on Cl and that Arg-26 enhances the hydrolysis by electrostatic stabilization but does not participate in proton transfer. In the enzyme-substrate complex of UDG, the role of electrostatic stabilization is played by His-268, whose pKa increases to 7.1 from 4.9 in the free enzyme. The pKa of Asp-145, the other important catalytic residue, remains around 4.2 in the free enzyme and in the complex. Thus, it can not act as a proton

  13. Measuring thermodynamic details of DNA hybridization using fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    You, Yong; Tataurov, Andrey V; Owczarzy, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Modern real-time PCR systems make it easy to monitor fluorescence while temperature is varied for hundreds of samples in parallel, permitting high-throughput studies. We employed such system to investigate melting transitions of ordered nucleic acid structures into disordered random coils. Fluorescent dye and quencher were attached to oligonucleotides in such a way that changes of fluorescence intensity with temperature indicated progression of denaturation. When fluorescence melting data were compared with traditional ultraviolet optical experiments, commonly used dye/quencher combinations, like fluorescein and tetramethylrhodamine, showed substantial discrepancies. We have therefore screened 22 commercially available fluorophores and quenchers for their ability to reliably report annealing and melting transitions. Dependence of fluorescence on temperature and pH was also investigated. The optimal performance was observed using Texas Red or ROX dyes with Iowa Black RQ or Black Hole quenchers. These labels did not alter two-state nature of duplex melting process and provided accurate melting temperatures, free energies, enthalpies, and entropies. We also suggest a new strategy for determination of DNA duplex thermodynamics where concentration of a dye-labeled strand is kept constant and its complementary strand modified with a quencher is added at increasing excess. These methodological improvements will help build predictive models of nucleic acid hybridization. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 95: 472–486, 2011. PMID:21384337

  14. DNA-based hybridization chain reaction for an ultrasensitive cancer marker EBNA-1 electrochemical immunosensor.

    PubMed

    Song, Chao; Xie, Guoming; Wang, Li; Liu, Lingzhi; Tian, Guang; Xiang, Hua

    2014-08-15

    An ultrasensitive and selective electrochemical immunosensor was developed for the detection of Epstein Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1). Firstly, a suspension of graphene sheets (GS) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was prepared with the aid of chitosan (CS) solution and then modified on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were then electrodeposited onto the surface of the GS-MWCNTs film by cyclic voltammetry (CV) to immobilize the captured antibodies. After that, specific sandwich immunoreactions were formed among the captured antibody, EBNA-1, and secondary antibody, DNA-coated carboxyl multi-wall carbon nanotubes (DNA-MWCNTs-Ab2). DNA initiator strands (S0) and secondary antibodies linked to the MWCNTs and double-helix DNA polymers were obtained by hybridization chain reaction (HCR), and here S0 on the MWCNTs propagates a chain reaction of hybridization events between two alternating hairpins to form a nicked double-helix. Finally, electroactive indicator doxorubicin hydrochloride was intercalated into the CG-GC steps between the HCR products and could produce an electrochemical signal, which was monitored by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Under optimum conditions, the amperometric signal increased linearly with the target concentrations (0.05-6.4ngmL(-1)), and the immunosensor exhibited a detection limit as low as 0.7pgmL(-1) (S/N=3). The proposed method showed acceptable stability and reproducibility, as well as favorable recovery for EBNA-1 in human serum. The proposed immunosensor provides a novel avenue for signal amplification and potential applications in bioanalysis and clinical diagnostics. PMID:24632131

  15. Electronic hybridization detection in microarray format and DNA genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Blin, Antoine; Cissé, Ismaïl; Bockelmann, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    We describe an approach to substituting a fluorescence microarray with a surface made of an arrangement of electrolyte-gated field effect transistors. This was achieved using a dedicated blocking of non-specific interactions and comparing threshold voltage shifts of transistors exhibiting probe molecules of different base sequence. We apply the approach to detection of the 35delG mutation, which is related to non-syndromic deafness and is one of the most frequent mutations in humans. The process involves barcode sequences that are generated by Tas-PCR, a newly developed replication reaction using polymerase blocking. The barcodes are recognized by hybridization to surface attached probes and are directly detected by the semiconductor device. PMID:24569823

  16. Electronic hybridization detection in microarray format and DNA genotyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blin, Antoine; Cissé, Ismaïl; Bockelmann, Ulrich

    2014-02-01

    We describe an approach to substituting a fluorescence microarray with a surface made of an arrangement of electrolyte-gated field effect transistors. This was achieved using a dedicated blocking of non-specific interactions and comparing threshold voltage shifts of transistors exhibiting probe molecules of different base sequence. We apply the approach to detection of the 35delG mutation, which is related to non-syndromic deafness and is one of the most frequent mutations in humans. The process involves barcode sequences that are generated by Tas-PCR, a newly developed replication reaction using polymerase blocking. The barcodes are recognized by hybridization to surface attached probes and are directly detected by the semiconductor device.

  17. Tissue-specific patterns of allelically-skewed DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Marzi, Sarah J.; Meaburn, Emma L.; Dempster, Emma L.; Lunnon, Katie; Paya-Cano, Jose L.; Smith, Rebecca G.; Volta, Manuela; Troakes, Claire; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.; Mill, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT While DNA methylation is usually thought to be symmetrical across both alleles, there are some notable exceptions. Genomic imprinting and X chromosome inactivation are two well-studied sources of allele-specific methylation (ASM), but recent research has indicated a more complex pattern in which genotypic variation can be associated with allelically-skewed DNA methylation in cis. Given the known heterogeneity of DNA methylation across tissues and cell types we explored inter- and intra-individual variation in ASM across several regions of the human brain and whole blood from multiple individuals. Consistent with previous studies, we find widespread ASM with > 4% of the ∼220,000 loci interrogated showing evidence of allelically-skewed DNA methylation. We identify ASM flanking known imprinted regions, and show that ASM sites are enriched in DNase I hypersensitivity sites and often located in an extended genomic context of intermediate DNA methylation. We also detect examples of genotype-driven ASM, some of which are tissue-specific. These findings contribute to our understanding of the nature of differential DNA methylation across tissues and have important implications for genetic studies of complex disease. As a resource to the community, ASM patterns across each of the tissues studied are available in a searchable online database: http://epigenetics.essex.ac.uk/ASMBrainBlood. PMID:26786711

  18. Detection of circovirus infection in pigeons by in situ hybridization using cloned DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Smyth, J A; Weston, J; Moffett, D A; Todd, D

    2001-11-01

    Degenerate primers were designed based on known sequence information for the circoviruses psittacine beak and feather disease virus and porcine circovirus and applied by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to known virus-infected bursa of Fabricius (BF) from a pigeon. A 548-bp DNA fragment was amplified and shown to be specific to a novel circovirus, named pigeon circovirus (PiCV), and was used to produce sensitive and specific probes for detection of circovirus DNA by in situ hybridization (ISH). Using ISH on BF from 107 pigeons submitted for necropsy, infection was detected in 89%, compared with a histologic detection rate of 66%. Using the ISH technique, infected cells were also found in liver, kidney, trachea, lung, brain, crop, intestine, spleen, bone marrow, and heart of some birds. Large quantities of DNA were present in some of these tissues, and in the absence of BF, liver in particular is identified as a potentially useful organ to examine for presence of PiCV. This high prevalence of infection in diseased birds is noteworthy, emphasizing the need for studies to determine the precise role of this virus as a disease-producing agent. PMID:11724137

  19. Specifications of an accelerator for the soliton hybrid reactor (RHYS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaveau, Bernard; Maillard, Jacques; Maurel, Gérard; Silva, Jorge

    2006-06-01

    The soliton hybrid reactor is a concept of an Accelerator Driven System, with a design insuring a long lifetime without core interventions. Soliton reactors and "candle reactors" have been proposed in order to use reactors for very long periods without reprocessing or enrichment. In this paper, we present the concept of hybrid soliton reactor. In this system, the constant displacement of the beam during the 30 years lifetime implies lower constraints on the window compared to other accelerator-driven systems. During its lifetime, the reactor can present constant profiles in chemical and isotopic composition and in power production if the beam of protons is maintained within certain limits. This is the soliton-like behavior. Using a mathematical analysis of the problem, we have shown that the solution of the equations presents a solitary wave behavior which is stable if the accelerator intensity is sufficiently low or if the velocity of the neutron source is sufficiently high. We have simulated these two behaviors with a GEANT III Monte Carlo program: a soliton behavior, and a one which may become unstable when the intensity is too large or the velocity too small. These preliminary considerations allow us to describe some specifications concerning an accelerator which can drive such a system.

  20. A hybrid DNA extraction method for the qualitative and quantitative assessment of bacterial communities from poultry production samples.

    PubMed

    Rothrock, Michael J; Hiett, Kelli L; Gamble, John; Caudill, Andrew C; Cicconi-Hogan, Kellie M; Caporaso, J Gregory

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of DNA extraction protocols can be highly dependent upon both the type of sample being investigated and the types of downstream analyses performed. Considering that the use of new bacterial community analysis techniques (e.g., microbiomics, metagenomics) is becoming more prevalent in the agricultural and environmental sciences and many environmental samples within these disciplines can be physiochemically and microbiologically unique (e.g., fecal and litter/bedding samples from the poultry production spectrum), appropriate and effective DNA extraction methods need to be carefully chosen. Therefore, a novel semi-automated hybrid DNA extraction method was developed specifically for use with environmental poultry production samples. This method is a combination of the two major types of DNA extraction: mechanical and enzymatic. A two-step intense mechanical homogenization step (using bead-beating specifically formulated for environmental samples) was added to the beginning of the "gold standard" enzymatic DNA extraction method for fecal samples to enhance the removal of bacteria and DNA from the sample matrix and improve the recovery of Gram-positive bacterial community members. Once the enzymatic extraction portion of the hybrid method was initiated, the remaining purification process was automated using a robotic workstation to increase sample throughput and decrease sample processing error. In comparison to the strict mechanical and enzymatic DNA extraction methods, this novel hybrid method provided the best overall combined performance when considering quantitative (using 16S rRNA qPCR) and qualitative (using microbiomics) estimates of the total bacterial communities when processing poultry feces and litter samples. PMID:25548939

  1. Specific primers for PCR amplification of the ITS1 (ribosomal DNA) of Trypanosoma lewisi.

    PubMed

    Desquesnes, Marc; Marc, Desquesnes; Kamyingkird, Ketsarin; Ketsarin, Kamyingkird; Yangtara, Sarawut; Sarawut, Yangtara; Milocco, Cristina; Cristina, Milocco; Ravel, Sophie; Sophie, Ravel; Wang, Ming-Hui; Ming-Hui, Wang; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Zhao-Rong, Lun; Morand, Serge; Serge, Morand; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Sathaporn, Jittapalapong

    2011-08-01

    Trypanosoma lewisi is a mild or non-pathogenic parasite of the sub-genus Herpetosoma transmitted by fleas to rats. In a previous study we described pan-trypanosome specific primers TRYP1 which amplify the ITS1 of ribosomal DNA by hybridizing in highly conserved regions of 18S and 5.8S genes. These primers proved to be useful for detecting T. lewisi DNA in laboratory rats, but a recent large scale survey in wild rodents demonstrated a lack of specificity. In the present study, we designed and evaluated mono-specific primers LEW1S and LEW1R, for the detection and identification of T. lewisi by a single-step PCR. These primers were designed inside the highly variable region of the ITS1 sequence of T. lewisi ribosomal DNA. The product size of 220 bp is specific to T. lewisi. The sensitivity limit was estimated between 0.055 and 0.55 pg of DNA per reaction, equivalent to 1-10 organisms per reaction. All the PCR products obtained from 6 different T. lewisi isolates were more than 98% similar with each other and similar to the sequences of T. lewisi already published in Genbank. All DNA of 7 T. lewisi stocks from China gave the specific 220 bp product. We showed that LEW1S and LEW1R primers enabled sensitive detection and identification of T. lewisi infection in laboratory and wild rats. This assay is recommended for monitoring T. lewisi infections in rat colonies or for studying infections in the wild fauna. An absence of cross reaction with human DNA means that these primers can be used to investigate atypical trypanosome infections in humans. Given the risk of T. lewisi infection in human, we believe that these primers will be beneficial for public health diagnosis and rodents investigation programmes. PMID:21570489

  2. Fixation conditions for DNA and RNA in situ hybridization: a reassessment of molecular morphology dogma.

    PubMed Central

    Tbakhi, A.; Totos, G.; Hauser-Kronberger, C.; Pettay, J.; Baunoch, D.; Hacker, G. W.; Tubbs, R. R.

    1998-01-01

    Neutral buffered formalin (NBF) (4% neutral buffered formaldehyde) has been advocated by most investigators as the primary fixative of choice for in situ hybridization (ISH), and specific anecdotal cautions interdicting the use of precipitating fixatives, which otherwise may offer certain advantages such as superior nuclear detail, are common. Few systematic studies addressing ISH fixation conditions have been published. We reasoned that heavy metals present in some precipitating fixatives may compromise duplex formation during ISH. Cell lines containing known viral gene content (CaSki, 200 to 600 human papilloma virus 16 copies/cell, and SiHa, 1 to 2 human papilloma virus 16 copies/cell) and two negative cell lines (K562 and MOLT 4) were expanded to >10(10) and pellets fixed in NBF, zinc formalin, B5, and Bouin's and Hollande's solutions, and subjected to DNA ISH using biotinylated genomic probes. Ten tissue biopsies fixed in both Hollande's and NBF solutions were also evaluated for human papilloma virus content using DNA ISH. Additionally, 17 cases of Hodgkin's disease fixed in B5 and formalin were compared for Epstein-Barr encoded RNA detection using RNA ISH with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled oligonucleotides. Catalyzed reporter deposition combined with Streptavidin-Nanogold staining and silver acetate autometallography (Catalyzed reporter deposition-Ng-autometallography ISH) and a conventional indirect alkaline phosphatase method were used for detection for both DNA and RNA. Contaminating heavy metals entrapped in fixed tissues were removed by two exposures to Lugol's iodine. Results for both DNA and RNA ISH comparing B5 and NBF fixatives were virtually identical. Hollande's, Bouin's, B5, and zinc formalin fixed tissue showed results indistinguishable from NBF fixed tissue in DNA ISH. Precipitating fixatives such as B5 and Hollande's solution may be used for DNA and RNA ISH under appropriate conditions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9422521

  3. pH-dependent specific binding and combing of DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Allemand, J F; Bensimon, D; Jullien, L; Bensimon, A; Croquette, V

    1997-01-01

    Recent developments in the rapid sequencing, mapping, and analysis of DNA rely on the specific binding of DNA to specially treated surfaces. We show here that specific binding of DNA via its unmodified extremities can be achieved on a great variety of surfaces by a judicious choice of the pH. On hydrophobic surfaces the best binding efficiency is reached at a pH of approximately 5.5. At that pH a approximately 40-kbp DNA is 10 times more likely to bind by an extremity than by a midsegment. A model is proposed to account for the differential adsorption of the molecule extremities and midsection as a function of pH. The pH-dependent specific binding can be used to align anchored DNA molecules by a receding meniscus, a process called molecular combing. The resulting properties of the combed molecules will be discussed. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 PMID:9336201

  4. Comparative study of antipneumocystis agents in rats by using a Pneumocystis carinii-specific DNA probe to quantitate infection.

    PubMed Central

    Liberator, P A; Anderson, J W; Powles, M; Pittarelli, L A; Worley, M; Becker-Hapak, M; Graves, D C; Schmatz, D M

    1992-01-01

    A repetitive genomic DNA clone (B12-2) that specifically hybridizes to Pneumocystis carinii DNA has been identified. No cross-hybridization to genomic DNA prepared from bacteria, other fungi, protozoa, or mammals was observed. Clone B12-2 is multiply represented in the P. carinii genome. By direct hybridization to DNA prepared from the lungs of immunosuppressed rats, the probe can detect the equivalent of fewer than 1,000 P. carinii organisms. A hybridization assay employing clone B12-2 has been developed to quantitate organism load in the rat model for P. carinii. Application of the assay to track the accumulation of organisms during the immunosuppression regimen as well as to monitor the efficacy of two drug therapies used clinically for the treatment of P. carinii pneumonia is described here. The clone B12-2 hybridization assay for the determination of P. carinii organism load possesses several advantageous features and thus should serve to complement conventional staining and immunohistochemical methods. Images PMID:1452667

  5. Sequencing of megabase plus DNA by hybridization: Method development ENT. Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Crkvenjakov, R.; Drmanac, R.

    1991-01-31

    Sequencing by hybridization (SBH) is the only sequencing method based on the experimental determination of the content of oligonucleotide sequences. The data acquisition relies on the natural process of base pairing. It is possible to determine the content of complementary oligosequences in the target DNA by the process of hybridization with oligonucleotide probes of known sequences.

  6. Short thio-multi-walled carbon nanotubes and Au nanoparticles enhanced electrochemical DNA biosensor for DNA hybridization detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng; Zhang, Jimei; Dai, Zhao; Zheng, Guo

    2010-07-01

    A novel and sensitive electrochemical DNA biosensor based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with a thio group (MWNTs-SH) and gold nanoparticles (GNPs) for covalent DNA immobilization and enhanced hybridization detection is described. The key step for developing this novel DNA biosensor is to cut the pristine MWNT into short and generate lots of active sites simultaneously. With this approach, the target DNA could be quantified in a linear range from 8.5×10-10 to 1.5×10-5 mol/L, with a detection limit of 1.67×10-11 mol/L by 3σ.

  7. DNA topology confers sequence specificity to nonspecific architectural proteins.

    PubMed

    Wei, Juan; Czapla, Luke; Grosner, Michael A; Swigon, David; Olson, Wilma K

    2014-11-25

    Topological constraints placed on short fragments of DNA change the disorder found in chain molecules randomly decorated by nonspecific, architectural proteins into tightly organized 3D structures. The bacterial heat-unstable (HU) protein builds up, counter to expectations, in greater quantities and at particular sites along simulated DNA minicircles and loops. Moreover, the placement of HU along loops with the "wild-type" spacing found in the Escherichia coli lactose (lac) and galactose (gal) operons precludes access to key recognition elements on DNA. The HU protein introduces a unique spatial pathway in the DNA upon closure. The many ways in which the protein induces nearly the same closed circular configuration point to the statistical advantage of its nonspecificity. The rotational settings imposed on DNA by the repressor proteins, by contrast, introduce sequential specificity in HU placement, with the nonspecific protein accumulating at particular loci on the constrained duplex. Thus, an architectural protein with no discernible DNA sequence-recognizing features becomes site-specific and potentially assumes a functional role upon loop formation. The locations of HU on the closed DNA reflect long-range mechanical correlations. The protein responds to DNA shape and deformability—the stiff, naturally straight double-helical structure—rather than to the unique features of the constituent base pairs. The structures of the simulated loops suggest that HU architecture, like nucleosomal architecture, which modulates the ability of regulatory proteins to recognize their binding sites in the context of chromatin, may influence repressor-operator interactions in the context of the bacterial nucleoid. PMID:25385626

  8. Electrochemical DNA sensor for specific detection of picomolar Hg(II) based on exonuclease III-assisted recycling signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Gan, Xiaorong; Zhao, Huimin; Chen, Shuo; Quan, Xie

    2015-03-21

    An ultrasensitive methodology was successfully developed for the quantitative detection of picomolar Hg(2+) based on the combination of thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine (T-Hg(2+)-T) coordination chemistry and exonuclease III-aided recycling signal amplification. Single-strand probe DNA was immobilized on an Au electrode via an Au-S bond. In the presence of Hg(2+), the probe DNA hybridized with the target DNA containing four thymine-thymine (T-T) mismatches via the Hg(2+)-mediated coordination of T-Hg(2+)-T base pairs. Then the probe DNA in the DNA duplex was specifically recognized and selectively digested by exonuclease III; in contrast the target DNA was safely dissociated from the DNA duplexes to subsequently hybridize with a new signal probe, leading to target recycling and signal amplification. As a result, the peak current caused by the electrostatic interactions of [Ru(NH3)6](3+) cations with the backbone of the probe DNA decreased by different degrees, corresponding to the Hg(2+) concentrations. Under the optimum conditions, the proposed electrochemical DNA biosensor showed a robust detection limit as low as 1 pM (S/N = 3), with a wide linear range from 0.01 to 500 nM and good selectivity. In addition, the proposed method was successfully applied to assay Hg(2+) in real environmental samples. PMID:25676090

  9. Gold coated ferric oxide nanoparticles based disposable magnetic genosensors for the detection of DNA hybridization processes.

    PubMed

    Loaiza, Óscar A; Jubete, Elena; Ochoteco, Estibalitz; Cabañero, German; Grande, Hans; Rodríguez, Javier

    2011-01-15

    In this article, a disposable magnetic DNA sensor using an enzymatic amplification strategy for the detection of specific hybridization processes, based on the coupling of streptavidin-peroxidase to biotinylated target sequences, has been developed. A thiolated 19-mer capture probe was attached to gold coated ferric oxide nanoparticles and hybridization with the biotinylated target was allowed to proceed. Then, a streptavidin-peroxide was attached to the biotinylated target and the resulting modified gold coated ferric oxide nanoparticles were captured by a magnetic field on the surface of a home-made carbon screen printed electrode (SPE). Using hydroquinone as a mediator, a square wave voltammetric procedure was chosen to detect the hybridization process after the addition of hydrogen peroxide. Different aspects concerning the assay protocol and nanoparticles fabrication were optimized in order to improve the sensitivity of the developed methodology. A low detection limit (31 pM) with good stability (RSD=7.04%, n=10) was obtained without the need of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. PMID:20951565

  10. Development of an electrochemical surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (EC-SERS) aptasensor for direct detection of DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Karaballi, R A; Nel, A; Krishnan, S; Blackburn, J; Brosseau, C L

    2015-09-01

    Rapid detection of disease biomarkers at the patient point-of-care is essential to timely and effective treatment. The research described herein focuses on the development of an electrochemical surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (EC-SERS) DNA aptasensor capable of direct detection of tuberculosis (TB) DNA. Specifically, a plausible DNA biomarker present in TB patient urine was chosen as the model target for detection. Cost-effective screen printed electrodes (SPEs) modified with silver nanoparticles (AgNP) were used as the aptasensor platform, onto which the aptamer specific for the target DNA was immobilized. Direct detection of the target DNA was demonstrated through the appearance of SERS peaks characteristic for adenine, present only in the target strand. Modulation of the applied potential allowed for a sizeable increase in the observed SERS response and the use of thiol back-filling prevented non-specific adsorption of non-target DNA. To our knowledge, this work represents the first EC-SERS study of an aptasensor for the direct, label-free detection of DNA hybridization. Such a technology paves the way for rapid detection of disease biomarkers at the patient point-of-care. PMID:25780805

  11. Design and evaluation of Bacteroides DNA probes for the specific detection of human fecal pollution.

    PubMed Central

    Kreader, C A

    1995-01-01

    Because Bacteroides spp. are obligate anaerobes that dominate the human fecal flora, and because some species may live only in the human intestine, these bacteria might be useful to distinguish human from nonhuman sources of fecal pollution. To test this hypothesis, PCR primers specific for 16S rRNA gene sequences of Bacteroides distasonis, B. thetaiotaomicron, and B. vulgatus were designed. Hybridization with species-specific internal probes was used to detect the intended PCR products. Extracts from 66 known Bacteroides strains, representing 10 related species, were used to confirm the specificity of these PCR-hybridization assays. To test for specificity in feces, procedures were developed to prepare DNA of sufficient purity for PCR. Extracts of feces from 9 humans and 70 nonhumans (cats, dogs, cattle, hogs, horses, sheep, goats, and chickens) were each analyzed with and without an internal positive control to verify that PCR amplification was not inhibited by substances in the extract. In addition, serial dilutions from each extract that tested positive were assayed to estimate the relative abundance of target Bacteroides spp. in the sample. Depending on the primer-probe set used, either 78 or 67% of the human fecal extracts tested had high levels of target DNA. On the other hand, only 7 to 11% of the nonhuman extracts tested had similarly high levels of target DNA. An additional 12 to 20% of the nonhuman extracts had levels of target DNA that were 100- to 1,000-fold lower than those found in humans.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7538270

  12. A proposed mechanism of the influence of gold nanoparticles on DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Sedighi, Abootaleb; Li, Paul C H; Pekcevik, Idah C; Gates, Byron D

    2014-07-22

    A combination of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and nucleic acids has been used in biosensing applications. However, there is a poor fundamental understanding of how gold nanoparticle surfaces influence the DNA hybridization process. Here, we measured the rate constants of the hybridization and dehybridization of DNA on gold nanoparticle surfaces to enable the determination of activation parameters using transition state theory. We show that the target bases need to be detached from the gold nanoparticle surfaces before zipping. This causes a shift of the rate-limiting step of hybridization to the mismatch-sensitive zipping step. Furthermore, our results propose that the binding of gold nanoparticles to the single-stranded DNA segments (commonly known as bubbles) in the duplex DNA stabilizes the bubbles and accelerates the dehybridization process. We employ the proposed mechanism of DNA hybridization/dehybridization to explain the ability of 5 nm diameter gold nanoparticles to help discriminate between single base-pair mismatched DNA molecules when performed in a NanoBioArray chip. The mechanistic insight into the DNA-gold nanoparticle hybridization/dehybridization process should lead to the development of new biosensors. PMID:24965286

  13. Synthesis of site-specific DNA-protein conjugates and their effects on DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Jung Eun; Wickramaratne, Susith; Khatwani, Santoshkumar; Wang, Yen-Chih; Vervacke, Jeffrey; Distefano, Mark D; Tretyakova, Natalia Y

    2014-08-15

    DNA-protein cross-links (DPCs) are bulky, helix-distorting DNA lesions that form in the genome upon exposure to common antitumor drugs, environmental/occupational toxins, ionizing radiation, and endogenous free-radical-generating systems. As a result of their considerable size and their pronounced effects on DNA-protein interactions, DPCs can interfere with DNA replication, transcription, and repair, potentially leading to mutagenesis, genotoxicity, and cytotoxicity. However, the biological consequences of these ubiquitous lesions are not fully understood due to the difficulty of generating DNA substrates containing structurally defined, site-specific DPCs. In the present study, site-specific cross-links between the two biomolecules were generated by copper-catalyzed [3 + 2] Huisgen cycloaddition (click reaction) between an alkyne group from 5-(octa-1,7-diynyl)-uracil in DNA and an azide group within engineered proteins/polypeptides. The resulting DPC substrates were subjected to in vitro primer extension in the presence of human lesion bypass DNA polymerases η, κ, ν, and ι. We found that DPC lesions to the green fluorescent protein and a 23-mer peptide completely blocked DNA replication, while the cross-link to a 10-mer peptide was bypassed. These results indicate that the polymerases cannot read through the larger DPC lesions and further suggest that proteolytic degradation may be required to remove the replication block imposed by bulky DPC adducts. PMID:24918113

  14. Non-Covalent Fluorescent Labeling of Hairpin DNA Probe Coupled with Hybridization Chain Reaction for Sensitive DNA Detection.

    PubMed

    Song, Luna; Zhang, Yonghua; Li, Junling; Gao, Qiang; Qi, Honglan; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2016-04-01

    An enzyme-free signal amplification-based assay for DNA detection was developed using fluorescent hairpin DNA probes coupled with hybridization chain reaction (HCR). The hairpin DNAs were designed to contain abasic sites in the stem moiety. Non-covalent labeling of the hairpin DNAs was achieved when a fluorescent ligand was bound to the abasic sites through hydrogen bonding with the orphan cytosine present on the complementary strand, accompanied by quench of ligand fluorescence. As a result, the resultant probes, the complex formed between the hairpin DNA and ligand, showed almost no fluorescence. Upon hybridization with target DNA, the probe underwent a dehybridization of the stem moiety containing an abasic site. The release of ligand from the abasic site to the solution resulted in an effective fluorescent enhancement, which can be used as a signal. Compared with a sensing system without HCR, a 20-fold increase in the sensitivity was achieved using the sensing system with HCR. The fluorescent intensity of the sensing system increased with the increase in target DNA concentration from 0.5 nM to 100 nM. A single mismatched target ss-DNA could be effectively discriminated from complementary target DNA. Genotyping of a G/C single-nucleotide polymorphism of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products was successfully demonstrated with the sensing system. Therefore, integrating HCR strategy with non-covalent labeling of fluorescent hairpin DNA probes provides a sensitive and cost-effective DNA assay. PMID:26879193

  15. A novel sandwich hybridization method for selecting cDNAs from large genomic regions: Identification of cDNAs from the cloned genomic DNA spanning the XLRP locus

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, D.; McHenry, C.; Fujita, R.

    1994-09-01

    We have developed an efficient hybridization-based cDNA-selection method. A sandwich of three species - single-stranded cDNA, tagged RNA derived from genomic DNA, and biotinylated RNA complementary to the tag - allows specific retention of hybrids on an avidin-matrix. Previously, using model experiments, we demonstrated highly specific and efficient selection of a retinal gene, NRL, from complex mixtures of cDNA clones, using a sub-library from a 5 kb NRL genomic clone. We have now applied this selection strategy to isolate cDNAs from human adult retina and fetal eye libraries, with the {open_quotes}genomic RNA{close_quotes} derived from two YAC clones (OTC-C and 55B) spanning the region of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) locus RP3 at Xp21.1. Effectiveness of the selection-method was monitored by enrichment of TCTEX-1L gene that maps within the 55B YAC. Of the 15 selected cDNA clones that hybridized to the 55B YAC DNA, five appear to the map to specific cosmid clones derived from the 55B YAC. Inserts in these selected cDNA clones range from 0.5 to 2.3 kb in size. Additional clones are now being isolated and characterized. This procedure should be independent of the size or complexity of genomic DNA being used for selection, allow for the isolation of full-length cDNAs, and may have wider application.

  16. Hybridization and Introgression among Species of Sunfish (Lepomis): Analysis by Mitochondrial DNA and Allozyme Markers

    PubMed Central

    Avise, John C.; Saunders, Nancy C.

    1984-01-01

    We explore the potential of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis, alone and in conjunction with allozymes, to study low-frequency hybridization and introgression phenomena in natural populations. MtDNAs from small samples of nine species of sunfish (Lepomis, Centrarchidae) were purified and digested with each of 13 informative restriction enzymes. Digestion profiles for all species were highly distinct: estimates of overall fragment homology between pairs of species ranged from 0–36%. Allozymes encoded by nine nuclear genes also showed large frequency differences among species and together with mtDNA provided many genetic markers for hybrid identification. A genetic analysis of 277 sunfish from two locations in north Georgia revealed the following: (1) a low frequency of interspecific hybrids, all of which appeared to be F1's; (2) the involvement of five sympatric Lepomis species in the production of these hybrids; (3) no evidence for introgression between species in our study locales (although for rare hybridization, most later-generation backcrosses would not be reliably distinguished from parentals); (4) a tendency for hybridizations to take place preferentially between parental species differing greatly in abundance; (5) a tendency for the rare species in a hybrid cross to provide the female parent. Our data suggest that absence of conspecific pairing partners and mating stimuli for females of rarer species may be important factors in increasing the likelihood of interspecific hybridization. The maternal inheritance of mtDNA offers at least two novel advantages for hybridization analysis: (1) an opportunity to determine direction in hybrid crosses; and (2) due to the linkage among mtDNA markers, an increased potential to distinguish effects of introgression from symplesiomorphy or character convergence. PMID:6090268

  17. DNA-inorganic hybrid nanovaccine for cancer immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guizhi; Liu, Yijing; Yang, Xiangyu; Kim, Young-Hwa; Zhang, Huimin; Jia, Rui; Liao, Hsien-Shun; Jin, Albert; Lin, Jing; Aronova, Maria; Leapman, Richard; Nie, Zhihong; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-03-01

    Cancer evolves to evade or compromise the surveillance of the immune system, and cancer immunotherapy aims to harness the immune system in order to inhibit cancer development. Unmethylated CpG dinucleotide-containing oligonucleotides (CpG), a class of potent adjuvants that activate the toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) located in the endolysosome of many antigen-presenting cells (APCs), are promising for cancer immunotherapy. However, clinical application of synthetic CpG confronts many challenges such as suboptimal delivery into APCs, unfavorable pharmacokinetics caused by limited biostability and short in vivo half-life, and side effects associated with leaking of CpG into the systemic circulation. Here we present DNA-inorganic hybrid nanovaccines (hNVs) for efficient uptake into APCs, prolonged tumor retention, and potent immunostimulation and cancer immunotherapy. hNVs were self-assembled from concatemer CpG analogs and magnesium pyrophosphate (Mg2PPi). Mg2PPi renders hNVs resistant to nuclease degradation and thermal denaturation, both of which are demanding characteristics for effective vaccination and the storage and transportation of vaccines. Fluorophore-labeled hNVs were tracked to be efficiently internalized into the endolysosomes of APCs, where Mg2PPi was dissolved in an acidic environment and thus CpG analogs were exposed to hNVs. Internalized hNVs in APCs led to (1) elevated secretion of proinflammatory factors, and (2) elevated expression of co-stimulatory factors. Compared with molecular CpG, hNVs dramatically prolonged the tissue retention of CpG analogs and reduced splenomegaly, a common side effect of CpG. In a melanoma mouse model, two injections of hNVs significantly inhibited the tumor growth and outperformed the molecular CpG. These results suggest hNVs are promising for cancer immunotherapy.Cancer evolves to evade or compromise the surveillance of the immune system, and cancer immunotherapy aims to harness the immune system in order to inhibit

  18. STATIC AND KINETIC SITE-SPECIFIC PROTEIN-DNA PHOTOCROSSLINKING: ANALYSIS OF BACTERIAL TRANSCRIPTION INITIATION COMPLEXES

    PubMed Central

    Naryshkin, Nikolai; Druzhinin, Sergei; Revyakin, Andrei; Kim, Younggyu; Mekler, Vladimir; Ebright, Richard H.

    2009-01-01

    Static site-specific protein-DNA photocrosslinking permits identification of protein-DNA interactions within multiprotein-DNA complexes. Kinetic site-specific protein-DNA photocrosslinking--involving rapid-quench-flow mixing and pulsed-laser irradiation--permits elucidation of pathways and kinetics of formation of protein-DNA interactions within multiprotein-DNA complexes. We present detailed protocols for application of static and kinetic site-specific protein-DNA photocrosslinking to bacterial transcription initiation complexes. PMID:19378179

  19. Highly specific SNP detection using 2D graphene electronics and DNA strand displacement

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Michael T.; Landon, Preston B.; Lee, Joon; Choi, Duyoung; Mo, Alexander H.; Glinsky, Gennadi; Lal, Ratnesh

    2016-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a gene sequence are markers for a variety of human diseases. Detection of SNPs with high specificity and sensitivity is essential for effective practical implementation of personalized medicine. Current DNA sequencing, including SNP detection, primarily uses enzyme-based methods or fluorophore-labeled assays that are time-consuming, need laboratory-scale settings, and are expensive. Previously reported electrical charge-based SNP detectors have insufficient specificity and accuracy, limiting their effectiveness. Here, we demonstrate the use of a DNA strand displacement-based probe on a graphene field effect transistor (FET) for high-specificity, single-nucleotide mismatch detection. The single mismatch was detected by measuring strand displacement-induced resistance (and hence current) change and Dirac point shift in a graphene FET. SNP detection in large double-helix DNA strands (e.g., 47 nt) minimize false-positive results. Our electrical sensor-based SNP detection technology, without labeling and without apparent cross-hybridization artifacts, would allow fast, sensitive, and portable SNP detection with single-nucleotide resolution. The technology will have a wide range of applications in digital and implantable biosensors and high-throughput DNA genotyping, with transformative implications for personalized medicine. PMID:27298347

  20. Highly specific SNP detection using 2D graphene electronics and DNA strand displacement.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Michael T; Landon, Preston B; Lee, Joon; Choi, Duyoung; Mo, Alexander H; Glinsky, Gennadi; Lal, Ratnesh

    2016-06-28

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a gene sequence are markers for a variety of human diseases. Detection of SNPs with high specificity and sensitivity is essential for effective practical implementation of personalized medicine. Current DNA sequencing, including SNP detection, primarily uses enzyme-based methods or fluorophore-labeled assays that are time-consuming, need laboratory-scale settings, and are expensive. Previously reported electrical charge-based SNP detectors have insufficient specificity and accuracy, limiting their effectiveness. Here, we demonstrate the use of a DNA strand displacement-based probe on a graphene field effect transistor (FET) for high-specificity, single-nucleotide mismatch detection. The single mismatch was detected by measuring strand displacement-induced resistance (and hence current) change and Dirac point shift in a graphene FET. SNP detection in large double-helix DNA strands (e.g., 47 nt) minimize false-positive results. Our electrical sensor-based SNP detection technology, without labeling and without apparent cross-hybridization artifacts, would allow fast, sensitive, and portable SNP detection with single-nucleotide resolution. The technology will have a wide range of applications in digital and implantable biosensors and high-throughput DNA genotyping, with transformative implications for personalized medicine. PMID:27298347

  1. Site-Specific Surface Functionalization of Gold Nanorods Using DNA Origami Clamps.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chenqi; Lan, Xiang; Lu, Xuxing; Meyer, Travis A; Ni, Weihai; Ke, Yonggang; Wang, Qiangbin

    2016-02-17

    Precise control over surface functionalities of nanomaterials offers great opportunities for fabricating complex functional nanoarchitectures but still remains challenging. In this work, we successfully developed a novel strategy to modify a gold nanorod (AuNR) with specific surface recognition sites using a DNA origami clamp. AuNRs were encapsulated by the DNA origami through hybridization of single-stranded DNA on the AuNRs and complementary capture strands inside the clamp. Another set of capture strands on the outside of the clamp create the specific recognition sites on the AuNR surface. By means of this strategy, AuNRs were site-specifically modified with gold nanoparticles at the top, middle, and bottom of the surface, respectively, to construct a series of well-defined heterostructures with controlled "chemical valence". Our study greatly expands the utility of DNA origami as a tool for building complex nanoarchitectures and represents a new approach for precise tailoring of nanomaterial surfaces. PMID:26824749

  2. Phenol emulsion-enhanced DNA-driven subtractive cDNA cloning: isolation of low-abundance monkey cortex-specific mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, G.H.; Sutcliffe, J.G.

    1988-03-01

    To isolate cDNA clones of low-abundance mRNAs expressed in monkey cerebral cortex but absent from cerebellum, the authors developed an improved subtractive cDNA cloning procedure that requires only modest quantities of mRNA. Plasmid DNA from a monkey cerebellum cDNA library was hybridized in large excess to radiolabeled monkey cortex cDNA in a phenol emulsion-enhanced reaction. The unhybridized cortex cDNA was isolated by chromatography on hydroxyapatite and used to probe colonies from a monkey cortex cDNA library. Of 60,000 colonies screened, 163 clones were isolated and confirmed by colony hybridization or RNA blotting to represent mRNAs, ranging from 0.001% to 0.1% abundance, specific to or highly enriched in cerebral cortex relative to cerebellum. Clones of one medium-abundance mRNA were recovered almost quantitatively. Two of the lower-abundance mRNAs were expressed at levels reduced by a factor of 10 in Alzheimer disease relative to normal human cortex. One of these was identified as the monkey preprosomatostatin I mRNA.

  3. Allele-specific enzymatic amplification of. beta. -globin genomic DNA for diagnosis of sickle cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D.Y.; Ugozzoli, L.; Pal, B.K.; Wallace, B. )

    1989-04-01

    A rapid nonradioactive approach to the diagnosis of sickle cell anemia is described based on an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (ASPCR). This method allows direct detection of the normal or the sickle cell {beta}-globin allele in genomic DNA without additional steps of probe hybridization, ligation, or restriction enzyme cleavage. Two allele-specific oligonucleotide primers, one specific for the sickle cell allele and one specific for the normal allele, together with another primer complementary to both alleles were used in the polymerase chain reaction with genomic DNA templates. The allele-specific primers differed from each other in their terminal 3{prime} nucleotide. Under the proper annealing temperature and polymerase chain reaction conditions, these primers only directed amplification on their complementary allele. In a single blind study of DNA samples from 12 individuals, this method correctly and unambiguously allowed for the determination of the genotypes with no false negatives or positives. If ASPCR is able to discriminate all allelic variation (both transition and transversion mutations), this method has the potential to be a powerful approach for genetic disease diagnosis, carrier screening, HLA typing, human gene mapping, forensics, and paternity testing.

  4. Determinants of Bacteriophage 933W Repressor DNA Binding Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Bullwinkle, Tammy J.; Samorodnitsky, Daniel; Rosati, Rayna C.; Koudelka, Gerald B.

