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Sample records for specific electronic signal

  1. Highly specific electronic signal transduction mediated by DNA/metal self-assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Dentinger, Paul M.; Pathak, Srikant

    2003-11-01

    Highly specific interactions between DNA could potentially be amplified if the DNA interactions were utilized to assemble large scale parts. Fluidic assembly of microsystem parts has the potential for rapid and accurate placement of otherwise difficult to handle pieces. Ideally, each part would have a different chemical interaction that allowed it to interact with the substrate only in specific areas. One easy way to obtain a multiple chemical permutations is to use synthetic DNA oligomers. Si parts were prepared using silicon-on-insulator technology microfabrication techniques. Several surface chemistry protocols were developed to react commercial oligonucleotides to the parts. However, no obvious assembly was achieved. It was thought that small defects on the surface did not allow the microparts to be in close enough proximity for DNA hybridization, and this was. in part, confirmed by interferometry. To assist in the hybridization, plastic, pliable parts were manufactured and a new chemistry was developed. However, assembly was still absent even with the application of force. It is presently thought that one of three mechanisms is preventing the assembly. The surfaces of the two solid substrates can not get in close enough proximity, the surface chemistry lacks sufficient density to keep the parts from separating, or DNA interactions in close proximity on solid substrates are forbidden. These possibilities are discussed in detail.

  2. Electronic signal generators: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Electronic signal generator data based on solid state concepts were simplified or refined to meet requirements, such as reliability, simplicity, fail-safe characteristics, and the capability of withstanding environmental extremes. Pulse generators, high voltage pulse generators, oscillators, analog signal generators, square wave signal generators, and special function signal generators are described.

  3. Electronics Signal Processing for Medical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetta, Renato

    This paper describes the way the signal coming from a radiation detector is conditioned and processed to produce images useful for medical applications. First of all, the small signal produce by the radiation is processed by analogue electronics specifically designed to produce a good signal-over-noise ratio. The optimised analogue signal produced at this stage can then be processed and transformed into digital information that is eventually stored in a computer, where it can be further processed as required. After an introduction to the general requirements of the processing electronics, we will review the basic building blocks that process the `tiny' analogue signal coming from a radiation detector. We will in particular analyse how it is possible to optimise the signal-over-noise ratio of the electronics. Some exercises, developed in the tutorial, will help to understand this fundamental part. The blocks needed to process the analogue signal and transform it into a digital code will be described. The description of electronics systems used for medical imaging systems will conclude the lecture.

  4. MAP kinase cascades: scaffolding signal specificity.

    PubMed

    van Drogen, Frank; Peter, Matthias

    2002-01-22

    Scaffold proteins organize many MAP kinase pathways by interacting with several components of these cascades. Recent studies suggest that scaffold proteins provide local activation platforms that contribute to signal specificity by insulating different MAP kinase pathways. PMID:11818078

  5. Species-specific beaked whale echolocation signals.

    PubMed

    Baumann-Pickering, Simone; McDonald, Mark A; Simonis, Anne E; Solsona Berga, Alba; Merkens, Karlina P B; Oleson, Erin M; Roch, Marie A; Wiggins, Sean M; Rankin, Shannon; Yack, Tina M; Hildebrand, John A

    2013-09-01

    Beaked whale echolocation signals are mostly frequency-modulated (FM) upsweep pulses and appear to be species specific. Evolutionary processes of niche separation may have driven differentiation of beaked whale signals used for spatial orientation and foraging. FM pulses of eight species of beaked whales were identified, as well as five distinct pulse types of unknown species, but presumed to be from beaked whales. Current evidence suggests these five distinct but unidentified FM pulse types are also species-specific and are each produced by a separate species. There may be a relationship between adult body length and center frequency with smaller whales producing higher frequency signals. This could be due to anatomical and physiological restraints or it could be an evolutionary adaption for detection of smaller prey for smaller whales with higher resolution using higher frequencies. The disadvantage of higher frequencies is a shorter detection range. Whales echolocating with the highest frequencies, or broadband, likely lower source level signals also use a higher repetition rate, which might compensate for the shorter detection range. Habitat modeling with acoustic detections should give further insights into how niches and prey may have shaped species-specific FM pulse types. PMID:23967959

  6. Can specific biological signals be digitized?

    PubMed

    Jonas, Wayne B; Ives, John A; Rollwagen, Florence; Denman, Daniel W; Hintz, Kenneth; Hammer, Mitchell; Crawford, Cindy; Henry, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    At the request of the United States Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, we attempted to replicate the data of Professor Jacques Benveniste that digital signals recorded on a computer disc produce specific biological effects. The hypothesis was that a digitized thrombin inhibitor signal would inhibit the fibrinogen-thrombin coagulation pathway. Because of the controversies associated with previous research of Prof. Benveniste, we developed a system for the management of social controversy in science that incorporated an expert in social communication and conflict management. The social management approach was an adaptation of interactional communication theory, for management of areas that interfere with the conduct of good science. This process allowed us to successfully complete a coordinated effort by a multidisciplinary team, including Prof. Benveniste, a hematologist, engineer, skeptic, statistician, neuroscientist and conflict management expert. Our team found no replicable effects from digital signals. PMID:16394263

  7. Signal peptide protection by specific chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Genest, Olivier; Seduk, Farida; Ilbert, Marianne; Mejean, Vincent; Iobbi-Nivol, Chantal . E-mail: iobbi@ibsm.cnrs-mrs.fr

    2006-01-20

    TorD is the private chaperone of TorA, a periplasmic respiratory molybdoenzyme of Escherichia coli. In this study, it is demonstrated that TorD is required to maintain the integrity of the twin-arginine signal sequence of the cytoplasmic TorA precursors. In the absence of TorD, 35 out of the 39 amino acid residues of the signal peptide were lost and the proteolysis of the N-terminal extremity of TorA precursors was not prevented by the molybdenum cofactor insertion. We thus propose that one of the main roles of TorD is to protect the TorA signal peptide to allow translocation of the enzyme by the TAT system.

  8. Signal processing and electronic noise in LZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaitan, D.

    2016-03-01

    The electronics of the LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) experiment, the 10-tonne dark matter detector to be installed at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), consists of low-noise dual-gain amplifiers and a 100-MHz, 14-bit data acquisition system for the TPC PMTs. Pre-prototypes of the analog amplifiers and the 32-channel digitizers were tested extensively with simulated pulses that are similar to the prompt scintillation light and the electroluminescence signals expected in LZ. These studies are used to characterize the noise and to measure the linearity of the system. By increasing the amplitude of the test signals, the effect of saturating the amplifier and the digitizers was studied. The RMS ADC noise of the digitizer channels was measured to be 1.19± 0.01 ADCC. When a high-energy channel of the amplifier is connected to the digitizer, the measured noise remained virtually unchanged, while the noise added by a low-energy channel was estimated to be 0.38 ± 0.02 ADCC (46 ± 2 μV). A test facility is under construction to study saturation, mitigate noise and measure the performance of the LZ electronics and data acquisition chain.

  9. Diverse FGF receptor signaling controls astrocyte specification and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Kyungjun; Song, Mi-Ryoung

    2010-05-07

    During CNS development, pluripotency neuronal progenitor cells give rise in succession to neurons and glia. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), a major signal that maintains neural progenitors in the undifferentiated state, is also thought to influence the transition from neurogenesis to gliogenesis. Here we present evidence that FGF receptors and underlying signaling pathways transmit the FGF-2 signals that regulate astrocyte specification aside from its mitogenic activity. Application of FGF-2 to cortical progenitors suppressed neurogenesis whereas treatment with an FGFR antagonist in vitro promoted neurogenesis. Introduction of chimeric FGFRs with mutated tyrosine residues into cortical progenitors and drug treatments to specifically block individual downstream signaling pathways revealed that the overall activity of FGFR rather than individual autophosphorylation sites is important for delivering signals for glial specification. In contrast, a signal for cell proliferation by FGFR was mainly delivered by MAPK pathway. Together our findings indicate that FGFR activity promotes astrocyte specification in the developing CNS.

  10. Electron environment specification models for Galileo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazaro, Didier; Bourdarie, Sebastien; Hands, Alex; Ryden, Keith; Nieminen, Petteri

    The MEO radiation hazard is becoming an increasingly important consideration with an ever rising number of satellites missions spending most of their time in this environment. This region lies in the heart of the highly dynamic electron radiation belt, where very large radiation doses can be encountered unless proper shielding to critical systems and components is applied. Significant internal charging hazards also arise in the MEO regime. For electron environment specification at Galileo altitude, new models have been developed and implemented: long term effects model for dose evaluation, statistical model for internal charging analysis and latitudinal model for ELDRS analysis. Models outputs, tools and validation with observations (Giove-A data) and existing models (such as FLUMIC) are presented . "Energetic Electron Environment Models for MEO" Co 21403/08/NL/JD in consortium with ONERA, QinetiQ, SSTL and CNES .

  11. Biomimetic catalysts responsive to specific chemical signals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yan

    2015-03-04

    Part 1. Design of Biomimetic Catalysts Based on Amphiphilic Systems The overall objective of our research is to create biomimetic catalysts from amphiphilic molecules. More specifically, we aim to create supramolecular systems that can be used to control the microenvironment around a catalytic center in a biomimetic fashion and apply the learning to construct supramolecular catalysts with novel functions found in enzymatic catalysts. We have prepared synthetic molecules (i.e., foldamers) that could fold into helical structures with nanometer-sized internal hydrophilic cavities. Cavities of this size are typically observed only in the tertiary and quaternary structures of proteins but were formed in our foldamer prepared in just a few steps from the monomer. Similar to many proteins, our foldamers displayed cooperativity in the folding/unfolding equilibrium and followed a two-state conformational transition. In addition, their conformational change could be triggered by solvent polarity, pH, or presence of metal ions and certain organic molecules. We studied their environmentally dependent conformational changes in solutions, surfactant micelles, and lipid bilayer membranes. Unlike conventional rigid supramolecular host, a foldamer undergoes conformational change during guest binding. Our study in the molecular recognition of an oligocholate host yielded some extremely exciting results. Cooperativity between host conformation and host–guest interactions was found to “magnify” weak binding interactions. In other words, since binding affinity is determined by the overall change of free energy during the binding, guest-induced conformational change of the host, whether near or far from the binding site, affects the binding. This study has strong implications in catalysis because enzymes have been hypothesized to harvest similar intramolecular forces to strengthen their binding with the transition state of an enzyme-catalyzed reaction. The supramolecular and

  12. Signal enhancement in electronic detection of DNA hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentil, C.; Philippin, G.; Bockelmann, U.

    2007-01-01

    Electronic detection of the specific recognition between complementary DNA sequences is investigated. DNA probes are immobilized at different lateral positions on a Poly( L -lysine)-coated surface of an integrated silicon transistor array. Hybridization and field effect detection are done with the solid surface immersed in electrolyte solutions. Differential measurements are performed, where DNA hybridization leads to surface potential shifts between the transistors of the array. We experimentally show that these differential signals of hybridization can be enhanced significantly by changing the salt concentration between hybridization and detection.

  13. Determinants of specificity in two-component signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Podgornaia, Anna I; Laub, Michael T

    2013-04-01

    Maintaining the faithful flow of information through signal transduction pathways is critical to the survival and proliferation of organisms. This problem is particularly challenging as many signaling proteins are part of large, paralogous families that are highly similar at the sequence and structural levels, increasing the risk of unwanted cross-talk. To detect environmental signals and process information, bacteria rely heavily on two-component signaling systems comprised of sensor histidine kinases and their cognate response regulators. Although most species encode dozens of these signaling pathways, there is relatively little cross-talk, indicating that individual pathways are well insulated and highly specific. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms that enforce this specificity. Further, we highlight recent studies that have revealed how these mechanisms evolve to accommodate the introduction of new pathways by gene duplication. PMID:23352354

  14. Exploration method using electron spin resonance signals from hydrocarbon crude

    SciTech Connect

    Nicksic, S.W.; Starke, G.W.

    1986-08-19

    An exploration method is described for mapping the subsurface course of crude petroleum accumulated in a producible subsurface reservoir by distinguishing crude petroleum based electron spin resonance signals from electron spin resonance signals from other constituent materials in earth formation samples. The method consists of: (a) collecting samples of subsurface earth formation materials from known positions within a formation from wells having known locations; (b) subjecting the earth formation samples to suitable conditions for the establishment of electron spin resonance of electrons present in the samples, and detecting electron spin resonance from the samples; (c) selecting those earth formation samples from which the electron spin resonance signals were detected and contacting the selected samples with a solution containing iodine; (d) subjecting the selected and contacted samples to the suitable conditions for establishment of electron spin resonance of electrons present in the samples, and detecting electron spin resonance signals from the selected samples; (e) identifying from the first selected samples those earth formation samples from which enhanced electron spin resonance signals were detected attributable to the contacting with the solution containing iodine as samples containing electrons associated with crude petroleum; (f) mapping the presence of the crude petroleum materials; (g) producing a representation of potential migration paths of hydrocarbon crudes within the formation; and (h) locating the origin of the identified samples demonstrating the enhanced electron spin resonance signals in distance, direction and depth with respect to the subsurface reservoir by using the mapped potential migration paths.

  15. A Generalizable Platform for Interrogating Target- and Signal-Specific Consequences of Electrophilic Modifications in Redox-Dependent Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hong-Yu; Haegele, Joseph A.; Disare, Michael T.; Lin, Qishan; Aye, Yimon

    2015-01-01

    Despite the known propensity of small-molecule electrophiles to react with numerous cysteine-active proteins, biological actions of individual signal inducers have emerged to be chemotype-specific. To pinpoint and quantify the impacts of modifying one target out of the whole proteome, we develop a target-protein-personalized “electrophile toolbox” with which specific intracellular targets can be selectively modified at a precise time by specific reactive signals. This general methodology—T-REX (targetable reactive electrophiles & oxidants)—is established by: (1) constructing a platform that can deliver a range of electronic and sterically different bioactive lipid-derived signaling electrophiles to specific proteins in cells; (2) probing the kinetics of targeted delivery concept which revealed that targeting efficiency in cells is largely driven by initial on-rate of alkylation; and (3) evaluating the consequences of protein-target- and small-molecule-signal-specific modifications on the strength of downstream signaling. These data show that T-REX allows quantitative interrogations into the extent to which the Nrf2 transcription factor-dependent antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling is activated by selective electrophilic modifications on Keap1 protein—one of several redox-sensitive regulators of the Nrf2–ARE axis. The results document Keap1 as a promiscuous electrophile-responsive sensor able to respond with similar efficiencies to discrete electrophilic signals, promoting comparable strength of Nrf2–ARE induction. T-REX is also able to elicit cell activation in cases in which whole-cell electrophile flooding fails to stimulate ARE induction prior to causing cytotoxicity. The platform presents a previously unavailable opportunity to elucidate the functional consequences of small-molecule-signal- and protein-target-specific electrophilic modifications in an otherwise unaffected cellular background. PMID:25909755

  16. Location-specific cuticular hydrocarbon signals in a social insect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qike; Goodger, Jason Q D; Woodrow, Ian E; Elgar, Mark A

    2016-03-30

    Social insects use cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) to convey different social signals, including colony or nest identity. Despite extensive investigations, the exact source and identity of CHCs that act as nest-specific identification signals remain largely unknown. Perhaps this is because studies that identify CHC signals typically use organic solvents to extract a single sample from the entire animal, thereby analysing a cocktail of chemicals that may serve several signal functions. We took a novel approach by first identifying CHC profiles from different body parts of ants (Iridomyrmex purpureus), then used behavioural bioassays to reveal the location of specific social signals. The CHC profiles of both workers and alates varied between different body parts, and workers paid more attention to the antennae of non-nest-mate and the legs of nest-mate workers. Workers responded less aggressively to non-nest-mate workers if the CHCs on the antennae of their opponents were removed with a solvent. These data indicate that CHCs located on the antennae reveal nest-mate identity and, remarkably, that antennae both convey and receive social signals. Our approach and findings could be valuably applied to chemical signalling in other behavioural contexts, and provide insights that were otherwise obscured by including chemicals that either have no signal function or may be used in other contexts. PMID:27030418

  17. Specificity, cross-talk and adaptation in Interferon signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilman, Anton

    Innate immune system is the first line of defense of higher organisms against pathogens. It coordinates the behavior of millions of cells of multiple types, achieved through numerous signaling molecules. This talk focuses on the signaling specificity of a major class of signaling molecules - Type I Interferons - which are also used therapeutically in the treatment of a number of diseases, such as Hepatitis C, multiple sclerosis and some cancers. Puzzlingly, different Interferons act through the same cell surface receptor but have different effects on the target cells. They also exhibit a strange pattern of temporal cross-talk resulting in a serious clinical problem - loss of response to Interferon therapy. We combined mathematical modeling with quantitative experiments to develop a quantitative model of specificity and adaptation in the Interferon signaling pathway. The model resolves several outstanding experimental puzzles and directly affects the clinical use of Type I Interferons in treatment of viral hepatitis and other diseases.

  18. Calcium specificity signaling mechanisms in abscisic acid signal transduction in Arabidopsis guard cells

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Benjamin; Munemasa, Shintaro; Wang, Cun; Nguyen, Desiree; Yong, Taiming; Yang, Paul G; Poretsky, Elly; Belknap, Thomas F; Waadt, Rainer; Alemán, Fernando; Schroeder, Julian I

    2015-01-01

    A central question is how specificity in cellular responses to the eukaryotic second messenger Ca2+ is achieved. Plant guard cells, that form stomatal pores for gas exchange, provide a powerful system for in depth investigation of Ca2+-signaling specificity in plants. In intact guard cells, abscisic acid (ABA) enhances (primes) the Ca2+-sensitivity of downstream signaling events that result in activation of S-type anion channels during stomatal closure, providing a specificity mechanism in Ca2+-signaling. However, the underlying genetic and biochemical mechanisms remain unknown. Here we show impairment of ABA signal transduction in stomata of calcium-dependent protein kinase quadruple mutant plants. Interestingly, protein phosphatase 2Cs prevent non-specific Ca2+-signaling. Moreover, we demonstrate an unexpected interdependence of the Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent ABA-signaling branches and the in planta requirement of simultaneous phosphorylation at two key phosphorylation sites in SLAC1. We identify novel mechanisms ensuring specificity and robustness within stomatal Ca2+-signaling on a cellular, genetic, and biochemical level. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03599.001 PMID:26192964

  19. Calcium specificity signaling mechanisms in abscisic acid signal transduction in Arabidopsis guard cells.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Benjamin; Munemasa, Shintaro; Wang, Cun; Nguyen, Desiree; Yong, Taiming; Yang, Paul G; Poretsky, Elly; Belknap, Thomas F; Waadt, Rainer; Alemán, Fernando; Schroeder, Julian I

    2015-01-01

    A central question is how specificity in cellular responses to the eukaryotic second messenger Ca(2+) is achieved. Plant guard cells, that form stomatal pores for gas exchange, provide a powerful system for in depth investigation of Ca(2+)-signaling specificity in plants. In intact guard cells, abscisic acid (ABA) enhances (primes) the Ca(2+)-sensitivity of downstream signaling events that result in activation of S-type anion channels during stomatal closure, providing a specificity mechanism in Ca(2+)-signaling. However, the underlying genetic and biochemical mechanisms remain unknown. Here we show impairment of ABA signal transduction in stomata of calcium-dependent protein kinase quadruple mutant plants. Interestingly, protein phosphatase 2Cs prevent non-specific Ca(2+)-signaling. Moreover, we demonstrate an unexpected interdependence of the Ca(2+)-dependent and Ca(2+)-independent ABA-signaling branches and the in planta requirement of simultaneous phosphorylation at two key phosphorylation sites in SLAC1. We identify novel mechanisms ensuring specificity and robustness within stomatal Ca(2+)-signaling on a cellular, genetic, and biochemical level. PMID:26192964

  20. Collection and analysis of specific ELINT Signal Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Lonnie A.

    1985-01-01

    This report was a followup to, Collection and Analysis of Specific ELINT Signal Parameters, DTIC A166507, 23 June 1985. The programs and hardware assembled for the above mentioned report were used to analyze two types of radar, the PPS-6 and the HOOD radars. The typical ELINT parameters of frequency, pulse width, and pulse repetition rate were collected and analyzed.

  1. Cross-peak-specific two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Read, Elizabeth L.; Engel, Gregory S.; Calhoun, Tessa R.; Mančal, Tomáš; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Blankenship, Robert E.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2007-01-01

    Intermolecular electronic coupling dictates the optical properties of molecular aggregate systems. Of particular interest are photosynthetic pigment–protein complexes that absorb sunlight then efficiently direct energy toward the photosynthetic reaction center. Two-dimensional (2D) ultrafast spectroscopy has been used widely in the infrared (IR) and increasingly in the visible to probe excitonic couplings and observe dynamics, but the off-diagonal spectral signatures of coupling are often obscured by broad diagonal peaks, especially in the visible regime. Rotating the polarizations of the laser pulses exciting the sample can highlight certain spectral features, and the use of polarized pulse sequences to elucidate cross-peaks in 2D spectra has been demonstrated in the IR for vibrational transitions. Here we develop 2D electronic spectroscopy using cross-peak-specific pulse polarization conditions in an investigation of the Fenna–Matthews–Olson light harvesting complex from green photosynthetic bacteria. Our measurements successfully highlight off-diagonal features of the 2D spectra and, in combination with an analysis based on the signs of features arising from particular energy level pathways and theoretical simulation, we characterize the dominant response pathways responsible for the spectral features. Cross-peak-specific 2D electronic spectroscopy provides insight into the interchromophore couplings, as well as into the energetic pathways giving rise to the signal. With femtosecond resolution, we also observe dynamical processes that depend on these couplings and interactions with the protein environment. PMID:17548830

  2. Electronic filters, signal conversion apparatus, hearing aids and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morley, Jr., Robert E. (Inventor); Engebretson, A. Maynard (Inventor); Engel, George L. (Inventor); Sullivan, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An electronic filter for filtering an electrical signal. Signal processing circuitry therein includes a logarithmic filter having a series of filter stages with inputs and outputs in cascade and respective circuits associated with the filter stages for storing electrical representations of filter parameters. The filter stages include circuits for respectively adding the electrical representations of the filter parameters to the electrical signal to be filtered thereby producing a set of filter sum signals. At least one of the filter stages includes circuitry for producing a filter signal in substantially logarithmic form at its output by combining a filter sum signal for that filter stage with a signal from an output of another filter stage. The signal processing circuitry produces an intermediate output signal, and a multiplexer connected to the signal processing circuit multiplexes the intermediate output signal with the electrical signal to be filtered so that the logarithmic filter operates as both a logarithmic prefilter and a logarithmic postfilter. Other electronic filters, signal conversion apparatus, electroacoustic systems, hearing aids and methods are also disclosed.

  3. Specific features of vowel-like signals of white whales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel'Kovich, V. M.; Kreichi, S. A.

    2004-05-01

    The set of acoustic signals of White-Sea white whales comprises about 70 types of signals. Six of them occur most often and constitute 75% of the total number of signals produced by these animals. According to behavioral reactions, white whales distinguish each other by acoustic signals, which is also typical of other animal species and humans. To investigate this phenomenon, signals perceived as vowel-like sounds of speech, including sounds perceived as a “bleat,” were chosen A sample of 480 signals recorded in June and July, 2000, in the White Sea within a reproductive assemblage of white whales near the Large Solovetskii Island was studied. Signals were recorded on a digital data carrier (a SONY minidisk) in the frequency range of 0.06 20 kHz. The purpose of the study was to reveal the perceptive and acoustic features specific to individual animals. The study was carried out using the methods of structural analysis of vocal speech that are employed in lingual criminalistics to identify a speaking person. It was demonstrated that this approach allows one to group the signals by coincident perceptive and acoustic parameters with assigning individual attributes to single parameters. This provided an opportunity to separate conditionally about 40 different sources of acoustic signals according to the totality of coincidences, which corresponded to the number of white whales observed visually. Thus, the application of this method proves to be very promising for the acoustic identification of white whales and other marine mammals, this possibility being very important for biology.

  4. Signal processing electronics for a capacitive microsensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendola, Gilles; Lu, Guo N.

    2000-04-01

    An interface circuit in a 0.8-micrometers CMOS process for the on- chip integration of a capacitive micro-sensor used as a microphone is presented. In order to circumvent 1/f noise contributions and to improve the signal/noise ratio, a synchronous modulation-demodulation technique has been applied. For the implementation of this technique, we have studied and designed several functional block, such as modulator with signal conversion, low-noise amplifier, demodulator, etc. To deal with problems related to dispersion of intrinsic capacitance of the sensor, a feedback compensating solution is suggested. The designed circuit has a sensibility of 1200 V/pF, with a minimum detectable capacitance variation of 2 10-6 pF.

  5. Electronic modulation of biochemical signal generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordonov, Tanya; Kim, Eunkyoung; Cheng, Yi; Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Ghodssi, Reza; Rubloff, Gary; Yin, Jun-Jie; Payne, Gregory F.; Bentley, William E.

    2014-08-01

    Microelectronic devices that contain biological components are typically used to interrogate biology rather than control biological function. Patterned assemblies of proteins and cells have, however, been used for in vitro metabolic engineering, where coordinated biochemical pathways allow cell metabolism to be characterized and potentially controlled on a chip. Such devices form part of technologies that attempt to recreate animal and human physiological functions on a chip and could be used to revolutionize drug development. These ambitious goals will, however, require new biofabrication methodologies that help connect microelectronics and biological systems and yield new approaches to device assembly and communication. Here, we report the electrically mediated assembly, interrogation and control of a multi-domain fusion protein that produces a bacterial signalling molecule. The biological system can be electrically tuned using a natural redox molecule, and its biochemical response is shown to provide the signalling cues to drive bacterial population behaviour. We show that the biochemical output of the system correlates with the electrical input charge, which suggests that electrical inputs could be used to control complex on-chip biological processes.

  6. Electronic modulation of biochemical signal generation.

    PubMed

    Gordonov, Tanya; Kim, Eunkyoung; Cheng, Yi; Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Ghodssi, Reza; Rubloff, Gary; Yin, Jun-Jie; Payne, Gregory F; Bentley, William E

    2014-08-01

    Microelectronic devices that contain biological components are typically used to interrogate biology rather than control biological function. Patterned assemblies of proteins and cells have, however, been used for in vitro metabolic engineering, where coordinated biochemical pathways allow cell metabolism to be characterized and potentially controlled on a chip. Such devices form part of technologies that attempt to recreate animal and human physiological functions on a chip and could be used to revolutionize drug development. These ambitious goals will, however, require new biofabrication methodologies that help connect microelectronics and biological systems and yield new approaches to device assembly and communication. Here, we report the electrically mediated assembly, interrogation and control of a multi-domain fusion protein that produces a bacterial signalling molecule. The biological system can be electrically tuned using a natural redox molecule, and its biochemical response is shown to provide the signalling cues to drive bacterial population behaviour. We show that the biochemical output of the system correlates with the electrical input charge, which suggests that electrical inputs could be used to control complex on-chip biological processes. PMID:25064394

  7. Ionospheric electron density profile estimation using commercial AM broadcast signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, De; Ma, Hong; Cheng, Li; Li, Yang; Zhang, Yufeng; Chen, Wenjun

    2015-08-01

    A new method for estimating the bottom electron density profile by using commercial AM broadcast signals as non-cooperative signals is presented in this paper. Without requiring any dedicated transmitters, the required input data are the measured elevation angles of signals transmitted from the known locations of broadcast stations. The input data are inverted for the QPS model parameters depicting the electron density profile of the signal's reflection area by using a probabilistic inversion technique. This method has been validated on synthesized data and used with the real data provided by an HF direction-finding system situated near the city of Wuhan. The estimated parameters obtained by the proposed method have been compared with vertical ionosonde data and have been used to locate the Shijiazhuang broadcast station. The simulation and experimental results indicate that the proposed ionospheric sounding method is feasible for obtaining useful electron density profiles.

  8. Specification of anteroposterior axis by combinatorial signaling during Xenopus development.

    PubMed

    Carron, Clémence; Shi, De-Li

    2016-01-01

    The specification of anteroposterior (AP) axis is a fundamental and complex patterning process that sets up the embryonic polarity and shapes a multicellular organism. This process involves the integration of distinct signaling pathways to coordinate temporal-spatial gene expression and morphogenetic movements. In the frog Xenopus, extensive embryological and molecular studies have provided major advance in understanding the mechanism implicated in AP patterning. Following fertilization, cortical rotation leads to the transport of maternal determinants to the dorsal region and creates the primary dorsoventral (DV) asymmetry. The activation of maternal Wnt/ß-catenin signaling and a high Nodal signal induces the formation of the Nieuwkoop center in the dorsal-vegetal cells, which then triggers the formation of the Spemann organizer in the overlying dorsal marginal zone. It is now well established that the Spemann organizer plays a central role in building the vertebrate body axes because it provides patterning information for both DV and AP polarities. The antagonistic interactions between signals secreted in the Spemann organizer and the opposite ventral region pattern the mesoderm along the DV axis, and this DV information is translated into AP positional values during gastrulation. The formation of anterior neural tissue requires simultaneous inhibition of zygotic Wnt and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signals, while an endogenous gradient of Wnt, fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), retinoic acid (RA) signaling, and collinearly expressed Hox genes patterns the trunk and posterior regions. Collectively, DV asymmetry is mostly coupled to AP polarity, and cell-cell interactions mediated essentially by the same regulatory networks operate in DV and AP patterning. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26544673

  9. Neuromorphic opto-electronic integrated circuits for optical signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeira, B.; Javaloyes, J.; Balle, S.; Piro, O.; Avó, R.; Figueiredo, J. M. L.

    2014-08-01

    The ability to produce narrow optical pulses has been extensively investigated in laser systems with promising applications in photonics such as clock recovery, pulse reshaping, and recently in photonics artificial neural networks using spiking signal processing. Here, we investigate a neuromorphic opto-electronic integrated circuit (NOEIC) comprising a semiconductor laser driven by a resonant tunneling diode (RTD) photo-detector operating at telecommunication (1550 nm) wavelengths capable of excitable spiking signal generation in response to optical and electrical control signals. The RTD-NOEIC mimics biologically inspired neuronal phenomena and possesses high-speed response and potential for monolithic integration for optical signal processing applications.

  10. Comparison of spatial resolutions obtained with different signal components in scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Merli, P G; Migliori, A; Nacucchi, M; Vittor Antisari, M

    1996-09-01

    Comparative studies on the ultimate spatial resolution of the Scanning Electron Microscope, using different components of the electron signal have been performed on specimens providing compositional contrast. By operating the microscope in conventional way as well as with a specifically designed set-up we have ascertained that the delocalized components of the signal provide a spatial resolution of the order of the beam size, even if the practical use can be limited by the noise. To amplify the contribution of the delocalized components of the signal, as backscattered electrons by a bulk specimen or forward scattered electrons by a thin specimen, we used a device consisting of a plate of a material with high secondary yield placed above or below the sample. An important practical implication arises from this study. A detecting system consisting of a standard Everhart-Thornley detector coupled with a converter of backscattered or transmitted electrons represents a high performance detecting device for low voltage observations. PMID:8961547

  11. Suppressing background signals in solid state NMR via the Electronic Mixing-Mediated Annihilation (EMMA) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollica, Giulia; Ziarelli, Fabio; Tintaru, Aura; Thureau, Pierre; Viel, Stéphane

    2012-05-01

    A simple procedure to effectively suppress background signals arising from various probe head components (e.g. stator, rotors, inserts) in solid state NMR is presented. Similarly to the ERETIC™ method, which uses an electronic signal as an internal standard for quantification, the proposed scheme is based on an electronically generated time-dependent signal that is injected into the receiver coil of the NMR probe head during signal acquisition. More specifically, the line shape, width and frequency of this electronic signal are determined by deconvoluting the background signal in the frequency domain. This deconvoluted signal is then converted into a time-dependent function through inverse Fourier Transform, which is used to generate the shaped pulse that is fed into the receiver coil during the acquisition of the Free Induction Decay. The power of the shaped pulse is adjusted to match the intensity of the background signal, and its phase is shifted by 180° with respect to the receiver reference phase. This so-called Electronic Mixing-Mediated Annihilation (EMMA) methodology is demonstrated here with a 13C Single Pulse Magic Angle Spinning spectrum of an isotopically enriched 13C histidine solid sample recorded under quantitative conditions.

  12. Electronic filters, signal conversion apparatus, hearing aids and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morley, Jr., Robert E. (Inventor); Engebretson, A. Maynard (Inventor); Engel, George L. (Inventor); Sullivan, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An electronic filter for filtering an electrical signal. Signal processing circuitry therein includes a logarithmic filter having a series of filter stages with inputs and outputs in cascade and respective circuits as GOVERNMENT SUPPORT This invention was made with U.S. Government support under Veterans Administration Contract VA KV 674P857 and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Research Grant No. NAG10-0040. The U.S. Government has certain rights in this invention.

  13. Monte Carlo modelling of the low-loss electron signal in scanning electron microscopy and comparison with the BSE signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonet, C.; El-Gomati, M. M.; Matthew, J. A. D.; Tear, S. P.

    2010-02-01

    Nanotechnology places increasing demands on techniques for sample characterisation on the sub-100 nm length scale, and the low-loss electron (LLE) signal may provide one possible way of addressing this need. Simulations of the LLE signal from a line-scan across a semiconductor superlattice structure have been performed using two different Monte Carlo models in order to assess their effectiveness in predicting spatial resolution for compositional imaging. Additionally, experimental measurements of LLE data using a detector added to a scanning electron microscope were made to investigate compositional contrast.

  14. Electronics and signal processing for the multichord far-infrared polarimeter of the RFX experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilli, E.; Milani, F.; O'Gorman, M.; Giudicotti, L.; Prunty, S. L.

    2001-11-01

    This article describes the realization and testing of the electronic system which forms part of the multichannel far-infrared (FIR) polarimeter for the RFX machine, a plasma confinement experiment with Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) configuration. The electronic system, which comprises the detectors, the signal-processing electronics, and the motion electronics for the half-wave plate movement, is described. Emphasis is placed in the analysis of the polarimeter signals, which permits an in-depth understanding of the performance of the data processing electronics and the role of the various sources of noise in the system. After a brief outline of the basic principle of the measurement, the choice of detectors and their characteristics are described in order to achieve the best performances at the FIR wavelength (λ=118.8 μm) of interest. Various tests, which are described, confirmed the need for a specifically designed pyroelectric detector capable of operating in the hostile magnetic environment near the machine. The processing of the raw polarimeter signals to produce the required sum and difference signals and to convert them into dc signals with 3 ms time constant is presented. These signals are synchronous with a chopper signal on the FIR beam and are subsequently fed to a lock-in amplifier. An accurate analysis of the data processing procedure is described, which helps to clarify the understanding of the output signals that are eventually recorded in the data acquisition system. In particular, various sources of noise, such as thermal noise of the detectors, laser fluctuations, spurious signals at harmonics of the chopper frequency, and phase jitter of the chopper, are evaluated, discussed, and compared with the observed signals. Finally, the control circuitry for the movement of the half-wave plates, both for manual control and for the programmed sequences of zero-search and calibration performed by a PLC control system, is described. Calibration curves obtained

  15. Inelastic vibrational signals in electron transport across graphene nanoconstrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunst, Tue; Markussen, Troels; Stokbro, Kurt; Brandbyge, Mads

    2016-06-01

    We present calculations of the inelastic vibrational signals in the electrical current through a graphene nanoconstriction. We find that the inelastic signals are only present when the Fermi-level position is tuned to electron transmission resonances, thus, providing a fingerprint which can link an electron transmission resonance to originate from the nanoconstriction. The calculations are based on a novel first-principles method which includes the phonon broadening due to coupling with phonons in the electrodes. We find that the signals are modified due to the strong coupling to the electrodes, however, still remain as robust fingerprints of the vibrations in the nanoconstriction. We investigate the effect of including the full self-consistent potential drop due to finite bias and gate doping on the calculations and find this to be of minor importance.

  16. Fine Specificity and Molecular Competition in SLAM Family Receptor Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Timothy J.; Garner, Lee I.; Metcalfe, Clive; King, Elliott; Margraf, Stefanie; Brown, Marion H.

