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Sample records for spect imaging probe

  1. Novel PET/SPECT Probes for Imaging of Tau in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    As the world's population ages, the number of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is predicted to increase rapidly. The presence of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), composed of hyperphosphorylated tau protein, is one of the neuropathological hallmarks of AD brain. Since the presence of NFTs is well correlated with neurodegeneration and cognitive decline in AD, imaging of tau using positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is useful for presymptomatic diagnosis and monitoring of the progression of AD. Therefore, novel PET/SPECT probes for the imaging of tau have been developed. More recently, several probes were tested clinically and evaluated for their utility. This paper reviews the current state of research on the development and evaluation of PET/SPECT probes for the imaging of tau in AD brain. PMID:25879047

  2. Dual tracer imaging of SPECT and PET probes in living mice using a sequential protocol

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Sarah E; Diener, Justin M; Sasser, Todd A; Correcher, Carlos; González, Antonio J; Avermaete, Tony Van; Leevy, W Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, multimodal imaging strategies have motivated the fusion of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) or Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) scans with an X-ray computed tomography (CT) image to provide anatomical information, as well as a framework with which molecular and functional images may be co-registered. Recently, pre-clinical nuclear imaging technology has evolved to capture multiple SPECT or multiple PET tracers to further enhance the information content gathered within an imaging experiment. However, the use of SPECT and PET probes together, in the same animal, has remained a challenge. Here we describe a straightforward method using an integrated trimodal imaging system and a sequential dosing/acquisition protocol to achieve dual tracer imaging with 99mTc and 18F isotopes, along with anatomical CT, on an individual specimen. Dosing and imaging is completed so that minimal animal manipulations are required, full trimodal fusion is conserved, and tracer crosstalk including down-scatter of the PET tracer in SPECT mode is avoided. This technique will enhance the ability of preclinical researchers to detect multiple disease targets and perform functional, molecular, and anatomical imaging on individual specimens to increase the information content gathered within longitudinal in vivo studies. PMID:23145357

  3. A guide to SPECT equipment for brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffer, P.B.; Zubal, G.

    1991-12-31

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was started by Kuhl and Edwards about 30 years ago. Their original instrument consisted of four focused Nal probes mounted on a moving gantry. During the 1980s, clinical SPECT imaging was most frequently performed using single-headed Anger-type cameras which were modified for rotational as well as static imaging. Such instruments are still available and may be useful in settings where there are few patients and SPECT is used only occasionally. More frequently, however, dedicated SPECT devices are purchased which optimize equipment potential while being user-friendly. Modern SPECT instrumentation incorporates improvements in the detector, computers, mathematical formulations, electronics and display systems. A comprehensive discussion of all aspects of SPECT is beyond the scope of this article. The authors, however, discuss general concepts of SPECT, the current state-of-the-art in clinical SPECT instrumentation, and areas of common misunderstanding. 9 refs.

  4. Molecular SPECT Imaging: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Magdy M.; Tremoleda, Jordi L.; Bayomy, Tamer B.; Gsell, Willy

    2011-01-01

    Molecular imaging has witnessed a tremendous change over the last decade. Growing interest and emphasis are placed on this specialized technology represented by developing new scanners, pharmaceutical drugs, diagnostic agents, new therapeutic regimens, and ultimately, significant improvement of patient health care. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) have their signature on paving the way to molecular diagnostics and personalized medicine. The former will be the topic of the current paper where the authors address the current position of the molecular SPECT imaging among other imaging techniques, describing strengths and weaknesses, differences between SPECT and PET, and focusing on different SPECT designs and detection systems. Radiopharmaceutical compounds of clinical as well-preclinical interest have also been reviewed. Moreover, the last section covers several application, of μSPECT imaging in many areas of disease detection and diagnosis. PMID:21603240

  5. Filtering in SPECT Image Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lyra, Maria; Ploussi, Agapi

    2011-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging is widely implemented in nuclear medicine as its clinical role in the diagnosis and management of several diseases is, many times, very helpful (e.g., myocardium perfusion imaging). The quality of SPECT images are degraded by several factors such as noise because of the limited number of counts, attenuation, or scatter of photons. Image filtering is necessary to compensate these effects and, therefore, to improve image quality. The goal of filtering in tomographic images is to suppress statistical noise and simultaneously to preserve spatial resolution and contrast. The aim of this work is to describe the most widely used filters in SPECT applications and how these affect the image quality. The choice of the filter type, the cut-off frequency and the order is a major problem in clinical routine. In many clinical cases, information for specific parameters is not provided, and findings cannot be extrapolated to other similar SPECT imaging applications. A literature review for the determination of the mostly used filters in cardiac, brain, bone, liver, kidneys, and thyroid applications is also presented. As resulting from the overview, no filter is perfect, and the selection of the proper filters, most of the times, is done empirically. The standardization of image-processing results may limit the filter types for each SPECT examination to certain few filters and some of their parameters. Standardization, also, helps in reducing image processing time, as the filters and their parameters must be standardised before being put to clinical use. Commercial reconstruction software selections lead to comparable results interdepartmentally. The manufacturers normally supply default filters/parameters, but these may not be relevant in various clinical situations. After proper standardisation, it is possible to use many suitable filters or one optimal filter. PMID:21760768

  6. SPECT imaging with resolution recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Bronnikov, A. V.

    2011-07-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a method of choice for imaging spatial distributions of radioisotopes. Many applications of this method are found in nuclear industry, medicine, and biomedical research. We study mathematical modeling of a micro-SPECT system by using a point-spread function (PSF) and implement an OSEM-based iterative algorithm for image reconstruction with resolution recovery. Unlike other known implementations of the OSEM algorithm, we apply en efficient computation scheme based on a useful approximation of the PSF, which ensures relatively fast computations. The proposed approach can be applied with the data acquired with any type of collimators, including parallel-beam fan-beam, cone-beam and pinhole collimators. Experimental results obtained with a micro SPECT system demonstrate high efficiency of resolution recovery. (authors)

  7. A 3D image analysis tool for SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontos, Despina; Wang, Qiang; Megalooikonomou, Vasileios; Maurer, Alan H.; Knight, Linda C.; Kantor, Steve; Fisher, Robert S.; Simonian, Hrair P.; Parkman, Henry P.

    2005-04-01

    We have developed semi-automated and fully-automated tools for the analysis of 3D single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. The focus is on the efficient boundary delineation of complex 3D structures that enables accurate measurement of their structural and physiologic properties. We employ intensity based thresholding algorithms for interactive and semi-automated analysis. We also explore fuzzy-connectedness concepts for fully automating the segmentation process. We apply the proposed tools to SPECT image data capturing variation of gastric accommodation and emptying. These image analysis tools were developed within the framework of a noninvasive scintigraphic test to measure simultaneously both gastric emptying and gastric volume after ingestion of a solid or a liquid meal. The clinical focus of the particular analysis was to probe associations between gastric accommodation/emptying and functional dyspepsia. Employing the proposed tools, we outline effectively the complex three dimensional gastric boundaries shown in the 3D SPECT images. We also perform accurate volume calculations in order to quantitatively assess the gastric mass variation. This analysis was performed both with the semi-automated and fully-automated tools. The results were validated against manual segmentation performed by a human expert. We believe that the development of an automated segmentation tool for SPECT imaging of the gastric volume variability will allow for other new applications of SPECT imaging where there is a need to evaluate complex organ function or tumor masses.

  8. Biomedical Imaging: SPECT and PET

    SciTech Connect

    Lecomte, Roger

    2007-11-26

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) are non-invasive nuclear imaging techniques relying on the use of tomographic reconstruction methods to provide 3D representations of the distribution of radiolabeled molecules in vivo. Differences in the underlying physical principles determine the achievable spatial resolution, sensitivity, specificity and observation time span of these two imaging modalities. Their specific characteristics are described and the current technology developments and design tradeoffs are reviewed.

  9. Radiosynthesis and biological evaluation of a promising σ2-receptor ligand radiolabeled with fluorine-18 or iodine-125 as a PET/SPECT probe for imaging breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Zhude; Xu, Jinbin; Jones, Lynne A.; Li, Shihong; Zeng, Dexing; Kung, Mei-Ping; Kung, Hank F.; Mach, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    Sigma-2 receptors represent an endogenous marker for proliferation in solid tumors. The high affinity, high selectivity σ2 receptor ligand N-(4-(6,7-dimethoxy-3,4-dihydroisoquinolin-2(1H)-yl)butyl)-2-(2-fluoroethoxy)-5-iodo-3-methoxybenzamide (3) was separately radiolabeled with F-18 and I-125. The radiolabeling yield was 30% and 70% for [18F]3 and [125I]3, respectively. Studies of [125I]3 using murine 66 breast tumor membrane homogenates and evaluation of [18F]3 and [125I]3 in 66 tumor-bearing mice indicate that this ligand has potential as a PET or a SPECT probe for imaging σ2 receptors in breast cancer. PMID:20594864

  10. Receptor binding characterization of the benzodiazepine radioligand sup 125 I-Ro16-0154: Potential probe for SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography) brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.W.; Woods, S.W.; Zoghbi, S.; Baldwin, R.M.; Innis, R.B. ); McBride, B.J. )

    1990-01-01

    The binding of an iodinated benzodiazepine (BZ) radioligand has been characterized, particularly in regard to its potential use as a neuroreceptor brain imaging agent with SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography). Ro16-0154 is an iodine-containing BZ antagonist and a close analog of Ro15-1788. In tissue homogenates prepared from human and monkey brain, the binding of {sup 125}I-labeled Ro16-0154 was saturable, of high affinity, and had high ratios of specific to non-specific binding. Physiological concentrations of NaCl enhanced specific binding approximately 15% compared to buffer without this salt. Kinetic studies of association and dissociation demonstrated a temperature dependent decrease in affinity with increasing temperature. Drug displacement studies confirmed that {sup 125}I-Ro16-0154 binds to the central type BZ receptor: binding is virtually identical to that of {sup 3}H-Ro15-1788 except that {sup 125}I-Ro16-0154 shows an almost 10 fold higher affinity at 37{degree}C. These in vitro results suggest that {sup 123}I-labeled Ro16-0154 shows promise as a selective, high affinity SPECT probe of the brain's BZ receptor.

  11. Synthesis and evaluation of a radioiodinated 4,6-diaryl-3-cyano-2-pyridinone derivative as a survivin targeting SPECT probe for tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Fuchigami, Takeshi; Mizoguchi, Tatsuya; Ishikawa, Natsumi; Haratake, Mamoru; Yoshida, Sakura; Magata, Yasuhiro; Nakayama, Morio

    2016-02-01

    Survivin is overexpressed in most of the cancerous tissues but not in terminally differentiated normal tissues, making it an attractive target for diagnosis and therapy of various types of cancers. In this study, we aimed to develop 4,6-diaryl-3-cyano-2-pyridinone (DCP) derivatives, as novel cancer imaging probes that target survivin. Chloro and iodo analogs of DCP (CDCP and IDCP, respectively) were successfully synthesized by using a previously unreported carbon monoxide-free procedure. IDCP exhibited a slightly higher binding affinity for recombinant human survivin (Kd=34 nM) than that of CDCP (Kd=44 nM). Fluorescence staining indicated that both CDCP and IDCP showed high signals in MDA-MB-231 cells with high levels of survivin expression. Significantly low fluorescent signals were observed in MCF-10A cells, which showed low levels of survivin expression. [(125)I]IDCP was synthesized for the application of IDCP to single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. Quantitative in vitro binding of [(125)I]IDCP in cell cultures showed results consistent to those observed after fluorescent staining. In vivo biodistribution studies in tumor-bearing mice demonstrated that the tumor uptake of [(125)I]IDCP increased gradually with time and was 0.65% injected dose per gram (% ID/g) at 180 min. The maximum tumor/blood and tumor/muscle ratio at 60 min were 0.87 and 2.27, respectively, indicating inadequate [(125)I]IDCP accumulation in tumors necessary for in vivo imaging. Although further structural modifications are necessary to improve pharmacokinetic properties of IDCP, this study demonstrates the feasibility of using the DCP backbone as a scaffold for the development of survivin-targeting tumor imaging probes. PMID:26733475

  12. SPECT functional brain imaging. Technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Devous, M D

    1995-07-01

    The technical aspects of functional brain single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging, referring primarily to the most common SPECT brain function measure--regional cerebral blood flow--are reviewed. SPECT images of regional cerebral blood flow are influenced by a number of factors unrelated to pathology, including tomographic quality, radiopharmaceuticals, environmental conditions at the time of radiotracer administration, characteristics of the subject (e.g., age, sex), image presentation, and image processing techniques. Modern SPECT scans yield excellent image quality, and instrumentation continues to improve. The armamentarium of regional cerebral blood flow and receptor radiopharmaceuticals is rapidly expanding. Standards regarding the environment for patient imaging and image presentation are emerging. However, there is still much to learn about the circumstances for performances and evaluation of SPECT functional brain imaging. Challenge tests, primarily established in cerebrovascular disease (i.e., the acetazolamide test), offer great promise in defining the extent and nature of disease, as well as predicting therapeutic responses. Clearly, SPECT brain imaging is a powerful clinical and research tool. However, SPECT will only achieve its full potential in the management of patients with cerebral pathology through close cooperation among members of the nuclear medicine, neurology, psychiatry, neurosurgery, and internal medicine specialties. PMID:7626833

  13. Biosynthesis of Fluorescent Bi2S3 Nanoparticles and their Application as Dual-Function SPECT-CT Probe for Animal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Imran; Ahmad, Absar; Siddiqui, Ejaz Ahmad; Rahaman, Sk Hasanur; Gambhir, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Bismuth sulphide (Bi2S3) is an excellent semiconductor and its nanoparticles have numerous significant applications including photovoltaic materials, photodiode arrays, bio-imaging, etc. Nevertheless, these nanoparticles when fabricated by chemical and physical routes tend to easily aggregate in colloidal solutions, are eco-unfriendly, cumbrous and very broad in size distribution. The aim of the present manuscript was to ecologically fabricate water dispersible, safe and stable Bi2S3 nanoparticles such that these may find use in animal imaging, diagnostics, cell labeling and other biomedical applications. Herein, we for the first time have biosynthesized highly fluorescent, natural protein capped Bi2S3 nanoparticles by subjecting the fungus Fusarium oxysporum to bismuth nitrate pentahydrate [Bi(NO3)3.5H2O] alongwith sodium sulphite (Na2SO3) as precursor salts under ambient conditions of temperature, pressure and pH. The nanoparticles were completely characterized using recognized standard techniques. These natural protein capped Bi2S3 nanoparticles are quasi-spherical in shape with an average particle size of 15 nm, maintain long term stability and show semiconductor behavior having blue shift with a band gap of 3.04 eV. Semiconductor nanocrystals are fundamentally much more fluorescent than the toxic fluorescent chemical compounds (fluorophores) which are presently largely employed in imaging, immunohistochemistry, biochemistry, etc. Biologically fabricated fluorescent nanoparticles may replace organic fluorophores and aid in rapid development of biomedical nanotechnology. Thus, biodistribution study of the so-formed Bi2S3 nanoparticles in male Sprague Dawley rats was done by radiolabelling with Technitium-99m (Tc-99m) and clearance time from blood was calculated. The nanoparticles were then employed in SPECT-CT probe for animal imaging where these imparted iodine equivalent contrast. PMID:26876521

  14. The AdaptiSPECT Imaging Aperture

    PubMed Central

    Chaix, Cécile; Moore, Jared W.; Van Holen, Roel; Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present the imaging aperture of an adaptive SPECT imaging system being developed at the Center for Gamma Ray Imaging (AdaptiSPECT). AdaptiSPECT is designed to automatically change its configuration in response to preliminary data, in order to improve image quality for a particular task. In a traditional pinhole SPECT imaging system, the characteristics (magnification, resolution, field of view) are set by the geometry of the system, and any modification can be accomplished only by manually changing the collimator and the distance of the detector to the center of the field of view. Optimization of the imaging system for a specific task on a specific individual is therefore difficult. In an adaptive SPECT imaging system, on the other hand, the configuration can be conveniently changed under computer control. A key component of an adaptive SPECT system is its aperture. In this paper, we present the design, specifications, and fabrication of the adaptive pinhole aperture that will be used for AdaptiSPECT, as well as the controls that enable autonomous adaptation. PMID:27019577

  15. Development of PET and SPECT Probes for Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Morio

    2015-01-01

    l-Glutamate and its receptors (GluRs) play a key role in excitatory neurotransmission within the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Impaired regulation of GluRs has also been implicated in various neurological disorders. GluRs are classified into two major groups: ionotropic GluRs (iGluRs), which are ligand-gated ion channels, and metabotropic GluRs (mGluRs), which are coupled to heterotrimeric guanosine nucleotide binding proteins (G-proteins). Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of GluRs could provide a novel view of CNS function and of a range of brain disorders, potentially leading to the development of new drug therapies. Although no satisfactory imaging agents have yet been developed for iGluRs, several PET ligands for mGluRs have been successfully employed in clinical studies. This paper reviews current progress towards the development of PET and SPECT probes for GluRs. PMID:25874256

  16. SPECT Imaging: Basics and New Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, Brian F.

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is widely used as a means of imaging the distribution of administered radiotracers that have single-photon emission. The most widely used SPECT systems are based on the Anger gamma camera, usually involving dual detectors that rotate around the patient. Several factors affect the quality of SPECT images (e.g., resolution and noise) and the ability to perform absolute quantification (e.g., attenuation, scatter, motion, and resolution). There is a trend to introduce dual-modality systems and organ-specific systems, both developments that enhance diagnostic capability.

  17. Rodent brain imaging with SPECT/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Youngho; Gao, D.-W.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.; Dae, Michael W.; Franc, Benjamin L.

    2007-04-15

    We evaluated methods of imaging rat models of stroke in vivo using a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system dedicated to small animal imaging (X-SPECT{sup TM}, Gamma Medica-Ideas, Northridge, CA). An animal model of ischemic stroke was developed for in vivo SPECT/CT imaging using the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) technique. The presence of cerebral ischemia was verified in ex vivo studies using triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. In vivo radionuclide imaging of cerebral blood flow was performed in rats following MCAO using dynamic planar imaging of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime with parallel hole collimation. This was followed immediately by in vivo radionuclide imaging of cerebral blood flow with {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime in the same animals using 1-mm pinhole SPECT. Correlated computed tomography imaging was performed to localize radiopharmaceutical uptake. The animals were allowed to recover and ex vivo autoradiography was performed with separate administration of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime. Time activity curve of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime showed that the radiopharmaceutical uptake could be maintained for over 9 min. The activity would be expected to be relatively stable for a much longer period, although the data were only obtained for 9 min. TTC staining revealed sizable infarcts by visual observation of inexistence of TTC stain in infracted tissues of MCAO rat brains. In vivo SPECT imaging showed cerebral blood flow deficit in the MCAO model, and the in vivo imaging result was confirmed with ex vivo autoradiography. We have demonstrated a capability of imaging regions of cerebral blood flow deficit in MCAO rat brains in vivo using a pinhole SPECT dedicated to small animal imaging.

  18. Cerebral SPECT imaging: Impact on clinical management

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, M.; Jacobs, S.; Pozniakof, T.

    1994-05-01

    Although cerebral SPECT has been reported to be of value in a variety of neurologic disorders, there is limited data available on the value of SPECT relative to clinical management decisions. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of cerebral SPECT imaging on patient management. A total of 94 consecutive patients referred for clinical evaluation with brain SPECT were included in this study. Patients were assigned to one of nine groups depending on the clinical indication for the study. These groups included transient ischemia (16), stroke (20), dementia (18), seizures (5), hemorrhage (13), head trauma (6), arteriovenous malformations (6), encephalopathy (6) and a miscellaneous (4) group. All patients were injected with 99mTc HMPAO in doses ranging from 15 mCi to 22 mCi (555 MBq to 814 MBq) and scanned on a triple headed SPECT gamma camera. Two weeks after completion of the study, a standardized interview was conducted between the nuclear and referring physicians to determine if the SPECT findings contributed to an alteration in patient management. Overall, patient management was significantly altered in 47% of the cases referred. The greatest impact on patient management occurred in the group evaluated for transient ischemia, where a total of 13/16 (81%) of patients had their clinical management altered as a result of the cerebral SPECT findings. Clinical management was altered in 61% of patients referred for evaluation of dementia, 67% of patients evaluated for arteriovenous malformations, and 50% of patients with head trauma. In the remainder of the patients, alteration in clinical management ranged from 17% to 50% of patients. This study demonstrates the clinical utility of cerebral SPECT imaging since in a significant number of cases clinical management was altered as a result of the examination. Long term follow up will be necessary to determine patient outcome.

  19. Integration of AdaptiSPECT, a small-animal adaptive SPECT imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Chaix, Cécile; Kovalsky, Stephen; Kosmider, Matthew; Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    AdaptiSPECT is a pre-clinical adaptive SPECT imaging system under final development at the Center for Gamma-ray Imaging. The system incorporates multiple adaptive features: an adaptive aperture, 16 detectors mounted on translational stages, and the ability to switch between a non-multiplexed and a multiplexed imaging configuration. In this paper, we review the design of AdaptiSPECT and its adaptive features. We then describe the on-going integration of the imaging system. PMID:26347197

  20. Synthesis and preliminary characterization of radioiodinated benzofuran-3-yl-(indol-3-yl)maleimide derivatives as potential SPECT imaging probes for the detection of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) in the brain.

    PubMed

    Ono, Masahiro; Kitada, Ayane; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Miyazaki, Anna; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Saji, Hideo

    2016-06-30

    We report on the synthesis and preliminary characterization of two radioiodinated benzofuran-3-yl-(indol-3-yl)maleimides, 3-(benzofuran-3-yl)-4-(5-[(125) I]iodo-1-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione ([(125) I]5), and 3-(5-[(125) I]iodo-1-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-4-(6-methoxybenzofuran-3-yl)-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione ([(125) I]6), as the first potential SPECT imaging probes targeting glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). In this study, we used (125) I as a surrogate of (123) I because of its ease of use. The radioiodinated ligands were prepared from the corresponding tributyltin precursors through an iododestannylation reaction using hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant with a radiochemical yield of 10-30%. In vitro binding experiments suggested that both compounds show high affinity for GSK-3β at a level similar to a known GSK-3β inhibitor. Biodistribution studies with normal mice revealed that the radioiodinated compounds display sufficient uptake into (1.8%ID/g at 10 min postinjection) and clearance from the brain (1.0%ID/g at 60 min postinjection). These preliminary results suggest that the further optimization of radioiodinated benzofuran-3-yl-(indol-3-yl)maleimide derivatives may facilitate the development of clinically useful SPECT imaging probes for the in vivo detection of GSK-3β. PMID:27126914

  1. Body Deformation Correction for SPECT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Songxiang; McNamara, Joseph E.; Mitra, Joyeeta; Gifford, Howard C.; Johnson, Karen; Gennert, Michael A.; King, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Patient motion degrades the quality of SPECT studies. Body bend and twist are types of patient deformation, which may occur during SPECT imaging, and which has been generally ignored in SPECT motion correction strategies. To correct for these types of motion, we propose a deformation model and its inclusion within an iterative reconstruction algorithm. Two experiments were conducted to investigate the applicability of our model. In the first experiment, the return of the postmotion-compensation locations of markers on the body-surface of a volunteer to approximate their original coordinates is used to examine our method of estimating the parameters of our model and the parameters’ use in undoing deformation. The second experiment employed simulated projections of the MCAT phantom formed using an analytical projector which includes attenuation and distance-dependent resolution to investigate applications of our model in reconstruction. We demonstrate in the simulation studies that twist and bend can significantly degrade SPECT image quality visually. Our correction strategy is shown to be able to greatly diminish the degradation seen in the slices, provided the parameters are estimated accurately. We view this work as a first step towards being able to estimate and correct patient deformation based on information obtained from marker tracking data. PMID:20336188

  2. Quantitative SPECT/CT: SPECT joins PET as a quantitative imaging modality.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Dale L; Willowson, Kathy P

    2014-05-01

    The introduction of combined modality single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT cameras has revived interest in quantitative SPECT. Schemes to mitigate the deleterious effects of photon attenuation and scattering in SPECT imaging have been developed over the last 30 years but have been held back by lack of ready access to data concerning the density of the body and photon transport, which we see as key to producing quantitative data. With X-ray CT data now routinely available, validations of techniques to produce quantitative SPECT reconstructions have been undertaken. While still suffering from inferior spatial resolution and sensitivity compared to positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, SPECT scans nevertheless can be produced that are as quantitative as PET scans. Routine corrections are applied for photon attenuation and scattering, resolution recovery, instrumental dead time, radioactive decay and cross-calibration to produce SPECT images in units of kBq.ml(-1). Though clinical applications of quantitative SPECT imaging are lacking due to the previous non-availability of accurately calibrated SPECT reconstructions, these are beginning to emerge as the community and industry focus on producing SPECT/CT systems that are intrinsically quantitative. PMID:24037503

  3. Hybrid SPECT/CT imaging in neurology.

    PubMed

    Ciarmiello, Andrea; Giovannini, Elisabetta; Meniconi, Martina; Cuccurullo, Vincenzo; Gaeta, Maria Chiara

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the SPECT/CT hybrid modality has led to a rapid development of imaging techniques in nuclear medicine, opening new perspectives for imaging staff and patients as well. However, while, the clinical role of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) is well consolidated, the diffusion and the consequent value of single-photon emission tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) has yet to be weighed, Hence, there is a need for a careful analysis, comparing the "potential" benefits of the hybrid modality with the "established" ones of the standalone machine. The aim of this article is to analyze the impact of this hybrid tool on the diagnosis of diseases of the central nervous system, comparing strengths and weaknesses of both modalities through the use of SWOT analysis. PMID:25143053

  4. PET/SPECT imaging agents for neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin; Ploessl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2014-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or positron emission computed tomography (PET) imaging agents for neurodegenerative disease have a significant impact on clinical diagnosis and patient care. The examples of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) and Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) imaging agents described in this paper provide a general view on how imaging agents, ie radioactive drugs, are selected, chemically prepared and applied in humans. Imaging the living human brain can provide unique information on the pathology and progression of neurodegenerative diseases, such as AD and PD. The imaging method will also facilitate preclinical and clinical trials of new drugs offering specific information related to drug binding sites in the brain. In the future, chemists will continue to play important roles in identifying specific targets, synthesizing target-specific probes for screening and ultimately testing them by in vitro and in vivo assays. PMID:24676152

  5. Dual-radiolabeled nanoparticle SPECT probes for bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Kvar C. L.; Akers, Walter J.; Sudlow, Gail; Xu, Baogang; Laforest, Richard; Achilefu, Samuel

    2014-12-01

    A gold nanoparticle was radiolabeled with 125I and 111In and functionalized with an MMP9-cleavable peptide to form a multispectral SPECT imaging contrast agent. Peptide cleavage from the nanoprobe by MMP9 was observed in vitro, and distinct pharmacokinetic properties of the contrast agent were observed between tumors with high or low MMP9 expression.A gold nanoparticle was radiolabeled with 125I and 111In and functionalized with an MMP9-cleavable peptide to form a multispectral SPECT imaging contrast agent. Peptide cleavage from the nanoprobe by MMP9 was observed in vitro, and distinct pharmacokinetic properties of the contrast agent were observed between tumors with high or low MMP9 expression. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05269b

  6. Preclinical Evaluation of a Potential GSH Ester Based PET/SPECT Imaging Probe DT(GSHMe)2 to Detect Gamma Glutamyl Transferase Over Expressing Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Harleen; Meena, Virendra Kumar; Prakash, Surbhi; Chuttani, Krishna; Chadha, Nidhi; Jaswal, Ambika; Dhawan, Devinder Kumar; Mishra, Anil Kumar; Hazari, Puja Panwar

    2015-01-01

    imaging using PET/SPECT. PMID:26221728

  7. Cervical SPECT Camera for Parathyroid Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2012-08-31

    Primary hyperparathyroidism characterized by one or more enlarged parathyroid glands has become one of the most common endocrine diseases in the world affecting about 1 per 1000 in the United States. Standard treatment is highly invasive exploratory neck surgery called Parathyroidectomy. The surgery has a notable mortality rate because of the close proximity to vital structures. The move to minimally invasive parathyroidectomy is hampered by the lack of high resolution pre-surgical imaging techniques that can accurately localize the parathyroid with respect to surrounding structures. We propose to develop a dedicated ultra-high resolution (~ 1 mm) and high sensitivity (10x conventional camera) cervical scintigraphic imaging device. It will be based on a multiple pinhole-camera SPECT system comprising a novel solid state CZT detector that offers the required performance. The overall system will be configured to fit around the neck and comfortably image a patient.

  8. Iterative restoration of SPECT projection images

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, S.J.; Xia, W.

    1997-04-01

    Photon attenuation and the limited nonstationary spatial resolution of the detector can reduce both qualitative and quantitative image quality in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In this paper, a reconstruction approach is described which can compensate for both of these degradations. The approach involves processing the project data with Bellini`s method for attenuation compensation followed by an iterative deconvolution technique which uses the frequency distance principle (FDP) to model the distance-dependent camera blur. Modeling of the camera blur with the FDP allows an efficient implementation using fast Fourier transformation (FFT) methods. After processing of the project data, reconstruction is performed using filtered backprojections. Simulation studies using two different brain phantoms show that this approach gives reconstructions with a favorable bias versus noise tradeoff, provides no visually undesirable noise artifacts, and requires a low computational load.

  9. SPECT data acquisition and image reconstruction in a stationary small animal SPECT/MRI system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jingyan; Chen, Si; Yu, Jianhua; Meier, Dirk; Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2010-04-01

    The goal of the study was to investigate data acquisition strategies and image reconstruction methods for a stationary SPECT insert that can operate inside an MRI scanner with a 12 cm bore diameter for simultaneous SPECT/MRI imaging of small animals. The SPECT insert consists of 3 octagonal rings of 8 MR-compatible CZT detectors per ring surrounding a multi-pinhole (MPH) collimator sleeve. Each pinhole is constructed to project the field-of-view (FOV) to one CZT detector. All 24 pinholes are focused to a cylindrical FOV of 25 mm in diameter and 34 mm in length. The data acquisition strategies we evaluated were optional collimator rotations to improve tomographic sampling; and the image reconstruction methods were iterative ML-EM with and without compensation for the geometric response function (GRF) of the MPH collimator. For this purpose, we developed an analytic simulator that calculates the system matrix with the GRF models of the MPH collimator. The simulator was used to generate projection data of a digital rod phantom with pinhole aperture sizes of 1 mm and 2 mm and with different collimator rotation patterns. Iterative ML-EM reconstruction with and without GRF compensation were used to reconstruct the projection data from the central ring of 8 detectors only, and from all 24 detectors. Our results indicated that without GRF compensation and at the default design of 24 projection views, the reconstructed images had significant artifacts. Accurate GRF compensation substantially improved the reconstructed image resolution and reduced image artifacts. With accurate GRF compensation, useful reconstructed images can be obtained using 24 projection views only. This last finding potentially enables dynamic SPECT (and/or MRI) studies in small animals, one of many possible application areas of the SPECT/MRI system. Further research efforts are warranted including experimentally measuring the system matrix for improved geometrical accuracy, incorporating the co

  10. Development and application of a multimodal contrast agent for SPECT/CT hybrid imaging.

    PubMed

    Criscione, Jason M; Dobrucki, Lawrence W; Zhuang, Zhen W; Papademetris, Xenophon; Simons, Michael; Sinusas, Albert J; Fahmy, Tarek M

    2011-09-21

    Hybrid or multimodality imaging is often applied in order to take advantage of the unique and complementary strengths of individual imaging modalities. This hybrid noninvasive imaging approach can provide critical information about anatomical structure in combination with physiological function or targeted molecular signals. While recent advances in software image fusion techniques and hybrid imaging systems have enabled efficient multimodal imaging, accessing the full potential of this technique requires development of a new toolbox of multimodal contrast agents that enhance the imaging process. Toward that goal, we report the development of a hybrid probe for both single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging that facilitates high-sensitivity SPECT and high spatial resolution CT imaging. In this work, we report the synthesis and evaluation of a novel intravascular, multimodal dendrimer-based contrast agent for use in preclinical SPECT/CT hybrid imaging systems. This multimodal agent offers a long intravascular residence time (t(1/2) = 43 min) and sufficient contrast-to-noise for effective serial intravascular and blood pool imaging with both SPECT and CT. The colocalization of the dendritic nuclear and X-ray contrasts offers the potential to facilitate image analysis and quantification by enabling correction for SPECT attenuation and partial volume errors at specified times with the higher resolution anatomic information provided by the circulating CT contrast. This may allow absolute quantification of intramyocardial blood volume and blood flow and may enable the ability to visualize active molecular targeting following clearance from the blood. PMID:21851119

  11. Recent developments and future prospects of SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Maseeh Uz; Hashmi, Ibrahim; Fatima, Nosheen

    2010-10-01

    Myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging is the most commonly performed functional imaging for assessment of coronary artery disease. High diagnostic accuracy and incremental prognostic value are the major benefits while suboptimal spatial resolution and significant radiation exposure are the main limitations. Its ability to detect hemodynamic significance of lesions seen on multidetector CT angiogram (MDCTA) has paved the path for a successful marriage between anatomical and functional imaging modalities in the form of hybrid SPECT/MDCTA system. In recent years, there have been enormous efforts by industry and academia to develop new SPECT imaging systems with better sensitivity, resolution, compact design and new reconstruction algorithms with ability to improve image quality and resolution. Furthermore, expected arrival of Tc-99m-labeled deoxyglucose in next few years would further strengthen the role of SPECT in imaging hibernating myocardium. In view of these developments, it seems that SPECT would enjoy its pivotal role in spite of major threat to be replaced by fluorine-18-labeled positron emission tomography perfusion and glucose metabolism imaging agents. PMID:20652774

  12. A SPECT imager with synthetic collimation

    PubMed Central

    Havelin, Ronan J.; Miller, Brian W.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Murphy, J M; Foley, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    This work outlines the development of a multi-pinhole SPECT system designed to produce a synthetic-collimator image of a small field of view. The focused multi-pinhole collimator was constructed using rapid-prototyping and casting techniques. The collimator projects the field of view through forty-six pinholes when the detector is adjacent to the collimator. The detector is then moved further from the collimator to increase the magnification of the system. The amount of pinhole-projection overlap increases with the system magnification. There is no rotation in the system; a single tomographic angle is used in each system configuration. The maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (MLEM) algorithm is implemented on graphics processing units to reconstruct the object in the field of view. Iterative reconstruction algorithms, such as MLEM, require an accurate model of the system response. For each system magnification, a sparsely-sampled system response is measured by translating a point source through a grid encompassing the field of view. The pinhole projections are individually identified and associated with their respective apertures. A 2D elliptical Gaussian model is applied to the pinhole projections on the detector. These coefficients are associated with the object-space location of the point source, and a finely-sampled system matrix is interpolated. Simulations with a hot-rod phantom demonstrate the efficacy of combining low-resolution non-multiplexed data with high-resolution multiplexed data to produce high-resolution reconstructions. PMID:26346410

  13. Ready for prime time? Dual tracer PET and SPECT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fakhri, Georges El

    2012-01-01

    Dual isotope single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and dual tracer positron emission tomography (PET) imaging have great potential in clinical and molecular applications in the pediatric as well as the adult populations in many areas of brain, cardiac, and oncologic imaging as it allows the exploration of different physiological and molecular functions (e.g., perfusion, neurotransmission, metabolism, apoptosis, angiogenesis) under the same physiological and physical conditions. This is crucial when the physiological functions studied depend on each other (e.g., perfusion and metabolism) hence requiring simultaneous assessment under identical conditions, and can reduce greatly the quantitation errors associated with physical factors that can change between acquisitions (e.g., human subject or animal motion, change in the attenuation map as a function of time) as is detailed in this editorial. The clinical potential of simultaneous dual isotope SPECT, dual tracer PET and dual SPECT/PET imaging are explored and summarized. In this issue of AJNMMI (http://www.ajnmmi.us), Chapman et al. explore the feasibility of simultaneous and sequential SPECT/PET imaging and conclude that down-scatter and crosstalk from 511 keV photons preclude obtaining useful SPECT information in the presence of PET radiotracers. They report on an alternative strategy that consists of performing sequential SPECT and PET studies in hybrid microPET/SPECT/CT scanners, now widely available for molecular imaging. They validate their approach in a phantom consisting of a 96-well plate with variable 99mTc and 18F concentrations and illustrate the utility of such approaches in two sequential SPECT-PET/CT studies that include 99mTc-MAA/18F-NaF and 99mTc-Pentetate/18F-NaF. These approaches will need to be proven reproducible, accurate and robust to variations in the experimental conditions before they can be accepted by the molecular imaging community and be implemented in routine molecular

  14. PET/SPECT molecular imaging in clinical neuroscience: recent advances in the investigation of CNS diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Feng-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an attractive technology widely used in clinical practice that greatly enhances our understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment in central nervous system (CNS) diseases. It is a novel multidisciplinary technique that can be defined as real-time visualization, in vivo characterization and qualification of biological processes at the molecular and cellular level. It involves the imaging modalities and the corresponding imaging agents. Nowadays, molecular imaging in neuroscience has provided tremendous insights into disturbed human brain function. Among all of the molecular imaging modalities, positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have occupied a particular position that visualize and measure the physiological processes using high-affinity and high-specificity molecular radioactive tracers as imaging probes in intact living brain. In this review, we will put emphasis on the PET/SPECT applications in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD) as major CNS disorders. We will first give an overview of the main classical molecular neuroimaging modalities. Then, the major clinical applications of PET and SPECT along with molecular probes in the fields of psychiatry and neurology will be discussed. PMID:26029646

  15. Real-time SPECT and 2D ultrasound image registration.

    PubMed

    Bucki, Marek; Chassat, Fabrice; Galdames, Francisco; Asahi, Takeshi; Pizarro, Daniel; Lobo, Gabriel

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present a technique for fully automatic, real-time 3D SPECT (Single Photon Emitting Computed Tomography) and 2D ultrasound image registration. We use this technique in the context of kidney lesion diagnosis. Our registration algorithm allows a physician to perform an ultrasound exam after a SPECT image has been acquired and see in real time the registration of both modalities. An automatic segmentation algorithm has been implemented in order to display in 3D the positions of the acquired US images with respect to the organs. PMID:18044572

  16. FastSPECT II: A Second-Generation High-Resolution Dynamic SPECT Imager

    PubMed Central

    Furenlid, Lars R.; Wilson, Donald W.; Chen, Yi-chun; Kim, Hyunki; Pietraski, Philip J.; Crawford, Michael J.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2010-01-01

    FastSPECT II is a recently commissioned 16-camera small-animal SPECT imager built with modular scintillation cameras and list-mode data-acquisition electronics. The instrument is housed in a lead-shielded enclosure and has exchangeable aperture assemblies and adjustable camera positions for selection of magnification, pinhole size, and field of view. The calibration of individual cameras and measurement of an overall system imaging matrix (1 mm3 voxels) are supported via a five-axis motion-control system. Details of the system integration and results of characterization and performance measurements are presented along with first tomographic images. The dynamic imaging capabilities of the instrument are explored and discussed. PMID:20877439

  17. Parallel-hole collimator concept for stationary SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pato, Lara R. V.; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Zedda, Tiziana; Van Holen, Roel

    2015-11-01

    Parallel-hole SPECT collimators have traditionally been manufactured by stacking sheets of lead foil or by casting. These techniques significantly restrict our options in terms of collimator geometry. However, recent developments in metal additive manufacturing are making novel collimator designs possible, giving rise to new opportunities in SPECT imaging. In this paper we propose an innovative type of collimator for stationary SPECT, using parallel-holes whose collimation direction depends on their axial position. Its main advantage compared to current stationary SPECT systems (which are based on pinholes) is that, using only axial bed translations, we can achieve complete angular sampling of an increased portion of the transaxial area of the collimator bore. This allows the system to be much more compact than current stationary SPECT systems that image objects of the same size. We describe three possible designs, for full-body, brain and small-animal imaging, respectively, and test their feasibility using simulations. The system modeling method is validated against realistic Monte Carlo simulations, and then used in the evaluation of the systems’ performances and reconstructions. The simulations show that the system is able to reconstruct objects occupying the predicted field of view (75% of the transaxial area of the bore) without sampling artifacts. In particular, we perform reconstructions from noisy projection data obtained for an activity and scanning time similar to standard protocols for the three applications, and the resulting images indicate the possibility of using the proposed systems in practice.

  18. Parallel-hole collimator concept for stationary SPECT imaging.

    PubMed

    Pato, Lara R V; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Zedda, Tiziana; Van Holen, Roel

    2015-11-21

    Parallel-hole SPECT collimators have traditionally been manufactured by stacking sheets of lead foil or by casting. These techniques significantly restrict our options in terms of collimator geometry. However, recent developments in metal additive manufacturing are making novel collimator designs possible, giving rise to new opportunities in SPECT imaging. In this paper we propose an innovative type of collimator for stationary SPECT, using parallel-holes whose collimation direction depends on their axial position. Its main advantage compared to current stationary SPECT systems (which are based on pinholes) is that, using only axial bed translations, we can achieve complete angular sampling of an increased portion of the transaxial area of the collimator bore. This allows the system to be much more compact than current stationary SPECT systems that image objects of the same size. We describe three possible designs, for full-body, brain and small-animal imaging, respectively, and test their feasibility using simulations. The system modeling method is validated against realistic Monte Carlo simulations, and then used in the evaluation of the systems' performances and reconstructions. The simulations show that the system is able to reconstruct objects occupying the predicted field of view ([Formula: see text] of the transaxial area of the bore) without sampling artifacts. In particular, we perform reconstructions from noisy projection data obtained for an activity and scanning time similar to standard protocols for the three applications, and the resulting images indicate the possibility of using the proposed systems in practice. PMID:26528908

  19. Molecular Imaging of Conscious, Unrestrained Mice with AwakeSPECT

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Justin S.; Endres, Christopher J.; Foss, Catherine A.; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Jung, Hyeyun; Goddard, James S.; Lee, Seungjoon; McKisson, John; Smith, Mark F.; Stolin, Alexander V.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a SPECT imaging system, AwakeSPECT, to enable molecular brain imaging of untrained mice that are conscious, unanesthetized, and unrestrained. We accomplished this with head tracking and motion correction techniques. Methods: The capability of the system for motion-corrected imaging was demonstrated with a 99mTc-pertechnetate phantom, 99mTcmethylene diphosphonate bone imaging, and measurement of the binding potential of the dopamine transporter radioligand 123I-ioflupane in mouse brain in the awake and anesthetized (isoflurane) states. Stress induced by imaging in the awake state was assessed through measurement of plasma corticosterone levels. Results: AwakeSPECT provided high-resolution bone images reminiscent of those obtained from CT. The binding potential of 123I-ioflupane in the awake state was on the order of 50% of that obtained with the animal under anesthesia, consistent with previous studies in nonhuman primates. Levels of stress induced were on the order of those seen in other behavioral tasks and imaging studies of awake animals. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the feasibility of SPECT molecular brain imaging of mice in the conscious, unrestrained state and demonstrate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on radiotracer uptake. PMID:23536223

  20. Molecular Imaging of Conscious, Unrestrained Mice with AwakeSPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Justin S.; Endres, Christopher J.; Foss, Catherine A.; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Jung, Hyeyun; Goddard, James S.; Lee, Seung Joon; McKisson, John; Smith, Mark F.; Stolin, Alexander V.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2013-06-01

    We have developed a SPECT imaging system, AwakeSPECT, to enable molecular brain imaging of untrained mice that are conscious, unanesthetized, and unrestrained. We accomplished this with head tracking and motion correction techniques. Methods: The capability of the system for motion-corrected imaging was demonstrated with a ^99mTc-pertechnetate phantom, ^99mTc-methylene diphosphonate bone imaging, and measurement of the binding potential of the dopamine transporter radioligand ^123I-ioflupane in mouse brain in the awake and anesthetized (isoflurane) states. Stress induced by imaging in the awake state was assessed through measurement of plasma corticosterone levels. Results: AwakeSPECT provided high-resolution bone images reminiscent of those obtained from CT. The binding potential of ^123I-ioflupane in the awake state was on the order of 50% of that obtained with the animal under anesthesia, consistent with previous studies in nonhuman primates. Levels of stress induced were on the order of those seen in other behavioral tasks and imaging studies of awake animals. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the feasibility of SPECT molecular brain imaging of mice in the conscious, unrestrained state and demonstrate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on radiotracer uptake.

  1. Molecular Imaging of Conscious, Unrestrained Mice with AwakeSPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Justin S; Endres, Christopher; Foss, Catherine; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Jung, Hyeyun; Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Lee, Seung Joon; McKisson, John; Smith, Mark F.; Stolin, Alexander; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Pomper, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a SPECT imaging system, AwakeSPECT, to enable molecular brain imaging of untrained mice that are conscious, unanesthetized, and unrestrained. We accomplished this with head tracking and motion correction techniques. Methods: The capability of the system for motion-corrected imaging was demonstrated with a 99mTc-pertechnetate phantom, 99mTcmethylene diphosphonate bone imaging, and measurement of the binding potential of the dopamine transporter radioligand 123I-ioflupane in mouse brain in the awake and anesthetized (isoflurane) states. Stress induced by imaging in the awake state was assessed through measurement of plasma corticosterone levels. Results: AwakeSPECT provided high-resolution bone images reminiscent of those obtained from CT. The binding potential of 123I-ioflupane in the awake state was on the order of 50% of that obtained with the animal under anesthesia, consistent with previous studies in nonhuman primates. Levels of stress induced were on the order of those seen in other behavioral tasks and imaging studies of awake animals. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the feasibility of SPECT molecular brain imaging of mice in the conscious, unrestrained state and demonstrate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on radiotracer uptake.

  2. Determination of left ventricular mass through SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zárate-Morales, A.; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M.; Martínez-Rodríguez, F.; Arévila-Ceballos, N.

    1998-08-01

    An edge detection algorithm has been applied to estimate left ventricular (LV) mass from single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) thallium-201 images. The algorithm was validated using SPECT images of a phantom. The algorithm was applied to 20 patient studies from the Hospital de Cardiologia, Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI. Left ventricular masses derived from the stress and redistribution studies were highly correlated (r=0.96). The average LV masses obtained were 162±37 g and 169±34 g in the redistribution and stress studies, respectively.

  3. Determination of left ventricular mass through SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zarate-Morales, A.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Martinez-Rodriguez, F.; Arevila-Ceballos, N.

    1998-08-28

    An edge detection algorithm has been applied to estimate left ventricular (LV) mass from single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) thallium-201 images. The algorithm was validated using SPECT images of a phantom. The algorithm was applied to 20 patient studies from the Hospital de Cardiologia, Centro Medico Nacional Siglo XXI. Left ventricular masses derived from the stress and redistribution studies were highly correlated (r=0.96). The average LV masses obtained were 162{+-}37 g and 169{+-}34 g in the redistribution and stress studies, respectively.

  4. System Integration of FastSPECT III, a Dedicated SPECT Rodent-Brain Imager Based on BazookaSPECT Detector Technology

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Brian W.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Moore, Stephen K.; Barber, H. Bradford; Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2010-01-01

    FastSPECT III is a stationary, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager designed specifically for imaging and studying neurological pathologies in rodent brain, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinsons’s disease. Twenty independent BazookaSPECT [1] gamma-ray detectors acquire projections of a spherical field of view with pinholes selected for desired resolution and sensitivity. Each BazookaSPECT detector comprises a columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator, image-intensifier, optical lens, and fast-frame-rate CCD camera. Data stream back to processing computers via firewire interfaces, and heavy use of graphics processing units (GPUs) ensures that each frame of data is processed in real time to extract the images of individual gamma-ray events. Details of the system design, imaging aperture fabrication methods, and preliminary projection images are presented. PMID:21218137

  5. A small-animal imaging system capable of multipinhole circular/helical SPECT and parallel-hole SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jianguo; Bradley, Eric L.; Majewski, Stan; Popov, Vladimir; Saha, Margaret S.; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Welsh, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    We have designed and built a small animal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging system equipped with parallel-hole and multipinhole collimators and capable of circular or helical SPECT. Copper-beryllium parallel-hole collimators suitable for imaging the ~35 keV photons from the decay of 125I have been built and installed to achieve useful spatial resolution over a range of object-detector distances and to reduce imaging time on our dual-detector array. To address the resolution limitations in the parallel-hole SPECT and the sensitivity and limited field of view of single-pinhole SPECT, we have incorporated multipinhole circular and helical SPECT in addition to expanding the parallel-hole SPECT capabilities. The pinhole SPECT system is based on a 110 mm diameter circular detector equipped with a pixellated NaI(Tl) scintillator array (1×1×5 mm3/pixel). The helical trajectory is accomplished by two stepping motors controlling the rotation of the detector-support gantry and displacement of the animal bed along the axis of rotation of the gantry. Results obtained in SPECT studies of various phantoms show an enlarged field of view, very good resolution and improved sensitivity using multipinhole circular or helical SPECT. Collimators with one, three and five 1 mm diameter pinholes have been implemented and compared in these tests. Our objective is to develop a system on which one may readily select a suitable mode of either parallel-hole SPECT or pinhole circular or helical SPECT for a variety of small animal imaging applications. PMID:19701447

  6. A small-animal imaging system capable of multipinhole circular/helical SPECT and parallel-hole SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jianguo; Bradley, Eric L.; Majewski, Stan; Popov, Vladimir; Saha, Margaret S.; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Welsh, Robert E.

    2008-08-01

    We have designed and built a small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging system equipped with parallel-hole and multipinhole collimators and capable of circular or helical SPECT. Copper-beryllium parallel-hole collimators suitable for imaging the ˜35 keV photons from the decay of 125I have been built and installed to achieve useful spatial resolution over a range of object-detector distances and to reduce imaging time on our dual-detector array. To address the resolution limitations in the parallel-hole SPECT and the sensitivity and limited field of view of single-pinhole SPECT, we have incorporated multipinhole circular and helical SPECT in addition to expanding the parallel-hole SPECT capabilities. The pinhole SPECT system is based on a 110 mm diameter circular detector equipped with a pixellated NaI(Tl) scintillator array (1×1×5 mm 3/pixel). The helical trajectory is accomplished by two stepping motors controlling the rotation of the detector-support gantry and displacement of the animal bed along the axis of rotation of the gantry. Results obtained in SPECT studies of various phantoms show an enlarged field of view, very good resolution and improved sensitivity using multipinhole circular or helical SPECT. Collimators with one, three and five, 1-mm-diameter pinholes have been implemented and compared in these tests. Our objective is to develop a system on which one may readily select a suitable mode of either parallel-hole SPECT or pinhole circular or helical SPECT for a variety of small animal imaging applications.

  7. Multispectral imaging probe

    SciTech Connect

    Sandison, David R.; Platzbecker, Mark R.; Descour, Michael R.; Armour, David L.; Craig, Marcus J.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    1999-01-01

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector.

  8. Multispectral imaging probe

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, D.R.; Platzbecker, M.R.; Descour, M.R.; Armour, D.L.; Craig, M.J.; Richards-Kortum, R.

    1999-07-27

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector. 8 figs.

  9. A COMPUTER MODEL OF LUNG MORPHOLOGY TO ANALYZE SPECT IMAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurement of the three-dimensional (3-D) spatial distribution of aerosol deposition can be performed using Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT). The advantage of using 3-D techniques over planar gamma imaging is that deposition patterns can be related to real lun...

  10. Three modality image registration of brain SPECT/CT and MR images for quantitative analysis of dopamine transporter imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Yuzuho; Takeda, Yuta; Hara, Takeshi; Zhou, Xiangrong; Matsusako, Masaki; Tanaka, Yuki; Hosoya, Kazuhiko; Nihei, Tsutomu; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Important features in Parkinson's disease (PD) are degenerations and losses of dopamine neurons in corpus striatum. 123I-FP-CIT can visualize activities of the dopamine neurons. The activity radio of background to corpus striatum is used for diagnosis of PD and Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). The specific activity can be observed in the corpus striatum on SPECT images, but the location and the shape of the corpus striatum on SPECT images only are often lost because of the low uptake. In contrast, MR images can visualize the locations of the corpus striatum. The purpose of this study was to realize a quantitative image analysis for the SPECT images by using image registration technique with brain MR images that can determine the region of corpus striatum. In this study, the image fusion technique was used to fuse SPECT and MR images by intervening CT image taken by SPECT/CT. The mutual information (MI) for image registration between CT and MR images was used for the registration. Six SPECT/CT and four MR scans of phantom materials are taken by changing the direction. As the results of the image registrations, 16 of 24 combinations were registered within 1.3mm. By applying the approach to 32 clinical SPECT/CT and MR cases, all of the cases were registered within 0.86mm. In conclusions, our registration method has a potential in superimposing MR images on SPECT images.

  11. Infective endocarditis detection through SPECT/CT images digital processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Albino; Valdés, Raquel; Jiménez, Luis; Vallejo, Enrique; Hernández, Salvador; Soto, Gabriel

    2014-03-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a difficult-to-diagnose pathology, since its manifestation in patients is highly variable. In this work, it was proposed a semiautomatic algorithm based on SPECT images digital processing for the detection of IE using a CT images volume as a spatial reference. The heart/lung rate was calculated using the SPECT images information. There were no statistically significant differences between the heart/lung rates values of a group of patients diagnosed with IE (2.62+/-0.47) and a group of healthy or control subjects (2.84+/-0.68). However, it is necessary to increase the study sample of both the individuals diagnosed with IE and the control group subjects, as well as to improve the images quality.

  12. Design and development of MR-compatible SPECT systems for simultaneous SPECT-MR imaging of small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Benjamin M. W.; Hugg, James W.; Xu, Jingyan; Chen, Si; Meier, Dirk; Edelstein, William; El-Sharkawy, Abdel; Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Patt, Bradley E.

    2011-03-01

    We describe a continuing design and development of MR-compatible SPECT systems for simultaneous SPECT-MR imaging of small animals. A first generation prototype SPECT system was designed and constructed to fit inside a MRI system with a gradient bore inner diameter of 12 cm. It consists of 3 angularly offset rings of 8 detectors (1"x1", 16x16 pixels MR-compatible solid-state CZT). A matching 24-pinhole collimator sleeve, made of a tungsten-compound, provides projections from a common FOV of ~25 mm. A birdcage RF coil for MRI data acquisition surrounds the collimator. The SPECT system was tested inside a clinical 3T MRI system. Minimal interference was observed on the simultaneously acquired SPECT and MR images. We developed a sparse-view image reconstruction method based on accurate modeling of the point response function (PRF) of each of the 24 pinholes to provide artifact-free SPECT images. The stationary SPECT system provides relatively low resolution of 3-5 mm but high geometric efficiency of 0.5- 1.2% for fast dynamic acquisition, demonstrated in a SPECT renal kinetics study using Tc-99m DTPA. Based on these results, a second generation prototype MR-compatible SPECT system with an outer diameter of 20 cm that fits inside a mid-sized preclinical MRI system is being developed. It consists of 5 rings of 19 CZT detectors. The larger ring diameter allows the use of optimized multi-pinhole collimator designs, such as high system resolution up to ~1 mm, high geometric efficiency, or lower system resolution without collimator rotation. The anticipated performance of the new system is supported by simulation data.

  13. A novel SPECT camera for molecular imaging of the prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebula, Alan; Gilland, David; Su, Li-Ming; Wagenaar, Douglas; Bahadori, Amir

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this work is to develop an improved SPECT camera for dedicated prostate imaging. Complementing the recent advancements in agents for molecular prostate imaging, this device has the potential to assist in distinguishing benign from aggressive cancers, to improve site-specific localization of cancer, to improve accuracy of needle-guided prostate biopsy of cancer sites, and to aid in focal therapy procedures such as cryotherapy and radiation. Theoretical calculations show that the spatial resolution/detection sensitivity of the proposed SPECT camera can rival or exceed 3D PET and further signal-to-noise advantage is attained with the better energy resolution of the CZT modules. Based on photon transport simulation studies, the system has a reconstructed spatial resolution of 4.8 mm with a sensitivity of 0.0001. Reconstruction of a simulated prostate distribution demonstrates the focal imaging capability of the system.

  14. Compact CT/SPECT Small-Animal Imaging System

    PubMed Central

    Kastis, George A.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Wilson, Donald W.; Peterson, Todd E.; Barber, H. Bradford; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a dual-modality CT/SPECT imaging system for small-animal imaging applications. The X-ray system comprises a commercially available micro-focus X-ray tube and a CCD-based X-ray camera. X-ray transmission measurements are performed based on cone-beam geometry. Individual projections are acquired by rotating the animal about a vertical axis in front of the CCD detector. A high-resolution CT image is obtained after reconstruction using an ordered subsets-expectation maximization (OS-EM) reconstruction algorithm. The SPECT system utilizes a compact semiconductor camera module previously developed in our group. The module is mounted perpendicular to the X-ray tube/CCD combination. It consists of a 64×64 pixellated CdZnTe detector and a parallel-hole tungsten collimator. The field of view is 1 square inch. Planar projections for SPECT reconstruction are obtained by rotating the animal in front of the detector. Gamma-ray and X-ray images are presented of phantoms and mice. Procedures for merging the anatomical and functional images are discussed. PMID:26538684

  15. SPECT-CT system for small animal imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Weisenberger; Randolph Wojcik; E.L. Bradley; Paul Brewer; Stanislaw Majewski; Jianguo Qian; Amoreena Ranck; Arunava Saha; Mark Smith; Robert Welsh

    2003-02-01

    The Detector Group at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) and the Biology, Physics, and Applied Sciences Departments at the College of William and Mary are collaborating on the development of a miniature dual modality SPECT-CT system for mouse imaging. The detector heads of the SPECT sub-system are designed to be capable of imaging the gamma- and X-ray emissions (28-35 keV) of the radioactive isotope iodine-125 (I-125). Two different sets of I-125 imaging detectors are configured on a gantry that has an open-barrel type design. One set of detector heads is based on the 1-in square Hamamatsu R5900-M64 position sensitive photomultiplier tube coupled to crystal scintillator arrays. The other detector heads configured on the gantry are two 5-in diameter Hamamatsu R3292-based compact gamma cameras. The X-ray radiographic projections are obtained using a LIXI Inc. model LF-85-503-OS X-ray imaging system that has an active area of 5.5 cm in diameter. The open-barrel shaped gantry facilitates the positioning of various mini gamma-ray imaging detectors and the X-ray system. The data acquisition and gantry control is interfaced through a Macintosh G3 workstation. Preliminary SPECT reconstruction results using the R5900 based detector are presented.

  16. SPECT-CT System for Small Animal Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    A.G. Weisenberger; R. Wojcik; E.L. Bradley; P. Brewer; S. Majewski; J. Qian; A. Ranck; M.S. Saha; K. Smith; M.F. Smith; R.E. Welsh

    2001-11-01

    The Detector Group at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) and the Biology, Physics and Applied Sciences Departments at the College of William and Mary are collaborating on the development of a miniature dual modality SPECT-CT system for mouse imaging. The detector heads of the SPECT sub-system are capable of imaging the gamma- and x-ray emissions (28-35 keV) of the radioactive isotope iodine-125 (I-125). Two different sets of I-125 imaging detectors are configured on a gantry which has an open-barrel type design. One set of detector heads is based on the 1 inch square Hamamatsu R5900-M64 position sensitive photomultiplier tube coupled to crystal scintillator arrays. The other detector heads configured on the gantry are two 5-inch diameter Hamamatsu R3292-based compact gamma cameras. The x-ray radiographic projections will be obtained using a LIXI Inc. model LF-85-503-OS x-ray imaging system that has an active area of 5.5 cm in diameter. The open-barrel shaped gantry facilitates the positioning of various mini gamma-ray imaging detectors and the x-ray system. The data acquisition and gantry control is interfaced through a Macintosh G3 workstation. SPECT reconstruction results using the R5900 based detector are presented.

  17. Nonlinear dual reconstruction of SPECT activity and attenuation images.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huafeng; Guo, Min; Hu, Zhenghui; Shi, Pengcheng; Hu, Hongjie

    2014-01-01

    In single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), accurate attenuation maps are needed to perform essential attenuation compensation for high quality radioactivity estimation. Formulating the SPECT activity and attenuation reconstruction tasks as coupled signal estimation and system parameter identification problems, where the activity distribution and the attenuation parameter are treated as random variables with known prior statistics, we present a nonlinear dual reconstruction scheme based on the unscented Kalman filtering (UKF) principles. In this effort, the dynamic changes of the organ radioactivity distribution are described through state space evolution equations, while the photon-counting SPECT projection data are measured through the observation equations. Activity distribution is then estimated with sub-optimal fixed attenuation parameters, followed by attenuation map reconstruction given these activity estimates. Such coupled estimation processes are iteratively repeated as necessary until convergence. The results obtained from Monte Carlo simulated data, physical phantom, and real SPECT scans demonstrate the improved performance of the proposed method both from visual inspection of the images and a quantitative evaluation, compared to the widely used EM-ML algorithms. The dual estimation framework has the potential to be useful for estimating the attenuation map from emission data only and thus benefit the radioactivity reconstruction. PMID:25225796

  18. Nonlinear Dual Reconstruction of SPECT Activity and Attenuation Images

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huafeng; Guo, Min; Hu, Zhenghui; Shi, Pengcheng; Hu, Hongjie

    2014-01-01

    In single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), accurate attenuation maps are needed to perform essential attenuation compensation for high quality radioactivity estimation. Formulating the SPECT activity and attenuation reconstruction tasks as coupled signal estimation and system parameter identification problems, where the activity distribution and the attenuation parameter are treated as random variables with known prior statistics, we present a nonlinear dual reconstruction scheme based on the unscented Kalman filtering (UKF) principles. In this effort, the dynamic changes of the organ radioactivity distribution are described through state space evolution equations, while the photon-counting SPECT projection data are measured through the observation equations. Activity distribution is then estimated with sub-optimal fixed attenuation parameters, followed by attenuation map reconstruction given these activity estimates. Such coupled estimation processes are iteratively repeated as necessary until convergence. The results obtained from Monte Carlo simulated data, physical phantom, and real SPECT scans demonstrate the improved performance of the proposed method both from visual inspection of the images and a quantitative evaluation, compared to the widely used EM-ML algorithms. The dual estimation framework has the potential to be useful for estimating the attenuation map from emission data only and thus benefit the radioactivity reconstruction. PMID:25225796

  19. Dual-headed SPECT for awake animal brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung Joon; Weisenberger, A G; McKisson, J; Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Baba, Justin S; Smith, M F

    2011-01-01

    Abstract- Motion-corrected awake animal imaging is needed for normal-state investigations of models of neurological disease and brain activity. The awake animal brain SPECT/CT system, AwakeSPECT at Johns Hopkins University has in the past used a single gamma camera for imaging. Enhancements have been made by adding a pinhole collimator to the second gamma camera at the opposite side which has been previously equipped parallel hole collimator. Geometry calibration was performed using a custom built quality control phantom containing three Co-57 point sources and applied to the tomographic reconstruction code. Hot-rod phantom scans with Tc-99m were performed to test sensitivity and resolution improvements. The reconstruction results show significant resolution and sensitivity improvements.

  20. Dual-headed SPECT for awake animal brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    S. Lee, B. Kross, D. Weisenberger, J. McKisson, J.S. Goddard, J.S. Baba, M.S. Smith

    2012-02-01

    Motion-corrected awake animal imaging is needed for normal-state investigations of models of neurological disease and brain activity. The awake animal brain SPECT/CT system, AwakeSPECT at Johns Hopkins University has in the past used a single gamma camera for imaging. Enhancements have been made by adding a pinhole collimator to the second gamma camera at the opposite side which has been previously equipped parallel hole collimator. Geometry calibration was performed using a custom built quality control phantom containing three Co-57 point sources and applied to the tomographic reconstruction code. Hot-rod phantom scans with Tc-99m were performed to test sensitivity and resolution improvements. The reconstruction results show significant resolution and sensitivity improvements.

  1. Molecular probes for cardiovascular imaging.

    PubMed

    Liang, Grace; Nguyen, Patricia K

    2016-08-01

    Molecular probes provide imaging signal and contrast for the visualization, characterization, and measurement of biological processes at the molecular level. These probes can be designed to target the cell or tissue of interest and must be retained at the imaging site until they can be detected by the appropriate imaging modality. In this article, we will discuss the basic design of molecular probes, differences among the various types of probes, and general strategies for their evaluation of cardiovascular disease. PMID:27189171

  2. Direction-dependent localization errors in SPECT images

    SciTech Connect

    Roper, Justin; Bowsher, James; Yin Fangfang

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is being investigated for imaging inside radiation therapy treatment rooms to localize biological targets. Here, computer simulations were used to analyze locational and directional dependencies in localization errors and to assess the effects of spatial resolution modeling and observer normalization on localization performance. Methods: SPECT images of the XCAT phantom, containing 12 hot tumors, were reconstructed with detector response function compensation (DRC) and without DRC (nDRC). Numerical observers were forced to select the most suspicious tumor location, using normalized cross correlation (NXC) or un-normalized cross correlation (XC), from 3 cm diameter search volumes that each contained only one tumor. For each tumor site, localization was optimized as a function of the iteration number and postreconstruction smoothing. Localization error, the distance between true and estimated tumor positions, was calculated across the ensembles of 80 images. Direction-dependent localization bias and precision were estimated from the image ensemble. Results: For the six superficial tumors in close proximity to the detector trajectory, mean localization errors were <2 mm and were lowest or comparable using DRC-NXC, though differences from DRC-XC and nDRC-NXC were not statistically significant. DRC-NXC did provide statistically significantly better localization than nDRC-XC for five of these six tumors. At the other six sites where attenuation was more severe and the distance was generally greater between the tumor and detector, DRC typically did not show better localization than nDRC. Observer normalization improved the localization substantially for a tumor near the hotter heart. Localization errors were anisotropic and dependent on tumor location relative to the detector trajectory. Conclusions: This computer-simulation study compared localization performance for normalized and un-normalized numerical

  3. Accuracy of quantitative reconstructions in SPECT/CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbinin, S.; Celler, A.; Belhocine, T.; van der Werf, R.; Driedger, A.

    2008-09-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the quantitative accuracy of our OSEM-APDI reconstruction method based on SPECT/CT imaging for Tc-99m, In-111, I-123, and I-131 isotopes. Phantom studies were performed on a SPECT/low-dose multislice CT system (Infinia-Hawkeye-4 slice, GE Healthcare) using clinical acquisition protocols. Two radioactive sources were centrally and peripherally placed inside an anthropometric Thorax phantom filled with non-radioactive water. Corrections for attenuation, scatter, collimator blurring and collimator septal penetration were applied and their contribution to the overall accuracy of the reconstruction was evaluated. Reconstruction with the most comprehensive set of corrections resulted in activity estimation with error levels of 3-5% for all the isotopes.

  4. Adaptive SPECT imaging with crossed-slit apertures

    PubMed Central

    Durko, Heather L.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is an essential tool for studying the progression, response to treatment, and physiological changes in small animal models of human disease. The wide range of imaging applications is often limited by the static design of many preclinical SPECT systems. We have developed a prototype imaging system that replaces the standard static pinhole aperture with two sets of movable, keel-edged copper-tungsten blades configured as crossed (skewed) slits. These apertures can be positioned independently between the object and detector, producing a continuum of imaging configurations in which the axial and transaxial magnifications are not constrained to be equal. We incorporated a megapixel silicon double-sided strip detector to permit ultrahigh-resolution imaging. We describe the configuration of the adjustable slit aperture imaging system and discuss its application toward adaptive imaging, and reconstruction techniques using an accurate imaging forward model, a novel geometric calibration technique, and a GPU-based ultra-high-resolution reconstruction code. PMID:26190884

  5. Intrinsic Feature Pose Measurement for Awake Animal SPECT Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Baba, Justin S; Lee, Seung Joon; Weisenberger, A G; Stolin, A; McKisson, J; Smith, M F

    2009-01-01

    New developments have been made in optical motion tracking for awake animal imaging that measures 3D position and orientation (pose) for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging system. Ongoing SPECT imaging research has been directed towards head motion measurement for brain studies in awake, unrestrained mice. In contrast to previous results using external markers, this work extracts and tracks intrinsic features from multiple camera images and computes relative pose from the tracked features over time. Motion tracking thus far has been limited to measuring extrinsic features such as retro-reflective markers applied to the mouse s head. While this approach has been proven to be accurate, the additional animal handling required to attach the markers is undesirable. A significant improvement in the procedure is achieved by measuring the pose of the head without extrinsic markers using only the external surface appearance. This approach is currently being developed with initial results presented here. The intrinsic features measurement extracts discrete, sparse natural features from 2D images such as eyes, nose, mouth and other visible structures. Stereo correspondence between features for a camera pair is determined for calculation of 3D positions. These features are also tracked over time to provide continuity for surface model fitting. Experimental results from live images are presented.

  6. New SPECT and PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Imaging Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sogbein, Oyebola O.; Pelletier-Galarneau, Matthieu; Schindler, Thomas H.; Wei, Lihui; Wells, R. Glenn; Ruddy, Terrence D.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology has experienced exponential growth within the past four decades with converging capacity to diagnose and influence management of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with technetium-99m radiotracers or thallium-201 has dominated the field; however new hardware and software designs that optimize image quality with reduced radiation exposure are fuelling a resurgence of interest at the preclinical and clinical levels to expand beyond MPI. Other imaging modalities including positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) continue to emerge as powerful players with an expanded capacity to diagnose a variety of cardiac conditions. At the forefront of this resurgence is the development of novel target vectors based on an enhanced understanding of the underlying pathophysiological process in the subcellular domain. Molecular imaging with novel radiopharmaceuticals engineered to target a specific subcellular process has the capacity to improve diagnostic accuracy and deliver enhanced prognostic information to alter management. This paper, while not comprehensive, will review the recent advancements in radiotracer development for SPECT and PET MPI, autonomic dysfunction, apoptosis, atherosclerotic plaques, metabolism, and viability. The relevant radiochemistry and preclinical and clinical development in addition to molecular imaging with emerging modalities such as cardiac MRI and PET-MR will be discussed. PMID:24901002

  7. Physiological imaging with PET and SPECT in Dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Jagust, W.J. . Dept. of Neurology Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1989-10-01

    Dementia is a medical problem of increasingly obvious importance. The most common cause of dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD) accounts for at least 50% of all cases of dementia, with multi-infarct dementia the next most common cause of the syndrome. While the accuracy of diagnosis of AD may range from 80 to 90%, there is currently no laboratory test to confirm the diagnosis. Functional imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) offer diagnostic advantages since brain function is unequivocally disturbed in all dementing illnesses. Both PET and SPECT have been utilized in the study of dementia. While both techniques rely on principles of emission tomography to produce three dimensional maps of injected radiotracers, the differences between positron and single photon emission have important consequences for the practical applications of the two procedures. This briefly reviews the technical differences between PET and SPECT, and discusses how both techniques have been used in our laboratory to elucidate the pathophysiology of dementia. 32 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Applications of SPECT imaging of dopaminergic neurotransmission in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Kugaya, A; Fujita, M; Innis, R B

    2000-02-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tracers selective for pre- and post-synaptic targets have allowed measurements of several aspects of dopaminergic (DA) neurotransmission. In this article, we will first review our DA transporter imaging in Parkinson's disease. We have developed the in vivo dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging with [123I]beta-CIT ((1R)-2beta-Carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-iodophenyl)tropane). This method showed that patients with Parkinson's disease have markedly reduced DAT levels in striatum, which correlated with disease severity and disease progression. Second, we applied DA imaging techniques in patients with schizophrenia. Using amphetamine as a releaser of DA, we observed the enhanced DA release, which was measured by imaging D2 receptors with [123I]IBZM (iodobenzamide), in schizophrenics. Further we developed the measurement of basal synaptic DA levels by AMPT (alpha-methyl-paratyrosine)-induced unmasking of D2 receptors. Finally, we expanded our techniques to the measurement of extrastriatal DA receptors using [123I]epidepride. The findings suggest that SPECT is a useful technique to measure DA transmission in human brain and may further our understanding of the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:10770574

  9. Molecular imaging of gene expression and protein function in vivo with PET and SPECT.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vijay; Luker, Gary D; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2002-10-01

    Molecular imaging is broadly defined as the characterization and measurement of biological processes in living animals, model systems, and humans at the cellular and molecular level using remote imaging detectors. One underlying premise of molecular imaging is that this emerging field is not defined by the imaging technologies that underpin acquisition of the final image per se, but rather is driven by the underlying biological questions. In practice, the choice of imaging modality and probe is usually reduced to choosing between high spatial resolution and high sensitivity to address a given biological system. Positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) inherently use image-enhancing agents (radiopharmaceuticals) that are synthesized at sufficiently high specific activity to enable use of tracer concentrations of the compound (picomolar to nanomolar) for detecting molecular signals while providing the desired levels of image contrast. The tracer technologies strategically provide high sensitivity for imaging small-capacity molecular systems in vivo (receptors, enzymes, transporters) at a cost of lower spatial resolution than other technologies. We review several significant PET and SPECT advances in imaging receptors (somatostatin receptor subtypes, neurotensin receptor subtypes, alpha(v)beta(3) integrin), enzymes (hexokinase, thymidine kinase), transporters (MDR1 P-glycoprotein, sodium-iodide symporter), and permeation peptides (human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat conjugates), as well as innovative reporter gene constructs (herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase, somatostatin receptor subtype 2, cytosine deaminase) for imaging gene promoter activation and repression, signal transduction pathways, and protein-protein interactions in vivo. PMID:12353250

  10. Filter and slice thickness selection in SPECT image reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanovic, M.; Weber, D.A.; Wilson, G.A.; O'Mara, R.E.