    2012-01-01

    We reported previously that 933W repressor apparently does not cooperatively bind to adjacent sites on DNA and that the relative affinities of 933W repressor for its operators differ significantly from that of any other lambdoid bacteriophage. These findings indicate that the operational details of the lysis-lysogeny switch of bacteriophage 933W are unique among lambdoid bacteriophages. Since the functioning of the lysis-lysogeny switch in 933W bacteriophage uniquely and solely depends on the order of preference of 933W repressor for its operators, we examined the details of how 933W repressor recognizes its DNA sites. To identify the specificity determinants, we first created a molecular model of the 933W repressor-DNA complex and tested the predicted protein-DNA interactions. These results of these studies provide a picture of how 933W repressor recognizes its DNA sites. We also show that, opposite of what is normally observed for lambdoid phages, 933W operator sequences have evolved in such a way that the presence of the most commonly found base sequences at particular operator positions serves to decrease, rather than increase, the affinity of the protein for the site. This finding cautions against assuming that a consensus sequence derived from sequence analysis defines the optimal, highest affinity DNA binding site for a protein. PMID:22509323

  5. A DNA hybridization detection based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer between dye-doped core-shell silica nanoparticles and gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Cui, Peng; Chen, Xiaoxiao; Ye, Qingqing; Li, Maoguo; Wang, Lun

    2011-10-01

    A novel and efficient method to evaluate the DNA hybridization based on a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) system, with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-doped fluorescent silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) as donor and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as acceptor, has been reported. The strategy for specific DNA sequence detecting is based on DNA hybridization event, which is detected via excitation of SiNPs-oligonucleotide conjugates and energy transfer to AuNPs-oligonucleotide conjugates. The proximity required for FRET arises when the SiNPs-oligonucleotide conjugates hybridize with partly complementary AuNPs-oligonucleotide conjugates, resulting in the fluorescence quenching of donors, SiNPs-oligonucleotide conjugates, and the formation of a weakly fluorescent complex, SiNPs-dsDNA-AuNPs. Upon the addition of the target DNA sequence to SiNPs-dsDNA-AuNPs complex, the fluorescence restores (turn-on). Based on the restored fluorescence, a homogeneous assay for the target DNA is proposed. Our results have shown that the linear range for target DNA detection is 0-35.0 nM with a detection limit (3σ) of 3.0 picomole. Compared with FITC-dsDNA-AuNPs probe system, the sensitivity of the proposed probe system for target DNA detection is increased by a factor of 3.4-fold. PMID:21845282

  6. DNA hybrid dielectric film devices for energy storage and bioelectronics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Donna M.; Venkat, Narayanan; Ouchen, Fahima; Singh, Kristi M.; Smith, Steven R.; Grote, James G.

    2013-10-01

    DNA biopolymer hybrids have been investigated for energy storage applications and also as potential high k gate dielectrics in bioelectronics applications such as BioFETs. DNA-based hybrid films incorporating sol-gel-derived ceramics have shown strong promise as insulating dielectrics for high voltage capacitor applications. Our studies of DNA-CTMA complex/sol-gel hybrid thin film devices have demonstrated reproducibility and stability in temperature-and frequency-dependent dielectric properties as well as reliability in DC voltage breakdown measurements, attaining values consistently in the 300 - 350 V/um range. We have also investigated DNA-inorganic hybrids by ex situ blending of aqueous solutions of DNA with high k ceramics such as BaTiO3 and TiO2. These systems are currently being investigated as potential gate dielectrics for BioFETs by virtue of their relatively high dielectric constant, high DC electrical resistivity, and lower leakage currents than pristine DNA. Functionally layered devices have also been designed, fabricated and characterized to determine any added benefit in dielectric applications. The electrical/dielectric characteristics of DNA and DNA-CTMA with sol-gel-derived ceramics, high k ceramic fillers, and in layered devices were examined to determine their effect on vital dielectric parameters for energy storage and bioelectronics applications.

  7. A Hybrid Computer Simulation to Generate the DNA Distribution of a Cell Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griebling, John L.; Adams, William S.

    1981-01-01

    Described is a method of simulating the formation of a DNA distribution, on which statistical results and experimentally measured parameters from DNA distribution and percent-labeled mitosis studies are combined. An EAI-680 and DECSystem-10 Hybrid Computer configuration are used. (Author/CS)

  8. A controlled microfluidic electrochemical lab-on-a-chip for label-free diffusion-restricted DNA hybridization analysis.

    PubMed

    Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Dykstra, Peter H; Bentley, William E; Ghodssi, Reza

    2015-02-15

    Lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices for electrochemical analysis of DNA hybridization events offer a technology for real-time and label-free assessment of biomarkers at the point-of-care. Here, we present a microfluidic LOC, with 3 × 3 arrayed electrochemical sensors for the analysis of DNA hybridization events. A new dual layer microfluidic valved manipulation system is integrated providing controlled and automated capabilities for high throughput analysis. This feature improves the repeatability, accuracy, and overall sensing performance (Fig. 1). The electrochemical activity of the fabricated microfluidic device is validated and demonstrated repeatable and reversible Nernstian characteristics. System design required detailed analysis of energy storage and dissipation as our sensing modeling involves diffusion-related electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The effect of DNA hybridization on the calculated charge transfer resistance and the diffusional resistance components is evaluated. We demonstrate a specific device with an average cross-reactivity value of 27.5%. The device yields semilogarithmic dose response and enables a theoretical detection limit of 1 nM of complementary ssDNA target. This limit is lower than our previously reported non-valved device by 74% due to on-chip valve integration providing controlled and accurate assay capabilities. PMID:25310492

  9. Identification of species in tribe Brassiceae by dot-blot hybridization using species-specific ITS1 probes.

    PubMed

    Tonosaki, K; Nishio, Takeshi

    2010-10-01

    Simple, reliable methods for identification of species are required for management of many species and lines in a plant gene bank. Species-specific probes were designed from published sequences of the ITS1 region in rDNA of 16 species in Brassica and its related genera, and used as probes for dot-blot hybridization with plant genomic DNA. All the probes detected species-specific signals at dot-blots of genomic DNAs of the 16 species in Brassica, Diplotaxis, Eruca, and Raphanus. Signals of the Brassica digenomic species in the U's triangle, i.e., B. napus, B. juncea, and B. carinata, were detected by the probes of their parental monogenomic species, i.e., B. rapa, B. nigra, and B. oleracea. The probe for B. oleracea showed signals of B. balearica, B. cretica, B. incana, B. insularis, and B. macrocarpa, which have the C genome as B. oleracea. Eruca vesicaria DNA was detected by the probe for E. sativa, which has been classified as a subspecies of E. vescaria. DNA of leaf tissue extracted by an alkaline solution and seed DNA prepared by the NaI method can be used directly for dot-blotting. Misidentification of species was revealed in 20 accessions in the Tohoku University Brassica Seed Bank. These results indicate dot-blot hybridization to be a simple and efficient technique for identification of plant species in a gene bank. PMID:20683723

  10. Tissue specific expression of avian vitellogenin gene is correlated with DNA hypomethylation and in vivo specific protein-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Jost, J P; Saluz, H P; McEwan, I; Feavers, I M; Hughes, M; Reiber, S; Liang, H M; Vaccaro, M

    1990-01-30

    The avian vitellogenin gene is expressed only in the liver of egg-laying hens. It can, however, be activated in immature chicks or roosters by oestradiol. Parallel to the onset of transcription, there is a demethylation of specific mCpGs in the promoter region and in the oestrogen response element (ERE). The methylation pattern in the promoter region is hormone and expression specific, whereas in the ERE it is only hormone and not organ specific. The demethylation occurring in the promoter region is correlated with the appearance of DNase I hypersensitivity sites and changes in the specific protein-DNA interactions. In vivo genomic footprinting of the ERE with varying concentrations of dimethylsulphate revealed, upon gene activation, only minor changes in the protein-DNA interaction. We present evidence that there is another protein that binds with high affinity to the ERE, besides the oestrogen receptor. PMID:1968660

  11. Taxonomic use of DNA G+C content and DNA-DNA hybridization in the genomic age.

    PubMed

    Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Göker, Markus

    2014-02-01

    The G+C content of a genome is frequently used in taxonomic descriptions of species and genera. In the past it has been determined using conventional, indirect methods, but it is nowadays reasonable to calculate the DNA G+C content directly from the increasingly available and affordable genome sequences. The expected increase in accuracy, however, might alter the way in which the G+C content is used for drawing taxonomic conclusions. We here re-estimate the literature assumption that the G+C content can vary up to 3-5 % within species using genomic datasets. The resulting G+C content differences are compared with DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) similarities calculated in silico using the GGDC web server, with 70% similarity as the gold standard threshold for species boundaries. The results indicate that the G+C content, if computed from genome sequences, varies no more than 1% within species. Statistical models based on larger differences alone can reject the hypothesis that two strains belong to the same species. Because DDH similarities between two non-type strains occur in the genomic datasets, we also examine to what extent and under which conditions such a similarity could be <70% even though the similarity of either strain to a type strain was ≥ 70%. In theory, their similarity could be as low as 50%, whereas empirical data suggest a boundary closer (but not identical) to 70%. However, it is shown that using a 50% boundary would not affect the conclusions regarding the DNA G+C content. Hence, we suggest that discrepancies between G+C content data provided in species descriptions on the one hand and those recalculated after genome sequencing on the other hand ≥ 1% are due to significant inaccuracies of the applied conventional methods and accordingly call for emendations of species descriptions. PMID:24505073

  12. Measurement of the sequence specificity of covalent DNA modification by antineoplastic agents using Taq DNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Ponti, M; Forrow, S M; Souhami, R L; D'Incalci, M; Hartley, J A

    1991-01-01

    A polymerase stop assay has been developed to determine the DNA nucleotide sequence specificity of covalent modification by antineoplastic agents using the thermostable DNA polymerase from Thermus aquaticus and synthetic labelled primers. The products of linear amplification are run on sequencing gels to reveal the sites of covalent drug binding. The method has been studied in detail for a number of agents including nitrogen mustards, platinum analogues and mitomycin C, and the sequence specificities obtained accord with those obtained by other procedures. The assay is advantageous in that it is not limited to a single type of DNA lesion (as in the piperidine cleavage assay for guanine-N7 alkylation), does not require a strand breakage step, and is more sensitive than other primer extension procedures which have only one cycle of polymerization. In particular the method has considerable potential for examining the sequence selectivity of damage and repair in single copy gene sequences in genomic DNA from cells. Images PMID:2057351

  13. Detection and analysis of leptospiral DNA in early Leptospirosis by polymerase chain reaction and DNA hybridization with Digoxingenin-AMPPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Lang; Yu, Ye-Rong; Terpstra, W. J.

    1994-07-01

    Fourteen serum specimens from patients with early Leptospirosis proven by blood culture and serological test were detected by PCR with the oligonucleotide primers obtained from a genomic library of leptospira interrogans. The amplified DNA were hybridized with the homologous DNA probe labeling with Digoxingenin-AMPPD. All of the samples revealed the presence of leptospira and the strong signals were visualized with homologous DNA probes hybridization. Negative and positive controls appeared correctly. The DNA fragment generated from PCR amplification homologically hybridized with the DNA of 16 strains of leptospira. The single recognized band (about 400 bps) from 6 out of the 16 strains has come out which are representative of the principal strains in Sichuan, China. The results demonstrated that PCR is an advanced diagnostic technique for early Leptospirosis. The treatment of samples is easy and has little risk of DNA loss and contamination. This is a considerable advantage over other detective techniques and can be available especially in China and other developing countries.

  14. Measuring the Electronic Properties of DNA-Specific Schottky Diodes Towards Detecting and Identifying Basidiomycetes DNA

    PubMed Central

    Periasamy, Vengadesh; Rizan, Nastaran; Al-Ta’ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Tan, Yee Shin; Tajuddin, Hairul Annuar; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of semiconducting behavior of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has resulted in a large number of literatures in the study of DNA electronics. Sequence-specific electronic response provides a platform towards understanding charge transfer mechanism and therefore the electronic properties of DNA. It is possible to utilize these characteristic properties to identify/detect DNA. In this current work, we demonstrate a novel method of DNA-based identification of basidiomycetes using current-voltage (I-V) profiles obtained from DNA-specific Schottky barrier diodes. Electronic properties such as ideality factor, barrier height, shunt resistance, series resistance, turn-on voltage, knee-voltage, breakdown voltage and breakdown current were calculated and used to quantify the identification process as compared to morphological and molecular characterization techniques. The use of these techniques is necessary in order to study biodiversity, but sometimes it can be misleading and unreliable and is not sufficiently useful for the identification of fungi genera. Many of these methods have failed when it comes to identification of closely related species of certain genus like Pleurotus. Our electronics profiles, both in the negative and positive bias regions were however found to be highly characteristic according to the base-pair sequences. We believe that this simple, low-cost and practical method could be useful towards identifying and detecting DNA in biotechnology and pathology. PMID:27435636

  15. Measuring the Electronic Properties of DNA-Specific Schottky Diodes Towards Detecting and Identifying Basidiomycetes DNA.

    PubMed

    Periasamy, Vengadesh; Rizan, Nastaran; Al-Ta'ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Tan, Yee Shin; Tajuddin, Hairul Annuar; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of semiconducting behavior of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has resulted in a large number of literatures in the study of DNA electronics. Sequence-specific electronic response provides a platform towards understanding charge transfer mechanism and therefore the electronic properties of DNA. It is possible to utilize these characteristic properties to identify/detect DNA. In this current work, we demonstrate a novel method of DNA-based identification of basidiomycetes using current-voltage (I-V) profiles obtained from DNA-specific Schottky barrier diodes. Electronic properties such as ideality factor, barrier height, shunt resistance, series resistance, turn-on voltage, knee-voltage, breakdown voltage and breakdown current were calculated and used to quantify the identification process as compared to morphological and molecular characterization techniques. The use of these techniques is necessary in order to study biodiversity, but sometimes it can be misleading and unreliable and is not sufficiently useful for the identification of fungi genera. Many of these methods have failed when it comes to identification of closely related species of certain genus like Pleurotus. Our electronics profiles, both in the negative and positive bias regions were however found to be highly characteristic according to the base-pair sequences. We believe that this simple, low-cost and practical method could be useful towards identifying and detecting DNA in biotechnology and pathology. PMID:27435636

  16. Measuring the Electronic Properties of DNA-Specific Schottky Diodes Towards Detecting and Identifying Basidiomycetes DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periasamy, Vengadesh; Rizan, Nastaran; Al-Ta’Ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Tan, Yee Shin; Tajuddin, Hairul Annuar; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2016-07-01

    The discovery of semiconducting behavior of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has resulted in a large number of literatures in the study of DNA electronics. Sequence-specific electronic response provides a platform towards understanding charge transfer mechanism and therefore the electronic properties of DNA. It is possible to utilize these characteristic properties to identify/detect DNA. In this current work, we demonstrate a novel method of DNA-based identification of basidiomycetes using current-voltage (I-V) profiles obtained from DNA-specific Schottky barrier diodes. Electronic properties such as ideality factor, barrier height, shunt resistance, series resistance, turn-on voltage, knee-voltage, breakdown voltage and breakdown current were calculated and used to quantify the identification process as compared to morphological and molecular characterization techniques. The use of these techniques is necessary in order to study biodiversity, but sometimes it can be misleading and unreliable and is not sufficiently useful for the identification of fungi genera. Many of these methods have failed when it comes to identification of closely related species of certain genus like Pleurotus. Our electronics profiles, both in the negative and positive bias regions were however found to be highly characteristic according to the base-pair sequences. We believe that this simple, low-cost and practical method could be useful towards identifying and detecting DNA in biotechnology and pathology.

  17. Sensitive detection of mercury and copper ions by fluorescent DNA/Ag nanoclusters in guanine-rich DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jun; Ling, Jian; Zhang, Xiu-Qing; Bai, Hui-Ping; Zheng, Liyan; Cao, Qiu-E; Ding, Zhong-Tao

    2015-02-25

    In this work, we designed a new fluorescent oligonucleotides-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA/AgNCs) probe for sensitive detection of mercury and copper ions. This probe contains two tailored DNA sequence. One is a signal probe contains a cytosine-rich sequence template for AgNCs synthesis and link sequence at both ends. The other is a guanine-rich sequence for signal enhancement and link sequence complementary to the link sequence of the signal probe. After hybridization, the fluorescence of hybridized double-strand DNA/AgNCs is 200-fold enhanced based on the fluorescence enhancement effect of DNA/AgNCs in proximity of guanine-rich DNA sequence. The double-strand DNA/AgNCs probe is brighter and stable than that of single-strand DNA/AgNCs, and more importantly, can be used as novel fluorescent probes for detecting mercury and copper ions. Mercury and copper ions in the range of 6.0-160.0 and 6-240 nM, can be linearly detected with the detection limits of 2.1 and 3.4 nM, respectively. Our results indicated that the analytical parameters of the method for mercury and copper ions detection are much better than which using a single-strand DNA/AgNCs. PMID:25305618

  18. Sensitive detection of mercury and copper ions by fluorescent DNA/Ag nanoclusters in guanine-rich DNA hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jun; Ling, Jian; Zhang, Xiu-Qing; Bai, Hui-Ping; Zheng, Liyan; Cao, Qiu-E.; Ding, Zhong-Tao

    2015-02-01

    In this work, we designed a new fluorescent oligonucleotides-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA/AgNCs) probe for sensitive detection of mercury and copper ions. This probe contains two tailored DNA sequence. One is a signal probe contains a cytosine-rich sequence template for AgNCs synthesis and link sequence at both ends. The other is a guanine-rich sequence for signal enhancement and link sequence complementary to the link sequence of the signal probe. After hybridization, the fluorescence of hybridized double-strand DNA/AgNCs is 200-fold enhanced based on the fluorescence enhancement effect of DNA/AgNCs in proximity of guanine-rich DNA sequence. The double-strand DNA/AgNCs probe is brighter and stable than that of single-strand DNA/AgNCs, and more importantly, can be used as novel fluorescent probes for detecting mercury and copper ions. Mercury and copper ions in the range of 6.0-160.0 and 6-240 nM, can be linearly detected with the detection limits of 2.1 and 3.4 nM, respectively. Our results indicated that the analytical parameters of the method for mercury and copper ions detection are much better than which using a single-strand DNA/AgNCs.

  19. Synthesis and self-assembly of DNA-chromophore hybrid amphiphiles.

    PubMed

    Albert, Shine K; Golla, Murali; Thelu, Hari Veera Prasad; Krishnan, Nithiyanandan; Deepak, Perapaka; Varghese, Reji

    2016-08-01

    DNA based spherical nanostructures are one of the promising nanostructures for several biomedical and biotechnological applications due to their excellent biocompatibility and DNA-directed surface addressability. Herein, we report the synthesis and amphiphilicity-driven self-assembly of two classes of DNA (hydrophilic)-chromophore (hydrophobic) hybrid amphiphiles into spherical nanostructures. A solid-phase "click" chemistry based modular approach is demonstrated for the synthesis of DNA-chromophore amphiphiles. Various spectroscopic and microscopic analyses reveal the self-assembly of the amphiphiles into vesicular and micellar assemblies with the corona made of hydrophilic DNA and the hydrophobic chromophoric unit as the core of the spherical nanostructures. PMID:27241196

  20. Multilocus sequence analysis supports the taxonomic position of Astragalus glycyphyllos symbionts based on DNA-DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Gnat, Sebastian; Małek, Wanda; Oleńska, Ewa; Wdowiak-Wróbel, Sylwia; Kalita, Michał; Rogalski, Jerzy; Wójcik, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the phylogenetic relationship and taxonomic status of six strains, representing different phenons and genomic groups of Astragalus glycyphyllos symbionts, originating from Poland, were established by comparative analysis of five concatenated housekeeping gene sequences (atpD, dnaK, glnA, recA and rpoB), DNA-DNA hybridization and total DNA G+C content. Maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analysis of combined atpD, dnaK, glnA, recA and rpoB sequence data placed the studied bacteria into the clade comprising the genus Mesorhizobium. In the core gene phylograms, four A. glycyphyllos nodule isolates (AG1, AG7, AG15 and AG27) formed a cluster common with Mesorhizobium ciceri, whereas the two other A. glycyphyllos symbionts (AG17 and AG22) were grouped together with Mesorhizobium amorphae and M. septentrionale. The species position of the studied bacteria was clarified by DNA-DNA hybridization. The DNA-DNA relatedness between isolates AG1, AG7, AG15 and AG27 and reference strain M. ciceri USDA 3383T was 76.4-84.2 %, and all these A. glycyphyllos nodulators were defined as members of the genomospecies M. ciceri. DNA-DNA relatedness for isolates AG17 and AG22 and the reference strain M. amorphae ICMP 15022T was 77.5 and 80.1 %, respectively. We propose that the nodule isolates AG17 and AG22 belong to the genomic species M. amorphae. Additionally, it was found that the total DNA G+C content of the six test A. glycyphyllos symbionts was 59.4-62.1 mol%, within the range for species of the genus Mesorhizobium. PMID:26704062

  1. Long-Range Charge Transport in Adenine-Stacked RNA:DNA Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanhui; Artés, Juan M; Hihath, Joshua

    2016-01-27

    An extremely important biological component, RNA:DNA can also be used to design nanoscale structures such as molecular wires. The conductance of single adenine-stacked RNA:DNA hybrids is rapidly and reproducibly measured using the break junction approach. The conductance decreases slightly over a large range of molecular lengths, suggesting that RNA:DNA can be used as an oligonucleotide wire. PMID:26596516

  2. Intense photoluminescence from dried double-stranded DNA and single-walled carbon nanotube hybrid

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Ito, Y.; Hayashida, T.; Nii, D.; Umemura, K.; Homma, Y.

    2014-01-27

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) show near-infrared photoluminescence (PL) when they are individually isolated. This was an obstacle to use photonic properties of SWNTs on a solid surface. We show that SWNTs wrapped with DNA maintain intense PL under the dry conditions. SWNTs are well isolated individually by DNA even when the DNA-SWNT hybrids are agglomerated. This finding opens up application of SWNTs to photonic devices.

  3. High specific surface gold electrode on polystyrene substrate: Characterization and application as DNA biosensor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiliu; Liu, Yichen; Lu, Wei; Yuan, Qingpan; Wang, Wei; Pu, Qiaosheng; Yao, Bo

    2016-05-15

    In the past decades, many efforts have been made to improve the sensitivity and specificity of electrochemical DNA biosensors. However, it is still strongly required to develop disposable and reliable DNA biosensors for wide and practical application. In this article, we reported superior electrochemical properties of an integrated plastic-gold electrode (PGE) fabricated in-house by chemical plating on polystyrene substrate. PGEs were found having extremely high capacity of DNA immobilization compared with gold electrodes fabricated by standard sputtering based photolithography. Unique nano-structured surface was observed on PGEs through morphology techniques, which would to some extend give an explanation to higher capacity of DNA immobilization on PGEs. A probable mechanism of carboxylic acid produced on polystyrene substrate after exposure to UV irradiation was proposed and discussed for the first time. This biosensor was applied to detection and manipulate of DNA hybridization. Detection limit of 7.2×10(-11)M and 1-500nM of linearity range was obtained. PMID:26992524

  4. Natural competence and the evolution of DNA uptake specificity.

    PubMed

    Mell, Joshua Chang; Redfield, Rosemary J

    2014-04-01

    Many bacteria are naturally competent, able to actively transport environmental DNA fragments across their cell envelope and into their cytoplasm. Because incoming DNA fragments can recombine with and replace homologous segments of the chromosome, competence provides cells with a potent mechanism of horizontal gene transfer as well as access to the nutrients in extracellular DNA. This review starts with an introductory overview of competence and continues with a detailed consideration of the DNA uptake specificity of competent proteobacteria in the Pasteurellaceae and Neisseriaceae. Species in these distantly related families exhibit strong preferences for genomic DNA from close relatives, a self-specificity arising from the combined effects of biases in the uptake machinery and genomic overrepresentation of the sequences this machinery prefers. Other competent species tested lack obvious uptake bias or uptake sequences, suggesting that strong convergent evolutionary forces have acted on these two families. Recent results show that uptake sequences have multiple "dialects," with clades within each family preferring distinct sequence variants and having corresponding variants enriched in their genomes. Although the genomic consensus uptake sequences are 12 and 29 to 34 bp, uptake assays have found that only central cores of 3 to 4 bp, conserved across dialects, are crucial for uptake. The other bases, which differ between dialects, make weaker individual contributions but have important cooperative interactions. Together, these results make predictions about the mechanism of DNA uptake across the outer membrane, supporting a model for the evolutionary accumulation and stability of uptake sequences and suggesting that uptake biases may be more widespread than currently thought. PMID:24488316

  5. DNA Hybridization Sensors Based on Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy as a Detection Tool

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Young; Park, Su-Moon

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in label free DNA hybridization sensors employing electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) as a detection tool are reviewed. These sensors are based on the modulation of the blocking ability of an electrode modified with a probe DNA by an analyte, i.e., target DNA. The probe DNA is immobilized on a self-assembled monolayer, a conducting polymer film, or a layer of nanostructures on the electrode such that desired probe DNA would selectively hybridize with target DNA. The rate of charge transfer from the electrode thus modified to a redox indicator, e.g., [Fe(CN)6]3−/4−, which is measured by EIS in the form of charge transfer resistance (Rct), is modulated by whether or not, as well as how much, the intended target DNA is selectively hybridized. Efforts made to enhance the selectivity as well as the sensitivity of DNA sensors and to reduce the EIS measurement time are briefly described along with brief future perspectives in developing DNA sensors. PMID:22303136

  6. Cloning and characterization of a Loa loa-specific repetitive DNA.

    PubMed

    Egwang, T G; Ajuh, P M; Akue, J P

    1992-12-01

    A Loa loa EcoRI genomic library in lambda gt11 was screened with 32P-labeled L. loa DNA and 1 repetitive clone, LL20, was isolated. An 800-bp Rsa I fragment of LL20, which is L. loa specific, was subcloned into pUC19 and the recombinant plasmid was designated pRsa4. While the 3.8-kb Eco RI fragment of LL20 cross-hybridized to other filarial DNA under low stringency conditions, the 800-bp fragment of pRsa4 was L. loa specific under the same conditions. Further characterization of the insert of pRsa4 was therefore carried out. Its lower limit of detection is 800 pg of L. loa genomic DNA, it has a low copy number (50-100) and an interspersed distribution in the genome. As a probe it does not distinguish between simian and human L. loa DNA. The nucleotide sequence contains 69% A + T and 31% G + C and shows no notable internal repeats. PMID:1484545

  7. A highly oriented hybrid microarray modified electrode fabricated by a template-free method for ultrasensitive electrochemical DNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Chu, Zhenyu; Dong, Xueliang; Jin, Wanqin; Dempsey, Eithne

    2013-11-01

    Highly oriented growth of a hybrid microarray was realized by a facile template-free method on gold substrates for the first time. The proposed formation mechanism involves an interfacial structure-directing force arising from self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) between gold substrates and hybrid crystals. Different SAMs and variable surface coverage of the assembled molecules play a critical role in the interfacial directing forces and influence the morphologies of hybrid films. A highly oriented hybrid microarray was formed on the highly aligned and vertical SAMs of 1,4-benzenedithiol molecules with rigid backbones, which afforded an intense structure-directing power for the oriented growth of hybrid crystals. Additionally, the density of the microarray could be adjusted by controlling the surface coverage of assembled molecules. Based on the hybrid microarray modified electrode with a large specific area (ca. 10 times its geometrical area), a label-free electrochemical DNA biosensor was constructed for the detection of an oligonucleotide fragment of the avian flu virus H5N1. The DNA biosensor displayed a significantly low detection limit of 5 pM (S/N = 3), a wide linear response from 10 pM to 10 nM, as well as excellent selectivity, good regeneration and high stability. We expect that the proposed template-free method can provide a new reference for the fabrication of a highly oriented hybrid array and the as-prepared microarray modified electrode will be a promising paradigm in constructing highly sensitive and selective biosensors. PMID:24061929

  8. Use of Multiple-Displacement Amplification and Checkerboard DNA-DNA Hybridization To Examine the Microbiota of Endodontic Infections▿

    PubMed Central

    Brito, L. C. N.; Teles, F. R.; Teles, R. P.; França, E. C.; Ribeiro-Sobrinho, A. P.; Haffajee, A. D.; Socransky, S. S.

    2007-01-01

    Multiple-displacement amplification (MDA) has been used to uniformly amplify bacterial genomes present in small samples, providing abundant targets for molecular analysis. The purpose of this investigation was to combine MDA and checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization to examine the microbiota of endodontic infections. Sixty-six samples were collected from teeth with endodontic infections. Nonamplified and amplified samples were analyzed by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization for levels and proportions of 77 bacterial taxa. Counts, percentages of DNA probe counts, and percentages of teeth colonized for each species in amplified and nonamplified samples were computed. Significance of differences for each species between amplified and nonamplified samples was sought with Wilcoxon signed-rank test and adjusted for multiple comparisons. The amount of DNA in the samples ranged from 6.80 (± 5.2) ng before to 6.26 (± 1.73) μg after MDA. Seventy of the 77 DNA probes hybridized with one or more of the nonamplified samples. All probes hybridized with at least one sample after amplification. Most commonly detected species at levels of >104 in both amplified and nonamplified samples were Prevotella tannerae and Acinetobacter baumannii at frequencies between 89 and 100% of samples. The mean number of species at counts of >104 in amplified samples was 51.2 ± 2.2 and in nonamplified samples was 14.5 ± 1.7. The endodontic microbiota was far more complex than previously shown, although microbial profiles at teeth with or without periradicular lesions did not differ significantly. Species commonly detected in endodontic samples included P. tannerae, Prevotella oris, and A. baumannii. PMID:17634304

  9. Specific association between the human DNA repair proteins XPA and ERCC1.

    PubMed Central

    Li, L; Elledge, S J; Peterson, C A; Bales, E S; Legerski, R J

    1994-01-01

    Processing of DNA damage by the nucleotide-excision repair pathway in eukaryotic cells is most likely accomplished by multiprotein complexes. However, the nature of these complexes and the details of the molecular interactions between DNA repair factors are for the most part unknown. Here, we demonstrate both in vivo, using the two-hybrid system, and in vitro, using recombinant proteins, that the human repair factors XPA and ERCC1 specifically interact. In addition, we report an initial determination of the domains in ERCC1 and XPA that mediate this interaction. These results suggest that XPA may play a role in the localization or loading of an incision complex, composed of ERCC1 and possibly other repair factors, onto a damaged site. Images PMID:8197174

  10. Strain-Specific Identification of Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus with Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA-Derived PCR Primers

    PubMed Central

    Tilsala-Timisjärvi, Anu; Alatossava, Tapani

    1998-01-01

    In the present work, strain-specific PCR primers for Lactobacillus rhamnosus Lc 1/3 are described. The randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique was used to produce potential strain-specific markers. They were screened for specificity by hybridization with DNA from 11 L. rhamnosus strains. A 613-bp RAPD marker found to be strain-specific was sequenced, and a primer pair specific to L. rhamnosus Lc 1/3 was constructed based on the sequence. The primer pair was tested with 11 Lactobacillus species and 11 L. rhamnosus strains and was found to be strain specific. The nucleotide sequence of the specific RAPD marker was found to contain part of a protein encoding region which showed significant similarity to several transposases for insertion sequence elements of various bacteria, including other lactic acid bacterium species. PMID:9835567

  11. Absence of Y-specific DNA sequences in human 46,XX true hermaphrodites and in 45,X mixed gonadal dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Waibel, F; Scherer, G; Fraccaro, M; Hustinx, T W; Weissenbach, J; Wieland, J; Mayerová, A; Back, E; Wolf, U

    1987-08-01

    A search for Y-specific DNA sequences has been performed in a sample of seven 46,XX true hermaphrodites and one 45,X mixed gonadal dysgenesis case and compared with a sample of 11 XX males. Using six Y-specific DNA probes no hybridization signal was obtained in the hermaphrodite group; in contrast, all XX males gave a positive signal with at least one probe. This difference is statistically highly significant. We conclude that the aetiology of true hermaphroditism is different from that of the XX male syndrome. As all cases of the hermaphrodite group are positive for the serological sex-specific antigen (Sxs) it is concluded that this antigen can be present even in the absence of Y-specific DNA. PMID:3038732

  12. Elucidation of the Mechanism of Gene Silencing using Small Interferin RNA: DNA Hybrid Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, L

    2006-02-08

    The recent discovery that short hybrid RNA:DNA molecules (siHybrids) induce long-term silencing of gene expression in mammalian cells conflicts with the currently hypothesized mechanisms explaining the action of small, interfering RNA (siRNA). As a first step to elucidating the mechanism for this effect, we set out to quantify the delivery of siHybrids and determine their cellular localization in mammalian cells. We then tracked the segregation of the siHybrids into daughter cells after cell division. Markers for siHybrid delivery were shown to enter cells with and without the use of a transfection agent. Furthermore, delivery without transfection agent only occurred after a delay of 2-4 hours, suggesting a degradation process occurring in the cell culture media. Therefore, we studied the effects of nucleases and backbone modifications on the stability of siHybrids under cell culture conditions.

  13. Species-diagnostic and species-specific DNA sequences evenly distributed throughout pine and spruce chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Mehes-Smith, Melanie; Michael, Paul; Nkongolo, Kabwe

    2010-10-01

    Genome organization in the family Pinaceae is complex and largely unknown. The main purpose of the present study was to develop and physically map species-diagnostic and species-specific molecular markers in pine and spruce. Five RAPD (random amplified polymorphic DNA) and one ISSR (inter-simple sequence repeat) species-diagnostic or species-specific markers for Picea mariana, Picea rubens, Pinus strobus, or Pinus monticola were identified, cloned, and sequenced. In situ hybridization of these sequences to spruce and pine chromosomes showed the sequences to be present in high copy number and evenly distributed throughout the genome. The analysis of centromeric and telomeric regions revealed the absence of significant clustering of species-diagnostic and species-specific sequences in all the chromosomes of the four species studied. Both RAPD and ISSR markers showed similar patterns. PMID:20962883

  14. Layered zirconium phosphonate with inorganic–organic hybrid structure: Preparation and its assembly with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Li-Min; Lu, Guo-Yuan; Jiang, Li-Ping; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2014-07-01

    An aminoethoxy-functionalized zirconium phosphonate (Zr(O{sub 3}POCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NH{sub 2}){sub 2}·3H{sub 2}O), abbreviated as ZrRP (R=OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NH{sub 2}), with layered structure has been synthesized. This layered compound possesses the characteristic of inorganic–organic hybrid, due to the covalently linked aminoethoxy in the host layer. The anion exchanged property of this zirconium phosphonate is suitable for the direct intercalation of negatively charged DNA, which is different from these reported zirconium phosphates or zirconium phosphonates. As a precursor, this prepared zirconium phosphonate was utilized to fabricate a novel DNA/ZrRP binary hybrid via a delamination-reassembly procedure. The release behavior of DNA from the DNA/ZrRP composite was investigated at different medium pH, because the combination between zirconium phosphonate sheets and DNA was pH-dependent sensitively. Moreover, the helical conformation of DNA was almost retained after the intercalation and release process. These properties of the DNA/ZrRP composite suggested the potential application of layered zirconium phosphonate as a non-viral vector in gene delivery. - Graphical abstract: The intercalation of DNA into zirconium phosphonate and the release of DNA from the interlayer of zirconium phosphonate. - Highlights: ●A layered aminoethoxy-functionalized zirconium phosphonate has been synthesized. ●DNA was intercalated directly into the prepared zirconium phosphonate. ●A novel zirconium phosphonate/DNA binary hybrid was fabricated. ●DNA can be reversibly released from the interlayer of zirconium phosphonate. ●The intercalation/release processes do not induce the denaturalization of DNA.

  15. An efficient algorithm for the stochastic simulation of the hybridization of DNA to microarrays

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Although oligonucleotide microarray technology is ubiquitous in genomic research, reproducibility and standardization of expression measurements still concern many researchers. Cross-hybridization between microarray probes and non-target ssDNA has been implicated as a primary factor in sensitivity and selectivity loss. Since hybridization is a chemical process, it may be modeled at a population-level using a combination of material balance equations and thermodynamics. However, the hybridization reaction network may be exceptionally large for commercial arrays, which often possess at least one reporter per transcript. Quantification of the kinetics and equilibrium of exceptionally large chemical systems of this type is numerically infeasible with customary approaches. Results In this paper, we present a robust and computationally efficient algorithm for the simulation of hybridization processes underlying microarray assays. Our method may be utilized to identify the extent to which nucleic acid targets (e.g. cDNA) will cross-hybridize with probes, and by extension, characterize probe robustnessusing the information specified by MAGE-TAB. Using this algorithm, we characterize cross-hybridization in a modified commercial microarray assay. Conclusions By integrating stochastic simulation with thermodynamic prediction tools for DNA hybridization, one may robustly and rapidly characterize of the selectivity of a proposed microarray design at the probe and "system" levels. Our code is available at http://www.laurenzi.net. PMID:20003312

  16. Label free detection of DNA hybridization by refractive index tapered fiber biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibaii, M. I.; Latifi, H.; Ghanati, E.; Gholami, M.; Hosseini, S. M.

    2010-04-01

    We demonstrate a simple refractive index sensor (RI) sensing system based on a biconical tapered optical fiber (BTOF), which is fabricated by heat pulling method, utilizing a CO2 laser. In this work we explore the application of these sensors for the detection of label free single stranded DNA (ssDNA) in real time. During the experiment, the target ssDNA did not need to be labeled with a fluorescent tag, which is expensive and complicated. The change in output optical transmission of the tapered fiber was recorded for Poly-L-Lysine (PLL) coating, ssDNA probe immobilization and hybridization. The result indicated that due to the hybridization with the complementary target ssDNA on the tapered surface, the RI of surrounding medium changes which leads to changes in the characteristics of the tapered region and change in the output power of the sensor.

  17. DNA fingerprinting of Kentucky bluegrass cultivars and hybrids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a high polyploidy, apomictic, self-incompatible, perennial grass, Kentucky bluegrass has such complex genetic architecture that conducting standard Mendelian genetic selection is currently impossible. One large hurdle is the inability to differentiate true hybrids from other apomictic progenies....

  18. PolyA-Mediated DNA Assembly on Gold Nanoparticles for Thermodynamically Favorable and Rapid Hybridization Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dan; Song, Ping; Shen, Juwen; Su, Shao; Chao, Jie; Aldalbahi, Ali; Zhou, Ziang; Song, Shiping; Fan, Chunhai; Zuo, Xiaolei; Tian, Yang; Wang, Lianhui; Pei, Hao

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the behavior of biomolecules on nanointerface is critical in bioanalysis, which is great challenge due to the instability and the difficulty to control the orientation and loading density of biomolecules. Here, we investigated the thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA hybridization on gold nanoparticle, with the aim to improve the efficiency and speed of DNA analysis. We achieved precise and quantitative surface control by applying a recently developed poly adenines (polyA)-based assembly strategy on gold nanoparticles (DNA-AuNPs). PolyA served as an effective anchoring block based on the preferential binding with the AuNP surface and the appended recognition block adopted an upright conformation that favors DNA hybridization. The lateral spacing and surface density of DNA on AuNPs can be systematically modulated by adjusting the length of polyA block. We found the stability of duplex on AuNP was enhanced with the increasing length of polyA block. When the length of polyA block reached to 40 bases, the thermodynamic properties were more similar to that of duplex in solution. Fast hybridization rate was observed on the diblock DNA-AuNPs and was increased along with the length of polyA block. We consider the high stability and excellent hybridization performance come from the minimization of the DNA-DNA and DNA-AuNP interactions with the use of polyA block. This study provides better understanding of the behavior of biomolecules on the nanointerface and opens new opportunities to construct high-efficiency and high-speed biosensors for DNA analysis. PMID:27058116

  19. Impact parameters on hybridization process in detecting influenza virus (type A) using conductimetric-based DNA sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Phuong Dinh; Tuan, Mai Anh; Van Hieu, Nguyen; Chien, Nguyen Duc

    2009-08-01

    This paper report various impact parameters on hybridization of probe/target DNA to detect the influenza virus (type A-H5N1) such as hybridization temperature, probe concentration, mismatch target and hybridization time. The DNA probe was attached to sensor surface by means of covalent bonding between amine of 3-aminopropyl-triethoxy-silance (APTS) and phosphate group of DNA sequence. The hybridization of probe/target DNA strands were detected by changing the surface conductance of sensors, which leads to the change in output signal of the system. The results reveal that the DNA sensor can detect as low as 0.5 nM of target DNA in real samples. The response time of DNA sensor is approximately 4 min, and the sensitivity of DNA sensor is about 0.03 mV/nM.