    2014-01-01

    SLAM family receptors regulate activation and inhibition in immunity through recruitment of activating and inhibitory SH2 domain containing proteins to immunoreceptor tyrosine based switch motifs (ITSMs). Binding of the adaptors, SAP and EAT-2 to ITSMs in the cytoplasmic regions of SLAM family receptors is important for activation. We analysed the fine specificity of SLAM family receptor phosphorylated ITSMs and the conserved tyrosine motif in EAT-2 for SH2 domain containing signalling proteins. Consistent with the literature describing dependence of CRACC (SLAMF7) on EAT-2, CRACC bound EAT-2 (KD = 0.003 μM) with approximately 2 orders of magnitude greater affinity than SAP (KD = 0.44 μM). RNA interference in cytotoxicity assays in NK92 cells showed dependence of CRACC on SAP in addition to EAT-2, indicating selectivity of SAP and EAT-2 may depend on the relative concentrations of the two adaptors. The concentration of SAP was four fold higher than EAT-2 in NK92 cells. Compared with SAP, the significance of EAT-2 recruitment and its downstream effectors are not well characterised. We identified PLCγ1 and PLCγ2 as principal binding partners for the EAT-2 tail. Both PLCγ1 and PLCγ2 are functionally important for cytotoxicity in NK92 cells through CD244 (SLAMF4), NTB-A (SLAMF6) and CRACC. Comparison of the specificity of SH2 domains from activating and inhibitory signalling mediators revealed a hierarchy of affinities for CD244 (SLAMF4) ITSMs. While binding of phosphatase SH2 domains to individual ITSMs of CD244 was weak compared with SAP or EAT-2, binding of tandem SH2 domains of SHP-2 to longer peptides containing tandem phosphorylated ITSMs in human CD244 increased the affinity ten fold. The concentration of the tyrosine phosphatase, SHP-2 was in the order of a magnitude higher than the adaptors, SAP and EAT-2. These data demonstrate a mechanism for direct recruitment of phosphatases in inhibitory signalling by ITSMs, while explaining competitive

  17. 29 CFR 1926.1420 - Signals-radio, telephone or other electronic transmission of signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1420 Signals—radio, telephone or other electronic... must be through a dedicated channel, except: (1) Multiple cranes/derricks and one or more signal persons may share a dedicated channel for the purpose of coordinating operations. (2) Where a crane...

  18. 29 CFR 1926.1420 - Signals-radio, telephone or other electronic transmission of signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1420 Signals—radio, telephone or other electronic... must be through a dedicated channel, except: (1) Multiple cranes/derricks and one or more signal persons may share a dedicated channel for the purpose of coordinating operations. (2) Where a crane...

  19. 29 CFR 1926.1420 - Signals-radio, telephone or other electronic transmission of signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1420 Signals—radio, telephone or other electronic... must be through a dedicated channel, except: (1) Multiple cranes/derricks and one or more signal persons may share a dedicated channel for the purpose of coordinating operations. (2) Where a crane...

  20. 29 CFR 1926.1420 - Signals-radio, telephone or other electronic transmission of signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1420 Signals—radio, telephone or other electronic... must be through a dedicated channel, except: (1) Multiple cranes/derricks and one or more signal persons may share a dedicated channel for the purpose of coordinating operations. (2) Where a crane...

  1. Gallium arsenide enhances digital signal processing in electronic warfare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, B.; Apte, D.

    1985-07-01

    The higher electron mobility and velocity of GaAs digital signal processing IC devices for electronic warfare (EW) allow operation times that are several times faster than those of ICs based on silicon. Particular benefits are foreseen for the response time and broadband capability of ECM systems. Many data manipulation methods can be implemented in emitter-coupled logic (ECL) GaAs devices, and digital GaAs RF memories are noted to show great promise for improved ECM system performance while encompassing microwave frequency and chirp signal synthesis, repeater jamming, and multiple false target generation. EW digital frequency synthesizers are especially in need of GaAS IC technology, since bandwidth and resolution have been limited by ECL technology to about 250 MHz.

  2. Signal conditioning electronics for a laser vector velocimeter.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosswy, F. L.; Hornkohl, J. O.

    1973-01-01

    A type of laser velocimeter termed a laser vector velocimeter (LVV) resolves the 180 deg directional ambiguity problem of the conventional laser velocimeter by exploiting optical frequency translation techniques and frequency division demultiplexing techniques. This paper defines some fundamental LVV system signal characteristics and signal conditioning and data acquisition problems. The signal conditioning electronics for a three velocity component LVV system are described. Data obtained from atmospheric wind velocity measurements using a two velocity component LVV system are presented to illustrate the vector velocity measurement capabilities of the system. The operational status LVV systems presently in use are two orthogonal velocity component units. However, a laboratory status LVV system has been used to make three-dimensional vector velocity measurements.

  3. Implications of non-specific strigolactone signaling in the rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Koltai, Hinanit

    2014-08-01

    Strigolactones produced by various plant species are involved in the development of different plant parts. They are also exuded by plant roots to the rhizosphere, where they are involved in the induction of seed germination of the parasitic plants Striga and Orobanche, hyphal branching of the symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), and the symbiotic interaction with Rhizobium. In the present discussion paper, the essentialness of strigolactones as communication signals in these plant interactions is discussed in view of the existence of other plant-derived substances that are able to promote these plant interactions. In addition, the importance of strigolactones for determination of interaction specificity is discussed based on current knowledge on strigolactone composition, perception and delivery. The different activities of strigolactones in plant development and in the rhizosphere suggest their possible use in agriculture. However, despite efforts made in this direction, there is no current, practical implementation. Possible reasons for the encountered difficulties and suggested solutions to promote strigolactone use in agriculture are discussed. PMID:25017154

  4. Noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes for highly specific electronic biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Robert J.; Bangsaruntip, Sarunya; Drouvalakis, Katerina A.; Wong Shi Kam, Nadine; Shim, Moonsub; Li, Yiming; Kim, Woong; Utz, Paul J.; Dai, Hongjie

    2003-04-01

    Novel nanomaterials for bioassay applications represent a rapidly progressing field of nanotechnology and nanobiotechnology. Here, we present an exploration of single-walled carbon nanotubes as a platform for investigating surface-protein and protein-protein binding and developing highly specific electronic biomolecule detectors. Nonspecific binding on nanotubes, a phenomenon found with a wide range of proteins, is overcome by immobilization of polyethylene oxide chains. A general approach is then advanced to enable the selective recognition and binding of target proteins by conjugation of their specific receptors to polyethylene oxide-functionalized nanotubes. This scheme, combined with the sensitivity of nanotube electronic devices, enables highly specific electronic sensors for detecting clinically important biomolecules such as antibodies associated with human autoimmune diseases.

  5. Attosecond metrology: from electron capture to future signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krausz, Ferenc; Stockman, Mark I.

    2014-03-01

    The accurate measurement of time lies at the heart of experimental science, and is relevant to everyday life. Extending chronoscopy to ever shorter timescales has been the key to gaining real-time insights into microscopic phenomena, ranging from vital biological processes to the dynamics underlying high technologies. The generation of isolated attosecond pulses in 2001 allowed the fastest of all motions outside the nucleus -- electron dynamics in atomic systems -- to be captured. Attosecond metrology has provided access to several hitherto immeasurably fast electron phenomena in atoms, molecules and solids. The fundamental importance of electron processes for the physical and life sciences, technology and medicine has rendered the young field of attosecond science one of the most dynamically expanding research fields of the new millennium. Here, we review the basic concepts underlying attosecond measurement and control techniques. Among their many potential applications, we focus on the exploration of the fundamental speed limit of electronic signal processing. This endeavour relies on ultimate-speed electron metrology, as provided by attosecond technology.

  6. Modification of Electron Cyclotron Maser Operation by Application of AN External Signal.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCurdy, Alan Hugh

    The operation of the electron cyclotron resonance maser (ECRM) when subjected to an external rf signal is studied. The signal is introduced both by direct injection through a coupling hole in the oscillator and by modulating the electron beam in separate cavities, upstream of the oscillator. The gyrotron, a specific embodiment of the ECRM, can be phase locked by premodulating the electron beam. The required drive power levels are more than 15 dB below that predicted by Adler's widely applicable theory for single-cavity oscillators. The phase locking results are compared with a multi-cavity theory in which the free -running gyrotron is perturbed by a small current modulation. The same experimental method allows gyrotron priming, (pulse to pulse phase coherence), at drive-to-oscillator powers 50 dB below that required by magnetrons for equivalent phase control. A lumped circuit theory is used to predict the phase control introduced by the priming signal. The theory agrees with experiment at external signal frequencies within about 5 MHz of the gyrotron frequency. Significant reduction of frequency and amplitude noise is observed within the phase locking band. Reduction of pulse-to-pulse starting time jitter by almost an order of magnitude also occurs. Mechanisms of convective noise growth are investigated by using a technique of noise determination based on the oscillator response to an external signal. The general amplitude-frequency response of the ECRM to an applied external signal is also investigated. Three distinct regions of qualitatively different behavior are noted: soft excitation, hard excitation, and amplification. Control of axial modes in a gyrotron by injection of an external signal is shown for the first time. Finally, it has been verified experimentally, for the first time, that the ECRM is dominated by interaction of the right-hand circularly polarized electromagnetic wave with the electron beam.

  7. Specificity and signaling in the Drosophila immune response

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, N; Paquette, N; Aggarwal, K

    2011-01-01

    The Drosophila immune response is characterized by the rapid and robust production of a battery of antimicrobial peptides immediately following infection. The genes encoding these antimicrobial peptides are controlled by two NF-κB signaling pathways that respond to microbial infection. The IMD pathway is triggered by DAP-type peptidoglycan, from the cell wall of most Gram-negative and certain Gram-positive bacteria, and activates the NF-κB precursor protein Relish. The Toll pathway, on the other hand, is stimulated by lysine-type peptidoglycan from many Gram-positive bacteria, β 1,3 glucans from many fungi, as well as by microbial proteases. Toll signaling leads to the activation and nuclear translocation of DIF or Dorsal, two other NF-κB homologs. This review presents our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in microbial recognition and signal transduction in these two innate immune pathways. PMID:21625362

  8. Low background signal readout electronics for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinn, I.; Abgrall, N.; Arnquist, I. J.; Avignone, F. T.; Baldenegro-Barrera, C. X.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Bradley, A. W.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Buuck, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y.-D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Efremenko, Yu.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gilliss, T.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Jasinski, B. R.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; MacMullin, J.; Martin, R. D.; Meijer, S. J.; Mertens, S.; Orrell, J. L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Poon, A. W. P.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Shanks, B.; Shirchenko, M.; Snyder, N.; Suriano, A. M.; Tedeschi, D.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yu, C.-H.; Yumatov, V.; Zhitnikov, I.

    2015-08-01

    The MAJORANA Collaboration will seek neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) in 76Ge using isotopically enriched p-type point contact (PPC) high purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors. A tonne-scale array of HPGe detectors would require background levels below 1 count/ROI-tonne-year in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) around the 2039 keV Q-value of the decay. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of such an experiment, the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, a 40 kg HPGe detector array, is being constructed with a background goal of < 3 count/ROI-tonne-year, which is expected to scale down to < 1 count/ROI-tonne-year for a tonne-scale experiment. The signal readout electronics, which must be placed in close proximity to the detectors, present a challenge toward reaching this background goal. This talk will discuss the materials and design used to construct signal readout electronics with low enough backgrounds for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR.

  9. Low background signal readout electronics for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Guinn, I.; Buuck, M.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Gruszko, J.; Leon, J.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Abgrall, N.; Bradley, A. W.; Chan, Y-D.; Mertens, S.; Poon, A. W. P.; Arnquist, I. J.; Hoppe, E. W.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Orrell, J. L.; Avignone, F. T.; Baldenegro-Barrera, C. X.; Bertrand, F. E.; and others

    2015-08-17

    The MAJORANA Collaboration will seek neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) in {sup 76}Ge using isotopically enriched p-type point contact (PPC) high purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors. A tonne-scale array of HPGe detectors would require background levels below 1 count/ROI-tonne-year in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) around the 2039 keV Q-value of the decay. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of such an experiment, the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, a 40 kg HPGe detector array, is being constructed with a background goal of < 3 count/ROI-tonne-year, which is expected to scale down to < 1 count/ROI-tonne-year for a tonne-scale experiment. The signal readout electronics, which must be placed in close proximity to the detectors, present a challenge toward reaching this background goal. This talk will discuss the materials and design used to construct signal readout electronics with low enough backgrounds for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR.

  10. Low Background Signal Readout Electronics for the Majorana Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Guinn, Ian; Rielage, Keith Robert; Elliott, Steven Ray; Xu, Wenqin; Goett, John Jerome III

    2015-06-11

    The MAJORANA Collaboration will seek neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) in 76Ge using isotopically enriched p-type point contact (PPC) high purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors. A tonne-scale array of HPGe detectors would require background levels below 1 count/ROI-tonne-year in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) around the 2039 keV Q-value of the decay. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of such an experiment, the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, a 40 kg HPGe detector array, is being constructed. The DEMONSTRATOR has a background goal of < 3 counts/ROI-tonne-year, which is expected to scale down to < 1 count/ROI-tonne-year for a one tonne experiment. The signal readout electronics, which must be placed in close proximity to the detectors, present a challenge toward reaching this background goal. This paper discusses the materials and design used to construct signal readout electronics with low enough backgrounds for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR.

  11. Kinetic insulation as an effective mechanism for achieving pathway specificity in intracellular signaling networks

    PubMed Central

    Behar, Marcelo; Dohlman, Henrik G.; Elston, Timothy C.

    2007-01-01

    Intracellular signaling pathways that share common components often elicit distinct physiological responses. In most cases, the biochemical mechanisms responsible for this signal specificity remain poorly understood. Protein scaffolds and cross-inhibition have been proposed as strategies to prevent unwanted cross-talk. Here, we report a mechanism for signal specificity termed “kinetic insulation.” In this approach signals are selectively transmitted through the appropriate pathway based on their temporal profile. In particular, we demonstrate how pathway architectures downstream of a common component can be designed to efficiently separate transient signals from signals that increase slowly over time. Furthermore, we demonstrate that upstream signaling proteins can generate the appropriate input to the common pathway component regardless of the temporal profile of the external stimulus. Our results suggest that multilevel signaling cascades may have evolved to modulate the temporal profile of pathway activity so that stimulus information can be efficiently encoded and transmitted while ensuring signal specificity. PMID:17913886

  12. Site-specific Auger electron spectra of ethyl trifluoroacelate molecules studied by magnetic bottle electron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwayama, Hiroshi; Shigemasa, Eiji; Hikosaka, Yasumasa; Nakano, Motoyoshi; Ito, Kenji; Lablanquie, Pascal; Penet, Francis; Andric, Lidija; Selles, Patricia

    2012-11-01

    We performed multielectron coincidence measurements for inner-shell photoionizations of ethyl trifluoroacelate molecules (C4H5F3O2) using a magnetic bottle electron spectrometer. From a two dimensional coincidence map between a photoelectron and Auger electron for C 1s ionizations, we extracted site-specific Auger electron spectra for each carbon site and corresponding binding energy of doubly charged states.

  13. Definition of a consensus transportin-specific nucleocytoplasmic transport signal.

    PubMed

    Bogerd, H P; Benson, R E; Truant, R; Herold, A; Phingbodhipakkiya, M; Cullen, B R

    1999-04-01

    The low cytoplasmic and high nuclear concentration of the GTP-bound form of Ran provides directionality for both nuclear protein import and export. Both import and export factors bind RanGTP directly, yet this interaction produces opposite effects; in the former case, RanGTP binding induces nuclear cargo release, whereas in the latter, RanGTP binding induces nuclear cargo assembly. Therefore, nuclear import and export receptors and their protein recognition sites are predicted to be distinct. Nevertheless, the approximately 38-amino acid M9 sequence present in heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 has been reported to serve as both a nuclear localization signal and a nuclear export signal, even though only one protein, the nuclear import factor transportin, has been shown to bind M9 directly. We have used a combination of mutational randomization followed by selection for transportin binding to exhaustively define amino acids in M9 that are critical for transportin binding in vivo. As expected, the resultant approximately 12-amino acid transportin-binding consensus sequence is also predictive of nuclear localization signal activity. Surprisingly, however, this extensive mutational analysis failed to dissect M9 nuclear localization signal and nuclear export signal function. Nevertheless, transportin appears unlikely to be the M9 export receptor, as RanGTP can be shown to block M9 binding by transportin not only in vitro, but also in the nucleus in vivo. This analysis therefore predicts the existence of a nuclear export receptor distinct from transportin that nevertheless shares a common protein-binding site on heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1. PMID:10092666

  14. Decoding RAS isoform and codon-specific signalling

    PubMed Central

    Newlaczyl, Anna U.; Hood, Fiona E.; Coulson, Judy M.; Prior, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    RAS proteins are key signalling hubs that are oncogenically mutated in 30% of all cancer cases. Three genes encode almost identical isoforms that are ubiquitously expressed, but are not functionally redundant. The network responses associated with each isoform and individual oncogenic mutations remain to be fully characterized. In the present article, we review recent data defining the differences between the RAS isoforms and their most commonly mutated codons and discuss the underlying mechanisms. PMID:25109951

  15. Coherence specific signal detection via chiral pump-probe spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Holdaway, David I H; Collini, Elisabetta; Olaya-Castro, Alexandra

    2016-05-21

    We examine transient circular dichroism (TRCD) spectroscopy as a technique to investigate signatures of exciton coherence dynamics under the influence of structured vibrational environments. We consider a pump-probe configuration with a linearly polarized pump and a circularly polarized probe, with a variable angle θ between the two directions of propagation. In our theoretical formalism the signal is decomposed in chiral and achiral doorway and window functions. Using this formalism, we show that the chiral doorway component, which beats during the population time, can be isolated by comparing signals with different values of θ. As in the majority of time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy, the overall TRCD response shows signatures of both excited and ground state dynamics. However, we demonstrate that the chiral doorway function has only a weak ground state contribution, which can generally be neglected if an impulsive pump pulse is used. These findings suggest that the pump-probe configuration of optical TRCD in the impulsive limit has the potential to unambiguously probe quantum coherence beating in the excited state. We present numerical results for theoretical signals in an example dimer system. PMID:27208941

  16. Modification of electron cyclotron maser operation by application of an external signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCurdy, Alan H.; Armstrong, C. M.; Bollen, W. M.

    1987-03-01

    Operation of the electron cyclotron resonance maser (ECRM) when subjected to an external rf signal is studied. The signal is introduced both by direct injection through a coupling hole in the oscillator and by modulating the electron beam in separate cavities, upstream of the oscillator. Experiments using both one and two pre bunching cavities are reported. It is found that the gyromonotron, a specific embodiment of the ECRM, can be phase locked by premodulating the electron beam. In this case, the required drive power levels are more than 15 dB below that predicated by Adler's widely applicable theory for single-cavity oscillators. In addition, the same method allows oscillator phase-locked systems, significant reduction of frequency and amplitude noise is observed within the locking band. In signal of a power level 65 dB below that of the oscillator. The general amplitude and frequency response of the ECRM to an applied external signal is also investigated. Three distinct regions of qualitatively different behavior are noted: soft excitation, which is free, self excited oscillation; hard excitation, where the oscillation requires an external impulse for start up; and amplifier, in which the output power level and frequency are linearly related to the drive in the small regime.

  17. GSFC specification electronic data processing magnetic recording tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinari, D. F.; Perry, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    The design requirements are given for magnetic oxide coated, electronic data processing tape, wound on reels. Magnetic recording tape types covered by this specification are intended for use on digital tape transports using the Non-Return-to-Zero-change-on-ones (NRZI) recording method for recording densities up to and including 800 characters per inch (cpi) and the Phase-Encoding (PE) recording method for a recording density of 1600 cpi.

  18. Phosphatase Specificity and Pathway Insulation in Signaling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Michael A.; Harrison, Brian; Deeds, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatases play an important role in cellular signaling networks by regulating the phosphorylation state of proteins. Phosphatases are classically considered to be promiscuous, acting on tens to hundreds of different substrates. We recently demonstrated that a shared phosphatase can couple the responses of two proteins to incoming signals, even if those two substrates are from otherwise isolated areas of the network. This finding raises a potential paradox: if phosphatases are indeed highly promiscuous, how do cells insulate themselves against unwanted crosstalk? Here, we use mathematical models to explore three possible insulation mechanisms. One approach involves evolving phosphatase KM values that are large enough to prevent saturation by the phosphatase’s substrates. Although this is an effective method for generating isolation, the phosphatase becomes a highly inefficient enzyme, which prevents the system from achieving switch-like responses and can result in slow response kinetics. We also explore the idea that substrate degradation can serve as an effective phosphatase. Assuming that degradation is unsaturatable, this mechanism could insulate substrates from crosstalk, but it would also preclude ultrasensitive responses and would require very high substrate turnover to achieve rapid dephosphorylation kinetics. Finally, we show that adaptor subunits, such as those found on phosphatases like PP2A, can provide effective insulation against phosphatase crosstalk, but only if their binding to substrates is uncoupled from their binding to the catalytic core. Analysis of the interaction network of PP2A’s adaptor domains reveals that although its adaptors may isolate subsets of targets from one another, there is still a strong potential for phosphatase crosstalk within those subsets. Understanding how phosphatase crosstalk and the insulation mechanisms described here impact the function and evolution of signaling networks represents a major challenge for

  19. Species, interindividual, and tissue specificity in endocrine signaling.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, C; Ahmed, S A; Brown, T; Ho, S M; Hodges, L; Lucier, G; Russo, J; Weigel, N; Weise, T; Vandenbergh, J

    1999-01-01

    The activity of endocrine-active agents exhibits specificity at many levels. Differential responsiveness to these agents has been observed between different species and extends to interindividual differences within a species and between different tissues as well. In cases where they have been identified, the biologic and molecular mechanisms underlying this specificity are quite diverse. Determinants of species specificity include differences that exist in receptor binding, gene transcription, and cellular responses to endocrine-active compounds between species. Interindividual differences in responsiveness may be determined at the level of genetic polymorphisms in hormone-metabolizing enzymes, hormone receptors, and in those genes that are transactivated by these receptors, as well as during changing windows of susceptibility that occur as a function of age, such as prenatal and postmenopausal exposures. Extrinsic factors such as diet can also impact individual susceptibility to endocrine-active agents. Tissue-specific determinants of susceptibility are well documented, but little is known regarding the mechanisms underlying these different responses. Differences in the expression of accessory proteins for steroid hormone receptors and different patterns of receptor expression, estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen receptor beta; for example, may contribute to tissue specificity, as may differences in the pattern of expression of other genes such as hormone-metabolizing enzymes. The use of animal model systems and development of appropriate mathematical models has the potential to yield additional valuable information for elucidating the role of these determinants of specificity at low-dose exposures and for improved risk assessments for the adverse health effects of endocrine-active compounds. PMID:10421772

  20. Erythropoietin receptor signals both proliferation and erythroid-specific differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Liboi, E; Carroll, M; D'Andrea, A D; Mathey-Prevot, B

    1993-01-01

    Ectopic expression of the erythropoietin receptor (EPO-R) in Ba/F3, an interleukin 3-dependent progenitor cell line, confers EPO-dependent cell growth. To examine whether the introduced EPO-R could affect differentiation, we isolated Ba/F3-EPO-R subclones in interleukin 3 and assayed for the induction of beta-globin mRNA synthesis after exposure to EPO. Detection of beta-globin mRNA was observed within 3 days of EPO treatment, with peak levels accumulating after 10 days. When EPO was withdrawn, expression of beta-globin mRNA persisted in most clones, suggesting that commitment to erythroid differentiation had occurred. Although EPO-R expression also supports EPO-dependent proliferation of CTLL-2, a mature T-cell line, those cells did not produce globin transcripts, presumably because they lack requisite cellular factors involved in erythrocyte differentiation. We conclude that the EPO-R transmits signals important for both proliferation and differentiation along the erythroid lineage. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8248252

  1. High Energy Electron Signals from Dark Matter Annihilation in the Sun

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, Philip; Toro, Natalia; Weiner, Neal; Yavin, Itay; /New York U., CCPP

    2012-04-09

    In this paper we discuss two mechanisms by which high energy electrons resulting from dark matter annihilations in or near the Sun can arrive at the Earth. Specifically, electrons can escape the sun if DM annihilates into long-lived states, or if dark matter scatters inelastically, which would leave a halo of dark matter outside of the sun. Such a localized source of electrons may affect the spectra observed by experiments with narrower fields of view oriented towards the sun, such as ATIC, differently from those with larger fields of view such as Fermi. We suggest a simple test of these possibilities with existing Fermi data that is more sensitive than limits from final state radiation. If observed, such a signal will constitute an unequivocal signature of dark matter.

  2. Specificity and sensitivity of glucocorticoid signaling in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Cain, Derek W; Cidlowski, John A

    2015-08-01

    Endogenous glucocorticoids regulate a variety of physiologic processes and are crucial to the systemic stress response. Glucocorticoid receptors are expressed throughout the body, but there is considerable heterogeneity in glucocorticoid sensitivity and induced biological responses across tissues. The immunoregulatory properties of glucocorticoids are exploited in the clinic for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders as well as certain hematological malignancies, but adverse side effects hamper prolonged use. Fully understanding the molecular events that shape the physiologic effects of glucocorticoid treatment will provide insight into optimal glucocorticoid therapies, reliable assessment of glucocorticoid sensitivity in patients, and may advance the development of novel GR agonists that exert immunosuppressive effects while avoiding harmful side effects. In this review, we provide an overview of mechanisms that affect glucocorticoid specificity and sensitivity in health and disease, focusing on the distinct isoforms of the glucocorticoid receptor and their unique regulatory and functional properties. PMID:26303082

  3. Clonal induction of helper T cells: conversion of specific signals into nonspecific signals.

    PubMed

    Schreier, M H; Tees, R

    1980-01-01

    The mechanism by which murine helper T cells specific for sheep erythrocytes (SRC) or horse erythrocytes (HRC) exert their effect in an antibody response has been studied in a specific in vitro helper assay in which T cells specific for SRC (TSRC) do not support an antibody response against HRC and in which T cells specific for HRC (T'HRC) do not support an antibody response against SRC. Either population of helper T cells can support an antibody response to both antigens if the homologous and an unrelated antigen are present at the same time. The helper effect is mediated by stable soluble products, the induction of which is antigen specific and independent of B cells. To exclude T cell-T cell interactions, pure populations of specific helper T cells were obtained by long-term culture in vitro of in vivo primed T cells followed by single cell cloning. Clones of T'SRC or T'HRC are highly specific both in vitro and in vivo. For in vivo experiments syngeneic nude mice, selectively and specifically reconstituted with cloned helper T cells, were used. While specific helper T cells can also provide help in vitro for an unrelated antigen, in vivo only specific T cell help is revealed. PMID:6153171

  4. A nonlinear optoelectronic filter for electronic signal processing

    PubMed Central

    Loh, William; Yegnanarayanan, Siva; Ram, Rajeev J.; Juodawlkis, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    The conversion of electrical signals into modulated optical waves and back into electrical signals provides the capacity for low-loss radio-frequency (RF) signal transfer over optical fiber. Here, we show that the unique properties of this microwave-photonic link also enable the manipulation of RF signals beyond what is possible in conventional systems. We achieve these capabilities by realizing a novel nonlinear filter, which acts to suppress a stronger RF signal in the presence of a weaker signal independent of their separation in frequency. Using this filter, we demonstrate a relative suppression of 56 dB for a stronger signal having a 1-GHz center frequency, uncovering the presence of otherwise undetectable weaker signals located as close as 3.5 Hz away. The capabilities of the optoelectronic filter break the conventional limits of signal detection, opening up new possibilities for radar and communication systems, and for the field of precision frequency metrology. PMID:24402418

  5. Optical Properties and Electronic States Specific to Solid Fullerene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Nobutsugu; Kazaoui, Said; Wen, Ching-Ju; Byrne, Hugh J.

    1996-03-01

    One of the most intriguing aspects of the fullerene research is to ask what specific phenomena will occur when the soccer-ball shaped molecules aggregate and make a solid. Seeking this question is crucial for the realization of any photonic and electronic application of this new type of carbon allotrope. We have been working on this theme by the study of optical and electrical properties of C60 thin film. An important result is the demonstration of a distinct intermolecular charge transfer excited state (CT exciton) originating from intermolecular electronic interaction specific to the spherical pai conjugation system. This has been shown by the coincidence in the threshold energy of 2.3eV for absorption, luminescence efficiency, field induced luminescence quenching, and photoconductivity. We also found an evidence of the interconnection between optical properties and the structural phase transition at 260K. Moreover, a composite film containing C60 is demonstrated to show intense luminescence under 10mW laser irradiation.

  6. Cytoplasmic nanojunctions between lysosomes and sarcoplasmic reticulum are required for specific calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Fameli, Nicola; Ogunbayo, Oluseye A; van Breemen, Cornelis; Evans, A Mark

    2014-01-01

    Herein we demonstrate how nanojunctions between lysosomes and sarcoplasmic reticulum (L-SR junctions) serve to couple lysosomal activation to regenerative, ryanodine receptor-mediated cellular Ca (2+) waves. In pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) it has been proposed that nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) triggers increases in cytoplasmic Ca (2+) via L-SR junctions, in a manner that requires initial Ca (2+) release from lysosomes and subsequent Ca (2+)-induced Ca (2+) release (CICR) via ryanodine receptor (RyR) subtype 3 on the SR membrane proximal to lysosomes. L-SR junction membrane separation has been estimated to be < 400 nm and thus beyond the resolution of light microscopy, which has restricted detailed investigations of the junctional coupling process. The present study utilizes standard and tomographic transmission electron microscopy to provide a thorough ultrastructural characterization of the L-SR junctions in PASMCs. We show that L-SR nanojunctions are prominent features within these cells and estimate that the junctional membrane separation and extension are about 15 nm and 300 nm, respectively. Furthermore, we develop a quantitative model of the L-SR junction using these measurements, prior kinetic and specific Ca (2+) signal information as input data. Simulations of NAADP-dependent junctional Ca (2+) transients demonstrate that the magnitude of these signals can breach the threshold for CICR via RyR3. By correlation analysis of live cell Ca (2+) signals and simulated Ca (2+) transients within L-SR junctions, we estimate that "trigger zones" comprising 60-100 junctions are required to confer a signal of similar magnitude. This is compatible with the 110 lysosomes/cell estimated from our ultrastructural observations. Most importantly, our model shows that increasing the L-SR junctional width above 50 nm lowers the magnitude of junctional [Ca (2+)] such that there is a failure to breach the threshold for CICR via RyR3. L

  7. Molecular Basis of Signaling Specificity of Insulin and IGF Receptors: Neglected Corners and Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Siddle, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) receptors utilize common phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt and Ras/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathways to mediate a broad spectrum of “metabolic” and “mitogenic” responses. Specificity of insulin and IGF action in vivo must in part reflect expression of receptors and responsive pathways in different tissues but it is widely assumed that it is also determined by the ligand binding and signaling mechanisms of the receptors. This review focuses on receptor-proximal events in insulin/IGF signaling and examines their contribution to specificity of downstream responses. Insulin and IGF receptors may differ subtly in the efficiency with which they recruit their major substrates (IRS-1 and IRS-2 and Shc) and this could influence effectiveness of signaling to “metabolic” and “mitogenic” responses. Other substrates (Grb2-associated binder, downstream of kinases, SH2Bs, Crk), scaffolds (RACK1, β-arrestins, cytohesins), and pathways (non-receptor tyrosine kinases, phosphoinositide kinases, reactive oxygen species) have been less widely studied. Some of these components appear to be specifically involved in “metabolic” or “mitogenic” signaling but it has not been shown that this reflects receptor-preferential interaction. Very few receptor-specific interactions have been characterized, and their roles in signaling are unclear. Signaling specificity might also be imparted by differences in intracellular trafficking or feedback regulation of receptors, but few studies have directly addressed this possibility. Although published data are not wholly conclusive, no evidence has yet emerged for signaling mechanisms that are specifically engaged by insulin receptors but not IGF receptors or vice versa, and there is only limited evidence for differential activation of signaling mechanisms that are common to both receptors. Cellular context, rather than intrinsic receptor activity, therefore appears

  8. Integration of digital signal processing technologies with pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pursley, Randall H.; Salem, Ghadi; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Subramanian, Sankaran; Koscielniak, Janusz; Krishna, Murali C.; Pohida, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    The integration of modern data acquisition and digital signal processing (DSP) technologies with Fourier transform electron paramagnetic resonance (FT-EPR) imaging at radiofrequencies (RF) is described. The FT-EPR system operates at a Larmor frequency (Lf) of 300 MHz to facilitate in vivo studies. This relatively low frequency Lf, in conjunction with our ~10 MHz signal bandwidth, enables the use of direct free induction decay time-locked subsampling (TLSS). This particular technique provides advantages by eliminating the traditional analog intermediate frequency downconversion stage along with the corresponding noise sources. TLSS also results in manageable sample rates that facilitate the design of DSP-based data acquisition and image processing platforms. More specifically, we utilize a high-speed field programmable gate array (FPGA) and a DSP processor to perform advanced real-time signal and image processing. The migration to a DSP-based configuration offers the benefits of improved EPR system performance, as well as increased adaptability to various EPR system configurations (i.e., software configurable systems instead of hardware reconfigurations). The required modifications to the FT-EPR system design are described, with focus on the addition of DSP technologies including the application-specific hardware, software, and firmware developed for the FPGA and DSP processor. The first results of using real-time DSP technologies in conjunction with direct detection bandpass sampling to implement EPR imaging at RF frequencies are presented. PMID:16243552

  9. Integration of digital signal processing technologies with pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pursley, Randall H.; Salem, Ghadi; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Subramanian, Sankaran; Koscielniak, Janusz; Krishna, Murali C.; Pohida, Thomas J.

    2006-02-01

    The integration of modern data acquisition and digital signal processing (DSP) technologies with Fourier transform electron paramagnetic resonance (FT-EPR) imaging at radiofrequencies (RF) is described. The FT-EPR system operates at a Larmor frequency ( Lf) of 300 MHz to facilitate in vivo studies. This relatively low frequency Lf, in conjunction with our ˜10 MHz signal bandwidth, enables the use of direct free induction decay time-locked subsampling (TLSS). This particular technique provides advantages by eliminating the traditional analog intermediate frequency downconversion stage along with the corresponding noise sources. TLSS also results in manageable sample rates that facilitate the design of DSP-based data acquisition and image processing platforms. More specifically, we utilize a high-speed field programmable gate array (FPGA) and a DSP processor to perform advanced real-time signal and image processing. The migration to a DSP-based configuration offers the benefits of improved EPR system performance, as well as increased adaptability to various EPR system configurations (i.e., software configurable systems instead of hardware reconfigurations). The required modifications to the FT-EPR system design are described, with focus on the addition of DSP technologies including the application-specific hardware, software, and firmware developed for the FPGA and DSP processor. The first results of using real-time DSP technologies in conjunction with direct detection bandpass sampling to implement EPR imaging at RF frequencies are presented.