    1985-05-01

    The choice of filter and slice thickness in SPECT image reconstruction as function of activity and linear and angular sampling were investigated in phantom and patient imaging studies. Reconstructed transverse and longitudinal spatial resolution of the system were measured using a line source in a water filled phantom. Phantom studies included measurements of the Data Spectrum phantom; clinical studies included tomographic procedures in 40 patients undergoing imaging of the temporomandibular joint. Slices of the phantom and patient images were evaluated for spatial of the phantom and patient images were evaluated for spatial resolution, noise, and image quality. Major findings include; spatial resolution and image quality improve with increasing linear sampling frequencies over the range of 4-8 mm/p in the phantom images, best spatial resolution and image quality in clinical images were observed at a linear sampling frequency of 6mm/p, Shepp and Logan filter gives the best spatial resolution for phantom studies at the lowest linear sampling frequency; smoothed Shepp and Logan filter provides best quality images without loss of resolution at higher frequencies and, spatial resolution and image quality improve with increased angular sampling frequency in the phantom at 40 c/p but appear to be independent of angular sampling frequency at 400 c/p.

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of PET and SPECT imaging of {sup 90}Y

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Akihiko Sasaki, Masayuki; Himuro, Kazuhiko; Yamashita, Yasuo; Komiya, Isao; Baba, Shingo

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Yittrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) is traditionally thought of as a pure beta emitter, and is used in targeted radionuclide therapy, with imaging performed using bremsstrahlung single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). However, because {sup 90}Y also emits positrons through internal pair production with a very small branching ratio, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is also available. Because of the insufficient image quality of {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung SPECT, PET imaging has been suggested as an alternative. In this paper, the authors present the Monte Carlo-based simulation–reconstruction framework for {sup 90}Y to comprehensively analyze the PET and SPECT imaging techniques and to quantitatively consider the disadvantages associated with them. Methods: Our PET and SPECT simulation modules were developed using Monte Carlo simulation of Electrons and Photons (MCEP), developed by Dr. S. Uehara. PET code (MCEP-PET) generates a sinogram, and reconstructs the tomography image using a time-of-flight ordered subset expectation maximization (TOF-OSEM) algorithm with attenuation compensation. To evaluate MCEP-PET, simulated results of {sup 18}F PET imaging were compared with the experimental results. The results confirmed that MCEP-PET can simulate the experimental results very well. The SPECT code (MCEP-SPECT) models the collimator and NaI detector system, and generates the projection images and projection data. To save the computational time, the authors adopt the prerecorded {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung photon data calculated by MCEP. The projection data are also reconstructed using the OSEM algorithm. The authors simulated PET and SPECT images of a water phantom containing six hot spheres filled with different concentrations of {sup 90}Y without background activity. The amount of activity was 163 MBq, with an acquisition time of 40 min. Results: The simulated {sup 90}Y-PET image accurately simulated the experimental results. PET image is visually

  12. SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging enables accurate evaluation of radiotracers for β-cell mass assessments

    PubMed Central

    Eter, Wael A.; Parween, Saba; Joosten, Lieke; Frielink, Cathelijne; Eriksson, Maria; Brom, Maarten; Ahlgren, Ulf; Gotthardt, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) has become a promising experimental approach to monitor changes in β-cell mass (BCM) during diabetes progression. SPECT imaging of pancreatic islets is most commonly cross-validated by stereological analysis of histological pancreatic sections after insulin staining. Typically, stereological methods do not accurately determine the total β-cell volume, which is inconvenient when correlating total pancreatic tracer uptake with BCM. Alternative methods are therefore warranted to cross-validate β-cell imaging using radiotracers. In this study, we introduce multimodal SPECT - optical projection tomography (OPT) imaging as an accurate approach to cross-validate radionuclide-based imaging of β-cells. Uptake of a promising radiotracer for β-cell imaging by SPECT, 111In-exendin-3, was measured by ex vivo-SPECT and cross evaluated by 3D quantitative OPT imaging as well as with histology within healthy and alloxan-treated Brown Norway rat pancreata. SPECT signal was in excellent linear correlation with OPT data as compared to histology. While histological determination of islet spatial distribution was challenging, SPECT and OPT revealed similar distribution patterns of 111In-exendin-3 and insulin positive β-cell volumes between different pancreatic lobes, both visually and quantitatively. We propose ex vivo SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging as a highly accurate strategy for validating the performance of β-cell radiotracers. PMID:27080529

  13. SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging enables accurate evaluation of radiotracers for β-cell mass assessments.

    PubMed

    Eter, Wael A; Parween, Saba; Joosten, Lieke; Frielink, Cathelijne; Eriksson, Maria; Brom, Maarten; Ahlgren, Ulf; Gotthardt, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) has become a promising experimental approach to monitor changes in β-cell mass (BCM) during diabetes progression. SPECT imaging of pancreatic islets is most commonly cross-validated by stereological analysis of histological pancreatic sections after insulin staining. Typically, stereological methods do not accurately determine the total β-cell volume, which is inconvenient when correlating total pancreatic tracer uptake with BCM. Alternative methods are therefore warranted to cross-validate β-cell imaging using radiotracers. In this study, we introduce multimodal SPECT - optical projection tomography (OPT) imaging as an accurate approach to cross-validate radionuclide-based imaging of β-cells. Uptake of a promising radiotracer for β-cell imaging by SPECT, (111)In-exendin-3, was measured by ex vivo-SPECT and cross evaluated by 3D quantitative OPT imaging as well as with histology within healthy and alloxan-treated Brown Norway rat pancreata. SPECT signal was in excellent linear correlation with OPT data as compared to histology. While histological determination of islet spatial distribution was challenging, SPECT and OPT revealed similar distribution patterns of (111)In-exendin-3 and insulin positive β-cell volumes between different pancreatic lobes, both visually and quantitatively. We propose ex vivo SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging as a highly accurate strategy for validating the performance of β-cell radiotracers. PMID:27080529

  14. Feasibility and Initial Performance of Simultaneous SPECT-CT Imaging Using a Commercial Multi-Modality Preclinical Imaging System

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Dustin R.; Austin, Derek W.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-modality imaging provides coregistered PET-CT and SPECT-CT images; however such multi-modality workflows usually consist of sequential scans from the individual imaging components for each modality. This typical workflow may result in long scan times limiting throughput of the imaging system. Conversely, acquiring multi-modality data simultaneously may improve correlation and registration of images, improve temporal alignment of the acquired data, increase imaging throughput, and benefit the scanned subject by minimizing time under anesthetic. In this work, we demonstrate the feasibility and procedure for modifying a commercially available preclinical SPECT-CT platform to enable simultaneous SPECT-CT acquisition. We also evaluate the performance of simultaneous SPECT-CT tomographic imaging with this modified system. Performance was accessed using a 57Co source and image quality was evaluated with 99mTc phantoms in a series of simultaneous SPECT-CT scans. PMID:26146568

  15. Brain SPECT Imaging in Complex Psychiatric Cases: An Evidence-Based, Underutilized Tool

    PubMed Central

    Amen, Daniel G; Trujillo, Manuel; Newberg, Andrew; Willeumier, Kristen; Tarzwell, Robert; Wu, Joseph C; Chaitin, Barry

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 20 years brain Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) imaging has developed a substantial, evidence-based foundation and is now recommended by professional societies for numerous indications relevant to psychiatric practice. Unfortunately, SPECT in clinical practice is utilized by only a handful of clinicians. This article presents a rationale for a more widespread use of SPECT in clinical practice for complex cases, and includes seven clinical applications where it may help optimize patient care. PMID:21863144

  16. EANM procedural guidelines for radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging with SPECT and SPECT/CT: 2015 revision.

    PubMed

    Verberne, Hein J; Acampa, Wanda; Anagnostopoulos, Constantinos; Ballinger, Jim; Bengel, Frank; De Bondt, Pieter; Buechel, Ronny R; Cuocolo, Alberto; van Eck-Smit, Berthe L F; Flotats, Albert; Hacker, Marcus; Hindorf, Cecilia; Kaufmann, Philip A; Lindner, Oliver; Ljungberg, Michael; Lonsdale, Markus; Manrique, Alain; Minarik, David; Scholte, Arthur J H A; Slart, Riemer H J A; Trägårdh, Elin; de Wit, Tim C; Hesse, Birger

    2015-11-01

    Since the publication of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) procedural guidelines for radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) in 2005, many small and some larger steps of progress have been made, improving MPI procedures. In this paper, the major changes from the updated 2015 procedural guidelines are highlighted, focusing on the important changes related to new instrumentation with improved image information and the possibility to reduce radiation exposure, which is further discussed in relation to the recent developments of new International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) models. Introduction of the selective coronary vasodilator regadenoson and the use of coronary CT-contrast agents for hybrid imaging with SPECT/CT angiography are other important areas for nuclear cardiology that were not included in the previous guidelines. A large number of minor changes have been described in more detail in the fully revised version available at the EANM home page: http://eanm.org/publications/guidelines/2015_07_EANM_FINAL_myocardial_perfusion_guideline.pdf . PMID:26290421

  17. Receptor Specific Ligands for Spect Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, H. F.

    2003-02-25

    In the past funding period we have concentrated in developing new 99mTc labeled MIBG analogs. Basic chemistry of ligand synthesis, radiochemistry of Re and 99mTc complex formation, separation of stereoisomers and in vitro stability were investigated. We have prepared a number of new MIBG derivatives containing chelating moiety N2S2 and additional groups to increase lipophilicity. Unfortunately none of the new 99mTc labeled MIBG analogs showed promise as an imaging agent for myocardial neuronal function. Radioactive-iodine-labeled meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is currently being used as an in vivo imaging agent to evaluate neuroendocrine tumors as well as the myocardial sympathetic nervous system in patients with myocardial infarct and cardiomyopathy. It is generally accepted that MIBG is an analog of norepinephrine and its uptake in the heart corresponds to the distribution of norepinephrine and the density of sympathetic neurons. A series of MIBG derivatives containing suitable chelating functional groups N2S2 for the formation of [Tcv0]+3N2S2 complex was successfully synthesized and the 99mTc-labeled complexes were prepared and tested in rats. One of the compounds, [99mTc]M2, tested showed significant, albeit lower, heart uptakes post iv injection in rats (0.18% dose/organ at 4 hours) as compared to [l25l]MIBG (1.4% dose/organ at 4 hours). The heart uptake of the 99mTc-labeled complex, [99mTc]M2, appears to be specific and can be reduced by coinjection with nonradioactive MIBG or by pretreatment with desipramine. a selective norepinephrine transporter inhibitor. Further evaluation of the in vitro uptake of [99mTc]M2 in cultured neuroblastoma cells displayed consistently lower, but measurable uptake (app. 10% of that for [125l]MlBG). These preliminary results suggested that the mechanisms of heart uptake of [99mTc]M2 may be related to those for [125l]MIBG uptake. To improve the heart uptake of the MIBG derivatives we have developed chemistry related to the

  18. SPECT imaging in a case of primary respiratory tract amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, M; Oda, J; Kamura, T; Kimura, M; Odano, I; Sakai, K

    1993-08-01

    SPECT findings in a very rare case of primary amyloidosis localized in the laryngotracheobronchial area are reported. SPECT using Tc-99m PYP revealed widespread uptake in the larynx and the entire tracheobronchial tree up to the subsegmental divisions; the areas corresponded to diffuse thickening and calcification of the walls on CT. SPECT using Ga-67 citrate also showed marked uptake in the same area, consistent with the findings shown by SPECT using Tc-99m PYP. PMID:8403700

  19. A review of small animal imaging planar and pinhole spect Gamma camera imaging.

    PubMed

    Peremans, Kathelijne; Cornelissen, Bart; Van Den Bossche, Bieke; Audenaert, Kurt; Van de Wiele, Christophe

    2005-01-01

    Scintigraphy (positron emission tomography (PET) or single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) techniques) allows qualitative and quantitative measurement of physiologic processes as well as alterations secondary to various disease states. With the use of specific radioligands, molecular pathways and pharmaco-kinetic processes can be investigated. Radioligand delivery can be (semi)quantified in the region of interest in cross-sectional and longitudinal examinations, which can be performed under the same conditions or after physiologic or pharmacologic interventions. Most preclinical pharmacokinetic studies on physiological and experimentally altered physiological processes are performed in laboratory animals using high-resolution imaging systems. Single photon emission imaging has the disadvantage of decreased spatial and temporal resolution compared with PET. The advantage of SPECT is that equipment is generally more accessible and commonly used radionuclides have a longer physical half-life allowing for investigations over a longer time interval. This review will focus on single photon emission scintigraphy. An overview of contemporary techniques to measure biodistribution and kinetics of radiopharmaceuticals in small animal in vivo is presented. Theoretical as well as practical aspects of planar gamma camera and SPECT pinhole (PH) imaging are discussed. Current research is focusing on refining PH SPECT methodology, so specific regarding technical aspects and applications of PH SPECT will be reviewed. PMID:15869162

  20. Prone breast tumor imaging using vertical axis-of-rotation (VAOR) SPECT systems: An initial study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Huili; Scarfone, C.; Greer, K.L.; Coleman, R.E.

    1996-12-31

    We propose the use of a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system equipped with multiple cameras revolving around a vertical axis-of-rotation (VAOR) to image tumors in a prone-dependent breast. This innovative breast imaging approach has the advantages of a small attenuation volume between breast lesions and gamma detector as well as a minimal radius-of-rotation compared to conventional (horizontal axis-of-rotation) breast SPECT. Small attenuation volume results in improved detected counts and minimal radius-of-rotation leads to increased collimator resolution. Because of no VAOR SPECT system currently available, we conducted our experiments on a conventional SPECT system using an isolated breast phantom to investigate the proposed VAOR breast SPECT. Our experimental setup simulated a VAOR SPECT study with a prone-dependent breast in the camera`s field-of-view. The results of our experiment indicate that VAOR breast SPECT with Trionix LESR parallel hole collimator is capable of detecting a breast lesion with a diameter of 10 mm and a lesion-to-background concentration ratio of 6 to 1. The results also demonstrate that VAOR breast SPECT provides improved lesion visualization over planar scintimammography and conventional breast SPECT.

  1. SPECT imaging evaluation in movement disorders: far beyond visual assessment.

    PubMed

    Badiavas, Kosmas; Molyvda, Elisavet; Iakovou, Ioannis; Tsolaki, Magdalini; Psarrakos, Kyriakos; Karatzas, Nikolaos

    2011-04-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging with (123)I-FP-CIT is of great value in differentiating patients suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD) from those suffering from essential tremor (ET). Moreover, SPECT with (123)I-IBZM can differentiate PD from Parkinson's "plus" syndromes. Diagnosis is still mainly based on experienced observers' visual assessment of the resulting images while many quantitative methods have been developed in order to assist diagnosis since the early days of neuroimaging. The aim of this work is to attempt to categorize, briefly present and comment on a number of semi-quantification methods used in nuclear medicine neuroimaging. Various arithmetic indices have been introduced with region of interest (ROI) manual drawing methods giving their place to automated procedures, while advancing computer technology has allowed automated image registration, fusion and segmentation to bring quantification closer to the final diagnosis based on the whole of the patient's examinations results, clinical condition and response to therapy. The search for absolute quantification has passed through neuroreceptor quantification models, which are invasive methods that involve tracer kinetic modelling and arterial blood sampling, a practice that is not commonly used in a clinical environment. On the other hand, semi-quantification methods relying on computers and dedicated software try to elicit numerical information out of SPECT images. The application of semi-quantification methods aims at separating the different patient categories solving the main problem of finding the uptake in the structures of interest. The semi-quantification methods which were studied fall roughly into three categories, which are described as classic methods, advanced automated methods and pixel-based statistical analysis methods. All these methods can be further divided into various subcategories. The plethora of the existing semi-quantitative methods reinforces

  2. 3D scintigraphic imaging and navigation in radioguided surgery: freehand SPECT technology and its clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Bluemel, Christina; Matthies, Philipp; Herrmann, Ken; Povoski, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    Freehand SPECT (fhSPECT) is a technology platform for providing 3-dimensional (3D) navigation for radioguided surgical procedures, such as sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy (SLNB). In addition to the information provided by conventional handheld gamma detection probes, fhSPECT allows for direct visualization of the distribution of radioactivity in any given region of interest, allowing for improved navigation to radioactive target lesions and providing accurate lesion depth measurements. Herein, we will review the currently available clinical data on the use of fhSPECT: (i) for SLNB of various malignancies, including difficult-to-detect SLNs, and (ii) for radioguided localization of solid tumors. Moreover, the combination of fhSPECT with other technologies (e.g., small field-of-view gamma cameras, and diagnostic ultrasound) is discussed. These technical advances have the potential to greatly expand the clinical application of radioguided surgery in the future. PMID:26878667

  3. Multipinhole SPECT helical scan parameters and imaging volume

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Rutao Deng, Xiao; Wei, Qingyang; Dai, Tiantian; Ma, Tianyu; Lecomte, Roger

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The authors developed SPECT imaging capability on an animal PET scanner using a multiple-pinhole collimator and step-and-shoot helical data acquisition protocols. The objective of this work was to determine the preferred helical scan parameters, i.e., the angular and axial step sizes, and the imaging volume, that provide optimal imaging performance. Methods: The authors studied nine helical scan protocols formed by permuting three rotational and three axial step sizes. These step sizes were chosen around the reference values analytically calculated from the estimated spatial resolution of the SPECT system and the Nyquist sampling theorem. The nine helical protocols were evaluated by two figures-of-merit: the sampling completeness percentage (SCP) and the root-mean-square (RMS) resolution. SCP was an analytically calculated numerical index based on projection sampling. RMS resolution was derived from the reconstructed images of a sphere-grid phantom. Results: The RMS resolution results show that (1) the start and end pinhole planes of the helical scheme determine the axial extent of the effective field of view (EFOV), and (2) the diameter of the transverse EFOV is adequately calculated from the geometry of the pinhole opening, since the peripheral region beyond EFOV would introduce projection multiplexing and consequent effects. The RMS resolution results of the nine helical scan schemes show optimal resolution is achieved when the axial step size is the half, and the angular step size is about twice the corresponding values derived from the Nyquist theorem. The SCP results agree in general with that of RMS resolution but are less critical in assessing the effects of helical parameters and EFOV. Conclusions: The authors quantitatively validated the effective FOV of multiple pinhole helical scan protocols and proposed a simple method to calculate optimal helical scan parameters.

  4. Observer detection limits for a dedicated SPECT breast imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutler, S. J.; Perez, K. L.; Barnhart, H. X.; Tornai, M. P.

    2010-04-01

    An observer-based contrast-detail study is performed in an effort to evaluate the limits of object detectability using a dedicated CZT-based breast SPECT imaging system under various imaging conditions. A custom geometric contrast-resolution phantom was developed that can be used for both positive ('hot') and negative contrasts ('cold'). The 3 cm long fillable tubes are arranged in six sectors having equal inner diameters ranging from 1 mm to 6 mm with plastic wall thicknesses of <0.25 mm, on a pitch of twice their inner diameters. Scans of the activity filled tubes using simple circular trajectories are obtained in a 215 mL uniform water filled cylinder, varying the rod:background concentration ratios from 10:1 to 1:10 simulating a large range of biological uptake ratios. The rod phantom is then placed inside a non-uniformly shaped 500 mL breast phantom and scans are again acquired using both simple and complex 3D trajectories for similarly varying contrasts. Summed slice and contiguous multi-slice images are evaluated by five independent readers, identifying the smallest distinguishable rod for each concentration and experimental setup. Linear and quadratic regression is used to compare the resulting contrast-detail curves. Results indicate that in a moderately low-noise 500 mL background, using the SPECT camera having 2.5 mm intrinsic pixels, the mean detectable rod was ~3.4 mm at a 10:1 ratio, degrading to ~5.2 mm with the 2.5:1 concentration ratio. The smallest object detail was observed using a 45° tilted trajectory acquisition. The complex 3D projected sine wave acquisition, however, had the most consistent combined intra- and inter-observer results, making it potentially the best imaging approach for consistent results.

  5. Samara Probe For Remote Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, James D.

    1989-01-01

    Imaging probe descends through atmosphere of planet, obtaining images of ground surface as it travels. Released from aircraft over Earth or from spacecraft over another planet. Body and single wing shaped like samara - winged seed like those of maple trees. Rotates as descends, providing panoramic view of terrain below. Radio image obtained by video camera to aircraft or spacecraft overhead.

  6. Filters in 2D and 3D Cardiac SPECT Image Processing

    PubMed Central

    Ploussi, Agapi; Synefia, Stella

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear cardiac imaging is a noninvasive, sensitive method providing information on cardiac structure and physiology. Single photon emission tomography (SPECT) evaluates myocardial perfusion, viability, and function and is widely used in clinical routine. The quality of the tomographic image is a key for accurate diagnosis. Image filtering, a mathematical processing, compensates for loss of detail in an image while reducing image noise, and it can improve the image resolution and limit the degradation of the image. SPECT images are then reconstructed, either by filter back projection (FBP) analytical technique or iteratively, by algebraic methods. The aim of this study is to review filters in cardiac 2D, 3D, and 4D SPECT applications and how these affect the image quality mirroring the diagnostic accuracy of SPECT images. Several filters, including the Hanning, Butterworth, and Parzen filters, were evaluated in combination with the two reconstruction methods as well as with a specified MatLab program. Results showed that for both 3D and 4D cardiac SPECT the Butterworth filter, for different critical frequencies and orders, produced the best results. Between the two reconstruction methods, the iterative one might be more appropriate for cardiac SPECT, since it improves lesion detectability due to the significant improvement of image contrast. PMID:24804144

  7. Two-dimensional filtering of SPECT images using the Metz and Wiener filters

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.A.; Schwinger, R.B.; Doherty, P.W.; Penney, B.C.

    1984-11-01

    Two-dimensional filtering, both before and after reconstruction, has been applied to the processing of single photon emission computerized tomographic (SPECT) images. The filters investigated were the count-dependent Metz filter and Wiener filter, both of which automatically adapt to the image being processed. Using a SPECT phantom, with images reconstructed with these filters rather than the ramp, the authors observed a statistically signficant increase in the image contrast for solid Plexiglas spheres, and significant decrease in the percent fractional standard deviation of counts in a region of uniform activity. The adaptability of these filters is demonstrated by a comparison of SPECT acquisition of the phantom at two different count levels. An example of the application to clinical studies is presented. Two-dimensional digital image restoration with these techniques can produce a significant increase in SPECT image quality, with a small cost in processing time when these techniques are implemented on an array processor.

  8. Onboard functional and molecular imaging: A design investigation for robotic multipinhole SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Bowsher, James Giles, William; Yin, Fang-Fang; Yan, Susu; Roper, Justin

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Onboard imaging—currently performed primarily by x-ray transmission modalities—is essential in modern radiation therapy. As radiation therapy moves toward personalized medicine, molecular imaging, which views individual gene expression, may also be important onboard. Nuclear medicine methods, such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), are premier modalities for molecular imaging. The purpose of this study is to investigate a robotic multipinhole approach to onboard SPECT. Methods: Computer-aided design (CAD) studies were performed to assess the feasibility of maneuvering a robotic SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. In order to obtain fast, high-quality SPECT images, a 49-pinhole SPECT camera was designed which provides high sensitivity to photons emitted from an imaging region of interest. This multipinhole system was investigated by computer-simulation studies. Seventeen hot spots 10 and 7 mm in diameter were placed in the breast region of a supine female phantom. Hot spot activity concentration was six times that of background. For the 49-pinhole camera and a reference, more conventional, broad field-of-view (FOV) SPECT system, projection data were computer simulated for 4-min scans and SPECT images were reconstructed. Hot-spot localization was evaluated using a nonprewhitening forced-choice numerical observer. Results: The CAD simulation studies found that robots could maneuver SPECT cameras about patients in position for radiation therapy. In the imaging studies, most hot spots were apparent in the 49-pinhole images. Average localization errors for 10-mm- and 7-mm-diameter hot spots were 0.4 and 1.7 mm, respectively, for the 49-pinhole system, and 3.1 and 5.7 mm, respectively, for the reference broad-FOV system. Conclusions: A robot could maneuver a multipinhole SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. The system could provide onboard functional and molecular imaging with 4-min

  9. Onboard functional and molecular imaging: A design investigation for robotic multipinhole SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Bowsher, James; Yan, Susu; Roper, Justin; Giles, William; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Onboard imaging—currently performed primarily by x-ray transmission modalities—is essential in modern radiation therapy. As radiation therapy moves toward personalized medicine, molecular imaging, which views individual gene expression, may also be important onboard. Nuclear medicine methods, such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), are premier modalities for molecular imaging. The purpose of this study is to investigate a robotic multipinhole approach to onboard SPECT. Methods: Computer-aided design (CAD) studies were performed to assess the feasibility of maneuvering a robotic SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. In order to obtain fast, high-quality SPECT images, a 49-pinhole SPECT camera was designed which provides high sensitivity to photons emitted from an imaging region of interest. This multipinhole system was investigated by computer-simulation studies. Seventeen hot spots 10 and 7 mm in diameter were placed in the breast region of a supine female phantom. Hot spot activity concentration was six times that of background. For the 49-pinhole camera and a reference, more conventional, broad field-of-view (FOV) SPECT system, projection data were computer simulated for 4-min scans and SPECT images were reconstructed. Hot-spot localization was evaluated using a nonprewhitening forced-choice numerical observer. Results: The CAD simulation studies found that robots could maneuver SPECT cameras about patients in position for radiation therapy. In the imaging studies, most hot spots were apparent in the 49-pinhole images. Average localization errors for 10-mm- and 7-mm-diameter hot spots were 0.4 and 1.7 mm, respectively, for the 49-pinhole system, and 3.1 and 5.7 mm, respectively, for the reference broad-FOV system. Conclusions: A robot could maneuver a multipinhole SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. The system could provide onboard functional and molecular imaging with 4-min

  10. U-SPECT-BioFluo: an integrated radionuclide, bioluminescence, and fluorescence imaging platform

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In vivo bioluminescence, fluorescence, and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging provide complementary information about biological processes. However, to date these signatures are evaluated separately on individual preclinical systems. In this paper, we introduce a fully integrated bioluminescence-fluorescence-SPECT platform. Next to an optimization in logistics and image fusion, this integration can help improve understanding of the optical imaging (OI) results. Methods An OI module was developed for a preclinical SPECT system (U-SPECT, MILabs, Utrecht, the Netherlands). The applicability of the module for bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging was evaluated in both a phantom and in an in vivo setting using mice implanted with a 4 T1-luc + tumor. A combination of a fluorescent dye and radioactive moiety was used to directly relate the optical images of the module to the SPECT findings. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) was compared to the localization of the fluorescence signal in the tumors. Results Both the phantom and in vivo mouse studies showed that superficial fluorescence signals could be imaged accurately. The SPECT and bioluminescence images could be used to place the fluorescence findings in perspective, e.g. by showing tracer accumulation in non-target organs such as the liver and kidneys (SPECT) and giving a semi-quantitative read-out for tumor spread (bioluminescence). Conclusions We developed a fully integrated multimodal platform that provides complementary registered imaging of bioluminescent, fluorescent, and SPECT signatures in a single scanning session with a single dose of anesthesia. In our view, integration of these modalities helps to improve data interpretation of optical findings in relation to radionuclide images. PMID:25386389

  11. Assessment of scanning model observers with hybrid SPECT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gifford, H. C.; Pretorius, P. H.; King, M. A.

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to test procedures for applying scanning model observers in order to predict human-observer lesion-detection performance with hybrid images. Hybrid images consist of clinical backgrounds with simulated abnormalities. The basis for this investigation was detection and localization of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPN) in SPECT lung images, and our overall goal has been to determine the extent to which detection of SPN could be improved by proper modeling of the acquisition physics during the iterative reconstruction process. Towards this end, we conducted human-observer localization ROC (LROC) studies to optimize the number of iterations and the postfiltering of four rescaled block-iterative (RBI) reconstruction strategies with various combinations of attenuation correction (AC), scatter correction (SC), and system-resolution correction (RC). This observer data was then used to evaluate a scanning channelized nonprewhitening model observer. A standard "background-known-exactly" (BKE) task formulation overstated the prior knowledge and training that human observers had about the hybrid images. Results from a quasi-BKE task that preserved some degree of structural noise in the detection task demonstrated better agreement with the humans.

  12. Development of 111In-labeled porphyrins for SPECT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Shaghayegh; Mirzaei, Mohammad; Rahimi, Mohammad; Jalilian, Amir R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this research was the development of 111In-labeled porphyrins as possible radiopharmaceuticals for the imaging of tumors. Methods: Ligands, 5, 10, 15, 20-tetrakis (3, 5-dihydroxyphenyl) porphyrin) (TDHPP), 5, 10, 15, 20-tetrakis (4-hydroxyphenyl) porphyrin (THPP) and 5, 10, 15, 20-tetrakis (3,4-dimethoxyphenyl) porphyrin) (TDMPP) were labeled with 111InCl3 (produced from proton bombardment of natCd target) in 60 min at 80 ºC. Quality control of labeled compounds was performed via RTLC and HPLC followed by stability studies in final formulation and presence of human serum at 37 ºC for 48 h as well as partition coefficient determination. The biodistribution studies performed using tissue dissection and SPECT imaging up to 24h. Results: The complexes were prepared with more than 99% radiochemical purity (HPLC and RTLC) and high stability to 48 h. Partition coefficients (calculated as log P) for 111In-TDHPP, 111In-THPP and 111In-TDMPP were 0.88, 0.8 and 1.63 respectively. Conclusion: Due to urinary excretion with fast clearance for 111In-TDMPP, this complex is probably a suitable candidate for considering as a possible tumor imaging agent. PMID:27408865

  13. Quantitative SPECT brain imaging: Effects of attenuation and detector response

    SciTech Connect

    Gilland, D.R.; Jaszczak, R.J.; Bowsher, J.E.; Turkington, T.G.; Liang, Z.; Greer, K.L.; Coleman, R.E. . Dept. of Radiology)

    1993-06-01

    Two physical factors that substantially degrade quantitative accuracy in SPECT imaging of the brain are attenuation and detector response. In addition to the physical factors, random noise in the reconstructed image can greatly affect the quantitative measurement. The purpose of this work was to implement two reconstruction methods that compensate for attenuation and detector response, a 3D maximum likelihood-EM method (ML) and a filtered backprojection method (FB) with Metz filter and Chang attenuation compensation, and compare the methods in terms of quantitative accuracy and image noise. The methods were tested on simulated data of the 3D Hoffman brain phantom. The simulation incorporated attenuation and distance-dependent detector response. Bias and standard deviation of reconstructed voxel intensities were measured in the gray and white matter regions. The results with ML showed that in both the gray and white matter regions as the number of iterations increased, bias decreased and standard deviation increased. Similar results were observed with FB as the Metz filter power increased. In both regions, ML had smaller standard deviation than FB for a given bias. Reconstruction times for the ML method have been greatly reduced through efficient coding, limited source support, and by computing attenuation factors only along rays perpendicular to the detector.

  14. Design and performance of a multi-pinhole collimation device for small animal imaging with clinical SPECT and SPECT CT scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Filippo, Frank P.

    2008-08-01

    A multi-pinhole collimation device is developed that uses the gamma camera detectors of a clinical SPECT or SPECT-CT scanner to produce high-resolution SPECT images. The device consists of a rotating cylindrical collimator having 22 tungsten pinholes with 0.9 mm diameter apertures and an animal bed inside the collimator that moves linearly to provide helical or ordered-subsets axial sampling. CT images also may be acquired on a SPECT-CT scanner for purposes of image co-registration and SPECT attenuation correction. The device is placed on the patient table of the scanner without attaching to the detectors or scanner gantry. The system geometry is calibrated in-place from point source data and is then used during image reconstruction. The SPECT imaging performance of the device is evaluated with test phantom scans. Spatial resolution from reconstructed point source images is measured to be 0.6 mm full width at half maximum or better. Micro-Derenzo phantom images demonstrate the ability to resolve 0.7 mm diameter rod patterns. The axial slabs of a Micro-Defrise phantom are visualized well. Collimator efficiency exceeds 0.05% at the center of the field of view, and images of a uniform phantom show acceptable uniformity and minimal artifact. The overall simplicity and relatively good imaging performance of the device make it an interesting low-cost alternative to dedicated small animal scanners.

  15. Clinical application of SPECT in adrenal imaging with iodine-131 6 beta-iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimura, J.; Kawanaka, M.; Fukuchi, M.

    1989-04-01

    Forty-one patients with or without adrenocortical disorders were studied to evaluate the clinical usefulness of SPECT in adrenal imaging with I-131 Adosterol. In the SPECT images from this study, all glands with either normally functioning or hyperfunctioning adrenal cortices could be detected, while those glands with hypofunctioning adrenal cortices could not be detected. Particularly in transaxial and sagittal slices, the adrenal gland was identified posteriorly and was clearly distinguished from the gallbladder. In preliminary results using SPECT by a standard method, uptake in 68 detectable glands ranged from 1.7% to 4.9% in four glands with Cushing's syndrome, from 1.1% to 1.3% in seven glands with primary aldosteronism, and were distributed below 1.0% in the remaining glands with normally functioning adrenal cortices. These data show that it is possible to evaluate the adrenocortical functioning status simply by analyzing the SPECT images of the adrenal.

  16. Motion correction for synthesis and analysis of respiratory-gated lung SPECT image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ue, Hidenori; Haneishi, Hideaki; Iwanaga, Hideyuki; Suga, Kazuyoshi

    2005-04-01

    A conventional SPECT image of lung is obtained by accumulating the detected count of gamma rays over long acquisition time that contains many respiratory cycles. The lung motion due to respiration during the acquisition makes reconstructed image blurred and may lead to a misdiagnosis. If a respiratory-gated SPECT is used, reconstructed images at various phase of respiration are obtained and the blur in a image can be avoided. However, the respiratory-gated SPECT requires long time to accumulate sufficient number of counts at each phase. If the acquisition time is not long enough, the detected count becomes inadequately small and hence the reconstructed image becomes noisy. We propose a method for correcting the motion between different phase images obtained with the respiratory-gated SPECT. In this method, an objective function consisting of both the degree of similarity between a reference and a deformed image and the smoothness of deformation is defined and optimized. The expansion ratio defined as a ratio of the change of the local volume due to the deformation is introduced to preserve the total activity during the motion correction process. By summing each phase images corrected by this method, a less noisy and less blurred SPECT image can be obtained. Furthermore, this method allows us to analyze the local movement of lung. This method was applied to the computer phantom, the real phantom and some clinical data and the motion correction and visualization of local movements between inspiration and expiration phase images were successfully achieved.

  17. SPECT imaging of neuropilin receptor type-1 expression with 131I-labeled monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Dou, Xiaofeng; Yan, Jianghua; Zhang, Yafei; Liu, Peng; Jiang, Yizhen; Lv, Sha; Zeng, Fanwei; Chen, Xiaoli; Wang, Shengyu; Zhang, Haipeng; Wu, Hua; Zhang, Hong; Ouyang, Lin; Su, Xinhui

    2016-09-01

    As a novel co-receptor for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), neuropilin receptor type-1 (NRP-1) is overexpressed in several cancers and metastases, and serves as an attractive target for cancer molecular imaging and therapy. Previous single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) studies demonstrated that the small NRP-1-targeting peptides 99mTc-MA-ATWLPPR and 99mTc-CK3 showed poor tumor imaging quality, because of their rapid blood clearance and very low tumor uptake. Compared with small peptides, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can improve imaging of NRP-1-expression, due to their high affinity, specificity and slow extraction. A6-11-26 is a novel monoclonal antibody against NRP-1 b1b2 domain that exhibits inhibition of tumor growth in NPR-1-expressing preclinical models. The aim of the present study was to develop the 131I-labeled anti-NRP-1 monoclonal antibody A6-11-26 as a SPECT probe for imaging of NRP-1-positive tumor. An anti-NRP-1 monoclonal antibody (A6-11-26) was produced by hybridomas and was labeled with iodine-131 by the iodogen method. In vitro, the radiolabeling efficiency, radiochemical purity, immunoreactive fraction and stability were assessed. Binding affinity and specificity of 131I‑A6-11-26 to NRP-1 were evaluated using human glioblastoma U87MG cells. In vivo, biodistribution and SPECT/CT studies were conducted on mice bearing U87MG xenografts after the injection of 131I-A6-11-26 with or without co-injection of unlabeled A6-11-26 antibody. A6-11-26 was generated successfully by hybridoma with high purity (>95%) and was labeled with iodine-131 within 60 min with high labelling efficiency (95.46±3.34%), radiochemical purity (98.23±1.41%). 131I-A6-11-26 retained its immunoreactivity and also displayed excellent stability in mouse serum and PBS solution during 1 to 96 h. Cell uptake assays showed high NRP-1-specific uptake (15.80±1.30% applied activity at 6 h) in U87MG cells. 131I-A6-11-26 bound to NRP-1 with low nanomolar

  18. Automatic estimation of detector radial position for contoured SPECT acquisition using CT images on a SPECT/CT system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruijie Rachel; Erwin, William D

    2006-08-01

    An algorithm was developed to estimate noncircular orbit (NCO) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) detector radius on a SPECT/CT imaging system using the CT images, for incorporation into collimator resolution modeling for iterative SPECT reconstruction. Simulated male abdominal (arms up), male head and neck (arms down) and female chest (arms down) anthropomorphic phantom, and ten patient, medium-energy SPECT/CT scans were acquired on a hybrid imaging system. The algorithm simulated inward SPECT detector radial motion and object contour detection at each projection angle, employing the calculated average CT image and a fixed Hounsfield unit (HU) threshold. Calculated radii were compared to the observed true radii, and optimal CT threshold values, corresponding to patient bed and clothing surfaces, were found to be between -970 and -950 HU. The algorithm was constrained by the 45 cm CT field-of-view (FOV), which limited the detected radii to < or = 22.5 cm and led to occasional radius underestimation in the case of object truncation by CT. Two methods incorporating the algorithm were implemented: physical model (PM) and best fit (BF). The PM method computed an offset that produced maximum overlap of calculated and true radii for the phantom scans, and applied that offset as a calculated-to-true radius transformation. For the BF method, the calculated-to-true radius transformation was based upon a linear regression between calculated and true radii. For the PM method, a fixed offset of +2.75 cm provided maximum calculated-to-true radius overlap for the phantom study, which accounted for the camera system's object contour detect sensor surface-to-detector face distance. For the BF method, a linear regression of true versus calculated radius from a reference patient scan was used as a calculated-to-true radius transform. Both methods were applied to ten patient scans. For -970 and -950 HU thresholds, the combined overall average root-mean-square (rms

  19. Automatic estimation of detector radial position for contoured SPECT acquisition using CT images on a SPECT/CT system

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Ruijie Rachel; Erwin, William D.

    2006-08-15

    An algorithm was developed to estimate noncircular orbit (NCO) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) detector radius on a SPECT/CT imaging system using the CT images, for incorporation into collimator resolution modeling for iterative SPECT reconstruction. Simulated male abdominal (arms up), male head and neck (arms down) and female chest (arms down) anthropomorphic phantom, and ten patient, medium-energy SPECT/CT scans were acquired on a hybrid imaging system. The algorithm simulated inward SPECT detector radial motion and object contour detection at each projection angle, employing the calculated average CT image and a fixed Hounsfield unit (HU) threshold. Calculated radii were compared to the observed true radii, and optimal CT threshold values, corresponding to patient bed and clothing surfaces, were found to be between -970 and -950 HU. The algorithm was constrained by the 45 cm CT field-of-view (FOV), which limited the detected radii to {<=}22.5 cm and led to occasional radius underestimation in the case of object truncation by CT. Two methods incorporating the algorithm were implemented: physical model (PM) and best fit (BF). The PM method computed an offset that produced maximum overlap of calculated and true radii for the phantom scans, and applied that offset as a calculated-to-true radius transformation. For the BF method, the calculated-to-true radius transformation was based upon a linear regression between calculated and true radii. For the PM method, a fixed offset of +2.75 cm provided maximum calculated-to-true radius overlap for the phantom study, which accounted for the camera system's object contour detect sensor surface-to-detector face distance. For the BF method, a linear regression of true versus calculated radius from a reference patient scan was used as a calculated-to-true radius transform. Both methods were applied to ten patient scans. For -970 and -950 HU thresholds, the combined overall average root-mean-square (rms) error

  20. Hotspot quantification of myocardial focal tracer uptake from molecular targeted SPECT/CT images: experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi-Hwa; Sahul, Zakir; Weyman, Christopher A.; Ryder, William J.; Dione, Donald P.; Dobrucki, Lawrence W.; Mekkaoui, Choukri; Brennan, Matthew P.; Hu, Xiaoyue; Hawley, Christi; Sinusas, Albert J.

    2008-03-01

    We have developed a new single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) hotspot quantification method incorporating extra cardiac activity correction and hotspot normal limit estimation. The method was validated for estimation accuracy of myocardial tracer focal uptake in a chronic canine model of myocardial infarction (MI). Dogs (n = 4) at 2 weeks post MI were injected with Tl-201 and a Tc-99m-labeled hotspot tracer targeted at matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). An external point source filled with Tc-99m was used for a reference of absolute radioactivity. Dual-isotope (Tc-99m/Tl-201) SPECT images were acquired simultaneously followed by an X-ray CT acquisition. Dogs were sacrificed after imaging for myocardial gamma well counting. Images were reconstructed with CT-based attenuation correction (AC) and without AC (NAC) and were quantified using our quantification method. Normal limits for myocardial hotspot uptake were estimated based on 3 different schemes: maximum entropy, meansquared-error minimization (MSEM) and global minimization. Absolute myocardial hotspot uptake was quantified from SPECT images using the normal limits and compared with well-counted radioactivity on a segment-by-segment basis (n = 12 segments/dog). Radioactivity was expressed as % injected dose (%ID). There was an excellent correlation (r = 0.78-0.92) between the estimated activity (%ID) derived using the SPECT quantitative approach and well-counting, independent of AC. However, SPECT quantification without AC resulted in the significant underestimation of radioactivity. Quantification using SPECT with AC and the MSEM normal limit yielded the best results compared with well-counting. In conclusion, focal myocardial "hotspot" uptake of a targeted radiotracer can be accurately quantified in vivo using a method that incorporates SPECT imaging with AC, an external reference, background scatter compensation, and a suitable normal limit. This hybrid SPECT/CT approach allows for the serial

  1. Compensation for non-uniform attenuation in SPECT brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, S.J.; King, M.A.; Pan, T.S.

    1994-05-01

    Photon attenuation is a major limitation in performing quantitative SPECT brain imaging. A number of methods have been proposed for compensation of attenuation in regions of the body that can be modelled as a uniform attenuator. The magnitude of the errors introduced into reconstructed brain images by assuming the head to be a uniform attenuator are uncertain (the skull, sinus cavities and head holder all have different attenuation properties than brain tissue). Brain imaging is unique in that the radioisotope, for the most part, is taken up within a uniform attenuation medium (i.e., brain tissue) which is surrounded by bone (i.e., the skull) of a different density. Using this observation, Bellini`s method for attenuation compensation (which is an exact solution to the exponential Radon transform) has been modified to account for the different attenuation properties of the skull. To test this modified Bellini method, a simple mathematical phantom was designed to model the brain and a skull of varying thickness less than 7.5 mm. To model brain imaging with Tc-99m HMPAO, the attenuation coefficient of the brain tissue and skull were set to 0.15 cm{sup -1} and 0.22 cm{sup -1} respectively. A ray-driven projector which accounted for non-uniform attenuation was used to simulate projection data from 128 views. The detector response and scatter were not simulated. It was observed that reconstructions processed with uniform attenuation compensation (i.e., where it was assumed that the brain tissue and the skull had the same attenuation coefficient) provided errors of 6-20%, whereas those processed with the non-uniform Bellini algorithm were biased by only 0-5%.

  2. SPECT/CT Imaging of High-Risk Atherosclerotic Plaques using Integrin-Binding RGD Dimer Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Sun Yoo, Jung; Lee, Jonghwan; Ho Jung, Jae; Seok Moon, Byung; Kim, Soonhag; Chul Lee, Byung; Eun Kim, Sang

    2015-01-01

    Vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques with unique biological signatures are responsible for most major cardiovascular events including acute myocardial infarction and stroke. However, current clinical diagnostic approaches for atherosclerosis focus on anatomical measurements such as the degree of luminal stenosis and wall thickness. An abundance of neovessels with elevated expression of integrin αvβ3 is closely associated with an increased risk of plaque rupture. Herein we evaluated the potential of an αvβ3 integrin-targeting radiotracer, 99mTc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2, for SPECT/CT imaging of high-risk plaque in murine atherosclerosis models. In vivo uptake of 99mTc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 was significantly higher in atherosclerotic aortas than in relatively normal aortas. Comparison with the negative-control peptide, 99mTc-IDA-D-[c(RADfK)]2, proved specific binding of 99mTc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 for plaque lesions in in vivo SPECT/CT and ex vivo autoradiographic imaging. Histopathological characterization revealed that a prominent SPECT signal of 99mTc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 corresponded to the presence of high-risk plaques with a large necrotic core, a thin fibrous cap, and vibrant neoangiogenic events. Notably, the RGD dimer based 99mTc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 showed better imaging performance in comparison with the common monomeric RGD peptide probe 123I-c(RGDyV) and fluorescence tissue assay corroborated this. Our preclinical data demonstrated that 99mTc-IDA-D-[c(RGDfK)]2 SPECT/CT is a sensitive tool to noninvasively gauge atherosclerosis beyond vascular anatomy by assessing culprit plaque neovascularization. PMID:26123253

  3. Two-dimensional filtering of SPECT images using the Metz and Wiener filters

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.A.; Schwinger, R.B.; Penney, B.C.; Doherty, P.W.

    1984-01-01

    Presently, single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) images are usually reconstructed by arbitrarily selecting a one-dimensional ''window'' function for use in reconstruction. A better method would be to automatically choose among a family of two-dimensional image restoration filters in such a way as to produce ''optimum'' image quality. Two-dimensional image processing techniques offer the advantages of a larger statistical sampling of the data for better noise reduction, and two-dimensional image deconvolution to correct for blurring during acquisition. An investigation of two such ''optimal'' digital image restoration techniques (the count-dependent Metz filter and the Wiener filter) was made. They were applied both as two-dimensional ''window'' functions for preprocessing SPECT images, and for filtering reconstructed images. Their performance was compared by measuring image contrast and per cent fractional standard deviation (% FSD) in multiple-acquisitions of the Jaszczak SPECT phantom at two different count levels. A statistically significant increase in image contrast and decrease in % FSD was observed with these techniques when compared to the results of reconstruction with a ramp filter. The adaptability of the techniques was manifested in a lesser % reduction in % FSD at the high count level coupled with a greater enhancement in image contrast. Using an array processor, processing time was 0.2 sec per image for the Metz filter and 3 sec for the Wiener filter. It is concluded that two-dimensional digital image restoration with these techniques can produce a significant increase in SPECT image quality.

  4. A parallel Monte Carlo code for planar and SPECT imaging: implementation, verification and applications in 131I SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Dewaraja, Yuni K.; Ljungberg, Michael; Majumdar, Amitava; Bose, Abhijit; Koral, Kenneth F.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the implementation of the SIMIND Monte Carlo code on an IBM SP2 distributed memory parallel computer. Basic aspects of running Monte Carlo particle transport calculations on parallel architectures are described. Our parallelization is based on equally partitioning photons among the processors and uses the Message Passing Interface (MPI) library for interprocessor communication and the Scalable Parallel Random Number Generator (SPRNG) to generate uncorrelated random number streams. These parallelization techniques are also applicable to other distributed memory architectures. A linear increase in computing speed with the number of processors is demonstrated for up to 32 processors. This speed-up is especially significant in Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) simulations involving higher energy photon emitters, where explicit modeling of the phantom and collimator is required. For 131I, the accuracy of the parallel code is demonstrated by comparing simulated and experimental SPECT images from a heart/thorax phantom. Clinically realistic SPECT simulations using the voxel-man phantom are carried out to assess scatter and attenuation correction. PMID:11809318

  5. Cardiac sarcoidosis demonstrated by Tl-201 and Ga-67 SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Taki, J.; Nakajima, K.; Bunko, H.; Ohguchi, M.; Tonami, N.; Hisada, K. )

    1990-09-01

    Ga-67 and Tl-201 SPECT was performed to evaluate cardiac sarcoidosis in a 15-year-old boy. Tl-201 SPECT imaging showed decreased uptake in the inferior to lateral wall and Ga-67 accumulation in the area of decreased Tl-201 uptake. These findings suggested cardiac sarcoidosis, and cardiac biopsy confirmed this diagnosis. After corticosteroid therapy, myocardial uptake of Ga-67 disappeared and myocardial TI-201 uptake became more homogeneous.

  6. Radiolabeled Peptide Scaffolds for PET/SPECT - Optical in Vivo Imaging of Carbohydrate-Lectin Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Deutscher, Susan

    2014-09-30

    The objective of this research is to develop phage display-selected peptides into radio- and fluoresecently- labeled scaffolds for the multimodal imaging of carbohydrate-lectin interactions. While numerous protein and receptor systems are being explored for the development of targeted imaging agents, the targeting and analysis of carbohydrate-lectin complexes in vivo remains relatively unexplored. Antibodies, nanoparticles, and peptides are being developed that target carbohydrate-lectin complexes in living systems. However, antibodies and nanoparticles often suffer from slow clearance and toxicity problems. Peptides are attractive alternative vehicles for the specific delivery of radionuclides or fluorophores to sites of interest in vivo, although, because of their size, uptake and retention may be less than antibodies. We have selected high affinity peptides that bind a specific carbohydrate-lectin complex involved in cell-cell adhesion and cross-linking using bacteriophage (phage) display technologies (1,2). These peptides have allowed us to probe the role of these antigens in cell adhesion. Fluorescent versions of the peptides have been developed for optical imaging and radiolabeled versions have been used in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) in vivo imaging (3-6). A benefit in employing the radiolabeled peptides in SPECT and PET is that these imaging modalities are widely used in living systems and offer deep tissue sensitivity. Radiolabeled peptides, however, often exhibit poor stability and high kidney uptake in vivo. Conversely, optical imaging is sensitive and offers good spatial resolution, but is not useful for deep tissue penetration and is semi-quantitative. Thus, multimodality imaging that relies on the strengths of both radio- and optical- imaging is a current focus for development of new in vivo imaging agents. We propose a novel means to improve the efficacy of radiolabeled and fluorescently

  7. Comparison of planar images and SPECT with bayesean preprocessing for the demonstration of facial anatomy and craniomandibular disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Kircos, L.T.; Ortendahl, D.A.; Hattner, R.S.; Faulkner, D.; Taylor, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    Craniomandiublar disorders involving the facial anatomy may be difficult to demonstrate in planar images. Although bone scanning is generally more sensitive than radiography, facial bone anatomy is complex and focal areas of increased or decreased radiotracer may become obscured by overlapping structures in planar images. Thus SPECT appears ideally suited to examination of the facial skeleton. A series of patients with craniomandibular disorders of unknown origin were imaged using 20 mCi Tc-99m MDP. Planar and SPECT (Siemens 7500 ZLC Orbiter) images were obtained four hours after injection. The SPECT images were reconstructed with a filtered back-projection algorithm. In order to improve image contrast and resolution in SPECT images, the rotation views were pre-processed with a Bayesean deblurring algorithm which has previously been show to offer improved contrast and resolution in planar images. SPECT images using the pre-processed rotation views were obtained and compared to the SPECT images without pre-processing and the planar images. TMJ arthropathy involving either the glenoid fossa or the mandibular condyle, orthopedic changes involving the mandible or maxilla, localized dental pathosis, as well as changes in structures peripheral to the facial skeleton were identified. Bayesean pre-processed SPECT depicted the facial skeleton more clearly as well as providing a more obvious demonstration of the bony changes associated with craniomandibular disorders than either planar images or SPECT without pre-processing.

  8. Attenuation correction for small animal SPECT imaging using x-ray CT data

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Andrew B.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.

    2005-09-15

    Photon attenuation in small animal nuclear medicine scans can be significant when using isotopes that emit lower energy photons such as iodine-125. We have developed a method to use microCT data to perform attenuation corrected small animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). A microCT calibration phantom was first imaged, and the resulting calibration curve was used to convert microCT image values to linear attenuation coefficient values that were then used in an iterative SPECT reconstruction algorithm. This method was applied to reconstruct a SPECT image of a uniform phantom filled with {sup 125}I-NaI. Without attenuation correction, the image suffered a 30% decrease in intensity in the center of the image, which was removed with the addition of attenuation correction. This reduced the relative standard deviation in the region of interest from 10% to 6%.

  9. Infected cyst localization with gallium SPECT imaging in polycystic kidney disease

    SciTech Connect

    Amesur, P.; Castronuovo, J.J.; Chandramouly, B.

    1988-01-01

    This case report describes a 43-year-old woman with polycystic renal disease and cyst infection. Infected cysts of the left kidney were successfully localized with Ga-67 citrate SPECT imaging and CT. Other imaging, including planar gallium imaging, was helpful diagnostically, but could not determine the exact location of infection within the kidney.

  10. Variable Activation of the DNA Damage Response Pathways in Patients Undergoing SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shijun; Liang, Grace; Ong, Sang-Ging; Han, Leng; Sanchez-Freire, Veronica; Lee, Andrew S.; Vasanawala, Minal; Segall, George; Wu, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although single photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT MPI) has improved the diagnosis and risk stratification of patients with suspected coronary artery disease, it remains a primary source of low dose radiation exposure for cardiac patients. To determine the biological effects of low dose radiation from SPECT MPI, we measured the activation of the DNA damage response pathways using quantitative flow cytometry and single cell gene expression profiling. Methods and Results Blood samples were collected from patients before and after SPECT MPI (n=63). Overall, analysis of all recruited patients showed no marked differences in the phosphorylation of proteins (H2AX, p53, and ATM) following SPECT. The majority of patients also had either down-regulated or unchanged expression in DNA damage response genes at both 24 and 48 hours post-SPECT. Interestingly, a small subset of patients with increased phosphorylation also had significant up-regulation of genes associated with DNA damage, whereas those with no changes in phosphorylation had significant down-regulation or no difference, suggesting that some patients may potentially be more sensitive to low dose radiation exposure. Conclusions Our findings showed that SPECT MPI resulted in a variable activation of the DNA damage response pathways. Although only a small subset of patients had increased protein phosphorylation and elevated gene expression post-imaging, continued care should be taken to reduce radiation exposure to both patients and operators. PMID:25609688

  11. Quantitative analysis of L-SPECT system for small animal brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Tasneem; Tahtali, Murat; Pickering, Mark R.

    2016-03-01

    This paper aims to investigate the performance of a newly proposed L-SPECT system for small animal brain imaging. The L-SPECT system consists of an array of 100 × 100 micro range diameter pinholes. The proposed detector module has a 48 mm by 48 mm active area and the system is based on a pixelated array of NaI crystals (10×10×10 mm elements) coupled with an array of position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs). The performance of this system was evaluated with pinhole radii of 50 μm, 60 μm and 100 μm. Monte Carlo simulation studies using the Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) software package validate the performance of this novel dual head L-SPECT system where a geometric mouse phantom is used to investigate its performance. All SPECT data were obtained using 120 projection views from 0° to 360° with a 3° step. Slices were reconstructed using conventional filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm. We have evaluated the quality of the images in terms of spatial resolution (FWHM) based on line spread function, the system sensitivity, the point source response function and the image quality. The sensitivity of our newly proposed L- SPECT system was about 4500 cps/μCi at 6 cm along with excellent full width at half-maximum (FWHM) using 50 μm pinhole aperture at several radii of rotation. The analysis results show the combination of excellent spatial resolution and high detection efficiency over an energy range between 20-160 keV. The results demonstrate that SPECT imaging using a pixelated L-SPECT detector module is applicable in a quantitative study of mouse brain imaging.

  12. Multi-pinhole collimator design for small-object imaging with SiliSPECT: a high-resolution SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokouhi, S.; Metzler, S. D.; Wilson, D. W.; Peterson, T. E.

    2009-01-01

    We have designed a multi-pinhole collimator for a dual-headed, stationary SPECT system that incorporates high-resolution silicon double-sided strip detectors. The compact camera design of our system enables imaging at source-collimator distances between 20 and 30 mm. Our analytical calculations show that using knife-edge pinholes with small-opening angles or cylindrically shaped pinholes in a focused, multi-pinhole configuration in combination with this camera geometry can generate narrow sensitivity profiles across the field of view that can be useful for imaging small objects at high sensitivity and resolution. The current prototype system uses two collimators each containing 127 cylindrically shaped pinholes that are focused toward a target volume. Our goal is imaging objects such as a mouse brain, which could find potential applications in molecular imaging.

  13. Multi-pinhole collimator design for small-object imaging with SiliSPECT: a high-resolution SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Shokouhi, S; Metzler, S D; Wilson, D W; Peterson, T E

    2010-01-01

    We have designed a multi-pinhole collimator for a dual-headed, stationary SPECT system that incorporates high-resolution silicon double-sided strip detectors. The compact camera design of our system enables imaging at source–collimator distances between 20 and 30 mm. Our analytical calculations show that using knife-edge pinholes with small-opening angles or cylindrically shaped pinholes in a focused, multi-pinhole configuration in combination with this camera geometry can generate narrow sensitivity profiles across the field of view that can be useful for imaging small objects at high sensitivity and resolution. The current prototype system uses two collimators each containing 127 cylindrically shaped pinholes that are focused toward a target volume. Our goal is imaging objects such as a mouse brain, which could find potential applications in molecular imaging. PMID:19088387

  14. Blind deconvolution of human brain SPECT images using a distribution mixture estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignotte, Max; Meunier, Jean

    2000-06-01

    Thanks to its ability to yield functionally-based information, the SPECT imagery technique has become a great help in the diagnostic of cerebrovascular diseases. Nevertheless, due to the imaging process, SPECT images are blurred and consequently their interpretation by the clinician is often difficult. In order to improve the spatial resolution of these images and then to facilitate their interpretation, we propose herein to implement a deconvolution procedure relying on an accurate distribution mixture parameter estimation procedure. Parameters of this distribution mixture are efficiently exploited in order to prevent overfitting of the noisy data or to determine the support of the object to be deconvolved when this one is needed. In this context, we compare the deconvolution results obtained by the Lucy-Richardson method and by the recent blind deconvolution technique called the NAS-RIF algorithm on real and simulated brain SPECT images. The NAS-RIF performs the best and shows significant contrast enhancement with little mottle (noise) amplification.

  15. Digital restoration of indium-111 and iodine-123 SPECT images with optimized Metz filters

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.A.; Schwinger, R.B.; Penney, B.C.; Doherty, P.W.; Bianco, J.A.

    1986-08-01

    A number of radiopharmaceuticals of great current clinical interest for imaging are labeled with radionuclides that emit medium- to high-energy photons either as their primary radiation, or in low abundance in addition to their primary radiation. The imaging characteristics of these radionuclides result in gamma camera image quality that is inferior to that of /sup 99m/Tc images. Thus, in this investigation /sup 111/In and /sup 123/I contaminated with approximately 4% /sup 124/I were chosen to test the hypothesis that a dramatic improvement in planar and SPECT images may be obtainable with digital image restoration. The count-dependent Metz filter is shown to be able to deconvolve the rapid drop at low spatial frequencies in the imaging system modulation transfer function (MTF) resulting from the acceptance of septal penetration and scatter in the camera window. Use of the Metz filter was found to result in improved spatial resolution as measured by both the full width at half maximum and full width at tenth maximum for both planar and SPECT studies. Two-dimensional, prereconstruction filtering with optimized Metz filters was also determined to improve image contrast, while decreasing the noise level for SPECT studies. A dramatic improvement in image quality was observed with the clinical application of this filter to SPECT imaging.

  16. Activatable Molecular Probes for Cancer Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seulki; Xie, Jin; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    The development of highly sensitive and specific molecular probes for cancer imaging still remains a daunting challenge. Recently, interdisciplinary research at the interface of imaging sciences and bionanoconjugation chemistry has generated novel activatable imaging probes that can provide high-resolution imaging with ultra-low background signals. Activatable imaging probes are designed to amplify output imaging signals in response to specific biomolecular recognition or environmental changes in real time. This review introduces and highlights the unique design strategies and applications of various activatable imaging probes in cancer imaging. PMID:20388112

  17. A hardware investigation of robotic SPECT for functional and molecular imaging onboard radiation therapy systems

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Susu; Bowsher, James; Tough, MengHeng; Cheng, Lin; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To construct a robotic SPECT system and to demonstrate its capability to image a thorax phantom on a radiation therapy flat-top couch, as a step toward onboard functional and molecular imaging in radiation therapy. Methods: A robotic SPECT imaging system was constructed utilizing a gamma camera detector (Digirad 2020tc) and a robot (KUKA KR150 L110 robot). An imaging study was performed with a phantom (PET CT PhantomTM), which includes five spheres of 10, 13, 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters. The phantom was placed on a flat-top couch. SPECT projections were acquired either with a parallel-hole collimator or a single-pinhole collimator, both without background in the phantom and with background at 1/10th the sphere activity concentration. The imaging trajectories of parallel-hole and pinhole collimated detectors spanned 180° and 228°, respectively. The pinhole detector viewed an off-centered spherical common volume which encompassed the 28 and 22 mm spheres. The common volume for parallel-hole system was centered at the phantom which encompassed all five spheres in the phantom. The maneuverability of the robotic system was tested by navigating the detector to trace the phantom and flat-top table while avoiding collision and maintaining the closest possible proximity to the common volume. The robot base and tool coordinates were used for image reconstruction. Results: The robotic SPECT system was able to maneuver parallel-hole and pinhole collimated SPECT detectors in close proximity to the phantom, minimizing impact of the flat-top couch on detector radius of rotation. Without background, all five spheres were visible in the reconstructed parallel-hole image, while four spheres, all except the smallest one, were visible in the reconstructed pinhole image. With background, three spheres of 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters were readily observed with the parallel-hole imaging, and the targeted spheres (22 and 28 mm diameters) were readily observed in the pinhole

  18. A hardware investigation of robotic SPECT for functional and molecular imaging onboard radiation therapy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Susu Tough, MengHeng; Bowsher, James; Yin, Fang-Fang; Cheng, Lin

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To construct a robotic SPECT system and to demonstrate its capability to image a thorax phantom on a radiation therapy flat-top couch, as a step toward onboard functional and molecular imaging in radiation therapy. Methods: A robotic SPECT imaging system was constructed utilizing a gamma camera detector (Digirad 2020tc) and a robot (KUKA KR150 L110 robot). An imaging study was performed with a phantom (PET CT Phantom{sup TM}), which includes five spheres of 10, 13, 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters. The phantom was placed on a flat-top couch. SPECT projections were acquired either with a parallel-hole collimator or a single-pinhole collimator, both without background in the phantom and with background at 1/10th the sphere activity concentration. The imaging trajectories of parallel-hole and pinhole collimated detectors spanned 180° and 228°, respectively. The pinhole detector viewed an off-centered spherical common volume which encompassed the 28 and 22 mm spheres. The common volume for parallel-hole system was centered at the phantom which encompassed all five spheres in the phantom. The maneuverability of the robotic system was tested by navigating the detector to trace the phantom and flat-top table while avoiding collision and maintaining the closest possible proximity to the common volume. The robot base and tool coordinates were used for image reconstruction. Results: The robotic SPECT system was able to maneuver parallel-hole and pinhole collimated SPECT detectors in close proximity to the phantom, minimizing impact of the flat-top couch on detector radius of rotation. Without background, all five spheres were visible in the reconstructed parallel-hole image, while four spheres, all except the smallest one, were visible in the reconstructed pinhole image. With background, three spheres of 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters were readily observed with the parallel-hole imaging, and the targeted spheres (22 and 28 mm diameters) were readily observed in the

  19. MRI-SPECT image registration using multiple MR pulse sequences to examine osteoarthritis of the knee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, John A.; Peterfy, Charles G.; White, David L.; Hawkins, Randall A.; Genant, Harry K.

    1999-05-01

    We have examined whether automated image registration can be used to combine metabolic information from SPECT knee scans with anatomical information from MRI. Ten patients, at risk of developing OA due to meniscal surgery, were examined. 99mTc methyldiphosphonate SPECT, T2-weighted fast spin echo (FSE) MRI, and T1-weighted, 3D fat-suppressed gradient recalled echo (SPGR) MRI images were obtained. Registration was performed using normalized mutual information. For each patient, FSE data was registered to SPGR data, providing a composite MRI image with each voxel represented by two intensities (ISPGR, IFSE). Modifications to the registration algorithm were made to allow registration of SPECT data (one intensity per voxel) to composite MRI data (2 intensities per voxel). Registration sources was assessed by visual inspection of uptake localization over expected anatomical locations, and the absence of uptake over unlikely sites. Three patients were discarded from SPECT-MRI registration tests since they had metallic artifacts that prevented co-registration of MR data. Registration of SPECT to SPGR or FSE data alone proved unreliable, with less than 50% of attempts succeeding. The modified algorithm, treating co-registered SPGR and FSE data as a two-value-per-voxel image, proved most reliable, allowing registration of all patients with no metallic artifacts on MRI.

  20. Design and Development of Molecular Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging, the visualization, characterization and measurement of biological processes at the cellular, subcellular level, or even molecular level in living subjects, has rapidly gained importance in the dawning era of personalized medicine. Molecular imaging takes advantage of the traditional diagnostic imaging techniques and introduces molecular imaging probes to determine the expression of indicative molecular markers at different stages of diseases and disorders. As a key component of molecular imaging, molecular imaging probe must be able to specifically reach the target of interest in vivo while retaining long enough to be detected. A desirable molecular imaging probe with clinical translation potential is expected to have unique characteristics. Therefore, design and development of molecular imaging probe is frequently a challenging endeavor for medicinal chemists. This review summarizes the general principles of molecular imaging probe design and some fundamental strategies of molecular imaging probe development with a number of illustrative examples. PMID:20388106

  1. SPECT Imaging as a Tool for Testing and Challenging Assumptions About Transport in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moysey, S. M.; DeVol, T. A.; Tornai, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Medical imaging has shown promise for unraveling the influence of physical, chemical and biological processes on contaminant transport. Micro-CT scans, for instance, are increasingly utilized to image the pore-scale structure of rocks and soils, which can subsequently be used within modeling studies. A disadvantage of micro-CT, however, is that this imaging modality does not directly detect contaminants. In contrast, Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) can provide the three-dimensional distribution of gamma emitting materials and is thus ideal for imaging the transport of radionuclides. SPECT is of particular interest as a tool for both directly imaging the behavior of long-lived radionuclides of interest, e.g., 99Tc and 137Cs, as well as monitoring shorter-lived isotopes as in-situ tracers of flow and biogeochemical processes. We demonstrate the potential of combining CT and SPECT imaging to improve the mechanistic understanding of flow and transport processes within a heterogeneous porous medium. In the experiment, a column was packed with 0.2mm glass beads with a cylindrical zone of 2mm glass beads embedded near the outlet; this region could be readily identified within the CT images. The column was injected with a pulse of NaCl solution spiked with 99mTcO4- and monitored using SPECT while aliquots of the effluent were used to analyze the breakthrough of both solutes. The breakthrough curves could be approximately replicated by a one-dimensional transport model, but the SPECT data revealed that the tracers migrated around the inclusion of larger beads. Although the zone of large-diameter beads was expected to act as a preferential pathway, the observed behavior could only be replicated in numerical transport simulations if this region was treated as a low-permeability zone relative to the rest of the column. This simple experiment demonstrates the potential of SPECT for investigating flow and transport phenomena within a porous medium.

  2. Optimization of SPECT-CT Hybrid Imaging Using Iterative Image Reconstruction for Low-Dose CT: A Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Grosser, Oliver S.; Kupitz, Dennis; Ruf, Juri; Czuczwara, Damian; Steffen, Ingo G.; Furth, Christian; Thormann, Markus; Loewenthal, David; Ricke, Jens; Amthauer, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Background Hybrid imaging combines nuclear medicine imaging such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET) with computed tomography (CT). Through this hybrid design, scanned patients accumulate radiation exposure from both applications. Imaging modalities have been the subject of long-term optimization efforts, focusing on diagnostic applications. It was the aim of this study to investigate the influence of an iterative CT image reconstruction algorithm (ASIR) on the image quality of the low-dose CT images. Methodology/Principal Findings Examinations were performed with a SPECT-CT scanner with standardized CT and SPECT-phantom geometries and CT protocols with systematically reduced X-ray tube currents. Analyses included image quality with respect to photon flux. Results were compared to the standard FBP reconstructed images. The general impact of the CT-based attenuation maps used during SPECT reconstruction was examined for two SPECT phantoms. Using ASIR for image reconstructions, image noise was reduced compared to FBP reconstructions for the same X-ray tube current. The Hounsfield unit (HU) values reconstructed by ASIR were correlated to the FBP HU values(R2 ≥ 0.88) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was improved by ASIR. However, for a phantom with increased attenuation, the HU values shifted for low X-ray tube currents I ≤ 60 mA (p ≤ 0.04). In addition, the shift of the HU values was observed within the attenuation corrected SPECT images for very low X-ray tube currents (I ≤ 20 mA, p ≤ 0.001). Conclusion/Significance In general, the decrease in X-ray tube current up to 30 mA in combination with ASIR led to a reduction of CT-related radiation exposure without a significant decrease in image quality. PMID:26390216

  3. Progress in BazookaSPECT: High-Resolution, Dynamic Scintigraphy with Large-Area Imagers

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Brian W.; Barber, H. Bradford; Barrett, Harrison H.; Liu, Zhonglin; Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    We present recent progress in BazookaSPECT, a high-resolution, photon-counting gamma-ray detector. It is a new class of scintillation detector that combines columnar scintillators, image intensifiers, and CCD (charge-coupled device) or CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductors) sensors for high-resolution imaging. A key feature of the BazookaSPECT paradigm is the capability to easily design custom detectors in terms of the desired intrinsic detector resolution and event detection rate. This capability is possible because scintillation light is optically amplified by the image intensifier prior to being imaging onto the CCD/CMOS sensor, thereby allowing practically any consumer-grade CCD/CMOS sensor to be used for gamma-ray imaging. Recent efforts have been made to increase the detector area by incorporating fiber-optic tapers between the scintillator and image intensifier, resulting in a 16× increase in detector area. These large-area BazookaSPECT detectors can be used for full-body imaging and we present preliminary results of their use as dynamic scintigraphy imagers for mice and rats. Also, we discuss ongoing and future developments in BazookaSPECT and the improved event-detection rate capability that is achieved using Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), multi-core processors, and new high-speed, USB 3.0 CMOS cameras. PMID:26346514

  4. SemiSPECT: A small-animal SPECT imager based on eight cadmium zinc tellurium detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunki

    We have completed a new small-animal imaging system, called SemiSPECT, based on eight pixellated cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) gamma-ray detector arrays. The detector is a 2.5 cm x 2.5 cm x 0.15 cm slab having a 64 x 64 pixel array. A read-out application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) is attached onto the detector via indium-bump bonding, and a -180 V bias is applied onto the detector surface to transport electron-hole pairs generated by gamma-ray interaction. Eight detectors are arranged in an octagonal lead-shielded ring. An eight-pinhole aperture is placed at the center of the ring, and an object is imaged onto each detector through a pinhole. The object can be rotated about a vertical axis to attain sufficient angular projections for tomographic reconstruction. The whole system gantry is compact enough to be placed onto a desktop-sized optical breadboard. Eight front-end boards were developed to detect events, generate list-mode data arrays, and send them to back-end boards. Four back-end boards are utilized to hold the list-mode data arrays and transfer them to a host computer. Eight clock-and-bias boards provide clock and bias signals to the eight ASICs. Eight control-and-bias boards were developed to monitor and control the temperatures on the eight detectors, analog and digital currents supplied to the eight ASICs, and -180 V biases applied to the eight detector surfaces. The spatial resolution provided by SemiSPECT, estimated both based on the system geometry and via the Fourier crosstalk approach, is about 1˜2 mm. The system sensitivity measured with a point source is about 1.53 x 10-4, and the estimated one from the system geometry is about 1.41 x 10-4. The energy resolution acquired by summing neighboring pixel signals in a 3 x 3 window is about 10% full-width-at-half-maximum for 140 keV gamma rays. The detectabilities for multiple signal spheres simulating various lesions or organs in a small animal are presented and discussed. A line

  5. Restoration of combined conjugate images in SPECT; Comparison of a new Weiner filter and the image-dependent Metz filter

    SciTech Connect

    Penny, B.C.; King, M.A.; Glick, S.J. . Dept. of Nuclear Medicine)

    1990-04-01

    This study applies two image-dependent restoration filters to projection image sets obtained with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Wiener and Metz restoration of combined conjugate views are compared to: each other, Wiener restoration of individual projection images, and to one-dimensional (1D) Butterworth smoothing. The combined view restoration filters adapt to the average thickness of the object by estimating a modulation transfer function (MTF) for that thickness. Simulated Tc-99m liver-spleen studies with randomly placed cold spot tumors, a projector which accounts for the spatially variant blurring in SPECT, and a Poisson noise generator are used to compute simulated projection image sets.