  20. Implication of Triticum searsii as the B-genome donor to wheat using DNA hybridizations.

    PubMed

    Nath, J; McNay, J W; Paroda, C M; Gulati, S C

    1983-08-01

    In vitro DNA:DNA hybridizations and hydroxyapatite thermal chromatography were employed to help identify the species ancestral to the B genome of the polyploid wheats. We hybridized 3H-Triticum aestivum DNA to the unlabeled DNAs of T. urartu, T. speltoides, T. sharonensis, T. bicorne, T. longissimum, and T. searsii, 3H-Labeled DNA of T. urartu was hybridized with the DNA of a synthetic tetraploid. AADD. The heteroduplex thermal stabilities indicated that T. searsii was most closely related to T. aestivum (ABD) and that the genome of T. urartu was more closely related to the A genome than the B genome. The degree of reassociation which may have occurred between the six diploid species and the D genome of T. aestivum was evaluated by hybridizing 3H-T. tauschii DNA with the DNAs of the diploids. The results indicated that T. urartu had the least sequence homology to T. tauschii, the D-genome donor lending additional support to the conclusion that T. urartu is related to the A genome. Thus, it is highly probable that T. searsii is the B-genome donor to the polyploid wheats or a major chromosome donor if the B genome is, in fact, polyphyletic in origin. PMID:6626143

  1. Infant sex-specific placental cadmium and DNA methylation associations

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, April F.; Farin, Fred M.; Bammler, Theo K.; MacDonald, James W.; Afsharinejad, Zahra; Burbacher, Thomas M.; Siscovick, David S.; and others

    2015-04-15

    Background: Recent evidence suggests that maternal cadmium (Cd) burden and fetal growth associations may vary by fetal sex. However, mechanisms contributing to these differences are unknown. Objectives: Among 24 maternal-infant pairs, we investigated infant sex-specific associations between placental Cd and placental genome-wide DNA methylation. Methods: We used ANOVA models to examine sex-stratified associations of placental Cd (dichotomized into high/low Cd using sex-specific Cd median cutoffs) with DNA methylation at each cytosine-phosphate-guanine site or region. Statistical significance was defined using a false discovery rate cutoff (<0.10). Results: Medians of placental Cd among females and males were 5 and 2 ng/g, respectively. Among females, three sites (near ADP-ribosylation factor-like 9 (ARL9), siah E3 ubiquitin protein ligase family member 3 (SIAH3), and heparin sulfate (glucosamine) 3-O-sulfotransferase 4 (HS3ST4) and one region on chromosome 7 (including carnitine O-octanoyltransferase (CROT) and TP5S target 1 (TP53TG1)) were hypomethylated in high Cd placentas. Among males, high placental Cd was associated with methylation of three sites, two (hypomethylated) near MDS1 and EVI1 complex locus (MECOM) and one (hypermethylated) near spalt-like transcription factor 1 (SALL1), and two regions (both hypomethylated, one on chromosome 3 including MECOM and another on chromosome 8 including rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) 10 (ARHGEF10). Differentially methylated sites were at or close to transcription start sites of genes involved in cell damage response (SIAH3, HS3ST4, TP53TG1) in females and cell differentiation, angiogenesis and organ development (MECOM, SALL1) in males. Conclusions: Our preliminary study supports infant sex-specific placental Cd-DNA methylation associations, possibly accounting for previously reported differences in Cd-fetal growth associations across fetal sex. Larger studies are needed to replicate and extend these

  2. Parallel Characterization of Anaerobic Toluene- and Ethylbenzene-Degrading Microbial Consortia by PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis, RNA-DNA Membrane Hybridization, and DNA Microarray Technology

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Yoshikazu; Kelly, John J.; Nakagawa, Tatsunori; Urakawa, Hidetoshi; El-Fantroussi, Saïd; Al-Muzaini, Saleh; Fukui, Manabu; Urushigawa, Yoshikuni; Stahl, David A.

    2002-01-01

    A mesophilic toluene-degrading consortium (TDC) and an ethylbenzene-degrading consortium (EDC) were established under sulfate-reducing conditions. These consortia were first characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments, followed by sequencing. The sequences of the major bands (T-1 and E-2) belonging to TDC and EDC, respectively, were affiliated with the family Desulfobacteriaceae. Another major band from EDC (E-1) was related to an uncultured non-sulfate-reducing soil bacterium. Oligonucleotide probes specific for the 16S rRNAs of target organisms corresponding to T-1, E-1, and E-2 were designed, and hybridization conditions were optimized for two analytical formats, membrane and DNA microarray hybridization. Both formats were used to characterize the TDC and EDC, and the results of both were consistent with DGGE analysis. In order to assess the utility of the microarray format for analysis of environmental samples, oil-contaminated sediments from the coast of Kuwait were analyzed. The DNA microarray successfully detected bacterial nucleic acids from these samples, but probes targeting specific groups of sulfate-reducing bacteria did not give positive signals. The results of this study demonstrate the limitations and the potential utility of DNA microarrays for microbial community analysis. PMID:12088997

  3. Parallel characterization of anaerobic toluene- and ethylbenzene-degrading microbial consortia by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, RNA-DNA membrane hybridization, and DNA microarray technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koizumi, Yoshikazu; Kelly, John J.; Nakagawa, Tatsunori; Urakawa, Hidetoshi; El-Fantroussi, Said; Al-Muzaini, Saleh; Fukui, Manabu; Urushigawa, Yoshikuni; Stahl, David A.

    2002-01-01

    A mesophilic toluene-degrading consortium (TDC) and an ethylbenzene-degrading consortium (EDC) were established under sulfate-reducing conditions. These consortia were first characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments, followed by sequencing. The sequences of the major bands (T-1 and E-2) belonging to TDC and EDC, respectively, were affiliated with the family Desulfobacteriaceae. Another major band from EDC (E-1) was related to an uncultured non-sulfate-reducing soil bacterium. Oligonucleotide probes specific for the 16S rRNAs of target organisms corresponding to T-1, E-1, and E-2 were designed, and hybridization conditions were optimized for two analytical formats, membrane and DNA microarray hybridization. Both formats were used to characterize the TDC and EDC, and the results of both were consistent with DGGE analysis. In order to assess the utility of the microarray format for analysis of environmental samples, oil-contaminated sediments from the coast of Kuwait were analyzed. The DNA microarray successfully detected bacterial nucleic acids from these samples, but probes targeting specific groups of sulfate-reducing bacteria did not give positive signals. The results of this study demonstrate the limitations and the potential utility of DNA microarrays for microbial community analysis.

  4. Sequence specificity of psoralen photobinding to DNA: a quantitative approach.

    PubMed

    Gia, O; Magno, S M; Garbesi, A; Colonna, F P; Palumbo, M

    1992-12-01

    The effects of different DNA sequences on the photoreaction of various furocoumarin derivatives was investigated from a quantitative point of view using a number of self-complementary oligonucleotides. These contained 5'-TA and 5'-AT residues, having various flanking sequences. The furocoumarins included classical bifunctional derivatives, such as 8-methoxy- and 5-methoxypsoralen, as well as monofunctional compounds, such as angelicin and benzopsoralen. Taking into an account the thermodynamic constant for noncovalent binding of each psoralen to each DNA sequence, the rate constants for the photobinding process to each fragment were evaluated. The extent of photoreaction is greatly affected by the DNA sequence examined. While sequences of the type 5'-(GTAC)n are quite reactive towards all furocoumarins, 5'-TATA exhibited a reduced rate of photobinding using monofunctional psoralens. In addition terminal 5'-TA groups were the least reactive with 5- and 8-methoxypsoralen, but not with angelicin or benzopsoralen. Also 5'-AT-containing fragments exhibited remarkably variable responses toward monofunctional or bifunctional psoralen derivatives. As a general trend the photoreactivity rate of the former is less sequence-sensitive, the ratio between maximum and minimum being less than 2 for the examined fragments. The same ratio is about 3.4 for 8-methoxypsoralen and 6.2 for 5-methoxypsoralen. This approach, in combination with footprinting studies, appears to be quite useful for a quantitative investigation of the process of covalent binding of psoralens to specific sites in DNA. PMID:1445915

  5. Sequence-specific DNA primer effects on telomerase polymerization activity.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M S; Blackburn, E H

    1993-01-01

    The ribonucleoprotein enzyme telomerase synthesizes one strand of telomeric DNA by copying a template sequence within the RNA moiety of the enzyme. Kinetic studies of this polymerization reaction were used to analyze the mechanism and properties of the telomerase from Tetrahymena thermophila. This enzyme synthesizes TTGGGG repeats, the telomeric DNA sequence of this species, by elongating a DNA primer whose 3' end base pairs with the template-forming domain of the RNA. The enzyme was found to act nonprocessively with short (10- to 12-nucleotide) primers but to become processive as TTGGGG repeats were added. Variation of the 5' sequences of short primers with a common 3' end identified sequence-specific effects which are distinct from those involving base pairing of the 3' end of the primer with the RNA template and which can markedly induce enzyme activity by increasing the catalytic rate of the telomerase polymerization reaction. These results identify an additional mechanistic basis for telomere and DNA end recognition by telomerase in vivo. Images PMID:8413255

  6. Molecular characterization and chromosomal distribution of species-specific repetitive DNA sequences from Beta corolliflora, a wild relative of sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Gao, D; Schmidt, T; Jung, C

    2000-12-01

    Repetitive DNA sequences have been isolated from a Sau3AI plasmid library of tetraploid Beta corolliflora (2n = 4x = 36), a wild relative of sugar beet (B. vulgaris). The library was screened by differential hybridization with genomic DNA of B. corolliflora and B. vulgaris. When used as probes for Southern hybridization of genomic DNA, six clones were determined to represent highly repetitive DNA families present only in the B. corolliflora genome. Five other sequences were highly repetitive in B. corolliflora and low or single copy in B. vulgaris. The insert size varied between 43 bp and 448 bp. Two sequences pBC1279 and pBC1944 displayed strong homology to a previously cloned satellite DNA from B. nana. With one exception, sequences are tandemly arranged as revealed by a typical ladder pattern after genomic Southern hybridization. The chromosomal distribution of five probes was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of mitotic metaphases from B. corolliflora and a triploid hybrid between B. vulgaris and B. corolliflora. Three sequences were spread along all chromosome arms of B. corolliflora while one sequence was present on only six chromosomes. The chromosome-specific sequence pBC216 was found in close vicinity to the 5S rDNA located on B. corolliflora chromosome IV. This set of species-specific sequences has the potential to be used as probes for the identification of monosomic alien addition lines and for marker-assisted gene transfer from wild beet to cultivated beet. PMID:11195340

  7. Application of DNA Hybridization Biosensor as a Screening Method for the Detection of Genetically Modified Food Components

    PubMed Central

    Tichoniuk, Mariusz; Ligaj, Marta; Filipiak, Marian

    2008-01-01

    An electrochemical biosensor for the detection of genetically modified food components is presented. The biosensor was based on 21-mer single-stranded oligonucleotide (ssDNA probe) specific to either 35S promoter or nos terminator, which are frequently present in transgenic DNA cassettes. ssDNA probe was covalently attached by 5′-phosphate end to amino group of cysteamine self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on gold electrode surface with the use of activating reagents – water soluble 1-ethyl-3(3′-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxy-sulfosuccinimide (NHS). The hybridization reaction on the electrode surface was detected via methylene blue (MB) presenting higher affinity to ssDNA probe than to DNA duplex. The electrode modification procedure was optimized using 19-mer oligoG and oligoC nucleotides. The biosensor enabled distinction between DNA samples isolated from soybean RoundupReady® (RR soybean) and non-genetically modified soybean. The frequent introduction of investigated DNA sequences in other genetically modified organisms (GMOs) give a broad perspectives for analytical application of the biosensor.

  8. Bioinformatic Tools Identify Chromosome-Specific DNA Probes and Facilitate Risk Assessment by Detecting Aneusomies in Extra-embryonic Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hui; Weier, Jingly F; Wang, Mei; Kassabian, Haig J; Polyzos, Aris A; Baumgartner, Adolf; O’Brien, Benjamin; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G

    2012-01-01

    Despite their non-diseased nature, healthy human tissues may show a surprisingly large fraction of aneusomic or aneuploid cells. We have shown previously that hybridization of three to six non-isotopically labeled, chromosome-specific DNA probes reveals different proportions of aneuploid cells in individual compartments of the human placenta and the uterine wall. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we found that human invasive cytotrophoblasts isolated from anchoring villi or the uterine wall had gained individual chromosomes. Chromosome losses in placental or uterine tissues, on the other hand, were detected infrequently. A more thorough numerical analysis of all possible aneusomies occurring in these tissues and the investigation of their spatial as well as temporal distribution would further our understanding of the underlying biology, but it is hampered by the high cost of and limited access to DNA probes. Furthermore, multiplexing assays are difficult to set up with commercially available probes due to limited choices of probe labels. Many laboratories therefore attempt to develop their own DNA probe sets, often duplicating cloning and screening efforts underway elsewhere. In this review, we discuss the conventional approaches to the preparation of chromosome-specific DNA probes followed by a description of our approach using state-of-the-art bioinformatics and molecular biology tools for probe identification and manufacture. Novel probes that target gonosomes as well as two autosomes are presented as examples of rapid and inexpensive preparation of highly specific DNA probes for applications in placenta research and perinatal diagnostics. PMID:23450259

  9. Application of DNA hybridization techniques in the assessment of diarrheal disease among refugess in Thailand. [Shigella; Escherichia coli; Campylobacter; Cryptosporidium

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.N.; Echeverria, P.; Pitarangsi, C.; Seriwatana, J.; Sethabutr, O.; Bodhidatta, L.; Brown, C.; Herrmann, J.E.; Blacklow, N.R.

    1988-01-01

    The epidemiology and etiology of acute diarrheal disease were determined in a Hmong refugee camp on the Thai-Laotian border from April 11 to May 14, 1985. DNA hybridization techniques were used to detect Shigella species, enteroinvasive Escherichia coli, and enterotoxigenic E. coli. A monoclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect rotavirus, and standard microbiology was used to detect other enteropathogens. The age-specific diarrheal disease rates were 47 episodes per month per 1000 children less than five years old and 113 episodes per month per 1000 children less than one year old. Rotavirus, enterotoxigenic E. coli, Campylobacter, and Cryptosporidium were the predominant pathogens in children less than two years old. The DNA probe hybridized with 94% of 31 specimens identified as enterotoxigenic E. coli by the standard assays and with none of the specimens in which the standard assays were negative. The probe for Shigella and enteroinvasive E. coli hybridized in eight of 10 stools that contained Shigella and four of 314 stools from which Shigella and enteroinvasive E. coli were not isolated. The use of DNA probes allows specimens to be collected in remote areas with a minimum amount of equipment and technical expertise so that they can be easily transported to a central laboratory for further processing.

  10. Identification of bovine Neospora parasites by PCR amplification and specific small-subunit rRNA sequence probe hybridization.

    PubMed

    Ho, M S; Barr, B C; Marsh, A E; Anderson, M L; Rowe, J D; Tarantal, A F; Hendrickx, A G; Sverlow, K; Dubey, J P; Conrad, P A

    1996-05-01

    Neospora is a newly recognized genus of pathogenic coccidia, closely related to Toxoplasma gondii, that can cause abortion or congenital disease in a variety of domestic animal hosts. On the basis of the small-subunit rRNA gene sequences of Neospora spp. and other apicomplexa coccidia, oligonucleotide primers COC-1 and COC-2 were used for PCR amplification of conserved sequences of approximately 300 bp in size. A Neospora-specific chemiluminescent probe hybridized to Southern blots of amplification products from Neospora DNA but not to Southern blots with amplified DNA from the other coccidian parasites tested. A Toxoplasma-specific probe whose sequence differed from that of the probe for Neospora spp. by a single base pair was used to distinguish these parasites by specific Southern blot hybridization. The PCR system detected as few as one Neospora tachyzoite in the culture medium or five tachyzoites in samples of whole blood or amniotic fluid spiked with Neospora parasites. In addition, Neospora PCR products were successfully amplified from whole blood and amniotic fluid samples of experimentally infected bovine and rhesus macaque fetuses. These results indicate that this PCR and probe hybridization system could be a valuable adjunct to serology and immunohistochemistry for the diagnosis of Neospora infections in bovine or primate fetuses. PMID:8727903

  11. DNA hybridization assay for detection of gypsy moth nuclear polyhedrosis virus in infected gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L. ) larvae

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, S.T.; Burand, J.P.; Elkinton, J.S. )

    1989-11-01

    Radiolabeled Lymantria dispar nuclear polyhedrosis virus DNA probes were used in a DNA hybridization assay to detect the presence of viral DNA in extracts from infected larvae. Total DNA was extracted from larvae, bound to nitrocellulose filters, and assayed for the presence of viral DNA by two methods: slot-blot vacuum filtration and whole-larval squashes. The hybridization results were closely correlated with mortality observed in reared larvae. Hybridization of squashes of larvae frozen 4 days after receiving the above virus treatments also produced accurate measures of the incidence of virus infection.

  12. Internalization of Locked Nucleic Acids/DNA Hybrid Oligomers into Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Traglia, German M; Sala, Carol Davies; Fuxman Bass, Juan I; Soler-Bistué, Alfonso J C; Zorreguieta, Angeles; Ramírez, María Soledad; Tolmasky, Marcelo E

    2012-10-01

    Delivery inside the cells is essential for practical application of antisense technologies. The hybrid locked nucleic acid (LNA)/DNA CAAGTACTGTTCCACCA (LNA residues are underlined) was labeled by conjugation to Alexa Fluor 488 (fLNA/DNA) and tested to determine its ability to penetrate Escherichia coli cells and reach the cytoplasm. Flow cytometry analysis showed that the fLNA/DNA was associated with 14% of cells from a stationary phase culture, while association with a labeled isosequential oligodeoxynucleotide was negligible. Laser scanning confocal microscopy confirmed that the fLNA/DNA was located inside the cytoplasm. PMID:23515318

  13. Chaos-based image encryption using a hybrid genetic algorithm and a DNA sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enayatifar, Rasul; Abdullah, Abdul Hanan; Isnin, Ismail Fauzi

    2014-05-01

    The paper studies a recently developed evolutionary-based image encryption algorithm. A novel image encryption algorithm based on a hybrid model of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) masking, a genetic algorithm (GA) and a logistic map is proposed. This study uses DNA and logistic map functions to create the number of initial DNA masks and applies GA to determine the best mask for encryption. The significant advantage of this approach is improving the quality of DNA masks to obtain the best mask that is compatible with plain images. The experimental results and computer simulations both confirm that the proposed scheme not only demonstrates excellent encryption but also resists various typical attacks.

  14. Detection and classification of Trypanosoma cruzi by DNA hybridization with nonradioactive probes.

    PubMed

    Solari, A; Venegas, J; Gonzalez, E; Vasquez, C

    1991-01-01

    Total or kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) from 72 isolates and clones of Trypanosoma cruzi as well as from nine related trypanosomatids were analyzed by dot hybridization using nonradioactive kDNA or cloned minicircle fragments as probes. Biotinylated-kDNA probes generated by nick-translation proved reliable for distinguishing Zymodeme 1 and Zymodeme 2bol of T. cruzi parasites. In contrast, digoxigenin-labeled kDNA obtained by random-priming did not distinguish among T. cruzi isolates but did distinguish among New World leishmanias. Cloned minicircle fragments labeled with digoxigenin gave the same results as digoxigenin-labeled kDNA, except for a 10-fold decrease in sensitivity. Digoxigenin-labeled DNA probes proved useful in unambiguously detecting T. cruzi from different geographic regions of America. However, T. rangeli and T. cruzi marinkellei were not distinguished by these probes. PMID:1667933

  15. Direct Measurement of Single-Molecule DNA Hybridization Dynamics with Single-Base Resolution.

    PubMed

    He, Gen; Li, Jie; Ci, Haina; Qi, Chuanmin; Guo, Xuefeng

    2016-07-25

    Herein, we report label-free detection of single-molecule DNA hybridization dynamics with single-base resolution. By using an electronic circuit based on point-decorated silicon nanowires as electrical probes, we directly record the folding/unfolding process of individual hairpin DNAs with sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio and bandwidth. These measurements reveal two-level current oscillations with strong temperature dependence, enabling us to determine the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of hairpin DNA hybridization. More importantly, successive, stepwise increases and decreases in device conductance at low temperature on a microsecond timescale are successfully observed, indicating a base-by-base unfolding/folding process. The process demonstrates a kinetic zipper model for DNA hybridization/dehybridization at the single base-pair level. This measurement capability promises a label-free single-molecule approach to probe biomolecular interactions with fast dynamics. PMID:27272178

  16. Interspersion of sequences in avian myeloblastosis virus rna that rapidly hybridize with leukemic chicken cell DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Drohan, W N; Shoyab, M; Wall, R; Baluda, M A

    1975-01-01

    Liquid hybridization of progressively smaller fragments (35S, 27S, 15.5S, 12.5S, and 8S) of poly(A)-selected avian myeloblastosis virus RNA with excess DNA from leukemic chicken myeloblasts revealed that all sizes of RNA contained sequences complementary to both slowly and rapidly hybridizing cellular DNA sequences. Apparently, the RNA sequences which hybridize rapidly with excesses of cellular DNA are not restricted to any one region of the avian myeloblastosis virus 35S RNA. Instead, they appear to be randomly distributed over the entire 35S avian myeloblastosis virus RNA molecule with some positioned within 200 nucleotides of the poly(A) tract at the 3' end of the RNA. PMID:163372

  17. Quantification of DNA cleavage specificity in Hi-C experiments

    PubMed Central

    Meluzzi, Dario; Arya, Gaurav

    2016-01-01

    Hi-C experiments produce large numbers of DNA sequence read pairs that are typically analyzed to deduce genomewide interactions between arbitrary loci. A key step in these experiments is the cleavage of cross-linked chromatin with a restriction endonuclease. Although this cleavage should happen specifically at the enzyme's recognition sequence, an unknown proportion of cleavage events may involve other sequences, owing to the enzyme's star activity or to random DNA breakage. A quantitative estimation of these non-specific cleavages may enable simulating realistic Hi-C read pairs for validation of downstream analyses, monitoring the reproducibility of experimental conditions and investigating biophysical properties that correlate with DNA cleavage patterns. Here we describe a computational method for analyzing Hi-C read pairs to estimate the fractions of cleavages at different possible targets. The method relies on expressing an observed local target distribution downstream of aligned reads as a linear combination of known conditional local target distributions. We validated this method using Hi-C read pairs obtained by computer simulation. Application of the method to experimental Hi-C datasets from murine cells revealed interesting similarities and differences in patterns of cleavage across the various experiments considered. PMID:26264668

  18. Principles Governing DNA Methylation during Neuronal Lineage and Subtype Specification

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ali; Klein, Shifra S.; Barboza, Luendreo; Lohdi, Niraj

    2016-01-01

    Although comprehensively described during early neuronal development, the role of DNA methylation/demethylation in neuronal lineage and subtype specification is not well understood. By studying two distinct neuronal progenitors as they differentiate to principal neurons in mouse hippocampus and striatum, we uncovered several principles governing neuronal DNA methylation during brain development. (1) The program consists of three stages: an initial genome-wide methylation during progenitor proliferation is followed by loss of methylation during the transition of regional progenitors to “young” hippocampal/striatal neurons, which is then reversed by gain in methylation during maturation to subtype-specific neurons. (2) At the first two stages, gain and loss of methylation are limited to CpGs, whereas during the third maturation stage, methylation also occurs at non-CpG sites in both lineages. (3) Methylation/demethylation, similar to transcription, are initially highly similar in the two lineages, whereas diversification in methylation and transcription during maturation creates subtype-specific methylation differences. (4) Initially, methylation targets all genomic locations, whereas later, during early and late differentiation, the preferred targets are intronic/intergenic sequences with enhancer-like activity. (5) Differentially methylated genes are enriched in sequential neurodevelopmental functions (such as progenitor proliferation, migration, neuritogenesis, and synaptic transmission); upregulated genes represent current and consecutive stage-specific functions, and downregulated genes represent preceding functions that are no longer required. The main conclusion of our work is that the neuronal methylation/demethylation program is predominantly developmental with minimal lineage specificity, except in the final stage of development when neuron subtype-specific differences also emerge. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our work is the first to describe a set of

  19. Computational redesign of endonuclease DNA binding and cleavage specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashworth, Justin; Havranek, James J.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Sussman, Django; Monnat, Raymond J.; Stoddard, Barry L.; Baker, David

    2006-06-01

    The reprogramming of DNA-binding specificity is an important challenge for computational protein design that tests current understanding of protein-DNA recognition, and has considerable practical relevance for biotechnology and medicine. Here we describe the computational redesign of the cleavage specificity of the intron-encoded homing endonuclease I-MsoI using a physically realistic atomic-level forcefield. Using an in silico screen, we identified single base-pair substitutions predicted to disrupt binding by the wild-type enzyme, and then optimized the identities and conformations of clusters of amino acids around each of these unfavourable substitutions using Monte Carlo sampling. A redesigned enzyme that was predicted to display altered target site specificity, while maintaining wild-type binding affinity, was experimentally characterized. The redesigned enzyme binds and cleaves the redesigned recognition site ~10,000 times more effectively than does the wild-type enzyme, with a level of target discrimination comparable to the original endonuclease. Determination of the structure of the redesigned nuclease-recognition site complex by X-ray crystallography confirms the accuracy of the computationally predicted interface. These results suggest that computational protein design methods can have an important role in the creation of novel highly specific endonucleases for gene therapy and other applications.

  20. A chelating dendritic ligand capped quantum dot: preparation, surface passivation, bioconjugation and specific DNA detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dejian; Li, Yang; Hall, Elizabeth A. H.; Abell, Chris; Klenerman, David

    2011-01-01

    Herein we report the synthesis of a new chelating dendritic ligand (CDL) and its use in the preparation a compact, stable and water-soluble quantum dot (QD), and further development of specific DNA sensor. The CDL, which contains a chelative dihydrolipoic acid moiety for strong QD surface anchoring and four dendritic carboxylic acidgroups, provides a stable, compact and entangled hydrophilic coating around the QD that significantly increases the stability of the resulting water-soluble QD. A CDL-capped CdSe/ZnS core/shell QD (CDL-QD) has stronger fluorescence than that capped by a monodendate single-chain thiol, 3-mercapto-propionic acid (MPA-QD). In addition, the fluorescence of the CDL-QD can be enhanced by 2.5-fold by treatments with Zn2+ or S2- ions, presumably due to effective passivation of the surface defects. This level of fluorescence enhancement obtained for the CDL-QD is much greater than that for the MPA-QD. Further, by coupling a short single-stranded DNA target to the QD via the CDL carboxylic acidgroup, a functional QD-DNA conjugate that can resist non-specific adsorption and hybridize quickly to its complementary DNAprobe has been obtained. This functional QD-DNA conjugate is suitable for specific quantification of short, labelled complementary probes at the low DNAprobe:QD copy numbers via a QD-sensitised dyefluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) response with 500 pM sensitivity on a conventional fluorimeter.Herein we report the synthesis of a new chelating dendritic ligand (CDL) and its use in the preparation a compact, stable and water-soluble quantum dot (QD), and further development of specific DNA sensor. The CDL, which contains a chelative dihydrolipoic acid moiety for strong QD surface anchoring and four dendritic carboxylic acidgroups, provides a stable, compact and entangled hydrophilic coating around the QD that significantly increases the stability of the resulting water-soluble QD. A CDL-capped CdSe/ZnS core/shell QD (CDL-QD) has

  1. A gene-specific DNA sequencing chip for exploring molecular evolutionary change.

    PubMed

    Fedrigo, Olivier; Naylor, Gavin

    2004-01-01

    Sequencing by hybridization (SBH) approaches to DNA sequencing face two conflicting constraints. First, in order to ensure that the target DNA binds reliably, the oligonucleotide probes that are attached to the chip array must be >15 bp in length. Secondly, the total number of possible 15 bp oligonucleotides is too large (>4(15)) to fit on a chip with current technology. To circumvent the conflict between these two opposing constraints, we present a novel gene-specific DNA chip design. Our design is based on the idea that not all conceivable oligonucleotides need to be placed on a chip--only those that capture sequence combinations occurring in nature. Our approach uses a training set of aligned sequences that code for the gene in question. We compute the minimum number of oligonucleotides (generally 15-30 bp in length) that need to be placed on a DNA chip to capture the variation implied by the training set using a graph search algorithm. We tested the approach in silico using cytochrome-b sequences. Results indicate that on average, 98% of the sequence of an unknown target can be determined using the approach. PMID:14973200

  2. Method for performing site-specific affinity fractionation for use in DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Mirzabekov, A.D.; Lysov, Y.P.; Dubley, S.A.

    1999-05-18

    A method for fractionating and sequencing DNA via affinity interaction is provided comprising contacting cleaved DNA to a first array of oligonucleotide molecules to facilitate hybridization between the cleaved DNA and the molecules; extracting the hybridized DNA from the molecules; contacting the extracted hybridized DNA with a second array of oligonucleotide molecules, wherein the oligonucleotide molecules in the second array have specified base sequences that are complementary to the extracted hybridized DNA; and attaching labeled DNA to the second array of oligonucleotide molecules, wherein the labeled re-hybridized DNA have sequences that are complementary to the oligomers. The invention further provides a method for performing multi-step conversions of the chemical structure of compounds comprising supplying an array of polyacrylamide vessels separated by hydrophobic surfaces; immobilizing a plurality of reactants, such as enzymes, in the vessels so that each vessel contains one reactant; contacting the compounds to each of the vessels in a predetermined sequence and for a sufficient time to convert the compounds to a desired state; and isolating the converted compounds from the array. 14 figs.

  3. Method for performing site-specific affinity fractionation for use in DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Mirzabekov, Andrei Darievich; Lysov, Yuri Petrovich; Dubley, Svetlana A.

    1999-01-01

    A method for fractionating and sequencing DNA via affinity interaction is provided comprising contacting cleaved DNA to a first array of oligonucleotide molecules to facilitate hybridization between said cleaved DNA and the molecules; extracting the hybridized DNA from the molecules; contacting said extracted hybridized DNA with a second array of oligonucleotide molecules, wherein the oligonucleotide molecules in the second array have specified base sequences that are complementary to said extracted hybridized DNA; and attaching labeled DNA to the second array of oligonucleotide molecules, wherein the labeled re-hybridized DNA have sequences that are complementary to the oligomers. The invention further provides a method for performing multi-step conversions of the chemical structure of compounds comprising supplying an array of polyacrylamide vessels separated by hydrophobic surfaces; immobilizing a plurality of reactants, such as enzymes, in the vessels so that each vessel contains one reactant; contacting the compounds to each of the vessels in a predetermined sequence and for a sufficient time to convert the compounds to a desired state; and isolating the converted compounds from said array.

  4. DNA Cleavage and Condensation Activities of Mono- and Binuclear Hybrid Complexes and Regulation by Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuo; Dai, Mingxing; Zhang, Chunping; Jiang, Bingying; Xu, Junqiang; Zhou, Dewen; Gu, Zhongwei

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid complexes with N,N'-bis(2-benzimidazolylmethyl)amine and cyclen moieties are novel enzyme mimics and controlled DNA release materials, which could interact with DNA through three models under different conditions. In this paper, the interactions between plasmid DNA and seven different complexes were investigated, and the methods to change the interaction patterns by graphene oxide (GO) or concentrations were also investigated. The cleavage of pUC19 DNA promoted by target complexes were via hydrolytic or oxidative mechanisms at low concentrations ranging from 3.13 × 10(-7) to 6.25 × 10(-5) mol/L. Dinuclear complexes 2a and 2b can promote the cleavage of plasmid pUC19 DNA to a linear form at pH values below 7.0. Furthermore, binuclear hybrid complexes could condense DNA as nanoparticles above 3.13 × 10(-5) mol/L and partly release DNA by graphene oxide with π-π stacking. Meanwhile, the results also reflected that graphene oxide could prevent DNA from breaking down. Cell viability assays showed dinuclear complexes were safe to normal human hepatic cells at relative high concentrations. The present work might help to develop novel strategies for the design and synthesis of DNA controllable releasing agents, which may be applied to gene delivery and also to exploit the new application for GO. PMID:27428945

  5. Contact-dependent regulation of vinculin expression in cultured fibroblasts: a study with vinculin-specific cDNA probes.

    PubMed Central

    Bendori, R; Salomon, D; Geiger, B

    1987-01-01

    Vinculin specific cDNA clones were isolated from chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cDNA library in lambda gt11. The clones, ranging in size from 2.8 to 5.0 kb, were initially selected by rabbit antibodies to vinculin. Their identity was further confirmed by their specific reactivities with a battery of different vinculin-specific monoclonal antibodies. Southern blot analysis of restriction enzyme digested chicken spleen DNA suggested that all the isolated cDNA clones correspond to the same gene(s). Northern blot hybridization revealed that the vinculin-specific cDNA clones react with a single 6.5 kb mRNA in total cellular RNA preparations of CEF, whole chicken embryos and chicken gizzard smooth muscle. Moreover, fractionation of CEF poly(A)+ RNA by sucrose gradient centrifugation followed by translation in cell free system indicated that the mRNA coding for vinculin has a size of about 6.0-7.0 kb. The identity of these clones was finally confirmed by selection hybridization assay. The isolated vinculin-specific cDNA probes were subsequently used in order to study the effect of substrate adhesiveness on the expression of vinculin. We show here that cells cultured on highly adhesive substrate, such as endothelial extracellular matrix (ECM), form large vinculin-rich focal contacts, while cells grown on poorly adhesive substrate poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) [poly(HEMA)] contain only small distorted vinculin spots. These morphological differences were accompanied by over 5-fold reduction in vinculin synthesis in cells growing on poly(HEMA), compared to those cultured on the ECM and over 7.5-fold decrease in the levels of vinculin-specific mRNA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:3121302

  6. Hybridization thermodynamics of DNA oligonucleotides during microchip capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Wynne, Thomas M; McCallum, Christopher; Del Bonis-O'Donnell, Jackson Travis; Crisalli, Pete; Pennathur, Sumita

    2015-03-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a powerful analytical tool for performing separations and characterizing properties of charged species. For reacting species during a CE separation, local concentrations change leading to nonequilibrium conditions. Interpreting experimental data with such nonequilibrium reactive species is nontrivial due to the large number of variables involved in the system. In this work we develop a COMSOL multiphysics-based numerical model to simulate the electrokinetic mass transport of short interacting ssDNAs in microchip capillary electrophoresis. We probe the importance of the dissociation constant, K(D), and the concentration of DNA on the resulting observed mobility of the dsDNA peak, μ(w), by using a full sweep of parametric simulations. We find that the observed mobility is strongly dependent on the DNA concentration and K(D), as well as ssDNA concentration, and develop a relation with which to understand this dependence. Furthermore, we present experimental microchip capillary electrophoresis measurements of interacting 10 base ssDNA and its complement with changes in buffer ionic strength, DNA concentration, and DNA sequence to vary the system equilibria. We then compare our results to thermodynamically calculated K(D) values. PMID:25634338

  7. Polymorphism of t-specific DNA elements of the proximal part of Mus mouse chromosome 17

    SciTech Connect

    Shustrova, I.V.; Tokarskaya, O.N.; Chekunova, A.I.

    1995-05-01

    To study structural organization and polymorphism of the proximal part of chromosome 17, a hybridization analysis of DNA from mice of different origin was carried out using four t-specific probes. Results of the analysis allow us to conclude that the DNA element copy number is quantitatively unstable and differs in distribution in both newly formed recombinant haplotypes and in wild-type chromosome 17. Probe Tu66 was used to study D17Leh66-element organization of Mus abbotti and Mus hortulanus mice. Three types of D17Leh66-elements were identified in the genomes of these species. The copy number of each type of DNA element varied in the genome of each of four studied species. Homologs to t-specific Tu66 and Tu119 probes were found in the genome of Rattus norvegicus rat. The data obtained are discussed with respect to the evolution of the proximal part of Mus mouse chromosome 17. 29 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Ethnic-affiliation estimation by use of population-specific DNA markers.

    PubMed Central

    Shriver, M D; Smith, M W; Jin, L; Marcini, A; Akey, J M; Deka, R; Ferrell, R E

    1997-01-01

    During the past 10 years, DNA analysis has revolutionized the determination of identity in a forensic context. Statements about the biological identity of two human DNA samples now can be made with complete confidence. Although DNA markers are very powerful for distinguishing among individuals, most offer little power to distinguish ethnicity or to support any statement about the physical characteristics of an individual. Through a search of the literature and of unpublished data on allele frequencies we have identified a panel of population-specific genetic markers that enable robust ethnic-affiliation estimation for major U.S. resident populations. In this report, we identify these loci and present their levels of allele-frequency differential between ethnically defined samples, and we demonstrate, using log-likelihood analysis, that this panel of markers provides significant statistical power for ethnic-affiliation estimation. In addition to their use in forensic ethnic-affiliation estimation, population-specific genetic markers are very useful in both population- and individual-level admixture estimation and in mapping genes by use of the linkage disequilibrium created when populations hybridize. PMID:9106543

  9. Body fluid identification by integrated analysis of DNA methylation and body fluid-specific microbial DNA.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ajin; Shin, Kyoung-Jin; Yang, Woo Ick; Lee, Hwan Young

    2014-01-01

    Identification of body fluids found at crime scenes provides important information that can support a link between sample donors and actual criminal acts. Previous studies have reported that DNA methylation analysis at several tissue-specific differentially methylated regions (tDMRs) enables successful identification of semen, and the detection of certain bacterial DNA can allow for identification of saliva and vaginal fluid. In the present study, a method for detecting bacterial DNA was integrated into a previously reported multiplex methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme-polymerase chain reaction. The developed multiplex PCR was modified by the addition of a new semen-specific marker and by including amplicons for the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of saliva- and vaginal fluid-specific bacteria to improve the efficacy to detect a specific type of body fluid. Using the developed multiplex system, semen was distinguishable by unmethylation at the USP49, DACT1, and PFN3 tDMRs and by hypermethylation at L81528, and saliva could be identified by detection of saliva-specific bacteria, Veillonella atypica and/or Streptococcus salivarius. Additionally, vaginal fluid and menstrual blood were differentiated from other body fluids by hypomethylation at the PFN3 tDMR and the presence of vaginal fluid-specific bacteria, Lactobacillus crispatus and/or Lactobacillus gasseri. Because the developed multiplex system uses the same biological source of DNA for individual identification profiling and simultaneously analyses various types of body fluid in one PCR reaction, this method will facilitate more efficient body fluid identification in forensic casework. PMID:24052059

  10. A simple colorimetric DNA detection by target-induced hybridization chain reaction for isothermal signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cuiping; Wang, Wenshuo; Mulchandani, Ashok; Shi, Chao

    2014-07-15

    A novel DNA detection method is presented based on a gold nanoparticle (AuNP) colorimetric assay and hybridization chain reaction (HCR). In this method, target DNA hybridized with probe DNA modified on AuNP, and triggered HCR. The resulting HCR products with a large number of negative charges significantly enhanced the stability of AuNPs, inhibiting aggregation of AuNPs at an elevated salt concentration. The approach was highly sensitive and selective. Using this enzyme-free and isothermal signal amplification method, we were able to detect target DNA at concentrations as low as 0.5 nM with the naked eye. Our method also has great potential for detecting other analytes, such as metal ions, proteins, and small molecules, if the target analytes could make HCR products attach to AuNPs. PMID:24780220

  11. Effect of site-specific modification on restriction endonucleases and DNA modification methyltransferases.

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, M; Nelson, M; Raschke, E

    1994-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases have site-specific interactions with DNA that can often be inhibited by site-specific DNA methylation and other site-specific DNA modifications. However, such inhibition cannot generally be predicted. The empirically acquired data on these effects are tabulated for over 320 restriction endonucleases. In addition, a table of known site-specific DNA modification methyltransferases and their specificities is presented along with EMBL database accession numbers for cloned genes. PMID:7937074

  12. Capacitive Monitoring of Morpholino-DNA Surface Hybridization: Experimental and Theoretical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tercero, Napoleon; Wang, Kang; Levicky, Rastislav

    2010-01-01

    Impedance and cyclic voltammetry methods, complemented by Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) modeling, are used to study hybridization of DNA analyte strands to monolayers of morpholino oligomers (MOs) immobilized by one end to mercaptopropanol-passivated gold electrodes. MOs, like peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), are uncharged molecules that recognize nucleic acids following conventional base-pairing rules. The capacitive response to hybridization, determined from real-time impedance measurements, is analyzed with emphasis on understanding the underlying structural changes and on providing a foundation for label-free diagnostics. The capacitive response is correlated with the instantaneous surface molecular populations by labeling DNA and MO strands with ferrocene tags and using cyclic voltammetry to monitor their respective coverages in real-time. This approach allows analysis of hybridization-induced changes in interfacial capacitance as a function of duplex coverage, the DC bias used for readout, buffer molarity, and probe coverage. The results indicate that unhybridized MO layers exist in a compact state on the solid support. For hybridized layers, the intrinsic signal per hybridization event is strongly enhanced at low ionic strengths but, interestingly, does not depend on the readout bias in the sampled range negative of the capacitive minimum. A PB model incorporating an effective medium description of the hybridizing films is used to establish how hybridization-derived changes in dielectric composition and charge distribution at the surface translate into experimentally-observed variations in interfacial capacitance. PMID:20690772

  13. A RNA-DNA Hybrid Aptamer for Nanoparticle-Based Prostate Tumor Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Leach, John C.; Wang, Andrew; Ye, Kaiming; Jin, Sha

    2016-01-01

    The side effects of radio- and chemo-therapy pose long-term challenges on a cancer patient’s health. It is, therefore, highly desirable to develop more effective therapies that can specifically target carcinoma cells without damaging normal and healthy cells. Tremendous efforts have been made in the past to develop targeted drug delivery systems for solid cancer treatment. In this study, a new aptamer, A10-3-J1, which recognizes the extracellular domain of the prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), was designed. A super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-aptamer-doxorubicin (SPIO-Apt-Dox) was fabricated and employed as a targeted drug delivery platform for cancer therapy. This DNA RNA hybridized aptamer antitumor agent was able to enhance the cytotoxicity of targeted cells while minimizing collateral damage to non-targeted cells. This SPIO-Apt-Dox nanoparticle has specificity to PSMA+ prostate cancer cells. Aptamer inhibited nonspecific uptake of membrane-permeable doxorubic to the non-target cells, leading to reduced untargeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake while enhancing targeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake. The experimental results indicate that the drug delivery platform can yield statistically significant effectiveness being more cytotoxic to the targeted cells as opposed to the non-targeted cells. PMID:26985893

  14. Protocol for sortase-mediated construction of DNA-protein hybrids and functional nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Koussa, Mounir A.; Sotomayor, Marcos; Wong, Wesley P.