  10. Integration of digital signal processing technologies with pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Pursley, Randall H; Salem, Ghadi; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Subramanian, Sankaran; Koscielniak, Janusz; Krishna, Murali C; Pohida, Thomas J

    2006-02-01

    The integration of modern data acquisition and digital signal processing (DSP) technologies with Fourier transform electron paramagnetic resonance (FT-EPR) imaging at radiofrequencies (RF) is described. The FT-EPR system operates at a Larmor frequency (L(f)) of 300MHz to facilitate in vivo studies. This relatively low frequency L(f), in conjunction with our approximately 10MHz signal bandwidth, enables the use of direct free induction decay time-locked subsampling (TLSS). This particular technique provides advantages by eliminating the traditional analog intermediate frequency downconversion stage along with the corresponding noise sources. TLSS also results in manageable sample rates that facilitate the design of DSP-based data acquisition and image processing platforms. More specifically, we utilize a high-speed field programmable gate array (FPGA) and a DSP processor to perform advanced real-time signal and image processing. The migration to a DSP-based configuration offers the benefits of improved EPR system performance, as well as increased adaptability to various EPR system configurations (i.e., software configurable systems instead of hardware reconfigurations). The required modifications to the FT-EPR system design are described, with focus on the addition of DSP technologies including the application-specific hardware, software, and firmware developed for the FPGA and DSP processor. The first results of using real-time DSP technologies in conjunction with direct detection bandpass sampling to implement EPR imaging at RF frequencies are presented. PMID:16243552

  11. A hierarchy of ECM-mediated signalling tissue-specific gene expression regulates tissue-specific gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Roskelley, Calvin D; Srebrow, Anabella; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-10-07

    A dynamic and reciprocal flow of information between cells and the extracellular matrix contributes significantly to the regulation of form and function in developing systems. Signals generated by the extracellular matrix do not act in isolation. Instead, they are processed within the context of global signalling hierarchies whose constituent inputs and outputs are constantly modulated by all the factors present in the cell's surrounding microenvironment. This is particularly evident in the mammary gland, where the construction and subsequent destruction of such a hierarchy regulates changes in tissue-specific gene expression, morphogenesis and apoptosis during each developmental cycle of pregnancy, lactation and involution.

  12. Diversity and specificity: auxin perception and signaling through the TIR1/AFB pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Renhou; Estelle, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Auxin is a versatile plant hormone that plays an essential role in most aspects of plant growth and development. Auxin regulates various growth processes by modulating gene transcription through a SCF(TIR1/AFB)-Aux/IAA-ARF nuclear signaling module. Recent work has generated clues as to how multiple layers of regulation of the auxin signaling components may result in diverse and specific response outputs. In particular, interaction and structural studies of key auxin signaling proteins have produced novel insights into the molecular basis of auxin-regulated transcription and may lead to a refined auxin signaling model. PMID:25032902

  13. Effect of external signal on the output power of an oscillator with electron feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, N. S.; Koronovskii, A. A.; Hramov, A. E.

    2012-11-01

    The effect of an external single-frequency harmonic signal on the output power of an oscillator with electron feedback has been studied by analytical and numerical methods. It is established that an increase in the input signal power leads to sharp growth in the output power of the nonautonomous oscillator. Physical processes that take place in the electron beam with virtual cathode under the action of an external harmonic signal, which leads to velocity modulation in the electron beam entering the interaction space, have been analyzed. The obtained results well agree with the data of previous experimental investigations of the signal gain in a low-voltage vircator.

  14. Cell-Autonomous Gβ Signaling Defines Neuron-Specific Steady State Serotonin Synthesis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu; Choi, Sunju; Xie, Yusu; Sze, Ji Ying

    2015-09-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins regulate a vast array of cellular functions via specific intracellular effectors. Accumulating pharmacological and biochemical studies implicate Gβ subunits as signaling molecules interacting directly with a wide range of effectors to modulate downstream cellular responses, in addition to their role in regulating Gα subunit activities. However, the native biological roles of Gβ-mediated signaling pathways in vivo have been characterized only in a few cases. Here, we identified a Gβ GPB-1 signaling pathway operating in specific serotonergic neurons to the define steady state serotonin (5-HT) synthesis, through a genetic screen for 5-HT synthesis mutants in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that signaling through cell autonomous GPB-1 to the OCR-2 TRPV channel defines the baseline expression of 5-HT synthesis enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase tph-1 in ADF chemosensory neurons. This Gβ signaling pathway is not essential for establishing the serotonergic cell fates and is mechanistically separated from stress-induced tph-1 upregulation. We identified that ADF-produced 5-HT controls specific innate rhythmic behaviors. These results revealed a Gβ-mediated signaling operating in differentiated cells to specify intrinsic functional properties, and indicate that baseline TPH expression is not a default generic serotonergic fate, but is programmed in a cell-specific manner in the mature nervous system. Cell-specific regulation of TPH expression could be a general principle for tailored steady state 5-HT synthesis in functionally distinct neurons and their regulation of innate behavior. PMID:26402365

  15. Cell-Autonomous Gβ Signaling Defines Neuron-Specific Steady State Serotonin Synthesis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lu; Choi, Sunju; Xie, Yusu; Sze, Ji Ying

    2015-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins regulate a vast array of cellular functions via specific intracellular effectors. Accumulating pharmacological and biochemical studies implicate Gβ subunits as signaling molecules interacting directly with a wide range of effectors to modulate downstream cellular responses, in addition to their role in regulating Gα subunit activities. However, the native biological roles of Gβ-mediated signaling pathways in vivo have been characterized only in a few cases. Here, we identified a Gβ GPB-1 signaling pathway operating in specific serotonergic neurons to the define steady state serotonin (5-HT) synthesis, through a genetic screen for 5-HT synthesis mutants in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that signaling through cell autonomous GPB-1 to the OCR-2 TRPV channel defines the baseline expression of 5-HT synthesis enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase tph-1 in ADF chemosensory neurons. This Gβ signaling pathway is not essential for establishing the serotonergic cell fates and is mechanistically separated from stress-induced tph-1 upregulation. We identified that ADF-produced 5-HT controls specific innate rhythmic behaviors. These results revealed a Gβ-mediated signaling operating in differentiated cells to specify intrinsic functional properties, and indicate that baseline TPH expression is not a default generic serotonergic fate, but is programmed in a cell-specific manner in the mature nervous system. Cell-specific regulation of TPH expression could be a general principle for tailored steady state 5-HT synthesis in functionally distinct neurons and their regulation of innate behavior. PMID:26402365

  16. Origin of electrical signals for plasma etching end point detection: Comparison of end point signals and electron density

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolewski, Mark A.; Lahr, David L.

    2012-09-15

    Electrical signals are used for end point detection in plasma etching, but the origin of the electrical changes observed at end point is not well understood. As an etch breaks through one layer and exposes an underlayer, the fluxes and densities of etch products and reactants in the gas phase will change. The resulting perturbation in gas composition may alter the plasma electron density, which in turn may affect the electrical signals. Alternatively, changes in substrate electrical properties or surface properties, such as work function or emitted electron yield, may be involved. To investigate these effects, experiments were performed in a radio-frequency (rf)-biased, inductively coupled reactor, during CF{sub 4}/Ar plasma etching of silicon dioxide films on silicon substrates. A complete set of electrical parameters, for the bias as well as the inductive source, was measured and compared. The most useful end point signal was found to be the fundamental rf bias impedance, which decreases when the oxide is removed. A simultaneous increase in plasma electron density was measured by a wave cutoff probe. Analytical sheath models indicate that the measured change in electron density accounts for nearly all of the impedance decrease. The change in electron density can in turn be explained by the effects of etch products or reactants on gas composition. In contrast, electrons emitted from the wafer surface play at most a minor role in the changes in electron density and impedance observed at end point.

  17. Canonical Notch Signaling Is Dispensable for Early Cell Fate Specifications in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shaolin; Stahl, Mark; Lu, Linchao; Stanley, Pamela

    2005-01-01

    The canonical Notch signaling pathway mediated by Delta- and Jagged-like Notch ligands determines a variety of cell fates in metazoa. In Caenorhabditis elegans and sea urchins, canonical Notch signaling is essential for different cell fate specifications during early embryogenesis or the formation of endoderm, mesoderm, or ectoderm germ layers. Transcripts of Notch signaling pathway genes are present during mouse blastogenesis, suggesting that the canonical Notch signaling pathway may also function in early mammalian development. To test this directly, we used conditional deletion in oocytes carrying a ZP3Cre recombinase transgene to generate mouse embryos lacking both maternal and zygotic protein O-fucosyltransferase 1, a cell-autonomous and essential component of canonical Notch receptor signaling. Homozygous mutant embryos derived from eggs lacking Pofut1 gene transcripts developed indistinguishably from the wild type until approximately embryonic day 8.0, a postgastrulation stage after the formation of the three germ layers. Thus, in contrast to the case with C. elegans and sea urchins, canonical Notch signaling is not required in mammals for earliest cell fate specifications or for formation of the three germ layers. The use of canonical Notch signaling for early cell fate specifications by lower organisms may represent co-option of a regulatory pathway originally used later in development by all metazoa. PMID:16227600

  18. Molecular genetic perspectives on cross-talk and specificity in abiotic stress signalling in plants.

    PubMed

    Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Schumaker, Karen; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2004-01-01

    The perception of abiotic stresses and signal transduction to switch on adaptive responses are critical steps in determining the survival and reproduction of plants exposed to adverse environments. Plants have stress-specific adaptive responses as well as responses which protect the plants from more than one environmental stress. There are multiple stress perception and signalling pathways, some of which are specific, but others may cross-talk at various steps. Recently, progress has been made in identifying components of signalling pathways involved in salt, drought and cold stresses. Genetic analysis has defined the Salt-Overly-Sensitive (SOS) pathway, in which a salt stress-induced calcium signal is probably sensed by the calcium-binding protein SOS3 which then activates the protein kinase SOS2. The SOS3-SOS2 kinase complex regulates the expression and activity of ion transporters such as SOS1 to re-establish cellular ionic homeostasis under salinity. The ICE1 (Inducer of CBF Expression 1)-CBF (C-Repeat Binding Protein) pathway is critical for the regulation of the cold-responsive transcriptome and acquired freezing tolerance, although at present the signalling events that activate the ICE1 transcription factor during cold stress are not known. Both ABA-dependent and -independent signalling pathways appear to be involved in osmotic stress tolerance. Components of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades may act as converging points of multiple abiotic as well as biotic stress signalling pathways. Forward and reverse genetic analysis in combination with expression profiling will continue to uncover many signalling components, and biochemical characterization of the signalling complexes will be required to determine specificity and cross-talk in abiotic stress signalling pathways. PMID:14673035

  19. Tissue-Specific Signals Control Reversible Program of Localization and Functional Polarization of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Okabe, Yasutaka; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Tissue-resident macrophages are highly heterogeneous in terms of their functions and phenotypes as a consequence of adaptation to different tissue environments. Local tissue-derived signals are thought to control functional polarization of resident macrophages; however, the identity of these signals remains largely unknown. It is also unknown whether functional heterogeneity is a result of irreversible lineage-specific differentiation or a consequence of continuous but reversible induction of diverse functional programs. Here, we identified retinoic acid as a signal that induces tissue-specific localization and functional polarization of peritoneal macrophages through the reversible induction of transcription factor GATA6. We further found that GATA6 in macrophages regulates gut IgA production through peritoneal B-1 cells. These results provide insight into the regulation of tissue-resident macrophage functional specialization by tissue-derived signals. PMID:24792964

  20. [Analysis of species specific acoustic signals in the mesencephalic, diencephalic, and neostriatal structures of the brain].

    PubMed

    Shliafer, T P; Aleksandrova, Zh G

    1979-10-01

    In chronic experiments, the neuronal activity in structures of the auditory analyzer was studied during perception of species-specific signals in the chicken. The majority of the neostriatum cells responded to territorial vocalizations of the rooster and to squeaking of the chicken; in the midbrain structures the maximal responses occurred to signals of distress and alarm. The greatest number of cells responded most obviously to the cardinal component of the chicken vocalization spectrum. PMID:510592

  1. 78 FR 22554 - Document to Support Submission of an Electronic Common Technical Document-Specifications for File...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-16

    ... Technical Document--Specifications for File Format Types Using Electronic Common Technical Document... regulatory submissions in electronic format using the electronic Common Technical Document (eCTD) specifications: ``Specifications for File Format Types Using eCTD Specification.'' ADDRESSES: Submit...

  2. FGF signaling restricts hematopoietic stem cell specification via modulation of the BMP pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pouget, Claire; Peterkin, Tessa; Simões, Filipa Costa; Lee, Yoonsung; Traver, David; Patient, Roger

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are produced during embryogenesis from the floor of the dorsal aorta. The localization of HSCs is dependent upon the presence of instructive signals on the ventral side of the vessel. The nature of the extrinsic molecular signals that control the aortic hematopoietic niche is currently poorly understood. Here we demonstrate a novel requirement for FGF signaling in the specification of aortic hemogenic endothelium. Our results demonstrate that FGF signaling normally acts to repress BMP activity in the subaortic mesenchyme through transcriptional inhibition of bmp4, as well as through activation of two BMP antagonists, noggin2 and gremlin1a. Taken together, these findings demonstrate a key role for FGF signaling in establishment of the developmental HSC niche via its regulation of BMP activity in the subaortic mesenchyme. These results should help inform strategies to recapitulate the development of HSCs in vitro from pluripotent precursors. PMID:25429520

  3. Cross-talk and specificity in two-component signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Ruchi; Sahoo, Bikash Kumar; Saini, Deepak Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Two-component signaling systems (TCSs) are composed of two proteins, sensor kinases and response regulators, which can cross-talk and integrate information between them by virtue of high-sequence conservation and modular nature, to generate concerted and diversified responses. However, TCSs have been shown to be insulated, to facilitate linear signal transmission and response generation. Here, we discuss various mechanisms that confer specificity or cross-talk among TCSs. The presented models are supported with evidence that indicate the physiological significance of the observed TCS signaling architecture. Overall, we propose that the signaling topology of any TCSs cannot be predicted using obvious sequence or structural rules, as TCS signaling is regulated by multiple factors, including spatial and temporal distribution of the participating proteins. PMID:27159035

  4. An Fgf-Shh signaling hierarchy regulates early specification of the zebrafish skull

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Neil; Sidik, Alfire; Bertrand, Julien Y.; Eberhart, Johann K.

    2016-01-01

    The neurocranium generates most of the craniofacial skeleton and consists of prechordal and postchordal regions. Although development of the prechordal is well studied, little is known of the postchordal region. Here we characterize a signaling hierarchy necessary for postchordal neurocranial development involving Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) signaling for early specification of mesodermally-derived progenitor cells. The expression of hyaluron synthetase 2 (has2) in the cephalic mesoderm requires Fgf signaling and Has2 function, in turn, is required for postchordal neurocranial development. While Hedgehog (Hh)-deficient embryos also lack a postchordal neurocranium, this appears primarily due to a later defect in chondrocyte differentiation. Inhibitor studies demonstrate that postchordal neurocranial development requires early Fgf and later Hh signaling. Collectively, our results provide a mechanistic understanding of early postchordal neurocranial development and demonstrate a hierarchy of signaling between Fgf and Hh in the development of this structure. PMID:27060628

  5. An Fgf-Shh signaling hierarchy regulates early specification of the zebrafish skull.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Neil; Sidik, Alfire; Bertrand, Julien Y; Eberhart, Johann K

    2016-07-15

    The neurocranium generates most of the craniofacial skeleton and consists of prechordal and postchordal regions. Although development of the prechordal is well studied, little is known of the postchordal region. Here we characterize a signaling hierarchy necessary for postchordal neurocranial development involving Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) signaling for early specification of mesodermally-derived progenitor cells. The expression of hyaluron synthetase 2 (has2) in the cephalic mesoderm requires Fgf signaling and Has2 function, in turn, is required for postchordal neurocranial development. While Hedgehog (Hh)-deficient embryos also lack a postchordal neurocranium, this appears primarily due to a later defect in chondrocyte differentiation. Inhibitor studies demonstrate that postchordal neurocranial development requires early Fgf and later Hh signaling. Collectively, our results provide a mechanistic understanding of early postchordal neurocranial development and demonstrate a hierarchy of signaling between Fgf and Hh in the development of this structure. PMID:27060628

  6. Smad phosphoisoform signaling specificity: the right place at the right time.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Koichi

    2011-11-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β antagonizes mitogenic Ras signaling during epithelial regeneration, but TGF-β and Ras act synergistically in driving tumor progression. Insights into these apparently contradictory effects have come from recent detailed analyses of the TGF-β signaling process. Here, we summarize the different modes of TGF-β/Ras signaling in normal epithelium and neoplasms and show how perturbation of TGF-β signaling by Ras may contribute to a shift from tumor-suppressive to protumorigenic TGF-β activity during tumor progression. Smad proteins, which convey signals from TGF-β receptors to the nucleus, have intermediate linker regions between conserved Mad homology (MH) 1 and MH2 domains. TGF-β Type I receptor and Ras-associated kinases differentially phosphorylate Smad2 and Smad3 to create C-terminally (C), linker (L) or dually (L/C) phosphorylated (p) isoforms. In epithelial homeostasis, TGF-β-mediated pSmad3C signaling opposes proliferative responses induced by mitogenic signals. During carcinogenesis, activation of cytoplasmic Ras-associated kinases including mitogen-activated protein kinase confers a selective advantage on benign tumors by shifting Smad3 signaling from a tumor-suppressive pSmad3C to an oncogenic pSmad3L pathway, leading to carcinoma in situ. Finally, at the edges of advanced carcinomas invading adjacent tissues, nuclear Ras-associated kinases such as cyclin-dependent kinases, together with cytoplasmic kinases, alter TGF-β signals to more invasive and proliferative pSmad2L/C and pSmad3L/C signaling. Taken together, TGF-β signaling specificity arises from spatiotemporal dynamics of Smad phosphoisoforms. Based on these findings, we have reason to hope that pharmacologic inhibition of linker phosphorylation might suppress progression to human advanced carcinomas by switching from protumorigenic to tumor-suppressive TGF-β signaling. PMID:21798854

  7. Smad phosphoisoform signaling specificity: the right place at the right time

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β antagonizes mitogenic Ras signaling during epithelial regeneration, but TGF-β and Ras act synergistically in driving tumor progression. Insights into these apparently contradictory effects have come from recent detailed analyses of the TGF-β signaling process. Here, we summarize the different modes of TGF-β/Ras signaling in normal epithelium and neoplasms and show how perturbation of TGF-β signaling by Ras may contribute to a shift from tumor-suppressive to protumorigenic TGF-β activity during tumor progression. Smad proteins, which convey signals from TGF-β receptors to the nucleus, have intermediate linker regions between conserved Mad homology (MH) 1 and MH2 domains. TGF-β Type I receptor and Ras-associated kinases differentially phosphorylate Smad2 and Smad3 to create C-terminally (C), linker (L) or dually (L/C) phosphorylated (p) isoforms. In epithelial homeostasis, TGF-β-mediated pSmad3C signaling opposes proliferative responses induced by mitogenic signals. During carcinogenesis, activation of cytoplasmic Ras-associated kinases including mitogen-activated protein kinase confers a selective advantage on benign tumors by shifting Smad3 signaling from a tumor-suppressive pSmad3C to an oncogenic pSmad3L pathway, leading to carcinoma in situ. Finally, at the edges of advanced carcinomas invading adjacent tissues, nuclear Ras-associated kinases such as cyclin-dependent kinases, together with cytoplasmic kinases, alter TGF-β signals to more invasive and proliferative pSmad2L/C and pSmad3L/C signaling. Taken together, TGF-β signaling specificity arises from spatiotemporal dynamics of Smad phosphoisoforms. Based on these findings, we have reason to hope that pharmacologic inhibition of linker phosphorylation might suppress progression to human advanced carcinomas by switching from protumorigenic to tumor-suppressive TGF-β signaling. PMID:21798854

  8. SoxB1-driven transcriptional network underlies neural-specific interpretation of morphogen signals.

    PubMed

    Oosterveen, Tony; Kurdija, Sanja; Ensterö, Mats; Uhde, Christopher W; Bergsland, Maria; Sandberg, Magnus; Sandberg, Rickard; Muhr, Jonas; Ericson, Johan

    2013-04-30

    The reiterative deployment of a small cadre of morphogen signals underlies patterning and growth of most tissues during embyogenesis, but how such inductive events result in tissue-specific responses remains poorly understood. By characterizing cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) associated with genes regulated by Sonic hedgehog (Shh), retinoids, or bone morphogenetic proteins in the CNS, we provide evidence that the neural-specific interpretation of morphogen signaling reflects a direct integration of these pathways with SoxB1 proteins at the CRM level. Moreover, expression of SoxB1 proteins in the limb bud confers on mesodermal cells the potential to activate neural-specific target genes upon Shh, retinoid, or bone morphogenetic protein signaling, and the collocation of binding sites for SoxB1 and morphogen-mediatory transcription factors in CRMs faithfully predicts neural-specific gene activity. Thus, an unexpectedly simple transcriptional paradigm appears to conceptually explain the neural-specific interpretation of pleiotropic signaling during vertebrate development. Importantly, genes induced in a SoxB1-dependent manner appear to constitute repressive gene regulatory networks that are directly interlinked at the CRM level to constrain the regional expression of patterning genes. Accordingly, not only does the topology of SoxB1-driven gene regulatory networks provide a tissue-specific mode of gene activation, but it also determines the spatial expression pattern of target genes within the developing neural tube. PMID:23589857

  9. Nucleotide-Specific Contrast for DNA Sequencing by Electron Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Davis, Ronald W.

    2016-01-01

    DNA sequencing by imaging in an electron microscope is an approach that holds promise to deliver long reads with low error rates and without the need for amplification. Earlier work using transmission electron microscopes, which use high electron energies on the order of 100 keV, has shown that low contrast and radiation damage necessitates the use of heavy atom labeling of individual nucleotides, which increases the read error rates. Other prior work using scattering electrons with much lower energy has shown to suppress beam damage on DNA. Here we explore possibilities to increase contrast by employing two methods, X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy. Using bulk DNA samples with monomers of each base, both methods are shown to provide contrast mechanisms that can distinguish individual nucleotides without labels. Both spectroscopic techniques can be readily implemented in a low energy electron microscope, which may enable label-free DNA sequencing by direct imaging. PMID:27149617

  10. Development of a new model system to dissect isoform specific Akt signalling in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kajno, Esi; McGraw, Timothy E; Gonzalez, Eva

    2015-06-15

    Protein kinase B (Akt) kinases are critical signal transducers mediating insulin action. Genetic studies revealed that Akt1 and Akt2 signalling differentially contribute to sustain lipid and glucose homoeostasis; however Akt isoform-specific effectors remain elusive due to the lack of a suitable model system to mechanistically interrogate Akt isoform-specific signalling. To overcome those technical limitations we developed a novel model system that provides acute and specific control of signalling by Akt isoforms. We generated mutants of Akt1 and Akt2 resistant to the allosteric Akt inhibitor MK-2206. We then developed adipocyte cell lines, in which endogenous Akt1 or Akt2 has been replaced by their corresponding drug-resistant Akt mutant. Treatment of those cells with MK-2206 allowed for acute and specific control of either Akt1 or Akt2 function. Our data showed that Akt1(W80A) and Akt2(W80A) mutants are resistant to MK-2206, dynamically regulated by insulin and able to signal to Akt downstream effectors. Analyses of insulin action in this cellular system showed that Akt1 and Akt2 are both able to mediate insulin regulation of the transcription factor forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) and the glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), revealing a redundant role for these Akt kinases in the control of glucose transport into fat cells. In contrast, Akt1 signalling is uniquely required for adipogenesis, by controlling the mitotic clonal expansion (MCE) of pre-adipocytes that precedes white adipose cell differentiation. Our data provide new insights into the role of Akt kinases in glucose transport and adipogenesis and support our model system as a valuable tool for the biochemical characterization of signalling by specific Akt isoforms. PMID:25856301

  11. Electronic filters, repeated signal charge conversion apparatus, hearing aids and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morley, Jr., Robert E. (Inventor); Engebretson, A. Maynard (Inventor); Engel, George L. (Inventor); Sullivan, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An electronic filter for filtering an electrical signal. Signal processing circuitry therein includes a logarithmic filter having a series of filter stages with inputs and outputs in cascade and respective circuits associated with the filter stages for storing electrical representations of filter parameters. The filter stages include circuits for respectively adding the electrical representations of the filter parameters to the electrical signal to be filtered thereby producing a set of filter sum signals. At least one of the filter stages includes circuitry for producing a filter signal in substantially logarithmic form at its output by combining a filter sum signal for that filter stage with a signal from an output of another filter stage. The signal processing circuitry produces an intermediate output signal, and a multiplexer connected to the signal processing circuit multiplexes the intermediate output signal with the electrical signal to be filtered so that the logarithmic filter operates as both a logarithmic prefilter and a logarithmic postfilter. Other electronic filters, signal conversion apparatus, electroacoustic systems, hearing aids and methods are also disclosed.

  12. Investigation of defects in In–Ga–Zn oxide thin film using electron spin resonance signals

    SciTech Connect

    Nonaka, Yusuke; Kurosawa, Yoichi; Komatsu, Yoshihiro; Ishihara, Noritaka; Oota, Masashi; Nakashima, Motoki; Hirohashi, Takuya; Takahashi, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Shunpei; Obonai, Toshimitsu; Hosaka, Yasuharu; Koezuka, Junichi; Yamauchi, Jun

    2014-04-28

    In–Ga–Zn oxide (IGZO) is a next-generation semiconductor material seen as an alternative to silicon. Despite the importance of the controllability of characteristics and the reliability of devices, defects in IGZO have not been fully understood. We investigated defects in IGZO thin films using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. In as-sputtered IGZO thin films, we observed an ESR signal which had a g-value of g = 2.010, and the signal was found to disappear under thermal treatment. Annealing in a reductive atmosphere, such as N{sub 2} atmosphere, generated an ESR signal with g = 1.932 in IGZO thin films. The temperature dependence of the latter signal suggests that the signal is induced by delocalized unpaired electrons (i.e., conduction electrons). In fact, a comparison between the conductivity and ESR signal intensity revealed that the signal's intensity is related to the number of conduction electrons in the IGZO thin film. The signal's intensity did not increase with oxygen vacancy alone but also with increases in both oxygen vacancy and hydrogen concentration. In addition, first-principle calculation suggests that the conduction electrons in IGZO may be generated by defects that occur when hydrogen atoms are inserted into oxygen vacancies.

  13. SUMOylation of AMPKα1 by PIAS4 specifically regulates mTORC1 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yan; Ollila, Saara; Wong, Iris P. L.; Vallenius, Tea; Palvimo, Jorma J.; Vaahtomeri, Kari; Mäkelä, Tomi P.

    2015-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibits several anabolic pathways such as fatty acid and protein synthesis, and identification of AMPK substrate specificity would be useful to understand its role in particular cellular processes and develop strategies to modulate AMPK activity in a substrate-specific manner. Here we show that SUMOylation of AMPKα1 attenuates AMPK activation specifically towards mTORC1 signalling. SUMOylation is also important for rapid inactivation of AMPK, to allow prompt restoration of mTORC1 signalling. PIAS4 and its SUMO E3 ligase activity are specifically required for the AMPKα1 SUMOylation and the inhibition of AMPKα1 activity towards mTORC1 signalling. The activity of a SUMOylation-deficient AMPKα1 mutant is higher than the wild type towards mTORC1 signalling when reconstituted in AMPKα-deficient cells. PIAS4 depletion reduced growth of breast cancer cells, specifically when combined with direct AMPK activator A769662, suggesting that inhibiting AMPKα1 SUMOylation can be explored to modulate AMPK activation and thereby suppress cancer cell growth. PMID:26616021

  14. Specific regions within the embryonic midbrain and cerebellum require different levels of FGF signaling during development

    PubMed Central

    Basson, M. Albert; Echevarria, Diego; Ahn, Christina Petersen; Sudarov, Anamaria; Joyner, Alexandra L.; Mason, Ivor J.; Martinez, Salvador; Martin, Gail R.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Development of the prospective midbrain and cerebellum are coordinated by FGF ligands produced by the isthmic organizer. Previous studies have suggested that the midbrain and cerebellum require different levels of FGF signaling for their development. However, little is known about the extent to which specific regions within these two parts of the brain differ in their requirement for FGF signaling during embryogenesis. In this study, we have explored the effects of inhibiting FGF signaling within the embryonic midbrain (mesencephalon) and cerebellum (rhombomere 1) by misexpressing Sprouty2 (Spry2) specifically in the mouse mesencephalon and rhombomere 1 from an early stage. We show that such Spry2 misexpression moderately reduces FGF signaling, and that this reduction causes the death of cells in the anterior mesencephalon, the region furthest from the source of FGF ligands. Interestingly, the remaining cells in the posterior mesencephalon develop into anterior midbrain, indicating that a low level of FGF signaling is sufficient to promote only anterior midbrain development. Spry2 misexpression also affects development of the vermis, the medial part of the cerebellum that spans the midline. We found that whereas misexpression of Spry2 alone caused loss of the anterior vermis, reducing FGF signaling further, by decreasing Fgf8 gene dosage, resulted in loss of the entire vermis. We provide evidence that cell death is not responsible for this tissue loss. Instead, our data suggest that the vermis fails to develop because reducing FGF signaling perturbs the balance between vermis and roof plate development in rhombomere 1. We suggest a molecular explanation for this phenomenon by providing evidence that FGF signaling functions to inhibit the BMP signaling that promotes roof plate development. PMID:18216176

  15. Sequence-specific targeting of nuclear signal transduction pathways by homeodomain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Grueneberg, D A; Simon, K J; Brennan, K; Gilman, M

    1995-01-01

    Cells translate extracellular signals into specific programs of gene expression that reflect their developmental history or identity. We present evidence that one way this interpretation may be performed is by cooperative interactions between serum response factor (SRF) and certain homeodomain proteins. We show that human and Drosophila homeodomain proteins of the paired class have the ability to recruit SRF to DNA sequences not efficiently recognized by SRF on its own, thereby imparting to a linked reporter gene the potential to respond to polypeptide growth factors. This activity requires both the DNA-binding activity of the homeodomain and putative protein-protein contact residues on the exposed surfaces of homeodomain helices 1 and 2. The ability of the homeodomain to impart signal responsiveness is DNA sequence specific, and this specificity differs from the simple DNA-binding specificity of the homeodomain in vitro. The homeodomain imparts response to a spectrum of signals characteristic of the natural SRF-binding site in the c-fos gene. Response to some of these signals is dependent on the secondary recruitment of SRF-dependent ternary complex factors, and we show directly that a homeodomain can promote the recruitment of one such factor, Elk1. We infer that SRF and homeodomains interact cooperatively on DNA and that formation of SRF-homeodomain complexes permits the recruitment of signal-responsive SRF accessory proteins. The ability to route extracellular signals to specific target genes is a novel activity of the homeodomain, which may contribute to the identity function displayed by many homeodomain genes. PMID:7760827

  16. A high signal-to-noise ratio toroidal electron spectrometer for the SEM.

    PubMed

    Hoang, H Q; Osterberg, M; Khursheed, A

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents a high signal-to-noise ratio electron energy spectrometer attachment for the scanning electron microscope (SEM), designed to measure changes in specimen surface potential from secondary electrons and extract specimen atomic number information from backscattered electrons. Experimental results are presented, which demonstrate that the spectrometer can in principle detect specimen voltage changes well into the sub-mV range, and distinguish close atomic numbers by a signal-to-noise ratio of better than 20. The spectrometer has applications for quantitatively mapping specimen surface voltage and atomic number variations on the nano-scale. PMID:21740873

  17. Low Background Signal Readout Electronics for the Majorana Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinn, I.; Abgrall, N.; Avignone, F. T., III; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Buuck, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y.-D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Efremenko, Yu; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Jasinski, B. R.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; MacMullin, J.; Martin, R. D.; Meijer, S. J.; Mertens, S.; Orrell, J. L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, N. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Shanks, B.; Shirchenko, M.; Snyder, N.; Suriano, A. M.; Tedeschi, D.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yu, C.-H.; Yumatov, V.; Majorana Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    The Majorana Demonstrator is a planned 40 kg array of Germanium detectors intended to demonstrate the feasibility of constructing a tonne-scale experiment that will seek neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) in 76Ge. Such an experiment would require backgrounds of less than 1 count/tonne-year in the 4 keV region of interest around the 2039 keV Q-value of the ββ decay. Designing low-noise electronics, which must be placed in close proximity to the detectors, presents a challenge to reaching this background target. This paper will discuss the Majorana collaboration's solutions to some of these challenges.

  18. The 20 kilovolt rocket borne electron accelerator. [equipment specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, R.

    1973-01-01

    The accelerator system is a preprogrammed multi-voltage system capable of operating at a current level of 1/2 ampere at the 20 kilovolt level. The five major functional areas which comprise this system are: (1) Silver zinc battery packs; (2) the electron gun assembly; (3) gun control and opening circuits; (4) the telemetry conditioning section; and (5) the power conversion section.

  19. Cell-specific STORM superresolution imaging reveals nanoscale organization of cannabinoid signaling

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, Szilárd I.; Szabadits, Eszter; Pintér, Balázs; Woodhams, Stephen G.; Henstridge, Christopher M.; Balla, Gyula Y.; Nyilas, Rita; Varga, Csaba; Lee, Sang-Hun; Matolcsi, Máté; Cervenak, Judit; Kacskovics, Imre; Watanabe, Masahiko; Sagheddu, Claudia; Melis, Miriam; Pistis, Marco; Soltesz, Ivan; Katona, István

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in neuroscience is to determine the nanoscale position and quantity of signaling molecules in a cell-type-, and subcellular compartment-specific manner. We therefore developed a novel approach combining cell-specific physiological and anatomical characterization with superresolution imaging, and studied the molecular and structural parameters shaping the physiological properties of synaptic endocannabinoid signaling in the mouse hippocampus. We found that axon terminals of perisomatically-projecting GABAergic interneurons possess increased CB1 receptor number, active-zone complexity, and receptor/effector ratio compared to dendritically-projecting interneurons, in agreement with higher efficiency of cannabinoid signaling at somatic versus dendritic synapses. Furthermore, chronic Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol administration, which reduces cannabinoid efficacy on GABA release, evoked dramatic CB1-downregulation in a dose-dependent manner. Full receptor recovery required several weeks after cessation of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol treatment. These findings demonstrate that cell-type-specific nanoscale analysis of endogenous protein distribution is possible in brain circuits, and identify novel molecular properties controlling endocannabinoid signaling and cannabis-induced cognitive dysfunction. PMID:25485758

  20. Chronic FLT3-ITD Signaling in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Is Connected to a Specific Chromatin Signature

    PubMed Central

    Cauchy, Pierre; James, Sally R.; Zacarias-Cabeza, Joaquin; Ptasinska, Anetta; Imperato, Maria Rosaria; Assi, Salam A.; Piper, Jason; Canestraro, Martina; Hoogenkamp, Maarten; Raghavan, Manoj; Loke, Justin; Akiki, Susanna; Clokie, Samuel J.; Richards, Stephen J.; Westhead, David R.; Griffiths, Michael J.; Ott, Sascha; Bonifer, Constanze; Cockerill, Peter N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by recurrent mutations that affect the epigenetic regulatory machinery and signaling molecules, leading to a block in hematopoietic differentiation. Constitutive signaling from mutated growth factor receptors is a major driver of leukemic growth, but how aberrant signaling affects the epigenome in AML is less understood. Furthermore, AML cells undergo extensive clonal evolution, and the mutations in signaling genes are often secondary events. To elucidate how chronic growth factor signaling alters the transcriptional network in AML, we performed a system-wide multi-omics study of primary cells from patients suffering from AML with internal tandem duplications in the FLT3 transmembrane domain (FLT3-ITD). This strategy revealed cooperation between the MAP kinase (MAPK) inducible transcription factor AP-1 and RUNX1 as a major driver of a common, FLT3-ITD-specific gene expression and chromatin signature, demonstrating a major impact of MAPK signaling pathways in shaping the epigenome of FLT3-ITD AML. PMID:26212328

  1. Design of thermal-noise-harnessing single-electron circuit for efficient signal propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirashima, Ryo; Oya, Takahide

    2016-06-01

    We propose a new single-electron (SE) circuit that can improve the signal propagation speed by harnessing thermal noise efficiently. Generally, an SE circuit has some weaknesses. It is very sensitive to thermal noise and it takes a long time for signal propagation. To solve these problems, we focus on a unique function at an output terminal (an axon) of a neuron that can improve the signal propagation speed because of its distinctive structure. It is expected that a new high-speed SE circuit can be realized by mimicking the structure of the neuron. Here, we indicate the possibility of improving the signal propagation speed by harnessing the thermal noise in one-dimensional neuromorphic single-electron oscillators. Moreover, we designed a two-dimensional neuromorphic single-electron oscillator as an advanced circuit and confirmed its tolerance to thermal noise. Our study will be useful for constructing novel devices that actively use noise energy in the future.