  6. Simultaneous SPECT imaging of multi-targets to assist in identifying hepatic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhide; Gao, Mengna; Zhang, Deliang; Li, Yesen; Song, Manli; Zhuang, Rongqiang; Su, Xinhui; Chen, Guibing; Liu, Ting; Liu, Pingguo; Wu, Hua; Du, Jin; Zhang, Xianzhong

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging technique is an attractive tool to detect liver disease at early stage. This study aims to develop a simultaneous dual-isotope single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT imaging method to assist diagnosis of hepatic tumor and liver fibrosis. Animal models of liver fibrosis and orthotopic human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were established. The tracers of 131I-NGA and 99mTc-3P-RGD2 were selected to target asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) on the hepatocytes and integrin αvβ3 receptor in tumor or fibrotic liver, respectively. SPECT imaging and biodistribution study were carried out to verify the feasibility and superiority. As expected, 99mTc-3P-RGD2 had the ability to evaluate liver fibrosis and detect tumor lesions. 131I-NGA showed that it was effective in assessing the anatomy and function of the liver. In synchronized dual-isotope SPECT/CT imaging, clear fusion images can be got within 30 minutes for diagnosing liver fibrosis and liver cancer. This new developed imaging approach enables the acquisition of different physiological information for diagnosing liver fibrosis, liver cancer and evaluating residual functional liver volume simultaneously. So synchronized dual-isotope SPECT/CT imaging with 99mTc-3P-RGD2 and 131I-NGA is an effective approach to detect liver disease, especially liver fibrosis and liver cancer. PMID:27377130

  7. Simultaneous SPECT imaging of multi-targets to assist in identifying hepatic lesions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhide; Gao, Mengna; Zhang, Deliang; Li, Yesen; Song, Manli; Zhuang, Rongqiang; Su, Xinhui; Chen, Guibing; Liu, Ting; Liu, Pingguo; Wu, Hua; Du, Jin; Zhang, Xianzhong

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging technique is an attractive tool to detect liver disease at early stage. This study aims to develop a simultaneous dual-isotope single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT imaging method to assist diagnosis of hepatic tumor and liver fibrosis. Animal models of liver fibrosis and orthotopic human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were established. The tracers of (131)I-NGA and (99m)Tc-3P-RGD2 were selected to target asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) on the hepatocytes and integrin αvβ3 receptor in tumor or fibrotic liver, respectively. SPECT imaging and biodistribution study were carried out to verify the feasibility and superiority. As expected, (99m)Tc-3P-RGD2 had the ability to evaluate liver fibrosis and detect tumor lesions. (131)I-NGA showed that it was effective in assessing the anatomy and function of the liver. In synchronized dual-isotope SPECT/CT imaging, clear fusion images can be got within 30 minutes for diagnosing liver fibrosis and liver cancer. This new developed imaging approach enables the acquisition of different physiological information for diagnosing liver fibrosis, liver cancer and evaluating residual functional liver volume simultaneously. So synchronized dual-isotope SPECT/CT imaging with (99m)Tc-3P-RGD2 and (131)I-NGA is an effective approach to detect liver disease, especially liver fibrosis and liver cancer. PMID:27377130

  8. First Results of Small Animal Imaging Spect Detector for Cardiovascular Disease Studies on Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magliozzi, M. L.; Ballerini, M.; Cisbani, E.; Colilli, S.; Cusanno, F.; Fratoni, R.; Garibaldi, F.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lucentini, M.; Santavenere, F.; Torrioli, S.; Veneroni, P.; Majewsky, S.; Mok, S. P. G.; Tsui, B. M. W.; Wang, Y.; Marano, G.; Musumeci, M.; Palazzesi, S.; Ciccariello, G.; de Vincentis, G.; Accorsi, R.

    2008-06-01

    We have developed a compact, open, Dual Head pinhole SPECT system for high resolution molecular imaging with radionuclides of mice, dedicated mainly to preclinical study of stem cells capability to recover myocardial infarction. The gamma detector is made of pinhole tungsten collimators, pixellated scintillators, matrix of multi-anode PMTs and individual channel readout. Measurements have been performed on phantoms and live mice devoted initially to test and calibrate the system and to optimize protocols. The implemented system and the first results will be presented, demonstrating the effectiveness of our dedicated SPECT detector for small animal imaging.

  9. Design and construction of a quality control phantom for SPECT and PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Dylan Christopher; Easton, Harry; Caldwell, Curtis B

    2009-12-01

    In this article, the authors present a method for quickly and easily constructing test phantoms for PET and SPECT quality assurance. As a demonstration, they constructed a complex prototype test phantom, showing the strengths of the construction method. Images taken using a PET/CT and a SPECT scanner are presented, along with a qualitative evaluation of PET/CT using the test phantom. The construction technique provides a quick, easy, and cost effective means of constructing a phantom for use in nuclear medicine imaging. PMID:20095252

  10. Detection of breast cancer microcalcification using 99mTc-MDP SPECT or Osteosense 750EX FMT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Dayo D.; Gore, John C.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Peterson, Todd E.; Barnes, Stephanie; Whisenant, Jennifer; Weis, Jared; Shoukouhi, Sepideh; Virostko, John; Nickels, Michael; McIntyre, J. Oliver; Sanders, Melinda; Abramson, Vandana; Tantawy, Mohammed N.

    2015-01-01

    Background In previous work, we demonstrated the presence of hydroxyapetite (type II microcalcification), HAP, in triple negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. We used 18F-NaF to detect these types of cancers in mouse models as the free fluorine, 18F−, binds to HAP similar to bone uptake. In this work, we investigate other bone targeting agents and techniques including 99mTc-MDP SPECT and Osteosense 750EX FMT imaging as alternatives for breast cancer diagnosis via targeting HAP within the tumor microenvironment. Methods Thirteen mice were injected subcutaneously in the right flank with 106 MDA-MB-231 cells. When the tumor size reached ~0.6 cm3, mice (n = 9) were injected with ~37 MBq of 99mTc-MDP intravenously and then imaged one hour later in a NanoSPECT/CT or injected intravenously with 4 nmol/g of Osetosense 750EX and imaged 24 hours later in an FMT (n = 4). The imaging probe concentration in the tumor was compared to that of muscle. Following SPECT imaging, the tumors were harvested, sectioned into 10 µm slices, and underwent autoradiography or von Kossa staining to correlate 99mTc-MDP binding with HAP distribution within the tumor. The SPECT images were normalized to the injected dose and regions-of-interest (ROIs) were drawn around bone, tumor, and muscle to obtain the radiotracer concentration in these regions in units of percent injected dose per unit volume. ROIs were drawn around bone and tumor in the FMT images as no FMT signal was observed in normal muscle. Results Uptake of 99mTc-MDP was observed in the bone and tumor with little or no uptake in the muscle with concentrations of 11.34 ± 1.46 (mean ± SD), 2.22 ± 0.95, and 0.05 ± 0.04 %ID/cc, respectively. Uptake of Osteosense 750EX was also observed in the bone and tumor with concentrations of 0.35 ± 0.07 (mean ± SD) and 0.04 ± 0.01 picomoles, respectively. No FMT signal was observed in the normal muscle. There was no significant difference in the bone-to-tumor ratio between the two

  11. Discrete Bimodal Probes for Thrombus Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, Ritika; Ciesienski, Kate L.; Chonde, Daniel B.; Loving, Galen S.; Caravan, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Here we report a generalizable solid/solution phase strategy for the synthesis of discrete bimodal fibrin-targeted imaging probes. A fibrin-specific peptide was conjugated with two distinct imaging reporters at the C- and N-terminus. In vitro studies demonstrated retention of fibrin affinity and specificity. Imaging studies showed that these probes could detect fibrin over a wide range of probe concentrations by optical, magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography imaging. PMID:22698259

  12. 99mTc-labelled anti-CD11b SPECT/CT imaging allows detection of plaque destabilization tightly linked to inflammation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guobing; Hu, Yan; Xiao, Jie; Li, Xiao; Li, Yanli; Tan, Hui; Zhao, Yanzhao; Cheng, Dengfeng; Shi, Hongcheng

    2016-01-01

    It remains challenging to predict the risk of rupture for a specific atherosclerotic plaque timely, a thrombotic trigger tightly linked to inflammation. CD11b, is a biomarker abundant on inflammatory cells, not restricted to monocytes/macrophages. In this study, we fabricated a probe named as (99m)Tc-MAG3-anti-CD11b for detecting inflamed atherosclerotic plaques with single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT). The ApoE-knockout (ApoE(-/-)) mice were selected to establish animal models, with C57BL/6J mice used for control. A higher CD11b(+)-cell recruitment with higher CD11b expression and more serious whole-body inflammatory status were identified in ApoE(-/-) mice. The probe showed high in vitro affinity and specificity to the Raw-264.7 macrophages, as well as inflammatory cells infiltrated in atherosclerotic plaques, either in ex vivo fluorescent imaging or in in vivo micro-SPECT/CT imaging, which were confirmed by ex vivo planar gamma imaging, Oil-Red-O staining and CD11b-immunohistochemistry staining. A significant positive relationship was identified between the radioactivity intensity on SPECT/CT images and the CD11b expression in plaques. In summary, this study demonstrates the feasibility of anti-CD11b antibody mediated noninvasive SPECT/CT imaging of inflammatory leukocytes in murine atherosclerotic plaques. This imaging strategy can identify inflammation-rich plaques at risk for rupture and evaluate the effectiveness of inflammation-targeted therapies in atheroma. PMID:26877097

  13. 99mTc-labelled anti-CD11b SPECT/CT imaging allows detection of plaque destabilization tightly linked to inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guobing; Hu, Yan; Xiao, Jie; Li, Xiao; Li, Yanli; Tan, Hui; Zhao, Yanzhao; Cheng, Dengfeng; Shi, Hongcheng

    2016-01-01

    It remains challenging to predict the risk of rupture for a specific atherosclerotic plaque timely, a thrombotic trigger tightly linked to inflammation. CD11b, is a biomarker abundant on inflammatory cells, not restricted to monocytes/macrophages. In this study, we fabricated a probe named as 99mTc-MAG3-anti-CD11b for detecting inflamed atherosclerotic plaques with single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT). The ApoE-knockout (ApoE−/−) mice were selected to establish animal models, with C57BL/6J mice used for control. A higher CD11b+-cell recruitment with higher CD11b expression and more serious whole-body inflammatory status were identified in ApoE−/− mice. The probe showed high in vitro affinity and specificity to the Raw-264.7 macrophages, as well as inflammatory cells infiltrated in atherosclerotic plaques, either in ex vivo fluorescent imaging or in in vivo micro-SPECT/CT imaging, which were confirmed by ex vivo planar gamma imaging, Oil-Red-O staining and CD11b-immunohistochemistry staining. A significant positive relationship was identified between the radioactivity intensity on SPECT/CT images and the CD11b expression in plaques. In summary, this study demonstrates the feasibility of anti-CD11b antibody mediated noninvasive SPECT/CT imaging of inflammatory leukocytes in murine atherosclerotic plaques. This imaging strategy can identify inflammation-rich plaques at risk for rupture and evaluate the effectiveness of inflammation-targeted therapies in atheroma. PMID:26877097

  14. Multimodal fluorescence mediated tomography and SPECT/CT for small animals imaging

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Metasebya; Nothdruft, Ralph E.; Akers, Walter; Edwards, W. Barry; Liang, Kexian; Xu, Baogang; Suddlow, Gail P.; Deghani, Hamid; Tai, Yuan-Chuan; Eggebrecht, Adam T.; Achilefu, Samuel; Culver, Joseph P.

    2014-01-01

    Spatial and temporal co-registration of nuclear and optical images would enable the fusion of the information from theses complementary molecular imaging modalities. A critical challenge in integration is fitting optical hardware into the nuclear imaging platforms. Flexible fiber-based fluorescence mediated tomography (FMT) systems provide a viable solution because the various imaging bore sizes of small animal nuclear imaging systems can potentially accommodate the FMT fiber imaging arrays. Further, FMT imaging facilitates co-registering the nuclear and optical contrasts in time. Herein, we combine a fiber based FMT system with a preclinical NanoSPECT/CT platform. Feasibility of in vivo imaging is demonstrated by tracking the accumulation of a monomolecular multimodal imaging agent (MOMIA) in a sentinel lymph node (SLN) of a rat. Methods The fiber-based, video-rate FMT imaging system is composed of 12 alternating sources (785nm and 830nm LDs) and 13 detectors. To maintain high temporal sampling, the system simultaneously acquires ratio-metric data at each detector. The data is reconstructed using the normalized Born approach with a three-dimensional finite element model derived from an anatomical CT image of a rat for accurate light propagation modeling. Nuclear and optical contrasts are integrated by using a MOMIA. Data collection begins immediately after injection of the MOMIA intradermally into the forepaw with the FMT data acquired simultaneously with both the SPECT and CT. Results Fluorescence and radioactivity from the MOMIA were co-localized in a spatially coincident region. Intravital imaging with surgical exposure of the lymph node validated the localization of the optical contrast. The optical and nuclear contrasts where integrated by incorporating SPECT as a prior in the DOT reconstruction. Conclusion The feasibility of integrating a fiber-based, video-rate FMT system with a commercial preclinical NanoSPECT/CT platform was established. The co

  15. Implications of CT noise and artifacts for quantitative {sup 99m}Tc SPECT/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hulme, K. W.; Kappadath, S. C.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: This paper evaluates the effects of computed tomography (CT) image noise and artifacts on quantitative single-photon emission computed-tomography (SPECT) imaging, with the aim of establishing an appropriate range of CT acquisition parameters for low-dose protocols with respect to accurate SPECT attenuation correction (AC). Methods: SPECT images of two geometric and one anthropomorphic phantom were reconstructed iteratively using CT scans acquired at a range of dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 0.4 to 46 mGy). Resultant SPECT image quality was evaluated by comparing mean signal, background noise, and artifacts to SPECT images reconstructed using the highest dose CT for AC. Noise injection was performed on linear-attenuation (μ) maps to determine the CT noise threshold for accurate AC. Results: High levels of CT noise (σ ∼ 200–400 HU) resulted in low μ-maps noise (σ ∼ 1%–3%). Noise levels greater than ∼10% in 140 keV μ-maps were required to produce visibly perceptible increases of ∼15% in {sup 99m}Tc SPECT images. These noise levels would be achieved at low CT dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 4 μGy) that are over 2 orders of magnitude lower than the minimum dose for diagnostic CT scanners. CT noise could also lower (bias) the expected μ values. The relative error in reconstructed SPECT signal trended linearly with the relative shift in μ. SPECT signal was, on average, underestimated in regions corresponding with beam-hardening artifacts in CT images. Any process that has the potential to change the CT number of a region by ∼100 HU (e.g., misregistration between CT images and SPECT images due to motion, the presence of contrast in CT images) could introduce errors in μ{sub 140} {sub keV} on the order of 10%, that in turn, could introduce errors on the order of ∼10% into the reconstructed {sup 99m}Tc SPECT image. Conclusions: The impact of CT noise on SPECT noise was demonstrated to be negligible for clinically achievable CT parameters. Because

  16. Initial experience with SPECT imaging of the brain using I-123 p-iodoamphetamine in focal epilepsy

    SciTech Connect

    LaManna, M.M.; Sussman, N.M.; Harner, R.N.; Kaplan, L.R.; Hershey, B.L.; Bernstein, D.R.; Goldstein, P.; Parker, J.A.; Wolodzko, J.G.; Popky, G.L.

    1989-06-01

    Nineteen patients with complex partial seizures refractory to medical treatment were examined with routine electroencephalography (EEG), video EEG monitoring, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, neuropsychological tests and interictal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with I-123 iodoamphetamine (INT). In 18 patients, SPECT identified areas of focal reduction in tracer uptake that correlated with the epileptogenic focus identified on the EEG. In addition, SPECT disclosed other areas of neurologic dysfunction as elicited on neuropsychological tests. Thus, IMP SPECT is a useful tool for localizing epileptogenic foci and their associated dynamic deficits.

  17. AIRS: The Medical Imaging Software for Segmentation and Registration in SPECT/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widita, R.; Kurniadi, R.; Haryanto, F.; Darma, Y.; Perkasa, Y. S.; Zasneda, S. S.

    2010-06-01

    We have been successfully developed a new software, Automated Image Registration and Segmentation (AIRS), to fuse the CT and SPECT images. It is designed to solve different registration and segmentation problems that arises in tomographic data sets. AIRS is addressed to obtain anatomic information to be applied to NanoSpect system which is imaging for nano-tissues or small animals. It will be demonstrated that the information obtained by SPECT/CT is more accurate in evaluating patients/objects than that obtained from either SPECT or CT alone. The registration methods developed here are for both two-dimensional and three-dimensional registration. We used normalized mutual information (NMI) which is amenable for images produced by different modalities and having unclear boundaries between tissues. The segmentation components used in this software is region growing algorithms which have proven to be an effective approach for image segmentation. The implementations of region growing developed here are connected threshold and neighborhood connected. Our method is designed to perform with clinically acceptable speed, using accelerated techniques (multiresolution).

  18. Objective evaluation of reconstruction methods for quantitative SPECT imaging in the absence of ground truth

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Abhinav K.; Song, Na; Caffo, Brian; Frey, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging is emerging as an important tool in clinical studies and biomedical research. There is thus a need for optimization and evaluation of systems and algorithms that are being developed for quantitative SPECT imaging. An appropriate objective method to evaluate these systems is by comparing their performance in the end task that is required in quantitative SPECT imaging, such as estimating the mean activity concentration in a volume of interest (VOI) in a patient image. This objective evaluation can be performed if the true value of the estimated parameter is known, i.e. we have a gold standard. However, very rarely is this gold standard known in human studies. Thus, no-gold-standard techniques to optimize and evaluate systems and algorithms in the absence of gold standard are required. In this work, we developed a no-gold-standard technique to objectively evaluate reconstruction methods used in quantitative SPECT when the parameter to be estimated is the mean activity concentration in a VOI. We studied the performance of the technique with realistic simulated image data generated from an object database consisting of five phantom anatomies with all possible combinations of five sets of organ uptakes, where each anatomy consisted of eight different organ VOIs. Results indicate that the method provided accurate ranking of the reconstruction methods. We also demonstrated the application of consistency checks to test the no-gold-standard output. PMID:26430292

  19. Objective evaluation of reconstruction methods for quantitative SPECT imaging in the absence of ground truth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Abhinav K.; Song, Na; Caffo, Brian; Frey, Eric C.

    2015-03-01

    Quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging is emerging as an important tool in clinical studies and biomedical research. There is thus a need for optimization and evaluation of systems and algorithms that are being developed for quantitative SPECT imaging. An appropriate objective method to evaluate these systems is by comparing their performance in the end task that is required in quantitative SPECT imaging, such as estimating the mean activity concentration in a volume of interest (VOI) in a patient image. This objective evaluation can be performed if the true value of the estimated parameter is known, i.e. we have a gold standard. However, very rarely is this gold standard known in human studies. Thus, no-gold-standard techniques to optimize and evaluate systems and algorithms in the absence of gold standard are required. In this work, we developed a no-gold-standard technique to objectively evaluate reconstruction methods used in quantitative SPECT when the parameter to be estimated is the mean activity concentration in a VOI. We studied the performance of the technique with realistic simulated image data generated from an object database consisting of five phantom anatomies with all possible combinations of five sets of organ uptakes, where each anatomy consisted of eight different organ VOIs. Results indicate that the method pro- vided accurate ranking of the reconstruction methods. We also demonstrated the application of consistency checks to test the no-gold-standard output.

  20. Multimodal imaging with hybrid semiconductor detectors Timepix for an experimental MRI-SPECT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajicek, J.; Jakubek, J.; Burian, M.; Vobecky, M.; Fauler, A.; Fiederle, M.; Zwerger, A.

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of clinical applications are being based on multimodal imaging systems (MIS), including anatomical (CT, MRI) and functional (PET, SPECT) techniques to provide complex information in a single image. CT with one of the scintigraphic methods (PET or SPECT) is nowadays a combination of choice for clinical practice and it is mostly used in cardiography and tumour diagnostics. Combination with MRI is also being implemented as no radiation dose is imparted to the patient and it is possible to gain higher structural resolution of soft tissues (brain imaging). A major disadvantage of such systems is inability to operate scintillators with photomultipliers (used for detection of γ rays) in presence of high magnetic fields. In this work we present the application of the semiconductor pixel detector for SPECT method in combination with MR imaging. We propose a novel approach based on MRI compatible setup with CdTe pixel sensor Timepix and non-conductive collimator. Measurements were performed on high proton-density (PD) phantom (1H) with an embedded radioisotopic source inside the shielded RF coil by MRI animal scanner (4.7 T). Our results pave the way for a combined MRI-SPECT system. The project was performed in the framework of the Medipix Collaboration.

  1. The parallel implementation of a backpropagation neural network and its applicability to SPECT image reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of using an Artificial Neural Network (ANN), in particular a backpropagation ANN, to improve the speed and quality of the reconstruction of three-dimensional SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) images. In addition, since the processing elements (PE)s in each layer of an ANN are independent of each other, the speed and efficiency of the neural network architecture could be better optimized by implementing the ANN on a massively parallel computer. The specific goals of this research were: to implement a fully interconnected backpropagation neural network on a serial computer and a SIMD parallel computer, to identify any reduction in the time required to train these networks on the parallel machine versus the serial machine, to determine if these neural networks can learn to recognize SPECT data by training them on a section of an actual SPECT image, and to determine from the knowledge obtained in this research if full SPECT image reconstruction by an ANN implemented on a parallel computer is feasible both in time required to train the network, and in quality of the images reconstructed.

  2. The parallel implementation of a backpropagation neural network and its applicability to SPECT image reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, J.P.

    1992-12-31

    The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of using an Artificial Neural Network (ANN), in particular a backpropagation ANN, to improve the speed and quality of the reconstruction of three-dimensional SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) images. In addition, since the processing elements (PE)s in each layer of an ANN are independent of each other, the speed and efficiency of the neural network architecture could be better optimized by implementing the ANN on a massively parallel computer. The specific goals of this research were: to implement a fully interconnected backpropagation neural network on a serial computer and a SIMD parallel computer, to identify any reduction in the time required to train these networks on the parallel machine versus the serial machine, to determine if these neural networks can learn to recognize SPECT data by training them on a section of an actual SPECT image, and to determine from the knowledge obtained in this research if full SPECT image reconstruction by an ANN implemented on a parallel computer is feasible both in time required to train the network, and in quality of the images reconstructed.

  3. Pictorial review of SPECT/CT imaging applications in clinical nuclear medicine

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Peeyush; He, Guocheng; Samarghandi, Amin; Delpassand, Ebrahim S

    2012-01-01

    Integrated SPECT/CT scanners are gaining popularity as hybrid molecular imaging devices which can acquire SPECT and CT in a single exam. CT can be a low dose non-contrast enhanced scan for attenuation correction and anatomical localization, or a contrast enhanced diagnostic quality scan for additional anatomical characterization. We present a pictorial review highlighting the usefulness of this emerging technology. We present SPECT/CT images of 13 patients where additional information was provided by the co-registered low dose non-contrast enhanced CT scan. They belong to 12 male and 1 female patients with age ranging from 28 to 76 yrs, who were referred to the Nuclear Medicine Department for various indications. We describe these cases under in the following categories: bone scintigraphy (2), leukocyte scintigraphy (2), nuclear oncology (5), nuclear cardiology (1), and general nuclear medicine (3). Additional information provided by the co-registered low dose CT improves the diagnostic confidence in image interpretation of SPECT imaging. PMID:23133813

  4. Preliminary evaluation of the tomographic performance of the mediSPECT small animal imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accorsi, Roberto; Curion, Assunta Simona; Frallicciardi, Paola; Lanza, Richard C.; Lauria, Adele; Mettivier, Giovanni; Montesi, Maria Cristina; Russo, Paolo

    2007-02-01

    We report on the tests of a prototype (MediSPECT) system developed at University & INFN Napoli, for Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) imaging on small animals with a small Field of View (FoV) and high spatial resolution. MediSPECT is a SPECT imaging system based on a 1-mm-thick CdTe pixel detector, bump-bonded to the Medipix2 CMOS readout circuit operating in single-photon counting. The CdTe detector has 256×256 square array of pixels arranged with a 55 μm pitch, for a sensitive area of 14×14 mm 2. In its present version, this system implements a single detector head, mounted on a rotating gantry. For preliminary testing and calibration of the acquisition equipment and image reconstruction algorithms, 90 projections of a γ-ray point source ( 109Cd) through a single pinhole (diameter 0.4 mm; radius of rotation about 2.5 cm; focal length about 4.5 cm) were acquired for 20 min each in a step-and-shoot mode. Capillaries, 800 μm in diameter, were arranged in a Y-shape to form a more complex phantom ( 125I, 1 mm pinhole diameter, 45 projections, each acquired for 25 min). Images were reconstructed with a custom algorithm implementing standard OS-EM with center of rotation correction and spatial resolution of 0.2 mm over a FoV of 2 mm was obtained.

  5. Assessment of the sources of error affecting the quantitative accuracy of SPECT imaging in small animals

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Andrew B; Franc, Benjamin L; Gullberg, Grant T; Hasegawa, Bruce H

    2009-01-01

    Small animal SPECT imaging systems have multiple potential applications in biomedical research. Whereas SPECT data are commonly interpreted qualitatively in a clinical setting, the ability to accurately quantify measurements will increase the utility of the SPECT data for laboratory measurements involving small animals. In this work, we assess the effect of photon attenuation, scatter and partial volume errors on the quantitative accuracy of small animal SPECT measurements, first with Monte Carlo simulation and then confirmed with experimental measurements. The simulations modeled the imaging geometry of a commercially available small animal SPECT system. We simulated the imaging of a radioactive source within a cylinder of water, and reconstructed the projection data using iterative reconstruction algorithms. The size of the source and the size of the surrounding cylinder were varied to evaluate the effects of photon attenuation and scatter on quantitative accuracy. We found that photon attenuation can reduce the measured concentration of radioactivity in a volume of interest in the center of a rat-sized cylinder of water by up to 50% when imaging with iodine-125, and up to 25% when imaging with technetium-99m. When imaging with iodine-125, the scatter-to-primary ratio can reach up to approximately 30%, and can cause overestimation of the radioactivity concentration when reconstructing data with attenuation correction. We varied the size of the source to evaluate partial volume errors, which we found to be a strong function of the size of the volume of interest and the spatial resolution. These errors can result in large (>50%) changes in the measured amount of radioactivity. The simulation results were compared with and found to agree with experimental measurements. The inclusion of attenuation correction in the reconstruction algorithm improved quantitative accuracy. We also found that an improvement of the spatial resolution through the use of resolution

  6. Assessment of the sources of error affecting the quantitative accuracy of SPECT imaging in small animals

    SciTech Connect

    Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, University of California, San Francisco and University of California, Berkeley; Department of Radiology, University of California; Gullberg, Grant T; Hwang, Andrew B.; Franc, Benjamin L.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.

    2008-02-15

    Small animal SPECT imaging systems have multiple potential applications in biomedical research. Whereas SPECT data are commonly interpreted qualitatively in a clinical setting, the ability to accurately quantify measurements will increase the utility of the SPECT data for laboratory measurements involving small animals. In this work, we assess the effect of photon attenuation, scatter and partial volume errors on the quantitative accuracy of small animal SPECT measurements, first with Monte Carlo simulation and then confirmed with experimental measurements. The simulations modeled the imaging geometry of a commercially available small animal SPECT system. We simulated the imaging of a radioactive source within a cylinder of water, and reconstructed the projection data using iterative reconstruction algorithms. The size of the source and the size of the surrounding cylinder were varied to evaluate the effects of photon attenuation and scatter on quantitative accuracy. We found that photon attenuation can reduce the measured concentration of radioactivity in a volume of interest in the center of a rat-sized cylinder of water by up to 50percent when imaging with iodine-125, and up to 25percent when imaging with technetium-99m. When imaging with iodine-125, the scatter-to-primary ratio can reach up to approximately 30percent, and can cause overestimation of the radioactivity concentration when reconstructing data with attenuation correction. We varied the size of the source to evaluate partial volume errors, which we found to be a strong function of the size of the volume of interest and the spatial resolution. These errors can result in large (>50percent) changes in the measured amount of radioactivity. The simulation results were compared with and found to agree with experimental measurements. The inclusion of attenuation correction in the reconstruction algorithm improved quantitative accuracy. We also found that an improvement of the spatial resolution through the

  7. Imaging probe for tumor malignancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shotaro; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae; Hiraoka, Hasahiro

    2009-02-01

    Solid tumors possess unique microenvironments that are exposed to chronic hypoxic conditions ("tumor hypoxia"). Although more than half a century has passed since it was suggested that tumor hypoxia correlated with poor treatment outcomes and contributed to cancer recurrence, a fundamental solution to this problem has yet to be found. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) is the main transcription factor that regulates the cellular response to hypoxia. It induces various genes whose functions are strongly associated with malignant alteration of the entire tumor. The cellular changes induced by HIF-1 are extremely important targets of cancer therapy, particularly in therapy against refractory cancers. Imaging of the HIF-1-active microenvironment is therefore important for cancer therapy. To image HIF-1activity in vivo, we developed a PTD-ODD fusion protein, POHA, which was uniquely labeled with near-infrared fluorescent dye at the C-terminal. POHA has two functional domains: protein transduction domain (PTD) and VHL-mediated protein destruction motif in oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD) domain of the alpha subunit of HIF-1 (HIF-1α). It can therefore be delivered to the entire body and remain stabilized in the HIF-1-active cells. When it was intravenously injected into tumor-bearing mice, a tumor-specific fluorescence signal was detected in the tumor 6 h after the injection. These results suggest that POHA can be used an imaging probe for tumor malignancy.

  8. A restraint-free small animal SPECT imaging system with motion tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Weisenberger, A.G.; Gleason, S.S.; Goddard, J.; Kross, B.; Majewski, S.; Meikle, S.R.; Paulus, M.J.; Pomper, M.; Popov, V.; Smith, M.F.; Welch, B.L.; Wojcik, R.

    2005-06-01

    We report on an approach toward the development of a high-resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system to image the biodistribution of radiolabeled tracers such as Tc-99m and I-125 in unrestrained/unanesthetized mice. An infrared (IR)-based position tracking apparatus has been developed and integrated into a SPECT gantry. The tracking system is designed to measure the spatial position of a mouse's head at a rate of 10-15 frames per second with submillimeter accuracy. The high-resolution, gamma imaging detectors are based on pixellated NaI(Tl) crystal scintillator arrays, position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes, and novel readout circuitry requiring fewer analog-digital converter (ADC) channels while retaining high spatial resolution. Two SPECT gamma camera detector heads based upon position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes have been built and installed onto the gantry. The IR landmark-based pose measurement and tracking system is under development to provide animal position data during a SPECT scan. The animal position and orientation data acquired by the tracking system will be used for motion correction during the tomographic image reconstruction.

  9. SPECT/NIRF Dual Modality Imaging for Detection of Intraperitoneal Colon Tumor with an Avidin/Biotin Pretargeting System

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chengyan; Yang, Sujuan; Shi, Jiyun; Zhao, Huiyun; Zhong, Lijun; Liu, Zhaofei; Jia, Bing; Wang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    We describe herein dual-modality imaging of intraperitoneal colon tumor using an avidin/biotin pretargeting system. A novel dual-modality probe, 99mTc-HYNIC-lys(Cy5.5)-PEG4-biotin, was designed, synthesized and characterized. Single-photon emission computed tomography/ computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging and near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging were developed using intraperitoneal LS180 human colon adenocarcinoma xenografts. Following avidin preinjection for 4 hours, 99mTc-HYNIC-lys(Cy5.5)-PEG4-biotin could successfully detect colon tumors of different sizes inside the abdominal region using both modalities, and the imaging results showed no differences. Biodistribution studies demonstrated that the tumors had a very high uptake of the probe 99mTc-HYNIC-lys(Cy5.5)-PEG4-biotin (12.74 ± 1.89% ID/g at 2 h p.i.), and the clearance from blood and other normal tissues occured very fast. The low tumor uptake in the non-pretargeted mice (1.63 ± 0.50% ID/g at 2 h p.i.) and tumor cell staining results showed excellent tumor binding specificity of the pretargeting system. The ability of the novel probe to show excellent imaging quality with high tumor-to-background contrast, a high degree of binding specificity with tumors and excellent in vivo biodistribution pharmacokinetics should prove that the avidin/biotin based dual-modality pretargeting probe is a promising imaging tool during the entire period of tumor diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26732543

  10. Cardiac SPECT/CCTA hybrid imaging : One answer to two questions?

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, P A; Buechel, R R

    2016-08-01

    Noninvasive cardiac imaging has witnessed tremendous advances in the recent past, particularly with regard to coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) where substantial improvements in image quality have been achieved while at the same time patients' radiation dose exposure has been reduced to the sub-millisievert range. Similarly, for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) the introduction of novel cadmium-zinc-telluride-based semiconductor detectors has significantly improved system sensitivity and image quality, enabling fast image acquisition within less than 2-3 min or reduction of radiation dose exposure to less than 5 mSv. However, neither imaging modality alone is able to fully cover the two aspects of coronary artery disease (CAD), that is, morphology and function. Both modalities have distinct advantages and shortcomings: While CCTA may prove a superb modality for excluding CAD through its excellent negative predictive value, it does not allow for assessment of hemodynamic relevance if obstructive coronary lesions are detected. Conversely, SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging cannot provide any information on the presence or absence of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. This article aims to highlight the great potential of cardiac hybrid imaging that allows for a comprehensive evaluation of CAD through combination of both morphological and functional information by fusing SPECT with CCTA. PMID:27286848

  11. Registration of serial SPECT/CT images for three-dimensional dosimetry in radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Sjögreen-Gleisner, K; Rueckert, D; Ljungberg, M

    2009-10-21

    For radionuclide therapy, individual patient pharmacokinetics can be measured in three dimensions by sequential SPECT imaging. Accurate registration of the time series of images is central for voxel-based calculations of the residence time and absorbed dose. In this work, rigid and non-rigid methods are evaluated for registration of 6-7 SPECT/CT images acquired over a week, in anatomical regions from the head-and-neck region down to the pelvis. A method for calculation of the absorbed dose, including a voxel mass determination from the CT images, is also described. Registration of the SPECT/CT images is based on a CT-derived spatial transformation. Evaluation is focused on the CT registration accuracy, and on its impact on values of residence time and absorbed dose. According to the CT evaluation, the non-rigid method produces a more accurate registration than the rigid one. For images of the residence time and absorbed dose, registration produces a sharpening of the images. For volumes-of-interest, the differences between rigid and non-rigid results are generally small. However, the non-rigid method is more consistent for regions where non-rigid patient movements are likely, such as in the head-neck-shoulder region. PMID:19794243

  12. System calibration and image reconstruction for a new small-animal SPECT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Chun

    A novel small-animal SPECT imager, FastSPECT II, was recently developed at the Center for Gamma-Ray Imaging. FastSPECT II consists of two rings of eight modular scintillation cameras and list-mode data-acquisition electronics that enable stationary and dynamic imaging studies. The instrument is equipped with exchangeable aperture assemblies and adjustable camera positions for selections of magnifications, pinhole sizes, and fields of view (FOVs). The purpose of SPECT imaging is to recover the radiotracer distribution in the object from the measured image data. Accurate knowledge of the imaging system matrix (referred to as H) is essential for image reconstruction. To assure that all of the system physics is contained in the matrix, experimental calibration methods for the individual cameras and the whole imaging system were developed and carefully performed. The average spatial resolution over the FOV of FastSPECT II in its low-magnification (2.4X) configuration is around 2.4 mm, computed from the Fourier crosstalk matrix. The system sensitivity measured with a 99mTc point source at the center of the FOV is about 267 cps/MBq. The system detectability was evaluated by computing the ideal-observer performance on SKE/BKE (signal-known-exactly/background-known-exactly) detection tasks. To reduce the system-calibration time and achieve finer reconstruction grids, two schemes for interpolating H were implemented and compared: these are centroid interpolation with Gaussian fitting and Fourier interpolation. Reconstructed phantom and mouse-cardiac images demonstrated the effectiveness of the H-matrix interpolation. Tomographic reconstruction can be formulated as a linear inverse problem and solved using statistical-estimation techniques. Several iterative reconstruction algorithms were introduced, including maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (ML-EM) and its ordered-subsets (OS) version, and some least-squares (LS) and weighted-least-squares (WLS) algorithms such

  13. Further capacitive imaging experiments using modified probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiaokang; Li, Zhen; Yan, An; Li, Wei; Chen, Guoming; Hutchins, David A.

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, capacitive imaging (CI) is growing in popularity within the NDE communities, as it has the potential to test materials and structures for defects that are not easily tested by other techniques. In previous work, The CI technique has been successfully used on a various types of materials, including concrete, glass/carbon fibre composite, steel, etc. In such CI experiments, the probes are normally with symmetric or concentric electrodes etched onto PCBs. In addition to these conventional coplanar PCB probes, modified geometries can be made and they can lead to different applications. A brief overview of these modified probes, including high resolution surface imaging probe, combined CI/eddy current probe, and CI probe using an oscilloscope probe as the sensing electrode, is presented in this work. The potential applications brought by these probes are also discussed.

  14. High-resolution single photon planar and spect imaging of brain and neck employing a system of two co-registered opposed gamma imaging heads

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Proffitt, James

    2011-12-06

    A compact, mobile, dedicated SPECT brain imager that can be easily moved to the patient to provide in-situ imaging, especially when the patient cannot be moved to the Nuclear Medicine imaging center. As a result of the widespread availability of single photon labeled biomarkers, the SPECT brain imager can be used in many locations, including remote locations away from medical centers. The SPECT imager improves the detection of gamma emission from the patient's head and neck area with a large field of view. Two identical lightweight gamma imaging detector heads are mounted to a rotating gantry and precisely mechanically co-registered to each other at 180 degrees. A unique imaging algorithm combines the co-registered images from the detector heads and provides several SPECT tomographic reconstructions of the imaged object thereby improving the diagnostic quality especially in the case of imaging requiring higher spatial resolution and sensitivity at the same time.

  15. (99m)Tc-HisoDGR as a Potential SPECT Probe for Orthotopic Glioma Detection via Targeting of Integrin α5β1.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haitao; Gao, Hannan; Zhai, Luoping; Liu, Xujie; Jia, Bing; Shi, Jiyun; Wang, Fan

    2016-05-18

    Integrins, a large family of cell adhesion receptors, have been shown to play an important role for glioma proliferation and invasion. Several integrin receptors, including αvβ3, αvβ5, and α5β1, have generated clinical interest for glioma diagnosis and antitumor therapy. Integrin α5β1 has been highlighted as a prognostic and diagnostic marker in glioma, and its expression is correlated with a worse prognosis in high-grade glioma. However, unlike extensively studied integrins αvβ3 and αvβ5, very few integrin α5β1-specific radiotracers have been reported. Developing α5β1-specific radiotracers may provide alternative diagnosis and evaluation options in addition to well-studied αvβ3/αvβ5-specific tracers, and they may add new documents for profiling tumor progression. Here, a novel integrin α5β1-specific probe (99m)Tc-HisoDGR was fabricated for SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography) imaging of glioma. To confirm its selective targeting of integrin α5β1 in vivo, the mouse models of α5β1-positive U87MG human glioma were subjected to SPECT/CT scans, and biodistribution experiments and blocking studies were performed. Small-animal SPECT/CT imaging experiments demonstrated that the tumors were clearly visualized in both subcutaneous and orthotopic glioma tumor models with clear background at 0.5, 1, and 2 h p.i. The tumor accumulation of (99m)Tc-HisoDGR showed significant reduction when excess cold isoDGR peptide was coinjected, suggesting that the tumor uptake was specifically mediated. Our work revealed that (99m)Tc-HisoDGR represented a powerful molecular probe for integrin α5β1-positive cancer imaging; moreover, it might be a promising tool for evaluating malignancy, predicting prognosis, selecting subpopulations of patients who might be sensitive to integrin α5β1-targeted drugs, and assessing and monitoring the response to integrin α5β1-targeted drugs in clinical trials. PMID:27098436

  16. SPECT imaging with Tl-201 and Ga-67 in myocardial sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kurata, C.; Sakata, K.; Taguchi, T.; Fukumoto, Y.; Miyata, H.; Aoshima, S.; Yamazaki, N. )

    1990-06-01

    Two patients with myocardial sarcoidosis are presented, both of whom underwent SPECT imaging with Tl-201 and Ga-67. The first had Ga-67 myocardial uptake with a Tl-201 defect, which disappeared with corticosteroid therapy. The second had multiple Tl-201 defects without Ga-67 uptake, which persisted despite corticosteroid therapy. Therefore, the combination of Tl-201 and Ga-67 imaging may be useful for recognizing myocardial sarcoidosis and for predicting the response to corticosteroid therapy.

  17. 99mTc-Macroaggregated Albumin SPECT/CT Perfusion Imaging of Omental Extrahepatic Vascularization.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ba D; Yang, Ming; Roarke, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    The authors present a case of omental perfusion by an extrahepatic branch of the right hepatic artery depicted during pre-embolization planning with 99mTc-macroaggregated albumin SPECT/CT imaging. This omental scintigraphic finding corresponds to an extrahepatic branch of the right hepatic artery demonstrated by selective angiography and related CT angiography. The authors would like to add the omentum to the previously reported sites of extrahepatic vascularization encountered during the hepatic pre-embolization imaging. PMID:26650883

  18. SPECT imaging with [123I]-beta-CIT in Parkinsonism: comparison of SPECT images obtained by a single-headed and a three-headed gamma camera.

    PubMed

    Eising, E G; Müller, T H; Freudenberg, L; Müller, S P; Dutschka, K; Sonnenschein, W; Przuntek, H; Bockisch, A

    2001-02-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of dopamine transporters by using the cocaine derivative [123I]-(1R)-2-beta-carbomethoxy-3-beta-(4-iodophenyl)-tropane ([123I]-beta-CIT) has been shown to be useful in patients with Parkinsonism. The aim of this study was to compare beta-CIT imaging with single-headed (SHS) and three-headed gamma camera systems (THS). In 17 patients with Parkinsonism, SPECT imaging with an SHS and a THS was performed 24 h after injection of 180 MBq of [123I]-beta-CIT. The SPECT studies were evaluated by visual assessment of the caudate nucleus (CN) and the putamen (PT) and the calculation of the striatal/cerebellar (S/C) ratios (with additional comparison to clinical symptoms measured by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS)). The S/C ratios measured by the SHS and THS showed highly significant correlation (two-tailed P < 0.01) with Spearman correlation coefficients (SCCs) of 0.864 for the right side, 0.676 for the left side, and 0.761 for both sides. By the SHS, a sufficient visual differentiation between the CN and the PT could not be achieved. A significantly better distinction could be achieved by using the THS (Wilcoxon P<0.05). The S/C ratios of the THS only showed a significant (P < 0.05) SCC of -0.514 comparing to the UPDRS. Pathological alterations in the beta-CIT uptake pattern could be identified by using the SHS, but a significantly better differentiation of CN and the PT was possible by using the THS. The significant correlation of the S/C ratios measured by THS only emphasizes the value of THS in beta-CIT imaging. PMID:11258400

  19. Pulmonary Ventilation Imaging Based on 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography: Comparison With Pulmonary Function Tests and SPECT Ventilation Images

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Kabus, Sven; Lorenz, Cristian; Mittra, Erik; Hong, Julian C.; Chung, Melody; Eclov, Neville; To, Jacqueline; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W.; Keall, Paul J.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT)-based pulmonary ventilation imaging is an emerging functional imaging modality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the physiological significance of 4D-CT ventilation imaging by comparison with pulmonary function test (PFT) measurements and single-photon emission CT (SPECT) ventilation images, which are the clinical references for global and regional lung function, respectively. Methods and Materials: In an institutional review board–approved prospective clinical trial, 4D-CT imaging and PFT and/or SPECT ventilation imaging were performed in thoracic cancer patients. Regional ventilation (V{sub 4DCT}) was calculated by deformable image registration of 4D-CT images and quantitative analysis for regional volume change. V{sub 4DCT} defect parameters were compared with the PFT measurements (forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV{sub 1}; % predicted) and FEV{sub 1}/forced vital capacity (FVC; %). V{sub 4DCT} was also compared with SPECT ventilation (V{sub SPECT}) to (1) test whether V{sub 4DCT} in V{sub SPECT} defect regions is significantly lower than in nondefect regions by using the 2-tailed t test; (2) to quantify the spatial overlap between V{sub 4DCT} and V{sub SPECT} defect regions with Dice similarity coefficient (DSC); and (3) to test ventral-to-dorsal gradients by using the 2-tailed t test. Results: Of 21 patients enrolled in the study, 18 patients for whom 4D-CT and either PFT or SPECT were acquired were included in the analysis. V{sub 4DCT} defect parameters were found to have significant, moderate correlations with PFT measurements. For example, V{sub 4DCT}{sup HU} defect volume increased significantly with decreasing FEV{sub 1}/FVC (R=−0.65, P<.01). V{sub 4DCT} in V{sub SPECT} defect regions was significantly lower than in nondefect regions (mean V{sub 4DCT}{sup HU} 0.049 vs 0.076, P<.01). The average DSCs for the spatial overlap with SPECT ventilation defect regions were only moderate (V

  20. SPECT/CT imaging in bone scintigraphy of a case of clavicular osteoma

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yuka; Nishiyama, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Osteoma is a benign bone-forming tumor that usually arises in the craniofacial bones and rarely in the long bones. Clavicular involvement is extremely rare. We report a 51-year-old woman with osteoma of the left clavicle. Radiograph of the left shoulder showed a well-defined lobulated blastic mass in the proximal and mid-portion of the left clavicle. Bone scintigraphy was performed 4 hours after an intravenous injection of Tc-99m hydroxymethylene diphosphonate (HMDP). Whole-body image showed a focus of intensely increased uptake in the clavicle. Single photon emission computed tomography / computed tomography (SPECT/CT) images were also acquired and clearly showed intense uptake at the tumor site. Integrated SPECT/CT imaging supplies both functional and anatomic information about bone the SPECT imaging improves sensitivity compared with planar imaging, the CT imaging provides precise localization of the abnormal uptake, and information on the shape and structure of the abnormalities improves the specificity of the diagnosis.

  1. Effects of attenuation map accuracy on attenuation-corrected micro-SPECT images

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), attenuation of photon flux in tissue affects quantitative accuracy of reconstructed images. Attenuation maps derived from X-ray computed tomography (CT) can be employed for attenuation correction. The attenuation coefficients as well as registration accuracy between SPECT and CT can be influenced by several factors. Here we investigate how such inaccuracies influence micro-SPECT quantification. Methods Effects of (1) misalignments between micro-SPECT and micro-CT through shifts and rotation, (2) globally altered attenuation coefficients and (3) combinations of these were evaluated. Tests were performed with a NEMA NU 4–2008 phantom and with rat cadavers containing sources with known activity. Results Changes in measured activities within volumes of interest in phantom images ranged from <1.5% (125I) and <0.6% (201Tl, 99mTc and 111In) for 1-mm shifts to <4.5% (125I) and <1.7% (201Tl, 99mTc and 111In) with large misregistration (3 mm). Changes induced by 15° rotation were smaller than those by 3-mm shifts. By significantly altering attenuation coefficients (±10%), activity changes of <5.2% for 125I and <2.7% for 201Tl, 99mTc and 111In were induced. Similar trends were seen in rat studies. Conclusions While getting sufficient accuracy of attenuation maps in clinical imaging is highly challenging, our results indicate that micro-SPECT quantification is quite robust to various imperfections of attenuation maps. PMID:23369630

  2. Multifunctional imaging probe based on gadofulleride nanoplatform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun-Peng; Liu, Qiao-Ling; Zhen, Ming-Ming; Jiang, Feng; Shu, Chun-Ying; Jin, Chan; Yang, Yongji; Alhadlaq, Hisham A.; Wang, Chun-Ru

    2012-05-01

    A FAR over-expressed tumor targeting multifunctional imaging probe has been fabricated based on gadofulleride nanoplatform. The combination of highly efficient MRI contrast enhancement and sensitive fluorescence imaging along with the preferential uptake toward FAR tumor cells suggest that the obtained multifunctional imaging probe possesses complementary capabilities for anatomical resolution and detection sensitivity.A FAR over-expressed tumor targeting multifunctional imaging probe has been fabricated based on gadofulleride nanoplatform. The combination of highly efficient MRI contrast enhancement and sensitive fluorescence imaging along with the preferential uptake toward FAR tumor cells suggest that the obtained multifunctional imaging probe possesses complementary capabilities for anatomical resolution and detection sensitivity. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials, instruments and methods, synthesis details, XPS characterization for estimation of average molecular formula, evaluation of conjugated FA and FITC ratio, zeta potential and fluorescent images. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30836c

  3. Single photon emission photography/magnetic resonance imaging (SPECT/MRI) visualization for frontal-lobe-damaged regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokking, Rik; Zuiderveld, Karel J.; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Viergever, Max A.

    1994-09-01

    We present multi-modality visualization strategies to convey information contained in registered Single Photon Emission Photography (SPECT) and Magnetic Resonance (MR) images of the brain. Multi-modality visualization provides a means to retrieve valuable information from the data which might otherwise remain obscured. Here we use MRI as an anatomical framework for functional information acquired with SPECT. This is part of clinical research studying the change of functionality caused by a frontal lobe damaged region. A number of known and newly developed techniques for the integrated visualization of SPECT and MR images will be discussed.

  4. Influences of reconstruction and attenuation correction in brain SPECT images obtained by the hybrid SPECT/CT device: evaluation with a 3-dimensional brain phantom

    PubMed Central

    Akamatsu, Mana; Yamashita, Yasuo; Akamatsu, Go; Tsutsui, Yuji; Ohya, Nobuyoshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this study was to evaluate the influences of reconstruction and attenuation correction on the differences in the radioactivity distributions in 123I brain SPECT obtained by the hybrid SPECT/CT device. Methods: We used the 3-dimensional (3D) brain phantom, which imitates the precise structure of gray matter, white matter and bone regions. It was filled with 123I solution (20.1 kBq/mL) in the gray matter region and with K2HPO4 in the bone region. The SPECT/CT data were acquired by the hybrid SPECT/CT device. SPECT images were reconstructed by using filtered back projection with uniform attenuation correction (FBP-uAC), 3D ordered-subsets expectation-maximization with uniform AC (3D-OSEM-uAC) and 3D OSEM with CT-based non-uniform AC (3D-OSEM-CTAC). We evaluated the differences in the radioactivity distributions among these reconstruction methods using a 3D digital phantom, which was developed from CT images of the 3D brain phantom, as a reference. The normalized mean square error (NMSE) and regional radioactivity were calculated to evaluate the similarity of SPECT images to the 3D digital phantom. Results: The NMSE values were 0.0811 in FBP-uAC, 0.0914 in 3D-OSEM-uAC and 0.0766 in 3D-OSEM-CTAC. The regional radioactivity of FBP-uAC was 11.5% lower in the middle cerebral artery territory, and that of 3D-OSEM-uAC was 5.8% higher in the anterior cerebral artery territory, compared with the digital phantom. On the other hand, that of 3D-OSEM-CTAC was 1.8% lower in all brain areas. Conclusion: By using the hybrid SPECT/CT device, the brain SPECT reconstructed by 3D-OSEM with CT attenuation correction can provide an accurate assessment of the distribution of brain radioactivity.

  5. First experience DaTSCAN imaging using cadmium-zinc-telluride gamma camera SPECT.

    PubMed

    Farid, Karim; Queneau, Mathieu; Guernou, Mohamed; Lussato, David; Poullias, Xavier; Petras, Slavomir; Caillat-Vigneron, Nadine; Songy, Bernard

    2012-08-01

    We report our first experience of brain DaTSCAN SPECT imaging using cadmium-zinc-telluride gamma camera (CZT-GC) in 2 cases: a 64-year-old patient suffering from essential tremor and a 73-year-old patient presenting with atypical bilateral extrapyramidal syndrome. In both cases, 2 different acquisitions were performed and compared, using a double-head Anger-GC, followed immediately by a second acquisition on CZT-GC. There were no significant visual differences between images generated by different GC. Our first result suggests that DaTSCAN SPECT is feasible on CZT-GC, allowing both injected dose and acquisition time reductions without compromising image quality. This experience needs to be evaluated in larger series. PMID:22785531

  6. SemiSPECT: A small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager based on eight cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyunki; Furenlid, Lars R.; Crawford, Michael J.; Wilson, Donald W.; Barber, H. Bradford; Peterson, Todd E.; Hunter, William C.J.; Liu Zhonglin; Woolfenden, James M.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2006-02-15

    The first full single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager to exploit eight compact high-intrinsic-resolution cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, called SemiSPECT, has been completed. Each detector consists of a CZT crystal and a customized application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The CZT crystal is a 2.7 cmx2.7 cmx{approx}0.2 cm slab with a continuous top electrode and a bottom electrode patterned into a 64x64 pixel array by photolithography. The ASIC is attached to the bottom of the CZT crystal by indium-bump bonding. A bias voltage of -180 V is applied to the continuous electrode. The eight detectors are arranged in an octagonal lead-shielded ring. Each pinhole in the eight-pinhole aperture placed at the center of the ring is matched to each individual detector array. An object is imaged onto each detector through a pinhole, and each detector is operated independently with list-mode acquisition. The imaging subject can be rotated about a vertical axis to obtain additional angular projections. The performance of SemiSPECT was characterized using {sup 99m}Tc. When a 0.5 mm diameter pinhole is used, the spatial resolution on each axis is about 1.4 mm as estimated by the Fourier crosstalk matrix, which provides an algorithm-independent average resolution over the field of view. The energy resolution achieved by summing neighboring pixel signals in a 3x3 window is about 10% full-width-at-half-maximum of the photopeak. The overall system sensitivity is about 0.5x10{sup -4} with the energy window of {+-}10% from the photopeak. Line-phantom images are presented to visualize the spatial resolution provided by SemiSPECT, and images of bone, myocardium, and human tumor xenografts in mice demonstrate the feasibility of preclinical small-animal studies with SemiSPECT.

  7. SemiSPECT: a small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager based on eight cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunki; Furenlid, Lars R; Crawford, Michael J; Wilson, Donald W; Barber, H Bradford; Peterson, Todd E; Hunter, William C J; Liu, Zhonglin; Woolfenden, James M; Barrett, Harrison H

    2006-02-01

    The first full single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager to exploit eight compact high-intrinsic-resolution cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, called SemiSPECT, has been completed. Each detector consists of a CZT crystal and a customized application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The CZT crystal is a 2.7 cm x 2.7 cm x -0.2 cm slab with a continuous top electrode and a bottom electrode patterned into a 64 x 64 pixel array by photolithography. The ASIC is attached to the bottom of the CZT crystal by indium-bump bonding. A bias voltage of -180 V is applied to the continuous electrode. The eight detectors are arranged in an octagonal lead-shielded ring. Each pinhole in the eight-pinhole aperture placed at the center of the ring is matched to each individual detector array. An object is imaged onto each detector through a pinhole, and each detector is operated independently with list-mode acquisition. The imaging subject can be rotated about a vertical axis to obtain additional angular projections. The performance of SemiSPECT was characterized using 99mTc. When a 0.5 mm diameter pinhole is used, the spatial resolution on each axis is about 1.4 mm as estimated by the Fourier crosstalk matrix, which provides an algorithm-independent average resolution over the field of view. The energy resolution achieved by summing neighboring pixel signals in a 3 x 3 window is about 10% full-width-at-half-maximum of the photopeak. The overall system sensitivity is about 0.5 x 10(-4) with the energy window of +/-10% from the photopeak. Line-phantom images are presented to visualize the spatial resolution provided by SemiSPECT, and images of bone, myocardium, and human tumor xenografts in mice demonstrate the feasibility of preclinical small-animal studies with SemiSPECT. PMID:16532954

  8. SemiSPECT: A small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager based on eight cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunki; Furenlid, Lars R.; Crawford, Michael J.; Wilson, Donald W.; Barber, H. Bradford; Peterson, Todd E.; Hunter, William C. J.; Liu, Zhonglin; Woolfenden, James M.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2008-01-01

    The first full single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager to exploit eight compact high-intrinsic-resolution cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, called SemiSPECT, has been completed. Each detector consists of a CZT crystal and a customized application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The CZT crystal is a 2.7 cm × 2.7 cm × ~ 0.2 cm slab with a continuous top electrode and a bottom electrode patterned into a 64 × 64 pixel array by photolithography. The ASIC is attached to the bottom of the CZT crystal by indium-bump bonding. A bias voltage of −180 V is applied to the continuous electrode. The eight detectors are arranged in an octagonal lead-shielded ring. Each pinhole in the eight-pinhole aperture placed at the center of the ring is matched to each individual detector array. An object is imaged onto each detector through a pinhole, and each detector is operated independently with list-mode acquisition. The imaging subject can be rotated about a vertical axis to obtain additional angular projections. The performance of SemiSPECT was characterized using 99mTc. When a 0.5 mm diameter pinhole is used, the spatial resolution on each axis is about 1.4 mm as estimated by the Fourier crosstalk matrix, which provides an algorithm-independent average resolution over the field of view. The energy resolution achieved by summing neighboring pixel signals in a 3 × 3 window is about 10% full-width-at-half-maximum of the photopeak. The overall system sensitivity is about 0.5 × 10−4 with the energy window of ±10% from the photopeak. Line-phantom images are presented to visualize the spatial resolution provided by SemiSPECT, and images of bone, myocardium, and human tumor xenografts in mice demonstrate the feasibility of preclinical small-animal studies with SemiSPECT. PMID:16532954

  9. New AIRS: The medical imaging software for segmentation and registration of elastic organs in SPECT/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widita, R.; Kurniadi, R.; Darma, Y.; Perkasa, Y. S.; Trianti, N.

    2012-06-01

    We have been successfully improved our software, Automated Image Registration and Segmentation (AIRS), to fuse the CT and SPECT images of elastic organs. Segmentation and registration of elastic organs presents many challenges. Many artifacts can arise in SPECT/CT scans. Also, different organs and tissues have very similar gray levels, which consign thresholding to limited utility. We have been developed a new software to solve different registration and segmentation problems that arises in tomographic data sets. It will be demonstrated that the information obtained by SPECT/CT is more accurate in evaluating patients/objects than that obtained from either SPECT or CT alone. We used multi-modality registration which is amenable for images produced by different modalities and having unclear boundaries between tissues. The segmentation components used in this software is region growing algorithms which have proven to be an effective approach for image segmentation. Our method is designed to perform with clinically acceptable speed, using accelerated techniques (multiresolution).

  10. Peritoneal fluid causing inferior attenuation on SPECT thallium-201 myocardial imaging in women

    SciTech Connect

    Rab, S.T.; Alazraki, N.P.; Guertler-Krawczynska, E.

    1988-11-01

    On SPECT thallium images, myocardial left ventricular (LV) anterior wall attenuation due to breast tissue is common in women. In contrast, in men, inferior wall counts are normally decreased compared to anterior counts. The purpose of this report is to describe cases of inferior wall attenuation of counts in women caused by peritoneal fluid, not myocardial disease. Twelve consecutive SPECT thallium myocardial studies performed in women on peritoneal dialysis, being evaluated for kidney transplant, were included in this study. For all studies, 3.5 mCi 201Tl were injected intravenously. Thirty-two images were acquired over 180 degrees (45 degrees RAO progressing to 45 degrees LPO) at 40 sec per stop. SPECT images were reviewed in short axis, horizontal long and vertical long axes. Data were also displayed in bullseye format with quantitative comparison to gender-matched normal files. Ten of 12 female patients studied had inferior wall defects on images, confirmed by bullseye display. All patients had approximately 2 liters of peritoneal fluid. Review of planar rotational views showed diaphragm elevation and fluid margin attenuations affecting left ventricular inferior wall. Thus, peritoneal fluid is a cause of inferior attenuation on 201Tl cardiac imaging.

  11. A comparison of cost functions for data-driven motion estimation in myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Joyeeta Mitra; Pretorius, P. H.; Johnson, K. L.; Hutton, Brian F.; King, Michael A.

    2011-03-01

    In myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging patient motion during acquisition causes severe artifacts in about 5% of studies. Motion estimation strategies commonly used are a) data-driven, where the motion may be determined by registration and checking consistency with the SPECT acquisition data, and b) external surrogate-based, where the motion is obtained from a dedicated motion-tracking system. In this paper a data-driven strategy similar to a 2D-3D registration scheme with multiple views is investigated, using a partially reconstructed heart for the 3D model. The partially-reconstructed heart has inaccuracies due to limited angle artifacts resulting from using only a part of the SPECT projections acquired while the patient maintained the same pose. The goal of this paper is to compare the performance of different cost-functions in quantifying consistency with the SPECT projection data in a registration-based scheme for motion estimation as the image-quality of the 3D model degrades. Six intensity-based metrics- Mean-squared difference (MSD), Mutual information (MI), Normalized Mutual information NMI), Pattern intensity (PI), normalized cross-correlation (NCC) and Entropy of the difference (EDI) were studied. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of the performance is reported using Monte-Carlo simulations of a realistic heart phantom including degradation factors such as attenuation, scatter and collimator blurring. Further the image quality of motion-corrected images using data-driven motion estimates was compared to that obtained using the external motion-tracking system in acquisitions of anthropomorphic phantoms and patient studies in a real clinical setting. Pattern intensity and Normalized Mutual Information cost functions were observed to have the best performance in terms of lowest average position error and stability with degradation of image quality of the partial reconstruction in simulations and anthropomorphic phantom acquisitions. In patient studies

  12. Adaptive SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Freed, Melanie; Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Whitaker, Meredith K.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive imaging systems alter their data-acquisition configuration or protocol in response to the image information received. An adaptive pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system might acquire an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the radiotracer distribution and then adjust the configuration or sizes of the pinholes, the magnifications, or the projection angles in order to improve performance. This paper briefly describes two small-animal SPECT systems that allow this flexibility and then presents a framework for evaluating adaptive systems in general, and adaptive SPECT systems in particular. The evaluation is in terms of the performance of linear observers on detection or estimation tasks. Expressions are derived for the ideal linear (Hotelling) observer and the ideal linear (Wiener) estimator with adaptive imaging. Detailed expressions for the performance figures of merit are given, and possible adaptation rules are discussed. PMID:18541485

  13. Developing MR probes for molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Michael T; Chan, Kannie W Y

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging plays an important role in the era of personalized medicine, especially with recent advances in magnetic resonance (MR) probes. While the first generation of these probes focused on maximizing contrast enhancement, a second generation of probes has been developed to improve the accumulation within specific tissues or pathologies, and the newest generation of agents is also designed to report on changes in physiological status and has been termed "smart" agents. This represents a paradigm switch from the previously commercialized gadolinium and iron oxide probes to probes with new capabilities, and leads to new challenges as scanner hardware needs to be adapted for detecting these probes. In this chapter, we highlight the unique features for all five different categories of MR probes, including the emerging chemical exchange saturation transfer, (19)F, and hyperpolarized probes, and describe the key physical properties and features motivating their design. As part of this comparison, the strengths and weaknesses of each category are discussed. PMID:25287693

  14. Molecular Imaging Probe Development using Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kan; Wang, Ming-Wei; Lin, Wei-Yu; Phung, Duy Linh; Girgis, Mark D.; Wu, Anna M.; Tomlinson, James S.; Shen, Clifton K.-F.

    2012-01-01

    In this manuscript, we review the latest advancement of microfluidics in molecular imaging probe development. Due to increasing needs for medical imaging, high demand for many types of molecular imaging probes will have to be met by exploiting novel chemistry/radiochemistry and engineering technologies to improve the production and development of suitable probes. The microfluidic-based probe synthesis is currently attracting a great deal of interest because of their potential to deliver many advantages over conventional systems. Numerous chemical reactions have been successfully performed in micro-reactors and the results convincingly demonstrate with great benefits to aid synthetic procedures, such as purer products, higher yields, shorter reaction times compared to the corresponding batch/macroscale reactions, and more benign reaction conditions. Several ‘proof-of-principle’ examples of molecular imaging probe syntheses using microfluidics, along with basics of device architecture and operation, and their potential limitations are discussed here. PMID:22977436

  15. Fused SPECT/CT imaging of Peri-iliopsoas infection using Indium-111-labeled leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Jennifer; Crawford, Joseph A; Sodee, D Bruce; Bakale, George

    2006-12-01

    Nuclear imaging with In-111-labeled leukocytes has become an instrumental tool in localizing sites of infection and is superior to Ga-67 in localizing abdominal and pelvic abscesses resulting from absence of a normal bowel excretory pathway. Labeled white blood cells (WBCs) localize at sites of infection through diapedesis, chemotaxis, and enhanced vascular permeability and can thus be used to identify infection. The accuracy of this functional imaging modality can be enhanced by fusing SPECT images of labeled WBC with CT images that provide anatomic detail to facilitate reading as illustrated in the case described. PMID:17117077

  16. Recent Progress in Fluorescent Imaging Probes.

    PubMed

    Pak, Yen Leng; Swamy, K M K; Yoon, Juyoung

    2015-01-01

    Due to the simplicity and low detection limit, especially the bioimaging ability for cells, fluorescence probes serve as unique detection methods. With the aid of molecular recognition and specific organic reactions, research on fluorescent imaging probes has blossomed during the last decade. Especially, reaction based fluorescent probes have been proven to be highly selective for specific analytes. This review highlights our recent progress on fluorescent imaging probes for biologically important species, such as biothiols, reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, metal ions including Zn(2+), Hg(2+), Cu(2+) and Au(3+), and anions including cyanide and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). PMID:26402684

  17. Recent Progress in Fluorescent Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Yen Leng; Swamy, K. M. K.; Yoon, Juyoung

    2015-01-01

    Due to the simplicity and low detection limit, especially the bioimaging ability for cells, fluorescence probes serve as unique detection methods. With the aid of molecular recognition and specific organic reactions, research on fluorescent imaging probes has blossomed during the last decade. Especially, reaction based fluorescent probes have been proven to be highly selective for specific analytes. This review highlights our recent progress on fluorescent imaging probes for biologically important species, such as biothiols, reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, metal ions including Zn2+, Hg2+, Cu2+ and Au3+, and anions including cyanide and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). PMID:26402684

  18. Dual-energy micro-CT imaging of pulmonary airway obstruction: correlation with micro-SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, C. T.; Befera, N.; Clark, D.; Qi, Y.; Johnson, G. A.

    2014-03-01

    To match recent clinical dual energy (DE) CT studies focusing on the lung, similar developments for DE micro-CT of the rodent lung are required. Our group has been actively engaged in designing pulmonary gating techniques for micro- CT, and has also introduced the first DE micro-CT imaging method of the rodent lung. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of DE micro-CT imaging for the evaluation of airway obstruction in mice, and to compare the method with micro single photon emission computed tomography (micro-SPECT) using technetium-99m labeled macroaggregated albumin (99mTc-MAA). The results suggest that the induced pulmonary airway obstruction causes either atelectasis, or air-trapping similar to asthma or chronic bronchitis. Atelectasis could only be detected at early time points in DE micro-CT images, and is associated with a large increase in blood fraction and decrease in air fraction. Air trapping had an opposite effect with larger air fraction and decreased blood fraction shown by DE micro-CT. The decrease in perfusion to the hypoventilated lung (hypoxic vasoconstriction) is also seen in micro-SPECT. The proposed DE micro-CT technique for imaging localized airway obstruction performed well in our evaluation, and provides a higher resolution compared to micro-SPECT. Both DE micro-CT and micro-SPECT provide critical, quantitative lung biomarkers for image-based anatomical and functional information in the small animal. The methods are readily linked to clinical methods allowing direct comparison of preclinical and clinical results.

  19. Towards Quantification of Functional Breast Images Using Dedicated SPECT With Non-Traditional Acquisition Trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Kristy L.; Cutler, Spencer J.; Madhav, Priti; Tornai, Martin P.

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of radiotracer uptake in breast lesions can provide valuable information to physicians in deciding patient care or determining treatment efficacy. Physical processes (e.g., scatter, attenuation), detector/collimator characteristics, sampling and acquisition trajectories, and reconstruction artifacts contribute to an incorrect measurement of absolute tracer activity and distribution. For these experiments, a cylinder with three syringes of varying radioactivity concentration, and a fillable 800 mL breast with two lesion phantoms containing aqueous 99mTc pertechnetate were imaged using the SPECT sub-system of the dual-modality SPECT-CT dedicated breast scanner. SPECT images were collected using a compact CZT camera with various 3D acquisitions including vertical axis of rotation, 30° tilted, and complex sinusoidal trajectories. Different energy windows around the photopeak were quantitatively compared, along with appropriate scatter energy windows, to determine the best quantification accuracy after attenuation and dual-window scatter correction. Measured activity concentrations in the reconstructed images for syringes with greater than 10 µCi /mL corresponded to within 10% of the actual dose calibrator measured activity concentration for ±4% and ±8% photopeak energy windows. The same energy windows yielded lesion quantification results within 10% in the breast phantom as well. Results for the more complete complex sinsusoidal trajectory are similar to the simple vertical axis acquisition, and additionally allows both anterior chest wall sampling, no image distortion, and reasonably accurate quantification. PMID:22262925

  20. Improved Pose Measurement and Tracking System for Motion Correction of Awake, Unrestrained Small Animal SPECT Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Baba, Justin S; Weisenberger, A G; Smith, M F

    2007-01-01

    An improved optical landmark-based pose measurement and tracking system has been developed to provide 3D animal pose data for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging system for awake, unanesthetized, unrestrained laboratory animals. The six degree of freedom animal position and orientation measurement data are time synchronized with the SPECT list mode data to provide for motion correction after the scan and before reconstruction. The tracking system employs infrared (IR) markers placed on the animal's head along with synchronized, strobed IR LEDs to illuminate the reflectors and freeze motion while minimizing reflections. A new design trinocular stereo image acquisition system using IEEE 1394 CMOS cameras acquires images of the animal with markers contained within a transparent enclosure. The trinocular configuration provides improved accuracy, range of motion, and robustness over the binocular stereo used previously. Enhanced software detects obstructions, automatically segments the markers, rejects reflections, performs marker correspondence, and calculates the 3D pose of the animal's head using image data from three cameras. The new hardware design provides more compact camera positioning with enhanced animal viewing through the 360 degree SPECT scan. This system has been implemented on a commercial scanner and tested using live mice and has been shown to be more reliable with higher accuracy than the previous system. Experimental results showing the improved motion tracking results are given.

  1. Towards Quantification of Functional Breast Images Using Dedicated SPECT With Non-Traditional Acquisition Trajectories.

    PubMed

    Perez, Kristy L; Cutler, Spencer J; Madhav, Priti; Tornai, Martin P

    2011-10-01

    Quantification of radiotracer uptake in breast lesions can provide valuable information to physicians in deciding patient care or determining treatment efficacy. Physical processes (e.g., scatter, attenuation), detector/collimator characteristics, sampling and acquisition trajectories, and reconstruction artifacts contribute to an incorrect measurement of absolute tracer activity and distribution. For these experiments, a cylinder with three syringes of varying radioactivity concentration, and a fillable 800 mL breast with two lesion phantoms containing aqueous (99m)Tc pertechnetate were imaged using the SPECT sub-system of the dual-modality SPECT-CT dedicated breast scanner. SPECT images were collected using a compact CZT camera with various 3D acquisitions including vertical axis of rotation, 30° tilted, and complex sinusoidal trajectories. Different energy windows around the photopeak were quantitatively compared, along with appropriate scatter energy windows, to determine the best quantification accuracy after attenuation and dual-window scatter correction. Measured activity concentrations in the reconstructed images for syringes with greater than 10 µCi /mL corresponded to within 10% of the actual dose calibrator measured activity concentration for ±4% and ±8% photopeak energy windows. The same energy windows yielded lesion quantification results within 10% in the breast phantom as well. Results for the more complete complex sinsusoidal trajectory are similar to the simple vertical axis acquisition, and additionally allows both anterior chest wall sampling, no image distortion, and reasonably accurate quantification. PMID:22262925

  2. Differential diagnosis of bilateral parietal abnormalities in I-123 IMP SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwabara, Y.; Ichiya, Y.; Otsuka, M.; Tahara, T.; Fukumura, T.; Gunasekera, R.; Masuda, K. )

    1990-12-01

    This report discusses the clinical significance of bilateral parietal abnormalities on I-123 IMP SPECT imaging in 158 patients with cerebral disorders. This pattern was seen in 15 out of 21 patients with Alzheimer's disease; it was also seen in 4 out of 5 patients with Parkinson's disease with dementia, in 3 out of 17 patients with vascular dementia, in 1 out of 36 patients with cerebral infarction without dementia, in 1 out of 2 patients with hypoglycemia, and in 1 out of 2 patients with CO intoxication. Detection of bilateral parietal abnormalities is a useful finding in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, but one should keep in mind that other cerebral disorders may also show a similar pattern with I-123 IMP SPECT imaging.