    2014-01-01

    Recent methods in DNA nanotechnology are enabling the creation of intricate nanostructures through the use of programmable, bottom-up self-assembly. However, structures consisting only of DNA are limited in their ability to act on other biomolecules. Proteins, on the other hand, perform a variety of functions on biological materials, but directed control of the self-assembly process remains a challenge. While DNA-protein hybrids have the potential to provide the best-of-both-worlds, they can be difficult to create as many of the conventional techniques for linking proteins to DNA render proteins dysfunctional. We present here a sortase-based protocol for covalently coupling proteins to DNA with minimal disturbance to protein function. To accomplish this we have developed a two-step process. First, a small synthetic peptide is bioorthogonally and covalently coupled to a DNA oligo using click chemistry. Next, the DNA-peptide chimera is covalently linked to a protein of interest under protein-compatible conditions using the enzyme sortase. Our protocol allows for the simple coupling and purification of a functional DNA-protein hybrid. We use this technique to form oligos bearing cadherin-23 and protocadherin-15 protein fragments. Upon incorporation into a linear M13 scaffold, these protein-DNA hybrids serve as the gate to a binary nanoswitch. The outlined protocol is reliable and modular, facilitating the construction of libraries of oligos and proteins that can be combined to form functional DNA-protein nanostructures. These structures will enable a new class of functional nanostructures, which could be used for therapeutic and industrial processes. PMID:24568941

  15. Sensitive and specific detection of Xanthomonas campestris pv. pelargonii with DNA primers and probes identified by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Manulis, S; Valinsky, L; Lichter, A; Gabriel, D W

    1994-01-01

    The random amplified polymorphic DNA method was used to distinguish strains of Xanthomonas campestris pv. pelargonii from 21 other Xanthomonas species and/or pathovars. Among the 42 arbitrarily chosen primers evaluated, 3 were found to reveal diagnostic polymorphisms when purified DNAs from compared strains were amplified by the PCR. The three primers revealed DNA amplification patterns which were conserved among all 53 strains tested of X. campestris pv. pelargonii isolated from various locations worldwide. The distinctive X. compestris pv. pelargonii patterns were clearly different from those obtained with any of 46 other Xanthomonas strains tested. An amplified 1.2-kb DNA fragment, apparently unique to X. campestris pv. pelargonii by these random amplified polymorphic DNA tests, was cloned and evaluated as a diagnostic DNA probe. It hybridized with total DNA from all 53 X. campestris pv. pelargonii strains tested and not with any of the 46 other Xanthomonas strains tested. The DNA sequence of the terminal ends of this 1.2-kb fragment was obtained and used to design a pair of 18-mer oligonucleotide primers specific for X. campestris pv. pelargonii. The custom-synthesized primers amplified the same 1.2-kb DNA fragment from all 53 X. campestris pv. pelargonii strains tested and failed to amplify DNA from any of the 46 other Xanthomonas strains tested. DNA isolated from saprophytes associated with the geranium plant also did not produce amplified DNA with these primers. The sensitivity of the PCR assay using the custom-synthesized primers was between 10 and 50 cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:7993095

  16. Homologous PNA Hybridization to Noncanonical DNA G-Quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Kormuth, Karen A; Woolford, John L; Armitage, Bruce A

    2016-03-29

    Potential guanine (G) quadruplex-forming sequences (QFSs) found throughout the genomes and transcriptomes of organisms have emerged as biologically relevant structures. These G-quadruplexes represent novel opportunities for gene regulation at the DNA and RNA levels. Recently, the definition of functional QFSs has been expanding to include a variety of unconventional motifs, including relatively long loop sequences (i.e., >7 nucleotides) separating adjacent G-tracts. We have identified a QFS within the 25S rDNA gene from Saccharomyces cerevisae that features a long loop separating the two 3'-most G-tracts. An oligonucleotide based on this sequence, QFS3, folds into a stable G-quadruplex in vitro. We have studied the interaction between QFS3 and several loop mutants with a small, homologous (G-rich) peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomer that is designed to form a DNA/PNA heteroquadruplex. The PNA successfully invades the DNA quadruplex target to form a stable heteroquadruplex, but with surprisingly high PNA:DNA ratios based on surface plasmon resonance and mass spectrometric results. A model for high stoichiometry PNA-DNA heteroquadruplexes is proposed, and the implications for quadruplex targeting by G-rich PNA are discussed. PMID:26950608

  17. Targeting and Processing of Site-specific DNA Interstrand Crosslinks

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Karen M.

    2010-01-01

    DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) are among the most cytotoxic types of DNA damage, and thus ICL-inducing agents such as cyclophosphamide, melphalan, cisplatin, psoralen and mitomycin C have been used clinically as anti-cancer drugs for decades. ICLs can also be formed endogenously as a consequence of cellular metabolic processes. ICL-inducing agents continue to be among the most effective chemotherapeutic treatments for many cancers; however, treatment with these agents can lead to secondary malignancies, in part due to mutagenic processing of the DNA lesions. The mechanisms of ICL repair have been characterized more thoroughly in bacteria and yeast than in mammalian cells. Thus, a better understanding the molecular mechanisms of ICL processing offers the potential to improve the efficacy of these drugs in cancer therapy. In mammalian cells it is thought that ICLs are repaired by the coordination of proteins from several pathways, including nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair (BER), mismatch repair (MMR), homologous recombination (HR), translesion synthesis (TLS), and proteins involved in Fanconi anemia (FA). In this review, we focus on the potential functions of NER, MMR, and HR proteins in the repair of and response to ICLs in human cells and in mice. We will also discuss a unique approach, using psoralen covalently linked to triplex-forming oligonucleotides to direct ICLs to specific sites in the mammalian genome. PMID:20196133

  18. DNA Sequence Determination by Hybridization: A Strategy for Efficient Large-Scale Sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drmanac, R.; Drmanac, S.; Strezoska, Z.; Paunesku, T.; Labat, I.; Zeremski, M.; Snoddy, J.; Funkhouser, W. K.; Koop, B.; Hood, L.; Crkvenjakov, R.

    1993-06-01

    The concept of sequencing by hybridization (SBH) makes use of an array of all possible n-nucleotide oligomers (n-mers) to identify n-mers present in an unknown DNA sequence. Computational approaches can then be used to assemble the complete sequence. As a validation of this concept, the sequences of three DNA fragments, 343 base pairs in length, were determined with octamer oligonucleotides. Possible applications of SBH include physical mapping (ordering) of overlapping DNA clones, sequence checking, DNA fingerprinting comparisons of normal and disease-causing genes, and the identification of DNA fragments with particular sequence motifs in complementary DNA and genomic libraries. The SBH techniques may accelerate the mapping and sequencing phases of the human genome project.

  19. DNA sequence determination by hybridization: A strategy for efficient large-scale sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Drmanac, R.; Drmanac, S.; Strezoska, Z.; Paunesku, T.; Labat, I.; Zeremski, M.; Snoody, J.; Crkvenjakov, R. ); Funkhouser, W.K.; Koop, B.; Hood, L. )

    1993-06-11

    The concept of sequencing by hybridization (SBH) makes use of an array of all possible n-nucleotide oligomers (n-mers) to identify n-mers present in an unknown DNA sequence. Computational approaches can then be used to assemble the complete sequence. As a validation of this concept, the sequences of three DNA fragments, 343 base pairs in length, were determined with octamer oligonucleotides. Possible applications of SBH include physical mapping (ordering) of overlapping DNA clones, sequence checking, DNA fingerprinting comparisons of normal and disease-causing genes, and the identification of DNA fragments with particular sequence motifs in complementary DNA and genomic libraries. The SBH techniques may accelerate the mapping and sequencing phases of the human genome project. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Detection of bovine viral diarrhea virus genome in leukocytes from persistently infected cattle by RNA-cDNA hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, J; Aiken, J; Schultz, R D

    1990-01-01

    A bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) cDNA library was constructed. One cloned complementary DNA sequence was used as a probe to detect BVDV RNA by hybridization in infected cell cultures and in mononuclear leukocytes from persistently infected cattle by dot blot and in situ hybridization. The cDNA probe hybridized with all cytopathic and noncytopathic BVDV isolates tested. The hybridization results were consistent with results obtained using conventional subculturing and immunofluorescent staining methods and by inoculation of seronegative test cattle. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:2162729

  1. Detection of DNA Hybridization by Methylene Blue Electrochemistry at Activated Nanoelectrode Ensembles.

    PubMed

    Silvestrini, Morena; Fruk, Ljiljana; Moretto, Ligia Maria; Ugo, Paolo

    2015-05-01

    Nanoelectrode ensembles (NEEs) obtained by electroless gold deposition in track-etched poly-carbonate (PC) membranes are functionalized and applied for DNA hybridization detection, using methylene blue (MB) as electroactive probe. To this aim, an amine terminated (ss)DNA probe is immobilized on the PC surface of the NEE by reaction via carbodiimide and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide. In order to increase the number of carboxylic groups present on PC and suitable for the functionalization, the surface of NEEs is oxidized with potassium permanganate. The presence of carboxylic functionalities is verified by spectrochemical titration with thionin acetate (THA) and the effect of the activation treatment on the electrode performances is evaluated by cyclic voltammetry (CV). After activation and functionalization with the probes, the NEE-based sensor is hybridized with complementary target sequences. The effect of the functionalization of the NEEs both with the (ss)DNA probe alone and after hybridization with the target, is studied by measuring the changes in the MB reduction signal by square wave voltammetry (SWV), after incubation in a suitable MB solution, rinsing and transfer to the measurement cell. It was observed that this peak signal decreases significantly after hybridization of the probe with the complementary target. Experimental evidences suggest that the interaction between MB and the guanines of (ss)DNA and (ds)DNA is at the basis of the development of the here observed analytical signal. The proposed approach allows the easy preparation and testing of NEE-based sensors for the electrochemical DNA hybridization detection. PMID:26504963

  2. Allele-specific DNA methylation reinforces PEAR1 enhancer activity.

    PubMed

    Izzi, Benedetta; Pistoni, Mariaelena; Cludts, Katrien; Akkor, Pinar; Lambrechts, Diether; Verfaillie, Catherine; Verhamme, Peter; Freson, Kathleen; Hoylaerts, Marc F

    2016-08-18

    Genetic variation in the PEAR1 locus is linked to platelet reactivity and cardiovascular disease. The major G allele of rs12041331, an intronic cytosine guanine dinucleotide-single-nucleotide polymorphism (CpG-SNP), is associated with higher PEAR1 expression in platelets and endothelial cells than the minor A allele. The molecular mechanism underlying this difference remains elusive. We have characterized the histone modification profiles of the intronic region surrounding rs12041331 and identified H3K4Me1 enhancer-specific enrichment for the region that covers the CpG-SNP. Interestingly, methylation studies revealed that the CpG site is fully methylated in leukocytes of GG carriers. Nuclear protein extracts from megakaryocytes, endothelial cells, vs control HEK-293 cells show a 3-fold higher affinity for the methylated G allele compared with nonmethylated G or A alleles in a gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay. To understand the positive relationship between methylation and gene expression, we studied DNA methylation at 4 different loci of PEAR1 during in vitro megakaryopoiesis. During differentiation, the CpG-SNP remained fully methylated, while we observed rapid methylation increases at the CpG-island overlapping the first 5'-untranslated region exon, paralleling the increased PEAR1 expression. In the same region, A-allele carriers of rs12041331 showed significantly lower DNA methylation at CGI1 compared with GG homozygote. This CpG-island contains binding sites for the methylation-sensitive transcription factor CTCF, whose binding is known to play a role in enhancer activation and/or repression. In conclusion, we report the molecular characterization of the first platelet function-related CpG-SNP, a genetic predisposition that reinforces PEAR1 enhancer activity through allele-specific DNA methylation. PMID:27313330

  3. Broken Optical Symmetry in DNA-SWNT Hybrids: Spectroscopic Signaling of the Helical Wrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotkin, Slava V.

    2009-03-01

    Functionalizing single-stranded DNA on a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) has allowed isolating individual tubes, making them soluble, and separating SWNTs according to their chirality. Such strong technological impact motivated our study of the optical properties of the DNA-SWNT hybrids, commonly used now for the solution-based fabrication and experiments. The helicity of the DNA wrap may interfere with the intrinsic Hamiltonian of the SWNT and result in bandstructure modulation. Our modeling predicts a symmetry lowering in the hybrid due to the Coulomb potential of the regular helical wrap of the ionized backbone of the ssDNA, followed by the qualitative changes in the cross- or circularly polarized SWNT absorption spectrum (with no or little change in the parallel polarization). In particular, we predict the appearance of a new peak in the cross-polarized absorption of the ssDNA-SWNT at a frequency lower than that of all allowed transitions in the bare tube. Such effect can be used for optical identification of the wrap at sufficient ssDNA coverage. Wrap signaling happens also via another optical effect, a strong circular dichroism even in the complex with an achiral SWNT, and even at the frequencies where ss-DNA has no absorption features at all. Symmetry of the wrap is central to determine such a circular dichroism of the hybrid. Having in mind that the exact geometry of a DNA wrap for an arbitrary tube is not precisely known yet, we put forward a general model capable of tracking optical effects, varying the parameters of the wrap and/or tube diameter. For various ssDNA backbone helical angles and for various tubes we predict different absorption spectra, though a general qualitative feature of the helical symmetry breaking, the appearance of new van Hove singularities and circular dichroism, must be present.

  4. Fast molecular beacon hybridization in organic solvents with improved target specificity.

    PubMed

    Dave, Neeshma; Liu, Juewen

    2010-12-01

    DNA hybridization is of tremendous importance in biology, bionanotechnology, and biophysics. Molecular beacons are engineered DNA hairpins with a fluorophore and a quencher labeled on each of the two ends. A target DNA can open the hairpin to give an increased fluorescence signal. To date, the majority of molecular beacon detections have been performed only in aqueous buffers. We describe herein DNA detection in nine different organic solvents, methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, acetonitrile, formamide, dimethylformamide (DMF), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethylene glycol, and glycerol, varying each up to 75% (v/v). In comparison with detection in water, the detection in organic solvents showed several important features. First, the molecular beacon hybridizes to its target DNA in the presence of all nine solvents up to a certain percentage. Second, the rate of this hybridization was significantly faster in most organic solvents compared with water. For example, in 56% ethanol, the beacon showed a 70-fold rate enhancement. Third, the ability of the molecular beacon to discriminate single-base mismatch is still maintained. Lastly, the DNA melting temperature in the organic solvents showed a solvent concentration-dependent decrease. This study suggests that molecular beacons can be used for applications where organic solvents must be involved or organic solvents can be intentionally added to improve the molecular beacon performance. PMID:21062084

  5. Allele-Specific Transcriptome and Methylome Analysis Reveals Stable Inheritance and Cis-Regulation of DNA Methylation in Nasonia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Werren, John H; Clark, Andrew G

    2016-07-01

    Gene expression divergence between closely related species could be attributed to both cis- and trans- DNA sequence changes during evolution, but it is unclear how the evolutionary dynamics of epigenetic marks are regulated. In eutherian mammals, biparental DNA methylation marks are erased and reset during gametogenesis, resulting in paternal or maternal imprints, which lead to genomic imprinting. Whether DNA methylation reprogramming exists in insects is not known. Wasps of the genus Nasonia are non-social parasitoids that are emerging as a model for studies of epigenetic processes in insects. In this study, we quantified allele-specific expression and methylation genome-wide in Nasonia vitripennis and Nasonia giraulti and their reciprocal F1 hybrids. No parent-of-origin effect in allelic expression was found for >8,000 covered genes, suggesting a lack of genomic imprinting in adult Nasonia. As we expected, both significant cis- and trans- effects are responsible for the expression divergence between N. vitripennis and N. giraulti. Surprisingly, all 178 differentially methylated genes are also differentially methylated between the two alleles in F1 hybrid offspring, recapitulating the parental methylation status with nearly 100% fidelity, indicating the presence of strong cis-elements driving the target of gene body methylation. In addition, we discovered that total and allele-specific expression are positively correlated with allele-specific methylation in a subset of the differentially methylated genes. The 100% cis-regulation in F1 hybrids suggests the methylation machinery is conserved and DNA methylation is targeted by cis features in Nasonia. The lack of genomic imprinting and parent-of-origin differentially methylated regions in Nasonia, together with the stable inheritance of methylation status between generations, suggests either a cis-regulatory motif for methylation at the DNA level or highly stable inheritance of an epigenetic signal in Nasonia. PMID

  6. Allele-Specific Transcriptome and Methylome Analysis Reveals Stable Inheritance and Cis-Regulation of DNA Methylation in Nasonia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Clark, Andrew G.

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression divergence between closely related species could be attributed to both cis- and trans- DNA sequence changes during evolution, but it is unclear how the evolutionary dynamics of epigenetic marks are regulated. In eutherian mammals, biparental DNA methylation marks are erased and reset during gametogenesis, resulting in paternal or maternal imprints, which lead to genomic imprinting. Whether DNA methylation reprogramming exists in insects is not known. Wasps of the genus Nasonia are non-social parasitoids that are emerging as a model for studies of epigenetic processes in insects. In this study, we quantified allele-specific expression and methylation genome-wide in Nasonia vitripennis and Nasonia giraulti and their reciprocal F1 hybrids. No parent-of-origin effect in allelic expression was found for >8,000 covered genes, suggesting a lack of genomic imprinting in adult Nasonia. As we expected, both significant cis- and trans- effects are responsible for the expression divergence between N. vitripennis and N. giraulti. Surprisingly, all 178 differentially methylated genes are also differentially methylated between the two alleles in F1 hybrid offspring, recapitulating the parental methylation status with nearly 100% fidelity, indicating the presence of strong cis-elements driving the target of gene body methylation. In addition, we discovered that total and allele-specific expression are positively correlated with allele-specific methylation in a subset of the differentially methylated genes. The 100% cis-regulation in F1 hybrids suggests the methylation machinery is conserved and DNA methylation is targeted by cis features in Nasonia. The lack of genomic imprinting and parent-of-origin differentially methylated regions in Nasonia, together with the stable inheritance of methylation status between generations, suggests either a cis-regulatory motif for methylation at the DNA level or highly stable inheritance of an epigenetic signal in Nasonia. PMID

  7. Enzymatic Reaction with Unnatural Substrates: DNA Photolyase (Escherichia coli) Recognizes and Reverses Thymine [2+2] Dimers in the DNA Strand of a DNA/PNA Hybrid Duplex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaiah, Danaboyina; Kan, Yongzhi; Koch, Troels; Orum, Henrik; Schuster, Gary B.

    1998-10-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are mimics with normal bases connected to a pseudopeptide chain that obey Watson--Crick rules to form stable duplexes with itself and natural nucleic acids. This has focused attention on PNA as therapeutic or diagnostic reagents. Duplexes formed with PNA mirror some but not all properties of DNA. One fascinating aspect of PNA biochemistry is their reaction with enzymes. Here we show an enzyme reaction that operates effectively on a PNA/DNA hybrid duplex. A DNA oligonucleotide containing a cis, syn-thymine [2+2] dimer forms a stable duplex with PNA. The hybrid duplex is recognized by photolyase, and irradiation of the complex leads to the repair of the thymine dimer. This finding provides insight into the enzyme mechanism and provides a means for the selective repair of thymine photodimers.

  8. A novel methyl-binding domain protein enrichment method for identifying genome-wide tissue-specific DNA methylation from nanogram DNA samples

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Growing evidence suggests that DNA methylation plays a role in tissue-specific differentiation. Current approaches to methylome analysis using enrichment with the methyl-binding domain protein (MBD) are restricted to large (≥1 μg) DNA samples, limiting the analysis of small tissue samples. Here we present a technique that enables characterization of genome-wide tissue-specific methylation patterns from nanogram quantities of DNA. Results We have developed a methodology utilizing MBD2b/MBD3L1 enrichment for methylated DNA, kinase pre-treated ligation-mediated PCR amplification (MeKL) and hybridization to the comprehensive high-throughput array for relative methylation (CHARM) customized tiling arrays, which we termed MeKL-chip. Kinase modification in combination with the addition of PEG has increased ligation-mediated PCR amplification over 20-fold, enabling >400-fold amplification of starting DNA. We have shown that MeKL-chip can be applied to as little as 20 ng of DNA, enabling comprehensive analysis of small DNA samples. Applying MeKL-chip to the mouse retina (a limited tissue source) and brain, 2,498 tissue-specific differentially methylated regions (T-DMRs) were characterized. The top five T-DMRs (Rgs20, Hes2, Nfic, Cckbr and Six3os1) were validated by pyrosequencing. Conclusions MeKL-chip enables genome-wide methylation analysis of nanogram quantities of DNA with a wide range of observed-to-expected CpG ratios due to the binding properties of the MBD2b/MBD3L1 protein complex. This methodology enabled the first analysis of genome-wide methylation in the mouse retina, characterizing novel T-DMRs. PMID:23759032

  9. Redox polymer and probe DNA tethered to gold electrodes for enzyme-amplified amperometric detection of DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Paul; Leech, Dónal

    2006-04-15

    The detection of nucleic acids based upon recognition surfaces formed by co-immobilization of a redox polymer mediator and DNA probe sequences on gold electrodes is described. The recognition surface consists of a redox polymer, [Os(2,2'-bipyridine)2(polyvinylimidazole)(10)Cl](+/2+), and a model single DNA strand cross-linked and tethered to a gold electrode via an anchoring self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of cysteamine. Hybridization between the immobilized probe DNA of the recognition surface and a biotin-conjugated target DNA sequence (designed from the ssrA gene of Listeria monocytogenes), followed by addition of an enzyme (glucose oxidase)-avidin conjugate, results in electrical contact between the enzyme and the mediating redox polymer. In the presence of glucose, the current generated due to the catalytic oxidation of glucose to gluconolactone is measured, and a response is obtained that is binding-dependent. The tethering of the probe DNA and redox polymer to the SAM improves the stability of the surface to assay conditions of rigorous washing and high salt concentration (1 M). These conditions eliminate nonspecific interaction of both the target DNA and the enzyme-avidin conjugate with the recognition surfaces. The sensor response increases linearly with increasing concentration of target DNA in the range of 1 x 10(-9) to 2 x 10(-6) M. The detection limit is approximately 1.4 fmol, (corresponding to 0.2 nM of target DNA). Regeneration of the recognition surface is possible by treatment with 0.25 M NaOH solution. After rehybridization of the regenerated surface with the target DNA sequence, >95% of the current is recovered, indicating that the redox polymer and probe DNA are strongly bound to the surface. These results demonstrate the utility of the proposed approach. PMID:16615783

  10. Instability of chromosome number and DNA methylation variation induced by hybridization and amphidiploid formation between Raphanus sativus L. and Brassica alboglabra Bailey

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Distant hybridization can result genome duplication and allopolyploid formation which may play a significant role in the origin and evolution of many plant species. It is unclear how the two or more divergent genomes coordinate in one nucleus with a single parental cytoplasm within allopolyploids. We used cytological and molecular methods to investigate the genetic and epigenetic instabilities associated with the process of distant hybridization and allopolyploid formation, measuring changes in chromosome number and DNA methylation across multiple generations. Results F1 plants from intergeneric hybridization between Raphanus sativus L. (2n = 18, RR) and Brassica alboglabra Bailey (2n = 18, CC) were obtained by hand crosses and subsequent embryo rescue. Random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were used to identify the F1 hybrid plants. The RAPD data indicated that the hybrids produced specific bands similar to those of parents and new bands that were not present in either parent. Chromosome number variation of somatic cells from allotetraploids in the F4 to F10 generations showed that intensive genetic changes occurred in the early generations of distant hybridization, leading to the formation of mixopolyploids with different chromosome numbers. DNA methylation variation was revealed using MSAP (methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism), which showed that cytosine methylation patterns changed markedly in the process of hybridization and amphidiploid formation. Differences in cytosine methylation levels demonstrated an epigenetic instability of the allopolyploid of Raphanobrassica between the genetically stable and unstable generations. Conclusions Our results showed that chromosome instability occurred in the early generations of allopolyploidy and then the plants were reverted to largely euploidy in later generations. During this process, DNA methylation changed markedly. These results suggest that, epigenetic mechanisms play an

  11. Hybridization accompanying FRET event in labeled natural nucleoside-unnatural nucleoside containing chimeric DNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Bag, Subhendu Sekhar; Das, Suman K; Pradhan, Manoj Kumar; Jana, Subhashis

    2016-09-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a highly efficient strategy in illuminating the structures, structural changes and dynamics of DNA, proteins and other biomolecules and thus is being widely utilized in studying such phenomena, in designing molecular/biomolecular probes for monitoring the hybridization event of two single stranded DNA to form duplex, in gene detection and in many other sensory applications in chemistry, biology and material sciences. Moreover, FRET can give information about the positional status of chromophores within the associated biomolecules with much more accuracy than other methods can yield. Toward this end, we want to report here the ability of fluorescent unnatural nucleoside, triazolylphenanthrene ((TPhen)BDo) to show FRET interaction upon hybridization with fluorescently labeled natural nucleosides, (Per)U or (OxoPy)U or (Per)U, forming two stable chimeric DNA duplexes. The pairing selectivity and the thermal duplex stability of the chimeric duplexes are higher than any of the duplexes with natural nucleoside formed. The hybridization results in a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from donor triazolylphenanthrene of (TPhen)BDo to acceptor oxopyrene of (OxoPy)U and/or to perylene chromophore of (Per)U, respectively, in two chimeric DNA duplexes. Therefore, we have established the FRET process in two chimeric DNA duplexes wherein a fluorescently labeled natural nucleoside ((OxoPy)U or (Per)U) paired against an unnatural nucleoside ((TPhen)BDo) without sacrificing the duplex stability and B-DNA conformation. The hybridization accompanying FRET event in these classes of interacting fluorophores is new. Moreover, there is no report of such designed system of chimeric DNA duplex. Our observed phenomenon and the design can potentially be exploited in designing more of such efficient FRET pairs for useful application in the detection and analysis of biomolecular interactions and in material science application. PMID:27498231

  12. DNA sequence similarity recognition by hybridization to short oligomers

    DOEpatents

    Milosavljevic, Aleksandar

    1999-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for the comparison of nucleic acid sequences. Data is generated by hybridizing sets of oligomers with target nucleic acids. The data thus generated is manipulated simultaneously with respect to both (i) matching between oligomers and (ii) matching between oligomers and putative reference sequences available in databases. Using data compression methods to manipulate this mutual information, sequences for the target can be constructed.

  13. Ultrasensitive Detection of DNA Hybridization Using Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maehashi, Kenzo; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko; Kerman, Kagan; Takamura, Yuzuru; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2004-12-01

    We have sensitively detected DNA hybridization using carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) in real time. Amino modified peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligonucleotides at 5' end were covalently immobilized onto the Au surface of the back gate. For 11-mer PNA oligonucletide probe, full-complementary DNA with concentration as low as 6.8 fM solution could be effectively detected. Our CNTFET-based biochip is a promising candidate for the development of an integrated, high-throughput, multiplexed DNA biosensor for medical, forensic and environmental diagnostics.

  14. [Three cases of vulvar bowenoid papulosis: the localization of HPV DNA by in situ hybridization].

    PubMed

    Kioka, H; Nagai, N; Tanioka, Y; Fujii, T; Katsube, Y; Egawa, K; Fujiwara, A

    1989-09-01

    Cytological, histological, and molecular biological studies were conducted in 3 cases of vulvar Bowenoid papulosis, using biotinylated HPV DNA probes by in situ hybridization. 1) Cytological findings showed dyskaryotic cells that revealed hyperchromatism with a coarse granular pattern, and a high N/C ratio was observed among the dyskeratotic cells. 2) In 2 cases of Bowenoid papulosis lesions, HPV 16 DNA was detected in the nucleus of the dysplastic cells. 3) In one case of Bowenoid papulosis, a complicated carcinoma in situ of the uterine cervix was observed, and the HPV 16 DNA was found to be positive in both the vulva and cervix. PMID:2550688

  15. Application of central composite design for DNA hybridization onto magnetic microparticles.

    PubMed

    Martins, S A M; Prazeres, D M F; Fonseca, L P; Monteiro, G A

    2009-08-01

    Central composite face-centered (CCF) design and response surface methodologies were used to investigate the effect of probe and target concentration and particle number in immobilization and hybridization on a microparticle-based DNA/DNA hybridization assay. The factors under study were combined according to the CCF design matrix, and the intensity of the hybridization signal was quantified by flow cytometry. A second-order polynomial was fitted to data and validated by analysis of variance. The results showed a complex relationship between variables and response given that all factors as well as some interactions were significant, yet it could explain 95% of the data. Probe and target concentration had the strongest impact on hybridization signal intensity. Increments in initial probe concentration in solution positively affected the hybridization signal until a negative influence of a compact probe layer emerged. This trend was attributed to probe-probe interactions. By manipulating particle number on both immobilization and hybridization, enhancements on the assay sensitivity could be obtained. Under optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) at the 95% confidence level was determined to be 2.3 nM of target solution concentration. PMID:19435595

  16. Detection of bovine trichomoniasis with a specific DNA probe and PCR amplification system.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, M S; Conrad, P A; Conrad, P J; LeFebvre, R B; Perez, E; BonDurant, R H

    1994-01-01

    Trichomoniasis is a widespread, economically important venereal disease of cattle which causes infertility and abortion. Effective control of trichomoniasis has been impeded by the insensitivity of traditional diagnostic procedures, which require the isolation and cultivation of the parasite, Tritrichomonas foetus, from infected cattle. We developed a 0.85-kb T. foetus DNA probe by identifying conserved sequences in DNAs from T. foetus that were isolated from cattle in California, Idaho, Nevada, and Costa Rica. The probe hybridized specifically to DNAs of T. foetus isolates from different geographic areas but not to DNA preparations of Trichomonas vaginalis, bovine cells, or a variety of bacteria from cattle. The probe detected DNA from a minimum of 10(5) T. foetus organisms. To improve sensitivity, a partial sequence of the probe was used to identify oligonucleotide primers (TF1 and TF2) which could be used to amplify a 162-bp product from T. foetus DNAs by PCR. A chemiluminescent internal T. foetus sequence probe was hybridized to Southern blots of the amplification product. This system detected as few as one T. foetus organism in culture media or 10 parasites in samples containing bovine preputial smegma. Analysis of 52 clinical samples showed that 47 (90.4%) of the 52 samples were correctly identified, with no false-positive reactions. In comparison, the traditional cultivation method detected 44 (84.6%) of the 52 samples from T. foetus-infected and uninfected bulls. These results indicate that the PCR-based amplification system could be a useful alternative method for the diagnosis of bovine trichomoniasis. Images PMID:8126211

  17. Detection of bovine trichomoniasis with a specific DNA probe and PCR amplification system.

    PubMed

    Ho, M S; Conrad, P A; Conrad, P J; LeFebvre, R B; Perez, E; BonDurant, R H

    1994-01-01

    Trichomoniasis is a widespread, economically important venereal disease of cattle which causes infertility and abortion. Effective control of trichomoniasis has been impeded by the insensitivity of traditional diagnostic procedures, which require the isolation and cultivation of the parasite, Tritrichomonas foetus, from infected cattle. We developed a 0.85-kb T. foetus DNA probe by identifying conserved sequences in DNAs from T. foetus that were isolated from cattle in California, Idaho, Nevada, and Costa Rica. The probe hybridized specifically to DNAs of T. foetus isolates from different geographic areas but not to DNA preparations of Trichomonas vaginalis, bovine cells, or a variety of bacteria from cattle. The probe detected DNA from a minimum of 10(5) T. foetus organisms. To improve sensitivity, a partial sequence of the probe was used to identify oligonucleotide primers (TF1 and TF2) which could be used to amplify a 162-bp product from T. foetus DNAs by PCR. A chemiluminescent internal T. foetus sequence probe was hybridized to Southern blots of the amplification product. This system detected as few as one T. foetus organism in culture media or 10 parasites in samples containing bovine preputial smegma. Analysis of 52 clinical samples showed that 47 (90.4%) of the 52 samples were correctly identified, with no false-positive reactions. In comparison, the traditional cultivation method detected 44 (84.6%) of the 52 samples from T. foetus-infected and uninfected bulls. These results indicate that the PCR-based amplification system could be a useful alternative method for the diagnosis of bovine trichomoniasis. PMID:8126211

  18. A DNA hybridization system for labeling of neural stem cells with SPIO nanoparticles for MRI monitoring post-transplantation.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Edgar Y; Kitamura, Narufumi; Nakai, Ryusuke; Arima, Yusuke; Iwata, Hiroo

    2015-06-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) demonstrate encouraging results in cell replacement therapy for neurodegenerative disorders and traumatic injury in the central nervous system. Monitor the survival and migration of transplanted cells would provide us important information concerning the performance and integration of the graft during the therapy time course. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allow us to monitor the transplanted cells in a non-invasive way. The only requirement is to use an appropriate contrast agent to label the transplanted cells. Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles are one of the most commonly used contrast agent for MRI detection of transplanted cells. SPIO nanoparticles demonstrated to be suitable for labeling several types of cells including NSCs. However, the current methods for SPIO labeling are non-specific, depending mostly on electrostatic interactions, demanding relatively high SPIO concentration, and long incubation time, which can affect the viability of cells. In this study, we propose a specific and relatively fast method to label NSCs with SPIO nanoparticles via DNA hybridization. Two short single stranded DNAs (ssDNAs), oligo[dT]20 and oligo[dA]20 were conjugated with a lipid molecule and SPIO nanoparticle respectively. The labeling process comprises two simple steps; first the cells are modified to present oligo[dT]20 ssDNA on the cell surface, then the oligo[dA]20 ssDNA conjugated with SPIO nanoparticles are presented to the modified cells to allow the oligo[dT]20-oligo[dA]20 hybridization. The method showed to be non-toxic at concentrations up to 50 μg/mL oligo[dA]20-SPIO nanoparticles. Presence of SPIO nanoparticles at cell surface and cell cytoplasm was verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). SPIO labeling via DNA hybridization demonstrated to not interfere on NSCs proliferation, aggregates formation, and differentiation. NSCs labeled with SPIO nanoparticles via DNA hybridization system were successfully

  19. Detection of specific DNA sequences with short biotin-labeled probes.

    PubMed

    Chu, B C; Orgel, L E

    1985-08-01

    We have developed a simple, general synthesis of nonradioactive DNA probes in which biotin is attached to the 5'-terminal phosphate of an oligodeoxyribonucleotide 16 bases long via an ethylenediamine or hexamethylenediamine linker. The products are stable under normal hybridization conditions. They hybridize to target DNA as efficiently as the underivatized oligodeoxyribonucleotide. Color development, using a commercially available kit, is complete within 3 hr using the biotin-detection method. The sensitivity of detection of homologous DNA with a probe to which biotin was attached via a hexamethylenediamine linker is about one-tenth of that achieved overnight by autoradiography with the corresponding 32P-labeled probe. PMID:4042814

  20. Shape Analysis of DNA-Au Hybrid Particles by Analytical Ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Urban, Maximilan J; Holder, Isabelle T; Schmid, Marius; Fernandez Espin, Vanesa; Garcia de la Torre, Jose; Hartig, Jörg S; Cölfen, Helmut

    2016-08-23

    Current developments in nanotechnology have increased the demand for nanocrystal assemblies with well-defined shapes and tunable sizes. DNA is a particularly well-suited building block in nanoscale assemblies because of its scalable sizes, conformational variability, and convenient self-assembly capabilities via base pairing. In hybrid materials, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can be assembled into nanoparticle structures with programmable interparticle distances by applying appropriate DNA sequences. However, the development of stoichiometrically defined DNA/NP structures is still challenging since product mixtures are frequently obtained and their purification and characterization is the rate-limiting step in the development of DNA-NP hybrid assemblies. Improvements in nanostructure fractionation and characterization techniques offer great potential for nanotechnology applications in general. This study reports the application of analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) for the characterization of anisotropic DNA-linked metal-crystal assemblies. On the basis of transmission electron microscopy data and the DNA primary sequence, hydrodynamic bead models are set up for the interpretation of the measured frictional ratios and sedimentation coefficients. We demonstrate that the presence of single DNA strands on particle surfaces as well as the shape factors of multiparticle structures in mixtures can be quantitatively described by AUC. This study will significantly broaden the possibilities to analyze mixtures of shape-anisotropic nanoparticle assemblies. By establishing insights into the analysis of nanostructure mixtures based on fundamental principles of sedimentation, a wide range of potential applications in basic research and industry become accessible. PMID:27459174

  1. An impedimetric study of DNA hybridization on paper-supported inkjet-printed gold electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihalainen, Petri; Pettersson, Fredrik; Pesonen, Markus; Viitala, Tapani; Määttänen, Anni; Österbacka, Ronald; Peltonen, Jouko

    2014-03-01

    In this study, two different supramolecular recognition architectures for impedimetric detection of DNA hybridization have been formed on disposable paper-supported inkjet-printed gold electrodes. The gold electrodes were fabricated using a gold nanoparticle based ink. The first recognition architecture consists of subsequent layers of biotinylated self-assembly monolayer (SAM), streptavidin and biotinylated DNA probe. The other recognition architecture is constructed by immobilization of thiol-functionalized DNA probe (HS-DNA) and subsequent backfill with 11-mercapto-1-undecanol (MUOH) SAM. The binding capacity and selectivity of the recognition architectures were examined by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements. SPR results showed that the HS-DNA/MUOH system had a higher binding capacity for the complementary DNA target. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements showed that the hybridization can be detected with impedimetric spectroscopy in picomol range for both systems. EIS signal indicated a good selectivity for both recognition architectures, whereas SPR showed very high unspecific binding for the HS-DNA/MUOH system. The factors affecting the impedance signal were interpreted in terms of the complexity of the supramolecular architecture. The more complex architecture acts as a less ideal capacitive sensor and the impedance signal is dominated by the resistive elements.