  2. Position Sensor with Integrated Signal-Conditioning Electronics on a Printed Wiring Board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Howard, David E. (Inventor); Smith, Dennis A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A position sensor, such as a rotary position sensor, includes the signal-conditioning electronics in the housing. The signal-conditioning electronics are disposed on a printed wiring board, which is assembled with another printed wiring board including the sensor windings to provide a sub-assembly. A mu-metal shield is interposed between the printed wiring boards to prevent magnetic interference. The sub-assembly is disposed in the sensor housing adjacent to an inductor board which turns on a shaft. The inductor board emanates an internally or externally generated excitation signal that induces a signal in the sensor windings. The induced signal represents the rotary position of the inductor board relative to the sensor winding board.

  3. SPA1: a new genetic locus involved in phytochrome A-specific signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Hoecker, U; Xu, Y; Quail, P H

    1998-01-01

    To identify mutants potentially defective in signaling intermediates specific to phytochrome A (phyA), we screened for extragenic mutations that suppress the morphological phenotype exhibited by a weak phyA mutant (phyA-105) of Arabidopsis. A new recessive mutant, designated spa1 (for suppressor of phyA-105), was isolated and mapped to the bottom of chromosome 2. spa1 phyA-105 double mutants exhibit restoration of several responses to limiting fluence rates of continuous far-red light that are absent in the parental phyA-105 mutant, such as deetiolation, anthocyanin accumulation, and a far-red light-induced inability of seedlings to green upon subsequent transfer to continuous white light. spa1 mutations do not cause a phenotype in darkness, indicating that the suppression phenotype is light dependent. Enhanced photoresponsiveness was observed in spa1 seedlings in a wild-type PHYA background as well as in the mutant phyA-105 background but not in a mutant phyA null background. These results indicate that phyA is necessary in a non-allele-specific fashion for the expression of the spa1 mutant phenotype and that phyB to phyE are not sufficient for this effect. Taken together, the data suggest that spa1 mutations specifically amplify phyA signaling and therefore that the SPA1 locus encodes a component that acts negatively early in the phyA-specific signaling pathway. PMID:9477570

  4. LED applications in road and railway signals: is it possible to fit specifications?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papalillo, Donato; Del Vecchio, Paolo; Schirripa Spagnolo, Giuseppe

    2012-02-01

    In recent times, the transportation industry has generated a number of developments involving new technology in signaling. Important developments have involved the production of light by means of light emitting diode (LED). Since the heat from the junction must be dissipated into the ambient somehow, changing the ambient temperature affects the junction temperature and hence the emitted light. When the LEDs have been used in the railway or traffic signals, the optical proprieties of these have to maintain more rigorous specifications. The junction temperature of the power LEDs affects the device's luminous flux of the device. To develop signals, using LED as light source, able to respect intensity specifications it is not simple. In fact, then shift in intensity, over the specified temperature range, can be greater than the magnitude of specification. In this paper, we describe problems of the temperature dependent changes of LED intensity. Besides we will introduce an innovative technical to allow the use of the LEDs in applications with rigorous specifications.

  5. LED applications in road and railway signals: is it possible to fit specifications?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papalillo, Donato; Del Vecchio, Paolo; Schirripa Spagnolo, Giuseppe

    2011-09-01

    In recent times, the transportation industry has generated a number of developments involving new technology in signaling. Important developments have involved the production of light by means of light emitting diode (LED). Since the heat from the junction must be dissipated into the ambient somehow, changing the ambient temperature affects the junction temperature and hence the emitted light. When the LEDs have been used in the railway or traffic signals, the optical proprieties of these have to maintain more rigorous specifications. The junction temperature of the power LEDs affects the device's luminous flux of the device. To develop signals, using LED as light source, able to respect intensity specifications it is not simple. In fact, then shift in intensity, over the specified temperature range, can be greater than the magnitude of specification. In this paper, we describe problems of the temperature dependent changes of LED intensity. Besides we will introduce an innovative technical to allow the use of the LEDs in applications with rigorous specifications.

  6. Pathway specific modulation of S1P1 receptor signalling in rat and human astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Luke M; Sheridan, Graham K; Pritchard, Adam J; Rutkowska, Aleksandra; Mullershausen, Florian; Dev, Kumlesh K

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 1 (S1P1R) is modulated by phosphorylated FTY720 (pFTY720), which causes S1P1R internalization preventing lymphocyte migration thus limiting autoimmune response. Studies indicate that internalized S1P1Rs continue to signal, maintaining an inhibition of cAMP, thus raising question whether the effects of pFTY720 are due to transient initial agonism, functional antagonism and/or continued signalling. To further investigate this, the current study first determined if continued S1P1R activation is pathway specific. Experimental Approach Using human and rat astrocyte cultures, the effects of S1P1R activation on cAMP, pERK and Ca2+ signalling was investigated. In addition, to examine the role of S1P1R redistribution on these events, a novel biologic (MNP301) that prevented pFTY720-mediated S1P1R redistribution was engineered. Key Results The data showed that pFTY720 induced long-lasting S1P1R redistribution and continued cAMP signalling in rat astrocytes. In contrast, pFTY720 induced a transient increase of Ca2+ in astrocytes and subsequent antagonism of Ca2+ signalling. Notably, while leaving pFTY720-induced cAMP signalling intact, the novel MNP301 peptide attenuated S1P1R-mediated Ca2+ and pERK signalling in cultured rat astrocytes. Conclusions and Implications These findings suggested that pFTY720 causes continued cAMP signalling that is not dependent on S1P1R redistribution and induces functional antagonism of Ca2+ signalling after transient stimulation. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that pFTY720 causes continued signalling in one pathway (cAMP) versus functional antagonism of another pathway (Ca2+) and which also suggests that redistributed S1P1Rs may have differing signalling properties from those expressed at the surface. PMID:23587004

  7. Signals of strong electronic correlation in ion scattering processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetto, F.; Gonzalez, C.; Goldberg, E. C.

    2016-05-01

    Previous measurements of neutral atom fractions for S r+ scattered by gold polycrystalline surfaces show a singular dependence with the target temperature. There is still not a theoretical model that can properly describe the magnitude and the temperature dependence of the neutralization probabilities found. Here, we applied a first-principles quantum-mechanical theoretical formalism to describe the time-dependent scattering process. Three different electronic correlation approaches consistent with the system analyzed are used: (i) the spinless approach, where two charge channels are considered (S r0 and S r+ ) and the spin degeneration is neglected; (ii) the infinite-U approach, with the same charge channels (S r0 and S r+ ) but considering the spin degeneration; and (iii) the finite-U approach, where the first ionization and second ionization energy levels are considered very, but finitely, separated. Neutral fraction magnitudes and temperature dependence are better described by the finite-U approach, indicating that e -correlation plays a significant role in charge-transfer processes. However, none of them is able to explain the nonmonotonous temperature dependence experimentally obtained. Here, we suggest that small changes in the surface work function introduced by the target heating, and possibly not detected by experimental standard methods, could be responsible for that singular behavior. Additionally, we apply the same theoretical model using the infinite-U approximation for the Mg-Au system, obtaining an excellent description of the experimental neutral fractions measured.

  8. Tissue-Specific Gain of RTK Signalling Uncovers Selective Cell Vulnerability during Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Audebert, Stéphane; Helmbacher, Françoise; Dono, Rosanna; Maina, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    The successive events that cells experience throughout development shape their intrinsic capacity to respond and integrate RTK inputs. Cellular responses to RTKs rely on different mechanisms of regulation that establish proper levels of RTK activation, define duration of RTK action, and exert quantitative/qualitative signalling outcomes. The extent to which cells are competent to deal with fluctuations in RTK signalling is incompletely understood. Here, we employ a genetic system to enhance RTK signalling in a tissue-specific manner. The chosen RTK is the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor Met, an appropriate model due to its pleiotropic requirement in distinct developmental events. Ubiquitously enhanced Met in Cre/loxP-based Rosa26 stopMet knock-in context (Del-R26 Met) reveals that most tissues are capable of buffering enhanced Met-RTK signalling thus avoiding perturbation of developmental programs. Nevertheless, this ubiquitous increase of Met does compromise selected programs such as myoblast migration. Using cell-type specific Cre drivers, we genetically showed that altered myoblast migration results from ectopic Met expression in limb mesenchyme rather than in migrating myoblasts themselves. qRT-PCR analyses show that ectopic Met in limbs causes molecular changes such as downregulation in the expression levels of Notum and Syndecan4, two known regulators of morphogen gradients. Molecular and functional studies revealed that ectopic Met expression in limb mesenchyme does not alter HGF expression patterns and levels, but impairs HGF bioavailability. Together, our findings show that myoblasts, in which Met is endogenously expressed, are capable of buffering increased RTK levels, and identify mesenchymal cells as a cell type vulnerable to ectopic Met-RTK signalling. These results illustrate that embryonic cells are sensitive to alterations in the spatial distribution of RTK action, yet resilient to fluctuations in signalling levels of an RTK when occurring

  9. Organ-specific adaptive signaling pathway activation in metastatic breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Riesa M.; Craven, Kelly E.; Krishnamurthy, Purna; Goswami, Chirayu P.; Badve, Sunil; Crooks, Peter; Mathews, William P.; Bhat-Nakshatri, Poornima; Nakshatri, Harikrishna

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer metastasizes to bone, visceral organs, and/or brain depending on the subtype, which may involve activation of a host organ-specific signaling network in metastatic cells. To test this possibility, we determined gene expression patterns in MDA-MB-231 cells and its mammary fat pad tumor (TMD-231), lung-metastasis (LMD-231), bone-metastasis (BMD-231), adrenal-metastasis (ADMD-231) and brain-metastasis (231-BR) variants. When gene expression between metastases was compared, 231-BR cells showed the highest gene expression difference followed by ADMD-231, LMD-231, and BMD-231 cells. Neuronal transmembrane proteins SLITRK2, TMEM47, and LYPD1 were specifically overexpressed in 231-BR cells. Pathway-analyses revealed activation of signaling networks that would enable cancer cells to adapt to organs of metastasis such as drug detoxification/oxidative stress response/semaphorin neuronal pathway in 231-BR, Notch/orphan nuclear receptor signals involved in steroidogenesis in ADMD-231, acute phase response in LMD-231, and cytokine/hematopoietic stem cell signaling in BMD-231 cells. Only NF-κB signaling pathway activation was common to all except BMD-231 cells. We confirmed NF-κB activation in 231-BR and in a brain metastatic variant of 4T1 cells (4T1-BR). Dimethylaminoparthenolide inhibited NF-κB activity, LYPD1 expression, and proliferation of 231-BR and 4T1-BR cells. Thus, transcriptome change enabling adaptation to host organs is likely one of the mechanisms associated with organ-specific metastasis and could potentially be targeted therapeutically. PMID:25926557

  10. Organ-specific adaptive signaling pathway activation in metastatic breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Riesa M; Craven, Kelly E; Krishnamurthy, Purna; Goswami, Chirayu P; Badve, Sunil; Crooks, Peter; Mathews, William P; Bhat-Nakshatri, Poornima; Nakshatri, Harikrishna

    2015-05-20

    Breast cancer metastasizes to bone, visceral organs, and/or brain depending on the subtype, which may involve activation of a host organ-specific signaling network in metastatic cells. To test this possibility, we determined gene expression patterns in MDA-MB-231 cells and its mammary fat pad tumor (TMD-231), lung-metastasis (LMD-231), bone-metastasis (BMD-231), adrenal-metastasis (ADMD-231) and brain-metastasis (231-BR) variants. When gene expression between metastases was compared, 231-BR cells showed the highest gene expression difference followed by ADMD-231, LMD-231, and BMD-231 cells. Neuronal transmembrane proteins SLITRK2, TMEM47, and LYPD1 were specifically overexpressed in 231-BR cells. Pathway-analyses revealed activation of signaling networks that would enable cancer cells to adapt to organs of metastasis such as drug detoxification/oxidative stress response/semaphorin neuronal pathway in 231-BR, Notch/orphan nuclear receptor signals involved in steroidogenesis in ADMD-231, acute phase response in LMD-231, and cytokine/hematopoietic stem cell signaling in BMD-231 cells. Only NF-κB signaling pathway activation was common to all except BMD-231 cells. We confirmed NF-κB activation in 231-BR and in a brain metastatic variant of 4T1 cells (4T1-BR). Dimethylaminoparthenolide inhibited NF-κB activity, LYPD1 expression, and proliferation of 231-BR and 4T1-BR cells. Thus, transcriptome change enabling adaptation to host organs is likely one of the mechanisms associated with organ-specific metastasis and could potentially be targeted therapeutically. PMID:25926557

  11. Direct Signal-to-Noise Quality Comparison between an Electronic and Conventional Stethoscope aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshburn, Thomas; Cole, Richard; Ebert, Doug; Bauer, Pete

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Evaluation of heart, lung, and bowel sounds is routinely performed with the use of a stethoscope to help detect a broad range of medical conditions. Stethoscope acquired information is even more valuable in a resource limited environments such as the International Space Station (ISS) where additional testing is not available. The high ambient noise level aboard the ISS poses a specific challenge to auscultation by stethoscope. An electronic stethoscope's ambient noise-reduction, greater sound amplification, recording capabilities, and sound visualization software may be an advantage to a conventional stethoscope in this environment. Methods: A single operator rated signal-to-noise quality from a conventional stethoscope (Littman 2218BE) and an electronic stethoscope (Litmann 3200). Borborygmi, pulmonic, and cardiac sound quality was ranked with both stethoscopes. Signal-to-noise rankings were preformed on a 1 to 10 subjective scale with 1 being inaudible, 6 the expected quality in an emergency department, 8 the expected quality in a clinic, and 10 the clearest possible quality. Testing took place in the Japanese Pressurized Module (JPM), Unity (Node 2), Destiny (US Lab), Tranquility (Node 3), and the Cupola of the International Space Station. All examinations were conducted at a single point in time. Results: The electronic stethoscope's performance ranked higher than the conventional stethoscope for each body sound in all modules tested. The electronic stethoscope's sound quality was rated between 7 and 10 in all modules tested. In comparison, the traditional stethoscope's sound quality was rated between 4 and 7. The signal to noise ratio of borborygmi showed the biggest difference between stethoscopes. In the modules tested, the auscultation of borborygmi was rated between 5 and 7 by the conventional stethoscope and consistently 10 by the electronic stethoscope. Discussion: This stethoscope comparison was limited to a single operator. However, we

  12. Contribution of Physical Interactions to Signaling Specificity between a Diguanylate Cyclase and Its Effector

    PubMed Central

    Dahlstrom, Kurt M.; Giglio, Krista M.; Collins, Alan J.; Sondermann, Holger

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) is a bacterial second messenger that controls multiple cellular processes. c-di-GMP networks have up to dozens of diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) that synthesize c-di-GMP along with many c-di-GMP-responsive target proteins that can bind and respond to this signal. For such networks to have order, a mechanism(s) likely exists that allow DGCs to specifically signal their targets, and it has been suggested that physical interactions might provide such specificity. Our results show a DGC from Pseudomonas fluorescens physically interacting with its target protein at a conserved interface, and this interface can be predictive of DGC-target protein interactions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that physical interaction is necessary for the DGC to maximally signal its target. If such “local signaling” is a theme for even a fraction of the DGCs used by bacteria, it becomes possible to posit a model whereby physical interaction allows a DGC to directly signal its target protein, which in turn may help curtail undesired cross talk with other members of the network. PMID:26670387

  13. Sex specific retinoic acid signaling is required for the initiation of urogenital sinus bud development.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Sarah L; Francis, Jeffrey C; Lokody, Isabel B; Wang, Hong; Risbridger, Gail P; Loveland, Kate L; Swain, Amanda

    2014-11-15

    The mammalian urogenital sinus (UGS) develops in a sex specific manner, giving rise to the prostate in the male and the sinus vagina in the embryonic female. Androgens, produced by the embryonic testis, have been shown to be crucial to this process. In this study we show that retinoic acid signaling is required for the initial stages of bud development from the male UGS. Enzymes involved in retinoic acid synthesis are expressed in the UGS mesenchyme in a sex specific manner and addition of ligand to female tissue is able to induce prostate-like bud formation in the absence of androgens, albeit at reduced potency. Functional studies in mouse organ cultures that faithfully reproduce the initiation of prostate development indicate that one of the roles of retinoic acid signaling in the male is to inhibit the expression of Inhba, which encodes the βA subunit of Activin, in the UGS mesenchyme. Through in vivo genetic analysis and culture studies we show that inhibition of Activin signaling in the female UGS leads to a similar phenotype to that of retinoic acid treatment, namely bud formation in the absence of androgens. Our data also reveals that both androgens and retinoic acid have extra independent roles to that of repressing Activin signaling in the development of the prostate during fetal stages. This study identifies a novel role for retinoic acid as a mesenchymal factor that acts together with androgens to determine the position and initiation of bud development in the male UGS epithelia. PMID:25261715

  14. Tissue-Specific Suppression of Thyroid Hormone Signaling in Various Mouse Models of Aging.

    PubMed

    Visser, W Edward; Bombardieri, Cíntia R; Zevenbergen, Chantal; Barnhoorn, Sander; Ottaviani, Alexandre; van der Pluijm, Ingrid; Brandt, Renata; Kaptein, Ellen; van Heerebeek, Ramona; van Toor, Hans; Garinis, George A; Peeters, Robin P; Medici, Marco; van Ham, Willy; Vermeij, Wilbert P; de Waard, Monique C; de Krijger, Ronald R; Boelen, Anita; Kwakkel, Joan; Kopchick, John J; List, Edward O; Melis, Joost P M; Darras, Veerle M; Dollé, Martijn E T; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Visser, Theo J

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage contributes to the process of aging, as underscored by premature aging syndromes caused by defective DNA repair. Thyroid state changes during aging, but underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Since thyroid hormone (TH) is a key regulator of metabolism, changes in TH signaling have widespread effects. Here, we reveal a significant common transcriptomic signature in livers from hypothyroid mice, DNA repair-deficient mice with severe (Csbm/m/Xpa-/-) or intermediate (Ercc1-/Δ-7) progeria and naturally aged mice. A strong induction of TH-inactivating deiodinase D3 and decrease of TH-activating D1 activities are observed in Csbm/m/Xpa-/- livers. Similar findings are noticed in Ercc1-/Δ-7, in naturally aged animals and in wild-type mice exposed to a chronic subtoxic dose of DNA-damaging agents. In contrast, TH signaling in muscle, heart and brain appears unaltered. These data show a strong suppression of TH signaling in specific peripheral organs in premature and normal aging, probably lowering metabolism, while other tissues appear to preserve metabolism. D3-mediated TH inactivation is unexpected, given its expression mainly in fetal tissues. Our studies highlight the importance of DNA damage as the underlying mechanism of changes in thyroid state. Tissue-specific regulation of deiodinase activities, ensuring diminished TH signaling, may contribute importantly to the protective metabolic response in aging. PMID:26953569

  15. Protein conservation and variation suggest mechanisms of cell type-specific modulation of signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Martin H; Yang, Jae-Seong; Serrano, Luis; Kiel, Christina

    2014-06-01

    Many proteins and signaling pathways are present in most cell types and tissues and yet perform specialized functions. To elucidate mechanisms by which these ubiquitous pathways are modulated, we overlaid information about cross-cell line protein abundance and variability, and evolutionary conservation onto functional pathway components and topological layers in the pathway hierarchy. We found that the input (receptors) and the output (transcription factors) layers evolve more rapidly than proteins in the intermediary transmission layer. In contrast, protein expression variability decreases from the input to the output layer. We observed that the differences in protein variability between the input and transmission layer can be attributed to both the network position and the tendency of variable proteins to physically interact with constitutively expressed proteins. Differences in protein expression variability and conservation are also accompanied by the tendency of conserved and constitutively expressed proteins to acquire somatic mutations, while germline mutations tend to occur in cell type-specific proteins. Thus, conserved core proteins in the transmission layer could perform a fundamental role in most cell types and are therefore less tolerant to germline mutations. In summary, we propose that the core signal transmission machinery is largely modulated by a variable input layer through physical protein interactions. We hypothesize that the bow-tie organization of cellular signaling on the level of protein abundance variability contributes to the specificity of the signal response in different cell types. PMID:24922536

  16. Identification of specific gravity sensitive signal transduction pathways in human A431 carcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijken, P. J.; de Groot, R. P.; Kruijer, W.; de Laat, S. W.; Verkleij, A. J.; Boonstra, J.

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) activates a well characterized signal transduction cascade in human A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells. The influence of gravity on EGF-induced EGF-receptor clustering and early gene expression as well as on actin polymerization and actin organization have been investigated. Different signalling pathways induced by the agents TPA, forskolin and A23187 that activate gene expression were tested for sensitivity to gravity. EGF-induced c-fos and c-jun expression were decreased in microgravity. However, constitutive β-2 microglobulin expression remained unaltered. Under simulated weightlessness conditions EGF- and TPA-induced c-fos expression was decreased, while forskolin- and A23187-induced c-fos expression was independent of the gravity conditions. These results suggest that gravity affects specific signalling pathways. Preliminary results indicate that EGF-induced EGF-receptor clustering remained unaltered irrespective of the gravity conditions. Furthermore, the relative filamentous actin content of steady state A431 cells was enhanced under microgravity conditions and actin filament organization was altered. Under simulated weightlessness actin filament organization in steady state cells as well as in EGF-treated cells was altered as compared to the 1 G reference experiment. Interestingly the microtubule and keratin organization in untreated cells showed no difference with the normal gravity samples. This indicates that gravity may affect specific components of the signal transduction circuitry.

  17. Tissue-Specific Suppression of Thyroid Hormone Signaling in Various Mouse Models of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Visser, W. Edward; Barnhoorn, Sander; Ottaviani, Alexandre; van der Pluijm, Ingrid; Brandt, Renata; Kaptein, Ellen; van Heerebeek, Ramona; van Toor, Hans; Garinis, George A.; Peeters, Robin P.; Medici, Marco; van Ham, Willy; Vermeij, Wilbert P.; de Waard, Monique C.; de Krijger, Ronald R.; Boelen, Anita; Kwakkel, Joan; Kopchick, John J.; List, Edward O.; Melis, Joost P. M.; Darras, Veerle M.; Dollé, Martijn E. T.; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Visser, Theo J.

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage contributes to the process of aging, as underscored by premature aging syndromes caused by defective DNA repair. Thyroid state changes during aging, but underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Since thyroid hormone (TH) is a key regulator of metabolism, changes in TH signaling have widespread effects. Here, we reveal a significant common transcriptomic signature in livers from hypothyroid mice, DNA repair-deficient mice with severe (Csbm/m/Xpa-/-) or intermediate (Ercc1-/Δ-7) progeria and naturally aged mice. A strong induction of TH-inactivating deiodinase D3 and decrease of TH-activating D1 activities are observed in Csbm/m/Xpa-/- livers. Similar findings are noticed in Ercc1-/Δ-7, in naturally aged animals and in wild-type mice exposed to a chronic subtoxic dose of DNA-damaging agents. In contrast, TH signaling in muscle, heart and brain appears unaltered. These data show a strong suppression of TH signaling in specific peripheral organs in premature and normal aging, probably lowering metabolism, while other tissues appear to preserve metabolism. D3-mediated TH inactivation is unexpected, given its expression mainly in fetal tissues. Our studies highlight the importance of DNA damage as the underlying mechanism of changes in thyroid state. Tissue-specific regulation of deiodinase activities, ensuring diminished TH signaling, may contribute importantly to the protective metabolic response in aging. PMID:26953569

  18. Low Background Signal Readout Electronics for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Guinn, I.; Abgrall, N.; Arnquist, Isaac J.; Avignone, Frank T.; Baldenegro-Barrera, C. X.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Bertrand, F.; Bradley, A. W.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Buuck, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, C. D.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Efremenko, Yuri; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, Steven R.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gilliss, T.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Henning, Reyco; Hoppe, Eric W.; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Jasinski, B. R.; Keeter, K.; Kidd, M. F.; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Laferriere, Brian D.; Leon, Jonathan D.; MacMullin, J.; Martin, R. D.; Meijer, S. J.; Mertens, S.; Orrell, John L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Poon, Alan; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Shanks, B.; Shirchenko, M.; Snyder, N.; Suriano, Anne-Marie; Tedeschi, D.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, Sergey; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; White, Brandon R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir; Zhitnikov, I.

    2015-03-18

    The Majorana Demonstrator (MJD)[1] is an array of p-type point contact (PPC) high purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors intended to search for neutrinoless double beta decay (0vBB decay) in 76Ge. MJD will consist of 40 kg of detectors, 30 kg of which will be isotopically enriched to 87% 76Ge. The array will consist of 14 strings of four or ve detectors placed in two separate cryostats. One of the main goals of the experiment is to demonstrate the feasibility of building a tonne-scale array of detectors to search for 0vBB decay with a much higher sensitivity. This involves acheiving backgrounds in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) around the 2039 keV Q-value of the BB decay of less than 1 count/ROI-t-y. Because many backgrounds will not directly scale with detector mass, the specific background goal of MJD is less than 3 counts/ROI-t-y.

  19. Positive and negative tissue-specific signaling by a nematode epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Lesa, G M; Sternberg, P W

    1997-01-01

    The major determinants of receptor tissue tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling specificity have been proposed to be Src homology 2 (SH2) binding sites, phosphotyrosine-containing oligopeptides in the cytoplasmic domain of the receptor. The Caenorhabditis elegans epidermal growth factor receptor homologue LET-23 has multiple functions during development and has eight potential SH2-binding sites in a region carboxyl terminal to its kinase domain. By analyzing transgenic nematodes for three distinct LET-23 functions, we show that six of eight potential sites function in vivo and that they are required for most, but not all, of LET-23 activity. A single site is necessary and sufficient to promote wild-type fertility. Three other sites activate the RAS pathway and are involved only in viability and vulval differentiation. A fifth site is promiscuous and can mediate all three LET-23 functions. An additional site mediates tissue-specific negative regulation. Putative SH2 binding sites are thus key effectors of both cell-specific and negative regulation in an intact organism. We suggest two distinct mechanisms for tissue-specific RTK-mediated signaling. A positive mechanism would promote RTK function through effectors present only in certain cell types. A negative mechanism would inhibit RTK function through tissue-specific negative regulators. Images PMID:9168466

  20. A cortical vascular model for examining the specificity of the laminar BOLD signal.

    PubMed

    Markuerkiaga, Irati; Barth, Markus; Norris, David G

    2016-05-15

    Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional MRI has been used for inferring layer specific activation in humans. However, intracortical veins perpendicular to the cortical surface are suspected to degrade the laminar specificity as they drain blood from the microvasculature and BOLD signal is carried over from lower to upper cortical layers on its way to the pial surface. In this work, a vascular model of the cortex is developed to investigate the laminar specificity of the BOLD signal for Spin Echo (SE) and Gradient Echo (GE) following the integrative model presented by Uludağ et al. (2009). The results of the simulation show that the laminar point spread function (PSF) of the BOLD signal presents similar features across all layers. The PSF for SE is highly localised whereas for GE there is a flat tail running to the pial surface, with amplitude less than a quarter of the response from the layer itself. Consequently the GE response at any layer will also contain a contribution accumulated from all lower layers. PMID:26952195

  1. Predictive features of ligand-specific signaling through the estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Nwachukwu, Jerome C; Srinivasan, Sathish; Zheng, Yangfan; Wang, Song; Min, Jian; Dong, Chune; Liao, Zongquan; Nowak, Jason; Wright, Nicholas J; Houtman, René; Carlson, Kathryn E; Josan, Jatinder S; Elemento, Olivier; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Zhou, Hai-Bing; Nettles, Kendall W

    2016-01-01

    Some estrogen receptor-α (ERα)-targeted breast cancer therapies such as tamoxifen have tissue-selective or cell-specific activities, while others have similar activities in different cell types. To identify biophysical determinants of cell-specific signaling and breast cancer cell proliferation, we synthesized 241 ERα ligands based on 19 chemical scaffolds, and compared ligand response using quantitative bioassays for canonical ERα activities and X-ray crystallography. Ligands that regulate the dynamics and stability of the coactivator-binding site in the C-terminal ligand-binding domain, called activation function-2 (AF-2), showed similar activity profiles in different cell types. Such ligands induced breast cancer cell proliferation in a manner that was predicted by the canonical recruitment of the coactivators NCOA1/2/3 and induction of the GREB1 proliferative gene. For some ligand series, a single inter-atomic distance in the ligand-binding domain predicted their proliferative effects. In contrast, the N-terminal coactivator-binding site, activation function-1 (AF-1), determined cell-specific signaling induced by ligands that used alternate mechanisms to control cell proliferation. Thus, incorporating systems structural analyses with quantitative chemical biology reveals how ligands can achieve distinct allosteric signaling outcomes through ERα. PMID:27107013

  2. Ventral specification and perturbed boundary formation in the mouse midbrain in the absence of Hedgehog signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Jennifer L.; Chiang, Chin; Huang, Xi; Agarwala, Seema

    2008-01-01

    Although Hedgehog (HH) signaling plays a critical role in patterning the ventral midbrain, its role in early midbrain specification is not known. We examined the midbrains of sonic hedgehog (Shh) and smoothened (Smo) mutant mice where HH signaling is respectively attenuated and eliminated. We show that some ventral (Evx1+) cell-fates are specified in the Shh-/- mouse in a Ptc1- and Gli1-independent manner. HH-independent ventral midbrain induction was further confirmed by the presence of a Pax7-negative ventral midbrain territory in both Shh-/- and Smo-/- mice at and before E8.5. Midbrain signaling centers are severely disrupted in the Shh-/- mutant. Interestingly, dorsal markers are upregulated (Wnt1, Gdf7, Pax7), downregulated (Lfng) or otherwise altered (Zic1) in the Shh-/- midbrain. Together with the increased cell-death seen specifically in Shh-/- dorsal midbrains (E8.5-E9), our results suggest specific regulation of dorsal patterning by SHH, rather than a simple deregulation due to its absence. PMID:18429041

  3. Precise measurement method for ionospheric total electron content using signals from GPS satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imae, Michito; Kiuchi, Hitoshi; Kaneko, Akihiro; Hama, Shinichi; Miki, Chihiro

    1990-01-01

    A GPS codeless receiver called GTR-2 was for measuring total electron content (TEC) along the line of sight to the GPS satellite by using the cross correlation amplitude of the received P-code signals carried by L1(1575.42 MHz) and L2(1227.6 MHz). This equipment has the performance of uncertainty in the measurement of TEC of about 2 X 10(exp 16) electrons/sq m when a 10 dBi gain antenna was used. To increase the measurement performance, an upper version of GTR-2 called GTR-3 is planned which uses the phase information of the continuous signals obtained by making a cross correlation or multiplication of the received L1 and L2 P-code signals. By using the difference of these measured phases values, the ionospheric delay with the ambiguities of the periods of L1+L2 and L1-L2 signals can be estimated.

  4. Differing HLA types influence inhibitory receptor signalling in CMV-specific CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Macaulay, Richard; Riddell, Natalie E; Griffiths, Stephen J; Akbar, Arne N; Henson, Sian M

    2013-03-01

    The dysregulated immune response to CMV constitutes a major force driving T cell immunosenescence and growing evidence suggests that it is not a benign virus in old age. We show here that the PD-1/L pathway defines a reversible defect in CMV specific CD8(+) T cell proliferative responses in both young and old individuals. More specifically, highly differentiated CD45RA(+)CD27(-) CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells exhibit a proliferative deficit compared their central and effector memory counterparts, which is reversed following PD-L blockade. However, we also report that HLA-B(∗)07/TPR specific CD8(+) T cells express higher levels of PD-1 than HLA-A(∗)02/NLV specific cells and HLA-A(∗)02 individuals show a higher proliferative response to PD-L blockade, than HLA-B(∗)07 individuals, which we postulate may be due to the differing functional avidities for these two CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells populations. Nevertheless data presented here demonstrate that CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells can be functionally enhanced by perturbation of the PD-1/L signalling pathway, whose manipulation may provide a therapeutic modality to combat age-associated immune decline. PMID:23220495

  5. Towards an understanding of cell-specific functions of signal-dependent transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dawn X; Glass, Christopher K

    2013-12-01

    The ability to regulate gene expression in a cell-specific manner is a feature of many broadly expressed signal-dependent transcription factors (SDTFs), including nuclear hormone receptors and transcription factors that are activated by cell surface receptors for extracellular signals. As the most plastic cells of the hematopoietic system, macrophages are responsive to a wide spectrum of regulatory molecules and provide a robust model system for investigation of the basis for cell-specific transcriptional responses at a genome-wide level. Here, focusing on recent studies in macrophages, we review the evidence suggesting a model in which cell-specific actions of SDTFs are the consequence of priming functions of lineage determining transcription factors. We also discuss recent findings relating lineage-determining and SDTF activity to alterations in the epigenetic landscape as well as the production and function of enhancer RNAs. These findings have implications for the understanding of how natural genetic variation impacts cell-specific programs of gene expression and suggest new approaches for altering gene expression in vivo. PMID:24130129

  6. Translatome analyses capture of opposing tissue-specific brassinosteroid signals orchestrating root meristem differentiation.