  3. PET and SPECT Imaging of Tumor Biology: New Approaches towards Oncology Drug Discovery and Development

    PubMed Central

    Van Dort, Marcian E.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Ross, Brian D.

    2009-01-01

    Spiraling drug developmental costs and lengthy time-to-market introduction are two critical challenges facing the pharmaceutical industry. The clinical trials success rate for oncology drugs is reported to be 5% as compared to other therapeutic categories (11%) with most failures often encountered late in the clinical development process. PET and SPECT nuclear imaging technologies could play an important role in facilitating the drug development process improving the speed, efficiency and cost of drug development. This review will focus on recent studies of PET and SPECT radioligands in oncology and their application in the investigation of tumor biology. The use of clinically-validated radioligands as imaging-based biomarkers in oncology could significantly impact new cancer therapeutic development. PMID:19809593

  4. Design and evaluation of a mobile bedside PET/SPECT imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studenski, Matthew Thomas

    Patients confined to an intensive care unit, the emergency room, or a surgical suite are managed without nuclear medicine procedures such as positron emission tomography (PET) or single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). These studies have diagnostic value which can greatly benefit the physician's treatment of the patient but require that the patient is moved to a scanner. This dissertation examines the feasibility of an economical PET/SPECT system that can be brought to the bedside of an immobile patient for imaging. We chose to focus on cardiac SPECT imaging including perfusion imaging using 99mTc tracers and viability imaging using 18F tracers first because of problems arising from positioning a detector beneath a patient's bed, a requirement for the opposed detector orientation in PET imaging. Second, SPECT imaging acquiring over the anterior 180 degrees of the patient results in reduced attenuation effects due to the heart's location in the anterior portion of the body. Four studies were done to assess the clinical feasibility of the mobile system; 1) the performance of the system was evaluated in SPECT mode at both 140 keV (99mTc tracers) and 511 keV (positron emitting tracers), 2) a dynamic cardiac phantom was used to develop and test image acquisition and processing methods for the system at both energies, 3) a high energy pinhole collimator was designed to reduce the effects of high energy photon penetration through the parallel hole collimator, and 4) we estimated the radiation dose to persons that would be in the vicinity of a patient to ensure that the effective dose is below the regulatory limit. With these studies, we show that the mobile system provides an economical means of bringing nuclear medicine to an immobile patient while staying below the regulatory dose limit to other persons. The system performed well at both 140 keV and 511 keV and provided viable images of a phantom myocardium at both energies. The system does not achieve the

  5. Performance evaluation of a compact PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system for small animal imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qingyang; Wang, Shi; Ma, Tianyu; Wu, Jing; Liu, Hui; Xu, Tianpeng; Xia, Yan; Fan, Peng; Lyu, Zhenlei; Liu, Yaqiang

    2015-06-01

    PET, SPECT and CT imaging techniques are widely used in preclinical small animal imaging applications. In this paper, we present a compact small animal PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system. A dual-functional, shared detector design is implemented which enables PET and SPECT imaging with a same LYSO ring detector. A multi-pinhole collimator is mounted on the system and inserted into the detector ring in SPECT imaging mode. A cone-beam CT consisting of a micro focus X-ray tube and a CMOS detector is implemented. The detailed design and the performance evaluations are reported in this paper. In PET imaging mode, the measured NEMA based spatial resolution is 2.12 mm (FWHM), and the sensitivity at the central field of view (CFOV) is 3.2%. The FOV size is 50 mm (∅)×100 mm (L). The SPECT has a spatial resolution of 1.32 mm (FWHM) and an average sensitivity of 0.031% at the center axial, and a 30 mm (∅)×90 mm (L) FOV. The CT spatial resolution is 8.32 lp/mm @10%MTF, and the contrast discrimination function value is 2.06% with 1.5 mm size cubic box object. In conclusion, a compact, tri-modality PET/SPECT/CT system was successfully built with low cost and high performance.

  6. Development of a combined microSPECT/CT system for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingshan

    Modern advances in the biomedical sciences have placed increased attention on small animals such as mice and rats as models of human biology and disease in biological research and pharmaceutical development. Their small size and fast breeding rate, their physiologic similarity to human, and, more importantly, the availability of sophisticated genetic manipulations, all have made mice and rats the laboratory mammals of choice in these experimental studies. However, the increased use of small animals in biomedical research also calls for new instruments that can measure the anatomic and metabolic information noninvasively with adequate spatial resolution and measurement sensitivity to facilitate these studies. This dissertation describes the engineering development of a combined single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and X-ray computed tomography (CT) system dedicated for small animals imaging. The system aims to obtain both the anatomic and metabolic images with submillimeter spatial resolution in a way that the data can be correlated to provide improved image quality and to offer more complete biological evaluation for biomedical studies involving small animals. The project requires development of complete microSPECT and microCT subsystems. Both subsystems are configured with a shared gantry and animal bed with integrated instrumentation for data acquisition and system control. The microCT employs a microfocus X-ray tube and a CCD-based detector for low noise, high resolution imaging. The microSPECT utilizes three semiconductor detectors coupled with pinhole collimators. A significant contribution of this dissertation project is the development of iterative algorithms with geometrical compensation that allows radionuclide images to be reconstructed at submillimeter spatial resolution, but with significantly higher detection efficiency than conventional methods. Both subsystems are capable of helical scans, offering lengthened field of view and improved

  7. Radionuclide (131)I-labeled multifunctional dendrimers for targeted SPECT imaging and radiotherapy of tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingyi; Zhao, Lingzhou; Cheng, Yongjun; Xiong, Zhijuan; Tang, Yueqin; Shen, Mingwu; Zhao, Jinhua; Shi, Xiangyang

    2015-11-21

    We report the synthesis, characterization, and utilization of radioactive (131)I-labeled multifunctional dendrimers for targeted single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging and radiotherapy of tumors. In this study, amine-terminated poly(amidoamine) dendrimers of generation 5 (G5·NH2) were sequentially modified with 3-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid-OSu (HPAO) and folic acid (FA) linked with polyethylene glycol (PEG), followed by acetylation modification of the dendrimer remaining surface amines and labeling of radioactive iodine-131 ((131)I). The generated multifunctional (131)I-G5·NHAc-HPAO-PEG-FA dendrimers were characterized via different methods. We show that prior to (131)I labeling, the G5·NHAc-HPAO-PEG-FA dendrimers conjugated with approximately 9.4 HPAO moieties per dendrimer are noncytotoxic at a concentration up to 20 μM and are able to target cancer cells overexpressing FA receptors (FAR), thanks to the modified FA ligands. In the presence of a phenol group, radioactive (131)I is able to be efficiently labeled onto the dendrimer platform with good stability and high radiochemical purity, and render the platform with an ability for targeted SPECT imaging and radiotherapy of an FAR-overexpressing xenografted tumor model in vivo. The designed strategy to use the facile dendrimer nanotechnology may be extended to develop various radioactive theranostic nanoplatforms for targeted SPECT imaging and radiotherapy of different types of cancer. PMID:26477402

  8. Differential diagnosis of regional cerebral hyperfixation of TC-99m HMPAO on SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Shirazi, P.; Konopka, L.; Crayton, J.W.

    1994-05-01

    Accurate diagnostic evaluation of patients with neurologic and neuropsychiatric disease is important because early treatment may halt disease progression and prevent impairment or disability. Cerebral hyperfixation of HMPAO has been ascribed to luxury perfusion following ischemic infarction. The present study sought to identify other conditions that also display radiotracer hyperfixation in order to develop a differential diagnosis of this finding on SPECT imaging. Two hundred fifty (n=250) successive cerebral SPECT images were reviewed for evidence of HMPAO hyperfixation. Hyperfixation was defined as enhanced focal perfusion surrounded by a zone of diminished or normal cerebral perfusion. All patients were scanned after intravenous injection of 25 mCi Tc-99m HMPAO. Volume-rendered and oblique images were obtained with a Trionix triple-head SPECT system using ultra high resolution fan beam collimators. Thirteen (13/250; 5%) of the patients exhibited regions of HMPAO hyperfixation. CT or MRI abnormalities were detected in 6/13 cases. Clinical diagnoses in these patients included intractable psychosis, post-traumatic stress disorder, alcohol and narcotic dependence, major depression, acute closed-head trauma, hypothyroidism, as well as subacute ischemic infarction. A wide variety of conditions may be associated with cerebral hyperfixation of HMPAO. These conditions include neurologic and psychiatric diagnoses, and extend the consideration of hyperfixation beyond ischemic infarction. Consequently, a differential diagnosis of HMPAO hyperfixation may be broader than originally considered, and this may suggest a fundamental role for local cerebral hyperperfusion. Elucidation of the fundamental mechanism(s) for cerebral hyperperfusion requires further investigation.

  9. Segmentation of acute pyelonephritis area on kidney SPECT images using binary shape analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chia-Hsiang; Sun, Yung-Nien; Chiu, Nan-Tsing

    1999-05-01

    Acute pyelonephritis is a serious disease in children that may result in irreversible renal scarring. The ability to localize the site of urinary tract infection and the extent of acute pyelonephritis has considerable clinical importance. In this paper, we are devoted to segment the acute pyelonephritis area from kidney SPECT images. A two-step algorithm is proposed. First, the original images are translated into binary versions by automatic thresholding. Then the acute pyelonephritis areas are located by finding convex deficiencies in the obtained binary images. This work gives important diagnosis information for physicians and improves the quality of medical care for children acute pyelonephritis disease.

  10. 3-D surface rendering of myocardial SPECT images segmented by level set technique.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwun-Jae; Lee, Sangbock

    2012-06-01

    SPECT(single photon emission computed tomography) myocardial imaging is a diagnosis technique that images the region of interest and examines any change induced by disease using a computer after injects intravenously a radiopharmaceutical drug emitting gamma ray and the drug has dispersed evenly in the heart . Myocardial perfusion imaging, which contains functional information, is useful for non-invasive diagnosis of myocardial disease but noises caused by physical factors and low resolution give difficulty in reading the images. In order to help reading myocardial images, this study proposed a method that segments myocardial images and reconstructs the segmented region into a 3D image. To resolve difficulty in reading, we segmented the left ventricle, the region of interest, using a level set and modeled the segmented region into a 3D image. PMID:20839037

  11. Pretargeted dual-modality immuno-SPECT and near-infrared fluorescence imaging for image-guided surgery of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lütje, Susanne; Rijpkema, Mark; Goldenberg, David M; van Rij, Catharina M; Sharkey, Robert M; McBride, William J; Franssen, Gerben M; Frielink, Cathelijne; Helfrich, Wijnand; Oyen, Wim J G; Boerman, Otto C

    2014-11-01

    Radical removal of malignant lesions may be improved using tumor-targeted dual-modality probes that contain both a radiotracer and a fluorescent label to allow for enhanced intraoperative delineation of tumor resection margins. Because pretargeting strategies yield high signal-to-background ratios, we evaluated the feasibility of a pretargeting strategy for intraoperative imaging in prostate cancer using an anti-TROP-2 x anti-HSG bispecific antibody (TF12) in conjunction with the dual-labeled diHSG peptide (RDC018) equipped with both a DOTA chelate for radiolabeling purposes and a fluorophore (IRdye800CW) to allow near-infrared optical imaging. Nude mice implanted s.c. with TROP-2-expressing PC3 human prostate tumor cells or with PC3 metastases in the scapular and suprarenal region were injected i.v. with 1 mg of TF12 and, after 16 hours of tumor accumulation and blood clearance, were subsequently injected with 10 MBq, 0.2 nmol/mouse of either (111)In-RDC018 or (111)In-IMP288 as a control. Two hours after injection, both microSPECT/CT and fluorescence images were acquired, both before and after resection of the tumor nodules. After image acquisition, the biodistribution of (111)In-RDC018 and (111)In-IMP288 was determined and tumors were analyzed immunohistochemically. The biodistribution of the dual-label RDC018 showed specific accumulation in the TROP-2-expressing PC3 tumors (12.4 ± 3.7% ID/g at 2 hours postinjection), comparable with (111)In-IMP288 (9.1 ± 2.8% ID/g at 2 hours postinjection). MicroSPECT/CT and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging confirmed this TROP-2-specific uptake of the dual-label (111)In-RDC018 in both the s.c. and metastatic growing tumor model. In addition, PC3 metastases could be visualized preoperatively with SPECT/CT and could subsequently be resected by image-guided surgery using intraoperative NIRF imaging, showing the preclinical feasibility of pretargeted dual-modality imaging approach in prostate cancer. PMID:25252911

  12. Recent advances in SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    1998-08-28

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a medical imaging modality that combines conventional nuclear medicine imaging technique and methods of computed tomography (CT). From images that represent the biodistribution of the injected radiopharmaceutical in the patient, SPECT provides functional information that is unique. The first SPECT system was developed in the sixties. However, early progress of SPECT was hampered by the lack of adequate image reconstruction methods. The development of x-ray CT and image reconstruction methods in the seventies spurred a renewed interest in SPECT. In 1981, the first commercial SPECT system based on a single rotating camera was available for clinical use. Today, most modern SPECT systems consist of multiple cameras that rotate around the patients. They have better spatial resolution and higher detection efficiency as compared to the earlier single camera systems. Recently, a new generation of dual camera systems allowing for coincidence imaging of positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals has emerged in the commercial market. Additionally, new quantitative image reconstruction methods are under development. They compensate for image degrading factors including attenuation, collimator-detector blurring and scatter. Also, they result in SPECT images with improved image quality and more accurately represent the three-dimensional radioactivity distribution in the patient. Such advances in radiopharmaceuticals, instrumentation, image reconstruction, compensation methods, and clinical applications have fueled a steady growth of SPECT as an important diagnostic tool in patient management.

  13. Pattern of brain blood perfusion in tinnitus patients using technetium-99m SPECT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudian, Saeid; Farhadi, Mohammad; Gholami, Saeid; Saddadi, Fariba; Karimian, Ali Reza; Mirzaei, Mohammad; Ghoreyshi, Esmaeel; Ahmadizadeh, Majid; Lenarz, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Tinnitus is associated with an increased activity in central auditory system as demonstrated by neuroimaging studies. Brain perfusion scanning using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was done to understand the pattern of brain blood perfusion of tinnitus subjects and find the areas which are mostly abnormal in these patients. Materials and Methods: A number of 122 patients with tinnitus were enrolled to this cross-sectional study. They underwent SPECT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain, and the images were fused to find the regions with abnormal perfusion. Results: SPECT scan results were abnormal in 101 patients (83%). Most patients had bilateral abnormal perfusion (N = 65, 53.3%), and most subjects had abnormality in middle-temporal gyrus (N = 83, 68%) and temporoparietal cortex (N = 46, 37.7%). Patients with multifocal involvement had the least mean age than other 2 groups (patients with no abnormality and unifocal abnormality) (P value = 0.045). Conclusions: Brain blood perfusion pattern differs in patient with tinnitus than others. These patients have brain perfusion abnormality, mostly in auditory gyrus (middle temporal) and associative cortex (temporoparietal cortex). Multifocal abnormalities might be due to more cognitive and emotional brain centers involvement due to tinnitus or more stress and anxiety of tinnitus in the young patients. PMID:23267375

  14. Dual head HIPDM SPECT imaging in the differential diagnosis of dementia with MR and CT correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, H.N.; Gilmor, R.; Hendrie, H.; Mock, B.; Kapuscinski, A.; Appledorn, C.R.; Krepshaw, J.

    1985-05-01

    Dual head SPECT brain imaging was performed in 25 patients with a clinical diagnosis of dementia approximately one-half hour after a 5mCi dose of high purity (p,5n) I-123 HIPDM (N,N,N'-Trimethyl-N'-(2-hydroxy-3-methyl-5-iodobenzyl)- 1,3-propane diamine). Tomographic reconstruction used a 30th order, moderate cutoff (0.2) Butterworth filter found previously to optimize low noise and conspicuity. Most patients had CT and MR imaging and some patients were studied more than once. In approximately one-half of patients referred with a diagnosis of dementia of the Alzheimer's type, SPECT results were consistent with multiple infarct dementia (MID). MR studies in most of these patients with MID demonstrated multiple white matter defects correlating with multiple gray matter defects seen with SPECT and consistent with angiogenic disease of the Binswanger's type. While CT demonstrated cortical abnormalities in some patients, the findings were often nonspecific with enlarged ventricles and widened sulci.

  15. Dual isotope brain SPECT imaging for monitoring cognitive activation: physical considerations.

    PubMed

    Madsen, M T; O'Leary, D S; Andreasen, N C; Kirchner, P T

    1993-05-01

    The physical considerations of using dual isotope brain SPECT imaging to monitor blood flow changes during cognitive activation studies were investigated. These factors included field uniformity, spatial resolution and crosstalk. Serial dual isotope single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) studies of a test tube phantom and an anthropomorphic brain phantom filled with 99Tcm and 123I were made over a 10 h period. The reconstructed counts in the 99Tcm and 123I windows were corrected for crosstalk and were plotted as a function of time. The plotted data from each window decreased over time with a half-life characteristic of each radionuclide. The relative difference between true 123I and 99Tcm region counts has to be of the order of 10% to be statistically significant at the P < 0.05 level. PMID:8510880

  16. Protein-based tumor molecular imaging probes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xin; Xie, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging discipline which plays critical roles in diagnosis and therapeutics. It visualizes and quantifies markers that are aberrantly expressed during the disease origin and development. Protein molecules remain to be one major class of imaging probes, and the option has been widely diversified due to the recent advances in protein engineering techniques. Antibodies are part of the immunosystem which interact with target antigens with high specificity and affinity. They have long been investigated as imaging probes and were coupled with imaging motifs such as radioisotopes for that purpose. However, the relatively large size of antibodies leads to a half-life that is too long for common imaging purposes. Besides, it may also cause a poor tissue penetration rate and thus compromise some medical applications. It is under this context that various engineered protein probes, essentially antibody fragments, protein scaffolds, and natural ligands have been developed. Compared to intact antibodies, they possess more compact size, shorter clearance time, and better tumor penetration. One major challenge of using protein probes in molecular imaging is the affected biological activity resulted from random labeling. Site-specific modification, however, allows conjugation happening in a stoichiometric fashion with little perturbation of protein activity. The present review will discuss protein-based probes with focus on their application and related site-specific conjugation strategies in tumor imaging. PMID:20232092

  17. First imaging result with an ultrahigh resolution stationary MR compatible SPECT system

    PubMed Central

    Cai, L.; Shen, Z. M.; Zhang, J. C.; Chen, C. T.; Meng, L. J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we will present the design and preliminary performance of an ultrahigh resolution stationary MR compatible SPECT (MRC-SPECT) system that is developed in our lab. The MRC-SPECT system is based on the second-generation energy-resolved photon-counting (ERPC) CdTe detectors and there are several key features associated with this system. Firstly, up to a total of twenty ERPC detectors will be assembled as a very compact ring, which provides an adequate angular sampling capability and a relatively high detection efficiency. The detectors are supported on a gantry made of high strength polyamide structure constructed using 3-D printing. This compact system can be directly operated inside an MR scanner. The detector module used in this system offers an intrinsic resolution of 350μm and an excellent energy resolution of around 3~4kev. Each ERPC detector module consists of four pixelated CdTe detectors with a total dimension of 4.5cm×2.25cm. Secondly, a die-cast platinum pinhole inserts and cast lead apertures are developed for this stationary SPECT system. Four 300/500μm diameter pinholes are used for each detector and all pinholes are mounted around a casted cylinder lead aperture tube. The inner diameter of the lead aperture tube is 6cm and the lead tube thickness is 16mm. The opposite detectors are placed 15.6cm apart and the magnification factor of this SPECT system is about 1.2. Thirdly, a comprehensive charge collection model inside strong magnetic field has been developed to account for the magnetic field induced distortion in the SPECT image. This model can accurately predict the detector’s energy and spatial response to gamma ray incident events and then help to compensate for the event position recording error due to the strong magnetic field. In this development, we have made an effort to minimize the amount of magnetic materials in the system to alleviate potential interference to magnetic field inhomogeneity. PMID:26692275

  18. Reliability evaluation of I-123 ADAM SPECT imaging using SPM software and AAL ROI methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bang-Hung; Tsai, Sung-Yi; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Su, Tung-Ping; Chou, Yuan-Hwa; Chen, Chia-Chieh; Chen, Jyh-Cheng

    2011-08-01

    The level of serotonin was regulated by serotonin transporter (SERT), which is a decisive protein in regulation of serotonin neurotransmission system. Many psychiatric disorders and therapies were also related to concentration of cerebral serotonin. I-123 ADAM was the novel radiopharmaceutical to image SERT in brain. The aim of this study was to measure reliability of SERT densities of healthy volunteers by automated anatomical labeling (AAL) method. Furthermore, we also used statistic parametric mapping (SPM) on a voxel by voxel analysis to find difference of cortex between test and retest of I-123 ADAM single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images.Twenty-one healthy volunteers were scanned twice with SPECT at 4 h after intravenous administration of 185 MBq of 123I-ADAM. The image matrix size was 128×128 and pixel size was 3.9 mm. All images were obtained through filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm. Region of interest (ROI) definition was performed based on the AAL brain template in PMOD version 2.95 software package. ROI demarcations were placed on midbrain, pons, striatum, and cerebellum. All images were spatially normalized to the SPECT MNI (Montreal Neurological Institute) templates supplied with SPM2. And each image was transformed into standard stereotactic space, which was matched to the Talairach and Tournoux atlas. Then differences across scans were statistically estimated on a voxel by voxel analysis using paired t-test (population main effect: 2 cond's, 1 scan/cond.), which was applied to compare concentration of SERT between the test and retest cerebral scans.The average of specific uptake ratio (SUR: target/cerebellum-1) of 123I-ADAM binding to SERT in midbrain was 1.78±0.27, pons was 1.21±0.53, and striatum was 0.79±0.13. The cronbach's α of intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.92. Besides, there was also no significant statistical finding in cerebral area using SPM2 analysis. This finding might help us

  19. Acute infantile bilateral striatal necrosis: single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging and review.

    PubMed

    Zevit, Noam; Steinmetz, Adam; Kornreich, Liora; Straussberg, Rachel

    2007-10-01

    Acute infantile bilateral striatal necrosis is a rarely described acute neurological syndrome associated with radiological findings. Its etiology and pathogenic mechanisms are unknown. Clinically, the syndrome usually follows respiratory illnesses and presents with an array of neurological findings, including axial ataxia, grimacing, mutism, head nodding, and high-pitched cry. This study follows a child with acute infantile bilateral striatal necrosis both clinically and radiologically. In addition, for the first time, the authors describe the serial findings of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) from onset of illness through 20 months. Their findings indicate an initial insult apparent on both magnetic resonance imaging and SPECT localized to the basal ganglia, which, although improved over time, does not fully regress. The residual lesion on SPECT was clinically associated with only mild attention deficit disorder and no motor pathology. The authors review the published literature concerning acute infantile bilateral striatal necrosis and suggest possible mechanisms of this poorly understood and probably underreported condition. PMID:17940250

  20. Improving the quality of small animal brain pinhole SPECT imaging by Bayesian reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sohlberg, Antti; Lensu, Sanna; Jolkkonen, Jukka; Tuomisto, Leena; Ruotsalainen, Ulla; Kuikka, Jyrki T

    2004-07-01

    The possibility of using existing hardware makes pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) attractive when pursuing the ultra-high resolution required for small animal brain imaging. Unfortunately, the poor sensitivity and the heavy weight of the collimator hamper the use of pinhole SPECT in animal studies by generating noisy and misaligned projections. To improve the image quality we have developed a new Bayesian reconstruction method, pinhole median root prior (PH-MRP), which prevents the excessive noise accumulation from the projections to the reconstructed image. The PH-MRP algorithm was used to reconstruct data acquired with our small animal rotating device, which was designed to reduce the rotation orbit misalignments. Phantom experiments were performed to test the device and compare the PH-MRP with the conventional Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) and pinhole ordered subsets maximum likelihood expectation maximisation (PH-OSEM) reconstruction algorithms. The feasibility of the system for small animal brain imaging was studied with Han-Wistar rats injected with (123)I-epidepride and (99m)Tc-hydroxy methylene diphosphonate. Considering all the experiments, no shape distortions due to orbit misalignments were encountered and remarkable improvements in noise characteristics and also in overall image quality were observed when the PH-MRP was applied instead of the FDK or PH-OSEM. In addition, the proposed methods utilise existing hardware and require only a certain amount of construction and programming work, making them easy to implement. PMID:14991246

  1. Evaluation of a Wobbling Method Applied to Correcting Defective Pixels of CZT Detectors in SPECT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhaoheng; Li, Suying; Yang, Kun; Xu, Baixuan; Ren, Qiushi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a wobbling method to correct bad pixels in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, using information of related images. We build up an automated device that realizes the wobbling correction for small animal Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) imaging. The wobbling correction method is applied to various constellations of defective pixels. The corrected images are compared with the results of conventional interpolation method, and the correction effectiveness is evaluated quantitatively using the factor of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and structural similarity (SSIM). In summary, the proposed wobbling method, equipped with the automatic mechanical system, provides a better image quality for correcting defective pixels, which could be used for all pixelated detectors for molecular imaging. PMID:27240368

  2. Evaluation of a Wobbling Method Applied to Correcting Defective Pixels of CZT Detectors in SPECT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhaoheng; Li, Suying; Yang, Kun; Xu, Baixuan; Ren, Qiushi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a wobbling method to correct bad pixels in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, using information of related images. We build up an automated device that realizes the wobbling correction for small animal Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) imaging. The wobbling correction method is applied to various constellations of defective pixels. The corrected images are compared with the results of conventional interpolation method, and the correction effectiveness is evaluated quantitatively using the factor of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and structural similarity (SSIM). In summary, the proposed wobbling method, equipped with the automatic mechanical system, provides a better image quality for correcting defective pixels, which could be used for all pixelated detectors for molecular imaging. PMID:27240368

  3. Design and development of a high resolution animal SPECT scanner dedicated for rat and mouse imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajedi, Salar; Zeraatkar, Navid; Moji, Vahideh; Farahani, Mohammad Hossein; Sarkar, Saeed; Arabi, Hossein; Teymoorian, Behnoosh; Ghafarian, Pardis; Rahmim, Arman; Reza Ay, Mohammad

    2014-03-01

    A dedicated small-animal SPECT system, HiReSPECT, was designed and developed to provide a high resolution molecular imaging modality in response to growing research demands. HiReSPECT is a dual-head system mounted on a rotating gantry. The detection system is based on pixelated CsI(Na) scintillator crystals coupled to two Hamamatsu H8500 Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tubes in each head. Also, a high resolution parallel-hole collimator is applied to every head. The dimensions of each head are 50 mm×100 mm, enabling sufficient transaxial and axial fields-of-view (TFOV and AFOV), respectively, for coverage of the entire mouse in single-bed position imaging. However, a 50 mm TFOV is not sufficient for transaxial coverage of rats. To address this, each head can be rotated by 90 degrees in order to align the larger dimension of the heads with the short body axis, allowing tomographic data acquisition for rats. An innovative non-linear recursive filter was used for signal processing/detection. Resolution recovery was also embedded in the modified Maximum-Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM) image reconstruction code to compensate for Collimator-Detector Response (CDR). Moreover, an innovative interpolation algorithm was developed to speed up the reconstruction code. The planar spatial resolution at the head surface and the image spatial resolutions were 1.7 mm and 1.2-1.6 mm, respectively. The measurements followed by post-processing showed that the observed count rate at 20% count loss is about 42 kcps. The system sensitivity at the collimator surface for heads 1 and 2 were 1.32 cps/μCi and 1.25 cps/μCi, respectively. The corresponding values were 1.18 cps/μCi and 1.02 cps/μCi at 8 cm distance from the collimator surfaces. In addition, whole-body scans of mice demonstrated appropriate imaging capability of the HiReSPECT.

  4. Radionuclide 131I-labeled multifunctional dendrimers for targeted SPECT imaging and radiotherapy of tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jingyi; Zhao, Lingzhou; Cheng, Yongjun; Xiong, Zhijuan; Tang, Yueqin; Shen, Mingwu; Zhao, Jinhua; Shi, Xiangyang

    2015-10-01

    We report the synthesis, characterization, and utilization of radioactive 131I-labeled multifunctional dendrimers for targeted single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging and radiotherapy of tumors. In this study, amine-terminated poly(amidoamine) dendrimers of generation 5 (G5.NH2) were sequentially modified with 3-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid-OSu (HPAO) and folic acid (FA) linked with polyethylene glycol (PEG), followed by acetylation modification of the dendrimer remaining surface amines and labeling of radioactive iodine-131 (131I). The generated multifunctional 131I-G5.NHAc-HPAO-PEG-FA dendrimers were characterized via different methods. We show that prior to 131I labeling, the G5.NHAc-HPAO-PEG-FA dendrimers conjugated with approximately 9.4 HPAO moieties per dendrimer are noncytotoxic at a concentration up to 20 μM and are able to target cancer cells overexpressing FA receptors (FAR), thanks to the modified FA ligands. In the presence of a phenol group, radioactive 131I is able to be efficiently labeled onto the dendrimer platform with good stability and high radiochemical purity, and render the platform with an ability for targeted SPECT imaging and radiotherapy of an FAR-overexpressing xenografted tumor model in vivo. The designed strategy to use the facile dendrimer nanotechnology may be extended to develop various radioactive theranostic nanoplatforms for targeted SPECT imaging and radiotherapy of different types of cancer.We report the synthesis, characterization, and utilization of radioactive 131I-labeled multifunctional dendrimers for targeted single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging and radiotherapy of tumors. In this study, amine-terminated poly(amidoamine) dendrimers of generation 5 (G5.NH2) were sequentially modified with 3-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid-OSu (HPAO) and folic acid (FA) linked with polyethylene glycol (PEG), followed by acetylation modification of the dendrimer remaining surface amines and

  5. Synthesis and Investigation of a Radioiodinated F3 Peptide Analog as a SPECT Tumor Imaging Radioligand

    PubMed Central

    Bhojani, Mahaveer S.; Ranga, Rajesh; Luker, Gary D.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Ross, Brian D.; Van Dort, Marcian E.

    2011-01-01

    A radioiodinated derivative of the tumor-homing F3 peptide, (N-(2-{3-[125I]Iodobenzoyl}aminoethyl)maleimide-F3Cys peptide, [125I]IBMF3 was developed for investigation as a SPECT tumor imaging radioligand. For this purpose, we custom synthesized a modified F3 peptide analog (F3Cys) incorporating a C-terminal cysteine residue for site-specific attachment of a radioiodinated maleimide conjugating group. Initial proof-of-concept Fluorescence studies conducted with AlexaFluor 532 C5 maleimide-labeled F3Cys showed distinct membrane and nuclear localization of F3Cys in MDA-MB-435 cells. Additionally, F3Cys conjugated with NIR fluorochrome AlexaFluor 647 C2 maleimide demonstrated high tumor specific uptake in melanoma cancer MDA-MB-435 and lung cancer A549 xenografts in nude mice whereas a similarly labeled control peptide did not show any tumor uptake. These results were also confirmed by ex vivo tissue analysis. No-carrier-added [125I]IBMF3 was synthesized by a radioiododestannylation approach in 73% overall radiochemical yield. In vitro cell uptake studies conducted with [125I]IBMF3 displayed a 5-fold increase in its cell uptake at 4 h when compared to controls. SPECT imaging studies with [125I]IBMF3 in tumor bearing nude mice showed clear visualization of MDA-MB-435 xenografts on systemic administration. These studies demonstrate a potential utility of F3 peptide-based radioligands for tumor imaging with PET or SPECT techniques. PMID:21811604

  6. Characterisation of radioiodinated flavonoid derivatives for SPECT imaging of cerebral prion deposits

    PubMed Central

    Fuchigami, Takeshi; Yamashita, Yuki; Kawasaki, Masao; Ogawa, Ayaka; Haratake, Mamoru; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Sano, Kazunori; Nakagaki, Takehiro; Ubagai, Kaori; Ono, Masahiro; Yoshida, Sakura; Nishida, Noriyuki; Nakayama, Morio

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative diseases characterised by deposition of amyloid plaques containing abnormal prion protein aggregates (PrPSc). This study aimed to evaluate the potential of radioiodinated flavonoid derivatives for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of PrPSc. In vitro binding assays using recombinant mouse PrP (rMoPrP) aggregates revealed that the 4-dimethylamino-substituted styrylchromone derivative (SC-NMe2) had higher in vitro binding affinity (Kd = 24.5 nM) and capacity (Bmax = 36.3 pmol/nmol protein) than three other flavonoid derivatives (flavone, chalcone, and aurone). Fluorescent imaging using brain sections from mouse-adapted bovine spongiform encephalopathy (mBSE)-infected mice demonstrated that SC-NMe2 clearly labelled PrPSc-positive prion deposits in the mice brain. Two methoxy SC derivatives, SC-OMe and SC-(OMe)2, also showed high binding affinity for rMoPrP aggregates with Ki values of 20.8 and 26.6 nM, respectively. In vitro fluorescence and autoradiography experiments demonstrated high accumulation of [125I]SC-OMe and [125I]SC-(OMe)2 in prion deposit-rich regions of the mBSE-infected mouse brain. SPECT/computed tomography (CT) imaging and ex vivo autoradiography demonstrated that [123I]SC-OMe showed consistent brain distribution with the presence of PrPSc deposits in the mBSE-infected mice brain. In conclusion, [123I]SC-OMe appears a promising SPECT radioligand for monitoring prion deposit levels in the living brain. PMID:26669576

  7. Characterisation of radioiodinated flavonoid derivatives for SPECT imaging of cerebral prion deposits.

    PubMed

    Fuchigami, Takeshi; Yamashita, Yuki; Kawasaki, Masao; Ogawa, Ayaka; Haratake, Mamoru; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Sano, Kazunori; Nakagaki, Takehiro; Ubagai, Kaori; Ono, Masahiro; Yoshida, Sakura; Nishida, Noriyuki; Nakayama, Morio

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative diseases characterised by deposition of amyloid plaques containing abnormal prion protein aggregates (PrP(Sc)). This study aimed to evaluate the potential of radioiodinated flavonoid derivatives for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of PrP(Sc). In vitro binding assays using recombinant mouse PrP (rMoPrP) aggregates revealed that the 4-dimethylamino-substituted styrylchromone derivative (SC-NMe2) had higher in vitro binding affinity (Kd = 24.5 nM) and capacity (Bmax = 36.3 pmol/nmol protein) than three other flavonoid derivatives (flavone, chalcone, and aurone). Fluorescent imaging using brain sections from mouse-adapted bovine spongiform encephalopathy (mBSE)-infected mice demonstrated that SC-NMe2 clearly labelled PrP(Sc)-positive prion deposits in the mice brain. Two methoxy SC derivatives, SC-OMe and SC-(OMe)2, also showed high binding affinity for rMoPrP aggregates with Ki values of 20.8 and 26.6 nM, respectively. In vitro fluorescence and autoradiography experiments demonstrated high accumulation of [(125)I]SC-OMe and [(125)I]SC-(OMe)2 in prion deposit-rich regions of the mBSE-infected mouse brain. SPECT/computed tomography (CT) imaging and ex vivo autoradiography demonstrated that [(123)I]SC-OMe showed consistent brain distribution with the presence of PrP(Sc) deposits in the mBSE-infected mice brain. In conclusion, [(123)I]SC-OMe appears a promising SPECT radioligand for monitoring prion deposit levels in the living brain. PMID:26669576

  8. Macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylates for stable radiometal antibody conjugates for therapy, spect and pet imaging

    DOEpatents

    Mease, Ronnie C.; Mausner, Leonard F.; Srivastava, Suresh C.

    1997-06-17

    A simple method for the synthesis of 1,4,7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane N,N'N",N'"-tetraacetic acid and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane N,N',N",N'"-tetraacetic acid involves cyanomethylating 1,4,7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane to form a tetranitrile and hydrolyzing the tetranitrile. These macrocyclic compounds are functionalized through one of the carboxylates and then conjugated to various biological molecules including monoclonal antibodies. The resulting conjugated molecules are labeled with radiometals for SPECT and PET imaging and for radiotherapy.

  9. Macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylates for stable radiometal antibody conjugates for therapy, SPECT and PET imaging

    DOEpatents

    Mease, R.C.; Mausner, L.F.; Srivastava, S.C.

    1997-06-17

    A simple method for the synthesis of 1,4,7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane N,N{prime}N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane N,N{prime},N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid involves cyanomethylating 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane to form a tetranitrile and hydrolyzing the tetranitrile. These macrocyclic compounds are functionalized through one of the carboxylates and then conjugated to various biological molecules including monoclonal antibodies. The resulting conjugated molecules are labeled with radiometals for SPECT and PET imaging and for radiotherapy. 4 figs.

  10. TU-A-12A-02: Novel Lung Ventilation Imaging with Single Energy CT After Single Inhalation of Xenon: Comparison with SPECT Ventilation Images

    SciTech Connect

    Negahdar, M; Yamamoto, T; Shultz, D; Gable, L; Shan, X; Mittra, E; Loo, B; Maxim, P; Diehn, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We propose a novel lung functional imaging method to determine the spatial distribution of xenon (Xe) gas in a single inhalation as a measure of regional ventilation. We compare Xe-CT ventilation to single-photon emission CT (SPECT) ventilation, which is the current clinical reference. Regional lung ventilation information may be useful for the diagnosis and monitoring of pulmonary diseases such as COPD, radiotherapy planning, and assessing the progression of toxicity after radiation therapy. Methods: In an IRB-approved clinical study, Xe-CT and SPECT ventilation scans were acquired for three patients including one patient with severe emphysema and two lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. For Xe- CT, we acquired two breath-hold single energy CT images of the entire lung with inspiration of 100% O2 and a mixture of 70% Xe and 30% O2, respectively. A video biofeedback system was used to achieve reproducible breath-holds. We used deformable image registration to align the breathhold images with each other to accurately subtract them, producing a map of the distribution of Xe as a surrogate of lung ventilation. We divided each lung into twelve parts and correlated the Hounsfield unit (HU) enhancement at each part with the SPECT ventilation count of the corresponding part of the lung. Results: The mean of the Pearson linear correlation coefficient values between the Xe-CT and ventilation SPECT count for all three patients were 0.62 (p<0.01). The Xe-CT image had a higher resolution than SPECT, and did not show central airway deposition artifacts that were present in the SPECT image. Conclusion: We developed a rapid, safe, clinically practical, and potentially widely accessible method for regional lung functional imaging. We demonstrated strong correlations between the Xe-CT ventilation image and SPECT ventilation image as the clinical reference. This ongoing study will investigate more patients to confirm this finding.

  11. TH-E-BRF-02: 4D-CT Ventilation Image-Based IMRT Plans Are Dosimetrically Comparable to SPECT Ventilation Image-Based Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Kida, S; Bal, M; Kabus, S; Loo, B; Keall, P; Yamamoto, T

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: An emerging lung ventilation imaging method based on 4D-CT can be used in radiotherapy to selectively avoid irradiating highly-functional lung regions, which may reduce pulmonary toxicity. Efforts to validate 4DCT ventilation imaging have been focused on comparison with other imaging modalities including SPECT and xenon CT. The purpose of this study was to compare 4D-CT ventilation image-based functional IMRT plans with SPECT ventilation image-based plans as reference. Methods: 4D-CT and SPECT ventilation scans were acquired for five thoracic cancer patients in an IRB-approved prospective clinical trial. The ventilation images were created by quantitative analysis of regional volume changes (a surrogate for ventilation) using deformable image registration of the 4D-CT images. A pair of 4D-CT ventilation and SPECT ventilation image-based IMRT plans was created for each patient. Regional ventilation information was incorporated into lung dose-volume objectives for IMRT optimization by assigning different weights on a voxel-by-voxel basis. The objectives and constraints of the other structures in the plan were kept identical. The differences in the dose-volume metrics have been evaluated and tested by a paired t-test. SPECT ventilation was used to calculate the lung functional dose-volume metrics (i.e., mean dose, V20 and effective dose) for both 4D-CT ventilation image-based and SPECT ventilation image-based plans. Results: Overall there were no statistically significant differences in any dose-volume metrics between the 4D-CT and SPECT ventilation imagebased plans. For example, the average functional mean lung dose of the 4D-CT plans was 26.1±9.15 (Gy), which was comparable to 25.2±8.60 (Gy) of the SPECT plans (p = 0.89). For other critical organs and PTV, nonsignificant differences were found as well. Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that 4D-CT ventilation image-based functional IMRT plans are dosimetrically comparable to SPECT ventilation image

  12. Production of glass microspheres comprising 90Y and (177)Lu for treating of hepatic tumors with SPECT imaging capabilities.

    PubMed

    Poorbaygi, Hosein; Reza Aghamiri, Seyed Mahmoud; Sheibani, Shahab; Kamali-Asl, Alireza; Mohagheghpoor, Elham

    2011-10-01

    Our objective was to determine if glass microspheres impregnated with two radionuclides, (90)Y as source of therapeutic beta emissions and (177)Lu as source of diagnostic gamma emissions can be useful for SPECT imaging during or after application of the (90)Y microspheres for treating of hepatic tumors. The glass-based microspheres labeled with (89)Y and lutetium (YAS (Lu)) or (89)Y and ytterbium (YAS (Yb)) were prepared by the sol-gel process where sol droplets directly were formed to gel microspheres. Results of the neutron activation indicate that such a combination of glass, microspheres allow bio-distribution studies by SPECT imaging with high resolution. PMID:21723135

  13. Comparison of image quality, myocardial perfusion, and LV function between standard imaging and single-injection ultra-low-dose imaging using a high-efficiency SPECT camera: the MILLISIEVERT study

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Andrew J.; Blankstein, Ron; Andrews, Howard; Fish, Mathews; Padgett, Richard; Hayes, Sean W.; Friedman, John D.; Qureshi, Mehreen; Rakotoarivelo, Harivony; Slomka, Piotr; Nakazato, Ryo; Bokhari, Sabahat; Di Carli, Marcello; Berman, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) plays a central role in coronary artery disease diagnosis; but concerns exist regarding its radiation burden. Compared to standard Anger-SPECT (A-SPECT) cameras, new high-efficiency (HE) cameras with specialized collimators and solid-state cadmium-zinc-telluride detectors offer potential to maintain image quality (IQ), while reducing administered activity and thus radiation dose to patients. No previous study has compared IQ, interpretation, total perfusion deficit (TPD), or ejection fraction (EF) in patients receiving both ultra-low-dose (ULD) imaging on a HE-SPECT camera and standard low-dose (SLD) A-SPECT imaging. Methods We compared ULD-HE-SPECT to SLD-A-SPECT imaging by dividing the rest dose in 101 patients at 3 sites scheduled to undergo clinical A-SPECT MPI using a same day rest/stress Tc-99m protocol. Patients received HE-SPECT imaging following an initial ~130 MBq (3.5mCi) dose, and SLD-A-SPECT imaging following the remainder of the planned dose. Images were scored visually by 2 blinded readers for IQ and summed rest score (SRS). TPD and EF were assessed quantitatively. Results Mean activity was 134 MBq (3.62 mCi) for ULD-HE-SPECT (effective dose 1.15 mSv) and 278 MBq (7.50 mCi, 2.39 mSv) for SLD-A-SPECT. Overall IQ was superior for ULD-HE-SPECT (p<0.0001), with twice as many studies graded excellent quality. Extracardiac activity and overall perfusion assessment were similar. Between-method correlations were high for SRS (r=0.87), TPD (r=0.91), and EF (r=0.88). Conclusion ULD-HE-SPECT rest imaging correlates highly with SLD-A-SPECT. It has improved image quality, comparable extracardiac activity, and achieves radiation dose reduction to 1 mSv for a single injection. PMID:24982439

  14. Silicon detectors for combined MR-PET and MR-SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studen, A.; Brzezinski, K.; Chesi, E.; Cindro, V.; Clinthorne, N. H.; Cochran, E.; Grošičar, B.; Grkovski, M.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Lacasta, C.; Llosa, G.; Mikuž, M.; Stankova, V.; Weilhammer, P.; Žontar, D.

    2013-02-01

    Silicon based devices can extend PET-MR and SPECT-MR imaging to applications, where their advantages in performance outweigh benefits of high statistical counts. Silicon is in many ways an excellent detector material with numerous advantages, among others: excellent energy and spatial resolution, mature processing technology, large signal to noise ratio, relatively low price, availability, versatility and malleability. The signal in silicon is also immune to effects of magnetic field at the level normally used in MR devices. Tests in fields up to 7 T were performed in a study to determine effects of magnetic field on positron range in a silicon PET device. The curvature of positron tracks in direction perpendicular to the field's orientation shortens the distance between emission and annihilation point of the positron. The effect can be fully appreciated for a rotation of the sample for a fixed field direction, compressing range in all dimensions. A popular Ga-68 source was used showing a factor of 2 improvement in image noise compared to zero field operation. There was also a little increase in noise as the reconstructed resolution varied between 2.5 and 1.5 mm. A speculative applications can be recognized in both emission modalities, SPECT and PET. Compton camera is a subspecies of SPECT, where a silicon based scatter as a MR compatible part could inserted into the MR bore and the secondary detector could operate in less constrained environment away from the magnet. Introducing a Compton camera also relaxes requirements of the radiotracers used, extending the range of conceivable photon energies beyond 140.5 keV of the Tc-99m. In PET, one could exploit the compressed sub-millimeter range of positrons in the magnetic field. To exploit the advantage, detectors with spatial resolution commensurate to the effect must be used with silicon being an excellent candidate. Measurements performed outside of the MR achieving spatial resolution below 1 mm are reported.

  15. Computer-assisted detection of epileptiform focuses on SPECT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzegorczyk, Dawid; Dunin-Wąsowicz, Dorota; Mulawka, Jan J.

    2010-09-01

    Epilepsy is a common nervous system disease often related to consciousness disturbances and muscular spasm which affects about 1% of the human population. Despite major technological advances done in medicine in the last years there was no sufficient progress towards overcoming it. Application of advanced statistical methods and computer image analysis offers the hope for accurate detection and later removal of an epileptiform focuses which are the cause of some types of epilepsy. The aim of this work was to create a computer system that would help to find and diagnose disorders of blood circulation in the brain This may be helpful for the diagnosis of the epileptic seizures onset in the brain.

  16. Validation study of ¹³¹I-RRL: assessment of biodistribution, SPECT imaging and radiation dosimetry in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qian; Yan, Ping; Yin, Lei; Li, Ling; Chen, Xue Qi; Ma, Chao; Wang, Rong Fu

    2013-04-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is important in the growth and metastasis of malignant tumors. In our previous study, we demonstrated that an arginine-arginine-leucine (RRL) peptide is a tumor endothelial cell-specific binding sequence that may be used as a molecular probe for the imaging of malignant tumors in vivo. The aim of the present study was to further explore the characteristics of 131I‑RRL by biodistribution tests, and to estimate the radiation dosimetry of 131I‑RRL for humans using mice data. The RRL peptide was radiolabeled with 131I by a chloramine-T (CH-T) method. The radiolabeling efficiency and radiochemical purity were then characterized in vitro. 131I‑RRL was injected intravenously into B16 xenograft-bearing Kunming mice. Biodistribution analysis and in vivo imaging were performed periodically. The radiation dosimetry in humans was calculated according to the organ distribution and the standard medical internal radiation dose (MIRD) method in mice. All data were analyzed by statistical and MIRDOSE 3.1 software. The labeling efficiency of 131I‑RRL reached 70.0±2.91% (n=5), and the radiochemical purity exceeded 95% following purification. In mice bearing B16 xenografts, 131I‑RRL rapidly cleared from the blood and predominantly accumulated in the kidneys, the stomach and the tumor tissue. The specific uptake of 131I‑RRL in the tumor increased over time and was significantly higher than that of the other organs, 24-72 h following injection (P<0.05). The ratio of tumor-to-skeletal muscle (T/SM) tissue exceeded 4.75, and the ratio of the tumor-to-blood (T/B) tissue peaked at 3.36. In the single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of Kunming mice bearing B16 xenografts, the tumors were clearly identifiable at 6 h, and significant uptake was evident 24-72 h following administration of 131I‑RRL. The effective dose for the adult male dosimetric model was estimated to be 0.0293 mSv/MBq. Higher absorbed doses were estimated for the stomach

  17. Temperature dependent operation of PSAPD-based compact gamma camera for SPECT imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangtaek; McClish, Mickel; Alhassen, Fares; Seo, Youngho; Shah, Kanai S; Gould, Robert G

    2011-10-10

    We investigated the dependence of image quality on the temperature of a position sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD)-based small animal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) gamma camera with a CsI:Tl scintillator. Currently, nitrogen gas cooling is preferred to operate PSAPDs in order to minimize the dark current shot noise. Being able to operate a PSAPD at a relatively high temperature (e.g., 5 °C) would allow a more compact and simple cooling system for the PSAPD. In our investigation, the temperature of the PSAPD was controlled by varying the flow of cold nitrogen gas through the PSAPD module and varied from -40 °C to 20 °C. Three experiments were performed to demonstrate the performance variation over this temperature range. The point spread function (PSF) of the gamma camera was measured at various temperatures, showing variation of full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) of the PSF. In addition, a (99m)Tc-pertechnetate (140 keV) flood source was imaged and the visibility of the scintillator segmentation (16×16 array, 8 mm × 8 mm area, 400 μm pixel size) at different temperatures was evaluated. Comparison of image quality was made at -25 °C and 5 °C using a mouse heart phantom filled with an aqueous solution of (99m)Tc-pertechnetate and imaged using a 0.5 mm pinhole collimator made of tungsten. The reconstructed image quality of the mouse heart phantom at 5 °C degraded in comparision to the reconstructed image quality at -25 °C. However, the defect and structure of the mouse heart phantom were clearly observed, showing the feasibility of operating PSAPDs for SPECT imaging at 5 °C, a temperature that would not need the nitrogen cooling. All PSAPD evaluations were conducted with an applied bias voltage that allowed the highest gain at a given temperature. PMID:24465051

  18. Temperature dependent operation of PSAPD-based compact gamma camera for SPECT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangtaek; McClish, Mickel; Alhassen, Fares; Seo, Youngho; Shah, Kanai S.; Gould, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the dependence of image quality on the temperature of a position sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD)-based small animal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) gamma camera with a CsI:Tl scintillator. Currently, nitrogen gas cooling is preferred to operate PSAPDs in order to minimize the dark current shot noise. Being able to operate a PSAPD at a relatively high temperature (e.g., 5 °C) would allow a more compact and simple cooling system for the PSAPD. In our investigation, the temperature of the PSAPD was controlled by varying the flow of cold nitrogen gas through the PSAPD module and varied from −40 °C to 20 °C. Three experiments were performed to demonstrate the performance variation over this temperature range. The point spread function (PSF) of the gamma camera was measured at various temperatures, showing variation of full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) of the PSF. In addition, a 99mTc-pertechnetate (140 keV) flood source was imaged and the visibility of the scintillator segmentation (16×16 array, 8 mm × 8 mm area, 400 μm pixel size) at different temperatures was evaluated. Comparison of image quality was made at −25 °C and 5 °C using a mouse heart phantom filled with an aqueous solution of 99mTc-pertechnetate and imaged using a 0.5 mm pinhole collimator made of tungsten. The reconstructed image quality of the mouse heart phantom at 5 °C degraded in comparision to the reconstructed image quality at −25 °C. However, the defect and structure of the mouse heart phantom were clearly observed, showing the feasibility of operating PSAPDs for SPECT imaging at 5 °C, a temperature that would not need the nitrogen cooling. All PSAPD evaluations were conducted with an applied bias voltage that allowed the highest gain at a given temperature. PMID:24465051

  19. Performance of Myocardial Perfusion Imaging Using Multi-focus Fan Beam Collimator with Resolution Recovery Reconstruction in a Comparison with Conventional SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Matsutomo, Norikazu; Nagaki, Akio; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): IQ-SPECT is an advanced high-speed SPECT modality for myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI), which uses a multi-focus fan beam collimator with resolution recovery reconstruction. The aim of this study was to compare IQ-SPECT with conventional SPECT in terms of performance, based on standard clinical protocols. In addition, we examined the concordance between conventional and IQ_SPECT in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods: Fifty-three patients, undergoing rest-gated MPI for the evaluation of known or suspected CAD, were enrolled in this study. In each patient, conventional SPECT (99mTc-tetrofosmin, 9.6 min and 201Tl, 12.9 min) was performed, immediately followed by IQ-SPECT, using a short acquisition time (4.3 min for 99mTc-tetrofosmin and 6.2 min for 201Tl). A quantitative analysis was performed on an MPI polar map, using a 20-segment model of the left ventricle. An automated analysis by gated SPECT was carried out to determine the left ventricular volume and function including end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). The degree of concordance between conventional SPECT and IQ-SPECT images was evaluated according to linear regression and Bland-Altman analyses. Results: The segmental percent uptake exhibited a significant correlation between IQ-SPECT and conventional SPECT (P<0.05). The mean differences in 99mTc-tetrofosmin studies were 1.1±6.6% (apex), 2.8±5.7% (anterior wall), 2.9±6.2% (septal wall), 4.9±6.7% (lateral wall), and 1.8±5.6% (inferior wall). Meanwhile, regarding the 201Tl-SPECT studies, these values were 1.6±6.9%, 2.0±6.6%, 2.1±5.9%, 3.3±7.2%, and 2.4±5.8%, respectively. Although the mean LVEF in IQ-SPECT tended to be higher than that observed in conventional SPECT (conventional SPECT=64.8±11.8% and IQ-SPECT=68.3±12.1% for 99mTc-tetrofosmin; conventional SPECT= 56.0±11.7% and IQ-SPECT=61.5±12.2% for 201Tl), quantitative parameters were not

  20. Automatic registration and alignment on a template of cardiac stress and rest reoriented SPECT images.

    PubMed

    Declerck, J; Feldmar, J; Goris, M L; Betting, F

    1997-12-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging with 201Tl or 99mTc agent is used to assess the location or the extent of myocardial infarction or ischemia. A method is proposed to decrease the effect of operator variability in the visual or quantitative interpretation of scintigraphic myocardial perfusion studies. To effect this, the patient's myocardial images (target cases) are registered automatically over a template image, utilizing a nonrigid transformation. The intermediate steps are: 1) Extraction of feature points in both stress and rest three-dimensional (3-D) images. The images are resampled in a polar geometry to detect edge points, which in turn are filtered by the use of a priori constraints. The remaining feature points are assumed to be points on the edges of the left ventricular myocardium. 2) Registration of stress and rest images with a global affine transformation. The matching method is an adaptation of the iterative closest point algorithm. 3) Registration and morphological matching of both stress and rest images on a template using a nonrigid local spline transformation following a global affine transformation. 4) Resampling of both stress and rest images in the geometry of the template. Optimization of the method was performed on a database of 40 pairs of stress and rest images selected to obtain a wide variation of images and abnormalities. Further testing was performed on 250 cases selected from the same database on the basis of the availability of angiographic results and patient stratification. PMID:9533574

  1. Regularized Fully 5D Reconstruction of Cardiac Gated Dynamic SPECT Images.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaofeng; Yang, Yongyi; Jin, Mingwu; Wernick, Miles N; King, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    In our recent work, we proposed an image reconstruction procedure aimed to unify gated imaging and dynamic imaging in nuclear cardiac imaging. With this procedure the goal is to obtain an image sequence from a single acquisition which shows simultaneously both cardiac motion and tracer distribution change over the course of imaging. In this work, we further develop and demonstrate this procedure for fully 5D (3D space plus time plus gate) reconstruction in gated, dynamic cardiac SPECT imaging, where the challenge is even greater without the use of multiple fast camera rotations. For 5D reconstruction, we develop and compare two iterative algorithms: one is based on the modified block sequential regularized EM (BSREM-II) algorithm, and the other is based on the one-step late (OSL) algorithm. In our experiments, we simulated gated cardiac imaging with the NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom and Tc99m-Teboroxime as the imaging agent, where acquisition with the equivalent of only three full camera rotations was used during the course of a 12-minute postinjection period. We conducted a thorough evaluation of the reconstruction results using a number of quantitative measures. Our results demonstrate that the 5D reconstruction procedure can yield gated dynamic images which show quantitative information for both perfusion defect detection and cardiac motion. PMID:24049191

  2. GATE simulation of a LYSO-based SPECT imager: Validation and detector optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Suying; Zhang, Qiushi; Xie, Zhaoheng; Liu, Qi; Xu, Baixuan; Yang, Kun; Li, Changhui; Ren, Qiushi

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a small animal SPECT system that is based on cerium doped lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) scintillation crystal, position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs) and parallel hole collimator. Spatial resolution test and animal experiment were performed to demonstrate the imaging performance of the detector. Preliminary results indicated a spatial resolution of 2.5 mm at FWHM that cannot meet our design requirement. Therefore, we simulated this gamma camera using GATE (GEANT 4 Application for Tomographic Emission) aiming to make detector spatial resolution less than 2 mm. First, the GATE simulation process was validated through comparison between simulated and experimental data. This also indicates the accuracy and effectiveness of GATE simulation for LYSO-based gamma camera. Then the different detector sampling methods (crystal size with 1.5, and 1 mm) and collimator design (collimator height with 30, 34.8, 38, and 43 mm) were studied to figure out an optimized parameter set. Detector sensitivity changes were also focused on with different parameters set that generated different spatial resolution results. Tradeoff curves of spatial resolution and sensitivity were plotted to determine the optimal collimator height with different sampling methods. Simulation results show that scintillation crystal size of 1 mm and collimator height of 38 mm, which can generate a spatial resolution of ~1.8 mm and sensitivity of ~0.065 cps/kBq, can be an ideal configuration for our SPECT imager design.

  3. Structural (CT) and functional imaging (PET/SPECT) for the investigation of dolphin bioacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houser, Dorian S.; Finneran, James J.; Mattrey, Robert; Hoh, Carl; Ridgway, Sam

    2003-10-01

    A combination of imaging modalities was used to address physiological and anatomical questions relevant to dolphin bioacoustics. Three dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) were scanned with CT to investigate in vivo dolphin cranial anatomy. One dolphin underwent SPECT and PET scanning to investigate blood flow and metabolic activity of the cranial tissues. Air spaces were mostly contiguous and covered the periotic bone and auditory bulla dorsally and medially. Cranial air was compartmentalized by the nasal plug and constriction of the palatopharyngeus muscle. Blood flow, determined from SPECT imaging of 99Tc-bicisate distribution, was greatest in the brain, melon, and posterior fats of the lower jaw. Metabolic activity of tissues, assessed by monitoring the uptake of 18F-deoxyglucose via PET, indicated that melon and jaw fats were metabolically inert compared to the brain. Nasal cavity and sinus air volume that is reduced during diving may be replenished with lung air via the palatopharyngeus and Eustachian tube. Air covering the bulla may protect the ears from outgoing echolocation pulses and contribute to spectral and time of arrival cues. Blood flow to the melon and lower jaw fats may serve to either regulate the temperature of acoustic lipids or act as a site of counter-current heat exchange.

  4. SPECT/CT evaluation of unusual physiologic radioiodine biodistributions: pearls and pitfalls in image interpretation.

    PubMed

    Glazer, Daniel I; Brown, Richard K J; Wong, Ka Kit; Savas, Hatice; Gross, Milton D; Avram, Anca M

    2013-01-01

    Radioiodine imaging has a well-established role in depicting metastatic disease after thyroidectomy in patients with well-differentiated thyroid cancer. Uptake of radioiodine in thyroid metastases depends on expression of sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) by tumor tissues. However, because radioiodine may also accumulate in normal structures and tissues, it is important to distinguish physiologic radioiodine activity from metastatic disease. Furthermore, secretions that contain radioiodine may also simulate pathologic uptake. A spectrum of physiologic distributions, normal variants, and benign mimics of disease have been described in the literature; yet, even when armed with a comprehensive knowledge of these patterns, interpreting radiologists and nuclear physicians may still encounter diagnostic uncertainty. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with integrated computed tomography (CT) is a novel technology that, when applied to diagnostic iodine 123 or iodine 131 ((131)I) radioiodine scintigraphy, may accurately localize and help distinguish benign mimics of disease, with the potential to alter the management plan. SPECT/CT is increasingly being used with radioiodine scintigraphy to evaluate patients with thyroid cancer and shows promise for improving imaging specificity and reducing false-positive results. PMID:23479704

  5. The effect of acquisition interval and spatial resolution on dynamic cardiac imaging with a stationary SPECT camera.

    PubMed

    Roberts, J; Maddula, R; Clackdoyle, R; DiBella, E; Fu, Z

    2007-08-01

    The current SPECT scanning paradigm that acquires images by slow rotation of multiple detectors in body-contoured orbits around the patient is not suited to the rapid collection of tomographically complete data. During rapid image acquisition, mechanical and patient safety constraints limit the detector orbit to circular paths at increased distances from the patient, resulting in decreased spatial resolution. We consider a novel dynamic rotating slant-hole (DyRoSH) SPECT camera that can collect full tomographic data every 2 s, employing three stationary detectors mounted with slant-hole collimators that rotate at 30 rpm. Because the detectors are stationary, they can be placed much closer to the patient than is possible with conventional SPECT systems. We propose that the decoupling of the detector position from the mechanics of rapid image acquisition offers an additional degree of freedom which can be used to improve accuracy in measured kinetic parameter estimates. With simulations and list-mode reconstructions, we consider the effects of different acquisition intervals on dynamic cardiac imaging, comparing a conventional three detector SPECT system with the proposed DyRoSH SPECT system. Kinetic parameters of a two-compartment model of myocardial perfusion for technetium-99m-teboroxime were estimated. When compared to a conventional SPECT scanner for the same acquisition periods, the proposed DyRoSH system shows equivalent or reduced bias or standard deviation values for the kinetic parameter estimates. The DyRoSH camera with a 2 s acquisition period does not show any improvement compared to a DyRoSH camera with a 10 s acquisition period. PMID:17634648

  6. Scanning probe image wizard: A toolbox for automated scanning probe microscopy data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stirling, Julian; Woolley, Richard A. J.; Moriarty, Philip

    2013-11-01

    We describe SPIW (scanning probe image wizard), a new image processing toolbox for SPM (scanning probe microscope) images. SPIW can be used to automate many aspects of SPM data analysis, even for images with surface contamination and step edges present. Specialised routines are available for images with atomic or molecular resolution to improve image visualisation and generate statistical data on surface structure.

  7. Multiple system atrophy: natural history, MRI morphology, and dopamine receptor imaging with 123IBZM-SPECT.

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, J B; Klockgether, T; Petersen, D; Jauch, M; Müller-Schauenburg, W; Spieker, S; Voigt, K; Dichgans, J

    1994-01-01

    Sixteen patients with a clinical diagnosis of probable multiple system atrophy (MSA) were examined clinically by MRI and by 123I-iodobenzamide single photon emission computed tomography (IBZM-SPECT). The clinical records of another 16 patients were also analysed retrospectively. On the basis of their clinical presentation, patients were subdivided into those with prominent parkinsonism (MSA-P, n = 11) and those with prominent cerebellar ataxia (MSA-C, n = 21). Autonomic symptoms were present in all patients and preceded the onset of motor symptoms in 63% of patients. Calculated median lifetime and the median time to become wheelchair bound after onset of disease were significantly shorter for MSA-P than for MSA-C (lifetime: 4.0 v 9.1 years; wheelchair: 3.1 vs 5.0 years) suggesting a better prognosis for cerebellar patients. A significant loss of striatal dopamine receptors (below 2 SD threshold) was detected by IBZM-SPECT in 63% of the patients (56% below 2.5 SD threshold). There was no difference between patients with MSA-C and those with MSA-P in the proportion with significant receptor loss and the extent of dopamine receptor loss. Planimetric MRI evaluation showed cerebellar and brainstem atrophy in both groups. Atrophy was more pronounced in patients with MSA-C than in those with MSA-P. Pontocerebellar hyperintensities and putaminal hypointensities on T2 weighted MRI were found in both groups. Pontocerebellar signal abnormalities were more pronounced in MSA-C than in MSA-P, whereas the rating scores for area but not for intensity of putaminal abnormalities were higher in MSA-P. MRI and IBZM-SPECT provide in vivo evidence for combined basal ganglia and pontocerebellar involvement in almost all patients in this series. Images PMID:8089667

  8. Resolution-recovery-embedded image reconstruction for a high-resolution animal SPECT system.

    PubMed

    Zeraatkar, Navid; Sajedi, Salar; Farahani, Mohammad Hossein; Arabi, Hossein; Sarkar, Saeed; Ghafarian, Pardis; Rahmim, Arman; Ay, Mohammad Reza

    2014-11-01

    The small-animal High-Resolution SPECT (HiReSPECT) is a dedicated dual-head gamma camera recently designed and developed in our laboratory for imaging of murine models. Each detector is composed of an array of 1.2 × 1.2 mm(2) (pitch) pixelated CsI(Na) crystals. Two position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (H8500) are coupled to each head's crystal. In this paper, we report on a resolution-recovery-embedded image reconstruction code applicable to the system and present the experimental results achieved using different phantoms and mouse scans. Collimator-detector response functions (CDRFs) were measured via a pixel-driven method using capillary sources at finite distances from the head within the field of view (FOV). CDRFs were then fitted by independent Gaussian functions. Thereafter, linear interpolations were applied to the standard deviation (σ) values of the fitted Gaussians, yielding a continuous map of CDRF at varying distances from the head. A rotation-based maximum-likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) method was used for reconstruction. A fast rotation algorithm was developed to rotate the image matrix according to the desired angle by means of pre-generated rotation maps. The experiments demonstrated improved resolution utilizing our resolution-recovery-embedded image reconstruction. While the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) radial and tangential resolution measurements of the system were over 2 mm in nearly all positions within the FOV without resolution recovery, reaching around 2.5 mm in some locations, they fell below 1.8 mm everywhere within the FOV using the resolution-recovery algorithm. The noise performance of the system was also acceptable; the standard deviation of the average counts per voxel in the reconstructed images was 6.6% and 8.3% without and with resolution recovery, respectively. PMID:24986422

  9. Evaluation of [111In]-Labeled Zinc-Dipicolylamine Tracers for SPECT Imaging of Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Douglas R.; Plaunt, Adam J.; Turkyilmaz, Serhan; Smith, Miles; Wang, Yuzhen; Rusckowski, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study prepared three structurally related zinc-dipicolylamine (ZnDPA) tracers with [111In] labels and conducted biodistribution and SPECT/CT imaging studies of a mouse leg infection model. Methods Two monovalent tracers, ZnDPA-[111In]DTPA and ZnDPA-[111In]DOTA, each with a single zinc-dipicolylamine targeting unit, and a divalent tracer, Bis(ZnDPA)-[111In]DTPA,with two zinc-dipicolylamine units were prepared. Organ biodistribution and SPECT/CT imaging studies were performed on living mice with a leg infection created by injection of clinically relevant Gram positive Streptococcus pyogenes. Fluorescent and luminescent Eu3+-labeled versions of these tracers were also prepared and used to measure relative affinity for the exterior membrane surface of bacterial cells and mimics of healthy mammalian cells. Results All three 111In-labeled radiotracers were prepared with radiopurity > 90%. The biodistribution studies showed that the two monovalent tracers were cleared from the body through the liver and kidney, with retained % injected dose for all organs of < 8 % at 20 hours and infected leg T/NT ratio of ≤ 3.0. Clearance of the divalent tracer from the bloodstream was slower and primarily through the liver, with a retained % injected dose for all organs < 37% at 20 hours and T/NT ratio rising to 6.2 after 20 hours. The SPECT/CT imaging indicated the same large difference in tracer pharmacokinetics and higher accumulation of the divalent tracer at the site of infection. Conclusions All three [111In]-ZnDPA tracers selectively targeted the site of a clinically relevant mouse infection model that could not be discerned by visual external inspection of the living animal. The highest target selectivity, observed with a divalent tracer equipped with two zinc-dipicolylamine targeting units, compares quite favorably with the imaging selectivities previously reported for other nuclear tracers that target bacterial cell surfaces. The tracer pharmacokinetics depended

  10. Molecular imaging probe development: a chemistry perspective

    PubMed Central

    Nolting, Donald D; Nickels, Michael L; Guo, Ning; Pham, Wellington

    2012-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an attractive modality that has been widely employed in many aspects of biomedical research; especially those aimed at the early detection of diseases such as cancer, inflammation and neurodegenerative disorders. The field emerged in response to a new research paradigm in healthcare that seeks to integrate detection capabilities for the prediction and prevention of diseases. This approach made a distinct impact in biomedical research as it enabled researchers to leverage the capabilities of molecular imaging probes to visualize a targeted molecular event non-invasively, repeatedly and continuously in a living system. In addition, since such probes are inherently compact, robust, and amenable to high-throughput production, these probes could potentially facilitate screening of preclinical drug discovery, therapeutic assessment and validation of disease biomarkers. They could also be useful in drug discovery and safety evaluations. In this review, major trends in the chemical synthesis and development of positron emission tomography (PET), optical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) probes are discussed. PMID:22943038

  11. Molecular Imaging Probes for Diagnosis and Therapy Evaluation of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qingqing; Li, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a major cause of cancer death in women where early detection and accurate assessment of therapy response can improve clinical outcomes. Molecular imaging, which includes PET, SPECT, MRI, and optical modalities, provides noninvasive means of detecting biological processes and molecular events in vivo. Molecular imaging has the potential to enhance our understanding of breast cancer biology and effects of drug action during both preclinical and clinical phases of drug development. This has led to the identification of many molecular imaging probes for key processes in breast cancer. Hormone receptors, growth factor receptor, and angiogenic factors, such as ER, PR, HER2, and VEGFR, have been adopted as imaging targets to detect and stage the breast cancer and to monitor the treatment efficacy. Receptor imaging probes are usually composed of targeting moiety attached to a signaling component such as a radionuclide that can be detected using dedicated instruments. Current molecular imaging probes involved in breast cancer diagnosis and therapy evaluation are reviewed, and future of molecular imaging for the preclinical and clinical is explained. PMID:23533377

  12. An image registration based ultrasound probe calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Kumar, Dinesh; Sarkar, Saradwata; Narayanan, Ram

    2012-02-01

    Reconstructed 3D ultrasound of prostate gland finds application in several medical areas such as image guided biopsy, therapy planning and dose delivery. In our application, we use an end-fire probe rotated about its axis to acquire a sequence of rotational slices to reconstruct 3D TRUS (Transrectal Ultrasound) image. The image acquisition system consists of an ultrasound transducer situated on a cradle directly attached to a rotational sensor. However, due to system tolerances, axis of probe does not align exactly with the designed axis of rotation resulting in artifacts in the 3D reconstructed ultrasound volume. We present a rigid registration based automatic probe calibration approach. The method uses a sequence of phantom images, each pair acquired at angular separation of 180 degrees and registers corresponding image pairs to compute the deviation from designed axis. A modified shadow removal algorithm is applied for preprocessing. An attribute vector is constructed from image intensity and a speckle-insensitive information-theoretic feature. We compare registration between the presented method and expert-corrected images in 16 prostate phantom scans. Images were acquired at multiple resolutions, and different misalignment settings from two ultrasound machines. Screenshots from 3D reconstruction are shown before and after misalignment correction. Registration parameters from automatic and manual correction were found to be in good agreement. Average absolute differences of translation and rotation between automatic and manual methods were 0.27 mm and 0.65 degree, respectively. The registration parameters also showed lower variability for automatic registration (pooled standard deviation σtranslation = 0.50 mm, σrotation = 0.52 degree) compared to the manual approach (pooled standard deviation σtranslation = 0.62 mm, σrotation = 0.78 degree).

  13. Gallbladder Activity on 99mTc-Labeled Red Cell Scintigraphy Confirmed by SPECT/CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Jing, Hongli; Chen, Libo; Wang, Zhenghua; Li, Fang

    2016-09-01

    Tc-labeled red cell (Tc-RBC) scintigraphy is commonly used to detect gastrointestinal bleeding. Gallbladder visualization on Tc-RBC scintigraphy is not common. We present a case of gallbladder visualization on Tc-RBC scintigraphy confirmed by SPECT/CT imaging in a patient with chronic renal failure and anemia. PMID:27405034

  14. Molecular probes for malignant melanoma imaging.

    PubMed

    Ren, Gang; Pan, Ying; Cheng, Zhen

    2010-09-01

    Malignant melanoma represents a serious public health problem and is a deadly disease when it is diagnosed at late stage. Though (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) has been widely used clinically for melanoma imaging, other approaches to specifically identify, characterize, monitor and guide therapeutics for malignant melanoma are still needed. Consequently, many probes targeting general molecular events including metabolism, angiogenesis, hypoxia and apoptosis in melanoma have been successfully developed. Furthermore, probes targeting melanoma associated targets such as melanocortin receptor 1 (MC1R), melanin, etc. have undergone active investigation and have demonstrated high melanoma specificity. In this review, these molecular probes targeting diverse melanoma biomarkers have been summarized. Some of them may eventually contribute to the improvement of personalized management of malignant melanoma. PMID:20497118

  15. Alzheimer disease: Quantitative analysis of I-123-iodoamphetamine SPECT brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hellman, R.S.; Tikofsky, R.S.; Collier, B.D.; Hoffmann, R.G.; Palmer, D.W.; Glatt, S.L.; Antuono, P.G.; Isitman, A.T.; Papke, R.A.