  2. Cell-specific DNA methylation patterns of retina-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Merbs, Shannath L; Khan, Miriam A; Hackler, Laszlo; Oliver, Verity F; Wan, Jun; Qian, Jiang; Zack, Donald J

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that epigenetic mechanisms are important in the regulation of gene expression during embryogenesis, gametogenesis, and other forms of tissue-specific gene regulation. We sought to explore the possible role of epigenetics, specifically DNA methylation, in the establishment and maintenance of cell type-restricted gene expression in the retina. To assess the relationship between DNA methylation status and expression level of retinal genes, bisulfite sequence analysis of the 1000 bp region around the transcription start sites (TSS) of representative rod and cone photoreceptor-specific genes and gene expression analysis were performed in the WERI and Y79 human retinoblastoma cell lines. Next, the homologous genes in mouse were bisulfite sequenced in the retina and in non-expressing tissues. Finally, bisulfite sequencing was performed on isolated photoreceptor and non-photoreceptor retinal cells isolated by laser capture microdissection. Differential methylation of rhodopsin (RHO), retinal binding protein 3 (RBP3, IRBP) cone opsin, short-wave-sensitive (OPN1SW), cone opsin, middle-wave-sensitive (OPN1MW), and cone opsin, long-wave-sensitive (OPN1LW) was found in the retinoblastoma cell lines that inversely correlated with gene expression levels. Similarly, we found tissue-specific hypomethylation of the promoter region of Rho and Rbp3 in mouse retina as compared to non-expressing tissues, and also observed hypomethylation of retinal-expressed microRNAs. The Rho and Rbp3 promoter regions were unmethylated in expressing photoreceptor cells and methylated in non-expressing, non-photoreceptor cells from the inner nuclear layer. A third regional hypomethylation pattern of photoreceptor-specific genes was seen in a subpopulation of non-expressing photoreceptors (Rho in cones from the Nrl -/- mouse and Opn1sw in rods). These results demonstrate that a number of photoreceptor-specific genes have cell-specific differential DNA methylation that

  3. Hybridization behavior of mixed DNA/alkylthiol monolayers on gold: characterization by surface plasmon resonance and 32P radiometric assay.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ping; Lee, Chi-Ying; Gamble, Lara J; Castner, David G; Grainger, David W

    2006-05-15

    Nucleic acid assay from a complex biological milieu is attractive but currently difficult and far from routine. In this study, DNA hybridization from serum dilutions into mixed DNA/mercaptoundecanol (MCU) adlayers on gold was monitored by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Immobilized DNA probe and hybridized target densities on these surfaces were quantified using 32P-radiometric assays as a function of MCU diluent exposure. SPR surface capture results correlated with radiometric analysis for hybridization performance, demonstrating a maximum DNA hybridization on DNA/MCU mixed adlayers. The maximum target surface capture produced by MCU addition to the DNA probe layer correlates with structural and conformational data on identical mixed DNA/MCU adlayers on gold derived from XPS, NEXAFS, and fluorescence intensity measurements reported in a related study (Lee, C.-Y.; Gong, P.; Harbers, G. M.; Grainger, D. W.; Castner, D. G.; Gamble, L. J. Anal. Chem. 2006, 78, 3316-3325.). MCU addition into the DNA adlayer on gold also improved surface resistance to both nonspecific DNA and serum protein adsorption. Target DNA hybridization from serum dilutions was monitored with SPR on the optimally mixed DNA/MCU adlayers. Both hybridization kinetics and efficiency were strongly affected by nonspecific protein adsorption from a complex milieu even at a minimal serum concentration (e.g., 1%). No target hybridization was detected in SPR assays from serum concentrations above 30%, indicating nonspecific protein adsorption interference of DNA capture and hybridization from complex milieu. Removal of nonsignal proteins from nucleic acid targets prior to assay represents a significant issue for direct sample-to-assay nucleic acid diagnostics from food, blood, tissue, PCR mixtures, and many other biologically complex sample formats. PMID:16689533

  4. Synthetic Polymer Hybridization with DNA and RNA Directs Nanoparticle Loading, Silencing Delivery, and Aptamer Function

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhun; Xia, Xin; Bong, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    We report herein discrete triplex hybridization of DNA and RNA with polyacrylates. Length-monodisperse triazine-derivatized polymers were prepared on gram-scale by reversible addition–fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization. Despite stereoregio backbone heterogeneity, the triazine polymers bind T/U-rich DNA or RNA with nanomolar affinity upon mixing in a 1:1 ratio, as judged by thermal melts, circular dichroism, gel-shift assays, and fluorescence quenching. We call these polyacrylates “bifacial polymer nucleic acids” (bPoNAs). Nucleic acid hybridization with bPoNA enables DNA loading onto polymer nanoparticles, siRNA silencing delivery, and can further serve as an allosteric trigger of RNA aptamer function. Thus, bPoNAs can serve as tools for both non-covalent bioconjugation and structure–function nucleation. It is anticipated that bPoNAs will have utility in both bio- and nanotechnology. PMID:26138550

  5. Synthetic Polymer Hybridization with DNA and RNA Directs Nanoparticle Loading, Silencing Delivery, and Aptamer Function.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhun; Xia, Xin; Bong, Dennis

    2015-07-22

    We report herein discrete triplex hybridization of DNA and RNA with polyacrylates. Length-monodisperse triazine-derivatized polymers were prepared on gram-scale by reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization. Despite stereoregio backbone heterogeneity, the triazine polymers bind T/U-rich DNA or RNA with nanomolar affinity upon mixing in a 1:1 ratio, as judged by thermal melts, circular dichroism, gel-shift assays, and fluorescence quenching. We call these polyacrylates "bifacial polymer nucleic acids" (bPoNAs). Nucleic acid hybridization with bPoNA enables DNA loading onto polymer nanoparticles, siRNA silencing delivery, and can further serve as an allosteric trigger of RNA aptamer function. Thus, bPoNAs can serve as tools for both non-covalent bioconjugation and structure-function nucleation. It is anticipated that bPoNAs will have utility in both bio- and nanotechnology. PMID:26138550

  6. Aptamer-MIP hybrid receptor for highly sensitive electrochemical detection of prostate specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Jolly, Pawan; Tamboli, Vibha; Harniman, Robert L; Estrela, Pedro; Allender, Chris J; Bowen, Jenna L

    2016-01-15

    This study reports the design and evaluation of a new synthetic receptor sensor based on the amalgamation of biomolecular recognition elements and molecular imprinting to overcome some of the challenges faced by conventional protein imprinting. A thiolated DNA aptamer with established affinity for prostate specific antigen (PSA) was complexed with PSA prior to being immobilised on the surface of a gold electrode. Controlled electropolymerisation of dopamine around the complex served to both entrap the complex, holding the aptamer in, or near to, it's binding conformation, and to localise the PSA binding sites at the sensor surface. Following removal of PSA, it was proposed that the molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) cavity would act synergistically with the embedded aptamer to form a hybrid receptor (apta-MIP), displaying recognition properties superior to that of aptamer alone. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to evaluate subsequent rebinding of PSA to the apta-MIP surface. The apta-MIP sensor showed high sensitivity with a linear response from 100pg/ml to 100ng/ml of PSA and a limit of detection of 1pg/ml, which was three-fold higher than aptamer alone sensor for PSA. Furthermore, the sensor demonstrated low cross-reactivity with a homologous protein (human Kallikrein 2) and low response to human serum albumin (HSA), suggesting possible resilience to the non-specific binding of serum proteins. PMID:26318788

  7. A mesocarp-and species-specific cDNA clone from oil palm encodes for sesquiterpene synthase.

    PubMed

    Shah; Cha

    2000-05-29

    The differential display method was used to isolate cDNAs corresponding to transcripts that accumulate during the period of lipid synthesis, 12-20 weeks after anthesis (WAA) in the mesocarp of two oil palms, Elaeis oleifera and Elaeis guineensis, Tenera. DNA-free total RNA from mesocarp and kernel of E. guineensis, Tenera and E. oleifera (15 WAA) were used to obtain differential gene expression patterns between these tissues from the two species. In this report, we describe the isolation and characterization of a specific cDNA clone, MO1 (434 bp) which was shown to be mesocarp-specific as well as species-specific for E. oleifera Sequencing of this fragment showed homology to the enzyme sesquiterpene synthase. Its longer cDNA clone, pMO1 (1072 bp), isolated from a 15-week E. oleifera mesocarp cDNA library confirmed that it encodes for sesquiterpene synthase. The complete sequence of 1976 bp was obtained using 5'RACE method. Northern hybridization showed that MO1 and pMO1 mRNA transcripts are highly expressed only in the mesocarp of E. oleifera from 5 to 20 WAA. No expression was detected in the kernel (12-17 WAA) and vegetative tissues of both species nor in the mesocarp of E. guineensis. This is the first communication to document on the isolation and characterisation of a mesocarp-and species-specific cDNA clone from oil palm. PMID:10729614

  8. Specific identification of human papillomavirus type in cervical smears and paraffin sections by in situ hybridization with radioactive probes: a preliminary communication

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, J.; Gendelman, H.E.; Naghashfar, Z.; Gupta, P.; Rosenshein, N.; Sawada, E.; Woodruff, J.D.; Shah, K.

    1985-01-01

    Cervical Papanicolaou smears and paraffin sections of biopsy specimens obtained from women attending dysplasia clinics were examined for viral DNA sequences by in situ hybridization technique using TVS-labeled cloned recombinant DNA probes of human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6, 11, and 16. These and one unrelated DNA probe complementary to measles virus RNA were labeled by nick translation using either one or two TVS-labeled nucleotides. Paraffin sections and cervical smears were collected on pretreated slides, hybridized with the probes under stringent or nonstringent conditions for 50 h, and autoradiographed. Additional cervical specimens from the same women were examined for the presence of genus-specific papillomavirus capsid antigen by the immunoperoxidase technique. Preliminary results may be summarized as follows. The infecting virus could be identified in smears as well as in sections. Viral DNA sequences were detected only when there were condylomatous cells in the specimen and in only a proportion of the condylomatous cells. Even under stringent conditions, some specimens reacted with both HPV-6 and HPV-11. In some instances, the cells did not hybridize with any of the three probes even when duplicate specimens contained frankly condylomatous, capsid antigen-positive cells. In situ hybridization of Papanicolaou smears or of tissue sections is a practical method for diagnosis and follow-up of specific papillomavirus infection using routinely collected material.

  9. Interpopulation hybridization generates meiotically stable rDNA epigenetic variants in allotetraploid Tragopogon mirus.

    PubMed

    Matyášek, Roman; Dobešová, Eva; Húska, Dalibor; Ježková, Ivana; Soltis, Pamela S; Soltis, Douglas E; Kovařík, Aleš

    2016-02-01

    Uniparental silencing of 35S rRNA genes (rDNA), known as nucleolar dominance (ND), is common in interspecific hybrids. Allotetraploid Tragopogon mirus composed of Tragopogon dubius (d) and Tragopogon porrifolius (p) genomes shows highly variable ND. To examine the molecular basis of such variation, we studied the genetic and epigenetic features of rDNA homeologs in several lines derived from recently and independently formed natural populations. Inbred lines derived from T. mirus with a dominant d-rDNA homeolog transmitted this expression pattern over generations, which may explain why it is prevalent among natural populations. In contrast, lines derived from the p-rDNA dominant progenitor were meiotically unstable, frequently switching to co-dominance. Interpopulation crosses between progenitors displaying reciprocal ND resulted in d-rDNA dominance, indicating immediate suppression of p-homeologs in F1 hybrids. Original p-rDNA dominance was not restored in later generations, even in those segregants that inherited the corresponding parental rDNA genotype, thus indicating the generation of additional p-rDNA and d-rDNA epigenetic variants. Despite preserved intergenic spacer (IGS) structure, they showed altered cytosine methylation and chromatin condensation patterns, and a correlation between expression, hypomethylation of RNA Pol I promoters and chromatin decondensation was apparent. Reversion of such epigenetic variants occurred rarely, resulting in co-dominance maintained in individuals with distinct genotypes. Generally, interpopulation crosses may generate epialleles that are not present in natural populations, underlying epigenetic dynamics in young allopolyploids. We hypothesize that highly expressed variants with distinct IGS features may induce heritable epigenetic reprogramming of the partner rDNA arrays, harmonizing the expression of thousands of genes in allopolyploids. PMID:26711705

  10. Inter-specific territoriality in a Canis hybrid zone: spatial segregation between wolves, coyotes, and hybrids.

    PubMed

    Benson, John F; Patterson, Brent R

    2013-12-01

    Gray wolves (Canis lupus) and coyotes (Canis latrans) generally exhibit intraspecific territoriality manifesting in spatial segregation between adjacent packs. However, previous studies have found a high degree of interspecific spatial overlap between sympatric wolves and coyotes. Eastern wolves (Canis lycaon) are the most common wolf in and around Algonquin Provincial Park (APP), Ontario, Canada and hybridize with sympatric gray wolves and coyotes. We hypothesized that all Canis types (wolves, coyotes, and hybrids) exhibit a high degree of spatial segregation due to greater genetic, morphologic, and ecological similarities between wolves and coyotes in this hybrid system compared with western North American ecosystems. We used global positioning system telemetry and probabilistic measures of spatial overlap to investigate spatial segregation between adjacent Canis packs. Our hypothesis was supported as: (1) the probability of locating wolves, coyotes, and hybrids within home ranges ([Formula: see text] = 0.05) or core areas ([Formula: see text] < 0.01) of adjacent packs was low; and (2) the amount of shared space use was negligible. Spatial segregation did not vary substantially in relation to genotypes of adjacent packs or local environmental conditions (i.e., harvest regulations or road densities). We provide the first telemetry-based demonstration of spatial segregation between wolves and coyotes, highlighting the novel relationships between Canis types in the Ontario hybrid zone relative to areas where wolves and coyotes are reproductively isolated. Territoriality among Canis may increase the likelihood of eastern wolves joining coyote and hybrid packs, facilitate hybridization, and could play a role in limiting expansion of the genetically distinct APP eastern wolf population. PMID:23864253

  11. Visual detection of cancer cells by colorimetric aptasensor based on aggregation of gold nanoparticles induced by DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Borghei, Yasaman-Sadat; Hosseini, Morteza; Dadmehr, Mehdi; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Sheikhnejad, Reza

    2016-01-21

    A simple but highly sensitive colorimetric method was developed to detect cancer cells based on aptamer-cell interaction. Cancer cells were able to capture nucleolin aptamers (AS 1411) through affinity interaction between AS 1411 and nucleolin receptors that are over expressed in cancer cells, The specific binding of AS 1411 to the target cells triggered the removal of aptamers from the solution. Therefore no aptamer remained in the solution to hybridize with complementary ssDNA-AuNP probes as a result the solution color is red. In the absence of target cells or the presence of normal cells, ssDNA-AuNP probes and aptamers were coexisted in solution and the aptamers assembled DNA-AuNPs, produced a purple solution. UV-vis spectrometry demonstrated that this hybridization-based method exhibited selective colorimetric responses to the presence or absence of target cells, which is detectable with naked eye. The linear response for MCF-7 cells in a concentration range from 10 to 10(5) cells was obtained with a detection limit of 10 cells. The proposed method could be extended to detect other cells and showed potential applications in cancer cell detection and early cancer diagnosis. PMID:26724767

  12. [Comparison of specific genomic DNA fragment between Microtus fortis calamorum and Microtus fortis fortis].

    PubMed

    Xu, Bing; Hu, Wei-Xin; Yang, Rong; Yu, Yuan-Jing; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xin-Fa; Peng, Xing-Hua

    2003-06-01

    Microtus fortis(Taxonomy ID: 100897), also named as reed vole, is classified as Microtus, Micotinae, Cricetidae, Rodentia, Mammalia on taxonomy. Microtus fortis mainly distributes in China. Some areas of Russia, North Korea and Mongolia close to Northeast borderland of China also have a small number of Microtus fortis in distribution. Microtus fortis in China has principally 4 subspecies, and most of them live is the drainage area of Yangtse River. Schistosoma japonicum (one of commonly parasites in China) can infect about 40 kinds of mammalian animals, including the human being, but could not infect Microtus foris. It is known as the only animal in Dongting Lake region of China which has the ability of natural resistance to Schistosoma japonicum. The Microtus fortis domesticated in laboratory has the same biological characteristics as the wild one and these characteristics could be inherited to its progeny steadily. We got a specific DNA fragment from genomic library of Microtus fortis. This DNA fragment in genomic DNA of human beings, Kunming mice, Balb/c mice and C57BL/6J mice could not be detected by dot blot hybridization and PCR, apart from genomic DNA of Microtus fortis. In this report, the differences of genomic DNA in 34 Microtus fortis were compared between Microtus fortis calamorum(Dongting Lake region of southern China) and Microtus fortis fortis (Ningxia province of northern China). The residing localion of these two subspecies is far away about 1,200 kilometers from each other. The genomic DNA of Microtus fortis calamorum and Microtus fortis fortis were extracted and amplified by PCR according to the specific genomic DNAs sequence of Microtus fortis reported previously (Accession number in GenBank: AF277394). The amplified DNA fragments were inserted into pGEM-T easy vector and sequenced. The DNA fragment sequencing results from the two subspecies were compared to detect whether there was any difference. 19 alleles were found from Microtus fortis (20

  13. Comparative genomic in situ hybridization (cGISH) analysis on plant chromosomes revealed by labelled Arabidopsis DNA.

    PubMed

    Zoller, J F; Yang, Y; Herrmann, R G; Hohmann, U

    2001-01-01

    A new approach for comparative cytogenetic banding analysis of plant chromosomes has been established. The comparative GISH (cGISH) technique is universally applicable to various complex genomes of Monocotyledonae (Triticum aestivum, Agropyron elongatum, Secale cereale, Hordeum vulgare, Allium cepa, Muscari armenaticum and Lilium longiflorum) and Dicotyledonae (Vicia faba, Beta vulgaris, Arabidopsis thaliana). Labelled total genomic DNA of A. thaliana generates signals at conserved chromosome regions. The nucleolus organizing regions (NORs) containing the majority of tandemly repeated rDNA sequences, N-band regions containing satellite DNA, conserved homologous sequences at telomeres and additional chromosome-characteristic markers were detected in heterologous FISH experiments. Multicolour FISH analysis with repetitive DNA probes simultaneously revealed the chromosome assignment of 56 cGISH signals in rye and 61 cGISH signals in barley. Further advantages of this technique are: (1) the fast and straightforward preparation of the probe; (2) the generation of signals with high intensity and reproducibility even without signal amplification; and (3) no requirement of species-specific sequences suitable for molecular karyotype analysis. Hybridization can be performed without competitive DNA. Signal detection without significant background is possible under low stringency conditions. The universal application of this fast and simple one-step fluorescence banding technique for plant cytogenetic and plant genome evolution is discussed. PMID:11448038

  14. The minimal amount of starting DNA for Agilent’s hybrid capture-based targeted massively parallel sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jongsuk; Son, Dae-Soon; Jeon, Hyo-Jeong; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Park, Gahee; Ryu, Gyu Ha; Park, Woong-Yang; Park, Donghyun

    2016-01-01

    Targeted capture massively parallel sequencing is increasingly being used in clinical settings, and as costs continue to decline, use of this technology may become routine in health care. However, a limited amount of tissue has often been a challenge in meeting quality requirements. To offer a practical guideline for the minimum amount of input DNA for targeted sequencing, we optimized and evaluated the performance of targeted sequencing depending on the input DNA amount. First, using various amounts of input DNA, we compared commercially available library construction kits and selected Agilent’s SureSelect-XT and KAPA Biosystems’ Hyper Prep kits as the kits most compatible with targeted deep sequencing using Agilent’s SureSelect custom capture. Then, we optimized the adapter ligation conditions of the Hyper Prep kit to improve library construction efficiency and adapted multiplexed hybrid selection to reduce the cost of sequencing. In this study, we systematically evaluated the performance of the optimized protocol depending on the amount of input DNA, ranging from 6.25 to 200 ng, suggesting the minimal input DNA amounts based on coverage depths required for specific applications. PMID:27220682

  15. Human chromosome-specific DNA libraries: construction and availability

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dilla, M.A.; Deaven, L.L.; Albright, K.L.; Allen, N.A.; Aubuchon, M.R.; Bartholdi, M.F.; Brown, N.C.; Campbell, E.W.; Carrano, A.V.; Clark, L.M.; Cram, L.S.

    1986-06-01

    The goal of the National Laboratory Gene Library Project at the Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories is the production of chromosome-specific human gene libraries and their distribution to the scientific community for studies of the molecular biology of genes and chromosomes, and for the study and diagnosis of genetic disease. The specific aim of Phase I of the project is the production of complete digest (4 kb average insert size) libraries from each of the 24 human chromosomal types purified by flow sorting. The bacteriophage vector is Charon 21A, which has both Eco R1 and Hind III insertion sites accommodating human DNA fragments up to 9.1 kb in size. Each laboratory has undertaken production of a complete set of chromosome-specific libraries, Los Alamos with Eco R1 and Livermore with Hind III; most of this task has now been accomplished. Close to 1200 library aliquots have been sent to about 300 laboratories world-wide through February 1986, at which time repository and distribution functions were transferred to the American Type Culture Collection, Rockville, MD. Following Phase I, libraries will be constructed with large inserts in a more advanced, recently developed bacteriophage vector (about 20 kb inserts) or in a cosmid vector (about 40 kb inserts), and with characteristics better suited to basic studies of gene structure and function.

  16. Crystal Structure of Human Thymine DNA Glycosylase Bound to DNA Elucidates Sequence-Specific Mismatch Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.; Morgan, M.T.; Pozharski, E.; Drohat, A.C.

    2009-05-19

    Cytosine methylation at CpG dinucleotides produces m{sup 5}CpG, an epigenetic modification that is important for transcriptional regulation and genomic stability in vertebrate cells. However, m{sup 5}C deamination yields mutagenic G{center_dot}T mispairs, which are implicated in genetic disease, cancer, and aging. Human thymine DNA glycosylase (hTDG) removes T from G{center_dot}T mispairs, producing an abasic (or AP) site, and follow-on base excision repair proteins restore the G{center_dot}C pair. hTDG is inactive against normal A{center_dot}T pairs, and is most effective for G{center_dot}T mispairs and other damage located in a CpG context. The molecular basis of these important catalytic properties has remained unknown. Here, we report a crystal structure of hTDG (catalytic domain, hTDG{sup cat}) in complex with abasic DNA, at 2.8 {angstrom} resolution. Surprisingly, the enzyme crystallized in a 2:1 complex with DNA, one subunit bound at the abasic site, as anticipated, and the other at an undamaged (nonspecific) site. Isothermal titration calorimetry and electrophoretic mobility-shift experiments indicate that hTDG and hTDG{sup cat} can bind abasic DNA with 1:1 or 2:1 stoichiometry. Kinetics experiments show that the 1:1 complex is sufficient for full catalytic (base excision) activity, suggesting that the 2:1 complex, if adopted in vivo, might be important for some other activity of hTDG, perhaps binding interactions with other proteins. Our structure reveals interactions that promote the stringent specificity for guanine versus adenine as the pairing partner of the target base and interactions that likely confer CpG sequence specificity. We find striking differences between hTDG and its prokaryotic ortholog (MUG), despite the relatively high (32%) sequence identity.

  17. Functionalized ensembles of nanoelectrodes as affinity biosensors for DNA hybridization detection.

    PubMed

    Silvestrini, Morena; Fruk, Ljiljana; Ugo, Paolo

    2013-02-15

    A novel electrochemical biosensor for DNA hybridization detection based on nanoelectrode ensembles (NEEs) is presented. NEEs are prepared by electroless deposition of gold into the pores of a templating track-etched polycarbonate (PC) membrane. The wide surface of the templating membrane surrounding the nanoelectrodes is exploited to bind the capture DNA probes via amide coupling with the carboxylic groups present on the PC surface. The probes are then hybridized with the complementary target labelled with glucose oxidase (GO(x)). The occurrence of the hybridization event is detected by adding, to the supporting electrolyte, excess glucose as the substrate and the (ferrocenylmethyl) trimethylammonium cation (FA(+)) as suitable redox mediator. In the case of positive hybridization, an electrocatalytic current is detected. In the proposed sensor, the biorecognition event and signal transduction occur in different but neighbouring sites, i.e., the PC surface and the nanoelectrodes, respectively; these sites are separated albeit in close proximity on a nanometer scale. Finally, the possibility to activate the PC surface by treatment with permanganate is demonstrated and the analytical performances of biosensors prepared with KMnO(4)-treated NEEs and native NEEs are compared and critically evaluated. The proposed biosensor displays high selectivity and sensitivity, with the capability to detect few picomoles of target DNA. PMID:22898659

  18. DNA Hybridization-Mediated Liposome Fusion at the Aqueous Liquid Crystal Interface

    PubMed Central

    Noonan, Patrick S.; Mohan, Praveena; Goodwin, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    The prominence of receptor-mediated bilayer fusion in cellular biology motivates development of biomimetic strategies for studying fusogenic mechanisms. An approach is reported here for monitoring receptor-mediated fusion that exploits the unique physical and optical properties of liquid crystals (LC). PEG-functionalized lipids are used to create an interfacial environment capable of inhibiting spontaneous liposome fusion with an aqueous/LC interface. Then, DNA hybridization between oligonucleotides within bulk phase liposomes and a PEG-lipid monolayer at an aqueous/LC interface is exploited to induce receptor-mediated liposome fusion. These hybridization events induce strain within the liposome bilayer, promote lipid mixing with the LC interface, and consequently create an interfacial environment favoring re-orientation of the LC to a homeotropic (perpendicular) state. Furthermore, the bi-functionality of aptamers is exploited to modulate DNA hybridization-mediated liposome fusion by regulating the availability of the appropriate ligand (i.e., thrombin). Here, a LC-based approach for monitoring receptor (i.e., DNA hybridization)-mediated liposome fusion is demonstrated, liposome properties that dictate fusion dynamics are explored, and an example of how this approach may be used in a biosensing scheme is provided. PMID:25506314

  19. Specific multiplex analysis of pathogens using a direct 16S rRNA hybridization in microarray system.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Byeong Hee; Shin, Hwa Hui; Seo, Jeong Hyun; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2012-06-01

    For the rapid multiplex analysis of pathogens, 16S rRNAs from cell lysates were directly applied onto a DNA microarray at room temperature (RT) for RNA-DNA hybridization. To eliminate the labeling step, seven fluorescent-labeled detector probes were cohybridized with 16S rRNA targets and adjacent specific capture probes. We found that eight pathogens were successfully discriminated by the 16S rRNA-based direct method, which showed greater specificity than the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-labeled method due to chaperone and distance effects. A new specificity criterion for a perfect match between RNA and DNA was suggested to be 21-41% dissimilarity using correlation analysis between the mismatch and the sequence according to the guanine-cytosine (GC) percentage or the distribution of mismatches. Six categories of food matrix (egg, meat, milk, rice, vegetable, and mixed) were also tested, and the target pathogen was successfully discriminated within statistically significant levels. Finally, we found that the intrinsic abundance of 16S rRNA molecules successfully substituted PCR-based amplification with a low limit of detection of 10-10(3) cells mL(-1) and a high quantitative linear correlation. Collectively, our suggested 16S rRNA-based direct method enables the highly sensitive, specific, and quantitative analysis of selected pathogens at RT within 2 h, even in food samples. PMID:22551354

  20. Nuclear corroboration of DNA-DNA hybridization in deep phylogenies of hummingbirds, swifts, and passerines: the phylogenetic utility of ZENK (ii).

    PubMed

    Chubb, Alison L

    2004-01-01

    This paper documents the phylogenetic utility of ZENK at the avian intra-ordinal level using hummingbirds, swifts, and passerines as case studies. ZENK sequences (1.7 kb) were used to reconstruct separate gene trees containing the major lineages of each group, and the three trees were examined for congruence with existing DNA-DNA hybridization trees. The results indicate both that ZENK is an appropriate nuclear marker for resolving relationships deep in the avian tree, and that many relationships within these three particular groups are congruent among the different datasets. Specifically, within hummingbirds there was topological agreement that the major hummingbird lineages diverged in a graded manner from the "hermits," to the "mangoes," to the "coquettes," to the "emeralds," and finally to a sister relationship between the "mountain-gems" and the "bees." Concerning swifts, the deepest divergences were congruent: treeswifts (Hemiprocnidae) were sister to the typical swifts (Apodidae), and the subfamily Apodinae was monophyletic relative to Cypseloidinae. Within Apodinae, however, were short, unresolved branches among the swiftlets, spinetails, and more typical swifts; a finding which coincides with other datasets. Within passerine birds, there was congruent support for monophyly of sub-oscines and oscines, and within sub-oscines, for monophyly of New World groups relative to the Old World lineages. New World sub-oscines split into superfamilies Furnaroidea and Tyrannoidea, with the Tyrannoid relationships completely congruent among ZENK and DNA-DNA hybridization trees. Within Furnaroidea, however, there was some incongruence regarding the positions of Thamnophilidae and Formicariidae. Concerning oscine passerines, both datasets showed a split between Corvida and Passerida and confirmed the traditional membership of passerid superfamilies Muscicapoidea and Passeroidea. Monophyly of Sylvioidea, however, remained uncertain, as did the relationships among the

  1. Population variation of human mtDNA control region sequences detected by enzymatic amplification and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed Central

    Stoneking, M; Hedgecock, D; Higuchi, R G; Vigilant, L; Erlich, H A

    1991-01-01

    A method for detecting sequence variation of hypervariable segments of the mtDNA control region was developed. The technique uses hybridization of sequence-specific oligonucleotide (SSO) probes to DNA sequences that have been amplified by PCR. The nucleotide sequences of the two hypervariable segments of the mtDNA control region from 52 individuals were determined; these sequences were then used to define nine regions suitable for SSO typing. A total of 23 SSO probes were used to detect sequence variants at these nine regions in 525 individuals from five ethnic groups (African, Asian, Caucasian, Japanese, and Mexican). The SSO typing revealed an enormous amount of variability, with 274 mtDNA types observed among these 525 individuals and with diversity values, for each population, exceeding .95. For each of the nine mtDNA regions significant differences in the frequencies of sequence variants were observed between these five populations. The mtDNA SSO-typing system was successfully applied to a case involving individual identification of skeletal remains; the probability of a random match was approximately 0.7%. The potential useful applications of this mtDNA SSO-typing system thus include the analysis of individual identity as well as population genetic studies. Images Figure 3 PMID:1990843

  2. Partial replication of UV-irradiated T4 bacteriophage DNA results in amplification of specific genetic areas

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, S.; Vogelbacker, H.H.; Restifo, L.L.; Mattson, T.; Kozinski, A.W.

    1981-11-01

    Upon infection of Escherichia coli with bormodeoxyuridine-labeled T4 phage that had received 10 lethal hits of UV irradiation, a sizable amount of phage DNA was synthesized (approximately 36 phage equivalent units of DNA per infected bacterium), although very little multiplicity reactivation occurs. This progeny DNA was isolated and analyzed. This DNA was biased in its genetic representation, as shown by hybridization to cloned segments of the T4 genome immobilized on nitrocellulose filters. Preferentially amplified areas corresponded to regions containing origins of T4 DNA replication. The size of the progeny DNA increased with time after infection, possibly due to recombination between partial replicas and nonreplicated subunits or due to the gradual overcoming of the UV damage. As the size of the progeny DNA increased, all of the genes were more equally represented, resulting in a decrease in the genetic bias. Amplification of specific genetic areas was also observed upon infection with UV-irradiated, non-bromo-deoxyuridine-substituted (light) phage. However, the genetic bias observed in this case was not as great as that observed with bromodeoxyuridine-substituted phage. This is most likely due to the higher efficiency of multiplicity reactivation of the light phage.

  3. Sliding of Proteins Non-specifically Bound to DNA: Brownian Dynamics Studies with Coarse-Grained Protein and DNA Models

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Tadashi; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    DNA binding proteins efficiently search for their cognitive sites on long genomic DNA by combining 3D diffusion and 1D diffusion (sliding) along the DNA. Recent experimental results and theoretical analyses revealed that the proteins show a rotation-coupled sliding along DNA helical pitch. Here, we performed Brownian dynamics simulations using newly developed coarse-grained protein and DNA models for evaluating how hydrodynamic interactions between the protein and DNA molecules, binding affinity of the protein to DNA, and DNA fluctuations affect the one dimensional diffusion of the protein on the DNA. Our results indicate that intermolecular hydrodynamic interactions reduce 1D diffusivity by 30%. On the other hand, structural fluctuations of DNA give rise to steric collisions between the CG-proteins and DNA, resulting in faster 1D sliding of the protein. Proteins with low binding affinities consistent with experimental estimates of non-specific DNA binding show hopping along the CG-DNA. This hopping significantly increases sliding speed. These simulation studies provide additional insights into the mechanism of how DNA binding proteins find their target sites on the genome. PMID:25504215

  4. Asymmetric hybridization and gene flow between Joshua trees (Agavaceae: Yucca) reflect differences in pollinator host specificity.

    PubMed

    Starr, Tyler N; Gadek, Katherine E; Yoder, Jeremy B; Flatz, Ramona; Smith, Christopher I

    2013-01-01

    The angiosperms are by far the largest group of terrestrial plants. Their spectacular diversity is often attributed to specialized pollination. Obligate pollination mutualisms where both a plant and its pollinator are dependent upon one another for reproduction are thought to be prone to rapid diversification through co-evolution and pollinator isolation. However, few studies have evaluated the degree to which pollinators actually mediate reproductive isolation in these systems. Here, we examine evidence for hybridization and gene flow between two subspecies of Joshua tree (Yucca brevifolia brevifolia and Yucca brevifolia jaegeriana) pollinated by two sister species of yucca moth. Previous work indicated that the pollinators differ in host specificity, and DNA sequence data suggested asymmetric introgression between the tree subspecies. Through intensive sampling in a zone of sympatry, a large number of morphologically intermediate trees were identified. These included trees with floral characters typical of Y. b. jaegeriana, but vegetative features typical of Y. b. brevifolia. The opposite combination-Y. b. brevifolia flowers with Y. b. jaegeriana vegetative morphology-never occurred. Microsatellite genotyping revealed a high frequency of genetically admixed, hybrid trees. Coalescent-based estimates of migration indicated significant gene flow between the subspecies and that the direction of gene flow matches differences in pollinator host fidelity. The data suggest that pollinator behaviour determines the magnitude and direction of gene flow between the two subspecies, but that specialized pollination alone is not sufficient to maintain species boundaries. Natural selection may be required to maintain phenotypic differences in the face of ongoing gene flow. PMID:23190404

  5. Human cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, J.R.

    1993-03-04

    Genetic mapping is approached using the techniques of high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This technology and the results of its application are designed to rapidly generate whole genome as tool box of expressed sequence to speed the identification of human disease genes. The results of this study are intended to dovetail with and to link the results of existing technologies for creating backbone YAC and genetic maps. In the first eight months, this approach generated 60--80% of the expressed sequence map, the remainder expected to be derived through more long-term, labor-intensive, regional chromosomal gene searches or sequencing. The laboratory has made significant progress in the set-up phase, in mapping fetal and adult brain and other cDNAs, in testing a model system for directly linking genetic and physical maps using FISH with small fragments, in setting up a database, and in establishing the validity and throughput of the system.

  6. Hybrid joint formation in human V(D)J recombination requires nonhomologous DNA end joining.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Sathees C; Tong, Jiangen; Lieber, Michael R

    2006-02-01

    In V(D)J recombination, the RAG proteins bind at a pair of signal sequences adjacent to the V, D, or J coding regions and cleave the DNA, resulting in two signal ends and two hairpinned coding ends. The two coding ends are joined to form a coding joint, and the two signal ends are joined to form a signal joint; this joining is done by the nonhomologous DNA end joining (NHEJ) pathway. A recombinational alternative in which a signal end is recombined with a coding end can also occur in a small percentage of the V(D)J recombination events in murine and human cells, and these are called hybrids (or hybrid joints). Two mechanisms have been proposed for the formation of these hybrids. One mechanism is via NHEJ, after initial cutting by RAGs. The second mechanism does not rely on NHEJ, but rather invokes that the RAGs can catalyze joining of the signal to the hairpinned coding end, by using the 3'OH of the signal end as a nucleophile to attack the phosphodiester bonds of the hairpinned coding end. In the present study, we addressed the question of which type of hybrid joining occurs in a physiological environment, where standard V(D)J recombination presumably occurs and normal RAG proteins are endogenously expressed. We find that all hybrids in vivo require DNA ligase IV in human cells, which is the final component of the NHEJ pathway. Hence, hybrid joints rely on NHEJ rather than on the RAG complex for joining. PMID:16275127

  7. Demonstration of paternal inheritance of plastids in Picea (Pinaceae). [Hybridization of cloned, sup 32 -P labeled, petunia cpDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Stine, M.

    1988-01-01

    Chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) was purified from Picea glauca, P. pungens, P. engelmannii, and P. omorika, and was digested with several restriction endonucleases. Interspecific restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) of cpDNA were identified. The RFLPs were identified as cpDNA by the hybridization of cloned, {sup 32}-P labeled, petunia cpDNA to the polymorphic bands, and by the lack of hybridization of a cloned and labeled mtDNA probe from maize. Chloroplast DNA RFLPs that showed no intraspecific variation when examined across the natural range for each species, were used as markers to follow the inheritance of plastids in interspecific hybrids. The inheritance of plastids was determined for F{sub 1}-hybrids from reciprocal crosses of P. glauca and P. pungens, P. glauca and P. omorika, and F{sub 1}-hybrids of P. engelmannii x pungens. All 31 F{sub 1}-hybrids examined showed the cpDNA genotypes of the pollen parent, or the paternal species.

  8. A supramolecular nanobiological hybrid as a PET sensor for bacterial DNA isolated from Streptomyces sanglieri.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Sudesna; Saikia, Dilip; Sharma, Priyanka; Adhikary, Nirab Chandra; Thakur, Debajit; Sen Sarma, Neelotpal

    2014-12-21

    The development of a rapid, label free, cost effective and highly efficient sensor for DNA detection is of great importance in disease diagnosis. Herein, we have reported a new hybrid fluorescent probe based on a cationic curcumin-tryptophan complex and water soluble mercapto succinic acid (MSA) capped CdTe quantum dots (QDs) for the detection of double stranded DNA (ds DNA) molecules. The cationic curcumin-tryptophan complex (CT) directly interacts with negatively charged MSA capped quantum dots via electrostatic coordination, resulting in photoluminescence (PL) quenching of QDs via the Photoinduced Electron Transfer (PET) process. Further, addition of ds DNA results in restoration of PL, as CT would intercalate between DNA strands. Thus, this process can be utilized for selective sensing of ds DNA via fluorescence measurements. Under optimized experimental conditions, the PL quenching efficiency of QDs is found to be 99.4% in the presence of 0.31 × 10(-9) M CT. Interestingly, the regain in PL intensity of QD-CT is found to be 99.28% in the presence of 1 × 10(-8) M ds DNA. The detection limit for ds DNA with the developed sensing probe is 1.4 × 10(-10) M. Furthermore, the probe is found to be highly sensitive towards bacterial DNA isolated from Streptomyces sanglieri with a detection limit of 1.7 × 10(-6) M. The present work will provide a new insight into preparation of bio-inspired hybrid materials as efficient sensors for disease diagnosis and agricultural development. PMID:25343270

  9. Sex-specific age association with primary DNA transfer.

    PubMed

    Manoli, Panayiotis; Antoniou, Antonis; Bashiardes, Evy; Xenophontos, Stavroulla; Photiades, Marinos; Stribley, Vaso; Mylona, Michalis; Demetriou, Christiana; Cariolou, Marios A

    2016-01-01

    Practicing forensic scientists who are called to provide expert witness testimony are often asked to explain both the presence and the absence of DNA on objects that have been handled by perpetrators with bare hands. Unwashed hands, depending on what they have come in contact with previously, may become the vehicle of both primary and secondary transfer of DNA. In this study, we investigated the propensity of primary and secondary transfer of DNA from unwashed bare hands of 128 individuals onto plastic tubes. Our experiments, carried out in triplicate, have shown that DNA was not detected on all the touched tubes, secondary transfer of DNA, through unwashed hands, was small, and in the majority of cases primary DNA transfer could be distinguished from secondary DNA transfer. A statistically significant association was demonstrated between percent DNA profile deposited on plastic tubes, through unwashed hands, and the age of male individuals. PMID:26582043

  10. Ultrasensitive Multiplexed Immunoassay for Tumor Biomarkers Based on DNA Hybridization Chain Reaction Amplifying Signal.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jinjin; Wang, Junchun; Zhao, Junqing; Guo, Zilin; Zhang, Yuzhong

    2016-03-23

    In this work, a novel electrochemical immunoassay protocol has been reported for simultaneous determination of multiple tumor biomarkers based on DNA hybridization chain reaction (HCR) for signal amplification. Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and prostate specific antigen (PSA) were selected as model biomarkers. The immunoassay protocol contained primary antibodies immobilized on gold nanoparticles (Au NPs), secondary antibodies conjugated with DNA concatemer from HCR of primer, auxiliary probe, and signal probe labeled with signal molecules (methyleneblue (MB) and ferrocene (Fc)). In the presence of target biomarkers, the sandwich immunocomplex was formed between the primary antibodies and secondary antibodies bioconjugates carrying numerous signal molecules. As a result, two well-resolved reduction peaks, one was at -0.35 V (corresponding to MB) and other was at 0.33 V (corresponding to Fc; both vs SCE), were obtained in differential pulse voltammetry, and peak currents changed were related to the level of biomarkers. Under optimal conditions, the electrochemical immunoassay exhibited a wide linear response range (0.5 pg mL(-1) to 50 ng mL(-1)) and low detection limits (PSA, 0.17 pg mL(-1); AFP, 0.25 pg mL(-1)) (at S/N = 3). In addition, the immunoassay was evaluated by analyzing simulate human serum sample, and the recoveries obtained were within 99.4-107.6% for PSA and 97.9-108.2% for AFP, indicating the immnuoassay could be applied to the simultaneous detection of AFP and PSA in human serum samples. PMID:26937717

  11. Label-free field-effect-based single-molecule detection of DNA hybridization kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Sorgenfrei, Sebastian; Chiu, Chien-yang; Gonzalez, Ruben L.; Yu, Young-Jun; Kim, Philip; Nuckolls, Colin; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2013-01-01

    Probing biomolecules at the single-molecule level can provide useful information about molecular interactions, kinetics and motions that is usually hidden in ensemble measurements. Techniques with improved sensitivity and time resolution are required to explore fast biomolecular dynamics. Here, we report the first observation of DNA hybridization at the single-molecule level using a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor. By covalently attaching a single-stranded probe DNA sequence to a point defect in a carbon nanotube, we are able to measure two-level fluctuations in the nanotube conductance due to reversible hybridizing and melting of a complementary DNA target. The kinetics are studied as a function of temperature, allowing the measurement of rate constants, melting curves and activation energies for different sequences and target concentrations. The kinetics show non-Arrhenius behavior, in agreement with DNA hybridization experiments using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. This technique is label-free and has the potential for studying single-molecule dynamics at sub-microsecond time-scales. PMID:21258331

  12. Hybrid polymeric hydrogels via peptide nucleic acid (PNA)/DNA complexation.

    PubMed

    Chu, Te-Wei; Feng, Jiayue; Yang, Jiyuan; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2015-12-28

    This work presents a new concept in hybrid hydrogel design. Synthetic water-soluble N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) polymers grafted with multiple peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are crosslinked upon addition of the linker DNA. The self-assembly is mediated by the PNA-DNA complexation, which results in the formation of hydrophilic polymer networks. We show that the hydrogels can be produced through two different types of complexations. Type I hydrogel is formed via the PNA/DNA double-helix hybridization. Type II hydrogel utilizes a unique "P-form" oligonucleotide triple-helix that comprises two PNA sequences and one DNA. Microrheology studies confirm the respective gelation processes and disclose a higher critical gelation concentration for the type I gel when compared to the type II design. Scanning electron microscopy reveals the interconnected microporous structure of both types of hydrogels. Type I double-helix hydrogel exhibits larger pore sizes than type II triple-helix gel. The latter apparently contains denser structure and displays greater elasticity as well. The designed hybrid hydrogels have potential as novel biomaterials for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. PMID:26394062

  13. Sequence-specific microscopic visualization of DNA methylation status at satellite repeats in individual cell nuclei and chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yufeng; Miyanari, Yusuke; Shirane, Kenjiro; Nitta, Hirohisa; Kubota, Takeo; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Okamoto, Akimitsu; Sasaki, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Methylation-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (MeFISH) was developed for microscopic visualization of DNA methylation status at specific repeat sequences in individual cells. MeFISH is based on the differential reactivity of 5-methylcytosine and cytosine in target DNA for interstrand complex formation with osmium and bipyridine-containing nucleic acids (ICON). Cell nuclei and chromosomes hybridized with fluorescence-labeled ICON probes for mouse major and minor satellite repeats were treated with osmium for crosslinking. After denaturation, fluorescent signals were retained specifically at satellite repeats in wild-type, but not in DNA methyltransferase triple-knockout (negative control) mouse embryonic stem cells. Moreover, using MeFISH, we successfully detected hypomethylated satellite repeats in cells from patients with immunodeficiency, centromeric instability and facial anomalies syndrome and 5-hydroxymethylated satellite repeats in male germ cells, the latter of which had been considered to be unmethylated based on anti-5-methylcytosine antibody staining. MeFISH will be suitable for a wide range of applications in epigenetics research and medical diagnosis. PMID:23990328

  14. Sequence-specific microscopic visualization of DNA methylation status at satellite repeats in individual cell nuclei and chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yufeng; Miyanari, Yusuke; Shirane, Kenjiro; Nitta, Hirohisa; Kubota, Takeo; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Okamoto, Akimitsu; Sasaki, Hiroyuki

    2013-10-01

    Methylation-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (MeFISH) was developed for microscopic visualization of DNA methylation status at specific repeat sequences in individual cells. MeFISH is based on the differential reactivity of 5-methylcytosine and cytosine in target DNA for interstrand complex formation with osmium and bipyridine-containing nucleic acids (ICON). Cell nuclei and chromosomes hybridized with fluorescence-labeled ICON probes for mouse major and minor satellite repeats were treated with osmium for crosslinking. After denaturation, fluorescent signals were retained specifically at satellite repeats in wild-type, but not in DNA methyltransferase triple-knockout (negative control) mouse embryonic stem cells. Moreover, using MeFISH, we successfully detected hypomethylated satellite repeats in cells from patients with immunodeficiency, centromeric instability and facial anomalies syndrome and 5-hydroxymethylated satellite repeats in male germ cells, the latter of which had been considered to be unmethylated based on anti-5-methylcytosine antibody staining. MeFISH will be suitable for a wide range of applications in epigenetics research and medical diagnosis. PMID:23990328

  15. A hybrid swarm population of Pinus densiflora x P. sylvestris hybrids inferred from sequence analysis of chloroplast DNA and morphological characters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To confirm a hybrid swarm population of Pinus densiflora × P. sylvestris in Jilin, China and to study whether shoot apex morphology of 4-year old seedlings can be correlated with the sequence of a chloroplast DNA simple sequence repeat marker (cpDNA SSR), needles and seeds from P. densiflora, P. syl...