    PubMed

    Vragović, Kristina; Sela, Ayala; Friedlander-Shani, Lilach; Fridman, Yulia; Hacham, Yael; Holland, Neta; Bartom, Elizabeth; Mockler, Todd C; Savaldi-Goldstein, Sigal

    2015-01-20

    The mechanisms ensuring balanced growth remain a critical question in developmental biology. In plants, this balance relies on spatiotemporal integration of hormonal signaling pathways, but the understanding of the precise contribution of each hormone is just beginning to take form. Brassinosteroid (BR) hormone is shown here to have opposing effects on root meristem size, depending on its site of action. BR is demonstrated to both delay and promote onset of stem cell daughter differentiation, when acting in the outer tissue of the root meristem, the epidermis, and the innermost tissue, the stele, respectively. To understand the molecular basis of this phenomenon, a comprehensive spatiotemporal translatome mapping of Arabidopsis roots was performed. Analyses of wild type and mutants featuring different distributions of BR revealed autonomous, tissue-specific gene responses to BR, implying its contrasting tissue-dependent impact on growth. BR-induced genes were primarily detected in epidermal cells of the basal meristem zone and were enriched by auxin-related genes. In contrast, repressed BR genes prevailed in the stele of the apical meristem zone. Furthermore, auxin was found to mediate the growth-promoting impact of BR signaling originating in the epidermis, whereas BR signaling in the stele buffered this effect. We propose that context-specific BR activity and responses are oppositely interpreted at the organ level, ensuring coherent growth. PMID:25561530

  7. Traction forces mediated by integrin signaling are necessary for definitive endoderm specification.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Weiner, Hermes; Ravi, Neeraja; Engler, Adam J

    2015-05-15

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) exert low-traction forces on their niche in vitro whereas specification to definitive endoderm in vivo coincides with force-mediated motility, suggesting a differentiation-mediated switch. However, the onset of contractility and extent to which force-mediated integrin signaling regulates fate choices is not understood. To address the requirement of tractions forces for differentiation, we examined mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) specification towards definitive endoderm on fibrillar fibronectin containing a deformation-sensitive FRET probe. Inhibiting contractility resulted in an increase in the observed fibronectin FRET intensity ratio but also decreased the amount of phosphorylated nuclear SMAD2, leading to reduced expression of the definitive endoderm marker SOX17. By contrast ESCs maintained in pluripotency medium did not exert significant tractions against the fibronectin matrix. When laminin-111 was added to fibrillar matrices to improve the efficiency of definitive endoderm induction, ESCs decreased their fibronectin traction forces in a laminin-dependent manner; blocking the laminin-binding α3-integrin restored fibronectin matrix deformation and reduced SOX17 expression and SMAD2 phosphorylation, probably because of compensation of inhibitory signaling from SMAD7 after 5 days in culture. These data imply that traction forces and integrin signaling are important regulators of early fate decisions in ESCs. PMID:25908864

  8. Site-specific Effects of DUOX1-Related Peroxidase on Intercellular Apoptosis Signaling.

    PubMed

    Heinzelmann, Sonja; Bauer, Georg

    2015-11-01

    Intercellular apoptosis-inducing HOCl signaling is known as an interplay between superoxide anions/H₂O₂ of transformed target cells and dual oxidase 1 (DUOX1)-related peroxidase that is released from neighboring non-transformed or transformed effector cells. Effector cells are dispensable when the release of the peroxidase domain of DUOX1 from target cells is prevented through inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. Membrane-associated peroxidase is then co-localized to NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1) and establishes HOCl signaling specifically in transformed cells, using the same biochemical pathways as classical intercellular HOCl signaling. Membrane-associated peroxidase protects against exogenous HOCl through reversal of the peroxidase reaction. In addition, membrane-associated peroxidase protects against NO/peroxynitrite signaling as it oxidates NO and decomposes peroxynitrite. The protective function of membrane-associated peroxidase (in the absence of MMP) is analogous to that of catalase, whereas the destructive effect of the enzyme, i.e. the synthesis of HOCl, is independent of its localization and of MMP activity. PMID:26504019

  9. Wnt and FGF signals interact to coordinate growth with cell fate specification during limb development

    PubMed Central

    ten Berge, Derk; Brugmann, Samantha A.; Helms, Jill A.; Nusse, Roel

    2009-01-01

    A fundamental question in developmental biology is how does an undifferentiated field of cells acquire spatial pattern and undergo coordinated differentiation? The development of the vertebrate limb is an important paradigm for understanding these processes. The skeletal and connective tissues of the developing limb all derive from a population of multipotent progenitor cells located in its distal tip. During limb outgrowth, these progenitors segregate into a chondrogenic lineage, located in the center of the limb bud, and soft connective tissue lineages located in its periphery. We report that the interplay of two families of signaling proteins, fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and Wnts, coordinate the growth of the multipotent progenitor cells with their simultaneous segregation into these lineages. FGF and Wnt signals act together to synergistically promote proliferation while maintaining the cells in an undifferentiated, multipotent state, but act separately to determine cell lineage specification. Withdrawal of both signals results in cell cycle withdrawal and chondrogenic differentiation. Continued exposure to Wnt, however, maintains proliferation and re-specifies the cells towards the soft connective tissue lineages. We have identified target genes that are synergistically regulated by Wnts and FGFs, and show how these factors actively suppress differentiation and promote growth. Finally, we show how the spatial restriction of Wnt and FGF signals to the limb ectoderm, and to a specialized region of it, the apical ectodermal ridge, controls the distribution of cell behaviors within the growing limb, and guides the proper spatial organization of the differentiating tissues. PMID:18776145

  10. Specific control of BMP signaling and mesenchymal differentiation by cytoplasmic phosphatase PPM1H

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tao; Sun, Chuang; Zhang, Zhengmao; Xu, Ningyi; Duan, Xueyan; Feng, Xin-Hua; Lin, Xia

    2014-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) belong to the TGF-β superfamily of structurally related signaling proteins that regulate a wide array of cellular functions. The key step in BMP signal transduction is the BMP receptor-mediated phosphorylation of transcription factors Smad1, 5, and 8 (collectively Smad1/5/8), which leads to the subsequent activation of BMP-induced gene transcription in the nucleus. In this study, we describe the identification and characterization of PPM1H as a novel cytoplasm-localized Smad1/5/8-specific phosphatase. PPM1H directly interacts with Smad1/5/8 through its Smad-binding domain, and dephosphorylates phospho-Smad1/5/8 (P-Smad1/5/8) in the cytoplasm. Ectopic expression of PPM1H attenuates BMP signaling, whereas loss of PPM1H activity or expression greatly enhances BMP-dependent gene regulation and mesenchymal differentiation. In conclusion, this study suggests that PPM1H acts as a gatekeeper to prevent excessive BMP signaling through dephosphorylation and subsequent nuclear exclusion of P-Smad1/5/8 proteins. PMID:24732009

  11. Batteryless wireless transmission system for electronic drum uses piezoelectric generator for play signal and power source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, H.; Yoshimi, A.; Takemura, K.; Tanaka, A.; Douseki, T.

    2015-12-01

    A batteryless self-powered wireless transmission system has been developed that sends a signal from a drum pad to a synthesizer. The power generated by a piezoelectric generator functions both as the “Play” signal for the synthesizer and as the power source for the transmitter. An FM transmitter, which theoretically operates with zero latency, and a receiver with quick-response squelch of the received signal were developed for wireless transmission with a minimum system delay. Experimental results for an electronic drum without any connecting wires fully demonstrated the feasibility of self-powered wireless transmission with a latency of 900 μs.

  12. Radiation-induced electron paramagnetic resonance signal and soybean isoflavones content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Marcos R. R.; Mandarino, José M. G.; del Mastro, Nelida L.

    2012-09-01

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) is a well-known spectroscopic technique that detects paramagnetic centers and can detect free radicals with high sensitivity. In food, free radicals can be generated by several commonly used industrial processes, such as radiosterilization or heat treatment. EPR spectroscopy is used to detect radioinduced free radicals in food. In this work the relation between EPR signal induced by gamma irradiation treatment and soybean isoflavones content was investigated. Present results did not show correlation between total isoflavones content and the EPR signal. Nevertheless, some isoflavone contents had a negative correlation with the radiation-induced EPR signal.

  13. The effect of electron beam geometric deformation errors on the small-signal characteristic of ECRM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongjian, Yu

    1993-08-01

    In this paper is studied the effect of electron beam geometric deformation errors on the small — signal characteristics of the TE{mn/o} mode Electron Cyclotron Resonance Maser (ECRM), based on the elliptically cross—sectional e—beam deformation model. As an example, the effect of small geometric deformation errors on the TE{01/o} mode fundamental ECRM coupling coefficient is quantitatively shown.

  14. Chemokine Signaling Specificity: Essential Role for the N-Terminal Domain of Chemokine Receptors†

    PubMed Central

    N. Prado, Gregory; Suetomi, Katsutoshi; Shumate, David; Maxwell, Carrie; Ravindran, Aishwarya; Rajarathnam, Krishna; Navarro, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Chemokine IL-8 (CXCL8) binds to its cognate receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2 to induce inflammatory responses, wound healing, tumorogenesis, and neuronal survival. Here we identify the N-loop residues in IL-8 (H18 and F21) and the receptor N-termini as the major structural determinants regulating the rate of receptor internalization, which in turn controlled the activation profile of ERK1/2, a central component of the receptor/ERK signaling pathway that dictates signal specificity. Our data further support the idea that the chemokine receptor core acts as a plastic scaffold. Thus, the diversity and intensity of inflammatory and noninflammatory responses mediated by chemokine receptors appear to be primarily determined by the initial interaction between the receptor N-terminus and the N-loop of chemokines. PMID:17630697

  15. Signal processing and display interface studies. [performance tests - design analysis/equipment specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Signal processing equipment specifications, operating and test procedures, and systems design and engineering are described. Five subdivisions of the overall circuitry are treated: (1) the spectrum analyzer; (2) the spectrum integrator; (3) the velocity discriminator; (4) the display interface; and (5) the formatter. They function in series: (1) first in analog form to provide frequency resolution, (2) then in digital form to achieve signal to noise improvement (video integration) and frequency discrimination, and (3) finally in analog form again for the purpose of real-time display of the significant velocity data. The formatter collects binary data from various points in the processor and provides a serial output for bi-phase recording. Block diagrams are used to illustrate the system.

  16. EGF receptor specificity for phosphotyrosine-primed substrates provides signal integration with Src

    PubMed Central

    Begley, Michael J; Yun, Cai-hong; Gewinner, Christina A; Asara, John M; Johnson, Jared L; Coyle, Anthony J; Eck, Michael J; Apostolou, Irina; Cantley, Lewis C

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the EGF receptor (EGFR) contributes to many human cancers by activating the Ras-MAPK and other pathways. EGFR signaling is augmented by Src-family kinases, but the mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we show that human EGFR preferentially phosphorylates peptide substrates that are primed by a prior phosphorylation. Utilizing peptides based on the sequence of the adaptor protein Shc1, we show that Src mediates the priming phosphorylation, promoting subsequent phosphorylation by EGFR. Importantly, the doubly phosphorylated Shc1 peptide binds more tightly to the Ras activator Grb2, a key step in activating the Ras-MAPK pathway, than singly phosphorylated peptides. Finally, a crystal structure of EGFR in complex with a primed Shc1 peptide reveals the structural basis for EGFR substrate specificity. These results provide a molecular explanation for the integration of Src and EGFR signaling with downstream effectors such as Ras. PMID:26551075

  17. Lineage-Specific Modulation of Interleukin 4 Signaling by Interferon Regulatory Factor 4

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sanjay; Jiang, Man; Anthony, Alissa; Pernis, Alessandra B.

    1999-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-4 is an immunoregulatory cytokine that exerts distinct biological activities on different cell types. Our studies indicate that interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-4 is both a target and a modulator of the IL-4 signaling cascade. IRF-4 expression is strongly upregulated upon costimulation of B cells with CD40 and IL-4. Furthermore, we find that IRF-4 can interact with signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat)6 and drive the expression of IL-4–inducible genes. The transactivating ability of IRF-4 is blocked by the repressor factor BCL-6. Since expression of IRF-4 is mostly confined to lymphoid cells, these data provide a potential mechanism by which IL-4–inducible genes can be regulated in a lineage-specific manner. PMID:10601358

  18. Discrete Notch signaling requirements in the specification of hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Albert D; Melick, Chase H; Clements, Wilson K; Stachura, David L; Distel, Martin; Panáková, Daniela; MacRae, Calum; Mork, Lindsey A; Crump, J Gage; Traver, David

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) require multiple molecular inputs for proper specification, including activity of the Notch signaling pathway. A requirement for the Notch1 and dispensability of the Notch2 receptor has been demonstrated in mice, but the role of the remaining Notch receptors has not been investigated. Here, we demonstrate that three of the four Notch receptors are independently required for the specification of HSCs in the zebrafish. The orthologues of the murine Notch1 receptor, Notch1a and Notch1b, are each required intrinsically to fate HSCs, just prior to their emergence from aortic hemogenic endothelium. By contrast, the Notch3 receptor is required earlier within the developing somite to regulate HSC emergence in a non-cell-autonomous manner. Epistatic analyses demonstrate that Notch3 function lies downstream of Wnt16, which is required for HSC specification through its regulation of two Notch ligands, dlc and dld. Collectively, these findings demonstrate for the first time that multiple Notch signaling inputs are required to specify HSCs and that Notch3 performs a novel role within the somite to regulate the neighboring precursors of hemogenic endothelium. PMID:25230933

  19. Interference in Ballistic Motor Learning: Specificity and Role of Sensory Error Signals

    PubMed Central

    Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Petersen, Tue Hvass; Rothwell, John C.; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2011-01-01

    Humans are capable of learning numerous motor skills, but newly acquired skills may be abolished by subsequent learning. Here we ask what factors determine whether interference occurs in motor learning. We speculated that interference requires competing processes of synaptic plasticity in overlapping circuits and predicted specificity. To test this, subjects learned a ballistic motor task. Interference was observed following subsequent learning of an accuracy-tracking task, but only if the competing task involved the same muscles and movement direction. Interference was not observed from a non-learning task suggesting that interference requires competing learning. Subsequent learning of the competing task 4 h after initial learning did not cause interference suggesting disruption of early motor memory consolidation as one possible mechanism underlying interference. Repeated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of corticospinal motor output at intensities below movement threshold did not cause interference, whereas suprathreshold rTMS evoking motor responses and (re)afferent activation did. Finally, the experiments revealed that suprathreshold repetitive electrical stimulation of the agonist (but not antagonist) peripheral nerve caused interference. The present study is, to our knowledge, the first to demonstrate that peripheral nerve stimulation may cause interference. The finding underscores the importance of sensory feedback as error signals in motor learning. We conclude that interference requires competing plasticity in overlapping circuits. Interference is remarkably specific for circuits involved in a specific movement and it may relate to sensory error signals. PMID:21408054

  20. Dendritic cell maturation: functional specialization through signaling specificity and transcriptional programming

    PubMed Central

    Dalod, Marc; Chelbi, Rabie; Malissen, Bernard; Lawrence, Toby

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are key regulators of both protective immune responses and tolerance to self-antigens. Soon after their discovery in lymphoid tissues by Steinman and Cohn, as cells with the unique ability to prime naïve antigen-specific T cells, it was realized that DC can exist in at least two distinctive states characterized by morphological, phenotypic and functional changes—this led to the description of DC maturation. It is now well appreciated that there are several subsets of DC in both lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues of mammals, and these cells show remarkable functional specialization and specificity in their roles in tolerance and immunity. This review will focus on the specific characteristics of DC subsets and how their functional specialization may be regulated by distinctive gene expression programs and signaling responses in both steady-state and in the context of inflammation. In particular, we will highlight the common and distinctive genes and signaling pathways that are associated with the functional maturation of DC subsets. PMID:24737868

  1. Brain-specific Angiogenesis Inhibitor-1 Signaling, Regulation, and Enrichment in the Postsynaptic Density*

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Jason R.; Paavola, Kevin J.; Schaefer, Stacy A.; Kaur, Balveen; Van Meir, Erwin G.; Hall, Randy A.

    2013-01-01

    Brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor-1 (BAI1) is an adhesion G protein-coupled receptor that has been studied primarily for its anti-angiogenic and anti-tumorigenic properties. We found that overexpression of BAI1 results in activation of the Rho pathway via a Gα12/13-dependent mechanism, with truncation of the BAI1 N terminus resulting in a dramatic enhancement in receptor signaling. This constitutive activity of the truncated BAI1 mutant also resulted in enhanced downstream phosphorylation of ERK as well as increased receptor association with β-arrestin2 and increased ubiquitination of the receptor. To gain insights into the regulation of BAI1 signaling, we screened the C terminus of BAI1 against a proteomic array of PDZ domains to identify novel interacting partners. These screens revealed that the BAI1 C terminus interacts with a variety of PDZ domains from synaptic proteins, including MAGI-3. Removal of the BAI1 PDZ-binding motif resulted in attenuation of receptor signaling to Rho but had no effect on ERK activation. Conversely, co-expression with MAGI-3 was found to potentiate signaling to ERK by constitutively active BAI1 in a manner that was dependent on the PDZ-binding motif of the receptor. Biochemical fractionation studies revealed that BAI1 is highly enriched in post-synaptic density fractions, a finding consistent with our observations that BAI1 can interact with PDZ proteins known to be concentrated in the post-synaptic density. These findings demonstrate that BAI1 is a synaptic receptor that can activate both the Rho and ERK pathways, with the N-terminal and C-terminal regions of the receptor playing key roles in the regulation of BAI1 signaling activity. PMID:23782696

  2. Phylogenetic signal in the community structure of host-specific microbiomes of tropical marine sponges

    PubMed Central

    Easson, Cole G.; Thacker, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Sponges (Porifera) can host diverse and abundant communities of microbial symbionts that make crucial contributions to host metabolism. Although these communities are often host-specific and hypothesized to co-evolve with their hosts, correlations between host phylogeny and microbiome community structure are rarely tested. As part of the Earth Microbiome Project (EMP), we surveyed the microbiomes associated with 20 species of tropical marine sponges collected over a narrow geographic range. We tested whether (1) univariate metrics of microbiome diversity displayed significant phylogenetic signal across the host phylogeny; (2) host identity and host phylogeny were significant factors in multivariate analyses of taxonomic and phylogenetic dissimilarity; and (3) different minimum read thresholds impacted these results. We observed significant differences in univariate metrics of diversity among host species for all read thresholds, with strong phylogenetic signal in the inverse Simpson's index of diversity (D). We observed a surprisingly wide range of variability in community dissimilarity within host species (4–73%); this variability was not related to microbial abundance within a host species. Taxonomic and phylogenetic dissimilarity were significantly impacted by host identity and host phylogeny when these factors were considered individually; when tested together, the effect of host phylogeny was reduced, but remained significant. In our dataset, this outcome is largely due to closely related host sponges harboring distinct microbial taxa. Host identity maintained a strong statistical signal at all minimum read thresholds. Although the identity of specific microbial taxa varied substantially among host sponges, closely related hosts tended to harbor microbial communities with similar patterns of relative abundance. We hypothesize that microbiomes with low D might be structured by regulation of the microbial community by the host or by the presence of

  3. Forward model of thermally-induced acoustic signal specific to intralumenal detection geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sovanlal; Bunting, Charles F.; Piao, Daqing

    2011-03-01

    This work investigates a forward model associated with intra-lumenal detection of acoustic signal originated from transient thermal-expansion of the tissue. The work is specific to intra-lumenal thermo-acoustic tomography (TAT) which detects the contrast of tissue dielectric properties with ultrasonic resolution, but it is also extendable to intralumenal photo-acoustic tomography (PAT) which detects the contrast of light absorption properties of tissue with ultrasound resolution. Exact closed-form frequency-domain or time-domain forward model of thermally-induced acoustic signal have been studied rigorously for planar geometry and two other geometries, including cylindrical and spherical geometries both of which is specific to external-imaging, i.e. breast or brain imaging using an externally-deployed applicator. This work extends the existing studies to the specific geometry of internal or intra-lumenal imaging, i.e., prostate imaging by an endo-rectally deployed applicator. In this intra-lumenal imaging geometry, both the source that excites the transient thermal-expansion of the tissue and the acoustic transducer that acquires the thermally-induced acoustic signal are assumed enclosed by the tissue and on the surface of a long cylindrical applicator. The Green's function of the frequency-domain thermo-acoustic equation in spherical coordinates is expanded to cylindrical coordinates associated with intra-lumenal geometry. Inverse Fourier transform is then applied to obtain a time-domain solution of the thermo-acoustic pressure wave for intra-lumenal geometry. Further employment of the boundary condition to the "convex" applicator-tissue interface would render an exact forward solution toward accurate reconstruction for intra-lumenal thermally-induced acoustic imaging.

  4. [A modified speech enhancement algorithm for electronic cochlear implant and its digital signal processing realization].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yulin; Tian, Xuelong

    2014-08-01

    In order to improve the speech quality and auditory perceptiveness of electronic cochlear implant under strong noise background, a speech enhancement system used for electronic cochlear implant front-end was constructed. Taking digital signal processing (DSP) as the core, the system combines its multi-channel buffered serial port (McBSP) data transmission channel with extended audio interface chip TLV320AIC10, so speech signal acquisition and output with high speed are realized. Meanwhile, due to the traditional speech enhancement method which has the problems as bad adaptability, slow convergence speed and big steady-state error, versiera function and de-correlation principle were used to improve the existing adaptive filtering algorithm, which effectively enhanced the quality of voice communications. Test results verified the stability of the system and the de-noising performance of the algorithm, and it also proved that they could provide clearer speech signals for the deaf or tinnitus patients. PMID:25464779

  5. [A modified speech enhancement algorithm for electronic cochlear implant and its digital signal processing realization].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yulin; Tian, Xuelong

    2014-08-01

    In order to improve the speech quality and auditory perceptiveness of electronic cochlear implant under strong noise background, a speech enhancement system used for electronic cochlear implant front-end was constructed. Taking digital signal processing (DSP) as the core, the system combines its multi-channel buffered serial port (McBSP) data transmission channel with extended audio interface chip TLV320AIC10, so speech signal acquisition and output with high speed are realized. Meanwhile, due to the traditional speech enhancement method which has the problems as bad adaptability, slow convergence speed and big steady-state error, versiera function and de-correlation principle were used to improve the existing adaptive filtering algorithm, which effectively enhanced the quality of voice communications. Test results verified the stability of the system and the de-noising performance of the algorithm, and it also proved that they could provide clearer speech signals for the deaf or tinnitus patients. PMID:25508410

  6. Observation and applications of single-electron charge signals in the XENON100 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprile, E.; Alfonsi, M.; Arisaka, K.; Arneodo, F.; Balan, C.; Baudis, L.; Bauermeister, B.; Behrens, A.; Beltrame, P.; Bokeloh, K.; Brown, A.; Brown, E.; Bruenner, S.; Bruno, G.; Budnik, R.; Cardoso, J. M. R.; Chen, W.-T.; Choi, B.; Colijn, A. P.; Contreras, H.; Cussonneau, J. P.; Decowski, M. P.; Duchovni, E.; Fattori, S.; Ferella, A. D.; Fulgione, W.; Gao, F.; Garbini, M.; Ghag, C.; Giboni, K.-L.; Goetzke, L. W.; Grignon, C.; Gross, E.; Hampel, W.; Itay, R.; Kaether, F.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Lamblin, J.; Landsman, H.; Lang, R. F.; Le Calloch, M.; Levy, C.; Lim, K. E.; Lin, Q.; Lindemann, S.; Lindner, M.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Lung, K.; Marrodán Undagoitia, T.; Massoli, F. V.; Melgarejo Fernandez, A. J.; Meng, Y.; Messina, M.; Molinario, A.; Naganoma, J.; Ni, K.; Oberlack, U.; Orrigo, S. E. A.; Pantic, E.; Persiani, R.; Piastra, F.; Plante, G.; Priel, N.; Rizzo, A.; Rosendahl, S.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Sartorelli, G.; Schreiner, J.; Schumann, M.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Selvi, M.; Shagin, P.; Simgen, H.; Teymourian, A.; Thers, D.; Vitells, O.; Wang, H.; Weber, M.; Weinheimer, C.

    2014-03-01

    The XENON100 dark matter experiment uses liquid xenon in a time projection chamber (TPC) to measure xenon nuclear recoils resulting from the scattering of dark matter weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). In this paper, we report the observation of single-electron charge signals which are not related to WIMP interactions. These signals, which show the excellent sensitivity of the detector to small charge signals, are explained as being due to the photoionization of impurities in the liquid xenon and of the metal components inside the TPC. They are used as a unique calibration source to characterize the detector. We explain how we can infer crucial parameters for the XENON100 experiment: the secondary-scintillation gain, the extraction yield from the liquid to the gas phase and the electron drift velocity.

  7. UV-radiation-induced electron emission by hormones. Hypothesis for specific communication mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getoff, Nikola

    2009-11-01

    The highlights of recently observed electron emission from electronically excited sexual hormones (17β-estradiol, progesterone, testosterone) and the phytohormone genistein in polar media are briefly reviewed. The electron yield, Q(e aq-), dependence from substrate concentration, hormone structure, polarity of solvent, absorbed energy and temperature are discussed. The hormones reactivity with e aq- and efficiency in electron transfer ensure them the ability to communicate with other biological systems in an organism. A hypothesis is presented for the explanation of the mechanisms of the distinct recognition of signals transmitted by electrons, originating from different types of hormones to receiving centres. Biological consequences of the electron emission in respect to cancer are mentioned.

  8. Caveolin-1 Orchestrates TCR Synaptic Polarity, Signal Specificity, and Function in CD8 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tomassian, Tamar; Humphries, Lisa A.; Liu, Scot D.; Silva, Oscar; Brooks, David G.; Miceli, M. Carrie

    2013-01-01

    TCR engagement triggers the polarized recruitment of membrane, actin, and transducer assemblies within the T cell–APC contact that amplify and specify signaling cascades and Teffector activity. We report that caveolin-1, a scaffold that regulates polarity and signaling in nonlymphoid cells, is required for optimal TCR-induced actin polymerization, synaptic membrane raft polarity, and function in CD8, but not CD4, T cells. In CD8+ T cells, caveolin-1 ablation selectively impaired TCR-induced NFAT-dependent NFATc1 and cytokine gene expression, whereas caveolin-1 re-expression promoted NFATc1 gene expression. Alternatively, caveolin-1 ablation did not affect TCR-induced NF-κB–dependent Iκbα expression. Cav-1−/− mice did not efficiently promote CD8 immunity to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, nor did cav-1−/− OT-1+ CD8+ T cells efficiently respond to Listeria mono-cytogenes-OVA after transfer into wild-type hosts. Therefore, caveolin-1 is a T cell-intrinsic orchestrator of TCR-mediated membrane polarity and signal specificity selectively employed by CD8 T cells to customize TCR responsiveness. PMID:21849673

  9. Dendritic cell specific targeting of MyD88 signalling pathways in vivo.

    PubMed

    Arnold-Schrauf, Catharina; Berod, Luciana; Sparwasser, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key regulators of both innate and adaptive immunity. During infection, DCs recognise pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) via pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) including the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family. TLRs mainly signal via the adaptor protein MyD88. This signalling pathway is required for immune protection during many infections, which are lethal in the absence of MyD88. However, the cell type specific importance of this pathway during both innate and adaptive immune responses against pathogens in vivo remains ill-defined. We discuss recent findings from conditional KO or gain-of-function mouse models targeting TLR/MyD88 signalling pathways in DCs and other myeloid cells during infection. While the general assumption that MyD88-dependent recognition by DCs is essential for inducing protective immunity holds true in some instances, the results surprisingly indicate a much more complex context-dependent requirement for this pathway in DCs and other myeloid or lymphoid cell-types in vivo. Furthermore, we highlight the advantages of Cre-mediated DC targeting approaches and their possible limitations. We also present future perspectives on the development of new genetic mouse models to target distinct DC subsets in vivo. Such models will serve to understand the functional heterogeneity of DCs in vivo. PMID:25403892

  10. Unbiased quantitative proteomics of lipid rafts reveals high specificity for signaling factors

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Leonard J.; de Hoog, Carmen L.; Mann, Matthias

    2003-01-01

    Membrane lipids were once thought to be homogenously distributed in the 2D surface of a membrane, but the lipid raft theory suggests that cholesterol and sphingolipids partition away from other membrane lipids. Lipid raft theory further implicates these cholesterol-rich domains in many processes such as signaling and vesicle traffic. However, direct characterization of rafts has been difficult, because they cannot be isolated in pure form. In the first functional proteomic analysis of rafts, we use quantitative high-resolution MS to specifically detect proteins depleted from rafts by cholesterol-disrupting drugs, resulting in a set of 241 authentic lipid raft components. We detect a large proportion of signaling molecules, highly enriched versus total membranes and detergent-resistant fractions, which thus far biochemically defined rafts. Our results provide the first large-scale and unbiased evidence, to our knowledge, for the connection of rafts with signaling and place limits on the fraction of plasma membrane composed by rafts. PMID:12724530

  11. RNAi screening identifies mediators of NOD2 signaling: Implications for spatial specificity of MDP recognition

    PubMed Central

    Lipinski, Simone; Grabe, Nils; Jacobs, Gunnar; Billmann-Born, Susanne; Till, Andreas; Häsler, Robert; Aden, Konrad; Paulsen, Maren; Arlt, Alexander; Kraemer, Lars; Hagemann, Nina; Erdmann, Kai Sven; Schreiber, Stefan; Rosenstiel, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The intracellular nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-2 (NOD2) receptor detects bacteria-derived muramyl dipeptide (MDP) and activates the transcription factor NF-κB. Here we describe the regulatome of NOD2 signaling using a systematic RNAi screen. Using three consecutive screens, we identified a set of 20 positive NF-κB regulators including the known pathway members RIPK2, RELA, and BIRC4 (XIAP) as well as FRMPD2 (FERM and PDZ domain-containing 2). FRMPD2 interacts with NOD2 via leucine-rich repeats and forms a complex with the membrane-associated protein ERBB2IP. We demonstrate that FRMPD2 spatially assembles the NOD2-signaling complex, hereby restricting NOD2-mediated immune responses to the basolateral compartment of polarized intestinal epithelial cells. We show that genetic truncation of the NOD2 leucine-rich repeat domain, which is associated with Crohn disease, impairs the interaction with FRMPD2, and that intestinal inflammation leads to down-regulation of FRMPD2. These results suggest a structural mechanism for how polarity of epithelial cells acts on intestinal NOD-like receptor signaling to mediate spatial specificity of bacterial recognition and control of immune responses. PMID:23213202

  12. Detecting electronic coherence by multidimensional broadband stimulated x-ray Raman signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfman, Konstantin E.; Bennett, Kochise; Mukamel, Shaul

    2015-08-01

    Nonstationary molecular states which contain electronic coherences can be impulsively created and manipulated by using recently developed ultrashort optical and x-ray pulses via photoexcitation, photoionization, and Auger processes. We propose several stimulated-Raman detection schemes that can monitor the subsequent phase-sensitive electronic and nuclear dynamics. Three detection protocols of an x-ray broadband probe are compared: frequency-dispersed transmission, integrated photon number change, and total pulse energy change. In addition, each can be either linear or quadratic in the x-ray probe intensity. These various signals offer different gating windows into the molecular response, which is described by correlation functions of electronic polarizabilities. Off-resonant and resonant signals are compared.

  13. Mapping the intramolecular contributions to the inelastic electron tunneling signal of a molecular junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foti, Giuseppe; Vázquez, Héctor

    2016-07-01

    We present a quantitative analysis of the intramolecular origin of the inelastic electron tunneling signal of a molecular junction. We use density-functional theory to study a representative conjugated molecule with a low degree of symmetry and calculate, for all modes, the different contributions that give rise to the vibrational spectrum. These local contributions involve products of scattering states with electron-phonon matrix elements and thus encode information on both the vibrational modes and the electronic structure. We separate these intra- and interatomic terms and draw a pattern of addition or cancellation of these partial contributions throughout the inelastic spectrum. This allows for a quantitative relation between the degree of symmetry of each vibrational mode, its inelastic signal, and the locality of selection rules.

  14. Positive selection of B10 cells is determined by BCR specificity and signaling strength.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jigang; Wan, Ming; Ren, Jing; Gao, Jixin; Fu, Meng; Wang, Gang; Liu, Yufeng; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    B10 cells, a regulatory B cell subset, negatively regulate immune responses in an IL-10-dependent manner. However, the mechanism of B10 cell development is unclear. We found that B10 cells mainly identified self-antigens. TgVH3B4 transgenic mice, whose VH was derived from an actin-reactive natural antibody, exhibit elevated numbers of actin-binding B10 cells. Immunization of TgVH3B4 mice with actin induced elevated B10 cell numbers in an antigen-specific manner, indicating positive selection of B10 cells by self-antigens. Furthermore, higher BCR signaling strength facilitated B10 cell development. We also observed that actin-reactive IgG levels were unchanged in TgVH3B4 mice after immunization with actin in contrast to the elevated OVA-reactive IgG level after immunization with OVA, indicating that B10 cells acted in an antigen-specific manner to inhibit the immune response. Our data demonstrate for the first time that B10 cells are positively selected by self-reactivity and that higher BCR signaling strength promotes B10 cell development. PMID:27132875

  15. Targeting autocrine HB-EGF signaling with specific ADAM12 inhibition using recombinant ADAM12 prodomain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Miles A.; Moss, Marcia L.; Powell, Gary; Petrovich, Robert; Edwards, Lori; Meyer, Aaron S.; Griffith, Linda G.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2015-10-01

    Dysregulation of ErbB-family signaling underlies numerous pathologies and has been therapeutically targeted through inhibiting ErbB-receptors themselves or their cognate ligands. For the latter, “decoy” antibodies have been developed to sequester ligands including heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF); however, demonstrating sufficient efficacy has been difficult. Here, we hypothesized that this strategy depends on properties such as ligand-receptor binding affinity, which varies widely across the known ErbB-family ligands. Guided by computational modeling, we found that high-affinity ligands such as HB-EGF are more difficult to target with decoy antibodies compared to low-affinity ligands such as amphiregulin (AREG). To address this issue, we developed an alternative method for inhibiting HB-EGF activity by targeting its cleavage from the cell surface. In a model of the invasive disease endometriosis, we identified A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase 12 (ADAM12) as a protease implicated in HB-EGF shedding. We designed a specific inhibitor of ADAM12 based on its recombinant prodomain (PA12), which selectively inhibits ADAM12 but not ADAM10 or ADAM17. In endometriotic cells, PA12 significantly reduced HB-EGF shedding and resultant cellular migration. Overall, specific inhibition of ligand shedding represents a possible alternative to decoy antibodies, especially for ligands such as HB-EGF that exhibit high binding affinity and localized signaling.

  16. Ubiquitin-specific protease 24 negatively regulates abscisic acid signalling in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinfeng; Zhou, Huapeng; Zhang, Ming; Gao, Yanan; Li, Long; Gao, Ying; Li, Ming; Yang, Yuhong; Guo, Yan; Li, Xueyong

    2016-02-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an important plant hormone integrating environmental stress and plant growth. Protein ubiquitination and deubiquitination are reversible processes catalysed by E3 ubiquitin ligase and deubiquitinating enzyme, respectively. Lots of E3 ubiquitin ligase and transcriptional factors modified by ubiquitination were reported to modulate ABA signalling. However, no deubiquitinating enzyme has been identified that functions in ABA signalling until now. Here, we isolated an ABA overly sensitive mutant, ubp24, in which the gene encoding ubiquitin-specific protease 24 (UBP24, At4g30890) was disrupted by a T-DNA insertion. The ubp24 mutant was hypersensitive to ABA and salt stress in both post-germinative growth and seedling growth. However, stomata closure in the ubp24 mutant was less sensitive to ABA, and the ubp24 mutant showed drought sensitivity. UBP24 possessed deubiquitinating enzyme activity, and the activity was essential for UBP24 function. Additionally, UBP24 formed homodimer in vivo. UBP24 was genetically upstream of ABI2, and the phosphatase activity of protein phosphatase 2C was decreased in the ubp24 mutant compared with the wild type in the presence of ABA. These results uncover an important regulatory role for the ubiquitin-specific protease in response to ABA and salt stress in plant. PMID:26290265

  17. Distributed category-specific recognition-memory signals in human perirhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Martin, Chris B; Cowell, Rosemary A; Gribble, Paul L; Wright, Jessey; Köhler, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Evidence from a large body of research suggests that perirhinal cortex (PrC), which interfaces the medial temporal lobe with the ventral visual pathway for object identification, plays a critical role in item-based recognition memory. The precise manner in which PrC codes for the prior occurrence of objects, however, remains poorly understood. In the present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we used multivoxel pattern analyses to examine whether the prior occurrence of faces is coded by distributed patterns of PrC activity that consist of voxels with decreases as well as increases in signal. We also investigated whether pertinent voxels are preferentially tuned to the specific object category to which judged stimuli belong. We found that, when no a priori constraints were imposed on the direction of signal change, activity patterns that allowed for successful classification of recognition-memory decisions included some voxels with decreases and others with increases in signal in association with perceived prior occurrence. Moreover, successful classification was obtained in the absence of a mean difference in activity across the set of voxels in these patterns. Critically, we observed a positive relationship between classifier accuracy and behavioral performance across participants. Additional analyses revealed that voxels carrying diagnostic information for classification of memory decisions showed category specificity in their tuning for faces when probed with an independent functional localizer in a nonmnemonic task context. These voxels were spatially distributed in PrC, and extended beyond the contiguous voxel clusters previously described as the anterior temporal face patch. Our findings provide support for proposals, recently raised in the neurophysiological literature, that the prior occurrence of objects is coded by distributed PrC representations. They also suggest that the stimulus category to which an item belongs shapes the

  18. 36 CFR 1235.50 - What specifications and standards for transfer apply to electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... electronic records in a format that is independent of specific hardware or software. Except as specified in... indicators for variable length records, or marks delimiting a data element, field, record, or file....

  19. 36 CFR 1235.50 - What specifications and standards for transfer apply to electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... electronic records in a format that is independent of specific hardware or software. Except as specified in... indicators for variable length records, or marks delimiting a data element, field, record, or file....

  20. Rapid electronic detection of probe-specific microRNAs using thin nanopore sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanunu, Meni; Dadosh, Tali; Ray, Vishva; Jin, Jingmin; McReynolds, Larry; Drndić, Marija

    2010-11-01

    Small RNA molecules have an important role in gene regulation and RNA silencing therapy, but it is challenging to detect these molecules without the use of time-consuming radioactive labelling assays or error-prone amplification methods. Here, we present a platform for the rapid electronic detection of probe-hybridized microRNAs from cellular RNA. In this platform, a target microRNA is first hybridized to a probe. This probe:microRNA duplex is then enriched through binding to the viral protein p19. Finally, the abundance of the duplex is quantified using a nanopore. Reducing the thickness of the membrane containing the nanopore to 6 nm leads to increased signal amplitudes from biomolecules, and reducing the diameter of the nanopore to 3 nm allows the detection and discrimination of small nucleic acids based on differences in their physical dimensions. We demonstrate the potential of this approach by detecting picogram levels of a liver-specific miRNA from rat liver RNA.