    1989-07-01

    To enable a more quantitative diagnosis of senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT), the authors developed and tested a semiautomated method to define regions of interest (ROIs) to be used in quantitating results from single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of regional cerebral blood flow performed with N-isopropyl iodine-123-iodoamphetamine. SPECT/IMP imaging was performed in ten patients with probable SDAT and seven healthy subjects. Multiple ROIs were manually and semiautomatically generated, and uptake was quantitated for each ROI. Mean cortical activity was estimated as the average of the mean activity in 24 semiautomatically generated ROIs; mean cerebellar activity was determined from the mean activity in separate ROIs. A ratio of parietal to cerebellar activity less than 0.60 and a ratio of parietal to mean cortical activity less than 0.90 allowed correct categorization of nine of ten and eight of ten patients, respectively, with SDAT and all control subjects. The degree of diminished mental status observed in patients with SDAT correlated with both global and regional changes in IMP uptake.

  16. SPECT Perfusion Imaging Demonstrates Improvement of Traumatic Brain Injury With Transcranial Near-infrared Laser Phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Theodore A; Morries, Larry D

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a growing health concern affecting civilians and military personnel. Near-infrared (NIR) light has shown benefits in animal models and human trials for stroke and in animal models for TBI. Diodes emitting low-level NIR often have lacked therapeutic efficacy, perhaps failing to deliver sufficient radiant energy to the necessary depth. In this case report, a patient with moderate TBI documented in anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) received 20 NIR treatments in the course of 2 mo using a high-power NIR laser. Symptoms were monitored by clinical examination and a novel patient diary system specifically designed for this patient population. Clinical application of these levels of infrared energy for this patient with TBI yielded highly favorable outcomes with decreased depression, anxiety, headache, and insomnia, whereas cognition and quality of life improved. Neurological function appeared to improve based on changes in the SPECT by quantitative analysis. NIR in the power range of 10-15 W at 810 and 980 nm can safely and effectively treat chronic symptoms of TBI. PMID:26535475

  17. Gold Nanoparticles Doped with (199) Au Atoms and Their Use for Targeted Cancer Imaging by SPECT.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongfeng; Pang, Bo; Luehmann, Hannah; Detering, Lisa; Yang, Xuan; Sultan, Deborah; Harpstrite, Scott; Sharma, Vijay; Cutler, Cathy S; Xia, Younan; Liu, Yongjian

    2016-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been labeled with various radionuclides and extensively explored for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in the context of cancer diagnosis. The stability of most radiolabels, however, still needs to be improved for accurate detection of cancer biomarkers and thereby monitoring of tumor progression and metastasis. Here, the first synthesis of Au nanoparticles doped with (199) Au atoms for targeted SPECT tumor imaging in a mouse triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) model is reported. By directly incorporating (199) Au atoms into the crystal lattice of each Au nanoparticle, the stability of the radiolabel can be ensured. The synthetic procedure also allows for a precise control over both the radiochemistry and particle size. When conjugated with D-Ala1-peptide T-amide, the Au nanoparticles doped with (199) Au atoms can serve as a C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5)-targeted nanoprobe for the sensitive and specific detection of both TNBC and its metastasis in a mouse tumor model. PMID:26865221

  18. Ligands for SPECT and PET imaging of muscarinic-cholinergic receptors of the heart and brain

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; McPherson, D.W.; Luo, H.

    1995-06-01

    Interest in the potential use of cerebral SPECT and PET imaging for determination of the density and activity of muscarinic-cholinergic receptors (mAChR) has been stimulated by the changes in these receptors which occur in many neurological diseases. In addition, the important involvement of mAChR in modulating negative inotropic cardiac activity suggests that such receptor ligands may have important applications in evaluation of changes which may occur in cardiac disease. In this paper, the properties of several key muscarinic receptor ligands being developed or which have been used for clinical SPECT and PET are discussed. In addition, the ORNL development of the new iodinated IQNP ligand based on QNB and the results of in vivo biodistribution studies in rats, in vitro competitive binding studies and ex vivo autoradiographic experiments are described. The use of radioiodinated IQNP may offer several advantages in comparison to IQNB because of its easy and high yield preparation and high brain uptake and the potential usefulness of the {open_quotes}partial{close_quotes} subtype selective IONP isomers. We also describe the development of new IQNP-type analogues which offer the opportunity for radiolabeling with positron-emitting radioisotopes (carbon-11, fluorine-18 and bromine-76) for potential use with PET.

  19. Taking the perfect nuclear image: quality control, acquisition, and processing techniques for cardiac SPECT, PET, and hybrid imaging.

    PubMed

    Case, James A; Bateman, Timothy M

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear Cardiology for the past 40 years has distinguished itself in its ability to non-invasively assess regional myocardial blood flow and identify obstructive coronary disease. This has led to advances in managing the diagnosis, risk stratification, and prognostic assessment of cardiac patients. These advances have all been predicated on the collection of high quality nuclear image data. National and international professional societies have established guidelines for nuclear laboratories to maintain high quality nuclear cardiology services. In addition, laboratory accreditation has further advanced the goal of the establishing high quality standards for the provision of nuclear cardiology services. This article summarizes the principles of nuclear cardiology single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and techniques for maintaining quality: from the calibration of imaging equipment to post processing techniques. It also will explore the quality considerations of newer technologies such as cadmium zinc telleride (CZT)-based SPECT systems and absolute blood flow measurement techniques using PET. PMID:23868070

  20. Molecular Probes for Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sarder, Pinaki; Maji, Dolonchampa; Achilefu, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Visualization of biological processes and pathologic conditions at the cellular and tissue levels largely rely on the use of fluorescence intensity signals from fluorophores or their bioconjugates. To overcome the concentration dependency of intensity measurements, evaluate subtle molecular interactions, and determine biochemical status of intracellular or extracellular microenvironments, fluorescence lifetime (FLT) imaging has emerged as a reliable imaging method complementary to intensity measurements. Driven by a wide variety of dyes exhibiting stable or environment-responsive FLTs, information multiplexing can be readily accomplished without the need for ratiometric spectral imaging. With knowledge of the fluorescent states of the molecules, it is entirely possible to predict the functional status of biomolecules or microevironment of cells. Whereas the use of FLT spectroscopy and microscopy in biological studies is now well established, in vivo imaging of biological processes based on FLT imaging techniques is still evolving. This review summarizes recent advances in the application of the FLT of molecular probes for imaging cells and small animal models of human diseases. It also highlights some challenges that continue to limit the full realization of the potential of using FLT molecular probes to address diverse biological problems, and outlines areas of potential high impact in the future. PMID:25961514

  1. Fluorescent nanoparticle probes for imaging of cancer.

    PubMed

    Santra, Swadeshmukul; Malhotra, Astha

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescent nanoparticles (FNPs) have received immense popularity in cancer imaging in recent years because of their attractive optical properties. In comparison to traditional organic-based fluorescent dyes and fluorescent proteins, FNPs offer much improved sensitivity and photostability. FNPs in certain size range have a strong tendency to enter and retain in solid tumor tissue with abnormal (leaky) vasculature--a phenomenon known as Enhanced Permeation and Retention (EPR) effect, advancing their use for in vivo tumor imaging. Furthermore, large surface area of FNPs and their usual core-shell structure offer a platform for designing and fabricating multimodal/multifunctional nanoparticles (MMNPs). For effective cancer imaging, often the optical imaging modality is integrated with other nonoptical-based imaging modalities such as MRI, X-ray, and PET, thus creating multimodal nanoparticle (NP)-based imaging probes. Such multimodal NP probes can be further integrated with therapeutic drug as well as cancer targeting agent leading to multifunctional NPs. Biocompatibility of FNPs is an important criterion that must be seriously considered during FNP design. NP composition, size, and surface chemistry must be carefully selected to minimize potential toxicological consequences both in vitro and in vivo. In this article, we will mainly focus on three different types of FNPs: dye-loaded NPs, quantum dots (Qdots), and phosphores; briefly highlighting their potential use in translational research. PMID:21480546

  2. CT/99mTc-GSA SPECT fusion images demonstrate functional differences between the liver lobes

    PubMed Central

    Sumiyoshi, Tatsuaki; Shima, Yasuo; Tokorodani, Ryoutarou; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Kozuki, Akihito; Hata, Yasuhiro; Noda, Yoshihiro; Murata, Yoriko; Nakamura, Toshio; Uka, Kiminori

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the functional differences between the 2 liver lobes in non-cirrhotic patients by using computed tomography/99mTc-galactosyl human serum albumin (CT/99mTc-GSA) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) fusion images. METHODS: Between December 2008 and March 2012, 264 non-cirrhotic patients underwent preoperative liver function assessment using CT/99mTc-GSA SPECT fusion images. Of these, 30 patients, in whom the influence of a tumor on the liver parenchyma was estimated to be negligible, were selected. Specifically, the selected patients were required to meet either of the following criteria: (1) the presence of an extrahepatic tumor; or (2) presence of a single small intrahepatic tumor. These 30 patients were retrospectively analyzed to calculate the percentage volume (%Volume) and the percentage function (%Function) of each lobe. The ratio between the %Function and %Volume (function-to-volume ratio) of each lobe was also calculated, and the ratios were compared between the 2 lobes. Furthermore, the correlations between the function-to-volume ratio and each of 2 liver parameters [lobe volume and diameter ratio of the left portal vein to the right portal vein (LPV-to-RPV diameter ratio)] were investigated. RESULTS: The median values of %Volume and %Function were 62.6% and 67.1% in the right lobe, with %Function being significantly higher than %Volume (P < 0.01). The median values of %Volume and %Function were 31.0% and 28.7% in the left lobe, with %Function being significantly lower than %Volume (P < 0.01). The function-to-volume ratios of the right lobe (1.04-1.14) were significantly higher than those of the left lobe (0.74-0.99) (P < 0.01). The function-to-volume ratio showed no significant correlation between the lobe volume in either lobe. In contrast, the function-to-volume ratio showed significant correlations with the LPV-to-RPV diameter ratio in both lobes (right lobe: negative correlation, rs = -0.37, P = 0.048; left lobe: positive

  3. Incorporation of paramagnetic, fluorescent and PET/SPECT contrast agents into liposomes for multimodal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Nick; Kalber, Tammy L.; Cooper, Margaret S.; Sunassee, Kavitha; Chalker, Samantha L.; Shaw, Karen P.; Ordidge, Katherine L.; Badar, Adam; Janes, Samuel M.; Blower, Philip J.; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Hailes, Helen C.; Tabor, Alethea B.

    2013-01-01

    A series of metal-chelating lipid conjugates has been designed and synthesized. Each member of the series bears a 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) macrocycle attached to the lipid head group, using short n-ethylene glycol (n-EG) spacers of varying length. Liposomes incorporating these lipids, chelated to Gd3+, 64Cu2+, or 111In3+, and also incorporating fluorescent lipids, have been prepared, and their application in optical, magnetic resonance (MR) and single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) imaging of cellular uptake and distribution investigated in vitro and in vivo. We have shown that these multimodal liposomes can be used as functional MR contrast agents as well as radionuclide tracers for SPECT, and that they can be optimized for each application. When shielded liposomes were formulated incorporating 50% of a lipid with a short n-EG spacer, to give nanoparticles with a shallow but even coverage of n-EG, they showed good cellular internalization in a range of tumour cells, compared to the limited cellular uptake of conventional shielded liposomes formulated with 7% 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[carboxy(polyethyleneglycol)2000] (DSPE-PEG2000). Moreover, by matching the depth of n-EG coverage to the length of the n-EG spacers of the DOTA lipids, we have shown that similar distributions and blood half lives to DSPE-PEG2000-stabilized liposomes can be achieved. The ability to tune the imaging properties and distribution of these liposomes allows for the future development of a flexible tri-modal imaging agent. PMID:23131536

  4. Imaging Lung Function in Mice Using SPECT/CT and Per-Voxel Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jobse, Brian N.; Rhem, Rod G.; McCurry, Cory A. J. R.; Wang, Iris Q.; Labiris, N. Renée

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lung disease is a major worldwide health concern but better tools are required to understand the underlying pathologies. Ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with per-voxel analysis allows for non-invasive measurement of regional lung function. A clinically adapted V/Q methodology was used in healthy mice to investigate V/Q relationships. Twelve week-old mice were imaged to describe normal lung function while 36 week-old mice were imaged to determine how age affects V/Q. Mice were ventilated with Technegas™ and injected with 99mTc-macroaggregated albumin to trace ventilation and perfusion, respectively. For both processes, SPECT and CT images were acquired, co-registered, and quantitatively analyzed. On a per-voxel basis, ventilation and perfusion were moderately correlated (R = 0.58±0.03) in 12 week old animals and a mean log(V/Q) ratio of −0.07±0.01 and standard deviation of 0.36±0.02 were found, defining the extent of V/Q matching. In contrast, 36 week old animals had significantly increased levels of V/Q mismatching throughout the periphery of the lung. Measures of V/Q were consistent across healthy animals and differences were observed with age demonstrating the capability of this technique in quantifying lung function. Per-voxel analysis and the ability to non-invasively assess lung function will aid in the investigation of chronic lung disease models and drug efficacy studies. PMID:22870297

  5. Incorporation of paramagnetic, fluorescent and PET/SPECT contrast agents into liposomes for multimodal imaging.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Nick; Kalber, Tammy L; Cooper, Margaret S; Sunassee, Kavitha; Chalker, Samantha L; Shaw, Karen P; Ordidge, Katherine L; Badar, Adam; Janes, Samuel M; Blower, Philip J; Lythgoe, Mark F; Hailes, Helen C; Tabor, Alethea B

    2013-01-01

    A series of metal-chelating lipid conjugates has been designed and synthesized. Each member of the series bears a 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) macrocycle attached to the lipid head group, using short n-ethylene glycol (n-EG) spacers of varying length. Liposomes incorporating these lipids, chelated to Gd(3+), (64)Cu(2+), or (111)In(3+), and also incorporating fluorescent lipids, have been prepared, and their application in optical, magnetic resonance (MR) and single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) imaging of cellular uptake and distribution investigated in vitro and in vivo. We have shown that these multimodal liposomes can be used as functional MR contrast agents as well as radionuclide tracers for SPECT, and that they can be optimized for each application. When shielded liposomes were formulated incorporating 50% of a lipid with a short n-EG spacer, to give nanoparticles with a shallow but even coverage of n-EG, they showed good cellular internalization in a range of tumour cells, compared to the limited cellular uptake of conventional shielded liposomes formulated with 7% 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[carboxy(polyethyleneglycol)(2000)] (DSPE-PEG2000). Moreover, by matching the depth of n-EG coverage to the length of the n-EG spacers of the DOTA lipids, we have shown that similar distributions and blood half lives to DSPE-PEG2000-stabilized liposomes can be achieved. The ability to tune the imaging properties and distribution of these liposomes allows for the future development of a flexible tri-modal imaging agent. PMID:23131536

  6. Development and testing of a restraint free small animal SPECT imaging system with infrared based motion tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Weisenberger, A.G.; Kross, B.; Gleason, S.S.; Goddard, J.; Majewski, S.; Meikle, S.R.; Paulus, M.J.; Pomper, M.; Popov, V.; Smith, M.F.; Welch, B.L.; Wojcik, R.

    2003-10-01

    The development and initial evaluation of a high-resolution single photon emission tomography (SPECT) based system to image the biodistribution of radiolabeled tracers such as Tc-99m and I-125 in unrestrained/un-anesthetized mice. An infrared (IR) based position tracking apparatus has been developed and integrated into a SPECT gantry. The tracking system is designed to measure the spatial position of a mouse's head at a rate of 10-15 frames per second with sub-millimeter accuracy. The high resolution, gamma imaging detectors are based on pixelated NaI(Tl) crystal scintillator arrays, arrays of compact position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes and novel readout circuitry for lower device cost while retaining high spatial resolution. Two SPECT gamma camera detector heads based on a 4 /spl times/ 8 array of Hamamatsu R8520-C12 position sensitive photomultiplier tubes have been built and installed onto the gantry. The IR landmark-based pose measurement and tracking system is under development to provide animal position data during a SPECT scan. The animal position and orientation data acquired by the IR tracking system is used for motion correction during the tomographic image reconstruction.

  7. Observer assessment of multi-pinhole SPECT geometries for prostate cancer imaging: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalantari, Faraz; Sen, Anando; Gifford, Howard C.

    2014-03-01

    SPECT imaging using In-111 ProstaScint is an FDA-approved method for diagnosing prostate cancer metastases within the pelvis. However, conventional medium-energy parallel-hole (MEPAR) collimators produce poor image quality and we are investigating the use of multipinhole (MPH) imaging as an alternative. This paper presents a method for evaluating MPH designs that makes use of sampling-sensitive (SS) mathematical model observers for tumor detectionlocalization tasks. Key to our approach is the redefinition of a normal (or background) reference image that is used with scanning model observers. We used this approach to compare different MPH configurations for the task of small-tumor detection in the prostate and surrounding lymph nodes. Four configurations used 10, 20, 30, and 60 pinholes evenly spaced over a complete circular orbit. A fixed-count acquisition protocol was assumed. Spherical tumors were placed within a digital anthropomorphic phantom having a realistic Prostascint biodistribution. Imaging data sets were generated with an analytical projector and reconstructed volumes were obtained with the OSEM algorithm. The MPH configurations were compared in a localization ROC (LROC) study with 2D pelvic images and both human and model observers. Regular and SS versions of the scanning channelized nonprewhitening (CNPW) and visual-search (VS) model observers were applied. The SS models demonstrated the highest correlations with the average human-observer results

  8. Preliminary experience with small animal SPECT imaging on clinical gamma cameras.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, P; Silva-Rodríguez, J; Herranz, M; Ruibal, A

    2014-01-01

    The traditional lack of techniques suitable for in vivo imaging has induced a great interest in molecular imaging for preclinical research. Nevertheless, its use spreads slowly due to the difficulties in justifying the high cost of the current dedicated preclinical scanners. An alternative for lowering the costs is to repurpose old clinical gamma cameras to be used for preclinical imaging. In this paper we assess the performance of a portable device, that is, working coupled to a single-head clinical gamma camera, and we present our preliminary experience in several small animal applications. Our findings, based on phantom experiments and animal studies, provided an image quality, in terms of contrast-noise trade-off, comparable to dedicated preclinical pinhole-based scanners. We feel that our portable device offers an opportunity for recycling the widespread availability of clinical gamma cameras in nuclear medicine departments to be used in small animal SPECT imaging and we hope that it can contribute to spreading the use of preclinical imaging within institutions on tight budgets. PMID:24963478

  9. Collimator and energy window optimization for ⁹⁰Y bremsstrahlung SPECT imaging: A SIMIND Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Roshan, Hoda Rezaei; Mahmoudian, Babak; Gharepapagh, Esmaeil; Azarm, Ahmadreza; Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh

    2016-02-01

    Treatment efficacy of radioembolization using Yttrium-90 ((90)Y) microspheres is assessed by the (90)Y bremsstrahlung single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging following radioembolization. The radioisotopic image has the potential of providing reliable activity map of (90)Y microspheres distribution. One of the main reasons of the poor image quality in (90)Y bremsstrahlung SPECT imaging is the continuous and broad energy spectrum of the related bremsstrahlung photons. Furthermore, collimator geometry plays an impressive role in the spatial resolution, sensitivity and image contrast. Due to the relatively poor quality of the (90)Y bremsstrahlung SPECT images, we intend to optimize the medium-energy (ME) parallel-hole collimator and energy window. The Siemens e.cam gamma camera equipped with a ME collimator and a voxelized phantom was simulated by the SImulating Medical Imaging Nuclear Detectors (SIMIND) program. We used the SIMIND Monte Carlo program to generate the (90)Y bremsstrahlung SPECT projection of the digital Jaszczak phantom. The phantom consist of the six hot spheres ranging from 9.5 to 31.8mm in diameter, which are used to evaluate the image contrast. In order to assess the effect of the energy window on the image contrast, three energy windows ranging from 60 to 160 KeV, 160 to 400 KeV, and 60 to 400 KeV were set on a (90)Y bremsstrahlung spectrum. As well, the effect of the hole diameter of a ME collimator on the image contrast and bremsstrahlung spectrum were investigated. For the fixed collimator and septa thickness values (3.28 cm and 1.14 mm, respectively), a hole diameter range (2.35-3.3mm) was chosen based on the appropriate balance between the spatial resolution and sensitivity. The optimal energy window for (90)Y bremsstrahlung SPECT imaging was extended energy window from 60 to 400 KeV. Besides, The optimal value of the hole diameter of ME collimator was obtained 3.3mm. Geometry of the ME parallel-hole collimator and energy

  10. Extracranial metastatic glioblastoma: Appearance on thallium-201-chloride/technetium-99m-HMPAO SPECT images

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, P.A.; Schwartz, R.B.; Alexander, E. III; Loeffler, J.S.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Nagel, J.S.; Holman, B.L. )

    1991-02-01

    Sequential thallium-201-chloride and technetium-99m-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images were obtained in a patient with extracranial metastatic glioblastoma multiforme. Thallium-201 uptake was high (three times the scalp background) in all pathologically confirmed extracranial metastases and moderate (1.6 times scalp background) intracranially, where most biopsy specimens showed gliosis with scattered atypical astrocytes. Technetium-99m-HMPAO uptake was decreased intracranially in the right frontal and parietal lobes which had been irradiated. It was also decreased in one well-encapsulated scalp lesion and high in another scalp mass with less defined borders. Possible mechanisms of tumor uptake of these agents are reviewed.

  11. Brain imaging with sup 123 I-IMP-SPECT in migraine between attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Schlake, H.P.; Boettger, I.G.G.; Grotemeyer, K.H.; Husstedt, I.W.

    1989-06-01

    {sup 123}I-IMP-SPECT brain imaging was performed in patients with classic migraine (n = 5) and migraine accompagnee (n = 18) during the headache-free interval. A regional reduction of tracer uptake into brain was observed in all patients with migraine accompagnee, while in patients with classic migraine only one case showed an area of decreased activity. The most marked alteration was found in a patient with persisting neurological symptoms (complicated migraine). In most cases the areas of decreased tracer uptake corresponded to headache localization as well as to topography of neurologic symptoms during migraine attacks. It may be concluded that migraine attacks occur in connection with exacerbations of preexisting changes of cerebral autoregulation due to endogenous or exogenous factors.

  12. An automated voxelized dosimetry tool for radionuclide therapy based on serial quantitative SPECT/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Price A.; Kron, Tomas; Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu; Hofman, Michael S.; Hogg, Annette; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To create an accurate map of the distribution of radiation dose deposition in healthy and target tissues during radionuclide therapy.Methods: Serial quantitative SPECT/CT images were acquired at 4, 24, and 72 h for 28 {sup 177}Lu-octreotate peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) administrations in 17 patients with advanced neuroendocrine tumors. Deformable image registration was combined with an in-house programming algorithm to interpolate pharmacokinetic uptake and clearance at a voxel level. The resultant cumulated activity image series are comprised of values representing the total number of decays within each voxel's volume. For PRRT, cumulated activity was translated to absorbed dose based on Monte Carlo-determined voxel S-values at a combination of long and short ranges. These dosimetric image sets were compared for mean radiation absorbed dose to at-risk organs using a conventional MIRD protocol (OLINDA 1.1).Results: Absorbed dose values to solid organs (liver, kidneys, and spleen) were within 10% using both techniques. Dose estimates to marrow were greater using the voxelized protocol, attributed to the software incorporating crossfire effect from nearby tumor volumes.Conclusions: The technique presented offers an efficient, automated tool for PRRT dosimetry based on serial post-therapy imaging. Following retrospective analysis, this method of high-resolution dosimetry may allow physicians to prescribe activity based on required dose to tumor volume or radiation limits to healthy tissue in individual patients.

  13. Estimating ROI activity concentration with photon-processing and photon-counting SPECT imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Abhinav K.; Frey, Eric C.

    2015-03-01

    Recently a new class of imaging systems, referred to as photon-processing (PP) systems, are being developed that uses real-time maximum-likelihood (ML) methods to estimate multiple attributes per detected photon and store these attributes in a list format. PP systems could have a number of potential advantages compared to systems that bin photons based on attributes such as energy, projection angle, and position, referred to as photon-counting (PC) systems. For example, PP systems do not suffer from binning-related information loss and provide the potential to extract information from attributes such as energy deposited by the detected photon. To quantify the effects of this advantage on task performance, objective evaluation studies are required. We performed this study in the context of quantitative 2-dimensional single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging with the end task of estimating the mean activity concentration within a region of interest (ROI). We first theoretically outline the effect of null space on estimating the mean activity concentration, and argue that due to this effect, PP systems could have better estimation performance compared to PC systems with noise-free data. To evaluate the performance of PP and PC systems with noisy data, we developed a singular value decomposition (SVD)-based analytic method to estimate the activity concentration from PP systems. Using simulations, we studied the accuracy and precision of this technique in estimating the activity concentration. We used this framework to objectively compare PP and PC systems on the activity concentration estimation task. We investigated the effects of varying the size of the ROI and varying the number of bins for the attribute corresponding to the angular orientation of the detector in a continuously rotating SPECT system. The results indicate that in several cases, PP systems offer improved estimation performance compared to PC systems.

  14. Imaging of cerebral blood flow-to-volume distribution using SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, W.H.; von Kummer, R.; Kuebler, W.

    1986-04-01

    The ratio between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) has been proposed as an adequate parameter for the evaluation of cerebrovascular disease (CVD), but to date it has not been assessed with SPECT. We have chosen (/sup 123/I)IMP for CBF and (/sup 99m/Tc) erythrocytes for CBV imaging. The distribution of both nuclides was investigated in succession using corrections for the contamination of the /sup 99m/Tc tomograms by /sup 123/I. The ratio between /sup 123/I and /sup 99m/Tc tomograms yielded the CBF/CBV distribution. Quantitation was obtained by side-to-side comparison of both hemispheres and of segments containing the territories affected by CVD. In 16 patients with CVD, CBF of the affected territories was 85 +/- 19% (s.d.) when related to the nonsymptomatic contralateral side (100%). When the regions of interest defined within one slice encompassed the entire affected hemisphere, the average CBF was 95 +/- 9%, again related to the nonsymptomatic side. The corresponding CBF/CBV data in 15 of these 16 patients were 60 +/- 32% and 81 +/- 16%. In unilateral internal carotid artery stenoses greater than 50% (N = 10), segmental CBF averaged 81.1 +/- 10.1% and CBF/CBV 49.6 +/- 15.5% relative to the contralateral side. The figures for the hemispheres were 92.8 +/- 5.8 and 75.8 +/- 12.6, respectively. These clinical findings mirror the characteristics of CBF autoregulation, namely the vasodilation of small vessels in decreased arterial perfusion pressure. They, therefore, substantiate SPECT imaging of CBF/CBV for the assessment of cerebral perfusion reserve in CVD.

  15. First Robotic SPECT for Minimally Invasive Sentinel Lymph Node Mapping.

    PubMed

    Fuerst, Bernhard; Sprung, Julian; Pinto, Francisco; Frisch, Benjamin; Wendler, Thomas; Simon, Hervé; Mengus, Laurent; van den Berg, Nynke S; van der Poel, Henk G; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B; Navab, Nassir

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present the usage of a drop-in gamma probe for intra-operative Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) imaging in the scope of minimally invasive robot-assisted interventions. The probe is designed to be inserted and reside inside the abdominal cavity during the intervention. It is grasped during the procedure using a robotic laparoscopic gripper enabling full six degrees of freedom handling by the surgeon. We demonstrate the first deployment of the tracked probe for intra-operative in-patient robotic SPECT enabling augmented-reality image guidance. The hybrid mechanical- and image-based in-patient probe tracking is shown to have an accuracy of 0.2 mm. The overall system performance is evaluated and tested with a phantom for gynecological sentinel lymph node interventions and compared to ground-truth data yielding a mean reconstruction accuracy of 0.67 mm. PMID:26561283

  16. CT-based attenuation and scatter correction compared with uniform attenuation correction in brain perfusion SPECT imaging for dementia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillen, Rebecca; Firbank, Michael J.; Lloyd, Jim; O'Brien, John T.

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated if the appearance and diagnostic accuracy of HMPAO brain perfusion SPECT images could be improved by using CT-based attenuation and scatter correction compared with the uniform attenuation correction method. A cohort of subjects who were clinically categorized as Alzheimer’s Disease (n=38 ), Dementia with Lewy Bodies (n=29 ) or healthy normal controls (n=30 ), underwent SPECT imaging with Tc-99m HMPAO and a separate CT scan. The SPECT images were processed using: (a) correction map derived from the subject’s CT scan or (b) the Chang uniform approximation for correction or (c) no attenuation correction. Images were visually inspected. The ratios between key regions of interest known to be affected or spared in each condition were calculated for each correction method, and the differences between these ratios were evaluated. The images produced using the different corrections were noted to be visually different. However, ROI analysis found similar statistically significant differences between control and dementia groups and between AD and DLB groups regardless of the correction map used. We did not identify an improvement in diagnostic accuracy in images which were corrected using CT-based attenuation and scatter correction, compared with those corrected using a uniform correction map.

  17. Molecular Platform for Design and Synthesis of Targeted Dual-Modality Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report a versatile dendritic structure based platform for construction of targeted dual-modality imaging probes. The platform contains multiple copies of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) branching out from a 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N,N′,N″-triacetic acid (NOTA) core. The specific coordination chemistries of the NOTA and DOTA moieties offer specific loading of 68/67Ga3+ and Gd3+, respectively, into a common molecular scaffold. The platform also contains three amino groups which can potentiate targeted dual-modality imaging of PET/MRI or SPECT/MRI (PET: positron emission tomography; SPECT: single photon emission computed tomography; MRI: magnetic resonance imaging) when further functionalized by targeting vectors of interest. To validate this design concept, a bimetallic complex was synthesized with six peripheral Gd-DOTA units and one Ga-NOTA core at the center, whose ion T1 relaxivity per gadolinium atom was measured to be 15.99 mM–1 s–1 at 20 MHz. Further, the bimetallic agent demonstrated its anticipated in vivo stability, tissue distribution, and pharmacokinetic profile when labeled with 67Ga. When conjugated with a model targeting peptide sequence, the trivalent construct was able to visualize tumors in a mouse xenograft model by both PET and MRI via a single dose injection. PMID:25615011

  18. Numerical surrogates for human observers in myocardial motion evaluation from SPECT image

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Thibault; Kalayehis, Mahdi M.; Parages, Felipe M.; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-01-01

    In medical imaging, the gold standard for image-quality assessment is a task-based approach in which one evaluates human observer performance for a given diagnostic task (e.g., detection of a myocardial perfusion or motion defect). To facilitate practical task-based image-quality assessment, model observers are needed as approximate surrogates for human observers. In cardiac-gated SPECT imaging, diagnosis relies on evaluation of the myocardial motion as well as perfusion. Model observers for the perfusion-defect detection task have been studied previously, but little effort has been devoted toward development of a model observer for cardiac-motion defect detection. In this work describe two model observers for predicting human observer performance in detection of cardiac-motion defects. Both proposed methods rely on motion features extracted using previously reported deformable mesh model for myocardium motion estimation. The first method is based on a Hotelling linear discriminant that is similar in concept to that used commonly for perfusion-defect detection. In the second method, based on relevance vector machines (RVM) for regression, we compute average human observer performance by first directly predicting individual human observer scores, and then using multi reader receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Our results suggest that the proposed RVM model observer can predict human observer performance accurately, while the new Hotelling motion-defect detector is somewhat less effective. PMID:23981533

  19. Comparison of simultaneous and sequential SPECT imaging for discrimination tasks in assessment of cardiac defects

    PubMed Central

    Trott, CM; Ouyang, J; El Fakhri, G

    2011-01-01

    Simultaneous rest perfusion/fatty-acid metabolism studies have the potential to replace sequential rest/stress perfusion studies for the assessment of cardiac function. Simultaneous acquisition has the benefits of increased signal and lack of need for patient stress, but is complicated by cross-talk between the two radionuclide signals. We consider a simultaneous rest 99mTc-sestamibi/123I-BMIPP imaging protocol in place of the commonly-used sequential rest/stress 99mTc-sestamibi protocol. The theoretical precision with which the severity of a cardiac defect and the transmural extent of infarct can be measured is computed for simultaneous and sequential SPECT imaging, and their performance is compared for discriminating (1) degrees of defect severity, and (2) sub-endocardial from transmural defects. We consider cardiac infarcts, for which reduced perfusion and metabolism are observed. From an information perspective, simultaneous imaging is found to yield comparable or improved performance compared with sequential imaging for discriminating both severity of defect and transmural extent of infarct, for three defects of differing location and size. PMID:21048290

  20. Real-time landmark-based unrestrained animal tracking system for motion-corrected PET/SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    J.S. Goddard; S.S. Gleason; M.J. Paulus; Stanislaw Majewski; Vladimir Popov; Mark Smith; Andrew Weisenberger; Benjamin Welch; Randolph Wojcik

    2003-08-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Jefferson Lab and are collaborating to develop a new high-resolution single photon emission tomography (SPECT) instrument to image unrestrained laboratory animals. This technology development will allow functional imaging studies to be performed on the animals without the use of anesthetic agents. This technology development could have eventual clinical applications for performing functional imaging studies on patients that cannot remain still (Parkinson's patients, Alzheimer's patients, small children, etc.) during a PET or SPECT scan. A key component of this new device is the position tracking apparatus. The tracking apparatus is an integral part of the gantry and designed to measure the spatial position of the animal at a rate of 10-15 frames per second with sub-millimeter accuracy. Initial work focuses on brain studies where anesthetic agents or physical restraint can significantly impact physiologic processes.

  1. Comparison of two I-123 labeled SPECT probes, for the dopamine transporter in non-human primate brain

    SciTech Connect

    Gandelman, M.S.; Scanley, B.E.; Al-Tikrite, M.S.

    1994-05-01

    A comparative SPECT evaluation of the regional uptake of 28-carboisopropoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropane (IP-CIT) and 2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropane ({beta}-CIT) was performed to assess the improved specificity of IP-CIT over {beta}-CIT for the dopamine (DE) transporter, as shown previously by in vitro studies (n=10), ranging from 7 to 10 hours with 6.9 to 15 mCi injected dose, were completed in 3 baboons. Peripheral metabolism of the two ligands were similar The SPECT images utilized ROIs over striatum (which reflect DA transporters), midbrain (previously shown for {beta}-CIT to reflect primarily serotonin transporters), and the occipital lobe (a region of non-specific uptake). The time to peak specific striatal uptake (striatal minus occipital activity) was similar for IP-CIT and {beta}-CIT (377{plus_minus}60 and 410{plus_minus}60 min, respectively); whereas midbrain peak activity occurred at a significantly earlier time for IP-CIT (21{plus_minus}4 min) as compared to {beta}-CIT (60{plus_minus}17 min). At time of peak specific striatal activity, striatal to occipital ratios were 2.7+0.6 for IP-CIT and 7.6{plus_minus}0.7 for {beta}-CIT, and at time of peak midbrain activity, midbrain to occipital ratios were 1.1{plus_minus}0.1 for IP-CIT, and 1.7{plus_minus}0.2 for {beta}-CIT. At peak specific striatal time, normalized regional uptake values ({mu}Ci/cc per {mu}Ci injected dose per g body mass) for the striatum were 4.9{plus_minus}1.1 IP-CIT and 5.2{plus_minus}0.7 {beta}-CIT, whereas for the occipital lobe normalized regional uptake values were 1.9{plus_minus}0.4 IP-CIT and 0.7{plus_minus}0.2 for {beta}-CIT. Similar regional kinetics in the striatum were observed, as both ligands demonstrate comparable peak striatal uptake and time to peak.

  2. The Imaging Probe Development Center and the Production of Molecular Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Gary L

    2008-01-01

    The Imaging Probe Development Center (IPDC), part of the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research Initiative (http://nihroadmap.nih.gov/) recently became fully operational at its newly refurbished laboratories in Rockville, MD. The IPDC (http://nihroadmap.nih.gov/molecularlibraries/ipdc/) is dedicated to the production of known and novel molecular imaging probes, with its services currently being used by the NIH intramural community, although in the future it is intended that the extramural community will also benefit from the IPDC’s resources. The Center has been set up with the belief that molecular imaging, and the probe chemistry that underpins it, will constitute key technologies going forward. As part of the larger molecular libraries and imaging initiative, it is planned that the IPDC will work closely with scientists from the molecular libraries effort. Probes produced at the IPDC include optical, radionuclide and magnetic resonance agents and may encompass any type of contrast agent. As IPDC is a trans-NIH resource it can serve each of the 27 Institutes and Centers that comprise NIH so its influence can be expected to impact widely different subjects and disease conditions spanning biological research. IPDC is expected to play a key part in interdisciplinary collaborative imaging projects and to support translational R&D from basic research through clinical development, for all of the imaging modalities. Examples of probes already prepared or under preparation are outlined to illustrate the breadth of the chemistries undertaken together with a reference outline of the diverse biological applications for which the various probes are intended. PMID:20161829

  3. Impact of extraneous mispositioned events on motion-corrected brain SPECT images of freely moving animals

    SciTech Connect

    Angelis, Georgios I. Ryder, William J.; Bashar, Rezaul; Meikle, Steven R.; Fulton, Roger R.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) brain imaging of freely moving small animals would allow a wide range of important neurological processes and behaviors to be studied, which are normally inhibited by anesthetic drugs or precluded due to the animal being restrained. While rigid body motion of the head can be tracked and accounted for in the reconstruction, activity in the torso may confound brain measurements, especially since motion of the torso is more complex (i.e., nonrigid) and not well correlated with that of the head. The authors investigated the impact of mispositioned events and attenuation due to the torso on the accuracy of motion corrected brain images of freely moving mice. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations of a realistic voxelized mouse phantom and a dual compartment phantom were performed. Each phantom comprised a target and an extraneous compartment which were able to move independently of each other. Motion correction was performed based on the known motion of the target compartment only. Two SPECT camera geometries were investigated: a rotating single head detector and a stationary full ring detector. The effects of motion, detector geometry, and energy of the emitted photons (hence, attenuation) on bias and noise in reconstructed brain regions were evaluated. Results: The authors observed two main sources of bias: (a) motion-related inconsistencies in the projection data and (b) the mismatch between attenuation and emission. Both effects are caused by the assumption that the orientation of the torso is difficult to track and model, and therefore cannot be conveniently corrected for. The motion induced bias in some regions was up to 12% when no attenuation effects were considered, while it reached 40% when also combined with attenuation related inconsistencies. The detector geometry (i.e., rotating vs full ring) has a big impact on the accuracy of the reconstructed images, with the full ring detector being more

  4. Dynamic molecular imaging of cardiac innervation using a dual headpinhole SPECT system

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jicun; Boutchko, Rostyslav; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Reutter, BryanW.; Huesman, Ronald H.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2008-03-29

    Typically 123I-MIBG is used for the study of innervation andfunction of the sympathetic nervous system in heart failure. The protocolinvolves two studies: first a planar or SPECT scan is performed tomeasure initial uptake of the tracer, followed some 3-4 hours later byanother study measuring the wash-out of the tracer from the heart. A fastwash-out is indicative of a compromised heart. In this work, a dual headpinhole SPECT system was used for imaging the distribution and kineticsof 123I-MIBG in the myocardium of spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR) andnormotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. The system geometry was calibratedbased on a nonlinear point projection fitting method using a three-pointsource phantom. The angle variation effect of the parameters was modeledwith a sinusoidal function. A dynamic acquisition was performed byinjecting 123I-MIBG into rats immediately after starting the dataacquisition. The detectors rotated continuously performing a 360o dataacquisition every 90 seconds. We applied the factor analysis (FA)methodand region of interest (ROI) sampling method to obtain time activitycurves (TACs)in the blood pool and myocardium and then appliedtwo-compartment modeling to estimate the kinetic parameters. Since theinitial injection bolus is too fast for obtaining a consistenttomographic data set in the first few minutes of the study, we appliedthe FA method directly to projections during the first rotation. Then thetime active curves for blood and myocardial tissue were obtained from ROIsampling. The method was applied to determine if there were differencesin the kinetics between SHR and WKY rats and requires less time byreplacing the delayed scan at 3-4 hours after injection with a dynamicacquisition over 90 to 120 minutes. The results of a faster washout and asmaller distribution volume of 123IMIBG near the end of life in the SHRmodel of hypertrophic cardiomyopthy may be indicative of a failing heartin late stages of heart failure.

  5. Superfluorinated PEI Derivative Coupled with (99m) Tc for ASGPR Targeted (19) F MRI/SPECT/PA Tri-Modality Imaging.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhide; Gao, Mengna; Song, Manli; Li, Yesen; Zhang, Deliang; Xu, Duo; You, Linyi; Wang, Liangliang; Zhuang, Rongqiang; Su, Xinhui; Liu, Ting; Du, Jin; Zhang, Xianzhong

    2016-07-01

    Fluorinated polyethylenimine derivative labeled with radionuclide (99m) Tc is developed as a (19) F MRI/SPECT/PA multifunctional imaging agent with good asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPR)-targeting ability. This multifunctional agent is safe and suitable for (19) F MRI/SPECT/PA imaging and has the potential to detect hepatic diseases and to assess liver function, which provide powerful support for the development of personalized and precision medicine. PMID:27159903

  6. Myocardial Perfusion SPECT Imaging in Dextrocardia with Situs Inversus: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ayeni, Olusegun Akinwale; Malan, Nico; Hammond, Emmanuel Niiboye; Vangu, Mboyo-Di-Tamba Heben

    2016-01-01

    Dextrocardia is a cardiac positional anomaly in which the heart is located in the right hemithorax with its base-to-apex axis directed to the right and caudad. Situs inversus is an autosomal recessive disorder that causes organs in the chest and abdomen to be positioned in a mirror image from their normal position. Dextrocardia may occur in isolation or as part of situs inversus. Similarly, situs inversus may occur with or without dextrocardia. Situs inversus accompanied with dextrocardia (situs inversus totalis) is a rare congenital abnormality occurring in 0.01% of live births. Herein, we present the case of a 35-year-old man with previously diagnosed situs inversus totalis with mirror-image dextrocardia, referred to our facility for diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). The incidence and presentation of CAD in patients with dextrocardia are similar to the normal population. However, considerable attention should be paid to the acquisition of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy and data processing/analysis in this group of patients. The present case highlights the distinctive applications and potential pitfalls of myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging in patients with dextrocardia. PMID:27408900

  7. Myocardial Perfusion SPECT Imaging in Dextrocardia with Situs Inversus: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ayeni, Olusegun Akinwale; Malan, Nico; Hammond, Emmanuel Niiboye; Vangu, Mboyo-Di-Tamba Heben

    2016-01-01

    Dextrocardia is a cardiac positional anomaly in which the heart is located in the right hemithorax with its base-to-apex axis directed to the right and caudad. Situs inversus is an autosomal recessive disorder that causes organs in the chest and abdomen to be positioned in a mirror image from their normal position. Dextrocardia may occur in isolation or as part of situs inversus. Similarly, situs inversus may occur with or without dextrocardia. Situs inversus accompanied with dextrocardia (situs inversus totalis) is a rare congenital abnormality occurring in 0.01% of live births. Herein, we present the case of a 35-year-old man with previously diagnosed situs inversus totalis with mirror-image dextrocardia, referred to our facility for diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). The incidence and presentation of CAD in patients with dextrocardia are similar to the normal population. However, considerable attention should be paid to the acquisition of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy and data processing/analysis in this group of patients. The present case highlights the distinctive applications and potential pitfalls of myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging in patients with dextrocardia. PMID:27408900

  8. Real-time Awake Animal Motion Tracking System for SPECT Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Baba, Justin S; Lee, Seung Joon; Weisenberger, A G; Stolin, A; McKisson, J; Smith, M F

    2008-01-01

    Enhancements have been made in the development of a real-time optical pose measurement and tracking system that provides 3D position and orientation data for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging system for awake, unanesthetized, unrestrained small animals. Three optical cameras with infrared (IR) illumination view the head movements of an animal enclosed in a transparent burrow. Markers placed on the head provide landmark points for image segmentation. Strobed IR LED s are synchronized to the cameras and illuminate the markers to prevent motion blur for each set of images. The system using the three cameras automatically segments the markers, detects missing data, rejects false reflections, performs trinocular marker correspondence, and calculates the 3D pose of the animal s head. Improvements have been made in methods for segmentation, tracking, and 3D calculation to give higher speed and more accurate measurements during a scan. The optical hardware has been installed within a Siemens MicroCAT II small animal scanner at Johns Hopkins without requiring functional changes to the scanner operation. The system has undergone testing using both phantoms and live mice and has been characterized in terms of speed, accuracy, robustness, and reliability. Experimental data showing these motion tracking results are given.

  9. Progesterone-Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Determination of progesterone receptor (PR) status in hormone-dependent diseases is essential in ascertaining disease prognosis and monitoring treatment response. The development of a noninvasive means of monitoring these processes would have significant impact on early detection, cost, repeated measurements, and personalized treatment options. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely recognized as a technique that can produce longitudinal studies, and PR-targeted MR probes may address a clinical problem by providing contrast enhancement that reports on PR status without biopsy. Commercially available MR contrast agents are typically delivered via intravenous injection, whereas steroids are administered subcutaneously. Whether the route of delivery is important for tissue accumulation of steroid-modified MRI contrast agents to PR-rich tissues is not known. To address this question, modification of the chemistry linking progesterone with the gadolinium chelate led to MR probes with increased water solubility and lower cellular toxicity and enabled administration through the blood. This attribute came at a cost through lower affinity for PR and decreased ability to cross the cell membrane, and ultimately it did not improve delivery of the PR-targeted MR probe to PR-rich tissues or tumors in vivo. Overall, these studies are important, as they demonstrate that targeted contrast agents require optimization of delivery and receptor binding of the steroid and the gadolinium chelate for optimal translation in vivo. PMID:25019183

  10. Computational tools and methods for objective assessment of image quality in x-ray CT and SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palit, Robin

    Computational tools of use in the objective assessment of image quality for tomography systems were developed for computer processing units (CPU) and graphics processing units (GPU) in the image quality lab at the University of Arizona. Fast analytic x-ray projection code called IQCT was created to compute the mean projection image for cone beam multi-slice helical computed tomography (CT) scanners. IQCT was optimized to take advantage of the massively parallel architecture of GPUs. CPU code for computing single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) projection images was written calling upon previous research in the image quality lab. IQCT and the SPECT modeling code were used to simulate data for multi-modality SPECT/CT observer studies. The purpose of these observer studies was to assess the benefit in image quality of using attenuation information from a CT measurement in myocardial SPECT imaging. The observer chosen for these studies was the scanning linear observer. The tasks for the observer were localization of a signal and estimation of the signal radius. For the localization study, area under the localization receiver operating characteristic curve (A LROC) was computed as AMeasLROC = 0.89332 ± 0.00474 and ANoLROC = 0.89408 ± 0.00475, where "Meas" implies the use of attenuation information from the CT measurement, and "No" indicates the absence of attenuation information. For the estimation study, area under the estimation receiver operating characteristic curve (AEROC) was quantified as AMeasEROC = 0.55926 ± 0.00731 and ANoEROC = 0.56167 ± 0.00731. Based on these results, it was concluded that the use of CT information did not improve the scanning linear observer's ability to perform the stated myocardial SPECT tasks. The risk to the patient of the CT measurement was quantified in terms of excess effective dose as 2.37 mSv for males and 3.38 mSv for females. Another image quality tool generated within this body of work was a singular value

  11. Optimization of Imaging Parameters for SPECT scans of [99mTc]TRODAT-1 Using Taguchi Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cheng-Kai; Wu, Jay; Cheng, Kai-Yuan; Pan, Lung-Kwang

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the basal ganglia. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scans using [99mTc]TRODAT-1 can image dopamine transporters and provide valuable diagnostic information of PD. In this study, we optimized the scanning parameters for [99mTc]TRODAT-1/SPECT using the Taguchi analysis to improve image quality. SPECT scans were performed on forty-five healthy volunteers according to an L9 orthogonal array. Three parameters were considered, including the injection activity, uptake duration, and acquisition time per projection. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was calculated from the striatum/occipital activity ratio as an image quality index. Ten healthy subjects and fifteen PD patients were used to verify the optimal parameters. The estimated optimal parameters were 962 MBq for [99mTc]TRODAT-1 injection, 260 min for uptake duration, and 60 s/projection for data acquisition. The uptake duration and time per projection were the two dominant factors which had an F-value of 18.638 (38%) and 25.933 (53%), respectively. Strong cross interactions existed between the injection activity/uptake duration and injection activity/time per projection. Therefore, under the consideration of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) for radiation protection, we can decrease the injection activity to 740 MBq. The image quality remains almost the same for clinical applications. PMID:25790100

  12. Multimode-Optical-Fiber Imaging Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Deborah

    1999-01-01

    Currently, endoscopic surgery uses single-mode fiber-bundles to obtain in vivo image information inside the orifices of the body. This limits their use to the larger natural orifices and to surgical procedures where there is plenty of room for manipulation. The knee joint, for example, can be easily viewed with a fiber optic viewer, but joints in the finger cannot. However, there are a host of smaller orifices where fiber endoscopy would play an important role if a cost effective fiber probe were developed with small enough dimensions (less than or equal to 250 microns). Examples of beneficiaries of micro-endoscopes are the treatment of the Eustatian tube of the middle ear, the breast ducts, tear ducts, coronary arteries, fallopian tubes, as well as the treatment of salivary duct parotid disease, and the neuro endoscopy of the ventricles and spinal canal. This work describes an approach for recovering images from tightly confined spaces using multimode. The concept draws upon earlier works that concentrated on image recovery after two-way transmission through a multimode fiber as well as work that demonstrated the recovery of images after one-way transmission through a multimode fiber. Both relied on generating a phase conjugated wavefront, which was predistorted with the characteristics of the fiber. The approach described here also relies on generating a phase conjugated wavefront, but utilizes two fibers to capture the image at some intermediate point (accessible by the fibers, but which is otherwise visually inaccessible).

  13. Full tip imaging in atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Du, Sichao; Burgess, Timothy; Loi, Shyeh Tjing; Gault, Baptiste; Gao, Qiang; Bao, Peite; Li, Li; Cui, Xiangyuan; Kong Yeoh, Wai; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati; Ringer, Simon P; Zheng, Rongkun

    2013-01-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is capable of simultaneously revealing the chemical identities and three dimensional positions of individual atoms within a needle-shaped specimen, but suffers from a limited field-of-view (FOV), i.e., only the core of the specimen is effectively detected. Therefore, the capacity to analyze the full tip is crucial and much desired in cases that the shell of the specimen is also the region of interest. In this paper, we demonstrate that, in the analysis of III-V nanowires epitaxially grown from a substrate, the presence of the flat substrate positioned only micrometers away from the analyzed tip apex alters the field distribution and ion trajectories, which provides extra image compression that allows for the analysis of the entire specimen. An array of experimental results, including field desorption maps, elemental distributions, and crystallographic features clearly demonstrate the fact that the whole tip has been imaged, which is confirmed by electrostatic simulations. PMID:23142750

  14. Value of thallium-201 reinjection after delayed SPECT imaging for predicting reversible ischemia after coronary artery bypass grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtani, H.; Tamaki, N.; Yonekura, Y.; Mohiuddin, I.H.; Hirata, K.; Ban, T.; Konishi, J. )

    1990-08-15

    The reinjection of a small dose (40 MBq) of thallium-201 after stress and delayed imaging often shows new redistribution in the regions with persistent defect. To assess whether these segments may represent reversible ischemia, reinjection thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed after stress and 3-hour delayed imaging in 24 patients before coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The left ventricular myocardium was divided into 5 myocardial segments and regional wall motion was scored on a scale from 0 (normal) to 4 (dyskinesia). Thallium-201 findings were compared with improvement in regional perfusion and wall motion 1 to 2 months after CABG. The reinjection imaging identified new redistribution in 15 of 32 persistent defects (47%) on the 3-hour delayed images. In the study of stress and delayed SPECT imaging, the improvement in perfusion was observed in 34 of 43 segments (79%) exhibiting redistribution and 15 of 32 (47%) segments without redistribution (p less than 0.01). The reinjection SPECT identified new redistribution in 12 of the 15 improved segments that were not detected on the delayed images. Similarly, the improvement in wall motion was observed in 23 of 31 segments (74%) exhibiting redistribution and 14 of 30 segments (47%) without redistribution on the delayed images (p less than 0.05). The reinjection identified new redistribution in 10 of the 14 improved segments that were undetected on the delayed images. The predictive values for improvement in perfusion and wall motion by the reinjection imaging were significantly higher (92 and 89%) than those by the delayed imaging (69 and 62%, respectively, p less than 0.05 each).

  15. Caudate nucleus infarction demonstrated by N-isopropyl-p iodoamphetamine SPECT imaging using a rotating gamma camera

    SciTech Connect

    Polak, J.F.; Mueller, S.P.; Holman, B.L.

    1986-10-01

    N-isopropyl p-iodoamphetamine (I-123 IMP) was used in two patients with previous unilateral basal ganglia infarcts documented by CT of the head. Tomographic images obtained with a commercially available rotating gamma camera equipped with a long-bore collimator showed corresponding areas of decreased uptake in the head of the caudate nuclei. Detection of such small areas of decreased perfusion is possible using SPECT and I-123 radiolabeled IMP.

  16. Performance measures in the selection of reconstruction filters for SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Appledorn, C.R.; Oppenheim, B.E.; Wellman, H.N.

    1985-05-01

    Filter selection in SPECT image reconstruction poses an implicit tradeoff between image smoothness, image contrast and noise texture. It is known that the Ramachandran or ramp filter provides the greatest contrast (and resolution) in a reconstructed image at the expense of poor noise handling. In order to improve detection of either hot or cold lesions, practical experience dictates that some image smoothing must be provided. Thus, the question of the ''optimal'' filter selection has been the subject of this investigation. Using an extension of the approach as originally developed by Beck and Metz, the authors derived a figure-of-merit (FOM) that quantifies the performance of the reconstruction algorithm being tested. The FOM can be separated into two components: smoothness factor (SF) which is a measure of noise reduction and contrast factor (CF) which is a measure of the spatial resolution of the filter being tested. Each component is measured separately. The optimum filter should maintain the contrast of the Ramachandran filter (CF = 0.313) but improve the noise handling (SF = 8.86). A variety of commercially available filters were tested: rectangular, Hann, and Butterworth. Also examined were the order of the filter and the interpolation method (nearest-neighbor, linear, and Fourier methods with padding of zeros). The authors found that high order Butterworth filters performed best in maintaining contrast but reducing noise. Using a cutoff frequency of 0.200 (Nyquist = 0.500) and an order of 30, the filter provided a CF = 0.313 and a SF = 30.31. Linear interpolation was marginally better.

  17. Optical brush: Imaging through permuted probes

    PubMed Central

    Heshmat, Barmak; Lee, Ik Hyun; Raskar, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    The combination of computational techniques and ultrafast imaging have enabled sensing through unconventional settings such as around corners, and through diffusive media. We exploit time of flight (ToF) measurements to enable a flexible interface for imaging through permuted set of fibers. The fibers are randomly distributed in the scene and are packed on the camera end, thus making a brush-like structure. The scene is illuminated by two off-axis optical pulses. Temporal signatures of fiber tips in the scene are used to localize each fiber. Finally, by combining the position and measured intensity of each fiber, the original input is reconstructed. Unlike conventional fiber bundles with packed set of fibers that are limited by a narrow field of view (FOV), lack of flexibility, and extended coaxial precalibration, the proposed optical brush is flexible and uses off-axis calibration method based on ToF. The enabled brush form can couple to other types of ToF imaging systems. This can impact probe-based applications such as, endoscopy, tomography, and industrial imaging and sensing. PMID:26868954

  18. Optical brush: Imaging through permuted probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heshmat, Barmak; Lee, Ik Hyun; Raskar, Ramesh

    2016-02-01

    The combination of computational techniques and ultrafast imaging have enabled sensing through unconventional settings such as around corners, and through diffusive media. We exploit time of flight (ToF) measurements to enable a flexible interface for imaging through permuted set of fibers. The fibers are randomly distributed in the scene and are packed on the camera end, thus making a brush-like structure. The scene is illuminated by two off-axis optical pulses. Temporal signatures of fiber tips in the scene are used to localize each fiber. Finally, by combining the position and measured intensity of each fiber, the original input is reconstructed. Unlike conventional fiber bundles with packed set of fibers that are limited by a narrow field of view (FOV), lack of flexibility, and extended coaxial precalibration, the proposed optical brush is flexible and uses off-axis calibration method based on ToF. The enabled brush form can couple to other types of ToF imaging systems. This can impact probe-based applications such as, endoscopy, tomography, and industrial imaging and sensing.

  19. SPECT imaging as a tool to prevent proliferation of nuclear weapons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundqvist, Tobias; Jacobsson Svärd, Staffan; Håkansson, Ane

    2007-10-01

    International efforts are taken to avoid the proliferation of material and technologies that may lead to the development of nuclear weapons. These activities are called safeguards and involve inspections of spent nuclear fuel at nuclear power plants and storage facilities. At these inspections, various measuring techniques are employed for verifying the presence and identity of spent nuclear fuel assemblies. However, a fuel assembly contains about 100-300 fuel rods and techniques are also required for verifying that no individual fuel rods have been removed from the assembly. For this purpose, a non-destructive tomographic measurement technique for spent-fuel assemblies is being developed at Uppsala University, based on single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The technique utilizes the γ-ray emission from spent fuel. The first step of the methodology is the recording of the γ-ray flux distribution in a large number of positions around the fuel assembly, using γ-ray detectors attached to a collimator system. In the following step, a cross-sectional image of the source distribution in the fuel assembly is reconstructed. Because the fuel rods are highly activated during reactor operation, and because they are stored in water with practically no radioactive content, they appear very clearly in this type of image. The technique has earlier been used for determining the power distribution in fuel assemblies [S. Jacobsson Svärd, A. Håkansson, et al., Nucl. Technol. 151(1) (2005) 70. [1

  20. A flexible high-rate USB2 data acquisition system for PET and SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    J. Proffitt, W. Hammond, S. Majewski, V. Popov, R.R. Raylman, A.G. Weisenberger, R. Wojcik

    2006-02-01

    A new flexible data acquisition system has been developed to instrument gamma-ray imaging detectors designed by the Jefferson Lab Detector and Imaging Group. Hardware consists of 16-channel data acquisition modules installed on USB2 carrier boards. Carriers have been designed to accept one, two, and four modules. Application trigger rate and channel density determines the number of acquisition boards and readout computers used. Each channel has an independent trigger, gated integrator and a 2.5 MHz 12-bit ADC. Each module has an FPGA for analog control and signal processing. Processing includes a 5 ns 40-bit trigger time stamp and programmable triggering, gating, ADC timing, offset and gain correction, charge and pulse-width discrimination, sparsification, event counting, and event assembly. The carrier manages global triggering and transfers module data to a USB buffer. High-granularity time-stamped triggering is suitable for modular detectors. Time stamped events permit dynamic studies, complex offline event assembly, and high-rate distributed data acquisition. A sustained USB data rate of 20 Mbytes/s, a sustained trigger rate of 300 kHz for 32 channels, and a peak trigger rate of 2.5 MHz to FIFO memory were achieved. Different trigger, gating, processing, and event assembly techniques were explored. Target applications include >100 kHz coincidence rate PET detectors, dynamic SPECT detectors, miniature and portable gamma detectors for small-animal and clinical use.

  1. Comparison of 18F PET and 99mTc SPECT imaging in phantoms and in tumored mice.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dengfeng; Wang, Yi; Liu, Xinrong; Pretorius, P Hendrik; Liang, Minmin; Rusckowski, Mary; Hnatowich, Donald J

    2010-08-18

    Our objective was to compare the performance of a micro-single photon emission computed tomography (micro-SPECT) with that of a micro-positron emission tomography (microPET) in a Her2+ tumored mice using an anti-Her2 nanoparticle radiolabeled with (99m)Tc and (18)F. Camera performance was first compared using phantoms; then a tumored mouse administered the (99m)Tc-nanoparticle was imaged on a Bioscan NanoSPECT/CT, while another tumored mouse received the identical nanoparticle, labeled now with (18)F, and was imaged on a Philips Mosaic HP PET camera. The nanoparticle was radiolabeled with (99m)Tc via MAG(3) chelation and with (18)F via SFB as an intermediate. Phantom imaging showed that the resolution of the SPECT camera was clearly superior, but even with 4 heads and multipinhole collimators, detection sensitivity was 15-fold lower. Radiolabeling of the nanoparticle by chelation with (99m)Tc was considerably easier and safer than manual covalent attachment of (18)F. Both cameras provided accurate quantitation of radioactivity over a broad range. In conclusion, when deciding between (99m)Tc vs (18)F, an advantage rests with the chelation of (99m)Tc over covalent attachment of (18)F, achieved manually or otherwise, but with these small animal cameras, this choice also results in trading lower sensitivity for higher resolution. PMID:20681508

  2. MO-G-17A-02: Computer Simulation Studies for On-Board Functional and Molecular Imaging of the Prostate Using a Robotic Multi-Pinhole SPECT System

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, L; Bowsher, J; Yin, F; Yan, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate prostate imaging onboard radiation therapy machines using a novel robotic, 49-pinhole Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) system. Methods: Computer-simulation studies were performed for region-of-interest (ROI) imaging using a 49-pinhole SPECT collimator and for broad cross-section imaging using a parallel-hole SPECT collimator. A male XCAT phantom was computersimulated in supine position with one 12mm-diameter tumor added in the prostate. A treatment couch was added to the phantom. Four-minute detector trajectories for imaging a 7cm-diameter-sphere ROI encompassing the tumor were investigated with different parameters, including pinhole focal length, pinhole diameter and trajectory starting angle. Pseudo-random Poisson noise was included in the simulated projection data, and SPECT images were reconstructed by OSEM with 4 subsets and up to 10 iterations. Images were evaluated by visual inspection, profiles, and Root-Mean- Square-Error (RMSE). Results: The tumor was well visualized above background by the 49-pinhole SPECT system with different pinhole parameters while it was not visible with parallel-hole SPECT imaging. Minimum RMSEs were 0.30 for 49-pinhole imaging and 0.41 for parallelhole imaging. For parallel-hole imaging, the detector trajectory from rightto- left yielded slightly lower RMSEs than that from posterior to anterior. For 49-pinhole imaging, near-minimum RMSEs were maintained over a broader range of OSEM iterations with a 5mm pinhole diameter and 21cm focal length versus a 2mm diameter pinhole and 18cm focal length. The detector with 21cm pinhole focal length had the shortest rotation radius averaged over the trajectory. Conclusion: On-board functional and molecular prostate imaging may be feasible in 4-minute scan times by robotic SPECT. A 49-pinhole SPECT system could improve such imaging as compared to broadcross-section parallel-hole collimated SPECT imaging. Multi-pinhole imaging can be improved by

  3. In vivo biodistribution of stable spherical and filamentous micelles probed by high-sensitivity SPECT.

    PubMed

    Jennings, L; Ivashchenko, O; Marsman, I J C; Laan, A C; Denkova, A G; Waton, G; Beekman, F J; Schosseler, F; Mendes, E

    2016-08-19

    Understanding how nanoparticle properties such as size, morphology and rigidity influence their circulation time and biodistribution is essential for the development of nanomedicine therapies. Herein we assess the influence of morphology on cellular internalization, in vivo biodistribution and circulation time of nanocarriers using polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) micelles of spherical or elongated morphology. The glassy nature of polystyrene guarantees the morphological stability of the carriers in vivo and by encapsulating Indium-111 in their core, an assessment of the longitudinal in vivo biodistribution of the particles in healthy mice is performed with single photon emission computed tomography imaging. Our results show prolonged blood circulation, longer than 24 hours, for all micelle morphologies studied. Dynamics of micelle accumulation in the liver and other organs of the reticuloendothelial system show a size-dependent nature and late stage liver clearance is observed for the elongated morphology. Apparent contradictions between recent similar studies can be resolved by considering the effects of flexibility and degradation of the elongated micelles on their circulation time and biodistribution. PMID:27286085

  4. Dual PET and Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging Probes as Tools for Imaging in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    An, Fei-Fei; Chan, Mark; Kommidi, Harikrishna; Ting, Richard

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this article is to summarize advances in PET fluorescence resolution, agent design, and preclinical imaging that make a growing case for clinical PET fluorescence imaging. CONCLUSION Existing SPECT, PET, fluorescence, and MRI contrast imaging techniques are already deeply integrated into the management of cancer, from initial diagnosis to the observation and management of metastases. Combined positron-emitting fluorescent contrast agents can convey new or substantial benefits that improve on these proven clinical contrast agents. PMID:27223168

  5. Biomedical applications of a new portable Raman imaging probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hidetoshi; Tanaka, Takeyuki; Ikeda, Teruki; Wada, Satoshi; Tashiro, Hideo; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2001-10-01

    This article reports the outline of a new portable Raman imaging probe and its applications. This probe may be the smallest and lightest Raman imaging probe in the world. It is equipped with an interchangeable long-working distance microscope objective lens. The irradiation area is about 45 and 90 μm and the spatial resolution is 1 μm. In the present study, the Raman imaging probe was used to obtain a Raman image of diamond particles and a Raman mapping of carotenoid in Euglena.

  6. Multimode-Optical-Fiber Imaging Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Deborah

    2000-01-01

    Currently, endoscopic surgery uses single-mode fiber-bundles to obtain in vivo image information inside orifices of the body. This limits their use to the larger natural bodily orifices and to surgical procedures where there is plenty of room for manipulation. The knee joint, for example can be easily viewed with a fiber optic viewer, but joints in the finger cannot. However, there are a host of smaller orifices where fiber endoscopy would play an important role if a cost effective fiber probe were developed with small enough dimensions (< 250 microns). Examples of beneficiaries of micro-endoscopes are the treatment of the Eustatian tube of the middle ear, the breast ducts, tear ducts, coronary arteries, fallopian tubes, as well as the treatment of salivary duct parotid disease, and the neuro endoscopy of the ventricles and spinal canal. To solve this problem, this work describes an approach for recovering images from. tightly confined spaces using multimode fibers and analytically demonstrates that the concept is sound. The proof of concept draws upon earlier works that concentrated on image recovery after two-way transmission through a multimode fiber as well as work that demonstrated the recovery of images after one-way transmission through a multimode fiber. Both relied on generating a phase conjugated wavefront which was predistorted with the characteristics of the fiber. The described approach also relies on generating a phase conjugated wavefront, but utilizes two fibers to capture the image at some intermediate point (accessible by the fibers, but which is otherwise visually unaccessible).

  7. Improved dosimetry for targeted radionuclide therapy using nonrigid registration on sequential SPECT images

    SciTech Connect

    Ao, Edwin C. I.; Mok, Greta S. P.; Wu, Nien-Yun; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Song, Na

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Voxel-level and patient-specific 3D dosimetry for targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) typically involves serial nuclear medicine scans. Misalignment of the images can result in reduced dosimetric accuracy. Since the scans are typically performed over a period of several days, there will be patient movement between scans and possible nonrigid organ deformation. This work aims to implement and evaluate the use of nonrigid image registration on a series of quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) images for TRT dosimetry. Methods: A population of 4D extended cardiac torso phantoms, comprised of three In-111 Zevalin biokinetics models and three anatomical variations, was generated based on the patient data. The authors simulated QSPECT acquisitions at five time points. At each time point, individual organ and whole-body deformation between scans were modeled by translating/rotating organs and the body up to 5°/voxels, keeping ≤5% difference in organ volume. An analytical projector was used to generate realistic noisy projections for a medium energy general purpose collimator. Projections were reconstructed using OS-EM algorithm with geometric collimator detector response, attenuation, and scatter corrections. The QSPECT images were registered using organ-based nonrigid image registration method. The cumulative activity in each voxel was obtained by integrating the activity over time. Dose distribution images were obtained by convolving the cumulative activity images with a Y-90 dose kernel. Dose volume histograms (DVHs) for organs-of-interest were analyzed. Results: After nonrigid registration, the mean differences in organ doses compared to the case without misalignment were improved from (−15.50 ± 5.59)% to (−2.12 ± 1.05)% and (−7.28 ± 2.30)% to (−0.23 ± 0.71)% for the spleen and liver, respectively. For all organs, the cumulative DVHs showed improvement after nonrigid registration and the normalized absolute error of differential DVHs ranged from 6.79% to

  8. Imaging probe for breast cancer localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soluri, A.; Scafè, R.; Capoccetti, F.; Burgio, N.; Schiaratura, A.; Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Cinti, M. N.; Mechella, M.; Amanti, A.; David, V.; Scopinaro, F.

    2003-01-01

    High spatial resolution, small Field Of View (FOV), fully portable scintillation cameras are lower cost and obviously lower weight than large FOV, not transportable Anger gamma cameras. Portable cameras allow easy transfer of the detector, thus of radioisotope imaging, where the bioptical procedure takes place. In this paper we describe a preliminary experience on radionuclide Breast Cancer (BC) imaging with a 22.8×22.8 mm 2 FOV minicamera, already used by our group for sentinel node detection with the name of Imaging Probe (IP). In this work IP BC detection was performed with the aim of guiding biopsy, in particular open biopsy, or to help or modify fine needle or needle addressing when main driving method was echography or digital radiography. The IP prototype weight was about 1 kg. This small scintillation camera is based on the compact Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tube Hamamatsu R7600-00-C8, coupled to a CsI(Tl) scintillation array 2.6×2.6×5.0 mm 3 crystal-pixel size. Spatial resolution of the IP was 2.5 mm Full-Width at Half-Maximum at laboratory tests. IP was provided with acquisition software allowing quick change of pixels number on the computer acquisition frame and an on-line image-smoothing program. Both these programs were developed in order to allow nuclear physicians to quickly get target source when the patient was anesthetized in the operator room, with sterile conditions. 99mTc Sestamibi (MIBI) was injected at the dose of 740 MBq 1 h before imaging and biopsy to 14 patients with suspicious or known BC. Scintigraphic images were acquired before and after biopsy in each patient. Operator was allowed to take into account scintigraphic images as well as previously performed X-ray mammograms and echographies. High-resolution IP images were able to guide biopsy toward cancer or washout zones of the cancer, that are thought to be chemoresistant in 7 patients out of 10. Four patients, in whom IP and MIBI were not able to guide biopsy, did not show

  9. Cerebral hemodynamics in human acute ischemic stroke: a study with diffusion- and perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and SPECT.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Karonen, J O; Vanninen, R L; Ostergaard, L; Roivainen, R; Nuutinen, J; Perkiö, J; Könönen, M; Hämäläinen, A; Vanninen, E J; Soimakallio, S; Kuikka, J T; Aronen, H J

    2000-06-01

    Nineteen patients with acute ischemic stroke (<24 hours) underwent diffusion-weighted and perfusion-weighted (PWI) magnetic resonance imaging at the acute stage and 1 week later. Eleven patients also underwent technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) at the acute stage. Relative (ischemic vs. contralateral control) cerebral blood flow (relCBF), relative cerebral blood volume, and relative mean transit time were measured in the ischemic core, in the area of infarct growth, and in the eventually viable ischemic tissue on PWI maps. The relCBF was also measured from SPECT. There was a curvilinear relationship between the relCBF measured from PWI and SPECT (r = 0.854; P < 0.001). The tissue proceeding to infarction during the follow-up had significantly lower initial CBF and cerebral blood volume values on PWI maps (P < 0.001) than the eventually viable ischemic tissue had. The best value for discriminating the area of infarct growth from the eventually viable ischemic tissue was 48% for PWI relCBF and 87% for PWI relative cerebral blood volume. Combined diffusion and perfusion-weighted imaging enables one to detect hemodynamically different subregions inside the initial perfusion abnormality. Tissue survival may be different in these subregions and may be predicted. PMID:10894174

  10. Evaluation of mechanical dyssynchrony and myocardial perfusion using phase analysis of gated SPECT imaging in patients with left ventricular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Trimble, Mark A.; Borges-Neto, Salvador; Honeycutt, Emily F.; Shaw, Linda K.; Pagnanelli, Robert; Chen, Ji; Iskandrian, Ami E.; Garcia, Ernest V.; Velazquez, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Using phase analysis of gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging, we examined the relation between myocardial perfusion, degree of electrical dyssynchrony, and degree of SPECT-derived mechanical dyssynchrony in patients with left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. Methods and Results We retrospectively examined 125 patients with LV dysfunction and ejection fraction of 35% or lower. Fourier analysis converts regional myocardial counts into a continuous thickening function, allowing resolution of phase of onset of myocardial thickening. The SD of LV phase distribution (phase SD) and histogram bandwidth describe LV phase dispersion as a measure of dyssynchrony. Heart failure (HF) patients with perfusion abnormalities ities have higher degrees of dyssynchrony measured by median phase SD (45.5° vs 27.7°, P < .0001) and bandwidth (117.0° vs 73.0°, P = .0006). HF patients with prolonged QRS durations have higher degrees of dyssynchrony measured by median phase SD (54.1° vs 34.7°, P < .0001) and bandwidth (136.5° vs 99.0°, P = .0005). Mild to moderate correlations exist between QRS duration and phase analysis indices of phase SD (r = 0.50) and bandwidth (r = 0.40). Mechanical dyssynchrony (phase SD >43°) was 43.2%. Conclusions HF patients with perfusion abnormalities or prolonged QRS durations QRS durations have higher degrees of mechanical dyssynchrony. Gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging can quantify myocardial function, perfusion, and dyssynchrony and may help in evaluating patients for cardiac resynchronization therapy. PMID:18761269

  11. Effect of beta blockade on single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) thallium-201 images in patients with coronary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Narahara, K.A.; Thompson, C.J.; Hazen, J.F.; Brizendine, M.; Mena, I.