  16. Mechanism and manipulation of DNA:RNA hybrid G-quadruplex formation in transcription of G-rich DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-yu; Zheng, Ke-wei; Xiao, Shan; Hao, Yu-hua; Tan, Zheng

    2014-01-29

    We recently reported that a DNA:RNA hybrid G-quadruplex (HQ) forms during transcription of DNA that bears two or more tandem guanine tracts (G-tract) on the nontemplate strand. Putative HQ-forming sequences are enriched in the nearby 1000 nt region right downstream of transcription start sites in the nontemplate strand of warm-blooded animals, and HQ regulates transcription under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore, knowledge of the mechanism of HQ formation is important for understanding the biological function of HQ as well as for manipulating gene expression by targeting HQ. In this work, we studied the mechanism of HQ formation using an in vitro T7 transcription model. We show that RNA synthesis initially produces an R-loop, a DNA:RNA heteroduplex formed by a nascent RNA transcript and the template DNA strand. In the following round of transcription, the RNA in the R-loop is displaced, releasing the RNA in single-stranded form (ssRNA). Then the G-tracts in the RNA can jointly form HQ with those in the nontemplate DNA strand. We demonstrate that the structural cascade R-loop → ssRNA → HQ offers opportunities to intercept HQ formation, which may provide a potential method to manipulate gene expression. PMID:24392825

  17. Nuclear Ribosomal DNA Variation and Pathogenic Specialization in Alternaria Fungi Known To Produce Host-Specific Toxins †

    PubMed Central

    Kusaba, Motoaki; Tsuge, Takashi

    1994-01-01

    A total of 99 strains of 11 Alternaria species, including 68 strains of seven fungi known to produce host-specific toxins, were subjected to analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) in nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA). Total DNA was digested with XbaI, and the Southern blots were probed with a nuclear rDNA clone of Alternaria kikuchiana. The hybridization gave 17 different RFLPs from the 99 strains. On the basis of these RFLPs, populations of host-specific toxin-producing fungi could not be differentiated from one another nor from nonpathogenic A. alternata. Each population of the toxin-producing fungi carried rDNA variants. Nine different types, named A1 to A6 and B1 to B3, were detected among the toxin-producing fungi and nonpathogenic A. alternata. All of the populations contained the type A4 variant, and the other rDNA types were also shared by different toxin-producing fungi and A. alternata. In contrast, Alternaria species that are morphologically distinguishable from A. alternata could be differentiated from A. alternata on the basis of the rDNA RFLPs. Polymorphisms in rDNA digested with HaeIII and MspI were also evaluated in 61 Alternaria strains. These restriction enzymes produced 31 variations among all of the samples. The seven toxin-producing fungi and nonpathogenic A. alternata could not be resolved by phylogenetic analysis based on the RFLPs, although they could be differentiated from the other Alternaria species studied. These results provide support for the hypothesis that Alternaria fungi known to produce host-specific toxins are intraspecific variants of A. alternata specialized in pathogenicity. Images PMID:16349367

  18. Identification of a tumor marker chromosome by flow sorting, DNA amplification in vitro, and in situ hybridization of the amplified product

    SciTech Connect

    Boschman, G.; Rens, W.; Slater, R.; Aten, J. ); Buys, C.; Veen, A. van der; Osinga, J. )

    1993-01-01

    A method combining flow sorting and molecular cytogenetic techniques was used to identify an unknown marker chromosome in the bladder tumor cell line J82. The marker chromosome was isolated by dual parameter sorting after staining with Hoechst 33258 and chromomycin [Lambda]3. DNA amplification of 300 isolated chromosomes by polymerase chain reaction using the Alu-primer Bk33 and the Lines-primer LH5 was carried out. The DNA was labelled using Bio-11-dUTP and applied to human lymphocyte metaphase cells in a suppressive in situ hybridization procedure. Fluorescence was visible over chromosome 20 and over the distal one-half of 6p. Together the fluorescent regions accounted for only 60% of the marker length, indicating a possible duplication of chromosome 20 material. This was subsequently confirmed by applying bicolor in-situ hybridization using chromosome 6- and 20-specific DNA libraries to metaphase cells of the J82 culture.

  19. Hypoxia-induced regulation of MAPK phosphatase-1 as identified by subtractive suppression hybridization and cDNA microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Seta, K A; Kim, R; Kim, H W; Millhorn, D E; Beitner-Johnson, D

    2001-11-30

    Subtractive suppression hybridization was used to generate a cDNA library enriched in cDNA sequences corresponding to mRNA species that are specifically up-regulated by hypoxia (6 h, 1% O(2)) in the oxygen-responsive pheochromocytoma cell line. The dual specificity protein-tyrosine phosphatase MAPK phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) was highly represented in this library. Clones were arrayed on glass slides to create a hypoxia-specific cDNA microarray chip. Microarray, northern blot, and western blot analyses confirmed that MKP-1 mRNA and protein levels were up-regulated by hypoxia by approximately 8-fold. The magnitude of the effect of hypoxia on MKP-1 was approximately equal to that induced by KCl depolarization and much larger than the effects of either epidermal growth factor or nerve growth factor on MKP-1 mRNA levels. In contrast to the calcium-dependent induction of MKP-1 by KCl depolarization, the effect of hypoxia on MKP-1 persisted under calcium-free conditions. Cobalt and deferoxamine also increased MKP-1 mRNA levels, suggesting that hypoxia-inducible factor proteins may play a role in the regulation of MKP-1 by hypoxia. Pretreatment of cells with SB203580, which inhibits p38 kinase activity, significantly reduced the hypoxia-induced increase in MKP-1 RNA levels. Thus, hypoxia robustly increases MKP-1 levels, at least in part through a p38 kinase-mediated mechanism. PMID:11577072

  20. A label-free colorimetric platform for DNA via target-catalyzed hairpin assembly and the peroxidase-like catalytic of graphene/Au-NPs hybrids.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chaohui; Li, Ningxing; Lan, Jingwen; Ji, Xinghu; He, Zhike

    2016-01-01

    A target-catalyzed hairpin assembly (CHA) and graphene/Au-NPs hybrids-based platform has been developed for the determination of DNA. This new sensor not only avoided any labeling but also reduced the background signal. In the absence of target, the assembly of H1 and H2 couldn't be triggered. The catalytic activity of graphene/Au-NPs hybrids was inhibited by adsorption of H1 and H2, leading to the "inactive" hybrids unable to catalyze the oxidation reaction of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB). However, with the addition of target DNA, the target-catalyzed hairpin assembly was initiated and produced plenty of H1-H2 duplex, which had a weak binding affinity with the graphene/Au-NPs. Thus, the protected interface of graphene/Au-NPs hybrids became active and catalyzed the oxidation reaction of TMB accompanied with a colorless to-blue color change. This approach exhibited good sensitivity and specificity for target DNA with a detection limit of 5.74 × 10(-11) M, and realized the assay of target DNA in human serum samples. Besides, this sensor could be further expanded to detect viruses or proteins by adapting the corresponding aptamers, showing great potential in biochemical detections. PMID:26703265

  1. An upconversion fluorescent resonant energy transfer biosensor for hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA hybridization detection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hao; Lu, Feng; Wu, Xing-Cai; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2015-11-21

    A novel fluorescent resonant energy transfer (FRET) biosensor was fabricated for the detection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA using poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) modified upconversion nanoparticles (NH2-UCNPs) as energy donor and gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) as acceptor. The PEI modified upconversion nanoparticles were prepared directly with a simple one-pot hydrothermal method, which provides high quality amino-group functionalized UCNPs with uniform morphology and strong upconversion luminescence. Two single-stranded DNA strands, which were partially complementary to each other, were then conjugated with NH2-UCNPs and Au NPs. When DNA conjugated NH2-UCNPs and Au NPs are mixed together, the hybridization between complementary DNA sequences on UCNPs and Au NPs will lead to the quenching of the upconversion luminescence due to the FRET process. Meanwhile, upon the addition of target DNA, Au NPs will leave the surface of the UCNPs and the upconversion luminescence can be restored because of the formation of the more stable double-stranded DNA on the UCNPs. The sensor we fabricated here for target DNA detection shows good sensitivity and high selectivity, which has the potential for clinical applications in the analysis of HBV and other DNA sequences. PMID:26421323

  2. Sensitive electrochemical assaying of DNA methyltransferase activity based on mimic-hybridization chain reaction amplified strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linqun; Liu, Yuanjian; Li, Ying; Zhao, Yuewu; Wei, Wei; Liu, Songqin

    2016-08-24

    A mimic-hybridization chain reaction (mimic-HCR) amplified strategy was proposed for sensitive electrochemically detection of DNA methylation and methyltransferase (MTase) activity In the presence of methylated DNA, DNA-gold nanoparticles (DNA-AuNPs) were captured on the electrode by sandwich-type assembly. It then triggered mimic-HCR of two hairpin probes to produce many long double-helix chains for numerous hexaammineruthenium (III) chloride ([Ru(NH3)6](3+), RuHex) inserting. As a result, the signal for electrochemically detection of DNA MTase activity could be amplified. If DNA was non-methylated, however, the sandwich-type assembly would not form because the short double-stranded DNAs (dsDNA) on the Au electrode could be cleaved and digested by restriction endonuclease HpaII (HapII) and exonuclease III (Exo III), resulting in the signal decrement. Based on this, an electrochemical approach for detection of M.SssI MTase activity with high sensitivity was developed. The linear range for M.SssI MTase activity was from 0.05 U mL(-1) to 10 U mL(-1), with a detection limit down to 0.03 U mL(-1). Moreover, this detecting strategy held great promise as an easy-to-use and highly sensitive method for other MTase activity and inhibition detection by exchanging the corresponding DNA sequence. PMID:27496999

  3. Transactivation of pancreas-specific gene sequences in somatic cell hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, K J; Samuelson, L C; Howard, G; Meisler, M H; Darlington, G J

    1991-01-01

    Enhancer/promoter elements from two pancreas-specific genes, those encoding amylase and elastase, were ligated to the bacterial GPT gene. The resulting construct can be used to select for expression of gene products which activate these pancreas-specific promoters in hybrid cells. The selectable GPT construct was stably transferred into several cell lines either directly or by cotransfection with pSV2Neo. GPT was expressed when transferred to pancreatic cell lines but not when transferred to GPT-fibroblast (L) cells or hepatoma cells. When the transformed L cells and hepatoma cells were fused with pancreatic cell lines, GPT was activated in the hybrid cells. Endogenous pancreas-specific genes from the L-cell and hepatoma parents were also activated in the hybrids. In addition, a pancreas-specific nuclear protein, PTF1, was produced in pancreatic and hybrid cells, correlating with GPT expression. The transformed L cells and hepatoma cells thus contained a nonexpressed construct which could be activated in trans by factors present in pancreatic cells. The hepatoma hybrid also continued to produce albumin, demonstrating the coexpression of liver and pancreas-specific genes in the hybrid-cell population. Cell lines carrying the amylase/elastase/GPT construct may be useful as a selection system for cloning of pancreatic transcription activators. Images PMID:1715019

  4. Hybrid Imaging for Patient-Specific Dosimetry in Radionuclide Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ljungberg, Michael; Gleisner, Katarina Sjögreen

    2015-01-01

    Radionuclide therapy aims to treat malignant diseases by systemic administration of radiopharmaceuticals, often using carrier molecules such as peptides and antibodies. The radionuclides used emit electrons or alpha particles as a consequence of radioactive decay, thus leading to local energy deposition. Administration to individual patients can be tailored with regards to the risk of toxicity in normal organs by using absorbed dose planning. The scintillation camera, employed in planar imaging or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), generates images of the spatially and temporally varying activity distribution. Recent commercially available combined SPECT and computed tomography (CT) systems have dramatically increased the possibility of performing accurate dose planning by using the CT information in several steps of the dose-planning calculation chain. This paper discusses the dosimetry chain used for individual absorbed-dose planning and highlights the areas where hybrid imaging makes significant contributions. PMID:26854156

  5. Hybrid Imaging for Patient-Specific Dosimetry in Radionuclide Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ljungberg, Michael; Sjögreen Gleisner, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    Radionuclide therapy aims to treat malignant diseases by systemic administration of radiopharmaceuticals, often using carrier molecules such as peptides and antibodies. The radionuclides used emit electrons or alpha particles as a consequence of radioactive decay, thus leading to local energy deposition. Administration to individual patients can be tailored with regards to the risk of toxicity in normal organs by using absorbed dose planning. The scintillation camera, employed in planar imaging or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), generates images of the spatially and temporally varying activity distribution. Recent commercially available combined SPECT and computed tomography (CT) systems have dramatically increased the possibility of performing accurate dose planning by using the CT information in several steps of the dose-planning calculation chain. This paper discusses the dosimetry chain used for individual absorbed-dose planning and highlights the areas where hybrid imaging makes significant contributions. PMID:26854156

  6. Synthesis of herpes simplex virus, vaccinia virus, and adenovirus DNA in isolated HeLa cell nuclei. I. Effect of viral-specific antisera and phosphonoacetic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Bolden, A; Aucker, J; Weissbach, A

    1975-01-01

    Purified nuclei, isolated from appropriately infected HeLa cells, are shown to synthesize large amounts of either herpes simplex virus (HSV) or vaccinia virus DNA in vitro. The rate of synthesis of DNA by nuclei from infected cells is up to 30 times higher than the synthesis of host DNA in vitro by nuclei isolated from uninfected HeLa cells. Thus HSV nuclei obtained from HSV-infected cells make DNA in vitro at a rate comparable to that seen in the intact, infected cell. Molecular hybridization studies showed that 80% of the DNA sequences synthesized in vitro by nuclei from herpesvirus-infected cells are herpesvirus specific. Vaccinia virus nuclei from vaccinia virus-infected cells, also produce comparable percentages of vaccinia virus-specific DNA sequences. Adenovirus nuclei from adenovirus 2-infected HeLa cells, which also synthesize viral DNA in vitro, have been included in this study. Synthesis of DNA by HSV or vaccinia virus nuclei is markedly inhibited by the corresponding viral-specific antisera. These antisera inhibit in a similar fashion the purified herpesvirus-induced or vaccinia virus-induced DNA polymerase isolated from infected cells. Phosphonoacetic acid, reported to be a specific inhibitor of herpesvirus formation and the herpesvirus-induced DNA polymerase, is equally effective as an inhibitor of HSV DNA synthesis in isolated nuclei in vitro. However, we also find phosphonoacetic acid to be an effective inhibitor of vaccinia virus nuclear DNA synthesis and the purified vaccinia virus-induced DNA polymerase. In addition, this compound shows significant inhibition of DNA synthesis in isolated nuclei obtained from adenovirus-infected or uninfected cells and is a potent inhibitor of HeLa cell DNA polymerase alpha. PMID:172658

  7. Sequence specificity of DNA cleavage by Micrococcus luteus. gamma. endonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Hentosh, P.; Henner, W.D.; Reynolds, R.J.

    1985-04-01

    DNA fragments of defined sequence have been used to determine the sites of cleavage by ..gamma..-endonuclease activity in extracts prepared from Micrococcus luteus. End-labeled DNA restriction fragments of pBR322 DNA that had been irradiated under nitrogen in the presence of potassium iodide or t-butanol were treated with M. luteus ..gamma.. endonuclease and analyzed on irradiated DNA preferentially at the positions of cytosines and thymines. DNA cleavage occurred immediately to the 3' side of pyrimidines in irradiated DNA and resulted in fragments that terminate in a 5'-phosphoryl group. These studies indicate that both altered cytosines and thymines may be important DNA lesions requiring repair after exposure to ..gamma.. radiation.

  8. Increased cytosine DNA-methyltransferase activity is target-cell-specific and an early event in lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Belinsky, S A; Nikula, K J; Baylin, S B; Issa, J P

    1996-01-01

    The association between increased DNA-methyltransferase (DNA-MTase) activity and tumor development suggest a fundamental role for this enzyme in the initiation and progression of cancer. A true functional role for DNA-MTase in the neoplastic process would be further substantiated if the target cells affected by the initiating carcinogen exhibit changes in enzyme activity. This hypothesis was addressed by examining DNA-MTase activity in alveolar type II (target) and Clara (nontarget) cells from A/J and C3H mice that exhibit high and low susceptibility, respectively, for lung tumor formation. Increased DNA-MTase activity was found only in the target alveolar type II cells of the susceptible A/J mouse and caused a marked increase in overall DNA methylation in these cells. Both DNA-MTase and DNA methylation changes were detected 7 days after carcinogen exposure and, thus, were early events in neoplastic evolution. Increased gene expression was also detected by RNA in situ hybridization in hypertrophic alveolar type II cells of carcinogen-treated A/J mice, indicating that elevated levels of expression may be a biomarker for premalignancy. Enzyme activity increased incrementally during lung cancer progression and coincided with increased expression of the DNA-MTase activity are strongly associated with neoplastic development and constitute a key step in carcinogenesis. The detection of premalignant lung disease through increased DNA-MTase expression and the possibility of blocking the deleterious effects of this change with specific inhibitors will offer new intervention strategies for lung cancer. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8633014

  9. Molecular characterization of the body site-specific human epidermal cytokeratin 9: cDNA cloning, amino acid sequence, and tissue specificity of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Langbein, L; Heid, H W; Moll, I; Franke, W W

    1993-12-01

    Differentiation of human plantar and palmar epidermis is characterized by the suprabasal synthesis of a major special intermediate-sized filament (IF) protein, the type I (acidic) cytokeratin 9 (CK 9). Using partial amino acid (aa) sequence information obtained by direct Edman sequencing of peptides resulting from proteolytic digestion of purified CK 9, we synthesized several redundant primers by 'back-translation'. Amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of cDNAs obtained by reverse transcription of mRNAs from human foot sole epidermis, including 5'-primer extension, resulted in multiple overlapping cDNA clones, from which the complete cDNA (2353 bp) could be constructed. This cDNA encoded the CK 9 polypeptide with a calculated molecular weight of 61,987 and an isoelectric point at about pH 5.0. The aa sequence deduced from cDNA was verified in several parts by comparison with the peptide sequences and showed the typical structure of type I CKs, with a head (153 aa), and alpha-helical coiled-coil-forming rod (306 aa), and a tail (163 aa) domain. The protein displayed the highest homology to human CK 10, not only in the highly conserved rod domain but also in large parts of the head and the tail domains. On the other hand, the aa sequence revealed some remarkable differences from CK 10 and other CKs, even in the most conserved segments of the rod domain. The nuclease digestion pattern seen on Southern blot analysis of human genomic DNA indicated the existence of a unique CK 9 gene. Using CK 9-specific riboprobes for hybridization on Northern blots of RNAs from various epithelia, a mRNA of about 2.4 kb in length could be identified only in foot sole epidermis, and a weaker cross-hybridization signal was seen in RNA from bovine heel pad epidermis at about 2.0 kb. A large number of tissues and cell cultures were examined by PCR of mRNA-derived cDNAs, using CK 9-specific primers. But even with this very sensitive signal amplification, only palmar

  10. Identification of human DNA in forensic evidence by loop-mediated isothermal amplification combined with a colorimetric gold nanoparticle hybridization probe.

    PubMed

    Watthanapanpituck, Khanistha; Kiatpathomchai, Wansika; Chu, Eric; Panvisavas, Nathinee

    2014-11-01

    A DNA test based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and colorimetric gold nanoparticle (AuNP) hybridization probe to detect the presence of human DNA in forensic evidence was developed. The LAMP primer set targeted eight regions of the human cytochrome b, and its specificity was verified against the DNA of 11 animal species, which included animals closely related to humans, such as chimpanzee and orangutan. By using the AuNP probe, sequence-specific LAMP product could be detected and the test result could be visualized through the change in color. The limit of detection was demonstrated with reproducibility to be as low as 718 fg of genomic DNA, which is equivalent to approximately 100 plasmid DNA copies containing the cytochrome b DNA target region. A simple DNA extraction method for the commonly found forensic biological samples was also devised to streamline the test process. This LAMP-AuNP human DNA test showed to be a robust, specific, and cost-effective tool for the forensic identification of human specimens without requiring sophisticated laboratory instruments. PMID:24827529

  11. Acquisition of double-stranded DNA-binding ability in a hybrid protein between Escherichia coli CspA and the cold shock domain of human YB-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, N; Yamanaka, K; Inouye, M

    2000-11-01

    Escherichia coli CspA, a major cold shock protein, is dramatically induced upon temperature downshift. As it binds co-operatively to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and RNA without apparent sequence specificity, it has been proposed that CspA acts as an RNA chaperone to facilitate transcription and translation at low temperature. CspA consists of a five-stranded beta-barrel structure containing two RNA-binding motifs, RNP1 and RNP2. Eukaryotic Y-box proteins, such as human YB-1, are a family of nucleic acid-binding proteins that share a region of high homology with CspA (43% identity), termed the cold shock domain (CSD). Their cellular functions are very diverse and are associated with growth-related processes. Here, we replaced the six-residue loop region of CspA between the beta3 and beta4 strands with the corresponding region of the CSD of human YB-1 protein. The resulting hybrid protein became capable of binding to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) in addition to ssDNA and RNA. The dsDNA-binding ability of an RNP1 point mutant (F20L) of the hybrid was almost unchanged. On the other hand, the dsDNA-binding ability of the hybrid protein was abolished in high salt concentrations in contrast to its ssDNA-binding ability. These results indicate that the loop region between the beta3 and beta4 strands of Y-box proteins, which is a little longer and more basic than that of CspA, plays an important role in their binding to dsDNA. PMID:11069676

  12. DNA hybridization as a guide to phylogeny: chemical and physical limits.

    PubMed

    Schmid, C W; Marks, J

    1990-03-01

    The technique of forming interspecific DNA heteroduplexes and estimating phylogenetic distances from the depression in their duplex melting temperature has several physical and chemical constraints. These constraints determine the maximum phylogenetic distance that may be estimated by this technique and the most appropriate method of analyzing that distance. Melting curves of self-renatured single copy primate DNAs reveal the presence of components absent from the renaturation products of exactly paired sequences. This observation, which confirms existing literature, challenges a fundamental assumption: that orthologous (i.e., corresponding) DNA sequences in the divergent species are being compared in DNA heteroduplex melting experiments. As a model system, the thermal stabilities of heteroduplexes formed between a human alpha-globin cDNA and four alpha-like globin genes isolated from chimpanzee are qualitatively compared. The results of this comparison show that the cross-hybrids of imperfectly matched gene duplicates from divergent species can contribute to the additional components that are present in renatured single copy DNAs. Single copy DNA, as usually defined, includes sequence duplicates that will obscure phylogenetic comparisons in a mass hybridization of genomes. PMID:2109086

  13. Quantum Dot-Bead-DNA Probe-Based Hybridization Fluorescence Assays on Microfluidic Chips.

    PubMed

    Ankireddy, Seshadri Reddy; Kim, Jongsung

    2015-10-01

    The development of chip-based, quantum dot (QD)-bead-DNA conjugate probes for hybridization detection is a prime research focus in the field of microfluidics. QD-Bead-DNA probe-based hybridization detection methods are often called "bead-based assays," and their success is substantially influenced by the dispensing and manipulation capabilities of microfluidic technology. Met was identified as a prognostic marker in different cancers including lung, renal, liver, head and neck, stomach, and breast. In this report, the cancer causing Met gene was detected with QDs attached to polystyrene microbeads. We constructed a microfluidic platform using a flexible PDMS polymer. The chip consists of two channels, with two inlets and two outlets. The two channels were integrated with QD-bead-DNA probes for simultaneous detection of wild type target DNA and mutant DNA, containing three nucleotide changes compared to the wild type sequence. The fluorescence quenching ability of QDs within the channels of microfluidic chips were compared for both DNAs. PMID:26726440

  14. Electrostatics of DNA nucleotide-carbon nanotube hybrids evaluated from QM:MM simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chehel Amirani, Morteza; Tang, Tian

    2015-11-01

    Biomolecule-functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been studied vastly in recent years due to their potential applications for instance in cancer detection, purification and separation of CNTs, and nanoelectronics. Studying the electrostatic potential generated by a biomolecule-CNT hybrid is important in predicting its interactions with the surrounding environment such as charged particles and surfaces. In this paper, we performed atomistic simulations using a QM:MM approach to evaluate the electrostatic potential and charge transfer for a hybrid structure formed by a DNA nucleotide and a CNT in solution. Four types of DNA nucleotides and two CNTs with chiralities of (4,4) and (7,0) were considered. The types of nucleotides and CNTs were both found to play important roles in the electrostatic potential and charge transfer of the hybrid. At the same distance from the CNT axis, the electrostatic potential for the nucleotide-(4,4) CNT hybrids was found to be stronger compared with that for the nucleotide-(7,0) CNT hybrids. Higher electric charge was also shown to be transferred from the DNA nucleotides to the (7,0) CNT compared with the (4,4) CNT. These results correlate with the previous finding that the nucleotides bound more tightly to the (7,0) CNT compared with the (4,4) CNT.Biomolecule-functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been studied vastly in recent years due to their potential applications for instance in cancer detection, purification and separation of CNTs, and nanoelectronics. Studying the electrostatic potential generated by a biomolecule-CNT hybrid is important in predicting its interactions with the surrounding environment such as charged particles and surfaces. In this paper, we performed atomistic simulations using a QM:MM approach to evaluate the electrostatic potential and charge transfer for a hybrid structure formed by a DNA nucleotide and a CNT in solution. Four types of DNA nucleotides and two CNTs with chiralities of (4,4) and (7

  15. Influence of Quasi-Specific Sites on Kinetics of Target DNA Search by a Sequence-Specific DNA-Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Functions of transcription factors require formation of specific complexes at particular sites in cis-regulatory elements of genes. However, chromosomal DNA contains numerous sites that are similar to the target sequences recognized by transcription factors. The influence of such “quasi-specific” sites on functions of the transcription factors is not well understood at present by experimental means. In this work, using fluorescence methods, we have investigated the influence of quasi-specific DNA sites on the efficiency of target location by the zinc finger DNA-binding domain of the inducible transcription factor Egr-1, which recognizes a 9 bp sequence. By stopped-flow assays, we measured the kinetics of Egr-1’s association with a target site on 143 bp DNA in the presence of various competitor DNAs, including nonspecific and quasi-specific sites. The presence of quasi-specific sites on competitor DNA significantly decelerated the target association by the Egr-1 protein. The impact of the quasi-specific sites depended strongly on their affinity, their concentration, and the degree of their binding to the protein. To quantitatively describe the kinetic impact of the quasi-specific sites, we derived an analytical form of the apparent kinetic rate constant for the target association and used it for fitting to the experimental data. Our kinetic data with calf thymus DNA as a competitor suggested that there are millions of high-affinity quasi-specific sites for Egr-1 among the 3 billion bp of genomic DNA. This study quantitatively demonstrates that naturally abundant quasi-specific sites on DNA can considerably impede the target search processes of sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins. PMID:26502071

  16. In-situ detection of DNA hybridization with a microfiber Bragg grating biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Dandan; Guo, Tuan; Xie, Xiaodong; Ran, Yang; Huang, Yunyun; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2014-05-01

    Microfiber Bragg gratings (mFBGs) can be used as cost-effective and relatively simple-to-implement biosensors for monitoring DNA interactions in situ. The sensors are functionalized by a monolayer of poly-L-lysine (PLL) with the specific molecular recognition probe DNA sequences to bind with high specificity to a given target. By recording the wavelength seperation between the two resonant peaks of a single mFBG, the mFBG biosensor is capable of detecting the presence of specific target DNA in situ.

  17. Three-Dimensional Control of DNA Hybridization by Orthogonal Two-Color Two-Photon Uncaging.

    PubMed

    Fichte, Manuela A H; Weyel, Xenia M M; Junek, Stephan; Schäfer, Florian; Herbivo, Cyril; Goeldner, Maurice; Specht, Alexandre; Wachtveitl, Josef; Heckel, Alexander

    2016-07-25

    We successfully introduced two-photon-sensitive photolabile groups ([7-(diethylamino)coumarin-4-yl]methyl and p-dialkylaminonitrobiphenyl) into DNA strands and demonstrated their suitability for three-dimensional photorelease. To visualize the uncaging, we used a fluorescence readout based on double-strand displacement in a hydrogel and in neurons. Orthogonal two-photon uncaging of the two cages is possible, thus enabling complex scenarios of three-dimensional control of hybridization with light. PMID:27294300

  18. Novel electrochemical DNA hybridization biosensors for selective determination of silver ions.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Maryam; Raoof, Jahan Bakhsh; Ojani, Reza

    2015-11-01

    In this work, novel electrochemical biosensors for Ag(+) determination based on Ag(+)-induced DNA hybridization, using Ethyl green (EG) as an electroactive label on the surface of bare carbon paste electrode (CPE) and gold nanoparticles-modified carbon paste electrode (GN-CPE) are reported. Two single-strand poly-C (100% cytosine bases) DNAs are used as oligonucleotide probe and target. In the presence of Ag(+), the target DNA with full cytosine-cytosine (C-C) mismatches could hybridize with the probe DNA by forming C-Ag(+)-C complex. The induced hybridization of the two oligonucleotides leads to the decrease in the reduction peak currents of EG, which could be used for electrochemical determination of Ag(+). This difference in the values of the reduction peak current of EG before and after DNA hybridization (∆I) was linear with the concentration of Ag(+) in the ranges from 3.0×10(-10) to 1.0×10(-9) mol L(-1) and 9.0×10(-11) to 1.0×10(-9) mol L(-1), for the biosensor and nanoparticles modified-biosensor, respectively. Calculated detection limits were 1.04×10(-10) and 2.64×10(-11) mol L(-1) for biosensor and nanoparticles modified-biosensor, respectively. The biosensors demonstrated good selectivity towards Ag(+) ions in the presence of some metal ions such as Pb(2+), Cu(2+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+), Fe(2+) and Hg(2+). The proposed biosensors were applied successfully to the voltammetric determination of Ag(+) in real samples. PMID:26452869

  19. Method for isolating chromosomal DNA in preparation for hybridization in suspension

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.

    2000-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. Chromosomal DNA in a sample containing cell debris is prepared for hybridization in suspension by treating the mixture with RNase. The treated DNA can also be fixed prior to hybridization.

  20. Synergistic effects of epoxy- and amine-silanes on microarray DNA immobilization and hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Sung-Kay; Hsu, Mandy; Ku, Wei-Chi; Tu, Ching-Yu; Tseng, Yu-Tien; Lau, Wai-Kwan; Yan, Rong-Yih; Ma, Jing-Tyan; Tzeng, Chi-Meng

    2003-01-01

    Most microarray slides are manufactured or coated with a layer of poly(L-lysine) or with silanes with different chemical functional groups, for the attachment of nucleic acids on to their surfaces. The efficiency with which nucleic acids bind to these surfaces is not high, because they can be washed away, especially in the case of spotting oligonucleotides. In view of this, we have developed a method to increase the binding capacity and efficiency of hybridization of DNA on to derivatized glass surfaces. This makes use of the synergistic effect of two binding interactions between the nucleic acids and the coating chemicals on the surface of the glass slides. The enhanced binding allows the nucleic acids to be bound tightly and to survive stringency washes. When immobilized, DNA exhibits a higher propensity for hybridization on the surface than on slides with only one binding chemical. By varying the silane concentrations, we have shown that maximal DNA oligonucleotide binding on glass surfaces occurs when the percentage composition of both of the surface-coating chemicals falls to 0.2%, which is different from that on binding PCR products. This new mixture-combination approach for nucleic-acid binding allows signals from immobilization and hybridization to have higher signal-to-noise ratios than for other silane-coated methods. PMID:12809552

  1. DNA-binding preferences of bisantrene analogues: relevance to the sequence specificity of drug-mediated topoisomerase II poisoning.

    PubMed

    Sissi, C; Bolgan, L; Moro, S; Zagotto, G; Bailly, C; Menta, E; Capranico, G; Palumbo, M

    1998-12-01

    To elucidate structure-activity relationships for drugs that are able to poison or inhibit topoisomerase II, we investigated the thermodynamics and stereochemistry of the DNA binding of a number of anthracene derivatives bearing one or two 4, 5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl-hydrazone side chains (characteristic of bisantrene) at different positions of the planar aromatic system. An aza-bioisostere, which can be considered a bisantrene-amsacrine hybrid, was also tested. The affinity for nucleic acids in different sequence contexts was evaluated by spectroscopic techniques, using various experimental conditions. DNA-melting and DNase I footprinting experiments were also performed. The location and number of the otherwise identical side chains dramatically affected the affinity of the test compounds for the nucleic acid. In addition, the new compounds exhibited different DNA sequence preferences, depending on the locations of the dihydroimidazolyl-hydrazone groups, which indicates a major role for the side-chain position in generating specific contacts with the nucleic acid. Molecular modeling studies of the intercalative binding of the 1- or 9-substituted isomers to DNA fully supported the experimental data, because a substantially more favorable recognition of A-T steps, compared with G-C steps, was found for the 9-substituted derivative, whereas a much closer energy balance was found for the 1-substituted isomer. These results compare well with the alteration of base specificity found for the topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage stimulated by the isomeric drugs. Therefore, DNA-binding specificity appears to represent an important determinant for the recognition of the topoisomerase-DNA cleavable complex by the drug, at least for poisons belonging to the amsacrine-bisantrene family. PMID:9855632

  2. Ion-Channel Genosensor for the Detection of Specific DNA Sequences Derived from Plum Pox Virus in Plant Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Malecka, Kamila; Michalczuk, Lech; Radecka, Hanna; Radecki, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    A DNA biosensor for detection of specific oligonucleotides sequences of Plum Pox Virus (PPV) in plant extracts and buffer is proposed. The working principles of a genosensor are based on the ion-channel mechanism. The NH2-ssDNA probe was deposited onto a glassy carbon electrode surface to form an amide bond between the carboxyl group of oxidized electrode surface and amino group from ssDNA probe. The analytical signals generated as a result of hybridization were registered in Osteryoung square wave voltammetry in the presence of [Fe(CN)6]3−/4− as a redox marker. The 22-mer and 42-mer complementary ssDNA sequences derived from PPV and DNA samples from plants infected with PPV were used as targets. Similar detection limits of 2.4 pM (31.0 pg/mL) and 2.3 pM (29.5 pg/mL) in the concentration range 1–8 pM were observed in the presence of the 22-mer ssDNA and 42-mer complementary ssDNA sequences of PPV, respectively. The genosensor was capable of discriminating between samples consisting of extracts from healthy plants and leaf extracts from infected plants in the concentration range 10–50 pg/mL. The detection limit was 12.8 pg/mL. The genosensor displayed good selectivity and sensitivity. The 20-mer partially complementary DNA sequences with four complementary bases and DNA samples from healthy plants used as negative controls generated low signal. PMID:25302809

  3. Label-Free Detection of Sequence-Specific DNA Based on Fluorescent Silver Nanoclusters-Assisted Surface Plasmon-Enhanced Energy Transfer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jin-Liang; Yin, Bin-Cheng; Le, Huynh-Nhu; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2015-06-17

    We have developed a label-free method for sequence-specific DNA detection based on surface plasmon enhanced energy transfer (SPEET) process between fluorescent DNA/AgNC string and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). DNA/AgNC string, prepared by a single-stranded DNA template encoded two emitter-nucleation sequences at its termini and an oligo spacer in the middle, was rationally designed to produce bright fluorescence emission. The proposed method takes advantage of two strategies. The first one is the difference in binding properties of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) toward AuNPs. The second one is SPEET process between fluorescent DNA/AgNC string and AuNPs, in which fluorescent DNA/AgNC string can be spontaneously adsorbed onto the surface of AuNPs and correspondingly AuNPs serve as "nanoquencher" to quench the fluorescence of DNA/AgNC string. In the presence of target DNA, the sensing probe hybridized with target DNA to form duplex DNA, leading to a salt-induced AuNP aggregation and subsequently weakened SPEET process between fluorescent DNA/AgNC string and AuNPs. A red-to-blue color change of AuNPs and a concomitant fluorescence increase were clearly observed in the sensing system, which had a concentration dependent manner with specific DNA. The proposed method achieved a detection limit of ∼2.5 nM, offering the following merits of simple design, convenient operation, and low experimental cost because of no chemical modification, organic dye, enzymatic reaction, or separation procedure involved. PMID:26024337

  4. SHAMS: Combining chemical modification of RNA with mass spectrometry to examine polypurine tract-containing RNA/DNA hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Kevin B.; Yi-Brunozzi, Hye Young; Brinson, Robert G.; Marino, John P.; Fabris, Daniele; Le Grice, Stuart F.J.

    2009-01-01

    Selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) has gained popularity as a facile method of examining RNA structure both in vitro and in vivo, exploiting accessibility of the ribose 2′-OH to acylation by N-methylisatoic anhydride (NMIA) in unpaired or flexible configurations. Subsequent primer extension terminates at the site of chemical modification, and these products are fractionated by high-resolution gel electrophoresis. When applying SHAPE to investigate structural features associated with the wild-type and analog-substituted polypurine tract (PPT)–containing RNA/DNA hybrids, their size (20–25 base pairs) rendered primer extension impractical. As an alternative method of detection, we reasoned that chemical modification could be combined with tandem mass spectrometry, relying on the mass increment of RNA fragments containing the NMIA adduct (Mr = 133 Da). Using this approach, we demonstrate both specific modification of the HIV-1 PPT RNA primer and variations in its acylation pattern induced by replacing template nucleotides with a non-hydrogen-bonding thymine isostere. Our selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by mass spectrometry strategy (SHAMS) should find utility when examining the structure of small RNA fragments or RNA/DNA hybrids where primer extension cannot be performed. PMID:19535461

  5. Lattice model of oligonucleotide hybridization in solution. II. Specificity and cooperativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araque, J. C.; Robert, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    Because oligonucleotides are short sequences of nucleic acid bases, their association in solution with complementary strands (hybridization) is often seen to conform to a simple two-state model. However, experimental evidence suggests that, despite their short length, oligonucleotides may hybridize through multiple states involving intermediates. We investigate whether these apparently contradictory scenarios are possible by imposing different levels of sequence specificity on a lattice model of oligonucleotides in solution, which we introduced in Part I [J. C. Araque et al., J. Chem. Phys. 134, 165103 (2011)]. We find that both multiple-intermediate (weakly cooperative) and two-state (strongly cooperative) transitions are possible and that these are directly linked to the level of sequence specificity. Sequences with low specificity hybridize (base-by-base) by way of multiple stable intermediates with increasing number of paired bases. Such intermediate states are weakly cooperative because the energetic gain from adding an additional base pair is outweighed by the conformational entropy loss. Instead, sequences with high specificity hybridize through multiple metastable intermediates which easily bridge the configurational and energetic gaps between single- and double-stranded states. These metastable intermediates interconvert with minimal loss of conformational entropy leading to a strongly cooperative hybridization. The possibility of both scenarios, multiple- and two-states, is therefore encoded in the specificity of the sequence which in turn defines the level of cooperativity.