  1. Transgenic Zebrafish Reveal Tissue-Specific Differences in Estrogen Signaling in Response to Environmental Water Samples

    PubMed Central

    Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Hung, Alice L.; Blazer, Vicki S.; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Environmental endocrine disruptors (EEDs) are exogenous chemicals that mimic endogenous hormones such as estrogens. Previous studies using a zebrafish transgenic reporter demonstrated that the EEDs bisphenol A and genistein preferentially activate estrogen receptors (ERs) in the larval heart compared with the liver. However, it was not known whether the transgenic zebrafish reporter was sensitive enough to detect estrogens from environmental samples, whether environmental estrogens would exhibit tissue-specific effects similar to those of BPA and genistein, or why some compounds preferentially target receptors in the heart. Methods: We tested surface water samples using a transgenic zebrafish reporter with tandem estrogen response elements driving green fluorescent protein expression (5xERE:GFP). Reporter activation was colocalized with tissue-specific expression of ER genes by RNA in situ hybridization. Results: We observed selective patterns of ER activation in transgenic fish exposed to river water samples from the Mid-Atlantic United States, with several samples preferentially activating receptors in embryonic and larval heart valves. We discovered that tissue specificity in ER activation was due to differences in the expression of ER subtypes. ERα was expressed in developing heart valves but not in the liver, whereas ERβ2 had the opposite profile. Accordingly, subtype-specific ER agonists activated the reporter in either the heart valves or the liver. Conclusion: The use of 5xERE:GFP transgenic zebrafish revealed an unexpected tissue-specific difference in the response to environmentally relevant estrogenic compounds. Exposure to estrogenic EEDs in utero was associated with adverse health effects, with the potentially unanticipated consequence of targeting developing heart valves. Citation: Gorelick DA, Iwanowicz LR, Hung AL, Blazer VS, Halpern ME. 2014. Transgenic zebrafish reveal tissue-specific differences in estrogen signaling in response to

  2. The Legalities and Practicalities of Developing a Course-Specific Electronic Reserve Room.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Mary A.; Curran, Kent E.

    2002-01-01

    Advocates a course-specific electronic reserve for timely, simplified distribution of course readings. Provides guidelines for the copyright and fair use implications of electronic reserve, suggesting a password-protected site. Explains the logistics of file creation, software, and hardware. (Contains 14 references.) (SK)

  3. Nuclear RhoA signaling regulates MRTF-dependent SMC-specific transcription

    PubMed Central

    Staus, Dean P.; Weise-Cross, Laura; Mangum, Kevin D.; Medlin, Matt D.; Mangiante, Lee; Taylor, Joan M.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that RhoA-mediated actin polymerization stimulates smooth muscle cell (SMC)-specific transcription by regulating the nuclear localization of the myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTFs). On the basis of the recent demonstration that nuclear G-actin regulates MRTF nuclear export and observations from our laboratory and others that the RhoA effector, mDia2, shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm, we investigated whether nuclear RhoA signaling plays a role in regulating MRTF activity. We identified sequences that control mDia2 nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling and used mDia2 variants to demonstrate that the ability of mDia2 to fully stimulate MRTF nuclear accumulation and SMC-specific gene transcription was dependent on its localization to the nucleus. To test whether RhoA signaling promotes nuclear actin polymerization, we established a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP)-based assay to measure green fluorescent protein-actin diffusion in the nuclear compartment. Nuclear actin FRAP was delayed in cells expressing nuclear-targeted constitutively active mDia1 and mDia2 variants and in cells treated with the polymerization inducer, jasplakinolide. In contrast, FRAP was enhanced in cells expressing a nuclear-targeted variant of mDia that inhibits both mDia1 and mDia2. Treatment of 10T1/2 cells with sphingosine 1-phosphate induced RhoA activity in the nucleus and forced nuclear localization of RhoA or the Rho-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), leukemia-associated RhoGEF, enhanced the ability of these proteins to stimulate MRTF activity. Taken together, these data support the emerging idea that RhoA-dependent nuclear actin polymerization has important effects on transcription and nuclear structure. PMID:24906914

  4. Design, development, and fabrication of a electronic analog microminiaturized electronic analog signal to discrete time interval converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenfeld, A. D.; Schuegraf, K. K.

    1973-01-01

    The microminiaturization of an electronic analog signal to discrete time interval converter is presented. Discrete components and integrated circuits comprising the converter were assembled on a thin-film ceramic substrate containing nichrome resistors with gold interconnections. The finished assembly is enclosed in a flat package measuring 3.30 by 4.57 centimeters. The module can be used whenever conversion of analog to digital signals is required, in particular for the purpose of regulation by means of pulse modulation. In conjunction with a precision voltage reference, the module was applied to control the duty cycle of a switching regulator within a temperature range of -55 C to +125 C, and an input voltage range of 10V to 35V. The output-voltage variation was less than + or - 300 parts per million, i.e., less than + or - 3mV for a 10V output.

  5. Identification of signals that facilitate isoform specific nucleolar localization of myosin IC

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, Ryan S.; Ihnatovych, Ivanna; Yunus, Sharifah Z.S.A.; Domaradzki, Tera; Hofmann, Wilma A.

    2013-05-01

    Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily that localizes to the cytoplasm and the nucleus, where it is involved in transcription by RNA polymerases I and II, intranuclear transport, and nuclear export. In mammalian cells, three isoforms of myosin IC are expressed that differ only in the addition of short isoform-specific N-terminal peptides. Despite the high sequence homology, the isoforms show differences in cellular distribution, in localization to nuclear substructures, and in their interaction with nuclear proteins through yet unknown mechanisms. In this study, we used EGFP-fusion constructs that express truncated or mutated versions of myosin IC isoforms to detect regions that are involved in isoform-specific localization. We identified two nucleolar localization signals (NoLS). One NoLS is located in the myosin IC isoform B specific N-terminal peptide, the second NoLS is located upstream of the neck region within the head domain. We demonstrate that both NoLS are functional and necessary for nucleolar localization of specifically myosin IC isoform B. Our data provide a first mechanistic explanation for the observed functional differences between the myosin IC isoforms and are an important step toward our understanding of the underlying mechanisms that regulate the various and distinct functions of myosin IC isoforms. - Highlights: ► Two NoLS have been identified in the myosin IC isoform B sequence. ► Both NoLS are necessary for myosin IC isoform B specific nucleolar localization. ► First mechanistic explanation of functional differences between the isoforms.

  6. Differential DNA damage signalling and apoptotic threshold correlate with mouse epiblast-specific hypersensitivity to radiation.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Audrey; Blasi, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    Between implantation and gastrulation, mouse pluripotent epiblast cells expand enormously in number and exhibit a remarkable hypersensitivity to DNA damage. Upon low-dose irradiation, they undergo mitotic arrest followed by p53-dependent apoptosis, whereas the other cell types simply arrest. This protective mechanism, active exclusively after E5.5 and lost during gastrulation, ensures the elimination of every mutated cell before its clonal expansion and is therefore expected to greatly increase fitness. We show that the insurgence of apoptosis relies on the epiblast-specific convergence of both increased DNA damage signalling and stronger pro-apoptotic balance. Although upstream Atm/Atr global activity and specific γH2AX phosphorylation are similar in all cell types of the embryo, 53BP1 recruitment at DNA breaks is immediately amplified only in epiblast cells after ionizing radiation. This correlates with rapid epiblast-specific activation of p53 and its transcriptional properties. Moreover, between E5.5 and E6.5 epiblast cells lower their apoptotic threshold by enhancing the expression of pro-apoptotic Bak and Bim and repressing the anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL. Thus, even after low-dose irradiation, the cytoplasmic priming of epiblast cells allows p53 to rapidly induce apoptosis via a partially transcription-independent mechanism. PMID:26395482

  7. Mitochondria are required for antigen-specific T cell activation through reactive oxygen species signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sena, Laura A.; Li, Sha; Jairaman, Amit; Prakriya, Murali; Ezponda, Teresa; Hildeman, David A.; Wang, Chyung-Ru; Schumacker, Paul T.; Licht, Jonathan D.; Perlman, Harris; Bryce, Paul J.; Chandel, Navdeep S.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY It is widely appreciated that T cells increase glycolytic flux during activation, however the role of mitochondrial flux is unclear. Here we have shown that mitochondrial metabolism, in the absence of glucose metabolism, was sufficient to support interleukin-2 (IL-2) induction. Furthermore, we used mice with reduced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) production in T cells (T-Uqcrfs−/− mice) to show that mitochondria are required for T cell activation to produce mROS for activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and subsequent IL-2 induction. These mice could not induce antigen-specific expansion of T cells in vivo, however Uqcrfs1−/− T cells retained the ability to proliferate in vivo under lymphopenic conditions. This suggests that Uqcrfs1−/− T cells were not lacking bioenergetically, but rather lacked specific ROS-dependent signaling events needed for antigen-specific expansion. Thus, mitochondrial metabolism is a critical component of T cell activation through production of complex III ROS. PMID:23415911

  8. The MEMSamp: using (RF-)MEMS switches for the micromechanical amplification of electronic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlijn van Spengen, W.; Roobol, Sander B.; Klaassen, Wouter P.; Oosterkamp, Tjerk H.

    2010-12-01

    Semiconductor-based electronic amplifiers are ubiquitous in the modern world, but have fundamental limitations, such as the impossibility of using them at extreme temperatures and their sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Also, they inherently have various sources of electronic noise. We have developed a MEMS (micro-electromechanical systems) switch based amplifier in which an electronic signal is mechanically amplified in power: the MEMSamp. The new device is suitable for the same applications as semiconductor-based amplifiers, with the additional advantage of a purely mechanical operation, circumventing the limitations mentioned above. A thermal noise analysis shows that a MEMSamp may be operated with much lower input noise than state-of-the-art semiconductor amplifiers. We expect optimized amplifiers based on this principle to be applicable in fields ranging from low-noise preamplifiers to radiation-hard power amplifiers, and from ultra-high temperature electronics to spacecrafts.

  9. Analysis of Technical Specifications of the Egyptian and French Electronic Storybooks (e-Storybook)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atta, Mohammed Mahmoud; Abd El Wahab, Shaimaa Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    This research aims at analysing technical specifications in a sample of Egyptian and French electronic storybooks (e-storybooks), to identify similarities and differences in technical specifications of children's e-storybooks and create a verified analysis list to be used for evaluation of e-storybooks. For this purpose, 32 e-storybooks in CD…

  10. Dense fibrillar collagen is a potent inducer of invadopodia via a specific signaling network

    PubMed Central

    Swatkoski, Stephen; Matsumoto, Kazue; Campbell, Catherine B.; Petrie, Ryan J.; Dimitriadis, Emilios K.; Li, Xin; Mueller, Susette C.; Bugge, Thomas H.; Gucek, Marjan

    2015-01-01

    Cell interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM) can regulate multiple cellular activities and the matrix itself in dynamic, bidirectional processes. One such process is local proteolytic modification of the ECM. Invadopodia of tumor cells are actin-rich proteolytic protrusions that locally degrade matrix molecules and mediate invasion. We report that a novel high-density fibrillar collagen (HDFC) matrix is a potent inducer of invadopodia, both in carcinoma cell lines and in primary human fibroblasts. In carcinoma cells, HDFC matrix induced formation of invadopodia via a specific integrin signaling pathway that did not require growth factors or even altered gene and protein expression. In contrast, phosphoproteomics identified major changes in a complex phosphosignaling network with kindlin2 serine phosphorylation as a key regulatory element. This kindlin2-dependent signal transduction network was required for efficient induction of invadopodia on dense fibrillar collagen and for local degradation of collagen. This novel phosphosignaling mechanism regulates cell surface invadopodia via kindlin2 for local proteolytic remodeling of the ECM. PMID:25646088

  11. Quantitative Site-Specific Phosphoproteomics of Trichoderma reesei Signaling Pathways upon Induction of Hydrolytic Enzyme Production.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Elizabeth V; Imanishi, Susumu Y; Haapaniemi, Pekka; Yadav, Avinash; Saloheimo, Markku; Corthals, Garry L; Pakula, Tiina M

    2016-02-01

    The filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei is used for industrial production of secreted enzymes including carbohydrate active enzymes, such as cellulases and hemicellulases. The production of many of these enzymes by T. reesei is influenced by the carbon source it grows on, where the regulation system controlling hydrolase genes involves various signaling pathways. T. reesei was cultivated in the presence of sorbitol, a carbon source that does not induce the production of cellulases and hemicellulases, and then exposed to either sophorose or spent-grain extract, which are efficient inducers of the enzyme production. Specific changes at phosphorylation sites were investigated in relation to the production of cellulases and hemicellulases using an MS-based framework. Proteome-wide phosphorylation following carbon source exchange was investigated in the early stages of induction: 0, 2, 5, and 10 min. The workflow involved sequential trypsin digestion, TiO2 enrichment, and MS analysis using a Q Exactive mass spectrometer. We report on the identification and quantitation of 1721 phosphorylation sites. Investigation of the data revealed a complex signaling network activated upon induction involving components related to light-mediated cellulase induction, osmoregulation, and carbon sensing. Changes in protein phosphorylation were detected in the glycolytic pathway, suggesting an inhibition of glucose catabolism at 10 min after the addition of sophorose and as early as 2 min after the addition of spent-grain extract. Differential phosphorylation of factors related to carbon storage, intracellular trafficking, cytoskeleton, and cellulase gene regulation were also observed. PMID:26689635

  12. A Physiological Signal Transmission Model to be Used for Specific Diagnosis of Cochlear Impairments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saremi, Amin; Stenfelt, Stefan

    2011-11-01

    Many of the sophisticated characteristics of human auditory system are attributed to cochlea. Also, most of patients with a hearing loss suffer from impairments that originate from cochlea (sensorineural). Despite this, today's clinical diagnosis methods do not probe the specific origins of such cochlear lesions. The aim of this research is to introduce a physiological signal transmission model to be clinically used as a tool for diagnosis of cochlear losses. This model enables simulation of different bio-mechano-electrical processes which occur in the auditory organ of Corti inside the cochlea. What makes this model different from many available computational models is its loyalty to physiology since the ultimate goal is to model each single physiological phenomenon. This includes passive BM vibration, outer hair cells' performances such as nonlinear mechanoelectrical transduction (MET), active amplifications by somatic motor, as well as vibration to neural conversion at the inner hair cells.

  13. Examining the specific entropy (density of adiabatic invariants) of the outer electron radiation belt

    SciTech Connect

    Borovsky, Joseph E; Denton, Michael H

    2008-01-01

    Using temperature and number-density measurements of the energetic-electron population from multiple spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit, the specific entropy S = T/n{sup 2/3} of the outer electron radiation belt is calculated. Then 955,527 half-hour-long data intervals are statistically analyzed. Local-time and solar-cycle variations in S are examined. The median value of the specific entropy (2.8 x 10{sup 7} eVcm{sup 2}) is much larger than the specific entropy of other particle populations in and around the magnetosphere. The evolution of the specific entropy through high-speed-stream-driven geomagnetic storms and through magnetic-cloud-driven geomagnetic storms is studied using superposed-epoch analysis. For high-speed-stream-driven storms, systematic variations in the entropy associated with electron loss and gain and with radiation-belt heating are observed in the various storm phases. For magnetic-cloud-driven storms, multiple trigger choices for the data superpositions reveal the effects of interplanetary shock arrival, sheath driving, cloud driving, and recovery phase. The specific entropy S = T/n{sup 2/3} is algebraically expressed in terms of the first and second adiabatic invariants of the electrons: this allows a relativistic expression for S in terms of T and n to be derived. For the outer electron radiation belt at geosynchronous orbit, the relativistic corrections to the specific entropy expression are -15%.

  14. The influence of the electronic specific heat on swift heavy ion irradiation simulations of silicon.

    PubMed

    Khara, Galvin S; Murphy, Samuel T; Daraszewicz, Szymon L; Duffy, Dorothy M

    2016-10-01

    The swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation of materials is often modelled using the two-temperature model. While the model has been successful in describing SHI damage in metals, it fails to account for the presence of a bandgap in semiconductors and insulators. Here we explore the potential to overcome this limitation by explicitly incorporating the influence of the bandgap in the parameterisation of the electronic specific heat for Si. The specific heat as a function of electronic temperature is calculated using finite temperature density functional theory with three different exchange correlation functionals, each with a characteristic bandgap. These electronic temperature dependent specific heats are employed with two-temperature molecular dynamics to model ion track creation in Si. The results obtained using a specific heat derived from density functional theory showed dramatically reduced defect creation compared to models that used the free electron gas specific heat. As a consequence, the track radii are smaller and in much better agreement with experimental observations. We also observe a correlation between the width of the band gap and the track radius, arising due to the variation in the temperature dependence of the electronic specific heat. PMID:27501917

  15. Regulation of cellular signals from nutritional molecules: a specific role for phytochemicals, beyond antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Virgili, Fabio; Marino, Maria

    2008-11-01

    Phytochemicals (PhC) are a ubiquitous class of plant secondary metabolites. A "recommended" human diet should warrant a high proportion of energy from fruits and vegetables, therefore providing, among other factors, a huge intake of PhC, in general considered "health promoting" by virtue of their antioxidant activity and positive modulation, either directly or indirectly, of the cellular and tissue redox balance. Diet acts through multiple pathways and the association between the consumption of specific food items and the risk of degenerative diseases is extremely complex. Recent literature suggests that molecules having a chemical structure compatible with a putative antioxidant capacity can actually "perform" activities and roles independent of such capacity, interacting with cellular functions at different levels, such as affecting enzyme activities, binding to membrane or nuclear receptors as either an elective ligand or a ligand mimic. Inductive or signaling effects may occur at concentrations much lower than that required for effective antioxidant activity. Therefore, the "antioxidant hypothesis" is to be considered in some cases an intellectual "shortcut" possibly biasing the real understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of various classes of food items. In the past few years, many exciting new indications elucidating the mechanisms of polyphenols have been published. Here, we summarize the current knowledge of the mechanisms by which specific molecules of nutritional interest, and in particular polyphenols, play a role in cellular response and in preventing pathologies. In particular, their direct interaction with nuclear receptors and their ability to modulate the activity of key enzymes involved in cell signaling and antioxidant responses are presented and discussed. PMID:18762244

  16. Signalling specificity of Ser/Thr protein kinases through docking-site-mediated interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Biondi, Ricardo M; Nebreda, Angel R

    2003-01-01

    Signal transduction pathways use protein kinases for the modification of protein function by phosphorylation. A major question in the field is how protein kinases achieve the specificity required to regulate multiple cellular functions. Here we review recent studies that illuminate the mechanisms used by three families of Ser/Thr protein kinases to achieve substrate specificity. These kinases rely on direct docking interactions with substrates, using sites distinct from the phospho-acceptor sequences. Docking interactions also contribute to the specificity and regulation of protein kinase activities. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members can associate with and phosphorylate specific substrates by virtue of minor variations in their docking sequences. Interestingly, the same MAPK docking pocket that binds substrates also binds docking sequences of positive and negative MAPK regulators. In the case of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), the presence of a phosphate-binding site allows docking of previously phosphorylated (primed) substrates; this docking site is also required for the mechanism of GSK3 inhibition by phosphorylation. In contrast, non-primed substrates interact with a different region of GSK3. Phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1) contains a hydrophobic pocket that interacts with a hydrophobic motif present in all known substrates, enabling their efficient phosphorylation. Binding of the substrate hydrophobic motifs to the pocket in the kinase domain activates PDK1 and other members of the AGC family of protein kinases. Finally, the analysis of protein kinase structures indicates that the sites used for docking substrates can also bind N- and C-terminal extensions to the kinase catalytic core and participate in the regulation of its activity. PMID:12600273

  17. Reversing the Signaled Magnitude Effect in Delayed Matching to Sample: Delay-Specific Remembering?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, K. Geoffrey; Brown, Glenn S.

    2011-01-01

    Pigeons performed a delayed matching-to-sample task in which large or small reinforcers for correct remembering were signaled during the retention interval. Accuracy was low when small reinforcers were signaled, and high when large reinforcers were signaled (the signaled magnitude effect). When the reinforcer-size cue was switched from small to…

  18. Persistent free radical ESR signals in marine bivalve tissues. [Electron Spin Resonance (ESR)

    SciTech Connect

    Mehlorn, R.J. . Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering); Mendez, A.T. ); Higashi, R. . Bodega Marine Lab.); Fan, T. )

    1992-08-01

    Freeze-dried homogenates of the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae collected from waters in Puerto Rico near urban and industrial sites as well as at relatively pristine locations yielded electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra characteristic of free radicals as well as spectral components of transition metal ions, dominated by manganese. The magnitudes of these ESR signals and the concentrations of trace elements (determined by X-ray fluorescence) varied considerably among oyster samples, masking any potential correlation with polluted waters. Laboratory studies were initiated to identify the factors controlling the magnitudes of the tissue free radical ESR signals. Another mollusc, Mytilus californianus collected at the Bodega Marine laboratory in northern California, was fractionated into goneds and remaining tissue. Freeze-dried homogenates of both fractions exhibited ESR signals that increased gradually with time. ESR signals were observed in freeze-dried perchloric acid (PCA) precipitates of the homogenates, delipidated PCA precipitates, and in chloroform extracts of these precipitates. Acid hydrolysis to degrade proteins to amino acids produced a residue, which yielded much larger ESR free radical signals after freeze-drying. Freshly thawed homogenates of Crassostrea rhizophorae also exhibited ESR signals. A laboratory model of copper stress in Crassostrea rhizophorae was developed to study the effect of this transition metal on dssue free radicals. Preliminary results suggested that sublethal copper exposure had little effect on tissue fire radicals, except possibly for a signal enhancement in an oyster fraction that was enriched in kidney granules. Since kidney granules are known to accumulate heavy metals in mussels and probably other marine bivalves, this signal enhancement may prove to be an indicator of free radical processes associated with heavy metal deposition in molluscs.

  19. Polymer coatings that display specific biological signals while preventing nonspecific interactions.

    PubMed

    Ameringer, Thomas; Fransen, Peter; Bean, Penny; Johnson, Graham; Pereira, Suzanne; Evans, Richard A; Thissen, Helmut; Meagher, Laurence

    2012-02-01

    Control over cell-material surface interactions is the key to many new and improved biomedical devices. It can only be achieved if interactions that are mediated by nonspecifically adsorbed serum proteins are minimized and if cells instead respond to specific ligand molecules presented on the surface. Here, we present a simple yet effective surface modification method that allows for the covalent coupling and presentation of specific biological signals on coatings which have significantly reduced nonspecific biointerfacial interactions. To achieve this we synthesized bottle brush type copolymers consisting of poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate and (meth)acrylates providing activated NHS ester groups as well as different spacer lengths between the NHS groups and the polymer backbone. Copolymers containing different molar ratios of these monomers were grafted to amine functionalized polystyrene cell culture substrates, followed by the covalent immobilization of the cyclic peptides cRGDfK and cRADfK using residual NHS groups. Polymers were characterized by GPC and NMR and surface modification steps were analyzed using XPS. The cellular response was evaluated using HeLa cell attachment experiments. The results showed strong correlations between the effectiveness of the control over biointerfacial interactions and the polymer architecture. They also demonstrate that optimized fully synthetic copolymer coatings, which can be applied to a wide range of substrate materials, provide excellent control over biointerfacial interactions. PMID:22076848

  20. Caenorhabditis elegans TRPV Channels Function in a Modality-Specific Pathway to Regulate Response to Aberrant Sensory Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ezak , Meredith J.; Hong , Elizabeth; Chaparro-Garcia , Angela; Ferkey , Denise M.

    2010-01-01

    Olfaction and some forms of taste (including bitter) are mediated by G protein-coupled signal transduction pathways. Olfactory and gustatory ligands bind to chemosensory G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in specialized sensory cells to activate intracellular signal transduction cascades. G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) are negative regulators of signaling that specifically phosphorylate activated GPCRs to terminate signaling. Although loss of GRK function usually results in enhanced cellular signaling, Caenorhabditis elegans lacking GRK-2 function are not hypersensitive to chemosensory stimuli. Instead, grk-2 mutant animals do not chemotax toward attractive olfactory stimuli or avoid aversive tastes and smells. We show here that loss-of-function mutations in the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) channels OSM-9 and OCR-2 selectively restore grk-2 behavioral avoidance of bitter tastants, revealing modality-specific mechanisms for TRPV channel function in the regulation of C. elegans chemosensation. Additionally, a single amino acid point mutation in OCR-2 that disrupts TRPV channel-mediated gene expression, but does not decrease channel function in chemosensory primary signal transduction, also restores grk-2 bitter taste avoidance. Thus, loss of GRK-2 function may lead to changes in gene expression, via OSM-9/OCR-2, to selectively alter the levels of signaling components that transduce or regulate bitter taste responses. Our results suggest a novel mechanism and multiple modality-specific pathways that sensory cells employ in response to aberrant signal transduction. PMID:20176974

  1. Smad2 and Smad3 have differential sensitivity in relaying TGFβ signaling and inversely regulate early lineage specification

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ling; Liu, Xu; Ren, Xudong; Tian, Yue; Chen, Zhenyu; Xu, Xiangjie; Du, Yanhua; Jiang, Cizhong; Fang, Yujiang; Liu, Zhongliang; Fan, Beibei; Zhang, Quanbin; Jin, Guohua; Yang, Xiao; Zhang, Xiaoqing

    2016-01-01

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) related signaling is one of the most important signaling pathways regulating early developmental events. Smad2 and Smad3 are structurally similar and it is mostly considered that they are equally important in mediating TGFβ signals. Here, we show that Smad3 is an insensitive TGFβ transducer as compared with Smad2. Smad3 preferentially localizes within the nucleus and is thus sequestered from membrane signaling. The ability of Smad3 in oligomerization with Smad4 upon agonist stimulation is also impaired given its unique linker region. Smad2 mediated TGFβ signaling plays a crucial role in epiblast development and patterning of three germ layers. However, signaling unrelated nuclear localized Smad3 is dispensable for TGFβ signaling-mediated epiblast specification, but important for early neural development, an event blocked by TGFβ/Smad2 signaling. Both Smad2 and Smad3 bind to the conserved Smads binding element (SBE), but they show nonoverlapped target gene binding specificity and differential transcriptional activity. We conclude that Smad2 and Smad3 possess differential sensitivities in relaying TGFβ signaling and have distinct roles in regulating early developmental events. PMID:26905010

  2. Smad2 and Smad3 have differential sensitivity in relaying TGFβ signaling and inversely regulate early lineage specification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Liu, Xu; Ren, Xudong; Tian, Yue; Chen, Zhenyu; Xu, Xiangjie; Du, Yanhua; Jiang, Cizhong; Fang, Yujiang; Liu, Zhongliang; Fan, Beibei; Zhang, Quanbin; Jin, Guohua; Yang, Xiao; Zhang, Xiaoqing

    2016-01-01

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) related signaling is one of the most important signaling pathways regulating early developmental events. Smad2 and Smad3 are structurally similar and it is mostly considered that they are equally important in mediating TGFβ signals. Here, we show that Smad3 is an insensitive TGFβ transducer as compared with Smad2. Smad3 preferentially localizes within the nucleus and is thus sequestered from membrane signaling. The ability of Smad3 in oligomerization with Smad4 upon agonist stimulation is also impaired given its unique linker region. Smad2 mediated TGFβ signaling plays a crucial role in epiblast development and patterning of three germ layers. However, signaling unrelated nuclear localized Smad3 is dispensable for TGFβ signaling-mediated epiblast specification, but important for early neural development, an event blocked by TGFβ/Smad2 signaling. Both Smad2 and Smad3 bind to the conserved Smads binding element (SBE), but they show nonoverlapped target gene binding specificity and differential transcriptional activity. We conclude that Smad2 and Smad3 possess differential sensitivities in relaying TGFβ signaling and have distinct roles in regulating early developmental events. PMID:26905010

  3. Ground level signal strength of electromagnetic waves generated by pulsed electron beams in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harker, K. J.; Neubert, T.; Banks, P. M.; Fraser-Smith, A. C.; Donohue, D. J.

    1991-11-01

    A theoretical study has been made of the signal strengths at ground level of waves generated by pulsed electron beams in space. The radiated energy is first calculated by an improved version of a theory based on coherent spontaneous emission. This theory evaluates the electric and magnetic field strengths and power fluxes in the far field by applying asymptotic expansion techniques. The power flowing out within a cone whose apex is located at the gun position is calculated, and the intersection of the rays in this cone with the earth's surface is determined by using Snell's law considerations. Ground signal levels are calculated for typical ionospheric conditions as a function of pulsing frequency for fixed beam voltage and for voltage adjusted for resonance between the waves and the particles. For short beams, the ground level signal strengths are relatively insensitive to the wave particle resonance condition, but for longer beams the associated peaking of the signal level begins to be observed. Finally, these results are compared against ambient noise levels to determine under which circumstances these ground signals can be detected.

  4. An ab initio study of specific solvent effects on the electronic coupling element in electron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Thomas M.; Cave, Robert J.

    1998-11-01

    Specific solvent effects on the electronic coupling element for electron transfer are examined using two model donor-acceptor systems (Zn2+ and Li2+) and several model "solvent" species (He, Ne, H2O, and NH3). The effects are evaluated relative to the given donor-acceptor pair without solvent present. The electronic coupling element (Hab) is found to depend strongly on the identity of the intervening solvent, with He atoms decreasing Hab, whereas H2O and NH3 significantly increase Hab. The distance dependence (essentially exponential decay) is weakly affected by a single intervening solvent atom-molecule. However, when the donor-acceptor distance increases in concert with addition of successively greater numbers of solvent species, the decay with distance of Hab is altered appreciably. Effects due to varying the orientation of molecular solvent are found, somewhat surprisingly, to be quite modest.

  5. The legalities and practicalities of developing a course-specific electronic reserve room.

    PubMed

    Curran, Mary A; Curran, Kent E

    2002-01-01

    This article discusses important issues related to maintaining the currency of readings in a nursing course. The development of a course-specific electronic reserve room is offered as a methodology for achieving both timeliness and simplified distribution of course readings. The article reviews legal issues related to the development of an electronic reserve room for internet access. In addition, hardware and software issues related to the transference of paper materials to a digital format are considered. PMID:12503469

  6. Influence of previous photoperiodic exposure on the reproductive response to a specific photoperiod signal in ewes.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, T; Donovan, A; Karsch, F J; Roche, J F; O'Callaghan, D

    1997-04-01

    Two experiments were carried out to determine whether the reproductive response of ewes to a specific photoperiodic signal depends on the time of year that the signal is given, and, if so, whether this dependence can be attributed to the photoperiodic history of the ewes. The aim of experiment 1 was to expand upon previous findings that the reproductive response to a specific photoperiodic challenge in ewes previously maintained on natural photoperiod varies with time of year. Ewes were transferred at one of three times of year from natural photoperiod to photochambers and were immediately exposed to 35 long days (18L:6D) followed by continuous exposure to short days (8.5L: 15.5D); this treatment is referred to as LD-->SD. The three times of year when long days started corresponded to the beginning of the breeding season, the mid-breeding season, and early anestrus (September 21, December 21, March 21, respectively). In ewes exposed to LD-->SD beginning in September, the breeding season and subsequent anestrous season was not altered. In ewes exposed to LD-->SD beginning in December, the transition to anestrus was advanced (p < 0.05) relative to that in controls maintained in simulated natural photoperiod. Subsequently, half of these ewes resumed reproductive activity within 180 days; this occurred 131 +/- 8 days after transfer to short days. In contrast, all ewes exposed to LD-->SD beginning in March resumed reproductive activity; this began 100 +/- 3 days after transfer to short days (p < 0.05 versus December group). The purpose of experiment 2 was to assess the extent to which the difference in response to a photoperiodic challenge can be attributed to photoperiodic history. Ewes were maintained on short days from the winter solstice interrupted with 35 long days from March 21, June 21, September 21, or December 21. The majority of ewes exhibited an onset of reproductive activity after exposure to LD-->SD at the different times of year, and there was no group

  7. Substrate Specificity and Interferences of a Direct-Electron-Transfer-Based Glucose Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Felice, Alfons K. G.; Sygmund, Christoph; Harreither, Wolfgang; Kittl, Roman; Gorton, Lo; Ludwig, Roland

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Electrochemical sensors for glucose monitoring employ different signal transduction strategies for electron transfer from the biorecognition element to the electrode surface. We present a biosensor that employs direct electron transfer and evaluate its response to various interfering substances known to affect glucose biosensors. Methods: The enzyme cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) was adsorbed on the surface of a carbon working electrode and covalently bound by cross linking. The response of CDH-modified electrodes to glucose and possible interfering compounds was measured by flow-injection analysis, linear sweep, and chronoamperometry. Results: Chronoamperometry showed initial swelling/wetting of the electrode. After stabilization, the signal was stable and a sensitivity of 0.21 μA mM−1 cm−2 was obtained. To investigate the influence of the interfering substances on the biorecognition element, the simplest possible sensor architecture was used. The biosensor showed little (<5% signal deviation) or no response to various reported electroactive or otherwise interfering substances. Conclusions: Direct electron transfer from the biorecognition element to the electrode is a new principle applied to glucose biosensors, which can be operated at a low polarization potential of −100 mV versus silver/silver chloride. The reduction of interferences by electrochemically active substances is an attractive feature of this promising technology for the development of continuous glucose biosensors. PMID:23759400

  8. Reduction of electronic delay in active noise control systems--a multirate signal processing approach.

    PubMed

    Bai, Mingsian R; Lin, Yuanpei; Lai, Jienwen

    2002-02-01

    Electronic delay has been a critical problem in active noise control (ANC) systems. This is true whether a feedforward structure or a feedback structure is adopted. In particular, excessive delays would create a causality problem in a feedforward ANC system of a finite-length duct. This paper suggests a multirate signal-processing approach for minimizing the electronic delay in the control loop. In this approach, digital controllers are required in decimation and interpolation of discrete-time signals. The computation efficiency is further enhanced by a polyphase method, where the phases of low-pass finite impulse response (FIR) filters must be carefully designed to avoid unnecessary delays. Frequency domain optimization procedures based on H1, H2, and Hinfinity norms, respectively, are utilized in the FIR filter design. The proposed method was implemented by using a floating-point digital signal processor. Experimental results showed that the multirate approach remains effective for suppressing a broadband (200-600 Hz) noise in a duct with a minimum upstream measurement microphone placement of 20 cm. PMID:11863193

  9. Dynamic temporal and cell type-specific expression of Wnt signaling components in the developing midbrain

    SciTech Connect

    Rawal, Nina; Castelo-Branco, Goncalo; Sousa, Kyle M.; Kele, Julianna; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Okano, Hideyuki; Arenas, Ernest . E-mail: Ernest.Arenas@ki.se

    2006-05-15

    Wnt1 and -5a have been shown to modulate the proliferation and differentiation of midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons. However, it is not known whether other Wnts or which Frizzled (Fz) receptors are expressed in the developing midbrain. We found that 13 out of 19 Wnts, all 10 Fzs, and several intracellular Wnt signaling modulators, including Axin, FRAT, Naked, Par-1, and Ltap are developmentally regulated between embryonic days (E) 10.5 and 15.5. Next, we studied whether Fzs are differentially expressed in different cell types and examined neuronal-progenitor- or glial-enriched cultures and DA neurons isolated from TH-GFP reporter mice. We found that Fz8 is expressed at high levels in DA neurons at E11.5 and E13.5. Fz6 and -7 are the predominant transcripts in glial precursors, and Fz9, which is absent in DA neurons at E11.5, is the main receptor expressed in neuronal precursors. We therefore examined the function of Fz9 in DA cells and found that overexpression of Fz9 reduced Wnt5a- but not Wnt3a-induced hyperphosphorylation of Dishevelled. Thus, our results show that Fzs are developmentally regulated and differentially expressed in VM precursors, DA neurons, and glia. These findings suggest that Fz expression contributes to provide specificity to Wnt-mediated effects.