    1989-05-01

    We evaluated the effect of beta blockers on thallium-201 (Tl-201) single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) imaging in 12 patients with coronary disease using an automated computer algorithm. Maximal exercise heart rate and blood pressure were reduced and exercise time was increased with beta blockers. Estimated stress defect size decreased from 47 +/- 36.3 gm during placebo treatment to 32 +/- 27.1 gm during beta blocker therapy (-32%; p less than 0.01). The placebo treatment redistribution defect was estimated to be 28 +/- 29.8 gm. It fell to 15 +/- 23.3 gm with beta blockade (-46%; p less than 0.005). All patients had a stress Tl-201 defect during placebo treatment and eight had redistribution defects consistent with residual scar. During beta blocker therapy, 2 of 12 patients had normal stress-redistribution studies and only five patients had redistribution defects. Beta blockade can reduce exercise and redistribution Tl-201 SPECT defect size significantly while simultaneously increasing exercise time and reducing angina. Beta blockers may unmask or may eliminate evidence of redistribution. Tl-201 SPECT imaging may be useful in defining the reduction in ischemia produced by cardiac drugs.

  12. Sci—Thur PM: Imaging — 01: Position-sensitive noise characteristics in multi-pinhole cardiac SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cuddy-Walsh, SG; Wells, RG

    2014-08-15

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is invaluable in the diagnosis and management of heart disease. It provides essential information on myocardial blood flow and ischemia. Multi-pinhole dedicated cardiac-SPECT cameras offer improved count sensitivity, and spatial and energy resolutions over parallel-hole camera designs however variable sensitivity across the field-of-view (FOV) can lead to position-dependent noise variations. Since MPI evaluates differences in the signal-to-noise ratio, noise variations in the camera could significantly impact the sensitivity of the test for ischemia. We evaluated the noise characteristics of GE Healthcare's Discovery NM530c camera with a goal of optimizing the accuracy of our patient assessment and thereby improving outcomes. Theoretical sensitivity maps of the camera FOV, including attenuation effects, were estimated analytically based on the distance and angle between the spatial position of a given voxel and each pinhole. The standard deviation in counts, σ was inferred for each voxel position from the square root of the sensitivity mapped at that position. Noise was measured experimentally from repeated (N=16) acquisitions of a uniform spherical Tc-99m-water phantom. The mean (μ) and standard deviation (σ) were calculated for each voxel position in the reconstructed FOV. Noise increased ∼2.1× across a 12 cm sphere. A correlation of 0.53 is seen when experimental noise is compared with theory suggesting that ∼53% of the noise is attributed to the combined effects of attenuation and the multi-pinhole geometry. Further investigations are warranted to determine the clinical impact of the position-dependent noise variation.

  13. 123I-ADAM SPECT imaging of serotonin transporter binding in patients with night eating syndrome: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Jennifer D; Newberg, Andrew B; Allison, Kelly C; Wintering, Nancy A; Ploessl, Karl; Stunkard, Albert J

    2008-04-15

    Night eating syndrome (NES) represents a delay in the circadian pattern of food intake, manifested by evening hyperphagia and/or nocturnal awakenings accompanied by ingestions of food. A neurobiological marker of NES has been implicated with the recently discovered therapeutic response to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) sertraline. This pilot SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) study compared the serotonin transporter (SERT) uptake ratios of night eaters with those of healthy controls. Six night eaters underwent SPECT imaging using the radiopharmaceutical (123)I-ADAM. Uptake, compared with that of the cerebellum, was obtained for the midbrain, basal ganglia, and temporal lobes; uptake ratios in night eaters were compared with those of six healthy controls. Night eaters had significantly greater SERT uptake ratios in the midbrain than healthy controls. These findings, in conjunction with the therapeutic response of NES to sertraline, indicate that the serotonin system is involved in the pathophysiology of NES. PMID:18281200

  14. Three-dimensional SPECT imaging with LaBr3:Ce scintillator for characterization of nuclear waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Tushar; Ratheesh, Jilju; Sinha, Amar

    2014-01-01

    Characterization of nuclear waste in terms of radioactivity distribution is important not only for their safe disposal but also for nuclear material accounting. Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) provides a non-invasive technique for the characterization and activity distribution of the gamma-emitting sources in a matrix. Sodium iodide scintillators, which are most commonly used, suffer from poor energy resolution and do not provide accurate peak discrimination for radioisotopes like 239Pu which have overlapping peaks. Cerium-activated lanthanum bromide (LaBr3:Ce) scintillators have better energy resolution and provide better peak discrimination. In this paper, experimental studies using LaBr3:Ce for 3D SPECT imaging of dummy waste drum has been discussed. The reconstruction has been done using the Filtered Backprojection scheme with attenuation compensation based on Novikov's inversion formula.

  15. Prediction of language and neurologic recovery after cerebral infarction with SPECT imaging using N-isopropyl-p-(I-123) iodoamphetamine

    SciTech Connect

    Bushnell, D.L.; Gupta, S.; Mlcoch, A.G.; Barnes, W.E.

    1989-06-01

    Fourteen patients (10 with left-sided and 4 with right-sided cerebral infarction) were prospectively studied with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using N-isopropyl-p-(I-123) iodoamphetamine (IMP, SPECTamine) to determine its usefulness in predicting neurologic/language recovery after cerebral infarction. All neuro-SPECT imaging was performed within 30 days after infarction. Detailed assessment of neurologic and/or language recovery (after 3 months) was carried out prospectively in each patient. Patients with smaller volume IMP defects in the region of infarction demonstrated significantly better neurologic and language recovery than patients with large IMP defects. Analysis of the IMP ''redistribution'' phenomenon failed to demonstrate definitively a relationship with clinical recovery. It was concluded that the volume of the IMP defect can aid in predicting recovery potential after cerebral infarction.

  16. Simultaneous Tc-99m/I-123 Dual Radionuclide Myocardial Perfusion/Innervation Imaging Using Siemens IQ-SPECT with SMARTZOOM Collimator

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yong; Bhattacharya, Manojeet; Frey, Eric. C.

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous dual-radionuclide myocardial perfusion/innervation SPECT imaging can provide important information about mismatch between scar tissue and denervated regions. The Siemens IQ-SPECT system developed for cardiac imaging uses a multifocal SMARTZOOM collimator to achieve a four-fold sensitivity for the cardiac region compared to a typical parallel-hole low-energy high-resolution collimator but without the data truncation that can result with conventional converging-beam collimators. The increased sensitivity allows shorter image acquisition times or reduced patient dose, making IQ-SPECT ideal for simultaneous dual-radionuclide SPECT, where reduced administrated activity is desirable in order to reduce patient radiation exposure. However, crosstalk is a major factor affecting the image quality in dual-radionuclide imaging. In this work we developed a model-based method that can estimate and compensate for the crosstalk in IQ-SPECT data. The crosstalk model takes into account interactions in the object and collimator-detector system. Scatter in the object was modeled using the effective source scatter estimation technique (ESSE), previously developed to model scatter with parallel-hole collimators. The geometric collimator detector response was analytically modeled in the IQ-SPECT projector. The estimated crosstalk was then compensated for in an iterative reconstruction process. The new method was validated with data from both Monte Carlo simulation and physical phantom experiments. The results showed that the estimated crosstalk was in good agreement with simulated and measured results. After model-based compensation the images from simultaneous dual-radionuclide acquisitions were similar in quality to those from single radionuclide acquisitions that did not have crosstalk contamination. The proposed model-based method can be used to improve simultaneous dual-radionuclide images acquired using IQ-SPECT. This work also demonstrates that ESSE scatter modeling

  17. Simultaneous Tc-99m/I-123 dual-radionuclide myocardial perfusion/innervation imaging using Siemens IQ-SPECT with SMARTZOOM collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yong; Bhattacharya, Manojeet; Frey, Eric C.

    2014-06-01

    Simultaneous dual-radionuclide myocardial perfusion/innervation SPECT imaging can provide important information about the mismatch between scar tissue and denervated regions. The Siemens IQ-SPECT system developed for cardiac imaging uses a multifocal SMARTZOOM collimator to achieve a four-fold sensitivity for the cardiac region, compared to a typical parallel-hole low-energy high-resolution collimator, but without the data truncation that can result with conventional converging-beam collimators. The increased sensitivity allows shorter image acquisition times or reduced patient dose, making IQ-SPECT ideal for simultaneous dual-radionuclide SPECT, where reduced administrated activity is desirable in order to reduce patient radiation exposure. However, crosstalk is a major factor affecting the image quality in dual-radionuclide imaging. In this work we developed a model-based method that can estimate and compensate for the crosstalk in IQ-SPECT data. The crosstalk model takes into account interactions in the object and collimator-detector system. Scatter in the object was modeled using the effective source scatter estimation technique (ESSE), previously developed to model scatter with parallel-hole collimators. The geometric collimator-detector response was analytically modeled in the IQ-SPECT projector. The estimated crosstalk was then compensated for in an iterative reconstruction process. The new method was validated with data from both Monte Carlo simulations and physical phantom experiments. The results showed that the estimated crosstalk was in good agreement with simulated and measured results. After model-based compensation the images from simultaneous dual-radionuclide acquisitions were similar in quality to those from single-radionuclide acquisitions that did not have crosstalk contamination. The proposed model-based method can be used to improve simultaneous dual-radionuclide images acquired using IQ-SPECT. This work also demonstrates that ESSE scatter

  18. Simultaneous Tc-99m/I-123 dual-radionuclide myocardial perfusion/innervation imaging using Siemens IQ-SPECT with SMARTZOOM collimator.

    PubMed

    Du, Yong; Bhattacharya, Manojeet; Frey, Eric C

    2014-06-01

    Simultaneous dual-radionuclide myocardial perfusion/innervation SPECT imaging can provide important information about the mismatch between scar tissue and denervated regions. The Siemens IQ-SPECT system developed for cardiac imaging uses a multifocal SMARTZOOM collimator to achieve a four-fold sensitivity for the cardiac region, compared to a typical parallel-hole low-energy high-resolution collimator, but without the data truncation that can result with conventional converging-beam collimators. The increased sensitivity allows shorter image acquisition times or reduced patient dose, making IQ-SPECT ideal for simultaneous dual-radionuclide SPECT, where reduced administrated activity is desirable in order to reduce patient radiation exposure. However, crosstalk is a major factor affecting the image quality in dual-radionuclide imaging. In this work we developed a model-based method that can estimate and compensate for the crosstalk in IQ-SPECT data. The crosstalk model takes into account interactions in the object and collimator-detector system. Scatter in the object was modeled using the effective source scatter estimation technique (ESSE), previously developed to model scatter with parallel-hole collimators. The geometric collimator-detector response was analytically modeled in the IQ-SPECT projector. The estimated crosstalk was then compensated for in an iterative reconstruction process. The new method was validated with data from both Monte Carlo simulations and physical phantom experiments. The results showed that the estimated crosstalk was in good agreement with simulated and measured results. After model-based compensation the images from simultaneous dual-radionuclide acquisitions were similar in quality to those from single-radionuclide acquisitions that did not have crosstalk contamination. The proposed model-based method can be used to improve simultaneous dual-radionuclide images acquired using IQ-SPECT. This work also demonstrates that ESSE scatter

  19. A miniature forward-imaging optical coherence tomography (OCT) probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joos, Karen M.; Shen, Jin-Hui

    2012-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has had a tremendous global health impact upon the current ability to diagnose, treat, and monitor multiple eye diseases. We propose that a miniature forward-imaging OCT probe can be developed for real-time ocular imaging. A miniature 25-gauge forward-imaging probe was designed and developed to use with an 850 nm spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) system (Bioptigen, Inc. Durham, NC). Imaging parameters were determined. Ocular tissues were examined with the miniature OCT probe. A miniature SDOCT probe was developed with the scanning driver within the hand piece. The SDOCT fiber-scanning probe maximally transmitted power of 800 μW. The scanning range was 3 mm when the probe tip was held 3 to 5 mm from the tissue surface. The axial resolution was 6 μm and the lateral resolution was 30-35 μm. The 25-gauge forward-imaging probe was used to image cellophane tape, eyelid skin, cornea, conjunctiva, sclera, iris, anterior lens, anterior chamber angle, retina, retinal tear, retinal detachment, optic nerve head, and optic nerve sheath. Images obtained from the miniature probe appeared similar to images from a 3 mm scanning range of a commercial large handheld OCT probe (Bioptigen, Inc. Durham, NC).

  20. PET and SPECT imaging of the opioid system: receptors, radioligands and avenues for drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Lever, John R

    2007-01-01

    As we celebrate the bicentennial of the isolation of morphine by Sertürner, opioids continue to dominate major sectors of the analgesic market worldwide. The pharmaceutical industry stands to benefit greatly from molecular imaging in preclinical and early clinical trials of new or improved opioid drugs. At this juncture, it seems fitting to summarize the past twenty or so years of research on molecular imaging of the opioid system from the viewpoint of drug discovery and development. Opioid receptors were first imaged in human volunteers by positron emission tomography (PET) in 1984. Now, quantitative PET imaging of the major opioid receptor types (micro, delta , kappa) is possible in the brain and peripheral organs of healthy persons and patient populations. Radioligands are under development for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of opioid receptors as well. These functional, nuclear imaging techniques can trace the fate of radiolabeled molecules directly, but non-invasively, and allow precise pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic measurements. Molecular imaging provides unique data that can aid in selecting the best drug candidates, determining optimal dosing regimens, clearing regulatory hurdles and lowering risks of failure. Using a historical perspective, this review touches on opioid receptors as drug targets, and focuses on the status and use of radiotracers for opioid receptor PET and SPECT. Selected studies are discussed to illustrate the power of molecular imaging for facilitating opioid drug discovery and development. PMID:17266587

  1. In vivo SPECT imaging of tumors by 198,199Au-labeled graphene oxide nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Fazaeli, Yousef; Akhavan, Omid; Rahighi, Reza; Aboudzadeh, Mohammad Reza; Karimi, Elham; Afarideh, Hossein

    2014-12-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) sheets functionalized by aminopropylsilyl groups (8.0 wt.%) were labeled by (198,199)Au nanoparticle radioisotopes (obtained through reduction of HAuCl4 in sodium citrate solution followed by thermal neutron irradiation) for fast in vivo targeting and SPECT imaging (high purity germanium-spectrometry) of tumors. Using instant thin layer chromatography method, the physicochemical properties of the amino-functionalized GO sheets labeled by (198,199)Au NPs ((198,199)Au@AF-GO) were found to be highly stable enough in organic phases, e.g. a human serum, to be reliably used in bioapplications. In vivo biodistribution of the (198,199)Au@AF-GO composite was investigated in rats bearing fibrosarcoma tumor after various post-injection periods of time. The (198,199)Au@AF-GO nanostructure exhibited a rapid as well as high tumor uptake (with uptake ratio of tumor to muscle of 167 after 4h intravenous injection) that resulted in an efficient tumor targeting/imaging. Meantime, the low lipophilicity of the (198,199)Au@AF-GO caused to its fast excretion (~24 h) throughout the body by the kidneys (as also confirmed by the urinary tract). Because of the short half-life of (198,199)Au radioisotopes, the (198,199)Au@AF-GO with an excellent tumor targeting/imaging and fast washing out from the body can be suggested as one of the most effective and promising nanomaterials in nanotechnology-based cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:25491820

  2. Comparison of the scanning linear estimator (SLE) and ROI methods for quantitative SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könik, Arda; Kupinski, Meredith; Hendrik Pretorius, P.; King, Michael A.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2015-08-01

    In quantitative emission tomography, tumor activity is typically estimated from calculations on a region of interest (ROI) identified in the reconstructed slices. In these calculations, unpredictable bias arising from the null functions of the imaging system affects ROI estimates. The magnitude of this bias depends upon the tumor size and location. In prior work it has been shown that the scanning linear estimator (SLE), which operates on the raw projection data, is an unbiased estimator of activity when the size and location of the tumor are known. In this work, we performed analytic simulation of SPECT imaging with a parallel-hole medium-energy collimator. Distance-dependent system spatial resolution and non-uniform attenuation were included in the imaging simulation. We compared the task of activity estimation by the ROI and SLE methods for a range of tumor sizes (diameter: 1-3 cm) and activities (contrast ratio: 1-10) added to uniform and non-uniform liver backgrounds. Using the correct value for the tumor shape and location is an idealized approximation to how task estimation would occur clinically. Thus we determined how perturbing this idealized prior knowledge impacted the performance of both techniques. To implement the SLE for the non-uniform background, we used a novel iterative algorithm for pre-whitening stationary noise within a compact region. Estimation task performance was compared using the ensemble mean-squared error (EMSE) as the criterion. The SLE method performed substantially better than the ROI method (i.e. EMSE(SLE) was 23-174 times lower) when the background is uniform and tumor location and size are known accurately. The variance of the SLE increased when a non-uniform liver texture was introduced but the EMSE(SLE) continued to be 5-20 times lower than the ROI method. In summary, SLE outperformed ROI under almost all conditions that we tested.

  3. Comparison of the scanning linear estimator (SLE) and ROI methods for quantitative SPECT imaging.

    PubMed

    Könik, Arda; Kupinski, Meredith; Pretorius, P Hendrik; King, Michael A; Barrett, Harrison H

    2015-08-21

    In quantitative emission tomography, tumor activity is typically estimated from calculations on a region of interest (ROI) identified in the reconstructed slices. In these calculations, unpredictable bias arising from the null functions of the imaging system affects ROI estimates. The magnitude of this bias depends upon the tumor size and location. In prior work it has been shown that the scanning linear estimator (SLE), which operates on the raw projection data, is an unbiased estimator of activity when the size and location of the tumor are known. In this work, we performed analytic simulation of SPECT imaging with a parallel-hole medium-energy collimator. Distance-dependent system spatial resolution and non-uniform attenuation were included in the imaging simulation. We compared the task of activity estimation by the ROI and SLE methods for a range of tumor sizes (diameter: 1-3 cm) and activities (contrast ratio: 1-10) added to uniform and non-uniform liver backgrounds. Using the correct value for the tumor shape and location is an idealized approximation to how task estimation would occur clinically. Thus we determined how perturbing this idealized prior knowledge impacted the performance of both techniques. To implement the SLE for the non-uniform background, we used a novel iterative algorithm for pre-whitening stationary noise within a compact region. Estimation task performance was compared using the ensemble mean-squared error (EMSE) as the criterion. The SLE method performed substantially better than the ROI method (i.e. EMSE(SLE) was 23-174 times lower) when the background is uniform and tumor location and size are known accurately. The variance of the SLE increased when a non-uniform liver texture was introduced but the EMSE(SLE) continued to be 5-20 times lower than the ROI method. In summary, SLE outperformed ROI under almost all conditions that we tested. PMID:26247228

  4. SPECT imaging in evaluating extent of malignant external otitis: case report

    SciTech Connect

    English, R.J.; Tu'Meh, S.S.; Piwnica-Worms, D.; Holman, B.L.

    1987-03-01

    Otitis externa, a benign inflammatory process of the external auditory canal, is general responsive to local therapy. Some patients however, develop a less controllable disease leading to chondritis and osteomyelitis of the base of the skull. The direct invasive characteristic of the disease has led to the descriptive term malignant external otitis (MEO), more appropriately called necrotizing or invasive external otitis. Malignant external otitis is caused by an aggressive pseudomonas or proteus infection that almost exclusively occurs in elderly diabetic patients. The primary imaging modalities previously used in the diagnosis and evaluation of MEO were standard planar scintigraphic techniques with technetium-99M (/sup 99m/Tc) bone agents and gallium-67 (/sup 67/Ga), and pluridirectional tomography. The advent of high resolution computed tomography (CT) effectively allowed demonstration of the soft tissue extension and bone destruction associated with MEO, but still suffered from the low sensitivity constraints of all radiographic techniques in determining early inflammatory bone involvement. Recent work suggests that scintigraphic detection of MEO with /sup 99m/Tc-MDP and /sup 67/Ga, combined with the cross-sectional resolution of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) may be of value in planning treatment of this inflammatory condition.

  5. Regional cerebral blood flow imaging: A quantitative comparison of technetium-99m-HMPAO SPECT with C15O2 PET

    SciTech Connect

    Gemmell, H.G.; Evans, N.T.; Besson, J.A.; Roeda, D.; Davidson, J.; Dodd, M.G.; Sharp, P.F.; Smith, F.W.; Crawford, J.R.; Newton, R.H. )

    1990-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare technetium-99m-hexamethylpropyleneamineoxime ({sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) imaging using positron emission tomography (PET). As investigation of dementia is likely to be one of the main uses of routine rCBF imaging, 18 demented patients were imaged with both techniques. The PET data were compared quantitatively with three versions of the SPECT data. These were, first, data normalized to the SPECT cerebellar uptake, second, data linearly corrected using the PET cerebellar value and, finally, data Lassen corrected for washout from the high flow areas. Both the linearly-corrected (r = 0.81) and the Lassen-corrected (r = 0.79) HMPAO SPECT data showed good correlation with the PET rCBF data. The relationship between the normalized HMPAO SPECT data and the PET data was nonlinear. It is not yet possible to obtain rCBF values in absolute units from HMPAO SPECT without knowledge of the true rCBF in one reference region for each patient.

  6. The multi-module multi-resolution SPECT system: A tool for variable-pinhole small-animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesterman, Jacob Yost

    The multi-module, multi-resolution SPECT system (M 3R) was developed and evaluated at the University of Arizona's Center for Gamma-Ray Imaging (CGRI). The system consists of four modular gamma cameras stationed around a Cerrobend shielding assembly. Slots machined into the shielding allow for the easy interchange of pinhole apertures, providing M3R with excellent hardware flexibility. Motivation for the system included serving as a prototype for a tabletop, small-animal SPECT system, acting as a testbed for image quality by enabling the experimental validation of imaging theory, and aiding in the development of techniques for the emerging field of adaptive SPECT imaging. Development of the system included design and construction of the shielding assembly and pinhole apertures. The issue of pinhole design and evaluation represents a recurring theme of the presented work. Existing calibration methods were adapted for use with M3R. A new algorithm, the contracting grid-search algorithm, that is capable of being executed in hardware was developed for use in position estimation. The algorithm was successfully applied in software and progress was made in hardware implementation. Special equipment and interpolation techniques were also developed to deal with M3R's unique system design and calibration requirements. A code library was created to simplify the many image processing steps required to realize successful analysis of measured image and calibration data and to achieve reconstruction. Observer studies were performed using both projection data and reconstructed images. These observer studies sought to explore signal-detection and activity estimation for various pinhole apertures. Special attention was paid to object variability, including the development and statistical analysis of a phantom capable of generating multiple realizations of a random, textured background. The results of these studies indicate potential for multiple-pinhole, multiplexed apertures but

  7. Imaging bacterial peptidoglycan with near-infrared fluorogenic azide probes

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Peyton; Siegrist, M. Sloan; Cullen, Andrew J.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent probes designed for activation by bioorthogonal chemistry have enabled the visualization of biomolecules in living systems. Such activatable probes with near-infrared (NIR) emission would be ideal for in vivo imaging but have proven difficult to engineer. We present the development of NIR fluorogenic azide probes based on the Si-rhodamine scaffold that undergo a fluorescence enhancement of up to 48-fold upon reaction with terminal or strained alkynes. We used the probes for mammalian cell surface imaging and, in conjunction with a new class of cyclooctyne d-amino acids, for visualization of bacterial peptidoglycan without the need to wash away unreacted probe. PMID:24706769

  8. Review of running injuries of the foot and ankle: clinical presentation and SPECT-CT imaging patterns

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier-Galarneau, Matthieu; Martineau, Patrick; Gaudreault, Maxime; Pham, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    Distance running is among the fastest growing sports, with record registration to marathons worldwide. It is estimated that more than half of recreational runners will experience injuries related to the practice of their sport. Three-phase bone scintigraphy is a very sensitive tool to identify sports injury, allowing imaging of hyperemia, stress reaction, enthesopathy and fractures, often before abnormalities can be detected on conventional anatomical modalities. In this article, we review the most common running related injuries and their imaging findings on bone scintigraphy with SPECT-CT. PMID:26269770

  9. Performance evaluation of a novel high performance pinhole array detector module using NEMA NU-4 image quality phantom for four head SPECT Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Tasneem; Tahtali, Murat; Pickering, Mark R.

    2015-03-01

    Radiolabeled tracer distribution imaging of gamma rays using pinhole collimation is considered promising for small animal imaging. The recent availability of various radiolabeled tracers has enhanced the field of diagnostic study and is simultaneously creating demand for high resolution imaging devices. This paper presents analyses to represent the optimized parameters of a high performance pinhole array detector module using two different characteristics phantoms. Monte Carlo simulations using the Geant4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) were executed to assess the performance of a four head SPECT system incorporated with pinhole array collimators. The system is based on a pixelated array of NaI(Tl) crystals coupled to an array of position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs). The detector module was simulated to have 48 mm by 48 mm active area along with different pinhole apertures on a tungsten plate. The performance of this system has been evaluated using a uniform shape cylindrical water phantom along with NEMA NU-4 image quality (IQ) phantom filled with 99mTc labeled radiotracers. SPECT images were reconstructed where activity distribution is expected to be well visualized. This system offers the combination of an excellent intrinsic spatial resolution, good sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio along with high detection efficiency over an energy range between 20-160 keV. Increasing number of heads in a stationary system configuration offers increased sensitivity at a spatial resolution similar to that obtained with the current SPECT system design with four heads.

  10. Design of a digital phantom population for myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging research

    PubMed Central

    Ghaly, Michael; Du, Yong; Fung, George S.K.; Tsui, Benjamin M.W.; Links, Jonathan M.; Frey, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Digital phantoms and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations have become important tools for optimizing and evaluating instrumentation, acquisition and processing methods for myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS). In this work, we designed a new adult digital phantom population and generated corresponding Tc-99m and Tl-201 projections for use in MPS research. The population is based on the 3D XCAT phantom with organ parameters sampled from the Emory PET Torso Model Database. Phantoms included 3 variations each in body size, heart size, and subcutaneous adipose tissue level, for a total of 27 phantoms of each gender. The SimSET Monte Carlo code and angular response functions were used to model interactions in the body and the collimator-detector system, respectively. We divided each phantom into seven organs, each simulated separately, allowing use of post-simulation summing to efficiently model uptake variations. Also, we adapted and used a criterion based on the relative Poisson effective count level to determine the required number of simulated photons for each simulated organ. This technique provided a quantitative estimate of the true noise in the simulated projection data, including residual MC simulation noise. Projections were generated in 1 keV wide energy windows from 48-184 keV assuming perfect energy resolution to permit study of the effects of window width, energy resolution, and crosstalk in the context of dual isotope MPS. We have developed a comprehensive method for efficiently simulating realistic projections for a realistic population of phantoms in the context of MPS imaging. The new phantom population and realistic database of simulated projections will be useful in performing mathematical and human observer studies to evaluate various acquisition and processing methods such as optimizing the energy window width, investigating the effect of energy resolution on image quality and evaluating compensation methods for degrading factors such as crosstalk in the

  11. Design of a digital phantom population for myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging research.

    PubMed

    Ghaly, Michael; Du, Yong; Fung, George S K; Tsui, Benjamin M W; Links, Jonathan M; Frey, Eric

    2014-06-21

    Digital phantoms and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations have become important tools for optimizing and evaluating instrumentation, acquisition and processing methods for myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS). In this work, we designed a new adult digital phantom population and generated corresponding Tc-99m and Tl-201 projections for use in MPS research. The population is based on the three-dimensional XCAT phantom with organ parameters sampled from the Emory PET Torso Model Database. Phantoms included three variations each in body size, heart size, and subcutaneous adipose tissue level, for a total of 27 phantoms of each gender. The SimSET MC code and angular response functions were used to model interactions in the body and the collimator-detector system, respectively. We divided each phantom into seven organs, each simulated separately, allowing use of post-simulation summing to efficiently model uptake variations. Also, we adapted and used a criterion based on the relative Poisson effective count level to determine the required number of simulated photons for each simulated organ. This technique provided a quantitative estimate of the true noise in the simulated projection data, including residual MC simulation noise. Projections were generated in 1 keV wide energy windows from 48-184 keV assuming perfect energy resolution to permit study of the effects of window width, energy resolution, and crosstalk in the context of dual isotope MPS. We have developed a comprehensive method for efficiently simulating realistic projections for a realistic population of phantoms in the context of MPS imaging. The new phantom population and realistic database of simulated projections will be useful in performing mathematical and human observer studies to evaluate various acquisition and processing methods such as optimizing the energy window width, investigating the effect of energy resolution on image quality and evaluating compensation methods for degrading factors such as crosstalk

  12. Design of a digital phantom population for myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaly, Michael; Du, Yong; Fung, George S. K.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.; Links, Jonathan M.; Frey, Eric

    2014-06-01

    Digital phantoms and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations have become important tools for optimizing and evaluating instrumentation, acquisition and processing methods for myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS). In this work, we designed a new adult digital phantom population and generated corresponding Tc-99m and Tl-201 projections for use in MPS research. The population is based on the three-dimensional XCAT phantom with organ parameters sampled from the Emory PET Torso Model Database. Phantoms included three variations each in body size, heart size, and subcutaneous adipose tissue level, for a total of 27 phantoms of each gender. The SimSET MC code and angular response functions were used to model interactions in the body and the collimator-detector system, respectively. We divided each phantom into seven organs, each simulated separately, allowing use of post-simulation summing to efficiently model uptake variations. Also, we adapted and used a criterion based on the relative Poisson effective count level to determine the required number of simulated photons for each simulated organ. This technique provided a quantitative estimate of the true noise in the simulated projection data, including residual MC simulation noise. Projections were generated in 1 keV wide energy windows from 48-184 keV assuming perfect energy resolution to permit study of the effects of window width, energy resolution, and crosstalk in the context of dual isotope MPS. We have developed a comprehensive method for efficiently simulating realistic projections for a realistic population of phantoms in the context of MPS imaging. The new phantom population and realistic database of simulated projections will be useful in performing mathematical and human observer studies to evaluate various acquisition and processing methods such as optimizing the energy window width, investigating the effect of energy resolution on image quality and evaluating compensation methods for degrading factors such as crosstalk in

  13. Correlation between clinical severity of central nervous system (CNS) lupus and findings on single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) images of the brain; preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, I.E.; Zeit, R.M.; Von Feldt, J.M.

    1994-05-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosis (SLE) commonly causes significant neuropsychiatric disorders. The purpose of this study was to review the brain SPECT studies of SLE patients with clinical evidence of CNS involvement and determine whether there is a correlation between the findings on SPECT images and the clinical manifestations of this serious phase of the disease. We enrolled 19 SLE patients and 12 normal controls in this study. The level of each patient`s disease activity was determined by the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI), an established method of scoring disease severity which is heavily weighted toward neuropsychiatric symptomatology, for 15 of the 19 SLE patients. The SLEDAI was calculated within a 10 day window of the date when the SPECT scan was obtained. SPECT scans were performed 30 minutes following the intravenous administration of 99mTc-HMPAO. Results are discussed.

  14. Prevalence and predictors of mechanical dyssynchrony as defined by phase analysis in patients with left ventricular dysfunction undergoing gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Samad, Zainab; Atchley, Allen E.; Trimble, Mark A.; Sun, Jie-Lena; Shaw, Linda K.; Pagnanelli, Robert; Chen, Ji; Garcia, Ernest V.; Iskandrian, Ami E.; Velazquez, Eric J.; Borges-Neto, Salvador

    2011-01-01

    Background A novel method to quantify dyssynchrony using phase analysis of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging has been developed. We sought to determine the prevalence of SPECT-derived mechanical dyssynchrony, and we report clinical variables which predict mechanical dyssynchrony in patients with left ventricular dysfunction. Methods We used a count-based Fourier analysis method to convert the regional myocardial counts from discrete frames per cardiac cycle into a continuous thickening function which allows resolution of the phase of the onset of myocardial contraction. The standard deviation of left ventricular phases (Phase SD) describes the regional phase dispersion as a measure of dyssynchrony. Significant dyssynchrony was defined as Phase SD ≥ 43°. 260 patients with left ventricular ejection fraction ≤35% were examined. Results The prevalence of mechanical dyssynchrony in the entire cohort of patients studied was 52%. Univariate predictors of Phase SD were age (P = .03), black race (P = .0005), QRS duration, EF, EDV, summed stress score (SSS), and summed rest score (SRS) (all P = <.0001). Black race, male gender, QRS EF, and SRS were independent predictors of SPECT-based mechanical dyssynchrony. Conclusions Significant SPECT-based mechanical dyssynchrony is relatively common among patients with left ventricular dysfunction. In a population of patients with predominantly ischemic heart disease referred for SPECT, a reduced EF, increasing QRS duration, severity and extent of myocardial scar on SPECT imaging are independent predictors of mechanical dyssynchrony and may serve to identify patients for dyssynchrony screening. PMID:21082299

  15. Analysis of scanning probe microscope images using wavelets.

    PubMed

    Gackenheimer, C; Cayon, L; Reifenberger, R

    2006-03-01

    The utility of wavelet transforms for analysis of scanning probe images is investigated. Simulated scanning probe images are analyzed using wavelet transforms and compared to a parallel analysis using more conventional Fourier transform techniques. The wavelet method introduced in this paper is particularly useful as an image recognition algorithm to enhance nanoscale objects of a specific scale that may be present in scanning probe images. In its present form, the applied wavelet is optimal for detecting objects with rotational symmetry. The wavelet scheme is applied to the analysis of scanning probe data to better illustrate the advantages that this new analysis tool offers. The wavelet algorithm developed for analysis of scanning probe microscope (SPM) images has been incorporated into the WSxM software which is a versatile freeware SPM analysis package. PMID:16439061

  16. Attenuation compensation in TC-99M SPECT brain imaging: Use of attenuation maps derived from tranmission versus emission data

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, T.S.; Licho, R.; Penney, B.C.

    1994-05-01

    This study compares reconstructions of Tc-99m brain SPECT studies made using two methods of estimating the attenuation map: (1) transmission scanning, and (2) segmenting reconstructions of emission data and assigning attenuation coefficient values. A three-head SPECT system with fan beam collimators was used. Transmission scanning was performed using a line source at the focal line of a fan beam collimator right after the regular emission scan. The higher attenuation of the skull and the lower attenuation in the sinus cavities were identifiable despite the noise in the reconstructed transmission data due to: (1) the contamination of the transmission data by emission photons, (2) the maximum acquisition count rate imposed by the SPECT system, and (3) the clinical scanning time. Emission data were recorded using both photopeak and Compton scatter energy windows. Outlines of the head and the maxillary sinus could be obtained using only the Compton scatter reconstructions, whereas identifying the skull regions and the frontal sinus required the photopeak data as well. We placed appropriate linear attenuation coefficients in the soft tissue, bone, sinus and air regions (0.15,. 0.22, 0, and 0 cm{sup -1}) and blurred this attenuation map with a Gaussian kernel of about 0.2 cm standard deviation to obtain the attenuation map based on the emission data. Reconstructions were computed using the maximum likelihood expectation maximization algorithm with Siddon`s ray-tracing algorithm. Reconstructions based on the two attenuation maps were compared quantitatively on the patient data. The differences noted were quite small. These results imply that attenuation correction based on emission data alone may be adequate for Tc-99m SPECT brain imaging.

  17. Regularized Image Reconstruction Algorithms for Dual-Isotope Myocardial Perfusion SPECT (MPS) Imaging Using a Cross-Tracer Prior

    PubMed Central

    He, Xin; Cheng, Lishui; Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    In simultaneous dual-isotope myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) imaging, data are simultaneously acquired to determine the distributions of two radioactive isotopes. The goal of this work was to develop penalized maximum likelihood (PML) algorithms for a novel cross-tracer prior that exploits the fact that the two images reconstructed from simultaneous dual-isotope MPS projection data are perfectly registered in space. We first formulated the simultaneous dual-isotope MPS reconstruction problem as a joint estimation problem. A cross-tracer prior that couples voxel values on both images was then proposed. We developed an iterative algorithm to reconstruct the MPS images that converges to the maximum a posteriori solution for this prior based on separable surrogate functions. To accelerate the convergence, we developed a fast algorithm for the cross-tracer prior based on the complete data OS-EM (COSEM) framework. The proposed algorithm was compared qualitatively and quantitatively to a single-tracer version of the prior that did not include the cross-tracer term. Quantitative evaluations included comparisons of mean and standard deviation images as well as assessment of image fidelity using the mean square error. We also evaluated the cross tracer prior using a three-class observer study with respect to the three-class MPS diagnostic task, i.e., classifying patients as having either no defect, reversible defect, or fixed defects. For this study, a comparison with conventional ordered subsets-expectation maximization (OS-EM) reconstruction with postfiltering was performed. The comparisons to the single-tracer prior demonstrated similar resolution for areas of the image with large intensity changes and reduced noise in uniform regions. The cross-tracer prior was also superior to the single-tracer version in terms of restoring image fidelity. Results of the three-class observer study showed that the proposed cross-tracer prior and the convergent algorithms improved the

  18. Imaging Non-Specific Wrist Pain: Interobserver Agreement and Diagnostic Accuracy of SPECT/CT, MRI, CT, Bone Scan and Plain Radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Huellner, Martin W.; Bürkert, Alexander; Strobel, Klaus; Pérez Lago, María del Sol; Werner, Lennart; Hug, Urs; von Wartburg, Urs; Seifert, Burkhardt; Veit-Haibach, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Chronic hand and wrist pain is a common clinical issue for orthopaedic surgeons and rheumatologists. The purpose of this study was 1. To analyze the interobserver agreement of SPECT/CT, MRI, CT, bone scan and plain radiographs in patients with non-specific pain of the hand and wrist, and 2. to assess the diagnostic accuracy of these imaging methods in this selected patient population. Materials and Methods Thirty-two consecutive patients with non-specific pain of the hand or wrist were evaluated retrospectively. All patients had been imaged by plain radiographs, planar early-phase imaging (bone scan), late-phase imaging (SPECT/CT including bone scan and CT), and MRI. Two experienced and two inexperienced readers analyzed the images with a standardized read-out protocol. Reading criteria were lesion detection and localisation, type and etiology of the underlying pathology. Diagnostic accuracy and interobserver agreement were determined for all readers and imaging modalities. Results The most accurate modality for experienced readers was SPECT/CT (accuracy 77%), followed by MRI (56%). The best performing, though little accurate modality for inexperienced readers was also SPECT/CT (44%), followed by MRI and bone scan (38% each). The interobserver agreement of experienced readers was generally high in SPECT/CT concerning lesion detection (kappa 0.93, MRI 0.72), localisation (kappa 0.91, MRI 0.75) and etiology (kappa 0.85, MRI 0.74), while MRI yielded better results on typification of lesions (kappa 0.75, SPECT/CT 0.69). There was poor agreement between experienced and inexperienced readers in SPECT/CT and MRI. Conclusions SPECT/CT proved to be the most helpful imaging modality in patients with non-specific wrist pain. The method was found reliable, providing high interobserver agreement, being outperformed by MRI only concerning the typification of lesions. We believe it is beneficial to integrate SPECT/CT into the diagnostic imaging algorithm of chronic wrist

  19. [Estimation of destruction of necrotic myocardium with serial PYP SPECT images and serum myosin light chain I level].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, T; Aizawa, T; Kato, K; Hosoi, H

    1992-02-01

    PYP SPECT images were underwent in 15 patients with acute myocardial infarction 2-5 times in three weeks. PYP SPECT images were reconstructed as to include both vertebral images and myocardial images. Quantitative estimation of PYP images was performed by the ratio of maximal PYP myocardial uptake to maximal PYP vertebral uptake in the central sagittal images (%PYP). Disappearance of PYP images was defined as the day, when %PYP reached 50%. Normalization of serum myosin light chain I (LCI) level was defined as the day, when LCI level reached 2.5 ng/ml. %PYP decreased continuously and maximal PYP point remained at the same area. Shape of PYP images varied and diminished. In case of anterior wall infarction apical PYP uptake persisted longer than basal uptake. In case of inferior wall infarction basal PYP uptake persisted longer than apical uptake. The mean period from onset to the disappearance of PYP images was 9 +/- 3 days. Pattern of serial serum MB level was simple, however corresponding pattern of serial serum LCI level showed various types. The mean period from onset to the peak level was 4.1 +/- 1 day. Normalization of LCI level was 9.3 +/- 2.9 days. It showed that process of destruction of necrotic myocardium vary in each case. Weak relation was noted between disappearance of PYP images (DAY-PYP) and normalization of LCI level (DAY-LCI). DAY-PYP = 4.4 +/- 0.46 DAY-LCI (n = 13, r = 0.4). Quantitative PYP images were useful for detecting ongoing necrotic myocardium and serum LCI level was useful for estimating destruction of necrotic myocardium.2+ level were useful to study the process of destruction of necrotic myocardium. PMID:1532996

  20. Comparison of technetium-99m-HMPAO and technetium-99m-ECD cerebral SPECT images in Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Dyck, C.H. van; Lin, C.H.; Smith, E.O.

    1996-11-01

    SPECT has shown increasing promise as a diagnostic tool in Alzheimer`s disease (AD). Recently, a new SPECT brain perfusion agent, {sup 99m}Tc-ethyl cysteinate dimer ({sup 99m}Tc-ECD) has emerged with purported advantages in image quality over the established tracer, {sup 99m}Tc-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime ({sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO). This research aimed to compare cerebral images for ({sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO). This research aimed to compare cerebral images for {sup 99}mTc-HMPAO and {sup 99m}Tc-ECD in discriminating patients with AD form control subjects. 51 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Ectopic expression of the sodium-iodide symporter enables imaging of transplanted cardiac stem cells in vivo by SPECT or PET

    PubMed Central

    Terrovitis, John; Kwok, Keng Fai; Lautamäki, Riikka; Engles, James M; Barth, Andreas S; Kizana, Eddy; Miake, Junichiro; Leppo, Michelle K; Fox, James; Seidel, Jurgen; Pomper, Martin; Wahl, Richard L; Tsui, Benjamin; Bengel, Frank; Marbán, Eduardo; Abraham, M. Roselle

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We examined the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) which promotes in vivo cellular uptake of 99mTc or 124I, as a reporter gene for cell tracking by SPECT or PET imaging. Background Stem cells offer the promise of cardiac repair. Stem cell labeling is a prerequisite to tracking cell fate in vivo. Methods The human NIS cDNA was transduced into rat cardiac-derived stem cells (rCDCs) using lentiviral vectors. Rats were injected intra-myocardially with up to 4 million NIS+-rCDCs immediately following LAD ligation. Dual isotope SPECT (or PET) imaging was performed, using 99mTc (or 124I) for cell detection and 201Tl (or 13NH3) for myocardial delineation. In a subset of animals, high resolution ex vivo SPECT scans of explanted hearts were obtained to confirm that in vivo signals were derived from the cell injection site. Results NIS expression in rCDCs did not affect cell viability and proliferation. NIS activity was verified in isolated transduced cells by measuring 99mTc uptake. NIS+ rCDCs were visualized in vivo as regions of 99mTc or 124I uptake within a perfusion deficit in the SPECT and PET images, respectively. Cells could be visualized by SPECT up to day 6 post-injection. Ex vivo SPECT confirmed that in vivo 99mTc signals were localized to the cell injection sites. Conclusion Ectopic NIS expression allows non invasive in vivo stem cell tracking in the myocardium, using either SPECT or PET. The general approach shows significant promise in tracking the fate of transplanted cells participating in cardiac regeneration, given its ability to observe living cells using clinically-applicable imaging modalities. PMID:18992656

  2. Estimation of dynamic time activity curves from dynamic cardiac SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, J.; Du, Y.; Links, J.; Rahmim, A.; Karakatsanis, N.; Akhbardeh, A.; Lyons, J.; Frey, E. C.

    2015-04-01

    Whole-heart coronary flow reserve (CFR) may be useful as an early predictor of cardiovascular disease or heart failure. Here we propose a simple method to extract the time-activity curve, an essential component needed for estimating the CFR, for a small number of compartments in the body, such as normal myocardium, blood pool, and ischemic myocardial regions, from SPECT data acquired with conventional cameras using slow rotation. We evaluated the method using a realistic simulation of 99mTc-teboroxime imaging. Uptake of 99mTc-teboroxime based on data from the literature were modeled. Data were simulated using the anatomically-realistic 3D NCAT phantom and an analytic projection code that realistically models attenuation, scatter, and the collimator-detector response. The proposed method was then applied to estimate time activity curves (TACs) for a set of 3D volumes of interest (VOIs) directly from the projections. We evaluated the accuracy and precision of estimated TACs and studied the effects of the presence of perfusion defects that were and were not modeled in the estimation procedure. The method produced good estimates of the myocardial and blood-pool TACS organ VOIs, with average weighted absolute biases of less than 5% for the myocardium and 10% for the blood pool when the true organ boundaries were known and the activity distributions in the organs were uniform. In the presence of unknown perfusion defects, the myocardial TAC was still estimated well (average weighted absolute bias <10%) when the total reduction in myocardial uptake (product of defect extent and severity) was ≤5%. This indicates that the method was robust to modest model mismatch such as the presence of moderate perfusion defects and uptake nonuniformities. With larger defects where the defect VOI was included in the estimation procedure, the estimated normal myocardial and defect TACs were accurate (average weighted absolute bias ≈5% for a defect with 25% extent and 100% severity).

  3. Detection of vulnerable atherosclerosis plaques with a dual-modal single-photon-emission computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging probe targeting apoptotic macrophages.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dengfeng; Li, Xiao; Zhang, Chunfu; Tan, Hui; Wang, Cong; Pang, Lifang; Shi, Hongcheng

    2015-02-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS), especially the vulnerable AS plaque rupture-induced acute obstructive vascular disease, is a leading cause of death. Accordingly, there is a need for an effective method to draw accurate predictions about AS progression and plaque vulnerability. Herein we report on an approach to constructing a hybrid nanoparticle system using a single-photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) multimodal probe, aiming for a comprehensive evaluation of AS progression by achieving high sensitivity along with high resolution. Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) was covered by aminated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and carboxylated PEG simultaneously and then functionalized with diethylenetriaminepentacetate acid for (99m)Tc coordination and subsequently Annexin V for targeting apoptotic macrophages abundant in vulnerable plaques. The in vivo accumulations of imaging probe reflected by SPECT and MRI were consistent and accurate in highlighting lesions. Intense radioactive signals detected by SPECT facilitated focus recognization and quantification, while USPIO-based T2-weighted MRI improved the focal localization and volumetry of AS plaques. For subsequent ex vivo planar images, targeting effects were further confirmed by immunohistochemistry, including CD-68 and TUNEL staining; meanwhile, the degree of concentration was proven to be statistically correlated with the Oil Red O staining results. In conclusion, these results indicated that the Annexin V-modified hybrid nanoparticle system specifically targeted the vulnerable AS plaques containing apoptotic macrophages and could be of great value in the invasively accurate detection of vulnerable plaques. PMID:25569777

  4. Physical phantom evaluation of simultaneous 99mTc/ 123I SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bang-Hung; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Lee, Jhih-Shian; Jan, Meei-Ling; Chang, Chia-Jung; Chen, Jyh-Cheng

    2011-10-01

    .03 and that of 123I was 1.07 from the W_eICA method. Besides, the recovery rate of 99mTc was 0.84 and that of 123I was 1.05 from the AEW approach. According to our results, the W_eICA method not only decreased the number of energy windows but also separated dual-isotope photopeaks successfully. The results have demonstrated that the W_eICA method improved the quantitative accuracy and might be an effective tool for simultaneous dual-isotope SPECT imaging.

  5. Impact of hybrid SPECT/CT imaging on the detection of single parathyroid adenoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Antony; Brennan, Patrick C.; Reed, Warren; Pietrzyk, Mariusz; Schembri, Geoff; Bailey, Elizabeth; Roach, Paul; Evanoff, Michael; Kench, Peter L.

    2011-03-01

    Objective: The aim of this investigation is to determine the impact of hybrid single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) on the detection of parathyroid adenoma. Materials and methods: 16 patients presented with suspected parathyroid adenoma localised within the neck. All patients were injected with Tc-99m sestamibi and were scanned with a GE Infinia Hawkeye SPECT/CT. There were six negative and ten positive confirmed cases. Five expert radiologists specializing in nuclear medicine were asked to report on the 16 planar and SPECT data sets and were then asked to report on the same randomly ordered data sets with the addition of CT. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed using the Dorfman-Berbaum-Metz multireadermulticase methodology and sensitivity and specificity values were generated. A significance level of p <= 0.05 was set for all comparisons. Results: ROC analysis demonstrated an AUC of 0.64 and 0.69 for SPECT and SPECT/CT respectively (p = 0.31). Mean sensitivity scores increased from 0.64 to 0.80 (p = 0.17) and specificity scores decreased from 0.57 to 0.40 (p = 0.17) with the addition of the CT data. Conclusion: This preliminary investigation suggests that extra CT information may increase lesion detection as well as false positive rates for SPECT-based investigations of a single parathyroid adenoma. However the difference in diagnostic efficacy between the two groups was not found to be statistically significant therefore requiring further investigation. These findings have implications beyond the clinical situation described here.

  6. SU-C-9A-07: Fabrication and Calibration of a Novel High-Sensitivity Collimator for Brain SPECT Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Park, M; Kijewski, M; Horky, L; Moore, S; Keijzers, M; Keijzers, R; Kalfin, L; Crough, J; Goswami, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We have designed a novel collimator for brain SPECT imaging that yields greatly increased sensitivity near the center of the brain without loss of resolution. The collimator was manufactured and initial evaluation has been completed. Methods: The collimator was time-consuming and challenging to build. Because our desired hole pattern required substantial variations in hole angle, we designed two supporting plates to securely position about 34,000 hexagonal, slightly tapered, 75-mm long steel pins. The holes in the plates were modeled to yield the desired focal length, hole length and septal thickness. Molten lead was poured in between the plates, and all pins were removed after cooling. The sensitivity gain compared to a fan-beam collimator was measured using a point source placed along the central ray at several distances from the collimator face. Visual inspection of the holes was not possible as the collimator was sealed so it could be safely mounted on a SPECT system. Therefore, we prepared a 2D array of 768, ∼48μCi Tc-99m point sources, separated by 1.6 cm. The array was imaged for 10 minutes at 4 shifted locations to reduce sampling distance to 8 mm. Results: The sensitivity of the novel cone-beam collimator varied with distance from the detector face; it was higher than that of the fan-beam collimator by factors ranging from 3 to 176. Examination of the projections of the 4×768 point sources revealed that fewer than 2% of the holes were fully or partially blocked, which indicates that the intensive manual fabrication process was very successful. Conclusion: We have designed and manufactured a novel collimator for brain SPECT imaging. As expected, the sensitivity is much higher than that of a fan-beam collimator. Because of differences between the manufactured collimator and its design, reconstruction of the data will require a measured system function.

  7. Radiolabeled Cyclic RGD Peptides as Radiotracers for Imaging Tumors and Thrombosis by SPECT.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Liu, Shuang

    2011-01-01

    The integrin family is a group of transmembrane glycoprotein comprised of 19 α- and 8 β-subunits that are expressed in 25 different α/β heterodimeric combinations on the cell surface. Integrins play critical roles in many physiological processes, including cell attachment, proliferation, bone remodeling, and wound healing. Integrins also contribute to pathological events such as thrombosis, atherosclerosis, tumor invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis, infection by pathogenic microorganisms, and immune dysfunction. Among 25 members of the integrin family, the α(v)β(3) is studied most extensively for its role of tumor growth, progression and angiogenesis. In contrast, the α(IIb)β(3 )is expressed exclusively on platelets, facilitates the intercellular bidirectional signaling ("inside-out" and "outside-in") and allows the aggregation of platelets during vascular injury. The α(IIb)β(3) plays an important role in thrombosis by its activation and binding to fibrinogen especially in arterial thrombosis due to the high blood flow rate. In the resting state, the α(IIb)β(3) on platelets does not bind to fibrinogen; on activation, the conformation of platelet is altered and the binding sites of α(IIb)β(3 )are exposed for fibrinogen to crosslink platelets. Over the last two decades, integrins have been proposed as the molecular targets for diagnosis and therapy of cancer, thrombosis and other diseases. Several excellent review articles have appeared recently to cover a broad range of topics related to the integrin-targeted radiotracers and their nuclear medicine applications in tumor imaging by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or a positron-emitting radionuclide for positron emission tomography (PET). This review will focus on recent developments of α(v)β(3)-targeted radiotracers for imaging tumors and the use of α(IIb)β(3)-targeted radiotracers for thrombosis imaging, and discuss different approaches to maximize the targeting capability of

  8. Implementation and assessment of an animal management system for small-animal micro-CT / micro-SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdsworth, David W.; Detombe, Sarah A.; Chiodo, Chris; Fricke, Stanley T.; Drangova, Maria

    2011-03-01

    Advances in laboratory imaging systems for CT, SPECT, MRI, and PET facilitate routine micro-imaging during pre-clinical investigations. Challenges still arise when dealing with immune-compromised animals, biohazardous agents, and multi-modality imaging. These challenges can be overcome with an appropriate animal management system (AMS), with the capability for supporting and monitoring a rat or mouse during micro-imaging. We report the implementation and assessment of a new AMS system for mice (PRA-3000 / AHS-2750, ASI Instruments, Warren MI), designed to be compatible with a commercial micro-CT / micro-SPECT imaging system (eXplore speCZT, GE Healthcare, London ON). The AMS was assessed under the following criteria: 1) compatibility with the imaging system (i.e. artifact generation, geometric dimensions); 2) compatibility with live animals (i.e. positioning, temperature regulation, anesthetic supply); 3) monitoring capabilities (i.e. rectal temperature, respiratory and cardiac monitoring); 4) stability of co-registration; and 5) containment. Micro-CT scans performed using a standardized live-animal protocol (90 kVp, 40 mA, 900 views, 16 ms per view) exhibited low noise (+/-19 HU) and acceptable artifact from high-density components within the AMS (e.g. ECG pad contacts). Live mice were imaged repeatedly (with removal and replacement of the AMS) and spatial registration was found to be stable to within +/-0.07 mm. All animals tolerated enclosure within the AMS for extended periods (i.e. > one hour) without distress, based on continuous recordings of rectal temperature, ECG waveform and respiratory rate. A sealed AMS system extends the capability of a conventional micro-imaging system to include immune-compromised and biosafety level 2 mouse-imaging protocols.

  9. Pituitary Prolactinoma Imaged by 99mTc-Sestamibi SPECT/CT in a Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1 Patient.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yu; Lv, Jing; Guo, Rui; Pan, Mengyi; Zhang, Yifan

    2016-06-01

    A 35-year-old woman who had undergone bilateral inferior parathyroidectomy for primary hyperparathyroidism was referred to our hospital to evaluate the cause of irregular menses, galactorrhea, and paroxysmal headache. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 was then suspected for the high levels of plasma prolactin, parathyroid hormone, serum calcium, insulin, and related symptoms. A Tc-sestamibi SPECT/CT acquired to evaluate parathyroid glands unexpectedly revealed an increased accumulation in the pituitary gland, which was further confirmed by enhanced magnetic resonance imaging as a pituitary microadenoma. Bromocriptine treatment gradually reduced the prolactin level. PMID:26828146

  10. Synthesis of macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylates and their use for preparing stable radiometal antibody immunoconjugates for therapy, SPECT and PET imaging

    DOEpatents

    Mease, R.C.; Mausner, L.F.; Srivastava, S.C.

    1995-06-27

    A simple method for the synthesis of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane N,N{prime}N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane N,N{prime},N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid involves cyanomethylating 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane to form a tetranitrile and hydrolyzing the tetranitrile. These macrocyclic compounds are functionalized through one of the carboxylates and then conjugated to various biological molecules including monoclonal antibodies. The resulting conjugated molecules are labeled with radiometals for SPECT and PET imaging and for radiotherapy. 4 figs.

  11. Synthesis of macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylates and their use for preparing stable radiometal antibody immunoconjugates for therapy, spect and pet imaging

    DOEpatents

    Mease, Ronnie C.; Mausner, Leonard F.; Srivastava, Suresh C.

    1995-06-27

    A simple method for the synthesis of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane N,N'N",N'"-tetraacetic acid and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane N,N',N",N'"-tetraacetic acid involves cyanomethylating 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane to form a tetranitrile and hydrolyzing the tetranitrile. These macrocyclic compounds are functionalized through one of the carboxylates and then conjugated to various biological molecules including monoclonal antibodies. The resulting conjugated molecules are labeled with radiometals for SPECT and PET imaging and for radiotherapy.

  12. Longitudinal Evaluation of Fatty Acid Metabolism in Normal and Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat Hearts with Dynamic MicroSPECT Imaging

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Reutter, Bryan W.; Huesman, Ronald H.; Brennan, Kathleen M.; Boutchko, Rostyslav; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop radionuclide molecular imaging technologies using a clinical pinhole SPECT/CT scanner to quantify changes in cardiac metabolism using the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) as a model of hypertensive-related pathophysiology. This paper quantitatively compares fatty acid metabolism in hearts of SHR and Wistar-Kyoto normal rats as a function of age and thereby tracks physiological changes associated with the onset and progression of heart failure in the SHR model. The fatty acid analog, 123 I-labeled BMIPP, was used in longitudinal metabolic pinhole SPECT imaging studies performed every seven months for 21 months. The uniquenessmore » of this project is the development of techniques for estimating the blood input function from projection data acquired by a slowly rotating camera that is imaging fast circulation and the quantification of the kinetics of 123 I-BMIPP by fitting compartmental models to the blood and tissue time-activity curves.« less

  13. SPECT brain imaging of the dopaminergic system in Parkinsonism using {sup 123}I and {sup 99m}Tc labeled agents

    SciTech Connect

    Du Yong

    2004-12-01

    SPECT brain imaging of the dopaminergic system using {sup 123}I and {sup 99m}Tc labeled agents, especially the simultaneous imaging of both pre- and postsynaptic neurons, promises to provide accurate diagnosis and differentiation of Parkinsonism. However, there are many degrading factors that affect the quality and quantitative accuracy of the SPECT images. These degrading factors limit the potential clinical applications of brain SPECT imaging. In this work, we studied these degrading factors by developing and validating a Monte Carlo (MC) method that provides accurate SPECT simulation with detailed modeling of the photon interactions inside the collimator detector system. To compensate for the partial volume effect (PVE) in the SPECT images caused by finite spatial resolution, we developed a new PVE compensation method that takes into account the effects of nonlinearity in iterative reconstruction-based compensation for image degrading factors, including attenuation, scatter, and collimator detector response. Compensation using the new method greatly improved the quantitative accuracy of brain SPECT images. We have also developed model-based method that can accurately estimate the downscatter and crosstalk contamination in the {sup 123}I imaging and the simultaneous {sup 123}I/{sup 99m}Tc dual-isotope imaging. Based on the model-based method, two different approaches to model-based downscatter and crosstalk contamination compensation were proposed. Both methods are based on iterative reconstruction and include compensation for other imaging degrading factors. The model-based downscatter and crosstalk compensation method provided greatly improved accuracy of activity estimates with little effect on the precision. Finally, optimization of energy windows for simultaneous {sup 123}I/{sup 99m}Tc acquisition was performed to find the energy windows with the best trade-off between minimizing the crosstalk and maximizing the detection efficiency for simultaneous

  14. Versatile robotic probe calibration for position tracking in ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eirik Bø, Lars; Fagertun Hofstad, Erlend; Lindseth, Frank; Hernes, Toril A. N.

    2015-05-01

    Within the field of ultrasound-guided procedures, there are a number of methods for ultrasound probe calibration. While these methods are usually developed for a specific probe, they are in principle easily adapted to other probes. In practice, however, the adaptation often proves tedious and this is impractical in a research setting, where new probes are tested regularly. Therefore, we developed a method which can be applied to a large variety of probes without adaptation. The method used a robot arm to move a plastic sphere submerged in water through the ultrasound image plane, providing a slow and precise movement. The sphere was then segmented from the recorded ultrasound images using a MATLAB programme and the calibration matrix was computed based on this segmentation in combination with tracking information. The method was tested on three very different probes demonstrating both great versatility and high accuracy.

  15. Biphasic thallium 201 SPECT-imaging for the noninvasive diagnosis of myocardial perfusion abnormalities in a child with Kawasaki disease--a case report

    SciTech Connect

    Hausdorf, G.; Nienaber, C.A.; Spielman, R.P.

    1988-02-01

    The mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome (Kawasaki disease) is of increasing importance for the pediatric cardiologist, for coronary aneurysms with the potential of thrombosis and subsequent stenosis can develop in the course of the disease. The authors report a 2 1/2-year-old female child in whom, fourteen months after the acute phase of Kawasaki disease, myocardial infarction occurred. Biphasic thallium 201 SPECT-imaging using dipyridamole depicted anterior wall ischemia and inferolateral infarction. This case demonstrates that noninvasive vasodilation-redistribution thallium 201 SPECT-imaging has the potential to predict reversible myocardial perfusion defects and myocardial necrosis, even in small infants with Kawasaki disease.

  16. TH-C-17A-06: A Hardware Implementation and Evaluation of Robotic SPECT: Toward Molecular Imaging Onboard Radiation Therapy Machines

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, S; Touch, M; Bowsher, J; Yin, F; Cheng, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To construct a robotic SPECT system and demonstrate its capability to image a thorax phantom on a radiation therapy flat-top couch. The system has potential for on-board functional and molecular imaging in radiation therapy. Methods: A robotic SPECT imaging system was developed utilizing a Digirad 2020tc detector and a KUKA KR150-L110 robot. An imaging study was performed with the PET CT Phantom, which includes 5 spheres: 10, 13, 17, 22 and 28 mm in diameter. Sphere-tobackground concentration ratio was 6:1 of Tc99m. The phantom was placed on a flat-top couch. SPECT projections were acquired with a parallel-hole collimator and a single pinhole collimator. The robotic system navigated the detector tracing the flat-top table to maintain the closest possible proximity to the phantom. For image reconstruction, detector trajectories were described by six parameters: radius-of-rotation, x and z detector shifts, and detector rotation θ, tilt ϕ and twist γ. These six parameters were obtained from the robotic system by calibrating the robot base and tool coordinates. Results: The robotic SPECT system was able to maneuver parallel-hole and pinhole collimated SPECT detectors in close proximity to the phantom, minimizing impact of the flat-top couch on detector-to-COR (center-ofrotation) distance. In acquisitions with background at 1/6th sphere activity concentration, photopeak contamination was heavy, yet the 17, 22, and 28 mm diameter spheres were readily observed with the parallel hole imaging, and the single, targeted sphere (28 mm diameter) was readily observed in the pinhole region-of-interest (ROI) imaging. Conclusion: Onboard SPECT could be achieved by a robot maneuvering a SPECT detector about patients in position for radiation therapy on a flat-top couch. The robot inherent coordinate frame could be an effective means to estimate detector pose for use in SPECT image reconstruction. PHS/NIH/NCI grant R21-CA156390-01A1.

  17. Lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) intrinsic activity correction and minimal detectable target activity study for SPECT imaging with a LSO-based animal PET scanner.

    PubMed

    Yao, Rutao; Ma, Tianyu; Shao, Yiping

    2008-08-21

    This work is part of a feasibility study to develop SPECT imaging capability on a lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) based animal PET system. The SPECT acquisition was enabled by inserting a collimator assembly inside the detector ring and acquiring data in singles mode. The same LSO detectors were used for both PET and SPECT imaging. The intrinsic radioactivity of (176)Lu in the LSO crystals, however, contaminates the SPECT data, and can generate image artifacts and introduce quantification error. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of a LSO background subtraction method, and to estimate the minimal detectable target activity (MDTA) of image object for SPECT imaging. For LSO background correction, the LSO contribution in an image study was estimated based on a pre-measured long LSO background scan and subtracted prior to the image reconstruction. The MDTA was estimated in two ways. The empirical MDTA (eMDTA) was estimated from screening the tomographic images at different activity levels. The calculated MDTA (cMDTA) was estimated from using a formula based on applying a modified Currie equation on an average projection dataset. Two simulated and two experimental phantoms with different object activity distributions and levels were used in this study. The results showed that LSO background adds concentric ring artifacts to the reconstructed image, and the simple subtraction method can effectively remove these artifacts-the effect of the correction was more visible when the object activity level was near or above the eMDTA. For the four phantoms studied, the cMDTA was consistently about five times of the corresponding eMDTA. In summary, we implemented a simple LSO background subtraction method and demonstrated its effectiveness. The projection-based calculation formula yielded MDTA results that closely correlate with that obtained empirically and may have predicative value for imaging applications. PMID:18670052

  18. Lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) intrinsic activity correction and minimal detectable target activity study for SPECT imaging with a LSO-based animal PET scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Rutao; Ma, Tianyu; Shao, Yiping

    2008-08-01

    This work is part of a feasibility study to develop SPECT imaging capability on a lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) based animal PET system. The SPECT acquisition was enabled by inserting a collimator assembly inside the detector ring and acquiring data in singles mode. The same LSO detectors were used for both PET and SPECT imaging. The intrinsic radioactivity of 176Lu in the LSO crystals, however, contaminates the SPECT data, and can generate image artifacts and introduce quantification error. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of a LSO background subtraction method, and to estimate the minimal detectable target activity (MDTA) of image object for SPECT imaging. For LSO background correction, the LSO contribution in an image study was estimated based on a pre-measured long LSO background scan and subtracted prior to the image reconstruction. The MDTA was estimated in two ways. The empirical MDTA (eMDTA) was estimated from screening the tomographic images at different activity levels. The calculated MDTA (cMDTA) was estimated from using a formula based on applying a modified Currie equation on an average projection dataset. Two simulated and two experimental phantoms with different object activity distributions and levels were used in this study. The results showed that LSO background adds concentric ring artifacts to the reconstructed image, and the simple subtraction method can effectively remove these artifacts—the effect of the correction was more visible when the object activity level was near or above the eMDTA. For the four phantoms studied, the cMDTA was consistently about five times of the corresponding eMDTA. In summary, we implemented a simple LSO background subtraction method and demonstrated its effectiveness. The projection-based calculation formula yielded MDTA results that closely correlate with that obtained empirically and may have predicative value for imaging applications.

  19. Using the Wiener estimator to determine optimal imaging parameters in a synthetic-collimator SPECT system used for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Alexander; Johnson, Lindsay C.; Shokouhi, Sepideh; Peterson, Todd E.; Kupinski, Matthew A.

    2015-03-01

    In synthetic-collimator SPECT imaging, two detectors are placed at different distances behind a multi-pinhole aperture. This configuration allows for image detection at different magnifications and photon energies, resulting in higher overall sensitivity while maintaining high resolution. Image multiplexing the undesired overlapping between images due to photon origin uncertainty may occur in both detector planes and is often present in the second detector plane due to greater magnification. However, artifact-free image reconstruction is possible by combining data from both the front detector (little to no multiplexing) and the back detector (noticeable multiplexing). When the two detectors are used in tandem, spatial resolution is increased, allowing for a higher sensitivity-to-detector-area ratio. Due to variability in detector distances and pinhole spacings found in synthetic-collimator SPECT systems, a large parameter space must be examined to determine optimal imaging configurations. We chose to assess image quality based on the task of estimating activity in various regions of a mouse brain. Phantom objects were simulated using mouse brain data from the Magnetic Resonance Microimaging Neurological Atlas (MRM NeAt) and projected at different angles through models of a synthetic-collimator SPECT system, which was developed by collaborators at Vanderbilt University. Uptake in the different brain regions was modeled as being normally distributed about predetermined means and variances. We computed the performance of the Wiener estimator for the task of estimating activity in different regions of the mouse brain. Our results demonstrate the utility of the method for optimizing synthetic-collimator system design.

  20. SU-E-I-81: Targeting of HER2-Expressing Tumors with Dual PET-MR Imaging Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, P; Peng, Y; Sun, M; Yang, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The detection of human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) expression in malignant tumors provides important information influencing patient management. Radionuclide in vivo imaging of HER2 may permit the detection of HER2 in both primary tumors and metastases by a single noninvasive procedure. Trastuzumab, effective in about 15 % of women with breast cancer, downregulates signalling through the Akt/PI3K and MAPK pathways.These pathways modulate metabolism which can be monitored by positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: The relationship between response of HER2 overexpressing tumours and changes in imaging PET or SPECT and MRI will be examined by a integrated bimodal imaging probe.Small (7 kDa) high-affinity anti-HER2 Affibody molecules and KCCYSL targeting peptide may be suitable tracers for visualization of HER2-expressing tumors. Peptide-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) as MRI imaging and CB-TE2A as PET imaging are integrated into a single synthetic molecule in the HER2 positive cancer. Results: One of targeted contrast bimodal imaging probe agents was synthesized and evaluated to target HER2-expressing tumors in a HER2 positive rat model. We will report the newest results regarding the development of bimodal imaging probes. Conclusion: The preliminary results of the bimodal imaging probe presents high correlation of MRI signal and PET imaging intensity in vivo. This unique feature can hardly be obtained by single model contrast agents. It is envisioned that this bimodal agents can hold great potential for accurate detection of HER2-expressing tumors which are critical for clinical management of the disease.

  1. Improved image quality in pinhole SPECT by accurate modeling of the point spread function in low magnification systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pino, Francisco; Roé, Nuria; Aguiar, Pablo; Falcon, Carles; Ros, Domènec; Pavía, Javier

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has become an important noninvasive imaging technique in small-animal research. Due to the high resolution required in small-animal SPECT systems, the spatially variant system response needs to be included in the reconstruction algorithm. Accurate modeling of the system response should result in a major improvement in the quality of reconstructed images. The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess the impact that an accurate modeling of spatially variant collimator/detector response has on image-quality parameters, using a low magnification SPECT system equipped with a pinhole collimator and a small gamma camera. Methods: Three methods were used to model the point spread function (PSF). For the first, only the geometrical pinhole aperture was included in the PSF. For the second, the septal penetration through the pinhole collimator was added. In the third method, the measured intrinsic detector response was incorporated. Tomographic spatial resolution was evaluated and contrast, recovery coefficients, contrast-to-noise ratio, and noise were quantified using a custom-built NEMA NU 4–2008 image-quality phantom. Results: A high correlation was found between the experimental data corresponding to intrinsic detector response and the fitted values obtained by means of an asymmetric Gaussian distribution. For all PSF models, resolution improved as the distance from the point source to the center of the field of view increased and when the acquisition radius diminished. An improvement of resolution was observed after a minimum of five iterations when the PSF modeling included more corrections. Contrast, recovery coefficients, and contrast-to-noise ratio were better for the same level of noise in the image when more accurate models were included. Ring-type artifacts were observed when the number of iterations exceeded 12. Conclusions: Accurate modeling of the PSF improves resolution, contrast, and recovery

  2. Ectopic Intrathymic Parathyroid adenoma demonstrated on Tc-99m Sestamibi SPECT-CT.

    PubMed

    Usmani, S; Oteifa, M; Abu Huda, F; Javaid, A; Amanguno, H G; Al Kandari, F

    2016-05-01

    Intrathymic parathyroid adenoma is a rare cause of primary hyperparathyroidism. In this case, Tc-99m Sestamibi SPECT-CT successfully localized abnormal tracer uptake in the mediastinum with corresponding low density lesion on CT images suggestive of mediastinal parathyroid adenoma which late on confirmed on histopathology. After the median sternotomy a large intrathymic parathyroid adenoma was identified and excised. With the help of gamma probe the surgeons detect the lesion early and with more confidence as well as reducing the total operation time. Tc-99m Sestamibi SPECT-CT scintigraphy and gamma probe localization is recommended for preoperative and intra operative localization of ectopic parathyroid adenomas. PMID:27250890

  3. Clinical utility of three-dimensional SPECT/CT imaging as a guide for the resection of medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, H; Shiba, H; Kawana, H; Nakahara, T

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, proactive surgical treatment has been reported to be effective for medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ). However, an uncertain resection entails the risk of recurrence, whereas an extensive surgical procedure may lead to a marked reduction in quality of life as a result of reduced masticatory function and poor cosmesis. Therefore, radiological assessment can be helpful to accurately localize MRONJ before surgery. The integrated single-photon emission computed tomography and computed tomography system (SPECT/CT) allows oral and maxillofacial surgeons to identify an area of MRONJ, especially when three-dimensional (3D) SPECT and CT fusion images are offered. A patient for whom 3D SPECT and CT image fusion (as developed in the radiology department of the study institution) contributed to determining the extent of the lesion, thereby leading to a favourable patient prognosis, is reported herein. There was exact correlation between the histological and radiological results. PMID:26008732

  4. Variable resolution imaging fiber probe using digital spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Anant; Perinchery, Sandeep M.; Vadakke Matham, Murukeshan

    2015-07-01

    Flexible fiber optic imaging systems including fiber optic confocal probes have found tremendous significance in the recent past for its applications in high resolution imaging. However, motorized stage is required for scanning the sample or tip of the fiber in fiber based confocal probes. In this context, we propose a fiber probe confocal system using digital spatial light modulator devoid of using a mechanical scanning stage. Each fiberlet in the image fiber acts not only as a light conduit but also as a confocal pinhole. The paper also introduces the variation in the contrast by varying the number of illuminated fiberlets which effectively implies variation in the effective pinhole size. This approach has enabled the probe to act as an imaging unit with resolution that can be controlled and varied from a wide-field to a confocal.