  6. Sentaurus® based modeling and simulation for GFET's characteristic for ssDNA immobilization and hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunfang, Jia; Cheng, Ju

    2016-01-01

    The graphene field effect transistor (GFET) has been widely studied and developed as sensors and functional devices. The first report about GFET sensing simulation on the device level is proposed. The GFET's characteristics, its responding for single strand DNA (ssDNA) and hybridization with the complimentary DNA (cDNA) are simulated based on Sentaurus, a popular CAD tool for electronic devices. The agreement between the simulated blank GFET feature and the reported experimental data suggests the feasibility of the presented simulation method. Then the simulations of ssDNA immobilization on GFET and hybridization with its cDNA are performed, the results are discussed based on the electron transfer (ET) mechanism between DNA and graphene. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61371028) and the Tianjin Natural Science Foundation (No. 12JCZDJC22400).

  7. Label-free in-situ real-time DNA hybridization kinetics detection employing microfiber-assisted Mach-Zehnder interferometer.

    PubMed

    Song, Binbin; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Bo; Lin, Wei; Wu, Jixuan

    2016-07-15

    A label-free DNA biosensor based on microfiber-assisted Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MAMZI) for in-situ real-time DNA hybridization kinetics detection has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated. A microfiber of hundreds of microns in length is fabricated by tapering a segment of standard single-mode fiber (SMF) to construct the U-shaped microcavity between the lead-in and lead-out SMFs. Thanks to the mode field mismatching between the SMF and microfiber, the incident guided mode light would separate into two beams that respectively propagate in the air microcavity and the microfiber. Consequently, interference between different light modes would occur at the joint between the microfiber and the lead-out SMF. Experimental results indicate that owing to the participation of opening cavity modes in the modal interference process, the interferometric spectrum of our proposed microcavity sensor is highly sensitive to the variation of environmental refractive index (RI), especially for the RI range around 1.34 which is useful for most biological applications. The microfiber functionalization is achieved by stepwise modifying the microfiber with monolayer Poly-l-lysine (PLL) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probes to produce the sensitive surface that could uniquely attach specific target ssDNAs. The fiber surface functionalization as well as DNA hybridization processes have been experimentally investigated for different target ssDNA solutions in real time. The interferometric transmission spectrum shows large wavelength shift for different biological phases, and a detection limit conservatively down to 0.0001pmol/μL has been acquired by employing the U-shaped microcavity of 176.88μm in length. Our proposed DNA biosensor possesses several advantages such as compact size, ease of fabrication, and strong response for DNA hybridization, which make it a promising candidate for potential applications in such rapidly expanding areas as medical diagnosis, cancer

  8. A sandwich-hybridization assay for simultaneous determination of HIV and tuberculosis DNA targets based on signal amplification by quantum dots-PowerVision™ polymer coding nanotracers.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhongdan; Gan, Ning; Zhang, Huairong; Wang, De; Qiao, Li; Cao, Yuting; Li, Tianhua; Hu, Futao

    2015-09-15

    A novel sandwich-hybridization assay for simultaneous electrochemical detection of multiple DNA targets related to human immune deficiency virus (HIV) and tuberculosis (TB) was developed based on the different quantum dots-PowerVision(TM) polymer nanotracers. The polymer nanotracers were respectively fabricated by immobilizing SH-labeled oligonucleotides (s-HIV or s-TB), which can partially hybrid with virus DNA (HIV or TB), on gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and then modified with PowerVision(TM) (PV) polymer-encapsulated quantum dots (CdS or PbS) as signal tags. PV is a dendrimer enzyme linked polymer, which can immobilize abundant QDs to amplify the stripping voltammetry signals from the metal ions (Pb or Cd). The capture probes were prepared through the immobilization of SH-labeled oligonucleotides, which can complementary with HIV and TB DNA, on the magnetic Fe3O4@Au (GMPs) beads. After sandwich-hybridization, the polymer nanotracers together with HIV and TB DNA targets were simultaneously introduced onto the surface of GMPs. Then the two encoding metal ions (Cd(2+) and Pb(2+)) were used to differentiate two viruses DNA due to the different subsequent anodic stripping voltammetric peaks at -0.84 V (Cd) and -0.61 V (Pb). Because of the excellent signal amplification of the polymer nanotracers and the great specificity of DNA targets, this assay could detect targets DNA as low as 0.2 femtomolar and exhibited excellent selectivity with the dynamitic range from 0.5 fM to 500 pM. Those results demonstrated that this electrochemical coding assay has great potential in applications for screening more viruses DNA while changing the probes. PMID:25911447

  9. Multicolor chromosome banding (MCB) with YAC/BAC-based probes and region-specific microdissection DNA libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Liehr, T.; Weise, A.; Heller, A.; Starke, H.; Mrasek, K.; Kuechler, A.; Weier, H.-U.G.; Claussen, U.

    2003-06-23

    Multicolor chromosome banding (MCB) allows the delineation of chromosomal regions with a resolution of a few mega base pairs, i.e., slightly below the size of most visible chromosome bands. Based on the hybridization of over lapping region-specific probe libraries, chromosomal subregions are hybridized with probes that fluoresce in distinct wave length intervals, so they can be assigned predefined pseudo-colors during the digital imaging and visualization process. The present study demonstrates how MCB patterns can be produced by region-specific micro dissection derived (mcd) libraries as well as collections of yeast or bacterial artificial chromosomes (YACs and BACs, respectively). We compared the efficiency of an mcd library based approach with the hybridization of collections of locus-specific probes (LSP) for fluorescent banding of three rather differently sized human chromosomes, i.e., chromosomes 2, 13, and 22. The LSP sets were comprised of 107 probes specific for chromosome 2, 82 probes for chromosome 13, and 31 probes for chromosome 22. The results demonstrated a more homogeneous coverage of chromosomes and thus, more desirable banding patterns using the microdissection library-based MCB. This may be related to the observation that chromosomes are difficult to cover completely with YAC and/or BAC clones as single-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments showed. Mcd libraries, on the other hand, provide high complexity probes that work well as region specific paints, but do not readily allow positioning of break points on genetic or physical maps as required for the positional cloning of genes. Thus, combinations of mcd libraries and locus-specific large insert DNA probes appear to be the most efficient tools for high-resolution cytogenetic analyses.

  10. Synthesis of eight-arm, branched oligonucleotide hybrids and studies on the limits of DNA-driven assembly.

    PubMed

    Schwenger, Alexander; Gerlach, Claudia; Griesser, Helmut; Richert, Clemens

    2014-12-01

    Oligonucleotide hybrids with organic cores as rigid branching elements and four or six CG dimer strands have been shown to form porous materials from dilute aqueous solution. In order to explore the limits of this form of DNA-driven assembly, we prepared hybrids with three or eight DNA arms via solution-phase syntheses, using H-phosphonates of protected dinucleoside phosphates. This included the synthesis of (CG)8TREA, where TREA stands for the tetrakis[4-(resorcin-5-ylethynyl)phenyl]adamantane core. The ability of the new compounds to assemble in a DNA-driven fashion was studied by UV-melting analysis and NMR, using hybrids with self-complementary CG zipper arms or non-self-complementary TC dimer arms. The three-arm hybrid failed to form a material under conditions where four-arm hybrids did so. Further, the assembly of TREA hybrids appears to be dominated by hydrophobic interactions, not base pairing of the DNA arms. These results help in the design of materials forming by multivalent DNA-DNA interactions. PMID:25407332

  11. Methylation interactions in Arabidopsis hybrids require RNA-directed DNA methylation and are influenced by genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingzhu; Wang, Dong; Lang, Zhaobo; He, Li; Yang, Lan; Zeng, Liang; Li, Yanqiang; Zhao, Cheng; Huang, Huan; Zhang, Heng; Zhang, Huiming; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-07-19

    DNA methylation is a conserved epigenetic mark in plants and many animals. How parental alleles interact in progeny to influence the epigenome is poorly understood. We analyzed the DNA methylomes of Arabidopsis Col and C24 ecotypes, and their hybrid progeny. Hybrids displayed nonadditive DNA methylation levels, termed methylation interactions, throughout the genome. Approximately 2,500 methylation interactions occurred at regions where parental DNA methylation levels are similar, whereas almost 1,000 were at differentially methylated regions in parents. Methylation interactions were characterized by an abundance of 24-nt small interfering RNAs. Furthermore, dysfunction of the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway abolished methylation interactions but did not affect the increased biomass observed in hybrid progeny. Methylation interactions correlated with altered genetic variation within the genome, suggesting that they may play a role in genome evolution. PMID:27382183

  12. Mutagenesis by site-specific arylamine adducts in plasmid DNA: Enhancing replication of the adducted strand alters mutation frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, T.M.; Lee, Meisie; King, C.M. )

    1990-07-03

    Site specifically modified plasmids were used to determine the mutagenic effects of single arylamine adducts in bacterial cells. A synthetic heptadecamer bearing a single N-(guanin-8-yl)-2-aminofluorene (AF) or N-(guanin-8-yl)-2-(acetylamino)fluorene (AAF) adduct was used to introduce the adducts into a specific site in plasmid DNA that contained a 17-base single-stranded region complementary to the modified oligonucleotide. Following transformation of bacterial cells with the adduct-bearing DNA, putative mutants were detected by colony hybridization techniques that allowed unbiased detection of all mutations at or near the site of the adduct. The site-specific AF or AAF adducts were also placed into plasmid DNA that contained uracil residues on the strand opposite that bearing the lesions. The presence of uracil in one strand of the DNA decreases the ability of the bacterial replication system to use the uracil-containing strand, thereby favoring the use of the strand bearing the adducts. In a comparison of the results obtained with site specifically modified DNA, either with or without uracil, the presence of the uracil increased the mutation frequencies of the AF adduct by >7-fold to 2.9% and of the AAF adduct by >12-fold to 0.75%. The AF adduct produced primarily single-base deletions in the absence of uracil but only base substitutions in the uracil-containing constructs. The AAF adduct produced mutations only in the uracil-containing DNA, which included both frame shifts and base substitutions. Mutations produced by both adducts were SOS dependent.

  13. Development of an electrochemical biosensor methods based on acrylic microsphere for the determination of Arowana DNA hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mahbubur; Heng, Lee Yook; Futra, Dedi; Chiang, Chew Poh

    2015-09-01

    An electrochemical method of Arowana DNA determination based of N-acrylosuccinimide (NAS) modified acrylic microsphere was fabricated. Hydrophobic succinimide functional group containing poly(n-butylacrylate-N-acryloxysuccinimide) microspheres were synthesized with a simple one-step photopolymerization pocedure. Aminated DNA probe was covalently bonded to the succinimde functional group of the acrylic microspheres. The hybridization of the immobilized DNA probe with the complementary DNA was determined by the differential pulse voltametry using anthraquninone-2-sulfonic acid monohydrate sodium salt (AQMS) as the electroactive hybridization label. The influences of many factors such as duration of DNA probe immobilization and hybridization, operational temperature and non-complementary DNA on the biosensor performance were evaluated. Under optimized conditions, the DNA microbiosensor demonstrated a wide linear response range to target DNA is 1.0 × 10-16 and 1.0 × 10-8 M with a lower limit of detection (LOD) of 9.46 × 10-17 M (R2 = 0.99) were calculated. This biosensor had improved the overall analytical performance of the resultant DNA microbiosensor when compared with other reported DNA biosensors using other nano-materials for membranes and microspheres as DNA immobilization matrices.

  14. Enhanced photoelectrochemical strategy for ultrasensitive DNA detection based on two different sizes of CdTe quantum dots cosensitized TiO2/CdS:Mn hybrid structure.

    PubMed

    Fan, Gao-Chao; Han, Li; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2014-11-01

    A TiO2/CdS:Mn hybrid structure cosensitized with two different sizes of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) was designed to develop a novel and ultrasensitive photoelectrochemical DNA assay. In this protocol, TiO2/CdS:Mn hybrid structure was prepared by successive adsorption and reaction of Cd(2+)/Mn(2+) and S(2-) ions on the surface of TiO2 film and then was employed as matrix for immobilization of hairpin DNA probe, whereas large-sized CdTe-COOH QDs and small-sized CdTe-NH2 QDs as signal amplification elements were successively labeled on the terminal of hairpin DNA probe. The target DNA detection was based upon the photocurrent change originated from conformation change of the hairpin DNA probe after hybridization with target DNA. In the absence of target DNA, the immobilized DNA probe was in the hairpin form and the anchored different sizes of CdTe-COOH and CdTe-NH2 QDs were close to the TiO2/CdS:Mn electrode surface, which led to a very strong photocurrent intensity because of the formation of the cosensitized structure. However, in the presence of target DNA, the hairpin DNA probe hybridized with target DNA and changed into a more rigid, rodlike double helix, which forced the multianchored CdTe QDs away from the TiO2/CdS:Mn electrode surface, resulting in significantly decreased photocurrent intensity because of the vanished cosensitization effect. By using this cosensitization signal amplification strategy, the proposed DNA assay could offer an ultrasensitive and specific detection of DNA down to 27 aM, and it opened up a new promising platform to detect various DNA targets at ultralow levels for early diagnoses of different diseases. PMID:25294102

  15. Hybridization probes for conventional DNA fingerprinting used as single primers in the polymerase chain reaction to distinguish strains of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, W; Mitchell, T G; Freedman, E Z; Vilgalys, R

    1993-01-01

    In conventional DNA fingerprinting, hypervariable and repetitive sequences (minisatellite or microsatellite DNA) are detected with hybridization probes. As demonstrated here, these probes can be used as single primers in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to generate individual fingerprints. Several conventional DNA fingerprinting probes were used to prime the PCR, yielding distinctive, hypervariable multifragment profiles for different strains of Cryptococcus neoformans. PCR fingerprinting with the oligonucleotide primers (GTG)5, (GACA)4, and the phage M13 core sequence (GAGGGTGGXGGXTCT), but not with (CA)8 or (CT)8, generated DNA polymorphisms with all 42 strains of C. neoformans investigated. PCR fingerprints produced by priming with (GTG)5, (GACA)4, or the M13 core sequence differentiated the two varieties of C. neoformans, C. neoformans var. neoformans (serotypes A and D) and C. neoformans var. gattii (serotypes B and C). Furthermore, strains of serotypes A, D, and B or C could be distinguished from each other by specific PCR fingerprint patterns. These primers, which also successfully amplified hypervariable DNA segments from other species, provide a convenient method of identification at the species or individual level. Amplification of polymorphic DNA patterns by PCR with these primers offers several advantages over classical DNA fingerprinting techniques, appears to be more reliable than other PCR-based methods for detecting polymorphic DNA, such as analysis of random-amplified polymorphic DNA, and should be applicable to many other organisms. Images PMID:8408543

  16. Thiazole Orange Dimers in DNA: Fluorescent Base Substitutions with Hybridization Readout.

    PubMed

    Berndl, Sina; Dimitrov, Stoichko D; Menacher, Florian; Fiebig, Torsten; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim

    2016-02-12

    By using (S)-2-amino-1,3-propanediol as a linker, thiazole orange (TO) was incorporated in a dimeric form into DNA. The green fluorescence (λ=530 nm) of the intrastrand TO dimer is quenched, whereas the interstrand TO dimer shows a characteristic redshifted orange emission (λ=585 nm). Steady-state optical spectroscopic methods reveal that the TO dimer fluorescence is independent of the sequential base contexts. Time-resolved pump-probe measurements and excitation spectra reveal the coexistence of conformations, including mainly stacked TO dimers and partially unstacked ones, which yield exciton and excimer contributions to the fluorescence, respectively. The helicity of the DNA framework distorts the excitonic coupling. In particular, the interstrand TO dimer could be regarded as an excitonically interacting base pair with fluorescence readout for DNA hybridization. Finally, the use of this fluorescent readout was representatively demonstrated in molecular beacons. PMID:26773846

  17. A model of binding on DNA microarrays: understanding the combined effect of probe synthesis failure, cross-hybridization, DNA fragmentation and other experimental details of affymetrix arrays

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background DNA microarrays are used both for research and for diagnostics. In research, Affymetrix arrays are commonly used for genome wide association studies, resequencing, and for gene expression analysis. These arrays provide large amounts of data. This data is analyzed using statistical methods that quite often discard a large portion of the information. Most of the information that is lost comes from probes that systematically fail across chips and from batch effects. The aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive model for hybridization that predicts probe intensities for Affymetrix arrays and that could provide a basis for improved microarray analysis and probe development. The first part of the model calculates probe binding affinities to all the possible targets in the hybridization solution using the Langmuir isotherm. In the second part of the model we integrate details that are specific to each experiment and contribute to the differences between hybridization in solution and on the microarray. These details include fragmentation, wash stringency, temperature, salt concentration, and scanner settings. Furthermore, the model fits probe synthesis efficiency and target concentration parameters directly to the data. All the parameters used in the model have a well-established physical origin. Results For the 302 chips that were analyzed the mean correlation between expected and observed probe intensities was 0.701 with a range of 0.88 to 0.55. All available chips were included in the analysis regardless of the data quality. Our results show that batch effects arise from differences in probe synthesis, scanner settings, wash strength, and target fragmentation. We also show that probe synthesis efficiencies for different nucleotides are not uniform. Conclusions To date this is the most complete model for binding on microarrays. This is the first model that includes both probe synthesis efficiency and hybridization kinetics/cross-hybridization. These

  18. Multilocus sequence and microsatellite identification of intra-specific hybrids and ancestor-like donors among natural Ethiopian isolates of Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Gelanew, Tesfaye; Hailu, Asrat; Schőnian, Gabriele; Lewis, Michael D; Miles, Michael A; Yeo, Matthew

    2014-09-01

    Protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae) cause widespread and devastating human diseases. Visceral leishmaniasis is endemic in Ethiopia where it has also been responsible for fatal epidemics. It is postulated that genetic exchange in Leishmania has implications for heterosis (hybrid vigour), spread of virulent strains, resistance to chemotherapeutics, and exploitation of different hosts and vectors. Here we analyse 11 natural Ethiopian Leishmania donovani isolates consisting of four putative hybrids, seven parent-like isolates and over 90 derived biological clones. We apply a novel combination of high resolution multilocus microsatellite typing (five loci) and multilocus sequence typing (four loci) that together distinguish parent-like and hybrid L. donovani strains. Results indicate that the four isolates (and their associated biological clones) are genetic hybrids, not the results of mixed infections, each possessing heterozygous markers consistent with inheritance of divergent alleles from genetically distinct Ethiopian L. donovani lineages. The allelic profiles of the putative hybrids may have arisen from a single hybridisation event followed by inbreeding or gene conversion, or alternatively from two or more hybridisation events. Mitochondrial sequencing showed uniparental maxicircle inheritance for all of the hybrids, each possessing a single mitochondrial genotype. Fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis of DNA content demonstrated that all hybrids and their associated clones were diploid. Together the data imply that intra-specific genetic exchange is a recurrent feature of natural L. donovani populations, with substantial implications for the phyloepidemiology of Leishmania. PMID:24995620

  19. Coarse-grained simulation study of sequence effects on DNA hybridization in a concentrated environment.

    PubMed

    Markegard, Cade B; Fu, Iris W; Reddy, K Anki; Nguyen, Hung D

    2015-02-01

    A novel coarse-grained model is developed to elucidate thermodynamics and kinetic mechanisms of DNA self-assembly. It accounts for sequence and solvent conditions to capture key experimental results such as sequence-dependent thermal property and salt-dependent persistence length of ssDNA and dsDNA. Moreover, constant-temperature simulations on two single strands of a homogeneous sequence show two main mechanisms of hybridization: a slow slithering mechanism and a one-order faster zippering mechanism. Furthermore, large-scale simulations at a high DNA strand concentration demonstrate that DNA self-assembly is a robust and enthalpically driven process in which the formation of double helices is deciphered to occur via multiple self-assembly pathways including the strand displacement mechanism. However, sequence plays an important role in shifting the majority of one pathway over the others and controlling size distribution of self-assembled aggregates. This study yields a complex picture on the role of sequence on programmable self-assembly and demonstrates a promising simulation tool that is suitable for studies in DNA nanotechnology. PMID:25581253

  20. A novel hybrid single molecule approach reveals spontaneous DNA motion in the nucleosome

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Sijie; Falk, Samantha J.; Black, Ben E.; Lee, Tae-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Structural dynamics of nucleic acid and protein is an important physical basis of their functions. These motions are often very difficult to synchronize and too fast to be clearly resolved with the currently available single molecule methods. Here we demonstrate a novel hybrid single molecule approach combining stochastic data analysis with fluorescence correlation that enables investigations of sub-ms unsynchronized structural dynamics of macromolecules. Based on the method, we report the first direct evidence of spontaneous DNA motions at the nucleosome termini. The nucleosome, comprising DNA and a histone core, is the fundamental packing unit of eukaryotic genes that must be accessed during various genome transactions. Spontaneous DNA opening at the nucleosome termini has long been hypothesized to enable gene access in the nucleosome, but has yet to be directly observed. Our approach reveals that DNA termini in the nucleosome open and close repeatedly at 0.1–1 ms−1. The kinetics depends on salt concentration and DNA–histone interactions but not much on DNA sequence, suggesting that this dynamics is universal and imposes the kinetic limit to gene access. These results clearly demonstrate that our method provides an efficient and robust means to investigate unsynchronized structural changes of DNA at a sub-ms time resolution. PMID:26013809

  1. Identification of tissue-specific cell death using methylation patterns of circulating DNA.

    PubMed

    Lehmann-Werman, Roni; Neiman, Daniel; Zemmour, Hai; Moss, Joshua; Magenheim, Judith; Vaknin-Dembinsky, Adi; Rubertsson, Sten; Nellgård, Bengt; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Spalding, Kirsty; Haller, Michael J; Wasserfall, Clive H; Schatz, Desmond A; Greenbaum, Carla J; Dorrell, Craig; Grompe, Markus; Zick, Aviad; Hubert, Ayala; Maoz, Myriam; Fendrich, Volker; Bartsch, Detlef K; Golan, Talia; Ben Sasson, Shmuel A; Zamir, Gideon; Razin, Aharon; Cedar, Howard; Shapiro, A M James; Glaser, Benjamin; Shemer, Ruth; Dor, Yuval

    2016-03-29

    Minimally invasive detection of cell death could prove an invaluable resource in many physiologic and pathologic situations. Cell-free circulating DNA (cfDNA) released from dying cells is emerging as a diagnostic tool for monitoring cancer dynamics and graft failure. However, existing methods rely on differences in DNA sequences in source tissues, so that cell death cannot be identified in tissues with a normal genome. We developed a method of detecting tissue-specific cell death in humans based on tissue-specific methylation patterns in cfDNA. We interrogated tissue-specific methylome databases to identify cell type-specific DNA methylation signatures and developed a method to detect these signatures in mixed DNA samples. We isolated cfDNA from plasma or serum of donors, treated the cfDNA with bisulfite, PCR-amplified the cfDNA, and sequenced it to quantify cfDNA carrying the methylation markers of the cell type of interest. Pancreatic β-cell DNA was identified in the circulation of patients with recently diagnosed type-1 diabetes and islet-graft recipients; oligodendrocyte DNA was identified in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis; neuronal/glial DNA was identified in patients after traumatic brain injury or cardiac arrest; and exocrine pancreas DNA was identified in patients with pancreatic cancer or pancreatitis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that the tissue origins of cfDNA and thus the rate of death of specific cell types can be determined in humans. The approach can be adapted to identify cfDNA derived from any cell type in the body, offering a minimally invasive window for diagnosing and monitoring a broad spectrum of human pathologies as well as providing a better understanding of normal tissue dynamics. PMID:26976580

  2. Multiplex analysis of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.; Kieffer-Higgins, Stephen

    1992-01-01

    This invention features vectors and a method for sequencing DNA. The method includes the steps of: a) ligating the DNA into a vector comprising a tag sequence, the tag sequence includes at least 15 bases, wherein the tag sequence will not hybridize to the DNA under stringent hybridization conditions and is unique in the vector, to form a hybrid vector, b) treating the hybrid vector in a plurality of vessels to produce fragments comprising the tag sequence, wherein the fragments differ in length and terminate at a fixed known base or bases, wherein the fixed known base or bases differs in each vessel, c) separating the fragments from each vessel according to their size, d) hybridizing the fragments with an oligonucleotide able to hybridize specifically with the tag sequence, and e) detecting the pattern of hybridization of the tag sequence, wherein the pattern reflects the nucleotide sequence of the DNA.

  3. Genetic relatedness of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) hybrids using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Sharaf-Eldin, M A; Al-Tamimi, A; Alam, P; Elkholy, S F; Jordan, J R

    2015-01-01

    The artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) is an important food and medicinal crop that is cultivated in Mediterranean countries. Morphological characteristics, such as head shape and diameter, leaf shape, and bract shape, are mainly affected by environmental conditions. A molecular marker approach was used to analyze the degree of polymorphism between artichoke hybrid lines. The degree of genetic difference among three artichoke hybrids was evaluated using random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR (RAPD-PCR). In this study, the DNA fingerprints of three artichoke lines (A13-010, A11-018, and A12-179) were generated, and a total of 10 decamer primers were applied for RAPD-PCR analyses. Polymorphism  (16.66 to 62.50%) was identified using eight arbitrary decamers and total genomic DNA extracted from the hybrids. Of the 59 loci detected, there were 25 polymorphic and 34 monomorphic loci. Jaccard's similarity index (JSI) ranged between 1.0 and 0.84. Based on the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) similarity matrix and dendrogram, the results indicated that two hybrids (A13-010 and A11-018) were closely related to each other, and the A12-179 line showed more divergence. When identifying correct accessions, consideration of the genetic variation and genetic relationships among the genotypes are required. The RAPD-PCR fingerprinting of artichoke lines clearly showed that it is possible to analyze the RAPD patterns for correlation between genetic means and differences or resemblance between close accessions (A13-010 and A11- 018) at the genomic level. PMID:26782491

  4. Germinal transmission of site-specific excised genomic DNA by the bacterial ParA resolvase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome engineering is an essential tool in research and product development. Behind some of the recent advances in plant gene transfer is the development of site-specific recombination systems that enable the precise manipulation of DNA, e.g. the deletion, integration or translocation of DNA. DNA ...

  5. Design, Synthesis, and Analysis of Minor Groove Binder Pyrrolepolyamide-2′-Deoxyguanosine Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Etsuko; Ohba, Yusuke; Terui, Yusuke; Kamaike, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    Pyrrolepolyamide-2′-deoxyguanosine hybrids (Hybrid 2 and Hybrid 3) incorporating the 3-aminopropionyl or 3-aminopropyl linker were designed and synthesized on the basis of previously reported results of a pyrrolepolyamide-adenosine hybrid (Hybrid 1). Evaluation of the DNA binding sequence selectivity of pyrrolepolyamide-2′-deoxyguanosine hybrids was performed by CD spectral and Tm analyses. It was shown that Hybrid 3 possessed greater binding specificity than distamycin A, Hybrid 1 and Hybrid 2. PMID:20700414

  6. Cloning and chromosomal assignment of a human cDNA encoding a T cell- and natural killer cell-specific trypsin-like serine protease

    SciTech Connect

    Gershenfeld, H.K.; Hershberger, R.J.; Shows, T.B.; Weissman, I.L.

    1988-02-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a human T cell- and natural killer cell-specific serine protease was obtained by screening a phage lambdagt10 cDNA library from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes with the mouse Hanukah factor cDNA clone. In an RNA blot-hybridization analysis, this human Hanukah factor cDNA hybridized with a 1.3-kilobase band in allogeneic-stimulated cytotoxic T cells and the Jurkat cell line, but this transcript was not detectable in normal muscle, liver, tonsil, or thymus. By dot-blot hybridization, this cDNA hybridized with RNA from three cytolytic T-cell clones and three noncytolytic T-cell clones grown in vitro as well as with purified CD16/sup +/ natural killer cells and CD3/sup +/, CD16/sup -/ T-cell large granular lymphocytes from peripheral blood lymphocytes (CD = cluster designation). The nucleotide sequence of this cDNA clone encodes a predicted serine protease of 262 amino acids. The active enzyme is 71% and 77% similar to the mouse sequence at the amino acid and DNA level, respectively. The human and mouse sequences conserve the active site residues of serine proteases--the trypsin-specific Asp-189 and all 10 cysteine residues. The gene for the human Hanukah factor serine protease is located on human chromosome 5. The authors propose that this trypsin-like serine protease may function as a common component necessary for lysis of target cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells.

  7. Sequence-specific binding of luzopeptin to DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, K R; Davies, H; Adams, G R; Portugal, J; Waring, M J

    1988-01-01

    We have examined the binding of luzopeptin, an antitumor antibiotic, to five DNA fragments of varying base composition. The drug forms a tight, possibly covalent, complex with the DNA causing a reduction in mobility on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels and some smearing of the bands consistent with intramolecular cross-linking of DNA duplexes. DNAase I and micrococcal nuclease footprinting experiments suggest that the drug binds best to regions containing alternating A and T residues, although no consensus di- or trinucleotide sequence emerges. Binding to other sites is not excluded and at moderate ligand concentrations the DNA is almost totally protected from enzyme attack. Ligand-induced enhancement of DNAase I cleavage is observed at both AT and GC-rich regions. The sequence selectivity and characteristics of luzopeptin binding are quite different from those of echinomycin, a bifunctional intercalator of related structure. Images PMID:3362673

  8. Nucleotide-Specific Contrast for DNA Sequencing by Electron Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Davis, Ronald W.

    2016-01-01

    DNA sequencing by imaging in an electron microscope is an approach that holds promise to deliver long reads with low error rates and without the need for amplification. Earlier work using transmission electron microscopes, which use high electron energies on the order of 100 keV, has shown that low contrast and radiation damage necessitates the use of heavy atom labeling of individual nucleotides, which increases the read error rates. Other prior work using scattering electrons with much lower energy has shown to suppress beam damage on DNA. Here we explore possibilities to increase contrast by employing two methods, X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy. Using bulk DNA samples with monomers of each base, both methods are shown to provide contrast mechanisms that can distinguish individual nucleotides without labels. Both spectroscopic techniques can be readily implemented in a low energy electron microscope, which may enable label-free DNA sequencing by direct imaging. PMID:27149617

  9. Homoeologous chromosome pairing in the distant hybrid Alstroemeria aurea x A. inodora and the genome composition of its backcross derivatives determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization with species-specific probes.

    PubMed

    Kamstra, S A; Ramanna, M S; de Jeu, M J; Kuipers, A G; Jacobsen, E

    1999-01-01

    A distant hybrid between two diploid species (2n = 2x = 16), Alstroemeria aurea and A. inodora, was investigated for homoeologous chromosome pairing, crossability with A. inodora and chromosome transmission to its BC1 offspring. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with two species-specific probes, A001-I (A. aurea specific) and D32-13 (A. inodora specific), was used to analyse chromosome pairing in the hybrid and the genome constitution of its BC1 progeny plants. High frequencies of associated chromosomes were observed in both genotypes of the F1 hybrid, A1P2-2 and A1P4. In the former, both univalents and bivalents were found at metaphase I, whereas the latter plant also showed tri- and quadrivalents. Based on the hybridization sites of DNA probes on the chromosomes of both parental species, it was established that hybrid A1P4 contains a reciprocal translocation between the short arm of chromosome 1 and the long arm of chromosome 8 of A. inodora. Despite regular homoeologous chromosome pairing in 30% of the pollen mother cells, both hybrids were highly sterile. They were backcrossed reciprocally with one of the parental species, A. inodora. Two days after pollination, embryo rescue was applied and, eventually, six BC1 progeny plants were obtained. Among these, two were aneuploids (2n = 2x + 1 = 17) and four were triploids (2n = 3x = 24). The aneuploid plants had originated when the interspecific hybrid was used as a female parent, indicating that n eggs were functional in the hybrid. In addition, 2n gametes were also functional in the hybrid, resulting in the four triploid BC1 plants. Of these four plants, three had received 2n pollen grains from the hybrid and one a 2n egg. Using FISH, homoeologous crossing over between the chromosomes of the two parental species in the hybrid was clearly detected in all BC1 plants. The relevance of these results for the process of introgression and the origin of n and 2n gametes are discussed. PMID:10087627

  10. DNA hybridization-induced reorientation of liquid crystal anchoring at the nematic liquid crystal/aqueous interface.

    PubMed

    Price, Andrew D; Schwartz, Daniel K

    2008-07-01

    Interactions between DNA and an adsorbed cationic surfactant at the nematic liquid crystal (LC)/aqueous interface were investigated using polarized and fluorescence microscopy. The adsorption of octadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (OTAB) surfactant to the LC/aqueous interface resulted in homeotropic (untilted) LC alignment. Subsequent adsorption of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) to the surfactant-laden interface modified the interfacial structure, resulting in a reorientation of the LC from homeotropic alignment to an intermediate tilt angle. Exposure of the ssDNA/OTAB interfacial complex to its ssDNA complement induced a second change in the interfacial structure characterized by the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of lateral regions that induced homeotropic LC alignment. Fluorescence microscopy showed explicitly that the complement was colocalized in the same regions as the homeotropic domains. Exposure to noncomplementary ssDNA caused no such response, suggesting that the homeotropic regions were due to DNA hybridization. This hybridization occurred in the vicinity of the interface despite the fact that the conditions in bulk solution were such that hybridization did not occur (high stringency), suggesting that the presence of the cationic surfactant neutralized electrostatic repulsion and allowed for hydrogen bonding between DNA complements. This system has potential for label-less and portable DNA detection. Indeed, LC response to ssDNA target was detected with a lower limit of approximately 50 fmol of complement and was sufficiently selective to differentiate a one-base-pair mismatch in a 16-mer target. PMID:18528984

  11. Constraint of DNA on Functionalized Graphene Improves Its Biostability and Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Zhiwen; Wu, Hong; Cort, John R.; Buchko, Garry W.; Zhang, Youyu; Shao, Yuyan; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Liu, Jun; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-06-01

    The single-stranded DNA constrained on graphene surface is effectively protected from enzymatic cleavage by DNase I. The anisotropy, fluorescence, NMR, and CD studies suggest that the single-stranded DNA is promptly adsorbed onto graphene forming strong molecular interactions. Furthermore, the constraint of DNA probe on graphene improves the specificity of its response to complementary DNA. These findings will promote the further application of graphene in biotechnology and biomedical fields.

  12. A Double-Hybridization Approach for the Transcription- and Amplification-Free Detection of Specific mRNA on a Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Michaela; Haselgrübler, Thomas; Sonnleitner, Alois; Aberger, Fritz; Hesse, Jan

    2016-01-01

    A double-hybridization approach was developed for the enzyme-free detection of specific mRNA of a housekeeping gene. Targeted mRNA was immobilized by hybridization to complementary DNA capture probes spotted onto a microarray. A second hybridization step of Cy5-conjugated label DNA to another section of the mRNA enabled specific labeling of the target. Thus, enzymatic artifacts could be avoided by omitting transcription and amplification steps. This manuscript describes the development of capture probe molecules used in the transcription- and amplification-free analysis of RPLP0 mRNA in isolated total RNA. An increase in specific signal was found with increasing length of the target-specific section of capture probes. Unspecific signal comprising spot autofluorescence and unspecific label binding did not correlate with the capture length. An additional spacer between the specific part of the capture probe and the substrate attachment site increased the signal significantly only on a short capture probe of approximately 30 nt length. PMID:27600071

  13. A Double-Hybridization Approach for the Transcription- and Amplification-Free Detection of Specific mRNA on a Microarray.

    PubMed

    Haider, Michaela; Haselgrübler, Thomas; Sonnleitner, Alois; Aberger, Fritz; Hesse, Jan

    2016-01-01

    A double-hybridization approach was developed for the enzyme-free detection of specific mRNA of a housekeeping gene. Targeted mRNA was immobilized by hybridization to complementary DNA capture probes spotted onto a microarray. A second hybridization step of Cy5-conjugated label DNA to another section of the mRNA enabled specific labeling of the target. Thus, enzymatic artifacts could be avoided by omitting transcription and amplification steps. This manuscript describes the development of capture probe molecules used in the transcription- and amplification-free analysis of RPLP0 mRNA in isolated total RNA. An increase in specific signal was found with increasing length of the target-specific section of capture probes. Unspecific signal comprising spot autofluorescence and unspecific label binding did not correlate with the capture length. An additional spacer between the specific part of the capture probe and the substrate attachment site increased the signal significantly only on a short capture probe of approximately 30 nt length. PMID:27600071

  14. Quantification of Cooperativity in Heterodimer-DNA Binding Improves the Accuracy of Binding Specificity Models.

    PubMed

    Isakova, Alina; Berset, Yves; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Deplancke, Bart

    2016-05-01

    Many transcription factors (TFs) have the ability to cooperate on DNA elements as heterodimers. Despite the significance of TF heterodimerization for gene regulation, a quantitative understanding of cooperativity between various TF dimer partners and its impact on heterodimer DNA binding specificity models is still lacking. Here, we used a novel integrative approach, combining microfluidics-steered measurements of dimer-DNA assembly with mechanistic modeling of the implicated protein-protein-DNA interactions to quantitatively interrogate the cooperative DNA binding behavior of the adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ):retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) heterodimer. Using the high throughput MITOMI (mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions) platform, we derived equilibrium DNA binding data for PPARγ, RXRα, as well as the PPARγ:RXRα heterodimer to more than 300 target DNA sites and variants thereof. We then quantified cooperativity underlying heterodimer-DNA binding and derived an integrative heterodimer DNA binding constant. Using this cooperativity-inclusive constant, we were able to build a heterodimer-DNA binding specificity model that has superior predictive power than the one based on a regular one-site equilibrium. Our data further revealed that individual nucleotide substitutions within the target site affect the extent of cooperativity in PPARγ:RXRα-DNA binding. Our study therefore emphasizes the importance of assessing cooperativity when generating DNA binding specificity models for heterodimers. PMID:26912662

  15. Quantification of Cooperativity in Heterodimer-DNA Binding Improves the Accuracy of Binding Specificity Models*

    PubMed Central

    Isakova, Alina; Berset, Yves; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Deplancke, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Many transcription factors (TFs) have the ability to cooperate on DNA elements as heterodimers. Despite the significance of TF heterodimerization for gene regulation, a quantitative understanding of cooperativity between various TF dimer partners and its impact on heterodimer DNA binding specificity models is still lacking. Here, we used a novel integrative approach, combining microfluidics-steered measurements of dimer-DNA assembly with mechanistic modeling of the implicated protein-protein-DNA interactions to quantitatively interrogate the cooperative DNA binding behavior of the adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ):retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) heterodimer. Using the high throughput MITOMI (mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions) platform, we derived equilibrium DNA binding data for PPARγ, RXRα, as well as the PPARγ:RXRα heterodimer to more than 300 target DNA sites and variants thereof. We then quantified cooperativity underlying heterodimer-DNA binding and derived an integrative heterodimer DNA binding constant. Using this cooperativity-inclusive constant, we were able to build a heterodimer-DNA binding specificity model that has superior predictive power than the one based on a regular one-site equilibrium. Our data further revealed that individual nucleotide substitutions within the target site affect the extent of cooperativity in PPARγ:RXRα-DNA binding. Our study therefore emphasizes the importance of assessing cooperativity when generating DNA binding specificity models for heterodimers. PMID:26912662

  16. Self-assembled multifunctional DNA nanospheres for biosensing and drug delivery into specific target cells.

    PubMed

    Bi, Sai; Dong, Ying; Jia, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Min; Zhong, Hua; Ji, Bin

    2015-04-28

    Self-assembly of three dimensional nucleic acid nanostructures is of great significance in nanotechnology, biosensing and biomedicine. Herein we present a novel class of multifunctional and programmable DNA nanostructures, termed nanospheres (NSs), with monodispersity, dense compaction and uniform size (∼ 200 nm) using only four DNAs based on not only Watson-Crick base pair hybridization between single-stranded DNA but also liquid crystallization and dense packing from periodic DNA duplexes. Due to the diversity of the internal structures, the present NSs can easily evolve into other kinds of DNA assemblies, such as DNA spherical structures with a larger size and a rough surface via rolling circle replication (RCR). Importantly, the functional arms incorporated in building units can be readily designed for biosensing and targeted cancer therapy with high payload capacity and excellent biocompatibility. Therefore, the proposed NSs could lead to novel routes for nucleic acid self-assembly, promising versatile applications in biosensing and biomedicine. PMID:25825266

  17. A genome-wide study of preferential amplification/hybridization in microarray-based pooled DNA experiments

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H.-C.; Liang, Y.-J.; Huang, M.-C.; Li, L.-H.; Lin, C.-H.; Wu, J.-Y.; Chen, Y.-T.; Fann, C.S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Microarray-based pooled DNA methods overcome the cost bottleneck of simultaneously genotyping more than 100 000 markers for numerous study individuals. The success of such methods relies on the proper adjustment of preferential amplification/hybridization to ensure accurate and reliable allele frequency estimation. We performed a hybridization-based genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyping analysis to dissect preferential amplification/hybridization. The majority of SNPs had less than 2-fold signal amplification or suppression, and the lognormal distributions adequately modeled preferential amplification/hybridization across the human genome. Comparative analyses suggested that the distributions of preferential amplification/hybridization differed among genotypes and the GC content. Patterns among different ethnic populations were similar; nevertheless, there were striking differences for a small proportion of SNPs, and a slight ethnic heterogeneity was observed. To fulfill appropriate and gratuitous adjustments, databases of preferential amplification/hybridization for African Americans, Caucasians and Asians were constructed based on the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 100 K Set. The robustness of allele frequency estimation using this database was validated by a pooled DNA experiment. This study provides a genome-wide investigation of preferential amplification/hybridization and suggests guidance for the reliable use of the database. Our results constitute an objective foundation for theoretical development of preferential amplification/hybridization and provide important information for future pooled DNA analyses. PMID:16931491

  18. Statistical analysis of structural determinants for protein-DNA-binding specificity.

    PubMed

    Corona, Rosario I; Guo, Jun-Tao

    2016-08-01

    DNA-binding proteins play critical roles in biological processes including gene expression, DNA packaging and DNA repair. They bind to DNA target sequences with different degrees of binding specificity, ranging from highly specific (HS) to nonspecific (NS). Alterations of DNA-binding specificity, due to either genetic variation or somatic mutations, can lead to various diseases. In this study, a comparative analysis of protein-DNA complex structures was carried out to investigate the structural features that contribute to binding specificity. Protein-DNA complexes were grouped into three general classes based on degrees of binding specificity: HS, multispecific (MS), and NS. Our results show a clear trend of structural features among the three classes, including amino acid binding propensities, simple and complex hydrogen bonds, major/minor groove and base contacts, and DNA shape. We found that aspartate is enriched in HS DNA binding proteins and predominately binds to a cytosine through a single hydrogen bond or two consecutive cytosines through bidentate hydrogen bonds. Aromatic residues, histidine and tyrosine, are highly enriched in the HS and MS groups and may contribute to specific binding through different mechanisms. To further investigate the role of protein flexibility in specific protein-DNA recognition, we analyzed the conformational changes between the bound and unbound states of DNA-binding proteins and structural variations. The results indicate that HS and MS DNA-binding domains have larger conformational changes upon DNA-binding and larger degree of flexibility in both bound and unbound states. Proteins 2016; 84:1147-1161. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27147539

  19. Density functional study of the phosphate diester hydrolysis of RNA in RNA/DNA hybrid by RNase HI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Makoto; Nakamura, Haruki; Takano, Yu

    2014-02-01

    Ribonuclease HI (RNase HI) catalyses the non-specific hydrolysis of RNA in an RNA/DNA hybrid. This enzyme is found in almost all organisms and involved in replication initiation and DNA topology restoration. A similar fold has been observed in other enzymes such as DNA transposases. In particular, RNases HI has emerged as important therapeutic targets because the enzymatic activity is absolutely required for proliferation of HIV and other retroviruses. The X-ray crystallographic structures of RNase HI revealed that the Mg2+ ion is essential for the enzymatic reaction and that Asp and Glu coordinate to the Mg2+ ion. There are, however, controversies about the catalytic mechanism of RNase HI, the number of Mg2+ ions, the proton transfer pathway, and the protonation states of the active site residues. In the present study, we have explored the hydrolysis of the phosphate diester group of RNA by RNase HI using density functional theory to elucidate how many Mg2+ ions are required for the catalysis of RNase HI. Our computation demonstrates that both one- and two-metal models show the stepwise hydrolysis pathway via a pentacovalent intermediate. However, the activation barrier of the two-metal model is lower than that of the one-metal model by 11.7 kcal/mol.