  10. Yeast cell wall integrity sensors form specific plasma membrane microdomains important for signalling.

    PubMed

    Kock, Christian; Arlt, Henning; Ungermann, Christian; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2016-09-01

    The cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae relies on the detection of cell surface stress by five sensors (Wsc1, Wsc2, Wsc3, Mid2, Mtl1). Each sensor contains a single transmembrane domain and a highly mannosylated extracellular region, and probably detects mechanical stress in the cell wall or the plasma membrane. We here studied the distribution of the five sensors at the cell surface by using fluorescently tagged variants in conjunction with marker proteins for established membrane compartments. We find that each of the sensors occupies a specific microdomain at the plasma membrane. The novel punctate 'membrane compartment occupied by Wsc1' (MCW) shows moderate overlap with other Wsc-type sensors, but not with those of the Mid-type sensors or other established plasma membrane domains. We further observed that sensor density and formation of the MCW compartment depends on the cysteine-rich head group near the N-terminus of Wsc1. Yet, signalling capacity depends more on the sensor density in the plasma membrane than on clustering within its microcompartment. We propose that the MCW microcompartment provides a quality control mechanism for retaining functional sensors at the plasma membrane to prevent them from endocytosis. PMID:27337501

  11. Detection of Q Fever Specific Antibodies Using Recombinant Antigen in ELISA with Peroxidase Based Signal Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua-Wei; Zhang, Zhiwen; Glennon, Erin; Ching, Wei-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the accepted method for Q fever serodiagnosis is indirect immunofluorescent antibody assay (IFA) using the whole cell antigen. In this study, we prepared the recombinant antigen of the 27-kDa outer membrane protein (Com1) which has been shown to be recognized by Q fever patient sera. The performance of recombinant Com1 was evaluated in ELISA by IFA confirmed serum samples. Due to the low titers of IgG and IgM in Q fever patients, the standard ELISA signals were further amplified by using biotinylated anti-human IgG or IgM plus streptavidin-HRP polymer. The modified ELISA can detect 88% (29 out of 33) of Q fever patient sera collected from Marines deployed to Iraq. Less than 5% (5 out of 156) of the sera from patients with other febrile diseases reacted with the Com1. These results suggest that the modified ELISA using Com1 may have the potential to improve the detection of Q fever specific antibodies. PMID:26904739

  12. Speaker specificity in speech perception: the importance of what is and is not in the signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahan, Delphine; Scarborough, Rebecca A.

    2005-09-01

    In some American English dialects, /ae/ before /g/ (but not before /k/) raises to a vowel approaching [E], in effect reducing phonetic overlap between (e.g.) ``bag'' and ``back.'' Here, participants saw four written words on a computer screen (e.g., ``bag,'' ``back,'' ``dog,'' ``dock'') and heard a spoken word. Their task was to indicate which word they heard. Participants' eye movements to the written words were recorded. Participants in the ``ae-raising'' group heard identity-spliced ``bag''-like words containing the raised vowel [E] participants in the ``control'' group heard cross-spliced ``bag''-like words containing standard [ae]. Acoustically identical ``back''-like words were subsequently presented to both groups. The ae-raising-group participants identified ``back''-like words faster and more accurately, and made fewer fixations to the competitor ``bag,'' than control-group participants did. Thus, exposure to ae-raised realizations of ``bag'' facilitated the identification of ``back'' because of the reduced fit between the input and the altered representation of the competing hypothesis ``bag.'' This demonstrates that listeners evaluate the spoken input with respect to what is, but also what is not, in the signal, and that this evaluation involves speaker-specific representations. [Work supported by NSF Human and Social Dynamics 0433567.

  13. SUBTYPE-SPECIFIC REGENERATION OF RETINAL GANGLION CELLS FOLLOWING AXOTOMY: EFFECTS OF OSTEOPONTIN AND MTOR SIGNALING

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xin; Qiao, Mu; Bei, Fengfeng; Kim, In-Jung; He, Zhigang; Sanes, Joshua R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In mammals, few retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) survive following axotomy and even fewer regenerate axons. This could reflect differential extrinsic influences or the existence of subpopulations that vary in their responses to injury. We tested these alternatives by comparing responses of molecularly distinct subsets of mouse RGCs to axotomy. Survival rates varied dramatically among subtypes, with alpha-RGCs (αRGCs) surviving preferentially. Among survivors, αRGCs accounted for nearly all regeneration following down-regulation of PTEN, which activates the mTOR pathway. αRGCs have uniquely high mTOR signaling levels among RGCs and also selectively express osteopontin (OPN) and receptors for the growth factor, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). Administration of OPN plus IGF-1 promotes regeneration as effectively as down-regulation of PTEN; however, regeneration is still confined to αRGCs. Our results reveal dramatic subtype-specific differences in the ability of RGCs to survive and regenerate following injury, and they identify promising agents for promoting axonal regeneration. PMID:25754821

  14. Species-specific signals for the splicing of a short Drosophila intron in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, M; Lo, P C; Mount, S M

    1993-01-01

    The effects of branchpoint sequence, the pyrimidine stretch, and intron size on the splicing efficiency of the Drosophila white gene second intron were examined in nuclear extracts from Drosophila and human cells. This 74-nucleotide intron is typical of many Drosophila introns in that it lacks a significant pyrimidine stretch and is below the minimum size required for splicing in human nuclear extracts. Alteration of sequences of adjacent to the 3' splice site to create a pyrimidine stretch was necessary for splicing in human, but not Drosophila, extracts. Increasing the size of this intron with insertions between the 5' splice site and the branchpoint greatly reduced the efficiency of splicing of introns longer than 79 nucleotides in Drosophila extracts but had an opposite effect in human extracts, in which introns longer than 78 nucleotides were spliced with much greater efficiency. The white-apricot copia insertion is immediately adjacent to the branchpoint normally used in the splicing of this intron, and a copia long terminal repeat insertion prevents splicing in Drosophila, but not human, extracts. However, a consensus branchpoint does not restore the splicing of introns containing the copia long terminal repeat, and alteration of the wild-type branchpoint sequence alone does not eliminate splicing. These results demonstrate species specificity of splicing signals, particularly pyrimidine stretch and size requirements, and raise the possibility that variant mechanisms not found in mammals may operate in the splicing of small introns in Drosophila and possibly other species. Images PMID:8423778

  15. Triple probe signal detection electronics for systems lacking a well defined ground.

    PubMed

    Compeau, R; Gilmore, M; Watts, C

    2008-10-01

    Triple probes have been used to measure plasma parameters of low temperature and edge plasmas, yielding simultaneous measurements of electron temperature, ion density, and floating potential. Unlike standard Langmuir and double probe techniques, there is no requirement to sweep the probe potential relative to the plasma, thus allowing fast time resolution. However, in some plasma systems "ground" is not well defined with respect to a known ground, may vary strongly in time, or may be at an inconveniently high voltage. The resulting high plasma (or floating) potential requires common mode rejection before the signals can be digitized. A signal detection circuit constructed from inexpensive operational amplifiers and that makes use of a novel floating bias generation configuration is described. PMID:19044612

  16. Triple probe signal detection electronics for systems lacking a well defined ground

    SciTech Connect

    Compeau, R.; Gilmore, M.; Watts, C.

    2008-10-15

    Triple probes have been used to measure plasma parameters of low temperature and edge plasmas, yielding simultaneous measurements of electron temperature, ion density, and floating potential. Unlike standard Langmuir and double probe techniques, there is no requirement to sweep the probe potential relative to the plasma, thus allowing fast time resolution. However, in some plasma systems 'ground' is not well defined with respect to a known ground, may vary strongly in time, or may be at an inconveniently high voltage. The resulting high plasma (or floating) potential requires common mode rejection before the signals can be digitized. A signal detection circuit constructed from inexpensive operational amplifiers and that makes use of a novel floating bias generation configuration is described.

  17. Scanning electron microscope image enhancement using spread spectrum through dither signal imposition.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwang Oh; Joo, Wonjong; Kim, Dong Hwan

    2011-12-01

    Noise is a primary issue in obtaining an image in a scanning microscope. This noise needs to be minimized in order to have a clear image of the sample in case of a nanosize level measurement. In this work, we propose a method to improve the image quality by applying dither signal injection to the scanning signal. This method involves minimizing the noise that occurs in scan control circuits, which results in a blurry or distorted image. The collected secondary electrons are first multiplied through a photomultiplier tube and are then converted into digital form using an analog/digital (A/D) converter. We propose a solution for the noise from the scan control circuit that appears on the image by adopting the spread spectrum method. PMID:21990426

  18. 77 FR 50726 - Software Requirement Specifications for Digital Computer Software and Complex Electronics Used in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or the Commission) is issuing for public comment draft regulatory guide (DG), DG-1209, ``Software Requirement Specifications for Digital Computer Software and Complex Electronics used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants.'' The DG-1209 is proposed Revision 1 of RG 1.172, dated September 1997. This revision endorses, with clarifications, the......

  19. 36 CFR 1235.50 - What specifications and standards for transfer apply to electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What specifications and standards for transfer apply to electronic records? 1235.50 Section 1235.50 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT TRANSFER OF RECORDS TO THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES OF THE UNITED STATES...

  20. 36 CFR 1235.50 - What specifications and standards for transfer apply to electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What specifications and standards for transfer apply to electronic records? 1235.50 Section 1235.50 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT TRANSFER OF RECORDS TO THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES OF THE UNITED STATES...

  1. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 395 - Electronic On-Board Recorder Performance Specifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electronic On-Board Recorder Performance Specifications A Appendix A to Part 395 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS HOURS OF SERVICE OF DRIVERS...

  2. The code for directing proteins for translocation across ER membrane: SRP cotranslationally recognizes specific features of a signal sequence.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, IngMarie; Lara, Patricia; Hessa, Tara; Johnson, Arthur E; von Heijne, Gunnar; Karamyshev, Andrey L

    2015-03-27

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) cotranslationally recognizes signal sequences of secretory proteins and targets ribosome-nascent chain complexes to the SRP receptor in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, initiating translocation of the nascent chain through the Sec61 translocon. Although signal sequences do not have homology, they have similar structural regions: a positively charged N-terminus, a hydrophobic core and a more polar C-terminal region that contains the cleavage site for the signal peptidase. Here, we have used site-specific photocrosslinking to study SRP-signal sequence interactions. A photoreactive probe was incorporated into the middle of wild-type or mutated signal sequences of the secretory protein preprolactin by in vitro translation of mRNAs containing an amber-stop codon in the signal peptide in the presence of the N(ε)-(5-azido-2 nitrobenzoyl)-Lys-tRNA(amb) amber suppressor. A homogeneous population of SRP-ribosome-nascent chain complexes was obtained by the use of truncated mRNAs in translations performed in the presence of purified canine SRP. Quantitative analysis of the photoadducts revealed that charged residues at the N-terminus of the signal sequence or in the early part of the mature protein have only a mild effect on the SRP-signal sequence association. However, deletions of amino acid residues in the hydrophobic portion of the signal sequence severely affect SRP binding. The photocrosslinking data correlate with targeting efficiency and translocation across the membrane. Thus, the hydrophobic core of the signal sequence is primarily responsible for its recognition and binding by SRP, while positive charges fine-tune the SRP-signal sequence affinity and targeting to the translocon. PMID:24979680

  3. Hedgehog targets in the Drosophila embryo and the mechanisms that generate tissue-specific outputs of Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Biehs, Brian; Kechris, Katerina; Liu, Songmei; Kornberg, Thomas B

    2010-11-01

    Paracrine Hedgehog (Hh) signaling regulates growth and patterning in many Drosophila organs. We mapped chromatin binding sites for Cubitus interruptus (Ci), the transcription factor that mediates outputs of Hh signal transduction, and we analyzed transcription profiles of control and mutant embryos to identify genes that are regulated by Hh. Putative targets that we identified included several Hh pathway components, mostly previously identified targets, and many targets that are novel. Every Hh target we analyzed that is not a pathway component appeared to be regulated by Hh in a tissue-specific manner; analysis of expression patterns of pathway components and target genes provided evidence of autocrine Hh signaling in the optic primordium of the embryo. We present evidence that tissue specificity of Hh targets depends on transcription factors that are Hh-independent, suggesting that `pre-patterns' of transcription factors partner with Ci to make Hh-dependent gene expression position specific. PMID:20978080

  4. Design and development of detector signal conditioning electronics for SST-1 Thomson scattering system.

    PubMed

    Thakar, Aruna; Kumar, Ajai; Thomas, Jinto; Chavda, Chhaya

    2008-09-01

    An IR enhanced thermoelectrically cooled Si-avalanche photodiode (Si-APD) module is used for detection of scattered photons from plasma electrons. Present design of signal conditioning electronics for the APD has fast (50 MHz) and slow (500 kHz) channels to measure scattered and plasma background light, respectively. We report design analysis for different stages and their performance. The performance of fast channel is analyzed for two different group delays, speed, linearity, and its cross-talk with slow channel. Temperature dependence of APD's responsivity is studied in the wavelength range of 900-1060 nm. A minimum detection of approximately 25 photoelectrons (with SN=1) in the range of 5 to 25 degrees C is achieved at an APD gain of 75 in the present design. PMID:19044411

  5. Design and development of detector signal conditioning electronics for SST-1 Thomson scattering system

    SciTech Connect

    Thakar, Aruna; Kumar, Ajai; Thomas, Jinto; Chavda, Chhaya

    2008-09-15

    An IR enhanced thermoelectrically cooled Si-avalanche photodiode (Si-APD) module is used for detection of scattered photons from plasma electrons. Present design of signal conditioning electronics for the APD has fast (50 MHz) and slow (500 kHz) channels to measure scattered and plasma background light, respectively. We report design analysis for different stages and their performance. The performance of fast channel is analyzed for two different group delays, speed, linearity, and its cross-talk with slow channel. Temperature dependence of APD's responsivity is studied in the wavelength range of 900-1060 nm. A minimum detection of {approx}25 photoelectrons (with S/N=1) in the range of 5 to 25 deg. C is achieved at an APD gain of 75 in the present design.

  6. Evolution of the electron acoustic signal as function of doping level in III-V semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Bresse, J.F.; Papadopoulo, A.C.

    1988-07-01

    The evolution of the electron acoustic signal has been measured for Be- and Si-doped GaAs and Ga/sub 0.28/Al/sub 0.19/In/sub 0.53/As layers with doping levels from10/sup 17/ to 10/sup 20/ at. cm/sup -3/. The samples have also been analyzed by cathodoluminescence spectroscopy for near-band-edge transition and deep level emission. The results are explained by the reduction of the mean free path of phonons, giving rise to a lattice thermal conductivity decrease. Meanwhile, the electronic part of the thermal conductivity of these compounds is found to be nearly negligible.

  7. Simultaneous measurements of pure scintillation and Cerenkov signals in an integrated fiber-optic dosimeter for electron beam therapy dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Shin, Sang Hun; Jeon, Dayeong; Hong, Seunghan; Kim, Seon Geun; Sim, Hyeok In; Jang, Kyoung Won; Cho, Seunghyun; Lee, Bongsoo

    2013-11-18

    For real-time dosimetry in electron beam therapy, an integrated fiber-optic dosimeter (FOD) is developed using a water-equivalent dosimeter probe, four transmitting optical fibers, and a multichannel light-measuring device. The dosimeter probe is composed of two inner sensors, a scintillation sensor and a Cerenkov sensor, and each sensor has two different channels. Accordingly, we measured four separate light signals from each channel in the dosimeter probe, simultaneously, and then obtained the scintillation and Cerenkov signals using a subtraction method. To evaluate the performance of the integrated FOD, we measured the light signals according to the irradiation angle of the electron beam, the depth variation of the solid water phantom, and the electron beam energy. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the pure scintillation and Cerenkov signals obtained by an integrated FOD system based on a subtraction method can be effectively used for calibrating the conditions of high-energy electron beams in radiotherapy. PMID:24514292

  8. Capturing structured, pulmonary disease-specific data elements in electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Peter E; Gronkiewicz, Cynthia; Diamond, Edward J; French, Kim D; Christodouleas, John

    2015-04-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) have the potential to improve health-care quality by allowing providers to make better decisions at the point of care based on electronically aggregated data and by facilitating clinical research. These goals are easier to achieve when key, disease-specific clinical information is documented as structured data elements (SDEs) that computers can understand and process, rather than as free-text/natural-language narrative. This article reviews the benefits of capturing disease-specific SDEs. It highlights several design and implementation considerations, including the impact on efficiency and expressivity of clinical documentation and the importance of adhering to data standards when available. Pulmonary disease-specific examples of collection instruments are provided from two commonly used commercial EHRs. Future developments that can leverage SDEs to improve clinical quality and research are discussed. PMID:25846531

  9. Conformation-specific anti-Mad2 monoclonal antibodies for the dissection of checkpoint signaling.

    PubMed

    Sedgwick, Garry G; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo; Lischetti, Tiziana; Streicher, Werner; Jersie-Christensen, Rosa Rakownikow; Olsen, Jesper V; Nilsson, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) ensures accurate chromosome segregation during mitosis by delaying the activation of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) in response to unattached kinetochores. The Mad2 protein is essential for a functional checkpoint because it binds directly to Cdc20, the mitotic co-activator of the APC/C, thereby inhibiting progression into anaphase. Mad2 exists in at least 2 different conformations, open-Mad2 (O-Mad2) and closed-Mad2 (C-Mad2), with the latter representing the active form that is able to bind Cdc20. Our ability to dissect Mad2 biology in vivo is limited by the absence of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) useful for recognizing the different conformations of Mad2. Here, we describe and extensively characterize mAbs specific for either O-Mad2 or C-Mad2, as well as a pan-Mad2 antibody, and use these to investigate the different Mad2 complexes present in mitotic cells. Our antibodies validate current Mad2 models but also suggest that O-Mad2 can associate with checkpoint complexes, most likely through dimerization with C-Mad2. Furthermore, we investigate the makeup of checkpoint complexes bound to the APC/C, which indicate the presence of both Cdc20-BubR1-Bub3 and Mad2-Cdc20-BubR1-Bub3 complexes, with Cdc20 being ubiquitinated in both. Thus, our defined mAbs provide insight into checkpoint signaling and provide useful tools for future research on Mad2 function and regulation. PMID:26986935

  10. ROS/redox signaling regulates bone turnover in an age-specific manner in female mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In bone, oxidant signaling through NADPH oxidase (NOX)-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) superoxide and/or hydrogen peroxide appears to be an important stimulus for osteoclast differentiation and activity. ROS signaling has been suggested to increase RANKL mRNA and protein expression, thus enha...

  11. An FGF3-BMP Signaling Axis Regulates Caudal Neural Tube Closure, Neural Crest Specification and Anterior-Posterior Axis Extension

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Matthew J.; Schimmang, Thomas; Lewandoski, Mark

    2016-01-01

    During vertebrate axis extension, adjacent tissue layers undergo profound morphological changes: within the neuroepithelium, neural tube closure and neural crest formation are occurring, while within the paraxial mesoderm somites are segmenting from the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). Little is known about the signals between these tissues that regulate their coordinated morphogenesis. Here, we analyze the posterior axis truncation of mouse Fgf3 null homozygotes and demonstrate that the earliest role of PSM-derived FGF3 is to regulate BMP signals in the adjacent neuroepithelium. FGF3 loss causes elevated BMP signals leading to increased neuroepithelium proliferation, delay in neural tube closure and premature neural crest specification. We demonstrate that elevated BMP4 depletes PSM progenitors in vitro, phenocopying the Fgf3 mutant, suggesting that excessive BMP signals cause the Fgf3 axis defect. To test this in vivo we increased BMP signaling in Fgf3 mutants by removing one copy of Noggin, which encodes a BMP antagonist. In such mutants, all parameters of the Fgf3 phenotype were exacerbated: neural tube closure delay, premature neural crest specification, and premature axis termination. Conversely, genetically decreasing BMP signaling in Fgf3 mutants, via loss of BMP receptor activity, alleviates morphological defects. Aberrant apoptosis is observed in the Fgf3 mutant tailbud. However, we demonstrate that cell death does not cause the Fgf3 phenotype: blocking apoptosis via deletion of pro-apoptotic genes surprisingly increases all Fgf3 defects including causing spina bifida. We demonstrate that this counterintuitive consequence of blocking apoptosis is caused by the increased survival of BMP-producing cells in the neuroepithelium. Thus, we show that FGF3 in the caudal vertebrate embryo regulates BMP signaling in the neuroepithelium, which in turn regulates neural tube closure, neural crest specification and axis termination. Uncovering this FGF3-BMP signaling axis is

  12. An FGF3-BMP Signaling Axis Regulates Caudal Neural Tube Closure, Neural Crest Specification and Anterior-Posterior Axis Extension.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Matthew J; Schimmang, Thomas; Lewandoski, Mark

    2016-05-01

    During vertebrate axis extension, adjacent tissue layers undergo profound morphological changes: within the neuroepithelium, neural tube closure and neural crest formation are occurring, while within the paraxial mesoderm somites are segmenting from the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). Little is known about the signals between these tissues that regulate their coordinated morphogenesis. Here, we analyze the posterior axis truncation of mouse Fgf3 null homozygotes and demonstrate that the earliest role of PSM-derived FGF3 is to regulate BMP signals in the adjacent neuroepithelium. FGF3 loss causes elevated BMP signals leading to increased neuroepithelium proliferation, delay in neural tube closure and premature neural crest specification. We demonstrate that elevated BMP4 depletes PSM progenitors in vitro, phenocopying the Fgf3 mutant, suggesting that excessive BMP signals cause the Fgf3 axis defect. To test this in vivo we increased BMP signaling in Fgf3 mutants by removing one copy of Noggin, which encodes a BMP antagonist. In such mutants, all parameters of the Fgf3 phenotype were exacerbated: neural tube closure delay, premature neural crest specification, and premature axis termination. Conversely, genetically decreasing BMP signaling in Fgf3 mutants, via loss of BMP receptor activity, alleviates morphological defects. Aberrant apoptosis is observed in the Fgf3 mutant tailbud. However, we demonstrate that cell death does not cause the Fgf3 phenotype: blocking apoptosis via deletion of pro-apoptotic genes surprisingly increases all Fgf3 defects including causing spina bifida. We demonstrate that this counterintuitive consequence of blocking apoptosis is caused by the increased survival of BMP-producing cells in the neuroepithelium. Thus, we show that FGF3 in the caudal vertebrate embryo regulates BMP signaling in the neuroepithelium, which in turn regulates neural tube closure, neural crest specification and axis termination. Uncovering this FGF3-BMP signaling axis is

  13. Subregional specification of embryonic stem cell-derived ventral telencephalic tissues by timed and combinatory treatment with extrinsic signals.

    PubMed

    Danjo, Teruko; Eiraku, Mototsugu; Muguruma, Keiko; Watanabe, Kiichi; Kawada, Masako; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Rubenstein, John L R; Sasai, Yoshiki

    2011-02-01

    During early telencephalic development, the major portion of the ventral telencephalic (subpallial) region becomes subdivided into three regions, the lateral (LGE), medial (MGE), and caudal (CGE) ganglionic eminences. In this study, we systematically recapitulated subpallial patterning in mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) cultures and investigated temporal and combinatory actions of patterning signals. In serum-free floating culture, the dorsal-ventral specification of ESC-derived telencephalic neuroectoderm is dose-dependently directed by Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. Early Shh treatment, even before the expression onset of Foxg1 (also Bf1; earliest marker of the telencephalic lineage), is critical for efficiently generating LGE progenitors, and continuous Shh signaling until day 9 is necessary to commit these cells to the LGE lineage. When induced under these conditions and purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorter, telencephalic cells efficiently differentiated into Nolz1(+)/Ctip2(+) LGE neuronal precursors and subsequently, both in culture and after in vivo grafting, into DARPP32(+) medium-sized spiny neurons. Purified telencephalic progenitors treated with high doses of the Hedgehog (Hh) agonist SAG (Smoothened agonist) differentiated into MGE- and CGE-like tissues. Interestingly, in addition to strong Hh signaling, the efficient specification of MGE cells requires Fgf8 signaling but is inhibited by treatment with Fgf15/19. In contrast, CGE differentiation is promoted by Fgf15/19 but suppressed by Fgf8, suggesting that specific Fgf signals play different, critical roles in the positional specification of ESC-derived ventral subpallial tissues. We discuss a model of the antagonistic Fgf8 and Fgf15/19 signaling in rostral-caudal subpallial patterning and compare it with the roles of these molecules in cortical patterning. PMID:21289201

  14. Measuring the Electronic Properties of DNA-Specific Schottky Diodes Towards Detecting and Identifying Basidiomycetes DNA

    PubMed Central

    Periasamy, Vengadesh; Rizan, Nastaran; Al-Ta’ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Tan, Yee Shin; Tajuddin, Hairul Annuar; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of semiconducting behavior of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has resulted in a large number of literatures in the study of DNA electronics. Sequence-specific electronic response provides a platform towards understanding charge transfer mechanism and therefore the electronic properties of DNA. It is possible to utilize these characteristic properties to identify/detect DNA. In this current work, we demonstrate a novel method of DNA-based identification of basidiomycetes using current-voltage (I-V) profiles obtained from DNA-specific Schottky barrier diodes. Electronic properties such as ideality factor, barrier height, shunt resistance, series resistance, turn-on voltage, knee-voltage, breakdown voltage and breakdown current were calculated and used to quantify the identification process as compared to morphological and molecular characterization techniques. The use of these techniques is necessary in order to study biodiversity, but sometimes it can be misleading and unreliable and is not sufficiently useful for the identification of fungi genera. Many of these methods have failed when it comes to identification of closely related species of certain genus like Pleurotus. Our electronics profiles, both in the negative and positive bias regions were however found to be highly characteristic according to the base-pair sequences. We believe that this simple, low-cost and practical method could be useful towards identifying and detecting DNA in biotechnology and pathology. PMID:27435636

  15. Measuring the Electronic Properties of DNA-Specific Schottky Diodes Towards Detecting and Identifying Basidiomycetes DNA.

    PubMed

    Periasamy, Vengadesh; Rizan, Nastaran; Al-Ta'ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Tan, Yee Shin; Tajuddin, Hairul Annuar; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of semiconducting behavior of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has resulted in a large number of literatures in the study of DNA electronics. Sequence-specific electronic response provides a platform towards understanding charge transfer mechanism and therefore the electronic properties of DNA. It is possible to utilize these characteristic properties to identify/detect DNA. In this current work, we demonstrate a novel method of DNA-based identification of basidiomycetes using current-voltage (I-V) profiles obtained from DNA-specific Schottky barrier diodes. Electronic properties such as ideality factor, barrier height, shunt resistance, series resistance, turn-on voltage, knee-voltage, breakdown voltage and breakdown current were calculated and used to quantify the identification process as compared to morphological and molecular characterization techniques. The use of these techniques is necessary in order to study biodiversity, but sometimes it can be misleading and unreliable and is not sufficiently useful for the identification of fungi genera. Many of these methods have failed when it comes to identification of closely related species of certain genus like Pleurotus. Our electronics profiles, both in the negative and positive bias regions were however found to be highly characteristic according to the base-pair sequences. We believe that this simple, low-cost and practical method could be useful towards identifying and detecting DNA in biotechnology and pathology. PMID:27435636

  16. Measuring the Electronic Properties of DNA-Specific Schottky Diodes Towards Detecting and Identifying Basidiomycetes DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periasamy, Vengadesh; Rizan, Nastaran; Al-Ta’Ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Tan, Yee Shin; Tajuddin, Hairul Annuar; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2016-07-01

    The discovery of semiconducting behavior of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has resulted in a large number of literatures in the study of DNA electronics. Sequence-specific electronic response provides a platform towards understanding charge transfer mechanism and therefore the electronic properties of DNA. It is possible to utilize these characteristic properties to identify/detect DNA. In this current work, we demonstrate a novel method of DNA-based identification of basidiomycetes using current-voltage (I-V) profiles obtained from DNA-specific Schottky barrier diodes. Electronic properties such as ideality factor, barrier height, shunt resistance, series resistance, turn-on voltage, knee-voltage, breakdown voltage and breakdown current were calculated and used to quantify the identification process as compared to morphological and molecular characterization techniques. The use of these techniques is necessary in order to study biodiversity, but sometimes it can be misleading and unreliable and is not sufficiently useful for the identification of fungi genera. Many of these methods have failed when it comes to identification of closely related species of certain genus like Pleurotus. Our electronics profiles, both in the negative and positive bias regions were however found to be highly characteristic according to the base-pair sequences. We believe that this simple, low-cost and practical method could be useful towards identifying and detecting DNA in biotechnology and pathology.

  17. A Probabilistic Boolean Network Approach for the Analysis of Cancer-Specific Signalling: A Case Study of Deregulated PDGF Signalling in GIST

    PubMed Central

    Wiesinger, Monique; Bahlawane, Christelle; Haan, Serge; Sauter, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background Signal transduction networks are increasingly studied with mathematical modelling approaches while each of them is suited for a particular problem. For the contextualisation and analysis of signalling networks with steady-state protein data, we identified probabilistic Boolean network (PBN) as a promising framework which could capture quantitative changes of molecular changes at steady-state with a minimal parameterisation. Results and Conclusion In our case study, we successfully applied the PBN approach to model and analyse the deregulated Platelet-Derived Growth Factor (PDGF) signalling pathway in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour (GIST). We experimentally determined a rich and accurate dataset of steady-state profiles of selected downstream kinases of PDGF-receptor-alpha mutants in combination with inhibitor treatments. Applying the tool optPBN, we fitted a literature-derived candidate network model to the training dataset consisting of single perturbation conditions. Model analysis suggested several important crosstalk interactions. The validity of these predictions was further investigated experimentally pointing to relevant ongoing crosstalk from PI3K to MAPK signalling in tumour cells. The refined model was evaluated with a validation dataset comprising multiple perturbation conditions. The model thereby showed excellent performance allowing to quantitatively predict the combinatorial responses from the individual treatment results in this cancer setting. The established optPBN pipeline is also widely applicable to gain a better understanding of other signalling networks at steady-state in a context-specific fashion. PMID:27232499

  18. Evaluation of superconducting quantum interference devices interfaced with digital signal processing electronics for biomagnetic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, Pang-Jen, Flynn, E.R.; Bracht, R.R.; Lewis, P.S.

    1994-08-01

    The performance of a dc-SQUID magnetometer driven by both analog electronics and digital signal processors are investigated and compared for biomagnetic applications. Low-noise ( < 5 {mu} {Phi} {sub 0}/{radical}Hz at 1 Hz) dc-SQUIDs were fabricated by Conductus, Inc. using the all-refractory Nb/Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Nb process on silicon substrates with on-chip modulation coils and integral washer damping resistors. A second-order gradiometer was magnetically coupled to the input coil of the SQUID to maximize the detected signal strength. The readout of this SQUID gradiometer was achieved using a conventional flux-locked loop (FLL) circuit to provide a linearized voltage output that was proportional to the flux applied to the SQUID. A shielded cylinder was constructed to house the magnetometer to reduce ambient field noise. To realize the digital feedback loop, the analog FLL is replaced except for the preamplifier by a digital signal processing board with dual 16-bit A/D and D/A converters. This approach shows several advantages over the analog scheme including operational flexibility, cost reduction, and possibly, the enhancement of dynamic ranges and slew rates.

  19. Gaussian approximation in the theory of MR signal formation in the presence of structure-specific magnetic field inhomogeneities.

    PubMed

    Sukstanskii, Alexander L; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A

    2003-08-01

    A detailed theoretical analysis of the free induction decay (FID) and spin echo (SE) MR signal formation in the presence of mesoscopic structure-specific magnetic field inhomogeneities is developed in the framework of the Gaussian phase distribution approximation. The theory takes into account diffusion of nuclear spins in inhomogeneous magnetic fields created by arbitrarily shaped magnetized objects with permeable boundaries. In the short-time limit the FID signal decays quadratically with time and depends on the objects' geometry only through the volume fraction, whereas the SE signal decays as 5/2 power of time with the coefficient depending on both the volume fraction of the magnetized objects and their surface-to-volume ratio. In the motional narrowing regime, the FID and SE signals for objects of finite size decay mono-exponentially; a simple general expression is obtained for the relaxation rate constant deltaR2. In the case of infinitely long cylinders in the motional narrowing regime the theory predicts non-exponential signal decay lnS approximately -tlnt in accordance with previous results. For specific geometries of the objects (spheres and infinitely long cylinders) exact analytical expressions for the FID and SE signals are given. The theory can be applied, for instance, to biological systems where mesoscopic magnetic field inhomogeneities are induced by deoxygenated red blood cells, capillary network, contrast agents, etc. PMID:12914839

  20. Comprehensive RNAi-based screening of human and mouse TLR pathways identifies species-specific preferences in signaling protein use.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Li, Ning; Oh, Kyu-Seon; Dutta, Bhaskar; Vayttaden, Sharat J; Lin, Bin; Ebert, Thomas S; De Nardo, Dominic; Davis, Joie; Bagirzadeh, Rustam; Lounsbury, Nicolas W; Pasare, Chandrashekhar; Latz, Eicke; Hornung, Veit; Fraser, Iain D C

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a major class of pattern recognition receptors, which mediate the responses of innate immune cells to microbial stimuli. To systematically determine the roles of proteins in canonical TLR signaling pathways, we conducted an RNA interference (RNAi)-based screen in human and mouse macrophages. We observed a pattern of conserved signaling module dependencies across species, but found notable species-specific requirements at the level of individual proteins. Among these, we identified unexpected differences in the involvement of members of the interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK) family between the human and mouse TLR pathways. Whereas TLR signaling in mouse macrophages depended primarily on IRAK4 and IRAK2, with little or no role for IRAK1, TLR signaling and proinflammatory cytokine production in human macrophages depended on IRAK1, with knockdown of IRAK4 or IRAK2 having less of an effect. Consistent with species-specific roles for these kinases, IRAK4 orthologs failed to rescue signaling in IRAK4-deficient macrophages from the other species, and only mouse macrophages required the kinase activity of IRAK4 to mediate TLR responses. The identification of a critical role for IRAK1 in TLR signaling in humans could potentially explain the association of IRAK1 with several autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, this study demonstrated how systematic screening can be used to identify important characteristics of innate immune responses across species, which could optimize therapeutic targeting to manipulate human TLR-dependent outputs. PMID:26732763

  1. TGF-β receptor levels regulate the specificity of signaling pathway activation and biological effects of TGF-β

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Andres; Padidam, Malla; Cress, Dean; Grady, William M.