  5. Carbon nanotube scanning probe for imaging in aqueous environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Ramsey M.; Nguyen, Cattien V.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) used as a probe for scanning probe microscopy has become one of the many potential usages of CNTs that is finding real applications in scientific research and industrial communities. It has been proposed that the unique mechanical buckling properties of the CNT would lessen the imaging force exerted on the sample and, thus, make CNT scanning probes ideal for imaging soft materials, including biological samples in liquid environments. The hydrophobic nature of the CNT graphitic sidewall is clearly chemically incompatible with the aqueous solution requirements in some biological imaging applications. In this paper, we present electron micrograph results demonstrating the instability of CNT scanning probes when submerged in aqueous solution. Moreover, we also introduce a novel approach to resolve this chemical incompatibility problem. By coating the CNT probe with ethylenediamine, thus rendering the CNT probe less hydrophobic, we demonstrate the liquid imaging capability of treated CNT probes. Experimental data for imaging in aqueous solutions are presented, which include an ultrathin Ir film and DNA molecules on a mica surface.

  6. Automatic detection of coronary artery disease in myocardial perfusion SPECT using image registration and voxel to voxel statistical comparisons.

    PubMed

    Peace, R A; Staff, R T; Gemmell, H G; McKiddie, F I; Metcalfe, M J

    2002-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of automatic detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) with that of expert observers. A male and female normal image template was constructed from normal stress technetium-99m single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies. Mean and standard deviation images for each sex were created by registering normal studies to a standard shape and position. The test group consisted of 104 patients who had been routinely referred for SPECT and angiography. The gold standard for CAD was defined by angiography. The test group studies were registered to the respective templates and the Z-score was calculated for each voxel. Voxels with a Z-score greater than 5 indicated the presence of CAD. The performance of this method and that of three observers were compared by continuous receiver operating characteristic (CROC) analysis. The overall sensitivity and specificity for automatic detection were 73% and 92%, respectively. The area (Az) under the CROC curve (+/-1 SE) for automatic detection of CAD was 0.88+/-0.06. There was no statistically significant difference between the performances of the three observers in terms of Az and that of automatic detection (P> or =0.25, univariate Z-score test). The use of this automated statistical mapping approach shows a performance comparable with experienced observers, but avoids inter-observer and intra-observer variability. PMID:12124485

  7. SU-C-201-06: Utility of Quantitative 3D SPECT/CT Imaging in Patient Specific Internal Dosimetry of 153-Samarium with GATE Monte Carlo Package

    SciTech Connect

    Fallahpoor, M; Abbasi, M; Sen, A; Parach, A; Kalantari, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Patient-specific 3-dimensional (3D) internal dosimetry in targeted radionuclide therapy is essential for efficient treatment. Two major steps to achieve reliable results are: 1) generating quantitative 3D images of radionuclide distribution and attenuation coefficients and 2) using a reliable method for dose calculation based on activity and attenuation map. In this research, internal dosimetry for 153-Samarium (153-Sm) was done by SPECT-CT images coupled GATE Monte Carlo package for internal dosimetry. Methods: A 50 years old woman with bone metastases from breast cancer was prescribed 153-Sm treatment (Gamma: 103keV and beta: 0.81MeV). A SPECT/CT scan was performed with the Siemens Simbia-T scanner. SPECT and CT images were registered using default registration software. SPECT quantification was achieved by compensating for all image degrading factors including body attenuation, Compton scattering and collimator-detector response (CDR). Triple energy window method was used to estimate and eliminate the scattered photons. Iterative ordered-subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) with correction for attenuation and distance-dependent CDR was used for image reconstruction. Bilinear energy mapping is used to convert Hounsfield units in CT image to attenuation map. Organ borders were defined by the itk-SNAP toolkit segmentation on CT image. GATE was then used for internal dose calculation. The Specific Absorbed Fractions (SAFs) and S-values were reported as MIRD schema. Results: The results showed that the largest SAFs and S-values are in osseous organs as expected. S-value for lung is the highest after spine that can be important in 153-Sm therapy. Conclusion: We presented the utility of SPECT-CT images and Monte Carlo for patient-specific dosimetry as a reliable and accurate method. It has several advantages over template-based methods or simplified dose estimation methods. With advent of high speed computers, Monte Carlo can be used for treatment planning

  8. A SPECT camera for combined MRI and SPECT for small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, D.; Wagenaar, D. J.; Chen, S.; Xu, J.; Yu, J.; Tsui, B. M. W.

    2011-10-01

    We describe an MR-compatible SPECT camera for small animals. The SPECT camera system can be inserted into the bore of a state-of-the-art MRI system and allows researchers to acquire tomographic images from a mouse in-vivo with the MRI and the SPECT acquiring simultaneously. The SPECT system provides functional information, while MRI provides anatomical information. Until today it was impossible to operate conventional SPECT inside the MRI because of mutual interference. The new SPECT technology is based on semiconductor radiation sensors (CZT, ASICs), and it fits into conventional high field MRI systems with a minimum 12-cm bore size. The SPECT camera has an MR-compatible multi-pinhole collimator for mice with a Ø25-mm field-of-view. For the work reported here we assembled a prototype SPECT camera system and acquired SPECT and MRI data from radioactive sources and resolution phantoms using the camera outside and inside the MRI.

  9. A SPECT Camera for Combined MRI and SPECT for Small Animals.

    PubMed

    Meier, D; Wagenaar, D J; Chen, S; Xu, J; Yu, J; Tsui, B M W

    2011-10-01

    We describe an MR-compatible SPECT camera for small animals. The SPECT camera system can be inserted into the bore of a state-of-the-art MRI system and allows researchers to acquire tomographic images from a mouse in-vivo with the MRI and the SPECT acquiring simultaneously. The SPECT system provides functional information, while MRI provides anatomical information. Until today it was impossible to operate conventional SPECT inside the MRI because of mutual interference. The new SPECT technology is based on semiconductor radiation sensors (CZT, ASICs), and it fits into conventional high field MRI systems with a minimum 12-cm bore size. The SPECT camera has an MR-compatible multi-pinhole collimator for mice with a ø25-mm field-of-view. For the work reported here we assembled a prototype SPECT camera system and acquired SPECT and MRI data from radioactive sources and resolution phantoms using the camera outside and inside the MRI. PMID:21966076

  10. A SPECT Camera for Combined MRI and SPECT for Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Meier, D.; Wagenaar, D. J.; Chen, S.; Xu, J.; Yu, J.; Tsui, B. M. W.

    2010-01-01

    We describe an MR-compatible SPECT camera for small animals. The SPECT camera system can be inserted into the bore of a state-of-the-art MRI system and allows researchers to acquire tomographic images from a mouse in-vivo with the MRI and the SPECT acquiring simultaneously. The SPECT system provides functional information, while MRI provides anatomical information. Until today it was impossible to operate conventional SPECT inside the MRI because of mutual interference. The new SPECT technology is based on semiconductor radiation sensors (CZT, ASICs), and it fits into conventional high field MRI systems with a minimum 12-cm bore size. The SPECT camera has an MR-compatible multi-pinhole collimator for mice with a ø25-mm field-of-view. For the work reported here we assembled a prototype SPECT camera system and acquired SPECT and MRI data from radioactive sources and resolution phantoms using the camera outside and inside the MRI. PMID:21966076

  11. Probe and object function reconstruction in incoherent stem imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Nellist, P.D.; Pennycook, S.J.

    1996-09-01

    Using the phase-object approximation it is shown how an annular dark- field (ADF) detector in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) leads to an image which can be described by an incoherent model. The point spread function is found to be simply the illuminating probe intensity. An important consequence of this is that there is no phase problem in the imaging process, which allows various image processing methods to be applied directly to the image intensity data. Using an image of a GaAs<110>, the probe intensity profile is reconstructed, confirming the existence of a 1.3 {Angstrom} probe in a 300kV STEM. It is shown that simply deconvolving this reconstructed probe from the image data does not improve its interpretability because the dominant effects of the imaging process arise simply from the restricted resolution of the microscope. However, use of the reconstructed probe in a maximum entropy reconstruction is demonstrated, which allows information beyond the resolution limit to be restored and does allow improved image interpretation.

  12. Image-guided surgery using multimodality strategy and molecular probes.

    PubMed

    Xi, Lei; Jiang, Hubei

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate goal of cancer surgery is to maximize the excision of tumorous tissue with minimal damage to the collateral normal tissues, reduce the postoperative recurrence, and improve the survival rate of patients. In order to locate tumor lesions, highlight tumor margins, visualize residual disease in the surgical wound, and map potential lymph node metastasis, various imaging techniques and molecular probes have been investigated to assist surgeons to perform more complete tumor resection. Combining imaging techniques with molecular probes is particularly promising as a new approach for image-guided surgery. Considering inherent limitations of different imaging techniques and insufficient sensitivity of nonspecific molecular probes, image-guided surgery with multimodality strategy and specific molecular probes appears to be an optimal choice. In this article, we briefly describe typical imaging techniques and molecular probes followed by a focused review on the current progress of multimodal image-guided surgery with specific molecular navigation. We also discuss optimal strategy that covers all stages of image-guided surgery including preoperative scanning of tumors, intraoperative inspection of surgical bed and postoperative care of patients. PMID:26053199

  13. Quantitative Upright–Supine High-Speed SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging for Detection of Coronary Artery Disease: Correlation with Invasive Coronary Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Nakazato, Ryo; Tamarappoo, Balaji K.; Kang, Xingping; Wolak, Arik; Kite, Faith; Hayes, Sean W.; Thomson, Louise E.J.; Friedman, John D.; Berman, Daniel S.; Slomka, Piotr J.

    2011-01-01

    A recently developed camera system for high-speed SPECT (HS-SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging shows excellent correlation with conventional SPECT. Our goal was to test the diagnostic accuracy of an automated quantification of combined upright and supine myocardial SPECT for detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) (≥70% luminal diameter stenosis or, in left main coronary artery, ≥50% luminal diameter stenosis) in comparison to invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Methods We studied 142 patients undergoing upright and supine HS-SPECT, including 56 consecutive patients (63% men; mean age 6 ± SD, 64 ± 13 y; 45% exercise stress) without known CAD who underwent diagnostic ICA within 6 mo of HS-SPECT and 86 consecutive patients with a low likelihood of CAD. Reference limits for upright and supine HS-SPECT were created from studies of patients with a low likelihood of CAD. Automated software adopted from supine–prone analysis was used to quantify the severity and extent of perfusion abnormality and was expressed as total perfusion deficit (TPD). TPD was obtained for upright (U-TPD), supine (S-TPD), and combined upright–supine acquisitions (C-TPD). Stress U-TPD ≥ 5%, S-TPD ≥ 5%, and C-TPD ≥ 3% myocardium were considered abnormal for per-patient analysis, and U-TPD, S-TPD, and C-TPD ≥ 2% in each coronary artery territory were considered abnormal for per-vessel analysis. Results On a per-patient basis, the sensitivity was 91%, 88%, and 94% for U-TPD, S-TPD, and C-TPD, respectively, and specificity was 59%, 73%, and 86% for U-TPD, S-TPD, and C-TPD, respectively. C-TPD had a larger area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve than U-TPD or S-TPD for identification of stenosis ≥ 70% (0.94 vs. 0.88 and 0.89, P < 0.05 and not significant, respectively). On a per-vessel basis, the sensitivity was 67%, 66%, and 69% for U-TPD, S-TPD, and C-TPD, respectively, and specificity was 91%, 94%, and 97% for U-TPD, S-TPD, and C-TPD, respectively (P = 0

  14. Infrared hollow optical fiber probes for reflectance spectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chenhui; Kino, Saiko; Katagiri, Takashi; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-05-10

    Systems for infrared reflectance imaging are built with an FT-IR spectrometer, hollow optical fibers, and a high-speed infrared camera. To obtain reflectance images of biological samples, an optical fiber probe equipped with a light source at the distal end and a hybrid fiber probe composed of fibers for beam radiation and ones for image detection have been developed. By using these systems, reflectance spectral images of lipid painted on biomedical hard tissue, which provides reflectance of around 4%, are successfully acquired. PMID:25967522

  15. Shielding of Piezoelectric Ultrasonic Probes in Hall Effect Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Han; Bennett, Eric; Wiesler, David G.

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses significant sources of electromagnetic noise in Hall effect imaging. Hall effect imaging employs large electrical pulses for signal generation and high sensitivity ultrasonic probes for signal reception. Coherent noise arises through various coupling mechanisms between the excitation pulse and the probe. In this paper, the coupling mechanisms are experimentally isolated and theoretically analyzed. Several methods of shielding the probe from electromagnetic interference are devised and tested. These methods are able to reduce the noise to levels below the random thermal noise, thereby improving the signal-to-noise ratio in HEI by two orders of magnitude. PMID:9921620

  16. Fluorogenic Probes for Multicolor Imaging in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Lukinavičius, Gražvydas; Reymond, Luc; Umezawa, Keitaro; Sallin, Olivier; D'Este, Elisa; Göttfert, Fabian; Ta, Haisen; Hell, Stefan W; Urano, Yasuteru; Johnsson, Kai

    2016-08-01

    Here we present a far-red, silicon-rhodamine-based fluorophore (SiR700) for live-cell multicolor imaging. SiR700 has excitation and emission maxima at 690 and 715 nm, respectively. SiR700-based probes for F-actin, microtubules, lysosomes, and SNAP-tag are fluorogenic, cell-permeable, and compatible with superresolution microscopy. In conjunction with probes based on the previously introduced carboxy-SiR650, SiR700-based probes permit multicolor live-cell superresolution microscopy in the far-red, thus significantly expanding our capacity for imaging living cells. PMID:27420907

  17. Spatial-scanning hyperspectral imaging probe for bio-imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hoong-Ta; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-03-01

    The three common methods to perform hyperspectral imaging are the spatial-scanning, spectral-scanning, and snapshot methods. However, only the spectral-scanning and snapshot methods have been configured to a hyperspectral imaging probe as of today. This paper presents a spatial-scanning (pushbroom) hyperspectral imaging probe, which is realized by integrating a pushbroom hyperspectral imager with an imaging probe. The proposed hyperspectral imaging probe can also function as an endoscopic probe by integrating a custom fabricated image fiber bundle unit. The imaging probe is configured by incorporating a gradient-index lens at the end face of an image fiber bundle that consists of about 50 000 individual fiberlets. The necessary simulations, methodology, and detailed instrumentation aspects that are carried out are explained followed by assessing the developed probe's performance. Resolution test targets such as United States Air Force chart as well as bio-samples such as chicken breast tissue with blood clot are used as test samples for resolution analysis and for performance validation. This system is built on a pushbroom hyperspectral imaging system with a video camera and has the advantage of acquiring information from a large number of spectral bands with selectable region of interest. The advantages of this spatial-scanning hyperspectral imaging probe can be extended to test samples or tissues residing in regions that are difficult to access with potential diagnostic bio-imaging applications.

  18. A SPECT Imaging Study Of Driving Impairment In Patients With Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Brian R.; Heindel, William C.; Whelihan, William M.; Caron, Mark D.; Piatt, Andrea L.; Noto, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was used in this study to examine the neurophysiologic basis of driving impairment in 79 subjects with dementia. Driving impairment, as measured by caregiver ratings, was significantly related to regional reduction of right hemisphere cortical perfusion on SPECT, particularly in the temporo-occipital area. With increased severity of driving impairment, frontal cortical perfusion was also reduced. Clock drawing was more significantly related to driving impairment than the Mini-Mental State Examination. Driving impairment in Alzheimer's disease is related to changes in cortical function which vary according to severity of disease. Cognitive tests of visuoperceptual and executive functions may be more useful screening tools for identifying those at greatest risk for driving problems than examinations like the Mini-Mental State Examination, that are weighted toward left hemisphere based verbal tasks. PMID:10765046

  19. Imaging resolution of AFM with probes modified with FIB.

    PubMed

    Skibinski, J; Rebis, J; Wejrzanowski, T; Rozniatowski, K; Pressard, K; Kurzydlowski, K J

    2014-11-01

    This study concerns imaging of the structure of materials using AFM tapping (TM) and phase imaging (PI) mode, using probes modified with focused ion beam (FIB). Three kinds of modifications were applied - thinning of the cantilever, sharpening of the tip and combination of these two modifications. Probes shaped in that way were used for AFM investigations with Bruker AFM Nanoscope 8. As a testing material, titanium roughness standard supplied by Bruker was used. The results show that performed modifications influence the oscillation of the probes. In particular thinning of the cantilever enables one to acquire higher self-resonant frequencies, which can be advantageous for improving the quality of imaging in PI mode. It was found that sharpening the tip improves imaging resolution in tapping mode, which is consistent with existing knowledge, but lowered the quality of high frequency topography images. In this paper the Finite Element Method (FEM) was used to explain the results obtained experimentally. PMID:25080273

  20. Feasibility study of SPECT system for online dosimetry imaging in boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Hales, B; Katabuchi, T; Hayashizaki, N; Terada, K; Igashira, M; Kobayashi, T

    2014-06-01

    A single collimator version of a proposed PG-SPECT system was manufactured and experimentally tested. Combining this experimental data with Monte Carlo simulation, the viability of Ge and CdTe semiconductors detectors was calculated. It was determined that the best detector of the ones compared would be a CdTe detector of 2-3mm, aided by the benefit of adding a Compton-suppression anti-coincidence timing detector. PMID:24378365

  1. (99m)Tc(N)-DBODC(5), a potential radiolabeled probe for SPECT of multidrug resistance: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Bolzati, Cristina; Carta, Davide; Gandin, Valentina; Marzano, Cristina; Morellato, Nicolò; Salvarese, Nicola; Cantore, Mariangela; Colabufo, Nicola Antonio

    2013-06-01

    [(99m)Tc(N)(DBODC)(PNP5)](+) [DBODC is bis(N-ethoxyethyl)dithiocarbamato; PNP5 is bis(dimethoxypropylphosphinoethyl)ethoxyethylamine], abbreviated as (99m)Tc(N)-DBODC(5), is a lipophilic cationic mixed compound investigated as a myocardial imaging agent. The findings that this tracer accumulates in mitochondrial structures through a mechanism mediated by the negative mitochondrial membrane potential and that the rapid efflux of (99m)Tc(N)-DBODC(5) from nontarget tissues seems to be associated with the multidrug resistance (MDR) P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transport function open up the possibility to extend its clinical applications to tumor imaging and noninvasive MDR studies. The rate of uptake at 4 and 37 °C of (99m)Tc(N)-DBODC(5) was evaluated in vitro in selected human cancer cell lines and in the corresponding sublines before and after P-gp and/or MDR-associated protein (MRP) modulator/inhibitor treatment using (99m)Tc-sestamibi as a reference. The results indicated that (1) the uptake of both (99m)Tc(N)-DBODC(5) and (99m)Tc-sestamibi is correlated to metabolic activity of the cells and (2) the cellular accumulation is connected to the level of P-gp/MRP expression; in fact, an enhancement of uptake in resistant cells was observed after treatment with opportune MDR inhibitor/modulator, indicating that the selective blockade of P-gp/MRP prevented efflux of the tracers. This study provides a preliminary indication of the applicability of (99m)Tc(N)-DBODC(5) in tumor imaging and in detecting P-gp/MRP-mediated drug resistance in human cancer. In addition, the possibility to control the hydrophobicity and pharmacological activity of this heterocomplex through the variation of the substituents on the ligands backbone without affecting the P2S2 coordinating sphere makes (99m)Tc(N)-DBODC(5) a suitable scaffold for the preparation of a molecular probe for single photon emission computed tomography of MDR. PMID:23543234

  2. MRI/SPECT/Fluorescent Tri-Modal Probe for Evaluating the Homing and Therapeutic Efficacy of Transplanted Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Rat Ischemic Stroke Model

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yaohui; Wang, Jixian; Lin, Xiaojie; Zhang, Lu; Yang, Yi; Wang, Yongting; Zhang, Zhijun; Bulte, Jeff W. M.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitatively tracking engraftment of intracerebrally or intravenously transplanted stem cells and evaluating their concomitant therapeutic efficacy for stroke has been a challenge in the field of stem cell therapy. In this study, first, an MRI/SPECT/fluorescent tri-modal probe (125I-fSiO4@SPIOs) is synthesized for quantitatively tracking mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplanted intracerebrally or intravenously into stroke rats, and then the therapeutic efficacy of MSCs delivered by both routes and the possible mechanism of the therapy are evaluated. It is demonstrated that (125)I-fSiO4@SPIOs have high efficiency for labeling MSCs without affecting their viability, differentiation, and proliferation capacity, and found that 35% of intracerebrally injected MSCs migrate along the corpus callosum to the lesion area, while 90% of intravenously injected MSCs remain trapped in the lung at 14 days after MSC transplantation. However, neurobehavioral outcomes are significantly improved in both transplantation groups, which are accompanied by increases of vascular endothelial growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-3 in blood, lung, and brain tissue (p < 0.05). The study demonstrates that 125I-fSiO4@SPIOs are robust probe for long-term tracking of MSCs in the treatment of ischemic brain and MSCs delivered via both routes improve neurobehavioral outcomes in ischemic rats. PMID:26290659

  3. Time of flight diffraction imaging for double-probe technique.

    PubMed

    Chang, Young-Fo; Hsieh, Cheng-I

    2002-06-01

    Due to rapid progress in microelectronics and computer technologies, the system evolving from analog to digital, and a programmable and flexible synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) for the single-probe pulse-echo imaging technique of ultrasonic nondestructive testing (NDT) becomes feasible. The double-probe reflection technique usually is used to detect the nonhorizontal flaws in the ultrasonic NDT. Because there is an offset between the transmitter and receiver, the position and size of the flaw cannot be directly read from the image. Therefore, a digital signal processing (DSP) imaging method is proposed to process the ultrasonic image obtained by double-probe reflection technique. In the imaging, the signal is redistributed on an ellipsoid with the transmitter and receiver positions as focuses, and the traveltime sum for the echo from the ellipsoid to the focuses as the traveltime of signal. After redistributing all the signals, the useful signals can be constructively added in some point in which the reflected point is; otherwise, the signals will be destructively added. Therefore, the image resolution of the flaw can be improved and the position and size of the flaw can be estimated directly from the processed image. Based on the experimental results, the steep flaw (45 degrees) cannot be detected by the pulse echo technique but can be detected by the double-probe method, and the double-probe B-scan image of 30 degrees tilted crack is clearer than the pulse echo B-scan image. However, the flaw image departs from its true position greatly. After processing, the steep flaw image can be moved to its true position. When the flaws are not greater than the probe largely, the sizes of the flaws are difficult to be discriminated in both pulse echo and double-probe B-scan images. In the processed double-probe B-scan image, the size of the flaws can be estimated successfully, and the images of the flaws are close to their true shape. PMID:12075969

  4. Functional imaging of brain maturation in humans using iodine-123 iodoamphetamine and SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, M.; Denays, R.; Ham, H.R.; Piepsz, A.; VanPachterbeke, T.; Haumont, D.; Nol, P. )

    1989-12-01

    The application of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) study by means of lipophilic radiotracers and single photon emission computed (SPECT) devices in very young infants is hampered by the considerable changes of rCBF pattern as a result of the cerebral maturation process. In an attempt to determine the normal evolution of ({sup 123}I)IMP SPECT pattern as a function of age, we retrospectively selected the studies of 30 babies with normal clinical examination, EEG and CT or ultrasound scans at time of SPECT. There was a marked predominance of the thalamic perfusion over cortical areas until the end of the second month. The distribution of regional cortical activity followed a strict sequence. The perfusion of both parietal and occipital areas was well-visualized around the 40th week of gestational age and thereafter rapidly rose, always, however, with a slight predominance of the parietal activity. At the opposite, frontal activity which remained scarcely recognizable up to the second month tremendously rose to present the adult-like pattern at the beginning of the second year. The rCBF changes described above are well in agreement with the behavioral evolution occurring during prime infancy.

  5. (99m)Tc-Labeled Multifunctional Low-Generation Dendrimer-Entrapped Gold Nanoparticles for Targeted SPECT/CT Dual-Mode Imaging of Tumors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Xiong, Zuogang; Xu, Xiaoying; Luo, Yu; Peng, Chen; Shen, Mingwu; Shi, Xiangyang

    2016-08-10

    Development of cost-effective and highly efficient nanoprobes for targeted tumor single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) dual-mode imaging remains a challenging task. Here, multifunctional dendrimer-entrapped gold nanoparticles (Au DENPs) modified with folic acid (FA) and labeled with (99m)Tc were synthesized for targeted dual-mode SPECT/CT imaging of tumors. Generation 2 (G2) poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers (G2-NH2) conjugated with cyclic diethylenetriamine pentaacetic anhydride (cDTPAA) via an amide linkage and FA via a spacer of polyethylene glycol (PEG) were used for templated synthesis of Au core NPs, followed by labeling of (99m)Tc via chelation. The thus created multifunctional Au DENPs were well-characterized. It is shown that particles with an average Au core diameter of 1.6 nm can be dispersed in water, display stability under different conditions, and are cytocompatible in the studied concentration range. Further results demonstrate that the multifunctional nanoprobe is able to be utilized for targeted SPECT/CT dual-mode imaging of cancer cells having FA receptor (FAR)-overexpression in vitro and the established subcutaneous tumor model in vivo within a time frame up to 4 h. The formed multifunctional Au DENPs synthesized using dendrimers of low-generation may be employed as an effective and economic nanoprobe for SPECT/CT imaging of different types of FAR-expressing tumors. PMID:27434031

  6. A dual-labeled Annexin A5 is not suited for SPECT imaging of brain cell death in experimental murine stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zille, Marietta; Harhausen, Denise; De Saint-Hubert, Marijke; Michel, Roger; Reutelingsperger, Chris P; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Wunder, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Cell death is one of the pathophysiological hallmarks after stroke. Markers to image cell death pathways in vivo are highly desirable. We previously showed that fluorescently labeled Annexin A5 (AnxA5), which binds specifically to phosphatidylserine (PS) on dead/dying cells, can be used in experimental stroke for monitoring cell death with optical imaging. Here we investigated whether dual-labeled AnxA5 (technetium and fluorescence label) can be used for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of cell death in the same model. C57Bl6/N mice were subjected to 60-minute middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and underwent SPECT imaging at 24, 48, and 72 hours afterwards. They were injected intravenously with either PS-binding AnxA5 or the nonfunctional AnxA5 (negative control), labeled with 99mTc and Alexa Fluor 568, respectively. After SPECT imaging, brain sections were cut for autoradiography and fluorescence microscopy. Ethanol-induced cell death in the femur muscle was used as positive control. We detected dual-labeled AnxA5 in the model of ethanol-induced cell death in the femur muscle, but not after MCAO at any time point, either with SPECT or with ex vivo autoradiography or fluorescence microscopy. Dual-labeled AnxA5 appears to be unsuited for visualizing death of brain cells in this MCAO model. PMID:24984896

  7. Quantifying the optical properties of turbid media using polarization sensitive hyperspectral imaging (SkinSpect): two-layer optical phantom studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasefi, Fartash; MacKinnon, Nicholas; Saager, Rolf; Durkin, Anthony J.; Chave, Robert; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2015-03-01

    A polarization-sensitive hyperspectral imaging system (SkinSpect) has been built and evaluated using two-layer tissue phantoms, fabricated to mimic the optical properties of melanin in different epidermal thickness and hemoglobin in dermal layers. Multiple tissue-mimicking phantoms with varying top layer thicknesses were measured for optical system calibration and performance testing. Phantom properties were characterized and validated using SkinSpect. The resulting analysis shows that the proposed system is capable of distinguishing and differentiating the layer-dependent absorption spectra and the depths at which this absorption occurs.

  8. Sci—Thur PM: Imaging — 05: Calibration of a SPECT/CT camera for quantitative SPECT with {sup 99m}Tc

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudin, Émilie; Montégiani, Jean-François; Després, Philippe; Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu

    2014-08-15

    While quantitation is the norm in PET, it is not widely available yet in SPECT. This work's aim was to calibrate a commercially available SPECT/CT system to perform quantitative SPECT. Counting sensitivity, dead-time (DT) constant and partial volume effect (PVE) of the system were assessed. A dual-head Siemens SymbiaT6 SPECT/CT camera equipped with low energy high-resolution collimators was studied. {sup 99m}Tc was the radioisotope of interest because of its wide usage in nuclear medicine. First, point source acquisitions were performed (activity: 30–990MBq). Further acquisitions were then performed with a uniform Jaszczak phantom filled with water at high activity (25–5000MBq). PVE was studied using 6 hot spheres (diameters: 9.9–31.2 mm) filled with {sup 99m}Tc (2.8MBq/cc) in the Jaszczak phantom, which was: (1) empty, (2) water-filled and (3) water-filled with low activity (0.1MBq/cc). The data was reconstructed with the Siemens's Flash3D iterative algorithm with 4 subsets and 8 iterations, attenuation-correction (AC) and scatter-correction (SC). DT modelling was based on the total spectrum counting rate. Sensitivity was assessed using AC-SC reconstructed SPECT data. Sensitivity and DT for the sources were 99.51±1.46cps/MBq and 0.60±0.04µs. For the phantom, sensitivity and DT were 109.9±2.3cps/MBq and 0.62±0.13µs. The recovery-coefficient varied from 5% for the 9.9mm, to 80% for the 31.2mm spheres. With our calibration methods, both sensitivity and DT constant of the SPECT camera had little dependence on the object geometry and attenuation. For small objects of known size, recovery-coefficient can be applied to correct PVE. Clinical quantitative SPECT appears to be possible and has many potential applications.

  9. Simultaneous Technetium-99m/Thallium-201 SPECT Imaging with Model-Based Compensation for Cross-Contaminating Effects

    PubMed Central

    Kadrmas, Dan J.; Frey, Eric C.; Tsui, Benjamin M.W.

    2009-01-01

    Simultaneous acquisition of dual-isotope SPECT data offers a number of advantages over separately acquired data; however, simultaneous acquisition can result in cross-contamination between isotopes. In this work we propose and evaluate two frameworks for iterative model-based compensation of cross-contamination in dual-isotope SPECT. The methods were applied to cardiac imaging with Technetium-99m-sestamibi and Thallium-201, and they were compared to a subtraction-based compensation method using a cross-talk estimate obtained from an auxiliary energy window. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to carefully study aspects of bias and noise for the methods, and a torso phantom with cardiac insert was used to evaluate the performance of the methods for experimentally acquired data. The cross-talk compensation methods substantially improved lesion contrast and significantly reduced quantitative errors for simultaneously acquired data. Thallium image normalized mean square error (NMSE) was reduced from 0.522 without cross-talk compensation to as low as 0.052 with model-based cross-talk compensation. This is compared to a NMSE of 0.091 for the subtraction-based compensation method. The application of a preliminary model for crosstalk arising from lead fluorescence x-rays and collimator scatter gave promising results, and the future development of a more accurate model for collimator interactions would likely benefit simultaneous Tc/Tl imaging. Model-based compensation methods provide feasible cross-talk compensation in clinically acceptable times, and they may ultimately make simultaneous dual-isotope protocols an effective alternative for many imaging procedures. PMID:10442716

  10. 3D dosimetry estimation for selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) using SPECT/CT images: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debebe, Senait A.; Franquiz, Juan; McGoron, Anthony J.

    2015-03-01

    Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) is a common way to treat liver cancer that cannot be treated surgically. SIRT involves administration of Yttrium - 90 (90Y) microspheres via the hepatic artery after a diagnostic procedure using 99mTechnetium (Tc)-macroaggregated albumin (MAA) to detect extrahepatic shunting to the lung or the gastrointestinal tract. Accurate quantification of radionuclide administered to patients and radiation dose absorbed by different organs is of importance in SIRT. Accurate dosimetry for SIRT allows optimization of dose delivery to the target tumor and may allow for the ability to assess the efficacy of the treatment. In this study, we proposed a method that can efficiently estimate radiation absorbed dose from 90Y bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT images of liver and the surrounding organs. Bremsstrahlung radiation from 90Y was simulated using the Compton window of 99mTc (78keV at 57%). 99mTc images acquired at the photopeak energy window were used as a standard to examine the accuracy of dosimetry prediction by the simulated bremsstrahlung images. A Liqui-Phil abdominal phantom with liver, stomach and two tumor inserts was imaged using a Philips SPECT/CT scanner. The Dose Point Kernel convolution method was used to find the radiation absorbed dose at a voxel level for a three dimensional dose distribution. This method will allow for a complete estimate of the distribution of radiation absorbed dose by tumors, liver, stomach and other surrounding organs at the voxel level. The method provides a quantitative predictive method for SIRT treatment outcome and administered dose response for patients who undergo the treatment.

  11. Comparison of technetium-99m pyrophosphate and technetium-99m DTPA aerosols for SPECT ventilation lung imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Isitman, A.T.; Collier, B.D.; Palmer, D.W.; Trembath, L.; Krasnow, A.Z.; Rao, S.A.; Hellman, R.S.; Hoffmann, R.G.; Peck, D.C.; Dellis, C.J.

    1988-11-01

    Although (/sup 99m/Tc) diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) is currently the most widely used radioaerosol, rapid alveolar clearance limits its usefulness for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) ventilation lung imaging. Previous research has shown that (/sup 99m/Tc)phosphate compounds have high alveolar deposition and slow clearance and thus provide suitable aerosols for pulmonary ventilation studies. We have compared the pulmonary retention and blood levels of (/sup 99m/Tc)pyrophosphate (PYP) and (99mTc)DTPA in eight normal nonsmoking male volunteers. These two radioaerosols have comparable pulmonary deposition. Technetium-99m PYP, however, has a much slower pulmonary clearance which allows sufficient time (20 or more minutes) for SPECT data acquisition using a single-headed rotating gamma camera. While the radiation absorbed dose to the lungs for (/sup 99m/Tc)PYP (0.31 rad/mCi) is greater than for (/sup 99m/Tc)DTPA (0.11 rad/mCi), it is at a clinically acceptable and safe level.

  12. A Point-Scoring System for the Clinical Diagnosis of Sjögren's Syndrome Based on Quantified SPECT Imaging of Salivary Gland

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Zhao, Xia; Liu, Haixia; Zhou, Sheng; Yang, Yunqiang; Li, Shouxin; Xianyu, Zhiqun; Han, Yunfeng; Shen, Guifen; Li, Jinming; Ye, Cong; Sun, Wei; Dong, Lingli

    2016-01-01

    Objective To establish a point-scoring diagnostic system for Sjögren's syndrome (SS) based on quantified SPECT imaging of salivary gland, and evaluate its feasibility and performance compared with 2002 AECG criteria and 2012 ACR criteria. Methods 213 patients with suspected SS enrolled in this study. The related clinical data of all patients were collected. All patients were evaluated and grouped on a clinical basis and posttreatment follow-up by rheumatology specialists as the unified standard (SS group with 149 cases and nSS group with 64 cases). From SPECT imaging of salivary gland, Tmax, UImax, Ts and EFs were derived for bilateral parotid and submandibular glands, and compared between the groups. A point-scoring diagnostic system for SS was established based on the quantified SPECT imaging of salivary gland. We estimated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy for the new diagnostic system, compared with 2002 AECG criteria and 2012 ACR criteria. Results When 7.0 was used as the cut-off point, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy for the new point-scoring system in diagnosing SS were 89.93% (134/149), 93.75% (60/64), 97.10% (134/138), 80.00% (60/75) and 91.08% (194/213), respectively. The new point-scoring diagnostic system based on quantified SPECT imaging of salivary gland keeps the specificity comparatively to 2002 AECG criteria and 2012 ACR criteria, but improves the sensitivity significantly (P<0.01). Conclusion The new point-scoring diagnostic system for SS based on quantified SPECT imaging of salivary gland may be superior to 2002 AECG criteria and 2012 ACR criteria, with higher sensitivity and similar specificity in the diagnosis of SS. Additionally, it also has good feasibility in the clinical settings. PMID:27195488

  13. Comparison of Gated SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging with Echocardiography for the Measurement of Left Ventricular Volumes and Ejection Fraction in Patients With Severe Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Shojaeifard, Maryam; Ghaedian, Tahereh; Yaghoobi, Nahid; Malek, Hadi; Firoozabadi, Hasan; Bitarafan-Rajabi, Ahmad; Haghjoo, Majid; Amin, Ahmad; Azizian, Nasrin; Rastgou, Feridoon

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gated single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is known as a feasible tool for the measurement of left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) and volumes, which are of great importance in the management and follow-up of patients with coronary artery diseases. However, considering the technical shortcomings of SPECT in the presence of perfusion defect, the accuracy of this method in heart failure patients is still controversial. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to compare the results from gated SPECT MPI with those from echocardiography in heart failure patients to compare echocardiographically-derived left ventricular dimension and function data to those from gated SPECT MPI in heart failure patients. Patients and Methods: Forty-one patients with severely reduced left ventricular systolic function (EF ≤ 35%) who were referred for gated SPECT MPI were prospectively enrolled. Quantification of EF, end-diastolic volume (EDV), and end-systolic volume (ESV) was performed by using quantitative gated spect (QGS) (QGS, version 0.4, May 2009) and emory cardiac toolbox (ECTb) (ECTb, revision 1.0, copyright 2007) software packages. EF, EDV, and ESV were also measured with two-dimensional echocardiography within 3 days after MPI. Results: A good correlation was found between echocardiographically-derived EF, EDV, and ESV and the values derived using QGS (r = 0.67, r = 0.78, and r = 0.80 for EF, EDV, and ESV, respectively; P < 0.001) and ECTb (r = 0.68, 0.79, and r = 0.80 for EF, EDV, and ESV, respectively; P < 0.001). However, Bland-Altman plots indicated significantly different mean values for EF, 11.4 and 20.9 using QGS and ECTb, respectively, as compared with echocardiography. ECTb-derived EDV was also significantly higher than the EDV measured with echocardiography and QGS. The highest correlation between echocardiography and gated SPECT MPI was found for mean values of ESV different. Conclusions: Gated

  14. Radiosynthesis, In Vivo Biological Evaluation, and Imaging of Brain Lesions with [123I]-CLINME, a New SPECT Tracer for the Translocator Protein.

    PubMed

    Mattner, F; Quinlivan, M; Greguric, I; Pham, T; Liu, X; Jackson, T; Berghofer, P; Fookes, C J R; Dikic, B; Gregoire, M-C; Dolle, F; Katsifis, A

    2015-01-01

    The high affinity translocator protein (TSPO) ligand 6-chloro-2-(4'-iodophenyl)-3-(N,N-methylethyl)imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-3-acetamide (CLINME) was radiolabelled with iodine-123 and assessed for its sensitivity for the TSPO in rodents. Moreover neuroinflammatory changes on a unilateral excitotoxic lesion rat model were detected using SPECT imaging. [(123)I]-CLINME was prepared in 70-80% radiochemical yield. The uptake of [(123)I]-CLINME was evaluated in rats by biodistribution, competition, and metabolite studies. The unilateral excitotoxic lesion was performed by injection of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid unilaterally into the striatum. The striatum lesion was confirmed and correlated with TSPO expression in astrocytes and activated microglia by immunohistochemistry and autoradiography. In vivo studies with [(123)I]-CLINME indicated a biodistribution pattern consistent with TPSO distribution and the competition studies with PK11195 and Ro 5-4864 showed that [(123)I]-CLINME is selective for this site. The metabolite study showed that the extractable radioactivity was unchanged [(123)I]-CLINME in organs which expresses TSPO. SPECT/CT imaging on the unilateral excitotoxic lesion indicated that the mean ratio uptake in striatum (lesion:nonlesion) was 2.2. Moreover, TSPO changes observed by SPECT imaging were confirmed by immunofluorescence, immunochemistry, and autoradiography. These results indicated that [(123)I]-CLINME is a promising candidate for the quantification and visualization of TPSO expression in activated astroglia using SPECT. PMID:26199457

  15. Radiosynthesis, In Vivo Biological Evaluation, and Imaging of Brain Lesions with [123I]-CLINME, a New SPECT Tracer for the Translocator Protein

    PubMed Central

    Mattner, F.; Quinlivan, M.; Greguric, I.; Pham, T.; Liu, X.; Jackson, T.; Berghofer, P.; Fookes, C. J. R.; Dikic, B.; Gregoire, M.-C.; Dolle, F.; Katsifis, A.

    2015-01-01

    The high affinity translocator protein (TSPO) ligand 6-chloro-2-(4′-iodophenyl)-3-(N,N-methylethyl)imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-3-acetamide (CLINME) was radiolabelled with iodine-123 and assessed for its sensitivity for the TSPO in rodents. Moreover neuroinflammatory changes on a unilateral excitotoxic lesion rat model were detected using SPECT imaging. [123I]-CLINME was prepared in 70–80% radiochemical yield. The uptake of [123I]-CLINME was evaluated in rats by biodistribution, competition, and metabolite studies. The unilateral excitotoxic lesion was performed by injection of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid unilaterally into the striatum. The striatum lesion was confirmed and correlated with TSPO expression in astrocytes and activated microglia by immunohistochemistry and autoradiography. In vivo studies with [123I]-CLINME indicated a biodistribution pattern consistent with TPSO distribution and the competition studies with PK11195 and Ro 5-4864 showed that [123I]-CLINME is selective for this site. The metabolite study showed that the extractable radioactivity was unchanged [123I]-CLINME in organs which expresses TSPO. SPECT/CT imaging on the unilateral excitotoxic lesion indicated that the mean ratio uptake in striatum (lesion : nonlesion) was 2.2. Moreover, TSPO changes observed by SPECT imaging were confirmed by immunofluorescence, immunochemistry, and autoradiography. These results indicated that [123I]-CLINME is a promising candidate for the quantification and visualization of TPSO expression in activated astroglia using SPECT. PMID:26199457

  16. Simulation of the expected performance of INSERT: A new multi-modality SPECT/MRI system for preclinical and clinical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busca, P.; Fiorini, C.; Butt, A. D.; Occhipinti, M.; Peloso, R.; Quaglia, R.; Schembari, F.; Trigilio, P.; Nemeth, G.; Major, P.; Erlandsson, K.; Hutton, B. F.

    2014-01-01

    A new multi-modality imaging tool is under development in the framework of the INSERT (INtegrated SPECT/MRI for Enhanced Stratification in Radio-chemo Therapy) project, supported by the European Community. The final goal is to develop a custom SPECT apparatus, that can be used as an insert for commercially available MRI systems such as 3 T MRI with 59 cm bore diameter. INSERT is expected to offer more effective and earlier diagnosis with potentially better outcome in survival for the treatment of brain tumors, primarily glioma. Two SPECT prototypes will be developed, one dedicated to preclinical imaging, the second one dedicated to clinical imaging. The basic building block of the SPECT detector ring is a small 5 cm×5 cm gamma camera, based on the well-established Anger architecture with a continuous scintillator readout by an array of silicon photodetectors. Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) and Silicon PhotoMultipliers (SiPM) are being considered as possible scintillator readout, considering that the detector choice plays a predominant role for the final performance of the system, such as energy and spatial resolution, as well as the useful field of view of the camera. Both solutions are therefore under study to evaluate their performances in terms of field of view (FOV), spatial and energy resolution. Preliminary simulations for both the preclinical and clinical systems have been carried out to evaluate resolution and sensitivity.

  17. Acceptance test of a commercially available software for automatic image registration of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 99mTc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) brain images.

    PubMed

    Loi, Gianfranco; Dominietto, Marco; Manfredda, Irene; Mones, Eleonora; Carriero, Alessandro; Inglese, Eugenio; Krengli, Marco; Brambilla, Marco

    2008-09-01

    This note describes a method to characterize the performances of image fusion software (Syntegra) with respect to accuracy and robustness. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies were acquired from two phantoms and 10 patients. Image registration was performed independently by two couples composed of one radiotherapist and one physicist by means of superposition of anatomic landmarks. Each couple performed jointly and saved the registration. The two solutions were averaged to obtain the gold standard registration. A new set of estimators was defined to identify translation and rotation errors in the coordinate axes, independently from point position in image field of view (FOV). Algorithms evaluated were local correlation (LC) for CT-MRI, normalized mutual information (MI) for CT-MRI, and CT-SPECT registrations. To evaluate accuracy, estimator values were compared to limiting values for the algorithms employed, both in phantoms and in patients. To evaluate robustness, different alignments between images taken from a sample patient were produced and registration errors determined. LC algorithm resulted accurate in CT-MRI registrations in phantoms, but exceeded limiting values in 3 of 10 patients. MI algorithm resulted accurate in CT-MRI and CT-SPECT registrations in phantoms; limiting values were exceeded in one case in CT-MRI and never reached in CT-SPECT registrations. Thus, the evaluation of robustness was restricted to the algorithm of MI both for CT-MRI and CT-SPECT registrations. The algorithm of MI proved to be robust: limiting values were not exceeded with translation perturbations up to 2.5 cm, rotation perturbations up to 10 degrees and roto-translational perturbation up to 3 cm and 5 degrees. PMID:17549564

  18. Intracellular probes for imaging oxygen concentration: how good are they?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Ruslan I.; Papkovsky, Dmitri B.

    2015-09-01

    In the last decade a number of cell-permeable phosphorescence based probes for imaging of (intra)cellular oxygen (icO2) have been described. These small molecule, supramolecular and nanoparticle structures, although allowing analysis of hypoxia, local gradients and fluctuations in O2, responses to stimulation and drug treatment at sub-cellular level with high spatial and temporal resolution, differ significantly in their operational performance and applicability to different cell and tissue models. Here we discuss and compare these probes with respect to their staining efficiency, brightness, photostability, toxicity, cell specificity, compatibility with different cell and tissue models, and analytical performance. Merits and limitations of particular probes are highlighted and strategies for development of new high-performance O2 imaging probes defined. Key application areas in hypoxia research, stem cells, cancer biology and tissue physiology are also discussed.

  19. Monte Carlo modeling of ultrasound probes for image guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Schlosser, Jeffrey; Chen, Josephine; Hristov, Dimitre

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To build Monte Carlo (MC) models of two ultrasound (US) probes and to quantify the effect of beam attenuation due to the US probes for radiation therapy delivered under real-time US image guidance. Methods: MC models of two Philips US probes, an X6-1 matrix-array transducer and a C5-2 curved-array transducer, were built based on their megavoltage (MV) CT images acquired in a Tomotherapy machine with a 3.5 MV beam in the EGSnrc, BEAMnrc, and DOSXYZnrc codes. Mass densities in the probes were assigned based on an electron density calibration phantom consisting of cylinders with mass densities between 0.2 and 8.0 g/cm{sup 3}. Beam attenuation due to the US probes in horizontal (for both probes) and vertical (for the X6-1 probe) orientation was measured in a solid water phantom for 6 and 15 MV (15 × 15) cm{sup 2} beams with a 2D ionization chamber array and radiographic films at 5 cm depth. The MC models of the US probes were validated by comparison of the measured dose distributions and dose distributions predicted by MC. Attenuation of depth dose in the (15 × 15) cm{sup 2} beams and small circular beams due to the presence of the probes was assessed by means of MC simulations. Results: The 3.5 MV CT number to mass density calibration curve was found to be linear with R{sup 2} > 0.99. The maximum mass densities in the X6-1 and C5-2 probes were found to be 4.8 and 5.2 g/cm{sup 3}, respectively. Dose profile differences between MC simulations and measurements of less than 3% for US probes in horizontal orientation were found, with the exception of the penumbra region. The largest 6% dose difference was observed in dose profiles of the X6-1 probe placed in vertical orientation, which was attributed to inadequate modeling of the probe cable. Gamma analysis of the simulated and measured doses showed that over 96% of measurement points passed the 3%/3 mm criteria for both probes placed in horizontal orientation and for the X6-1 probe in vertical orientation. The

  20. Patient-specific dosimetry based on quantitative SPECT imaging and 3D-DFT convolution

    SciTech Connect

    Akabani, G.; Hawkins, W.G.; Eckblade, M.B.; Leichner, P.K.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to validate the use of a 3-D discrete Fourier Transform (3D-DFT) convolution method to carry out the dosimetry for I-131 for soft tissues in radioimmunotherapy procedures. To validate this convolution method, mathematical and physical phantoms were used as a basis of comparison with Monte Carlo transport (MCT) calculations which were carried out using the EGS4 system code. The mathematical phantom consisted of a sphere containing uniform and nonuniform activity distributions. The physical phantom consisted of a cylinder containing uniform and nonuniform activity distributions. Quantitative SPECT reconstruction was carried out using the Circular Harmonic Transform (CHT) algorithm.

  1. SemiSPECT: A Small-animal Imaging System Based on Eight CdZnTe Pixel Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Todd E.; Kim, Hyunki; Crawford, Michael J.; Gershman, Benjamin M.; Hunter, William C.J.; Barber, H. Bradford; Furenlid, Lars R.; Wilson, Donald W.; Woolfenden, James M.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2015-01-01

    We have constructed a SPECT system for small animals that utilizes eight CdZnTe pixel detectors. The eight detectors are arranged in a single octagonal ring, where each views the object to be imaged through a single pinhole. Additional projections are obtained via rotation of the animal. Each CdZnTe detector is approximately 2 mm in thickness and is patterned on one surface into a 64×64 array of pixels with 380 micron pitch. We have designed an electronic readout system capable of collecting data from the eight detectors in listmode. In this scheme each event entry for a gamma-ray hit includes the pulse height of the pixel with the largest signal and the pulse height for each of its eight nearest neighbors. We present details of the overall design, the electronics, and system performance. PMID:26568674

  2. Imaging muscarinic cholinergic receptors in human brain in vivo with Spect, [123I]4-iododexetimide, and [123I]4-iodolevetimide.

    PubMed

    Müller-Gärtner, H W; Wilson, A A; Dannals, R F; Wagner, H N; Frost, J J

    1992-07-01

    A method to image muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (muscarinic receptors) noninvasively in human brain in vivo was developed using [123I]4-iododexetimide ([123I]IDex), [123I]4-iodolevetimide ([123I]ILev), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). [123I]IDex is a high-affinity muscarinic receptor antagonist. [123I]ILev is its pharmacologically inactive enantiomer and measures nonspecific binding of [123I]IDex in vitro. Regional brain activity after tracer injection was measured in four young normal volunteers for 24 h. Regional [123I]IDex and [123I]ILev activities were correlated early after injection, but not after 1.5 h. [123I]IDex activity increased over 7-12 h in neocortex, neostriatum, and thalamus, but decreased immediately after the injection peak in cerebellum. [123I]IDex activity was highest in neostriatum, followed in rank order by neocortex, thalamus, and cerebellum. [123I]IDex activity correlated with muscarinic receptor concentrations in matching brain regions. In contrast, [123I]ILev activity decreased immediately after the injection peak in all brain regions and did not correspond to muscarinic receptor concentrations. [123I]IDex activity in neocortex and neostriatum during equilibrium was six to seven times higher than [123I]ILev activity. The data demonstrate that [123I]IDex binds specifically to muscarinic receptors in vivo, whereas [123I]ILev represents the nonspecific part of [123I]IDex binding. Subtraction of [123I]ILev from [123I]IDex images on a pixel-by-pixel basis therefore reflects specific [123I]IDex binding to muscarinic receptors. Owing to its high specific binding, [123I]IDex has the potential to measure small changes in muscarinic receptor characteristics in vivo with SPECT. The use of stereoisomerism directly to measure nonspecific binding of [123I]IDex in vivo may reduce complexity in modeling approaches to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in human brain. PMID:1618935

  3. Atomic Resolution Imaging with a sub-50 pm Electron Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Erni, Rolf P.; Rossell, Marta D.; Kisielowski, Christian; Dahmen, Ulrich

    2009-03-02

    Using a highly coherent focused electron probe in a 5th order aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, we report on resolving a crystal spacing less than 50 pm. Based on the geometrical source size and residual coherent and incoherent axial lens aberrations, an electron probe is calculated, which is theoretically capable of resolving an ideal 47 pm spacing with 29percent contrast. Our experimental data show the 47 pm spacing of a Ge 114 crystal imaged with 11-18percent contrast at a 60-95percent confidence level, providing the first direct evidence for sub 50-pm resolution in ADF STEM imaging.

  4. ADAPT, a Novel Scaffold Protein-Based Probe for Radionuclide Imaging of Molecular Targets That Are Expressed in Disseminated Cancers.

    PubMed

    Garousi, Javad; Lindbo, Sarah; Nilvebrant, Johan; Åstrand, Mikael; Buijs, Jos; Sandström, Mattias; Honarvar, Hadis; Orlova, Anna; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Hober, Sophia

    2015-10-15

    Small engineered scaffold proteins have attracted attention as probes for radionuclide-based molecular imaging. One class of these imaging probes, termed ABD-Derived Affinity Proteins (ADAPT), has been created using the albumin-binding domain (ABD) of streptococcal protein G as a stable protein scaffold. In this study, we report the development of a clinical lead probe termed ADAPT6 that binds HER2, an oncoprotein overexpressed in many breast cancers that serves as a theranostic biomarker for several approved targeting therapies. Surface-exposed amino acids of ABD were randomized to create a combinatorial library enabling selection of high-affinity binders to various proteins. Furthermore, ABD was engineered to enable rapid purification, to eradicate its binding to albumin, and to enable rapid blood clearance. Incorporation of a unique cysteine allowed site-specific conjugation to a maleimido derivative of a DOTA chelator, enabling radionuclide labeling, ¹¹¹In for SPECT imaging and ⁶⁸Ga for PET imaging. Pharmacologic studies in mice demonstrated that the fully engineered molecule (111)In/⁶⁸Ga-DOTA-(HE)3-ADAPT6 was specifically bound and taken up by HER2-expressing tumors, with a high tumor-to-normal tissue ratio in xenograft models of human cancer. Unbound tracer underwent rapid renal clearance followed by high renal reabsorption. HER2-expressing xenografts were visualized by gamma-camera or PET at 1 hour after infusion. PET experiments demonstrated feasibility for discrimination of xenografts with high or low HER2 expression. Our results offer a preclinical proof of concept for the use of ADAPT probes for noninvasive in vivo imaging. PMID:26297736

  5. Cubical S values for use with SPECT, PET, and autoradiographic imaging data in performing small-scale dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Costes, S.V.; Bouchet, L.G.; Bolch, W.E.

    1996-06-01

    A traditional assumption made in nuclear medicine dosimetry methodologies such as the MIRD schema is that the activity in the source organ is uniformly distributed. Localization techniques such as quantitative SPEC and PET imaging allow one to dispense with this assumption and look at realistic nonuniform activity distributions in selected organs or organ regions. Therapy applications further emphasize the need for direct treatment of nonuniformities. Many researchers have relied upon elaborate computational techniques such as dose kernels to assess dose distributions in these regions. In this work, a simplified approach is proposed which allows direct use of the MIRD schema in conjunction with imaging data to rapidly assess organ dose distributions with minimal computational effort. The EGS4 radiation transportcode has been used with a cubical array of tissue voxel elements for a centrally located source cube of {sup 32}P, {sup 131}I, {sup 89}Sr, {sup 90}Y, and {sup 99m}Tc. Three sets of voxel dimensions are considered: 6 mm for SPECT images, 3 mm for PET images, and 50 {mu}m for autoradiography. Radionuclide S values are subsequently tabulated as a single function of the source-to-target voxel separation distance. Isodose contours are shown for (1) a mouse renal cell carcinoma with {sup 131}I-labeled antibody, (2) a human colon adenocarcinoma with {sup 131}I-labeled antibody, and (3) various tumors directly injected With {sup 32}P.

  6. Free-radical probes for functional in vivo EPR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, S.; Krishna, M. C.

    2007-02-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) is one of the recent functional imaging modalities that can provide valuable in vivo physiological information on its own merit and aids as a complimentary imaging technique to MRI and PET of tissues especially with respect to in vivo pO II (oxygen partial pressure), redox status and pharmacology. EPR imaging mainly deals with the measurement of distribution and in vivo dynamics and redox changes using special nontoxic paramagnetic spin probes that can be infused into the object of investigation. These spin probes should be characterized by simple EPR spectra, preferably with narrow EPR lines. The line width should be reversibly sensitive to the concentration of in vivo pO II with a linear dependence. Several non-toxic paramagnetic probes, some particulate and insoluble and others water-soluble and infusible (by intravenous or intramuscular injection) have been developed which can be effectively used to quantitatively assess tissue redox status, and tumor hypoxia. Quantitative assessment of the redox status of tissue in vivo is important in investigating oxidative stress, and that of tissue pO II is very important in radiation oncology. Other areas in which EPR imaging and oxymetry may help are in the investigation of tumorangiogenesis, wound healing, oxygenation of tumor tissue by the ingestion of oxygen-rich gases, etc. The correct choice of the spin probe will depend on the modality of measurement (whether by CW or time-domain EPR imaging) and the particular physiology interrogated. Examples of the available spin probes and some EPR imaging applications employing them are presented.

  7. Evaluation of Extrahepatic Perfusion of Anticancer Drugs in the Right Gastric Arterial Region on Fused Images Using Combined CT/SPECT: Is Extrahepatic Perfusion Predictive of Gastric Toxicity?

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osamu Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Shiraishi, Shinya; Kawanaka, Kouichi; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Morishita, Shouji; Takamori, Hiroshi; Chikamoto, Akira; Kanemitsu, Keiichirou; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2007-06-15

    Background. Hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) chemotherapy is effective for treating primary and metastatic carcinomas of the liver. Since hepatic arteries also supply the stomach and duodenum, HAI may result in unwanted infusion into the upper gastrointestinal tract and consequent gastric toxicity. Using fused images obtained with a combined SPECT/CT system, we assessed extrahepatic perfusion (EHP) and its correlation with gastrointestinal toxicity in patients receiving HAI. Methods. We studied 41 patients with primary or metastatic carcinoma of the liver who received HAI chemotherapy consisting of 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin. All underwent abdominal SPECT using a {sup 99m}Tc-MAA (185 MBq) instrument and an injection rate of 0.1 ml/min, identical to the chemotherapy infusion rate. Delivery was through an implantable port. We analyzed the distribution of the anticancer agent on fused images and the relationship between EHP of the right gastric arterial region and gastric toxicity. All patients underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGDS). Results. Of the 41 patients, 11 (27%) manifested enhancement of the duodenal and gastric pyloric region on fused images. EGDS at the time of reservoir placement detected gastric ulcers in 10 of these patients. Conclusion. Fusion imaging with combined SPECT/CT reflects the actual distribution of the infused anticancer agents. The detection of EHP on fused images is predictive of the direct gastric toxicity from anticancer agents in patients undergoing HAI.

  8. Dual-function fluorescent probe for cancer imaging and therapy.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hongjing; Wang, Ran; Zhou, Ying; Shu, Chang; Song, Fengjuan; Zhong, Wenying

    2016-05-01

    To date, several fluorescent probes modified by a single targeting agent have been explored. However, studies on the preparation of dual-function quantum dot (QD) fluorescent probes with dual-targeting action and a therapeutic effect are rare. Here, a dual-targeting CdTe/CdS QD fluorescent probe with a bovine serum albumin-glycyrrhetinic acid conjugate and arginine-glycine-aspartic acid was successfully prepared that could induce the apoptosis of liver cancer cells and showed enhanced targeting in in vitro cell imaging. Therefore, the as-prepared fluorescent probe in this work is an efficient diagnostic tool for the simultaneous detection of liver cancer and breast cancer cells. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26387677

  9. SU-E-J-100: Reconstruction of Prompt Gamma Ray Three Dimensional SPECT Image From Boron Neutron Capture Therapy(BNCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, D; Jung, J; Suh, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Purpose of paper is to confirm the feasibility of acquisition of three dimensional single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) image from boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using Monte Carlo simulation. Methods: In case of simulation, the pixelated SPECT detector, collimator and phantom were simulated using Monte Carlo n particle extended (MCNPX) simulation tool. A thermal neutron source (<1 eV) was used to react with the boron uptake region (BUR) in the phantom. Each geometry had a spherical pattern, and three different BURs (A, B and C region, density: 2.08 g/cm3) were located in the middle of the brain phantom. The data from 128 projections for each sorting process were used to achieve image reconstruction. The ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) reconstruction algorithm was used to obtain a tomographic image with eight subsets and five iterations. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to evaluate the geometric accuracy of reconstructed image. Results: The OSEM image was compared with the original phantom pattern image. The area under the curve (AUC) was calculated as the gross area under each ROC curve. The three calculated AUC values were 0.738 (A region), 0.623 (B region), and 0.817 (C region). The differences between length of centers of two boron regions and distance of maximum count points were 0.3 cm, 1.6 cm and 1.4 cm. Conclusion: The possibility of extracting a 3D BNCT SPECT image was confirmed using the Monte Carlo simulation and OSEM algorithm. The prospects for obtaining an actual BNCT SPECT image were estimated from the quality of the simulated image and the simulation conditions. When multiple tumor region should be treated using the BNCT, a reasonable model to determine how many useful images can be obtained from the SPECT could be provided to the BNCT facilities. This research was supported by the Leading Foreign Research Institute Recruitment Program through the National Research

  10. Use of a ray-based reconstruction algorithm to accurately quantify preclinical microSPECT images.

    PubMed

    Vandeghinste, Bert; Van Holen, Roel; Vanhove, Christian; De Vos, Filip; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Staelens, Steven

    2014-01-01

    This work aimed to measure the in vivo quantification errors obtained when ray-based iterative reconstruction is used in micro-single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). This was investigated with an extensive phantom-based evaluation and two typical in vivo studies using 99mTc and 111In, measured on a commercially available cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)-based small-animal scanner. Iterative reconstruction was implemented on the GPU using ray tracing, including (1) scatter correction, (2) computed tomography-based attenuation correction, (3) resolution recovery, and (4) edge-preserving smoothing. It was validated using a National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) phantom. The in vivo quantification error was determined for two radiotracers: [99mTc]DMSA in naive mice (n  =  10 kidneys) and [111In]octreotide in mice (n  =  6) inoculated with a xenograft neuroendocrine tumor (NCI-H727). The measured energy resolution is 5.3% for 140.51 keV (99mTc), 4.8% for 171.30 keV, and 3.3% for 245.39 keV (111In). For 99mTc, an uncorrected quantification error of 28 ± 3% is reduced to 8 ± 3%. For 111In, the error reduces from 26 ± 14% to 6 ± 22%. The in vivo error obtained with 99mTc-dimercaptosuccinic acid ([99mTc]DMSA) is reduced from 16.2 ± 2.8% to -0.3 ± 2.1% and from 16.7 ± 10.1% to 2.2 ± 10.6% with [111In]octreotide. Absolute quantitative in vivo SPECT is possible without explicit system matrix measurements. An absolute in vivo quantification error smaller than 5% was achieved and exemplified for both [99mTc]DMSA and [111In]octreotide. PMID:24824961

  11. Radioactive smart probe for potential corrected matrix metalloproteinase imaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiun-Wei; Li, Zibo; Conti, Peter S

    2012-11-21

    Although various activatable optical probes have been developed to visualize metalloproteinase (MMP) activities in vivo, precise quantification of the enzyme activity is limited due to the inherent scattering and attenuation (limited depth penetration) properties of optical imaging. In this investigation, a novel activatable peptide probe (64)Cu-BBQ650-PLGVR-K(Cy5.5)-E-K(DOTA)-OH was constructed to detect tumor MMP activity in vivo. This agent is optically quenched in its native form, but releases strong fluorescence upon cleavage by selected enzymes. MMP specificity was confirmed both in vitro and in vivo by fluorescent imaging studies. The use of a single modality to image biomarkers/processes may lead to erroneous interpretation of imaging data. The introduction of a quantitative imaging modality, such as PET, would make it feasible to correct the enzyme activity determined from optical imaging. In this proof of principle report, we demonstrated the feasibility of correcting the activatable optical imaging data through the PET signal. This approach provides an attractive new strategy for accurate imaging of MMP activity, which may also be applied for other protease imaging. PMID:23025637

  12. The Wide-Field Imager for Solar Probe Plus (WISPR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vourlidas, Angelos; Howard, Russell A.; Plunkett, Simon P.; Korendyke, Clarence M.; Thernisien, Arnaud F. R.; Wang, Dennis; Rich, Nathan; Carter, Michael T.; Chua, Damien H.; Socker, Dennis G.; Linton, Mark G.; Morrill, Jeff S.; Lynch, Sean; Thurn, Adam; Van Duyne, Peter; Hagood, Robert; Clifford, Greg; Grey, Phares J.; Velli, Marco; Liewer, Paulett C.; Hall, Jeffrey R.; DeJong, Eric M.; Mikic, Zoran; Rochus, Pierre; Mazy, Emanuel; Bothmer, Volker; Rodmann, Jens

    2015-02-01

    The Wide-field Imager for Solar PRobe Plus (WISPR) is the sole imager aboard the Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission scheduled for launch in 2018. SPP will be a unique mission designed to orbit as close as 7 million km (9.86 solar radii) from Sun center. WISPR employs a 95∘ radial by 58∘ transverse field of view to image the fine-scale structure of the solar corona, derive the 3D structure of the large-scale corona, and determine whether a dust-free zone exists near the Sun. WISPR is the smallest heliospheric imager to date yet it comprises two nested wide-field telescopes with large-format (2 K × 2 K) APS CMOS detectors to optimize the performance for their respective fields of view and to minimize the risk of dust damage, which may be considerable close to the Sun. The WISPR electronics are very flexible allowing the collection of individual images at cadences up to 1 second at perihelion or the summing of multiple images to increase the signal-to-noise when the spacecraft is further from the Sun. The dependency of the Thomson scattering emission of the corona on the imaging geometry dictates that WISPR will be very sensitive to the emission from plasma close to the spacecraft in contrast to the situation for imaging from Earth orbit. WISPR will be the first `local' imager providing a crucial link between the large-scale corona and the in-situ measurements.

  13. MediSPECT: Single photon emission computed tomography system for small field of view small animal imaging based on a CdTe hybrid pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accorsi, R.; Autiero, M.; Celentano, L.; Chmeissani, M.; Cozzolino, R.; Curion, A. S.; Frallicciardi, P.; Laccetti, P.; Lanza, R. C.; Lauria, A.; Maiorino, M.; Marotta, M.; Mettivier, G.; Montesi, M. C.; Riccio, P.; Roberti, G.; Russo, P.

    2007-02-01

    We describe MediSPECT, a new scanner developed at University and INFN Napoli, for SPECT studies on small animals with a small field of view (FOV) and high spatial resolution. The CdTe pixel detector (a 256×256 matrix of 55 μm square pixels) operating in single photon counting for detection of gamma-rays with low and medium energy (e.g. 125I, 27-35 keV, 99mTc, 140 keV), is bump bonded to the Medipix2 readout chip. The FOV of the MediSPECT scanner with a coded aperture mask collimator ranges from 6.3 mm (system spatial resolution 110 μm at 27-35 keV) to 24.3 mm. With a 0.30 mm pinhole the FOV ranges from 2.4 to 29 mm (where the system spatial resolution is 1.0 mm at 27-35 keV and 2.0 mm at 140 keV). MediSPECT will be used for in vivo imaging of small organs or tissue structures in mouse, e.g., brain, thyroid, heart or tumor.

  14. [Clinical evaluation of patients with right ventricular infarction detected by dual SPECT imaging of thallium-201 and technetium-99m pyrophosphate].

    PubMed

    Kuwano, H; Kimura, M; Sakai, K; Ishiguro, J; Ishida, H; Okabe, M

    1994-10-01

    We evaluated clinical significance of dual-nuclide SPECT imaging (D-SPECT) of thallium-201 and technetium-99m pyrophosphate (PYP) in patients of acute inferior left ventricular infarction with PYP uptake in the right ventricle (PYP (+) group) in comparison with those without PYP uptake (PYP (-) group). There was no difference in coronary risk factors, history of angina, blood pressure, heart rate, and hemodynamics on admission between PYP (+) group and PYP (-) group. The duration from onset to admission was longer in PYP (+) group and coronary reperfusion therapies were carried out in few cases. In 7 of 8 PYP-positive patients, the diagnosis of right ventricular infarction was made only by D-SPECT. Four of 8 were complicated with shock within three days, and the duration of hospitalization was longer. Coronary angiography demonstrated many proximal lesions (50%) in PYP (+) group but few ones (18%) in PYP (-) group. D-SPECT was very useful for diagnosing acute right ventricular infarction, and it might contribute to the prevention of shock if performed within a few days. PMID:7807721

  15. Fast Monte Carlo based joint iterative reconstruction for simultaneous 99mTc/ 123I SPECT imaging.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Jinsong; El Fakhri, Georges; Moore, Stephen C

    2007-08-01

    Simultaneous 99mTC/ 123I SPECT allows the assessment of two physiological functions under identical conditions. The separation of these radionuclides is difficult, however, because their energies are close. Most energy-window-based scatter correction methods do not fully model either physical factors or patient-specific activity and attenuation distributions. We have developed a fast Monte Carlo (MC) simulation-based multiple-radionuclide and multiple-energy joint ordered-subset expectation-maximization (JOSEM) iterative reconstruction algorithm, MC-JOSEM. MC-JOSEM simultaneously corrects for scatter and cross talk as well as detector response within the reconstruction algorithm. We evaluated MC-JOSEM for simultaneous brain profusion (99mTc-HMPAO) and neurotransmission (123I-altropane) SPECT. MC simulations of 99mTc and 123I studies were generated separately and then combined to mimic simultaneous 99mTc/ 123I SPECT. All the details of photon transport through the brain, the collimator, and detector, including Compton and coherent scatter, septal penetration, and backscatter from components behind the crystal, were modeled. We reconstructed images from simultaneous dual-radionuclide projections in three ways. First, we reconstructed the photopeak-energy-window projections (with an asymmetric energy window for 1231) using the standard ordered-subsets expectation-maximization algorithm (NSC-OSEM). Second, we used standard OSEM to reconstruct 99mTc photopeak-energy-window projections, while including an estimate of scatter from a Compton-scatter energy window (SC-OSEM). Third, we jointly reconstructed both 99mTc and 123I images using projection data associated with two photo-peak energy windows and an intermediate-energy window using MC-JOSEM. For 15 iterations of reconstruction, the bias and standard deviation of 99mTc activity estimates in several brain structures were calculated for NSC-OSEM, SC-OSEM, and MC-JOSEM, using images reconstructed from primary

  16. Image reconstruction of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on a pebble bed reactor (PBR) using expectation maximization and exact inversion algorithms: Comparison study by means of numerical phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Razali, Azhani Mohd Abdullah, Jaafar

    2015-04-29

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is a well-known imaging technique used in medical application, and it is part of medical imaging modalities that made the diagnosis and treatment of disease possible. However, SPECT technique is not only limited to the medical sector. Many works are carried out to adapt the same concept by using high-energy photon emission to diagnose process malfunctions in critical industrial systems such as in chemical reaction engineering research laboratories, as well as in oil and gas, petrochemical and petrochemical refining industries. Motivated by vast applications of SPECT technique, this work attempts to study the application of SPECT on a Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) using numerical phantom of pebbles inside the PBR core. From the cross-sectional images obtained from SPECT, the behavior of pebbles inside the core can be analyzed for further improvement of the PBR design. As the quality of the reconstructed image is largely dependent on the algorithm used, this work aims to compare two image reconstruction algorithms for SPECT, namely the Expectation Maximization Algorithm and the Exact Inversion Formula. The results obtained from the Exact Inversion Formula showed better image contrast and sharpness, and shorter computational time compared to the Expectation Maximization Algorithm.

  17. Image reconstruction of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on a pebble bed reactor (PBR) using expectation maximization and exact inversion algorithms: Comparison study by means of numerical phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razali, Azhani Mohd; Abdullah, Jaafar

    2015-04-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is a well-known imaging technique used in medical application, and it is part of medical imaging modalities that made the diagnosis and treatment of disease possible. However, SPECT technique is not only limited to the medical sector. Many works are carried out to adapt the same concept by using high-energy photon emission to diagnose process malfunctions in critical industrial systems such as in chemical reaction engineering research laboratories, as well as in oil and gas, petrochemical and petrochemical refining industries. Motivated by vast applications of SPECT technique, this work attempts to study the application of SPECT on a Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) using numerical phantom of pebbles inside the PBR core. From the cross-sectional images obtained from SPECT, the behavior of pebbles inside the core can be analyzed for further improvement of the PBR design. As the quality of the reconstructed image is largely dependent on the algorithm used, this work aims to compare two image reconstruction algorithms for SPECT, namely the Expectation Maximization Algorithm and the Exact Inversion Formula. The results obtained from the Exact Inversion Formula showed better image contrast and sharpness, and shorter computational time compared to the Expectation Maximization Algorithm.

  18. Assessment of a Monte-Carlo simulation of SPECT recordings from a new-generation heart-centric semiconductor camera: from point sources to human images.