  20. The histone-like protein HU binds specifically to DNA recombination and repair intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Kamashev, D.; Rouviere-Yaniv, J.

    2000-01-01

    The heterodimeric HU protein associated with the Escherichia coli nucleoid shares some properties with histones and HMG proteins. HU binds DNA junctions and DNA containing a nick much more avidly than double-stranded (ds-) DNA. Cells lacking HU are extremely sensitive to γ irradiation and we wondered how HU could play a role in maintaining the integrity of the bacterial chromosome. We show that HU binds with high affinity to DNA repair and recombination intermediates, including DNA invasions, DNA overhangs and DNA forks. The DNA structural motif that HU specifically recognizes in all these structures consists of a ds-DNA module joined to a second module containing either ds- or single-stranded (ss-) DNA. The two modules rotate freely relative to one another. Binding specificity results from the simultaneous interaction of HU with these two modules: HU arms bind the ds-DNA module whereas the HU body contacts the ‘variable’ module containing either ds- or ss-DNA. Both structural motifs are recognized by HU at least 1000-fold more avidly than duplex DNA. PMID:11101525

  1. Identification and quantification of Bifidobacterium species isolated from food with genus-specific 16S rRNA-targeted probes by colony hybridization and PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, P; Pfefferkorn, A; Teuber, M; Meile, L

    1997-01-01

    A Bifidobacterium genus-specific target sequence in the V9 variable region of the 16S rRNA has been elaborated and was used to develop a hybridization probe. The specificity of this probe, named lm3 (5'-CGGGTGCTI*CCCACTTTCATG-3'), was used to identify all known type strains and distinguish them from other bacteria. All of the 30 type strains of Bifidobacterium which are available at the German culture collection Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen, 6 commercially available production strains, and 34 closely related relevant strains (as negative controls) were tested. All tested bifidobacteria showed distinct positive signals by colony hybridization, whereas all negative controls showed no distinct dots except Gardnerella vaginalis DSM4944 and Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii DSM4902, which gave slight signals. Furthermore, we established a method for isolation and identification of bifidobacteria from food by using a PCR assay without prior isolation of DNA but breaking the cells with proteinase K. By this method, all Bifidobacterium strains lead to a DNA product of the expected size. We also established a quick assay to quantitatively measure Bifidobacterium counts in food and feces by dilution plating and colony hybridization. We were able to demonstrate that 2.1 x 10(6) to 2.3 x 10(7) colonies/g of sour milk containing bifidobacteria hybridized with the specific nucleotide probe. With these two methods, genus-specific colony hybridization and genus-specific PCR, it is now possible to readily and accurately detect any bifidobacteria in food and fecal samples and to discriminate between them and members of other genera. PMID:9097423

  2. Characterization of the structural and protein recognition properties of hybrid PNA-DNA four-way junctions.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Douglas; Serrano, Crystal; Brahan, Ann Marie; Shams, Arik; Totsingan, Filbert; Bell, Anthony J

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the structure and protein recognition properties of hybrid four-way junctions (4WJs) composed of DNA and peptide nucleic acid (PNA) strands. We compare a classic immobile DNA junction, J1, vs. six PNA-DNA junctions, including a number with blunt DNA ends and multiple PNA strands. Circular dichroism (CD) analysis reveals that hybrid 4WJs are composed of helices that possess structures intermediate between A- and B-form DNA, the apparent level of A-form structure correlates with the PNA content. The structure of hybrids that contain one PNA strand is sensitive to Mg(+2). For these constructs, the apparent B-form structure and conformational stability (Tm) increase in high Mg(+2). The blunt-ended junction, b4WJ-PNA3, possesses the highest B-form CD signals and Tm (40.1 °C) values vs. all hybrids and J1. Protein recognition studies are carried out using the recombinant DNA-binding protein, HMGB1b. HMGB1b binds the blunt ended single-PNA hybrids, b4WJ-PNA1 and b4WJ-PNA3, with high affinity. HMGB1b binds the multi-PNA hybrids, 4WJ-PNA1,3 and b4WJ-PNA1,3, but does not form stable protein-nucleic acid complexes. Protein interactions with hybrid 4WJs are influenced by the ratio of A- to B-form helices: hybrids with helices composed of higher levels of B-form structure preferentially associate with HMGB1b. PMID:26348651

  3. Introgression of wheat DNA markers from A, B and D genomes in early generation progeny of Aegilops cylindrica Host x Triticum aestivum L. hybrids.

    PubMed

    Schoenenberger, N; Felber, F; Savova-Bianchi, D; Guadagnuolo, R

    2005-11-01

    Introgression from allohexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L., AABBDD) to allotetraploid jointed goatgrass (Aegilops cylindrica Host, CCDD) can take place in areas where the two species grow in sympatry and hybridize. Wheat and Ae. cylindrica share the D genome, issued from the common diploid ancestor Aegilops tauschii Coss. It has been proposed that the A and B genome of bread wheat are secure places to insert transgenes to avoid their introgression into Ae. cylindrica because during meiosis in pentaploid hybrids, A and B genome chromosomes form univalents and tend to be eliminated whereas recombination takes place only in D genome chromosomes. Wheat random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fragments, detected in intergeneric hybrids and introgressed to the first backcross generation with Ae. cylindrica as the recurrent parent and having a euploid Ae. cylindrica chromosome number or one supernumerary chromosome, were assigned to wheat chromosomes using Chinese Spring nulli-tetrasomic wheat lines. Introgressed fragments were not limited to the D genome of wheat, but specific fragments of A and B genomes were also present in the BC1. Their presence indicates that DNA from any of the wheat genomes can introgress into Ae. cylindrica. Successfully located RAPD fragments were then converted into highly specific and easy-to-use sequence characterised amplified regions (SCARs) through sequencing and primer design. Subsequently these markers were used to characterise introgression of wheat DNA into a BC1S1 family. Implications for risk assessment of genetically modified wheat are discussed. PMID:16133306

  4. Self-assembled multifunctional DNA nanospheres for biosensing and drug delivery into specific target cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Sai; Dong, Ying; Jia, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Min; Zhong, Hua; Ji, Bin

    2015-04-01

    Self-assembly of three dimensional nucleic acid nanostructures is of great significance in nanotechnology, biosensing and biomedicine. Herein we present a novel class of multifunctional and programmable DNA nanostructures, termed nanospheres (NSs), with monodispersity, dense compaction and uniform size (~200 nm) using only four DNAs based on not only Watson-Crick base pair hybridization between single-stranded DNA but also liquid crystallization and dense packing from periodic DNA duplexes. Due to the diversity of the internal structures, the present NSs can easily evolve into other kinds of DNA assemblies, such as DNA spherical structures with a larger size and a rough surface via rolling circle replication (RCR). Importantly, the functional arms incorporated in building units can be readily designed for biosensing and targeted cancer therapy with high payload capacity and excellent biocompatibility. Therefore, the proposed NSs could lead to novel routes for nucleic acid self-assembly, promising versatile applications in biosensing and biomedicine.Self-assembly of three dimensional nucleic acid nanostructures is of great significance in nanotechnology, biosensing and biomedicine. Herein we present a novel class of multifunctional and programmable DNA nanostructures, termed nanospheres (NSs), with monodispersity, dense compaction and uniform size (~200 nm) using only four DNAs based on not only Watson-Crick base pair hybridization between single-stranded DNA but also liquid crystallization and dense packing from periodic DNA duplexes. Due to the diversity of the internal structures, the present NSs can easily evolve into other kinds of DNA assemblies, such as DNA spherical structures with a larger size and a rough surface via rolling circle replication (RCR). Importantly, the functional arms incorporated in building units can be readily designed for biosensing and targeted cancer therapy with high payload capacity and excellent biocompatibility. Therefore, the

  5. Bright luminescence from pure DNA-curcumin-based phosphors for bio hybrid light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Reddy, M Siva Pratap; Park, Chinho

    2016-01-01

    Recently, significant advances have occurred in the development of phosphors for bio hybrid light-emitting diodes (Bio-HLEDs), which have created brighter, metal-free, rare-earth phosphor-free, eco-friendly, and cost-competitive features for visible light emission. Here, we demonstrate an original approach using bioinspired phosphors in Bio-HLEDs based on natural deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-curcumin complexes with cetyltrimethylammonium (CTMA) in bio-crystalline form. The curcumin chromophore was bound to the DNA double helix structure as observed using field emission tunnelling electron microscopy (FE-TEM). Efficient luminescence occurred due to tightly bound curcumin chromophore to DNA duplex. Bio-HLED shows low luminous drop rate of 0.0551 s(-1). Moreover, the solid bio-crystals confined the activating bright luminescence with a quantum yield of 62%, thereby overcoming aggregation-induced quenching effect. The results of this study herald the development of commercially viable large-scale hybrid light applications that are environmentally benign. PMID:27572113

  6. Bright luminescence from pure DNA-curcumin–based phosphors for bio hybrid light-emitting diodes

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, M. Siva Pratap; Park, Chinho

    2016-01-01

    Recently, significant advances have occurred in the development of phosphors for bio hybrid light-emitting diodes (Bio-HLEDs), which have created brighter, metal-free, rare-earth phosphor-free, eco-friendly, and cost-competitive features for visible light emission. Here, we demonstrate an original approach using bioinspired phosphors in Bio-HLEDs based on natural deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-curcumin complexes with cetyltrimethylammonium (CTMA) in bio-crystalline form. The curcumin chromophore was bound to the DNA double helix structure as observed using field emission tunnelling electron microscopy (FE-TEM). Efficient luminescence occurred due to tightly bound curcumin chromophore to DNA duplex. Bio-HLED shows low luminous drop rate of 0.0551 s−1. Moreover, the solid bio-crystals confined the activating bright luminescence with a quantum yield of 62%, thereby overcoming aggregation-induced quenching effect. The results of this study herald the development of commercially viable large-scale hybrid light applications that are environmentally benign. PMID:27572113

  7. Reactive Microcontact Printing of DNA Probes on (DMA-NAS-MAPS) Copolymer-Coated Substrates for Efficient Hybridization Platforms.

    PubMed

    Castagna, Rossella; Bertucci, Alessandro; Prasetyanto, Eko Adi; Monticelli, Marco; Conca, Dario Valter; Massetti, Matteo; Sharma, Parikshit Pratim; Damin, Francesco; Chiari, Marcella; De Cola, Luisa; Bertacco, Riccardo

    2016-04-01

    High-performing hybridization platforms fabricated by reactive microcontact printing of DNA probes are presented. Multishaped PDMS molds are used to covalently bind oligonucleotides over a functional copolymer (DMA-NAS-MAPS) surface. Printed structures with minimum width of about 1.5 μm, spaced by 10 μm, are demonstrated, with edge corrugation lower than 300 nm. The quantification of the immobilized surface probes via fluorescence imaging gives a remarkable concentration of 3.3 × 10(3) oligonucleotides/μm(2), almost totally active when used as probes in DNA-DNA hybridization assays. Indeed, fluorescence and atomic force microscopy show a 95% efficiency in target binding and uniform DNA hybridization over printed areas. PMID:26972953

  8. NMR structure of a specific DNA complex of Zn-containing DNA binding domain of GATA-1.

    PubMed

    Omichinski, J G; Clore, G M; Schaad, O; Felsenfeld, G; Trainor, C; Appella, E; Stahl, S J; Gronenborn, A M

    1993-07-23

    The three-dimensional solution structure of a complex between the DNA binding domain of the chicken erythroid transcription factor GATA-1 and its cognate DNA site has been determined with multidimensional heteronuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The DNA binding domain consists of a core which contains a zinc coordinated by four cysteines and a carboxyl-terminal tail. The core is composed of two irregular antiparallel beta sheets and an alpha helix, followed by a long loop that leads into the carboxyl-terminal tail. The amino-terminal part of the core, including the helix, is similar in structure, although not in sequence, to the amino-terminal zinc module of the glucocorticoid receptor DNA binding domain. In the other regions, the structures of these two DNA binding domains are entirely different. The DNA target site in contact with the protein spans eight base pairs. The helix and the loop connecting the two antiparallel beta sheets interact with the major groove of the DNA. The carboxyl-terminal tail, which is an essential determinant of specific binding, wraps around into the minor groove. The complex resembles a hand holding a rope with the palm and fingers representing the protein core and the thumb, the carboxyl-terminal tail. The specific interactions between GATA-1 and DNA in the major groove are mainly hydrophobic in nature, which accounts for the preponderance of thymines in the target site. A large number of interactions are observed with the phosphate backbone. PMID:8332909

  9. Differential representation of sunflower ESTs in enriched organ-specific cDNA libraries in a small scale sequencing project

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Paula; Paniego, Norma; Lew, Sergio; Hopp, H Esteban; Heinz, Ruth A

    2003-01-01

    Background Subtractive hybridization methods are valuable tools for identifying differentially regulated genes in a given tissue avoiding redundant sequencing of clones representing the same expressed genes, maximizing detection of low abundant transcripts and thus, affecting the efficiency and cost effectiveness of small scale cDNA sequencing projects aimed to the specific identification of useful genes for breeding purposes. The objective of this work is to evaluate alternative strategies to high-throughput sequencing projects for the identification of novel genes differentially expressed in sunflower as a source of organ-specific genetic markers that can be functionally associated to important traits. Results Differential organ-specific ESTs were generated from leaf, stem, root and flower bud at two developmental stages (R1 and R4). The use of different sources of RNA as tester and driver cDNA for the construction of differential libraries was evaluated as a tool for detection of rare or low abundant transcripts. Organ-specificity ranged from 75 to 100% of non-redundant sequences in the different cDNA libraries. Sequence redundancy varied according to the target and driver cDNA used in each case. The R4 flower cDNA library was the less redundant library with 62% of unique sequences. Out of a total of 919 sequences that were edited and annotated, 318 were non-redundant sequences. Comparison against sequences in public databases showed that 60% of non-redundant sequences showed significant similarity to known sequences. The number of predicted novel genes varied among the different cDNA libraries, ranging from 56% in the R4 flower to 16 % in the R1 flower bud library. Comparison with sunflower ESTs on public databases showed that 197 of non-redundant sequences (60%) did not exhibit significant similarity to previously reported sunflower ESTs. This approach helped to successfully isolate a significant number of new reported sequences putatively related to responses

  10. Vasopressin mRNA in situ hybridization: localization and regulation studied with oligonucleotide cDNA probes in normal and Brattleboro rat hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Uhl, G.R.; Zingg, H.H.; Habener, J.F.

    1985-08-01

    Hybridizable vasopressin mRNA may be quantitatively localized in situ in sections from rat hypothalamus. Radiolabeled oligonucleotide cDNA probes, synthesized by chemical and enzymatic means, provide strong hybridization in zones known to contain vasopressin cell bodies. Multiple single-stranded /sup 32/P-, /sup 35/S-, or /sup 3/H-labeled oligonucleotides demonstrate localized hybridization that increases as probes are lengthened from 8 to 75 bases. Competition studies, RNase experiments, anatomic localization, and use of multiple probes all support hybridization specificity. An approximate doubling of hybridizable mRNA in both supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei can be detected with dehydration of the animals. Hybridizable mRNA densities are virtually normal in hypothalamic nuclei of Brattleboro rats given free access to water. These methods can provide insight into regional mRNA dynamics and may reflect functional activity of peptidergic neurons.

  11. Genetic characterization of inbred lines of Chinese cabbage by DNA markers; towards the application of DNA markers to breeding of F1 hybrid cultivars.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Kazutaka; Kawanabe, Takahiro; Shimizu, Motoki; Okazaki, Keiichi; Kaji, Makoto; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Osabe, Kenji; Fujimoto, Ryo

    2016-03-01

    Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. var. pekinensis) is an important vegetable in Asia, and most Japanese commercial cultivars of Chinese cabbage use an F1 hybrid seed production system. Self-incompatibility is successfully used for the production of F1 hybrid seeds in B. rapa vegetables to avoid contamination by non-hybrid seeds, and the strength of self-incompatibility is important for harvesting a highly pure F1 seeds. Prediction of agronomically important traits such as disease resistance based on DNA markers is useful. In this dataset, we identified the S haplotypes by DNA markers and evaluated the strength of self-incompatibility in Chinese cabbage inbred lines. The data described the predicted disease resistance to Fusarium yellows or clubroot in 22 Chinese cabbage inbred lines using gene associated or gene linked DNA markers. PMID:26862564

  12. Optical detection of PNA/DNA hybridization in resonant porous silicon-based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotiroti, Lucia; Arcari, Paolo; Lamberti, Annalisa; Sanges, Carmen; De Tommasi, Edoardo; Rea, Ilaria; Rendina, Ivo; De Stefano, Luca

    2008-04-01

    The development of label-free optical biosensors could have a great impact on life sciences as well as on screening techniques for medical and environmental applications. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is a nucleic acid analog in which the sugar phosphate backbone of natural nucleic acid has been replaced by a synthetic peptide backbone, resulting in an achiral and uncharged mimic. Due to the uncharged nature of PNA, PNA-DNA duplexes show a better thermal stability respect the DNA-DNA equivalents. In this work, we used an optical biosensor, based on the porous silicon (PSi) nanotechnology, to detect PNA-DNA interactions. PSi optical sensors are based on changes of reflectivity spectrum when they are exposed to the target analytes. The porous silicon surface was chemically modified to covalently link the PNA which acts as a very specific probe for its ligand (cDNA).

  13. The DNA Structure-Specific Endonuclease MUS81 Mediates DNA Sensor STING-Dependent Host Rejection of Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ho, Samantha S W; Zhang, Wendy Y L; Tan, Nikki Yi Jie; Khatoo, Muznah; Suter, Manuel A; Tripathi, Shubhita; Cheung, Florence S G; Lim, Weng Khong; Tan, Puay Hoon; Ngeow, Joanne; Gasser, Stephan

    2016-05-17

    Self-DNA is present in the cytosol of many cancer cells and can promote effective immune rejection of tumor cells, but the mechanisms leading to the presence of cytosolic DNA are unknown. Here, we report that the cleavage of genomic DNA by DNA structure-specific endonuclease MUS81 and PARP-dependent DNA repair pathways leads to the accumulation of cytosolic DNA in prostate cancer cells. The number of nuclear MUS81 foci and the amount of cytosolic dsDNA increased in tandem from hyperplasia to clinical stage II prostate cancers and decreased at stage III. Cytosolic DNA generated by MUS81 stimulated DNA sensor STING-dependent type I interferon (IFN) expression and promoted phagocytic and T cell responses, resulting in type I and II IFN-mediated rejection of prostate tumor cells via mechanisms that partly depended on macrophages. Our results demonstrate that the tumor suppressor MUS81 alerts the immune system to the presence of transformed host cells. PMID:27178469

  14. [Detection of human papillomavirus (H.P.V.) DNA in genital lesions using molecular hybridization].

    PubMed

    Meguenni, S; el-Mehdaoui, S; Bandoui, D; Bouguermouh, A; Allouache, A; Bendib, A; Chouiter, A; Djenaoui, T; Lalliam, N; Bouhadef, A

    1992-01-01

    Detection of human papilloma virus in genitals lesions by molecular hybridization. Some H.P.V. types are sexually transmitted and infect genital organs. We have used molecular hybridization to examine the distribution of H.P.V. 6 or II and H.P.V. 16 in benign, premalignant and malignant genital lesions from 344 patients. The frequency of H.P.V. 16 positive cases increases as the cervical lesions progress to malignancy: 57/78 are positive (73%) in the carcinomas, 29/83 are positive (35%) in mild or moderate dysplasia. The majority of benign condylomata acuminata harbors DNA of other types, namely H.P.V. 6 and II. PMID:1339249

  15. Enzymatic Activities and DNA Substrate Specificity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA Helicase XPB

    PubMed Central

    Balasingham, Seetha V.; Zegeye, Ephrem Debebe; Homberset, Håvard; Rossi, Marie L.; Laerdahl, Jon K.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Tønjum, Tone

    2012-01-01

    XPB, also known as ERCC3 and RAD25, is a 3′→5′ DNA repair helicase belonging to the superfamily 2 of helicases. XPB is an essential core subunit of the eukaryotic basal transcription factor complex TFIIH. It has two well-established functions: in the context of damaged DNA, XPB facilitates nucleotide excision repair by unwinding double stranded DNA (dsDNA) surrounding a DNA lesion; while in the context of actively transcribing genes, XPB facilitates initiation of RNA polymerase II transcription at gene promoters. Human and other eukaryotic XPB homologs are relatively well characterized compared to conserved homologs found in mycobacteria and archaea. However, more insight into the function of bacterial helicases is central to understanding the mechanism of DNA metabolism and pathogenesis in general. Here, we characterized Mycobacterium tuberculosis XPB (Mtb XPB), a 3′→5′ DNA helicase with DNA-dependent ATPase activity. Mtb XPB efficiently catalyzed DNA unwinding in the presence of significant excess of enzyme. The unwinding activity was fueled by ATP or dATP in the presence of Mg2+/Mn2+. Consistent with the 3′→5′ polarity of this bacterial XPB helicase, the enzyme required a DNA substrate with a 3′ overhang of 15 nucleotides or more. Although Mtb XPB efficiently unwound DNA model substrates with a 3′ DNA tail, it was not active on substrates containing a 3′ RNA tail. We also found that Mtb XPB efficiently catalyzed ATP-independent annealing of complementary DNA strands. These observations significantly enhance our understanding of the biological roles of Mtb XPB. PMID:22615856

  16. [DNA fingerprinting of individual species and intergeneric and interspecific hybrids of genera Bos and Bison, subfamily Bovinae].

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, V A; Steklenev, E P; Morozova, E V; Semenova, S K

    2002-04-01

    Genome fingerprinting with a hypervariable minisatellite sequence of phage M13 DNA was used to study the genetic variation in individual species of the genera Bos and Bison (subfamily Bovinae) and in their interspecific and intergeneric hybrids. DNA fingerprints were obtained for domestic cow Bos taurus primigenius, vatussy Bos taurus macroceros, banteng Bos javanicus, gaur Bos gaurus, wisent Bison bonasus, bison Bison bison, and for the interspecific and intergeneric hybrids. Compared with the original species, most hybrids showed a greater variation in number and size of hybridization fragments. An association was revealed between the number of hybridization fragments and blood composition of interspecific hybrids resulting from unique crossing of domestic cow and banteng. Pairwise similarity coefficients were calculated to construct a dendrogram of genetic similarity, which reflected the relationships between the parental species and hybrids varying in blood composition. The applicability of the method for identifying interspecific and intergeneric hybrids and for studying the consequences of distant hybridization in the subfamily Bovinae is discussed. PMID:12018169

  17. Ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensor for specific detection of DNA based on molecular beacon mediated circular strand displacement polymerization and hyperbranched rolling circle amplification.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolu; Guo, Jing; Zhai, Qian; Xia, Jing; Yi, Gang

    2016-08-31

    Using a cascade signal amplification strategy, an ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensor for specific detection of DNA based on molecular beacon (MB) mediated circular strand displacement polymerization (CSDP) and hyperbranched rolling circle amplification (HRCA) was proposed. The hybridization of MB probe to target DNA resulted in a conformational change of the MB and triggered the CSDP in the presence of bio-primer and Klenow fragment (KF exo(-)), leading to multiple biotin-tagged DNA duplex. Furthermore, the HRCA was implemented to product amounts of double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) fragments using phi29 DNA polymerase via biotin-streptavidin interaction. After the product of HRCA binded numerous biotinylated detection probes, an ultrasensitive electrochemical readout by further employing the streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase. The proposed biosensor exhibited excellent detection sensitivity and specificity with a log-linear response to target DNA from 0.01 fM to 10 pM as low as 8.9 aM. The proposed method allowed DNA detection with simplicity, rapidness, low cost and high specificity, which might have the potential for application in clinical molecular diagnostics and environmental monitoring. PMID:27506343

  18. Segregation of relaxed replicated dimers when DNA ligase and DNA polymerase I are limited during oriC-specific DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Munson, B R; Maier, P G; Greene, R S

    1989-01-01

    An in vitro Escherichia coli oriC-specific DNA replication system was used to investigate the DNA replication pathways of oriC plasmids. When this system was perturbed by the DNA ligase inhibitor nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), alterations occurred in the initiation of DNA synthesis and processing of intermediates and DNA products. Addition of high concentrations of NMN soon after initiation resulted in the accumulation of open circular dimers (OC-OC). These dimers were decatenated to open circular monomers (form II or OC), which were then processed to closed circular supercoiled monomers (form I or CC) products. After a delay, limited ligation of the interlinked dimers (OC-OC to CC-OC and CC-CC) also occurred. Similar results were obtained with replication protein extracts from polA mutants. The presence of NMN before any initiation events took place prolonged the existence of nicked template DNA and promoted, without a lag period, limited incorporation into form II molecules. This DNA synthesis was nonspecific with respect to oriC, as judged by DnaA protein dependence, and presumably occurred at nicks in the template DNA. These results are consistent with oriC-specific initiation requiring closed supercoiled molecules dependent on DNA ligase activity. The results also show that decatenation of dimers occurs readily on nicked dimer and represents an efficient pathway for processing replication intermediates in vitro. Images PMID:2544556

  19. Microfluidic enzymatic DNA extraction on a hybrid polyester-toner-PMMA device.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Brandon L; Birch, Christopher; Li, Jingyi; DuVall, Jacquelyn A; Le Roux, Delphine; Nelson, Daniel A; Tsuei, An-Chi; Mills, Daniel L; Krauss, Shannon T; Root, Brian E; Landers, James P

    2016-08-01

    To date, the forensic community regards solid phase extraction (SPE) as the most effective methodology for the purification of DNA for use in short tandem repeat (STR) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. While a dominant methodology, SPE protocols generally necessitate the use of PCR inhibitors (guanidine, IPA) and, in addition, can demand timescales of up to 30 min due to the necessary load, wash and elution steps. The recent discovery and characterization of the EA1 protease has allowed the user to enzymatically extract (not purify) DNA, dramatically simplifying the task of producing a PCR-ready template. Despite this, this procedure has yet to make a significant impact on microfluidic technologies. Here, we describe a microfluidic device that implements the EA1 enzyme for DNA extraction by incorporating it into a hybrid microdevice comprising laminated polyester (Pe) and PMMA layers. The PMMA layer provides a macro-to-micro interface for introducing the biological sample into the microfluidic architecture, whilst also possessing the necessary dimensions to function as the swab acceptor. Pre-loaded reagents are then introduced to the swab chamber centrifugally, initiating DNA extraction at 75 °C. The extraction of DNA occurs in timescales of less than 3 min and any external hardware associated with the transportation of reagents by pneumatic pumping is eliminated. Finally, multiplexing is demonstrated with a circular device containing eight separate chambers for the simultaneous processing of eight buccal swab samples. The studies here provide DNA concentrations up to 10 ng μL(-1) with a 100% success rate in less than 3 minutes. The STR profiles generated using these extracted samples demonstrate that the DNA is of PCR forensic-quality and adequate for human identification. PMID:27250903

  20. Hybrid reuteransucrase enzymes reveal regions important for glucosidic linkage specificity and the transglucosylation/hydrolysis ratio.

    PubMed

    Kralj, Slavko; van Leeuwen, Sander S; Valk, Vincent; Eeuwema, Wieger; Kamerling, Johannis P; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2008-12-01

    The reuteransucrase enzymes of Lactobacillus reuteri strain 121 (GTFA) and L. reuteri strain ATCC 55730 (GTFO) convert sucrose into alpha-d-glucans (labelled reuterans) with mainly alpha-(1-->4) glucosidic linkages (50% and 70%, respectively), plus alpha-(1-->6) linkages. In the present study, we report a detailed analysis of various hybrid GTFA/O enzymes, resulting in the identification of specific regions in the N-termini of the catalytic domains of these proteins as the main determinants of glucosidic linkage specificity. These regions were divided into three equal parts (A1-3; O1-3), and used to construct six additional GTFA/O hybrids. All hybrid enzymes were able to synthesize alpha-glucans from sucrose, and oligosaccharides from sucrose plus maltose or isomaltose as acceptor substrates. Interestingly, not only the A2/O2 regions, with the three catalytic residues, affect glucosidic linkage specificity, but also the upstream A1/O1 regions make a strong contribution. Some GTFO derived hybrid/mutant enzymes displayed strongly increased transglucosylation/hydrolysis activity ratios. The reduced sucrose hydrolysis allowed the much improved conversion of sucrose into oligo- and polysaccharide products. Thus, the glucosidic linkage specificity and transglucosylation/hydrolysis ratios of reuteransucrase enzymes can be manipulated in a relatively simple manner. This engineering approach has yielded clear changes in oligosaccharide product profiles, as well as a range of novel reuteran products differing in alpha-(1-->4) and alpha-(1-->6) linkage ratios. PMID:19016850

  1. Case-specific, breakpoint-spanning DNA probes for analysis of single interphase cells.

    PubMed

    Lersch, R A; Fung, J; Munné, S; Pedersen, R A; Weier, H U

    2000-01-01

    Balanced reciprocal translocations are known to interfere with homolog pairing in meiosis. Many individuals carrying such chromosomal abnormalities suffer from reduced fertility or spontaneous abortions and seek help in the form of assisted reproductive technology. Although most translocations are relatively easy to detect in metaphase cells, the majority of embryonic cells biopsied in the course of in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures are in interphase. These nuclei are, thus, unsuitable for analysis by chromosome banding or painting using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Our assay, based on FISH detection of breakpoint-spanning DNA probes, identifies translocations in interphase nuclei by microscopic inspection of hybridization domains. Probes are selected that span the breakpoint regions on normal homologs. The probes should hybridize to several hundred kilobases of DNA flanking the breakpoint. The two breakpoint-spanning DNA probes for the translocation chromosomes are labeled in separate colors (e.g., red and green). The translocation event producing two fused red/green hybridization domains can then be detected in interphase cell nuclei using a fluorescence microscope. We applied this scheme to analyze somatic and germ cells from 21 translocation patients, each with distinct breakpoints. Here, we summarize our experience and provide a description of strategies, cost estimates, as well as typical time frames. PMID:11142758

  2. The Ion-Specific, Non-Equilibrium Structural Behavior of DNA Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Dan; Saleh, Omar

    The highly tunable, sequence-dependent hybridization of DNA has enabled construction of DNA hydrogels with applications ranging from drug delivery to responsive materials. Though many have examined the structural characteristics of DNA hydrogels at equilibrium, relatively little is known about their non-equilibrium behavior, apart from their degradation rates when delivering molecular payloads. Here, we examine the effect of changing salt concentration on the dynamic formation, ageing, and degradation of DNA hydrogels comprised of branched DNA nanostars with palindromic overhangs. First, we observe that hydrogel phase is sensitive to the presence of a single unpaired base on the overhang, resulting in either a percolated network or a liquid-liquid phase separated state at high salt concentrations. Particular to the percolated network, we can induce the system to either contract or relax by changing the salt concentration. Decreasing monovalent NaCl induces the network to irreversibly contract whereas decreasing divalent MgCl2 induces the network to reversibly expand; this behavior runs counter to what is expected solely from electrostatic screening. We qualitatively understand these results by assuming that the monovalent salt modulates the dynamic hybridization between nanostar binding partners, whereas the divalent salt drives the dramatic/reversible induction of the `stacked-X' conformation in the DNA nanostars. Biomolecular Science and Engineering Program.

  3. A method of layer-by-layer gold nanoparticle hybridization in a quartz crystal microbalance DNA sensing system used to detect dengue virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sz-Hau; Chuang, Yao-Chen; Lu, Yi-Chen; Lin, Hsiu-Chao; Yang, Yun-Liang; Lin, Chih-Sheng

    2009-05-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is nowadays the most important arthropod-spread virus affecting humans existing in more than 100 countries worldwide. A rapid and sensitive detection method for the early diagnosis of infectious dengue virus urgently needs to be developed. In the present study, a circulating-flow quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensing method combining oligonucleotide-functionalized gold nanoparticles (i.e. AuNP probes) used to detect DENV has been established. In the DNA-QCM method, two kinds of specific AuNP probes were linked by the target sequences onto the QCM chip to amplify the detection signal, i.e. oscillatory frequency change (ΔF) of the QCM sensor. The target sequences amplified from the DENV genome act as a bridge for the layer-by-layer AuNP probes' hybridization in the method. Besides being amplifiers of the detection signal, the specific AuNP probes used in the DNA-QCM method also play the role of verifiers to specifically recognize their target sequences in the detection. The effect of four AuNP sizes on the layer-by-layer hybridization has been evaluated and it is found that 13 nm AuNPs collocated with 13 nm AuNPs showed the best hybridization efficiency. According to the nanoparticle application, the DNA-QCM biosensing method was able to detect dengue viral RNA in virus-contaminated serum as plaque titers being 2 PFU ml-1 and a linear correlation (R2 = 0.987) of ΔF versus virus titration from 2 × 100 to 2 × 106 PFU ml-1 was found. The sensitivity and specificity of the present DNA-QCM method with nanoparticle technology showed it to be comparable to the fluorescent real-time PCR methods. Moreover, the method described herein was shown to not require expensive equipment, was label-free and highly sensitive.

  4. Whole-mount MeFISH: a novel technique for simultaneous visualization of specific DNA methylation and protein/RNA expression.

    PubMed

    Shiura, Hirosuke; Okamoto, Akimitsu; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Abe, Kuniya

    2014-01-01

    To understand the spatiotemporal changes in cellular status that occur during embryonic development, it is desirable to detect simultaneously the expression of genes, proteins, and epigenetic modifications in individual embryonic cells. A technique termed methylation-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (MeFISH) was developed recently that can visualize the methylation status of specific DNA sequences in cells fixed on a glass slide. Here, we adapted this glass slide-based MeFISH to the study of intact embryos, and established a method called whole-mount MeFISH. This method can be applied to any DNA sequences in theory and, as a proof-of-concept experiment, we examined the DNA methylation status of satellite repeats in developing mouse primordial germ cells, in which global DNA demethylation is known to take place, and obtained a result that was consistent with previous findings, thus validating the MeFISH method. We also succeeded in combining whole-mount MeFISH with immunostaining or RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (RNA-FISH) techniques by adopting steps to retain signals of RNA-FISH or immunostaining after harsh denaturation step of MeFISH. The combined methods enabled the simultaneous visualization of DNA methylation and protein or RNA expression at single-cell resolution without destroying embryonic and nuclear structures. This whole-mount MeFISH technique should facilitate the study of the dynamics of DNA methylation status during embryonic development with unprecedented resolution. PMID:24755742

  5. Whole-Mount MeFISH: A Novel Technique for Simultaneous Visualization of Specific DNA Methylation and Protein/RNA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Shiura, Hirosuke; Okamoto, Akimitsu; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Abe, Kuniya

    2014-01-01

    To understand the spatiotemporal changes in cellular status that occur during embryonic development, it is desirable to detect simultaneously the expression of genes, proteins, and epigenetic modifications in individual embryonic cells. A technique termed methylation-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (MeFISH) was developed recently that can visualize the methylation status of specific DNA sequences in cells fixed on a glass slide. Here, we adapted this glass slide-based MeFISH to the study of intact embryos, and established a method called whole-mount MeFISH. This method can be applied to any DNA sequences in theory and, as a proof-of-concept experiment, we examined the DNA methylation status of satellite repeats in developing mouse primordial germ cells, in which global DNA demethylation is known to take place, and obtained a result that was consistent with previous findings, thus validating the MeFISH method. We also succeeded in combining whole-mount MeFISH with immunostaining or RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (RNA-FISH) techniques by adopting steps to retain signals of RNA-FISH or immunostaining after harsh denaturation step of MeFISH. The combined methods enabled the simultaneous visualization of DNA methylation and protein or RNA expression at single-cell resolution without destroying embryonic and nuclear structures. This whole-mount MeFISH technique should facilitate the study of the dynamics of DNA methylation status during embryonic development with unprecedented resolution. PMID:24755742

  6. Full-Length Enriched cDNA Libraries and ORFeome Analysis of Sugarcane Hybrid and Ancestor Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Scott; Pörtner-Taliana, Antje; Souza, Glaucia Mendes

    2014-01-01

    Sugarcane is a major crop used for food and bioenergy production. Modern cultivars are hybrids derived from crosses between Saccharum officinarum and Saccharum spontaneum. Hybrid cultivars combine favorable characteristics from ancestral species and contain a genome that is highly polyploid and aneuploid, containing 100–130 chromosomes. These complex genomes represent a huge challenge for molecular studies and for the development of biotechnological tools that can facilitate sugarcane improvement. Here, we describe full-length enriched cDNA libraries for Saccharum officinarum, Saccharum spontaneum, and one hybrid genotype (SP803280) and analyze the set of open reading frames (ORFs) in their genomes (i.e., their ORFeomes). We found 38,195 (19%) sugarcane-specific transcripts that did not match transcripts from other databases. Less than 1.6% of all transcripts were ancestor-specific (i.e., not expressed in SP803280). We also found 78,008 putative new sugarcane transcripts that were absent in the largest sugarcane expressed sequence tag database (SUCEST). Functional