    2009-01-01

    TGF-β is a pluripotent cytokine that mediates its effects through a receptor composed of TGF-β receptor type II (TGFBR2) and type I (TGFBR1). The TGF-β receptor can regulate Smad and nonSmad signaling pathways, which then ultimately dictate TGF-β's biological effects. We postulated that control of the level of TGFBR2 is a mechanism for regulating the specificity of TGF-β signaling pathway activation and TGF-β's biological effects. We used a precisely regulatable TGFBR2 expression system to assess the effects of TGFBR2 expression levels on signaling and TGF-β mediated apoptosis. We found Smad signaling and MAPK-ERK signaling activation levels correlate directly with TGFBR2 expression levels. Furthermore, p21 levels and TGF-β induced apoptosis appear to depend on relatively high TGFBR2 expression and on the activation of the MAPK-ERK and SMAD pathways. Thus, control of TGFBR2 expression and the differential activation of TGF-β signaling pathways appears to be a mechanism for regulating the specificity of the biological effects of TGF-β. PMID:19339207

  2. Myeloid-Specific Blockade of Notch Signaling Attenuates Choroidal Neovascularization through Compromised Macrophage Infiltration and Polarization in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Guo-Rui; Li, Na; Chang, Tian-Fang; Zhang, Ping; Gao, Xiang; Yan, Xian-Chun; Liang, Liang; Han, Hua; Wang, Yu-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages have been recognized as an important inflammatory component in choroidal neovascularization (CNV). However, it is unclear how these cells are activated and polarized, how they affect angiogenesis and what the underlining mechanisms are during CNV. Notch signaling has been implicated in macrophage activation. Previously we have shown that inducible disruption of RBP-J, the critical transcription factor of Notch signaling, in adult mice results in enhanced CNV, but it is unclear what is the role of macrophage-specific Notch signaling in the development of CNV. In the current study, by using the myeloid specific RBP-J knockout mouse model combined with the laser-induced CNV model, we show that disruption of Notch signaling in macrophages displayed attenuated CNV growth, reduced macrophage infiltration and activation, and alleviated angiogenic response after laser induction. The inhibition of CNV occurred with reduced expression of VEGF and TNF-α in infiltrating inflammatory macrophages in myeloid specific RBP-J knockout mice. These changes might result in direct inhibition of EC lumen formation, as shown in an in vitro study. Therefore, clinical intervention of Notch signaling in CNV needs to pinpoint myeloid lineage to avoid the counteractive effects of global inhibition. PMID:27339903

  3. AGE-RAGE signal generates a specific NF-κB RelA "barcode" that directs collagen I expression.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yunqian; Kim, Ji-Min; Park, Hal-Sol; Yang, Annie; Islam, Celia; Lakatta, Edward G; Lin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are sugar-modified biomolecules that accumulate in the body with advancing age, and are implicated in the development of multiple age-associated structural and functional abnormities and diseases. It has been well documented that AGEs signal via their receptor RAGE to activate several cellular programs including NF-κB, leading to inflammation. A large number of stimuli can activate NF-κB; yet different stimuli, or the same stimulus for NF-κB in different cellular settings, produce a very different transcriptional landscape and physiological outcome. The NF-κB barcode hypothesis posits that cellular network dynamics generate signal-specific post-translational modifications, or a "barcode" to NF-κB, and that a signature "barcode" mediates a specific gene expression pattern. In the current study, we established that AGE-RAGE signaling results in NF-κB activation that directs collagen Ia1 and Ia2 expression. We further demonstrated that AGE-RAGE signal induces phosphorylation of RelA at three specific residues, T254, S311, and S536. These modifications are required for transcription of collagen I genes and are a consequence of cellular network dynamics. The increase of collagen content is a hallmark of arterial aging, and our work provides a potential mechanistic link between RAGE signaling, NF-κB activation, and aging-associated arterial alterations in structure and function. PMID:26729520

  4. Specific functions of the Wnt signaling system in gene regulatory networks throughout the early sea urchin embryo

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Miao; Siriwon, Natnaree; Li, Enhu; Davidson, Eric H.; Peter, Isabelle S.

    2014-01-01

    Wnt signaling affects cell-fate specification processes throughout embryonic development. Here we take advantage of the well-studied gene regulatory networks (GRNs) that control pregastrular sea urchin embryogenesis to reveal the gene regulatory functions of the entire Wnt-signaling system. Five wnt genes, three frizzled genes, two secreted frizzled-related protein 1 genes, and two Dickkopf genes are expressed in dynamic spatial patterns in the pregastrular embryo of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. We present a comprehensive analysis of these genes in each embryonic domain. Total functions of the Wnt-signaling system in regulatory gene expression throughout the embryo were studied by use of the Porcupine inhibitor C59, which interferes with zygotic Wnt ligand secretion. Morpholino-mediated knockdown of each expressed Wnt ligand demonstrated that individual Wnt ligands are functionally distinct, despite their partially overlapping spatial expression. They target specific embryonic domains and affect particular regulatory genes. The sum of the effects of blocking expression of individual wnt genes is shown to equal C59 effects. Remarkably, zygotic Wnt-signaling inputs are required for only three general aspects of embryonic specification: the broad activation of endodermal GRNs, the regional specification of the immediately adjacent stripe of ectoderm, and the restriction of the apical neurogenic domain. All Wnt signaling in this pregastrular embryo is short range (and/or autocrine). Furthermore, we show that the transcriptional drivers of wnt genes execute important specification functions in the embryonic domains targeted by the ligands, thus connecting the expression and function of wnt genes by encoded cross-regulatory interactions within the specific regional GRNs. PMID:25385617

  5. A hypothesis-effect of T cell epitope fusion peptide specific immunotherapy on signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao-Pin; Yang, Bang-He

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic nonspecific inflammatory disease of the airway primarily mediated by different inflammatory cells, including mast cells, eosinophils and T cells. We hereby specially focused on a signal pathway for Janus kinase-signal transducer and activators of transduction (JAK-STATs), which has been the interest of study in asthma since it more likely regulates cellular proliferation and differentiation, and consequently modulates immune system. In our consideration, knowledge on this signal pathway may provide an avenue for rational options in treatment of asthma on control of immune response basis. PMID:26770626

  6. Cytoplasmic domains determine signal specificity, cellular routing characteristics and influence ligand binding of epidermal growth factor and insulin receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, H; Dull, T J; Honegger, A M; Schlessinger, J; Ullrich, A

    1989-01-01

    The cell surface receptors for insulin and epidermal growth factor (EGF) both employ a tyrosine-specific protein kinase activity to fulfil their distinct biological roles. To identify the structural domains responsible for various receptor activities, we have generated chimeric receptor polypeptides consisting of major EGF and insulin receptor structural domains and examined their biochemical properties and cellular signalling activities. The EGF-insulin receptor hybrids are properly synthesized and transported to the cell surface, where they form binding competent structures that are defined by the origin of their extracellular domains. While their ligand binding affinities are altered, we find that these chimeric receptors are fully functional in transmitting signals across the plasma membrane and into the cell. Thus, EGF receptor and insulin receptor cytoplasmic domain signalling capabilities are independent of their new heterotetrameric or monomeric environments respectively. Furthermore, the cytoplasmic domains carry the structural determinants that define kinase specificity, mitogenic and transforming potential, and receptor routing. Images PMID:2583088

  7. Distribution and specificity of S-cone ("blue cone") signals in subcortical visual pathways.

    PubMed

    Martin, Paul R; Lee, Barry B

    2014-03-01

    We review here the distribution of S-cone signals and properties of S-cone recipient receptive fields in subcortical pathways. Nearly everything we know about S-cone signals in the subcortical visual system comes from the study of visual systems in cats and primates (monkeys); in this review, we concentrate on results from macaque and marmoset monkeys. We discuss segregation of S-cone recipient (blue-on and blue-off) receptive fields in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus and describe their receptive field properties. We treat in some detail the question of detecting weak S-cone signals as an introduction for newcomers to the field. Finally, we briefly consider the question on how S-cone signals are distributed among nongeniculate targets. PMID:24555883

  8. Fuz Regulates Craniofacial Development through Tissue Specific Responses to Signaling Factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zichao; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J.; Niederreither, Karen; Venugopalan, Shankar; Florez, Sergio; Finnell, Richard H.; Amendt, Brad A.

    2011-01-01

    The planar cell polarity effector gene Fuz regulates ciliogenesis and Fuz loss of function studies reveal an array of embryonic phenotypes. However, cilia defects can affect many signaling pathways and, in humans, cilia defects underlie several craniofacial anomalies. To address this, we analyzed the craniofacial phenotype and signaling responses of the Fuz−/− mice. We demonstrate a unique role for Fuz in regulating both Hedgehog (Hh) and Wnt/β-catenin signaling during craniofacial development. Fuz expression first appears in the dorsal tissues and later in ventral tissues and craniofacial regions during embryonic development coincident with cilia development. The Fuz−/− mice exhibit severe craniofacial deformities including anophthalmia, agenesis of the tongue and incisors, a hypoplastic mandible, cleft palate, ossification/skeletal defects and hyperplastic malformed Meckel's cartilage. Hh signaling is down-regulated in the Fuz null mice, while canonical Wnt signaling is up-regulated revealing the antagonistic relationship of these two pathways. Meckel's cartilage is expanded in the Fuz−/− mice due to increased cell proliferation associated with the up-regulation of Wnt canonical target genes and decreased non-canonical pathway genes. Interestingly, cilia development was decreased in the mandible mesenchyme of Fuz null mice, suggesting that cilia may antagonize Wnt signaling in this tissue. Furthermore, expression of Fuz decreased expression of Wnt pathway genes as well as a Wnt-dependent reporter. Finally, chromatin IP experiments demonstrate that β-catenin/TCF-binding directly regulates Fuz expression. These data demonstrate a new model for coordination of Hh and Wnt signaling and reveal a Fuz-dependent negative feedback loop controlling Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:21935430

  9. Wnt isoform-specific interactions with coreceptor specify inhibition or potentiation of signaling by LRP6 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yan; Bourhis, Eric; Chiu, Cecilia; Stawicki, Scott; DeAlmeida, Venita I; Liu, Bob Y; Phamluong, Khanhky; Cao, Tim C; Carano, Richard A D; Ernst, James A; Solloway, Mark; Rubinfeld, Bonnee; Hannoush, Rami N; Wu, Yan; Polakis, Paul; Costa, Mike

    2010-01-01

    β-Catenin-dependent Wnt signaling is initiated as Wnt binds to both the receptor FZD and coreceptor LRP5/6, which then assembles a multimeric complex at the cytoplasmic membrane face to recruit and inactivate the kinase GSK3. The large number and sequence diversity of Wnt isoforms suggest the possibility of domain-specific ligand-coreceptor interactions, and distinct binding sites on LRP6 for Wnt3a and Wnt9b have recently been identified in vitro. Whether mechanistically different interactions between Wnts and coreceptors might mediate signaling remains to be determined. It is also not clear whether coreceptor homodimerization induced extracellularly can activate Wnt signaling, as is the case for receptor tyrosine kinases. We generated monoclonal antibodies against LRP6 with the unexpected ability to inhibit signaling by some Wnt isoforms and potentiate signaling by other isoforms. In cell culture, two antibodies characterized further show reciprocal activities on most Wnts, with one antibody antagonizing and the other potentiating. We demonstrate that these antibodies bind to different regions of LRP6 protein, and inhibition of signaling results from blocking Wnt binding. Antibody-mediated dimerization of LRP6 can potentiate signaling only when a Wnt isoform is also able to bind the complex, presumably recruiting FZD. Endogenous autocrine Wnt signaling in different tumor cell lines can be either antagonized or enhanced by the LRP6 antibodies, indicating expression of different Wnt isoforms. As anticipated from the roles of Wnt signaling in cancer and bone development, antibody activities can also be observed in mice for inhibition of tumor growth and in organ culture for enhancement of bone mineral density. Collectively, our results indicate that separate binding sites for different subsets of Wnt isoforms determine the inhibition or potentiation of signaling conferred by LRP6 antibodies. This complexity of coreceptor-ligand interactions may allow for

  10. Dark matter scattering on electrons: Accurate calculations of atomic excitations and implications for the DAMA signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, B. M.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; Pospelov, M.; Stadnik, Y. V.

    2016-06-01

    We revisit the WIMP-type dark matter scattering on electrons that results in atomic ionization and can manifest itself in a variety of existing direct-detection experiments. Unlike the WIMP-nucleon scattering, where current experiments probe typical interaction strengths much smaller than the Fermi constant, the scattering on electrons requires a much stronger interaction to be detectable, which in turn requires new light force carriers. We account for such new forces explicitly, by introducing a mediator particle with scalar or vector couplings to dark matter and to electrons. We then perform state-of-the-art numerical calculations of atomic ionization relevant to the existing experiments. Our goals are to consistently take into account the atomic physics aspect of the problem (e.g., the relativistic effects, which can be quite significant) and to scan the parameter space—the dark matter mass, the mediator mass, and the effective coupling strength—to see if there is any part of the parameter space that could potentially explain the DAMA modulation signal. While we find that the modulation fraction of all events with energy deposition above 2 keV in NaI can be quite significant, reaching ˜50 %, the relevant parts of the parameter space are excluded by the XENON10 and XENON100 experiments.

  11. Retinol as electron carrier in redox signaling, a new frontier in vitamin A research.

    PubMed

    Hammerling, Ulrich

    2016-02-01

    Nature uses carotenoids and retinoids as chromophores for diverse energy conversion processes. The key structural feature enabling the interaction with light and other manifestations of electro-magnetism is the conjugated double-bond system that all members of this superfamily share in common. Among retinoids, retinaldehyde alone was long known as the active chromophore of vision in vertebrates and invertebrates, as well of various light-driven proton and ion pumps in Archaea. Until now, vitamin A (retinol) was solely regarded as a biochemical precursor for bioactive retinoids such as retinaldehyde and retinoic acid (RA), but recent results indicate that this compound has its own physiology. It functions as an electron carrier in mitochondria. By electronically coupling protein kinase Cδ (PCKδ) with cytochrome c, vitamin A enables the redox activation of this enzyme. This review focuses on the biochemistry and biology of the PCKδ signaling system, comprising PKCδ, the adapter protein p66Shc, cytochrome c and retinol. This complex positively regulates the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) by the pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme. Vitamin A therefore plays a key role in glycolytic energy generation. The emerging paradigm of retinol as electron-transfer agent is potentially transformative, opening new frontiers in retinoid research. PMID:26904553

  12. Retinol as electron carrier in redox signaling, a new frontier in vitamin A research

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nature uses carotenoids and retinoids as chromophores for diverse energy conversion processes. The key structural feature enabling the interaction with light and other manifestations of electro-magnetism is the conjugated double-bond system that all members of this superfamily share in common. Among retinoids, retinaldehyde alone was long known as the active chromophore of vision in vertebrates and invertebrates, as well of various light-driven proton and ion pumps in Archaea. Until now, vitamin A (retinol) was solely regarded as a biochemical precursor for bioactive retinoids such as retinaldehyde and retinoic acid (RA), but recent results indicate that this compound has its own physiology. It functions as an electron carrier in mitochondria. By electronically coupling protein kinase Cδ (PCKδ) with cytochrome c, vitamin A enables the redox activation of this enzyme. This review focuses on the biochemistry and biology of the PCKδ signaling system, comprising PKCδ, the adapter protein p66Shc, cytochrome c and retinol. This complex positively regulates the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) by the pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme. Vitamin A therefore plays a key role in glycolytic energy generation. The emerging paradigm of retinol as electron-transfer agent is potentially transformative, opening new frontiers in retinoid research. PMID:26904553

  13. Core Community Specifications for Electron Microprobe Operating Systems: Software, Quality Control, and Data Management Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fournelle, John; Carpenter, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Modem electron microprobe systems have become increasingly sophisticated. These systems utilize either UNIX or PC computer systems for measurement, automation, and data reduction. These systems have undergone major improvements in processing, storage, display, and communications, due to increased capabilities of hardware and software. Instrument specifications are typically utilized at the time of purchase and concentrate on hardware performance. The microanalysis community includes analysts, researchers, software developers, and manufacturers, who could benefit from exchange of ideas and the ultimate development of core community specifications (CCS) for hardware and software components of microprobe instrumentation and operating systems.

  14. Inductive specification and axonal orientation of spinal neurons mediated by divergent bone morphogenetic protein signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)7 evokes both inductive and axon orienting responses in dorsal interneurons (dI neurons) in the developing spinal cord. These events occur sequentially during the development of spinal neurons but in these and other cell types such inductive and acute chemotactic responses occur concurrently, highlighting the requirement for divergent intracellular signaling. Both type I and type II BMP receptor subtypes have been implicated selectively in orienting responses but it remains unclear how, in a given cell, divergence occurs. We have examined the mechanisms by which disparate BMP7 activities are generated in dorsal spinal neurons. Results We show that widely different threshold concentrations of BMP7 are required to elicit the divergent inductive and axon orienting responses. Type I BMP receptor kinase activity is required for activation of pSmad signaling and induction of dI character by BMP7, a high threshold response. In contrast, neither type I BMP receptor kinase activity nor Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation is involved in the low threshold orienting responses of dI axons to BMP7. Instead, BMP7-evoked axonal repulsion and growth cone collapse are dependent on phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) activation, plausibly through type II receptor signaling. BMP7 stimulates PI3K-dependent signaling in dI neurons. BMP6, which evokes neural induction but does not have orienting activity, activates Smad signaling but does not stimulate PI3K. Conclusions Divergent signaling through pSmad-dependent and PI3K-dependent (Smad-independent) mechanisms mediates the inductive and orienting responses of dI neurons to BMP7. A model is proposed whereby selective engagement of BMP receptor subunits underlies choice of signaling pathway. PMID:22085733

  15. Layer specific and general requirements for ERK/MAPK signaling in the developing neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Lei; Larsen, Rylan S; Bjorklund, George Reed; Li, Xiaoyan; Wu, Yaohong; Philpot, Benjamin D; Snider, William D; Newbern, Jason M

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant signaling through the Raf/MEK/ERK (ERK/MAPK) pathway causes pathology in a family of neurodevelopmental disorders known as 'RASopathies' and is implicated in autism pathogenesis. Here, we have determined the functions of ERK/MAPK signaling in developing neocortical excitatory neurons. Our data reveal a critical requirement for ERK/MAPK signaling in the morphological development and survival of large Ctip2+ neurons in layer 5. Loss of Map2k1/2 (Mek1/2) led to deficits in corticospinal tract formation and subsequent corticospinal neuron apoptosis. ERK/MAPK hyperactivation also led to reduced corticospinal axon elongation, but was associated with enhanced arborization. ERK/MAPK signaling was dispensable for axonal outgrowth of layer 2/3 callosal neurons. However, Map2k1/2 deletion led to reduced expression of Arc and enhanced intrinsic excitability in both layers 2/3 and 5, in addition to imbalanced synaptic excitation and inhibition. These data demonstrate selective requirements for ERK/MAPK signaling in layer 5 circuit development and general effects on cortical pyramidal neuron excitability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11123.001 PMID:26848828

  16. Non-Coding RNA: Sequence-Specific Guide for Chromatin Modification and DNA Damage Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Francia, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin conformation shapes the environment in which our genome is transcribed into RNA. Transcription is a source of DNA damage, thus it often occurs concomitantly to DNA damage signaling. Growing amounts of evidence suggest that different types of RNAs can, independently from their protein-coding properties, directly affect chromatin conformation, transcription and splicing, as well as promote the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) and DNA repair. Therefore, transcription paradoxically functions to both threaten and safeguard genome integrity. On the other hand, DNA damage signaling is known to modulate chromatin to suppress transcription of the surrounding genetic unit. It is thus intriguing to understand how transcription can modulate DDR signaling while, in turn, DDR signaling represses transcription of chromatin around the DNA lesion. An unexpected player in this field is the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery, which play roles in transcription, splicing and chromatin modulation in several organisms. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and several protein factors involved in the RNAi pathway are well known master regulators of chromatin while only recent reports show their involvement in DDR. Here, we discuss the experimental evidence supporting the idea that ncRNAs act at the genomic loci from which they are transcribed to modulate chromatin, DDR signaling and DNA repair. PMID:26617633

  17. A specific requirement for PDGF-C in palate formation and PDGFR-alpha signaling.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hao; Wu, Xiaoli; Boström, Hans; Kim, Injune; Wong, Nicole; Tsoi, Bonny; O'Rourke, Meredith; Koh, Gou Young; Soriano, Philippe; Betsholtz, Christer; Hart, Thomas C; Marazita, Mary L; Field, L L; Tam, Patrick P L; Nagy, Andras

    2004-10-01

    PDGF-C is a member of the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) family, which signals through PDGF receptor (PDGFR) alphaalpha and alphabeta dimers. Here we show that Pdgfc(-/-) mice die in the perinatal period owing to feeding and respiratory difficulties associated with a complete cleft of the secondary palate. This phenotype was less severe than that of Pdgfra(-/-) embryos. Pdgfc(-/-) Pdgfa(-/-) embryos developed a cleft face, subepidermal blistering, deficiency of renal cortex mesenchyme, spina bifida and skeletal and vascular defects. Complete loss of function of both ligands, therefore, phenocopied the loss of PDGFR-alpha function, suggesting that both PDGF-A and PDGF-C signal through PDGFR-alpha to regulate the development of craniofacial structures, the neural tube and mesodermal organs. Our results also show that PDGF-C signaling is a new pathway in palatogenesis, different from, and independent of, those previously implicated. PMID:15361870

  18. Electron precipitation zones around major ground-based VLF signal sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inan, U. S.; Chang, H. C.; Helliwell, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    The spatial distribution of electron precipitation induced by VLF signals from ground-based transmitters is determined by using a test particle computer model of the gyroresonant wave-particle interaction (Inan et al., 1982). The results are presented as contours of energy flux on a map of the region around each transmitter. It is shown that the size of the precipitation zones is a strong function of the geographic location of the transmitter, as well as its radiated power and operating frequency. In general, the precipitation zones are much wider in longitude than in latitude and are oriented along lines of constant geomagnetic latitude. Assuming backscatter and/or wave echoing, precipitation zones around the points that are magnetically conjugate to the sources are also estimated. The results presented can be used to interpret satellite- or ground-based measurements of the precipitation induced by ground-based VLF transmitters.

  19. First measurement of electron temperature from signal ratios in a double-pass Thomson scattering system

    SciTech Connect

    Tojo, H.; Itami, K.; Hatae, T.; Ejiri, A.; Yamaguchi, T.; Takase, Y.; Hiratsuka, J.

    2012-02-15

    This paper presents an experimental demonstration to determine electron temperature (T{sub e}) with unknown spectral sensitivity (transmissivity) in a Thomson scattering system. In this method, a double-pass scattering configuration is used and the scattered lights from each pass (with different scattering angles) are measured separately. T{sub e} can be determined from the ratio of the signal intensities without knowing a real chromatic dependence in the sensitivity. Note that the wavelength range for each spectral channel must be known. This method was applied to the TST-2 Thomson scattering system. As a result, T{sub e} measured from the ratio (T{sub e,r}) and T{sub e} measured from a standard method (T{sub e,s}) showed a good agreement with <|T{sub e,r}-T{sub e,s}|/T{sub e,s}>= 7.3%.

  20. APOBEC2, a selective inhibitor of TGFβ signaling, regulates left-right axis specification during early embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vonica, Alin; Rosa, Alessandro; Arduini, Brigitte; Brivanlou, Ali H.

    2011-01-01

    The specification of left-right asymmetry is an evolutionarily conserved developmental process in vertebrates. The interplay between two TGFβ ligands, Derrière/GDF1 and Xnr1/Nodal, together with inhibitors such as Lefty and Coco/Cerl2, have been shown to provide the signals that lead to the establishment of laterality. However, molecular events leading to and following these signals remain mostly unknown. We find that APOBEC2, a member of the cytidine deaminase family of DNA/RNA editing enzymes, is induced by TGFβ signaling, and that its activity is necessary to specify the left-right axis in Xenopus and zebrafish embryos. Surprisingly, we find that APOBEC2 selectively inhibits Derrière, but not Xnr1, signaling. The inhibitory effect is conserved, as APOBEC2 blocks TGFβ signaling, and promotes muscle differentiation, in a mammalian myoblastic cell line. This demonstrates for the first time that a putative RNA/DNA editing enzyme regulates TGFβ signaling, and plays a major role in development. PMID:20880495

  1. THE SPECIFIC ACCELERATION RATE IN LOOP-STRUCTURED SOLAR FLARES-IMPLICATIONS FOR ELECTRON ACCELERATION MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jingnan; Emslie, A. Gordon; Piana, Michele E-mail: piana@dima.unige.it

    2013-03-20

    We analyze electron flux maps based on RHESSI hard X-ray imaging spectroscopy data for a number of extended coronal-loop flare events. For each event, we determine the variation of the characteristic loop length L with electron energy E, and we fit this observed behavior with models that incorporate an extended acceleration region and an exterior 'propagation' region, and which may include collisional modification of the accelerated electron spectrum inside the acceleration region. The models are characterized by two parameters: the plasma density n in, and the longitudinal extent L{sub 0} of, the acceleration region. Determination of the best-fit values of these parameters permits inference of the volume that encompasses the acceleration region and of the total number of particles within it. It is then straightforward to compute values for the emission filling factor and for the specific acceleration rate (electrons s{sup -1} per ambient electron above a chosen reference energy). For the 24 events studied, the range of inferred filling factors is consistent with a value of unity. The inferred mean value of the specific acceleration rate above E{sub 0} = 20 keV is {approx}10{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with a 1{sigma} spread of about a half-order-of-magnitude above and below this value. We compare these values with the predictions of several models, including acceleration by large-scale, weak (sub-Dreicer) fields, by strong (super-Dreicer) electric fields in a reconnecting current sheet, and by stochastic acceleration processes.

  2. Precision analog signal processor for beam position measurements in electron storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkson, J.A.; Unser, K.B.

    1995-05-01

    Beam position monitors (BPM) in electron and positron storage rings have evolved from simple systems composed of beam pickups, coaxial cables, multiplexing relays, and a single receiver (usually a analyzer) into very complex and costly systems of multiple receivers and processors. The older may have taken minutes to measure the circulating beam closed orbit. Today instrumentation designers are required to provide high-speed measurements of the beam orbit, often at the ring revolution frequency. In addition the instruments must have very high accuracy and resolution. A BPM has been developed for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley which features high resolution and relatively low cost. The instrument has a single purpose; to measure position of a stable stored beam. Because the pickup signals are multiplexed into a single receiver, and due to its narrow bandwidth, the receiver is not intended for single-turn studies. The receiver delivers normalized measurements of X and Y posit ion entirely by analog means at nominally 1 V/mm. No computers are involved. No software is required. Bergoz, a French company specializing in precision beam instrumentation, integrated the ALS design m their new BPM analog signal processor module. Performance comparisons were made on the ALS. In this paper we report on the architecture and performance of the ALS prototype BPM.

  3. Hallucinogens recruit specific cortical 5-HT(2A) receptor-mediated signaling pathways to affect behavior.

    PubMed

    González-Maeso, Javier; Weisstaub, Noelia V; Zhou, Mingming; Chan, Pokman; Ivic, Lidija; Ang, Rosalind; Lira, Alena; Bradley-Moore, Maria; Ge, Yongchao; Zhou, Qiang; Sealfon, Stuart C; Gingrich, Jay A

    2007-02-01

    Hallucinogens, including mescaline, psilocybin, and lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), profoundly affect perception, cognition, and mood. All known drugs of this class are 5-HT(2A) receptor (2AR) agonists, yet closely related 2AR agonists such as lisuride lack comparable psychoactive properties. Why only certain 2AR agonists are hallucinogens and which neural circuits mediate their effects are poorly understood. By genetically expressing 2AR only in cortex, we show that 2AR-regulated pathways on cortical neurons are sufficient to mediate the signaling pattern and behavioral response to hallucinogens. Hallucinogenic and nonhallucinogenic 2AR agonists both regulate signaling in the same 2AR-expressing cortical neurons. However, the signaling and behavioral responses to the hallucinogens are distinct. While lisuride and LSD both act at 2AR expressed by cortex neurons to regulate phospholipase C, LSD responses also involve pertussis toxin-sensitive heterotrimeric G(i/o) proteins and Src. These studies identify the long-elusive neural and signaling mechanisms responsible for the unique effects of hallucinogens. PMID:17270739

  4. One-step, multiplexed fluorescence detection of microRNAs based on duplex-specific nuclease signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Yin, Bin-Cheng; Liu, Yu-Qiang; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2012-03-21

    Traditional molecular beacons, widely applied for detection of nucleic acids, have an intrinsic limitation on sensitivity, as one target molecule converts only one beacon molecule to its fluorescent form. Herein, we take advantage of the duplex-specific nuclease (DSN) to create a new signal-amplifying mechanism, duplex-specific nuclease signal amplification (DSNSA), to increase the detection sensitivity of molecular beacons (Taqman probes). DSN nuclease is employed to recycle the process of target-assisted digestion of Taqman probes, thus, resulting in a significant fluorescence signal amplification through which one target molecule cleaves thousands of probe molecules. We further demonstrate the efficiency of this DSNSA strategy for rapid direct quantification of multiple miRNAs in biological samples. Our experimental results showed a quantitative measurement of sequence-specific miRNAs with the detection limit in the femtomolar range, nearly 5 orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional molecular beacons. This amplification strategy also demonstrated a high selectivity for discriminating differences between miRNA family members. Considering the superior sensitivity and specificity, as well as the multiplex and simple-to-implement features, this method promises a great potential of becoming a routine tool for simultaneously quantitative analysis of multiple miRNAs in tissues or cells, and supplies valuable information for biomedical research and clinical early diagnosis. PMID:22394262

  5. Signal acquisition in Cherenkov-type diagnostics of electron beams within tokamak facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabiński, Marek; Jakubowski, Lech; Sadowski, Marek J.; Żebrowski, Jarosław; Jakubowski, Marcin J.; Malinowski, Karol; Mirowski, Robert

    2015-09-01

    The paper presents feasibility and design studies of Cherenkov-type probes, a development of the measuring head construction designed for different tokamak devices, and in particular the acquisition of optical signals to a data storage system. In order to lower the energy threshold of the electron detection the authors applied radiators with the highest values of the refractive index. Different radiator materials, such as aluminium nitride and CVD diamond were applied. Several versions of measuring heads and different manipulators, e.g., a movable vacuum-tight shaft or a fast-moving reciprocating probe, were manufactured and used. The practical application of the Cherenkov probes required also a consideration of spectral characteristics of optical fibres and photomultipliers. The Cherenkov radiation, as generated inside the radiators, is lead out through separate fibres (optical cables) to the atmospheric pressure side. The emitted radiation in the blue (near ultraviolet) spectrum range should be collected and delivered through appropriate optical cables to a control room, amplified within photomultipliers and recorded in a digital form. In order to investigate an electron energy distribution the multi-channel probes have also been designed and applied.

  6. Cell signaling (mechanism and reproductive toxicity): redox chains, radicals, electrons, relays, conduit, electrochemistry, and other medical implications.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Peter; Pozos, Robert S

    2006-12-01

    This article deals with a novel, simple, integrated approach to cell signaling involving basic biochemical principles, and their relationship to reproductive toxicity. Initially, an overview of the biological aspects is presented. According to the hypothetical approach, cell signaling entails interaction of redox chains, involving initiation, propagation, and termination. The messengers are mainly radicals and electrons that are generated during electron transfer (ET) and hydrogen atom abstraction reactions. Termination and initiation processes in the chain occur at relay sites occupied by redox functionalities, including quinones, metal complexes, and imines, as well as redox amino acids. Conduits for the messengers, comprising species with nonbonding electrons, are omnipresent. Details are provided for the various electron transfer processes. In relation to the varying rates of cell communication, rationale is based on electrons and size of radicals. Another fit is similarly seen in inspection of endogenous precursors of reactive oxygen species (ROS); namely, proteins bearing redox moieties, lipid oxidation products, and carbohydrate radicals. A hypothesis is advanced in which electromagnetic fields associated with mobile radicals and electrons play a role. Although radicals have previously been investigated as messengers, the area occupies a minor part of the research, and it has not attracted broad consensus as an important component. For the first time, an integrated framework is presented composed of radicals, electrons, relays, conduits, and electrical fields. The approach is in keeping with the vast majority of experimental observations. Cell signaling also plays an important role in reproductive toxicity. The main classes that cause birth defects, including ROS, radiation, metal compounds, medicinals, abused drugs, and miscellaneous substances, are known to participate in the signaling process. A unifying basis exists, in that both signaling and

  7. Science Signaling Podcast for 2 August 2016: Patient-specific protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Schrum, Adam G; Neier, Steven C; VanHook, Annalisa M

    2016-01-01

    This Podcast features an interview with Adam Schrum and Steven Neier, authors of a Research Article that appears in the 2 August 2016 issue of Science Signaling, about a method for identifying protein-protein interactions in patient tissue samples. The authors used this method to compare signaling complexes downstream of the T cell receptor in T cells from healthy skin with those in T cells from the skin of patients with the autoimmune disease alopecia areata. The study revealed differences in the relative abundance of some protein complexes between T cells from the control and patient groups. This technique could be adapted for use as a diagnostic tool to stratify patients by molecular phenotype and predict the therapeutic strategy that is likely to work best for each patient.Listen to Podcast. PMID:27485014

  8. CqsA-CqsS quorum-sensing signal-receptor specificity in Photobacterium angustum.

    PubMed

    Ke, Xiaobo; Miller, Laura C; Ng, Wai-Leung; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2014-02-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a process of bacterial cell-cell communication that relies on the production, detection and population-wide response to extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. The QS system commonly found in vibrios and photobacteria consists of the CqsA synthase/CqsS receptor pair. Vibrio cholerae CqsA/S synthesizes and detects (S)-3-hydroxytridecan-4-one (C10-CAI-1), whereas Vibrio harveyi produces and detects a distinct but similar molecule, (Z)-3-aminoundec-2-en-4-one (Ea-C8-CAI-1). To understand the signalling properties of the larger family of CqsA-CqsS pairs, here, we characterize the Photobacterium angustum CqsA/S system. Many photobacterial cqsA genes harbour a conserved frameshift mutation that abolishes CAI-1 production. By contrast, their cqsS genes are intact. Correcting the P. angustum cqsA reading frame restores production of a mixture of CAI-1 moieties, including C8-CAI-1, C10-CAI-1, Ea-C8-CAI-1 and Ea-C10-CAI-1. This signal production profile matches the P. angustum CqsS receptor ligand-detection capability. The receptor exhibits a preference for molecules with 10-carbon tails, and the CqsS Ser(168) residue governs this preference. P. angustum can overcome the cqsA frameshift to produce CAI-1 under particular limiting growth conditions presumably through a ribosome slippage mechanism. Thus, we propose that P. angustum uses CAI-1 signalling for adaptation to stressful environments. PMID:24372841

  9. The class-specific BCR tonic signal modulates lymphomagenesis in a c-myc deregulation transgenic model

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Rada; Marfak, Abdelghafour; Pangault, Céline; Oblet, Christelle; Chanut, Aurélie; Tarte, Karin; Denizot, Yves; Cogné, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Deregulation of c-myc by translocation onto immunoglobulin (Ig) loci can promote B cell malignant proliferations with phenotypes as diverse as acute lymphoid leukemia, Burkitt lymphoma, diffuse large B cell lymphoma, myeloma… The B cell receptor (BCR) normally providing tonic signals for cell survival and mitogenic responses to antigens, can also contribute to lymphomagenesis upon sustained ligand binding or activating mutations. BCR signaling varies among cell compartments and BCR classes. For unknown reasons, some malignancies associate with expression of either IgM or class-switched Ig. We explored whether an IgA BCR, with strong tonic signaling, would affect lymphomagenesis in c-myc IgH 3′RR transgenic mice prone to lymphoproliferations. Breeding c-myc transgenics in a background where IgM expression was replaced with IgA delayed lymphomagenesis. By comparison to single c-myc transgenics, lymphomas from double mutant animals were more differentiated and less aggressive, with an altered transcriptional program. Larger tumor cells more often expressed CD43 and CD138, which culminated in a plasma cell phenotype in 10% of cases. BCR class-specific signals thus appear to modulate lymphomagenesis and may partly explain the observed association of specific Ig classes with human B cell malignancies of differential phenotype, progression and prognosis. PMID:25229630

  10. TISSUE SPECIFIC RESPONSES TO ABERRANT FGF SIGNALING IN COMPLEX HEAD PHENOTYPES

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Abadías, Neus; Motch, Susan M.; Pankratz, Talia L.; Wang, Yingli; Aldridge, Kristina; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Richtsmeier, Joan T.

    2012-01-01

    Background The role of fibroblast growth factor and receptor (FGF/FGFR) signaling in bone development is well studied, partly because mutations in FGFRs cause human diseases of achondroplasia and FGFR-related craniosynostosis syndromes including Crouzon syndrome. The FGFR2c C342Y mutation is a frequent cause of Crouzon syndrome, characterized by premature cranial vault suture closure, midfacial deficiency and neurocranial dysmorphology. Here, using newborn Fgfr2cC342Y/+ Crouzon syndrome mice, we tested whether the phenotypic effects of this mutation go beyond the skeletal tissues of the skull, altering the development of other non-skeletal head tissues including the brain, the eyes, the nasopharynx and the inner ears. Results Quantitative analysis of 3D multimodal imaging (high resolution micro computed tomography and magnetic resonance microscopic images) revealed local differences in skull morphology and coronal suture patency between Fgfr2cC342Y/+ mice and unaffected littermates, as well as changes in brain shape but not brain size, significant reductions in nasopharyngeal and eye volumes, and no difference in inner ear volume in Fgfr2cC342Y/+ mice. Conclusion These findings provide an expanded catalogue of clinical phenotypes in Crouzon syndrome caused by aberrant FGF/FGFR signaling and evidence of the broad role for FGF/FGFR signaling in development and evolution of the vertebrate head. PMID:23172727