    PubMed

    Imbert, Laetitia; Galbrun, Ernest; Odille, Freddy; Poussier, Sylvain; Noel, Alain; Wolf, Didier; Karcher, Gilles; Marie, Pierre-Yves

    2015-02-01

    Geant4 application for tomographic emission (GATE), a Monte-Carlo simulation platform, has previously been used for optimizing tomoscintigraphic images recorded with scintillation Anger cameras but not with the new-generation heart-centric cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) cameras. Using the GATE platform, this study aimed at simulating the SPECT recordings from one of these new CZT cameras and to assess this simulation by direct comparison between simulated and actual recorded data, ranging from point sources to human images. Geometry and movement of detectors, as well as their respective energy responses, were modeled for the CZT 'D.SPECT' camera in the GATE platform. Both simulated and actual recorded data were obtained from: (1) point and linear sources of (99m)Tc for compared assessments of detection sensitivity and spatial resolution, (2) a cardiac insert filled with a (99m)Tc solution for compared assessments of contrast-to-noise ratio and sharpness of myocardial borders and (3) in a patient with myocardial infarction using segmented cardiac magnetic resonance imaging images. Most of the data from the simulated images exhibited high concordance with the results of actual images with relative differences of only: (1) 0.5% for detection sensitivity, (2) 6.7% for spatial resolution, (3) 2.6% for contrast-to-noise ratio and 5.0% for sharpness index on the cardiac insert placed in a diffusing environment. There was also good concordance between actual and simulated gated-SPECT patient images for the delineation of the myocardial infarction area, although the quality of the simulated images was clearly superior with increases around 50% for both contrast-to-noise ratio and sharpness index. SPECT recordings from a new heart-centric CZT camera can be simulated with the GATE software with high concordance relative to the actual physical properties of this camera. These simulations may be conducted up to the stage of human SPECT-images even if further refinement is needed

  19. Computer-assisted superimposition of magnetic resonance and high-resolution technetium-99m-HMPAO and thallium-201 SPECT images of the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, B.L.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Johnson, K.A.; Carvalho, P.A.; Schwartz, R.B.; Loeffler, J.S.; Alexander, E.; Pelizzari, C.A.; Chen, G.T. )

    1991-08-01

    A method for registering three-dimensional CT, MR, and PET data sets that require no special patient immobilization or other precise positioning measures was adapted to high-resolution SPECT and MRI and was applied in 14 subjects (five normal volunteers, four patients with dementia (Alzheimer's disease), two patients with recurrent glioblastoma, and three patients with focal lesions (stroke, arachnoid cyst and head trauma)). T2-weighted axial magnetic resonance images and transaxial 99mTc-HMPAO and 201Tl images acquired with an annular gamma camera were merged using an objective registration (translation, rotation and rescaling) program. In the normal subjects and patients with dementia and focal lesions, focal areas of high uptake corresponded to gray matter structures. Focal lesions observed on MRI corresponded to perfusion defects on SPECT. In the patients who had undergone surgical resection of glioblastoma followed by interstitial brachytherapy, increased 201Tl corresponding to recurrent tumor could be localized from the superimposed images. The method was evaluated by measuring the residuals in all subjects and translational errors due to superimposition of deep structures in the 12 subjects with normal thalamic anatomy and 99mTc-HMPAO uptake. This method for superimposing magnetic resonance and high-resolution SPECT images of the brain is a useful technique for correlating regional function with brain anatomy.

  20. Molecular imaging probes derived from natural peptides.

    PubMed

    Charron, C L; Hickey, J L; Nsiama, T K; Cruickshank, D R; Turnbull, W L; Luyt, L G

    2016-06-01

    Covering: up to the end of 2015.Peptides are naturally occurring compounds that play an important role in all living systems and are responsible for a range of essential functions. Peptide receptors have been implicated in disease states such as oncology, metabolic disorders and cardiovascular disease. Therefore, natural peptides have been exploited as diagnostic and therapeutic agents due to the unique target specificity for their endogenous receptors. This review discusses a variety of natural peptides highlighting their discovery, endogenous receptors, as well as their derivatization to create molecular imaging agents, with an emphasis on the design of radiolabelled peptides. This review also highlights methods for discovering new and novel peptides when knowledge of specific targets and endogenous ligands are not available. PMID:26911790

  1. Dendritic Phosphorescent Probes for Oxygen Imaging in Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lebedev, Artem Y.; Cheprakov, Andrei V.; Sakadžić, Sava; Boas, David A.; Wilson, David F.; Vinogradov, Sergei A.

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen levels in biological systems can be measured by the phosphorescence quenching method using probes with controllable quenching parameters and defined biodistributions. We describe a general approach to the construction of phosphorescent nanosensors with tunable spectral characteristics, variable degrees of quenching, and a high selectivity for oxygen. The probes are based on bright phosphorescent Pt and Pd complexes of porphyrins and symmetrically π-extended porphyrins (tetrabenzoporphyrins and tetranaphthoporphyrins). π-Extension of the core macrocycle allows tuning of the spectral parameters of the probes in order to meet the requirements of a particular imaging application (e.g., oxygen tomography versus planar microscopic imaging). Metalloporphyrins are encapsulated into poly(arylglycine) dendrimers, which fold in aqueous environments and create diffusion barriers for oxygen, making it possible to regulate the sensitivity and the dynamic range of the method. The periphery of the dendrimers is modified with poly(ethylene glycol) residues, which enhance the probe’s solubility, diminish toxicity, and help prevent interactions of the probes with the biological environment. The probe’s parameters were measured under physiological conditions and shown to be unaffected by the presence of biomacromolecules. The performance of the probes was demonstrated in applications, including in vivo microscopy of vascular pO2 in the rat brain. PMID:20072726

  2. Using image processing techniques on proximity probe signals in rotordynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamond, Dawie; Heyns, Stephan; Oberholster, Abrie

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a new approach to process proximity probe signals in rotordynamic applications. It is argued that the signal be interpreted as a one dimensional image. Existing image processing techniques can then be used to gain information about the object being measured. Some results from one application is presented. Rotor blade tip deflections can be calculated through localizing phase information in this one dimensional image. It is experimentally shown that the newly proposed method performs more accurately than standard techniques, especially where the sampling rate of the data acquisition system is inadequate by conventional standards.

  3. Lipid-Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticles for Delivery to the Lymphatic System and SPECT/CT Imaging of Lymph Node Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yu-Cheng; Xu, Zhenghong; Guley, Kevin; Yuan, Hong; Huang, Leaf

    2014-01-01

    A lipid/calcium/phosphate (LCP) nanoparticle (NP) formulation (particle diameter ~25 nm) with superior siRNA delivery efficiency was developed and reported previously. Here, we describe the successful formulation of 111In into LCP for SPECT/CT imaging. Imaging and biodistribution studies showed that, polyethylene glycol grafted 111In-LCP preferentially accumulated in the lymph nodes at ~70% ID/g in both C57BL/6 and nude mice when the improved surface coating method was used. Both the liver and spleen accumulated only ~25% ID/g. Larger LCP (diameter ~67 nm) was less lymphotropic. These results indicate that 25 nm LCP was able to penetrate into tissues, enter the lymphatic system, and accumulate in the lymph nodes via lymphatic drainage due to 1) small size, 2) a well-PEGylated lipid surface, and 3) a slightly negative surface charge. The capability of intravenously injected 111In-LCP to visualize an enlarged, tumor-loaded sentinel lymph node was demonstrated using a 4T1 breast cancer lymph node metastasis model. Systemic gene delivery to the lymph nodes after IV injection was demonstrated by the expression of red fluorescent protein cDNA. The potential of using LCP for lymphatic drug delivery is discussed. PMID:24613050

  4. MR/SPECT Imaging Guided Photothermal Therapy of Tumor-Targeting Fe@Fe3O4 Nanoparticles in Vivo with Low Mononuclear Phagocyte Uptake.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhao, Heng; Zhou, Zhiguo; Zhou, Ping; Yan, Yuping; Wang, Mingwei; Yang, Hong; Zhang, Yingjian; Yang, Shiping

    2016-08-10

    The (125)I-c(RGDyK) peptide PEGylated Fe@Fe3O4 nanoparticles ((125)I-RGD-PEG-MNPs) with the average hydrodynamic diameter of ∼40 nm as a novel multifunctional platform were developed for tumor-targeting MR/SPECT imaging guided photothermal therapy in vivo. On the αvβ3-positive U87MG glioblastoma xenograft model, the signals of tumor from T2-weighted MR and SPECT imaging were much higher than those in the blocking group at 6 h post injection (p.i.) of RGD-PEG-MNPs and (125)I-RGD-PEG-MNPs intravenously, respectively. The pharmacokinetics and biodistribution were analyzed quantitatively by gamma counter ex vivo. The fact suggested that RGD-PEG-MNPs exhibited excellent targeting property and low mononuclear phagocyte uptake. At 6 h p.i. for (125)I-RGD-PEG-MNPs, the maximum uptake of 6.75 ± 1.24% of the percentage injected dose per gram (ID/g) was accumulated in the tumor. At 48 h p.i., only 1.11 ± 0.21% and 0.16 ± 0.09% ID/g were accumulated in the liver and spleen, respectively. With the guidance of MR/SPECT imaging, the multifunctional nanoparticles achieved a good photothermal therapeutic efficacy in vivo. PMID:27428929

  5. Comparison of photon counting and conventional scintillation detectors in a pinhole SPECT system for small animal imaging: Monte carlo simulation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young-Jin; Park, Su-Jin; Lee, Seung-Wan; Kim, Dae-Hong; Kim, Ye-Seul; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2013-05-01

    The photon counting detector based on cadmium telluride (CdTe) or cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) is a promising imaging modality that provides many benefits compared to conventional scintillation detectors. By using a pinhole collimator with the photon counting detector, we were able to improve both the spatial resolution and the sensitivity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the photon counting and conventional scintillation detectors in a pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system. We designed five pinhole SPECT systems of two types: one type with a CdTe photon counting detector and the other with a conventional NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. We conducted simulation studies and evaluated imaging performance. The results demonstrated that the spatial resolution of the CdTe photon counting detector was 0.38 mm, with a sensitivity 1.40 times greater than that of a conventional NaI(Tl) scintillation detector for the same detector thickness. Also, the average scatter fractions of the CdTe photon counting and the conventional NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors were 1.93% and 2.44%, respectively. In conclusion, we successfully evaluated various pinhole SPECT systems for small animal imaging.

  6. Chemiluminescent Probes for Imaging H2S in Living Animals†

    PubMed Central

    Cao, J.; Lopez, R.; Thacker, J.M.; Moon, J.Y.; Jiang, C.; Morris, S.N.S.; Bauer, J.H.; Tao, P.; Mason, R.P.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is an endogenous mediator of human health and disease, but precise measurement in living cells and animals remains a considerable challenge. We report the total chemical synthesis and characterization of three 1,2-dioxetane chemiluminescent reaction-based H2S probes, CHS-1, CHS-2, and CHS-3. Upon treatment with H2S at physiological pH, these probes display instantaneous light emission that is sustained for over an hour with high selectivity against other reactive sulphur, oxygen, and nitrogen species. Analysis of the phenol/phenolate equilibrium and atomic charges has provided a generally applicable predictive model to design improved chemiluminescent probes. The utility of these chemiluminescent reagents was demonstrated by applying CHS-3 to detect cellularly generated H2S using a multi-well plate reader and to image H2S in living mice using CCD camera technology. PMID:25709805

  7. Ultraviolet Imaging Probe for the Pan-STARRS-1 Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodapp, K.; Chambers, K.

    This paper describes the scientific rationale, the design, and the expected data products of the u-band Imaging Probe (UIP) for Pan-STARRS. The Pan-STARRS photometric survey itself will be conducted in the g, r, i, z, and y bands and cover the 3/4 of the sky accessible from Haleakala. In parallel to the survey conducted with the PS1 1.8m telescope, an Imaging Sky Probe (ISP, Granett et. al., these proceedings) will monitor the sky conditions, variations in transparency across the 3° field of view, provide a characterization of the astronomical diffuse sky brightness, and extend the dynamic range of PS1 stellar photometry to the brightest stars. The u-band Imaging Probe is an additional small wide-field camera to extend this bright star photometric survey to the shortest wavelengths accessible from ground-based observatories. It will thereby establish a well characterized photometric system at these wavelengths with a dense sample of stars covering 3/4 of the entire sky, including the galactic plane. The UIP will continuously make dedicated u-band measurements, and the large number of these independent measurements together with substantial overlapping fields of view and repeated visits to standard star fields as part of the PS1 mission, has the potential of substantially improving u-band calibration and photometry across the sky over all previous u-band imaging and catalog surveys. For specific future observations with larger telescopes, this system of stars will serve as secondary calibration stars to tie these deeper observations into the photometric system established in this way. The UIP is currently in the early design stages. The UIP will be operated as an extension of the PS1 Imaging Sky Probe (ISP), and the data will be processed through the same data reduction pipeline and be made available as part of the photometric survey.

  8. (99m)Tc SPECT imaging agent based on cFLFLFK for the detection of FPR1 in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Stasiuk, Graeme J; Holloway, Paul M; Rivas, Charlotte; Trigg, William; Luthra, Sajinder Kaur; Morisson Iveson, Veronique; Gavins, Felicity N E; Long, Nicholas J

    2015-03-21

    Non-invasive imaging of the inflammatory process can provide great insight into a wide variety of disease states, aiding diagnosis, evaluation and effective targeted treatment. During inflammation, blood borne leukocytes are recruited, through a series of activation and adhesion steps, to the site of injury or infection where they migrate across the blood vessel wall into the tissue. Thus, tracking leukocyte recruitment and accumulation provides a dynamic and localised read out of inflammatory events. Current leukocyte imaging techniques require ex vivo labelling of patient blood, involving laborious processing and potential risks to both patient and laboratory staff. Utilising high affinity ligands for leukocyte specific receptors may allow for injectable tracers that label leukocytes in situ, omitting potentially hazardous ex vivo handling. Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are a group of G-protein coupled receptors involved in the chemotaxis and inflammatory functioning of leukocytes. Highly expressed on leukocytes, and up-regulated during inflammation, these receptors provide a potential target for imaging inflammatory events. Herein we present the synthesis and initial in vitro testing of a potential Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) leukocyte tracer. The FPR1 antagonist cFLFLFK-NH2, which displays high affinity with little physiological effect, has been linked via a PEG motif to a (99m)Tc chelate. This tracer shows in vitro binding to human embryonic kidney cells expressing the FPR1 receptor, and functional in vitro tests reveal cFLFLFK-NH2 compounds to have no effect on inflammatory cell functioning. Overall, these data show that (99m)Tc.cFLFLFK-NH2 may be a useful tool for non-invasive imaging of leukocyte accumulation in inflammatory disease states. PMID:25603955

  9. Evaluation of Simultaneous Dual-radioisotope SPECT Imaging Using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose and 99mTc-tetrofosmin

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yasuyuki; Mochiki, Mizuki; Koyama, Keiko; Ino, Toshihiko; Yamaji, Hiroyuki; Kawakami, Atsuko

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Use of a positron emission tomography (PET)/single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system facilitates the simultaneous acquisition of images with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) and technetium (99mTc)-tetrofosmin. However, 18F has a short half-life, and 511 keV Compton-scattered photons are detected in the 99mTc energy window. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to investigate the consequences of these facts. Methods: The crosstalk correction for images in the 99mTc energy window involved the dual energy window (DEW) subtraction method. In phantom studies, changes in the count of uniform parts in a phantom (due to attenuation from decay), signal detectability in the hot-rod part of the phantom, and the defect contrast ratio in a cardiac phantom were examined. Results: For 18F-FDG in the step-and-shoot mode, nearly a 9% difference was observed in the count of projection data between the start and end positions of acquisition in the uniform part of the phantom. Based on the findings, the detectability of 12 mm hot rods was relatively poor. In the continuous acquisition mode, the count difference was corrected, and detectability of the hot rods was improved. The crosstalk from 18F to the 99mTc energy window was approximately 13%. In the cardiac phantom, the defect contrast in 99mTc images from simultaneous dual-radionuclide acquisition was improved by approximately 9% after DEW correction; the contrast after correction was similar to acquisition with 99mTc alone. Conclusion: Based on the findings, the continuous mode is useful for 18F-FDG acquisition, and DEW crosstalk correction is necessary for 99mTc-tetrofosmin imaging. PMID:27408894

  10. Integrated ultrasound and gamma imaging probe for medical diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Cinti, M. N.; Polito, C.; Orlandi, C.; Fabbri, A.; De Vincentis, G.

    2016-03-01

    In the last few years, integrated multi-modality systems have been developed, aimed at improving the accuracy of medical diagnosis correlating information from different imaging techniques. In this contest, a novel dual modality probe is proposed, based on an ultrasound detector integrated with a small field of view single photon emission gamma camera. The probe, dedicated to visualize small organs or tissues located at short depths, performs dual modality images and permits to correlate morphological and functional information. The small field of view gamma camera consists of a continuous NaI:Tl scintillation crystal coupled with two multi-anode photomultiplier tubes. Both detectors were characterized in terms of position linearity and spatial resolution performances in order to guarantee the spatial correspondence between the ultrasound and the gamma images. Finally, dual-modality images of custom phantoms are obtained highlighting the good co-registration between ultrasound and gamma images, in terms of geometry and image processing, as a consequence of calibration procedures.

  11. [PET and SPECT in epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Setoain, X; Carreño, M; Pavía, J; Martí-Fuster, B; Campos, F; Lomeña, F

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most frequent chronic neurological disorders, affecting 1-2% of the population. Patients with complex partial drug resistant episodes may benefit from a surgical treatment consisting in the excision of the epileptogenic area. Localization of the epileptogenic area was classically performed with video-EEG and magnetic resonance (MR). Recently, functional neuroimaging studies of Nuclear Medicine, positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) have demonstrated their utility in the localization of the epileptogenic area prior to surgery. Ictal SPECT with brain perfusion tracers show an increase in blood flow in the initial ictal focus, while PET with (18)FDG demonstrates a decrease of glucose metabolism in the interictal functional deficit zone. In this review, the basic principles and methodological characteristics of the SPECT and PET in epilepsy are described. The ictal SPECT injection mechanism, different patterns of perfusion based on the time of ictal, postictal or interictal injection are detailed and the different diagnostic sensitivities of each one of these SPECT are reviewed. Different methods of analysis of the images with substraction and fusion systems with the MR are described. Similarly, the injection methodology, quantification and evaluation of the images of the PET in epilepsy are described. Finally, the main clinical indications of SPECT and PET in temporal and extratemporal epilepsy are detailed. PMID:24565567

  12. Characterization of a Fluorescent Probe for Imaging Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Ghebremariam, Yohannes T; Huang, Ngan F; Kambhampati, Swetha; Volz, Katharina S; Joshi, Gururaj G; Anslyn, Eric V; Cooke, John P

    2014-01-01

    Background Nitric Oxide (NO), a potent vasodilator and anti-atherogenic molecule, is synthesized in various cell types including vascular endothelial cells (ECs). The biological importance of NO enforces the need to develop and characterize specific and sensitive probes. To date, several fluorophores, chromophores and colorimetric techniques have been developed to detect NO or its metabolites (NO2 and NO3) in biological fluids, viable cells or cell lysates. Methods Recently, a novel probe (NO550) has been developed and reported to detect NO in solution and in primary astrocytes and neuronal cells with a fluorescence signal arising from a non-fluorescent background. Results Here, we report further characterization of this probe by optimizing conditions for the detection and imaging of NO products in primary vascular endothelial cells, fibroblasts, embryonic stem cell (ESC)- and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)- derived endothelial cells (ESC-ECs. and iPSC-ECs respectively) in the absence and presence of pharmacological agents that modulate NO levels. In addition, we studied the stability of this probe in cells over time and evaluated its compartmentalization in reference to organelle-labeling dyes. Finally, we synthesized an inherently fluorescent diazo ring compound (AZO550) that is expected to form when the non-fluorescent NO550 reacts with cellular NO and compared its cellular distribution with that of NO550. Conclusion NO550 is a promising agent for imaging NO at baseline and in response to pharmacological agents that modulate its levels. PMID:24335468

  13. Molecular Imaging of Proteases in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunan; Hong, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Cai, Weibo

    2010-01-01

    Proteases play important roles during tumor angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Various molecular imaging techniques have been employed for protease imaging: optical (both fluorescence and bioluminescence), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET). In this review, we will summarize the current status of imaging proteases in cancer with these techniques. Optical imaging of proteases, in particular with fluorescence, is the most intensively validated and many of the imaging probes are already commercially available. It is generally agreed that the use of activatable probes is the most accurate and appropriate means for measuring protease activity. Molecular imaging of proteases with other techniques (i.e. MRI, SPECT, and PET) has not been well-documented in the literature which certainly deserves much future effort. Optical imaging and molecular MRI of protease activity has very limited potential for clinical investigation. PET/SPECT imaging is suitable for clinical investigation; however the optimal probes for PET/SPECT imaging of proteases in cancer have yet to be developed. Successful development of protease imaging probes with optimal in vivo stability, tumor targeting efficacy, and desirable pharmacokinetics for clinical translation will eventually improve cancer patient management. Not limited to cancer, these protease-targeted imaging probes will also have broad applications in other diseases such as arthritis, atherosclerosis, and myocardial infarction. PMID:20234801

  14. Molecular Imaging Probes for Positron Emission Tomography and Optical Imaging of Sentinel Lymph Node and Tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhengtao

    Molecular imaging is visualizations and measurements of in vivo biological processes at the molecular or cellular level using specific imaging probes. As an emerging technology, biocompatible macromolecular or nanoparticle based targeted imaging probes have gained increasing popularities. Those complexes consist of a carrier, an imaging reporter, and a targeting ligand. The active targeting ability dramatically increases the specificity. And the multivalency effect may further reduce the dose while providing a decent signal. In this thesis, sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping and cancer imaging are two research topics. The focus is to develop molecular imaging probes with high specificity and sensitivity, for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and optical imaging. The objective of this thesis is to explore dextran radiopharmaceuticals and porous silicon nanoparticles based molecular imaging agents. Dextran polymers are excellent carriers to deliver imaging reporters or therapeutic agents due to its well established safety profile and oligosaccharide conjugation chemistry. There is also a wide selection of dextran polymers with different lengths. On the other hand, Silicon nanoparticles represent another class of biodegradable materials for imaging and drug delivery. The success in fluorescence lifetime imaging and enhancements of the immune activation potency was briefly discussed. Chapter 1 begins with an overview on current molecular imaging techniques and imaging probes. Chapter 2 presents a near-IR dye conjugated probe, IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept. Fluorophore density was optimized to generate the maximum brightness. It was labeled with 68Ga and 99mTc and in vivo SLN mapping was successfully performed in different animals, such as mice, rabbits, dogs and pigs. With 99mTc labeled IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept, chapter 3 introduces a two-day imaging protocol with a hand-held imager. Chapter 4 proposed a method to dual radiolabel the IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept with both 68Ga and

  15. Optimization of energy window for {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung SPECT imaging for detection tasks using the ideal observer with model-mismatch

    SciTech Connect

    Rong Xing; Ghaly, Michael; Frey, Eric C.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: In yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) microsphere brachytherapy (radioembolization) of unresectable liver cancer, posttherapy {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has been used to document the distribution of microspheres in the patient and to help predict potential side effects. The energy window used during projection acquisition can have a significant effect on image quality. Thus, using an optimal energy window is desirable. However, there has been great variability in the choice of energy window due to the continuous and broad energy distribution of {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung photons. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the ideal observer (IO) is a widely used figure of merit (FOM) for optimizing the imaging system for detection tasks. The IO implicitly assumes a perfect model of the image formation process. However, for {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung SPECT there can be substantial model-mismatch (i.e., difference between the actual image formation process and the model of it assumed in reconstruction), and the amount of the model-mismatch depends on the energy window. It is thus important to account for the degradation of the observer performance due to model-mismatch in the optimization of the energy window. The purpose of this paper is to optimize the energy window for {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung SPECT for a detection task while taking into account the effects of the model-mismatch. Methods: An observer, termed the ideal observer with model-mismatch (IO-MM), has been proposed previously to account for the effects of the model-mismatch on IO performance. In this work, the AUC for the IO-MM was used as the FOM for the optimization. To provide a clinically realistic object model and imaging simulation, the authors used a background-known-statistically and signal-known-statistically task. The background was modeled as multiple compartments in the liver with activity parameters independently following a

  16. Evaluation of simultaneous 201Tl/99mTc dual-isotope cardiac SPECT imaging with model-based crosstalk compensation using canine studies

    PubMed Central

    Du, Y.; Links, J. M.; Becker, L.; DiPaula, A. F.; Frank, T.; Schuleri, K. H.; Lardo, A. C.; Frey, E. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Simultaneous 201Tl/99mTc-Sestamibi dual-isotope myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging can reduce imaging time and produce perfectly registered rest/stress images. However, crosstalk from 99mTc into 201Tl images can significantly reduce 201Tl image quality. We have developed a model-based compensation (MBC) method to compensate for this crosstalk. The method has previously been validated with phantom and simulation studies. In this study, we evaluated the MBC method using a canine model. Methods Left anterior descending or left circumflex coronary artery stenoses were created in 50 adult mongrel dogs weighing 20–30 kg. The dogs were injected with 111 MBq (3 mCi) of 201Tl at rest, and a SPECT study acquired. Stress was induced by administering adenosine to the dog, followed by injection of 740 MBq (20 mCi) of 99mTc-Sestamibi at peak stress. A second SPECT study was performed with data acquired in both 201Tl and 99mTc energy windows to provide simultaneous dual-isotope projection data. The images were reconstructed using the ordered subsets-expectation maximization (OS-EM) reconstruction algorithm with compensation for attenuation, scatter and detector response. For simultaneously acquired 201Tl data, we also applied the MBC method to compensate for crosstalk contamination from 99mTc. Results Without compensation, 99mTc crosstalk increased the estimated 201Tl activity concentration in the rest images and reduced defect contrast. After MBC, the 201Tl images were in good agreement with the registered single isotope images and ex vivo count data. The ischemic (IS) to non-ischemic (NIS) region 201Tl activity concentration ratios were computed for single isotope and dual isotope studies. The correlation with ex vivo IS-NIS ratios was 0.815 after MBC, compared to the 0.495 from data without compensation. In addition, the regression line for the IS-NIS ratios with MBC was almost parallel to the line of identity with a slope of 0.93, compared to a slope of 0

  17. Low-Temperature Scanning Capacitance Probe for Imaging Electron Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandari, S.; Westervelt, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Novel techniques to probe electronic properties at the nanoscale can shed light on the physics of nanoscale devices. In particular, studying the scattering of electrons from edges and apertures at the nanoscale and imaging the electron profile in a quantum dot, have been of interest [1]. In this paper, we present the design and implementation of a cooled scanning capacitance probe that operates at liquid He temperatures to image electron waves in nanodevices. The conducting tip of a scanned probe microscope is held above the nanoscale structure, and an applied sample-to-tip voltage creates an image charge that is measured by a cooled charge amplifier [2] adjacent to the tip. The circuit is based on a low-capacitance, high- electron-mobility transistor (Fujitsu FHX35X). The input is a capacitance bridge formed by a low capacitance pinched-off HEMT transistor and tip-sample capacitance. We have achieved low noise level (0.13 e/VHz) and high spatial resolution (100 nm) for this technique, which promises to be a useful tool to study electronic behavior in nanoscale devices.

  18. Imaging energy landscapes with concentrated diffusing colloidal probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahukudumbi, Pradipkumar; Bevan, Michael A.

    2007-06-01

    The ability to locally interrogate interactions between particles and energetically patterned surfaces provides essential information to design, control, and optimize template directed self-assembly processes. Although numerous techniques are capable of characterizing local physicochemical surface properties, no current method resolves interactions between colloids and patterned surfaces on the order of the thermal energy kT, which is the inherent energy scale of equilibrium self-assembly processes. Here, the authors describe video microscopy measurements and an inverse Monte Carlo analysis of diffusing colloidal probes as a means to image three dimensional free energy and potential energy landscapes due to physically patterned surfaces. In addition, they also develop a consistent analysis of self-diffusion in inhomogeneous fluids of concentrated diffusing probes on energy landscapes, which is important to the temporal imaging process and to self-assembly kinetics. Extension of the concepts developed in this work suggests a general strategy to image multidimensional and multiscale physical, chemical, and biological surfaces using a variety of diffusing probes (i.e., molecules, macromolecules, nanoparticles, and colloids).

  19. Dual modality micro-SPECT and micro-CT for small animal imaging: technical advances and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izaguirre, Enrique W.; Sun, Mingshan; Carver, James; Thompson, Steve; Hasegawa, Bruce H.

    2005-09-01

    Small animal dual modality microSPECT-micro CT has seen many technological advances during recent years. The design of small animal dual modality scanners is a multidisciplinary field, where several interrelated technological problems must be integrated in a complex instrument. This article describes the general concepts that must be taken into consideration during the design process of dual modality microSPECT- microCT scanners. A description of the contemporary scanner technology is presented using the recently designed dual modality micro SPECT -microCT at the Physics Research Laboratory at UCSF. The technology is described with a simple approach to introduce the reader to the complex process of the dual modality scanner design. This article includes a discussion of current technological challenges that have potential to improve or expand the microSPECT-microCT performance and its applications.

  20. Photoacoustic imaging of fluorophores using pump-probe excitation

    PubMed Central

    Märk, Julia; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Theiss, Christoph; Dortay, Hakan; Friedrich, Thomas; Laufer, Jan

    2015-01-01

    A pump-probe technique for the detection of fluorophores in tomographic PA images is introduced. It is based on inducing stimulated emission in fluorescent molecules, which in turn modulates the amount of thermalized energy, and hence the PA signal amplitude. A theoretical model of the PA signal generation in fluorophores is presented and experimentally validated on cuvette measurements made in solutions of Rhodamine 6G, a fluorophore of known optical and molecular properties. The application of this technique to deep tissue tomographic PA imaging is demonstrated by determining the spatial distribution of a near-infrared fluorophore in a tissue phantom. PMID:26203378

  1. Imaging targeted-agent binding in vivo with two probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogue, Brian W.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Hextrum, Shannon; O'Hara, Julia A.; Jermyn, Michael; Srinivasan, Subhadra; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2010-05-01

    An approach to quantitatively image targeted-agent binding rate in vivo is demonstrated with dual-probe injection of both targeted and nontargeted fluorescent dyes. Images of a binding rate constant are created that reveal lower than expected uptake of epidermal growth factor in an orthotopic xenograft pancreas tumor (2.3×10-5 s-1), as compared to the normal pancreas (3.4×10-5 s-1). This approach allows noninvasive assessment of tumor receptor targeting in vivo to determine the expected contrast, spatial localization, and efficacy in therapeutic agent delivery.

  2. Integrated transrectal probe for translational ultrasound-photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Kevan L.; Harrison, Tyler; Usmani, Nawaid; Zemp, Roger J.

    2016-03-01

    A compact photoacoustic transrectal probe is constructed for improved imaging in brachytherapy treatment. A 192 element 5 MHz linear transducer array is mounted inside a small 3D printed casing along with an array of optical fibers. The device is fed by a pump laser and tunable NIR-optical parametric oscillator with data collected by a Verasonics ultrasound platform. This assembly demonstrates improved imaging of brachytherapy seeds in phantoms with depths up to 5 cm. The tuneable excitation in combination with standard US integration provides adjustable contrast between the brachytherapy seeds, blood filled tubes and background tissue.

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of αvβ3-Targeting Peptidomimetic Chelate Conjugates for PET and SPECT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Seung; Nwe, Kido; Milenic, Diane E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.; Satz, Stanley; Baidoo, Kwamena E.

    2012-01-01

    There is growing interest in small peptidomimetic αvβ3 integrin antagonists that are readily synthesized and characterized and can be easily handled using physiological conditions. Peptidomimetic 4-[2-(3,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidine-2-ylamino)ethyloxy]benzoyl-2-[N-(3-amino-neopenta-1-carbamyl)]-aminoethylsulfonyl-amino-β-alanine (IAC) was successfully conjugated to 1-(1-carboxy-3-carbo-t-butoxypropyl)-4,7-(carbo-tert-butoxymethyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane (NODAGA(tBu)3) and 1-(1-carboxy-3-carbotertbutoxymethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (DOTAGA(tBu)4) and radiolabeled with 111In, 67Ga and 203Pb. Results of a radioimmunoassay demonstrated binding to purified αvβ3 integrin when one to four equivalents of integrin were added to the reaction. Based on this promising result, investigations are moving forward to evaluate the NODA-GA-IAC and DOTA-GA-IAC conjugates for the targeting tumor associated angiogenesis and αvβ3 integrin positive tumors to define their PET and SPECT imaging qualities as well as their potential for delivery of therapeutic radionuclides. PMID:22853992

  4. In vivo SPECT/CT imaging and biodistribution using radioactive Cd125mTe/ZnS nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, Jonathan D.; Kennel, Steve J.; Mirzadeh, Saed; Dai, Sheng; Wall, Jonathan S.; Richey, Tina; Avenell, James; Rondinone, Adam J.

    2007-05-01

    Radioactive cadmium telluride/zinc sulfide (Cd125mTe/ZnS) nanoparticles were targeted to mouse lung with antibody to mouse lung endothelium and quantified using radiological histology in order to test the in vivo targeting efficacy of a nanoparticle-antibody (NP-mAb) system. The nanoparticles were linked to either a monoclonal antibody to mouse lung thrombomodulin (mAb 201B) or a control antibody (mAb 33), and injected into groups of 6-week-old Balb/C female mice. Animals were sacrificed at 1, 4, 24, 72 and 144 h post-injection, and biodistribution in major organs was determined. Full body microSPECT/CT imaging was performed on a pair of mice (experimental and control) providing visual confirmation of the biodistribution. The Cd125mTe/ZnS NPs conjugated to mAb 201B principally target the lungs while the nanoparticles coupled to mAb 33 accumulate in the liver and spleen. These data provide, for the first time, a quantitative measurement of the in vivo targeting efficacy of an inorganic nanoparticle-mAb system.

  5. Assessment of a Monte-Carlo simulation of SPECT recordings from a new-generation heart-centric semiconductor camera: from point sources to human images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbert, Laetitia; Galbrun, Ernest; Odille, Freddy; Poussier, Sylvain; Noel, Alain; Wolf, Didier; Karcher, Gilles; Marie, Pierre-Yves

    2015-02-01

    Geant4 application for tomographic emission (GATE), a Monte-Carlo simulation platform, has previously been used for optimizing tomoscintigraphic images recorded with scintillation Anger cameras but not with the new-generation heart-centric cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) cameras. Using the GATE platform, this study aimed at simulating the SPECT recordings from one of these new CZT cameras and to assess this simulation by direct comparison between simulated and actual recorded data, ranging from point sources to human images. Geometry and movement of detectors, as well as their respective energy responses, were modeled for the CZT ‘D.SPECT’ camera in the GATE platform. Both simulated and actual recorded data were obtained from: (1) point and linear sources of 99mTc for compared assessments of detection sensitivity and spatial resolution, (2) a cardiac insert filled with a 99mTc solution for compared assessments of contrast-to-noise ratio and sharpness of myocardial borders and (3) in a patient with myocardial infarction using segmented cardiac magnetic resonance imaging images. Most of the data from the simulated images exhibited high concordance with the results of actual images with relative differences of only: (1) 0.5% for detection sensitivity, (2) 6.7% for spatial resolution, (3) 2.6% for contrast-to-noise ratio and 5.0% for sharpness index on the cardiac insert placed in a diffusing environment. There was also good concordance between actual and simulated gated-SPECT patient images for the delineation of the myocardial infarction area, although the quality of the simulated images was clearly superior with increases around 50% for both contrast-to-noise ratio and sharpness index. SPECT recordings from a new heart-centric CZT camera can be simulated with the GATE software with high concordance relative to the actual physical properties of this camera. These simulations may be conducted up to the stage of human SPECT-images even if further refinement is needed

  6. In vivo imaging of light-emitting probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Bradley W.; Cable, Michael D.; Nelson, Michael B.

    2001-10-01

    In vivo imaging of cells tagged with light-emitting probes, such as firefly luciferase or fluorescent proteins, is a powerful technology that enables a wide range of biological studies in small research animals. Reporters with emission in the red to infrared (> 600 nm) are preferred due to the low absorption in tissue at these wavelengths. Modeling of photon diffusion through tissue indicates that bioluminescent cell counts as low as a few hundred can be detected subcutaneously, while approximately106 cells are required to detect signals at approximately 2 cm depth in tissue. Signal-to- noise estimates show that cooled back-thinned integrating charge coupled devices (CCDs) are preferred to image-intensified CCDs for this application, mainly due to their high quantum efficiency (approximately 85%) at wavelengths > 600 nm where tissue absorption is low. Instrumentation for in vivo imaging developed at Xenogen is described and several examples of images of mice with bioluminescent cells are presented.

  7. Probes for intracellular RNA imaging in live cells.

    PubMed

    Santangelo, Philip J; Alonas, Eric; Jung, Jeenah; Lifland, Aaron W; Zurla, Chiara

    2012-01-01

    RNA localization, dynamics, and regulation are becoming increasingly important to our basic understanding of gene expression and RNA virus pathogenesis. An improved understanding of these processes will be necessary in order to identify new drug targets, as well as to create models of gene expression networks. Much of this new understanding will likely come from imaging studies of RNA, which can generate the spatiotemporal information necessary to characterize RNA within the cellular milieu. Ideally, this would be performed imaging native, nonengineered RNAs, but the approaches for performing these experiments are still evolving. In order for them to reach their potential, it is critical that they have characteristics that allow for the tracking of RNA throughout their life cycle. This chapter presents an overview of RNA imaging methodologies, and focuses on a single RNA sensitive method, employing exogenous probes, for imaging, native, nonengineered RNA in live cells. PMID:22289464

  8. Radiopharmaceuticals for SPECT cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, V. I.; Medvedeva, A. A.; Zelchan, R. V.; Sinilkin, I. G.; Stasyuk, E. S.; Larionova, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Choynzonov, E. L.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI in the detection of breast, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers. A total of 220 patients were included into the study: 120 patients with breast lesions (100 patients with breast cancer and 20 patients with benign breast tumors) and 100 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal diseases (80 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer and 20 patients with benign laryngeal/hypopharyngeal lesions). No abnormal 199Tl uptake was seen in all patients with benign breast and laryngeal lesions, indicating a 100% specificity of 199Tl SPECT. In the breast cancer patients, the increased 199Tl uptake in the breast was visualized in 94.8% patients, 99mTc-MIBI—in 93.4% patients. The increased 199Tl uptake in axillary lymph nodes was detected in 60% patients, and 99mTc-MIBI—in 93.1% patients. In patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer, the sensitivity of SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI was 95%. The 199Tl SPECT sensitivity in identification of regional lymph node metastases in the patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer was 75% and the 99mTc-MIBI SPECT sensitivity was 17%. The data obtained showed that SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI can be used as one of the additional imaging methods in detection of tumors.

  9. Radiopharmaceuticals for SPECT Cancer Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, V. I.; Medvedeva, A. A.; Zelchan, R. V.; Sinilkin, I. G.; Stasyuk, E. S.; Larionova, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Choynzonov, E. L.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI in the detection of breast, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers. Materials and Methods: a total of 220 patients were included into the study. Of them, there were 120 patients with breast lesions (100 patients with breast cancer and 20 patients with benign breast tumors) and '00 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal diseases (80 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer and 20 patients with benign laryngeal/hypopharyngeal lesions). Results: no abnormal 199Tl uptake was seen in all patients with benign breast and laryngeal lesions, indicating a 100% specificity of 199Tl SPECT. In breast cancer patients, increased 199Tl uptake in the breast was visualized in 94.8% patients, 99mTc-MIBI in 93.4% patients. Increased 199Tl uptake in axillary lymph nodes was detected in 60% patients and 99mTc-MIBI in 93.1% patients. In patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer, sensitivity of SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI were 95%. The 199Tl SPECT sensitivity in identification of regional lymph node metastases in patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer was 75% and the 99mTc-MIBI SPECT sensitivity was 17%. Conclusion: the data obtained show that SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI can be used as one of the additional imaging methods in detection of tumors.

  10. Molecular probes for nonlinear optical imaging of biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard-Desce, Mireille H.; Ventelon, Lionel; Charier, Sandrine; Moreaux, Laurent; Mertz, Jerome

    2001-12-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) are nonlinear optical (NLO) phenomena that scale with excitation intensity squared, and hence give rise to an intrinsic 3-dimensional resolution when used in microscopic imaging. TPEF microscopy has gained widespread popularity in the biology community whereas SHG microscopy promises to be a powerful tool because of its sensitivity to local asymmetry. We have implemented an approach toward the design of NLO-probes specifically adapted for SHG and/or TPEF imaging of biological membranes. Our strategy is based on the design of nanoscale amphiphilic NLO-phores. We have prepared symmetrical bolaamphiphilic fluorophores combining very high two-photon absorption (TPA) cross-sections in the visible red region and affinity for cellular membranes. Their incorporation and orientation in lipid membranes can be monitored via TPEF anisotropy. We have also prepared amphiphilic push-pull chromophores exhibiting both large TPA cross-sections and very large first hyperpolarizabilities in the near-IR region. These NLO-probes have proved to be particularly useful for imaging of biological membranes by simultaneous SHG and TPEF microscopy and offer attractive prospects for real-time imaging of fundamental biological processes such as adhesion, fusion or reporting of membrane potentials.

  11. Design Studies of a CZT-based Detector Combined with a Pixel-Geometry-Matching Collimator for SPECT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Weng, Fenghua; Bagchi, Srijeeta; Huang, Qiu; Seo, Youngho

    2013-10-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) suffers limited efficiency due to the need for collimators. Collimator properties largely decide the data statistics and image quality. Various materials and configurations of collimators have been investigated in many years. The main thrust of our study is to evaluate the design of pixel-geometry-matching collimators to investigate their potential performances using Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations. Here, a pixel-geometry-matching collimator is defined as a collimator which is divided into the same number of pixels as the detector's and the center of each pixel in the collimator is a one-to-one correspondence to that in the detector. The detector is made of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT), which is one of the most promising materials for applications to detect hard X-rays and γ-rays due to its ability to obtain good energy resolution and high light output at room temperature. For our current project, we have designed a large-area, CZT-based gamma camera (20.192 cm×20.192 cm) with a small pixel pitch (1.60 mm). The detector is pixelated and hence the intrinsic resolution can be as small as the size of the pixel. Materials of collimator, collimator hole geometry, detection efficiency, and spatial resolution of the CZT detector combined with the pixel-matching collimator were calculated and analyzed under different conditions. From the simulation studies, we found that such a camera using rectangular holes has promising imaging characteristics in terms of spatial resolution, detection efficiency, and energy resolution. PMID:25378898

  12. Design Studies of a CZT-based Detector Combined with a Pixel-Geometry-Matching Collimator for SPECT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Fenghua; Bagchi, Srijeeta; Huang, Qiu; Seo, Youngho

    2014-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) suffers limited efficiency due to the need for collimators. Collimator properties largely decide the data statistics and image quality. Various materials and configurations of collimators have been investigated in many years. The main thrust of our study is to evaluate the design of pixel-geometry-matching collimators to investigate their potential performances using Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations. Here, a pixel-geometry-matching collimator is defined as a collimator which is divided into the same number of pixels as the detector’s and the center of each pixel in the collimator is a one-to-one correspondence to that in the detector. The detector is made of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT), which is one of the most promising materials for applications to detect hard X-rays and γ-rays due to its ability to obtain good energy resolution and high light output at room temperature. For our current project, we have designed a large-area, CZT-based gamma camera (20.192 cm×20.192 cm) with a small pixel pitch (1.60 mm). The detector is pixelated and hence the intrinsic resolution can be as small as the size of the pixel. Materials of collimator, collimator hole geometry, detection efficiency, and spatial resolution of the CZT detector combined with the pixel-matching collimator were calculated and analyzed under different conditions. From the simulation studies, we found that such a camera using rectangular holes has promising imaging characteristics in terms of spatial resolution, detection efficiency, and energy resolution. PMID:25378898

  13. Synthesis and evaluation of ¹²³/¹³¹I-Iochlonicotinamide as a novel SPECT probe for malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Chao; Chang, Chih-Hsien; Shen, Chih-Chieh; Chen, Chuan-Lin; Liu, Ren-Shyan; Lin, Ming-Hsien; Wang, Hsin-Ell

    2015-05-01

    Malignant melanoma expresses a highly aggressive metastasis. Early diagnosis of malignant melanoma is important for patient survival. Radiolabeled benzamides and nicotinamides have been reported to be attractive candidates for malignant melanoma diagnosis as they bind to melanin, a characteristic substance that displays in malignant melanoma, and show high tumor accumulation and retention. Herein, we designed and synthesized a novel (123/131)I-labeled nicotinamide derivative that specifically binds to melanin. (123/131)I-Iochlonicotinamide was prepared with good radiochemical yield (50-70%, decay corrected) and high specific radioactivity (50-80 GBq/μmol). (131)I-Iochlonicotinamide exhibited good in vitro stability (radiochemical purity >95% after a 24-h incubation) in human serum. High uptake of (123/131)I-Iochlonicotinamide in B16F0 melanoma cells compared to that in A375 amelanotic cells demonstrated its selective binding to melanin. Intravenous administration of (123/131)I-Iochlonicotinamide in a melanoma-bearing mouse model revealed high uptake in melanotic melanoma and high tumor-to-muscle ratio. MicroSPECT scan of (123/131)I-Iochlonicotinamide injected mice also displayed high contrast tumor imaging as compared with normal organs. The radiation-absorbed dose projection for the administration of (131)I-Iochlonicotinamide to human was based on the results of biodistribution study. The effective dose appears to be approximately 0.44 mSv/MBq(-1). The specific binding of (123/131)I-Iochlonicotinamide to melanin along with a prolonged tumor retention and acceptable projected human dosimetry suggest that it may be a promising theranostic agent for treating malignant melanoma. PMID:25800432

  14. Local and Non-local Regularization Techniques in Emission (PET/SPECT) Tomographic Image Reconstruction Methods.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Munir; Shahzad, Tasawar; Masood, Khalid; Rashid, Khalid; Tanveer, Muhammad; Iqbal, Rabail; Hussain, Nasir; Shahid, Abubakar; Fazal-E-Aleem

    2016-06-01

    Emission tomographic image reconstruction is an ill-posed problem due to limited and noisy data and various image-degrading effects affecting the data and leads to noisy reconstructions. Explicit regularization, through iterative reconstruction methods, is considered better to compensate for reconstruction-based noise. Local smoothing and edge-preserving regularization methods can reduce reconstruction-based noise. However, these methods produce overly smoothed images or blocky artefacts in the final image because they can only exploit local image properties. Recently, non-local regularization techniques have been introduced, to overcome these problems, by incorporating geometrical global continuity and connectivity present in the objective image. These techniques can overcome drawbacks of local regularization methods; however, they also have certain limitations, such as choice of the regularization function, neighbourhood size or calibration of several empirical parameters involved. This work compares different local and non-local regularization techniques used in emission tomographic imaging in general and emission computed tomography in specific for improved quality of the resultant images. PMID:26714680

  15. Progress in BazookaSPECT

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Brian W.; Barber, H. Bradford; Furenlid, Lars R.; Moore, Stephen K.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2010-01-01

    Recent progress on a high-resolution, photon-counting gamma-ray and x-ray imager called BazookaSPECT is presented. BazookaSPECT is an example of a new class of scintillation detectors based on integrating detectors such as CCD(charge-coupled device) or CMOS(complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) sensors. BazookaSPECT is unique in that it makes use of a scintillator in close proximity to a microchannel plate-based image intensifier for up-front optical amplification of scintillation light. We discuss progress made in bringing about compact BazookaSPECT modules and in real-time processing of event data using graphics processing units (GPUs). These advances are being implemented in the design of a high-resolution rodent brain imager called FastSPECT III. A key benefit of up-front optical gain is that any CCD/CMOS sensor can now be utilized for photon counting. We discuss the benefits and feasibility of using CMOS sensors as photon-counting detectors for digital radiography, with application in mammography and computed tomography (CT). We present as an appendix a formal method for comparing various photon-counting integrating detectors using objective statistical criteria. PMID:21297897

  16. Photonic Doppler velocimetry lens array probe incorporating stereo imaging

    DOEpatents

    Malone, Robert M.; Kaufman, Morris I.

    2015-09-01

    A probe including a multiple lens array is disclosed to measure velocity distribution of a moving surface along many lines of sight. Laser light, directed to the moving surface is reflected back from the surface and is Doppler shifted, collected into the array, and then directed to detection equipment through optic fibers. The received light is mixed with reference laser light and using photonic Doppler velocimetry, a continuous time record of the surface movement is obtained. An array of single-mode optical fibers provides an optic signal to the multiple lens array. Numerous fibers in a fiber array project numerous rays to establish many measurement points at numerous different locations. One or more lens groups may be replaced with imaging lenses so a stereo image of the moving surface can be recorded. Imaging a portion of the surface during initial travel can determine whether the surface is breaking up.

  17. Band Excitation in Scanning Probe Microscopy: Recognition and Functional Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jesse, Stephen; Vasudevan, Dr. Rama; Collins, Liam; Strelcov, Evgheni; Okatan, Mahmut B; Belianinov, Alex; Baddorf, Arthur P; Proksch, Roger; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2014-01-01

    Field confinement at the junction between a biased scanning probe microscope s (SPM) tip and solid surface enables local probing of various bias-induced transformations such as polarization switching, ionic motion, or electrochemical reactions to name a few. The nanoscale size of the biased region is smaller or comparable to features like grain boundaries and dislocations, potentially allows for the study of kinetics and thermodynamics at the level of a single defect. In contrast to classical statistically averaged approaches, this allows one to link structure to functionality and deterministically decipher associated mesoscopic and atomistic mechanisms. Furthermore, this type of information can serve as a fingerprint of local material functionality, allowing for local recognition imaging. Here, current progress in multidimensional SPM techniques based on band-excitation time and voltage spectroscopies is illustrated, including discussions on data acquisition, dimensionality reduction, and visualization along with future challenges and opportunities for the field.

  18. Quantification of the spatial distribution of rectally applied surrogates for microbicide and semen in colon with SPECT and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ying J; Caffo, Brian S; Fuchs, Edward J; Lee, Linda A; Du, Yong; Li, Liye; Bakshi, Rahul P; Macura, Katarzyna; Khan, Wasif A; Wahl, Richard L; Grohskopf, Lisa A; Hendrix, Craig W

    2012-01-01

    AIMS We sought to describe quantitatively the distribution of rectally administered gels and seminal fluid surrogates using novel concentration–distance parameters that could be repeated over time. These methods are needed to develop rationally rectal microbicides to target and prevent HIV infection. METHODS Eight subjects were dosed rectally with radiolabelled and gadolinium-labelled gels to simulate microbicide gel and seminal fluid. Rectal doses were given with and without simulated receptive anal intercourse. Twenty-four hour distribution was assessed with indirect single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and direct assessment via sigmoidoscopic brushes. Concentration–distance curves were generated using an algorithm for fitting SPECT data in three dimensions. Three novel concentration–distance parameters were defined to describe quantitatively the distribution of radiolabels: maximal distance (Dmax), distance at maximal concentration (DCmax) and mean residence distance (Dave). RESULTS The SPECT/CT distribution of microbicide and semen surrogates was similar. Between 1 h and 24 h post dose, the surrogates migrated retrograde in all three parameters (relative to coccygeal level; geometric mean [95% confidence interval]): maximal distance (Dmax), 10 cm (8.6–12) to 18 cm (13–26), distance at maximal concentration (DCmax), 3.8 cm (2.7–5.3) to 4.2 cm (2.8–6.3) and mean residence distance (Dave), 4.3 cm (3.5–5.1) to 7.6 cm (5.3–11). Sigmoidoscopy and MRI correlated only roughly with SPECT/CT. CONCLUSIONS Rectal microbicide surrogates migrated retrograde during the 24 h following dosing. Spatial kinetic parameters estimated using three dimensional curve fitting of distribution data should prove useful for evaluating rectal formulations of drugs for HIV prevention and other indications. PMID:22404308

  19. Evaluation and localization of lymphatic drainage and sentinel lymph nodes in patients with head and neck melanomas by hybrid SPECT/CT lymphoscintigraphic imaging.

    PubMed

    Mar, Martha V; Miller, Scott A; Kim, E Edmund; Macapinlac, Homer A

    2007-03-01

    In patients with head and neck tumors, preoperative lymphoscintigraphy can be used to map lymphatic drainage patterns and identify sentinel lymph nodes. However, it is very difficult to determine the exact locations of head and neck sentinel nodes on preoperative lymphoscintigraphy without the use of anatomic landmarks. Lymph nodes in the head and neck are grouped into 7 regions, or levels, on the basis of anatomic landmarks. In patients undergoing standard lymphoscintigraphy, obtaining lateral marker images that show important anatomic landmarks can help with the localization of sentinel nodes. However, technical problems often render marker images of little or no use. Hybrid SPECT/CT lymphoscintigraphic imaging facilitates the localization of sentinel nodes by reliably showing the relationships between sentinel nodes and important anatomic structures. After reading this article, the reader should understand the lymph node level classification system for head and neck melanomas, be able to describe the technique used for the imaging of sentinel nodes in the head and neck region, and be able to demonstrate how SPECT/CT lymphoscintigraphic imaging can enable precise sentinel node localization and thus help to ensure minimal dissection. PMID:17337652

  20. A comparison of rat SPECT images obtained using 99mTc derived from 99Mo produced by an electron accelerator with that from a reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galea, R.; Wells, R. G.; Ross, C. K.; Lockwood, J.; Moore, K.; Harvey, J. T.; Isensee, G. H.

    2013-05-01

    Recent shortages of molybdenum-99 (99Mo) have led to an examination of alternate production methods that could contribute to a more robust supply. An electron accelerator and the photoneutron reaction were used to produce 99Mo from which technetium-99m (99mTc) is extracted. SPECT images of rat anatomy obtained using the accelerator-produced 99mTc with those obtained using 99mTc from a commercial generator were compared. Disks of 100Mo were irradiated with x-rays produced by a 35 MeV electron beam to generate about 1110 MBq (30 mCi) of 99Mo per disk. After target dissolution, a NorthStar ARSII unit was used to separate the 99mTc, which was subsequently used to tag pharmaceuticals suitable for cardiac and bone imaging. SPECT images were acquired for three rats and compared to images for the same three rats obtained using 99mTc from a standard reactor 99Mo generator. The efficiency of 99Mo-99mTc separation was typically greater than 90%. This study demonstrated the delivery of 99mTc from the end of beam to the end user of approximately 30 h. Images obtained using the heart and bone scanning agents using reactor and linac-produced 99mTc were comparable. High-power electron accelerators are an attractive option for producing 99Mo on a national scale.

  1. Radiolabeled2{beta}-carbo-2{prime}(S)-fluoroisopropoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)-tropane (FIPIT): Synthesis, characterization and primate imaging of a radioligand for mapping dopamine transporter sites by both PET and SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Keil, R.; Shi, B.; Hoffman, J.M.

    1996-05-01

    Highly potent and selective dopamine transporter ligands containing both iodine and fluorine are versatile probes for in vivo mapping of dopamine transporter sites in the striatum by PET and SPECT when labeled with fluorine-18 and iodine-123, respectively. Dual labeled biochemical probes are attractive agents since only one set of toxicity and pharmacokinetic analysis may be required for ligand validation for both imaging modalities. Recently, we reported that replacement of the methyl ester of 2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-chlorophenyl)tropane with a 2{prime}(R,S)-[F-18]fluoroisopropyl ester affords a highly potent and selective dopamine transporter ligand, 2{beta}-carbo-2{prime}(R,S)- fluoroisopropoxy-3{beta}-(4-chlorophenyl)tropane (FIPCT). FIPCT showed high uptake and retention in the striatum (S) resulting in good S/cerebellum = 3.5 at 125 min post injection in a rhesus monkey. These findings prompted us to synthesize and evaluate the 4-iodo analog, 2{beta}-carbo-2{prime}-(S)-fluoroisopropoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropane (1) with 1-fluoropropan-2-ol (2) and POC13. These results suggest that [F-18]S-FIPIT is an excellent candidate for mapping of dopamine transporter sites.

  2. Fast Monte Carlo based joint iterative reconstruction for simultaneous {sup 99m}Tc/{sup 123}I SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyang Jinsong; El Fakhri, Georges; Moore, Stephen C.

    2007-08-15

    Simultaneous {sup 99m}Tc/{sup 123}I SPECT allows the assessment of two physiological functions under identical conditions. The separation of these radionuclides is difficult, however, because their energies are close. Most energy-window-based scatter correction methods do not fully model either physical factors or patient-specific activity and attenuation distributions. We have developed a fast Monte Carlo (MC) simulation-based multiple-radionuclide and multiple-energy joint ordered-subset expectation-maximization (JOSEM) iterative reconstruction algorithm, MC-JOSEM. MC-JOSEM simultaneously corrects for scatter and cross talk as well as detector response within the reconstruction algorithm. We evaluated MC-JOSEM for simultaneous brain profusion ({sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO) and neurotransmission ({sup 123}I-altropane) SPECT. MC simulations of {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 123}I studies were generated separately and then combined to mimic simultaneous {sup 99m}Tc/{sup 123}I SPECT. All the details of photon transport through the brain, the collimator, and detector, including Compton and coherent scatter, septal penetration, and backscatter from components behind the crystal, were modeled. We reconstructed images from simultaneous dual-radionuclide projections in three ways. First, we reconstructed the photopeak-energy-window projections (with an asymmetric energy window for {sup 123}I) using the standard ordered-subsets expectation-maximization algorithm (NSC-OSEM). Second, we used standard OSEM to reconstruct {sup 99m}Tc photopeak-energy-window projections, while including an estimate of scatter from a Compton-scatter energy window (SC-OSEM). Third, we jointly reconstructed both {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 123}I images using projection data associated with two photopeak energy windows and an intermediate-energy window using MC-JOSEM. For 15 iterations of reconstruction, the bias and standard deviation of {sup 99m}Tc activity estimates in several brain structures were calculated for NSC

  3. Spatiotemporal processing of gated cardiac SPECT images using deformable mesh modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Brankov, Jovan G.; Yang Yongyi; Wernick, Miles N.

    2005-09-15

    In this paper we present a spatiotemporal processing approach, based on deformable mesh modeling, for noise reduction in gated cardiac single-photon emission computed tomography images. Because of the partial volume effect (PVE), clinical cardiac-gated perfusion images exhibit a phenomenon known as brightening--the myocardium appears to become brighter as the heart wall thickens. Although brightening is an artifact, it serves as an important diagnostic feature for assessment of wall thickening in clinical practice. Our proposed processing algorithm aims to preserve this important diagnostic feature while reducing the noise level in the images. The proposed algorithm is based on the use of a deformable mesh for modeling the cardiac motion in a gated cardiac sequence, based on which the images are processed by smoothing along space-time trajectories of object points while taking into account the PVE. Our experiments demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can yield significantly more-accurate results than several existing methods.

  4. Multimodality evaluation of ventricular function: comparison of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, echocardiography, and planar and SPECT blood pool imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiglin, David H.; Krol, Andrzej; Tillapaugh-Fay, Gwen M.; Szeverenyi, Nikolaus M.; Thomas, Frank D.

    2001-05-01

    Fifteen patients underwent resting echocardiography (EC), ECG gated cardiac MR ventriculography (MRV) and blood pool planar and SPECT ventriculography (SPV) sequentially on the same day. In addition, 36 patients had sequential ECG gated blood pool and SPV and 20 normal volunteers, age > 18 years, had sequential ECG gated cardiac MRI performed on both Siemens closed, 1.5T, and open, 0.2T, magnets. Echocardiography was performed using a HP 5500 system equipped with an S4 transducer in 2D mode. MRV at 0.2T and 1.5T used a circular polarized body coil. Nuclear Medicine studies used 25 mCi Tc- 99m labeled red blood cells. Gated planar and SPV were acquired on a dual head Siemens E-Cam system. We have found that MRV affords the most accurate measurement of ventricular function. SPV and MRV provide similar estimations of left ventricular function (LVEF). Further, SPV consistently provides higher LVEF, as compared to the planar data simultaneously acquired. Observed significant differences in intermodality measurements indicate that follow up studies in patients, especially in patients whose management is critically dependent on functional measurement changes, should be monitored by one modality only.

  5. Fluorescent carbonaceous nanospheres as biological probe for noninvasive brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jun; Ruan, Shaobo; Cao, Xi; Cun, Xingli; Chen, Jiantao; Shen, Shun; Jiang, Xinguo; He, Qin; Zhu, Jianhua; Gao, Huile

    2014-12-15

    Fluorescent carbonaceous nanospheres (CDs) have generated much excitement in bioimaging because of their impressive fluorescent properties and good biocompatibility. In this study, we evaluated the potential application of CDs in noninvasive brain imaging. A new kind of CDs was prepared by a heat treating method using glutamic acid and glucose as the precursors. The hydrated diameter and zeta potential of CDs were 101.1 nm (PDI=0.110) and -22.4 mV respectively. Palpable emission spectrum could be observed from 400 nm to 600 nm when excited at corresponding wavelength, suggesting CDs could be used as a noninvasive bio-probe for in vivo imaging. Additionally, several experiments indicated that CDs possess good serum stability and hemocompatibility with low cytotoxicity. In vitro, the CDs could be efficiently taken up by bEnd.3 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. In vivo, CDs could be used for noninvasive brain imaging due to its high accumulation in brain region, which was demonstrated by in vivo imaging and ex vivo tissue imaging. Moreover, the fluorescent distribution in tissue slice showed CDs accumulated in brain with high intensity. In conclusion, CDs were prepared using a simple one-step method with unique optical and good biological properties and could be used for noninvasive brain imaging. PMID:25278360

  6. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of 4-(5-dimethylamino-naphthalene-1-sulfon-amido)-3-(4-iodophenyl)butanoic acid as a novel molecular probe for apoptosis imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Wenbin; Miao, Weimin; Le Puil, Michael; Shi, Guangqing; Biggerstaff, John; Kabalka, George W.; Townsend, David

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} Annexin V is the gold standard probe for imaging apoptosis. {yields} Unfavorable profiles of Annexin V make it difficult to apply in the clinic. {yields} A novel small-molecular probe DNSBA was designed as an alternative to Annexin V. {yields} DNSBA specifically and selectively detect apoptotic cancer cells at all stages. {yields} DNSBA is a potential SPECT and PET agent when labeled with radioiodine. -- Abstract: Apoptosis (programmed cell death) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of many disorders, thus the detection of apoptotic cells can provide the physician with important information to further therapeutic strategies and would substantially advance patient care. A small molecule, 4-(5-dimethylamino-naphthalene-1-sulfonamido)-3-(4-iodo-phenyl)butanoic acid (DNSBA), was designed as a novel probe for imaging apoptosis and synthesized with good yield. The biological characterization demonstrated that DNSBA can be used to specifically and selectively detect apoptotic cancer cells at all stages. DNSBA is also designed as a potential SPECT and PET probe when labeled with radioiodine (I-123, -124, and -131).

  7. Near-infrared dyes for molecular probes and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patonay, Gabor; Beckford, Garfield; Strekowski, Lucjan; Henary, Maged; Kim, Jun Seok; Crow, Sidney

    2009-02-01

    Near-Infrared (NIR) fluorescence has been used both as an analytical tool as molecular probes and in in vitro or in vivo imaging of individual cells and organs. The NIR region (700-1100 nm) is ideal with regard to these applications due to the inherently lower background interference and the high molar absorptivities of NIR chromophores. NIR dyes are also useful in studying binding characteristics of large biomolecules, such as proteins. Throughout these studies, different NIR dyes have been evaluated to determine factors that control binding to biomolecules, including serum albumins. Hydrophobic character of NIR dyes were increased by introducing alkyl and aryl groups, and hydrophilic moieties e.g., polyethylene glycols (PEG) were used to increase aqueous solubility. Recently, our research group introduced bis-cyanines as innovative NIR probes. Depending on their microenvironment, bis-cyanines can exist as an intramolecular dimer with the two cyanines either in a stacked form, or in a linear conformation in which the two subunits do not interact with each other. In this intramolecular H-aggregate, the chromophore has a low extinction coefficient and low fluorescence quantum yield. Upon addition of biomolecules, the H-and D- bands are decreased and the monomeric band is increased, with concomitant increase in fluorescence intensity. Introduction of specific moieties into the NIR dye molecules allows for the development of physiological molecular probes to detect pH, metal ions and other parameters. Examples of these applications include imaging and biomolecule characterizations. Water soluble dyes are expected to be excellent candidates for both in vitro and in vivo imaging of cells and organs.

  8. The added value of hybrid ventilation/perfusion SPECT/CT in patients with stable COPD or apparently healthy smokers. Cancer-suspected CT findings in the lungs are common when hybrid imaging is used.

    PubMed

    Jögi, Jonas; Markstad, Hanna; Tufvesson, Ellen; Bjermer, Leif; Bajc, Marika

    2015-01-01

    Ventilation/perfusion (V/P) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is recognized as a diagnostic method with potential beyond the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. V/P SPECT identifies functional impairment in diseases such as heart failure (HF), pneumonia, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The development of hybrid SPECT/computed tomography (CT) systems, combining functional with morphological imaging through the addition of low-dose CT (LDCT), may be useful in COPD, as these patients are prone to lung cancer and other comorbidities. The aim of this study was to investigate the added value of LDCT among healthy smokers and patients with stable COPD, when examined with V/P SPECT/CT hybrid imaging. Sixty-nine subjects, 55 with COPD (GOLD I-IV) and 14 apparently healthy smokers, were examined with V/P SPECT and LDCT hybrid imaging. Spirometry was used to verify COPD grade. Only one apparently healthy smoker and three COPD patients had a normal or nearly normal V/P SPECT. All other patients showed various degrees of airway obstruction, even when spirometry was normal. The same interpretation was reached on both modalities in 39% of the patients. LDCT made V/P SPECT interpretation more certain in 9% of the patients and, in 52%, LDCT provided additional diagnoses. LDCT better characterized the type of emphysema in 12 patients. In 19 cases, tumor-suspected changes were reported. Three of these 19 patients (ie, 4.3% of all subjects) were in the end confirmed to have lung cancer. The majority of LDCT findings were not regarded as clinically significant. V/P SPECT identified perfusion patterns consistent with decompensated left ventricular HF in 14 COPD patients. In 16 patients (23%), perfusion defects were observed. HF and perfusion defects were not recognized with LDCT. In COPD patients and long-time smokers, hybrid imaging had added value compared to V/P SPECT alone, by identifying patients with lung malignancy and more clearly identifying

  9. Assessment of hybrid rotation-translation scan schemes for in vivo animal SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yan; Yao, Rutao; Deng, Xiao; Liu, Yaqiang; Wang, Shi; Ma, Tianyu

    2013-02-01

    To perform in vivo animal single photon emission computed tomography imaging on a stationary detector gantry, we introduced a hybrid rotation-translation (HRT) tomographic scan, a combination of translational and limited angle rotational movements of the image object, to minimize gravity-induced animal motion. To quantitatively assess the performance of ten HRT scan schemes and the conventional rotation-only scan scheme, two simulated phantoms were first scanned with each scheme to derive the corresponding image resolution (IR) in the image field of view. The IR results of all the scan schemes were visually assessed and compared with corresponding outputs of four scan scheme evaluation indices, i.e. sampling completeness (SC), sensitivity (S), conventional system resolution (SR), and a newly devised directional spatial resolution (DR) that measures the resolution in any specified orientation. A representative HRT scheme was tested with an experimental phantom study. Eight of the ten HRT scan schemes evaluated achieved a superior performance compared to two other HRT schemes and the rotation-only scheme in terms of phantom image resolution. The same eight HRT scan schemes also achieved equivalent or better performance in terms of the four quantitative indices than the conventional rotation-only scheme. As compared to the conventional index SR, the new index DR appears to be a more relevant indicator of system resolution performance. The experimental phantom image obtained from the selected HRT scheme was satisfactory. We conclude that it is feasible to perform in vivo animal imaging with a HRT scan scheme and SC and DR are useful predictors for quantitatively assessing the performance of a scan scheme.

  10. Image reconstruction algorithm for a spinning strip CZT SPECT camera with a parallel slat collimator and small pixels

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Gengsheng L.; Gagnon, Daniel

    2004-12-01

    This paper discusses the use of small pixels in a spinning CdZnTe single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) camera that is mounted with a parallel slat collimator. In a conventional slat collimation configuration, there is a detector pixel between two adjacent collimator slats. In our design, the pixel size is halved. That is, there are two smaller pixels to replace a regular pixel between two adjacent slats while the collimator remains unchanged. It has an advantage over our older design that uses tilted slats. In order to acquire a complete data set the tilted-slat collimator must spin 360 deg. at each SPECT view while the proposed design requires only 180 deg. at each SPECT view. Computer simulations and phantom experiments have been carried out to investigate the performance of the small-pixel configuration. It is observed that this design has the potential to increase the spatial resolution of the detector while keeping photon counts the same.

  11. Preliminary results of 3D dose calculations with MCNP-4B code from a SPECT image.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Gual, M; Lima, F F; Sospedra Alfonso, R; González González, J; Calderón Marín, C

    2004-01-01

    Interface software was developed to generate the input file to run Monte Carlo MCNP-4B code from medical image in Interfile format version 3.3. The software was tested using a spherical phantom of tomography slides with known cumulated activity distribution in Interfile format generated with IMAGAMMA medical image processing system. The 3D dose calculation obtained with Monte Carlo MCNP-4B code was compared with the voxel S factor method. The results show a relative error between both methods less than 1 %. PMID:15625058

  12. Preliminary Characterization and In Vivo Studies of Structurally Identical (18)F- and (125)I-Labeled Benzyloxybenzenes for PET/SPECT Imaging of β-Amyloid Plaques.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanping; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Cui, Mengchao; Zhang, Jinming; Guo, Zhide; Li, Yesen; Zhang, Xianzhong; Dai, Jiapei; Liu, Boli

    2015-01-01

    With the assistance of molecular docking and 3D-QSAR models established previously, structurally identical (18)F- and (125)I-labeled benzyloxybenzene derivatives were designed to achieve the early detection of Aβ plaques by PET/SPECT imaging. In competition binding assay, ligands 7a and 12a displayed high binding affinities to Aβ42 aggregates with Ki values of 19.5 nM and 23.9 nM, respectively. Specific plaque labeling was observed on the in vitro autoradiography of brain sections from AD patients and Tg mice. In biodistribution, [(125)I]7a, [(18)F]7a, [(125)I]12a and [(18)F]12a all exhibited high initial brain uptakes (>5% ID/g at 2 min). [(125)I]7a and [(125)I]12a cleared fast from the normal brain regions, while corresponding [(18)F]7a and [(18)F]12a showed slow washout rates. Dynamic microPET/CT and microSPECT/CT imaging data in normal ICR mice were in accordance with in vivo biodistribution results. In vivo metabolism results indicated that the different clearance profiles between the structurally identical (18)F- and (125)I-labeled tracers could be attributed to different biochemical characteristics of the radiometabolites. Radioiodinated benzyloxybenzene derivatives exhibited good in vivo biostability in brain. Ex vivo autoradiography further confirmed the strong in vivo Aβ labeling ability of [(125)I]7a. These new fluorinated and iodinated benzyloxybenzenes can develop into PET/SPECT dual imaging agents targeting Aβ plaques. PMID:26170205

  13. In vitro binding properties and autoradiographic imaging of 3-iodobenzamide ((/sup 125/I)-IBZM): a potential imaging ligand for D-2 dopamine receptors in SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Bruecke, T.; Tsai, Y.F.; McLellan, C.; Singhanyom, W.; Kung, H.F.; Cohen, R.M.; Chiueh, C.C.

    1988-01-01

    The in vitro binding properties of the (/sup 125/I) labeled benzamide, (S(-)-N-((1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-methyl)-2-hydroxy-3-iodo-6-methoxy-benzamide, IBZM) were determined in bovine and mouse caudate membrane homogenates and by autoradiography of mouse brain slices. (/sup 125/I)-IBZM binding is saturable and reversible with B/sub max/ of 373 +/- 51 fmol/mg protein and a K/sub d/ of 3.1 +/- 0.62 nM and 0.56 nM as calculated by association and dissociation time constants. In competition experiments, K/sub i/ values for the D-2 antagonists YM-09151-2 and spiperone are 4 orders of magnitude lower than the K/sub i/ value for the D-1 antagonist SCH-23390 and S(-)-IBZM is ten-fold more potent than R(+)-IBZM. (/sup 125/I)-IBZM has a low affinity for serotonin S-2 and for alpha receptors. Therefore, it is a highly selective ligand for dopamine D-2 receptors. Autoradiographic images of brain sections incubated with (/sup 125/I)-IBZM show the dopamine D-2 receptors of the striatum, nucleus accumbens and olfactory tubercle with a high ratio of specific to nonspecific binding. Thus, S(-)-IBZM, when labeled with (/sup 125/I), may be useful for in vivo imaging of dopamine D-2 receptors by single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT).

  14. SPECT/CT and pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Jann; Gutte, Henrik

    2014-05-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is diagnosed either by ventilation/perfusion (V/P) scintigraphy or pulmonary CT angiography (CTPA). In recent years both techniques have improved. Many nuclear medicine centres have adopted the single photon emissi